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 Section A: Main
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 Section B continued
 Section B continued
 Section C: North Florida Focus
 Section C: Community Calendar
 Section D: Classifieds
 Section D: Classified Marketpl...
 Section D continued














The Jasper news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028306/00012
 Material Information
Title: The Jasper news
Uniform Title: Jasper news (Jasper, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: F.M. DeGraffenried
Place of Publication: Jasper Fla
Creation Date: March 17, 2005
Publication Date: 1890-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Jasper (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hamilton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hamilton -- Jasper
Coordinates: 30.518889 x -82.951111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 21, 1890)-
General Note: Editor: Jno. M. Caldwell, <1890>.
General Note: Publisher: W.L. Whitfield, <1904>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579542
oclc - 33315707
notis - ADA7388
lccn - sn 95047198
System ID: UF00028306:00012

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Sports
        page B 1
    Section B continued
        page B 2
        page B 3
    Section B continued
        page B 4
    Section B continued
        page B 5
        page B 6
    Section C: North Florida Focus
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
    Section C: Community Calendar
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
        page C 9
        page C 10
        page C 11
        page C 12
    Section D: Classifieds
        page D 1
        page D 2
    Section D: Classified Marketplace
        page D 3
        page D 4
        page D 5
    Section D continued
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
Full Text


nflaonline.com
r l Il .


S'111fi
**5-DIGIT 32611 000000
SUBSCRIBER UNIV OF FLA LIBRARY
SERIAL SECTION
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32711-7nn.


134THYARNUMBUAYS4PAG


Governor listens


- request granted


Caution light placed at school entrance


in response to citizens' request


When Gov. Jeb Bush and
Lt. Gov. Toni Jennings visit-
ed Jasper on Jan. 28, over 50
individuals and groups con-
vened at the Courthouse to
voice their concerns and/or
appreciation. One mother-
and-son team had a major
concern. Melody and Bran-
don McCoy were worried
about the safety of students
at the new Hamilton County
High School.
The driveway for the
school is located on SR 129,
between Jasper and Live
Oak. There is a considerable
amount of traffic during the
morning and afternoon
"rush hour" when people
are hurrying to and from
work and school. Logging
trucks, rock trucks and other
tractor-trailer trucks also
regularly travel along the
highway.
The McCoys were afraid
that the combination of
heavy traffic and young in-
experienced drivers would
'result in an accident maybe
even a fatal one. They felt
there should be a caution
light- in addition to the
"school entrance" sign to en-
courage drivers to slow
down.


DOUBLE WARNING:
If the flashing yellovu
caution light at the
net, Hamilton County
High School driveltay
doesn't slow drivers
doinn, then the
presence of local law
enforcement should
do the trick.,sirr Pn,:roil


... .--


They had contacted the
Department of Transporta-
tion (DOT) several times to
no avail, so they decided to
appeal'to a higher authority.
With the help of Attorney
Sonny Scaff of Jasper, they
wrote a petition requesting
that a caution light be in-
stalled at the school drive-
way. The McCoys collected
almost 300 signatures in the
week before the governor's
visit.
When they told Gov. Bush
of their concern and present-
ed him with the petition, he
was surprised. He had trav-
eled from Live Oak on SR
129 earlier that morning and
was not aware that he had
passed a school entrance.
The matter was clearly on
the governor's mind
throughout the day. He
questioned several other lo-
cal residents about the traffic
on SR 129 and the need for a
caution light. Most agreed
that a light was needed.
Several days later a repre-
sentative from the DOT con-
tacted the McCoys to dis-
cuss the situation. The de-,
partment agreed to install

see Governor, Page 2A


Local government seeks

funds from Florida

Legislature for improvements

and new construction


By Kalifa Hickinson
Your Capitol Bureau
Hamilton County and the
Town of White Springs has
requested $5,838,000 from
the Florida Legislature to
pay for improvements to ex-
isting buildings and for the
construction of new facilities.
Hamilton County requested
$250,000 for the renovation
and/or construction of facili-
ties at the agricultural arena
and fairgrounds, $200,000
for the renovation of the an-
nex buildings (formerly
Hamilton County High
School) which would serve
as an administrative govern-
ment complex, $350,000 to
construct an annex adjacent
to the senior center, and
$300,000 to renovate the,
courthouse. The Town of
White Springs requested
$2,500,000 for the construc-
tion of a White Springs mul-
ti-use storm shelter facility,
which would also be used
for cultural programs, and
$2,238,000 to improve White
Springs water and sewer fa-
cilities.
The Florida Legislature
convened on March 8 for its
60-day Regular Session to
create the state's 2005-2006
budget. "I think we've got a


fairly good shot at making
sure we bring in some mon-
ey for Hamilton County,"
said Rep. Will Kendrick, D-
Carrabelle. "The county has
been fairly successful at re-
ceiving courthouse funding
in the past and this year the
commissioner of agriculture
has a commitment to try to
look at something for the
agricultural centers and fair-
grounds. Wastewater is al-
ways a high priority and leg-
islators try to fund as many
of those projects as they
can."
Hamilton County Coordi-
nator Mike Williams said,
"If the state doesn't fund the
projects, then we won't be
able to move forward with
those renovations. It's that
simple. It takes every penny
we get to operate the govern-
ment."
Williams said there is no
other source for Hamilton
County to get the money.
The county has requested
funding for some projects,
such as the senior citizen
center, for the past three
years, but funding has not
been granted. However,
Hamilton County will con-

see Local, Page 2A *


Free generic medicine available

to Hamilton County seniors


KIWANIS RAFFLE: Business was brisk last Friday in front of Hitchcock's Foodway in
Jasper as Kiwanis Club members sold raffle tickets for a 14' Tracker boat and 8 HP Mer-
cury motor and trailer to be given away on May 14 during the Suwannee River Rat Race
at the Spirit of Suwannee. The event, sponsored by the Jasper Kiwanis, Bruce Glueck
Marine and PCS Phosphate, is a fundraiser for local youth activities. Tickets are $2 each
or three for $5 and can be purchased from any Kiwanis Club member. (Staff Photo)


INSIDE TODAY


INDEX
Obituaries ......... 5A
Jail Notes .......... 5B
Legal Notices .......5B
Classifieds .......1-5D
Calendar ........4-11C


Florida's seruors, 60 and
over, have a limited time to
apply for tree prescription
medicine following an
agreement with pharma-
ceutical giant MEDCO ac-
cording to Attorney General
Charlie Chrint. The settle-
ment provides eligible Flori-
da seniors with the oppor-
turutn to receive free pre-
scription medicine.
The program is the result
of a settlement between the
Attorney General's office
and MEDCO. It \vill distnb-
ute free medication to
Hamilton county residents


who are at least 60 \'ears of
age and have incomes be-
low $19 836 for a single per-
son or $26,356 for a couple.
Up to $300 worth of free
medications are available
on a rirst come, first served
basis. Additional informa-
tion and the applications are
available through the local
SHINE IServing Health In-
surance Needs ot Elders)
counselor Bob Clark at the
Hamilton County Pharma-
cy Program office in the
Sandlin Building across
from the Courthouse in
Jasper.


Race fans from
South Georgia and
North Florida attend
inaugural race at
South Georgia
Motorsports Park
PAGE IC


4GE .X90 /Vao ll/ry

COOKI I turns 100
skSO a INSIDE
C'OOKIE' tf7 100
For Kids I
12 & Under I --- -- ,- -' DETAILS
"* *LBA C r0 JT E TF NORTH
No Purchase Necessary / NORTH
Mus PresentCoupon i FOCUS
Limit 1 Per Person Cr
Good 3/18/05 Only I ... PAGE 7C


Funded by a grant from
The Blue Foundation for a
Healthy Florida the Hamil-
ton Counts Pharmacy A.-
sistance Program can help
with the application process
for free or low cost medi-
cine. It is a local resource for
residents to hnd other
sources for medicines from
discount cards for everyone
to free programs for those
who quahlfy. The program
has numerous resources
available for all Hamilton
County residents. Program

sec Free, Page 2A








GRAB THE GREEN:
WQHL set up its
Cash Cube in front
of Hitchcock's
Foodway last Friday
to help promote the
Kiwanis Club's
Suwannee River Rat
Race raffle. Kickin'
Kevin Thomas from
the radio station
watches as Ridge
Cone tries to catch
the ones, fives, terrn
and twenties swirling
around him. The
eight-year-old son of
James and Jennifer
Cone exited the
Cash Cube after ten
seconds with a
handful of money.
(Staff Photo)


IES


I iii I _.


tis I i








PAGE 2A THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2005


Colon cancer third leading


cause of cancer death


Thousands of people die
from embarrassment each
year and the American Can-
cer Society wants it to stop.
Senator Rod Smith under-
went colon cancer testing
recently in an effort to take
the mystery and fear out of
this vitally important
process.
The Senator had a
colonoscopy, the type of
procedure made famous by
Today Show host Katie
Couric in 2000. Like many
other people his age, he was
reluctant to schedule the
procedure. In fact, his wife
made the appointment and
he's glad she did. Senator
Smith didn't need to wait so
long because the test is ac-
tually no problem at all.
Today, colon cancer is the
third leading cause of can-
cer death in the United
States. Early stages of colon
cancer usually show no


symptoms, meaning that
regular testing is imperative
to catching the disease be-
fore it becomes deadly. If
caught early, colon cancer
has a 90 percent survival
rate. Otherwise, that rate
plummets to nine percent.
According to the ACS at
least half the people who
die from colon cancer could
have been saved. The ACS
recommends that both men
and women age 50 and old-
er get screened on a regular
basis
Senator Smith says he un-
derstands people's reluc-
tance to be screened. The
idea of the screening makes
people uncomfortable. It's
also embarrassing, but re-
member that years ago peo-
ple were embarrassed by
talk of screening for breast
cancer and prostrate cancer.
Early screening for those
diseases pays off by saving


Governor


Continued From Page 1A

caution lights on the "school
entrance" signs. Less than a
month after the governor's
visit, the caution lights were
warning drivers to slow
down near the school drive-
way.
The McCoys don't feel
they did anything special -
the DOT didn't respond to


their request but to the gov-
ernor's request. They think
that Gov. Bush should get
the thanks.
But, if the McCoys and
300 other local residents
hadn't cared about their
children's safety, Gov. Bush
wouldn't have known
about the problem and
wouldn't have been able to
provide a solution.


lives. The same thing is true
for colon cancer.
The Senator can say from
experience that when it
comes to testing, there's
nothing to fear. Patients are
anesthetized while a slen-
der, flexible, hollow, lighted
tube is eased inside the
colon. A tiny video camera
sends images back to a TV
monitor where the physi-
cian can get a clear picture
of any polyps or other irreg-
ularities.
The exam itself only takes
about 30 minutes. There is
no pain or soreness after the
procedure. The preceding
day's preparations, which
involve a special liquid diet
and the ingestion of very
strong laxatives to clean out
the entire digestive system,
takes the most commit-
ment.
The ACS is a nationwide
community-based volun-
tary health organization
dedicated to eliminating
cancer as a major health
problem through research,
education, advocacy, and
service. In Florida, there are
three Hope Lodges, more
than 35 ACS offices, and ap-
proximately 100,000 active
volunteers.
For more information
about cancer call 1-800-
ACS-2345 (1-800-227-2345)
or visit the ACS web site at
www.cancer.org.


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"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Local


Continued From Page 1A

tinue to submit requests ac-
cording to Williams.
Last year the county re-
ceived almost $200,000 for
the public library in Jasper,
$175,000 in courthouse
fiiundimg;- $91,Nt'lna sd' d
waste grant fro 'the: De-:
partment of Environmental


Protection and some fund-
ing for district education.
Editor's note: Kalifa Hick-
inson is a student at Florida A
&r M University (FAMU) in
Tallahassee in the School of
Journalism. Through a pro,-
gram of that department, Hick-
inson is provdn ihe asper
News with limited coverage o
the Legislature this spring.


Free


Continued From Page 1A

services are completely free.
Anyone who is having
trouble paying for their med-
icine or is not taking it be-
cause they can not afford it
should contact the Hamilton
County Pharmacy Assis-


tance Program office at 792-
2143.
The office is located at 204'
NE First Street in the SandlinK
building across from the'
courthouse; the entrance is"
on the side of the building on'
First Ave. It is open week-a
days from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. '


Premature babies


need hope, love


,,, and you.


Joh
Bul


S By joining March of Dimes WalkAmenca.
S you can help save babies from premature
birth. Every year, more than 470,000 babies
are born too soon. Some die; others face
inny lifelong disability. Premature birth is a
common, serious and costly problem.
lard And it affects us all.


Hamilton
County
Honorary
Chair


Walk for someone you love.'"
Walk in honor of your own baby, a relative's
or a friend's. Please join me and
* raise money to fight premature birth
* form a WalkAmerica team in your
company
* ask family and friends to participate


RPOR,,, R See you at WalkAmerica on:
AtliREP 'ORT HANDS HANDS April 16, 2005
Atlant IiS take Sho'e a Iive Ok Theme: Walk For Someone You Love
.d. l akeI Place: Olustee Park Downtown Lake City
inua Baya ..... M Address: 169 North Marion Avenue
SRegister: 8:00 AM
SFIRST FEDERAL- Register on line walkamerica.org
% SAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDA or call 1-800-525-9255
Questions: call 386-755-0507


:4WI ~ffii'^^^&^^^BftCT^Ii ^ sUri^ ^^^^* *


DISPOSITION OF PROPERTY

The Hamilton County School Board is requesting sealed bids for the
disposition of the following buildings:

(1) Portable building #21 at the Old Hamilton County High School,
960 Sq. Ft. constructed 1993.
(2) Portable building #34 at the Old Hamilton County High School,
766 Sq. Ft. constructed 1994.
(3) Portable building #98 at the Old Hamilton County High School,
1,356 Sq. Ft. constructed 1990.

Only 1 bid per building per person. Bids must be in a sealed
envelope, marked as sealed bid for the Portable Buildings. All bids
must be received in the office of the Superintendent of Schools, Harry
J. Pennington, located at 4280 SW CR 152 (Old Hamilton Middle
School) Jasper, Florida 32052 by April 4, 2005 not later than 4 p.m.
Bids will be opened at 2 p.m. on April 5, 2005 at the same address.
Bids will be awarded at the regularly scheduled board meeting of April
11, 2005. Each awarded bidder will be responsible for the cost
associated with moving the portables and cleaning up. Each awarded
bidder must move the portables within 60 days -of the award of the
contract. The Hamilton County School Board reserves the right to
reject any and all bids.


For additional information contact Ronald Hobbs at (386) 792-6503.
151441JRS-F


:"t" School I n

March 21-25, 2005
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th
Grades Pk 6th Lunch


. i


THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2005


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 2A


Nl-yr







THI IPflAV MAP(mT 17m 90fl! THE JSENWapeVV.FL-PAGE.3A


Irrigation System Retrofit sign-up

ongoing through March 31


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


The United States De-
partment of Agriculture
Natural Resources Con-
servation Service (USDA
NRCS) is accepting ap-
plications for the Irriga-
tion System Retrofit pro-
gram through March 31.
The program is a cooper-
ative effort between the
USDA NRCS and the
Suwannee River Water
Management District
(SRWMD).
Financial assistance of
about 75% (50% cost
share from USDA NRCS
and 25% cost-share from
SRWMD) is available on
practices that allow for
retrofit or up-grading of


older existing irrigation
systems with low pres-
sure sprinkler nozzles to
increase irrigation effi-
ciency.
The goal of the Irriga-
tion System Retrofit pro-
gram is water savings.
Priorities of the Retrofit
Program are the conver-
sion of overhead impact
sprinklers and spray noz-
zles to drop nozzles, and
the update of nozzles
and regulators on exist-
ing drops or overhead.
Cost-shareable items are
sprinkler packages that
includes sprinklers, pres-
sure regulators, drop
lines, weights, hoses and


installation, and end
guns that includes noz-
zles, valves, shut-off de-
vices, booster pump, and
installation
All USDA programs
are available to all eligi-
ble persons without re-
gard to race, color, na-
tional origin, sex, reli-
gion, age, disability, po-
litical beliefs, and marital
or familial status.
For additional details
or to make an application
for the Irrigation Retrofit
program contact the
NRCS office located at
the USDA Service Center
at 1628 U.S. 41 N in
Jasper, or call 792-1105.


FDACS and DOF join forces

to protect Florida's forests


Poison center urges

caution when using over

the counter medications


Over' the counter reme-
dies, readily available' on
grocery and pharmacy
shelves, are purchased
without a doctor's pre-
scription. As with pre-
scription medications, dos-
ing errors also occur with
over the counter products,
and are often due to taking
or being given a medica-
tion dose twice. The Flori-
da Poison Information
Center in Jacksonville re-
ceived over 158 calls at-
tributed to this error. Par-
ents and caretakers should
establish a routine for tak-
ing medications, and com-
municate with all family
members to ensure that a
medication dose is not tak-
en or given twice.
Commonly used over
the counter products, like
pain relievers and cough
medicines, can be harmful
if misused or abused. The
2003 Annual Report of the
American Association of
Poison Control Centers
lists analgesics (pain re-
lievers), cold and cough
medications among the
top substances involved in
human poisoning expo-
sures.
The Florida Poison Infor-
mation Center in. Jack-
sonville offers the follow-
ing guidelines for over the
counter medication safety:
Read the medication la-
bel before each use and fol-
low directions precisely.
Call the product informa-
tion phone number on the
label or contact a pharma-
cist or physician for clarifi-
cation of hard-to-under-
stand instructions.
Follow the recommend-
ed dose; do not exceed the
maximum daily dose stat-
ed on the label.

DOWLING PARK


-INSIDE


Be careful when taking
more than one over the
counter medication. Med-
ications may contain the
same or similar active in-
gredients, which when
added together may ex-
ceed the maximum safe
dosage.
Some over the counter
products should not be
mixed with prescription
medications. Always
speak with a pharmacist
or physician before taking
more than one prescrip-
tion medication or over
the counter medicine.
Keep all medications, in-
cluding over the counter
products out of children's
reach, locked up and out
of sight. Small amounts of
some adult medications
can be harmful or life
threatening to a child.
Never call medication
candy. Do not let small
children see others take
medication.
Keep all medications
and household chemicals


in containers fitted with
safety caps. Never take
medications out of their
original containers.
Always turn on the light
prior to taking any med-
ication. Put on eyeglasses,
if necessary before taking
any medication.
Be aware of medications
or other household prod-
ucts that look like candy
or food.
Post the Poison Informa-
tion Center's emergency
hot-line phone number
near the phone.
If someone takes the
wrong kind of medication
or the wrong dose, call the
Poison Information Center
toll free 24 hours a day at
1-800-222-1222
(Voice/TDD). The health-
care professionals at the
center will immediately
respond to poison emer-
gencies and answer poison
related questions about
medications, and other po-
tentially dangerous sub-
stances.


HE IS RISEN




The Choice

A Dramatic Musical For Easter
March 19 and 20
Saturday and Sunday
at 7 p.m. each night


First Baptist

Church in ,. ,"

Jasper cn S i
207 NE Second St. ,, '. r --<
4 .* 1


. 3 ...-SVMW


Florida Department of
Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services (FDACS)
Commissioner Charles
Bronson recently an-
nounced that the depart-
ment is launching a major
planning project to help
shape the future of forests
in Florida. Bronson wants
to address the issue of
how Florida's forests are
going to continue to pro-
vide wood, clean water,
recreation and diversity
of wildlife 25 years from
now.
As a result of develop-
ment, hurricanes, wild-
fires, insect and disease
outbreaks and the de-
mand for forestry prod-


ucts, Florida's forests to-
day comprise only 14 mil-
lion acres down from
more than 20 million acres
in the 1930s. Officials esti-
mate that the figure will
decline to 12 million acres
by the year 2030.
The planning effort that
is getting under way will
focus on how the state
manages what are in-
evitable changes, rather
than merely reacting to
those changes. Division of
Forestry (DOF) officials
have already taken the
first step, assessing the
present conditions of
forests in Florida. The
public can review that as-
sessment by visiting their


website at www.fl-
dof.com.
The public is encour-
aged to participate by at-
tending one of a series of
workshops that will be
held around the state this
month to solicit opinions
on the future of forests in
Florida. A draft plan is ex-
pected to be posted on the
DOF website next fall and
the public will be asked to
comment on it.
A workshop will be
held on Thursday, March
24, from 6 p.m. until 9
p.m., at the Columbia
County Extension Service
office located at 164 SW
Mary Ethel Lane in Lake
City.


ROBERT G. BUSCH, D.O.

ERIC ORDINARIO, D.O.
BOARD CERTIFIED UROLOGY AND
UROLOGICAL SURGERY


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Common Problems Treated Infections Prostrate Problems Kidney Stones Sexual Problems
* Genital Surgery Cancer of the Urinary Tract Impotence Infertility Urinary Incontinence
Common Surgical Procedures In Office Cystoscopy No Scalpel Vasectomy Treatment of
Condyloma Prostate Ultrasound/Biopsy Bladder Ultrasound Penile Vascular Studies
Common Surgical Procedures in Hospital or Ambulatory Surgical Center Prostate, Kidney
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PAGE 3A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY. MARCH 17.2~7 005


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PAGE 4A THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY MARCH 17, 2005


T4r 3Jasper Nenus
Published weekly every Thursday. USPS #755-980
Office located at 105 NE 2nd Avenue,
Bank of America, Jasper, FL 32052
Phone (386) 792-2487 FAX (386) 792-3009
E-mail address: jaspernewsl@alltel.net
Myra Regan .........................Publisher
Melody Lee ..........................Manager
Kathy Sasser ............. ...... .. Advertising
Robin Whiddon ......... Administrative Assistant
Periodicals postage paid at Jasper, FL.
Annual subscription rate is $16 in county,
$23 out of county and out of state.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Jasper News, 105 NE 2nd Ave., Jasper, FL 32052

Letter to the Editor and Article Policy
Letters to the Editor and news articles can be mailed, FAXed
or dropped off at the news office located in the Bank of Amer-
ica Building, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. till 5 p.m.
Letters to the Editor should be typed, double-spaced if pos-
sible, brief and to the point, approximately 150 to 200 words or
less. Not all letters are published. To be considered for publi-
cation Letters to the Editor must be signed, include the
writer's address and phone number, and in the Jasper News'
office on Friday before 5 p.m.
News Releases, 400 or less words, should be typed, double-
spaced if possible, brief and to the point. Not all articles are
published.
Letters and articles may be edited to fit available space. Well
written letters/articles require less editing.
To mail your letter/article, send it to: The Jasper News, 105
NE 2nd Ave., Jasper, FL 32052 or FAX it to: 792-3009.


Disabled athletes

enjoy sports through

Special Olympics
March is national "Mental Retardation Awareness
Month." There are approximately 170 million people
with intellectual disabilities worldwide, and more than
7 million in the United States, many in our own com-
munities.
The Special Olympics serve over one million athletes
with intellectual disabilities in more than 160 countries
providing year-round sports training and competition
in 26 Olympic-type summer and winter sports.
Special Olympics sees the abilities not the limitations
of people with intellectual disabilities. This month,
Special.,QOiynpics Florida athleteS ta.i x.led -to. Nag.a:no '
Japan for the 2005 World Winter Games..
The motto of the Games was "Let's Celebrate Togeth-
er," words that Floridians seem to have already em-
braced. Citizens everywhere showed their support of
these extraordinary athletes by joining forces with Pub-
lix Supermarkets to raise over $1.1 million dollars for
Special Olympics Florida in the month of January. This
support helps make Special Olympics a reality for more
people than ever before.
Special Olympics is an environment where people
with intellectual disabilities can be successful and
where parents can be proud of their children. That's no
small feat given the amount of prejudice and discrimi-
nation that most of the athletes face on a day-to-day ba-
sis.
By participating in Special Olympics, people with in-
tellectual disabilities have gained the self-confidence
and social skills to succeed both on and off the playing
field. Individuals once thought burdens to society are
proving themselves productive citizens.
For more information or to volunteer with the Special
Olympics Florida call 1-800-322-HERO (4376) or visit
their website at www.sofl.org.







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Available from Commercial News Providers"


GOvernor Bush announces increase in Florida tourism


Governor Jeb Bush announced that the total number of
tourists visiting Florida in 2004 increased by three percent
from the same period in 2003. From Jan. 1 through Dec. 31,
2004, more than 76.8 million people visited Florida according
to preliminary data released today by VISIT FLORIDA, the
state's official source for travel planning.
While the total visitor spending for 2004 is not yet available,
tourist spending (out-of-state and residents) from January
through November 2004 was $51.8 million, surpassing the
full 2003 visitor spending total of $51.5 million.
Florida's tourism industry is focusing efforts on improving
perceptions on travel to Florida, specifically during the time-
frame of June through Nov. The international media coverage
of the storms in 2004 continued for six weeks and aired glob-
ally leaving incorrect perceptions about Florida's well-being
and overall status as an intact tourism destination, sparking
the need for a focused marketing campaign to improve per-
ceptions and reassure travelers that Florida is a safe, sunny,
and welcoming destination.
VISIT FLORIDA cautioned that it is realistic to assume that
some of the domestic travel visitor estimates for 2004 third

Voluntary Pre-kindergarten
Education programavailable


for '05 '06
According to the Early
Learning Coalition of Flori-
da's Gateway, families in
the Gateway region (Hamil-
ton, Suwannee, Columbia,
Lafayette, and Union Coun-
ties) are eligible for a new,
free, educational program -
Voluntary Pre-kindergarten
Education (VPK).
Any child residing in
Florida, who will turn four
on or before Sept. 1, 2005, is
eligible to receive, free of
charge, 540 hours of devel-
opmentally appropriate


school year
preschool instruction this
coming school year (begin-
ning in August).
Parents of four-year-olds
interested in VPK should
contact Jamie Witzman, the
Enrollment Manager at the
Early Learning Coalition of
Florida's Gateway in Lake
City at 386-752-9770 ext. 24.
,A parent pre-application
form can be submitted di-
rectly through their website
at www.elc-fg.org or the
state VPK website at
www.vpkflorida.com.


and fourth quarters included travelers to Florida who were
part of the hurricane relief and reconstruction efforts. The
magnitude of that impact on 2004 domestic visitors is un-
known.
A detailed account of VISIT FLORIDA's marketing re-
sponse thus far to the 2004-2005 hurricane season can be
viewed at www.VISITFLORIDA.org by clicking on Hurri-
cane Recovery link on the left hand side menu bar. Visit Flori-
da, a direct support organization of the Florida Commission
on Tourism, promotes Florida as the world's premier travel
destination. Governor Bush serves as chairman of the Florida
Commission on Tourism, and his Office of Tourism, Trade,
and Economic Development (OTTED) oversees both the
Commission and VISIT FLORIDA.

Chamber of Commerce sponsors
Business After Hours event to
promote local businesses


BuLsiness After Hours.
s.pons.ored by the Hamil-
ton Counts Chamber of
Commerce, is a bimonthly
event where local compa-
nies can promote their
businesses. Each meehng
is hosted by a different
business member ot the
chamber who e\plain- the
services and benefits, ot his
or her business. Aft-i the
presentation, members
will have time to exchange
business and contact infor-
mahton.
This month'i event will
be hosted by and held att
the Telford Hotel on River
St. in White Springs on
Thurida\, March 2-1, at
5:30 p.m. The e\ent i. free


and light retreshments will
be served.
The Chamber will use
the business cards of those
who attend the event to
compile a list for business
referrals. The cards will
also be used a drawing for
door prizes. This month's
prizes include $100 cash
donated b\' Suwanrnee Riv-
er Outdoors and dinner for
fout at the Telford Hotel.
The ne\t e ent will be
held at Jennings Outdoor
Campground on Thurs-
da\, lay 19
For more information
call 792-1300 or visit the
Chamber's website at
w\ \' \. ha milto coun -
tvflorida.com.


Judy

Thomason
Joins the
Ratliff Realty
Sales Team


Ratliff and Associates Realty Group, Inc.
Located in downtown Jasper
SA#1 full service real estate team
Serving the North Florida area for 25 plus I ears
Contact Judy for all your buying, selling and
investment needs.

(386) 792-8484 Office
(386) 303-1794 Cell
Email: judythomason@alltel.net 151679DH-F
-* ^151679DH-F


TABE Test required

SUWAN NE- 415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
HAMILTON Live Oak, FL 32064
TECHNICAL CENTER (386) 364-2750
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING BENEFITS.
ACCREDITED BYTHE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.
ACCREDITED BYTHE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC. '


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2005


PAGE 4A


I










O2TASRIESL


Flora C. Bembry
Flora C. Bembry, age 81,
passed away March 4, 2005,
in Tallahassee, Florida. For-
merly of Jasper, Florida,
she lived in Havana, Flori-
da, since 1986. Mrs. Bem-
bry was a member of the
First Baptist Church of Ha-
vana. She was an excellent
seamstress and enjoyed
crafts and cooking.
Survivors include three
sons: John F. (Elaine) Bem-
bry of Tallahassee, Gary
(Gina) Bembry of Pensaco-
la, Florida, and Charlie
(Martha) Bembry of Ha-
vana; two brothers: Harrell
Cunningham of Cocoa,
Florida, and Louis Cun-
ningham of Lakeland,
Florida.
The funeral service was
held March 6, 2005, at the
First Baptist Church of Ha-
vana with the internment
at Woodland Cemetery in
Havana.
Bevis Funeral Home of
Quincy, Florida, was in
charge of the arrange-
ments.

Lonnie Mae Bogart
Lonnie Mae Bogart, age
81, of White Springs, Flori-
da, passed away Sunday,
March 6, 2005, at Trinity
Community Hospital fol-
lowing a brief illness. The
Hamilton County native
was a homemaker and a
member of Suwannee Riv-
er Church of the Nazarene.
Survivors include four
children; two brothers:
Cleo and Clarence Smith of
Apopka, Florida, and sev-
eral nieces, nephews and
grandchildren.
Funeral services were
held Wednesday, March 9,
2005, in the chapel of Harry
T. Reid Funeral Home with
Pastor William White offi-
ciating. Interment followed
at Geiger Cemetery.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home was in charge of
arrangements.

Charles Willis Smith
Charles Willis Smith, age
84, of Jasper, Florida, died
Saturday, March 12, 2005,
in a Gainesville hospital.
Mr. Smith was a native of
Hamilton County and at-
tended the Jasper Assem-
bly of God Church. He was
retired from the State of
Florida and enjoyed work-
ing in his garden following
his retirement.
Survivors include: his
wife, Mary Smith of Jasper,
six children: Charles Lester
Smith of Jasper, Peggy
(Dick) Oliver of Jack-
sonville, Florida, Marie
(James)McCormick of Mar-


ianna, Florida, Ken (Chris)
Luedke of Jacksonville,
Russ (en) Luedke of Fer-
nandina Beach, Florida,
and Barbara (Nick) Hyman
of Jacksonville; two broth-
ers: Edward Cuthbirt Smith
of Jasper and Thomas W.
Smith Sr of Burnsville,
North Carolina; four sis-
ters: Ovis Deas and Beat-
rice Selph, both of Jen-
nings, Florida, and Dollie
Selph and Winnie Hodges
both of Jasper; 13 grand-
children and 12 great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services were
held Wednesday, March
16, 2005, in the chapel of
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home with interment in
New Hope Baptist Church
Cemetery.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home was in charge of
arrangements.

Joseph Horace Corbett II
Joseph Horace Corbett II,
age 48, of Jasper, passed
away at his home Sunday,
March 6, 2005, following an
extended illness. Mr. Cor-
bett was born in
Immokalee, Florida, and
lived most of his life in
Hamilton County. He was
a retired pipe fitter and
welder.
Survivors include his
wife, Linda Corbett of
Jasper; one son and daugh-
ter-in-law, Shawn and
Robin Corbett of Jasper;
one brother, James Alfred
Corbett III of Yulee, Flori-
da; one sister, Zelma Cor-
bett, and brother-in-law
Ken Braddick of Yulee;
three grandchildren: Kate-
lyn, Christian and Cason
Corbett; a sister-in-law,
Faye Smith Corbett of Jen-
nings, Florida, and special
friends, Porky and Lottie
Moody of Jasper.
Memorial services were
held Monday, March 7,
2005, at Jasper First Presby-
terian Church with Pastor
Doug Hilliard officiating.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home was in charge of
arrangements.

Robert Edward Jackson
Robert E. Jackson, age 61,
of Bronson, Florida passed
away Monday, March 7,
2005, at Gainesville Health
Care Center. He was born
in Montgomery, Alabama,
and moved to Bronson in
1999 after living for a peri-
od of time in Gainesville,
Florida. Mr. Jackson gradu-
ated from J.R.E. Lee High
School in Jasper, Florida.
He retired from Florida De-
partment of Juvenile Justice
(FDJJ) as a Juvenile Deten-


Thank You


I would like to express express what it meant to
my sincere thanks for all me. A special thanks to
the prayers, .cards, and the Hamilton County
gifts during the loss of School Board General
my mother, Reba Wat- Services Department.
son. Words can never Donna Davis
- .- -- .- __ .- -- ..^


Thank you
We would like to say of kindness in the time of
"Thanks" for all the the loss of our dear moth-
prayers, food, donations, er.
and the many other acts The family ofOleta Lindsey


S Look for
Seniors
Ues united
in the
March 24

edition
Uf the

United -fCeI


tion Officer.
Mr. Jackson served in the
United States Army for 22
years and was a Sergeant
First Class. He received
several medals including
the National Defense Ser-
vice Medal, Bronze Star
Medal, Vietnam Service
Medal, One Silver Service
Star, Vietnam Campaign
Medal, Vietnam Cross of
Gallantry with Palm, Meri-
torious Unit Commenda-
tion, Good Conduct Medal
(5th award), Army Service
Ribbon, Oversea Service
Ribbon (3rd award) and
Meritorious Service Medal.
He was baptized in 1985
as one of Jehovah's Wit-
nesses and served as an el-
der with the Williston Con-
gregation of Jehovah's Wit-
nesses.
Survivors include his
wife of 30 years, Mary R.
(M, Jaye) Jackson of Bron-
son; three sons: Donald E.
Jackson of Gainesville;
Phillip M. Jackson and An-
dre Jackson both of Jen-
nings, Florida; four daugh-
ters: Carmen B. Jones and
Deborah D. Lee of Jen-
nings, Me,Shele D. Jackson
of Dallas, Texas, and
Te,Sha S. Jackson Meghoo-
Neill of Ocala, Florida; two
sisters: Bernice Jackson and
Barbara Allen, both of
Gainesville; 10 grandchil-
dren and one great-grand-
child.
Memorial services were
held Saturday, March 12,
2005, at Williston Kingdom
Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses
with Brother Ernest Adams
officiating.

Oleta Bryan Lindsey
Oleta Bryan Lindsey, age
86, of White Springs, Flori-
da, passed away Friday,
March 11, 2005, in a Jack-
sonville Hospital. Mrs.
Lindsey was a native and
life-long resident of Hamil-
ton County where she was


a member of the Long
Branch Congregational
Methodist Church. She was
a homemaker.
Survivors include: one
daughter, Carolyn L. Pick-
ering of Winter Haven,
Florida; four sons: James
W. Lindsey of Raiford,
Florida, Edwin Lindsey,
Glenn Lindsey, and Tom-
my Lindsey all of White
Springs, one brother, Elmer
Leon Bryan of Lake City,
Florida; four sisters: Mary
B. Sweat of Jacksonville,
Florida, Evelyn Stormant
and Alma Sweat both of
White Springs, and Carrie
Brown of Lake City; 10
grandchildren and 10
great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were
held on Sunday, March 13,
2005, at the Long Branch
Congregational Methodist
Church with burial in the
Riverside Cemetery of
White Springs.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home was in charge of the
arrangements.

Melba Law Smith
Melba Law Smith, age 88,
of Jasper, Florida, passed
away Monday, March 7,
2005, at Suwannee Valley
Nursing Center. The
Hamilton County native
and lifelong resident was a
homemaker and member
of Bright Pond Baptist
Church.
Survivors include four
sons: Joey Wayne Smith of
Bell, Florida, Elza Danny
Smith .and Ronnie Law
Smith, both of Jasper, and
Gary Glenn Smith of Ver-
mont; three brothers: J.D.
Law of Gainesville, Florida,
Drew Law of Lake City,
Florida, and Nick Law of
Jennings, Florida; one sis-
ter, Verdie Moore of Jack-
sonville, Florida; nine
grandchildren and eight
great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were


MADVl CHRITA3N'IINDIPNDNBPT


FIRST ADVENT CHRISTIAN FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH
N.W. 15th Avenue Jasper 13159 S.E. C.R. 137, Jasper, FL
Rev. Fran Wood Pastor-Mark Collins Phone -(386) 792-2470
Sunday Sunday
Sunday School.......................10:00 a.m. Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Su
Morning Worship...................11:00 a.m. Sunday Worship..................11:00a.m. Mt
Wednesday Evening Worship....................6:00 p.m. Su
Prayer Fellowship.................6:30 p.m. Wednesday
129012JS-F Prayer Service 7:30 p.m. Wi
P ISITC Sot ih ill 129017DF-F
CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH Bi
1/2 mile East on Hwy. 6, Jasper, Fl 32052
792-2275 S. Wendell Hill, Pastor I
Sunday School...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship...................11:00 a.m.
Children's Church.................11:00 a.m.
Church Training...................6:00 p.m. C *H .RH
Evening Worship....... ......7:00 p.m.
Wednesday CHURCH OF CHRIST Su
Prayer Meeting.....................7:00 p.m. N.W. 3rd St., Jasper W(
129o13JS-F Bldg.: 792-2277 Ev
JASPER FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday
207 N.E. 2nd Street, Jasper 792-2658 Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Pr
Pastor: Bill Floyd Morning Worship.....................10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship.......................... 6:00 p.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Wednesday
Morning Worship...................... 1:00a.m. Evening 6:00 p.m.
Children's Choir &
Discipleship Training......................... 5:00 p.m. 129o1aJS-F
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. A
Wednesday
Supper 6:00 p.m.
Youth WOW 6:30p.m. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Prayer Meeting 6:30 p.m. 204 N.W. 3rd Avenue, Jasper, 792-2258
Youth Bible Study............................. 6:00 p.m. Pastor: Rev. Doug Hilliard, 792-8412
129014-F SUNDAY
Sunday School ........................ 10:00 a.m.
SUNRISE BAPTIST CHURCH Worship Service.................... 11:00 a.m.
U.S. 129- 3 miles North of Jasper WEDNESDAY
Pastor: Rev. Gene Speight Prayer in Fellowship Hall...............9:00 a.m.
Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Choir Practice 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.1
Church 11:00a.m. 129019JS-F
129015JS-F S
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
SR 6 West, 6592 NW 48th St. NEW BETHEL AME CHURCH
Jennings, FL 32053 604 SW 6th Ave., Jasper, FL 32053
938-5611 Rev. Ron Rawls
Pastor:Jeff Cordero Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Church School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00a.m. New Members Class....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Youth Meeting......................5:00 p.m. 11:00a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship Mission Friends WorshipService
RA's, GA's 6:00 p.m. Communion every 1st Sunday
Wednesday
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Thursday
and Youth Meeting.......................7:00 p.m. Choir Rehersal 6:30 p.m.
*.. 129016JS-F www.newbetheljasper.com
Po*'J l l r


held Friday, March 11,
2005, at Bright Pond Baptist
Church with Reverend
Wendell Hill officiating, as-
sisted by Reverend Gerald
Smith. Interment followed
in Evergreen Cemetery.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home was in charge of
arrangements.

Charles "Trig" Pafford
Charles "Trig" Pafford,
age 54, of Live Oak, Flori-
da, passed away Saturday,
March 5, 2005, in the Lake
City Medical Center. The
Lake City, Florida, native
moved to Live Oak from
Jasper, Florida, in 1993 and
was a truck driver.
Survivors include his
wife: Carol Pafford of Live
Oak; his mother, Joy
Smith and step-father, Wal-
ter Smith Sr. of Branford,
Florida; three daughters:
Kimberly Pafford and
Pamela Pafford, both of
Fort White, Florida, and
Becky Miles of Lake City;
one step-daughter, Eliza-
beth Sullivan of Lake City;
one step-son, Kurt Sullivan
of Live Oak; two sisters:
Ann Rogers and Lynn
Ward, both of Live Oak;
one brother, Walter Smith
Jr of Gainesville, Florida,
and six grandchildren.
Funeral services were
conducted on Wednesday,
March 9, 2005, at Daniels
Memorial Chapel in Live
Oak, with Reverend Jerry
Owens officiating. Inter-
ment was held at Prospect
Baptist Church Cemetery
in White Springs.
Daniels Funeral Home of
Live Oak was in charge of
arrangements.

Minnie Pearson Shiver
Minnie Pearson Shiver,
age 96 of Jasper, Florida,
died Saturday morning in a
local nursing home. Mrs.
Shiver was a native of Ten-
nessee and lived most of


her life in Hamilton County
where she retired following
38 years of teaching. She
was a graduate of Middle
Tennessee Teacher's Col-
lege and a member of Jen-
nings Missionary Baptist
Church.
Survivors include two
daughters: Patricia (Har-
rell) Tyree of Jennings, and
Joyce (Donald) Smith of
Kissimmee, Florida; four
grandchildren, five great-
grandchildren and several
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were
held Monday, March 7,
2005, in the chapel of Harry
T. Reid Funeral Home with
Dr. Jimmy Deas and Rev.
Wendell Hill officiating. In-
terment followed in Sassers
Landing Cemetery.
Memorial contributions.
may be made to: Hamilton
County Education Founda-
tion c/o South Hamilton
Elementary School, 16693
Spring Street, White
Springs, FL 32096; Attn:
Johnny Bullard.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home was in charge of
arrangements.

Reba Mae Watson
Reba Mae Watson, age
78, of Jennings, Florida,
passed away Wednesday,
March 9, 2005, following a
brief illness. She moved to
Jennings from Alabama six
years ago and was a home-
maker.
Survivors include one
daughter, Donna Davis;
three sisters: Ruth Larkin,
Eleanor Lawson and Vir-
ginia Keefer; three grand-
children: Brenda, Christina
and April; and one grand-
daughter, Liberty Kay.
Private graveside funeral
services Viree held Thurs-
day, March 10, 2005, in Oak
Grove Cemetery.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home was in charge of
arrangements.


I CHURCH OFGOD3I. 6 IAl.Al.B


JASPER CHURCH OF GOD
408 Palmetto Ave., Jasper, 792-2312
Pastor: Robert L. Layne
Sunday
inday School 10:00 a.m.
morning Worship..........................10:45 a.m.
unday Evening 6:00 p.m.
ed. Family Training..................7:00 p.m.
Ministering to all ages.
129020-F
NONDEN MIATIO AL


BURNHAM
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
4520 NW CR 146, Jennings, FL 32053
938-1265
Youth Pastor: John Proctor
Sunday
nday School 9:45 a.m.
worship 11:00 a.m.
ening Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
ayer Meeting 7:00 p.m.
129022JS-F





tv j
ay


HARVEST FELLOWSHIP
407 Hatley St.; Hwy. 6E
PO. Box 1512, Jasper, FL
Pastor Jerry Thomason
Phone (386) 792-3833 or 792-3831
Sunday
Morning Worship........................ 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday
Bible Study(all age groups)................7:00 p.m.
Call Church for Directions
129023-F


ST. THERESE CATHOLIC CHURCH
Three miles north of Jasper U.S. 41
P.O. Box 890, Jasper, FL 32052
Rectory U.S. 90 E.,
Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-1108
Sunday MASS 11:15 a.m.
129024JS-F


To list your church
on our church
directory, please
call Kathy at
1-800-525-4182


PAGE 5A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2005






THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2005


Bass Deas


Melissa Merritt and Dale Nichols


Merritt Nicols


to wed April 16
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Merritt Jr. of Jasper, Florida, are
pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming
marriage of their daughter, Melissa Renee, to Dale An-
thony Nichols, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles "Buddy"
-Niciols of Jasper. Melissa is the granddaughter of Mr.
Allen S. Adams and the late Betty W. Adams, Mrs.
Edna Guest and John H. Merritt Sr. of Jasper. Dale is
the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Willie C. Nichols of
Jasper and Mrs. Eva Hewitt and the late Axom Hewitt
of Live Oak, Florida.
Melissa is a 1999 graduate of Hamilton County High
School and a 2001 graduate of North Florida Commu-
nity College. She received her Bachelors Degree in Bi-
ology with a minor in Chemistry in December 2004,
from Florida State University. She has been accepted to
Nova Southeastern College of Optometry in Davie,
Florida, where she will begin classes in the fall.
Dale is a 1999 graduate of Hamilton County High
School. He is employed by Rescar, Inc. in Jasper as a
Leadsman and certified welder.
The couple will reside in Davie, Florida.
The wedding is planned for April 16, 2005, at 5 p.m.
at Stephen Foster Memorial Museum in White Springs,
Florida. The reception will follow at the Telford House.
All family and friends are invited to attend.


~


-g,


W.Ar


Barry Deas and Brianne Bass
Barry Deas and Brianne Bass


DOWLING PARK


- LOOK FOR THIS SPECIAL
SECTION INSIDE


1- '' 5-
st ^a -


announce wedding
Darryl and Jo Bass of Statenville, Georgia, announce
the wedding plans of their daughter, Brianne Bass, and
Barry Deas of Jennings, Florida, son of Roger and Anne
Deas of Jennings.
The bride-elect is a graduate of Echols County High
School in Statenville and is attending Valdosta State
University where she is pursuing a degree in secondary
education with an emphasis in biology. She is employed
by King's Grocery in Jennings. She is the granddaughter
of Lillian and Jack Barfield of Statenville, and the late
C.H. and Hazel Lee of Jennings.
The future groom is a graduate of Hamilton County
High School in Jasper. He is employed by Deas Brothers
Farms, Inc. in Jennings. He is the grandson of Elizabeth
Deas and the late Quinteen Deas of Jennings, and Gwen-
dolyn Tuten and the late J.R. "Buck" Tuten of Jasper,
Florida.
A 3 p.m. wedding is planned on April 2, 2005, at
Statenville United Methodist Church. Friends and fami-
ly are invited to attend.



V ,


Bonnie Marie Danielle Graham, to Lamar Riley Stormant,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Bryan Stormant, of White Springs,
Florida.
The bride-elect is the maternal granddaughter of Mrs.
Virginia Morgan and the late Mr. Bruce Morgan of White
Springs. Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Wesley
Graham, of Lake City, Florida.
The future groom is the maternal grandson of Mr. and
Mrs. Don DeLoach, of Iron Station, North Carolina. Pater-
nal grandparents are Mrs. Magdaline Kirby and the late
Mr. Bud Stormant, of White Springs.
Ms. Graham is a graduate of Tabernacle Baptist High
School, in Live Oak, Florida, and is employed by Wal-Mart
of Lake City. Mr. Stormant attended Joy Explosion Christ-
ian Academy in Lake City, and is employed by the De-
partment of Corrections.
The wedding will be held April 15, 2005,, at 7 p.m. at
Friendship Baptist Church in Jasper. The reception will
follow in the Church Fellowship Hall.
No local invitations are being sent, but all friends and
family are invited to attend this joyous occasion.


Chad aind Leslie V7 iddon will celebrate their first wedding
,n7niivrsLn/ on Sunday. March 20.
Colngratulations!


OPEN HOUSE!
Friday & @ Poker Run
Saturday Refreshments
Customer
April 1 & 2 Appreciation Sale








: Rancher 350TE


Dealer Discounts up to $1,000 on select models


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Redemption value not to exceed S200 for TRX4OOFGA.FA Cuslnmers m eay apply cerlif cale to parts. accessories, rd g geal or other
purchases, and are rsponsie for elated sales tax Bonus Bucks offer good through 5,31r05 Ciecrk wtlh participaltig dealers for complete
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151806DH.F


Long Branch

Church hosts

fundraising

event for St.

Jude's Hospital
In conjunction with the
St. Jude's Children's Re-
search Hospital Miracle
Mile event on Saturday,
March 19, the Long Branch
C.M. Church will have a
youth walk. The walk will
start at 1 p.m. at the Bailey
Ogburn recreation ball
field in White Springs and
will end at the church on
CR 135.
St. Jude's is internation-
ally recognized for its pio-
neering work in finding
cures and saving children
with cancer and other cat-
astrophic diseases. The
hospital is financially sup-
ported by ALSAC, its
fundraising organization.
Families without insur-
ance or without adequate
insurance are not required
to pay for treatment.
All participants and do-
nations are welcome. All
funds will go to St. Jude's
Hospital.
For more information
contact the event coordi-
nator, Hylda Rogers at
397-2673.

7h7 best of
I '
-.. '" ; 8D, i
t" P-IGE 8D


PAGE 6A


.-.








Danielle Graham and Lamar Stormant

Graham Stormant

to wedApri 15
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Graham are proud to announce the
engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter,






TUI IQnAV tAACI'-I 17 TnnH;


Spiritual

Guidance
By Billy Evans, Harvest Fellowship Church


God's
It's very common today
to hear people speaking up
in defense their rights. The
idea of rights is not foreign
to Americans; our very
Constitution regards all as
having been "endowed by
our Creator with certain
unalienable rights." These
rights include life, liberty,
and the pursuit of happi-.
ness. Then, there's the
whole gamut of various
groups fighting for their
rights, such as women's
rights, minority rights,
equal rights, and even ani-
mal rights. But have you
ever heard of anyone
standing up for God's
rights?
Think about it, who
more than God should
have a claim to rights?
How about His right to
rule over the universe He

Local

libraries

celebrate

Florida

Heritage

Month
Florida's Department
of State and the local li-
braries are celebrating
the Second Annual
Florida Heritage
Month from March 15
to April 15, with spe-
cial events that encom-
pass historic preserva-
tion, archaeology, arts
and culture. The
month-long celebration
offers the opportunity
to recognize the signifi-
cance of Florida's rich
cultural life, it's di-
verse history and the
contribution it makes
to our communities.
The Jasper, Jennings
and White Springs li-
braries each have their
individual special dis-
plays of Florida's histo-
ry and heritage, Flori-
da State facts, history
of its flag and seal, his-
tory of the local li-
braries, local history,
books by local authors,
artists' renderings of
local points of interest
(both past and pre-
sent), and decorated
bulletin boards with
assorted historical
facts. Children's pro-
gramming and infor-
mative readings will
provide other interest-
ing information.
For more information
on Florida Heritage
Month visit their web-
site at www.Florida-
HeritageMonth.com.
For more information
on local events call
Jasper Public Library at
792-2285, Jennings
Public Library at 938-
1143, or White Springs
Library at 397-1389.

Calvary

Baptist

Church

Homecoming

March 20
Calvary Baptist Church
will celebrate its home-


coming on March 20, with
singing and preaching.
Food will be served fol-
lowing the service.
Sunday School will be-
gin at 10 a.m. and the
worship service will be-
gin at 11 a.m. The church
is located on SR 6 east in
Jasper.


rights
created? Or, what about
His right to have a say in
what goes on in this world
that He made and sus-
tains? And, of course,
there's His right to be
loved and appreciated by
everyone to whom he has
given the right to life, liber-
ty, and the pursuit of hap-
piness?
According to the dictio-
nary, the idea of rights is
defined as "an abstract
idea of that which is due to
a person or government by
law or tradition or nature."
Thisbeing the case, the
Bible declares, and every-
day experience bears out
the fact that God, for the
most part, does not receive
His due from man.
For instance, everyday
God faithfully blesses us
with the necessities of life
(i.e., food, water, air, sun-
shine, etc.), yet, most peo-
ple never even offer Him a
simple prayer of thanks.
Doesn't He have a right to
it? Doesn't a Father, who
abundantly provides for
His children have a right to
be loved and appreciated
by them?
The fact of the matter is
this: God has a right to our
lives, and His due is noth-
ing less than our whole-
hearted devotion. His right
is founded on His value;


He is the most valuable
Person in the universe. We
owe our very existence to
Him, and we are totally de-
pendent upon Him. If God
were to cease to exist, then
everything would cease to
.exist, because everything
operates according to His
wisdom. Therefore, He has
a right to our utmost love
and appreciation.
In closing, I can't help
but wonder what effect it
would have on our world
if Christians began to pub-
licly campaign for God's
rights. Imagine if there
were huge billboards along
the interstates, and full-
page newspaper ads, along
with radio and television
spots declaring the rights
of God. Suppose Chris-
tians became as passionate
for God's rights as the pro-
choice advocates are for a
woman's right to an abor-
tion. Do you think it might
cause non-Christians to see
God in a different light?
Oh well, publicity cam-
paigns aside, I believe that
the catalyst needed to
spark a revival and turn
our nation around is for
God's people to get back to
honoring His rights, in-
stead of worrying about
their own. Like the early
Christians, we need to fo-
cus our message on God's
rights instead of human
need. Then it will be said
of us, as it was of them,
that we have "turned the
world upside down." After
all, doesn't the Bible de-
.clare, "Not to us, not to us,
O Lord, but to your name
be the glory" (Ps. 115:1)?


The Sigma Delta Sweet-
heart Pageant will be held on
Saturday, March 19, at 6 p.m.
in the Hamilton County
High School Auditorium.
There are 20 girls competing
in four age divisions from
grades K-12.
Tiny Miss age division in-
cludes K-3rd grade. Contes-
tants are Madison Brantley,
Whitney Crosby, Holly
Crutchfield, Sadie Jones,


Elizabeth Lewis, Areal Smith
and Alexis Trouille.
Little Miss age division in-
cludes 4th-6th grade. Contes-
tants are Kayla Dyer, Ashley
Moore and Rebecca Vickers.
Junior Miss age division
includes 7th-9th grade. Con-
testants are Markesha
Brown, Alden Kennedy,
Cierra Michel, Shannon
Shakespeare, Rebecca Smith,
Elizabeth Krueger and Kay-


lyn Stout.
Senior Miss age division
includes 10th-12th grade.
Contestants are Brianna Ben-
nett, Ariel Johnson and Patri-
cia LeBroke.
Miss Sigma Delta Sweet-
heart 2004 Amanda Walker,
Miss HCHS 2004 Amber
Robinson and several other
HCHS students will provide
entertainment.
Tickets are $5 at the door.


Wild Azalea Festival March 19


The Town of White
Springs, Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park and the Nature and
Tourism Center will host
the Fifth Annual Wild Aza-
lea Festival on Saturday,
March 19, from 9 a.m. until
5 p.m.
Expert craftsman will
display and sell handmade
items at the Street Crafts
Fair on Bridge Street and


folk singers, musicians,
dancers and cloggers will
perform at the Tourism
Center. The Little Miss
Azalea Contest will feature
young ladies from the area.
A ribbon cutting ceremo-
ny for the newly completed
Woodpecker Trail will take
place at the Little Shoals
entrance. American Canoe
Adventures of White
Springs is sponsoring the


Suwannee River Duck race
again this year.
Other activities include
boat rides, canoe and kayak
rentals, and a special two-
mile hike along the Little
Shoals.
For more information
contact the White Springs
Town Hall at 397-2310 or
the Nature and Heritage
Tourism Center at 397-
4461.


Maximum Refund Guaranteed.
We get you every penny, guaranteed.
It s estimated Americans overpaid their taxes by nearly a billion dollars. Don t be one of
them. H&R Block will get ou the maximum refund you re entitled to, or your tax
preparation is free. So all the money you ve earned is where it belongs. In your pocket.
Call 1-800-HRBLOCK or visit hrblock.com for an office near you.
386-792-1402 H&R BLOCK"
548 Chanbridges Dr., Jasper, FL 32052 0
*Fees will apply if you choose to re-file. Individual results may vary. Valid for past three years tax returns only. At participating locations. @2004 H&R
Block Tax Services, Inc. 150822DH-F


USDA

SUnited States Department of Agriculture





The Tobacco Transition Payment


Program (also called "Tobacco Buyout").




You've heard about it.


Now be a part of it.



This is it. The Federal tobacco marketing quota system is over. No more plant-
ing restrictions. No more marketing cards. No more price support loans.
Instead, the USDA's new Tobacco Transition Payment Program will provide
money to eligible tobacco quota holders and producers to help in this transi-
tion that ends the old system. But sign up now or you will not get a 2005 payment.


i Did you own a farm as of October 22, 2004, with a 2004 basic
marketing quota?

) Are you an owner, operator, landlord, tenant, or sharecropper who
shared in the risk of producing tobacco anytime between 2002 and
2004?

> Do you grow Flue-cured, Burley, Fire-cured, Dark air-cured, Virginia
sun-cured, or Cigar filler/binder tobacco?


Please sign up between March 14, 2005, and June 17, 2005,
at your local USDA Service Center.

Call 1-866-887-0140 or visit http://offices.usda.gov
to find your local county Service Center.


Farm Service Agency

USDA is an equal upportunity piovidet and employed


151061


Sweetheart Pageant


1 r Iurlou/Ay, iIl/T\rlurl 1 1, uuo


THE JASPER-NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 7A


---





PA(_ RATEJSE ESJseF HRDAMRH1,20


NEW BETHEL YOUTH: Twenty-two youth from New Bethel AME Church in Jasper recently participated in Black Her-
itage Week in Lakeland, where they competed against other youth from Florida and the Bahamas in several categories
including poetry, essay writing, monologues, vocals, instrumentals, dance, volleyball and kickball. Pictured are chaper-
ones Geadon Smith, Naomi Jefferson, Marcus Weary, Charlene Robinson, Rosemary Peterson and Meshon Rawls,
and youth group members Timothy Sanford, Jamahl Rawls, Victoria Postell, Jacarri Washington, Denise Postell, Kiara
Rawls, Darius Hightower, Gregory Taylor Jr., Cody Bristol, Markesha Brown, Cedrieka Jolly, Jermesa Lee, Jasmine Mar-
shall, Craig Powell, Tashea Seymore, Ashley Jackson and Mark Jolly. Not pictured are Lament Harden, Marcus Weary,
Trevion Weary, Raven Devers and Velena Davis. (Photo Submitted)

Arbor Day Foundation offers free flowering dogwood trees


PERFORMING PRINCESS: The theme of the Women's
Annual Banquet last month at Christ Central Ministries in
Lake City was "Once Upon a Time." Amid the fairy-tale
princesses were several real princesses, including Miss
North Florida 2005 Kylie Williams of Jasper who per-
formed during the dinner. (staff Photo)


Ten free white flowering
dogwood trees will be given
to each person who joins
The National Arbor Day
Foundation during March.
The free trees are part of the
nonprofit Foundation's
Trees for America cam-
paign.


White flowering dog-
woods have showy spring
flowers, scarlet autumn fo-
liage, and red berries which
attract songbirds all winter.
The trees will be shipped
postpaid at the right time for
planting before May 31 with
enclosed planting instruc-


tions. The six to twelve inch
trees are guaranteed to grow
or they will be replaced free
of charge.
Members also receive a
subscription to Arbor Day,
the Foundation's monthly
publication, and The Tree
Book with information


about tree planting and care.
To become a member of
the Foundation and receive
the free trees, send a $10
contribution to Ten Free
Trees, National Arbor Day
Foundation, 100 Arbor Av-
enue, Nebraska City, NE
68410, by March 31.


Be Kind to

Animals

Kid Contest


Animal rescue organization seeking volunteers


Puppy Place CARES. a
non-profit animal sup-
port organization i look-
ing for local residents
..L, i n n f...- i n


seeking local a
nominations HOURS:
M-F 7-8
Now is the time to nom- Sat. &
inate an extraordinary kid Sun. 8-7
for the American Humane
Association's Be Kind to
Animals Kid contest spon-
sored by the Pet Products
division of Del Monte
Foods Company.
Any child who does ex-
ceptional things for ani- u
mals or any young person
whose dedication to ani-
mals is inspirational may
be nominated for the Fresh
award. Nodmihees will be
divided into two age VEGET
groups six to nine and
ten to thirteen. One grand
prize winner and two run- FOR
ners-up will be selected
from each group. Me
Grand prize winners B
will each receive a $5,000 B C
award. All winners and
runners-up will receive a
prize package and will be
featured in American Hu-
mane press materials and Bak
on their website. SHOR1
Winners will be an-
nounced during Be Kind
to'Animals Week, May 1
through 7. F3R
Nominations must be
made by an adult (age 18
or over) who is the child's
legal guardian or has writ- Fr
ten permission from the COLI
child's guardian and must GRE
be postmarked by March 3 O
25. Contest rules and nom-
ination forms may be ob-
tained at www.american-
humane.org.

Bluegrass STRAW

music at

Spirit of

Suwannee-
The Cherry Holmes
Family will perform tradi- USD,
tional bluegrass music Weste
with a fresh and exciting CH
new sound on Friday, RO
March 18, at 7 p.m. at the
Music Hall at the Spirit of
Suwannee Music Park. F2


Tickets are
plus tax.


$10 per person


Fresh I
Tender E
SIRI
PORK

$1!
*Pe


helping and rescuing ani-
mal .,
CARES Companion
Animal Rescue and Edu-
cation Society is a divi-


varietiess Asst. Varieties
Frozen Totino's
ABLES PIZZA
.00 $J| Ot
2LB. 3F g,
F 0 FOR 4c' *
erico Libby's

UITS VEGETABLES

16 oz. F

;erite Asst. Varieties Alpo

FENING DOG FOOD
00 $ 0o
42 5 13.2
oz. FOR oz


sion of the HLuton Ani-
mal Shelter. Inc. CARES
believes that there is
strength in many people
working together tou\ard


Asst. Varieties
SMITH'S
PIE M
$ 29 7
I EACH

Hy-Top
SALAD
DRESSING
$ 000 '
2 _0 16 r
FOR oz -
Angel Soft
DOUBLE ROLL


FOR Roll p i


Pillsbury
BISCUITS

$5OO
2 E -3 r5"

White Lily
FLOUR
$300
FOR3 LB .w

Trend
DETERGENT


the common goal of help-
ing animals in Hamilton
CouLnt .
To volunteer or for
more information contact


Asst. Varieties
HOT
POCKETS

$400
! EACH H

Ritz
COLA

S$|19
S119
3 Liters

12 oz. Cans
COKE


- PRODUC


esh
LARD
OENS

0 :Per Lb.


Fresh
MUSTARD
GREENS
3 FOR


Red Large

PLUMS


A Select USDA Sel
ern Beef Western E
UCK CHUCK
AST STEAl
69 $0691
Per Per
lb 1 Ib.
Lean 'n Fresh Lean 'n
Boneless Tender
LOIN PORK
CHOPS CUBE STEAKS
9 Ps er lb
~res


29 Per Lb. 5 99 '
lectU

--nu.^n


ect
leef
vK
KS
MS


Rome East

APPLES
2 FOR


USDA Select
Western Beef
BEEF
STEW

$2!


Florida

ORANGES
2 FOR


Fresh Lean
GROUND
BEEF

2 e.
$21.9-


Goldkist USDA
Inspected
CHICKEN
WINGS
$139
Per
lb.


Sunnyland
JUMBO
FRANKS

s1'%.


Red & White
Seedless
GRAPES


USDA Select
Western Beef
SIRLOIN
STEAKS

$299


We now carry
Cow Heads,
Cow Tongues,
Rabbit Meat
and
Goat Meat


H E O
OU ETI U RS AL NORMRE YORCTES115-A3 .WEALWYSSELMET REH


Kerry Gavronskv, Direc-
tor ot Pupp\ Place
CARES, at 397-1665 or at
PO Bo\ 525, whitee
Springs, FL 32096.

Hamilton

County

Landfill

closed

March 25
The Hamilton County
Landfill and Recycling Cen-
ter will be closed Friday,
March 25, in observance of
Good Friday. The Landfill
will be open Saturday, March
26.
The Landfill accepts resi-
dential household garbage,
as well as hazardous waste
and items for recycling.
The Hazardous Waste
Center accepts paint, house-
hold chemicals, used motor
oil, oil filters and batteries\at
no charge.
The Recycling Center ac-
cepts glass, plastic, cardboard
and papers (newspapers, cat-
alogs, magazines, etc.) at no
charge. They buy only alu-
minum cans.
The normal hours of opera-
tion for the Landfill are Mon-
day through Friday, 8 a.m. till
4 p.m., and Saturday, 9 a.m.
till 12 p.m. The Landfill is
closed Sunday and holidays.
The Landfill is located at
I 4652 SW 107th Ave. in Jasper.
For more information call
792-1020.

ICCC presents

Broadway Cabaret

and dessert

intermission
The Lake City Community
College Choir will present a
"sweet" Broadway Cabaret
musical entertainment with a
"dessert intermission" featur-
ing music from the American
musical stage and screen on
Saturday, March 19, at 7 p.m.
in the fellowship hall of First
United Methodist Church in
Lake City.
There will be a special mu-
sical tribute by the choir to
Harold Arlen, composer of
"Somewhere Over the Rain-
bow" and many other songs.
LCCC band director Harry
Wuest and his Jazz Combo
will also perform special mu-
sic during the evening.
Tickets for the show and
dessert are $9 for adults, $7
for senior adults, LCCC staff
and all Students, and $5 for
children (5-12). Tickets may
be purchased from any col-
lege choir member or call
Owen Wingate, choir direc-
tor at 386-754-4255.


Goldkist USDA
Inspected
CHICKEN
LEG 1/4's

43U, .:


- I


Iq


THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2005


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGF 8A


interest in











A Sports


The Banks Perspective and SHE News 2B
Norris Notes 3B
White Springs News and NHE News 4B
Arrest Records and Legal Notices 5B
Town Happenings and United Way 6B


Thursday, March 17, 2005
Page 1B
B-Section


H a.





By Head Coach Bobby Eason


The Hamilton County
High School Baseball
Team won another im-
portant District Game
last week with a 11-1 win
over Branford. Pablo
Garcia hit a solo homerun
in the bottom of the first
inning, to tie the score at
1-1. The Trojans took con-
trol of the game over the
next four innings, scoring


10 runs. Ignacio Zamora
hit a three run homerun
in the third inning.
Austin Gaver, Jamie Gar-
cia, Kent Scaff, Kaleb
Windham, and Daniel
Deas all contributed hits
in the game. Daniel Deas
was outstanding on the
mound throwing a two-
hitter and allowing only
one unearned run to


cross the plate. The Tro-
jans are now 2-1 in dis-
trict play.
The team lost a Satur-
day game, March 12, in
the Bulldog Invitational
Tournament to Charlton
County, GA, 6-1. Charl-
ton county's ace pitcher
controlled the game,
striking out 12 Trojan
batters. Austin Gaver
drove in Kaleb Windham
with a double to provide
the only score for the
Trojans.
The Trojans continue
district play this week, in
Bronson to night at 7 p.m.
in Bronson, and at home
against Trenton at 7 p.m.
on Friday, March 18.


Hamilt



North


SI


on 4-H winners



Florida Livestol



low and Sale


Rare birds visit Tallahassee


Marty Steiner

The second item most
people read in their local
newspaper is the obituar-
ies. More often than not,
there will be a World War
II veteran or defense
worker or civil defense air
raid warden. This is true
in every community re-
gardless of size. Tom
Brokaw labeled these "the
greatest generation."
Many years earlier a
different kind of passing
took place. What many
refer t6 as the "greatest
airplanes" were methodi-
cally destroyed in the
mistaken hope that war
itself had been defeated.
Of the tens of thousands
of each major aircraft type
produced only;a few were
allowed to remain. Now
some types are totally ex-
tinct with only reproduc-
tions in existence. Others
have only a few non-fly-
ing examples in museums
that are generally un-
available to most Ameri-
cans.
The non-profit Collings
Foundation has taken a
different approach. The
only authentic flying ex-
ample of a Consolidated
B-24 Liberator bomber
was meticulously re-
stored in 1989. It joined a
Boeing B-17 Flying
Fortress that had previ-
ously been restored to
tour the country. This


"Wings of Freedom" tour
usually visits over 100
communities each year.
North Florida and
South Georgia had nu-
merous air training bases
during World War II. In
addition, many of that
"greatest generation"
have retired into the area
with at least a few doing
so because they "met and
married" local girls.
These touring aircraft
provide these veterans,
their survivors and their
families the opportunity
to see what "Dad flew
during the war!"
Senior groups frequent-
ly visit the aircraft, re-
membering Life magazine
and Movietone newsreels
showing these aircraft in
action. Some few may
have built planes or oth-
erwise' participated in the
war effort.
Young people with little
exposure to this time in
their history books are ex-
cited to see these "old
planes" bristling with ma-
chine guns and hearing a
veteran telling a story or
two. Some want one more
ride on what they remem-
ber to be reliable ma-
chines that brought their
crews home even after
sustaining heavy battle
damage.
One old pilot took his
wife of over sixty years
on a flight so that she
might finally understand
what he had been


through. They told me
later that this had been
one of the most signifi-
cant events that they had
ever shared!
The "Wings of Free-
dom" tour will be at the
Tallahassee Regional Air-
port at 10 a.m., Monday,
March 21, through 1 p.m.
on Wednesday, March 23.
Walk through tours are $8
for adults and $4 for chil-
dren under twelve. Group
discounts are available by
reservation only.
The Collings Founda-
tion is a-supporter of the
Library of Congress Vet-
erans History Project
(VHP). This project is
conducting interviews
with veterans, and others
with war-time experi-
ences. Qualifying veter-
ans, civil defense and de-
fense workers who regis-
ter for a VHP interview
will be. given free admis-
sion with advance regis-
tration.
Group reservations and
VHP interview registra-
tion must be made with
Marty Steiner, Heritage
Resources Group at 229-
985-7503. Two "Wings of
Freedom" information
lines have been estab-
lished at 850-558-3051 or
229-246-6331, ext. 2019.
Flight experience rides
are- $400 per person per
flight and must be re-
served directly with the
Collings Foundation at
978-562-9182.


CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS: Shown I-r, first row: Gage Stout, Zach Deas, Garrett Stout, Conher
Carter; second row: Regan Adams, Katie Burnam, Kendall Newsome, Robbielyn Roberson, An-
drea Abbott; back row: Courtney Igo, Trent Abbott, Heath Ragans and Alayna Abbott.


(Photo Submitted)
The Livestock Judging
Team did an outstanding
job representing Hamil-
ton County at the North
Florida Show and Sale in
Madison County on Feb-
ruary 22. The youth had
to compare and rank
livestock from the most
desirable to the least de-
sirable. They judged two
classes of market steers,
two classes of market
hogs and one class of
heifers. Each class con-
sists of four animals and
a perfect score is worth
50 points. A perfect team
score for the contest


would be 750 points.
The Sr. Team (ages 13 -
18) consisting of Trent
Abbott, Alayna Atbott,
Courtney Igo and -leath
Ragans came in First in
the Senior Division with
a score of 659. The Sr.
Team consisting of Ra-
gan Adams, Roblpielyn
Roberson, Katie Bdrnam
and Kendall NeWsome
placed Second in the Se-
nior Division with a
score of 607.
The Jr. Team (ages 8 -
12) consisting of Zach
Deas, Conner carter,
Garrett Stout and Gage
i


Stout placed Third in the
Junior Division with; a
score of 613. Andrea Ab-
bott participated as an
individual in the Senior
Division.
Representing Hamil-
ton County in the swine
show were Dalton Tyree,
Alayna Abbott,i Andrea
Abbott, and Josh Beden-
baugh. The Feeder
Champion Steer was
shown by Trent Abbott.
The livestock judging
teams were taught by
Clevie Selph and Greg
Hicks (4-H/Agriculture
Agent).


Hamilton Couhty


Baseball Clinic March 19


The Trojain Baseball
team, Head Coach Bobby
Eason and other coaches
will provide hands-on
technical training during a
baseball clinic for youth


ages 7 to 16 on Saturday,
March 19, from 10 a.h un-
til 3 p.m. at the Hahiilton
County Recreation enter.
Following' the clinic
there will be a horie run.
!


derby.
Registration is required
and there is no fee. Every-
one bring a glove and 9at.
For more information call
Chuck Burnet at 303-1145.
'


Register npw for

Bass Touriament


at Bienville Plantation

asper Volunteer Fire directed by Southern Shin- Prizes will be pro-ra
rs are sponsoring ers, Inc. Special guest Jeff more or less boats.
:h Annual Open Bass Cook of the country Entry fee is $200
ament at Bienville singing group Alabama will be a $25 late
:ion in White Springs will appear as the Alabama registering at the ga
iturday, April 23. State Fishing Ambassador. For entry forms c
raised will be used Prize amounts range information conta
new equipment, from $100 to $2,500, based Jasper Fire Departr
tournament will be on a full field of 100 boats, call 792-2181 or 792-


ated for

. There
fee for
te.
or more
ct the
nent or
-2211.


Crossr

Result


RARE BIRDS FLY HIGH: The Collings Foundation's Wings of Freedom Tour brings two of the most
important aircraft of WWII: the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress and the Consolidated B-24 Liberator re-
turn to Tallahassee at the Tallahassee Regional Airport for a display at The Flightline Group Talla-
hassee from Monday, March 21 through Wednesday, March 23. Restored to exacting 1944 condi-
tion, they fly to over 120 cites nationwide for display and to offer flights for people interested in re-
living history through a hands-on experience. (Photo Submitted)


Community Events see page 4B


Im,
0A
-'0 5


ads

ts


March '12


Jr Sportsman 1
Amber Colvin
Jr Stock
Cody Cunningham
Adam DeRocco
Kyle Altmix
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IA(r T1HJ EWLS., Ja r TH SDYMAC 72


Hello everyone, this is
Banks once again. I hope
you're ready because I'm
about to take you on a
soaring flight from Cen-
tral Hamilton Elementary.
Excitement, .excitement
was in the air at Central
Hamilton Elementary last
Friday as the state tests
were announced over.
Thank God, I said to my-
self. I know all the teach-
ers and students are hap-
py they can now breathe


South


Hamilton


News

As we approach the mid-
dle of March, our thoughts
turn to St. Patrick's Day
and Easter. At South, we
will celebrate the "Wearin'
o' the Green" today with
everyone wearing some-
thing "green" to school -


freely. Everyone at Cen-
tral can't wait for the test
scores; hopefully we have
beaten the "CAT," and
have risen to the top.
CHE's sixth grade cho-
rus and music teacher,
Amber Jones, are taking
things back to the 50s.
Mrs. Jones has done a
great job in the past and
intends to do the same
this year with a 50s con-
cert. The chorus and Mrs.
Jones will be putting on a


By Johnny Bullard


no pinches. We would also
like to remind everyone
that Saturday, we will cel-
ebrate our Wild Azalea
Festival here in White
Springs. I hope everyone
will support our town, and
the Wild Azalea Festival.


The Banks



Perspective Bn

By Jonathan Banks


The Festival will be held in
front of the Nature and
Heritage Tourism Center.
Come out and support it.
Upcoming events:
Monday, March 21 -
Third nine weeks report
cards go home.
Friday, March 25 Good
Friday; holiday for all.
Sunday, March 27 East-
er.
Monday through Friday,
March 28 through April 1 -
Spring Break.
Monday, April 4 Return
to school after Spring
Break.


50s show towards the end
of the school year. If any-
one owns a poodle skirt
and would like to donate
it to the school for the
show, please contact Mrs.
Norris or Mrs. Jones at
792-6530. Get ready,
Jasper, to swing back into
the 50s and bring back
those twisting memories.
The American Cancer
Society has confirmed the
date for the "Relay for
Life." April 16, at 6 p.m. is
when the relay will be tak-
ing place at old Hamilton
County High School. CHE
has started conducting its
fund raising activities. As
you walk into our school
you will notice moon and
star cards posted on the
window. The students
purchase a card by donat-
ing a dollar. When they


In Miss Runyon's and
Ms. Johnson's kinder-
garten class, we are mak-
ing our Easter baskets out
of plastic bleach bottles,
and we need grass and
goodies to go in them.
Thanks for all your cooper-
ation and support. Have a
good weekend.
Mrs. Mickler's first grade
is proud to be finished
with Stanford 10 Testing.
However, parents, remind
your children that testing
may be over, but there is
still lots to be learned be-
fore going to second grade.
This week, we.have been
reading a true story about
a cat saving her kittens
from a burning building.
Scarlett the cat became
known as the bravest cat in
New York. We have also
been talking about seatbelt
safety. Our classroom
poster winners are: Jared
Claridy, Allison Lee and
Kailyn Peters. Congratula-
tions, winners!!!
The second grade read a
story from Laura Ingalls
Wilder's "Little House in
the Big Woods." They


receive their card, they
will print a loved one's or
friend's name on the card
that has or had cancer.
Anyone wishing to help
fight cancer can come by
CHE to make a donation
or join our relay team.
Cheer on CHE while they
do their part by helping
fight cancer.
Guess what everyone?
J.K. Rowling is kicking it
up a notch with her new
book. She named it Harry
Potter and the Half-Blood
Prince." This book was
published on March 9,
and will be released for
sale on July 16. One of my
friends has read all of the
past five Harry Potter
books. He thinks that all
of the books are great, as
long as the readers don't
take the books' actions


found in a general store of
that era. They compared
these with those used to-
day. In Math, students be-
gan subtracting three digit
numbers. They continued
to count coins. Please emp-
ty out your pockets for
them. Everyone enjoyed
making their
Rainbow/Shamrock mo-
bile.
Third grade is relieved to
have the FCAT behind us
for this year. We worked
very hard for the past two
weeks to do our very best,
and we're ready to get
back to our schedule.
We're enjoying a story
about a time in the life of
Booker T. Washington and
how he learned to read.
This has helped us appreci-
ate what we have and can
do in our lifetime. We also
want to give a big thanks to
D& K Nursery for the mag-
nolia trees they donated for
us to plant in front of our
school. One day they will
be a beautiful addition to
our school. Also thanks to
Mr. Greg Hicks and all the
time he gives to our chil-


identified tools and 'items'J dren."
r~rf -I (I *


and details out of context.
Overall, I believe Harry
Potter books are adven-
turous and exciting and I
have enjoyed the three I
have read.
The residents of Jasper
decided once again to al-
low gambling. The vote
this time was to decide
whether or not to allow
card rooms. Card rooms
are defined as rooms
where people play cards
for money, by betting and
gambling. I believe that
some of the residents
were not surprised with
the voting results of two-
to-one, since "YES" votes
had already won before. I
asked a couple of students
their opinion on the card
room voting.
My classmate Jeffrey
Monds gave me his opin-


Our student of the week
is Ronteisha Owens. Ron-
teisha is a super girl who
always wants to help oth-
ers. She works very hard in
school and loves to draw.
We enjoy having Ronteisha
in our class.
In our fourth, fifth, and
sixth grade classes, we are
breathing a sigh of relief
now that FCAT is over. We
are looking forward to
spring break very soon. We
wish to extend our thanks
to Mrs. Dorothy Bryant for
all her help in coordinating
our testing, and we also
want to thank our School
Advisory Council for fund-
ing our FCAT snacks each
day. Thank you to Mr.
Bullard, our principal, and
to Mrs. Lori Stormant, SAC
Chairperson, for seeing to
it that we had yummy
FCAT snacks each day.
Many thanks to our cafete-
ria staff for all theTr help in
serving us our snacks each
day. We appreciate our
cafeteria staff at South!!!
Students paid a visit to
Mrs. Joan Radford, our

see SHE, Page 3B


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ion, "I think the card
room is cool." He also
said, "The reason "YES"
won was because there
are some unemployed
people in the county and
they thought voting
"YES" would bring more
jobs." A couple of other
students thought that
bringing the card room in
is a sin and gambling
which would go against
the Christian religion.
"YES" has won and I
guess we will have to wait
and see how everything
will turn out.
That is all folks; I hope
you enjoyed reading my
article. If you have any
comments or suggestions,
you can email me at
evin_05@yahoo.com.
Have a great week!
Adios, Banks!!


IEBrothers

ELECTRONIC S


i


THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2005


THE JASPER NEWS, Jaspqr, FL


PAG;F 2R






Ti-II QCnAv MAAc rU- 17 9(nnC;


Norris Notes


By Lillian Norris
Spring is arriving, and
we can know this by the
signs of spring around
our county. My sign is the
beautiful tree that shows
its blossoms over the roof
of Melanie and Randy
Gay's home, the tree
makes a perfect picture
from my kitchen window.
If you have, heard me
speak of this before, you
will know that in the past
it has been called a dog-
wood tree, but on closer
observation, it is not a
dogwood tree. Melanie
tells us, that Allen Tyree
said a common name for
it is the popcorn tree and
that is good enough for
us. It is in full bloom now
and makes working in my
kitchen a little more
pleasant. The weather is
beautiful and we look for-
ward to many spring
days.
From all who attended,
the performance of the
Bryan College Chorale
and Chamber Singers at
Jennings Methodist


Church on Tuesday,
March 8, was a marvelous
occasion. The group of 45
singers represented 12
states and performed a
variety of classical, spiri-
tual, gospel and contem-
porary music. The direc-
tor was Dr. David Luther,
the accompanist was Dr.
Sigrid Luther. Dr. David
Luther's father, the late
Rev. James Luther, was
pastor of Jennings
Methodist Church for
about eight years.
The Church housed the
group at Shoney's Inn,
and served them a meal
on Tuesday evening and
held a reception follow-
ing the performance.
Rita Luther, widow of
Rev. James Luther and
mother of Dr. David
Luther, who now lives in
Camilla, Georgia, was in
attendance. Billy Blair of
Jennings went to Camilla,
Georgia, and brought her
down for the perfor-
mance. She was able to
stay at Shoney's and visit


with the Luthers and the
group of singers, this was
a surprise to Dr. Luther,
this made it extra special.
Mrs. Luther requested a
solo from her son and he
responded by singing
"How Great Thou Art", a
favorite of hers (and of
ours). It was a wonderful
evening and we are sorry
we had to miss it.
At a Hamilton County
High School baseball
game in Statenville, GA,
last .week, we were at the
concession stand, I heard
someone say "Mrs. Nor-
ris" and looked up to see a
former resident of Jasper,
Marcus Zipperer, who
was a classmate of Ben's
and was in our Cub Scout
troop, a few years ago. He
had recognized me and I
did him immediately,
guess that says something
for both of us. He got to
talk with several former
friends and classmates,
they enjoyed visiting.
Marcus is Rev. Marcus
Zipperer, pastor of Bethel
Church of God in Echols
County, on Coggins Road.
He and his wife, Sharon,
have two children, Der-
rick, 18 and Kristin, 16.


Derrick was on the Echols
County Baseball team.
Marcus' mother, Ruth
Zipperer, attends church
at Marcus' church and
was not at the ball game
as she was attending a
meeting of the ladies of
the Church, they were
meeting and eating at
Sparks Tea Room in
Sparks, GA, which she
says is a lovely old home
and has wonderful food.
Marcus is the son of the
late Clinton Zipperer.
Beverly Collins, daugh-
ter of the late Gary Gar-
raghan and the late Jean
McGhin Garraghan, is
spending several days ,in
Jasper with Lucille Gar-
raghan. She attended
church at First Presbyter-
ian in Jasper Sunday and
saw many old friends, she
also visited with her aunt,
Inez McGhin and will be
getting together with oth-
er friends and former
classmates while here.
Nancy McGhin Stewart
and her daughter, Terri,
from Atlanta, GA, are
spending several days
this week with Nancy's
mother, Inez McGhin.
Trey Norris, son of Dr.


SHE


Continued From Page 2B

school reading coach, for
help in reading. A comput-
er program, "My Reading
Coach", offers intensive
practice with phonics
(hearing, identifying
sounds and sounding out
words). Several other
hands-on activities are en-
joyed by the students at
our school. Here at South
Hamilton, not a rock goes
unturned when it comes to
trying everything imagin-
able to instill the knowl-
edge necessary to insure a
good education for our stu-
dents. We have a creative
and dedicated principal
and dedicated, creative
teachers.
In dosing our newsletter
this week, we bid a fond


farewell to Miss Donna
Scaff. Miss Scaff has gra-
ciously and very profes-
sionally been in charge of
our ESE class for some
time, and she has done a
wonderful job. We appreci-
ate all Miss Scaff has done
for us at South, and we will
always cherish the time she
served here with us. Miss
Ellen Gay returned to
South Hamilton Elemen-
tary on Monday, March 14,
after a long illness. Miss
Gay underwent a kidney
transplant a couple of
months ago, and we hope
she is fully recovered and
ready to come back and
join us here at South
Hamilton. Thank you, once
again, Miss Scaff.
Our school bids a fond
farewell to Ashely Subic,


sixth grader, and Joey
Subic, second grader. Ash-
ley and Joey will be mov-
ing to Central Florida, near
Orlando. Their mother,
Valinda Subic, served for
over ten years as park
manager of the Stephen
Foster Center.
She has taken a job as as-
sistant District Manager
over the Central Florida
District for the Divisidn of
Parks. Valinda served as
our school's School Advi-
sory chairperson. We wish
them well in their new
home.
Our sympathy goes out
to the family of Mrs. Oleta
Lindsey of White Springs.
Mrs. Lindsey has a number
of great-grandchildren at-
tending school here at
South Hamilton including


Amber Howard, Kristi
Howard, C.J. Williams and
Hunter Williams. The fam-
ily has the prayers of our
South Hamilton family and
our community.
South Hamilton was
honored by a visit on
Thursday, March 10, from
our Superintendent of
Schools, Mr. Harry J. Pen-
nington, our assistant Su-
perintendent, Mr. Ronald
Hobbs, and our District Di-
rector of Finance, Mr. Sean
Alderman.
We appreciate these gen-
tleman visiting our school,
and our welcome mat is al-
ways out for our visitors.
At South Hamilton,
"Way Down Upon the
Suwannee River", we are
"Changing Lives through
Quality Education."


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Ben and Leigh Ann Norris
celebrated his 9th birth-
day last week on several
occasions, which seems to
be the right way to cover
everything. On Thursday
evening, March 10, Trey
had birthday cake at Spir-
it of the Suwannee and
shared birthday cake with
all who were in atten-
dance, including rela-
tives, friends, and per-
former Ted McMullen
and family. Grandparents
Richard and Ann Shep-
herd came from
Sycamore, GA for the
weekend and they cele-
brated again on Sunday,
March 13, with family in-
cluding me, and friends;
of course sister Kaleigh
Norris was a special
guest.
The awning at One
Twelve Hatley certainly
adds so much to the ap-
pearance on the main
street through town. With
upgrading the old bank
building owned by the
Reckners, it really helps
as you drive along.-the
street; all improvements
help. S&S has now been
completed and Shamrock
has added improvements,
all helping to bring a bet-
ter appearance going
through town on US 41.
Marsha and Henry
Groll, Alma Scherban and
Louise Vinson. of Jasper
attended the funeral of
Carol Molle, in DeBary,
FL, last week. Carol was
the wife of Bruce Molle,


nephew of Louise and
Alma. Also attending
were their brothers and
sister, Jimmy and Paul
Johnson and Mary Ann
Lastinger of Hahira, GA.
The funeral was on
Wednesday, March 9, and
Alma, Henry and Marsha
remained until Friday,
March 11, to visit with
Alma's sister, Doris
Molle.
Elizabeth Baker came
for a visit with her moth-
er, Dorothy Pittman, and
to take Dorothy to Jack-
sonville last weekend for
the wedding of Brian
Shepherd to Staci Renee
Ellison on Sunday, March
6, at Hilltop Club, Orange
Park. They were guests at
a sit-down dinner follow-
ing the wedding. Brian is
the son of Terry and
Becky (Pittman) Shepherd
of Jacksonville; the grand-
son of Dorothy Pittman
and the late Wayne
Pittman; and the late Fos-
ter and Evelyn Shepherd.
Brian's brothers, Mitchell
and Lee, were in the wed-
ding as was his father,
Terry. We will have more
information on the family
of the bride next week.
Upcoming events to
look forward to and pre-
pare for are the Easter ser-
vices and the Relay for
Life; we will have more
information as the time
grows nearer.
Have a good weekend.
Lillian Norris
792-2151


SUWANNEE-
HAMILTON
TECHNICAL CENTER


School Advisory


Committee Meeting




6:30 p.m. @ Student Center

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I r IVI IC)U/A T IVI/-kr rl1 1 e--UD --- -


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 3B






PAUA 431FrI TF .I Ar PR -nFW. .i nr F ...-L


THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2005


White Springs







By Johnny Bullard


The Town of White
Springs will come alive
on Saturday, March 19,
when we celebrate the
fifth annual Wild Azalea
Festival. Please come
down and join us for a
full day of festivities. The
festival will take place
around the Nature and
Heritage Tourism Center.
There will be regional
foods, great music, and
the Little Miss Azalea
Festival to name just a
few of the activities.
Bring the entire family
and enjoy a day of food,
festivities and fun.
Our sympathy goes out
to the family of Mrs. Ole-
ta Lindsey, lifetime resi-
dent of the White Springs
area. Mrs. Lindsey was a
wonderful, sweet Christ-
ian lady. She was known
far and wide for her tal-
ents as a "top notch"
cook, and there are many
who can testify to her
culinary talents. We will
miss her sweet smile and
her warm and genuine
love for family members
and friends. To all the
family, we love you and
you are in our prayers.
Gail Ward, Orlando,
FL, will soon be a resi-'
dent of White Springs, as
she has purchased the
Carver House next to the
S and S Food Store on the
south end of town. We
welcome Gail to White
Springs, and we hope she
will love it here "Way
Down upon the Suwan-
nee River."
Jerry Lawrence and I
traveled a.t6' Dade City
and attended the Will
McClean Festival at the
Sertoma Youth Ranch. It


was wonderful, glorious
weather for the entire
weekend, and we en-
joyed seeing a lot of old
friends and meeting
some new ones and, in
addition, we heard some
great music. It was so
good to see, among oth-
ers, Doug Gauss of Talla-
hassee, Ken and Nancy
Buchanan of Loxahatch-
ee, Bobby and Ginny
Hicks of Tampa, Frank
Thomas of Lake Wales,
Jeanie and Ned Fitchen
of Cocoa, Wayne Martin
of Blountstown, Dale
Crider of Windsor, Sonny
Edwards of Huntsville,
AL, Jerry Mincey of Win-
ter Haven, and, of course,
the festival coordinator,
Margaret Longhill.
The late Will McClean
is known nationally as
Florida's premiere song-
writer. The Festival is
dedicated to his memory
and to the perpetuation
of Florida songs. It was a
great weekend full of
good weather, good food,
music, and laughter, all
set in the rolling hills of
central Florida, right be-
tween two orange
groves, one couldn't
have asked for a more
perfect natural scene in
the state of Florida truly
wonderful. We were de-
lighted to see Wendy
Welch, and husband Jack
of White Springs,
(Wendy is our Florida
Folk Festival coordina-
tor), as well as Larry
Hoover, Wendy's assis-
tant. We shared a nice
visit with Wendy, Jack,
and Larry.
Our thirty-eighth an-
nual Easter Sunrise Ser-


vice will be held on Sun-
day, March 27, at the
Stephen Foster Center, in
front of the Museum. The
gates for the Foster Cen-
ter will open at 6:15 a.m.,
there will be carillon con-
cert of special music at
6:45 a.m. and the service
will begin at 7 a.m. Ad-
mission to the park is free
for this annual event -
sponsored by the Stephen
Foster Citizens Support
Organization and area
churches. There is a large
cross section of commu-
nity participation in this
impressive service.
Happy birthday wishes
go out on St. Patrick's
Day, today, to my sister-
in-law, Amanda Bullard.
We wish her many, many
more Happy Birthdays!!!
South Hamilton Ele-
mentary extends its ap-
preciation to Stormant's
Grocery for providing us
with many wonderful
treats during FCAT Test-
ing. Mrs. Lori Stormant
of Stormant's Grocery
saw to it that our stu-
dents received tasty
treats throughout FCAT
testing. Thank you Mrs.
Stormant and thank you
Stormant's Grocery.
Shirley Marshall Peter-
son of Jacksonville, came
by the school for a short
visit last week. I bought a
copy of Shirley's mem-
oirs written about her
growing up years in
White Springs and about
her Mother and Daddy
the late Louise and
"Bear" Marshall. As I
read Shirley's book, I
laughed a lot and shed a
few tears too, as I turned
back the pages of time
through her memoirs. I
appreciate Shirley shar-
ing this book with me,
and I know her parents
would be proud to know
she had captured memo-
ries of them in this spe-
cial book.
Please remember the.
following in prayer: Ben
Register, Ouida Hard-
wick, Ralph Hardwick,


Gussie Cheshire, Ada
Register, Malcolm
Beauchamp, Virginia
Beauchamp, Barbara
Beauchamp, Virginia
Daniel, Ceil Pound,
Gaynelle Greene, Tom-
mie Smith, Ella Taylor,
Verna. Mae Johnson, the
family of Oleta Lindsey,


Jean Padgett, Dorothy
Hill, Pearsall Fouraker,
Amy Claxton, J.M. Mor-
gan, Trey Townsend,
Suwannee County, our
state, our nation, and our
"own" Hamilton County.
Quote for the week:
"Keep on the sunny side,
always on the sunny side,


NHE .....


NEWS


Students in Mrs. Drig-
gers' second grade class
recently completed an au-
thor study on Marc
Brown who is known for
the popular children's
books about Arthur. Stu-
dents learned about his
childhood and how he
got started as a writer.
They learned that his
grandmother helped him
with his college tuition
and was always his
biggest fan. The grand-
mother in his books is
named after her, Grand-
ma Thora. A fun activity
was learning to draw
Arthur. They also wrote
letters to Marc Brown and
had a class picture taken
with two "stuffed"
Arthurs.
Mrs. Tyre's second
grade class has been busy
writing. After studying
the difference between
facts and 'opinions, they
wrote facts about rabbits
and their opinions about
rabbits. In another related
activity, each student
drew and decorated a
large rabbit. Later, they
imagined being the rabbit
That they had created and
wrote about "themselves"
and their "rabbit life".
Holly Crutchfield
wrote: "Hello! I'm Love-
ly. I live with my mom,
dad, and sister at the Oak
Water Park in a hole. I en-


joy playing on the equip-
ment. I have seven bunny
friends.' They are Cody,
Lexy, Lizzy, Mazey, Ash-
lyn, Kayla, Alexis, and
Amber. We have fun to-
gether on the play-
ground. Wheeeee! I eat
cabbage, carrots, peas,
and peanuts. I decorate
every Easter. It is fun! I
like to look for eggs! They
are very colorful. I am
scared of hurricanes.
Once at the park, a power
line blew up. It went
Boom! I was so scared. I
am ten feet tall and my
ears are twenty inches
long. Happy Easter!"
In science, Mrs. Tyre's
class has been studying
space. Each student chose
a favorite topic, such as a
planet, the international
space station, or tele-
scopes. After completing
research on their topic,
the students wrote the
important facts about
their subject, drew a re-
lated picture, and con-
cluded by reporting their
findings to the class. The
class enjoyed these re-
ports. Now, they are anx-
iously waiting to see the
spacecraft's being created
at home by each student
and their parents. A few
amazing crafts have )al-
ready landed in the class-
room. The students will
also write the steps they


keep on the sunny side of
life. It will help you
every day, it will bright-
en up your way if you'll
keep on the sunny side of
life." The Carter Family -
A.P. and Sara Carter
Have a good week
Hamilton County I love
you.

took to build their space-
craft's.
Second graders also en-
joyed drawing lep-
rechauns for St. Patrick's
Day. Second grader, Hol-
ly Crutchfield, visited
Mrs. McCall's classroom
and helped her kinder-
gartners draw lep-
rechauns.
All kindergarten classes
are busy with beginning
reader books. Many have
"baggy books" to read
nightly. Parents, please
listen to your child read
and help as needed.
Mrs. McCall's kinder-
gartners enjoyed a yam
tasting party last Friday.
"Yam" was one of their
spelling words. Thanks to
Cammie's mom for bring-
ing the yams. This week,
as a part of their study of
the letter Vv, they were
treated to a lesson about
violins, given by class-
mate Bailey Jones. Bailey
proudly showed off his
violin, explained the dif-
ferent parts, demonstrat-
ed the correct way to hold
it, and played for the
class.
Parents, please remem-
ber to send $15 if you
wish to purchase a year-
book. These are certainly
very nice keepsakes.
Also, the cost of class pic-
tures is $10. Remember,
Friday, March 25 is Good
Friday Holiday and the
following week is spring
break. We are beginning
our last nine weeks of the
school year.
We encourage students
and parents to continue
to work with us at NHE
where "We are changing
lives through quality ed-
ucation".


.1


L'1
. *r,


: .
*- ,./U.. .


Community Good Friday Events

The Hamilton County Ministerial Alliance invites the
community to participate in two Good Friday events.

First, a Cross Walk beginning at 12:00 noon at
City Hall and ending at City Park, will dramatically
present Jesus carrying the cross to His crucifixion,
depicting the Passion of Christ.

Second, the annual Good Friday Worship Service
will be held at First Presbyterian Church beginning
at 7:00 p.m., with area pastors and churches
participating. The church is located at
208 3rd Avenue NW.


C(omcast

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You want Comcast Cable.
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wide variety of channels
with thousands of program
choices, like sports, local
weather, news, movies, and
more. And you'll avoid
long-term commitments,
costly equipment repairs,
and the hassles of satellite
service. At Comcast, we're
committed to giving you
the best service in any
weather.

For more information,
call Comcast at
792-1820.



203 NW Hat Stree
Jaser Flria 32052


An Easter egg hunt will
be held at the Old Jail
Museum on March 26
at 11:00 a.m.
Following the egg hunt,
hot dogs and drinks
will be served.
All children through
the age of 12 years old
are invited.
The Museum will
be open for tours.
Sponsored by:
Jasper Foodway and
Old Jail Museum


McCoy-Aire



Enterprises

Commercial & Residential Services
Air Conditioner, Refrigeration, Ice Machine
Emergency Service 24-7




,,: F,.l^^ 'led ^ r,..O(', '' ,-
'.P ., .' L



Vernon McCoy, Owner
Fl Lic #CAC055548, Ga Lic #CN209614
306 W. Hatley St. Phone: 386-792-2900
Jasper, Florida 32052 Toll Free: 866-792-2900
E-mail: mccoyaire@alltel.net 148261DH-F



V Donna's"^


Bait & Tackle
Live Bait: Worms Crickets Minnows
River Rider Boats Fishing Tackle
Knives Hunting Supplies Camo
T-Shirts & Hats Sunglasses
Tree Stands Deer Feeders
Hunting & Fishing License Sold Here
Ice Drinks Snacks Gift Items


Special order items welcome.
Delivery time in a week or less.


Hours: Mon. Fri. 9:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.
& 4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m. on school days
Saturday 6:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
306 W. Hatley St., Jasper (3861 792-7395
Come see us today! We're open 6 days a week 148254D-F


Aliens


Small Engi-


Repair


ne


Tune-Ups, Repairs, Blades, Belts,
String Trimmer Line, Air Filters

> Pick-up and Delivery i
S available ,

Open 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. .
Monday Saturday

(3861397-1200
Take Hwy. 41 north to 164th Ave, Shop
right on to 164th Ave. approx 1000 ft. 15148D-F


$2988
29 COMPLETE


HAIR67YLING


Helene
Includes:
shampoo,
condition


117 S. Cent
Jasper,
792-31


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Curtis
Haircut,
pre-perm


ral Ave.,
FL
056
151479DH-F

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THE JASPERR NEWS. Jasoer,. FL


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NOTES




ARREST

REPORTS

Editor's note: The Jasper
News prints the entire arrest
record each week. If your
name appears here and you
are later found not guilty or
the charges are dropped, we
will be happy to make note of
this in the newspaper when
judicial proof is presented to
us by you or the authorities.
The following abbrevia-
tions are used below:
DAC Department of
Agriculture Commission
DOA Department of
Agriculture
DOT Department of
Transportation
FDLE Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement
FHP Florida Highway
Patrol
FWC Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission
HCDTF Hamilton
County Drug Task Force
HCSO Hamilton Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office
JAPD Jasper Police De-
partment
JNPD Jennings Police
Department
OALE Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforcement
P&P Probation and Pa-
role
SCSO Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
WSPD White Springs
Police Department
March 7, Christopher J.
McPherson, 21, 16628
Glover St., White Springs,
violation of parole (sale of
cannabis), HCSO.


Jasper Legals


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO: 242005CP00008
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Harold E. Doten
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Harold E.
Doten, deceased, whose date of death was
October 23, 2004, and whose Social Security
Number is 384-26-1838, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Hamilton County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is 207
Northeast First Street, Jasper, Florida 32052.
The names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS



'"* / ,
,,t / / f ',, 1l "'
i /


A spring is here, and
it's time to think about garden
parties and colorful ways to
bring joy to your next gather-
ing of family and friends.
Keeping it simple by using
shortcuts with ready-made
mixes and springtime candy fa-
vorites will create just the right
"pizzazz "for your next party.
PAGE 8D


- -


Jasper Legals
BARRED.The date of first publication of this
notice is March 10, 2005.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Kenneth N. "Sonny" Scarf Jr.
Florida Bar No. 046099
PO Drawer 0
Jasper, Florida 32052
386-792-2395
Personal Representative:
Mary J. Wolfe
4542 NW 24th Ave.
Jasper, FL 32052
3/10,17
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR HAMILTON COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2004-CA-350
GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THOMAS H. EVANS, SR., ROSALIND C.
EVANS; ORANGE PARK MEDICAL CEN-
TER, INC., d/b/a ORANGE PARK MEDICAL
CENTER; JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, Un-
known Tenant (s).
Defendant (s).
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANTTO FS. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVE that pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure, dated March 4, 2005, in
the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash in the South front lob-
by of the Hamilton County Courthouse, 207 NE
1st Street, Jasper, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on the
1st day of April, 2005 the following described
real and personal property:
Lot 7 of LAKEWOOD HILLS SOUTH SUBDI-
VISION, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 88
and 89 of the Public Records of Hamilton,
County, Florida.
Together with that certain manufactured home
more specifically described as: 1999, Homes
of merit (32 x 76) with Serial Number
FLHML3B167Y19184 A&B.


MOVING SALE
March 18 & 19
8:00 a.m.
Timberlake Area, near
Jennings off CR141
Advertise your YARD
SALE, VEHICLES OR
UNWANTED ITEMS IN
THE CLASSIFIED
fUR ONLY $5.
Call Kathy Sasser
13SBB 782-2487 to
place your ad today.


March 7, Adrienne P.
Linton, 32, 615 Church
Ave., Live Oak, credit
card fraud, petit theft (2
counts), JAPD.
March 8, Napoleon Hay
Hill, 26, 805 Lane Drive,
Lake Park, GA, trespass
after warning, petit theft,
JAPD.
March 8, Richard Tink
Johns, 19, 9869 SW 59th
Drive, Jasper, possession
of alcohol under 21 years,
JAPD.
March 9, Jamerson L.
Smith, 29, PO Box 460,
Jasper, bond revoked, vio-
lation of probation, bat-
tery, HCSO.
March 9, Calvin Lamar
Jones, 3726 NW 108th Ct.,
Jasper, violation of proba-
tion, sale of cocaine, P&P.
March 9, Ralph L.
Humphrey, 36, PO Box
617, Jasper, violation of
probation, P&P.
March 10, Kay Edward
Dauphin, 1140 NE 140th
St., Miami, FL, driving
while license suspended,
unlawful speed, HCSO.
March 10, Leroy A.
Russ, 39, 10290 SW 173rd
St., Miami, FL, non sup-
port, HCSO.
March 10, Esmaiel
Shakhoud, 52, in transit,
hold for Marion County
Sheriff's Office, hold for
Pike County Sheriff's Of-
fice, FHP.
March 10, Stan Allen
Stone, 47, 140 Peckham
St., Port Charlotte, FL, dri-
ving while license sus-
pended, possession of
open container, WSPD.
March 10, Leo Leonard
Lee, 27, 3672 NW 107th
Ave., Jasper, sale of co-
caine, HCSO.
March 10, Travis R.
Brown, 18, PO Box 29,
Jasper, no valid driver's
license, FHP.
March 10, DeAndre L.
Claridy, 19, 10233 SW 59th
Dr., Jasper, disorderly
conduct, unauthorized
possession of driver's li-
cense, JAPD.
March 10, Diane Carol
Thornton, 28, Ocala, FL,


Jasper Legals

Dated this 4th day of April, 2005.

Greg Godwin
Clerk of Court
By:/S/ Cynthia Johnson
Deputy Clerk
3/10, 17
LEGAL NOTICE
The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc.
Board of Directors will-hold a meeting for the
Executive Committee Members on Monday,
March 21, 2005, 11:00 A.M. at the Quality Inn
& Conference Center in Lake City, Florida.
03/17
Legal Notice
The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc.
Board of Directors will hold a meeting of the .
Board of Directors on Monday, March 28,
2005, 7:00 p.m. at the Quality Inn and Confer-
ence Center in Lake City, Florida.
3/17

Notice of Annual Meeting
The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest
Florida Regional Housing Authority will hold its
Annual Meeting, April 1, 2005, at the Ramada
Inn North, 2900 North Monroe St., Tallahas-
see, Florida. Business meeting will begin at
1:30 p.m., est. The meeting will be open to the
public.
3/17, 3/24

To the registered owner of a 1993 Acura, white
in color, Pa. tag # CCE9138, VIN
JH4KA766XPC005479. This vehicle is current-
ly being stored by the City of Jasper Police De-
partment. This vehicle has been stored since
July 24th 2002. Be it known that the City of
Jasper intends to convert said vehicle to the
use of the Jasper Police Department. The reg-
istered owner of the above described vehicle
may claim said vehicle upon payment of rea-
sonable storage and processing fees. For fur-
ther information, contact Sgt. Price at the
Jasper Police Department at 792-1130.
3/17,3/24


Goats


for Sale


$45 each


(386)792-2188
: '.D F


^--ifC^


driving while license sus-
pended, cancelled or re-
voked, FHP.
March 10, Joe Elbert
Dampier Jr, 34, 7801 NW
CR 152, Jennings, viola-
tion of probation, driving
while license suspended
or revoked, HCSO.
March 11, Maria Salas,
43, 1386 Plum St., Jen-
nings, no driver's license,
HCSO.
March 11, Tywonne Tra-
vaille Jackson, 23, 306 10th
Ave. SW, Jasper, driving
while license suspended
(habitual), no tag, HCSO.
March 11, Pedro Ybarra,
38, 3027 54th Ter. SW,
Naples, FL, violation of
probation for driving
while license suspended
or revoked, driving while
under the influence,
HCSO.
March 11, Robert
Mitchell, 42, 3423 NW CR
152, Jennings, failure to
appear, HCSO.
SMarch 11, Charles Fran-
cis Auritt, 46, 6276 SW CR
751, Jasper, failure to reg-
ister as sex offender,
HCSO.
March 11, Joseph Antho-
ny Rossi, 61, 3208 Rangers
Gate, Marietta, GA, in to
serve for first weekend,
HCSO.
March 11, Raymond
Marshall Dyal, 24, 1293
NW 89th Ct., Jasper, dri-
ving while license sus-
pended, child support,
HCSO.
March 11, Venita R.
Mitchell, 26, 2936 NW 5th
St., Jennings, sale of co-
caine, DTF.
March 12, George Ralph
Davis, 1962 W 127th St.,
Jacksonville, FL, violation
of probation, hold for Co-
lumbia County, WSPD.
March 13, Louis Lopez,
25, 6097 SR 6 West 600
Club, Jennings, child
abuse, battery, domestic
violence, HCSO.
March 14, Curtis Leon
Butler, 24, 514 Lincoln
Ave., Live Oak, possession
of less than 20 grams of
marijuana, HCSO.


It's time to get busy in
the garden again. Al-
though there may be more
freezing weather, spring
is just weeks away.
Cut back cold-damaged
perennials, such as
salvias, tibouchinas, or
angel's trumpets. Leave
six to twelve inches of
stem so you won't step on
them before growth re-
sumes in spring.
It's time to prune most
plants, such as boxwoods,
hollies, and crape myrtles.
Prune those that flower in
early spring, such as
loropetalums, spireas,
and azaleas, after they fin-
ish flowering. Prune roses
back to a few strong canes
about knee high. Climb-
ing roses are generally
pruned lightly after they
bloom.
Thin fruit trees, elimi-
nating crossing and rub-
bing branches. Then
shorten limbs to the de-
sired length. Crape myr-
tles can also be thinned or
pruned.
In early March, drasti-
cally cut back overgrown
broadleaf shrubs. Cut hol-
lies and ligustrums to


within a foot or two of the
ground; they will re-grow
if they are healthy and re-
ceive enough water. Don't
cut back needle ever-
greens, though. They
don't have latent buds be-
neath the old wood, so the
branches will remain
bare.
Fertilize trees and
shrubs as needed in early
March. Large, mature
shrubs and trees generally
don't benefit from fertiliz-
er. Roses, because of re-
peating bloom cycles, will
benefit from monthly fer-
tilization- through the
summer. Unless a soil test
indicated a need for phos-
phorus, a 15-0-15 fertilizer
is good for landscape
plants. Select one with
7.5% slow-release nitro-
gen.
Fall-planted cool-season
annuals and bulbs are
coming into peak bloom,
while fall-planted seeds of
bachelor buttons, poppies,
larkspurs, and sweet peas
really begin to grow and
will be flowering by late
March. There's still time to
plant cool-season annuals,
such as petunias, snap-


bNro,


Friday March 18TH 8:00PM
Wades Baled Pine Straw

\.)y Saturday March 19TH 8:00PM
il-- Travel Country R.V. Center


NEXELSunday March 20TH 2:00PM
Baker's Communications, Inc.
Ticket Outlets Include:
Columbia County Fair Office 386-752-8822
Smitty's Western Store US 90 West 386-755-2688
The Money Man Lake City 386-752-7828
Wilson's Ace Hardware 386-752-2750
Waco Food Stores in Perry, Trenton & Fanning Springs ....

I'R.;r It) 'EDKRAL


fC "- WQAL-FP
E TO DAY'S T OUIRY


The IM1 rr"W
MONEY omN
MAN S. 1 TORe
COVERED STADIUM SEATING wILSON'S
S Rodeo Goes Rain or Shine A"CCE tAmn

A SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS INCLUDE.
Lake City Medical Center, Swift Lube, Trade & Save, Lake City
Advertiser, Royals Mobile Homes, Peloni's Pumping & Portable
Toilets, Ring Power, Baya Pharmacy, Anderson Columbia Co.; tM
Columbia Home Builders, Security Safe Company, Moontime,
Dale's Excavating, Quality Inns & Suites, Terry Dicks Trucklng, i U
Heaven, Lisa D. Vanacore & Associates Realty


O--L-a



Garden
almanac
for March


The Florida Department of


Health ui
With the spring season
approaching, The Florida
Department of Health
(DOH) urges the state's
citizens and visitors to
protect against sunburn
caused by ultraviolet (UV)
rays and practice safe tan-
ning procedures.
According to the DOH,
tanning is a gradual
process that should in-
volve limited exposure to
UV light from the sun or
tanning devices to avoid
injury. To avoid overexpo-
sure, the DOH recom-
mends the following
smart tanning practices:
Apply a generous
amount of sunscreen be-
fore going outdoors. Ap-


rges safe
ply early and often.
Protect lips by using lip
balm that blocks UV light.
Whether indoors or out-
doors, keep skin moist by
using aloe vera gel or
moisturizer to avoid sun-
burn and to soothe skin.
Lengthen the amount of
tanning time over several
days and weeks, whether
outdoors in the sun or us-
ing a tanning device in-
doors.
When using a tanning
device, always follow the
recommended tanning
schedule provided by the
manufacturer and read all
warning signs and opera-
tional procedures. Each
bed or booth is different.


tanning
Certain foods and med-
ications may cause ad-
verse effects during the
tanning process. Ask the
operator to see a list of
these foods and medica-
tions.
Wear protective eye
wear that has b6ee+ 'ap-
proved by the FDA.
An adult should always
accompany children un-
der the age of 14 when us-
ing an indoor tanning de-
vice.
For more information on
tanning, visit the DOH at
www.doh.state.fl.us, and
click on the Division of
Environmental Health, or
contact the local health de-
partment at 792-1414.


noCeo


rch 2005

19TH, 20m


Award Winning Livestock Columbia County Fairgrounds
LOWRY'S 4L US 90 W. Turn On CR 247 386-752-8822
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dragons, alyssum, lobelia,
and diascia. After freeze
danger is past in late
March to early April,
plant warm-season annu-
als such as pentas, impa-
tiens, torenias, and bego-
nias.
In mid-to-late March,
plant vegetables such as
snap beans, pole beans,
lima beans, cantaloupes,
sweet corn, cucumbers,
eggplant, southern peas,
peppers, sweet potatoes,
pumpkins, squash, toma-
toes, and watermelons.
Plant in full sun and well-
drained soil. Consider
planting cherry or salad
tomatoes in containers.
Wait until late March to
fertilize your lawn; early
April is even better for
centipede lawns. Cen-
tipede lawns, fertilized
while the soil is still cool,
often respond with yellow
blotches of iron chlorosis.
Use a 15-0-15 fertilizer.
Winter lawn weeds are
at their peak in March, but
it's too late to use herbi-
cides. Just mow the lawn
at least every two weeks
to keep winter weeds from
spreading seeds. If sum-
mer weeds are a serious
concern, don't fertilize the
lawn until late April. Use
a weed-and-feed 15-0-15
fertilizer containing
atrazine. Follow label pre-
cautions to the letter.
For more information
call the Hamilton County
Extension Office at 792-
1276.


DECLASSIFIED


I I


PAGE 5B


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THI ipCnqnV KA\DrH 17 ?nnFr







PA(EF V: QH ASE-ES--s FLTU .., MARCH- 17,.2005


I recently visited with
Mrs. Hilda Rogers at Stor-
mant's Grocery and she
informed me that the
youth of the Long Branch
Congregational Methodist
Church will be participat-
ing in a walk-a-thon this
Saturday, March 19, at 2
p.m. from Ogburn Field in
White Springs out Wood-
pecker Route to the
church. The funds raised
by the youth will be do-
nated to the St. Jude's
Hospital. The church cele-
brated its one hundredth
year of Christian worship
in 2001 and many of their
congregation reside in
White Springs.
The White Springs Po-
lice Department will be
.1i.iting the church in
crossing US 41 and along
the rest of their walk. Dri-
vers, please be aware of
this event and use cau-
tion.
The new sidewalk pro-
ject along US 41 will begin
construction this fall with
a completion date of May
2006. This project will ex-
tend the existing sidewalk
from South Hamilton Ele-
mentary south to the
Wayside Boat Ramp Park
at the Suwannee River.
The northern end will be-
gin at Jewett St. and travel
north to the S&S Food
Store and the northern
end of-town.
This is a joint project in-
cluding the Town, Hamil-
ton County and the De-
partment of Transporta-


tion. The Town has also
used this grant project to
apply for historic lighting
and historic signage along
US 41 beginning at Jewett
St. to Willie Guy Turner
Park.
Mentioning Turner Park
reminds me that Mr.
Willie S. Turner recently
wrote the town and his
family regarding the lot
adjacent to Ogburn Field.
It was nice to hear from
Mr. Turner and to learn
that he wished to renew
the contract. The contract
is for seven years and al-
lows the town to use the
property adjacent to
Adams Memorial Drive
for parking and public
use. Thanks to Mr. Willie
S. Turner for his contin-
ued contribution to our
community.
As a reminder to our cit-
izens the Town's Land
Development Regulations
require a building permit
prior to any construction
or building and some
types of renovation. Not
all work requires a permit,
so please contact Town
Hall prior to beginning
your project. The contact
number is 397-2310, Mon-
day through Friday.
The Town Council at the
February council meeting
approved the White
Springs Volunteer Fire
Department purchase jf a
pumper fire truck to re-
place the pumper now in
use. The firemen will be
required to attend a one-


Town


Happenings

By Robert Townsend
White Springs Town Manager


day training session on
the use of the truck. The
truck will be purchased
using town funds and the
capital outlay funds pro-
vided by Hamilton Coun-
ty.
The town is also in ne-
gotiations with Hamilton
County and FEMA to con-
struct additions at the ex-
isting Fire Department to
house the new truck and
possibly a rescue unit. Re-
cently the White Springs
Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment purchased a rescue
vehicle from the Jasper
Fire Department and
equipped it with first re-
sponder equipment.
According to Chief Mar-
shall all the volunteers are
first responder certified
and one member has his
EMT license and one is
currently in EMT certifica-
tion class. The town pays
for their certification tu-
ition, but the men put in
the volunteer hours to im-
prove their education to
better serve their commu-
nity. In the last few
months they have re-
sponded to more than 15
emergency calls, proving
their initiative has been a
benefit to White Springs
and Hamilton County.
Thank you to our volun-
teer fire fighters.
Please put on your
agenda the Wild Azalea
Festival Saturday, March
19, from 8 a.m. until 5
p.m. in White Springs.
There will be fourteen art
and crafts booths. a carni-
val for the kids, music and
dancing at the Nature and
Heritage Center, horse
and buggy rides, a duck
race, the Little Miss Aza-
lea Contest, wild azaleas
and other plants for sale
and many other activities.
See you there!


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.




















S-U-C-C-E-S-S: The 2004-2005 United Way of Suwannee Valley community fund-raising cam-
paign is complete and campaign volunteers, loan executives and campaign coordinators came
together Feb. 24 to celebrate the success and recognize and thank the many volunteers who en-
sured the campaign was successful. United Way campaign results for 2004-2005 is projected
to total $623,000. Add to this
the community impact grant
funds resulting from 2004 ef-
forts, which total $645,305
and United Way has a com-
munity impact total of
$1,268,305. (Above) Every
SGOAL year, PCS Phosphate of
oo. 0 White Springs provides in-
90 credible support to the com-
800 munity in many ways,-one of
which is an outstanding Unit-
ed Way campaign organized
60so and conducted by their own
so campaign team. On display at
-40 the 2005 United Way Annual
30--- Meeting and Banquet, Feb.
2o 24 was a "check" represent-
0o ing the amount of the PCS
campaign ($148,660). 2005-
2006 United Way of Suwan-
nee Valley President Garry
Karsner, center, recognized
Ol~ d H Jeff Parker, right, for his
leadership in coordinating
the huge campaign, and
asked PCS General Manager
Paul Barrett, left, to share
with all of the employees at
PCS this recognition of their
employee campaign.
(Photos submitted by Rob Wolfe)


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2005


PAGE 6BR


I


4 1. DF IRFAC, S f










North Florida


March 16-17, 2005
Live Oak Publications, Inc.


Race fans from South Georgia and North Florida attend


inaugural race at South Georgia Motorsports Park


#72 Mikie Stafford's crew does air pressure check before qualify-
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As the sun sets, Hooter's Pro
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a 250-lap race at South Georgia
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dosta, Ga. Inset- #99 Ken But-
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qualifying prior to the Hooters
Pro Cup 250. Photos: Bill Regan


United Speed Alliance Kacing
official posts qualifying times

Staff
With track owner Larry
Dean declaring to the sell-
out crowd that the South
Georgia version of the "Day-
tona 500" was ready to be-
gin, last Saturday's Hooters
Pro Cup 250 inaugural race
at South Georgia Motor-
sports Park took the green
flag.
Thirty-five cars began the
250-lap marathon over the
slightly banked half-mile
oval short track.
South Georgia Motorsports
Park is an impressive facility
located 12 miles north of
Valdosta, Ga. off 1-75 exit
32.
The nationally known
Hooters Pro Cup (HPC) se-
ries is sanctioned by United
Speed Alliance Racing. It
was an impressive event to
"rev-up" the track season.
Fans from both South
Georgia and North Florida
watched as the HPC cars and
stars negotiated the 60-foot
wide turns and 70-foot wide
straightaways.
Speed TV filmed the race.
It will be televised March 26
at 10 p.m.
Saturday's race was the
second stop for the Southern
Division of HPC. The sea-

SEE INAUGURAL RACE, PAGE 3C


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Inaugural race


Continued From Page 1C

son began last week at Lake-
land.
Shane Huffman in his No.
81 Knight's Companies Ford
took the lead on lap 209 and
went on to win his second
race of the season.
"Anytime you go some-
where for the first time you
always want to win," Huff-
man said.
"It's an awesome feeling
and an awesome place, and I
thank the owners for building
the place and inviting Hoot-
ers Pro Cup Series guys to
run," Huffman said.
The win for Huffman did
not come without a tussle.


On the restart after a late
caution on lap 244, Mark Mc-
Farland, whose #32 JR Mo-
torsports car led the first 100
laps of the race after starting
on the pole, got Huffman
loose coming out of turn two
and made the pass for the
lead.
"It was my fault to be hon-
est with you," Huffman stated.
"I got loose getting into one
and let him get under me
there."
But in the corner of turn
four, McFarland's right front
went down and he slide up
into Huffman, nearly spinning
him out.
Huffman held on at the
start-finish line as the cau-


tion flag flew with just three
laps left.
"He was running hard and
just got in too deep and got
into me," Huffman said.
"The half-mile speedway's
opener went off without a
hitch, but the track surface
was a mystery from time tri-
als to the waving of the green
flag."
Four cars spun in turns two
and four during timed-runs.
"It threw me for a curve-
ball," Huffman said of the
track. "My car was really
good in practice, and I quit
early and I don't ever quit
early.
"Then, tonight it just got
real free in the middle."


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PAGE 4C, MARCH 16-17, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Co mmuityCalendar


First DaY


0oSpring 0

March 20 j


Monthly Meetings
Allen Boyd (D-North
Florida) Staff Live Oak -
Third Wednesday; City
Council Chambers, City Hall,
101 SE White Ave., Live
Oak; 9:30-11:30 a.m.; trained
staff visits to assist con-
stituents; Info: 202-225-
5235, www.house.gov/boyd/.
Alzheimer's Support
Group Third Thursday;
3:30 p.m.; Marvin E. Jones
Building, Dowling Park;
Info: Cindy Erskin, 386-658-
5700.
American Legion Post
107 First Thursday; 12-2
p.m., Suwannee River Re-
gional Library, South Ohio
Ave., Live Oak; Info: Clair
McLauchlin, 386-362-3524;
Richard Buffington, 386-
364-5985.
Branford Camera Club -
Third Thursday; 7:30 p.m.;
Branford Library; Info: Car-
olyn Hogue, 386-935-2044.
Cub Scout Pack No. 408
Committee Second Tues-
day; 6:30 p.m.; Live Oak
Church of Christ,, 1497 Irvin
Ave..S-R'51 South; Info: Alan
Stefanik, Committee Chair-


man, 386-362-3032,
comm_chair@pack408.net,
www.pack408.net; Tiger,
Wolf, Bears and Webelos
dens (grades one five) -
Every Thursday; at the
church; 6:30-8 p.m.; Aug.-
May; Pack meeting Fourth
Thursday; at the church;
6:30-8 p.m., Aug.-May; en-
tire group meets; awards,
skits and fun.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Chapter No. 126 Sec-
ond Thursday; 6 p.m.; 226
Parshley St., S.W, Live Oak;
Info: 386-362-1701.
Florida Gateway Charter
Chapter of the American
Business Women's Associa-
tion Second Thursday; 6
p.m.; locations change; Info:
Sandy Harrison at 386-754-
0434 or 386-752-0516.
Friends of Suwannee Riv-
er State Park Second Tues-
day; 7 p.m., board meeting;
Suwannee River State Park,
US 90 West, Live Oak; Info:
Membership Chair Walter
Schoenfelder 850-971-5354,
wbs@surfbest.net ...
Girl Scout Leaders, Girl
Scouts of Gateway Council


"I want to be there when
my customers are ready to buy."

4



















e ALL

,*, .:.f akes sei













J ILLUCEL
You got that right.


- First Monday; 7 p.m.;
Woman's Club, Eleventh
Street, Live Oak; Info: Mary
Check-Cason, 386-362-4475.
Hamilton County Gov-
ernmental, Bellville Volun-
teer Fire/Rescue executive
board Second Monday, 7
p.m.
Hamilton County Alcohol
and Other Drug Prevention
Coalition fourth Wednes-
day; 9:30-11 a.m., Hamilton
County School Board meet-
ing room, JRE Lee Adminis-
trative Complex, Jasper; Info:
Grace McDonald, 386-938-
4911, mcdonaldgl@alltel.net
Hamilton County Board
of Commissioners First
Tuesday, 9 a.m., and third
Tuesday at 6 p.m., County
Commissioners' Board
Room, courthouse, Jasper.
Hamilton County Cham-
ber of Commerce, Inc. -
First Thursday; 6 p.m.; 204
N. Hatley St., Jasper; Info:
386-792-1300.
Hamilton County Council
on Aging, Inc. Needs vol-
unteer drivers; home-deliv-
ered meals program; Info:
Dorsey Stubbs; 1509 S.W.
First Street, Jasper, 386-792-
1136.
Hamilton County Devel-
opment Authority Second
Thursday; 7 p.m., at 204 NE
1st St., Sandlin Building,
Jasper; Info: 386-792-6828.
Hamilton County Tourist
Development Council Sec-
ond Wednesday; noon; 204
NE 1st St., Sandlin Building,
Jasper; Info: 386-792-6828.
Home and Community
Educators (HCE) First Fri-
day; 9:30 a.m.; Suwannee
County Extension Office,
Coliseum Complex, Eleventh
Street, Live Oak; new mem-
bers welcome; Info: 386-362-
2771.
Jasper City Council
Meeting Second Monday; 6
p.m.; Jasper City Hall.
Jasper Lions Club Meet-
ing Second and fourth Tues-
day, 7 p.m., Roosters Diner.
Info: Jim Taitt, 386-938-
3582.
Jennings Town Council
Meeting First Tuesday; 7
p.m.; Jennings Town Hall.
MainStreet Hamilton


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County, Inc. Third Thurs-
day; 6 p.m.; MainStreet Of-
fice, Jasper,
Hamilton County School
Board Fourth Tuesday; 6
p.m.
White Springs Town
Council Meeting: Third
Tuesday; 7 p.m.; White
Springs Town Hall.
I Can Cope (cancer) -
Third Tuesday; 7 p.m.; Mar-
vin E. Jones Building, Dowl-
ing Park; Info: Cindy, 386-
658-5700; educational sup-
port group for any type of
cancer for patients, families
and friends.
Leona 4-H Community
Club First Monday; 7 p.m.;
home of Avon and Betty
Hicks, 6107 180th St.,
McAlpin; Info: Betty Hicks,
386-963-4205; Pam Nettles,
386-963-1236.
Lion's Club Second
Tuesday and fourth Tuesday;
7 p.m.; Farm Bureau meeting
room; Info: Richard Tucker,
386-963-4577.
Live Oak Artist Guild -
First Tuesday; 7 p.m.; St.
Luke's Episcopal Church,
Live Oak; Info: Don Strick-
land, 386-362-5146.
Live Oak Christian Home
Educators First Thursday
of every month. Info: Pat,
386-364-1734; strong home
school support group.
Live Oak Garden Club -
Sept.-May; Morning Glories
- third Friday; Night
Bloomers third Tuesday,
1302 S.W. Eleventh Street,
Live Oak.
Live Oak Senior Citizens
- first Monday; 10:30 a.m.;
Exhibition II Building, Coli-
seum Complex, 1302 SW
Eleventh St., Live Oak; es-
corted tours, prices vary;
Info: Lula Herring, 386-364-
1510.
Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society Animal
Shelter Second Monday;
noon; at the shelter located
on Bisbee Loop, south en-
trance, in Lee off CR 255,
Madison County; Info: toll-
free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-
7 8 1 2
www.geocities.com/suwan-
neehs.
Live Oak, Suwannee
County Recreation Board -
Second Wednesday; 5 p.m.;
Suwannee Parks & Recre-
ation offices, 1201 Silas Dri-
ve, Live Oak; Info: 386-362-
3004.
MADD Dads Third
Thursday; 7 p.m.; Suwannee
County Courthouse.
Man To Man Group sec-
ond Thursday; 7 p.m.; Mar-
vin E. Jones Building, Dowl-
ing Park; free; refreshments
provided; Info: American
Cancer Society toll-free 800-
ACS-2345 or the local office
toll-free 888-295-6787 (Press
2) Ext. 114.
Market Days Advent
Christian Village First Sat-
urday; 8 a.m.-l p.m.; Space-
first-come, first-serve basis,
$5 each; Village Square
shops open; Info: Lodge Of-
fice 386-658-5200.
McAlpin Community
Club Second Monday; 7
p.m.; covered dish dinner
first; everyone welcome; pur-
pose to acquaint members
of the community services
available in the county; Info:
Grant Meadows Jr., 386-935-
9316 or Shirley Jones, 386-
963-5357; building rental:
Kristie Harrison. 386-364-
3400.
MOMS Club Second
Wednesday; 11:15 a.m. at the
fellowship hall of Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church,
go West on US 90 seven
miles from 1-75, and 1-1/2
miles from the


Columbia/Suwannee County
line, 12 miles from Live Oak;
Info: 386-397-1254, MOM-
SClubofLiveOak-
LakeCityFl@alltel.net
National Association of
Retired Federal Employees
(N.A.R.F.E.) Chapter 1548 -
Third Tuesday; 11:30 a.m.;
Quail Heights Country Club,
Lake City; guest speakers; all
present and retired federal
employees invited; Info: 386-
755-8570 or 386-752-6593.
Nursing Mom's Group -
Second Friday; 10 a.m.;
Suwannee River Regional Li-


brary, Live Oak; Info:
Michelle, 386-776-2955.
Remembering the Loss of
Your Baby first Thursday;
11:30 a.m.-l p.m.; Hospice of
North Central Florida, North
Building Counseling Room,
4305 NW 90th Blvd.,
Gainesville; open support
group for families who have
experienced the loss of a
baby; Info: Cheryl Bailey,
352-692-5107, toll-free 800-
816-0596.
SHINE Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders -
Volunteers needed; compre-
hensive training provided to
assist elders and their care-
givers receive information
and assistance on health in-
surance and Medicare; Flori-
da Department of Elder Af-
fairs; no charge for services;
Info: toll-free 800-262-2243,
Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.-
4:30 p.m.
SHINE Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders -
Branford first Wednesday;
9-11 a.m.; Library, US 129
North, Branford; free; trained
volunteers help elders and
their caregivers in Suwannee
County to understand
Medicare and other health in-
surance programs make in-
formed decisions on insur-
ance, Medicare Prescription
Drug Cards and on discount-
ed prescription drug pro-
grams and eligibility require-
ments; Info: Florida Depart-
ment of Elder Affairs toll-
free 800-262-2243, Monday -
Friday,'8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders -
Advent Christian Village -
Dowling Park trained vol-
unteers help elders and their
caregivers in Dowling Park
area of Suwannee County to
understand Medicare and
other health insurance pro-
grams make informed deci-
sions on insurance, Medicare
Prescription Drug Cards and
on discounted prescription
drug programs and eligibility
requirements; free; Info: ap-
pointment 386-658-3333 or
386-658-5329; Florida De-
partment of Elder Affairs
toll-free 800-262-2243, Mon-
day Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30
p.m.
SHINE Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders -
Live Oak Second Monday,
12:30-2:30 p.m. or second
Thursday, 1:30-2:30 p.m.;
Suwannee River Regional Li-
brary, US 129 South, Live
Oak; trained volunteers help
elders and their caregivers in
Suwannee County to under-
stand Medicare and other
health insurance programs
make informed decisions on
insurance, Medicare Pre-
scription Drug Cards and on
discounted prescription drug
programs and eligibility re-
quirements; free; Info: Flori-
da Department of Elder Af-
fairs toll-free 800-262-2243,
Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.-
4:30 p.m.
SHINE Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders -
Mayo First Wednesday,
12:30-2:30 p.m., Library, SR
51, Mayo; trained volunteers
help elders and their care-
givers in Lafayette County to
understand Medicare and
other health insurance pro-
grams make informed deci-
sions on insurance, Medicare
Prescription Drug Cards and
on discounted prescription
drug programs and eligibility
requirements; free; Info:
Florida Department of Elder
Affairs toll-free 800-262-
2243, Monday Friday, 8:30
a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Small Scale Farmers and
Craft Designers Market


Committee Third Thurs-
day; 7 p.m.; Coliseum exten-
sion offices.
Suwannee Chapter of the
Florida Trail Association -
Second Monday; 7 p.m.;
Suwannee River Water Man-
agement District; Info: Don
Neale, 386-362-4850; Sylvia
Dunnam, 386-362-3256.
Suwannee County Tourist
Development Council-
Fourth Tuesday; 1 p.m.;
Chamber of Commerce
Building, 816 S. Ohio Ave.,
Live Oak.
Suwannee County Cattle-


men's Association Third
Thursday; 6:30 p.m.; Farmers
Co-op meeting room; Info:
Herb Rogers, 386-362-4118.
Suwannee County Senior
Citizens First Monday;
10:30 a.m., Exhibition II
Building, Coliseum Com-
plex, 1302 SW Eleventh St.,
Live Oak; escorted tours,
prices vary; Info: Lula Her-
ring, 386-364-1510.
Suwannee River Valley
Archaeology Society Third
Tuesday; public library,
Branford; Info: 386-935-
4901.
Suwannee Valley Builders
Association Second Thurs-
day; 6 p.m.; Farm Bureau
meeting room, 407 Dowling
Ave., Live Oak; $5 per per-
son for meal and meeting.
Suwannee Valley Ge-
nealogical Society First
Thursday; 7 p.m., Wilbur St.
Live Oak; Open Tuesdays
and Thursdays, 9 a.m.-noon
and 1-5 p.m.; Info: 386-330-
0110.
Suwannee Valley Quilters
- First and third Thursday; 10
a.m.; Info: Jane, 386-776-
2909 after 4 p.m.
Suwannee Valley Kennel
Club Third Tuesday; 7:30
p.m.; Hospitality and Recre-
ational Building, Columbia
County Fairgrounds, Lake
City, Lake City.
Tobacco-Free Partner-
ship of Suwannee County -
quarterly, Info: Mary Jordan
Taylor, 386-362-27,08, ext.
232.
Vivid Visions, Inc. First
Monday; 5:30 p.m.; Douglass
Center Conference Room; a
shelter and outreach agency
for victims of domestic vio-
lence; Info: 386-364-5957.
Wellborn Community As-
sociation (WCA) Second
Thursday; 7 p.m.; Wellborn
Community Center; Info:
Bonnie Scott, 386-963-4952,
386-208-1733-leave a mes-
sage. WCA fund-raiser to
benefit building fund -
Blueberry Pancake Break-
fast First Saturday; center
of Wellborn, Andrews
Square; blueberry pancakes,
sausage and orange juice or
coffee .
Wellborn Neighborhood
Watch last Thursday, 7
p.m., Blake Lowe Building,
1517 4th Ave., Wellborn;
Info: Bruce or Jane, 386-963-
3196.
Weekly Meetings
Al-Anon/Mayo Al-Anon
Group meets each Thurs-
day, 8 p.m., Mayo Manna
House, Pine Street for fam-
ily members and friends to
show support. For more info,
call Barbara, 386-294-3348
or Marcia, 386-208-1008.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Branford meets Tuesday
and Friday, 7:30 p.m., Bran-
ford United Methodist
Church, Express and Henry
St., Branford. For more info,
call 386-935-2242 or the Dis-
trict 16 Help Line toll-free,
800-505-0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Live Oak meets Tuesday
and Friday, 8 p.m., Precinct
Voting Building, Nobles Fer-
ry Road, Live Oak. For more
info, call District 16 Help
Line toll-free, 800-505-0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Mayo Group 'meets Sun-
day, Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday at 8 p.m. The
meetings are held at Manna
House, Pine Street, Mayo.
Info: 386-294-2423 or Dis-
trict 16 Help Line toll-free,
800-505-0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
White Springs Courage to
Change Monday, 8 p.m.,
Methodist Church, White
Springs. Info: 386-397-1410


or District 16 Help Line toll-
free, 800-505-0702.
Bluegrass Association -
Saturdays; 6 p.m.; Pickin'
Shed; Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park; covered dish on
first and third Saturday. Info:
386-364-1683.
Bridge Club Monday,
6:45 p.m., Golden Corral
Restaurant, Live Oak. Info:
386-362-3200.
Boy Scout Troop #693 -
Every Monday, 7 p.m.,
Shrine Club, Bass Road, until


SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 5C






NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS MARCH 16-17, 2005, PAGE 5C


Calendar


Continued From Page 4C

further notice. Info: 386-776-
2863.
Live Oak Singles Group -
Friday, 7:30 p.m., Live Oak
Christian Church fellowship
hall on US 129 North (next to
Walt's Ford). This not a
church sponsored event.
Info: Bob, 386-935-6595 or
Carla, 386-758-1802;
http://groups.yahoo.com/gro
up/SuwanneeSingles/
Narcotics Anonymous -
The Gratitude Group
Meetings held Monday, 7
p.m., at St. Luke's Episcopal
Church, 1391 S.W. Eleventh
St. (in the back), Live Oak,
FL 32060.
Over Eaters Anonymous
We care. Meets Mondays
11:35 a.m.- 12:50 p.m., Mon-
days, at Suwannee River Re-
gional Library, 129 South,
Live Oak. For more info, call
386-364-4749.
Quarterback Club Meet-
ing Old Nettie Baisden
school next to the football
stadium, 6:30 p.m., every
Monday.
Square Dance With
Vagabond Squares, Thurs-
day, 7-9:30 p.m., St. Luke's
Episcopal Church, Newbem
Road. Loyce Harrell, 386-
963-3225, or Ralph Beek-
man, 386-752-2544.
Suwannee River Riding
Club Membership fee $25
per year. Team roping first
and third Friday night. Speed
events first and third Satur-
day night. Call 386-935-
2622.
Suwannee Valley Barber-
shop Chorus Every Tues-
day, Crapps Meeting Room,
Suwannee River Regional
Library, US 129 South, Live
Oak at 7 p.m. Call Fred
Phillips, 386-362-1886.
TOPS Take Off Pounds
Sensibly (TOPS); Live Oak
Community Church of God,
Thursday; 8:30 a.m. weigh-
in; meeting 9 a.m.; Info: Bar-
bara Crain, 386-362-5933;
Sharon Martin, 386-364-
5423.
Weight Watchers Mon-
day, 9:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., St.
Luke's Episcopal, toll-free
800-651-6000.
FYI
AARP Taxaide Program -
Free tax service; all taxpay-
ers; low or middle income;
special attention 60 and old-
er; Community Presbyterian
Church, every Tuesday; 10
a.m.-1 p.m.; Suwannee River
Regional Library, every Sat-
urday, 9 a.m.-noon. No ap-
pointment needed. Info: Jack
Wilson, 386-963-5023.
Advent Christian Village
- 2004-2005 Artist Series -
Events include: Cotton Patch
Gospel, Monday, March 21,
at the Village Church, 7 p.m.
(Based on Clarence Jordan's
version of the book of
Matthew); The Phillips-Las-
siter Guitar Duo, Friday,
April 22, at the Village
Church, 7 p.m. ACV season
tickets are available at Ad-
vent Christian Village, The
Music Center in Live Oak,
and the Suwannee County
Chamber of Commerce.
Cost: Adults $80; Students
(ages 13-18) $35; Children
(ages 5-12) $25.
Another Way, Inc. Sup-
port Groups Another Way,
Inc. offers support groups for
victims and survivors of do-
mestic violence. For info re-
garding dates and times, call
386-792-2747 or the toll-free
hotline at 800-500-1119.
'Before You Tie The
Knot' four-hour class for
couples who will marry soon.
The cost is $10 per couple.
Completion of this course is
required when couples re-


362-2708, ext. 218 Coleen
Cody. The classes are free of
charge.
Department of Children
and Families can assist you
in applying to register to vote
or update your voter registra-
tion record. If you receive or
apply for public assistance
benefits, your local Depart-
ment of Children and Fami-
lies service center can assist
you in completing a voter
registration application to
your local Supervisor of elec-
tions for you. Remember,
voting is a right. Your local
service center is at 501 De-
morest St., Live Oak, 386-
362-1483.
Disaster Action Team
Volunteers Needed The
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley is looking
for volunteers to join the Dis-
aster Action Team to assist
victims of fires and other nat-
ural disasters. If you are in-
terested and would like to
learn more, call 386-752-
0650.
The Story of Dowling
Park Do you want to know
more about the Advent Chris-
tian Village (ACV) at Dowl-
ing Park? ACV representa-
tives are available to meet
with you and share the story
of Dowling Park. If you're
interested in arranging a
speaking engagement or a
tour for your organization,
club or church, please contact
us at 386-658-5110 or toll-
free, 800-714-3134 or e-mail
ccarter@acvillage.net. For an
ACV preview, visit
www.acvillage.net. Or re-
quest a free videotape.
Experience Works a na-
tional nonprofit organization,
(formerly Green Thumb) pro-
vides training and employ-
ment services to older work-
ers over 55 and with a lim-
ited income in Suwannee
County through the Senior
Community Service Employ-



l 'il i


ment Program (SCSEP). Par-
ticipants are paid the mini-
mum wage for an average of
20 hours per week. For more
info, visit www.experience-
works.org or call the Lake
City One Stop, 386-755-
9026, ext. 3129 for Loretta or
ext. 3134 for Ronald.
Florida Museum of Nat-
ural History in Gainesville -
Florida's state natural history
museum, located near the in-
tersection of Southwest 34th
Street and Hull Road in the
University of Florida Cultur-
al Plaza in Gainesville. Hours
are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day-Saturday and 1-5 p.m.
Sunday. Closed on Thanks-
giving and Christmas. For
more info, including ticket
prices, directions and parking
info, call 352-846-2000. Vis-
it www.flmnh.ufl.edu.
Florida Museum of Nat-
ural History in Gainesville -
Wigglers and Walkers for
children ages 2-5 is offered
the second Wednesday of
every month. The children
learn about exhibits through
stories, games, hands-on ob-
jects and other age-appropri-
ate activities. Adult volun-
teers are needed to give Wig-
glers and Walkers tours and
no experience is required. To
volunteer, applicants must be
available to meet the first
Wednesday of each month
from 3-4 p.m. and to give
tours every second Wednes-
day from 3:30-4:30 p.m. For
more info, call 352-846-
2000, ext. 277.
FoodSource a Christian
based Christian food cooper-
ative, is in your area! Stretch
your food dollars! With the
help of dedicated volunteers,
FoodSource is able to pro-
vide quality foods at low
prices while promoting
Christian values and volun-
teerism in your community.
This is NOT a needy only
program; it is for EVERY-

Peeljitlr or


ONE. For questions or to or-
der, call your local coordina-
tor. Live Oak: Live Oak
Church of God 386-362-
2483; Wellborn United
Methodist Church 386-963-
5023; Ebenezer AME Church
- 386-362-6383 or 386-364-
4323 or 386-362-4808;
Jasper: 386-792-3965; White
Springs: 386-752-2196 or
386-397-1228; Bell: 352-
463-7772 or 352-463-1963;
Lake City 386-752-7976 or
FoodSource toll-free at 800-
832-5020 or visit Web site at
www.foodsource.org for
questions or to become a lo-
cal host site.
Friends of Suwannee
River State Park Join the
Friends of Suwannee River
State Park, a non-profit
501(c)3 charitable organiza-
tion. Help keep the State Park
the gem of the Suwannee
River. The park is located 13
miles West of Live Oak off
US 90. Quarterly newsletter,
quarterly meetings, monthly
board meetings and an annu-
al luncheon meeting. Mem-
bership brochures may be
picked up at the State Park or
mail your membership to:
Friends of Suwannee River
State Park, 20185 CR 132,
Live Oak, FL 32060. Phone:
386-362-2746. Individual
Friend-$15; Family-$25;
Business Sponsor-$50; Cor-
porate Friend-$100-$250;
Lifetime Friend-$300. For
more info contact the mem-
bership chair Walter Schoen-
felder at 850-971-5354, or e-
mail him at wbsesurfbest.net
GED Tests A person
wanting to take the GED test
must call to reserve a seat in
the registration session. At-
tendance in a registration
session is mandatory in or-
der to take the GED test. To
reserve seat for registration
session and pay fees, call
386-364-2782-Lynn Lee. To
inquire about age waivers,


call 386-384-2763-Lynne
Roy, counselor, and 386-364-
2619-Kim Boatright, GED
examiner at Suwannee-
Hamilton Technical Center.
Harsonhill Inc., a pre-
scription information pub-
lishing company Financial
help for those who can't af-
ford their prescription drugs
is available right now. Steve
Reynolds, President of Har-
sonhill Inc., a prescription in-
formation publishing compa-
ny, states assistance pro-
grams have been established
by more than 100 U.S. drug
manufacturers to assist low
income people. These pro-
grams cover over 1,400 com-
monly prescribed medicines.
Reynolds states his company
publishes a 85+ page manual
that contains all the informa-
tion required to apply to
these assistance programs.
For more information about
these programs or to obtain
the manual e-mail: harsonhill
@earthlink.net or contact
Reynolds toll-free at 888-
240-9240 or write to Harson-
hill Inc., 22425 Ventura
Blvd., No. 190, Woodland
Hills, CA 91364. For imme-
diate info, visit www.Pre-
scriptions4Free.com i
Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley Helping Hands Vol-
unteer Orientation first
Wednesday, 10-11 a.m. at
Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley, 618 SW FL Gateway
Drive, Lake City. After at-
tending orientation and com-
pleting the screening process,
you will be eligible for vol-
unteering in the Hospice At-
tic thrift store, administrative
offices as well as helping at
special events, educational
fairs, community events and
fund raising. To register or
for more info contact Car-
olyn Long, 386-752-9191.
Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley Helping Hands Vol-
unteer Orientation third


Tuesday, 5-6:30 p.m. at Hos-
pice of the Suwannee Valley,
618 SW FL Gateway Drive,
Lake City. After attending
orientation and completing
the screening process, you
will be eligible for volunteer-
ing in the Hospice Attic thrift
store, administrative offices
as well as helping at special
events, educational fairs,
community events and fund
raising. To register or for
more info contact Carolyn
Long, 386-752-9191.
Lafayette County Veter-
ans All veterans of
Lafayette County for your
protection, your military
records DD Form 214, "Cer-
tificate of Release or Dis-
charge from Active Duty"
can be recorded in the
Lafayette County Court-
house. Please see the Clerk of
Court's office.
LillyAnswers Program -
Available to Floridians 65
and older who are enrolled in
Medicare, have an annual in-
come below 200 percent of
the federal poverty level and
have no other drug coverage.
Seniors may apply for the
program at no cost by calling
a toll-free number, 877-RX-
LILLY, or by filling out an
application. LillyAnswers
card enables them to receive
a 30-day supply of Lilly
pharmaceutical products that
are sold at participating retail
pharmacies for a flat fee of
$12. Info about the LillyAn-
swers program is available at
www.lillyanswers.com or by
calling toll-free 877-RX-
LILLY.
Love INC A non-profit
Christian group that repre-
sents local churches in find-
ing help for valid needs. Call
Ginny Peters, 386-364-4673,
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. -
noon
MDA Assists people with

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 8C


duce their marriage license
fee by $32.50. Pre-registra-
tion is required. Registration
forms are available at the
Clerk of the Court's office or
the Suwannee County Exten-
sion Service office, 386-362-
2771.
Childbirth classes of-
fered at the Suwannee Coun-
ty Health Department on
Tuesday from 6 8 p.m.
Please call to register at 386-


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Nathan Adam Hatch
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PAGE 8C, MARCH 16-17, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 5C

ALS through help with pur-
chase and repair of wheel-
chairs, support groups, ex-
pert-led seminars, an ALS
Web site
(www.als.mdausa.org) and
ALS-specific chat rooms
(www.mdausa.org/chat).
MOPS Mothers of
Preschoolers a gathering of
moms for encouragement
and fun. All mothers of chil-
dren from birth to age five
are invited to attend. The
meetings are the second and
fourth Tuesday of the month,
September through May,
from 9:30 a.m. to noon. They
are held at the First Baptist
Church on Howard St. in
Live Oak. For more info,
please call 386-362-1583.
Marine Corps League
meets in Lake City First
Tuesday of.each month The
Suwannee Valley Detach-
ment of the Marine Corps
League of the United States
meets monthly in Lake City.
Even months are met in Live
Oak at the Shriners Club, odd
months are in Lake City at
Quality Inn (formerly Holi-
day Inn). Marines in Suwan-
nee County should call Dale
Condy, 386-776-2002 or
John Meyers, 386-935-6784.

POOL CHLORINE
$25
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147853RS-F 362-4043



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Lake City representatives,
John Parker, 386-754-1980
or Bob Edgar, 386-755-1354.
Marriage? Help me! A
program presented by Solid
Rock Ministries, Inc. of
Jasper; at no charge to any-
one. Call for appointment at
386-792-2603. Helping to
apply Christian principles to
our every day living...
Morningside Nature Cen-
ter Living History Farm,
Gainesville Barnyard Bud-
dies, free admission, 3 p.m.
every Wednesday and Satur-
day to meet and greet the
farm animals. After the ani-
mal introductions, help with
the afternoon feeding. Tod-
dlers and preschoolers will
love learning about the barn-
yard buddies. Meet at the
barn. For more info, call 352-
334-2170 or visit www.na-
tureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature Cen-
ter Living History Farm,
Gainesville Living History
Days, every Saturday, from 9
a.m. 5 p.m. with staff in pe-
riod dress interpreting day-
to-day life on a Florida farm
in 1870. Sample homemade
biscuits on the woodstove
with fresh butter and cane
syrup grown and made on the
farm. Help feed the farm ani-
mals at 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. dai-
ly. Free admission. For more
info call 352-334-2170 or
v i s i t
www.natureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature Cen-
ter Living History Farm,
Gainesville Discover & Do,
third Sunday of the month,
kids bring your favorite adult
for a fun activity and make a
cool craft to take home. Meet
at Loblolly Environmental
Facility on NW 34th Street
between University and NW
8th Ave. Reservations re-
quired. Free admission. For
more info and to RSVT '.11
352-334-2170 or visit
www.natureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature Cen-
ter Living History Fa. m,
Gainesville Who's Who in
the Woods, last Saturday of
the month, naturalist-guided
walk at 9 a.m. 1-1.5 hours


walk, wear comfortable
walking shoes. Meet at the
education office, 3540 E.
University Ave. Free admis-
sion. For more info call 352-
334-2170 or visit www.na-
tureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature Cen-
ter Living History Farm,
Gainesville A Night at the
Owlery, By the light of the
silvery moon with the owls
and frogs we'll croon...each
Saturday nearest the full
moon. Come at 7 p.m. with
family and friends for a live-
ly variety of talks, songs,
hikes, fires, and fun! Florida
Wildlife Care's Leslie Straub
will help us meet and greet
our noisy nocturnal neigh-
bors, the owls, at Boulware
Springs Historic Waterworks,
3300 SE 15th St.,
Gainesville. Free admission.
For more info call 352-334-
2170 or visit www.natureop-
erations.org.
NFCC offers ed2go -
more than 290 on-line cours-
es in 30 different subject ar-
eas; six week intervals; April
20, May 18 and June 15; in-
structor-led, affordable, in-
formative, convenient and
highly interactive; requires
Internet access, e-mail and
Netscape Navigator or Mi-
crosoft Internet Explorer;
course fees vary; Info: Suzie
Godfrey, 850-973-9453,
communityed@nfcc.edu,
www.ed2go.com/nfcc.
NFCC Children's The-
ater performances NFCC
will present "The Adventures
of Lewis and Clark" by GMT
Productions, Inc. on April 18,
with two performances for
sixth eighth graders in
NFCC's six county service
area. Performance will be
held at the Van H. Priest Au-
ditorium on the Madison
campus. For more info visit
www.nfcc.edu/NewsEv-
ents/ArtistSeries/childrenthe-
ater.html or contact the
NFCC College Advancement
Office, 850-973-1613.
NFCC College Placement
Tests NFCC will conduct
College Placement Tests
(CPT). on computer every


Thursday at 8:30 a.m. and
1:30 p.m. in the NFCC Tech-
nical Center, Bldg. 13, on the
Madison campus. Persons
taking the tests will be re-
quired to register in NFCC
Student Services 24 hours
before testing. There is a fee
of $10 for the test. For more
info, please call 850-973-
1612.
NFCC E-Spotlight pro-
vides weekly information -
Interested in North Florida
Community College events?
Have current college news
and happenings delivered di-
rectly to your e-mail address
through NFCC's e-Spotlight.
Alumni, former faculty or
staff and community mem-
bers interested in keeping up
with NFCC's calendar of
events and news are invited
to join the list of e-Spotlight
recipients. To receive
NFCC's weekly e-Spotlight
call the Office of Institution-
al Advancement at 850-973-
1613 or e-mail Kim Scarboro
at scarborok@nfcc.cc.
Narconon Arrowhead -
Drug addiction can leave an
individual feeling helpless
and out of control. Especially
if you are the family member
or friend of an addict. Nar-
conon Arrowhead can help.
Narconon offers free coun-
seling, assessments and re-
ferrals to rehabilitation cen-
ters nationwide by calling
toll-free, 800-468-6933 or
logging onto www.stopaddic-
tion.com. Don't wait until it's
too late. Call Narconon now!
North Central Florida
Sexual Assault Center, Inc.
- provides individual and
group counseling for victims
of rape and incest. Any man
or woman who is 18 years
old or older and is a victim of
rape, sexual abuse or incest is
eligible to participate. All
services are free and confi-
dential. Call Victim Advo-
cate, Erica Nix toll-free at
Pager Number, 800-400-
7140. For other info call
386-719-9287.
North Florida Workforce
Development AWI person-
nel, as part of the one-stop


system, strive to help dislo-
cated workers and other job
seekers find employment in a
prompt manner. AWI staff
now have office hours at the
One-Stop Centers in Hamil-
ton: 386-792-1229, Jeffer-
son: 850-342-3338,
Lafayette: 386-294-1055,
Madison: 850-973-9675,
Suwannee: 386-364-7952
and Taylor: 850-584-7604
counties as follows: 8 a.m.-5
p.m. Monday through Friday,
and alternate Saturdays 9
a.m.-1 p.m.
Parents of ADD and
ADHD Children If you are
interested in joining a sup-
port group call Lea-Anne
Elaine, 386-362-7339.
Pregnancy Crisis Center -
The Live Oak Pregnancy Cri-
sis Center at 112 Piedmont
St. (behind the Amoco) is
open on Wednesday through
Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
The center will offer confi-
dential counseling, free preg-
nancy tests, clothes for ex-
pectant mothers and infants.
The center will also offer re-
ferrals to pro-life doctors.
Groups and churches might
want to have a baby shower
and donate all the items to
the center. Also needed: Ma-
ternity clothes and hangers.
Telephone 386-330-2229; or
toll-free 800-696-4580.
Rainbow Acres Animal
Shelter A nonprofit, no kill,
animal shelter, needs dona-
tions of all kinds, shelter ma-
terial, wood, fencing, etc.
Food, old pots, pans, etc. Al-
most anything you no longer
need, we can put to good use.
Cash is also accepted to keep
our kittens and puppies
healthy. Our animals are free.
Donations accepted, not re-
quired. Free!!!!! Puppies and
Dogs. Kittens and Cats. Con-
tact Carolynn or Matt, 386-
362-3338.
Reach To Recovery -
breast cancer survivors visit-
ing breast cancer patients
with information and hope.
One on one visits. Free of
charge. Call toll-free, 800-
ACS-2345 to schedule a vis-
it. Sponsored by the Ameri-


can Cancer Society.
Regional Heart Disease
and Stroke Prevention
Coalition serving Suwan-
nee, Lafayette, Hamilton,
Madison, Jefferson and Tay-
lor counties meets quarter-
ly. Please call Diana King at
850-342-0170 ext. 220 for
more info.
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park & Camp-
ground upcoming events in-
clude March 18 Cherry
Holmes Family; March 24-27
- Suwannee Spring Fest;
March 27 Craft Village
Easter Egg Hunt.
Stephen Foster State Cul-
ture Center State Park -
monthly Cracker Coffee-
house from 7-9 p.m. in the
Auditorium. Upcoming
events: Antique Tractor and
Engine Show April 1-3;
Florida Folk Festival May
27-29. Open stage night held
the first Saturday of every
month with songs, stories,
yodeling, music and much
more. Coffee and desserts
available for sale. Free ad-
mission at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park, White Springs. Located
on US 41, three miles from I-
75 and nine miles from I-10.
For info on additional pro-
grams and times, contact the
park at 386-397-4331, or vis-
i t
www.FloridaStateParks.org/s
tephenfoster/
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park The Suwan-
nee Valley Bluegrass Asso-
ciation every Saturday
night; 6:30 p.m.; bluegrass
jam; Pickin' Shed; Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park,
US 129 North, Live Oak;
covered dish pot luck, first
and third Saturday, 6 p.m.;
Info: 386-842-5786.
Suwannee Primary
School Lost and Found -
Parents may check with the
school office to see if their
child's missing coat,
sweater, hat, gloves, lunch
bags, etc. are in the items
that are overflowing ih the

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NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS MARCH 16-17, 2005, PAGE 9C


Calendar


Continued From Page 8C

storage area.
Suwannee Primary
"School Emergency
'Clothes Closet The closet
'is in desperate need of small
pants and underwear for
'boys and girls. Sizes 4, 5, 6
and 7 are needed to help
'with "accidents" at school.
Clean clothes are welcome.
"Drop off at the school of-
fice. Thank you.
Suwannee Valley
Builders Association
(SVBA) A non profit orga-
'nization, is a group of ap-
proximately 80 local citi-
zens dedicated to building a
"stronger community, whose
members volunteer their
"time with active involve-
"ment with associate spon-
Ssorships of worthwhile
'community activities and
'associate members of the
'Council for Progress and
Suwannee County Chamber
of Commerce. SVBA do-
nates two academic scholar-
ships each year, donates
Christmas gift/food baskets
"each year and sponsor of
'the children's playhouse
"raffle at Christmas. Fea-
tured speakers from local
'businesses and a catered
'dinner are the highlights of
'the evening at monthly
meetings. The general pub-
lic is invited to attend and
become members. Dona-
tions of $5 a person are ac-
cepted at the door to help
cover catering expenses.
For more info on joining the
organization, contact Ron-
nie Poole, 386-362-4539.
Wanted Volunteer posi-
tions open; Surrey Place,
US 90 East, Live Oak; ex-
:tensive seven-day-a-week
'activity program; volun-
"teers needed: calling out
bingo or pokeno, reading to
residents who no longer see
well or sharing scriptures,
giving wheel chair rides in
the courtyard, helping with
special events or being a


"helper/partner" on outings
out of the facility; goal: to
keep residents lives fulfilled
by being busy and happy;
Info: 386-364-5961.
Wild Adventures upcom-
ing events include: Collec-
tive Soul and Low Millions
- March 26; Charlie Daniels
Band and Trick Pony April
2; Ryan Cabrera with Aslyn
and Bonnie McKee April
16; Switchfoot April 30;
Gary Allan and Chris Cagle
- May 7. Wild Adventures
Theme Park is located at
3766 Old Clyattville Rd.
Valdosta, Ga. For more info,
visit www.wild-
adventure.com.
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
Through March 28
Driver's license and
vehicle inspection
checkpoints scheduled
The Florida Highway Pa-
trol will conduct driver's
license and vehicle inspec-
tion checkpoints through
March 28, on Brown Road,
CR 252, CR 252-A, CR
252-B, CR 25-A, SR 47,
SR 341, US 441, US 41,
CR 245, CR 238, CR 135,
Turner Road, SR 100, Trot-


ter's Road, Fairfield Farms
Road, CR 250, CR 349, SR
247 and SR 25 in Colum-
bia County; CR 132, CR
136, CR 136-A, CR 137,
CR 249, CR 250, CR 252,
CR 349, CR 49, CR 795,
SR 20, SR 247, SR 10, SR
51, US 129 and Mitchell
Road in Suwannee County;
and CR 136, CR 152, CR
143, CR 249, CR 137, CR
251, CR 146, CR 135, CR
141, CR 150, CR 145 and
US 41, SR 6, SR 25 in
Hamilton County. Recog-
nizing the danger present-
ed to the public by defec-
tive vehicle equipment,
troopers will concentrate
their efforts on vehicles
being operated with de-
fects such as bad brakes,
worn tires and defective
lighting equipment. In ad-
dition, attention will be di-
rected to drivers who
would violate the driver li-
cense laws of Florida. The
Patrol has found these
checkpoints to be an effec-
tive means of enforcing the
equipment and driver's li-
cense laws of Florida
while ensuring the protec-
tion of all motorists.


u-wann-% Coiwzty iai ekI! 1
7tIJnn^uaZ ?a^[

ciLn.n-.' & -lA/a[af 'Va

Course: The course begins at the Suwannee County Fairgrounds and
winds through one of Live Oak's finest neighborhood. The 3.1 mile
course out and back is fast and flat with two water stops.
When: Saturday, March 19, 2005.
Registration: 8 a.m. Race starts: 9 a.m.
Cost: $7 Individual open class $6 Special Category Team member
* Tee shirts to all entrants
* Awards to the top 3 in all age groups and top finishers on each team.
* Award ceremony 30 minutes after race.
* Refreshments at finish line.
* Race packets may be picked up at registration on March 19, 2005


Classifications: Age Groups: Male and Female
12 years & under 31-39
13-17 40-49
1 R-3 50-59


24-30 60 & over i3
Special Categories: Corporate, Local business, Handicapped,
walkers, Walkers with Baby Strollers, Clubs, Fraternities and Celebrities.


Register Now!
Voluntary
Prekindergarten Program
Early Learning Coalition
of Florida's Gateway; Vol-
untary Prekindergarten


(VPK); Children four on or
before Sept. 1, are eligible
to receive 540 hours of de-
velopmentally appropriate
preschool instruction free
this coming school year (be-


ginning in August). INFO:
Enrollment Manager Jamie
Witzman, 386-752-9770,
ext. 24 or Gateway Execu-

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 10C


M&M AUTO SALESi"
YOUR PRE- 0 WNVED HEAD QUARTERS


00 Mazda Millenia, leather, alloy wheels, sunroof, CD player $10,995
92 Honda Accord Wagon, power locks, CD player $4,999
00 Saturn SC-2, power locks, CD player $9,995
99 Mitsubishi Galant, sunroof, power $8,380
98 Ford Mustang GT, convertible, CD player $9,995
99 Nissan Altima GXE, AT, CD & cassette $9,750
98 Saturn SLI, auto, AM/FM cassette $6,850
00 Ford Contour, AT, PW, PDL, alloy wheels *8,999
99 Pontiac Grand Prix GTP, fully loaded $9,250
01 Buick Century, AT, PW, PDL, cruise $8,995
01 Chevy Malibu, AT, PW, PDL, cruise $10,995


00 Chrysler Town & Country, leather, power, CD $11,350
99 Mercury Villager, 73k. 7 passenger 11,250
01 Nissan Pathfinder, leather $14,995
01 Ford Windstar, 65k, all power $9,995
99 Ford Ranger, extra cab, bed liner *9,995
01 Nissan Pathfinder, PW, running boards $15,995
99 Dodge Ram 1500, 85K, quad cab *14,995
99 Toyota Tacoma, 74k, ext. cab *15,995
99 Ford Ranger, 4x4, ext. cab $8,995
98 Ford Ranger, 80k, camper topper $8,750
01 Ford Explorer, 75k, all power $10,895
00 Mitsubishi Montero, 79k, 4x4 $12,998


88 Mazda B2200 $3,875 92 Nissan Sentra $3,995
92 Toyota 4 Runner $4,995 91 Toyota Corolla $3,995
92 Dodge Caravan *2,995 98 Dodge Conversion Van.................$9,995

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PAGE 10C, MARCH 16-17, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 9C

tive Director Dr. Thomas
Logan, ext. 12. www.elc-
fg.org.





e x t e n d y o u r r e a c h

Register Now!
NFCC offers ed2go
on-line courses
March 16
NFCC offers ed2go, more
than 290 on-line courses in
30 different subject areas;
six week intervals beginning
March 16, April 20, May 18
and June 15; instructor-led,
affordable, informative, con-
venient and highly interac-
tive; requires Internet ac-
cess, e-mail and Netscape
Navigator or Microsoft In-
ternet Explorer; course fees
vary; Info: Suzie Godfrey,
850-973-9453, communi-
tyed.@n fc c. edu,
www.ed2go.com/nfcc.
Enter now!
NFCC seeks
entries for
annual Quilt i
Show
April 16 and -
April 18-20
Call for entries:
quilts new or old,
treasured heirloom
or a recent gift; for
annual NFCC Quilt


Show in conjunction with the
Madison County Four Free-
doms Festival, Madison;
April 16 and April 18-20;
Info or applications to enter:
Maria Greene, WSG Confer-
ence Center Coordinator, at
850-973-9432 or e-mail
greenem@nfcc.edu.
Make donations now!
Items needed for porch
sale to benefit Puppy Place
CARES, White Springs
March 19
Items needed; porch sale;
March 19; White Springs
Bed and Breakfast, US 41
and Kendrick Ave.; donations
tax deductible; benefits Pup-
py Place CARES; Info: 386-
397-1665 or www.nflpuppy-
place.org.
March April
Storytime free for ages 3-5
at Suwannee River Region-
al Library Branford and
Live Oak March and April
Storytime; free for ages 3-
5; Suwannee River Regional
Library; Branford: first Tues-
day until May, 10-10:45
a.m.; Live Oak: every Mon-


day through April 11, 10-
10:45 a.m.; fun stories, play
games, make crafts, and
much more; Info: 386-362-
2317.
Register Now!
SHS Class of 1954 2005
Beach Bash April 4-6
Suwannee High School,
Live Oak, class of 1954,
Beach Bash, Monday-
Wednesday, April 4-6, at the
Sea Horse Oceanfront Inn,
Jacksonville Beach. Info/reg-
istration: Ken Voyles, 352-
861-8650 or Erma Evans-
Parker, 904-221-1203.
Register now!
Lafayette High School
class of 1980 is looking
for classmates
Lafayette High School
class of 1980; looking for
classmates; 25th class re-
union;' Info: Susan Harris
Allen, 386-935-0901, Pam
Zimmerman Corbin, 386-
935-3118, Jean Williams,
386-294-1241.
Buy tickets now!
Suwannee County
Cattlemen's Association
Heifer Raffle
Suwannee County
Cattlemen's Associa-
tion Heifer Raffle.
S Tickets $1 each. Pro-
'.. ceeds support Beef
Heifer Show. Draw-
ing at Suwannee
County Fair in
March. Info or tick-
S ets:Dottie Barfuss,


386-364-3266 or Joe Jordan,
386-362-4724.
Register now!
Suwannee Parks &
Recreation offers Umpire
Clinic March 19
Suwannee Parks & Recre-
ation; volunteer umpires
needed for Babe Ruth pro-
gram; free, one-day Umpire
Clinic; 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Satur-
day, March 19, First Federal
Sportsplex; season: April-
May; All-star games: June-
July. Volunteer positions
open: coaches, assistant
coaches, team moms, conces-
sion workers, team sponsors
and scorekeepers; training
available; Info: 386-362-
3004.
Artists apply by May 20
24th Annual Downtown
Festival & Art Show Nov.
12-13
24th Annual Downtown
Festival & Art Show;
Gainesville; Saturday and
Sunday, Nov. 12-13; Artists
apply by May 20; Info:
www.gvlculturalaffairs.org
or Linda Piper, 352-334-
5064.
Suwannee District
Schools will administer
Spring 2005 Assessments -
SAT 10 March 21-23
Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring 2005
Assessments SAT 10 -
March 21-23. SAT 10 isfor
Grade K-2. Each school has
more detailed testing infor-


nation available. Daily stu-
dent attendance is critical
during these assessment peri-
ods.
April 9
Friends of the Library,
Gainesville book sale
opens April 9
Friends of the Library,
Gainesville; Spring Book
Sale; April 9-13; Friends of
the Library Book House, 430
North Main Street,
Gainesville.
Apply now to be listed!
Fresh From the Farm a
market guide for Suwan-
nee County
The Suwannee County Ex-
tension Service is in the
process of creating a market
guide Fresh From the Farm
- to help the general public
locate products straight from
the farm. Info/application:
386-362-2771.
Now April 1
Ten Star All Star
Basketball Camp
Ten Star All Star Summer
Basketball Camp; appllica-
tions taken thru April 1; nvi-
tation only. Boys/girls ages
10-19; College basketball
scholarships; Where: Babson
Park and Atlanta, Ga.
Info/brochure: 704-373-
0873.
The 5th Army Associa-
tion tour of Italy, depart-
ing New York on June 15
The 5th Army Association
World War II, Italy, will con-


Spring Time Cleasing of Handreds of lst Quality Flooring
Siin al tke Styles, Patterms, Colors a& extares for ,


duct a 10 day final tour of
Italy, departing New York on
June 15 visiting Rome,
Venice, Florence, Pisa, Sor-
rento and a special stop at the
American Military Cemetery
near Anzio. Former members
of the many combat divisions
and support groups, their
families, friends and those in-
terested in the history of the
U.S. 5th Army can contact
Sny Canton at 5277B Lake-
front Blvd., Delray Beach, FL
33484 or call 561-865-8495.
Register Now!
Suwannee High School
Class of 1975 plans
30-year reunion
Suwannee High School
Class of 1975 plans 30-year
class reunion. Info: Jane
Gamble Lew, 386-776-1459
or Wayne Mitchell, 386-330-
2554.
Register Now!
Suwannee High School
Class of 1986 plans
20-year reunion
Suwannee High School
Class of 1986; 20-year re-
union; Info: Angela Hunter
Mandrell, Mandr003@bell-
south.net., Catrena Francis,
VanessaFrancis@msn.com as
soon as possible.
Sign up now!
Live Oak Senior Citizens
schedule tours
Live Oak Senior Citizens
schedule escorted tours to:
San Antonio Experience, Oct.
19-23. Costs and deadlines
for payment vary for each
trip. The group meets the first
Monday, 10:30 a.m., Exten-
sion Building II, Agriculture
Center. Visitors welcome.
Info: Lula Herring, 386-364-
1510.
March 16
NFCC will conduct
GED tests
NFCC; GED tests; 6 p.m.,
March 16, NFCC Technical
Center; Madison campus;
Photo ID required; prepara-
tion courses free; fee for test;
Info/registration: 850-973-
1629.
March 16
Office hours with
Congressman Boyd's
staff in Live Oak
A member of Congressman
Allen Boyd's (D-North Flori-
da) staff will be visiting Live
Oak on the third Wednesday
of every month so the people
of Suwannee County have the
opportunity to personally dis-
cuss issues concerning them.
Congressman Boyd's staff is
trained to assist constituents
with a variety of issues relat-
ing to various federal agen-
cies. It is important to Con-
gressman Boyd that his staff
is available for those who are
not able to travel to either his
Panama City or Tallahassee
offices. Office hours with
Congressman Boyd's staff
this month will be Wednes-
day, March 16, from 9:30
a.m. 11:30 a.m., Live Oak
City Hall, Live Oak.
March 17
American Red Cross will
hold an Adult, Infant and
Child CPR and First Aid
class in Lake City
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley; Adult, In-
fant and Child CPR and First
Aid class; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Thursday, March 17; 264 NE
Hernando Ave., Suite 102,
Lake City. Info: 386-752-
0650.
March 17
NFCC will conduct Col-
lege Placement Tests (CPT)
NFCC; College Placement
Tests (CPT); on computer;
8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. and 6
p.m. Thursday, March 17,
NFCC Technical Center,
Building No. 13; Madison
campus. Info/registration:


850-973-9451.
March 18-20
2005 Florida Trail
Conference, Live Oak
2005 Florida Trail Confer-


- "-ILA4r-I A --


BRRP~r"" D--Y


SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 11C
I







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS MARCH 16-17, 2005, PAGE 11C


Calendar


Continued From Page 10C

ence; March 18-20, Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park
and Campground, Live Oak;
Info/registration: 877-HIKE-
FLA; www.floridatrail.org
or 386-362-3256.
March 18-20
Basket classes at
Craft Square
Basket makers Rich
Prange and Jeanette Bieder-
man; basket classes; 9 a.m.-5
p.m., Friday-Sunday, March
18-20, Craft Square, Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park, White Springs;
$20 per day, plus materials of
$15 to $25 per basket; Info:
3 8 6 3 9 7 1 9 2 0 ,
www.StephenFosterCSO.org
o- r
wwiwFloridaStateParks.org/s
tephenfoster/
\ March 19
Porch sale to benefit
Puppy Place CARES,.
%\ hire Springs
Porch sale to benefit Puppy
Place CARES, a nonprofit
animal support group; 9 a.m.-
3 p.m., Saturday, March 19;
White Springs Bed and
Breakfast, US 41 and
Kendrick Ave.; all new mer-
chandise; Info, donations,
newsletter: 386-397-1665.
March 19
International F.&A.M.
Masons and Order of
Eastern Star, Lake City
presents a free barbecue
International F.&A.M.
Masons and Order of East-
ern Star presents a free bar-
becue for anyone 21 and
older at 5 p.m., March 19, at
the Lodge and Chapter on
SW Sisters Welcome Road,
off U.S. 90, Lake City; free
barbecue sandwiches,.
drinks, music and door
prizes; Bring a date, a friend
or a relative. Info: Karla,
386-752-6266 or 386-754-
9461.
March 19
Third Annual New York
: Day inwLake City
Third Annual New York
Day, 12:30-4 p.m., Saturday,
March 19, Tucker's Fine
Dining; Lake City.


Info/reservations: Mau-
reen/Vern Lloyd, 386-752-
4885, Ed Pettie. 386-752-
8520.
March 19
Fifth Annual
Wild Azalea Festival
Fifth Annual Wild Azalea
Festival; Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center, White
Springs; Saturday, March
19, 10 a.m. 4 p.m., folk
singers, musicians, dancers,
cloggers and more; Little
Miss Azalea Contest;
Suwannee River Duck Race
and much more; Street Craft
Fair, Bridge Street, White
Springs, begins at 9 a.m.;
Info: 386-397-2310 or 386-
397-4461.
March 19
American Red Cross
will hold an Adult, Infant
and Child CPR and First
Aid class in Lake City
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley; Adult, In-
fant and Child CPR and First
Aid class; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Saturday, March 19; 264 NE
Hernando Ave., Suite 102,
Lake City. Info: 386-752-
0650.
March 20
Florida Museum experts
host Calusa Indian lecture
and book signing
Florida Museum of Natur-
al History, Gainesville; lec-
ture and book signing by
Darcie MacMahon and
William Marquardt authors
of "The Calusa and Their
Legacy: South Florida Peo-
ple and Their Environ-
ments;" 2-3:30 p.m., Sun-
day, March 20; Sunday
Snoop available for children
4-10; pre-registration re-
quired; $5 fee; Info: 352-
846-2000.
March 21-23
Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring
2005 Assessments SAT 10
Suwannee District
Schools will administer
Spring 2005 Assessments -
SAT 10 March 21-23. SAT
10 is for Grade K-2. Each
school has more detailed
testing information avail-
able. Daily student- atten-


dance is critical during these
assessment periods.
March 22
American Red Cross will
hold an Adult CPR class in
Lake City
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley; Adult CPR
class; 6-9 p.m., Tuesday,
March 22; 264 NE Hernando
Ave., Suite 102, Lake City.
Info: 386-752-0650.
March 24
American Red Cross will
hold an Infant and Child
CPR and First Aid class in
Lake City
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley; Infant and
Child CPR and First Aid
class; .6-10 p.m., Thursday,
March 24; 264 NE Hernando
Ave., Suite 102, Lake City.
Info: 386-752-0650.
March 24-27
SpringFest
SpringFest; Spirit of
Suwannee Music Park
(SOSMP), Live Oak, March
24-27; Scheduled appear-
ances: The Bela Fleck
Acoustic Trio, Rodney
Crowell with Bryan Sutton
and Casey Driessen, Donna
the Buffalo, Vassar
Clements, Peter Rowan and
Tony Rice, Guy Clark, Ver-
lon Thompson, Jim Laud-
erdale, Laura Love Band,
The Duhks, Reeltime Travel-
ers, Darol Anger and Mike
Marshall and many, many
others. Info: 386-364-1683,
www.musicliveshere.com,
www.magmusic.com.


March 26
Old Timers Day at Troy
Springs State Park
Troy Springs State Park,
CR 435, Lafayette County;
Annual Old Timers Day; Sat-
urday, March 26, 10 a.m.-5
p.m.; need copies of old pho-
tos, newspaper clippings,
dive logs or stories. Info:
Mebane Cory-Ogden, 386-


935-4835.
March 28
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult Basic
Education)
NFCC; TABE (Test of
Adult Basic Education);
Monday, March 28, 6 p.m.,
NFCC Technical Center;
Madison campus; Photo ID
required; Info/registration:
850-973-9451.
March 29
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult Basic
Education)
NFCC; TABE (Test of
Adult Basic Education);
Tuesday, March 29, 1:30
p.m., NFCC Technical Cen-
ter; Madison campus; Photo
ID required; Info/registra-
tion: 850-973-9451.
March 31
NFCC will conduct
College Placement Tests
(CPT)
NFCC; College Placement
Tests (CPT); on computer;
8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.,
Thursday, March 31, NFCC
Technical Center, Building
No. 13; Madison campus.
Info/registration: 850-973-
9451.
April 1-2
Third Annual Florida
State Bluegrass Festival
The Perry-Taylor County
Chamber of
Commerce/Tourism Develop-
ment Council, Third Annual
Florida State Bluegrass Festi-
val, Forest Capital State Park,
Perry; Friday-Saturday April
1-2; Friday 4-
11 p.m., Satur-
day noon-ll
p.m.; and
Third Annual
Rotary Club
Chili Cook-
off. Info/ven-
dors: Dawn Taylor, toll-free
866-584-5366.
April 1-3
17th Annual Antique
Tractor and Engine Show
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park, White


Springs; 17th Annual Antique
Tractor and Engine Show; 9
a.m. until 5 p.m., April 1-3;
farming history displays of an-
tique equipment, demonstra-
tions, competitions, races, a
parade on Saturday, food and
more; admission $4 for a vehi-
cle with up to eight passen-
gers; Info: 386-397-2733,
www.floridastateparks.org
April 9-13
Friends of the Library,
Gainesville book sale opens
April 9
Friends of the Library,
Gainesville; Spring Book Sale;
April 9-13; Friends of the Li-
brary Book House, 430 North
Main Street, Gainesville.
April 16
Gethsemane Church of
God in Christ will hold its
Annual Youth Summit
Annual Youth Summit,
April 16, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Geth-
semane Church of God in
Christ, 917 NE Duval Street,
Live Oak; Theme: "If It's To
Be, It's Up To Me." The sum-
mit will deal with AIDS, peer
pressure, drugs, black history
brain bowl, door prizes etc.
Speakers: Yvonne Scott and
others.
April 30
Perry Elks Lodge
Poker Run
Perry Elks Lodge No. 1851;
Poker Run; April 30, 9 a.m.;
115-miles; win cash or prizes;
entry fee, $20/motorcycle,
$5/additional rider; 9 p.m.,
dance, live band "Faster than
Flash," Perry Elks Lodge ban-
quet room; Info: Wendy


Cruce, 850-838-5190, Richard
Johnson, 850-584-9288,
Aaron Portwood, 850-838-
4834; entry forms: Perry Elks
Lodge, 304 Puckett Road.


Emmylou Harris


May 27-29
53rd annual Florida
Folk Festival
53rd annual Florida Folk
Festival; Stephen Foster Folk
Cultural Center, White
Springs; May 27-29; Emmy-
lou Harris headlines; Tick-
ets: in advance $15 a day or
$35 for the weekend; at the
gate $20 a day/$40 for the
weekend; Info or tickets:
Elaine McGrath, Marketing
Director; toll-free 877-635-
3655 or www.FloridaFolkFes-
tival.com.
June 25
Suwannee High School
Class of 1975 reunion
Suwannee High School
Class of 1975; 30-year re-
union; June 25; Info: Jane
Gamble Lee, 386-776-1459,
Wayne Mitchell, 386-330-
2554.


-MUSIC FEST

The Spirit of the SuwRnge Music Park

Live Oak Florida

April 7th, S&t, & 9t 2005

Featuring Performances By:


The Lonesome River Band

IIIrd Tyme Out

mountain Heart

Seldom Scene

Larry Sparks
IBm Uocalist of the Year

King Wilkie
Emerging artist of the Year

Wildfire



Ticket Information:

www.lrbmusicfest.com
www.musicliveshere.com or call
386-364-1683 for more information
.Weekend Advance $45.00 thru 3-29-05
( ThiSday S15.0 Frfidi 50.UU00 Salurdav i S5. rplui~ lax)
,: Children? 12 $10.00 per day or $15.00 Weekend
,' Children 6 & under free with adult ticket







North Florida Sales


Blue moon Rising

Southern Lite

Ernie Thacker 6 Route 23

moron Brothers

Bluegrass Parlor Band

Boone Brothers 6 Co.

The Boohers

Swinging Bridge

The Scott fnderson Band


,sAL.F'i~wa 8~~


FOOD STORES


.ll Mo..). ,,.. IIl :.
Seera Manag.l wi [ ll I
US 90 WEST SERVICEOPE
The d LIVE OAK,FL 362-4012
10 % Service Department Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8-5:
--- HBmeteown PeoDple 19 BufslAes The Boetown


U-I11





PAGE 12C, MARCH 16-17, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


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n Car f t% Lincoln Aviator


AC 5 Star SafeIly Rating "Loaded'; Luxury Package u s 9

Was $25,150 9 Was $29,725 0 Was $50,585 4 Was $42,5702 2, Was $41,415 ".... -
After all rebates in lieu of special APR, financing through FMCC, Owner Loyalty or Buick, Olds, Conquest rebate, Plus Tax, Tag, Title and $249.95 ADM fee.
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386-362-1734


Real Estates Listings


wh(






)m I


More profits will be heading your way

en you advertise in color. It's a fact that

lore people read ads with color. Color is

appealing, lively, eye-catching-and

it sells!
Call now for rates and Information:
386-362-1734 ext102.
The Classified Marketplace
Suwannee Democrat
P.O. Box 370 Live Oak, FL 32064


rn Sky Realty
Sr n Ra of Florida, Inc.
O er and Lc. n Barnhill
Ir N-. .: Owner and Lie. Real Estate Broker


Live Oak
(386) 364-1576
Toll Free: (800) 822-1576
South Oaks Square Shopping Center
1554 South Ohio Avenue
Live Oak, FL 32062


For more information about this Featured Home of the Week,

call the associates of Southern Sky Realty at 386-364-1576.


p -We'll find the right home for you.
SUWANNEE RIVER CAR WASH LAFAYETTE COUNTY

~32--




Coin operated car wad inw.1a irngile Wi:de This is a flag lot with 166+ feet of US Hwy
mobile nmcme currently being rented lir 27 frontage possible to re-zone to
AWESOME 3/2 home with 4 acres located additional income. MLS# 42319 $64,900 commercial. MLS#42323 $114,900
on the Suwannee River. Offers 2 heated UNBELIEVABLE VALUE HORSESHOE BEACH
and air conditioned shops, in houseSESHOE BEACH
sprinkler system for fire protection. MLS#
42399 $489,900
TIMBER LAKE SUB.' '


TOO NEW FOR PHOTO!
Nice wooded lot in The Rolling Hills of
Timber Lake Sub. Private access to
Timber Lake. Great Fishing. Home
owners association. MLS#42331 $10,000


Great location! Large 4 bedroom 2 bath This 2 bedroom 1 bath home has all new
DWMH. This one acre lots is covered in carpet and vinyl. Is in move in condition.
shade trees. On paved road. Close to And is in walking distance to the gulf and
school and shopping. All it needs is a new boat ramp. MLS# 42567 $149,900
family. MLS#42253 $99.000 146234JRS-F


In The

7ii Buy Sell Marketplace

in rr, C russjoe1
;. -.it.,q
II".0". I q


2806 West US Highway 90 i
Suite 101, Lake City, FL 32055
HYPERLINK
"http://www.FloridaAcreage.com"
DANIEL CRAPPS
agency, inc. 1-800-805-7566
(1) 5 ACRES COLUMBIA COUNTY If you are looking for a beautiful home and lush pasture
for your horse this is it. Located just 5 minutes outside Lake City this 4 BD, 3BA, home has too
many extras to list. A fenced pasture and a beautiful view compliment the rear of the property.
$309,000.
(2) 55 (+/-) SUWANNEE COUNTY Country close to town and to Interstate 10. 15 acres of
established pasture a hardwood hammock and the balance in an old cultivated field suitable for
pasture, hay or crops $275,000.
(3) 674 ACRES MADISON COUNTY This tract has some cut over land, about 195 acres of
'2001-planted sand pines and some beautiful hardwood hammocks surrounding the Sand Pond.
Ideal for deer and turkey hunting. Property is situated on a paved road about 5 miles south of an
interchange on Interstate 10. $3,200 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(4) 166 ACRES SUWANNEE COUNTY Unique property located on a paved road, this
property would be ideal for someone that wants a private spot for their home site. Includes some
planted pines, some cut over land and natural hardwoods. $3,495 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(5) 43 (+/-) ACRES COLUMBIA COUNTY Land has frontage on a county paved road and is
located south of Lake City. Property has about 40 acres of 5-year-old planted slash pines and
has pine straw income potential. $4,500 per acre.
(6) 482 ACRES SUWANNEE COUNTY -TWO SPRINGS That's right this property has two
springs located on the interior of the property that are not accessible to the public. The property
has paved & graded road frontage and is comprised of young planted slash pine and
hardwoods. It joins State owned property on one side. $4,500 per acre.
For more details about these properties or if you would like to receive our monthly t
featured property list sent by e-mail, call BAYNARD WARD, CHUCK DAVIS or
KATRINA BLALOCK at (386) 755-9715. E-mail: ward@danielcrapps com r i


BRICK HOME ON 7+ ACRES 1,910
sq. ft. 3/2. Clean with LOTS of storage on
beautiful property with lots of trees and
flowers. Workshop. Sprinkler system;
termite control, appliances. $225,000.
#44553


S r. --

PERFECT STARTER HOME clean and
well-maintained, this 3/2 on one fenced
acre would make a great SHIP house.
Outbuildings & pond. $88,500. #44358

, ; r, "



BEAUTIFUL LAKEFRONT 350'+ of
frontage in new gated, homes-only
community. Underbrushed, gorgeous
trees. Must be seen to be appreciated.
Private road access. $112,000. #44383.


STEINHATCHEt WATIR VIlW -
Residential lot in fast-growing, gulf-front
vacation community. $125,000. #44284


AFFORDABLE HOME Well-kept 3/2
DW, fenced .25 acre, 2-car garage, large
storage shed,all appliances; new central
heat, water heater and plumbing. Inside
city limits. $58,000. #43309
.* .. ^ .


MUCH SOUGHT-AFTER 10-acre
parcel in Lafayette County. Beautiful
property with lots of granddaddy oaks. In
homes-only subdivision with boat ramp to
Suwannee River. $65,000. #44187
146181JRS-F


*-~:~- --C ~~x .4 *X. 4 .-.iy ~. 2. V-r )- oh.


Car, Trucks and Motorcycles


I Ma)o
1386, 294-1576
Toll Free: 81)01 605-1576
Corrnr .:., IUS 2 arid M.nrire 5
M j ,:, FL 3 ',-"''
W ,-r: e waI ;iulrer",'rr yre Ill':.-',m


I Section D
March 16-17, 2005

) 800-525-4182

EED A RIDE?


,;'~kn i', C.:~~.rF, -$p


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ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
FOUND-Black dog with four puppies.
If they belong to you or if you know of
someone that has lost these dogs,
please call 386-776-2746.




BUSINESS SERVICES
First Day
A & B Professional Fence Company
Fencing-Installation & Repairs
Wood/Chain Link/Farm Fence
Free Estimates 386-963-4861
Senior Citizen Discount




FINANCIAL SERVICES

Real Estate

Land for Sale-6.8 Acres. Live
Oak/Dowling Park. Beautifully
wooded. Just off paved CR 250.
Owner financing, no downpayment.
$560./mo. Total price $54,500. 352-
215-1018.

OWNER FINANCE
3BD/2BA DWMH w/family room
addition, on 1 acre. 7852 137th
Place, Live Oak, FL. 386-867-0048.
WANTED TO BUY
5 TO 10 ACRES
HIGH & DRY
PARTIALLY CLEARED
386-776-1266





PERSONAL SERVICES

FOR RENT-
3BR, 2BA DWMH,
CENTRAL H/A.
FIRST MONTH'S
RENT PLUS
DEPOSIT TO
MOVE IN.
WATER, SEWER
& GARBAGE
INCLUDED.
NO PETS
386-330-2567
133339-F


Health Care
First D
DIABETIC BREAI
You can beat
Call (386) 93
or 877-320-5455
NEW MOTORIZED
Diabetic Supplies at
eligible. Free Deliver
Private Insurance
come to you! TLC Me
1-888-601-


Music
First C
FOR SALE 1000
Amp. & Four Roc
(sixes). $500.00 OBC
0521.





LOST AN ANIMA
ADOPT? Call Suw
Animal Control at 386
from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Suwannee Valley Hi
The Suwannee V
Society (a no kill
limited space shelti
adoptions for availa
Adoption fee of
spay/neuter,
heartworm/feline (le
and rabies shot. P
shelter, the animals
meet you. The shelter
miles south of Le
County, just of CR
Loop. (Exit 262 off I
90 turn onto CR 25
Bisbee Loop.) Call fo
must check with
bringing a drop-off
shelter.
REMINDER: DO NO
IN VEHICLES FOR
OF TIME DUE TO T


HUMIDITY.
Visit the Suwannee Valley Humane
Society web-site and see the
)ay animals that need a really good
KTHROUGH home at geocities.com/suwanneehs.
diabetes! Due to the generous gift of a new
5-0678 building, we are now able to accept
S(toll-free). donations of furniture ... and we now
have some nice pieces to sell.
Wheelchairs, WE REALLY CAN USE FURNITURE
"NO COST', if DONATIONS!!!
y! Medicare or Attention: If you have lost a pet or
accepted. We found one, the humane society will
dical Supplies, help you find your pet. Call 850-971-
-0641 9904 or toll-free at 866-236-7812.
Leave a message if we are closed,
we will return your call. They will do
what they can to help you find your
pet. Please check with your local
animal control if you have lost a pet.
LOST OR FOUND ANIMALS:
SERVICES LOST DOG: BLACKIE Large Black
German Shepherd. Healthy and
friendly. Lost in Live Oak on 152nd
)ay Terrace.
LOST DOG: BANDIT Solid white
Watt Memphis Pyrenees, male, 145 pounds, two
ckford Fosqate years old. Lost near 50th Street in
). Call 386-984- Live Oak.
These are just a few of the kittens
and cats, puppies and dogs
available. Featured animals for
adoption:
DOGS:
#2699 DEZI Nine week old,
PETS female, chocolate and black. Now
here we have a lady who is frankly
L? WANT TO looking for a place in a loving home.
iannee County Yours?
3-208-0072. M-F #2700 DEMETREE Three month
old, white, brown and black, male.
umane Society There is something about this puppy
'alley Humane that is irresistible! Come see for
shelter) and a yourself!
er depends on #2707 JESSE Eight week old,
ability of space, male, red. Cold nose, warm heart
$45 includes and bright shining eyes. Captivating.
deworming, #2708 ROSCO Eight week old,
ukemia) testing brown and black, male. Pure love in
'lease visit the a wiggly little body. Would like a
would love to chance to win your heart. Come on
ar is located two out!
Be in Madison #2710 PRECIOUS Four month
255 on Bisbee old, white with black, female. This
-10 or from US plucky girl will cover you with kisses
55, go south to and worm her way into your heart.
ir directions. You Many more beautiful puppies and
them prior to large dogs to choose from.
animal to the CATS:
#2635 DORA One-and-a-half-year
T LEAVE PETS old, grey, female. A playful shadow
ANY LENGTH with a heart of pure love. Would love
THE HEAT AND


Mobile Homes

and

Land for sale.

Financed

by owner.

Ask for
Larry Olds.-.

386-362-2720


-FOR RENT-
2 BR, singlewide
mobile home,
central H/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer, &
garbage included.
No pets
386-330-2567


01 4@


r. .
4.


For more information about this Featured Home of the Week,
call the associates of Lighthouse Realty at 386-208-5394.


to meet you and capture your heart.
#2667 ERMA Six month old,
tabby, female. A stand-out in the
feline world. A sweet nature and a
bundle of personality, with purrs on
demand.
#2684 ABE Three year old,
orange, male. A dignified man of the
world with an affectionate and loyal
personality. This is a cat to cherish.
#2709 ONYX One-and-a-half year
old, .black, female. A slinky
enchantress who is delightful in
every way. Meet her and fall in love!
#2710 FONZI One year old silver
and tabby, male. Handsome as a lad
can be, this fine fellow will be a
graceful and loving addition to your
home.
Many more kittens and cats available
for adoption.
Please help care for the animals.
Visit our newly expanded thrift store.


-FOR RENT-
3BR, Singlewide
mobile home.
Central H/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer &
garbage~ included.
No pets.
386-330-2567
1334-FE


to Subscribe?


The Suwannee Democrat, The

Jasper News, The Mayo Free

Press and The Branford News is

online, so it's easier than every

to stay informed.


Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Closed Sunday and open by
appointment only on Monday. ALL
PROCEEDS SUPPORT THE
HUMANE SOCIETY.
The Suwannee Valley Humane
Society also recycles aluminum
cans. Take them to the shelter.
Recycle, recycle, recycle!
Please recycle newspapers for the
Suwannee Valley Humane Society.
The recycle dumpster is located at
305 Pinewood Dr. in Live Oak, next
to Johnson's Appliance Center. ALL
PROCEEDS SUPPORT THE
HUMANE SOCIETY.
Pets for Sale
FOR SALE American/Red Nose
Bulldog puppies. $125.00 ea. Have
shots, worming, health certificates &
exams. Call 386-776-1093.
FOR SALE Chihuahuas, AKC, M/F,
Cute & cuddly, Looking for happy
homes. $350.00. Call 386-776-2233.




AGRICULTURE





MERCHANDISE




You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Louise at

386-362-1734
134698DH-F


Miscellaneous
BEDS, Queen Orthopedic Pillow Top,
mattress, box. Name brand, with
warranty, new in plastic. $140.00.
Also new. King size Pillow Top
mattress set, $200. Can delver. Call
229-630-7013


Selling due to Health. Two brand new
scooters, 2003 & 2004. Speeds up to
50 & 80 mph. Hates gas! Will take
best offer. Call 386-776-1867.
Boats/Supplies
AIRBOAT FOR SALE
14' Apache with 160hp
Lycoming motor, runs great,
new starter, new battery.
Priced to sell $3,500.
Call 386-938-1218




REAL ES-A-E FOR RENT
Apartments


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
:J-,Housing Act which makes it illegal to
.advertise "any preference, limitation
or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability, familial
status or national origin, or an
intention, to make any such
preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of 18
living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all


EQUAI. HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
dwellings advertised



S.C SulvnAe


in this




REALTY
REALTOF?


529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
Realtor Assoc. M. Elizabeth Elliott, Evening 842-2372


(1) Lee, FL: 7.3 Acres on
US 90 near I-10 with a 3/4
bedroom CH/AC home
containing approximately
1,750 sq. ft. under roof
together with a C.B.S.
Commercial Building
containing approximately
12,500 with 11,500 sq. ft. of
packing..$250,000.
(2) 169th Road: Five acres
in grass with a three
bedroom, two bath central
heat and air condition
doublewide mobile home in
excellent condition cont.
approx. 1,850 sq. ft. under
roof. Kitchen furnished
24'x36' detached garage &
shop, fenced. Good buy at
$105,000.
(3) 177th Drive: 3
Bedroom, 2 bath central
heat and air. Home
containing approximately
1,350 sq. ft. Kitchen
furnished 225'137 lot.
$72,000.
(4) (5) Off CR 51 S.W.: 20
acres wooded with large
oaks, and a 3BR/2BA,
CH/CA DWMH in
excellent condition, contact
office. 2000 sq. ft. under
roof, detached storage
$149,500.
(5) CR 249: 11.67 acres
with a three bedroom, two
bath central heat & air
condition brick home
containing approx. 1,500 sq.
ft. under roof, detached
storage (22x25 and 28x22)
good location $235,000.
(6) Harrell Heights: Check


out the new homes under
construction, three
bedroom, two bath, central
heat and air condition, city
sewer & water. 100%
financing to qualified
buyers will work for
S.H.I.P.
(7) Hunting Tract: 13 acres
+, wooded, Steinhatchee
Springs area, river access,
and Hwy. 51 access, recent
survey. $26,000.
(8) Five acres on paved
road: wooded, homes only.
Good area. Priced to sell at
$5,995 per acre.
(9) Camping Lot: One
acre riverview lot in the
Blue Springs area, river
access. $5,995.
(10) US 129: near Spirit
of Suwannee 1.4 ac +-
$10,000.
(11) Azalea Park: Three
bedroom, two bath, central
heat and air conditioned
home on two lots. Good
area. $69,900. Financing
available.
(12) Azalea Park: Three
bedroom, two bath, central
heat & air condition home,
priced to sell @ $60,000.
Financing available.
(13) US 90 West & 1-10:
32 Acres, zoned C.H.I.,
corner tract, will divide.
(14) Old Sugar Mill
Farm: Ni re tract
on pa r .a 2001
CH&Ae fn e home,
kitchen furnished. 12x20
storage building. Good
area. $67,500.
146187-F


w w w


Par.F gn MARCH 16-17.2005nF NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


M CLASSIFIED MAaRKETPLACEF SERVING: NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


lom


PMMW4a








SCLAS l I VIE nri rILMV r I P rl- M m. .w I. ...- ---- --w -I ---I


You are just a call away... call 1-800-525-4182, ext. 102 to place your ad FAX 386-364-5578


Mon. Fri. 8 a.m. 5 p.m. *You are just a click away... find the classified marketplace online at www.nflaonline.com


Cateory b In


ru
ANNOUNCEMENTS



EMPLOYMENT




BUSINESS SERVICES




FINANCIAL SERVICES


PERSONAL SERVICES



EDUCATIONAL SERVICES




2 PARIETS




AGRICULTURE


REAL


RENT


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE




TRANSPORTATION


To Place Your Ad
Monday through Friday by calling 386-362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182, faxing to 386-364-5578 or mailing to:
Classified Marketplace, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064



WE ACCEPT.: mBy Urde
Money Orders Personal Checks


--~--1


Your Classified Ad can

appear in 5 paid

newspapers:

The Suwannee Democrat

on both Wed. & Fri.,

7 the Jasper News,

i The Branford News &

The Mayo Free Press on

Thursday; a total of

15,200 issues weekly!
Increase your promotional reach and tap into
potential new markets... Ask about placing your
advertising message into: The Valdosta Daily
Times, The Thoniasville Times-Enterprise; The
Lowndes Edition-Mailbox Post; The Thomas
County Buyer's Guide; or a network of over 20
other publications, serving over 30 counties; with
over 20,000 readers in South Georgia.
Ask about our
"Service Directory" rates


FLORIDA (386)208 Live Oak 294 Mayo 303
White Springs 362, 364 Live Oak 397 White
Springs 454 High Springs 497 Fort White 658
Dowling Park, 752, 755,758 Lake City 776
Luraville 792 Jasper 842 Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch (Live Oak) 935 Branford 938 Jennings
S961 Lake City 963 Welborn 965 Lake City
GEORGIA (229) 219 Valdosta 224, 225, 226,
227, 228 Thomasville 241, 242, 244,245, 247,
249, 251,253, 257, 259 Valdosta 263 Quitman
268 Vienna 268 Lilly 271,273 Cordele *282,
283, 285, 287 Waycross 293 Valdosta 324 Bedin
S 333 Valdosta 345 Nicholls 346 Coolidge 359
Ambrose 362 Milan 363 Lumber City 365
Rochelle 367 Baxley 375 Hazelhurst 377,378
Cairo, 381 Douglas 382 Titon 383,384
Douglas 385 Rhine 386, 387 Tifton 389, 393
Douglas 422 Pearson 423,424 Fitzgerald 433
Byromville 449 Blackshear 455 Ray City'467
Abbeville 468 Ocilla 472 Montezuma 472
Oglethorpe, 482 Lakeland, *487 Homerville 498
Boston 528 Omega 532 Alapaha 533 Enigma *
534 Willacoochee 535 Warwick 546 Lenox
*549 Sparks 559 Lake Park 567 Ashbum 574
Ocklochnee 594 Uvalda 624 Pineview 627
Unadilla 632 Alma 637 Fargo 643 Rebecca
648 Pitts 649 Buena Vista 683 Meigs 686
Nashville 735 Barwick *762 Whigham 769
Norman Park 775 Morven 776 Sylvester *782
Doerun 794 Hahira 824 Plains 831 Irwinville
S 833 Jacksonville 846 Smithville 853 Cobb
859 Pavo *863 Blackshear 868 McRae 873
Moultrie 874 Leslie *887 Richland 890, 891
Moultrie 896 Adel 899 Moutrie '924,928
Americus *929 Pinetta *938 Jennings 941
Funston'973 Madison 985 Moultrie -


feature D ior o D For Wednesday Publication 11 aF.m.,
r ad wth a border S Friday (prior),
flY iO.r ir For Friday Publication, 11 a.m.,
'W reserve t right lo cancel any special offer or promotion In the Clasalfied Marketplace upon a 30-day notce.'


newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain of
discrimination call HUD toll-free 1-.
800-669-9777. The toll-free number
for the hearing impaired is 1-800-
927-9275


Houses for Rent
First Day
Large House for rent in Jennings, FL.
4BD/2BA. $700./mo plus 1st & last &
deposit. No pets in house. Call 386-
938-4610 or 386-938-2529.
First Day
Three BD/One BA home with CH&A.
In Town (Live Oak, FL). Nice lot,
porch, carport. $550./mo plus 1st,
last, & sec. dep. No pets. References
& lease required. Call 386-330-5274.
Mobile Homes for rent

Home. $350.00 plus deposit. NO
PETS! Call 386-362-1171.

Classifieds

Work!

Call Louise at

386-362-1734

to place your

ad today!


Vacation Rentals


.." .

~f i '. g ,


North Carolina. Easy access, great
view, 10 min to Maggie Valley, 30 min
to Cherokee, 2 min to Parkway,
Mountain Stream with picnic area,
Fireplace, Sleeps 10. All Amenities.
$500/wk, $1600/mo. (386) 330-4207
Lucy




REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Mobile Homes
First Day
Big sale. 32X80 Fleetwood, 4+2 with
living room and den. Set up and
delivery for only $49,995.00.Call
Mike: 1-352-378-6024.
First Day
Brand new Fleetwood, 16X80, 2+2
or 3+2, set up and delivery for
$28,995.00. Call Mike : 352-373-
5428.
First Day
Fleetwood, 28X52, 3+2, loaded very
nice. Includes setup, a/c, skirting,
and two mini decks for only
$36,995.00. Call Mike: 1-352-373-
5428.
FOR SALE- 1980 Homette Mobile
Home w/669 sq. ft. & a 1980 Crowe
Mobile Home w/905 sq. ft. You move
to your lot. Asking $5,000.00 each.
Call 386-658-5291.


First Day
Must sell, never titled, 32' wide
Fleetwood. All manufactured
warranties applied includes setup
and delivery for only $39,995.00. Call
Mike: 352-376-1008.

Lots
FIVE, TEN AND TWENTY ACRE
LOTS with well & septic. Owner
financing. Call 386-752-4339.
www.deasbullardbkl.com






-. EMLOYENT
Help Wanted
CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
needed, two (2) years experience
required Drug Free Work Place.
Call (386) 294-3411.
S.E. Regional Drivers







DAVIS EXPRESS
Hwy. 301 S.
Starke, FL
is looking for drivers to run SE.
Requires Class A CDL w/hazmat.

$500.00 Sign-on Bonus
98% miles in FL, GA, TN, S.C.,
& Alabama
-Start up to .36 cpm with 3 yrs.
experience
.100% Lumper Reimbursement
SSafety bonus
-Guaranteed hometime
Health, Life, Dental, & Disability
Insurance
-401 K Available

Call 1-800-874-4270 #6
www.davis-express.com

First Day
FIBERGLASS/GELCOTE
FINISHERS
Experience preferred but not
required. Apply in person M-F 8am at
Baha Cruiser Boats in Mayo, FL.


First Day
Accounting Instructor
NORTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE

ACCOUNTING INSTRUCTOR
needed at North Florida
Community College, Madison, FL.
Master's degree in accounting with
18 graduate hours in additional
discipline preferred. Experience in
use of technology. in classroom
highly desirable. Duties: Teach 15
credit-hours each semester in
accounting and other qualified
area. Candidates chosen for
interview will give sample
presentation utilizing instructional
technology. Duties commence
8/1/2005.
Position also requires having
established office hours,
participating in department and
College activities. Teaching may be
night and/or dual enrollment
courses on NFCC campus and/or
at satellite locations.
Applications to:
Director HR,
North Florida Community College,
1000 Turner Davis Drive,
Madison, Florida 32340.

Only complete application packets
considered: letter of interest;
resume and application; copy of
transcripts (unofficial okay).
Application available at:
www.nfcc.edu
Questions call 850-973-9487
Application packet must be
received by 03/25/2005. (Deadline
extended). EOE


First Day
Avalon Healthcare Center
is currently accepting applications
for the following positions:
CNA
3/11 and 11p/7a shifts available

Competitive Salary.
*Shift and Weekend Differential.

Please apply at Avalon Healthcare
and Rehabilitation Center, Selena
Cameron-Young.

1270 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
(386) 752-7900
DFWP/EOE


First Day
Area Foreman Maintenance
PCS PHOSPHATE
WHITE SPRINGS, FL
is seeking a candidate for position
of Area Foreman Maintenance to
be filled by April 8, 2005. This
position reports to the
Superintendent Mechanical
Maintenance.

Experienced supervisor of
mechanical maintenance crew in
industrial or chemical facilities. The
individual must be a dynamic self-
starter who has the ability to
handle multiple work priorities,
tasks and planning in a safe and
productive manner. Effective
communication skills with
subordinates, peers and superiors
are required. The individual must
be a good steward of the resources
and equipment provided. Personal
and professional references will be
needed and checked. Preferred
varied experience with the
maintenance, fabrication and
operation of pumps, vessels,
piping, valves, conveyors, and
other process equipment.

An attractive salary/benefit
package accompanies this
position. For confidential
consideration, forward your
resume, with salary history to:

PCS Phosphate-White Springs
ATTN: Human Resources
P. O. Box 300
White Springs, FL 32096

PCS Phosphate White Springs is
engaged in phosphate mining and
manufacturing of fertilizer and
animal feed products in Hamilton
County, Florida. The operation is a
subsidiary of Potash Corp., the
world's largest integrated producer
of basic plant and animal nutrients.



CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANTS
Day Shift Openings
Call Amelia Tompkins
At 386-362-7860
Or apply at
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston Street
Live Oak, FL 32064
EOE/DN/M/F


First Day
CNA
Professional & Skilled CNA
for private In-home care.
Excellent Pay.
For more info. Call 386-688-0547.
Serious Inquiries Only
CUSTOMER SERVICE REP.
Career opportunity in
a sales/service environment
available for qualified individual
with a strong work ethic and
dedication to the job.
Min. 3 years Customer Service
exp. in a fast paced
working environment.
Must enjoy working
with people.
Computer/Data Entry
skills required as well as
Windows proficiency
Minimum 50 wpm.
No phone calls, please.
Resumes Att: Joy
ws4140@earthlink.net

Customer Service/Sales Position
available. Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Outgoing, friendly personality
required. Call Lisa @ Howell's
Office Supply, 386-362-4406 or
apply in person.

First Day
Driver-O/O and Company
Great Opportunities!
HOME WEEKLY!
Excellent compensation packages!
Class A CDL w/HazMat & 1 yr.
Exp.
1-800-299-4744
www.arnoldtrans.com
Driver/Laborer
Waste Management, Inc.
Lake City/Gainesville
Has an immediate opening for a
hard working, flexible individual to
fill the position of Driver/Laborer
for Lake City and Gainesville. This
position requires a minimum Class
B CDL with air brake endorsement.
Waste Management offers a full
benefits package including health
insurance and 401-K plan. If you feel
you meet the requirements, please
apply by phone
1-877-220-JOBS (5627)
or online at
WWW.WMCAREERS.COM
EOE/ADA/DFWP


Accepting Applications
Good, bad and no credit.
l11 for 1st & 2nd mortgages, ,
Established full service co. S M W


WE BUY MORTGAGES.
ROO) 226-6044
, 622 NW 43rd St, Suite A-I
Licensed Mig. Lender


FOR
|RENT|
HUD Vouchers Welcome!
1,2 & 3 BR HC & Non-HC
Accessible Apartments
(49~ Oa^ IIOa. 1
705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Opportunity


FOR

Rental Assistance
2, 3, & 4 BR HC & Non-
HC Accessible Apartments
705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936 &
TDD/TTY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity T


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living 2
bedroom duplex. Call
362-3110.
128545JS-F

Retired
Telephone
Man
will do telephone
installation, repair,
TV Cable installation,
& phone wiring,
jacks and repairs
or other small jobs.
Call Tom @
658-2611. n


r General General
GOOD BUY CASH CASH s"tMMED
CLASSIFIED 8 S*~ M:,D;. *



lIOW TO WRITE A CLASSIFIED) AD

8 Simple Steps to Creating a Classified Ad That Sells:


SWhat do you have to offer? Start your
advertisement by naming the item or service
you are presenting.

SAre you being clear? Complete, concise
information will encourage a quick response
from readers.

Can the reader reach you? Be sure to include
your telephone number or address.
If necessary, list a preferred time to have
potential buyers contact you.
Are you giving your ad enough exposure?
Consecutive publication of your ad will
generate the greatest amount of reader
attention. Generally, a 15-day run time is the
best and most cost-effective arrangement.

3 What's the best part of your offer? Identify
and write about the most beneficial feature
of the product or service you are advertising.


Have you covered all of your bases? Make
sure you are providing sufficient information
about the merchandise or service you are
offering, including the price! Does the reader
know what you are selling, why they should
buy it and how they can contact you for more
information?out the most beneficial feature of
the product or service you are advertising.

How can you reach the greatest number of
prospective buyers? Place your classified ad
with The Classified Marketplace.

O Call 1-800-525-4182 today!



4 BUSINESS IS
S 'B." ... ... BOOMINOi
EANOCKST D PART.. .ENT .
OCKSI 1n C f. .' 2 i ,


We Will Help You

* 'GAIN EXTRA ATTENTION
To Your Classified Ad On
MERCHANDISE The First Day It Runs!
MitS E Wth the



RECREATION Logo in the Classified Marketplace
Adb&


Ca
E


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS MARCH 16-17, 2005, PAGE 3D


= f~lACCIIr% fiAcl=TD Ani: qFRVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTHlT GEORGIA


memo
r







PAGE 4D, MARCH 16-17, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS I CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


362-1734 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 1-800-525-4182

First Day First Day First Day WANTED!! New Beginnings Credit Program or
Firt nav ASSISTANT Buy Here, Pay Here will put you in.


DRIVERS- Home EVERY Weekend!
Start up to 40cpm. Great Benefits
/Equipment! Multiple Insurance
Choices. Dedicated Runs Available;
CLASS-A 800-992-7863 ext. 126
First Day
DRIVERS- W-2 LOOKS BAD? We
cure bad W-2's. It's all about the
money. Is yours enough? CDL-A 6
months T/T expereince. Call Sunday
or anytime 800-893-6791.
farm help
HELP WANTED
Knowledge of tractor and equipment
is a must. Call 386-330-2567 to
enquire. Drug Free Work Place.

Food Service
COUNTRY KITCHENS
Now hiring, all positions open.
Call 850-971-0024.

Front Office
People & detail oriented, basic math
& spelling skills, pleasant phone
voice a must. FT/PT day/eve. Apply

SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE
PARK OFFICE
between 2pm-4pm
Hwy 129 N. of Live Oak, FL
E.O.E.

Housekeeping
Laundry & Bathhouse Attendant
needed 20-40 hours per week.
Some unit cleaning. Apply @
SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE PARK
between 2pm-4pm
Hwy 129 N. of Live Oak, FL
E.O.E.
Paramedic
Lafayette County EMS is seeking a
full time Paramedic or EMT-B. (Either
may apply). Benefits include health
insurance, dental insurance option,
FRS, vacation and sick allowance.
Applicant must be certified with the
State of Florida and have a good
driving record. Please submit an
application to John Bell, Lafayette
Co. Courthouse, 386-294-4178 or at
the EMS station. Deadline for
applications will be March 31, 2005.


LPN, 10pm-6am and PRN Position
Seeking individual for fulltime
position. Shift differential. Must like
being a hands-on leader. Must have
history of being able to function at
high level with minimal direction, and
excellent attendance. Also, seeking
person with flexibility to assist to
cover the scheduled days off of
fulltime staff and for call in
assistance. Must have history of
excellent attendance. Contact Lyn
Shine. Lafayette Health Care Center,
512 W. Main St., Mayo, FL. 386-294-
3300.

WANT A NEW CAREER?
Will train for security officer license.
Call Jim Tucker @ 386-364-7780
or Joe Peavey @ 850-929-4747.


First Day
TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED (CDL)
Must be Drug Free, Dependable &
have 3 years Exp. Hauling Pine
Straw & Misc. Freight. Call (386) 935-
2773 or Fax Resume (386) 935-6838
(FL)

WANTED! WANTED!
WANTED!
HARDWORKERS ONLY
NEED APPLY ALL SHIFTS
MUST BE ABLE TO LIFT
50LBS-7LBS-70LBS
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
BACKGRD/DRUG SCREEN REQ.

maintenance
HELP WANTED maintenance man
with knowledge of plumbing, electric
and carpentry. Tools required.
Transportation a must. Drug free
workplace. Call (386) 330-2567

MECHANIC
W. B. HOWLAND CO. INC.
Mechanic w/ diesel engine and
hydraulic experience needed
@ W.B. Howland Company.
Full time position with excellent
benefits package. Apply in person
@ Howlands corner of Walker &
11th St. or call (386) 362-1235.


HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT








Bulldozers, Backhoes, Loaders,
Dump Trucks, Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Next Class: March 28th
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com T


I m l iLFT
Medical Positions
The following positions are
available with Meridian
Behavioral Healthcare:

Counselor II:
FT Lake City
Counselor III:
F/T Lake City
Counselor IV/Sr. Clin'n:
Outpatient Adults/Child'n, FT
G'ville,
Lake City, Jasper, Lake Butler &.
Starke
Add Specialist:
MIST & Adult Programs-
FT/PT G'ville & PRN Lake City
Children's Welfare Supervisor:
FT Starke
Adult Case Manager:
FT G'ville
Emergency Svcs Intake
Evaluator:
FT G'ville, Lake City
Program Director, Acute Care
FT G'ville
Sr. Client Relations Specialist:
PT Lake City
Comp Assessor:
PRN G'ville, Lake City
Staff Psychiatrist:
FT G'ville
RN:
FT G'ville & Lake City
LPN:
FT/PRN G'ville & Lake City
Psych Tech:
PRN G'ville & Lake City
Family Support Worker:
FT G'ville
Driver:
FT G'ville

Excellent benefits. For details visit
www.meridian-healthcare.org or call
(352) 374-5600 ext. 8277. Send
resumes to Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, Inc., Human
Resources, 4300 SW 13th St.,
Gainesville, FL 32608, fax (352)
374-5608. EOE, DFWP.


Prep/Cook, skilled. PT-hourly, for
high volume kitchen. Opportunity for
advancement. Must work at a fast
pace & have the ability to multi-task.
A great place to work! Call Camp
Weed @ 386-364-5250.

Restaurant Mgmt.
Asst. Mgr. for Night Shift:
3pm-10:30pm
Starting Salary: $7.00 per hour
Qualifications: Must be at least 18
years old, have your own
transportation, willing to work and
learn, be enthusiastic, able to work
with public, must be responsible
enough to supervise other
employees. A high school diploma or
GED is preferred. Previous mgmt. or
supervisory skills would be a plus,
but not necessary. Valid driver's
license required.
Send a completed resume to:
Restaurant Mgmt.
6468 57th Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32060

SALES POSITION
MUST HAVE STRONG SALES
EXPERIENCE
PLEASE CALL FOR APPT.
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DRUGSCREEN & BACKGRD REQ.

Security officers needed.
YARBOROUGH CORPORATION
Must have State security license.
Call Jim Tucker 386-364-7780 or Joe
Peavy 850-929-4747.


MUSGROVE
CONSTRUCTION INC.
Has an immediate opening for
experienced mechanic. Hydraulic
knowledge a plus.Must have own
hand tools. Call 386-362-7048 or
come by the office of Musgrove
Construction, 8708 US 90 Live
Oak. Drug Free Workplace.

S110 a M ral rM '


- -_- - w- w -
S In The

huil Buy Sell Maretace
Classified
fid ell Marketplace



it! it! it! ''a&
|l. Ple |c'oluroed


Si ll u oT
' .1 -, 25..i 2 W
: ] a, -- J^ U --.. ; X'K== it-l '.' *A,-;:..' '


m A


EXPERIENCED WITH
TILE AND MARBLE
MUST BE ABLE TO LIFT
UPTO 70 LBS.
NON-SMOKER
PLEASE CALL FOR APPT.
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
386-755-1991
DRUGSCREEN & BACKGRD REQ.





TRANSPORTATION
Autos for Sale
Cadillac Catera, 1998, Excellent
Condition. Must see! $6,500.00. Call
386-362-7237 or 386-697-9385.
Ford Mustang, 2004, 40th
anniversary edition, only 14,000
miles, power seats and windows,
power steering tinted windows, ac/cd
$16,500 Call 386-362-7652
New Beginnings Credit Program or
Buy Here, Pay Here will have you in
this 2000 Ford Contour today. Call
local 386-590-6151 for details.
Pontiac Firebird, 2002. Good, clean
car. T-tops, rear spoiler, good miles.
Shaky credit or no money down?
Call local 386-867-0694.
First Day
Saturn, LW300 Wagon, 2002. Runs
good, looks good. Very good
condition, like new! $18,000.00 OBO.
Call 850-971-5465.
TAKE OVER PAYMENTS of $450.00
per month on a 2004 Chevy Max.
DVD, leather, sunroof, skid control,
XM satellite radio, 38 MPG. Call 386-
362-1734 ext. 107.
Toyota Celica GTS, 2000, nice car.
Ask for the OK Deal. Shaky Credit or
no money down? Call local 386-867-
0694.

Trucks for Sale
Choice of Trucks: Ford F150 XLT,
2WD or 4WD 2002 nice trucks. If you
have been on your job for one year &
have a phone, come pick out your
truck! Shaky credit or no money
down. Ask for the OK Deal. Call 386-
867-0694.
New Beginnings Credit Program or
Buy Here, Pay Here has this 2002
Ford F150 regular cab, 5-speed. Call
local 386-590-6151 for details.

Utility
For Sale Ford Explorer Sport 2001,
or Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo.
Both are nice SUVs with nice miles.
Many happy trouble free miles. Your
choice, ask for the OK Deal. Shaky
credit or no money down? Call local
386-867-0694.
First Day
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 1993,
2nd owner. 133k. dark green, good
icond everymlhng A'.-.rk. .. limited
n.;mdoel with iledther .riterior arid idd
player, located dowling park, $3900.
386-658-2380


this 1999 Ford Explorer, 4-dr, loaded.
Call local 386-590-6151 for details.

Vans for Sale
Family vehicle. Ford Windstar, 2002,
minivan, clean cold AC. Shaky credit
or no money down? Ask for the OK
Deal. Call local 386-867-0694.
FOR SALE- 2001 Pontiac Montana
Van. Extended model-seats seven.
65K miles. In great condition, silver in
color. $12,000.00 firm. Call 386-294-
1722, if no ans., leave msg.




-a'




FOR SALE-1998 DODGE RAM
2500
8 Passenger Van. 75,300 miles-V8.
A/C, AM/FM/Cassette Radio,
Automatic Transmission, Captain's
chairs-2 removable bench seats,
cruise control, power brakes, mirrors,
steering & windows. $7,895.00 OBO.
Contact Dean Papapetrou @ 386-
362-7955 or 386-208-9864.

Ford Van, Club Wagon XLT, 1989. 5L
V8 engine, 136,500 mi., Captain
chairs, bench/bed. No rust-excellent
body & interior. Runs well. $2,900.00.
Call (386) 364-6952.
New Beginnings Credit Program or
Buy Here, Pay Here has a 1999 Ford
Windstar Van. Could be yours! Call
local 386-590-6151 for details.

Accessories/Parts
FOR SALE Four 15" Chrome Rims.
Used for 2 months. Paid $1,000.00.
Asking $700.00. Call 386-590-6357.
First Day
FOR SALE- Large Car-top luggage
carrier. $50.00. Call 386-364-2824.

Motorcycles
Honda Shadow Ace 750, 2002,
excellent condition. Black with lots of
chrome. Only 2,200 miles. $4,500.00
OBO. Call 386-362-1849 between
5pm-9pm.

Find It, Buy it

and Sell it

in the

Classified

Marketplace

Call Louise at

386-362-1734

to place your

ad today!


Announcements

Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read DIANETICS by Ron
L. Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send $7.99 to Dianetics,
3102 N. Habana Ave., Tampa FL 33607.


Auctions


LAND & GROVE AUCTION! Lake Placid, FL 11AM, Sat
Mar 26 443.9+/- Total Acres 3 Tracts Offered in 16 Parcels.
Preview: I-5PM, Sat. March 19 Call for details:
(800)257-4161 Higgenbotham Auctioneers
www.higgenbotham com ME Higgenbotham, CAI FL Lic
#AU305/AB158.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy Direct From
Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick
turn around! Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.


Business Opportunities


INCREDIBLE OPPORTUNITY!!! Looking for a few
exceptional people to make an above average income.
Call (800)489-8930.

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/day? 30
Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995. (800)814-6323
B02000033. CALL US: We will not be undersold!

$$$$$ Weekly Use eBay to get Paid. Get $250 in FREE
products to Start No Inventory Required No Experience
Required Call OnlineSupplier (800)940-4948 Ext. 5314.

#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending Machine Hd. You approve
Loc's-$10,670 (800)836-3464 #802428.


Financial


$ CASH ADVANCES $ Personal Injury Lawsuits-Struc-
tured Settlements- Annuities-Pensions-Inheritances-Lottery-
Prize Winnings-We Buy Mortgage, Real Estate, Business
notes. Se Habla Espanol. Jerry (866)767-2270.

Loans by phone. Up to $1000 in 24hrs. No Credit Check!
Bank Account Req.(888)350-3722 www paychecktoday corn


For Sale


STEEL BUILDINGS EZ BUILD AISC Certification -
Office/Warehouse, Shop/Garage, Arena/Barn, Hangers. A
plant near you! Will beat any price or $205. (800)993-4660,
www.universalsteel corn


Help Wanted


Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits for Experienced Drivers, O/O. Solos, Teams &
Graduate Students. Bonuses Paid Weekly. Equal
Opportunity Employer. (888)MORE PAY (888-667-3729).

Drivers- Owner Ops & Co. Drivers Needed Now! Run SE
Only or SE, Mid-Atl, MW Regional, 0/0's -No Forced
Dispatch, Good Pay plus Fuel (866)250-4292.

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS PT/FT no exp
necessary $50 Cash hiring bonus Guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638 ext 107 www.USMailingGroup com

POSTAL POSITIONS AVAILABLE!! Federal, State,
Local. $14.00-$48.00+hr. No Experience necessary. Paid
Training and Full Benefits. Entry Levels. Call 7 days for
information. (888)826-2513 ext. 11I.


UP TO $4,000 WEEKLY!! Exciting Weekly Paycheck!
Written Guarantee! 11 Year Nationwide Company Now
Hiring! Easy Work, Sending Out Our Simple One Page
Brochure! Free Postage, Supplies! Awesome Bonuses!!
FREE INFORMATION, CALL NOW!!
(800)242-0363 Ext. 3800.

Legal Services

DIVORCE$175-$275*COVERS children, etc. Only one
signature required! *Excludes govt. fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, ext.600. (8am-7pm) Divorce Tech.
Established 1977.

Miscellaneous

FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT SYSTEM includes standard
installation. 2 MONTHS FREE 50+ Premium Channels.
Access to over 225 channels! Limited time offer. S&H.
Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.

EARN DEGREE online from home. *Business, *Parale-
gal, *Computers. Job Placement Assistance. Computer &
Financial aid if qualify. (866)858-2121
www.tidewatertechonline com.

SPA! Overstocked! New 7 person spa-Loaded! Includes
cover, delivery & warranty. $2999, was $5999.
(888)397-3529.


Real Estate


BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. WINTER SEASON
IS HERE! MUST SEE THE BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL
MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS. Homes,
Cabins, Acreage & Investments. Cherokee Mountain
Realty GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainrealty com Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868.

LAND WANTED Land Investment company seeks large
acreage in Florida and Georgia. Interested in waterfront,
timber, and agricultural lands. Must have road frontage or
good access. Cash buyer with quick closings.
Call (877)426-2326 or email: landyetiveg@aol.com.

ATTENTION INVESTORS: Waterfront lots in the Foot-
hills of NC. Deep water lake with 90 miles of shoreline. 20%
redevelopment discounts and 90% financing. NO PAY-
MENTS for 1 year. Call now for best selection.
www.nclakefrontproperties com (800)709-LAKE.

40 AC w/creek near Peace River. 1/2 pasture: 1/2 pines. Street
ends at preserve. Power, well; 3400 sq. ft. house foundation
and kit house, ready to go. $485,000 (239)340-0501.

FREE LAND LIST- NC MOUNTAINS- Custom built log
homes, river frontage and beautiful secluded land off Blue
Ridge Parkway. Call now. (800)455-1981, ext. 133.

FORECLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low down! Tax
repos and bankruptcies! No Credit O.K. $0 to low down. For
listings (800)501-1777 ext. 1299.

Grand Opening Land Sale! SO. FLORIDA 10+ ACRES
Only $294,900. Huge savings on big ranch acreage in South
Florida! Gorgeous mix of mature oaks. palms, & pasture.
Miles of bridle paths. Near Lake Okecchobee. Quiet,
secluded, yet close to 1-95 & coast. Also. 5 acres $174,900.
Great financing, little down. Call now. (866)352-2249 x379.

LAKE VIEW BARGAIN $29,900. Free boat slip! High
elevation beautifully wooded parcel. Across from national
forest on 35,000 acre recreational lake in TN. Paved roads,
u/g utils, central water, sewer, more. Excellent financing.
Call now (800)704-3154, ext. 609. Sunset Bay, LLC.


COASTAL NORTH CAROLINA. Phase I sold out. Now
offering new homesites in Phase II at Shine Landing, a gated
waterfront community. Be a proud owner in this upscale
community with boating access to the Neuse River, Pamlico
Sound and Atlantic Ocean, plus clubhouse, fitness center,
tennis, swimming pool and private marina. Homesites as low
as $29,900. Financing available. Coastal Marketing &
Development Company, New Bern, NC (800)566-5263,
www.shinelanding com

NORTH CAROLINA LAKEFRONT ONLY $39,900.
Great All Sports lake to fish, boat, swim or just relax. Call
for details, MLC (866)920-5263.

COASTAL GEORGIA- GATED COMMUNITY Large
wooded water access and marshfront homesites. Ancient Live
oaks, pool, tennis, golf. Water access. From $64,900.
Pre-construction discounts. www cooperspoint com
(877)266-7376.

SERENE MOUNTAIN GOLF HOMESITE $208.03/
MO. Upscale Golf Community set amid Dye designed
.18 hole course in Carolina Mountains. Breathtaking views.
Near Asheville NC. A sanctioned Golf Digest Teaching
Facility! Call toll-free (866)334-3253 ext 832
www cherokeevalleysc corn Price: $59,900, 10% down,
balance financed 12 months at 4.24% fixed, one year balloon,
OAC.

Lake View Bargain! 2 Acres $19,900. New waterfront
community on one of largest, cleanest, mountain lakes in
America! Hardwoods, views, common area w/ beach!
Country road, water, utilities. Low financing. Lakefront
available. Call (800)564-5092 x96.

RVs/Campers

ST. PATTY'S RV SALE! March 17th-20th. Nation's #1
Selling RV's! Low Sale Prices! Giant Recreation World
*Melbourne- (800)700-1021. *Orlando- (800)654-8475.
*Daytona- (800)893-2552. www.grwrv.com.


Steel Buildings


PIONEER BUILDING SALE! "Rock Bottom Prices!"
Beat Next Price Increase. Go direct/save. 20x26. 25x30.
30x40 30x44. 35x50. 40x60. 45x90. 50x100. 60x180.
Others. Pioneer (800)668-5422.

STEEL BUILDINGS. Factory Deals Save $$$. 40 x 60'
to 100 x 200'. Example: 50 x 100 x 12' = $3.60/sq ft.
(800)658-2885 www rigidbuilding com

Steel Arch Buildings! Genuine SteelMaster Buildings,
factory direct at HUGE Savings! 20x24, 30x60, 35x50.
Perfect Garage/Workshop/Barn. Call (800)341-7007.
www.SteelMasterUSA corn


Your Ad Could Be Here


ONE CALL STANDS BETWEEN YOUR BUSINESS
and millions of potential customers. Place your advertise-
ment in the FL Classified Advertising Network. For $450
your ad will be placed in over 150 papers. Check out our 2x2
and 2x4 display network too! Call this paper, or Heather Mola,
FL Statewide Network Director at (866)742-1373, or e-mail
hmola@flpress.com for more information. (Out of State
placement is also available.) Visit us online at
www florida-clasifieds com




FCAN


Week of March 14, 2005


13s32n-F j


Career Opportunities


FORTUNE 500 COMPANIES

LOOKING FOR REPS IN THIS AREA

To see if you qualify
Attend a 30 min. free seminar
March 18 7:00 p.m.
Location:
Quality Inn, Hwy. 90 W.
Lake City, FL

Please present this ad at door 149151JRS-F







NO EXPERIllENCE!

MALE & FEMALE










.

WE WILL TEACH YOU HOW TO SELL CARS
& MAKE BIG $$$$!
EARN FROM $42,000 $68,000
Most dealers do not offer PROFESSIONAL training but we
believe that the true professionals will sell more cars, make
more money, and take better car of our customers.
YES, NO EXPERIENCE!

WE OFFER:
V-10 H,,il ,' lk' II l:"|1t :, I 'm
EXCITING TRAINING PROGRAM!
kIi ;I I IJII [r--1'-f w ; i
5 DAY WORK WEEK!

HEALTH 8 DENTAL PLAN!

PAID VACATION!


[77,rIL}'i ANl','&I E.lI M 4 1 II i14; 11 H 4q1 I I A I I I V,


SUPER OPPORTUNITY TO ADVANCE!






Sales Manager AG
--US90 WEST 6.. .. 1 0

The GM d LIVE OAK, FL 3Seri62Dep
SernicIU Department Hours: 0 fon.-fr. -5:3(0
11f 69trM 11800 1M fif te s m rho N M@ ftM OW


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These local businesses are here to take good care of you.


ABBEY MINI STORAGE
All New Units
5X15 5X20 10X15 10X20 15X20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd.
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak

364-5300B



Trees, Trimmed or Removed Firewlood
Licensed &, Insured Free Estimates

TREE WORK
Buckei Truck and Climbing

963-50261


f I ~ i 'lL111 k` i '{I ni


4--r


o Metal Roofing
$p $$S$ $ SAVE$$$$
Quality Metal Roofing & Accessories At Discount Prices!!
wide galtalume Cut to your desired lengths!
3' wde painted ,Deliven Serv'ie A\ailable.
2' nide 5-l ,sk jaout isebl buidinQs
Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. Inc.
CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335




DUNCAN TIRE & AUTO
"Complete One Stop Service For Your Vehicle"
Alignment Specialists


24 HOUR TOWING
SV1362-4743 1-888-362-2568
422 E. HOWARD ST. LIVE OAK PLAZA
LEN A. DUNCAN


ID. KASTOR INC.


* Pool & Patio Decks
* Spracrele.'River Rock
* Painting & Stucco
* Interior/Exterior
386-362-3107
386-362-2526


* Licensed Contractor
* Highly' Experienced
* Free Estimates
AlW'iol (dAi'or-Oiiner
I/5ss 6Si Si
Live Ot. FL 32i)6i
a i. .'rilt _a' \ 'i/l ',.t 'iII


repairs and needs call
John & Trish Adams
1386) 362-7916


Ecckkeepi na
by riaren

labook .rialiel net L.t.IEGEL \C(OUNTlMr
A DinISION OF KtRDl [ EN ERPRI E%. IN(
(OMPLE TL BOlOKkEPIN \, \t l.N'MIN. [iR\i,:Ls
,M JL &l\ MEDIUM BLUiNSSESE
MOUNTMLY REPORTING
STATE & FEDERAL SALES & PAYROLL RETURNS
STATE 8 FEDERAL BUSINESS RELATED iNCOMETAY RETURNS


1 lfe. IIUII Jner lJops.
Floor CSoering.
Painting. Decks.
Screened Enclosures.


To place
an ad on
this page,
please
call Myrtle at
(386) 362-1734,
ext. 103.


,,",l 1 ', .
Drigger's Heating,
Air Conditioning
and Refrigeration
Reidenrual and C mnmercIal
3 Eergrer e.t-ri \ie. 386i 364-5"3-4
i ()ak, FL 321164 (Iark Drilgers. O ntmr
,.1.1 '"


4 GEl JER-TIOI JS CF EXPERIENCE"
24 HR. EMERGENCY PUMP SERVICE

IWeI |ISTALIN
Well Drilling
EbalI St Li- -# -


Roofs Mobile Homes
* Brick Homes Stucco Homes
SDecks Driveways
Free Eatwatej
No Job Too Big... No Job Too Small
386-776-2067
i,,i,!+,:,)!; ,; .,,


ONE CALL DOES IT ALL
-.-. Da For Your
-' David ,HOME
Mcl a ghlin Improvements & Repairs
Remodeling & Renovations
386-963-1391
Licensed & Insured
A D Avision I
KARDAV ENTERPRISES, INC. FEI 061 i0i00


S1- I\c tiIkc lli \ Aork out ;iovin-ii
,ight Law
55i0,, Count\ Road '5 tloming Coniiuliani
\\ellborn. FL 32N- 4 ---
(386) 963-2282
i 3s6j 903-29-26 1Fa\)
Call it. ir ra i'ee e'iti at '.-
Fla. No\er Reg. No. INI 1174




rLAKEWOOD
| APARTMENTS
| IN LIVE OAK

Quiet cotuntr\ li \ing 2 bedroom duplex
Call 362-3110


nH^B I^MB^^^M^H^
.HlkHB WE~Pr ~ iateHB


srigs Sons ostoi tMeat Ctd
Jasper, Florida Cows
(~ 'ustoni"
Slaughter, C'utling IItnriIL& IJplladb'1
Wrapping .Iiinw) Iriprgi
& Sausagl-1-mi-ETI-2521i
Planti N!i:-l.II Ilo I-oLm


E-LIMB-INATORS, INC.
Complete Tree Senice
Licensed & Insured


21653 H. Shekinah Place :
O'Bien, FL 3207 I
Phone 386-935-1993
Fax 386-935-3321 \


_.V" Interior
Exterior
< I-nc' Drywall
ffi'P', Wallpaper
lJ.I .!,.l,,,l Licensed
Insured
L,,:n. i r J:. 5-3r0976- 2 Pressure
Cleaning
Office (386) 364-5045 Site
Mobile (386) 362-9178 Clean
Michael Guenther, o.wnp, Up



J.R. FARNUM
STATE CERTIFIED
CONTRACTOR
Roof Repairs Fascia & Soffit
METAL ROOFING
SPECIALISTS
(386) 362-3320
CCC057785


CARROLL

CONCRETE
SCurbing Gutters Monolithic Slabs
Patios* Driveways & Sidewalks
Commercial & Residential
Licensed & Insured
Rt.2 Box 166 (386)9381156
Jennings, FL 32053 (386)9381156




JT's Transmissions
James Tullis, Owner
I2o91i1 N CR 2511
\ellbomrn. Florida 3219i
TAKINGG CA RE OF ALL WYOI R
TRANSMIISSION NEEDS"
Phone: 386-963-3616
Cell: 386-697-944(-


Stump Grinding


Jim Sellers 386-776-2522


ADKINS


LANDCLEARING LLC
Owner, Johliuj .dkins
Free Estimates i' -
Phone:
386-294-3837,,
&d 2hJ.


LIVE OAKI

MINI STORAGE
* 5x15 5x20 10x15 10x20
CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE
5x5 *5x10 *10x10*10x20
Units located on Gold Kist Road
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Lihe Oak 364-6626




DREAM DESIGN
INCORPORATED
Residential Ilake-overs Free Estimates
Licensed and Insured

Cabinets. Ceramic
Fodtr mamnam r o ftnur home0i TH. f'. ...., Ta...


I fill
LI'
rut


I


v


W-MV4c


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CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS MARCH 16-17, 2005, PAGE 5D7


2~i~i~







PAGE 6D, MARCH 16-17, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS 3 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA



An ancient luxury becomes a modern morning necessity

A look at the cascading evolution of the shower W


Count yourself lucky for
living in the modem world. If
you're like most people, you
begin every day by taking for
granted something that was not
even available to some of the
most wealthy and powerful
people throughout history -- a
shower.
Today, going without a
shower for even a day is out of
the question for most people,
and to not shower for a week or
more would be unthinkable.
But most of us have ancestors
who probably shunned bathing
to the greatest extent possible.
Even the Romans, who loved to
bathe, took their baths in
stagnant pools of dirty water
that they shared with hundreds
of their fellow citizens. They
had no concept of bacteria of
course.
In ancient times, the best a
rich or royal person could do
was to have a servant dump
cold water over them as they
stood in a basin -- hardly a
relaxing experience by modem
standards.
Today, manufacturers spend
millions finding ways to make
water do magical things in
order to make showering a
luxurious, invigorating and
revitalizing experience.
"The soothing massage of a
specially engineered stream of
hot water is what people seek in
their showers today," says
David Lingafelter, Moen
Incorporated's vice president of
product marketing. "We spend a
lot of time figuring out how to
make water create the sensation
of a massage when designing
shower fixtures," he adds. "Our
Revolution showerhead
actually spins each drop of
water that it puts out and then
twirls the whole shower stream
so that users feel enveloped in
water. Making the water
droplets larger makes them feel
warmer and the increased speed
and movement of each drop
gives the sensation of higher
flow and higher pressure."
You don't get that sort of
feeling from your average
ancient servant with a bucket.
But, at various times
throughout history, ancient
cultures have embraced the
notion of showering for
cleansing. During excavation of
the Egyptian city of Akhenaten
at Tel-el-Amama, which dates
back to 1350 B.C., a small
bathroom was found. Lawrence
Wright's "Clean & Decent: The
Fascinating History of the
Bathroom and the Water-
Closet" reports that it was
determined from the design of
the basin, complete with
splashbacks, that it was a
simple form of a shower. It is
believed that the water was


most likely poured on the
bather from servants holding
vases.
Babylon had a series of
aqueducts (the earliest ones on
record) laboriously maintained
to provide the well-to-do with
water for their bathrooms,
according to "The History of
Plumbing Babylon" on
PlumbingSupply.com. While
the common people were
bathing and washing clothes on
the banks of canals or in
cisterns, King
Nebuchandnezzar (605 to 562
B.C.) bathed in a shower room
where, you guessed it, slaves
poured water over him as he
washed with soap made of
ashes and animal fat. The
plumbing was advanced
enough that a drainpipe took
away the wastewater,
something modem plumbers
wouldn't accomplish until the
19th century.
In ancient Greece, citizens
took outdoor showers by
standing under a stream of
water coming from spouts
found on the sides of large
fountains built in the cities,
according to Penny Colman's,
"Toilets, Bathtubs, Sinks, and
Sewers." Grecian vases with
paintings of people showering
in this manner were found by
archaeologists.
Unfortunately, the Western
world's showering
advancements stopped when
people began to think that
bathing itself was not altogether
necessary. Queen Isabella of
Spain, who funded the voyage
of Christopher Columbus, was
proud of the fact she had taken
only two showers in her
lifetime, reported Colman. In
fact, early Christians equated
bathing with vanity and
avoided it in order to be more
holy. Colman wrote that St.
Francis of Assisi listed dirtiness
as one of the signs of a holy
person, St. Catherine of Siena
avoided washing, and St.
Agnes, who died at the age of
13, had never taken a bath.
Eventually, cleanliness began
to come into vogue again, but
only long after a third of
Europe had succumbed to the
Plague. In 1598, Wright reports,
bathing rooms were added to
Windsor Castle in London. It
was here that Queen Elizabeth
took a bath once a month
whether she needed to or not.
As recently as 1812, bathing
was looked upon as frivolous.
When the Lord Mayor of
London requested a simple
shower bath in the mansion
house, he was turned down by
the Common Council on the
grounds that no one had ever
wanted one before. It would
take 20 more years before one


would be installed.
Showers, as we know them
today without the pouring
servants, came into use in the
late 18th century, according to
Rebecca Weaver and Rodney
Dale's, "Machines in the
Home." The first patent for a
shower was granted in 1767
and owned by William
Feetham. The earliest showers
usually had a hand pump and
became popular because they
required a smaller water supply.
Frank Muir's "An Irreverent
and Almost Complete Social
History of the Bathroom,"
reports that showers had other
advantages over the
commonplace bathtubs. They
were smaller, taking up less
room in already tight areas, and
they were cheaper to install.
With showers, servants had a
wider area to clean, but they
also had less wastewater to
carry away.
But by far the biggest
drawback of the shower was
the cold water shock that
accompanied pulling the cord
on the overhead tank. That
reason alone kept many people
in baths until the advent of
piped hot water. They reasoned
it was easier to slowly drop into
a tub of cold water than to pull
the cord and let it rain down
upon them.
This shower Renaissance
was brought on, in great part,
by doctors prescribing water
cures to their patients. The
water was applied in a number
of ways, including the Rain
Bath -- simply a shower where
the patient would walk in and
the doctor would pull the cord
on the nozzle to shower the
patient.
Lawrence Wright includes
this quote: "It is no rare thing to
see a subject who at this first
shower betrays actual terror,
shouts, struggles, runs away,.
experiences frightening
suffocation and palpitation; and
it is not rare to hear him say,
after a moment, 'so that's all it
is.'"
Shortly thereafter, showers
started becoming
commonplace. The plumbing
industry responded with what
some consider the first designer
shower, the English Regency
Shower. According to "The
Stand-Up Bath" on
theplumber.com this 12-foot-
high luxury shower was made
of metal painted to look like
bamboo. At its base was a basin
with a drain and above it was a
tank. A hand pump forced water
from the basin into the tank and
then over the bather's head. The
main drawback of this design
was that the same water re-
circulated over the bather.
In the 1830s, another unique


.I














showering device hit the
market, the American Virginia
Stool Shower. This all-wood
device resembled a quality
piano stool with a rotating seat.
Placed in the bathtub, the
Shower Stool had a hand-
operated lever that pumped
water from the tub and over the
bather's head and back. A scrub
brush, attached to a vertical
pipe, could be worked up and
down the user's body with the
accompanying foot pedal.
Advances in plumbing in the
mid- 1800s led to advancements
in showering capabilities. It was
about this time that embers
began making freestanding
showers with both hot and cold
water, according to
theplumber.conm.
In 1879, Warren Wasson and
Charles Harris, of Carson City,
Nev., patented a shower that
required the bather to maintain
a constant treading motion with
the feet to operate a pump
which recirculated water from
the tub, according to Weaver
and Dale.
They go on to report on
William Luther's 1891 shower
patent in which a pumpr
compressed air in a reservoir to
force water up to a showerhead.
In 1882 was the first
appearance of Ewart's
Improved Spray Bath with no
fewer than 10 controls that
manipulated various body
manipulated various body


sprays.
In 1889, J. L. Mott Iron
Works followed suit, offering a
unit that could shower the
bather from every angle. The
company's catalog touted that
the shower would provide for
the bather "needle, shower,
descending douche, liver spray
and bidet" functions. Other
manufacturers got in on the act
and provided a variety of
showering options like multiple
heads, waterfall spouts and
body sprays.
"The desires of the
showering public really haven't
changed much 'whZn"' you
compare these antique showers
with shower suites available
today. We've just gotten better
at delivering what the consumer
wants," Lingafelter says.
There are still waterfall
spouts, rain-like showerheads
and body sprays. For example,
Moen's Vertical Spa is available
with multiple body sprays to hit
every part of the body.
The biggest difference
between showers of the 19th
and 21st centuries is that today,
the pipes are behind the walls
and the hot water is a littlemore
reliable. For the hot water, we
can thank Edwin Ruud, founder
of the Ruud Manufacturing
Company, who in 1898
invented the automatic storage
water heater. No longer would
it be necessary to begin boiling


water well in advance of a bAth, !
or stand under the sho wer
awaiting the shock of frigid!
water.
In fact, today's shower ij'
technology has even been able
to remove the dreaded shodk
that accompanies the untimely
flushing ofa toilet or running bf
the kitchen faucet when another
household member is in jle :
shower. Pressure-balanc ng
thermostatic valves like Morn's
ExactTemp are able to maintain
a steady flow-rate and constant :
water temperature, even f If
someone decides to start tlie.
dishwasher .:or do. "a load 'bf
laundry while you're wash'g
away the cares of the day. .
Shortly after the sho rer.
renaissance in the late 19th
century, showers moved back to
being thought of as strictly
utilitarian devices and the fancy
designs disappeared until the
1980s when manufacturers
began responding to the desires
of their customers for mbte
versatility in the shower.
"Today, manufacturers re
continually coming up with
advances in showering -
technology," Lingafelter says.:
"Manufacturers are constaitty
working on'ways to deliver tie
optimal shower to keep tle
showering public clean as wll !
as happy."
Or, you could just get
yourself a servant and a buckle!


What's old is new again, even in


By Judith Nasatir
In design, as in life, what
goes around comes around.
Every style follows a cycle: in,
out and in again. Designs are
revised, refined and updated
with the latest technology. As
each generation discovers the
pleasures of the past, what's
old becomes new again.
Bathroom design is no
exception to this rule.


Minimalism and eclecticism
are popular. But the vintage
look is also "in" for bathrooms,
taking its style cues from the
Art Deco era of the 1920s and
1930s.
The Treasure Hunt: Creating
Vintage Bathrooms
Creating period-style
bathrooms poses its own set of
challenges. Whether the bath of
your dreams is Art Deco or


Porcher's Calla II Suite features refined, alluring shapes reminisce
Art Deco style of the 1930s era. All of the new Calla pieces, incl
cabinet, mirror, whirlpool, pedestal lavatory and toilet, are currently


another style, you must first
find appropriate vintage fittings
and fixtures, or those that look
like the originals. Consider this
first phase as the treasure hunt
because you'll be poking
through salvage yards and
searching the Internet for
original elements such as tubs,
sinks, mirrors and hardware.
Once you've found them, most
vintage fittings must be
retrofitted to meet
1 today's codes and
standards. In
Addition, you'll
probably want to
refinish many of
these pieces. Some
S signs of time's
passage may be
S appealing, but
chipped enamel or
yellowing porcelain
is not.
New Fixtures,
Vintage Look
Luckily, today's
homeowners have
many options if
they don't want to
spend the time and
effort pursuing and
upgrading vintage
ent of the fixtures. Some
uding the companies have
available. resurrected models


first introduced in the 1920s
and 1930s. Others, such as
Porcher, offer designs that
feature up-to-the-minute
functional features wrapped in
period-style packages.
Porcher's Calla II Suite
features refined shapes and
beveled edges recalling themes
from the Art Deco style of the
1930s. Adding modem
conveniences, the Calla 6-foot
oval whirlpool features
StayClean technology that
helps reduce the time needed to
clean and increases the time
spent enjoying the relaxing
experience.
A Splash of Art Deco Color
American bathrooms of the
1920s and 1930s reflected our
growing obsession with
cleanliness. Until late in the
1920s, bathroom walls were
tiled with subway-style
rectangular tiles in bright,
glossy white. With the
emergence of Art Deco, color
flooded the bath. Square,
smooth porcelain tiles with a
high-gloss glaze in bright
white, soft pink or a shade of
green generally lined the walls,
along with lavender, plum and
everything in between. Black
trim pieces added a thin accent
line usually about halfway up


the
feature
mosa
patter
or oct
You'll
tiles
you
above
like t
Just r
and
appro
Fil
Furr
Bey
fixtur
fitting
eleme
Deco
garden
sport
fashion
feature
These
and m
work
in m
chrome
Bui
and
anothc
charac
bath,
attach
ornam
and sc


the bathroom

wall. Floor tiles, often, metals. Restored lightirig:
ring a black-and-white fixtures and frosted glas,
ic border or checkerboard reproductions provide m4ry.
n, were often hexagonal choices. And don't forget lightly
tagonal rather than square. dimmers, which allow you o '
1 have no trouble finding convert your everyday ba.h
to meet your needs, and into a romantic retreat. '
can use more than the Bathroom furniture was
e-mentioned colors just created as early as the 18ih
:he Art Deco decorators. century to help consuniers
remember: Crisp corners hide the unmentionables:in
white grout are period- high style. If you're workrmig
private musts. on a bath with an Art Deqo:
things, Finishings and feel, you might consider oile
liture: The Final Touch or all of the pieces tn
yond finding the right Porcher's Calla II Suite, whidh
es, colors and tiles, puts a modern spin on vintage
gs are another important furniture with a pedestal siri.'k
;nt in recreating an Art top built into a cherry-fiuiih
bathroom. The common, cabinet with pull-out dra6vtri
n variety of this era and shelf space.
-d four arms; the Whether you're restoring an
unable, fancy version old house or building a riev,
ed a five-pronged "star." home, any period i 13
styles remain popular, provide a wonderful source. f
models with updated inner inspiration for designing tlie
ngs are widely available bath. If you want to create: ani
any finishes including authentic look, you can
ie, porcelain and enamel, research, find and restore(
It-ins, such as storage vintage pieces. You also c4'n
medicine chests, are find vintage styles in new, ati-
er distinctive the-ready bathroom fixtures.
cteristic of the vintage The resources are endless, andt
as are towel bars the rules are flexible. Either
ed to the sink and way, you won't have Ia
mental ceiling fixtures problem making what's old'
;onces in frosted glass or new again in your bath.







C L SL Irl eu Mi Min e" I EI-M/' b r'V IIM u *I* ann -.. .v i....- .-. ... ..-.-- .


Assisted Living


to' L IL, d
L Alc. o tO.)12.
4,i~L~fLLC


7Y
IJ40Lc L -amp


Qui, IJafats, County, aount'i siting.
AiiL~ate ooim, slenci, 24 zho) caa.
Visit us on the web at www.oakridgealf.com
I- Email: oakridgealf@alltel.net
Mayo, FL* County Rd. 251-A (386) 294-5050
License #AL9863 131384JRS-F

Lake City
:i 0i Eye
?p : Physicians



Sherri A. Cole, L.D.O. Reaves C. Cole, O.D.
Owner Board Certified
Licensed Optician Optometric Physician
621 SW Baya Drive, Suite 101
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 719-9292
or (.86) 754-6616
www.coleoptics.com ,


Si


Counseling
ANDREW HARRELL
SLicensed Mental Health Counselor
Certified Addiction Prevention
Professional
SBlue Cross Blue Shield
Accepted
Amodalon
Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-8825
147830DH-F


Treatment Centers
Lake Cit \ &
Live Oak
K. .2
cancerhope.com

Specializing in Oncology since 1989
S-Comprehensive and Personalized Care
*Best equipment
.' 'Most advanced treatment
S.*Treat all types of cancers
S.IMRT PET CT Eric C. Rost, M.D.
S" David S. Cho, M.D.
Purendra P. Sinha, M.D.
S Board Certified All Insurances Accepted No Referral Necessary
Suwannee Valley CancerHope of
Cancer Center Live Oak
S 795 SW State Road 47 1500 Ohio Ave. North
S Lake City, FL 32025 Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 758-SVCC (7822) (386)362-1174
131387JRS-F
SRonald R. Fdreman. O.D,, PA. Frank A. Broom, i, 10.D.
Kimberly M. Broome, O.D. JuHe L. Owens, 0.D.


North


Florida


EyeCa re
Examination and Treatment of the Eye
Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses
PHONE (386) 362-5055 625 Helvenston
FAX (386) 208-8660 Live Oak, Florida 32066
147761DH-F













Home Recovery"

Locally Owned & Operated
101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
(386) 935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo, F,382066
(386) 294-3777 13144JS-F


Take


to


Your




Heart


r EYE CENTER of North Florida
General Eye Care & Surgery
EYE EXAMS CATARACT SURGERY
GLAUCOMA MACULAR DEGENERATION
*DIABETES* LASERS
Eduardo M. Bedoya, MD
Board Certified, American Board of Ophthalmology
Eye Physician & Surgeon


Medicare, Medicaid, Avmed,
Blue Cross/Blue Shield
& other insurance accepted.
Se habla espafiol.

917 W. Duval St.
Lake City
386-755-7595


Dr. Rios
.1 OBGYN
idwife Services Available
Marlene Summers, CNM

Hours:
Mon. Thur. 8:30 5:00
Closed 12:30-1:30


(386) 755-0500
Fax (386) 755-9217

449 SE Baya Dr.
Lake City, FL 32055 13140


Cancer Care of North Florida
Now seeing patients at Shands at Live Oak
We are a Welcoming New Patients at S alizin in:
total care our two offices at: ,Thrombocylopenia
Bleeding or clotting disorders
medical Shands @ Live Oak or Lake City. Breast Cancer
oncology & Please call (386) 755-1655 SCon Cancer
hematology for an appointment or information Multiple Myeloma
practice. Waeemohn, Leukemia
practice. All Chemotherapy administration and management *Lymphoma
21 .15n F-F Aceesbno Medicare & Motl Insurance


f


Specializing in the evaluation and treatment of Male
Impotence Surgical arnd Medical Therapies
All patients are given
personal and confidential attention.

131382JS-F


We


L1 Health


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I


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS MARCH 16-17, 2005, PAGE 7D


M fnl A Qrl n RA AOL CT1 At,= cZIPVI r, NORT FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEO~ECRGIA


+1-


Melanoma is on the rise:
Learn how to protect yourself
When unprotected skin is exposed to the sun, it can not only be damaged, it significantly increases
the risk of melanoma, currently the most serious type of skin cancer. In the United States alone, the
percentage of people who develop melanoma has more than doubled in the past 30 years, according to
the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Each year, more than 50,000 people in the United States learn
they have melanoma. In some parts of the world, especially in Western countries, melanoma is
becoming more common every year, reports the NCI.
With those alarming numbers and the summer weather here, when our skin is more likely to be
exposed to damaging UVA and UVB rays, we need to learn about melanoma and take the necessary
precautions to protect our skin.
DEVELOPMENT
Melanoma is a type of skin cancer that begins in cells in the skin called melanocytes. Melanocytes
produce melanin, the pigment that gives skin its natural color. When skin is exposed to the sun,
melanocytes produce more pigment,
causing the skin to tan. Sometimes,
clusters of melanocytes and
surrounding tissue form
noncancerous growths called moles.
j. melanocytes become malignant. The
A ,- chance of developing melanoma
increases with age, but the disease
affects people of all ages. It can
: occur on any skin surface. In men,
melanoma is often found on the area
Between the shoulders and the hips,
S the head or the neck. In women, it
often develops on the lower legs.
Melanoma is rare in African
Americans and in others with dark
skin. When it does develop, it tends
Experts believe that much of the worldwide increase in to occur under the fingernails,
melanoma correlates with an increased amount of time toenails or on the palms or soles.
spent in the sun. To reduce your risk, limit your sun RISK FACTORS
exposure and always protect your skin. The exact causes of melanoma are
unknown, and doctors can seldom
explain why one person gets it and another does not. However, research has shown that people with the
following risk factors are more likely than others to develop melanoma.
Abnormal moles: These are more likely than ordinary moles to become cancerous.
Many (more than 50) ordinary moles: Having a high number of moles increases the risk of
developing melanoma.
Fair skin: Melanoma occurs more frequently in people who have skin that burs or freckles easily
(these people also usually have red or blond hair and blue eyes) than in those with darker skin.
Personal history of melanoma or skin cancer: People who have been treated for melanoma have a
high risk of developing a second melanoma.
Family history of melanoma: Having two or more close relatives with the disease increases one's
risk.
Weak immune system: People whose immune system is weakened by illness or drug treatment are
at risk.
Severe, blistering sunburns: People who have had at least one severe, blistering sunburn as a child,
teenager or adult are at increased risk.
Ultraviolet (UV) radiation: Spending large amounts of time in the sun causes premature aging of
the skin and damage that can lead to melanoma. Artificial sources of UV radiation, such as sunlamps
and tanning booths, also increase the risk of melanoma.
SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
Often, the first sign of melanoma is a change in the size, shape, color or feel of an existing mole.
Melanomas may be black, abnormal, or just "ugly looking." Newly formed fine scales and itching in a
mole also are common symptoms of early melanoma. Melanomas may feel different from regular
moles. In more advanced stages, the texture of the mole may become hard or lumpy. More advanced
tumors may itch, ooze or bleed.
THE ABCD METHOD
OF CHECKING MOLES
The NCI advises that we check our skin regularly for new growths or other changes, using the
ABCD method.
Asymmetry -- The shape of one half does not match the other.
Border -- The edges are often ragged, notched, blurred, or irregular in outline; the pigment may
spread into the surrounding skin.
Color -- The color is uneven. Shades of black, brown and tan may be present. Areas of white, grey,
red, pink or blue also may be seen.
Diameter -- There is a change in size, usually an increase. Melanomas are usually larger than the
eraser of a pencil (1/4 inch or five millimeters).
Melanomas can vary greatly in appearance. Many show all the ABCD features. However, some may
show changes or abnormalities in only one or two of the ABCD features.
A SKIN SELF-EXAM

Check the skin after a shower or bath in a well-lit room using a full-length and hand-held mirrors.
Learning where our birthmarks, moles and blemishes are and what they look and feel like helps ease
the process.
Check for anything new:
A new mole (that looks abnormal)
A change in the size, shape, color, or texture of a mole
A sore that does not heal
Examine yourself from head to toe. Check all areas of the skin, including the back, the scalp,
between the buttocks, the genital area, the feet, including soles, between the toes and nails.
By checking your skin regularly, you will become familiar with what is normal for you. It may be
helpful to record the dates of your skin exams and write down how your skin looks. The NCI
recommends seeing a doctor immediately if you have questions or find anything unusual.
PREVENTION
The sun can damage our skin year-round, not just during the summer. UV radiation can penetrate
light clothing, windshields and windows, and it can be reflected by sand, water, snow and ice. That's
why doctors recommend we protect our skin at all times by:
Avoiding sun exposure from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. whenever possible.
Wearing long sleeves, long pants, a hat with a wide brim and sunglasses with UV-absorbing lenses
when outdoors.
Using a "broad-spectrum coverage" sunscreen which reflects, absorbs and/or scatters all types of
ultraviolet radiation.
To learn more about melanoma, call the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at (800) 4-CANCER (800-
422-6237); TTY (for deaf and hard of hearing
callers): (800) 332-8615, or go online and visit -- ,
their Web site at www.cancer.gov. _. -" _,-


Ophthalmology
GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
Located In SHANDS At Live Oak
1100 SW llth St. Live Oak
(904) 373-4300 or 1-800-435-3937

Family enutistry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
SD.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) 131390JS-F



General Orthopaedics

Edward J.
Sambey, M.D.
Occupational Medicine The
General Orthopaedics orthopaedic
Sports Medicine U center
Lake City Office 4367 NW American Lane
Phone 386-755-9215 Toll Free 1-888-860-7050
Workers compensation and
Most Insurance Plans Accepted ,3595DH-F



Medicine




RENALDAS A. SMIDTAS, M.D. AND ASSOCIATES
American Board of Internal Medicine certified,
Fellow of American Board of Balance Medicine.
SHELIA Y. ROBERTS, A.R.N.P., C.S.
KATHY NEWMAN, A.R.N.P
Heart, Cardiovascular Diseases Diabetes management
Allergy and Asthma Lung diseases Women's Health
Invasive Pain Management for Arthritis of the Knee, Shoulders,
Back Pain Ultrasound Diagnostic and More
Live Oak Jasper
362-5840 792-0753
1437 N. Ohio Ave. 413 NW 5th Ave..

Physical Th,-apy

JfK? I^r~aLiaoz fLnc,.
"cl (snting JI' joauv J~s~agioiLoatecsc JV.fis"
Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy
Specializing In Arthritis Fibronyalgia* Geriatrics Spinal &
Joint Pain Sports Injuries -Work Injuries Pediatrics
SManual Therapy Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross, Av Med
Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics
Branford 935-1449 *Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans

A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency a
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore




Heartland
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA

PROFESSIONAL TOUCH
PHYSICAL THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis
Orthopedic/Sports Medicine, Pediatrics
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS
Providers
1506 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051 131397J

Urolngy, Urologic Surgery
& Iihpotunn Center




ROBERT G. BUSCH, D.O.
ERIC ORDINARIO, D.O.
Board Certified Urology and Urological Surgery
Common Problems Treated:
Infections Prostate Problems Kidney Stones Sexual
Problems Genital Surgery Cancer of the Urinary Tract *
Impotence Infertility Urinary Incontinence
Common Surgical Procedures In Office:
Cystoscopy No Scapel Vasectomy Treatment of
Condyloma Prostate Ultrasound/Biopsy Bladder
Ultrasound Penil Vascular Studies
Common Surgical Problems In
Hospital or Ambulatory Surgical Center;
Prostate, Kidney and Bladder Cancer Surgery
Kidney Stone and Surgery Litholripsy Microscopic
Vasectomy Reversal Impotence Surgcry Hernia Surgery





PAGE 8D. MARCH 16-17. 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA U--


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