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 Section A: Sports
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 Section B continued
 Section B: North Florida Focus
 Section C: Community Calendar
 Section B: Classifieds
 Section D continued














The Jasper news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028306/00004
 Material Information
Title: The Jasper news
Uniform Title: Jasper news (Jasper, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: F.M. DeGraffenried
Place of Publication: Jasper Fla
Creation Date: January 20, 2005
Publication Date: 1890-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Jasper (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hamilton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hamilton -- Jasper
Coordinates: 30.518889 x -82.951111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 21, 1890)-
General Note: Editor: Jno. M. Caldwell, <1890>.
General Note: Publisher: W.L. Whitfield, <1904>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579542
oclc - 33315707
notis - ADA7388
lccn - sn 95047198
System ID: UF00028306:00004

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
    Section A: Sports
        page B 1
        page B 2
    Section B continued
        page B 3
    Section B continued
        page B 4
    Section B continued
        page B 5
        page B 6
    Section B: North Florida Focus
        page C 1
        page C 2
    Section C: Community Calendar
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
        page C 9
        page C 10
    Section B: Classifieds
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
    Section D continued
        page D 4
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
Full Text


nflaonline.com









**5-DIGIT 32611 000000
SUBSCRIBER UNIV OF FLA LIBRARIES
SERIAL SECTION
N Do C rPO0 BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


'No Deal' for Card Room at Jai Alai


Commissioners play their hand

against strong opposition Tuesday

Referendum vote may be

'ante'for county on issue
See the January 27 issue of the
Jasper News for full coverage of this story

A Hamilton session

with Gov. Bush on

tap for January 28


Clean-up drive on MLK Drive,


residents honor civil rights leader


TRIBUTE TO MLK JR. : It was a labor of love for numerous local residents honoring Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday,
January 17, by cleaning trash and debris from Martin Luther King Drive in JaspYer. The clean-up was sponsored by the
Hamilton County FAMU Chapter. Although the weather was cold and windy, the zealous citizens worked diligently and
cheerfully even pausing from the task at hand, long enough for a smiling, exuberant group photo. A jubilant parade fol-
lowed and it was on to the Hamilton County Recreation Center afterwards for some well-deserved family fun, food and
fellowship all in honor of the slain civil rights leader during the national holiday celebrated Monday. Special guest speak-
er for the occasion was Reverend Desi Nixon. (staff Photo)

Hamilton company joins tsunami

recovery effort, pledges $1 million


On a tirst come first
serve basis Hamilton
County residents may
sign-up tor a personal
chit-chat \with either Flori-
da Governor Jeb Bush, or
Lt. Gov. Tom Jennings
when the pair \isits the
community ne\t Friday,
Jan. 28.
A designated 'Citizens
Hour' is designed to al-
low any resident of the
community an one-on-
one opportunity to sit
wilth the Governor or Lt.
Governor and discuss is-
Lsues of concern or impor-
tance sign-up and regis-
trahon for 'Citizens Hour'
will begin the morning of
the 28th at 7 a.m.. at the


courthouse in Jasper. Staff
members from the Gover-
nor's otfiice will be on
hand at that time to coor-
dinate the program.
A- requested residents
can then sit with Gov.
Bush or Lt. Gov. inningss
and air concerns during
their five-minute meet-
ing. The sessions ~vill run
from 8 a.m. on lan. 28. un-
til 12 noon. The program
is slated to be held in
Room 106 at the court
house.
The 'Citizens Hour'
concept, "gives us an in-
valuable opportunity to
listen, learn and serve the
people of our great state,"
noted Gov. Bush.


"Log-rolling" in


PCS Phosphate:

"We know these

people"
PCS Phosphate of Hamil-
ton County, through its
parent company Potash
Corp. of Saskatchewan, re-
cently pledged to donate $1
million to the on-going
tsunami relief effort over-
seas.
The organization receiv-
ing the money has yet to be
decided, but the selection
has been narrowed to a
handful of reputable orga-
nizations. "When we look
at the magnitude of the do-
nation, we want to ensure
that we distribute it respon-
sibly," stated corporate and
. government relations direc-
tor Tom Pasztor. "It's im-
portant to the company that

Hamilton


funds get to the people,in
the affected areas on a sus-
tained basis."
When the devastation
first hit, Potash Corp. re-
sponded with a $10,000 do-
nation to Doctors Without
Boarders. The amount was
increased to $1 million once
the extent of the tsunami
damage became apparent.
The overseas' devastation
is in an area all too familiar
to the company. It's recog-
nized that many Potash em-
ployees working through-
out the hardest hit region in
the past, have helped each
of those countries affected
develop effective food pro-
duction systems. "We
know these people. Not as
customers, but as friends,"
noted Pasztor.
The parent company has
also adjusted its matching
gift program for donations

County


toward the relief program.
Employee donations will
continue to be matched dol-


lar for dollar, with no mini-
mum or maximum contri-
bution.


Local organization

given grant award


The Florida Humanities
Council recently announced
that a Hamilton County or-
ganization was the recipient
of a major grant award in
support of a local humanities
program that will take place
in White Springs. Stephen
Foster Citizen Support
Group received $8,000 in
support of "Florida Folklife
Area New Communities."
The project funds the folklife
area of the Florida Folk Festi-
val in order to expand aware-
ness of the traditional arts
and crafts of cultures new to
Florida.
The Florida Humanities
Council is an independent,
non-profit organization and


is the state affiliate of the Na-
tional Endowment for the
Humanities. Each year, FHC
funds hundreds of public
program throughout the
state that explore Florida's
history, folklore, environ-
ment, literature, music and
art. Libraries, civic groups,
universities, colleges, muse-
ums, historical societies and
theaters have received grants
to sponsor humanities pro-
grams.
For more information on
how to apply for humanities
grants, contact Florida Hu-
manities Council, 599 S 2nd
St., St. Petersburg, FL 33701
or visit their website,
"www.flahum.org."


INSIDE TODAY
DOWLING PARK


SPECIAL SECTION
FEATURED INSIDE


THIRD TIME LUCKY: A third accident involving a logging truck has occurred in Hamilton County in less than a month.
L&L Wood Hauling logging truck driver Willie Hicks of Live Oak, lost control of his truck Monday when the load shifted
on the curve near Hebron Cemetery on CR 51, locally known as Baker's Mill Road. He had just left the loading area
and was traveling north. Although traffic was tied-up on the roadway, no other vehicles were involved in the incident and
there were no injuries reported according to the accident report. Florida Highway Patrol investigated the mishap and
Hicks was not charged with a violation Additional logging truck accident pictures appear on page 3A. (staff Photo)
THIRD TIME LUCKY: A third accident involving a logging truck has occurred in Hamilton County in less than a month.
L&L Wood Hauling logging truck driver Willie Hicks of Live Oak, lost control of his truck Monday when the load shifted
on the curve near Hebron Cemetery on CR 51, locally known as Baker's Mill Road. He had just left the loading area
and was traveling north. Although traffic was tied-up on the roadway no other vehicles were involved in the incident and
there were no injuries reported according to the accident report, Florida Highway Patrol investigated the mishap and
Hicks was not charged with a violation Additional logging truck accident pictures appear on page 3A. (staf Photo)


With a recommendation
of 5 to 9 servings of
fruits and vegetables a
day, there is plenty of
room to add variety to a
child's fruit choices.
-Page 7D


INDEX
Obituaries ......... 5A
Jail Notes ......... .5B
Legal Notices .......5B
Classifieds .......1-5D
Calendar .........3-9C





f COOKIE
For Kids I
PuI 12 & Under
No Purchase Necessary
lust Present Coupon
' /W Limit 1 Per Person
\I, dW q Good 1/21/05 Only


I ._____ I







PAG 2A_ THE JAPRNWJseFHUSAJNAY2,20


New discount cards


available to public for


prescription drug use


No


dictionary


needed


Central


spellers


shine


TOP SPELLERS:
Winners of the CHE
spelling bee are ready to
take on the competition at i
the Hamilton County
Spelling Bee on Friday,
Feb. 4. Pictured are: front (I
to r) Meagan Vaughn, First
Place and Bria Davis, Sec-
ond Place; back (I to r)
Cameron Hawkins, Fourth .
Place and Jasmine Jack-
son, Third Place. (Photo Sub- "
mitted) .


Many Hamilton County
residents could save money
on prescription drugs with a
new discount card now
available. A group of major
medicine manufacturers has
joined together to offer the
Together Rx Access Card to
millions of uninsured citi-
zens.
The card will allow those
who qualify for it to save 25
to 40 percent on over 275 dif-
ferent medications. Singles
under age 65 with incomes of
less $30,000 per year ($40,000
for couples) and not having
Medicare are eligible for the
card.
David Newman, pharma-
cy manager at Baya Pharma-
cy in Jasper, sees many peo-
ple struggling to pay for their
medicine. "This card will be a
big help to younger families
and singles in the area,"
Newman said, "and especial-
ly to those approaching
Medicare age that are unin-
sured." He looks forward to
seeing people come in with
the cards, which will be effec-
tive next month.
Most pharmacies are ex-
pected to accept the cards.
Call 1-800-444-4106 or con-
tact the Hamilton County
Pharmacy Assistance Pro-
gram (792-2143) for more in-
formation or to sign-up for
the new card.


For many families, free or
lower cost prescription medi-
cine is available in Hamilton
County. Anyone taking any
medicine for over a few
months may be eligible to get
it for free from the manufac-
turer. Blood pressure medi-
cines, heart medicines and a
wide variety of other medi-
cines are covered by various
free programs. Some generic
medicines are available at a
very low cost. Applications
are free and readily available.
Funded by a grant from
The Blue Foundation for a
Healthy Florida, the Hamil-
ton County Pharmacy Assis-
tance Program can help with
the application process for
free or low cost medicine. It is
a local resource for residents
to find other sources for med-
icines, from discount cards
for everyone, to free pro-
grams for those who qualify.
The program has numerous
resources available for all
Hamilton County residents.
Program services are com-
pletely FREE.
The program is located at
204 Northeast First Street in
the Sandlin Building across
from the courthouse. The en-
trance is on the side of the
building on First Avenue. It
is open daily from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. The telephone number
is 792-2143.


"Jump Against Drugs"

with world record-holder

Mark Rothstein January 21


STRIVING TO SPELL: CHE fifth and sixth grade students vied for winning positions at the school spelling bee on
January 14, and the opportunity to compete in the Hamilton County Spelling Bee. (Photo Submitted)






EVENING COURSES


SUWANNEE-HAMILTON TECHNICAL CENTER

415 SW Pinewood Dr.,
Live Oak, FL 32060 (386) 364-2750
Registration: January 10th & January 11th, 2005
5:00 7:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY EDUCATION

Seven Week Course Nine Week Course
1. Course cost is figured at the rate of $2.00 per hour, plus books
2. Full refunds will be issued, if the class is cancelled for insufficient enrollment (less than 10).
3. A $5.00 processing fee will be charged for all other refunds.
4. Classes with less than 10 may elect to continue, if the participants pay a prorated amount for less than 10 students enrolled.
5. All classes are from 6:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. (unless noted otherwise).


Rope jumping record
holder Mark Rothstein will
appear at North Hamilton
Elementary in the auditori-
um at 1:30 p.m. on Friday,
January 21. He has estab-
lished two world records for
marathon rope jumping. His
most recent was jumping
continuously for more than
36 hours over 259,000 total
jumps.
Rothstein combines his
Skills as a professional rope
jumper, educator, entertain-
er, athlete and role model to
present the "Jump Against
Drugs" program to young
people around the world.
During the show, he per-
forms about 100 different
rope jumping skills.
Since beginning his tour in
the mid 1980's, Rothstein has
presented more than 7500
"Jump Against Drugs"


school assemblies to over
5,000,000 young people in
more than'5000 cities, towns,
villages and reservations.
When touring in the United
States, he drives to all loca-
tions and has driven more
than 1,000,000 miles. He has
also traveled to the Middle
East, Europe and Asia.
Rothstein's personal phi-
losophy is "believe in your-
self, maintain a dedicated
work ethic and strive to im-
prove your physical fitness."
The "Jump Against Drugs"
program emphasizes staying
drug-free, physically fit, and
eager to try. He also stresses
the importance of character
building by emphasizing
honesty, polite manners, and
acts of kindness.
The public is invited. For
more information call 938-
1400.


COURSE TITLE DAY DATES (2005) COST
* Cake Decorating Monday January 24-March 21 $43.00
* Conversational Spanish Monday January 24-March21 $53.00
* Floral Design Monday January 24-March 21 $43.00
Introduction to Computer Keyboarding Monday January 24-April 11 $58.00
Introduction to Internet 4 weeks Monday January 24-April 11 $28.00
Microsoft Access Monday January 24-April 11 $58.00
Microsoft Windows 2000 Monday January 24-April 11 $58.00


The following classes will be scheduled when at least 10 persons indicate an interest.
Call in registration accepted by calling (386) 364-2759.
Monday CPR(lan.l, 11,Feb.7,8.arl,8.Apr.4i.,My2&3) $35.00 Tuesday Bicycle Repair $43.00
Monday First Aid lan.24 Feb.14.la.21,Apr.ll &ay)9 $25.00 Tuesday Intro to Photography $43.00
Monday Hobby Woodworking $43.00 Tuesday Lamaze $50.00
Monday Antiques & Collectibles $43.00 Thursday Genealogy $43.00
Monday Basic Mechanics $43.00
Class enrollment must be sufficient to support all programs. Enrollment is based on first
come, first serve basis. Equal opportunity employer. All computer classes have a
prerequisite of Keyboarding with the exception of Introduction to Computer Keyboarding.
Classes and fees are subject to change. Maximum of 15 for all computer classes.


Microsott Word for Wndows 2000 Monday January 24-April 11 $58.00 Adult Education DAY DATES Times Cost
Quickbooks Pro 2001 (New Class) Monday January 24-April 11 $58.00 Adult Education/GED Prep/at ranford High School Monday & Wednesay Continuous 5:30 p.m.- 8:30 p.m. Free
* Sign Language Monday January 24-March 21 $43.00 AdultEducationGED Prep Monday &Tuesday Continuous 5:30 p.m.- 8:30 p.m. Free
Job Preparatory
*Beginning Bridge Tuesday January 25-March 8 $43.00 A $50.00 non-refundable deposit is due at the lime of application. The applicant must have the deposit or a letter of
authorization from an agency that is sponsoring the student to have their name placed on the class roll. The deposit will
Introduction to Computer Keyboarding Tuesday January 25-March 22 $58.00 be applied to the tuition and fees of the participant. The deposit will be refunded if tie class is cancelled.
Microsoft Excel Tuesday January 25-March 22 $58.00 0 Hour ChildCare Preschool Mon. &Tues Feb. 28, Mar, I & 7,2005 6:00-9:30 p.m. $27.50
l0 Hour Child Care"BOS" Mon. & Tues. Mar 14,21,& 22,2005 600-9:00 p.m. $26.72
Microsoft Office 2000 Tuesday January 25-March 22 $58.00 20 HourChildCare Mon.&Tues. Jan. 24, 25,31,Feb. &7,2005 6:00-10:00p.m. $52.17
* Oil Painting Tuesday January 25-March 8 $43.00 30 HourChild Care Mon.& Tues. See 10 Hr Prschool&20 Hr above 6:00-9:30 p.m 79.67
40HourChild Care IOhr Preschool; 10hr. SeelOHrPreschoolOHrlOS.&20Hr 600-10.00pm. 5106.39
* One Stroke by Donna Dewberry Tuesday January 25-March 8 $43.00 BOS; 20 hr. Child Care Rules & Regulailons above
Pro 2002 Tuesday January 25-March22 $58.00 30HourChild Care Homre Saturday Jan 29,Fei.5,12,19,&26,2005 8a.m.-2 p.m. $ S86.48
Quickbooks Pro 2002 Tuesday January 25-March 22 $58.00 Eary childhood aon2dScCDA Tuesday 3Ap ,2005 6:00-9:00 p.m. S54.75
Creative Writing Workshop, Poetry, & Thursday January 25-Feb. 24 $37.00 Phlebotom vs hours) Mon. & Tues. an 24 April 1, 2005 6:00-9:00p.m. S216.75
Flash Fiction (Book Reg.) IV Therap 30 hours Friday ay 6, l3.20 & 27.2005 8 a.m.4:30 p.m. 5206.66
Dianne Westcott, Accredited by Council on Occupational Education George E. McKnight, SUlW ANN "EE- i
Principal 41 Perimeter Center East, NE, Suite 640 Evening Coordinator ]H ASIILTON4s14Q- 'S
(386) 364-2750 Atlanta, Georgia 30346 (770) 396-3898 (386) 364.2759 TECH NICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064
TABE TEST GED TEST HSCT TEST (386) 364-2750
364-2798 364-2782 364-2798 FINANCIALAIDIS AVAILABLEANDACCEPTED.
36-2798 3 64-0 2782APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING BENEFITS.
ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


I.


Mark Rothstein
ROPE JUMPING CHAMPION


-I A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


PAGE 2A


Al All-Ar- M


I I A I ') A-- I d o An






III "LAY __iA IRI TE S N S a FPG


Recent log spills hamper local traffic, no injuries reported





.4.- a. "..I
A-4 N W--_.


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-.1~ -


-ff


-~~ y:%:


,. -- .- .. ,_




BURGERS AND LOGS: A Lowndes Timber Company logging truck driver made a sud-
den turn into the Burger King parking lot at the intersection of SR 6 and 1-75 to avoid col-
liding with a car that pulled into the road in front of him last week. The load of cut logs
shifted off-balance and about a quarter of the load fell from the truck into the parking lot.
None of the logs landed in the road and there was no damage or injuries. The driver
loaded the logs by hand while waiting for company help. (Staff Photo)


Ge i o,_l
With nstan Mone


Action always hot &
heavy at Crossroads
Sports Page 1B


" -. '- .-' ;" I ; a_ .. -


Hamilton County Produce

Grand Opening Allprod,
Friday, January 21st & fruit
Located at Intersection of Hwy. 41 & SR 137 slivered
(South entrance of PCS) iy
O l .].Js- a e 1 a I .. *, --.-,-,1-. ,


Instant Money.


At H&R Block, you can walk in with your taxes and walk
out with a refund anticipation loan check. Get the money
.you're looking for to pay off bills and other debt fast.

386-792-1402


ii
r
r
i

i'
i


.. H&R BLOCK
548 Chanbridges Dr., Jasper, FL 32052
Additional fee disclosed at an interest rate, charged by H&R Bank, the lender. Limited availability based on credit acceptance. Those not qualifying for
Instant Money may qualify for a classic refund anticipation loan in as little as one day. At participating locations. 2004 H&R Block Tax Services, Inc.


FARM)


PAGE 3A


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


SI.THU RSDAY. JANUARY 20, 2005


I-i~ i
-I-
'"


I i A Wft A% mr






PIr%%AFF 4A THE.JASPER-NEWS, JasperTH A N Y 2


3Upe dtapper Ncwua
Published weekly every Thursday. USPS #755-980
Office located at 105 NE 2nd Avenue,
Bank of America, Jasper, FL 32052
Phone (386) 792-2487 FAX (386) 792-3009
E-mail address: jaspernewsl@alltel.net
Myra Regan ......................... Publisher
Leonard Dramesi ........................Editor
Melody Lee ............. Administrative Assistant
Kathy Sasser ........................Advertising
Periodicals postage paid at Jasper, FL.
Annual subscription rate is $16 in county,
$23 out of county and out of state.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:


4A

.'SiV1


The Jasper News, 105 NE 2nd Ave., Jasper, FL 32052

Letter to the Editor and Article Policy "Copyrighted Material
Letters to the Editor and news articles can be mailed, FAXed
or dropped off at the news office located in the Bank of Amer-
ica Building, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. till 5 p.m.
Letters to the Editor should be typed, double-spaced if pos-
sible, brief and to the point, approximately 150 to 200 words orAvailable from Com m ercial New s Providers
less. Not all letters are published. To be considered for publi-
cation Letters to the Editor must be signed, include the
writer's address and phone number, and in the Jasper News'
office on Friday before 5 p.m.
I News Releases, 400 or less words, should be typed, double-
spaced if possible, brief and to the point. Not all articles are
published.
Letters and articles may be edited to fit available space. Well
written letters/articles require less editing.
To mail your letter/article, send it to: The Jasper News, 105
NE 2nd Ave., Jasper, FL 32052 or FAX it to: 792-3009.


Common childhood ailment


possible hearing loss cause


Children suffer from illnesses of the ear, nose and throat
more than any other part of the body. Otolaryngologists
(ear, nose and throat specialists) report that children visit
physicians because of ear infections more than for any oth-
er disorder.
Improperly treated ear infections can lead to hearing

Public libraries

hours of operation


Jasper
Monday
Tuesday Friday
Saturday

Jennings
Monday, Wednesday,
Thursday, Friday
Tuesday

White Springs
Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, Friday
Thursday


9 a.m. 8 p.m.
9 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
9 a.m. 12:30 p.m.



1 p.m. 6 p.m.
10 a.m. 6 p.m.



1 pm. 6 p.m.
10 a.m. 12 p.m.
1 p.m. 6 p.m.


loss. Hearing impairment and deafness are common post-
natal developmental disabilities.
Nearly 12 percent of American children suffer from res-
piratory allergies. Approximately 42 percent of school-
aged children may suffer from allergic rhinitis (hayfever),
which can lead to chronic sinusitis. It can cause interrupt-
ed sleep, increased fatigue, irritability, loss of concentra-
tion, itching and watery nose and eyes and sneezing and a
blocked nose. On any given day, more than 10,000 chil-
dren are absent from school due to allergic rhinitis.
If a child has been diagnosed with allergic rhinitis, there
are a number of things than can be done. Try to keep pets
outside or confined to carpet-free areas outside the bed-
room. Fully encase mattresses and pillows in semi-perme-
able coverings to keep down dust mites. Replace the
child's bedroom curtains with shades or blinds. Every
week, freeze stuffed toys for 24 hours and then wash them
to kill dust mites. Don't smoke or allow smoking in the
house. Use a spray furniture polish, air cleaner, and a vac-
uum cleaner with HEPA filters. Get rid of carpets and
rugs. When the pollen count is high, keep the child in-
doors.
To help teach parents the importance of children's ear,
nose and throat health, otolaryngologists started a public
education campaign called Kids E.N.T. Health. In addition
to giving pediatric health advice to parents, the program
provides information on the diagnoses of ear, nose and
throat disorders to other physicians and healthcare givers.
For more information on the program or to learn more
about protecting your child's ear, nose and throat health,
visit the Web site "www.entnet.org/KidsENT."


Step Up To One Of Your
Greatest Challenges: The Scale.
" The Role Of Diet And Exercise In Weight Loss"


Free event sponsored by Women's Advantage
Tuesday, January 25, 2005 Noon to 1pm
Live Oak Garden Club, 11th Street, Live Oak
(Light lunch will be provided.)


Guest Speaker:
Joyce Cortes, MD
Shands Medical Group of Live Oak
Reservations required. Space is limited.


HANDS
HealthCare
shands.org


A/omen s Advaiztarge
A FREE m rtml' r,hipj1prwi.raIa
affiliated -ith:l 'l,fian, I.l1.alth( are'


4
o
l., "


GED Test Dates j
February 7 & 8 at 4 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday
You must attend the registration session
Monday, January 31, 6 p.m.
Wednesday, February 2 at 9 a.m.


Call Lynn Lee at
364-2782
to sign iup for registration. 9

S Suwannee-Hamilton
-echnical Center
N. Live Oak, FL
U I _. _______- _____________


ROBERT G. BUSCH, D.O.
ERIC ORDINARIO, D.O.
BOARD CERTIFIED UROLOGY AND
UROLOGICAL SURGERY


Busch Urology offers comprehensive urological services-the care of Genitourinary problems in
men and urinary tract problems in women. All ages welcomed and each patient is treated as an
individual, with his or her needs specifically addressed.
Common Problems Treated Infections Prostrate Problems Kidney Stones Sexual Problems
* Genital Surgery Cancer of the Urinary Tract Impotence Infertility Urinary Incontinence
Common Surgical Procedures In Office Cystoscopy No Scalpel Vasectomy Treatment of
Condyloma Prostate Ultrasound/Biopsy Bladder Ultrasound Penile Vascular Studies
Common Surgical Procedures in Hospital or Ambulatory Surgical Center Prostate, Kidney
and Bladder Surgery Kidney Stone and Surgery Lithotripsy Microscopic Vasectomy Reversal
* Impotence Surgery

SPECIALIZING IN THE EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF MALE IMPOTENCE
SURGICAL AND MEDICAL THERAPIES
All patients are given personal and confidential attention
Office Locations in Lake City and Live Oak
Toll Free 1-888-775-6853 13156JRs-F


-00-- p---
F-Fwvoow


Historic

days,
medieval

knights
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THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


PAGE 4A


M


~~,.







THRDY JAUR 0 05TEJSERNWJseF AE5


Recent losses sadden Hamiton County






.Awo "


Sauls- Bembry


vows set for April 23


William Arvel Drury

Passing of Drury


A pair of stalwarts, well-
known throughout Hamilton
County, passed away recent-
ly.
Hamilton County is a car-
ing community, and openly
expressed its sadness with an
outpouring of affection and
grief with the deaths of local
residents William Drury and
Hilward Morgan. Both men


In most cases when you
speak to a pastor he or she
will speak of their calling
into the Lord's service. Many
people outside the ministry
do not understand what they
are talking about. So what is
this calling and where does it
come from?
When Paul wrote to the
church at Ephesus he ad-
dressedthe letter to the saints
or people in the church. Eph-
esians 4:1 says "I, therefore,
the prisoner of the Lord, be-
seech you to walk worthy of
the calling with which you
were called" (Italics mine).
So it looks like all Christians
have a calling of some kind.
Here, I believe Paul is speak-
ing of the call to be a Christ-
ian and follow God's will.
I have spoken with many


--. .. "._
Ray Hilward Morgan

- Morgan grieve a caring community


were life-long residents of
Hamilton, prominently in-
grained into the very breath
and fabric of the community.
Each passed away follow-
ing an extended illness. Ded-
ication and devotion to the
community were trademarks
of Morgan and Drury.
Morgan served the local
school system for many years


as both a member and chair-
man of the Hamilton County
School Board. In conjunction
with his numerous farm-re-
lated interests and activities,
Hilward was also president of
the Hamilton County Farm
Bureau. He resided in the
White Springs section of the
county.
Drury was elected 3rd Ju-


from a prophetic word spo-
ken through one of God's ser-
vants. So when you hear
someone say they have heard
from God it doesn't necessar-
ily mean that they have audi-
bly heard something in their
ears but more than likely they
have heard through one of the
methods above.
When I first started feeling
drawn to serve God as a min-
ister I felt a strong urge to get
closer to God and to learn
more about Him. I had been a
Christian for some time but
had never had the desire to
form a deep relationship with
God but then, for some rea-
son, I just couldn't get
enough bf'G6d."That reason
was the call of God. So I
prayed more, studied the
Bible more, and got much
more involved in my church.
Not long after that I was at-
tending a church meeting and


dicial Circuit Judge in '73.
He served as attorney for.the
county and the school board,
along with being a Hamilton
County prosecutor. Drury
was active with the local Ki-
wanis Club, as well as presi-
dent of both the Lions Club
and Hamilton County Cham-
ber of Commerce. He was a
resident of Jasper.


when the invitation came to
make a decision for the Lord
I was impressed by the Holy
Spirit to go forward and tell
the pastor that I was making
myself available for God's
service, whatever that may
be.
With counsel from my pas-
tor and the leading of God I
found myself enrolled in a
Bible College and serving as
a pastor. Today as I pastor
Harvest Fellowship Church I
find myself completely satis-
fied that I am doing what God
intended for me to do when
He first "called" me twenty-
four years ago. Although I
have served'as pastor inr three
d tifere n''ar4's "afid 'been led'
by God to minister in many
different ways, the. call re-
mains the same.
God's call is real. Could He
be calling you to minister in a
special way?


ministers who have been
"called into ministry" which
is a subsequent calling to do
something beyond our initial
calling into Christianity. I can
testify of my own salvation
and subsequent call into min-
istry. So I will attempt to ex-
plain what it is to experience
a call from God.
It is not like the comedy
routine where a man gets a
phone call from God and then
tries to explain why he hasn't
been going to church. Being
called into ministry has noth-
ing to do with a phone call
but does involve communi-
cating with God in some way.
Just a few ways people com-
municate with God is through
dreams, visions, impressions,
urges, and godly thoughts, di-
rection from God's Word or


OIITUARYm


Libbey Jean Alford Kry
Libbey Jean Alford Kry,
age 92, of Jasper, Florida,
passed away Friday, January
14, 2005, at Shands at Lake
Shore, following an extended
illness. She was born in Cal-
houn County, Florida, on No-
vember 18, 1912, and was a
longtime resident of Hamil-
ton County, Florida. Mrs.
Kry worked as a nurses aide
for both Jasper Hospital and
Suwannee Valley Nursing
Center. She was a member of
the First Presbyterian Church
in Jasper. Mrs. Kry was pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band, James M. Kry, a son-
in-law, Judge Clyde B.
Wells, four brothers and one
sister.
Survivors include one son
and daughter-in-law, James
and Martha Kry of Bushnell,


Florida; two daughters: Es-
teena K. Wells of Defuniak
Springs, Florida, and Bar-
bara A. Griffin of Chatta-
hoochee, Florida; one sister-
in-law, Mrs. Fletcher Alford
of Chattahoochee; eight
grandchildren: James W. Kry
Jr., Cheryl Christensen,
Dwayne Walton Kry, Kelly
Horton, Judge Kelvin Wells,
Rookie Whiddon, Ricky
Whiddon and David Griffin;
and ten great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
Monday, January 17, at the
First Presbyterian Church
with Reverend Doug Hilliard
officiating and Reverend
Wendell Hill assisting. Inter-
ment followed in Evergreen
Cemetery.
Harry T. Reid Funeral
Home was in charge of
arrangements.


Thank You


Our family is very appre-
ciative of the thoughts,
prayers and love extended
to Hilward and our family
during his battle with can-
cer. We are confident that
the prayers were answered,
and we are comforted
knowing he is now at peace.
We are so fortunate to
live in a caring community
where friends support one
another in times of need.


Your acts of love and kind-
ness will never be forgot-
ten.
Hilward was proud to
live in Hamilton County,
and he valued the friend-
ship he shared with you all.
May God bless you al-
ways!
Irene T. Morgan
Kevin, Cindy,
Rachel and
Mallory Morgan


Action always hot &

heavy at Crossroads.

See page 1B for photos


Bud Henry Bembry and Heather L. Sauls


Mackey W. Sauls Jr. of
Jennings, Florida, and Lynn
Plair Davis of Jennings,
Florida, are pleased to an-
nounce the upcoming mar-
riage of their daughter,
Heather L. Sauls, to Bud
Henry Bembry, the son of
the late Elwood Bembry and
Mary Bembry of Jasper,
Florida.
The bride-elect's maternal
grandparents are the late Ed
and the late Lossie Player of
Jennings. Paternal grandpar-
ents are the late Mackey W.
Sauls Sr. and Coye Hall of
Jennings.
The future groom's mater-
nal grandparents are the late
E.J. Paulk Sr. and the late
Dixie Paulk of Suwannee
County. Paternal grandpar-
ents are the late Henry Bem-
bry and the late Ocilla Bem-


bry of Hamilton County.
Heather is a graduate of
Hamilton County High
School. She completed the
Medical Assistant Program
at Valdosta Technical
School and is currently em-
ployed with South Georgia
Medical Associates in Val-
dosta, Georgia.
Bud is a graduate of
Hamilton County High
School and is currently em-
ployed with the Florida De-
partment of Corrections.
The wedding will take
place Saturday, April 23,
2005, at 6:00 p.m. at
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
State Park in White Springs,
Florida. The reception will
follow immediately after the
ceremony.
All family and friends are
invited.


Thank You


"'0, gile thanks to the
Lord. for He is good, for His
nercy endures forever."
%\e, the family of the late
Betty .1. Smith Po-iell. \wsh
to thank e\ eryone tfr all acts
of kindness during our time
of sorrow We thank yon for
all cards, flowers, donations.
words of comfron. \isits and
your lo\ e.


Special thanks to the Ne\\
Bethel Baptist Church fauni-
1%. the New% Bethel ANME
Clutrch family and the Hines
and Simimons Ftuneral Home
staff.
Nlai God keep and bles-s
vou all.
Tie Raren, 5nulth
Ow'en, Tucker and
thdcherson Faindies.




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Ouse&rnmi9 So~yecer


FIRST ADVENT CHRISTIAN
N.W. 15th Avenue Jasper
Rev. Fran Wood
Sunday
Sunday School.......................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship....................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Fellowship.................6:30 p.m.
129012JS-F


CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1/2 mile East on Hwy. 6, Jasper, Fl 32052
792-2275 S. Wendell Hill, Pastor
Sunday
Sunday School.....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship...................11:00 a.m.
Children's Church.................11:00 a.m.
Church Training....................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship.................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting..................7:00 p.m.
129013JS-F
JASPER FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
207 N.E. 2nd Street, Jasper 792-2658
Pastor: Bill Floyd
Sunday
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship.............. .. .............11:00 a.m.
Children's Choir &
Discipleship Training..... ............... 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship........................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Supper 6:00 p.m.
Youth WOW 6:30 p.m.
Prayer Meeting 6:30 p.m.
Youth Bible Study............................. 6:00 p.m.
129014-F
SUNRISE BAPTIST CHURCH
U.S. 129 3 miles North of Jasper
Pastor: Rev. Gene Speight
Bible Study 9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Church 11:00 a.m.
129015JS-F
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
SR 6 West, 6592 NW 48th St.
Jennings, FL 32053
938-5611
Pastor:Jeff Cordero
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Youth Meeting................5:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Worship Mission Friends
RA's, GA's 6:00 p.m.

Prayer Meetinig
and Youth Meeirrq 1:, ,,

^i. ,h i- F


FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH
13159 S.E. C.R. 137, Jasper, FL
Pastor-Mark Collins Phone -(386) 792-2470
Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship........................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship.................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Service 7:30 p.m.
129017DF-F


CHURCH OF CHRIST
CHURCH OF CHRIST
N.W. 3rd St., Jasper
Bldg.: 792-2277
Sunday
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship........................ 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship..................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Evening 6:00 p.m.
129018JS-F


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
204 N.W. 3rd Avenue, Jasper, 792-2258
Pastor: Rev. Doug Hilliard, 792-8412
SUNDAY
Sunday School ........................ 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service........................... 11:00 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer in Fellowship Hall...............9:00 a.m.
Choir Practice 7:30 p.m.
129019JS-F


JASPER CHURCH OF GOD
408 Palmetto Ave., Jasper, 792-2312
Pastor: Robert L. Layne
Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship....................... 10:45 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Family Training......................7:00 p.m.
Ministering to all ages.
129020-F


BURNHAM
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
4520 NW CR 146, Jennings, FL 32053
938-1265
Youth Pastor: John Proctor
Sunday
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship 11:00a.m.
Evening Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting 7:00 p.m.
129022JS-F


HARVEST FELLOWSHIP
407 Hatley St., Hwy. 6E
P.O. Box 1512, Jasper, FL
Pastor Jerry Thomason
Phone- (386) 792-3833 or 792-3831
Sunday
Morning Worship.................... 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday
Bible Study (all age groupsl................7:00 p.m.
Call Church for Directions
129023-F


ST. THERESE CATHOLIC CHURCH
Three miles north of Jasper U.S. 41
P.O. Box 890, Jasper, FL 32052
Rectory U.S. 90 E.,
Live Oak, FL
(386)364-1108
Sunday MASS 11:15 a.m.
129024JS-F


To list your church
on our church
directory, please
call Kathy at
1-800-525-4182


NEW BETHEL AME CHURCH
604 SW 6th Ave., Jasper, FL 32053
Rev. Ron Rawls
Sunday
Church School 10:00 a.m.
New Members Class ....................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
*Communion every 1st Sunday
Wednesday
Bible Study 7-00 p m
Triurcd3y
Chrr Rehersl F, 30 p m
ww* r ne tiellij..,er I:,:nm

. Z&dU&'ie


Spiritual

Guidance
By Jerry A. Thomason, Pastor, Harvest Fellowship


What's in a calling?


11 -.11


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 5A


THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005





THE JASPER NEWS. Jasoer. FL


Hamilton "greeting" on target


Congressman Ander Cren-
shaw joined Florida Senators
Bill Nelson and Mel Martinez
in calling on the Bush Ad-
ministration to maintain the
current end-strength of the
Navy's aircraft carrier fleet.
Crenshaw and his colleagues
unveiled legislation mandat-
ing the Navy keep a fleet of at
least 12 carriers.
"In 2000, President Bush
and I ran for elected office on
the same national security
platform. We promised to re-
store our military's strength
and to commit the funding
needed to ensure this nation
was fully prepared for battle.
This legislation we announce
today ensures we keep that
firm commitment to national


THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


Shaping-up for new year:

Realistic plan, set

attainable goals,


key to good
The most important thing
to keep in mind while mak-
ing resolutions for the New
Year is to set attainable goals.
Look better, feel better, lose
weight and tone up but re-
member it is important to
have fun and be realistic
about the goals. Change
WELCOME CENTER PROGRESSES: It's the first stop in Florida for visitors traveling 1-75 South, and it's progress- doesn't come overnight
irig just fine. Construction on the new Florida Welcome Center in Hamilton County is on target and the local area will which is why a fitness resolu-
soon be greeting Florida visitors with a new modern, state-of-the-art facility the second busiest in the state. Key tion should last all year.
turn-over from the state is expected in April, along with total completion of the project tearing down of the old fa- Drink plenty of water. This
cility earmarked for August of this year. (Staff Photo)

Progress Energy announces year-end totals for Energy Neighbor flnd


Progress Energy Florida
maintains The Energy
Neighbor Fund through vol-
untary contributions from
customers and employees. In
2004, the company and its
customers raised $485,276,
which included a $223,000


contribution from the
Progress Energy Foundation.
Since 1988, Progress Ener-
gy and its customers have
raised roughly $7 million
and helped nearly 60,000
families in financial need pay
their power bills. Progress


Energy is a partner with the
United Way to select social
service agencies to work
within the communities they
serve. The agencies distribute
100 percent of the money do-
nated by customers to people
who cannot afford their elec-


THE SCIENCE OF

INNER HARMONY
and the art of

r editatioii
Welcome to a free seminar on the meditation
of the inner Light and Sound


Thursday, January 27
6:30-10:00 pm

LIVE OAK
PUBLIC LIBRARY
1848 OhoAwvenue South


Saturday, January 29
1:30-5:00pm
LAKE CITY
PUBLIC LIBRARY
]30 c l'vl Columrrbia Avwoe

Sunday, January 30
1:30-o00 pm
HIGH SPRINGS
BRANCH LIBRARY
i N.W j A ,en


Free of Charge ~ Beneficialfor persons of all beliefs
Offered by authorized-erepresentatives of Sant Thakar Singh


(386) 842-2221 or 1-877-MEDITATE
www.knowt hselfassoul.org


" ^\ '[*',.,, ,..r..':, r' f', tN ..' ,: L '*I.

S Sou t h e a s t
j ri- r r, n -.~..i,..r organization
137173-F


tricity, gas, oil or wood.
Progress Energy Florida, a
subsidiary of Progress Ener-
gy (NYSE: PGN), provides
electricity and related ser-
vices to more than 1.5 million
customers in Florida. The
company is headquartered in
St. Petersburg, FL, and serves
a territory encompassing
over 20,000 square miles.
For more information


about receiving assistance
through the Energy Neigh-
bor Fund, customers should
contact Progress Energy at 1-
800-700-8744 or visit
www.progress-energy.com.
To contribute to Progress
Energy's Energy Neighbor
Fund, personal checks can be
mailed to Progress Energy,
P.O. Box 14042, St. Peters-
burg, FL 33733.


resolutions
is nothing new it is as im-
portant as ever to drink at
least eight tall glasses of wa-
ter a day. Design a sensible,
balanced food plan and allow
a treat on the weekends or for
special occasions.
Along with focusing on
healthy food, it is important
to pay attention to serving
size. Americans tend to eat
much larger servings then
necessary. Eat small meals
frequently as opposed to two
or three large meals a day. At
home start with a small por-
tion and wait 20 minutes be-
fore eating a second serving.
In a restaurant put half of the
meal in a doggy bag before
eating the remainder.
Keep alcohol consumption
to a minimum and drink a
glass of water between every
party drink. Don't smoke and
avoid second-hand smoke.
Weight train. Balance out a
cardio work-out by lifting
weights. For every pound of
muscle gained, the body will
bum an additional 30 to 50
calories a day. For example,
five additional pounds of
muscle will bum up to 250
extra calories a day.
Stay motivated by writing
down a 30-day fitness goal.
At the end of the month eval-
uate the goal and adjust it for
the next 30 days. Use a realis-
tic plan and keep track of ac-
complishments orf a calen-
dar.
Focus a work-out on fun.
Exercise does not have to be a
dreadful, boring routine. Ex-
ercise with a friend it is eas-
ier to maintain a plan with
companionship.
Be consistent. Regularity is
more important than total
volume. For example it is
more effective to work out
four times a week for 30 min-
utes as opposed to two hours
once a week.


security.
"As a member of the
House Appropriations Com-
mittee and a former member
of the House Armed Services
Committee, I have listened to
the testimony and briefings
by senior leadership of all the
armed services. The consis-
tent message that I heard was
that many of the important
tactical missions accom-
plished in Afghanistan and
Iraq would not have been
possible without our fleet of
aircraft carriers.
"I remain hopeful Presi-
dent Bush will hear the mes-
sage we send today and di-
rect the Department of De-
fense to reject any proposal to
reduce carrier strength."


All entries will be entered into a drawing
to win a romantic weekend get-a-way at
The Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park

Pubis i te husdy, ebuay 0 d io


U U


Meet t


Stop by a



1150 US 41 NW
Suite 13
Jasper, FL


)e staff of









Ph acy



Teresa McCoy
Teresa Anne McCoy has been working
at Baya Pharmacy for two years as a
Pharmacy Technician responsible for
preparing and dispensing prescription
drugs. She is a graduate of Hamilton
County High School and has been a
Pharmacy Tech for fourteen years.
Teresa enjoys spending time with her
two children, Kyle and Joshua, her
family and friends. She has a twin
brother named Timothy, two more
brothers and a sister. Her favorite sport
is football and FSU is her favorite
team. Her leisure time is spent with her
Boyfriend and her best friend April.
When asked about her dreams, she said
-, "I have lots of dreams and goals. I'd
have to say the most important is to
have a family and get my nursing
degree and work in labor and
delivery."
S Teresa enjoys working at Baya with
David. She said, "He is a great boss
and also a great friend."


nd say Hello!



(386) 792-3355
PphJ acy Located in the mall across from
Hamilton County High School,
13210R-.


I--


nA '-- R A


Crenshaw: Navy needs

to maintain carrier strength


HAUL bA


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.......






..........
............








Sports


Crossroads Motorplex
Lifeline Screening
White Springs News and Norris Notes
Arrest Records and Legal Notices
Community Events


2B 0 3iat epr IXt
3B
4B Thursday, January 20, 2005
5B Page 1B
6B B-Section


Action


- always hot & heavy at Crossroads


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Crossroads Motorplex


a WKA Pavement Divisional


Results Saturday, Jan. 15

Briggs Jr Sportsman Champ Heavy Adam Collins Hoboken, GA


lt, FL
atsworth, GA
1 City, AL
npa, FL
1 City, AL

ksonville, FL
wnan, GA
Pete, FL
dosta, GA
dosta, GA
Cloud, FL
ala, FL

)oksville, FL
1 City, AL
Pete, FL
celand, FL
rgo, FL
wnan, GA

ksonville, FL
wnan, GA
dosta, GA
Pete, FL
dosta, GA
ala, FL
Cloud, FL


David Cody Smith Ho
Brady Todd Ch;
Adam Dyer Pel
Dillon Baker Tar
Tyler Dyer Pel
Briggs Junior Heavy
Brandon Wells Jac
Buck Ridley Ne'
Bobby Ervien St.
Evan Becton Val
Kyle Meeks Val
Bill Palmeri St.
Jacob Lecson Oco
Briggs Jr Champ Heavy
David Davis Brc
Tony Armstrong Pel
A.J. Isbister St.
Blake Lehr Lal
Sean Bernard Lai
Buck Ridley Ne'
Briggs Junior Lite
Brandon Wells Jac
Buck Ridley Ne'
Evan Becton Val
Bobby Ervien St.
Kyle Meeks Val
Jacob Lecson Oc;
Bill Palmeri St
Briggs Jr Animal Champ


Blake Lehr Lakeland,
Buck Ridley Newnan, C
Briggs Lite
Corey Holley Ocala, FL
Brian Davis Jacksonvill
Briggs Heavy
Kevin Tillman Alma, GA
Thomas Carter Ocala, FL
Briggs Junior Sportsman I Lite


Amber Colvin
Justin Dodson
Briggs Super Hea
Christopher Morri
Edwin Sides
Thomas Carter
Lee Harrell
Briggs Animal Hi
Nathan Wendrick
George Stewart
Rocky Prosser
Briggs Jr Sports
Brady Todd
David Cody Smith
Adam Dyer
Dillon Baker
Tyler Dyer
Briggs Jr Champ
A.J. Isbister
David Davis
Tony Armstrong
Sean Bernard
Blake Lehr
Buck Ridley
Briggs Medium
Corey Holley
Nathan Wendrick
Ricky Hill


Tallahassee, FL
Pell City, AL


avy


son Rocky Face, GA
Wetumpka, AL
Ocala, FL
Dalton, GA
eavy
Bradenton, FL
Thomasville, GA
Coolidge, GA
Champ Lite
Chatsworth, GA
S Holt, FL
Pell City, AL
Tampa, FL
Pell City, AL
Lite
St. Pete, FL
Hudson, FL
Pell City, AL
Largo, FL
Lakeland, FL
Newnan, GA

Ocala, FL
Bradenton, FL
Omega, GA


Briggs Jr Sports II Heavy


FL
]A


le, FL


Steven Keith Omega, GA
Briggs Jr Sports II Lite
Taylor Dyer Pell City, AL


Taylor Dyer
Justin Dodson
Adam Collins
Amber Colvin
Sr Champ Lite
Lee Harrell
Ryan Watkins
Christopher Morrison
Rance Williams
Ryan Williams
Kid Kart
Austin Carter


Pell City, AL
Pell City, AL
Hoboken, GA
Tallahassee, FL

Dalton, GA
Tallahassee, FL
Rocky Face, GA
Lithia, FL
Lithia, FL

Ocala, FL


The Hamilton County Lady Trojans boosted their record
to 10-2 with wins over Bronson and'Bell, and a loss to
Madison.

JAN. 13 AGAINST BRONSON


HAMILTON
BRONSON


SCORING
Melissa Daniels
Candice Cooks
Vanessa Diaz
Walnesha Jones
Amber Robinson
Shimese Tumblin
Shatouri McClellan
LaFaye Alexander
Samantha Morgan
Tammy Jones
Nakia Dye
REBOUNDS
Melissa Daniels
Candice Cooks
LaFaye Alexander
Shatouri McClellan
Tammy Jones
Vanessa Diaz
Shimese Tumblin
Amber Robinson
Nakia Dye
STEALS
Candice Cooks
Nakia Dye
Amber Robinson
Vanessa Diaz
Shatouri McClellan
ASSISTS
Candice Cooks
Amber Robinson
Nakia Dye
Walnesha Jones
Vanessa Diaz


2nd 3rd 4th Final
17 11 11 56
2 0 2 8


JAN. 14 AGAINST BELL HIGH


HAMILTON
BELL HIGH


2nd 3rd 4th Final
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The Lady Trojans traveled to Gainesville on Tuesday, to take
on the sixth ranked Oak Hall team. They will host Lafayette
County (Mayo) tomorrow and Trenton High School on Satur-
day. The home games will begin at 3:30 p.m. for the Junior Var-
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-1lf& j-


THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


DAGfEC 1R


77,


Ail%






THURSDAY. JANUARY 20. 2005 THE JASPER NEWS. Jasper. FL PAGE 3B


Life Line Screening helps local



residents assess risk of stroke


Residents living in and
around the Jasper communi tn
can be screened to reduce
their risk of ha\in a stroke.
Life Line Screening x\ill be at
the Hamilton Countyl (Council
on Aging located at I 50 SW\
1st Street in Jasper on .Janu-
ary 24. Pre-registration is re-
quired. Appointmcntsi \\ill
begin at 9 a.m.
A stroke, also kiion a as a
"brain attack", is ranked ais
the third leading killer in their
world. and the second among
women. Through prc\enli\e
screenings, the risk ol ha\ ing
a stroke can he greatly re-
duced.
Screenings are last, paiin-
less and lo\\ cost. They in-
volxe the use of ultrasound


technology, and scan for po-
tential health problems relat-
ed to blocked arteries that can
lead to a stroke. aortic
ancurvsmns that can lead to a
rupiturd aorta, and hardening
of tlhe arteries in the legs.
\ which is a strong predictor of
heart disease. A bone density
screening to assess the risk
ior osteoporosis is also of-
fered for men and \women.
f.ach screening requires
tell minutes or less to coin-
plete. A complete vascular
screening package includes
the Stroke/Carotid Artery,
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
and Ankle Brachial Index
(hardening of the arteries)
screenings and costs $109. A
complete vascular package


\with osteoporosis screening
costs S129.
Life Line Screening was
established in 1993. and has
since become the nation's
leading provider of vascular
screenings. Over 45 ultra-
sound teams travel to com-
munities to make the screen-
ings available to local resi-
dents. These non-invasive,
inexpensive and painless, ul-
trasound tests help people
identify their risk for stroke,
vascular diseases or osteo-
porosis early enough for their
physician to begin preventive
procedures.
For more information re-
garding the screenings or to
schedule an appointment call
1-800-6797-21.


Florida Department of Health

receives additional flu vaccines


According to Florida De-
partnlent of Health (D)(11)
Secretary John Ag\\ unohbi an
additional 210,000) doses of
adul t lu vaccine ha\e been
received and are currently hc-
ing shipped to health depart-
ments in Florida. Local
providers seeking \ accinle or
their patients or clients
should call their local county
health department about sup-
plies.
Flu season in Florida is just
beginning. During holiday
travel many colds and 1lu are
spread across the borders.
Vaccination is appropriate
for those with chronic health
conditions or over 50, those
who are pregnant or an inl'ant
caregiver or those \ ho live
with anyone who meets these
conditions. Agwunohi recent-,
ly amended the reconlmend-
ed high-risk individual cate-
gories of those who should
receive fIu vaccine to include
those 50 or older.


Anyone who is high-risk or
living with someone high-
risk is encouraged to call the
local county health depart-
iment to arrange vaccination.
Iligh-risk individuals include
persons 50 years or older,
children aged six to thirty-
five months, and residents
and employees of nursing
homes and other long-term
facilities that house persons
of any age who have long-
teirm illnesses.
Persons six months of age
and older who have chronic
heart or lung conditions (in-
cluding asthma), need regular
medical care or must be in a
hospital due to metabolic dis-
cases (like diabetes), chronic
kidney disease or weakened
immune system (including
problems caused by medicine
or infection with I1 IV/AIDS)
should also be vaccinated.
Other high-risk individuals
are children and teenagers six
months to 18 years who are


on long-term aspirin therapy
and, therefore, could develop
Reye syndrome after the flu
and women who are pregnant
during the flu season.
A few simple steps can re-
duce the probability of con-
tracting respiratory infec-
tions: Clean hands often with
soap and water or an alcohol-
based hand cleaner. Avoid
touching the eyes, nose or
mouth. When coughing or
sneezing, cover the nose and
mouth. Do not share eating
utensils, drinking glasses,
towels or other personal
items. Stay home when sick
and keep sick children home.
Avoid close contact with sick
people, if possible.
The Hamilton County
Health Department is located
at 209 SE Central Ave. in
Jasper. Their hours are 8 a.m.
to 12 p.m and I p.m. to 5
p.m., Monday through Fri-
day. For more information
call 792-1414.


"Step Up Florida" wants Hamilton


County residents to get moving


Hamilton Counti residents
%will ha\e the opportunity to
participate in an unusual
month-long event designed to
get Floridians up and exercis-
ing. The e\ent. called "Step
Up Florida. On Our Wa\ To
Healthy Living" will let peo-
ple walk, run, skate, swim or
paddle flags across the coun-
ty. It will give local residents
an opportunity to have fun
and take part in a community-
wide event to promote physi-


cal actixitv and healthy
lifestyles.
Four routes will begin on
separate dates and will culmi-
nate in Orlando on February
26. Hamilton will play its part
on February 7. On that day'
the flag is scheduled to make
its way from the Hamilton-
Suwannee county line on US
lH\wy 129 across the county to
the Hamilton-Columbia coun-
ty line. The flag will make its
way through Jennings, Jasper


and \White Springs.
A closing ceremony will be
held at the Nature and Her-
itage Tourism Center in White
Springs followed by the hand-
ing-off of the flag to Colum-
bia County at the Suwannee
River on US 41.
Individuals or groups are
welcome to volunteer for any
length of time or any distance.
For more information contact
the I lamilton County Health
Department at 792-1414.


Free tax returns for active


military available on-line


Personal Tax Services,
Inc, a financial service com-
pany, offers free tax prepa-
ration and E-filing to all ac-
tive military personnel, sta-
tioned anywhere in the
world, through Red-
taxfrog.com. Troops can log
on, complete their federal
and state taxes and have
their refunds directly de-
posited so their families can
have it quickly.
Visitors to
Redtaxfrog.com are greeted
by Percival, the Frog, who
helps with the orientation
process. Then one can click





Norris


Notes


to start a federal and state
tax return. Once logged in
to the secure site, visitors go
through an interview
process that helps complete
the return accurately.
From a simple return to
the more complicated, each
option is easily clicked and
explored from one surpris-
ingly simple interface. Once
completed, the refund


amount is displayed.
Anyone can e-file their
taxes at Redtaxfrog.com for
$24.95. Returns for active
military are free. State re-
turns are e-filed free for
everyone.
Refunds may be received
by check or direct deposit.
Refund anticipated loans are
available in as little as twen-
ty-four hours.


- A, ', -, .'~. ,
-- ---~--s -


'I

b~~bvt


Nutrition











ins






Reading the newspaper regularly leads children to discover new
words and new ideas, helping them succeed in the classroom
and beyond. Strong reading skills and curiosity about the world
around them are important characteristics that will help children
both now and in the future as adults. Do your child a favor and
subscribe to home delivery of The Jasper News.




iper iDeut


011600 0 0counN)
I Yaisubci'ptio 20(ut0f o0


386-792-248


or mail in your subscription to

105 2nd Avenue

Jasper, FL 32052


7


Mail to: 3.aiwper NewtIS, 105 2nd Avenue, Jasper, Florida 32052


134509-F


LWWW. woodstovefforida. com),


PAGE 3B


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper. FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


jJ
~.







PAGE 4B THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


It is that time of year in the
Suwannee River Valley
when the roadsides and
yards are covered with
robins who fly South for the
winter months, when various
varieties of camellias are in
bloom in yards and cemeter-
ies throughout our area,
when smoke from wood
fires curls lazily from chim-
neys and "boil up" from
bonfires and campfires made
throughout our region. Win-
ter in the Suwannee River
Valley offers good opportu-
nities for those who love the
indoors or the outdoors.
Mild afternoons offer oppor-
tunities to walk along the
many trails in our region.
This is the perfect time of
year to make a trip down to
the Big Shoals Recreation
area and hike along the
Suwannee's edge till you
reach the only whitewater
rapids in the state of Florida.
You won't be "eaten up" by
mosquitoes or yellow flies
this time of year, and your
"window of opportunity"
won't last long.
Enjoy these few weeks of
cool weather and, even


though, our temperatures
may bottom out in the lower
thirties and upper twenties at
times, the robins know that
our temperatures are mild
compared to the subzero
temperatures they have left
behind in the North. We can
always give thanks and, in
the words of the old African
American Spiritual, "If a
robin can sing His praise,
then why can't we?" To coin
the closing lines used for
many years by Virgie Cone
in her column entitled
"Thoughts" "Think About
It."
Virgie Cone comes to
mind quite often. Most re-
cently she came to mind
when I read that Lawton
"Bud" Chiles III was consid-
ering tossing his "hat in the
ring" in the upcoming Gu-
bernatorial race in 2006 I
remember that Virgie Cone
spoke at Governor Lawton
Chiles' second inauguration
in Tallahassee and, as her
friend, I was so proud of her
- I miss Virgie Cone very
much She made a "differ-
ence" in the life of our coun-
ty, our state, and our nation.


To paraphrase the words of
Henry Wadsworth Longfel-
low in his "Psalm of Life",
she did not leave "a barren
path behind."
The annual Stephen Foster
Day Celebration held at the
Foster Museum on Sunday,
January 16, at 2 p.m. was
well coordinated and well at-
tended. Many thanks to pro-
gram coordinator, Martha
Nelson and to assistant pro-
gramming coordinator, Larry
Hoover, for all their hard
work. Everyone in atten-
dance seemed to really enjoy
the musical selections, as
well as the delicious refresh-
ments provided by our
Stephen Foster Citizens Sup-
port Organization. Many
thanks to Pat Cromer, Muse-
um Guide, and Mary Lou
Bullard, CSO Member, who
served at the reception fol-
lowing the concert, and we
appreciate the generosity of
many individuals in our area
who supported our 'Stephen
Foster Citizens Support Or-
ganization.
The White Springs Diner
owned by Wayne and Rose
Stormant features good,
"down home" Southern
cooking. The Diner also fea-
tures a beautiful mural that
depicts various natural
scenes along the Suwannee
River. Stop by the White
Springs Diner on U. S. 41 N
in White Springs across from
the Spring Street Antique
Store. You will be glad you
did!!!!!! The food is deli-
cious, and the atmosphere is


very friendly.
Thinking of the late Rev.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,
and his dream, I know that
many of our community ac-
tivists, including Bernard
Williams, dream about a life
long learning center housed
in part of the old Carver
School one day. I hope, one
day, their dream will be a re-
ality. Bernard is considering
calling the center, the E.W.
Graham Sr., Learning Center
- to be named after the late
Mr. E.W. Graham, who was
the longtime principal of the
Carver School. Mr. Graham
was wonderful educator, and
I don't want to take a thing
away from him, but I really
think consideration should
be given to naming the facil-
ity the E.W. and Mary Gra-
ham Learning Center, as Mr.
and Mrs. Graham worked as
a "team" for many years, and
she was, in my opinion, as
much a part of the fabric of
the education community
and the community in gener-
al here as he was. This is just
an opinion, but Mrs. Gra-
ham's family, the Williams',
the Penders, the Grooms',
and all the connected family
have "roots" that run deep in
the soil of southern Hamilton
County, as stated earlier -
just an opinion. I know she,
like Mr. Graham, had a deep
love for Carver, for White
Springs, and for Hamilton
County.
On Monday, Jan. 17, I en-
joyed lunching at "A Place in
the Park" Restaurant with


two very good friends, Mary
Daniels, Branford, retired
assistant Superintendent in
charge of Administration for
Suwannee County and Nan-
cy Roberts, present Director
of Elementary Education for
Suwannee County Public
Schools. Both ladies are very
good friends, and a group of
us who worked together in
Suwannee County lunch to-
gether from time to time.
The victims of the terrible
tsunami tragedy in Sri Lanka
and India haunt us, as we
watch with horror, the un-
folding of a series of terrible
events wrought by a natural
disaster. Our hurricanes, as
destructive as they were,
don't even come close to
comparing with the tragedy
of this event. Please keep the
families of the victims of the
tsunami, the many relief and
medical workers, and all
those organizations support-
ing this part of the world in
your prayers.
This is the time of year
when we begin to think
about income taxes, prepar-
ing, paying, etc. Uncle Sam
is a relative who visits with
regularity and, like it or not,
Uncle Sam is going to have
his "just due". Many times
we feel we are working pri-
marily for "Uncle Sam".
Federal Income Tax did not
come into effect until near
the end of the First World
War. Prior to that time, there
was no Federal Income Tax.
If you made the money, you
kept the money. You paid


nothing to the Federal gov-
ernment in the way of in-
come tax. Most of those
marvelous mansions built in
Newport, Rhode Island, by
the Vanderbilts, and all the
other captains of industry:
during America's Industrial
Revolution, were built be--
fore the advent of federal in-
come tax.
The nation's 55th Presi-
dential Inaugural takes place
on Thursday, Jan. 20, in
Washington, D.C. I have lis-
tened with interest about the.-
history of presidential inau-
gurations over the past few
weeks. I have found the,
commentaries on NPR, etc.,:
very interesting. If you have
an opportunity, "tune in" and
watch the Inaugural festivi-'.
ties.
Please remember the fol-
lowing in prayer: Ben Regis-,.
ter, Ralph Hardwick, Ouida,
Hardwick, Malcolm."
Beauchamp, Virginia '
Beauchamp, J.M. Morgan,',
Pearsall Fouraker, Amy
Claxton, Verna Mae John-
son, Gaynelle Greene, Ceil'
Pound, Ella Taylor, Gussie
Cheshire, Ada Register,
Tommie Smith, Jean Pad-
gett, Trey Townsend,
Suwannee County, our state,
our nation, and our own
Hamilton County.
Quote for the week:
"Some succeed because they
are destined to, but most suc- '
ceed because they are deter-,
mined to."
Have a good week, Hamil-,.
ton County I love you.


Norris Notes


By Lillian Norris


Here's hoping, you missed
my column last week as
much as I missed doing it
(some of you have told me).
My computer is back in
business as of now, and we
will fty to keep it in order so
that this will not happen
again. The Jasper News has
been very patient with me,
and considerate, so we will
try not to let them down
again.
Recently I startedreading
a book I have had for a long
time; had not gotten into it;


sometimes it takes a while
to get interested, but the
book is Standing In The
Rainbow, by Fannie Flagg,
and it is fun to read. In it
there is a portion regarding'
a woman in the earl3) 30'd
who has a local radio show
that reminds me of what I
attempt to give you in writ-
ten form. Do any of you re-
member this type of radio
shows? It is about people in
the community, happenings,
news, etc.; she mentions re-
ceiving mail. It was sug-


gested at one time that it
might be good to put my
mailing address in the col-
umn; asI read this book and
she wrote of receiving mail,
the thought occurred to me
that it might be a good idea.
There may be some of you
who for some reason would
prefer to put your news on
paper, and for those of you
who are away from Hamil-
ton 'County; it might be
More con enient, so heree
goes: my mailing address is
Lillian Norris, 1310 Third
Street NW, Jasper, FL
32052. Now you have no
excuse for not getting in
touch with me and you can
still call, I will get the news
straight from you. Thank
you for this suggestion, let


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me know what you think. I
will watch my mail box
each day. Hope this will be
satisfactory for all of us.
Since my last column we
have been saddened by the
loss of members of our
community who have been
such an important part of
our lives. Hilward Morgan
has touched the lives of so
many of us, older and
younger ones, and from all
over the State. The number
of friends from everywhere
was a tribute to him and to
his family, for the love ex-
pressed from all who knew
and loved him. We give our
love and sympathy and
prayers to his family and
friends.
We attended a visitation
and funeral in Valdosta for
Mrs. Weeks, mother of Ann
Hilliard (Ann is the wife of
Pastor Doug Hilliard of
First Presbyterian Church,
Jasper). It was a beautiful
service held at the chapel of
Carson MacLane Funeral
Home, Valdosta. Prior to the
service I asked about a
friend of ours who works at
the funeral home; was told
she hadn't come in (later
she was there when we were
leaving) and when the gen-
tleman learned we were
from Jasper he asked if we
knew Wayne Robinson; of
course we told him we did
and asked if he knew Wayne
had died; he was saddened
to learn of Wayne's death. It
seems that Wayne had done
some work for him in Val-
dosta and he was planning
to get in touch with him to
do more work. It is a small
world and we were touched,
but not surprised, that
Wayne was so well-known
and appreciated outside of
our immediate area. We
talked with Wayne's wife
Pat and told her of this
man's respect for Wayne.
In learning from the
Jasper News that Governor
Jeb Bush would be coming
here for a visit, reminded
me of correspondence with
Virgie Cone. that I had re-
cently come across in going
through papers, regarding
former governors of Florida
who had visited in Jasper,
recalling that the last three
governors of the State of
Florida had visited in
Jasper. A number of years
ago Gov. Martinez came to
Jasper and visited at the
Chamber of Commerce
building here. Governor Jeb


Bush, who was then head of
the Department of Com-
merce, Florida, came at our
invitation to be the guest
speaker at the annual Cham-
ber dinner, when we asked
him while in his office if it
would be possible for some-
one from his office to at-
tend, he answered that he
would come himself. Gov-
ernor Lawton Chiles was
here for Virgie's big day, to
help Virgie celebrate the
opening of the Virgie H.
Cone Mental Health Center.
And now we will have Jeb
Bush back as Governor. We
are grateful for the time of
these busy people to visit
our area.
Dana Braswell has re-
turned to her home in
Olympia, WA, after spend-
ing several days with her
mother, Ulma Braswell.
Ulma and Dana's sister,
Marsha Barker, met Dana at
the Jacksonville airport; her
sister, Elizabeth and Eliza-
beth's daughter, Gretchen,
took Dana to the Jack-
sonville airport on Monday
to catch the plane back to
her home in Washington.
While Dana was here her
sisters and their families, as
well as her mother, kept her
busy with family get-togeth-
ers at their homes. In addi-
tion to the Jasper family
gatherings, they were enter-
tained in Valdosta by sister,
Jeannette Staley. The girls
and their mother stay in
touch and get together as of-
ten as possible, always have
a good time when they meet
either here or Washington,
or elsewhere.
We understand that Sis-
terhood was well attended,
they had 73 present; the pro-
gram was outstanding and
of course the food was deli-
cious. From some who at-
tended, they said the ladies
had decorated the Fellow-
ship Hall in keeping with
the theme of the evening.
Ladies of First Baptist
Church, White Springs ex-
tended an invitation for the
ladies to meet with them in
April, the second Tuesday,
hope we can all make it to
that one. We will get details
for you at a later date, but
you can go ahead and mark
this on your calendar.
Countywide Brotherhood
will be meeting on Thurs-
day, January 27, at 7:30 at
First Baptist Church, Jasper.
Men are asked to bring a
covered dish, they always


have good food. We will of-
fer details regarding pro-
gram, etc., by next week.
Mrs. Libbey Kry's funer-
al was held Monday morn-
ing at First Presbyterian"'
Church. She had been mak-
ing her home in Dowling
Park in recent years, having
'been a long-time resident of-
Jasper. She had been em-,
ployed in earlier years at the
hospital in Jasper and at
Suwannee Valley Nursing
Center; she will be missed'
by many who knew and
loved her.
A few evenings ago when
I returned home there was a
pretty little white dog in my.
garage, no collar and no
identification, and I was
afraid to get out but Jim Coe'
and Jo were bringing me:
home so Jim got out to it so
I could get into the house.
The dog was still there the
next morning and I called
the police station and Billy,
Tanner came out and picked
him up to keep, said they
would keep it for 10 days.
Billy said it was probably,.
more afraid of me than I of
it. This was such a pretty
dog and should have a
home, should probably be-
out in the country where
there is plenty of room. We
have not been able to locate
anyone who knows anything,.
about a dog like this being'
missing, someone said it
was probably put out by
someone else. I plan to go:
see about it, but if you have
any information about a
missing dog get in touch.,
with me or Mr. Tanner; her
told me he will give time for
this to get into the paper to ,
see if we can locate some-'
one; he said it looks like it
has some German Shepherd
in it.
Since I decided not to,
make any New Year's Reso-
lutions, I haven't had to be
concerned about breaking,
any; maybe I should be-,
making some now in order
to get more done. You are
all very special to me and it
is always good to hear from
you, and to meet you down-
town, in the store or some-,
where, and have you tell me
you read something in my
column, or you missed it."
Stay in touch and remember'-
you can contact me in a
number of ways now; will
look forward to hearing
from you soon.
Lillian Norris
792-2151


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


PAGE 4B






TrUI IDClo AV IAMI IAIV 9n 9nn,;


J I I




----



NOTES





ARREST

REPORTS

Editor's note: The jasper
News prints the entire arrest
record each week. If your
name appears here and you
are later found not guilty or
the charges are dropped, we
will be happy to make note of
this in the newspaper when
judicial proof is presented to
us by you or the authorities.
The following abbrevia-
tions are used below:
DAC Department of
Agriculture Commission
DOA Department of
Agriculture
DOC Department of
Corrections
DOT Department of
Transportation
FDLE Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement
FHP Florida Highway
Patrol
FWC Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission
HCDTF Hamilton
County Drug Task Force
HCSO Hamilton Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office
JAPD Jasper Police De-
partment
JNPD Jennings Police
Department
OALE Office of Agri-


cultural Law Enforcement
P&P Probation and Pa-
role
SCSO Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
WSPD White Springs
Police Department
Jan. 10, Dale Dewayne
Yound, 45; 1847 Hamilton
Ave., Jennings; violation
of probation; hold for
Baker County; P&P.
Jan. 10, Ponce Antonio
Hutcherson, 20; PO Box
380, White Springs; viola-
tion of probation; hold for
Columbia County; P&P.
Jan. 10, James Fredrick
Mahaffy, 43; 1677 NW
Lynn St., Jasper; serving
sentence; HCSO.
Jan. 10, Alfonso Willis,
39; 3753 NW 108th Lane,
Jasper; child abuse (inten-
tional act); HCSO.
Jan. 11, Charles B. Sey-
more, 35; PO Box 205,
Jasper; battery (domestic
violence); JAPD.
Jan. 12, Kenneth R.
Bullard, 45; 11474 E CR 6,
Jasper, driving while li-
cense suspended (habitu-
al); HCSO.
Jan. 12, Tracey B. Jack-
son, 33; 4345 SW CR 152,
Jasper; obtaining unem-
ployment compensation
by fraud; HCSO.
Jan. 13, Cornelius Mau-
rice Daniels, 22; 1313
Stephens St., Jennings;
bond revoked, battery on
law enforcement officer;
HCSO.
Jan. 13, Earl Butler, 25;
600 W. College Dr., Avon
Park, FL; in to serve one
year; HCSO.
Jan. 13, Roger Denney,
15430 US 129, McAlpin,
FL; serving 22 months;
DOC.
Jan. 13, Tylnonne Tra-
vaille Jackson, 22; PO Box
1465, Jasper; warrant (pe-
tit theft); HCDTF.


Jan. 13, Ernest Mitchell
Jr., 24; 470 SW 12th Ave.,
Jasper; violation of proba-
tion (sale of cocaine);
DOC.
Jan; 13, Patrick Cor-
nelius Whetstone, 24;
1076 Mary St., Jennings;
possession of controlled
substance (less than 20
grams cannabis), obstruc-
tion of justice (resisting
arrest), warrants (fleeing
and eluding two counts,
sale of cocaine within
1000 feet of place of wor-
ship, possession of con-
trolled substance with in-
tent to sell); HCDTF.
Jan. 13, Linda Marie
Johnson, 44; 3875 S San
Pablo Rd, Jacksonville,
FL; driving with license
revoked; FHP.
Jan. 14, Ricky Warren
Howell, 45; PO Box 173,
Jennings; warrants (sale
of controlled substance -
cocaine, within 1000 feet
of place of worship; sale
or delivery of controlled
substance cannabis,
within 1000 feet of place
of worship); HCSO.
Jan. 14, Johnny A.
Bowles, 29; 405 NW US
Hwy 41, Jennings; child
support; HCSO.
Jan. 14, Anthony
George Early, 41; 5525
NW 24th Ave., Miami, FL;
possession of stolen prop-
erty; HCSO.
Jan. 14, Malcolm W.
Whittington, 32; P.O. Box
227, Statenville, GA; in to
serve weekend; HCSO.
Jan. 15, Douglas Keith
Booth, 45; 2750 Harrow
Dr., Chamblee, GA; dri-
ving under the influence;
FHP.
Jan. 16, Antony B. Paul,
23; 4844 NW 58th Place,
Jennings; criminal mis-
chief, battery (domestic
violence); JAPD.


Food tips focus on public safety


The Department of
Health. (DOH) .urges
everyone to focus on tak-
ing precautions when
preparing food for special
occasions. The DOH rec-
ommends the four basic
food safety tips cook,
clean, chill and separate.
Wash hands before


Jasper Legals


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR HAMILTON COUNTY
CASE NO: 24-2004-CA-189
ROBERT L. HENDRY and IMOGENE K.
HENDRY, his wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
JIM N. ESTEP and BOBBIE JO ESTEP, and
JAMES EDWARD KERSHNER,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JIM N. ESTEP
Address Unknown
BOBBIE JO ESTEP
Address Unknown
AS WELL AS their respective heirs, administra-
tors or assigns; and all other parties claiming
by, through, under, or against JIM N. ESTEP
and BOBBIE JO ESTEP, as well as all parties
having or claiming to have any right, title or in-
terest in the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet the
itle to the following property in Hamilton Coun-
ty, Florida, to-wit:
Lot 30, OAK HILL PLANTATION, a subdivision
as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 92, public re-
cords of Hamilton County, Florida. ORB 325-
165. Section 8, Township 2N, Range 11E. (Par-
cel No. 4936-030)
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it on CHARLOTTE J. WEIDNER,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is Post Of-
fice Box 1354, Bronson, Florida 32621 on or
before February 14, 2005 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either before ser-
vice on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or petition.
Dated on January 3, 2005
GREG GODWIN
Clerk of Court
BY:/s/ Cynthia Johnson
Deputy Clerk
12/13, 20, 27, 2/03
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR HAMILTON COUNTY
CASE NO: 24-2004-CA-188
ROBERT L. HENDRY and IMOGENE K.
HENDRY, his wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
JIM N. ESTEP and BOBBIE JO ESTEP, and
JAMES EDWARD KERSHNER,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JIM N. ESTEP
Address Unknown
BOBBIE JO ESTEP
Address Unknown


preparing or eating food,
after handling uncpoked,.
food, after using the bath-
room or changing a dia-
per, after playing with a
pet, after handling
garbage, after tending to
someone who is sick or in-
jured, and after nose-
blowing, coughing or


Jasper Legals

AS WELL AS their respective heirs, adminis-
trators or assigns; and all other parties claim-
ing by, through, under, or against JIM N. ES-
TEP and BOBBIE JO ESTEP, as well as all
parties hav-ing or claiming to have any right, ti-
tle or interest in the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet the
title to the following property in Hamilton Coun-
ty, Florida, to-wit:
Lot 29, OAK HILL PLANTATION, a subdivision
as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 92, public re-
cords of Hamilton County, Florida. ORB 325-
165. Section 8, Township 2N, Range 11E. (Par-
cel No. 4936-020)
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any,
to it on CHARLOTTE J. WEIDNER, Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is Post Office Box
1354, Bronson, Florida 32621 on or before
February 14, 2005 and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Complaint or pe-
tition.
Dated on January 3, 2005
GREG GODWIN
Clerk of Court
BY:/s/ Cynthia Johnson
Deputy Clerk
12/13, 20, 27, 2/03


sneezing.
Thaw frozen foods in the
refrigerator where it will
remain a safe, constant
temperature of 40 degrees
Fahrenheit or below. If
that is not possible, food
can be defrosted in the mi-
crowave or by running
cold water over the food
item.
When preparing foods,
follow the appropriate
temperature guidelines for
defrosting, cooking and
cooling. Store leftovers
within two hours of cook-
ing. When in doubt, throw
it out.
For additional food safe-
ty information, call the
USDA/FSIS Meat and
Poultry Hotline at 1-888-
674-6854.
If poisoning does occur,
call the Poison Informa-
tion Center at 1-888-222-
1222. The healthcare pro-
fessionals at the Center
will immediately respond
to poison emergencies and
answer poison-related
questions about medica-
tions, household products
and other potentially dan-
gerous substances.



Homeowners alerted to


pending termite turmoil


Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services Com-
missioner Charles Bron-
son is warning homeown-
ers that this is the time of
year when termites begin
to "swarm" or leave their
colonies to search for new
nesting sites. Many home-
owners discover that they
have a termite problem
when they find termite
swarmers (winged, black
insects about 1/4 inch
long) in their homes.
Termites can cause con-
sumers to lose their
largest economic asset -
their homes and are re-
sponsible for over $700
million in costs to con-
sumers in Florida each
year for damage and con-
trol costs. Termites are a
fact of life in Florida and
people need to actively
protect their homes by us-
ing a licensed professional
pest control company to
provide termite protection
services.
This is a good time of
year for consumers to
check their contracts with
licensed pest control com-
panies to make sure they
are current. Anyone who
has questions about their


pest control contract or
company can call the De-
partment hotline at 1-800-
HELP-FLA (1-800-435-
7352). "Considering the
cost of a house, it's fright-
ening to think that about
half the homeowners in
Florida have not taken
steps to protect this in-
vestment from these dam-
aging insects," Bronson
said.
People who do not have
a current termite protec-
tion contract are urged to
contact several pest con-
trol companies and re-
quest written estimates
and a copy of the contract
they offer. Consumers
should not sign a contract
until they have compared
at least three companies.
Pest control companies
are required by law to ob-
tain a signed contract pri-
or to treating a home.
The two main types of
termites that affect Florida
consumers are subter-
ranean termites, which
live in soil and attack
structures from the
ground up, and drywood
termites, which can live in
isolated pieces of wood in
a structure such as attic


rafters and can go unde-
tected until they cause ex-
tensive damage. Licensed
pest management profes-
sionals have the expertise
to inspect and treat for in-
festations of these ter-
mites and provide protec-
tive measures for home-
owners.
Companies that provide
termite control services
are licensed and inspected
by the Department and
consumers can call the toll
free number to determine
whether a company is
properly licensed and to
check the complaint histo-
ry of a business.
To protect their homes
from termites, consumers
should have annual in-
spections of their homes
and renew their termite
protection contract annu-
ally. When purchasing a
home, carefully check the
termite protection history
of the home.
Remove wood piles and
other cellulose sources
from under and next to
structures. Direct water
sources, such as air condi-
tioner drip lines and roof
down spouts, away from
structure foundations.


Make nutrition, health


resolutions a


Frequently resolutions for
the New Year focus on im-
proving health, exercising
and losing weight. All too of-
ten, despite good intentions,
many find themselves slip-
ping into old habits of un-
healthy eating and inactivity
early in the year.
Nearly sixty percent of
Americans resolve to lose
weight, exercise more or
make some other health re-
lated change in their lives.
Yet only 10 percent strictly
stick to their resolutions,
while another 24 percent do
so occasionally. This means
that 66 percent don't keep
their resolutions at all.
There is an epidemic of
obesity in the United States.
Over 60 percent of adults
and 16 percent of children
are either overweight or
obese. Eating right and being
physically active are vital to
promoting health and reduc-
ing the risk for death or dis-
ability due to chronic dis-
eases such as heart disease,
certain cancers, diabetes,
stroke and osteoporosis.
Adopting a healthier
lifestyle involves healthy eat-
ing and physical activity in a
series of small attainable
steps. Set one or two specific,
realistic nutrition and physi-
cal activity goals.
Focus on changing behav-
ior in small steps. Drink wa-
ter or low-fat milk instead of
high calorie beverages with
meals. Eat a salad as a first
course with dinner. Eat fruit


for dessert. Start the day
with breakfast.
Look for opportunities to
increase activity during the
day. Take the stairs rather
than the elevator. Rather
than choosing a parking
spot close to the door,
choose one farther away.
Walk an extra 2,000 steps
per day.
Control the environment.
Don't keep high-calorie
snack foods in the house.
Wear walking shoes as a re-
minder to exercise.
Recruit a friend or a fami-
ly member to participate in


reality
nutrition and physical activ-
ity resolutions with you.
Commit to exercising to-
gether. Walk or ride bikes
with the whole family.
When eating out, share an
entree or dessert.
Enlist support from family
and friends. Report on
progress made toward the
desired goals.
Post weight and exercise
goals in a visible place, such
as the refrigerator door.
Keep a journal or. chart to
track progress toward the
goals. When a goal is
achieved, enjoy a reward.


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THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 5B


I


I

(







PA(~E 6B THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


CENTRAL

TTTIN/rES


The news of Central Hamilton Elementar

Central Hamilton Elemen-
tary School held its annual
spelling bee on Friday, Janu-
ary 14, in the Library-Media
Center. Representatives from
the fifth and sixth grade
homerooms participated in
the school-sponsored event.
Participants in the spelling
bee were fifth graders: Jadyn
Lessman, Buster Frederick,
Paris Ingram, Jasmine Jack-
son, Emily Moody, and
Donovan Smith. Sixth grade
participants were: Bridgett
Izell, Meagan Vaughan, Bria
Davis, Alfonso Willis,
Cameron Hawkins, Samantha
Dotson and Jeffrey Monds.
The spellers were amazing
as they participated in twen-
ty-eight rounds. The winner
of the spelling bee was Mea-
gan Vaughn. Second place
was awarded to Bria Davis.
Jasmine Jackson earned third
place and Cameron Hawkins,
fourth place.


Central Hamilton Elemen-
tary is offering a FCAT Math
workshop at 6 p.m. on Tues-
day, January 25. Sixth grade
teacher Kathy Smith will
present information that will
allow parents to help their


Kids ages 2-17 spend an
average of 19 hours and 40
minutes watching television
each \\eek. With rising con-
cerns about the diet and eer-
cise habits of American kids.
it's important to have a strat-
egy to cut back on telex vision
or computers.
Keep in mind that screen
time is more than just TV
time: computer use can spiral
out of control as %ell Ithere
are e\en computer addiction
reco er. camps for children).
It may seem counterproduc-
tive to limit children's access
to computers in a sociert that
can barely remember when a
mouse was merely a rodent.
but it's important to use com-
puters in proportion to their
true educational or entertain-
ment value.
When cooped "up inside
during winter, television and


children improve their math
skills.
Grade level demonstra-
tions will be presented dur-
ing break out sessions. Learn
what math skills are tested
and in what grades) the


computer entertainment can
be tempting. Use these tips to
help limit the amount of time
spent watching the infamous
"tube" or surfing the endless
Internet.
Set time limits for chil-
dren. Try using a simple
chart to track screen time.
Get some stickers and assign
a value to each, such as a
half-hour Each \\eek gi\e
children the appropriate
number of stickers. Hat e
them put the stickers on a
chart as screen time is spent.
When the stickers are gone.
no more screen time until
next week.
Limit personal screen time.
Set a good example. Tr\ tap-
ing shows to watch h after kids
go to bed, and try not to aim-
lessly surf the Internet too
much.
Establish priorities. Home-


!it,


y School

These ladies will advance
to the Hamilton County
Spelling Bee on Friday, Feb-
ruary 4. Participants from
Central Hamilton Elemen-
tary, South Hamilton Ele-
mentary, North Hamilton El-
ementary and Hamilton
County High School will
"spell" for the honor of repre-
senting the county in the re-
gional spelling bee. The re-
gional spelling bee is spon-
sored by The Florida Times-
Union.
CHE sponsored an FCAT
Writing Night on January 11.
Fourth grade teacher David
Law spoke to parents about
the importance of the writing
portion of the FCAT, and pre-
sented information about the
assessment. After a general
assembly, the parents attend-
ed breakout sessions with
each grade-level.
The writing night was one
event in the Parent Workshop


series that CHE has sched-
uled this year. The next infor-
mative session is scheduled
for Tuesday, January 25.
FCAT Mathematics Night
will be held then, under the
direction of sixth grade math
teacher Kathy Smith. Infor-
mation can be obtained by
contacting Julie Gant, Family
Resource Specialist, at 792-
6539. Childcare will be pro-
vided.
The FCAT is right around
the corner! CHE is kicking
off its "Mission Possible:
FCAT 2005" campaign. The
writing portion of the test
will be administered on Feb-
ruary 8 and 9. The remaining
sections of the FCAT will be
administered on March 1-4
and 7-10.
The President's Day holi-
day has been restored by the
Hamilton County School
Board. Please note the
change in your calendars, as
students and staff will be on
holiday, Monday, February
21.
Keep up with happenings and
events at CHE, by logging onto
http://www.firn.edu/schools/ha
milton/centhamel.


skills are taught? Also learn
how to help a child prepare
for testing.
To reserve space call Fam-
ily Resource Specialist Julie
Gant at 792-6538 or e-mail
gantj 03@fim.edu.


work, piano practice and oth-
er responsibilities come be-
fore screen time.
Screen children's selec-
tions. Tr, to waich a program
or mo tie before letting chil-
dren watch it and decide
whether it's appropriate. Al-
ways check out computer
games and Web sites before
letting children see them as
well.
Control the screen popula-
tion. The few\er screens there
are in the house, the less im-
portant they'll seem and the
less temptation the\ \\ill be.
Of course, remember that
time spent doing homework
on the computer would not
count against children's lim-
its. Computers and televi-
sion. when used correctly.
ha\e educational possibili-
ties. But practicing modera-
tion can be ver) healthy.


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NHE NEWS j


Everyone at NHE came back
to school with a big smile and a
positive attitude, ready to meet
new challenges and make great
strides of progress in the New
Year. Most classes are busy do-
ing practice and preparation for
the upcoming achievement test.
Parents, you can help by check-
ing students' work and encourag-
ing them to do their best In a re-
cent article on 10 things that suc-
cessful parents do, these behav-
iors were given:
1. They are leaders as well as
parents. They take "first" respon-
sibility for their child's education
and values.
2. They have a vision for their
family and its future.
3. They are behavioral models
for their children, modeling traits
like honesty, forgiveness, and de-
cision-making.
4. They enable their children,
communicating high, yet achiev-
able goals and provide the spiri-
tual, emotional, physical, intel-
lectual, and financial resources
the children need to successfully
achieve them.
5. They talk with their kids, not
at them.
6. They take pains to under-
stand how children develop.
7. They take an active role in
their children's education, both
formal and informal.
8. Although their children are
outstanding in any number of
ways, these parents freely admit
their kids are anything but per-
fect.
9. When the time comes, they
discuss the future and provide ap-
propriate advice and guidance re-
garding career and other life
choices that children must even-
tually make.
10. Through it all, they encour-
age independent, critical thinking
so, in the final analysis, each
child becomes his or her own
person.
Congratulations to our


TEACHER of the year, Mrs.
Barbara Tyre. Mrs. Tyre was
bom in Alabama and grew up in
Crestview, FL. She graduated
from FSU and earned her mas-
ter's degree from Troy State Uni-
versity. Her teaching career be-
gan in Cairo, GA, in 1970. She
also taught in Shalimar, FL, and
Andalusia, AL, before coming to
Hamilton County. She has taught
33 years. She is married and has
two grown children. Her teach-
ing experience is in kindergarten,
first and second grades. She
presently teaches second grade.
Mrs. Tyre says, I feel fortunate
to be doing something in life that
I enjoy so much. Ijust can't think
of anything else that I would
rather be doing!"All of us here at
NHE are thankful that we have
such a quality teacher on our
staff.
We also salute our SCHOOL-
RELATED EMPLOYEE of the
year, our data clerk, Mrs. Norma
L. Zamora. Mrs. Zamora is mar-
ried to Javier Zamora and is the
mother of three wonderful chil-
dren, Roxanne, 17, Ignacio, 16,
and Javy, 5. She has lived in
Hamilton County for 18 years
and been employed by the school
system for 11 years. She attends
St. Therese Catholic Church,
where she teaches communion
and confirmation classes. She en-
joys spending time with children,
especially during baseball/soft-
ball season. Mrs. Zamora is a
"key" person in our office and is
especially helpful with translat-
ing for our Hispanic parents.
A special welcome goes to
"Coach K", Kellan Dedge, who
is doing his internship from UF
in our physical education pro-
gram. He's doing a great job, and
his enthusiasm makes him a "big
hit" with the students.
A long-standing tradition at
North Hamilton was continued
"last year" when Ms. Zant, me-
dia specialist read the Christmas


classic, "The Polar Express" by
Chris Van Allusburg, to kinder-
garten through 2nd grade classes.
The students enjoyed comparing
the book with the movie. We
would like to take this opportuni-
ty to wish Ms. Zant a very happy
birthday! Also, January birthday
greetings to our school secretary,
Ms. Bates.
Please mark your calendars for
our honor roll assembly on Janu-
ary 20. Please note that there are
no more early dismissal days, ex-
cept the last day of school on
May 20. Be sure you have signed
and returned your child's report
card, which was sent home on
Tuesday, January 11. Parents of
4th graders are encouraged to at-'
tend our 4th grade FCAT Par-
ent/Student Write Night on Tues-
day, January 25, beginning at 6
p.m. in the cafeteria. Parents will
be writing a Florida Writes Paper
with their child. Afterwards, a
meal will be served. Also, Satur-
day school will begin on January
22 for 3rd 6th graders, 9 a.m. -
11 a.m. in the computer lab.
Kindergarten thanks Ms. San-
di from the Jennings Library. She
comes in every week and reads
stories and does activities for the
letter of the week. Last week,
they enjoyed books about rac-
coons and rattlesnakes and col-
ored a book with pictures begin-
ning with the letter Rr. Kinder-
garteners also had a special les-
son from Ms. Martha Fultz,
nurse, about keeping clean and
not spreading germs. They
viewed a video, listened to and
shared ideas with Ms. Fultz, and
did a coloring sheet on keeping
hands clean.
Congratulations to Seth
Adams, Gina Giannantonio,
Bryon Samuel, Dalton Norris,
Trevor Barker, Andrew Be-'
navidez, and Amanda Alvarez in
Ms. Kennedy's 3rd grade class.
They met their reading goal for
the month of December in ihe
Pizza Hut Book-it Program.'
Making strides like this in read-
ing is just one of the ways we are
"Changing lives through quality edu-
cation"


LAKE (ITYsPEEDWAY

I/ A- StaeAaWt naIU caaem %t 4Rac8R Part<
THE FLORIDA RACERS PARTY OF THE YEAR!!


Classes Competing
Non-Winged Sprints, Super Late Models, Mini-Stocks-Florida-U.M.P. Imca
type Modifieds, K.O.I.L. Legends, Mini Sprints, Hobby Stock, Pure Stock,
Street Stock
Schedule Of Events
Thursday 5-10pm campers Move In, Music, Bon Fire
Friday Sign-in 10am-8:30pm, Hot Laps: All Divisions 4pm-7pm,
Qualifications: All Cars, Renegade, 4-Car Dashes, Mini Car Derby (Racers
Party)
Saturday Gates Open 9am ~ Sign in until 2pm, Auction Begins 10am,
Vintage Car Races 11am to 2pm, Heat Races 2:30, Big Car Demo 7:30pm
Sunday Gate Open 10am, Church Service 10:30am
Features All Day
(Starting at noon ENTRY FEE ALL CLASSES), Pits All 4 days $45 or $20 per day
General Admission $15 per day or $35 for all 3 days, Kids under 6 FREE,
6-12 $5 per day
For Rules & Questions (812)689-1046,
(812)871-7728, (859)581-8579, Track (386)754-8800



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J. SHERM FR & ASSOCIATES
Registered Surveyors






106 W. Hatley Street .P.O. Box 580
Jasper, FL 32052 Live Oak, FL 32064
Phone: 386-792-1096 Phone: 386-362-4629
Fax: 386-362-5270 Email: jsfa@alltel.net 133488DH-F

Advertise your event

in the Community Events

Please contact Kathy Sasser

at le a ipetr nietuw

(386) 792-2487
1-800-525-4182 131943DH-F


CHE offers FCAT

Math Workshop


Cooped-up kids: rules for

computer and television


THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


THE JASPER NEWS, Jasper, FL


PAGE 6B


















Serving Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette Counties Live Oak Publications, Inc.




Historic days, medieval knights


'-By Scott Hunter
For two weekends each
-year, the clear blast of trum-
,pets mingles with the laughter
of children as the kingdom of
:Hoggetowne opens its gates.
Dancers and singers in me-
dieval garb perform to the de-
:liht of passers-by. Vendors
"hawk their fine wares and
blacksmiths demonstrate their
,kills. Magicians amaze
'crowds with their secret arts.
,Knights battle one another
from horseback and warriors
meet in combat as pieces in a
t iine chessboard.
The Hoggetowne Medieval
Faire is a beloved Gainesville
tradition, and for the 19th year
it will delight many thousands


of guests over two weekends,
Jan. 29-30 and Feb. 4-6. Hun-
dreds of actors, volunteers and
merchants work together to
produce the award-winning
event. The Faire features talent
from all over the country, but
it's not only the actors and
merchants who travel to
Hoggetowne.
"We're expecting upwards
of 50,000 guests this year,"
said Linda Piper, events coor-
dinator for the Faire. "Some
people wait all year to come to
the Faire, and we're thrilled to
have them."
On School Day, thousands
of children come to the Faire
to take a field trip back in time
and learn about the medieval


era first-hand.
Admission for the Faire is
$10 for adults and $5 for chil-
dren ages five-17. Children
under five enter free. Admis-
sion on School Day, Friday,
Feb. 4, is half-price. The Faire
is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on
the weekends and 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Friday's School Day.
The Faire offers attractions
for guests of all ages, and es-
pecially for the younger mem-
bers of the kingdom. Animal
rides, games of chance and
skill, and of course, the royal
pavilion await visitors.
The brightly colored pavil-
ion is erected near the entrance
of the Faire. A green overhang
shades the royal throne, upon
which sit the King and Queen
of Hoggetowne, flanked by
their guards and heralds. It's
here where, over the course of
the Faire, more than 1,000


children will become knights
and ladies, dragon slayers and
damsels of the royal court.
And as these children, new-
ly honored by the King and
Queen, wander through the
Faire, they'll be met by dozens
of different attractions, ven-
dors, and merchants.
Seven stages of continuous
entertainment feature jugglers,
jesters and magicians. Musi-
cians play medieval melodies
on period instruments and bel-
ly dancers perform in the
street. Thrilling human-pow-
ered push rides attract lines of
eager children and vendors
calf out to the crowds to try
their hand at crossbow shoot-
ing and knife throwing. The
astounding "Birds of Prey"
show features trained hawks
and falcons who perform for
the pleasure of the crowds.
Guests can visit one of


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Hwy. 129, Live Oak, FL

386-330-2269
.0;L ^ im am,.,


VENDORS WITH THEIR WARES: City of Gainesville Department of
Cultural Affairs sponsors the 19th Annual Hoggetown Medieval
Faire Jan. 29-30 and Feb. 4-6. Photo: Submitted


JUGGLERS, JESTERS AND MAGICIANS: Entertainment at the
19th Annual Hoggetown Medieval Faire in Gainesville will feature
jugglers, jesters and magicians, and more.


Hoggetowne's mysterious for-
tune-tellers to learn the secrets
of the future, or they may visit
artisans, have their hair braid-
ed or faces festively painted.
One of the Faire's most no-
table attractions is the joust,
where knights in full plate ar-
mour charge each other on
horseback, clashing in the
middle of the field and battling
for the honor of the King and
Queen. After the joust, chil-
dren are encouraged to meet
the knights and their steeds.
The marketplace has more
than 150 skilled artisans,
whose specialties include
weaving, jewelry making,
blacksmithing, leatherwork-
ing; woodcarving and ceram-
ics. It's here that guests will
see one-of-a-kind items not
available anywhere else in
Gainesville. Guests can make


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their own candles or even buy
a colorful wax replica of their
own hand.
Past the marketplace is the
food court, where the delicious
aromas of cooking food entice
those passing by. Tasty onion
blossoms, soups, fresh-baked
pastries and sweet potato fries
are the norm. It's not uncom-
mon to see a young lord of the
court munching happily on a
giant turkey leg or a sugary
funnel cake.
Visitors are encouraged to
arrive early for the "meet and
greet session" during the first
30 minutes of the Faire, when
actors and dancers gather each
day at the front gate to enter-
tain the early crowds.
"That's my favorite part of
the day," Piper says. "It's great
to see all the performers at the
gate to greet the guests. The
sights and sounds are simply
breathtaking; I get so much
pleasure from watching the
faces of the visitors as they en-
ter Hoggetowne."
The Faire, which is pro-
duced by the City of
Gainesville Department of
Cultural Affairs, is one of
North Florida's most popular
events. The Alachua County
Fairgrounds is located east of
Gainesville, on 39th Avenue
and SR 24, adjacent to the
Gainesville Regional Airport.
For more information call 352-
334-ARTS or visit www.gvl-
culturalaffairs.org.

INFORMATION
WHO: City of Gainesville
Department of Cultural
Affairs
WHAT: Hoggetowne
Medieval Faire
WHEN: Jan. 29-30 and
Feb. 4-6
WHERE: Alachua County
Fairgrounds is located
east of Gainesville, on
39th Avenue and SR 24,
adjacent to the
Gainesville Regional
Airport
COST: $10 for adults and
$5 for children ages five-
17. Children under five
enter free
CONTACT: 352-334-
ARTS or visit
www.gvlculturalaffairs.org


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NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 3C


'Hall, 101 SE White Ave.,
I



: ;
4-











.You Monthly Meetings
m, Alien Boyd (D-North
gFlorida) Staffn- Live Oak -
I .Third Wednesday, City
nee Council Chambers, City
unity Hall, 101 SE White Ave.,
Live Oak, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
.," You may reach Congress-
man Boyd by calling 202-
*I 225-5235 or his web site at
iss www.house.gov/Boyd. Con-
SCon gressman Boyd's staff visit
; so that the people of Suwan-
;'\; nee County have the oppor-
,*\' tunity to discuss in person
*^ issues of concern to them.
;? Congressman Boyd's staff
constituents with a variety
of issues related to various
i federal agencies. It is im-
portant to the Congressman
.that his staff make them-
tselves available for those
who are not able to travel to
,either his Panama City or
STallahassee offices.
"' Alzheimer's Support
Group -:,Third Thursday,
Marvin E. Jones Building,
i Dowling Park, 3:30 p.m.
ii Call Cindy Erskin at 386-
658-5700.
.American Legion Post
"10f7'07'FTid iThursday, 12-2
%'p.m., Su%\annee li\er Re-
gional,'Library, South Ohio
; Ave../Call Clair McLauchlin
1 at 386-362-3524 or Richard
Buffington at '386-364-
5985.
Branford Camera Club -
t Regular club meetings, 7:30
Sp.m., third Thursday, Bran-
ford Library, Contact Car-
o;lyn Hogue 386-935-2044.
Sf~ Cub Scout Pack No. 408
Committee meets monthly
on the second Tuesday, 6:30
.,.p.m., at the Live Oak
",.Church of Christ, 1497
Irvin Ave (SR 51
^ South). Anyone interested is
r welcome to attend. Call
Alan Stefanik, Committee
Chairman, 386-362-3032, e-:
im .a i 1 :
comm_chair@pack408.net
or visit pack's website:
www.pack408.net, for addi-
tional information. The
Tiger, Wolf, Bears, and We-
0 belos dens (grades one -
five) meet every Thursday
^ at the church, 6:30-8 p.m.,
^ when school is in
('session. In lieu of a den
i meeting, the pack meeting
is held on the fourth Thurs-
,-day at the same time and
; place during which the en-
Stire group meets for awards,
Sskits and fun. The pack
'. holds two or three activities
,',,-during the summer, as well
as a week of Day Camp.
; Disabled American Vet-
,; erans Chapter No. 126 -
'" Second Thursday, 6 p.m.,
:. 226 Parshley St., S.W. Call
S386-362-1701.
Florida Gateway Char-
Si,' ter Chapter of the Ameri-
;, can Business Women's As-
sociation will hold its reg-
i ular meeting on the second
Thursday of each month at 6
; p.m. For more info please
call Laura Skow 386-362-


;, 2086 or visit
, www.abwa.org.
\ Friends of Suwannee
4 River State Park monthly
, board meeting are held the
second Tuesday of the
Month at 7 p.m. at the
: Suwannee River State Park.
SFor info, contact Member-
'ship Chair Walter Schoen-


of cancer for patients, fami-
lies and friends. Third Tues-
day, 7 p.m., Marvin E. Jones
Building, Dowling Park.
Call Cindy 386-658-5700.
Leona 4-H Community
Club First Monday, 7
p.m., home of Avon and
Betty Hicks, 6107 180th St.,
McAlpin. Call Betty Hicks
at 386-963-4205 or Pam
Nettles at 386-963-1236.
Lion's Club Farm Bu-
reau meeting room, 7 p.m.,
second Tuesday and fourth
Tuesday. Call Richard
Tucker, 386-963-4577.
Live Oak Artist Guild -
7 p.m., first Tuesday, St.
Luke's Episcopal Church.
Contact Don Strickland,
386-362-5146.
Live Oak Christian
Home Educators meet
first Thursday of every
month. If you are looking
for a strong home school
fielder 850-971-5354 or e- support grpup please con-
mail wbs@surfbest.net tact Pat, 386-364-1734.
Girl Scout Leaders Live Oak Garden Club -
First Monday, 7 p.m. Girl Monthly from Sept.-May.
Scouts of Gateway Council The Morning Glories day
will meet at the Woman's group-third Friday and the
Club. Call Mary Check-Ca- Night Bloomers night
son, 386-362-4475. group-third Tuesday, 1302
Hamilton County Gov- S.W. Eleventh Street, Live
ernmental Monthly Meet- Oak.
ings Bellville Volunteer Live Oak Senior Citi-
Fire/Rescue executive zens meet at 10:30 a.m.,
board: second Monday of first Monday of the month
each month at 7 p.m. at the Exhibition II Build-
Hamilton County Alco- ing, Coliseum Complex,
hol and Other Drug Pre- 1302 SW Eleventh St., Live
vention Coalition meet Oak. Members have the op-
fourth Wednesday, 9:30-11 portunity to take part in es-
a.m., at the Hamilton Coun- corted tours. For more info,
ty School Board meeting call Lula Herring at 386-
room, JRE Lee Administra- 364-1510.
tive Complex, Jasper. For Suwannee Valley Hu-
more info, contact Grace mane Society Animal Shel-
McDonald at 386-938-4911 ter The monthly meeting
or e-mail mcdonaldgl@all- will be held on the second
tel.net Monday of the month at
Hamilton County Board noon at the shelter. For
of Commissioners First more info, contact the toll-
Tuesday, 9 a.m., and third free number: 866-Adoptl2
Tuesday at 6 p.m., County (866-236-7812). Located on
Commissioners' Board Bisbee Loop (use the south
Room, courthouse, Jasper. entrance). In Lee off CR
Hamilton County Cham- 255, Madison County. Visit
ber of Commerce, Inc. web-site, .at
meets first 'Thursday ~ 6 www.geocities.com/suwan-
p.m., at 204 N. Hatley St., neehs.
Jasper: For'more info, call Live Oak, Suwannee
386-792-1300. County Recreation Board
Hamilton County Coun- of Directors Second Tues-
cil on Aging, Inc. Needs day, 5:45 p.m.at the Suwan-
volunteer drivers for the nee Parks & Recreation of-
home-delivered meals pro- fices on Silas Drive.
gram. If you enjoy helping MADD Dads Third
others and are interested or Thursday at 7 p.m. at the
need more information, Suwannee County Court-
please contact Dorsey house.
Stubbs at Council on Aging, Man To Man Group -
1509 S.W. First Street in Meets regularly at 7 p.m.,
Jasper or call 386-792- second Thursday each
1136. month at the Marvin E.
Hamilton County Devel- Jones Building, Dowling
opment Authority meets Park. Each program is free
the second Thursday, at 7 of charge and refreshments
p.m., at 204 NE 1st St., San- are provided. For further
dlin Building, Jasper. For info, call the American Can-
more info, call 386-792- cer Society toll-free at 800-
6828. ACS-2345 or the local of-
Hamilton County fice toll-free at 888-295-
Tourist Development 6787 (Press 2) Ext. 114.
Council meets the second Market Days Advent
Wednesday, at 12 noon, at Christian Village, first Sat-
204 NE 1st St., Sandlin urday, 8 a.m. 1 p.m. Space
Building, Jasper. For more on first-come, first-serve
info, call 386-792-6828. basis, $5 each. Village
Home and Community Square shops open. Call the
Educators (HCE) the Lodge Office 386-658-
council meets on the first 5200.
Friday of the month at 9:30 McAlpin Community
a.m. at the Suwannee.Coun- Club Regular monthly
ty Extension Office, Colise- meetings are held on the
um Complex, Eleventh second Monday at 7 p.m.,
Street, Live Oak. They wel- beginning with a covered
come new members. For dish dinner. Everyone is
further information call welcome. The purpose of
386-362-2771. the Club is to acquaint
Jasper City Council members of the community
Meeting Second Monday, with all the services that are
6 p.m., Jasper City Hall. available in the County. For
Jasper Lions Club Meet- info on scheduled speakers,
ing Second and fourth call Grant Meadows Jr.,
Tuesday, 7 p.m., Roosters 386-935-9316 or Shirley
Diner. Call Jim Taitt for fur- Jones, 386-963-5357. For
their information at 386- info on renting the building,
938-3582. call Kristie Harrison at 386-


Jennings Town Council 364-3400.
Meeting First Tuesday, 7 MOMS Club Second
p.m., Jennings Town Hall. Wednesday, 11:15 a.m. at
MainStreet Hamilton the .fellowship hall of
County, Inc. Third Thurs- Bethel Missionary Baptist
day, MainStreet Office, Church. Go West on US 90 -
Jasper, 6 p.m. seven miles from 1-75, and
School Board Fourth 1-1/2 miles from the Co-
Tuesday, 6 p.m. lumbia/Suwannee County

White Springs Town line, 12 miles from Live
Council Meeting: Third Oak. For. more info, call
Tuesday, 7 p.m., White 386-397-1254 or e-mail
Springs Town Hall. MOMSClubofLiveOak-
I Can Cope Educational LakeCityFl@alltel.net
support group for any type Nursing Mom's Group -


Second Friday, 10 a.m., trained SHINE volunteers
Suwannee River Regional help Medicare recipients
Library. Call Michelle, 386- make informed decisions
776-2955, for more info. about their health insurance
Remembering the Loss and Medicare Prescription
of Your Baby An open Drug Cards. SHINE volun-
support group for families teers also inform seniors
who have experienced the about free and discounted
loss of a baby through mis- prescription drug programs
carriage, ectopic pregnancy, and eligibility require-
stillbirth, newborn death or ments. This service is pro-
termination due to fetal ab- vided at no charge. For
normality or maternal com- more info or if you can't
plications. Group meets the travel to the site, contact the
first Thursday of each Elder Helpline toll-free at
month, 11:30 a.m. 1 p.m., 800-262-2243, Monday -
at Hospice of North Central Friday 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Florida, North Building SHINE Serving Health
Counseling Room, 4305 Insurance Needs of Elders
NW 90th Blvd., -, Live Oak Suwannee
Gainesville. To register or River Regional Library, US
for more information con- 129 South, 12:30-2:30 p.m.
tact Cheryl Bailey at Hos- second Monday of every
pice of North Central Flori- month. Elders and their
da, 352-692-5107 or toll- caregivers in Suwannee
free, 800-816-0596. County who are trying to
SHINE Serving Health understand Medicare and
Insurance Needs of Elders other health insurance pro-
Volunteers are needed in grams can receive help from
your area to assist elders the Florida Department of
and their caregivers receive Elder Affairs' SHINE (Serv-
information and assistance ing Health Insurance Needs
on health insurance and of Elders) Program. Spe-
Medicare. Comprehensive cially trained SHINE volun-
training is provided by the teers help Medicare recipi-
Florida Department of Elder ents make informed deci-
Affairs. This service is pro- sions about their health in-
vided at no charge. Call the surance and Medicare Pre-
Elder Helpline toll-free at scription Drug Cards.
800-262-2243. SHINE volunteers also in-
SHINE Serving Health form seniors about free and
Insurance Needs of Elders discounted prescription
Branford Library, US drug programs and eligibili-
129 North, Branford, 9,11 ty requirements. This ser-
a.m. first Wednesday of vice is provided at no
every month. Elders and charge. For more info or if
their caregivers in Suwan- you can't travel to the site,
nee County who are trying contact the Elder Helpline
to understand Medicare and toll-free at 800-262-2243,
other health insurance pro- Monday Friday 8:30 a.m.-
grams can receive help from 4:30 p.m.
the Florida Department of SHINE Serving Health
Elder Affairs' SHINE (Serv- Insurance Needs of Elders
ing Health Insurance Needs Mayo Library, SR 51,
of Elders) Program. Spe- Mayo, 12:30-2:30 p.m. -
cially trained SHINE volun- first Wednesday of every
teers help Medicare recipi- month. Elders and their
ents make informed deci- caregivers in Lafayette
sions about their health in- County who are trying to
surance and Medicare Pre- understand, Medicare and
scription Drug Cards. other health insurance pro-
SHINE volunteers 'al.sowiYt'zwgranms; can receive help from
form seniors about free and the Florida. Department of
discounted prescription Elder Affairs' SHINE-(Serv-
drug programs and eligibili- ing Health Insurance Needs
ty requirements. This ser- of Elders) Program. Spe-
vice is provided at no cially trained SHINE volun-
charge. For more info or if teers help Medicare recipi-
you can't travel to the site, ents make informed deci-
contact the Elder Helpline sions about their health in-
toll-free at 800-262-2243, surance and Medicare Pre-
Monday Friday 8:30 a.m.- scription Drug Cards.
4:30 p.m. SHINE volunteers also in-
SHINE Serving Health form seniors about free and
Insurance Needs of Elders discounted prescription
- Advent Christian Village drug programs and eligibili-
- Dowling Park Schedule ty requirements. This ser-
appointment with SHINE vice is provided at no
counselor by calling 386- charge. For more info or if
658-3333 or 386-658-5329. you can't travel to the site,
Elders and their caregivers contact the Elder Helpline
in Suwannee County who toll-free at 800-262-2243,
are trying to understand Monday Friday 8:30 a.m.-
Medicare and other health 4:30 p.m.
insurance programs can re- Small Scale Farmers
ceive help from the Florida and Craft Designers Mar-
Department of Elder Af- ket Committee Third
fairs' SHINE (Serving Thursday, 7 p.m., Coliseum
Health Insurance Needs of extension offices.
Elders) Program. Specially Suwannee Chapter of


the Florida Trail Associa-
tion Second Monday, 7
p.m., Suwannee River Wa-
ter Management District.
For more info, call Don
Neale, 386-362-4850 or
Sylvia Dunnam, 386-362-
3256.
Suwannee County
Tourist Development
Council Fourth Tuesday, 1
p.m., Chamber of Com-
merce Building, 816 S.
Ohio Ave., P.O. Drawer C.,
Live Oak, FL 32064
Suwannee County Cat-
tlemen's Association -
Third Thursday, 6:30 p.m.,
Farmers Co-op meeting
room,. Call Herb Rogers,
386-362-4118.
Suwannee County Se-
nior Citizens meet at
10:30 a.m., first Monday of
the month at the Exhibition
II Building, Coliseum Com-
plex, 1302 SW Eleventh St.,
Live Oak. For more info
call Lula Herring, 386-364-
1510.
Suwannee Valley
Builders Association Sec-
ond Thursday, 6 p.m., Farm
Bureau meeting room, 407
Dowling Ave., Live Oak, $5
per person for meal and
meeting.
Suwannee Valley Ge-
nealogical Society First
Thursday, 7 p.m., Wilbur St.
Live Oak (behind Mizell's).
Open Tuesdays and Thurs-
days, 9 a.m.-noon and 1-5
p.m. Phone: 386-330-0110.
Suwannee Valley Quil-
ters First and third Thurs-
day, 10 a.m. Jane, 386-776-
2909 after 4 p.m.
Suwannee Valley Kennel
Club Third Tuesday, 7:30
p.m., Hospitality and Recre-
ational Building, Columbia
County Fairgrounds, Lake
City, P.O. Box 2013, Lake
City, FL 32056.
Tobacco-Free Partner-
ship of Suwannee County -
meet quarterly, call Mary
Jordan Taylor 386-362-
2708, ext. 232.
Vivid Visions, Inc..- A
shelter and outreach agency
for victims of domestic vio-
lence meets the first Mon-
day of each month at 5:30
p.m., Douglass Center Con-
ference Room. All persons
interested in helping vic-
tims of domestic violence
are encouraged to attend.
For more info,, call 386-
364-5957.
Wellborn Community
Association (WCA) Sec-
ond Thursday, 7 p.m., Well-
born Community Center.
Contact Bonnie Scott, 386-
963-4952 or leave a mes-
sage at 386-208-1733.
WCA (building fund)-First
Saturday-Blueberry Pan-
cake Breakfast, center of
Wellborn, Andrews Square.
Blueberry pancakes,
sausage, OJ, coffee.
Wellborn Neighborhood
Watch last Thursday, 7
p.m., Blake Lowe Building,

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 4C


IN CONCERT


Saturday, March 19, 2005

7:30 pm at the

Suwannee County Fair



S Tickets on Sale


NOWI!!


Reserve your

VIP seating now!


/ Call for more info.

:0 362-7366







PAGE 4C, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 3C

1517 4th Ave., Wellborn.
For more info, call Bruce or
Jane, 386-963-3196.
Weekly Meetings
Al-Anon/Mayo Al-Anon
Group meets each Thurs-
day, 8 p.m., Mayo Manna
House, Pine Street for
family members and friends
to show support. For more
info, call Barbara, 386-294-
3348 or Marcia, 386-208-
1008.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Branford meets Tuesday
and Friday, 7:30 p.m., Bran-
ford United Methodist
Church, Express and Henry
St., Branford. For more
info, call 386-935-2242 or
the District 16 Help Line
toll-free, 800-505-0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Live Oak meets Tuesday
and Friday, 8 p.m., Precinct
Voting Building, Nobles
Ferry Road, Live Oak. For
more info, call District 16
Help Line toll-free, 800-
505-0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Mayo Group meets Sun-
day, Monday, Wednesday
and Thursdays at 8 p.m. The
meetings are held at Manna
House, Pine Street, Mayo.
For more info call 386-294-
2423 or District 16 Help
Line toll-free, 800-505-
0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
White Springs Courage
to Change meets Monday,
8 p.m., Methodist Church,
White springs. For more
info, call 386-397-1410 or
District 16 Help Line toll-
free, 800-505-0702.
Bluegrass Association -
Saturday, Spirit of the
Suwannee Park, 6 p.m.
Covered dish. SRBA mem-
bers admitted free. For info,
call 386-364-1683.
Bridge Club Monday,
6:45 p.m., Golden Corral
Restaurant, Live Oak. For
information call 386-362-
3200.
Boy Scout Troop #693 -
Every Monday, 7 p.m.,
Shrine Club, Bass Road, un-


til further notice. Call 386-
776-2863.
Live Oak Singles Group
- meets Friday, 7:30 p.m.,
Live Oak Christian Church
fellowship hall on US 129
North, Live Oak (next to
Walt's Ford). Parking is be-
tween church and cemetery
on church property or along
US 129 North. This not a
church sponsored event. For
more info, call Carla, 386-
364-4756. Visit web site at
http://groups.yahoo.com/gr
oup/SuwanneeSingles/
Narcotics Anonymous -
The Gratitude Group -
Meetings held Monday, 7
p.m., at St. Luke's Episco-
pal Church, 1391 S.W.
Eleventh St. (in the back),
Live Oak, FL 32060.
Over Eaters Anonymous
- We care. Meets Mondays
11:35 a.m.- 12:50 p.m.,
Monday, at Suwannee Riv-
er Regional Library, 129
South, Live Oak. For more
info, call 386-364-4749.
Quarterback Club
Meeting Old Nettie Bais-
den school next to the foot-
ball stadium, 6:30 p.m.,
every Monday.
Square Dance With
Vagabond Squares, Thurs-
day, 7-9:30 p.m., St. Luke's
Episcopal Church, Newbern
Road. Loyce Harrell, 386-
963-3225, or Ralph Beek-
man, 386-752-2544.
Suwannee River Riding
Club Membership fee $25
per year. Team roping first
and third Friday night.
Speed events first and third
Saturday night. Call 386-
935-2622.
Suwannee Valley Bar-
bershop Chorus Every
Tuesday, Crapps Meeting
Room, Suwannee River Re-
gional Library, US 129
South, Live Oak at 7 p.m.
Call Fred Phillips, 386-362-
1886.
TOPS Take Off Pounds
Sensibly,: the. Live Oak
Community Church of God,
every Thursday, 8:30 a.m.,
weigh-in, meeting, 9 a.m.
Barbara Crain, 386-362-
5933 or Sharon Martin,


386-364-5423.
Weight Watchers Mon-
day. 9:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.,
St. Luke's Episcopal, toll-
free 800-651-6000.
FYI
Advent Christian Vil-
lage 2004-2005 Artist Se-
ries Events include: 'His-
tory Jumps Off the Page,'
Friday, Jan. 28, at the
Phillips Dining Room, 6
p.m.; Donna Wissinger -
flutist, Saturday, March 12,
at the Phillips Dining
Room, 7 p.m., 'Cotton
Patch Gospel,' Monday,
March 21, at the Village
Church, 7 p.m. (Based on
Clarence Jordan's version
of the book of Matthew);
The Phillips-Lassiter Guitar
Duo, Friday, April 22, at the
Village Church, 7 p.m. ACV
season tickets are available
at Advent Christian Village;
The Music Center in Live
Oak, and the Suwannee
County Chamber of Com-
merce. Cost: Adults $80;
Students (ages 13-18) $35;
Children (ages 5-12) $25.
Another Way, Inc. Sup-
port Groups Another
Way, Inc. offers support
groups for victims and sur-
vivors of domestic vio-
lence. For info regarding
dates and times, call 386-
792-2747 or the toll-free
hotline at 800-500-1119.
'Before You Tie The
Knot' four-hour class for
couples who will marry
soon. The cost is $10 per
couple. Completion of this
course is required when
couples reduce their mar-
riage license fee by $32.50.
Pre-registration is required.
Registration forms are
available at the Clerk of the
Court's office or the
Suwannee County Exten-
sion Service office, 386-
362-2771.
Childbirth classes of-
fered at the Suwannee
County Health Department
on Tuesday from 6 8 p.m.
Please call to register at
386-362-2708, ext. 218 -
Coleen Cody. The classes
,are free of charge.


Department of Children
and Families can assist
you in applying to register
to vote or update your voter
registration record. If you
receive or apply for public
assistance benefits, your lo-
cal Department of Children
and Families service center
can assist you in completing
a voter registration applica-
tion to your local Supervi-
sor of elections for you. Re-
member, voting is a right.
Your local service center is
at 501 Demorest St., Live
Oak, 386-362-1483.
Disaster Action Team
Volunteers Needed The
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley is looking
for volunteers to join the
Disaster Action Team to as-
sist victims of fires and oth-
er natural disasters. If you
are interested and would
like to learn more, call 386-
752-0650.
The Story of Dowling
Park Do you want to
know more about the Ad-
vent Christian Village
(ACV) at Dowling Park?
ACV representatives are
available to meet with you
and share the story of
Dowling Park. If you're in-
terested in arranging a
speaking engagement or a
tour for your organization,
club or church, please con-
tact us at 386-658-5110 or
toll-free, 800-714-3134 or
e m a i 1
ccarter@acvillage.net. For
an ACV preview, visit
www.acvillage.net. Or re-
quest a free videotape.
Downtown Craft Mar-
ket, High Springs Brings
talented local artists togeth-
er to showcase their talents
in the heart of downtown
High Springs and is open
each Saturday at the corner
of NW 1st Avenue and Main
Street. Admission and ac-
tivities are free. For more
info, please call 386-454-
3950.
Experience Works a
national nonprofit organiza-
tion, (formerly Green
Thumb) provides training
and employment services to
older workers over 55 and'
with a limited income in
Suwannee County through
the Senior Community Ser-
vice Employment Program
(SCSEP). Participants are
paid the minimum wage for
an average of 20 hours per
week. For more info, visit
www.experienceworks.org
or call the Lake City One
Stop, 386-755-9026, ext.
3129 for Loretta or ext.
3134 for Ronald.
FoodSource a Christian
based Christian food coop-
erative, is in your area!
Stretch your food dollars!
With the help of dedicated
volunteers, FoodSource is
able to provide quality
foods at low prices while
promoting Christian values
and volunteerism in your
community. This is NOT a
needy only program; it is
for EVERYONE. There are
no qualifications to partici-


pate! FoodSource accepts
cash, checks, Visa, Master-
card, Debit, EBT and mon-
ey orders. Menu is subject
to change! This months ten-
tative menu is: whole chick-
en, beef stew (all meat
stew), Ammons Brothers
country sausage, bologna,
fresh eggs. cheese, Quiznos
broccoli cheese soup (fami-
ly sized), oatmeal or cream
of wheat, 7-layer sensation
dessert, peanut butter, 16-
bean soup mix, fresh tange-
los, fresh grapefruit, fresh
broccoli, fresh apples, fresh
bananas, fresh onions and
fresh five-pound bag of
potatoes.Pick Up Date: Jan.
22. Regular package price -
$25. Meat package avail-
able $25. Tentative meat
box menu: boston butt,
whole chicken beef roast,
hot dogs, hamburger patties
and breakfast sausage. TO
ORDER AND PAY BY
CREDIT/DEBIT/CHECK
CARD, CALL TOLL-FREE
800-832-5020. PICK UP
ORDER AT LOCAL SITE.
For questions or to order,
call your local coordinator.
Live Oak: Live Oak Church
of God 386-362-2483;
Wellborn United Methodist
Church 386-963-5023;
Ebenezer AME Church -
386-362-6383 or 386-364-
4323 or 386-362-4808;
Jasper: 386-792-3965;
White Springs: 386-752-
2196 or 386-397-1228;
Bell: 352-463-7772 or 352-
463-1963; Lake City 386-
752-7976 or FoodSource
toll-free at 800-832-5020 or
visit website at www.food-
source.org for questions or
to become a local host site.
Friends of Suwannee
River State Park Join the
Friends of Suwannee River
State Park, a non-profit
501(c)3 charitable organi-
zation. Help keep the State
Park the gem of the Suwn-
nee River. The park is locat-
ed 13 miles West of Live
Oak off US 90. Quarterly
newsletter, quarterly meet-
ings, monthly board meet-
ings and an annual luncheon
meeting. Membership
brochures may be picked up
at the State Park or mail
your membership to:
Friends of Suwannee River
State Park, 20185 CR 132,
Live Oak, FL 32060. Phone:
386-362-2746. Individual
Friend-$15; Family-$25;
Business Sponsor-$50; Cor-
porate Friend-$100-$250;
Lifetime Friend-$300. For
more info contact the mem-
bership chair Walter
Schoenfelder at 850-971-
5354, or e-mail him at wb-
sesurfbest.net
Florida Museum of Nat-
ural History Florida's
state natural history muse-
um, located near the inter-
section of Southwest 34th
Street and Hull Road in the
University of Florida Cul-
tural Plaza in Gainesville.
Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m,
Monday-Saturday and 1-5
p.m. Sunday. Closed on
Thanksgiving and Christ-


mas. For more info, includ-
ing ticket prices, directions
and parking info, call 352-
846-2000. Visit
www.flmnh.ufl.edu.
GED Tests A person
wanting to take the GED
test must call to reserve a
seat in the registration ses-
sion. Attendance in a reg-
istration session is manda-
tory in order to take the
GED test. To reserve seat
for registration session and
pay fees, call 386-364-
2782-Lynn Lee. To inquire
about age waivers, call 386-
384-2763-Lynne Roy, coun-
selor, and 386-364-2619-
Kim Boatright, GED exam-
iner at Suwannee-Hamilton
Technical Center.
Grower's Market on
Lake Ella Drive, Talla-
hasee open Wednesday
evenings from 3-6:30 p.m.
The growers will be provid-
ing organic, local, seasonal,
farm fresh produce for
sale: lettuces, Asian greens,
sugar cane, garlic, herbs,
squash, mustards, turnips,
arugula, shiitake mush-
rooms, kale, cut flowers,
speciality flowers; food
demonstrations, and much,
much more. In collabora-
tion with our local small
farmers, The American Le-
gion and Black Dog
Cafe. For additional info,
please contact Jennifer Tay-
lor or O. Reis, at FAMU
Small Farm Programs/Co-
operative Extension Pro-
grams, 850-599-3546.
Harsonhill Inc., a pre-
scription information
publishing company Fi-
nancial help for those who
can't afford their prescrip-
tion drugs is available right
now. Steve Reynolds, Presi-
dent of Harsonhill Inc., a
prescription information
publishing company, states
assistance programs have
been established by more
than 100 U.S. drug manu-
facturers to assist low in-
come people. These pro-
grams cover over 1,400
commonly prescribed medi-
cines. Reynolds states his
company publishes a 85+
page manual that contains
all the information required
to apply to these assistance
programs.- For more infor-
mation about these pro-
grams or to obtain the man-
ual e-mail: harsonhill
@earthlink.net or contact
Reynolds toll-free at 888-
240-9240 or write to Har-
sonhill Inc., 22425 Ventura
Blvd., No. 190, Woodland
Hills, CA 91364. For imme-
diate info, visit www.Pre-
scriptions4Free.com
Hearing Solutions If
you are interested in com-
municating with the deaf or
hard of hearing or if you are
hard of hearing yourself and
would like to learn sign lan-
guage, now's your chance.
Every Wednesday 10-11:30
a.m. or 2-3:30 p.m., at
Hearing Solutions (next
door to D.Q.), instructor

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 5C


ATTENTION ALL SUWANNEE


COUNTY FAIR PARTICIPANTS

RPjRemembet; deadline tor-

Ssignl iup... for Dairy,

SGoat, Rabbit, Beef Heife r

and PoulllrY 'ill ,be


FEBRUARY 18, 2001


FREEMAN Brothers 13358 US 90 West, Live Oak

ELECTRONICS 386-364-1557
Requires subso-'-i to a minimum of Amerlca'Top 60 oD SLatino prorammng to receive equipment crleds. Your Social Seourity Number will be required forlidenftyveriicatlon purposes by DISH Netwo
at tim of account set-uap I a Socal Scwurty Number is not proided, you must provide the last four digits of your Social Security tmber and pay a $49.99 non-refundable ee to DISH Network at such Dlme.


Criwce mark, and Tadetaftk tolng ao Ithe,, reypeccve owns 23
128315-F


r NO EXCEPTIONS

For more information on;U

t getting an entry form call thr!
fair office 386-362-7366


M f.1V 111.11 :1 IMM A kyj A I'm






NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 5C


Calendar


Continued From Page 4C

Kay Butler. Call 386-362-
2904 for further info.
Hospice of the Suwan-
nee Valley Helping
Hands Volunteer Orienta-
tion first Wednesday, 10-
11- a.m. at Hospice of the
Suwannee Valley, 618 SW
FL Gateway Drive, Lake
City. After attending orien-
tation and completing the
screening process, you will
be eligible for volunteering
in the Hospice Attic thrift
store, administrative offices
as well as helping at special
events, educational fairs,
community events and fund
raising. To register or for
more info contact Carolyn
Long, 386-752-9191.
Lafayette County Veter-
ans All veterans of
Lafayette County for your
protection, your military
records DD Form 214,
"Certificate of Release or
Discharge from Active
Duty" can be recorded in
the Lafayette County Court-
house. Please see the Clerk
of Court's office.
LillyAnswers Program -
Available to Floridians 65.
and older who are enrolled
in Medicare, have an annual
income below 200 percent
of the federal poverty level
and have no other drug cov-
erage. Seniors may apply
for the program at no cost
by calling a toll-free num-
ber, 877-RX-LILLY, or by
filling out an application.
LillyAnswers card enables
them to receive a 30-day
supply of Lilly pharmaceu-
tical products that are sold
at participating retail phar-
macies for a flat fee of $12.
Info about the LillyAnswers
i program is available at
www.lillyanswers.com or
by calling toll-free 877-RX-
LILLY.
Love INC A non-profit
Christian group that repre-
sents local churches in find-
ing help for valid needs.


Call Ginny Peters, 386-364-
4673, Monday-Friday, 9
a.m. noon
MDA Assists people
with ALS through help with
purchase and repair of
wheelchairs, support
groups, expert-led semi-
nars, an ALS Web site
(www.als.mdausa.org) and
ALS-specific chat rooms
(www.mdausa.org/chat).
MOPS Mothers of
Preschoolers a gathering
of moms for encouragement
and fun. All mothers of
children from birth to age
five are invited to attend.
The meetings are the second
and fourth Tuesday of the
month, September through
May, from 9:30 a.m. to
noon. They are held at the
First Baptist Church on
Howard St. in Live Oak.
For more info, please call
386-362-1583.
Marine Corps League
meets in Lake City First
Tuesday of each month The
Suwannee Valley Detach-
ment of the Marine Corps
League of the United States
meets monthly in Lake City.
Even months are met in
Live Oak at the Shriners
Club, odd months are in
Lake City at Quality Inn
(formerly Holiday Inn).
Marines in Suwannee Coun-
ty should call Dale Condy,
386-776-2002 or John Mey-
ers, 386-935-6784. Lake
City representatives, John
Parker, 386-754-1980 or
Bob Edgar, 386-755-1354.
Marriage? Help me! A
program presented by Solid
Rock Ministries, Inc. of
Jasper; at no charge to any-
one. Call for appointment at
386-792-2603. Helping to
apply Christian principles
to our every day living...
Morningside Nature
Center Living History
Farm, Gainesville Barn-
yard Buddies, free admis-
sion, 3 p.m..every Wednes-
day and Saturdylr to reet
and greet the farm animals.


After the animal introduc-
tions, help with the after-
noon feeding. Toddlers and
preschoolers will love
learning about the barnyard
buddies. Meet at the barn.
For more info, call 352-
334-2170 or visit www.na-
tureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature
Center Living History
Farm, Gainesville Living
History Days, every Satur-
day,
from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. with
staff in period dress inter-
preting day-to-day life on a
Florida farm in 1870. Sam-
ple homemade biscuits on
the woodstove with fresh
butter and cane syrup grown
and made on the farm. Help
feed the farm animals at 9
a.m. and 3 p.m. daily. Free
admission. For more info
call 352-334-2170 or visit
www.natureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature
Center Living History
Farm, Gainesville Dis-
cover & Do, third Sunday
of the month, kids bring
your favorite adult for a fun
activity and make a cool
craft to take home. Meet at
Loblolly Environmental Fa-
cility on NW 34th Street be-
tween University and NW
8th Ave. Reservations re-
quired. Free admission. For
more info and to RSVP call
352-334-2170 or visit
www.natureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature
Center Living History
Farm, Gainesville Who's
Who in the Woods, last Sat-
urday of the month, natural-
ist-guided walk at 9 a.m. 1-
1.5 hours walk, wear com-
fortable walking shoes.
Meet at the education of-
fice, 3540 E. University
Ave. Free admission. For
more info call 352-334-
2170 or visit www.nature-
operations.org.
Morningside Nature
Center Living. History
Farm, Gainesville !' A
Night at the Owlery, By the


light of the silvery moon
with the owls and frogs
we'll croon...each Saturday
nearest the full moon. Come
at 7 p.m. with family and
friends for a lively variety
of talks, songs, hikes, fires,
and fun! Florida Wildlife
Care's Leslie Straub will
help us meet and greet our
noisy nocturnal neighbors,
the owls, at Boulware
Springs Historic Water-
works, 3300 SE 15th St.,
Gainesville. Free admis-
sion. For more info call
352-334-2170 or visit
www.natureoperations.org.
NFCC Artist Series
2004-2005 Performances
will be held on campus at
the Van H. Priest Auditori-
um, Madison. This year's
line-up includes: Jan. 25,
Glenn Miller Orchestra -
Glenn Miller Orchestra per-
form classics; Feb. 17,
Mark Twain on Stage: John
Chappell as Samuel L.
Clemens in look, in voice,
in gesture and above all, in
his own memorial words, he
lives again; March 3,
Chamber Orchestra Krem-
lin Russia's international-
ly known ensemble per-
forms. Season passes $40
for adults, $25 for children
12 and under. Become a
sponsor $100 individual to
$500 corporate. For more
info, passes, or to sponsor
call 850-973-1653 or e-mail
artistseries@nfcc.edu/ Visit
on-line at
htpp://www.nfcc.edu/New-
sEvents/ArtistSeries/home.
html.
NFCC Children's The-
ater performances '- NFCC
will present "The Adven-
tures of Lewis and Clark"
by GMT Productions, Inc.
on April 18, with two per-
formances for sixth eighth
graders in NFCC's six
county service area. Perfor-
mance will be held at the
Van H. Priest Auditorium
ro"'the Madis'6n cahiptiu. For
more info visit


www.nfcc.edu/NewsEv-
ents/ArtistSeries/chil-
drentheater.html or contact
the NFCC College Ad-
vancement Office, 850-973-
1613.
NFCC College Place-
ment Tests NFCC will
conduct College Placement
Tests (CPT) on computer
every Thursday at 8:30 a.m.
and 1:30 p.m. in the NFCC
Technical Center, Bldg. 13,
on the Madison campus.
Persons taking the tests will
be required to register in
NFCC Student Services 24
hours before testing. There
is a fee of $10 for the test.
For more info, please call
850-973-1612.
NFCC E-Spotlight pro-
vides weekly information -
Interested in North Florida
Community College
events? Have current col-
lege news and happenings
delivered directly to your e-
mail address through
NFCC's e-Spotlight. Alum-
ni, former faculty or staff
and community members
interested in keeping up
with NFCC's calendar of
events and news are invited
to join the list of e-Spot-
light recipients. To receive
NFCC's weekly e-Spotlight
call the Office of Institu-
tional Advancement at 850-
973-161-3 or e-mail Kim
Scarboro at
scarborok@nfcc.cc.
Narconon Arrowhead-
Drug addiction can leave an
individual feeling helpless
and out of control. Espe-
cially if you are the family
member or friend of an ad-
dict. Narconon Arrowhead
can help. Narconon offers
free counseling, assess-
ments and referrals to reha-
bilitation centers nation-
wide by calling toll-free,
800-468-6933 or logging
o n t o
www.stopaddiction.com.
Don't wait until it's too
'latd.'Call' Ntr6oii'tiibiW!
North Central Florida


Sexual Assault Center,
Inc. provides individual
and group counseling for
victims of rape and incest.
Any man or woman who is
18 years old or older and is
a victim of rape, sexual
abuse or incest is eligible to
participate. All services are
free and confidential. Call
Victim Advocate, Erica Nix
toll-free at Pager Number,
800-400-7140. For other
info, call 386-719-9287.
North Florida Work-
force Development AWI
personnel, as part of the
one-stop system, strive to
help dislocated workers and
other job seekers find em-
ployment in a prompt man-
ner. AWI staff now have of-
fice hours at the One-Stop
Centers in Hamilton: 386-
792-1229, Jefferson: 850-
342-3338, Lafayette: 386-
294-1055, Madison: 850-
973-9675, Suwannee: 386-
364-7952 and Taylor: 850-
584-7604 counties as fol-
lows: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday
through Friday, and alter-
nate Saturdays 9 a.m.-1
p.m.
Parents of ADD and
ADHD Children If you
are interested in joining a
support group call Lea-
Anne Elaine, 386-362-
7339.
Pregnancy Crisis Center
The Live Oak Pregnancy
Crisis Center at 112 Pied-
mont St. (behind the Amo-
co) is open on Wednesday
through Friday from 9 a.m.-
3 p.m. The center will offer
confidential counseling,
free pregnancy tests,
clothes for expectant moth-
ers and infants. The center
will also offer referrals to
pro-life doctors. Groups
and churches might want to
have a baby shower and do-
nate all the items to the cen-
ter. Also needed:. Maternity
clothes and hangers. Tele-
phone 386-330-2229; or

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 6C


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147 .
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PAGE 6C, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 5C

toll-free 800-696-4580.
Rainbow Acres Animal
Shelter A nonprofit, no
kill, animal shelter, needs
donations of all kinds, shel-
ter material, wood, fencing,
etc. Food, old pots, pans,
etc. Almost anything you no
longer need, we can put to
good use. Cash is also ac-
cepted to keep our kittens
and puppies healthy. Our
animals are free. Donations
accepted, not required.
Free!!!!! Puppies and Dogs.
Kittens and Cats. Contact
Carolynn or Matt, 386-362-
3338.
Reach To Recovery -
breast cancer survivors vis-
iting breast cancer patients
with information and hope.
One on one visits. Free of
charge. Call toll-free, 800-
ACS-2345 to schedule a
visit. Sponsored by the
American Cancer Society.
Regional Heart Disease
and Stroke Prevention
Coalition serving Suwan-
nee, Lafayette, Hamilton,
Madison, Jefferson and
Taylor counties meets
quarterly. Please call Diana
King at 850-342-0170 ext.
220 for more info.
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park & Camp-
ground upcoming events
include Jan. 15 Lewis
Family; Feb. 12 Sun
Country Jamboree; Feb. 14
- Valentines Day; Feb. 22-
24 Best of America by
Horseback; Feb. 24 Mark
Newton Band; March 5 -
Spring Fling Garage Sale;
March 12 Sun Country
Jamboree; March 18 Cher-
ry Holmes Family; March
24-27 Suwannee Spring
Fest; March 27 Craft Vil-
lage Easter Egg Hunt.
Stephen Foster State
Culture Center State Park
- monthly Cracker Coffee-
house from, 7-9,p.m. in the
Auditorium. Upcoming
events: Craft Rendezvous -
Jan. 29. Open stage night
held the first Saturday of
every month with songs,
stories, yodeling, music and
much 'more. Coffee and
desserts available for sale.
Free admission at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park, White Springs.
Located on US 41, three
miles from 1-75 and nine
miles from I-10. For info on
additional programs and
times, contact the park at
386-397-4331, or visit
www.FloridaStateParks.org
/stephenfoster/


Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
- Honored as one of 10
"21st Century American
Heritage Parks" in 2003.
For more info, call 3-86-
397-7009. Visit www.Flori-
daStateParks.org/stephen-
foster/
Suwannee Valley Blue-
grass Association gets to-
gether at the Pickin' Shed
every Saturday evening at
the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park & Campground,
3076 95th Dr., Live Oak.
For more info, call 386-
364-1683.
Suwannee Valley
Builders Association
(SVBA) A non profit orga-
nization, is a group of ap-
proximately 80 local citi-
zens dedicated to building a
stronger community, whose
members volunteer their
time with active involve-
ment with associate spon-
sorships of worthwhile
community activities and
associate members of the
Council for Progress and
Suwannee County Chamber
of Commerce. SVBA do-
nates two academic scholar-
ships each year, donates
Christmas gift/food baskets
each year and sponsor of
the children's playhouse
raffle at Christmas. Fea-
tured speakers from local
businesses and a catered
dinner are the highlights of
the evening at monthly
meetings. The general pub-
lic is invited to attend and
become members. Dona-
tions of $5 a person are ac-
cepted at the door to help
cover catering expenses.
For more info on joining the
organization, contact Ron-
nie Poole, 386-362-4539.
Wanted Have an hour a
week to share? Volunteers
needed at Surrey Place for
our extensive seven-day-a-
week activity program.
Many volunteers positions
are now open. Calling out
bingo or pokeno, reading to
residents who no longer see
well or sharing scriptures,
giving wheel chair rides in
the courtyard, helping with
special events or being a
"helper/partner" on outings
out of the facility. Our goal
is to keep our residents'
lives fulfilled by being busy
and happy. For more info,
please call Karen or Ellie at
Surrey Place, 386-364-
5961.
Wild Adventures up-
coming events include:
Snow Days Now-Feb. 28;
Winter Jam: Tait, TobyMac,


Newsong, Building 429,
Mathew West, Chaos on
Wheels Jan 22; Diamond
Rio with Jimmy Wayne -
Feb. 5; Bowling for Soup -
Feb. 19; Terri Clark and
Josh Turner Feb. 26. Wild
Adventures Theme Park is
located at 3766. Old Cly-
attville Rd. Valdosta, Ga.
For .more info visit
www.wild-adventure.com.
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
Through Jan. 31
Driver's license and
vehicle inspection
checkpoints scheduled
The Florida Highway Pa-
trol will conduct driver's li-
cense and vehicle inspec-
tion checkpoints through
Jan. 31, on Brown Road,
CR 252, CR 252-A, CR
252-B, CR 25-A, SR 47, SR
341, US 441, US 41, CR
245, CR 238, CR 135, Turn-
.er Road, SR 100, Trotter's
Road, Fairfield Farms
Road, CR 250, CR 349, SR
247 and SR 25 in Columbia
County; CR 132, CR 136,
CR 136-A, CR 137, CR
249, CR 250, CR 252, CR
349, CR 49, CR 795, SR 20,
SR 247, SR 10, SR 51, US
129 and Mitchell Road in
Suwannee County; and CR
136, CR 152, CR 143, CR
249, CR 137, CR 251, CR
146, CR 135, CR 141, CR
150, CR 145 and US 41, SR
6, SR 25 in Hamilton Coun-
ty. Recognizing the danger
presented' to the public by
defective vehicle equip-
ment, troopers will concen-
trate their efforts on vehi-
cles being operated with de-
fects such as bad brakes,
worn tires and defective
lighting equipment. In addi-
tion, attention will be di-
rected to drivers who would
violate the driver license
laws of Florida. The Patrol
has found these checkpoints
to be ineffective means of
enforcing the equipment
and driver's license laws of
Florida while ensuring the
protection of all motorists.
Now April 1
Ten Star All Star
Basketball Camp
Applications are now be-
ing evaluated thru April 1
- for The Ten Star All Star
Summer Basketball Camp.
The camp is by invitation
only. Boys and girls ages
10-19 are eligible to apply.
Past participants include:
Michael Jordan, Tim Dun-
can, Vince Carter, Jerry
Stackhouse, Grand Hill and
Antawn Jamison. Players
from 50 states and 17 for-


eign countries attended the
2004 camp. College basket-
ball scholarships are possi-
ble for players selected to
the All-American Team.
Camp locations include:
Babson Park and Atlanta,
Ga. For a free brochure, call
704-373-0873 anytime.
The 5th Army Associa-
tion tour of Italy, depart-
ing New York on June 15
The 5th Army Association
World War II, Italy, will
conduct a 10 day final tour
of Italy, departing New
York on June 15 visiting
Rome, Venice, Florence,
Pisa, Sorrento and a special
stop at the American Mili-
tary Cemetery near Anzio.
Former members of the
many combat divisions and
support groups, their fami-
lies, friends and those inter-
ested in the history of the
U.S. 5th Army can contact
Sny Canton at 5277B Lake-
front Blvd., Delray Beach,
FL 33484 or call 561-865-
8495.
Calling all classmates of
SHS Class of 1986
Hello! To the graduating
class of 1986, our 20 year
reunion is fast approaching.
It will be great to see every-
one. Preparation for the re-
union is in progress. Class
members please contact An-
gela Hunter Mandrell at her
e-mail address: Man-
dr003@bellsouth.net. The
class members may also
contact Catrena Francis at:
VanessaFrancis@msn.com
as soon as possible.
Tickets on sale now!
Riverdance
engagement rescheduled
for Feb. 4 6
The return engagement
for Riverdance, originally
scheduled for Feb. 18-20,
has been rescheduled to
Feb. 4-6, at the. Curtis M.
Phillips Center for the Per-
forming Arts, Gainesville
Tickets for performances of
Riverdance, scheduled Feb-
ruary 4-6, are on sale now.
Patrons who already pur-
chased tickets for the per-
formances may use their
tickets for the performances
at the same times: Feb. 18
tickets on Feb. 4; Feb. 19
tickets on Feb. 5; and Feb.
20 tickets on Feb. 6. For
more info, patrons can con-
tact the Phillips Center Box
Office at 352-392-ARTS
(2787) or toll-free within
Florida at 800-905-ARTS
(2787). Riverdance is spon-
sored by ERA Trend Realty
and Shands HealthCare.
Visit the Riverdance web-
site at
www.riverdance.com. Tick-
ets are also available at the
University Box Office, all
Ticketmaster outlets,
www.ticketmaster.com or
by calling Ticketmaster at
904-353-3309. Cash, Visa
and MasterCard are accept-
ed. The Phillips Center Box
Office is open Monday -.
Saturday, noon to 6 p.m.
Performance dates, times
and programs are subject to
change.
Sign up now!
Live Oak Senior
Citizens schedule tours
Live Oak Senior Citizens
schedule escorted tours to:
The Dead Sea Scrolls Ex-
hibit, The Festival of Flow-
ers and a river boat cruise,
Mobile, Ala., March 8-11;
Carnival Cruise to Western
Caribbean, May 15-22; and
a San Antonio Experience,
Oct. 19-23. Costs and dead-


Truck


Accessories






Grill Guards, Fog Lamps
Roll Bars, Tool Boxes,
Bug Shields & More


Hwy 90 W., Lake City
752-0054
129906-F


lines for payment vary for
each trip. The group meets
the first Monday, 10:30
a.m., Extension Building II,
Agriculture Center. Visitors
welcome. For more info,
contact Lula Herring at
386-364-1510.
Jan. 19
NFCC will conduct
GED tests
North Florida Community
College will conduct GED
tests Jan. 19, at 6 p.m. in
the NFCC Technical Center
on the Madison
campus. Persons taking the
tests will be required to fur-
nish a photo ID. NFCC
holds GED preparation
courses free of charge;
there is a fee for the
test. Pre-registration is re-
quired. To register please
call 850-973-1629.
Jan. 19
NFCC Lady Sentinels
next home basketball
game
The North Florida Com-
munity College Lady Sen-
tinels next home basketball
game will be played at 5:30
p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 19,
against Gulf Coast at Colin
P. Kelly Gymnasium on the
Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to
the public. For more info,
contact NFCC basketball
coach Clyde Alexander at
850-973-1609 or visit ath-
letics at www.nfcc.edu.
Jan. 19
Office hours with
Congressman Boyd's
staff in Live Oak
A member of Congress-
man Allen Boyd's (D-North
Florida) staff will be visit-
ing Live Oak on the third
Wednesday of every month
so the people of Suwannee
County have the opportuni-
ty to personally discuss is-
sues concerning them. Con-
gressman Boyd's staff is
trained to assist con-
stituents with a variety of
issues relating to various
federal agencies. It is im-
portant to Congressman
Boyd that his staff is avail-
able for those who are not
able to travel to either his
Panama City or Tallahassee
offices. Office hours with
Congressman Boyd's staff
this month will be Wednes-
day, Jan. 19, from 9:30
a.m. 11:30 a.m., Live Oak
City Hall, Live Oak.
Jan. 20
Gateway School
Readiness Coalition, Inc.
quality and executive
committees will meet
The Gateway School
Readiness Coalition, Inc.
quality and executive com-
mittees will meet at 2 p.m.
on Thursday, Jan. 20, at the
Gateway School Readiness
Coalition, 484 SW Com-
merce Drive, Suite 140,
Lake City. The coalition
oversees the state and fed-
eral funding for all school
readiness programs birth to
age five for Columbia,
Hamilton, Lafayette,
Suwannee and Union Coun-
ties. They encourage com-
munity participation and
welcome any input. If any
persons) interested in at-
tending this meeting has a
disability requiring special
assistance, please contact
Heidi Moore at 386-752-
9770. Notice has been made
of this meeting, through
publication, to cover the
"Government in the Sun-
shine" law.

Jan. 20
Jana Jae, a Hee Haw
fiddle player, and her
blue fiddle will perform


in free concert at
Wal-Mart in Live Oak
Jana Jae, a Hee Haw fid-
dle player and "The First
Lady of Country Fiddle!,"
will perform with her blue
fiddle and her band Hotwire
in a free concert at Wal-
Mart No. 2626, 6868 US
129, Live Oak beginning at
7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan.
20. For more info, contact
Robert Bedenbaugh, 386-
330-2488.


Jan. 20
Healthy Start of North
Central Florida board of
directors meeting
Healthy Start of North
Central Florida board of di-
rectors will meet at 2 p.m.
on Thursday, Jan. 20, at the
United Way of Alachua,
6031 NW 1st Place,
Gainesville. The public is
invited. For more info, call
Celia Paynter at 352-955-
2264, ext. 314.
Jan. 20
American Red Cross
,will hold an Adult
CPR/First Aid class in
Lake City
The American Red Cross
of Suwannee Valley will
hold an Adult CPR/First
Aid class from 6-9:30 p.m.,
Thursday, Jan. 20, at their
office at 264 NE Hernando
Ave., Suite 102, Lake City.
For info and to register, call
386-752-0650.
Jan. 20
Situation Ethics
workshop
Q. Is it always right to
tell the truth or does it de-
pend on the situation? If
you've ever struggled with
this question and many oth-
ers like it [dealing with -
'what is the right thing to
do?]...please join us for a
brief study in: Situation
Ethics, Jan. 20, at 6:30 p.m.
Led by Glenn L. Jernigan at
the Suwannee River Re-
gional Library, Community
Meeting Room, US 129 S.,
Live Oak. Regardless of
your religious views, ethi-
cal doctrine or philosophy
of life everyone is wel-
come...as we look at this
sometimes controversial but
always interesting" ethical
approach. This workshop is
not library-sponsored. It is
educational in nature and
open to the public at large.
Again, all are welcome. No
charge. Free.
Jan. 20
The American Cancer
Society will host a
Physicians' Outreach
Continuing Medical
Education credits event
The American Cancer So-
ciety will host a dinner and
presentation for Continuing
Medical Education (CME)
credits from 6-9 p.m. on
Jan. 20, at the Paramount
Plaza Hotel, 2900 SW 13th
Street in Gainesville free of
charge for physicians and
other medical professionals
and just in time to meet the
Jan. 31 requirements for li-
censure in the State of
Florida. Two CME credits
will be offered: End-of-Life
and Palliative Care and Ge-
homics and Proteomics for
Individualized Cancer
Treatment. Sponsors for
this. event include the
American Cancer Society,
Community Cancer Center
of North Florida, MGI
PHARMA, AMGEN and
GENENTECH pharmaceu-
tical companies. To reserve
a seat at this event, please
call the American Cancer
Society at 352-376-6866
ext. 114.
Jan. 20
Branford Camera
Club will meet
The Branford Camera
Club will meet on Thurs-
day, Jan. 20, at the Branford
Public Library, 7:30
p.m. This month's program
will focus on basic photo-
graphic techniques applica-
ble to all levels of film and
digital cameras. Gilbert
Bernardo will lead the dis-
cussion of composition,
lighting, accessories and
other topics of interest to


the group. Yvonne Robel
will share pictures of her
"painting with light" exper-
iments, both from the De-
cember meeting and a per-
sonal project. If you got a
new camera for Christmas
or one of your New Year's
resolutions was to learn to
take better pictures in 2005,
please plan to join us. Bring
your holiday pictures to

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 8C


Sahurday, January 22nd, 1 lam 2pm


M&M Auto Sales

J.W. Hill & Associates
License #AB2083
A," o S..... C (386) 362-3300
Auction beginning at 1:00 pm. All makes & models.
Bids beginning at '50. Cars. Trucks & SUVs will be sold.
All Vehicles will be sold as is.
Preview Beginning 12:00 noon- Friday, January 21.
,.-- am mew 0.0






NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 7C


Take


lHlealth


TREATS ALL
RESPIRATORY DISEASES
~ NEW PATIENTS WELCOME ~

M. Choudhury, M.D.


155 NW Enterprise Way, Suite A, Lake City
134761DH-F


C Lake City
: PhEye
,(i( Physicians

^^s lhn~mmtmm^S^SR^


621 SW Baya Drive, Suite 101
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 719-9292
or (386) 754-6616
www.coleoptics.com ,,


Assisted Living
%Lromn h omE to




QuiEt, LafayedtE County, counwz iEttni .
criuatE oomz, fTi 2enaier 24 Iou'Z caa.
Visit us on the web at www.oakridgealf.com
Email: oakridgealf@alltel.net
Mayo, FL 3County Rd. 251-A (386) 294-500
License #AL9863 (386) 294-5050


CancerHope
Treatment Centers
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cancerhope com
Specializing in Oncology since 1989
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David S. Cho, M.D.
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Board Certified All Insurances Accepted No Referral Necessary


Suwannee Valley
Cancer Center
795 SW State Road 47
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 758-SVCC (7822)


CancerHope of
Live Oak
1500 Ohio Ave. North
Live Oak, FL 32060
(386)362-1174


OB/GYN
Expecting
or having a baby?
Now Providing
Prenatal & Obstetric Care

Dr. Frederick L. Vinson,
Board Certified OB/GYN
17 Years Experience Delivering

Women's Health Care
2806 W. Hwy. 90, Ste. 103,
Lake City
386-755-5060
Please call for appointment



North Florida

Pharmacy of Branford

I* Medical
Equipment
Oxygen

"Everything For Your
Home Recovery"
Locally Owned & Operated
101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
(386) 935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo, FL 32066
(386) 294-3777 13140


to


Your




Heart


Learn the differences
between the latest fad diets
A fast-food mentality. A preoccupation with slender figures. A sedentary lifestyle. What
do all of these statements have in common? These are leading factors in America's
infatuation with weight loss and dieting.
An estimated 50 million people will try a diet this year, according to the National Center
for Health Statistics. Most seek advice from books and television diet gurus. Some consult
support groups, doctors and clinical programs. In the end, we have turned the weight-loss
industry into a billion-dollar business, says the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
Leading the weight-loss trend are fad diets that promise amazing results in relatively
short amounts of time. Millions try these diets with varying degrees of success. Their
effectiveness has been the subject of debate and their safety often questioned. However,
they're usually the first type of a diet a person will try in lieu of traditional calorie
reduction and exercise.
If you're thinking about going a diet, there is enough information out there to make your
head spin. Here is a breakdown of the top fad diets, listing their pros and cons and a brief
description of what they entail.
1. The Atkins Diet -- It's perhaps the most well-known and popular fad diet of our time.
This program has spawned a low-carbohydrate wave across the country. Now, most food
companies, fast-food restaurants and the like offer lower-carb options to complement the
program.
The plan: You eliminate most carbs
early in the program and then slowly
reintroduce some later on as weight ..
loss milestones are achieved.
Emphasis is placed on eating high
protein foods and certain foods high
in saturated fat.
Bad: Atkins encourages dieters to skip .
some fruits and vegetables, which
many health experts feel can deprive
,the body of much-needed vitamins,
fiber and water. Also, it has not yet
been proven if the permissible fatty
foods contribute to increased bad
cholesterol levels or heart problems
down the road.
Good: Following the diet will make
you lose weight -- at least 15 pounds
initially. However, some of this --
weight loss is due to water loss and
reduced caloric intake, which occurs
by limiting the foods you eat.'
2. The South Beach Diet -- Riding the .
waves of Atkins' success, this diet is
the one on the market, today.
Ceil"britis and regular folks alike 0
have touted its wonders.
The plan: According to the Diet's
official Web site, "The South Beach Want to lose weight? Determine if one of the
Diet is not low-carb, nor is it low-fat popular fad diets might be the right choice for you.
Rather, it teaches you to rely on the
right carbs and the right fats and enables you to live quite happily without the bad carbs and
bad fats." Like Atkins, certain foods are "banned" initially and then reintroduced later on.
Bad: Giving up the foods you love cold turkey can discourage many dieters. They may feel
like they are being deprived.
Good: You do get to indulge in meats, cheeses and bacon. You will lose 8 to 13 pounds in
the first two-week phase but, again, this is probably attributed to water loss. -
3. The Zone Diet -- Once a Hollywood staple (Brad and Jen were reported to have favored
it), still a favorite among dieters. I/
The plan: You control insulin production by balancing protein and carbohydrate \
consumption at meals to help you metabolize foods more efficiently and lose weight. The
insulin-control component of the program can be described as a moderate-carbohydrate,
moderate-protein, and moderate-fat dietary program. It is a lifelong program.
Bad: This diet focuses on a limited caloric intake, which most nutritionists say is too
stringent to be healthy over the long haul. Experts agree that the 40 percent carbs, 30
percent protein and the 30 percent fat equation doesn't necessarily help you reach a
metabolic state that will keep you thin, but rather, eating smaller portions will.
Good: It's an easy-to-follow plan that will guide you on correct portion size and help you
control food intake.
4. The Slim-Fast Plan -- It's endured popularity for years and has had notable celebrity


endorsements.
The plan: Meal and snack replacements shakes and bars are enjoyed at breakfast and lunch
instead of regular foods and the dieter eats a "sensible" dinner.
Bad: Deprivation feelings may be common with this diet. Many people do not feel full with
the diet's shakes and snack bars, which provide a controlled amount of calories. They may
then sneak snacks or food in addition to having the meal replacements.
Good: Packaged foods are pre-portioned and portable. Plus, the plan is simple to follow. An
emphasis is placed on eating a balance of healthy foods, combined with moderate exercise.
Most nutritionists agree that a healthy balance of portion control, reduced caloric intake and
exercise are the keys to weight loss. However, some feel that fad diets can be used to jump-
start weight loss when necessary. Before embarking on any diet program, consult with your
doctor for a health assessment and to e-- ,
determine which plan is right for you. -


( EYE CENTER of North Florida
kJ General Eye Care & Surgery
EYE EXAMS CATARACT SURGERY
GLAUCOMA MACULAR DEGENERATION
*DIABETES -LASERS
Eduardo M. Bedoya, MD
Board Certified, American Board of Ophthalmology
Eye Physician & Surgeon


Medicare, Medicaid, Avmed,
Blue Cross/Blue Shield
& other Insurance accepted.
Se habla espafiol.

917 W. Duval St
Lake City
386-755-7595


13


Dr. Rios
i' OBGYN
,, Midwife Services Avail


able


Marlene Summers, INM

Hours:
Mon. Thur. 8:30 5:00
Closed 12:30-1:30

(386) 755-0500
Fax (386) 755-9217


449 SE Baya Dr.
Lake City, FL 32055


131407-F


Cancer Care of North Florida
Now seeing patients at Shands at Live Oak
We are a New P at Specializing in
Sa a Welcoming New Patients at Anemia
total care our two offices at: .Thrombocytopenia
m medical Bleeding or clotting disorders
medical Shands @ Live Oak or Lake City. Breast Cancer
oncology & Please call (386) 755-1655 ColonCancer
hematoloi nOi Cancer
emactogy Waseem Khan, M. for an appointment or information 'eMu"e LMyeoma
S All Chemotherapy administration and management ukemia
p139ciF-F All Chemotherapy administration and management liMre&om u


77


Ophthalmology
GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
Located In SHANDS At Live Oak
1100 SW llth St. Live Oak
(904) 373-4300 or 1-800-435-3937 S


Family Dentistry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL t
(386) 362-6556
S1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) 1139


n.l.-F


General Orthopaedics

Edward J.
Sambey, M.D.
* Occupational Medicine The
* General Orthopaedics Orthopaedic
* Sports Medicine Center
Lake City Office 4367 NW American Lane
Phone 386-755-9215 Toll Free 1-888-860-7050
Workers compensation and
Most Insurance Plans Accepted .13552DH-F

Inlt'iaidl BusuI-d
Medicine
.i .




RENALDAS A. SMIDTAS, M.D. AND ASSOCIATES
American Board of Internal Medicine certified,
Fellow of American Board of Balance Medicine.
SHELIA Y. ROBERTS, A.R.N.P., C.S.
KATHY NEWMAN, A.R.N.P
Heart, Cardiovascular Diseases Diabetes management
Allergy and Asthma Lung diseases Women's Health
Invasive Pain Management for Arthritis of the Knee, Shoulders,
Back Pain Ultrasound Diagnostic and More
Live Oak Jasper
362-5840 792-0753
1437 N. OhioAve. 413 NW5thAve.' A i :
Visa, MasterCard Accepted 3s1a9j2J-F

Physical Thr-apy

L9I) 4caLkftnou, f/nc.
"lAetEti ffI q(YouI taatiuVate /I
* Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis Fibromyalgia Geriatrics Spinal &
Joint Pain Sports Injuries* Work Injuries Pediatrics
Manual Therapy Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross, Av Med
Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics
Branford.. 935-1449 Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore




Heartland
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
PROFESSIONAL TOUCH
PHYSICAL THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis
Orthopedic/Sports Medicine, Pediatrics
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS
Providers
1506 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051 131397JS-F

rolnogy, Urologic Surgery
5 Impotence Center


ROBERT G. BUSCH, D.O.
ERIC ORDINARIO, D.O.
Board Certified Urology and Urological Surgery
lrt i m till1 iii /ltm n i. l IIItrm 1m


Common Problems Treated:
* Infections Prostate Problems Kidney Stones Sexual
Problems Genital Surgery Cancer of the Urinary.Tract *
Impotence Infertility Urinary Incontinence
Common Surgical Procedures In Office:
* Cystoscopy No Scapel Vasectomy Treatment of
Condyloma Prostate Ultrasound/Biopsy Bladder
Ultrasound Penil Vascular Studies
Common Surgical Problems In
Hospital or Ambulatory Surgical Center:
* Prostate, Kidney and Bladder Cancer Surgery
* Kidney Stone and Surgery Lithotripsy Microscopic
Vasectomy Reversal Impotence Surgery Hernia Surgery
Specializing in the evaluation and treatment of Male
Impotence Surgical and Medical Therapies
All patients are given
personal and confidential attention.


0allnal F e 1


We


Sherri A. Cole, L.D.O.
Owner
Licensed Optician


Reaves C. Cole, O.D.
Board Certified
Optometric Physician


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 7C


lvvj-


I Medca Dreto


I I ACIN IIa MeoiIare tk M061 n5Urahe


131382JS-FI


r







PAGE 8C, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 6C

share and your camera and
owner's manual if you'd
like help with your specific
camera questions. For more
info, please contact one of
the following: Carolyn
Hogue, Program Chairman,
386-935-2044; Gilbert
Bernardo, Technical Con-
sultant, 386-935-0340;
Dick Bryant, Technical
Consultant, 386-935-1977;
or Dick Madden, Technical
Consultant, 396-935-0296.
Jan. 21
Special video
conference: Post-Storm
Timber Tax and Forest
Health Issues to be held
The 2004 hurricane sea-
son was damaging to a large
portion of Florida's private
timberlands. Casualty loss
and forest health issues that
thousands of private timber-
land owners are now facing
as a result of these storms
will be addressed by a spe-
cial videoconference: Post-
Storm Timber Tax and For-
est Health Issues. The
videoconference will be
held on Friday, Jan., 21,
from 4:30-7 p.m. (EST) at
11 locations throughout
Florida. One of the eleven
sites will be held in Live
Oak at: UF-IFAS Suwannee
Valley North Florida REC,
7580 CR 136, 386-362-
1725. Space is limited, reg-
ister early. For more info or
to register, contact Chris
Demers at 352-846-2375 or
cdemers@ifas.ufl.edu. This
free program is a service of
the Florida Division of
Forestry, Forest Steward-
ship Program University of

POOL CHLORINE

Refill
SEAMAN'S AQUA CLEAN
S 30 Ho ..ard St., Live Oak
36252JS-F. 362-4043


Florida, IFAS, Cooperative
Extension Service.
Jan. 22
Dowling Park
Volunteer Fire Fighters
training meeting
Attention! The Dowling
Park Volunteer Fire Fight-
ers training meeting will be
held at 0900 hours (9 a.m.)
on Saturday, Jan. 22, at the
fire station located at
22992 CR 250. Chief James
L. O'Neill Jr. See you
there.
Jan. 22
Annual Relay for
Life yard sale
Annual Relay for Life
yard sale will be held at
Camp Suwannee, Dowling
Park from 8 a.m. until 1
p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 22.
Jan. 24
Free estate planning
seminar will be
conducted at the
Suwannee River Regional
Library in Live Oak
A free seminar on estate
planning, wills, trusts, as-
set protection, avoiding
probate and guardianship
will be held at 7 p.m. on
Monday, Jan. 24, at the
Suwannee River Regional
Library in the Crapps
Meeting Room, 1848 Ohio
Avenue South, Live Oak.
The seminar will be con-
ducted by Joseph F. Pippen
Jr. and Associates and local
attorney Frank Davis.
Jan. 24, 31 and
Feb. 7. 21
Home school class
offered at Florida
Museum of Natural
History in Gainesvile
The Florida Museum of
Natural History,
Gainesville will offer a
four-week home school
class series titled "Squirmy
Science" from 9:30-11:30
a.m. on Jan. 24, 31 and
Feb. 7, 21 for children ages
six-11. The class is $40 for


members and $45 for non-
members. Pre-registration
is required. For more infor-
mation call 352-846-2000,
ext. 277.
Jan. 24
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education) ,
North Florida Communi-
ty College will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult Basic
Education) on Monday,
Jan. 24, at 6 p.m., in the
NFCC Technical Center on
the Madison campus. TABE
is required for acceptance
into vocational/technical
programs. Photo ID re-
quired. Pre-registration is
required. To register please
call 850-973-9451.
Jan. 25
FAMU Cooperative Ex-
tension Service will host
a local meat goat produc-
er meeting
The Florida A & M Uni-
versity (FAMU) Extension
Service will host a local
meat goat producer meeting
at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
Jan. 25, at the Suwannee
County Extension Service
Office, 1302 Eleventh St.,
Live Oak. Les Harrison of
the Florida Department of
Agriculture, Division of
Marketing and Develop-
ment and Richard Esseck of
the Florida Meat Goat As-
sociation will be guest
speakers. The meeting is
open to all meat goat pro-
ducers in Suwannee,
Hamilton, Madison and Co'-
lumbia counties. No regis-
tration fee. Pre-register by
calling FAMU Small Farm
Management Specialist
Phillip Petway, 386-362-
2771.
Jan. 25
Glenn Miller Orchestra
swings at NFCC
World Famous Glenn
Miller Orchestra, one of the
most popular dance 'bands


in history, performs at 7
p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 25, at
the Van H. Priest Auditori-
um of North Florida Com-
munity College in Madi-
son. Tickets are $11 for
adults and $6 for children.
Tickets are available by
calling 850-973-1653 or e-
m a i 1
ArtistSeries@nfcc.edu.
Jan. 25
American Red Cross
will hold an Adult CPR
class in Lake City
The American Red Cross
of Suwannee Valley will
hold an Adult CPR class
from 6-9 p.m., Tuesday,
Jan. 25, at their office at
264 NE Hernando Ave.,
Suite 102, Lake City. For
info and to register, call
386-752-0650.
Jan. 25
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education)
North Florida Community
College will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Educa-
tion) on Tuesday, Jan. 25, at
1:30 p.m., in the NFCC
Technical Center on the
Madison campus. TABE is
required for acceptance into
vocational/technical 'pro-
grams. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration is required.
To register please call 850-
973-9451.
Jan. 26
Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild meeting
Do you need a quilting
challenge? The Lady of the
Lake Quilting Guild will
hold its monthly meeting on
Wednesday, Jan. 26, at 10
a.m. at the Southside Recre-
ation Center, 901 Saint
Margaret Road, Lake City.
Marika Sevin, Development
Director of the Arthritis
Foundation of Jacksonville,
will present "a call to entry"
for quilted items for the No-
vember Comfort for a Cure


Quilt Challenge to benefit
the Arthritis Foundation.
The Guild is an organiza-
tion for anyone interested in
quilts and the art of quilt-
ing. The public is welcome.
For more details, contact
President Sandy Lindfors,
386-362-6850, or e-mail
riverfolk@alltel.net.
Jan. 27
American Red Cross
will hold a First Aid class
in Lake City
The American Red Cross
of Suwannee Valley will
hold a First Aid class from
6-9 p.m., Thursday, Jan.
27, at their office at 264
NE Hernando Ave., Suite
102, Lake City. For info
and to register, call 386-
752-0650.
Jan. 28-30
Lake City Speedway will
host the Florida Racers
Party of the Year!
Lake City Speedway will
host The Florida Racers
Party of the Year! Friday,
Saturday and Sunday, Jan.
28-30. Classes competing:
non-winged sprints, super
late model, mini-stocks-
Florida-U.M.P. Imca type
modifieds, K.O.I L. Leg-
ends, mini sprints, hobby
stock, pure stock and street
stock; Schedule of events:
Thursday, Jan. 27, 5-10
p.m., campers move in,
music and bonfire; Friday,
Jan. 28, 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m.
sign-in, hot laps: all divi-
sions 4-7 p.m.; Qualifica-
tions: all cars, renegade,
four-car dashes, mini car
derby (Racers Party); Sat-
urday, Jan. 29, gates open
at 9 a.m., sign-in until 2
p.m., auction begins at 10
a.m., vintage car races 11
a.m. -2 p.m., heat races
2:30 p.m., big car demo
7:30 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 30,
gates open at 10 a.m.,
church service 10:30 a.m.
features all day starting at
noon-entry fee all classes:
Pits all four days $45 or
$20 per day; general ad-
mission $15 per day or $35
for all three days, kids un-
der six free, six-12 $5 per
day. For rules and ques-
tions, call 812-689-1046,
812-871-7728, 859-581-
8579 or the track at 386-
754-8800.
Jan. 29
Suwannee County
Museum Chili Challenge
The Suwannee County
Museum Association is
planning its second Chili
Challenge. The event will
be held on Saturday, Jan.
29, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on the loading dock of the
old Atlantic Coastline
Freight Depot. This year
there wil be three classes in
the competition. Restau-
rants and businesses will
comepte for a handsome
torphy. Civic organizations
will compete for a cash
prize of $100. This yar, in-
dividuals wil compete, in
their own class, for a tro-
phy. there will also be tro-
phies for the People's
Choice Award and for the
best presentation (table
decoration). There will be
entertainment and an art
exhibit by the Live Oak
Artist Guild. Chili must be.
prepared and heated to 140
degrees F. when competitor
check in. The temperature
of the chili will be checked
before the judging. You
may use crock pots or hot
plates to keep your chili up
to temperature. Electrical
outlets are available. If
you have questions about
the Chili Challenge, please
call 386-362-1776 and ask


for Carol or Richard. After
hours, please leave a mes-
sage and we will get back
to you. Proceeds from the
event will go to support the
Suwannee County Histori-
cal Museum.
Jan 29
The Family CAFE
Bistro comes to Lake
City
The Family CAFE Bistro
a free conference for stu-
dents and adults with dis-


abilities, their families and
friends will be held at the
Columbia County School
Board Administration
Complex on Saturday, Jan.
29, from 8 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. A free continental
breakfast will be provided.
The registration deadline is
Jan. 24. For more info or to
register, call FDLRS/Gate-
way toll free at 800-227-
0059.
Jan. 29
Sixth Annual Great Air
Potato Roundup
Join hundreds of volun-
teers to take back
Gainesville's natural areas
from. invasive exotic
species! Modeled after a lit-
ter cleanup, pick up air
potatoes and other exotics
by the bushel! After potato
picking from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
on Saturday, Jan. 29, join in
the post-roundup celebra-
tion at Morningside Nature
Center Living History
Farm. Live music, free food
and t-shirts, prize drawings
and awards for the biggest
and wierdest potatoes and
the largest group!!! Great
fun for kids! Pre-registra-
tion recommended. For
more info call 352-334-
2170 or visit www.nature-
operations.org.
Jan. 29-30 and Feb. 4-6
19th Annual Hoggetowne
Medieval Faire comes to
life in Gainesville on Jan
29-30 and Feb. 4-6
The Alachua County Fair-
grounds come to life as the
19th Annual Hoggetowne
Medieval Faire brings the
magic of the past to
Gainesville. Join hundreds
of actors, artisans and vol-
unteers for two weekends of
merriment Jan. 29-30 and
Feb. 4-6. Faire hours are 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday
and Sundays and 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Friday. Admission
is $10 for adults. !5 for
children ages 5-17. and-free
for children 4 and younger.
For more information call
352-334-ARTS or visit
www.gvlculturalaffairs.org.
Jan. 30
The Florida Museum of
Natural History will host
a Science Sunday lecture
on wild orchids
The Florida Museum of
Natural History in
Gainesville will host a Sci-
ence Sunday lecture on wild
orchids by Connie Bransil-
ver, author of "Wild Love
Affair: Essence of Florida's
Native Orchids," from 2-3
p.m. on Jan. 30. The event
is free and open to the pub-
lic. The Florida Museum
also will offer a new pro-
gram "Sunday Snoop,"
where museum staff enter-
tain children ages 4-10 for
an hour with fun activities
and a guided tour while
adults enjoy the
lecture/book signing. Reg-
istration for "Sunday
Snoop" is $5 and pre-regis-
tration is required. For more
info or to register for "Sun-
day Snoop," call 352-846-
2000, ext. 277.
Jan. 31
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education)
North Florida Communi-
ty College will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult Basic
Education)' on Monday,
Jan. 31, at 6 p.m., in the
NFCC Technical Center on
the Madison
campus. TABE is required
for acceptance into voca-
tional/tech nical
programs. Photo ID re-
quired. Pre-registration is
required. To register please
call 850-973-9451.


Feb. 2
Helping Hands
Volunteer Orientation
Make a difference in
someone's life! After attend-
ing orientation and complet-
ing the screening process,
you will be eligible for vol-
unteering in the Hospice At-
tic thrift store, administra-
tive offices, as well as help-

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 9C


o[~~l_~B1~bMROW TIMUIIlp ~ m






NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 9C


Calendar


Continued From Page 8C

ing at special events, educa-
tional fairs, community
events and fund raising. You
must register for orientation.
Orientation will be held
from 10-11 a.m. on Wednes-
day, Feb. 2 (first Wednesday
of every month) at Hospice
of the Suwannee Valley, 618
SW FL Gateway Drive,
Lake City. To register or for
more info contact Carolyn
Long, 386-752-9191.
Feb. 2
NFCC Lady Sentinels
next home basketball
game
The North Florida Com-
munity College Lady Sen-
tinels next home basketball
game will be played at 5:30
p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 2,
against Okaloosa-Walton at
Colin P. Kelly Gymnasium
on the Madison campus. All
home games are free and
open to the public. For more
info, contact NFCC basket-
ball coach Clyde Alexander
at 850-973-1609 or visit ath-
letics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 5 May 30
"Microbes: Invisible In-
vaders...Amazing Allies,"
will be on display at the
Florida Museum of Natur-
al History, Gainesville
"Microbes: Invisible In-
vaders...Amazing Allies,"
will be on display Feb. 5 -
May 30 at the Florida Muse-
um of Natural History,
Gainesville. The exhibit,
produced by Clear Channel
Exhibitions in collaboration
with the National Institutes
of Health, is an interactive,
technologically enhanced
exhibit that explores the hid-
den world of microbes, in-
cluding bacteria, viruses and
beneficial germs. For more
info call 352-846-2000, ext.
277.
Feb. 8-10
Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring
40WJoo ssessienits -FCAT
Writing Test
Suwannee District
Schools will administer
Spring 2005 Assessments -
FCAT Writing Test Feb. 8-
10. FCAT is for grades 3-10
(Grade 11-Adult RE-
TAKES). Each school has
more detailed testing infor-
mation available. Daily stu-
dent attendance is critical
during these assessment pe-
riods.
Feb. 9
NFCC Lady Sentinels
next home basketball
game
The North Florida Com-
munity College Lady Sen-
tinels next home basketball
game will be played at 5:30
p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 9,


against Tallahassee at Colin
P. Kelly Gymnasium on the
Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to
the public. For more info,
contact NFCC basketball
coach Clyde Alexander at
850-973-1609 or visit athlet-
ics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 11-12
NFCC Lady Sentinels
next home basketball
game
The North Florida Com-
munity College Lady Sen-
tinels next home basketball
game will be played at 5:30
p.m. on Friday and 2 p.m. on
Saturday, Feb. 11-12,
against Pensacola at Colin P.
Kelly' Gymnasium on the
Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to
the public. For more info,
contact NFCC basketball
coach Clyde Alexander at
850-973-1609 or visit athlet-
ics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 15
SCORE will sponsor a fi-
nancial management and
record keeping workshop
SCORE will sponsor a
workshop on financial man-
agement and record keeping
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on
Tuesday, Feb. 15, at the
Quality Inn, US 90 and 1-75,
Lake City. The cost is $20
with lunch and materials in-
cluded. Topics will include
business loans, credit, in-
ventory management, record
keeping systems and more.
Seating is limited. For reser-
vations or more information,
call 386-755-9026 ext.
3214. SCORE is a non-prof-
it organization which pro-
vides counseling to small
businesses by experienced
local volunteers.
Feb. 16
ServSafe Program
will be held
The. Suwannee County
Extension Service, will be
providing food safety train-
ing on Wednesday, Feb. 16,
from 8:10 a;m.-5j'.'m.ait the
Suwannee County Extension
Office, 1302 Eleventh
Street, SW, Live Oak. Certi-
fication is required in Flori-
da for food managers of all
establishments. The Univer-
sity of Florida Food Safety
and Quality Program man-
ages the ServSafe Program
training (including all regis-
trations and material or-
ders). More info is available
about this training by calling
toll-free 888-232-8723 or
v i s i t
http://foodsafety.ifas.ufl.edu

Feb. 12
2005 Lafayette Baseball
Golf Tournament
The 2005 Lafayette Base-
ball Golf Tournament will


be held at 9 a.m. on Satur-
day, Feb. 12, at the Suwan-
nee Country Club, Live Oak.
Four man scramble with
prizes to the top three teams.
Cost: $50 per player or $200
per team. Come and support
Hornet Baseball. For more
info, contact Derek Garland,
386-294-3025 or Joann
Page, 386-294-2834.
Feb. 16
NFCC Lady
Sentinels next home
basketball game
The North Florida Com-
munity College Lady Sen-
tinels next home basketball
game will be played at 5:30
p.m. on Wednesday, Feb.
16, against Chipola at Colin
P. Kelly Gymnasium on the
Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to
the public. For more info,
contact NFCC basketball
coach Clyde Alexander at
850-973-1609 or visit athlet-
ics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 21
NFCC Lady
Sentinels next home
basketball game
The North Florida Com-
munity College Lady Sen-
tinels next home basketball
game will be played at 5:30
p.m. on Monday, Feb. 21,
against Gulf Coast at Colin
P. Kelly Gymnasium on tly
Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to
the public. For more info,
contact NFCC basketball
coach Clyde Alexander at
850-973-1609 or visit athlet-
ics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 28 March 11
Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring
2005 Assessments FCAT
Reading, Math and Sci-
ence Tests
Suwannee District
Schools will administer
Spring 2005 Assessments -
FCAT Reading, Math and
Science Tests Feb. 28-
March 11. FCAT is for
grades 3-10 (Grade 11-Adult
RETAKES). Each school
has more detailed testing in-
formation available. Daily
student attendance is critical
during these assessment pe-
riods.
March 21-23
Suwannee District
Schools will administer
Spring 2005 Assessments
SAT 10
Suwannee District
Schools will administer
Spring 2005 Assessments -
SAT 10 March 21-23.
SAT 10 is for Grade K-2.
Each school has more de-
tailed testing information
available. Daily student
attendance is critical dur-
ing these assessment peri-
ods.


Teach children proper

handwashing this

cold and flu season


With the cold and flu season
here, one of the most vulnera-
ble populations are young chil-
dren attending schools and
daycare. To keep kids healthy,
handwashing continues to be
one of the most simple, yet ef-
fective ways to fight disease,
according to the Centers for
Disease Control and Preven-
tion.
The main way that illnesses
like colds and flu are spread is
from person-to-person in respi-
ratory droplets of coughs or
sneezes, called "droplet
spread." This can happen when




j^ -? -


.t .




droplets from a cough or
sneeze of an infected person
move through the air and come
in contact with the mouth or
nose of people nearby, or when
germs land on shared items
such as toys, desks and door-
knobs. If a person fails to wash
their hands after touching these
surfaces, they can become vul-
nerable if they touch their eyes,
mouth or nose.
To help kids protect them-
selves, kids and their parents
can now benefit by getting help
from The Scrub Club, an ani-
mated Web site (www.scrub-
club.org) developed by the not-
for-profit NSF International.
The new Web site teaches kids
and their parents the impor-
tance of washing hands in the
fight against infections and
food borne diseases through in-
teractive games, activities, a
handwashing song and even an
animated webisode.


"The Scrub Club was created
to raise awareness about the
benefits of handwashing," says
William Fisher, vice president
at NSF International, a public
health and safety organization
that independently certifies
products and writes standards.
"By offering children, parents
and teachers a fun and educa-
tional Web site, our goal is to
reduce the number of school
sick days and ultimately im-
prove the overall hygiene of
children and adults."
Six Steps to Proper Hand-
washing
The Scrub
Club Web
site features
| s e v e n
I soaper-
hero" kids --
"Hot Shot,"
"Chill,"
S "Squeaks,"
Taki,"
"Scruff, "
"Tank" and
"P.T." -- that transform to repre-
sent each of the six steps to
proper handwashing.
Step 1: Wash with warm wa-
ter. "Hot Shot" and "Chill" turn
into hot and cold faucets and
then combine to make the warm
water essential for proper hand-
washing.
Step 2: Apply soap -- bar or
pump are both fine. "Squeaks"
can transform into various
forms of soap, from bars of all
sizes to pumps of all kinds.
Step 3: Wash for a full 20
seconds, rubbing hands togeth-
er to lather soap. "Taki" be-
comes a clock that counts down
the required 20 seconds for
thorough handwashing.
Step 4: Clean around your
fingernails, using a nail brush if
you have one. "Scruff" reminds
kids that hands aren't clean un-
til the nails are clean.
Step 5: Rinse away soap with
warm water. "Tank" turns into a


sink and serves as a reminder to
rinse away germs.
Step 6: Dry with paper towels
or warm air dryer. "P.T." trans-
forms herself into paper towels.
At www.scrubclub.org, kids
see the six steps to proper hand-
washing in action through an
interactive webisode and can
also sing along to the Scrub
Club theme song. The first we-
bisode, "The Good, the BAC
and the Ugly," finds the Scrub
Club battling the loathsome, but
lovable character BAC (from
the Partnership for Food Safety
Education's Fight BAC! food
safety public education cam-
paign), and one of his partners
in "grime," "Sal Monella," in a
Wild-West themed adventure.
Interactive games, including
one that features the evil vil-
lain "Influenza Enzo" called
"Stop Fluin' Around," teach
children how illnesses and
food borne diseases are spread
and how to prevent them. Ad-
ditionally, Scrub Club visitors
can also download materials
such as a Scrub Club member-
ship card, posters; stickers,
games and activities as well
educational materials for
teachers and information for
parents that not only enhance
the site but also make it fun for
kids to return to the site time
and time again. For additional
information, visit www.scrub-
club.org. Other helpful re-
sources include
www.cdc.go'v/fl 'school.
www.fightbac.org and
www.cleanhandscoalition.org.


0mlM


Book now don't delay!

Space is still available.

Departures available from Lake City

Live Oak & Dowling Park

January 22,2005 Gaither Homecoming Concert
Book now for an exciting evening filled with wholesome entertainment
for everyone. SPACE IS LIMITED! Includes: motorcoach transportation,
Artist Circle Seats and driver gratuity. Price: $65 per person
February 19, 2005 Florida's Silver Spring
Spend the day at Florida's Silver Spring and enjoy all this natural
attraction has to offer. Also included are reserved seats to Lee
Greenwood's show, Salute to America. Includes: motorcoach
transportation, admission to Silver Springs, reserved seats for Lee
Greenwood show and driver gratuity. Price: $75 per person
March 11-14, 2005 Mobile Flower Show and The Dead Sea Scrolls
Visit historic Mobile for a special showing of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the
Festival of Flowers, tours of historic homes and much more! Includes:
motorcoach transportation, 3 nights accommodations, admission to the
Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit, Festival of Flowers, some meals and more.
Price: $535 per person, double occupancy


American Travel

(800) 344-6769 or


i Gerald & Lula Herring


(386) 364-1510


www. americantraveltours. com


ANNOUNCING!!!

GM OWNER LOYALTY CASH


04 GMC Canyon 03 Ford Expedition 04 GMC Yukon SLE
Crew Cab 4x4 Eddie Bauer 4x4





Off Road, Pkg. Sunroof, Completely Loaded Loaded, Leather, Sunroof
Very Low Miles! 5 /0% Off! New Save 40% Off! New

Hometown People Doing Business The Hometown Way!


Jeff Moslel. ,
Sales Manager
The G d LIVE OAK, FL 3 4
10% Service Departme
5s se Hafbla .i,


BwbBEST rown 1 It
***** Jonathan\... 1.11Nm Mik
| ? JoA Melton IMcKinnr TITcker

Mon.-Fri. 8:3f Monday-Friday
Mn ri3 HOU S:U 8-6; Sat.9-5)
'wi) m


4r, Roar


133873DH-F





PAGE 10C, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


2005 Ford
"A%-


$AVE 4,445


I AVE $ a


SBrand New Lincoln Navigator Brand New Mercury Monterey
Was $51,115
"Loaded", Luxury Package, Moonroof .A(A loaded W
SAVE s12,000 SAVE 011
$39,115 2,1


s Lincoln Aviator '05 Mercury Grand Marquis GS
America's Only Rear Wheel Drive Sedan
.- J~/4


2005 Lincoln LS
l^^^l^


'05 Mercury Mountaineer


'05 Lincoln Town Car


s- $32,995 278,995 S27,995 2 $W$47,550 s,934,995
Was $44,030 99 Was $25,150 u p995 Was $33,110 I W Was $33,550 21550 Was $42,595
After all rebates in lieu of special APR, financing through FMCC, owner loyalty, Plus Tax, Tag, Title and $249.95 ADM fee.


I I


Vas $34.295


r


I


113000
LP95

















I"


It


Section D
January 19-20, 2005

800-525-4182

EED A RIDE?


Real Estates Listings Employment Opportunities and Services Car, Trucks and Motorcycles


Planning to use color


Sin your ads is a great
way to build your bottom
\ -line. It's a fact that more
"* people read
ads with color.
~- ; _.. Color is bright,
"--. ) attractive, attention-
( J getting-and
it sells!

Classified Marketplace
386-362-1734 or 800-525-4182



unSky Realty
M...i.B Rarltof Florida, Inc.
Karen Barnhill
- -Owner and Lie. Real Estate Broker


S Mayo
(386) 294-1576
Toll Free: (800) 605-1576
Corer of US 27 and Monroe St.
Mayo, FL 32066
Website: www.southernskyrealty.com


Live Oak
(386) 364-1576
Toll Free: (800) 822-1576
South Oaks Square Shopping Center
1554 South Ohio Avenue
Live Oak, FL 32062


For more information about this home, call the

associates of Sullivan Agency at386-362- 389.


We'll find the right home for you.


*- ..... Nice 1/i acre lot ror your nome.
Convenient to shopping and schools.
This is a flog lot with 166+ feet of US Located on SE Lynwood Dr., electric and
Highway 27 frontage. Possible to re-zone phone in the area. MLS#42330 $5,995
to commercial. MLS#42323 $114,900 12832oJRS-F


Classiifieds W I!

To place your ad in the

Classified Marketplace, call

Louise at 386-362-1734 today!

2806 West US Highway 90 Ei |
HYPERLINK
1 DANpI "http://www.FloridaAcreage.com"

agency, inc. 1-800-805-7566

(1) 20 (+/-) ACRES SUWANNEE COUNTY property is located a short distance from
Charles Springs and a boat ramp on the Suwannee River. $3,350 per acre owner financing
available (Owner/Broker)
(2) 84.50 (+/-) SUWANNEE COUNTY property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great home site! $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(3 65 ACRES SUWANNEE'COUNTY property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great home site! $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(4) 155 (+/-) ACRES SUWANNEE COUNTY gently rolling land located next to Peacock
Springs State Park. Ideal for home site or hunting! $2,995 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(5) 210 (+/-) ACRES SUWANNEE COUNTY property is located on State Road #51 about 3
miles north of the Suwannee River. Great location for home site! $3,500 per acre
(Owner/Broker)
(6) 645 ACRES MADISON COUNTY gently rolling land with majestic hardwoods along the
meandering of a creek that runs through the property. Land is in 19 & 20 year old planted
pines and has paved road frontage. Ideal for hunting, other recreational uses or home site.
$2,725 per acre
(7) 674 ACRES MADISON COUNTY this tract has some cut over land, about 195 acres of
2001 planted sand pines and some beautiful hardwood hammocks surrounding the Sand Pond.
Ideal for deer and turkey hunting. Property is a short drive from 1-10. $1,995 per acre
(Owner/Broker)
For additional information, contact
BAYNARD WARD, KATRINA BLALOCK or CHUCK DAVIS
E-mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:ward@danielcrapps.com"


FROM A B'iGOriE ERA Well-kept
vintage home inside city limits. Sit a
spell on the lovely screened porch and
admire the tidy, fenced yard. New AC
unit in '99. Monthly termite treatment.
Home warranty. Motivated Seller.
$97,000. #43388


^ -^ '"- J
NEAR THE RIVER Well-kept SW on
fenced i-acre. Nice yard with lots of
flowers & fruit trees. Clean 8x8 shed
w/elec. New water treatment system.
$40,000. #41860.


NEW SIDING, SKIRTING and
PANELING on this 3/2 home in a quiet,
family neighborhood. One-acre lot.
Appliances stay. $59,900. MLS 42075











OAK this 3/2 DW is on one wooded
acre. Walk-in closets, garden tub,
skylights, ceiling fans. Insulated 40x36
barn and 20x24 carport. Add'I acre
available. $84,000. #42719
CONVENIENT TO LAKE CITY & LIVE
OAK this 3/2 DW is on one wooded
acre. Walk-in closets, garden tub,
skylights, ceiling fans. Insulated 40x36
barn and 20x24 carport. Add'l acre
available. $84,000. #42719
128317JRS-F


386-362-1734


r -


12 0. o ar0 tre, ieea?,F ord


ILI_


----------I-'-i'~--T
,:.t.... ;;:- ~ ......






PFDJU 1- 20 R FR FCU AIE M EL -EI N TF D SU G R


Lost & Found
LOST DOG Black & White Pit Bull.
Four white paws. Last seen in
Dowling Park. Reward. Call 386-658-
3902.
Special Notices
IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO
WORK23520750 you may be
entitled to money through social
security. Call Intergrated Family
Services at 1-866-4-SSI-USA




BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
First Day
FIRE WOOD FOR SALE 1/2 cord
$75.00, cord $175.00. Will deliver
season or green oak wood. Call
Eddie for more info. @ 386-590-
1096.
First Day
FOR SALE Treadmill $40., Gas
Furnance $100., 1 Window A/C unit
- $50., Stainless Steel Range Hood -
$60., Couch $40. Call 386-638-
1686
Real Estate
ENJOY NORTH FLORIDA LIVING
LIVE OAK. FLORIDA
15 Ac. Approx. 7 mi. W. of Live Oak
w/2001 Homes of Merit 2300+ sq. ft.
Mobile Home. 4BD/2BA, 2LR. Lots of
storage area, Lg. Kit, Lg. Deck on
back w/concrete patio. Home sits in
about 3 Ac. of Lg. Oak Trees w/the
bal. of prop. in pasture. Mostly fenced
& cross-fenced for cattle & horses.
Accessible from 2. roads: 1 paved, 1
dirt. Irrigation for garden spot or start
of a nursery. Asking $177,000.
CALL FOR APPT.TO SEE:
DAYTIME: 386-867-1888
AFTER 6PM: 386-330-2373'
LOCATION, LOCATION,
LOCATION
www.suwanneecointyflorida.com
This cyber realestate for sale.
Will trade for property in Suwannee
County. 888-786-0676




PERSONAL SERVICES
Convalescent Care
DIABETIC TESTING SUPPLIES
& Respiratory supplies at little or no
cost. Medicare approved supplier.
Extensive line of brand name
products. Satisfaction Guaranteed!
1-800-815-1577 Ext. 35


EDUCATIONAL SERVICES


LOST AN 'ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072. M-F
from 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.





AGRICULTURE

Cattle

First Day
Registered Polled Hereford Bulls.
For Sale. Ages: Weaning to 2 yrs.
Call 386-776-2163 evenings.


MERCHANDISE


Building Materials

First Day
FOR SALE 19 Attic trusses
designed for 24'x36' Garage. 2'x10'
ceiling joists. Buyer will need to pick
up. $500.00. Call 386-362-4491.


Garage/Yard Sales


First Day
BIG GARAGE SALE 01/20,21,22,23
@ 8384 152nd Ter. Live Oak, FL.
Follow signs @ CR 252 & US 129 or
CR 49. Antiques/Collectibles, furn.,
elec. stove, dryer, living room set,
records- something for everyone.
386-364-6012.

MOVING SALE 3yr old mahogany 2-
pedestal dining table w/4 matching
side & 2 arm chairs. Matching buffet
w/granite top. Beautiful, like new
condition $2300. Antique cedar chest
w/very ornate carvings $400.
Commercial type treadmill in great
condition $400. Universal gym w/4
stations & all weights, great
condition. Has been kept indoors
$475. Please call 386-364-1234.


Are you curious about the value
of your property y?

Call m.A now for a FREE -
no obligation marketing analysis!
\Vhen professionalism and experience
maller.... Call Amy, she is the right
choice in today's wsorld-wide market.


-, c. ,cuw, ,,u~prote 386-984-5050 Cell
Realtor 386-364-1576 Office
.' t'' .'t!.' alFt.iR,.3lE t..t..,..,"


Southern Sky Realty
of Florida, Inc.
128316-F



I -- REALTOFf
529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
Realtor Assoc. M. Elizabeth Elliott, Evening 842-2372


(1) Lee, FL: 7.3 Acres on US
90 near 1-10 with a 3/4
bedroom CH/AC home
containing approximately
1,750 sq. ft. under roof
together with a C.B.S.
Commercial Building
containing approximately
12,500 with 11,500 sq. ft. of
packing. $250,000.
(2) 75 acres on paved road
on pasture with some live
oaks, fenced and cross fenced,
two wells, 1/4 mile on paved
Rd. 1/4 mile on county grade,
good area. $3,995 per acre.
(3) 177th Drive: 3 Bedroom,
2 bath central heat and air.
Home containing
approxaimtely 1,350 sq. ft.
Kitchen furnished 225'137
lot. $72,000.
(4) Jasper, FL: 3 Bedroom, 2
Bath, CH/AC, brick, containing
approximately 1,700 sq. ft.,
tender roof. Kitchen furnished
147x97 lot, pool, $95,000..
(5) Off CR 51 S.W.: 20 acres
wooded with large oaks, and a
3BR/2BA, CH/CA DWMH in
excellent condition, contact
office. 2000 sq. ft. under
roof, detached storage
$149,500.
(6) 161 /St Rd.: 10 acres with
a four bedroom, three bath,
CH/CA, brick home
containing approximatley
2,500 sq. ft. under roof,
kitchen furnished, 3 car
garage. REDUCED to
$225,000.
(7) Off CR 249: 3 Bedroom,
I 1/2 bath, CH/AC, home
contains approximately 1,180
sq. ft. 1 1/2 acres of land
(paved road) $55,000. Would
work for S.H.I.P.
(8) Hunting Tract: 13 acres


+, wooded, Steinhatchee
Springs area, river access, and
Hwy. 51 access, recent survey.
$26,000.
(9) CR 132: 13 acres wooded
on paved road with a 3
bedroom, 2 bath, CH/CA
DWMH in excellent
condition, cont. approx. 1450
sq. ft., heated area, will have
to see to appreciate.
$119,000.
(10) Camping Lot: One
acre riverview lot in the Blue
Springs area, river access.
$5,995.
(11) Off CR 252: 10 Acres
wooded on 61st Road
convenient to Lake City, can
be divided. $4,950 per acre.
(12) Perry Fla: Nice two
bedroom, CH/CA, brick
home with garage, good area.
$51,900.
(13) Perry Fla: 3 bedroom,
central heat and air, 218x170'
lot, nice trees, numerous
updates, new carpet, paint,
stove & refrig. 100%
financing. $61,900.
(14) Suwannee River: Four
plus acres with 220 ft. on the
water, 4' well, septic tank,
20x32 and 10x20 buidlings.
$110,000.
(15) 177th Road: 10 acres,
wooded 4' well, septic tank,
good county road. $4,200
per acre.
(16) US 90 West & 1-10: 32
Acres, zoned C.H.I., corner
tract, will divide.
(17) Off 208th: 4 Acres
wooded corner tract. Good
buy @ $11,995.
(18) 169th Place: 5 Acres
wooded with survey. $5,250
per acres. Terms.
12844a-F


For more information about this home,
call The associates of J. W. Hill Realty at 386-362-3300.


, a


First Day


FOR SALE 1994 21.5' Montego by
TravelMaster. 'E350 Ford Chassis.
53K mi. Fully equipped, new tires.
Must see to appreciate! Asking
$13,500. OBO. 386-776-2309


'


Boats/Supplies
First Day
FOR SALE 1968 19 ft. Skiff Craft I/O
Boat Motor & Trailer. $3500. OBO.
Like new. Call 386-364-5589.
FOR SALE 1996 Robalo 2120,
center console w/225 Mercury
w/warranty. Continental trailer. Many
extras. Asking $17,500. Call 386-
362-4775.


Campers/Motor Homes
First Day
FOR SALE Camper, 1994 Prowler
24'. Separate bedroom, Queen Bed,
also sleeper couch. Very clean.
Hitch, awning. Must See! $4500.
firm. Phone 386-963-2817.
FOR SALE Houseboat, 29 ft.
Pontoon. Self-contained. Fridge,
stove, bed. 2001 hp. Honda 4-stroke,
tilt & trim. $6000. OBO. Call 727-421-
5207 or 727-526-0622.


CLASSIFIED WORK!


or Something?



Look no further than

the Classifieds.


REAL ES-A-E FOR RENT

Apartments
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal to
advertise "any preference, limitation
or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability, familial
status or national origin, or an
intention, to make any such
preference, limitation and
discrimination. Familial status
includes children under the age of 18
living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain of
discrimination call HUD toll-free 1-
800-669-9777. The toll-free number
for the hearing impaired is 1-800-
927-9275



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Rooms
ROOMS FOR RENT Unfurnished 1
or 2 BR in my home justeNW Live
Oak. Quality home fully fenced 1/2
ac. yard. Children, pets welcome. No
drinking, smoking, drugs on
premises. Share bath, kit, LR, yard.
Min. stay-2mos. $420. 1 BD, $470. 2
BD, +$100. dep. Call 386-362-3991.
Houses for Rent
First Day
HOUSE FOR RENT 1BR/1BA 1 mi.
from Live Oak. CHA, W/D. $450/mo,
1st, last & $300. sec. dep. NO PETS!
386-362-3002
HOUSE FOR RENT 1BR/1BA Brand
New House CHA Screened Porch,
$600/mo, 1st, last & $300. sec. dep.


PETS! 386-362-3002

Classified Marketplace Mobile Homes for rent
First Day


386.362.1734 or 800.525.4182


FOR RENT-
3BR, 2BA DWMH,
CENTRAL H/A.
FIRST MONTH'S
RENT PLUS
DEPOSIT TO
MOVE IN.
WATER, SEWER
& GARBAGE
INCLUDED.
NO PETS
386-330-2567
133339-F


Double Wide
Mobile Home
and
Land for sale.
Financed
by owner.

Ask for
Larry Olds.

386-362-2720


-FOR RENT-
2 BR, singlewide
mobile home,
central H/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer, &
garbage included.
No pets
386-330-2567


A g """"" 771~""


Touch of Class
Not just any mobile home.
This one has a lot to offer...
1,550 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA, metal
roof, vinyl siding, new central
heat and air unit, new 40 gal.
hot water heater and Kinetico
water purifying system.
Kitchen & breakfast area has
been remodeled with a Tuscan
them, family room has a
wo-':-"o fireplace with a gas
log. All rooms have been
freshly painted, and are ready
for you. Home also has a
covered back porch and a new
front deck with rails. All this
on 2.5 acres with two deep
wells, metal storage building,
Planted Pines, Pecan, and
Oak Trees. Only 6 miles from
Live Oak. 13191


I


FOR RENT 3BD/2BA MH on 5 quiet
-acres. 50 ft. Porch. Washer & Dryer
hook-up. No smoking on premises.
$450.00 plus deposit. Call 386-364-
5007.
First Day
MH RENTAL SPECIAL
In Jasper & Live Oak areas.Jan/Feb.
1/2 mo. free with 1st/last plus sec. w/
12 mo. lease. $295.-$425. Call for
details: (386) 294-2600.



You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Louise at

386-362-1734
134698DH-F

-FOR RENT-
3BR, Singlewide
mobile home.
Central H/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
No pets.
386-330-2567
133V37-F


Inside, you 'II find great deals on merchandise you

can use, like a summer rental home or a new sofa

for the living room. Best of all, you can shop the

Classifieds anytime, any where, no computer

required. Pick up your copy today!


ucafe-l r0t#CO4(4 o


i5uOJ W. I UWrdVu SLtrct, JL ivT: Vi, rlullud 3 2u64.
SOffice: (386) 362-3300 Toll Free: 1-888-821-0894 \!
momsl__-l l__.l__ \ _LIl_.4F\__3~__\


.


3fin~~~nw~Jk~RI~,____


PAGE 2D. JANUARY 19-20, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


E CLAaSSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


~~i~i


loo@ 00~ ~


V@Aa~


AWAM-


00


11 .


I










You are just a call away... call 1-800-525-4182, ext. 102 to place your ad FAX 386-364-5578


Mon. Fri. 8 a.m. 5 p.m. *You are just a click away... find the classified marketplace online at www.nflaonline.com


We Will Help You

SSZIh GAIN EXTRA ATTENTION
To Your Classified Ad On
MERCHANDISE The First Day It Runs!
With the



PERSONAL SERVICES RECREATION Logo in the Classified Marketplace




EDUCATIONAL SERVICES REAL ESTATE FOR RENT 0- ~i


ALPETS





AGRICULTURE


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE





TRANSPORTATION


u reac'rY


To Place Your Ad

Monday through Friday by calling 386-362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182, faxing to 386-364-5578 or mailing to:
Classified Marketplace, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064



WE ACCEPT Personal Checks
I Mney Ordrs Persmnal Checks


Your Classified Ad can

appear in 5 paid

newspapers:

The Suwannee Democrat

on both Wed. & Fri.,

Pl the Jasper News,

SThe Branford News &

The Mayo Free Press on

Thursday; a total of

15,200 issues weekly!
Increase your promotional reach and tap into
potential new markets... Ask about placing your
advertising message into: The Valdosta Daily
Times, The Thomasville Times-Enterprise; The
Lowndes Edition-Mailbox Post; The Thomas
County Buyer's Guide; or a network of over 20
other publications, serving over 30 counties; with
over 20,000 readers in South Georgia.
Ask about our
"Service Directory" rates


FLORIDA (386) 208 Live Oak 294 Mayo 303
White Springs 362, 364 Live Oak 397 White
Springs 454 High Springs 497 Fort White 658
Dowling Park 752, 755, 758 Lake City 776
Luraville o 792 Jasper 842 Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch (Live Oak) 935 Branford 938 Jennings
961 Lake City 963 Welborn 965 Lake City
GEORGIA (229) 219 Valdosta 224, 225, 226,
227, 228 Thomasville *241,242, 244,245,247,
249, 251, 253, 257, 259 Valdosta 263 Ouitman ,
268 Vienna 268 Lilly 271,273 Cordele 282,
283, 285, 287 Waycross 293 Valdosta 324 Berlin
S 333 Valdosta 345 Nicholls 346 Coolidge 359
Ambrose 362 Milan 363 Lumber City 365
Rochelle* 367 Baxley 375 Hazelhurst 377, 378
Cairo 381 Douglas 382 Tifton 383, 384
Douglas 385 Rhine 386,387Tifton 389, 393
Douglas 422 Pearson 423, 424 Fitzgerald 433
Byromville 449 Blackshear 455 Ray City .467
Abbeville 468 Ocilla 472 Montezuma 472
Oglethorpe *482 Lakeland 487 Homerville 498
Boston 528 Omega 532 Alapaha 533 Enigma.
534Willacoochee 535 Warwick 546 Lenox
*549 Sparks 559 Lake Park 567 Aslburn o 574
Ocklochnee 594 Uvalda 624 Pineview 627
Unadilla 632 Alma 637 Fargo 643 Rebecca
S648 Pitts 649 Buena Vista 683 Meigs 686
Nashville *735 Barwick 762 Whigham 769
Norman Park 775 Morven 776 Sylvester' 782
Doerun 794 Hahira 824 Plains 831 irwinville
833 Jacksonville 846 Smilhville 853 Cobb *
859 Pavo 863 Blackshear 868 McRae 873
Moultrie 874 Leslie 887 Richland 890,891
Moultrie 896 Adel 899 Moultrie *924, 928
Americus 929 Pinetta 938 Jennings 941
Funston 973 Madison '985 Moultrie


ing features. A F R I IN p For Wednesday Publication 11 a.m.,
your adwithaaborder R ****|H| H ID fE IS Friday (prior),
o.nly solu For Friday Publication, 11 a.m.,
B e rn eeIIIH I cOeNy al la os Wednesday (prior).
^ *We reserve the right to cancel any special offer or promotion In the Classified Marketplace upon a 30-day notice.!


Vacation Rentals






North Carolina. Easy access, great
view, 10 min to Maggie Valley, 30 min
to Cherokee, 2 min to Parkway,
Mountain Stream with picnic area,
Fireplace, Sleeps 10. All Amenities.
$500/wk, $1600/mo. (386) 330-4207
Lucy





REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

FOR SALE W/OWNER FINANCING
1 AC. buildable lot near SR 247
$12,000. 2 AC. buildable lot near SR
247 $20,000. 4 AC. lot off 137 on
35th $30,000. 2 AC. lot 3 mi. off US
90 near Madison Co. line $12,500.
(386) 935-2301.
OWNER FINANCE
Jasper 4BD/2&1/2BA DWMH on 1
ACRE, NICE PRIVACY, Lg. Front &
Rear decks, fireplace, new
carpet.Sm. down & $750/mo.
Call (386) 758-9785

OWNER FINANCE
O'Brien Spacious 3BR/2BA on
2.03 acres. Beautiful Oak Trees Sm.
down & $695.00 mo.
Call (386) 758-9785

Homes for Sale

First Day
FOR SALE 3BD/1&1/2BA Brick
Home in Live Oak. Lg. den w/fpl,
closed carport, privacy fence. Nearly
2000 sq. ft. Also, separate 400 sq. ft.
room that could be used as guest
house, gameroom, etc. A must-see
@ 1453 Pearl Ave. Call 386-330-
2201.


FOR SALE by owner-N. Suwannee
County. 3/2 Cypress frame home-
1995. 2100 sq. ft. conditioned+lg.
screen porch & decks. Beautiful 6 ac.
of hardwood forest, high & dry. 3 min.
walk to Suwannee River w/gated
access to miles of state-owned river
frontage. $213,000. Call 386-362-
5979

Mobile Homes
OWNER FINANCE
E. of Branford-close to beautiful
Itchetucknee River- 3BD/2BA MH
Small down, $625/mo. 386-758-9785

Lots
FIVE, TEN AND TWENTY ACRE
LOTS with well & septic. Owner
financing. Call 386-752-4339.
www.deasbullardbkl.cd'rh







EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
ACCOUNT PAYABLES
NEEDED
LIVE OAK AREA
CALL FOR APPT:
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGRD
REQ.

COMPREHENSIVE
COMMUNITY SERVICES, INC.

Is seeking a qualified individual to
fill Rest Area janitorial position.
Must be able to follow directions
and work independently. Physical
stamina to perform job
requirements. Must have
transportation and able to use
telephone, have good attitude..
ADA/EOE/Drug free work place.
Apply CCS, 506 S. Ohio Ave., Live
Oak, FL.


afd Seweee4

4 0 r Accepting Applications
FOR Good, bad and no credit.
T Call for 1st & 2nd mortgages.
Established full service co.
RentalAssistance WE BUY MORTGAGES.
1, 2, 3, & 4 BR HC & Non- fl00) 226-6044
HC Accessible Apartments 622 NW 43rd S, Suite A
(^I~ a~e Oe I jfrCe^ 'Licensed Mtg. Lender
705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936 TRAILER HARBOR
TDD/TTY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity MOBILE HOME PARE

S ^ A Family Park with
FOR rentals. Drug Free
RET in-town location.Single
HUD Vouchers Welcome!d Do e
1,2 &3 BR HC & Non-HC and Double lots
Aeible Apar enrs available. 362-3868
0a3S II p" 4128497JS-
705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936 Retired
TDDp/TY/711 R ir
Equal Housing Opporlunity .- T aT lB r -- n _


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living 2
bedroom duplex. Call
362-3110.
128545JS-F


K











S-F


PrI ERI
Man
will do telephone
installation,repair,
TV Cable installation,
& phone wiring,
jacks and repairs
or other small jobs. -
Call Tom @
658-2611.


First Day
Administrative Sales .Assistant
needed for a busy dealership. All
applicants must be proficient in
Word and Excel. Excellent
communication skills and
telephone skills a must. Great work
environment and benefit package,
health, dental and a 401k. E.O.E.
PLEASE NO PHONE CALLS. Fax
resume to: 386-362-3541, Attn:
Dave Esco, Jr., General Manager
or mail to:
WALT'S LIVE OAK FORD
P. O. BOX N
LIVE OAK, FL 32064


First Day





CHILDREN'S
THERAPIST

The Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch is
currently recruiting for a Children's
Therapist. Position requires a
Master's degree in counseling,
social work, psychology or related
human services field with a
preference of 2 years clinical
experience in providing services to
youth with emotional disturbances..
Please forward resume to:
Eileen McCowan
Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch
emccowan @ youthranches.org
P.O. Box 2000
Boys Ranch, Florida 32064
386/842-5555 (800/765-2697)
FAX: 386/842-1029

Licensed supervision available.
SE.O.E./Drug Free Workplace

CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
needed, two (2) years experience
required Drug Free Work Place.
Call (386) 294-3411.


First Day
Clerical/Industrial
HELP WANTED

MANY POSITIONS AVAILABLE
INDUSTRIAL/CLERICAL
APPOINTMENT NEEDED
CALL FOR INFO:
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
BACKGROUND/DRUG SCREEN
REQUIRED


First Day





COTTAGE PARENTS

The Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch, a
private residential childcare
program in North Florida, is looking
for couples to be full-time
professional Cottage Parents.
Responsibilities include the direct
care and development of 10 boys,
ages 8-18. We provide you with
specific professional skill based
training & support. Our model
helps children develop social,
academic, and independent living
skills. Salary $38,480.00 per
couple with housing, utilities,
board, and benefits provided. High
school diploma or GED and no
children living at home required.
For more information on this
challenging opportunity contact
Linda Mather at (386) 842-5555. E-
mail: Imather@youthranches.org
E.O.E./Drug Free Workplace

First Day
Counselor, OPS
NORTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE

COUNSELOR, OPS needed at
North Florida Community College,
Madison, Fla. Grant funded, 28
hr/week. Coordinates College
Board Expanded Opportunity
Program and program for
improving FCAT scores and SAT
scores. Requires AA/AS degree,
experience working with at risk
youth; counseling or education
experience. Education majors
encouraged to apply. Strong
organizational and interpersonal
skills, some evenings and weekend
work. Application at www.nfcc.edu.
Send complete application packet
of cover letter, resume, application
and transcripts (unofficial OK) to:
HR Director, NFCC, 1000 Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, FL 32340.
Deadline 1/28/05. EOE

MECHANIC
W. B. HOWLAND CO.
INC.
Mechanic w/ diesel engine and
hydraulic experience needed
@ W.B. Howland Company.
Full time position with excellent
benefits package. Apply in person
@ Howlands corner of Walker &
11th St. or call (386) 362-1235.


What do you have to offer? Start your
advertisement by naming the item or service
you are presenting.

Are you being clear? Complete, concise
information will encourage a quick response
from readers.

Can the reader reach you? Be sure to include
your telephone number or address.
If necessary, list a preferred time-to have
potential buyers contact you.
Are you giving your ad enough exposure?
Consecutive publication of your ad will
generate the greatest amount of reader
attention. Generally, a 15-day run time is the
best and most cost-effective arrangement.

What's the best part of your offer? Identify
and write about the most beneficial feature
of the product or service you are advertising.


First Day
DRIVERS
Are you getting a pay raise in 2005?
Roehl drivers are! Van drivers-up
to 390 plus bonus. Flatbed drivers-up
to 410 .plus bonus, plus tarp. Up to
$2,000. sign-on bonus. Students
Welcome. Class A required. EOE
Call Roehl, 'THE TAKE HOME
MORE, BE HOME MORE
CARRIER":
$$$ 800-626-4915 $$$
www.GoRoehl.com


First Day
drivers.
NEW PAY PACKAGE
Home every Weekend
: GUARANTEED!!
3 immediate Openings! Avg.
2444 mi. wkly.
CDL-A required
1-877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com

farm help
HELP WANTED
Knowledge of tractor and equipment
is a must. Call 386-330-2567 to
enquire. Drug Free Work Place.

Food Service
COUNTRY KITCHENS
Now hiring, all positions open.
Call 850-971-0024.

First Day
Housekeeper
Full time position in O'Brien area in
Suwannee County. Duties include
housecleaning, laundry and running
errands. Must be experienced, have
dependable transportation and
excellent references. Call 800-704-
7397.


Housekeeping
Laundry & Bathhouses Attendant
position open. Experience preferred
but will train. Apply in person @
SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE
MUSIC PARK
between 2pm-4pm @
3076 95th Dr. Live Oak, FL
E.O.E.

LABORERS NEEDED
MANY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
FOR MORE INFO CALL:
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
(386) 755-1991 APPT. ONLY
BACKGRD/DRUGSCREEN
REQ.


Maintenance Director
Seeking individual with electrical,
plumbing, heating, carpentry, and
appliance repair background. Will
need to be able to work with people
as well as blue prints. Must have
stable job history. Responsible for
maintenance functions for seven
year old 60 bed health care facility.
Fax resumes to the attention of Rich
Wisdahl at 386-294-3301, or apply at
Lafayette Health Care Center, 512 W.
Main Street, Mayo, FL 32066.



maintenance
HELP WANTED maintenance man
with. knowledge of plumbing, electric
and carpentry. Tools required.
Transportation a must. Drug free
workplace.
Call (386) 330-2567


Mechanic
Full Time position open at
Spirit of the Suwannee.
Experience Required.
Apply in person from
2pm-4pm @
3076 95th Dr., Live Oak, FL
E.O.E.


medical
MADISON NURSING CENTER
2481 W. US 90, Madison, FI
Seeking Full Time/Part Time
RN's & LPN's.

medical
MADISON NURSING CENTER
2481 W. US 90, Madison, FI
Seeking RN for Risk Management/
Staff Development


a
I nDI

FrScalScrt

orSS9


SHave you covered all of your bases? Make
sure you are providing sufficient information
about the merchandise or service you are
offering, including the price! Does the reader
know what you are selling, why they should
buy it and how they can contact you for more
information?out the most beneficial feature of
the product or service you are advertising.

How can you reach the greatest number of
prospective buyers? Place your classified ad
with The Classified Marketplace.

DIS Call 1-800-525-4182 today!



..c..a..... ....." ,..., s
APARTMENT
_-______ w .. *. e, .O -'.


ANNOUNCEMENTS




EMPLOYMENT




BUSINESS SERVICES





FINANCIAL SERVICES


SGeneralM General
GOOD -BUY CASH CASHSS .. I IMMEDIATE,, ,
CLASSIFIED ,pF40



liOW TO WRITE A CLASSIFIED AlD

8 Simple Steps to Creating a Classified Ad That Sells:


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 3D


--- --- --- ----- ----- m


0) CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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I CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA ;:


362-1734


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE


1-800-525-4182


First Day
Member Service Representative
Suwannee River Federal
Credit Union
has an opening for a Member
Service Representative position
working in the Jasper and Live Oak
offices. Cash handling/teller
experience and computer experience
is a must. Applications can be
obtained at the Live Oak office
located at 203 Pinewood Way and
Jasper office at 102 Central Avenue
NW. Deadline for applications is
January 24, 2005.
PHYSICAL THERAPIST
Full/Part time Flex. Hrs.-
Competitive Salary- Paid
EU/Licensure. Send resumes to
'more than words' PEDIATRIC
THERAPY ASSO, INC. fax 229
44-4244 or call 229-244-4545

PC Support Spec.
NORTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PC SUPPORT SPECIALIST, North
Florida Community College,
Madison, FL. Assist manager in
planning, design, installation,
implementation, operation and
maintenance of all facets of
computer networking including
hardware, software and
infrastructure. Must also be willing
to serve on college committees
and participate in college and
departmental activities. Associate
degree (preferred), plus six (6)
months related paid experience.
Only complete applications will be
considered. Complete application
packet requires cover letter,
resume and application. Mail to
Director of HR, NFCC, 1000 Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, FL, 32340 or
email to HR-Dept@nfcc.edu.
Application and complete job
description available at
www.nfcc.edu. Deadline 1/21/2005.
EOE

RECEPTIONIST NEEDED
LIVE OAK AREA
FAX RESUMES
(386) 755-7911
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGRD
REQ.

First Day
Truck Drivers
PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS
$1000.00 New Hire Bonus for
experienced drivers! Call about dry
bulk and flat bed positions @ our
Newberry terminal. 866-300-8759.


First Day
Service Aide full/part time. Assist
individuals with physical and
developmental disabilities; flexible
schedule, trains people in activities
of daily living in the community. One
year experience medical, psychiatric,
nursing, child care or working with
persons with developmental
disabilities. Good driving record,
background screenings.
ADA/EOE/Drug free. Apply at:
COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY
SERVICES
506 S. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, FL

Stable hand/trail guide rider
position open at
Spirit of the Suwannee Stables.
Experience necessary. Must have
reliable transportation and great
horse/people skills, available to
work weekends. Apply in person @
SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE
MUSIC PARK
3076 95th Dr.
Live Oak, FI 32060
(North on Hwy. 129) E.O.E.

STOCKING/INVENTORY
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT.
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGROUND
REQ.

First Day
Tax Preparers
!!! EARN EXTRA MONEYII!
JACKSON HEWITT
LIVE OAK & JASPER OFFICES
now hiring experienced tax
preparers.
(386) 362-1633
945 N. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, FL 32064


Sales
WALT'S LIVE OAK
FORD-MERCURY

Looking for Experienced
Sales People
or Right People with no Experience
Will Train

*Up To 35% Commissions
Demo Program for Sales
People
Health Insurance
Great Work Environment
Paid 3% on F&l
*Paid Salary During Training
Please call Bobby Cogswell
at 386-362-1112


"THERE'S MORE On thic lucr.
%f IN THAT OLD CAR ihfe'j mindful. l hjr.,
THAN Oli Bul .i,u 11 ill up l, h ITl 'ji
Ti- ^I i(- -IT" y h.' \' hen ,,i:u 4cll lhc ,:,lId
THOiUGHT" L c e. r o 'Us.
I H ........ ,,f ..,ek. ,,r ,: ernet,.
hr \,ugh hie Clj fired

AUTO SPECIAL


4 Lines for I Month




Call plati yourad, nowk!

Classified Marketplace
386-362-1734 or 800-525-4182




ON-SITE



AUCTION

SAT., JAN 22 at 10 a.m.
10891 S. U.S. 441, LAKE CITY, FL
LOCATION: GO 10 MILES SOUTH OF LAKE CITY ON U.S. 441 TO SALE SITE

LOOK FOR SIGNS

PARTIAL LISTING
FARM EQUIPMENT: 2 FORD TRACTORS (1000 MODEL & 5600
MODEL), WOODS BUSHHOG, RHINO MOWER DECK, LONG
ROLLER DISC, COMB RAKE, DRAG BUCKET, DRAG BLADE,
CROSLEY 16' FLAT BED TRAILER

VEHICLES: 1983 FORD F250 DIESEL PICK-UP, 1983 20'
BAYLINER BOAT W/INBOARD MOTOR & TRAILER

TOOLS & SHOP EQUIPMENT: SNAP-ON 15 DRAWER
ROLLING CABINET W/SIDE CABINET, CRAFTSMAN TOOL
CABINETS & CHESTS, KENNEDY MACHINISTS BOX, SNAP-
ON TOOLS, CRAFTSMAN TOOLS, AIR TOOLS, 80 GAL. AIR
COMPRESSOR, DRILL PRESS, FLOOR JACKS, JACK STANDS,
VIKING 60,000# SHOP PRESS, GRINDERS, VISES, POWER
TOOLS, HAND TOOLS, TIRE CHANGER, MOTOR STANDS,
LADDERS, LAWNMOWERS, TABLE SAWS, 4 TON CHAIN
HOIST, BICYCLES, PARTS CLEARNER, MISC. CAR PARTS &
MUCH MORE.

AUCTIONEERS NOTE: THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF SMALL
TOOLS. IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR QUALITY TOOLS, THIS IS
A MUST SALE.

PREVIEW: 8 A.M. TIL SALE TIME
REMOVAL: DAY OF SALE & SUNDAY A.M.

TERMS: CASH, APPROVED CHECK, M/C, VISA, DISCOVER,
AMEX

SALE CONDUCTED BY: LAKE CITY AUTION CO. AS584
COL. JERRY FRAZIER AU904
P.O. BOX 3064
LAKE CITY, FL 32056
136761JRS-F


First Day
TEMPORARY ROAD
MAINTENANCE WORKER I
The Suwannee County Public
Works Department is currently
recruiting for two temporary Road
Maintenance Worker 1 positions.
Responsibilities include but are not
limited to performing manual
and/or semi-skilled labor as
directed by supervisor. May
perform minor repairs/adjustments
or maintenance on equipment.
These positions will primarily work
in the Live Oak area. Qualifications
include one year of manual labor
experience and education
equivalent to a partial high school
education. Must possess a valid
Florida Drivers License. Rate of
pay is $7.29 per hour. Interested
applicants are required to submit a
County application to the
Administrative Services
Department, 224 Pine Avenue,
Live Oak, Florida 32064, (386)
362-6869 no later than 5:00 p.m.
January 28, 2005. All applicants
are subject to a pre-employment
physical and drug test.
EEO/AA/V/D

First Day
Secretary/Receptionist
Full time position in busy real estate
office in Mayo. Must have excellent
computer skills with emphasis on
Windows, Word and Excel with
experience in general office duties.
Send resume to: PO Box 268, Mayo,
FL 32066

First Day
WAYNE FRIER
CORPORATE OFFICE
in Live Oak, FL is seeking a mature
individual to fill multi-task position.
Background in Banking, Finance or
Mortgage Lending helpful. Call
Larry J. Olds at 386-362-2720.





TRANSPORTATION
Autos for Sale
FOR SALE 1994 Chevy Lumina.
Runs good. Good tires. $1200.00
firm. Call 386-362-6479.

First Day
FOR SALE '98 Ford Contour SE
Sport, 4dr. Low mi., good condition,
clean, well maintained,good tires.
AC/AM/FM/CD/power everything.
Asking $4000. 386-842-2006
days/eves.
TAKE OVER PAYMENTS or 5-150 00
per rnmnlrn o.n a 2'o0 Crne'.y l'.1,
DVD, leather, sunroof, skid control,
XM satellite radio, 38 MPG. Call 386-
362-1734 ext. 107.
Trucks for Sale
First Day
FOR SALE 2002 Ford Ranger.
$10,500.00. Good condition. Can be
seen @ 122 W. Duval, Live Oak,
across from bread store. Call for
more info 386-362-7084.
Vans for Sale
FOR SALE 1996 Dodge Converted
Van. Low Mileage. $6,000.00 OBO.
Must sell! Call 305-338-8990 or
leave msg. @ 386-330-0355.

Motorcycles

First Day
FOR SALE 2004 50cc GY50 dirt
bike. Disk brakes, electric start, 4-
speed trans. Like new. $800.00. Call
386-362-4491.


As education options


grow, more parents


opt for homeschooling


Parents face more choices
than ever when determining
how best to educate their
children.
A century ago, parents had
few educational options.
Then, in 1906, Virgil Hillyer,
a Harvard University-trained
scholar and head master of
Calvert School, a private
school in Maryland, gave
parents a new choice: a for-
mal elementary school cur-
riculum ie could use to
teach their children at home.
Soon, people all over the
United States, especially in
remote areas, as well as
those living abroad, flocked
to use lessons based on
classroom instruction at
Calvert School.
Almost a century later,
homeschooling continues to
flourish, even as newer edu-
cational options have
emerged. A recent Calvert
School study found more
than 1.8 million school-age
children in the United States
are educated in their homes,
an increase of 38 percent
since 2002.
"What makes homeschool-
ing so appealing is its afford-
ability coupled with how it


MOWING BUSH HOGGING
AND MUCH MORE .

FREE ESTIMATES






Employment Opportunity

Lafayette County Rescue is seeking a Full-time
EMT-Basic or Paramedic (either may apply).
Benefits include medical, dental, vacation, sick & FRS options.
Safe driving record required.
Applicants must hold a current Florida certification.
Serious inquiries may apply at the office of John Bell, Mon-Fri
from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. or may drop off an application at
the LCEMS station from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 7 days a week.
Deadline to apply for the position will be January 22, 2005. T


helps children reach their
full potential," said Jean C.
Halle, president of Calvert
School's distance-learning
operations. Since parents are
not professional teachers,
Calvert provides them with
daily, step-by-step lesson
plans, textbooks, workbooks
and supplies as well as acad-
emic support.
Homeschooling appeals to
.people from various educa-
tion le els. Cal\ ert. School's
study, conducted in spring
2004, found about 19 percent
of homeschooling parents
did ndt graduate from high
school; 45 percent took some
college courses; and the oth-
er 36 percent graduated from
college.
The income level of home-
schooling families also
varies. Sixty-three percent of
homeschoolers earn less than
$60,000 in household in-
come annually. Another 21
percent earn between
$60,000 and $90,000 annual-
ly, and about 16 percent of
homeschooling families earn
more than $90,000 a year.
The majority (85 percent) of
homeschooling families
spend less than $900 a year
on homeschooling, Calvert
School research found.
Calvert School suggests
parents ask the following six
questions to determine if
homeschooling is right for
their family.
Would one-on-one
instruction help
your child?
One-on-one instruction,
when delivered in a com-
plete program offering
placement assistance and
academic support, helps
many children to excel acad-
emically: Homeschooling
provides an alternative when
the traditional academic set-
ting is not ideal. Home-
schooling also supports the
unique educational needs of
children who are academi-
cally advanced or in need of
remediation, those experi-

HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT






Bulldozers, Backhoes, Loaders,
Dump Trucks, Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Next Class: Jan 24th
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement in your area
800-383-7364
,Associated Training Services P
www.Equipment-School.com Y


encing physical or
behavioral prob-.
lems, or children
whose extra-curricu-
lar activities or fam-
ily situation make
attending daily
classroom instruc-
tion difficult.
Do you want
to?
Homeschooling
takes between 2 1/2
to 5 hours a day.
Successful home-
schooling families
structure their days
around their lessons.
By creating a
"school room" with-
in the home, fami-
lies often quickly es-
tablish an atmos-
phere for learning.
In addition to find-
ing that educational :
opportunities
abound -- practicing
math at the store,
discussing science
concepts while
walking in the


woods -- these fami-
lies enjoy the free-
dom to pursue other
interests, including
travel, performance, athlet-
ics.
Are you qualified
to teach?
Home teachers come from
all walks of life and educa-
tion levels. A curriculum
prepared specifically for-.
homeschoolers with detailed.
lesson plans, incorporating
activities, assignments, and
discussion questions, helps
make sure you teach. ;the.
eightt lessons in the besi se-
quence.
What do you teach?
Finding age-appropriate
textbooks, workbooks, and
other materials can be time-
consuming and complicated.
Although some families
gather their own lessons,
many families opt for a com-
plete curriculum to ensure
there are no gaps in their
child's education. Relying
on educational professionals
to find the best educational
materials and guide your in-
struction maximizes your
teaching time -- and gives
you the peace of mind that
comes when your child ex-
cels.
What grade is right?
Selecting the right grade is
critical. Completing a pre-
enrollment assessment and
working closely with a cur-
riculum provider's educa-
tional experts for sugges-
tions accelerated or remedial
work, when necessary, helps
guarantee your child's suc-
cess in homeschooling.
Are there state
requirements?
Homeschooling is legal
throughout the United States,
although state regulations dif-
fer. Most states require fami-
lies to keep records, and some
curriculum providers offer
accredited programs that
meet state standards for
homeschooling. Contact the
state or local board of educa-
tion for more information or
visit the Home School Legal
Defense Association at
www.hslda.org or call them at
(540) 338-5600.
What will it cost?
Homeschooling's costs are
significantly less than a pri-
vate school education. Most
programs cost less than
$1,000 a year per child. In ex-
change for your labor, home-
schooling offers families the
reward of valuable time to-
gether -- which can be price-
less.
What about...
If you have more ques-.,
tions, contact Calvert School
at (888) 487-4652 or visit
www.calvertschoool.org.


PAGE 4D, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


R-Acp






3 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Recognize the signs of a heart attack


Heart pain is nothing to take
lightly. Yet surprisingly, half
of all people having a heart at-
tack wait more than two hours
before getting help, according
to the American Heart Associ-
ation (AHA). While 250,000
people die each year from
heart-related problems before
they get to a hospital, immedi-


ate action can prevent many of
these tragedies.
Heart attacks can happen
suddenly and instantly. But
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New laser makes kids' trip to the dentist less of a pain


Dr. Cory Evans, a Salt Lake City dentist who uses the Waterlase and 11-year old patient Eric Tsuchida. Eric had a cavity repaired with
the laser on Thursday, December 16, 2004, in Dr. Evans' office.


For many kids, going to
the dentist is as scary as that
imaginary monster under the
bed. Dentists, knowing this,
have been trying to ease
children's dentistry fears for
years. Some. dentists dole
out free pencils and costume
jewelry. Others paint fun zoo
animal-filled scenes on
walls', and install televisions
playing children's movies.
But, so far, no free gadget or
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tential to fully cure kids'
(and even parents') fears of
going to the dentist. Until
now, says one California
dentist whose practice in-
cludes patients from 12
months of age to age 100.
"I have had patients, my
own daughter included, who
don't respond positively to
any kind of anesthesia. For
them, having dental work
done is a horrible experi-
ence," says Dr. James Jesse,


a Colton, Calif. dentist and
instructor at the Loma Linda
University School of Den-
tistry in Loma Linda, Calif.
"I now use a water energized
laser on my patients, the
most advanced dental tool
available today. In most cas-
es, the laser replaces the
need for a shot of Novocain
and the traditional dental
drill. One of my patients,
who doesn't respond to
anesthesia, actually started
clapping after the procedure
was completed. She said it
didn't hurt a bit -- and that's
without any anesthesia."
The laser Jesse is referring
to is the Waterlase MD, the
latest pain-free dentistry de-
vice developed by San
Clemente, California's Bio-
lase Technology. This tech-
nology allows patients, of
most any age, to undergo
cavity preparation, root
canals and even some mouth


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surgeries using only the Wa-
.terlase's combination of wa-
ter and laser -- no anesthesia
is needed in most cases. The
Waterlase MD is the most
significant advancement to
modem dentistry in over 50
years,
While adults certainly en-
joy the benefits of the laser,
children may benefit the
most from this technology
since kids often fear going to
the dentist because of pain
associated with previous vis-
its. "A visit to the dentist can
be stressful, especially for
kids. But with the laser, Dr.
Jesse is able to make the ex-
perience much more posi-
tive," says Kristine Hunt, a
mother from Lemon Grove,
Calif., whose nine-year old
son recently had a cavity
filled using the Waterlase.
"No one really loves going
to the dentist, but this tool
makes it much" easier. My


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son had a completely differ-
ent dental experience with
the Waterlase than I had
when I was a child."
Often the first thought a
parent has about taking their
child to the dentist is their
own nervous recollections of
a shrieking drill and the
sting of a Novocain shot.
The last thing they want to
do is put their child through
the same painful experience.
But with the Waterlase MD,
Jesse says patients have an
option for pain-free den-
tistry. "I use the Waterlase
on all of my patients, but it's
especially great for kids be-
cause they don't have to get
a shot and they don't have to
worry about biting numbed
lips," he says.
Waterlase dentists often
educate their child patients
by explaining to the kids
how the cavity will be
"sprayed away." Jesse says


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he first describes the laser to
his younger patients by
telling them that it's a laser,
"like in the movies." He then
sprays his arm with the laser,
so the kids can understand
that it's just water. Then, he
sprays the child's wrist to
show them that it doesn't
hurt at all. "This demonstra-
tion makes kids really com-
fortable having their mouth
worked on. They know that
I'm just using water and that
it didn't hurt their arm so it
won't hurt in their mouth,"
he says.
Children also respond well
to the laser's gentle pulsing
sound, which is much differ-
ent than the high-pitched
screeching sound made by
the conventional dental drill.
The fact that the Waterlase
doesn't create the uncom-
fortable vibrations that pa-
tients feel with the drill also
helps alleviate the nervous-
ness often felt by children.
"This technology offers,
my patients the ability to be
more comfortable in the den-
tal chair having procedures
performed. They experience
less anxiety and the dental
work even becomes a pleas-
ant experience. There's less
trauma to the patient and less
trauma to the tooth..And::
they don't have to worry:
about having their face numb :
from the anesthesia," says.
Jesse.
Before the Waterlase, ih'?
most innovative iecefit' ad-
vancement in dentistry was
50 years ago with the advent
of the power drill. Biolase
CEO Robert Grant says that
50 years is too long for pa-
tients to go without a major
dentistry breakthrough,
which is why it's so impor-
tant that the Waterlase MD is
ushering in the next genera-
tion of dentistry.
"There is obviously a:need
to upgrade the dental care
sj\illable to"American pa-
tients," says Grant. "The
feedback we're getting from
dentists across the country in
support of the Waterlase is
phenomenal. This technolo-
gy is changing their patients'
dental experience forever --
and for parents, it. makes
their lives much easier,
knowing their child isn't go-
ing to experience pain and
fear at the dentist."
The Waterlase MD is the
'latest product using lasers
for the health benefit of pa-
tients. Along with surgical
lasers, dermatological lasers
and vision correction lasers,
patients seem responsive to
this new crop of less-inva-


sive medical treatments.
"Because the Waterlase
doesn't make much noise
and doesn't cause any pain,
my patients say a visit to the
dentist is now closer to a vis-
it to the spa. They just lay in
the chair and relax," says
Jesse.
Dr. Louis Malcmacher, of
Bay Village, Ohio, an inter-
national lecturer on dental
practice management, says
"the laser is also a key tool
in preventative dental care.
Much of the dental work we
see being performed on
adults today is a result of
work done when they were
kids. It's not that the dental
work was bad, but the trau-
ma caused, by drills de-
stroyed large portions of the
healthy tooth. In my o\.v4
practice I find the laser is
precise, it actually helps prog
tect the patient's tooth from
problems that lead to root
canals, crowns and other ex-
tensive dental work doo-
the line."
With its laser precisi
the Waterlase MD targets
direct;, small area of t|
mouth. So, when a dent
cuts a patient's hard tisst
such as bone or teeth, or sA
tissue, such as gums, it cais
es minimal or no damage ,
surrounding tissue. This si-
.rounding tissue damage h1
typically been the culprit be
hind a 'dentist having
numb 'a patients' mouth
fore treatment, and the
tient experiencing pain and
sometimes long recoveries
after procedures.
Additionally, the WateR-
lase reduces the possibility
of micro fractures, or tiny
cracks, in the patient's tooth,
unlike the traditional drill
dentists use today. Mic'rd
fractures can result in future
cavities and weakening 'of
tooth structure as well as ini-
fections in patients' teeth,
months or even years after
the cracks first occur.
The Waterlase MD em-
ploys the latest in modern
technology, including a de-
sign that contains materials
and technology used by Mer-
cedes Benz and NASA.
However, this high-tech talk
only means one thing -- bet-
ter dentistry:
What a relief for parents to
hear their children say, "Go-
ing to the dentist isn't scary
anymore. I didn't like the
drill or the shots. With the
Waterlase, it doesn't hurt."
To find a Waterlase den-
tist, visit www.NoPainDen-
tistry.com or
www.biolase.com.


10 tips to


keep you safe


An assault is never a vic-
tim's fault. But it's important
to make safety a priority to
increase your likelihood of
avoiding harm. Whether you
live in a city or in a rural
area, you still should know
how to stay safe. Follow
these tips to help avoid dan-
gerous situations outside
your home.
1. Stay alert and be aware
of your surroundings wher-
ever you are. Convey that
feeling by acting cool, calm
and confident.
2. Know several routes
home, including ones on
well-lit, busy streets. This
way, you can change your
route regularly and modify it
instantly if you feel threat-
ened. Take note of establish-
ments that stay open late and
could provide safe shelter.
3. Don't make yourself a
target. When alone, avoid
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you. Travel with a compan-
ion whenever possible. Car-
ry belongings in a way that
leaves your hands free.
4. Always wait for public
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is well lit and full of people.
5. Choose your seat on
public transportation with


care. Select an aisle seat so
you won't be "blocked in" by
a potential assailant. During
off-pdak hours, sit near the
most passengers, the driver
or the door.
6. Be alert in parking lots.
Always approach your vehi-
cle with your keys ready. In-
spect your car before enter-
ing. Don't be afraid to ask
someone to escort you to
your car.
7. Never leave your car
unlocked, even for a few
minutes.
8. Always check the iden-
tification of a taxi driver
(usually located near the vi-
sor) and ensure that it match-
es the driver. Don't sit be-
hind the driver; it's easier for
him to lock the rear passen-
ger door.
9. Always walk against
traffic so you can see what is
coming.
10. It is not as easy as' it
used to be to get a strangerio
help you. Yell something
like, "You in the red shirt, go:
call 911 now!" instead
screaming, "Please." Maket
clear that you don't know tl e
person who is harming you..
Many bystanders will steer,
clear of domestic disputes,:
so lie if necessary.


PAGE 6D, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


E CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA





* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA
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NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 7D

//li''


"Copyrighted'Materal:

SSyndicated Conten
Available from Commercial News Providers"


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PAGE 8D, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA