Citation
The Jacksonville free press

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Creation Date:
September 14, 1916
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
002042477 ( ALEPH )
19095970 ( OCLC )
AKN0341 ( NOTIS )
sn 95007355 ( LCCN )
1081-3349 ( ISSN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

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Full Text

PAGE 1

Volume 31 o. 39 August 23 29, 2018 Jacksonville,Florida PRSTSTD U.S. Postage PAID Jacksonville, FL Permit No. 662 75 Cents White Enrollment at HBCUs Increasing at Alarming Rates Page 7 Opioid Crisis Continues to Destroy Communities and FamiliesPage 4Issa Rae Wants to Change the Way Dark Skinned Women Are PortrayedPage 9 urse Sues Hospital for Honoring a Patients Racist RequestPage 10 75c RETUR SERVICE REQUESTED Legal Battle Begins Over Georgia Voter SuppressionThe Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law warned a Georgia elections board that its ready for a legal battle in federal court to stop a proposal that would suppress Black voter turnout in a key governors race. The civil rights group submitted a pre-suit demand letter to the Randolph County Board of Elections, objecting to a plan that would close 75 percent of the polling places in the predominantly AfricanAmerican county. Georgias Black voters have the opportunity to elect Stacey Abrams, who could become the nations first female AfricanAmerican governor. Randolph County, which is 60 percent Black, has a two-member election board that is expected to vote on whether to shutter seven of the countys nine voting sites. Supporters of the plan claim the sites violate federal disabilities law because theyre not wheelchair accessible. Opponents believe that reason is a pretext to veil underlying racism and to keep the governors office under Republican control. If the plan goes through, many of the rural countys Black voters, who dont have reliable transportation, would have to travel up to 10 miles to cast a ballot at alternative polling stations.Girl Kicked Out of School Because of her Unnatural HairA young Black girl was expelled from her Louisiana middle school because her hair was unnatural,Ž according to activist Shaun King. King posted a video on Instagram on Tuesday of the young girl, who hasnt been identified, crying after she was allegedly told to leave the school. It just happened again. Christ The King Middle School in Gretna, Louisiana expelled this beautiful young Black girl saying that her hairstyle was unnatural,Ž King wrote. She was humiliated and removed from the school over it.Ž The shocking video mirrors a recent incident in Apopka, FL. where a young Black boy was not allowed to go to his private school because of his dreadlocks. King says that the school implemented the new rule about hair this summer, despite it being in its handbook.Georgia State Senator Says Its OK if Trump Used the -Word A Republican Georgia state lawmaker said that he would not have a problem with President Donald Trump using the n-word in the past and that it would set a bad precedentŽ to hold a president liable for mistakes made before they entered political office. State Sen. Michael Williams spoke to CNNs Victor Blackwell on New Day Saturday that the use of the n-word is wrong, but Trump gets a pass if he said it before he became President. I will always say using the n-word is wrong, and its bad, and should never be accepted in our society,Ž he said. But just because [Trump] might have done it years ago, not as our president, doesnt mean we need to continue to berate him because he used it.Ž Omarosa Manigault Newman, who worked for Trump in the White House for a year, said in her new book Unhinged that Trump used the nword on the set of The Apprentice and that theres a recording of it. It would not necessarily matter to me as the person that is running our country,Ž Williams said about Trump using the slur. [Trump] has his personal beliefs, his personal ideas. I truly believe he is able to separate those from how he is running the country.Žational Prison Strike Taking Place in 17 StatesA burgeoning movement for change has been birthed within prisons across the nation. Inmates in at least 17 states have been participating in a widespread strike that is expected to last through Sept. 9 as rallies have ramped up for jail reform. Prisoner groups said they were looking to raise awareness and push for action to address several incarceration issues: forced labor for low wages, poor living conditions, jailhouse deaths, disenfranchisement, limited access to rehabilitation and more. Protest methods „ including sit-ins, boycotts and hunger strikes „ have been suggested by Jailhouse Lawyers Speak, a South Carolina group of prisoners who give help and legal training to other inmates, according to The Guardian. What the strike can mean in real-time is the absence of prison labor in jail kitchens, laundry rooms, corridors and outside lawns. The strike could potentially become the largest in U.S. prison history, but that came with a high risk of punishment. Prisoners, however, were moving forward by issuing a list of demands, hoping that the end justifies the means. The prisoners have let past events fuel their protest, as well. This years strike was spurred by the Lee Correctional Institution riot in South Carolina in which seven inmates died in April. They also have marked the protest dates for Tuesday „ the 47th anniversary of the death of well-known Black Panther member George Jackson who was killed while trying to escape prison in San Quentin, California „ and Sept. 9 „ the 47th anniversary of the Attica prison rebellion in upstate New York. They said they hope the strike will spur solutions for better conditions behind bars. The Black Panther Party has always been at the forefront of fighting for the rights of African Americans. Recently, a member of the New Black Panther Party was arrested in nearby Kingsland, GA, for participating in a protest. Minister Mikhail Muhammad was arrested last week for protesting outside the Kingsland City Hall. He was cited for disorderly conduct for not giving up his megaphone. He was protesting the murder of Tony Punch' Greene, who was killed by Kingsland police officer Zechariah Presley on June 21, 2018. Presley, who is white, was following Green, who was black and pulled him over for a reported traffic violation. Presley made physical contact, but when Green ran, "Presley fired multiple shots resulting in the death of Green," according to a Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) report. According to the arrest warrant, Presley acted "solely as the result of a sudden, violent, and irresistible passion, resulting from serious provocation sufficient to excite such passion in a reasonable person." The GBI reviewed video from Presley's patrol car and body camera. Arrest warrants were issued for Presley, who turned himself in to the Camden Sheriff's Office. Kingsland Police Chief Daryl Griffis recommended that Presley be fired, and Kingsland City Manager Lee Spell agreed. The department also released Presley's personnel file, which shows he was hired last year despite admitting that he had physically fought his wife, had bought or sold marijuana, repeatedly shouted at people, was involved in "2-3" accidents and had been arrested for "reckless, eluding, speeding," according to his handwritten text. Black Panthers Among Protesters Leading to Arrest of White Officer Shown is Minister Mikhail Muhammad confronts Police Chief Griffis. Muhammad was later arrested and released. ew Black Panther Party will be back in Kingsland for the next City Council meeting. Shown accepting donations (l-r), Desmond Meek and Tony Hill; Karen Britt and Rep Tracie Davis; CBIC Pastor Karl Hodges with Royal Vagabond members (l-r): Danny Larkins, Seabon Dixon, Lavale Paulin, and Pastor Karl Hodges. August is the Month of Philanthropic Receiving Presidents HatefulDemeanor Continues to Attack America Only two days after President Donald Trump met with nearly two dozen predominately Black pastors, he tweeted yet another racially charged message calling CNN news anchor Don Lemon the dumbest man on televisionŽ. In that same tweet, he insulted the intelligence of basketball star Lebron James, saying Lemon made Labron look smart, which isnt easy to do.Ž In yet another angry tweet days later, he called his former White House assistant Omarosa Manigault Newman a crazed, crying low lifeŽ and a dogŽ amidst her release of taped White House conversations as promotion for her new book. This most recent public vitriole … despite private meetings with clergy and advisors … have added to a long list of equally unsavory tweets the President has unleashed … many of which appear to be racist at the core. Whats more, First Lady Melania Trump has unveiled a platform, Be BestŽ, which in part, campaigns against cyberbullying. He has also verbally or electronically portrayed the media as the enemy of the people, African nations as shitholeŽ countries; NFL players as sons of bitches; Congresswoman Maxine Waters as a person with a very low eye QŽ and President Obama as establishing "stupied" policies. These racial stereotypes attempting to denigrate the intellect of Black people and other obscenities and absurdities are among the reasons that Bishop Reginald T. Jackson, president of the Council of the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME), is organizing an ecumenical Call to Conscience: Day of ActionŽ, set for Lafayette Park across from the White House at 10 am Sept 6. Continued on page 2 Shown (l-r) are elementary awardees: Ofavia Wilson, Leighmar Wilson, Josiah Parker, Bryson Mims and Graylin BrownDoing Our Part Local Foundation Working to End Disparity of Drowning Black Youth On Saturday, August 18th, the Shawn Delifus Foundation celebrated their 2nd graduation of 86 swimmers ages 6 months to 88 years old. Both local senior citizens and youth held court at the William Raines High School pool to showcase their swimming skills and receive medals for passing swim courses. Continued on page 3 During the month of August, three local organizations were the recipients of philanthropic gifts geared towards furthering their missions. One of the nonprofit groups was the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition (FRRC). The organization is a grassroots membership organization run by returning citizens (formerly convicted persons) who are dedicated to ending the disenfranchisement and discrimination against people with convictions. FRRC received a $5,000 check from the United Mine Works and Concerned Citizens … the group is currently running a campaign to support the passage of a November 6th Florida Voting Restoration Amendment. Also receiving grant funds this month was Beta Alpha Zeta (BAZ) Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. New president, Karen Britt accepted a $500 donation from State Rep. Tracie Davis of District 13. Rep. Davis presented the chapter with a check for their support of her efforts to create a healthy start for young women and children in the community. BAZ in-house Storks Nest, which represents over 40 years of partnership with the March of Dimes Foundation. The Storks Nest aims to increase the number of women receiving early and regular prenatal care in an effort to prevent cases of low birth-weight, premature births and infant deaths. This past Sunday, after preaching a rousing sermon focused on giving thanks for your blessings, Central Baptist International Church Pastor Karl Hodges also received a philanthropic gift from a local organization. The Royal Vagabonds Club presented the pastor with a check for $300 for the CBIC Youth Department. Formed in 1928 as a social and civic organization, the Royal Vagabond Club is composed of professional men with a desire to have a positive impact on the African-American Diaspora.

PAGE 2

Page 2 Ms. Perrys Free Press August 23 -29, 2018 If you have mortgage problems, call 888-995-HOPE for one-on-one expert advice from this free government program.Youre not alone. What will happen to us if we lose the house?Ž Jax Bridges Seeking Motivated EntrepreneursJAX Bridges, a program of the JAX Chamber's Entrepreneurial Growth Division, is looking for its next cohort. The program is designed to connect small and medium sized companies with opportunities to do business with larger corporations; as well as providing targeted entrepreneurial education support. The JAX Bridges program is a simulation that educates entrepreneurs. The task is to create "many-to-many relationship access" for both vendors and suppliers. The program leverages entrepreneurial tools, unique learning strategies, and corporate relationships to deliver on our value proposition. If you are a business owner looking for entrepreneurial education, applications for the next session are open now and close August 29th. To register and for more info visit www.jaxbridges.com.Trumps Hateful Public Demeanor Continues Even After Meeting With Black Pastors The most recent class of Jax Bridges entrepreneursFederal Grant Funded to Help Women Enter ApprenticeshipsThe U.S. Department of Labor recently announced the availability of funding to help recruit, train, and retain more women in quality pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs, and pursue careers in manufacturing, infrastructure, cybersecurity, and healthcare, among other industries. The Women in Apprenticeship and Nontraditional Occupations (WANTO) grant helps to expand pathways for women to enter in, and lead in, all industries. Under President Trumps leadership, we have seen a record number of job openings in the United States,Ž said U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta. We must continue our efforts to maximize opportunities for women to enter apprenticeship programs and secure good, family-sustaining jobs.Ž The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that in 2016, the year for the most recent data available, women accounted for more than half of all workers within several industry sectors, including education and health services (75 percent), financial activities (52 percent), and leisure and hospitality (51 percent). Women accounted for less than half in several industry sectors, including manufacturing (29 percent), agriculture (25 percent), transportation and utilities (24 percent), mining (13 percent), and construction (9 percent). Women account for less than 10 percent of individuals enrolled in apprenticeship programs. The WANTO grant program will award at least $994,000 to community-based organizations to encourage womens employment in underrepresented occupations and pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs. Grants will be awarded to up to six recipients. Organizations applying must provide one or more of the following types of technical assistance: €Developing pre-apprenticeship, apprenticeship, or nontraditional skills training programs to prepare women for those careers; €Providing ongoing orientations for employers, unions, and workers on creating a successful environment for women to succeed in those careers; and €Setting up support groups and facilitating networks for women to improve their retention. The 2018 grants are administered by the Departments Womens Bureau and the Employment and Training Administration. Visit the Womens Bureau athttps://www.dol.gov/wb/media/wa ntogrants.htm for more information. Continued from front We are calling pastors, congregants, and citizens from across the country to join us in Washington DC on September 5th and 6th, as we call the nation to conscience. Additionally, Sunday, September 2nd is designated as Social Justice Sunday. We are asking every pastor to preach a sermon related to social Justice,Ž Jackson says in a statement. There are some who think the Black Church is weak and has little strength or influence. This thinking is incorrect. We are at war, and we call all soldiers to active duty.Ž The demonstration was largely inspired by the news that almost two dozen Black pastors, led by Trump's spiritual advisor, Paula White, met with Trump at the White House Aug. 1, saying they had been invited to discuss criminal justice issues, including prison reform and other urban issues. But the meeting appeared to be little more than a photo op. The White House only released an approximately 30 minute video from the meeting, showing the pastors introducing themselves and praising the president as if his vitriolic public behavior did not exist. But, Bishop Harry Jackson said there was a substantive meeting after the introductions. That meeting, he said, lasted approximately two and a half hours with Trump remaining in the meeting for as much as 90 minutes. It went on for at least two hours with others … the criminal justice reform people, the outreach people, and his staffers in the room with us. And were planning to have some ongoing dialog,Ž Bishop Harry Jackson said. He said he has maintained ongoing communications with the President about his urban agenda. Ive been talking with the president for 15 months plus and with Jared Kushner about prison reform. So, the presupposition that this was just a photo op and you just ushered these Black guys in was not true,Ž he said. But he conceded that no one in the Aug. 1 meeting brought up the destructiveness of Trumps public conduct. So, yes. I think the concern is valid. Is anybody saying anything to the president?Ž Bishop Harry Jackson answered that question by noting that although he has not publicly criticized the president, that doesnt mean he has not spoken to him behind closed doors. Also, when violence broke out in Charlottesville last year and Trump went on television calling White supremacists as very fine peopleŽ, Jackson said he and others did pull Trump's coat. I personally talked with the president a few days after Charlottesville about race along with 15 religious leaders, and about how he could project himself better.Ž Yet, a year later, some might argue that the daily tweets still coming from the President might need to be screened for suitability for children and some adults. My question to Harry Jackson would be whatever you told him privately, how has it transformed him publicly?Ž asked the Rev. Jamal-Harrison Bryant, pastor of the Empowerment Temple AME Church in Baltimore, also an organizer of the Sept. 6 Call to Conscience. Because whatever he said to him privately on Wednesday, on Friday he called [Don Lemon] the dumbest man ƒ What is their prophetic impact? They dont have any prophetic impact. The Bible says, By their fruits shall you know them. So with all of that access and insight, we have seen no transformation?Ž Both Bryant and Bishop Harry Jackson acknowledged that they were planning to sit down and meet with each other this week as a video of Bryant strongly criticizing the pastors is still circulating on social media. Bryant says he has great respect for Bishop Harry Jackson as a committed Republican. But the rising up of the Black church to publicly speak truth to power is crucial, Bryant said. I just want to underscore the importance of clergy coming Sept. 6. That its not just an AME call but all of us who are conscience of whats taking place in our community and want their voices heard and felt. Its not just for clergy but for all of us, including our Congregants. And I think its a critical moment for the Black church.Ž As he prepares to lead the Call to Conscience … Day of ActionŽ, Bishop Reginald Jackson says the White House and the Black pastors failure to report any substantive part of the meeting was a disservice to the community. My only concern is the ones who went to the White House, in fact, when they came out of the meeting, why didnt they say to us that we discussed this or raised our objections to this or disputed him on that?Ž Jackson questioned. A release on the Call to Conscience includes: It is time for the Black Church to speak, our congregations and the nation need to hear us. Therefore, Black denominational and faith leaders have scheduled a Call to Conscience Day of Action for September 5th and 6th in Washington DC, the nation's capital. It is not only time for us to say something, we must do something. We must fight against, "spiritual wickedness in high places."

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Ms. Perrys Free Press Page 3 August 23 29, 2018 ANDING T ST ALL ANDING T ALL V MOC UTH D V TH AND A AID FOR A P V DEMOC N E O Y GRESS CPR T MA Y FOR C H E WSO OTE V ONGRESS SON FOR C AL LA Y AL RIZED B HOR OTE 0 V 18 V 2 TICPRIMAR R 18 RA CRA 18 0 2 2 8 2 . Shown are legendary coaches athanial Washington, Jimmie Thompson and Dickie Robinson in a circa 1951 photo taken at Matthew Gilbert High SchoolLegacy Memoirs History of Black Athletics Preserved Through Local Association By William C. Hines When I was a young boy growing up in Jacksonville there were two Black high schools … Stanton High (Blue Devils) and the Matthew W. Gilbert (Panthers). The Stanton Blue Devils represented the western part of the city and the Gilbert Panthers, the eastern section. James P. Small coached Stanton and Gilberts coach was Jimmy Thompson. These men helped to develop one of the most important football rivalries and social events of the 1940s, 50s and 60s. Under their leadership, they were able to encourage the all white city recreation department to allow Blacks to play football in the historic Gator Bowl, now TIAA Field. The annual football game and events surrounding it remained the social happening for many years. When integration swept the city, some of the excitement for this game and the social events lost some of its glory. The African American population began moving to other areas of the city and as a result our schools and the Black areas of the city lost large quantities of students. By the mid 70s, the number of predominately black high schools had been diminished from seven to two, and much of the Black history celebrated at those schools was lost. The African American Coaches, Game Officials and Athletic Associations (AACGOA) were established to assure the perseverance of Black athletics and cultural achievements in Duval County. The association was the idea of Coaches Earl Kitchings, Jimmy Johnson, Dr. Alvin White and many others. The coaches would meet on the second Friday of each month to eat breakfast and enjoy fellowship. Naturally, discussions would follow about sports and other topics important to the community. Each part of the city had a recreational park and leaders that helped develop our athletes and youth. Every school had outstanding coaches and athletes. Those recreational leaders played a major role in developing the association. AACGOA meets every second Friday of the month at Joint Heirs Church at 150 Clark Rd. Governor Candidates a o Show as Gillum Faces AACP Alone With less than 10 days until the Florida primary election, the Hillsborough County NAACP hosted a gubernatorial forum in Tampa last Saturday. All five candidates confirmed their attendance „ but four of them stood up the organizers, the 20 community groups involved, and the more than one hundred people in attendance. The only candidate who showed up to speak was Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, the only AfricanAmerican candidate in the race. All four other candidates refused to attend the event. Gillum talked unapologetically about his record as Mayor, including reforming the criminal justice system to Ban the BoxŽ and lowering crime to a five-year low. He also worked with President Obama to train workers for high-tech jobs, and he is campaigning on a platform of raising teacher and staff salaries, increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour, creating better-paying jobs in Florida, and legalizing marijuana to invest more funding in public schools. Shown is Gillum seated alone for the one man forum. Delifus Foundation Awards Medals to Swimming Course Grads of All Ages Continued from page 1 City Councilmen Garrett Dennis and Terrance Freeman were in attendance to award medals to program graduates. Parents, guardians and spouses brought their lawn chairs and sunglasses to view graduates swim the length of the pool. We are excited to present the second graduating class to the community,Ž said the foundations Executive Delores Delifus. Swimming is crucial to African American neighborhoods. Blacks are likely to drown and being afraid of the water is not an option in our class.Ž The Foundation was founded by Daniel and Joyce Delifus and named in his honor of their son Shawn, who was a swimmer and 2003 graduate of Raines High School. From his humble beginnings, Delifus became one of the top swim coaches in the nation before passing away at the age of 30 in 2016. To support Shawns passion, the foundation collaborated with YMCA to offer a swimming instruction course for youth and families. The swim classes are dedicated to delivering quality professional instructions to low and moderate income families in addition to youth education and nutrition.

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Poet Lucille Clifton once said, We have a generation enslaving itself to drugs, young men and women doing to our race what slavery couldnt.Ž The opioid epidemic certainly is not a race-based crisis, but the quote from Clinton is very relevant … drugs are literally destroying individuals and families. According to the Harvard Law Reviews study, more than two million Americans suffer from opioid addiction. The latest estimates, overdoses involving opioids killed nearly 50,000 people last year. Before President Obama left office he traveled to West Virginia, which is the state that is home to the highest rate of heroine overdose deaths in the nation to hear directly from citizens of that state. This is an important enough issue that Obama knew that it needed a considerable amount of attention … unfortunately President Trump has done little to address it. Its a crisis that Trump needs to recoginize. This opioid epidemic has hit the United States like a massive hurricane washing over the nation. On average, 115 Americans die every day from a drug overdose involving an opioid, and even more suffer the incapacitating effects of addiction. Heres what I have learned about drugs like heroine or crack cocaine … generally, they dont discriminate … they affect the black, white, young, old, rich and poor. The affect of this monster rips families apart and consistently devastates communities. And perhaps there is no better case study than any and I said anyŽ inner-city community in any mid-size to large metropolitan area. But wait … thats the assumption that most of us have. But if we think about it drugs affects suburban and upper income communities as well and can even be as devastating. Rich people sometimes can mask their drug addiction much better than the poor. Just look at entertainers like Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson and many, many others. Whether we are talking about illegal or prescription drugs, the toll is great. Obama tried to do his part … implementing policies to increase access to drug treatment and expand the training of doctors who prescribe opiate painkillers. The Federal Drug Administration says that drug overdoses now kill more people than car accidents each year. The Obama administration hoped to double the number of doctors who can prescribe a rehab drug called buprenorphine, with the goal of increasing usage to 60,000 from 30,000 over the next three years, but progress has been slow. Most experts agree that while Obamas efforts helped, they havent even made a modest dent in the overall crisis. As I said … drugs dont discriminate. They impact rural and urban America. While some want to paint this epidemic as a poor peoples issue, the evidence suggests hat socioeconomic conditions cannot be blamed for the crisis itself. The Harvard Law Review says, We must look at the opioid epidemic for what it is: a selfinflicted perfect storm that arose from a combination of newly available opioids, new attitudes about the importance of pain management, loose prescribing practices, and a lack of professional accountability. The solution to the problem must lie in addressing some of these root causes.Ž I wrote an article a couple of years ago about one of my favorite shows of all time, The Wire,Ž which aired on HBO. The premise of the show surrounded the drug trade in Baltimore, MD. One of the great aspects of the show was that it highlighted the drug game from every aspect possible … the user, seller, importer, police and City Hall. You saw how the mid-level drug dealers, who are normally black males are the ones who are targeted by police. The suppliers are rarely apart of the investigation, and at the end of the day everyone in the game is expendable. The game doesnt change … just the players. It was an amazing show, which became so popular because it was so real. The WireŽ is inner city Jacksonville or Houston or Oakland or Pittsburgh. So what other strategies can we use to combat drugs in our communities? It has to start where many other issues start … education. Educating our children on the negative effects that drugs have on them personally, but also how drugs tear apart the community is critical. But the drug issue isnt solely about the end user and abuser. What about all of the young African American males who get caught up in the selling? These youth are often looking for fast money and a gloried life as a drug dealer. Many of these young men stand on corners pushing drugs, but when you factor in the money they eventually make and the time associated with the activity, they are probably making less than minimum wage. And throw in danger of being shot, robbed or arrested and you have yourself and very short-lived career. And because of minimum sentencing requirements, many of these young men ended up in prison for a long time, which also affects our communities. Drugs are simply devastating. We have to educate our children as early as possible and look for ways to promote the prevention of drug use and selling. The most deadly thing about cocaine is that it separates you from your soul,Ž said Quincy Jones. Powerful words. Signing off from downtown Jacksonville, Reggie Fullwood By Julianne Malveaux I am no fan of Omarosa Manigault Newman, the mononymous diva who dominates the airwaves whenever she wants to. Her new book, Unhinged,Ž which I wont read, is billed as a tell-all on 45sŽ White House and its shenanigans. In making the rounds, OmierosieŽ (my nickname for her) has played tapes that seem to corroborate at least some of her allegations about 45.Ž More importantly, her tapes are evidence that the game captured the hunter. In other words, Omierosie took a page from 45s book and trusted fewer people than even 45Ž did. Now the 45-defense machine, led by Sarah Huckabee Sanders, has gone out of its way to paint her as all kinds of liars. Surprise, surprise. And folks have run to the airwaves to suggest that the White House is inhabited entirely by liars. If you elect a clown, expect a circus. But this is more than a spectacle now; it is the systematic denigration of Black people and Black women that must be repudiated and rejected. The dehumanization of Black people allowed whites to enslave us and then justify enslavement. The defeminization of Black women allowed White men to use us sexually, and shielded them, after enslavement, from any consequences. Legally, it was almost impossible, until recently, to convict a White man of raping a Black woman. Recy Taylors rapists got away with it, and White women stood by them. Omierosie may be an integrity-challenged lowlife (that didnt start with this book), but she is not a dog. Calling Omarosa a dog is a sly way of 45 trying to call her a b…ch, or a female dog. She is, as we all are, a terribly flawed human being. In naming her a dog, as in calling Congresswoman Maxine Waters low IQŽ is casting aspersion on all Black women. The civil rights activist Ruby Sales addressed this on a Facebook post that bears sharing. Ruby Sales Facebook post said: Trump called Omarosa a dog. For younger folk let me break it down. His slander is laden with White Supremacist historical slander of Black women in a culture of White male rape and a reign of terror. Their assault against Black women extends back to captivity and enslavement in sites of terror in a strange land where we were hostages to the sexual whims of White men. Moreover, these men were also pedophiles who raped young Black girls. The post continued: To justify their perverse behavior, desires and the colonization and invasion of the lives and body territory of Black girls and women, they slandered us as whores and immoral sexual predators whose sexual appetites know no limits. So when you sit quietly and allow Trump„ no matter what you think about Omarosa„to call her a dog, you give him a pass to raise up the White smear of us that your older sisters went to the mat placing our lives on the line to end this culture.Ž Omarosa isnt the only former White House aide who has written about the dysfunctional White House. Sean Spicer did the same thing, yet he has not been called a dog. Instead, he was feted in Washington with a book party that actually charged an admission fee. No shade and no disparagement from the White House. Censure seems only to come when a Black woman is speaking her truth. It is an interesting time to be an African American woman. On the one hand, during this September month, we see eleven Black women gracing the covers of magazines. Beyonc is on the cover of Vogue; Rihanna on the cover of British Vogue; Tracy Ellis Ross on the cover of Elle, Zendaya on the cover of Marie Claire; Issa Ray graces the cover of Ebony; actress and comedian Tiffany Haddish is on the cover of Glamour; Lupita Nyongo is on the cover of Porte; and there are others who show up on smaller publications. In total, writes Joy Sewing, African American women graced eleven magazine covers in the all-important September issues, the issues that often attract the most advertising and also set trends for the fall and the rest of the year. The Beyonc cover for Vogue is especially impactful, because Beyonc used her influence and editorial direction to bring a young, Black man in as her photographer. It was the first time that an African American was the cover photographer for Vogue magazine.. On the one hand we are being celebrated, and on the other hand, we are being slammed. Commercial sensibilities are out of sync with the bigotry of this president, but can these commercial sensibilities be used to topple 45s bigotry? Beyonc brought a Black cover photographer to Vogue Magazine. Can her Bey-hive bring change to prevailing racist attitudes? Will the women who pick up these magazines send a strong message to the woman-hating, genital grabbing President? Omorosa may be a lot of things, Chump, but she is not your dog, and neither are the rest of us! Julianne Malveaux is an author, economist and founder of Economic Education. Her latest book is Are We Better Off? Race, Obama and Public Policy.Ž isFuture of Democratic Party Lies in Moving to the Moral CenterThe media is now reporting on the debate among Democrats and activists about what the party should stand for, and how it will win elections. Establishment Democrats are said to fear that the populist reform energy represented by Bernie Sanders and rising star Alexandria OcasioCortez (who upset Rep. Joe Crowley, the fourthranking Democrat in the House, in a New York City primary) will turn off the moderate, upscale, white suburban Republicans who they believe are appalled by Trump and the key to taking back the Congress. A Wall-Street-funded group known as the Third Way „ which might better be known as the Wrong Way since it has been wrong about every major issue facing the country over the last years, championing disastrous corporate trade deals, deregulation of Wall Street and the Iraq War among other calamities „ even convened a small gathering, cohostedŽ by a billionaire real estate developer to map out how to counter what the media describes as the left. The very terms of this debate are misleading. Ideas that have broad public support, such as tuition-free college, are labeled left.Ž Ideas that offend philosophical conservatives, such as subsidies to big oil companies, are tagged as on the right, championed by Republicans. Wed be wiser to focus on common sense and basic principles. When Dr. Martin Luther King spoke forcefully against what he called the triple evilsŽ of racism, economic exploitation and militarism,Ž he was criticized for weakening the cause of civil rights, for getting out of his lane by talking about economic inequality and against the Vietnam War. He responded, Im against segregation at lunch counters, and Im not going to segregate my moral concerns.Ž Cowardice, he taught us, asks the question Is it safe?Ž Expediency asks, Is it politic?Ž Vanity asks, Is it popular?Ž Conscience asks, Is it right?Ž We are a nation faced with great perils. Inequality has reached new extremes and, even with the economy near full employment, working people still struggle simply to stay afloat. Big money corrupts our politics and distorts our government. We are mired in wars without end „ 17 years in Afghanistan and counting „ and without victory or sense. We have a president who believes he profits politically by spreading racial division, appealing to our fears rather than our hopes. This is the time for citizens and for true leaders to move not left or right, to the expedient or the cautious, but to the moral center. Affordable health care for all isnt left or right, it is the moral center. Jobs that pay a living wage, affordable housing, public education, college without debt, clean water and air, action to address catastrophic climate change that literally may endanger the world „ these are not ideas of the right or left. They are the moral center. Holding to the moral center has its own power. Opposition to slavery started as a minority position, but its moral force was undeniable. Integration seemed impossible in the segregated South, but its moral force could not be denied. In this time of troubles, I believe that Americans in large numbers are looking for leaders who will embrace the moral center, not the expedient, the safe or the fashionable. They are looking for champions who will represent them, not those with deep pockets. That may be the final irony. The most successful political strategy may well be not to trim to prevailing opinion or compromise with entrenched interest but to stand up forcefully for what is right. Page 4 Ms.Perrys Free Press SUBSCRIBE TODAY SUBSCRIBE TODAY Yes, Id like to subscribe to the Jacksonville Free Press!Enclosed is my check __ money order __for $40.50 to cover my one year subscription.AME _________________________________________ ADDRESS_______________________________________ CITY____________________STATE____ZIP________ DISCLAIMERThe United State provides opportunities for free expression of ideas. The Jacksonville Free Press has its view, but others may differ. Therefore, the Free Press ownership reserves the right to publish views and opinions by syndicated and local columnist, professional writers and other writers which are solely their own. Those views do not necessarily reflect the policies and positions of the staff and management of the Jacksonville Free Press. Readers, are encouraged to write letters to the editor commenting on current events as well as what they wouldlike to see included in the paper. All letters must be type written and signed and include a telephone number and address. Please address letters to the Editor, c/o JFP, P.O. Box 43580 Jacksonville, FL 32203. (o CALLS PLEASE)MAILTO: JACKSONVILLE FREE PRESS P.O. BOX 43580, JACKSONVILLE, FL 32203 MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 43580 Jacksonville, FL 32203 PHYSICAL ADDRESS 1122 W. Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville,FL32208Email: JfreePress@aol.com TELEPHONE (904) 634-1993 Fax (904) 765-8611 Sylvia PerryPUBLISHER Rita PerryPublisher Emeritus CONTRIBUTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald Fullwood, E.O.Huthchinson, WilliamReed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Marsha Oliver, Marretta Latimer, Phyllis Mack, Tonya Austin, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver, Vickie Brown, Rahman Johnson, Headshots, William Jackson. City Chronicles Diatribes on life in the African-American Diaspora by Reggie Fullwood GUEST EDITORIAL by Jesse JacksonAugust 23 29, 2018 Opioid Crisis Continues to Destroy Communities and FamiliesOmarosa is ot Your Dog Trump

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August 23-29, 2018 Ms. Perrys Free Press Page 5 FOR THE WEEK OF AUGUST 21 27, 2018’Classic logoTEAM-BY-TEAM SCHEDULES, TOP GAMES, POY CANDIDATES AS 2018 SEASON STARTSUNDER THE BANNERWHAT'S GOING ON IN AND AROUND BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS SWAC NAMES NEW COMMISSIONER: BIRMINGHAM, Ala. … The Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) Council of Presidents has announced that Dr. Charles McClelland will become the sixth SWAC Commissioner in league history since the conference began in 1920. McClelland has served the past 17 plus years at the helm of two SWAC member institutions„Vice President of Intercollegiate Athletics at Texas Southern University since April of 2008 and the prior seven years as Athletics Director at Prairie View A&M University McClelland will succeed the role from Edgar Gantt who has served the role of Interim Commissioner since December 31, 2017. "As a young person growing up in the Southwestern Athletic Conference, its a good feeling to be named commissioner," Dr. McClelland said. "To have an opportunity to lead this conference in this era is overwhelming. Ive been here at TSU [Texas Southern University] for 10 years and met a lot of friends. TSU is like family. Im sad to close that chapter, but I'm excited to open a new one." A native of Jackson, Miss., Dr. McClelland earned his doctoral degree in higher education administration at Texas A&M University in 2011. A 1993 graduate of Prairie View A&M, McClelland earned his bachelors degree in accounting and in 1997 received an MBA from Prairie View. McClelland is a former member of the NCAA Leadership/Management Council. He is also a past president of the Houston Touchdown Club and has served on the board of directors. Previously, McClelland served as chairman of the SWAC Council of Athletics Directors, a position he had held for 10 years. McClelland is also currently a member of the Houston Final Four Organizing Committee.Season kicks off with a classicLUT WILLIAMSBCSP Editor Let the games begin!! Three games this week will kick off the 2018 black college football schedule, none bigger than the Garden Credit Union FCS Classic Saturday in Montgomery, Alabama. That game will be played before a national television audience on ESPN and will match national powers in the 2017 undefeated Mid Eastern Athletic Conference and Celebration Bowl champion North Carolina A&T Aggies against the four-time defending Ohio Valley Conference champion Jacksonville State Gamecocks (6 p.m., CT). After tying for two of the three previous defeated in conference play (8-0) to claim the outright league title and at 12-0 overall after their 21-14 bowl game victory over Southwestern Athletic Conference champion Grambling State The Aggies were the undisputed king of black college football and ranked sixth nationwere seventh in the STATS FCS national poll. They return a dynamic trio of offensive stars in senior quarterback Lamar Raynard, senior running back Marquell Cartwright and junior wide receiver Elijah Bell Raynard is the reigning MEAC offensive player of the year and 2018 preseason offesnvie player of the year. Last season he broke numerous school records in passing for over 2,900 yards and 27 touchdowns with just 7 picks. Cartwright ran for 1,190 yards and 14 TDs to spur the Aggies' ground attack while Bell hauled in 64 receptions for just under 1,000 yards and brought in 11 TDs. A&T also has standout defenders in defensive end Darryl Johnson Jr. season all-American and cornerback Franklin "Mac" McCain who was among the nation's leaders in interceptions last year as a freshman. The biggest change for the Aggies may be on the sidelines where longtime defensive coordinator Sam Washington takes over after veteran head coach Rod Broadway retired. The Gamecocks are coming off a 10-2 season in 2017 that saw them go 8-0 in Ohio Valley Conference play and win a fourth-straight league title. They've now won 32-straight OVC games, the second-longest conference win streak in FCS history, and are 31-0 in OVC play under head coach John Grass. Washington RaynardCoaches and STATS polls last year. They were 9th in the STATS poll and 10th in the Coaches poll. The Gamecocks however were voted ahead of the Aggies at 6th in the 2018 preaseason FCS Coaches poll. A&T was 14th. In the STATS FCS poll, they are positioned in the same way. "We know they're good, but we feel we're pretty good also," Washington said last month at the MEAC Media Day. "We'll be ready," he said. JSU has spent 60-straight weeks in the FCS top 10, the second-longest active streak in the nation, with 2018 top ranked and FCS defendinb champion North Dakota State being the only team to be in the Top 10 for as many weeks as JSU. JSU returns a pair of All-Americans for the 2018 season, one on offense and one on defense. Junior safety Marlon Bridges was an All-American for the second-straight season as a sophomore and has been named the OVC Preseason Defensive Player of the Year by both the league's head coaches and the media. Senior center Tyler Scozzaro returns after being granted a sixth year of eligibility after his All-America campaign. Bridges is joined on the defensive side by second-team All-OVC defensive lineman Randy Robinson, while veteran returning starters and seniors Connor Christian (defensive line) and Quan Stoudemire (linebacker) also look to lead in 2018. team All-OVC lineman B.J. Autry and secondteam All-OVC lineman Darius Anderson to help pave the way up front, while freshman AllAmerican tight end Trae Barry and OVC AllNewcomer running back Tramel Terry return, as well. LET'S GET IT STARTED!INTRIGUING MATCH: MEAC, HBCU national champ NC A&T to face four-time OVC champ Jacksonville State in Saturday's kickoff classic THE STAT CORNERWHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS WATCH LIST FOR 2018 BLACK COLLEGE FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME (BCFHOF) PLAYER OF THE YEAR AWARDNAME SCHOOL POS CLASSKyle Anthony Howard WR Junior Tyreek Bailey Fayetteville State OL Senior Stefen Banks Savannah State DL Senior Elijah Bell North Carolina A&T WR Junior Jordan Bentley Alabama A&M RB Junior Jarell Bright Winston-Salem State DL Senior Dwayne Brown Bethune Cookman OL Senior Alex Brown South Carolina State DB Senior Mafquell Cartwright North Carolina A&T RB Senior Javarrius Cheatham Tuskegee WR Senior De'Arius Christmas Grambling State LB Senior Darrell Clark Grambling State WR Junior La'Allan Clark Grambling State DL Senior Jamal Currie-Elliot North Carolina Central RB Sophomore Jean Cyriaque Morehouse OL Senior Jamarcus Ezell Tuskegee QB Junio Jequez Ezzard Howard WR Junior William Flowers Bowie State PR Junior Mike Green Albany State WR Senior Stevie Green Fayetteville State RB Junior Amir Hall Bowie State QB Senior Sterling Hammond Virginia Union DB Junior Patrick Harbin Mississippi Valley State LB Senior Justin Hardy Miles RB Senior Leroy Hill North Carolina A&T TE Senior Demerio Houston Southern DB Senior Devon Hunt Shaw LB Junior Noah Johnson Alcorn State QB Sophomore Darryl Johnson, Jr. North Carolina A&T DL Junior Rico Kennedy Morgan State LB Junior Mac McCain III North Carolina A&T DB Sophomore Quinn McElfresh Mississippi Valley State WR Senior Vernon Morland Alabama A&M DL Senior Kerrion Moore Winston-Salem State RB Junior Javen Morrison Alcorn State DB Junior Shamdu Nails Virginia Union OL Senior Steven Newbold Tennessee State WR Junior Caylin Newton Howard QB Sophomore Lamar Raynard North Carolina A&T QB Senior Davanta Reynolds North Carolina Central DB Senior P. J. Simmons Alcorn State RB Senior Lorenzo Smothers Fort Valley State WR/PR Sophomore Brett Sylve Kentucky State RB/KR Junior Derrick Tate Bowie State OL Senior Marcus Taylor Norfolk State WR/KR Senior Davoris Thomas Tuskegee LB Junior Isaiah Totten North Carolina Central RB Sophomore Brandon Varner Grambling State DL Senior William Waddell Grambling State OL Sophomore Malach Washington Jr. Morgan State DL Senior KeShawn Williams Arkansas-Pine Bluff RB Senior G A M E S T H I S W E E K SATURDAY, AUGUST 25Edward Waters vs. St. Andrews in Jacksonville, FL 4p TV GAMES ESPN NC A&T vs. Jacksonville State in Montgomery, AL 6p ESPN+ Prairie View A&M vs. Rice in Houston, TX 6p 2 0 1 8 T E A M B Y T E A M B L A C K C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L S C H E D U L E S BOWIE STATE 8 /3 0 ..................@ W agner ..................6 9/ 8 ...........@ A lderson Broaddus ..... 12 n 9/ 1 5...............@ Mc K endree ............... 1 9/ 22 ..........@ S aint A ugustine's ........... 1 9/ 2 9......... W inston -S alem S tate ..........4 10 / 8 .................@ Chowan ..................6 10 / 1 3......... Virginia S tate ( H C) ........... 1 10 / 20 ...........@ Virginia U nion ............. 1 10 / 27 ................@ Lincoln ................... 1 11 /3 ........... E lizabeth City S tate ........... 1 CHOWAN 8 /3 0 ................@ Campbell ................. 7 9/ 8 ..................@ Davidson ................. 7 9/ 1 5...................@ S haw .................... 1 9/ 22 .................Mc K endree .................. 1 9/ 2 9............ F ayetteville S tate .............610 /6.................Bowie S tate .................6 10 / 1 3.........Virginia U nion ( H C) ........... 1 10 / 20 ......@ E lizabeth City S tate .... 1 :3 0 10 / 27 ...........@ Virginia S tate .............. 2 11 /3 ................Lincoln (Pa.) ................. 1 ELIZABETH CITY STATE 9/ 1 ..................Central S tate ................ 1 9/ 8 .............@ U NC Pembroke ............ 7 9/ 1 5....... WSSU in R ocky Mt. NC .......4 9/ 22 ..........@ F ayetteville S tate ........... 1 9/ 2 9.............. S t. A ugustine's ............... 1 10 /6.............@ Virginia S tate .............. 2 10 / 1 3.......@ Lincoln (Pa.) ( H C) .......... 1 10 / 20 ..................Chowan ............... 1 :3 0 10 / 27 .............Virginia U nion ................ 1 11/3 ..............@ Bowie S tate ............... 1 FAYETTEVILLE STATE 9/ 1 ................@ Lincoln (Pa.) ..............5 9/ 8 ...................@ W ingate ..................6 9/ 1 5...................Benedict .................... 1 9/ 22 ........... E lizabeth City S tate ........... 1 9/ 2 9.................@ Chowan ..................6 10 /6...................@ S haw .................... 1 10 / 1 3..........Johnson C. S mith ............. 1 10 / 20 ........@ S aint A ugustine's ........... 2 10 / 27 ...........Livingstone ( H C) ............. 2 11 /3 ......... W inston -S alem S tate .......... 1 JOHNSON C. SMITH 9/ 1 ...................@ W ingate .................. 7 9/ 8 .....................Benedict ....................6 9/ 1 5...............Virginia U nion ................4 9/ 22 ................Virginia S tate ................6 9/ 2 9..............@ Lincoln (Pa.) .............. 1 10 /6......... W inston -S alem S tate .......... 1 10 /1 3........@ F ayetteville S tate ........... 1 10 / 20 .................@ S haw .................... 1 10 / 27 ...... S aint A ugustine's ( H C) ......... 1 11 /3 .................Livingstone .................. 1 LINCOLN (PA) 9/ 1 ............... F ayetteville S ate..............5 9/ 7 .....@ Central Connecticut S tate ....6 9/ 1 5..................@ Clarion ................... 1 9/ 22 ...............@ Livingstone ............... 1 9/ 2 9............Johnson C. S mith ............. 1 10 /6.............@ Virginia U nion ............. 1 10 / 1 3.... E lizabeth City S tate ( H C) ....... 1 10 / 20 ...........@ Virginia S tate .............. 2 10 / 27 ...............Bowie S tate ................. 1 11 /3 .................@ Chowan .................. 1 LIVINGSTONE 9/ 1 ...................@ Pikeville .................. 7 9/ 8 ......................@ A llen .....................3 9/1 5....................@ Lane .................... 2 9/ 22 ................Lincoln (Pa.) ................. 1 9/ 2 9.............@ Virginia U nion ............. 1 10 /6........ S aint A ugustine's ( H C) .... 1 :3 0 10 / 1 3.................... S haw ...................... 1 10 / 20 .....@ W inston -S alem S tate ... 1 :3 0 10 / 27 ........@ F ayetteville S tate ........... 2 11 /3 ..........@ Johnson C. S mith .......... 1 ST. AUGUSTINE'S 9/ 1 ................@ Jacksonville ............... 1 9/ 8 ........@ North Carolina Central .......6 9/ 1 5................Virginia S tate ................ 1 9/ 22 .................Bowie S tate ................. 1 9/ 2 9........@ E lizabeth City S tate ......... 1 10 /6...............@ Livingstone .......... 1 :3 0 10 / 1 3.....@ W inston -S alem S tate ... 1 :3 0 10 / 20 ...... F ayetteville S tate ( H C) ......... 1 10 / 27 ........@ Johnson C. S mith .......... 1 11 /3 ...................... S haw ...................... 1 SHAW 9/ 1 ...................@ H ampton .................6 9/ 8 ...................@ Mars H ill ................. 1 9/ 1 5....................Chowan .................... 1 9/ 22 ................@ Campbell .................6 9/ 2 9..............@ Virgini S tate ...............6 10 /6............ F ayetteville S tate ............. 1 10 / 1 3.............@ Livingstone ............... 1 10 / 20 ..........Johnson C. S mith ............. 1 10 / 27 ... W inston -S alem S tate ( H C) ...... 1 11 /3 ..........@ S aint A ugustine's ........... 1 VIRGINIA STATE 9/ 1 ................@ Norfolk S tate ..............69/ 8 ...............@ R obert Morris .......... 12 n 9/ 1 5..........@ S aint A ugustine's ........... 1 9/ 22 ..........@ Johnson C. S mith ..........6 9/ 2 9...................... S haw ......................6 10 /6........... E lizabeth City S tate ........... 2 10 / 1 3............@ Bowie S tate ............... 2 10 / 20 ..........Lincoln (Pa.) ( H C) ............ 1 10 / 27 ..................Chowan .................... 2 11 /3 .............@ Virginia U nion ............. 2 VIRGINIA UNION 9/ 1 ..................... S eton H ill ................... 1 9/ 8 ...............Carson Newman ............. 1 9/ 1 5..........@ Johnson C. S mith ..........4 9/ 1 5.................Central S tate .................5 9/ 22 ..............Miles in Chicago ..........3:3 0 9/ 2 9............@ K entucky S tate ............ 2 10 /6.... T uskegee in Columbus GA ..... 2 10 / 1 3.............. A lbany S tate .................6 10 / 20 ...............@ Benedict ................. 2 10 / 27 ....... F ort Valley S tate ( H C) ......... 2 11 /3 ..............@ Clark A tlanta ............. 2 TUSKEGEE 9/ 1 ................ A labama S tate ...............5 9/ 8 ....... A lbany S tate in Phenix City .....5 9/ 1 5..............@ Clark A tlanta ..............6 9/ 22 ................Missouri S & T ................ 1 9/ 2 9......................Lane ....................... 1 10 /6...Morehouse in Columbus GA .... 2 10 / 1 3.........@ F ort Valley S tate ...........6 10 / 20 ........ Kentucky S tate ( H C) .......... 1 10 / 27 ...........@ Central S tate .............. 1 11 /3 ....................@ Miles .................... 2 ALABAMA A&M 9/ 1 ........................Miles .......................6 9/ 8 ................North A labama ...............6 9/ 1 5................@ Cincinnati ................. 7 9/ 22 ........ S outhern in Mobile A L .........4 9/ 2 9.............@ Jackson S tate ............. 2 10 /6............@ T exas S outhern ............6 10 / 1 3.......... A lcorn S tate ( H C) ............. 2 10 / 27 ..... A labama S tate in B'ham ... 2 :3 0 11 /3 ........@ A rkansas Pine Bluff .... 2 :3 0 11 / 10 ........... G rambling S tate .............. 1 11 / 17 ...@ Mississippi Valley S tate ...... 1 ALABAMA STATE9/ 1 .................... T uskegee ...................5 9/ 8 ....................@ A uburn ..............6:3 0 9/ 1 5...........@ K ennesaw S tate ...........5 9/ 22 ...........@ G rambling S tate ...........6 10 /6..............@ A lcorn S tate ............... 2 10 / 1 3.... S outh A labama in Mobile .. T B A 10 / 27 ...A labama A &M in Birmingham 2 :3 0 11 /3 ..............T exas S outhern ............... 2 11 / 10 .............Jackson S tate................ 2 11 / 17 ........@ Prairie View A &M ........... 1 11 / 22 ......Mississippi Valley S tate ........ 2 ALCORN STATE 9/ 1 ...............@ G eorgia T ech ....... 12 :3 0 9/ 8 ..............Louisiana College.............6 9/ 1 5.............. T exas S outhern ..............6 9/ 22 .....@ Mississippi Valley S tate ......6 9/ 2 9.................@ S outhern .................6 10 /6.......... A labama S tate ( H C) ........... 2 10 / 1 3...........@ A labama A &M ............. 2 10 / 20 ........... G rambling S tate .............. 2 10 / 27 ........@ Prairie View A &M ........... 2 11 /3 .........@ New Mexico S tate .......... 2 11 / 17 .............Jackson S tate................2 ARKANSAS-PINE BLUFF 9/ 1 ...................Morehouse ..................6 9/ 8 ...................Cumberland .................6 9/ 1 5........@ S outh Dakota S tate .........5 9/ 2 9............Prairie View A &M ............. 2 10 /6........@ F lorida International .... 2 :3 0 10 / 1 3.............Jackson S tate................ 2 10 / 20 ...@ Mississippi Valley S tate ...... 2 10 / 27 .........@ G rambling S tate ............6 11 /3 ........... A labama A &M ( H C) ........... 2 11 / 10 ...............@ S outhern .................4 11 / 17 ..........@ T exas S outhern ............ 2 GRAMBLING STATE 9/ 1 ..........@ Louisiana Lafayette .........6 9/ 8 ...........@ Northwestern S tate .........6 9/ 22 .............. A labama S tate................6 9/ 2 9.....Prairie View A &M in Dallas .....4 10 /6.... O klahoma Panhandle S tate .....6 10 / 1 3..........@ T exas S outhern ............6 10 / 20 ............@ A lcorn S tate ............... 2 10 / 27 ......... A rkansas Pine Bluff ........... 2 11 /3 ........Mississippi Valley S tate ........ 2 11 / 10 ...........@ A labama A &M ............. 1 11 / 2 4 ......S outhern in New O rleans .........4 JACKSON STATE 9/ 1 .........@ S outhern Mississippi ........6 9/ 8 ..... T ennessee S tate in Memphis ....6 9/ 1 5..............@ F lorida A &M ...............5 9/ 2 9............... A labama A &M ...............6 10 /6........@ A rkansas Pine Bluff .........4 10 / 1 3...... Miss. Valley S tate ( H C) ........6 10 / 20 ............North A labama ...............6 10 / 27 ................@ S outhern .................. 2 11 /3 ............Prairie View A &M ............. 2 11 / 10 ...........@ A labama S tate .............. 1 11 / 17 ............@ A lcorn S tate ............... 2 MISSISSIPPI VALLEY STATE 8 /3 0 .............@ North Dakota ..............6 9/ 8 ............@ Jacksonville S tate ..........6 9/ 22 ................. A lcorn S tate .................6 10 /6...........Bethune Cookman ............4 10 / 1 3...........@ Jackson S tate ............. 2 10 / 20 .... A rkansas Pine Bluff ( H C) ....... 2 10 / 27 ..........@ T exas S outhern ............ 2 11 /3 ...........@ G rambling S tate ........... 2 11 / 10 ................. H ampton.................... 1 11 / 17 ............. A labama A &M ............... 1 11 / 22 ..........@ A labama S tate ............. 2 PRAIRIE VIEW A&M 8 / 2 5.....................@ R ice .....................6 9/ 2 .........North Carolina Central in A tlanta ... 12 n 9/ 8 ..........@ S am H ouston S tate .........6 9/ 1 5...................@ U NLV ............... T B A 9/ 22 ........@ A rkansas Pine Bluff .........6 9/ 2 9...... G rambling S tate in Dallas ......4 10 / 1 3................. S outhern....................5 10 / 27 .......... A lcorn S tate ( H C) ............. 2 11 /3 .............@ Jackson S tate ............. 2 11 / 17 ............ A labama S tate ............... 1 11 / 2 4 ............... T exas S outhern ................ 1 C I A A ALL TIMES LOCAL9/ 22 .......@ W inston -S alem S tate ........6 9/ 2 9.................Livingstone .................. 1 10 /6............Lincoln (Pa.) ( H C) ............ 1 10 / 1 3...............@ Chowan .................. 1 10 / 20 ...............Bowie S tate ................. 1 10 / 27 ......@ E lizabeth City S tate ......... 1 11 /3 ................Virginia S tate ................ 1 WINSTON-SALEM STATE 9/ 1 .....................Catawba ....................6 9/ 8 ................ U NC Pembroke ..............6 9/ 1 5... E liz. City S t. in R ocky Mt. NC ...4 9/ 22 ...............Virginia U nion. ...............6 9/ 2 9..............@ Bowie S tate ...............4 10 /6..........@ Johnson C. S mith .......... 1 10 / 1 3........... S aint A ugustine's ............. 1 10 / 22 ...........Livingstone ( H C) ........ 1 :3 0 10/ 27 .................@ S haw .................... 1 11 /5 ..........@ F ayetteville S tate ........... 1 BETHUNE-COOKMAN 9/ 1 .............@ T ennessee S tate ...........6 9/ 8 ..........Va. U niv. of Lynchburg .........4 9/ 1 5............@ F lorida A tlantic ............6 9/ 22 ........ H oward in Indianapolis ....4:3 0 9/ 2 9...........@ S avannah S tate ............6 10 /6...Mississippi Valley S tate ( H C) ....4 10 / 1 3.....@ S outh Carolina S tate ........ 2 10 / 20 .........North Carolina A & T ...........4 11 /3 .............@ Morgan S tate ..............4 11 / 8 ........North Carolina Central ......... 7 11 / 17 ...... F lorida A &M in O rlando ........ 2 DELAWARE STATE 9/ 1 ....................@ Buffalo ...................6 9/ 8 ...............@ S aint F rancis ..........12 n 9/ 1 5..........@ W estern Michigan .......... 7 9/ 2 9..............@ Norfolk S tate ..............4 10 /6...........North Carolina A & T ........... 7 10 / 1 3................@ H oward .................. 1 10 / 20 .....@ S outh Carolina S tate ... 1 :3 0 10 / 27 ..North Carolina Central ( H C) ..... 2 11 /3 ............. S avannah S tate .............. 2 11 / 10 ...........@Morgan S tate .............. 1 11 / 17 ......Va. U niv. of Lynchburg ......... 2 FLORIDA A&M 9/ 1 ............... F ort Valley S tate ..............5 9/ 8 ......................@ T roy .....................6 9/ 1 5...............Jackson S tate................5 9/ 22 ............. S avannah S tate ..............4 9/ 2 9......@ North Carolina Central .......4 10 /6............Norfolk S tate (H C) ............4 10 / 1 3.......@ North Carolina A & T ......... 1 10 / 27 .............Morgan S tate ................4 11 /3 ..................@ H oward .................. 1 11 / 10 ........ S outh Carolina S tate ..........4 11 / 17 ...Bethune Cookman in O rlando ..... 2 HOWARD 9/ 1 ......................@ O hio ..................... 2 9/ 8 ..................@ K ent S tate ...........3:3 0 9/ 1 5............. S avannah S tate .............. 1 9/ 22 .....Bethune Cookman in Indy .4:3 0 10 /6......@ North Carolina Central ....... 2 10 / 1 3............Delaware S tate............... 1 10 / 20 ...........@ Morgan S tate .............. 7 10 / 27 ... S outh Carolina S tate ( H C) ...... 1 11 /3 ................. F lorida A &M ................. 1 11 / 10 ............@ Norfolk S tate .............. 1 11 / 17 ...................Bryant ...................... 1 MORGAN STATE 9/ 1 ...................... T owson ..................... 7 9/ 8 .....................@ A kron ...............3:3 0 9/ 1 5...................@ A lbany ................... 7 9/ 22.........@ North Carolina A & T ........6 10 /6..... S outh Carolina S tate ( H C) ...... 1 10 / 1 3.........@ S avannah S tate ............6 10 / 20 .................. H oward ..................... 7 10 / 27 ............@ F lorida A &M ...............4 11 /3 ...........Bethune Cookman ............4 11 / 10 ............Delaware S tate............... 1 11 / 17 ............@ Norfolk S tate .............. 1 NORFOLK STATE 9/ 1 ..................Virginia S tate ................6 9/ 8 ................James Madison ..............6 9/ 1 5...................@ Liberty ...................6 9/ 22 .......@ S outh Carolina S tate ........6 9/ 2 9..............Delaware S tate...............4 10 /6..............@ F lorida A &M ...............4 10 / 20 .. North Carolina Central ( H C) ..... 2 10 / 27 .........@ S avannah S tate ............3 11 /3 .........@ North Carolina A & T ......... 1 11 / 10 .................. H oward ..................... 1 11 / 17 .............Morgan S tate ................ 1 NORTH CAROLINA A&T 8 / 2 5......Jacksonville S tate in M'tgmery A L ......6 9/ 1 ...............@ E ast Carolina ..............6 9/ 8 ................. G ardner W ebb ...............6 9/ 22 ...............Morgan S tate ................6 9/ 27 .......... S outh Carolina S tate .......... 7 10 /6............@ Delaware S tate ............ 7 10 / 1 3............... F lorida A &M ................. 1 10 / 20 .......@ Bethune Cookman .........4 11 /3 ............Norfolk S tate ( H C) ............ 1 11 / 10 .........@ S avannah S tate ............ 1 11 / 17 ....@ North Carolina Central ....... 2 NORTH CAROLINA CENTRAL 9/ 2 ...........Prairie View in A tlanta ..... 12 n 9/ 8 ................ S t. A ugustine's ...............6 9/ 1 5.......@ S outh Carolina S tate ........6 9/ 22 ....................@ Duke ............... T B A 9/ 2 9................. F lorida A &M .................4 10 /6.................... H oward ..................... 2 10 / 20 ............@ Norfolk S tate .............. 2 10 / 27 ..........@ Delaware S tate ............ 2 11 /3 .......... E dward W aters ( H C) .......... 2 11 / 8 .........@ Bethune Cookman ......... 7 11 / 17 .........North Carolina A & T ........... 2 M E A C S I A C S W A C SOUTHERN 9/ 1 ......................@ T C U ................ 1 :3 0 9/ 8 ..............@ Louisiana T ech.............6 9/ 1 5...................Langston ...................6 9/ 22 .... A labama A &M in Mobile A L .....6 9/ 2 9............ A lcorn S tate ( H C) .............6 10 / 1 3........@ Prairie View A &M ...........6 10 / 20 .... T exas S outhern in Dallas .......6 10 / 27 ..............Jackson S tate ............ 2 :3 0 11 / 10 ......... A rkansas Pine Bluff ...........4 11 / 2 5 ...G rambling S t. in New O rleans .....4 TEXAS SOUTHERN 9/ 1 .............. UT Permian Basin ............ 7 9/ 8 .................@ T exas S tate ...............6 9/ 1 5..............@ A lcorn S tate ...............6 9/ 22 .................@ H ouston .................. 7 10 /6............... A labama A &M ...............6 10 / 1 3........... G rambling S tate ..............6 10 / 20 .......... S outhern in Dallas ............ 2 10 / 27 ......Miss. Valley S tate ( H C) ........ 2 11 /3 ............@ A labama S tate ............. 2 11 / 17 ......... A rkansas Pine Bluff .......... 2 11 / 2 4 ........@ Prairie View A &M ........... 1 EDWARD WATERS 8 / 2 5............... S aint A ndrews ...............4 9/ 1 ................Lindsey W ilson ............... 7 9/ 8 ......................@ Point ............... 1:3 0 9/ 22 ..............@ Cumberland .......... 1 :3 0 9/ 2 9...................@ K aiser .............. 1 :3 0 10 /6..................@ W arner .............. 1 :3 0 10 / 1 3................. F aulkner ....................4 10 / 20 ............ A ve Maria ( H C) ..............3 10 / 27 ...........@ S outheastern .............. 1 11 /3 ......@ North Carolina Central ....... 2 11 / 10 ........ W ebber International ..........4 HAMPTON 9/ 1 ........................ S haw ......................6 9/ 8 .................@ Monmouth ................3 9/ 1 5............. T ennessee S tate .............6 9/ 22 .............@ Northern Iowa .............4 9/ 2 9..........Charleston S outhern .......... 2 10 /6......................Lane ....................... 2 10 / 1 3............@ Presbyterian .......... 12 n 10 / 27 ....Va. U niv. of Lynchb. ( H C) ....... 2 11 /3 ............@ SUNY Maritime ............ 1 11 / 10 ...@ Mississippi Valley S tate ...... 1 11 / 17 ............. S aint A ndrews ............... 1 LANGSTON 9/ 8 .......................O ttawa .........................2 9/ 1 5.................@ S outhern .................6 9/ 22 ..................... SAGU ......................6 9/ 2 9............. W ayland Baptist .............. 2 10 /6...........@ T exas W esleyan ........... 7 10 / 1 3........@ A rizona Christian ........... 7 10 / 20 ................Lyon ( H C) ............... 12 n 10 / 27 ...........@ T exas College ............. 2 11 /3 ..................@ Bacone .............. 12 n 11 / 10 ...........Panhandle S tate.............. 2 LINCOLN (MO) 9/ 1 .....................@ Lane. .................... 2 9/ 8 ...............@ Missouri S tate .............6 9/ 1 5........... W isconsin O shkosh ........... 1 9/ 22 ............ S outhwest Baptist ............6 9/ 2 9..............@ Indianapolis ...............5 10 /6................Quincy ( H C) ................. 2 10 / 1 3...........@ T ruman S tate .............. 2 10 / 20 ...........@ W illiam Jewell ......... 12 n 10 / 27 ..............Missouri S & T ................ 7 11 /3 .............@ T arleton S tate ............. 2 11 / 10 ...............Mc K endree .............. 12 n TENNESSEE STATE 9/ 1 .............Bethune Cookman ............6 9/ 8 .......Jackson S tate in Memphis ......6 9/ 1 5.................@ H ampton .................6 9/ 22 ............@ E astern Illinois ............. 2 9/ 2 9................@ Vanderbilt............ T B A 10 /6..............@ A ustin Peay ...............6 10 / 1 3............@ Murray S tate .............. 1 10 / 20 ....... T ennessee T ech ( H C).....4:3 0 11 /3 ..............@ SE Missouri ............... 1 11 / 10 ..........Jacksonville S tate ............ 2 11 / 17 ................ UT Martin ................... 2 TEXAS COLLEGE 9/ 15...........@ T exas W esleyan ........... 7 9/ 2 9............. A rizona Christian ............. 2 10 /6...................@ SAGU ...................6 10 / 1 3................@ O ttawa ................... 7 10 / 20 ........... W ayland Baptist .............. 1 10 / 27 .............Langston ( H C) ............... 2 11 /3 ...........@ Panhandle S tate ........... 2 11 / 10 ..................@ Lyon ..................... 2 VIRGINIA-LYNCHBURG 9/ 8 ...........@ Bethune Cookman .........4 9/ 1 5................@ Newberry ................. 1 9/ 22 ....................Brevard..................... 1 9/ 2 9...........@ F ort Valley S tate ...........6 10 /6.................@ Benedict ................. 2 10 / 1 3.....@ Charleston S outhern ........6 10 / 20 .........@ Carson Newman ........... 1 10 / 27 ...............@ H ampton ................. 2 11 / 10 ..................@ A llen ................ 1 :3 011 / 17 .........@ Delaware S tate ............ 2 WEST VIRGINIA STATE 8 /3 0 ...............@ Charleston ........... 7 : 0 5 9/ 8 ..................Virginia W ise ............ 12 n 9/ 1 5..........@ Notre Dame ( OH ) ...... 12 n 9/ 22 .................. S hepherd ............... 12 n 9/ 2 9............@ G lenville S tate ......... 12 n 10 /6.......... K entucky S tate ( H C) ..... 1 :3 0 10 / 1 3..................Concord .................... 1 10 / 20 ............@ W est Liberty............... 1 10 / 27 ............. F airmont S tate ............... 1 11 /3 ..................@ U rbana ................... 1 11 / 10 ..... W est Virginia W esleyan ........ 1 I N D E P E N D E N T S SAVANNAH STATE 8 /3 0 ....................@ UA B ..................... 7 9/ 8 .....................@ Miami ....................6 9/ 1 5..................@ H oward .................. 1 9/ 22 ..............@ F lorida A &M ...............4 9/ 2 9...........Bethune Cookman ............6 10 /6..........Charleston S outhern ..........6 10 / 1 3.............Morgan S tate ................6 10 / 27 ..........Norfolk S tate ( H C) ............3 11 /3 ............@ Delaware S tate ............ 2 11 / 10 .........North Carolina A & T ........... 1 11 / 17 ......@ S outh Carolin S tate .... 1 :3 0 SOUTH CAROLINA STATE 9/ 1 ............@ G eorgia S outhern .........6 9/ 8 ..............@ Central F lorida .............6 9/ 1 5........North Carolina Central .........6 9/ 22 ................Norfolk S tate ................6 9/ 27 ..........@ North Carolina A & T ......... 7 10 /6.............@ Morgan S tate .............. 1 10 / 1 3.........Bethune Cookman ............ 2 10 / 20 ........Delaware S tate ( H C) ..... 1 :3 0 10 / 27 ................@ H oward .................. 1 11 / 10 ............@ F lorida A &M ...............4 11 / 17 ........... S avannah S tate ......... 1 :3 0 ALBANY STATE 9/ 1 ..............@ Valdosta S tate ............. 7 9/ 8 ...... T uskegee in Phenix City A L .....5 9/ 1 5............... W est G eorgia ................ 7 9/ 22 ....................@ Lane ..................... 2 9/ 2 9......................Miles ....................... 7 10 /6...................Catawba ............... 1 :3 0 10 / 1 3.............@ Morehouse ...............6 10 / 20 ..........Clark A tlanta ( H C) ............ 2 10 / 27 ...............@ Benedict ................. 2 11 /3 .....F ort Valley S tate in Columbus GA ....... 2BENEDICT 9/ 1 ................... F lorida T ech .................6 9/ 8 ............@ Johnson C. S mith ..........6 9/ 1 5..........@ F ayetteville S tate ........... 1 9/ 2 3............. F ort Valley S tate .........4:3 0 9/ 2 9................Central S tate ................ 1 10 /6........Va. U niv. of Lynchburg ......... 2 10 / 1 3............@ Clark A tlanta .............. 2 10 / 20 ...........Morehouse ( H C).............. 2 10 / 27 .............. A lbany S tate ................. 2 11 /3 ............@ K entucky S tate ............ 2 CENTRAL STATE 9/ 1 ..........@ E lizabeth City S tate ......... 1 9/ 8 ..................Clark A tlanta ................. 1 9/ 1 5...............@ Morehouse ...............5 9/ 22 ............@ K entucky S tate ............ 2 9/ 29...................Benedict .................... 1 10 /6....................@ Miles .................... 2 10 / 1 3....... U NC Pembroke ( H C) .......... 1 10 / 20 ...........@ R obert Morris .......... 12 n 10 / 27 ................ T uskegee ................... 1 11 /3 ......................Lane ....................... 1 CLARK-ATLANTA 8 /3 0 .........@ Mississippi College ......... 7 9/ 8 ...............@ Central S tate .............. 1 9/ 1 5.................. T uskegee ...................6 9/ 22 ...........@ K ennesaw S tate ...........6 9/ 2 9.......................A llen .......................4 10 /6...........@ F ort Valley S tate ...........6 10 / 1 3.............Benedict ( H C)................ 2 10 / 20 .............. A lbany S tate ................. 2 10 / 27 ....................Miles ....................... 1 11 /3 .................Morehouse .................. 2 FORT VALLEY STATE 9/ 1 ................@ F lorida A &M ...............5 9/ 8 ...Valdosta S tate in W aycross GA .. 7 9/ 1 5....................@ Miles ....................3 9/ 2 3.................@ Benedict ............4:3 0 9/ 2 9........Va. U niv. of Lynchburg .........6 10 /6................Clark A tlanta .................6 10 / 1 3................ T uskegee ...................6 10 / 20 .........Lenoir -R hyne ( H C) ............ 2 10 / 27 .............@ Morehouse ............... 2 11 /3 ....A lbany S tate in Columbus GA ..... 2 KENTUCKY STATE 9/ 1 ...............@ S lippery R ock ............. 1 9/ 8 ...................Mc K endree ..................4 9/ 1 5........@ K entucky W esleyan ......... 1 9/ 22 ................Central S tate ................ 2 9/ 2 9.................Morehouse .................. 2 10 /6.........@ W est Virginia S tate .... 1 :3 0 10 / 1 3................Miles ( H C) .................. 2 10 / 20 ................ T uskegee ................... 1 10 / 27 ....................Lane ....................... 2 11 /3 ...................Benedict .................... 2 LANE 9/ 1 ..................Lincoln (M O )................. 2 9/ 8 ...................Morehouse .................. 2 9/ 1 5.................Livingstone .................. 2 9/ 22 ................ A lbany S tate ................. 2 9/ 2 9................@ T uskegee ................. 1 10 /6.................@ H ampton ................. 210 / 1 3................ A llen ( H C)................... 2 10 / 20 ....................Miles ....................... 2 10 / 27 ..........@ K entucky S tate ............ 2 11 /3 .............@ Central S tate .............. 1 MILES 9/ 1 ...............@ A labama A &M .............6 9/6..............@ W est A labama .............6 9/ 1 5............. F ort Valley S tate ..............3 9/ 22 ........Morehouse in Chicago ....3:3 0 9/ 2 9..............@ A lbany S tate .............. 7 10 /6............Central S tate ( H C) ............ 2 10 / 1 3..........@ K entucky S tate ............ 2 10 / 20 ..................@ Lane .................... 2 10 / 27 ............@ Clark A tlanta .............. 1 11 /3 .................. T uskegee ................... 2 MOREHOUSE 9/ 1 ............. A rkansas -Pine Bluff ...........6 9/ 8 ......................@ Lane ..................... 2 SOURCE: Onnidan.com McClelland

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Greater Grant Memorial AME Church Mid-Summer RevivalGreater Grant Memorial AME located at 5533 Gilchrist Road will present their Mid Summer RevivalŽ taking place August 28th-30th at 7 p.m. nightly. Guest evangelist is Reverend Anthony Reed, pastor of Martin Memorial AME Church (Miami, Florida). Attend this devotion and praise service for great preaching, teaching and worship. Pastor Tan C. Moss is the pastor. For more info contact the church office at (904) 764-5992.St. Gabriels Episcopal Church Patronal Feast Day CelebrationSt. Gabriels Episcopal Church located at 5235 Moncrief Road West Patronal Feast Day Celebration is scheduled for Sunday, September 30th at 10 a.m. Guest Speaker will be Reverend Dr. Randolph Bracy, co-founder and retired pastor of New Covenant Baptist Church in Orlando, Florida. This years theme is Following the Shepherd (John 10:27). For further info contact Richardean Wright at (904) 509-1903.Mt. Lebanon Missionary Baptist Church Womens Celebration EventsMt. Lebanon Missionary Baptist Church, 9319 Ridge Blvd. under the leadership of Reverend Freddie Sumner will celebrate their annual "Women in White" Fruit of the Spirit event, Saturday, August 25th, 10 a.m. 12 p.m. On Sunday, September 9th, at 4 pm. the church will commemorate their annual Women's Day celebration. This years theme is "Women...Praising, Thanking and Worshiping God,Ž from scripture Psalm 100:4. For more info contact the church office at (904) 527-1762.Covered House Revelation ServiceThe Covered House Ministry The Book of Revelation Live: Unveiling of The SevenŽ service is scheduled for Sunday, September 23rd, at 4 p.m. The Covered House Ministry is located at 4300 Post Street. For more information call the church office at (904) 405-8077. True Holiness Under God's Salvation Pack the Pew RallyTrue Holiness Under God's Salvation Church located at 1086 W. 23rd Street presents the Pack the Pew Rally,Ž scheduled for Sunday, August 25th at 4 p.m. Bishop James Sapp Jr. and congregation expect to see you there to worship and enjoy this rally for Christ. For more information contact the church office at (904) 361-8772.Min. Davis Presents Pop LifeŽMinister Octavius Davis presents The POP LifeŽ a motivational speaking series developed to inspire individuals to diligently pursue their passion (s) is scheduled for Saturday, October 20th from 11 a.m. … 1 p.m. Featuring a one-on-one conversational-style interview with award-winning ESPN and Big Ten Network womens basketball analyst Vera Jones at The Ritz Theatre and Museum, 829 N. Davis St. For tickets call (904) 807-2010.Praise 107.9 1K Famo Day TourPrexxy Prex Praise 107.9 and 1KFamo presents the 1K Famo Day Tour featuring 1KPhew, 1Kpson, Don Tino and Rey Jose, Saturday, August 25th, 7 10 p.m. at the Christ Ministry of Changing Lives church located at 3040 Gilead Dr. For tickets and more info visit www.praise1079.com.Hephzibah Evangelistic Church Pastor and First Lady 3rd AnniversaryCome commemorate Pastor Stephen Smith and First Lady Alexandria Smith on their third Pastoral Anniversary Celebration, Saturday, August 25th at 12 p.m. at Hephzibah Evangelistic Pentecostal church located at 3796 Turton Avenue. Guest speaker for the occasion is Bishop Vaughn McLaughlin of Potters House International Ministries. For more info email the church at info@h-epc.org.Womens Missionary Society of St. Paul AME Church presents Behold The Bridegroom ComethŽThe Womens Missionary Society of St. Paul AME Church, 6910 New Kings Road will present a special production of Behold the Bridegroom ComethŽ in the churchs sanctuary slated for Sunday, August 26th, at 4 p.m. Mrs. Deborah Limbric-Rasheed is Program chairperson. Mrs. Maggie Jones is local WMS president. The Rev. Dr. Marvin C. Zanders, III is the Pastor. The St. Paul AME Church Family extends a warm welcome to all churches, missionaries and the public to share in this spirit filled occasion. For more info contact the church office at (904) 764-2755. OTICE:Church news is published free of charge. Information must be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5 p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information received prior to the event date will be printed on a space available basis until the date. Fax your information to 904-765-8611, e-mail to JFreePress@aol.com or bring by our offices located at 1122 WestEdgewood Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32208. Page 6 Ms. Perrys Free Press August 23 29, 2018 Greater Macedonia Baptist Church1880 West Edgewood Avenue The doors of Macedonia are always open to you and your family. If we may be of any assistance to you in your spiritual walk, please contact us at 764-9257 or via email at GreaterMac@aol.com. Seeking the lost for ChristMatthew 28:19 20 Dr. Landon Williams 8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Morning WorshipTuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m. Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m. Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM Sunday 2 PM 3 PM **FREE TUTORIG FOR YOUTH I EGLISH, SCIECE, HISTORY AD MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M. Bethel Baptist Institutional Church215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464 Bishop Rudolph McKissick, Jr. Senior Pastor Sunday Morning Worship 8:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Church school 9:30 a.m. Bible Study 6:45 p.m.Midweek Services Wednesday oon Service Miracle at MiddayŽ 12 noon 1:00 p.m. Weekly Services Come share in Holy Communion on 1st Sunday at 7:40 and 10:40 a.m. Worship with us LIVE on the web visitwww.truth2powerministries.org Grace and Peacevisit www.Bethelite.org Bishop Rudolph McKissick, Sr.. Pastor Emeritusby James Washington As a Christian, no matter how devout, life will put you in the dumps about your particular situation or circumstance. Being a Christian does not guarantee a life void of trial and tribulation. As a matter of fact, being a Christian is tantamount to sending VIP invitations to Mr. Temptation and Ms. Test. This obvious yet important point is not about anything other than what I believe to be the key to getting through it all and maintaining a sense of inner peace that God is always in your life. No matter the situation, God will never abandon you; regardless of how lonely life gets or appears to be. I liken it to pushing a huge rock uphill. On many a day that rock becomes a boulder and that hill transforms into a very steep and treacherous mountain. At these times, one must recognize that were if not for Gods presence in your life, that rock would push back and the hill would turn into quicksand. The truth reveals that within your attitude is the solution and the peace you require to keep pushing. I admit its easy to get down on yourself even when you are a believer. But because youre a believer, it should be impossible to stay down. I went to two different churches recently where members were allowed to give testimony and request prayer. One church was very large and high tech and those who spoke, spoke of their real life journeys to Christ by concluding that Jesus is more than a story.Ž Each testimony of Christs reality in changing a life forced me to rethink my own situation and conclude, I have no right to be down. Heaven! Im blessed. In the other much smaller and more intimate church, member after member told stories of specific trials and tests and the need for prayer, from family situations in which a 6-month-old died prematurely and a 7-yearold suffered from cancer, to a person so allergic to life that the smell of perfume would cause excruciating pain and a life of seclusion. I have no right to be down. Heaven! Im blessed. I pass these stories along because in all instances the people involved found a way to cope, to live, to survive. God gave them all hope. Remember, every testimony was relayed in church as an acknowledgement of the power and love of the Lord through whom all blessings flow. Every story was an entreaty for prayer and a public proclamation of faith. Real Christians ƒ real life ƒ the real world. I just thought Id take this opportunity to let you know that my real world, no matter how messed up it is, has been and can be, is never as bad as it could be without the love of the Lord in my heart, the faith of Jesus Christ in spirit and the invitation to the Holy Spirit to ride shotgun with me wherever I go. I dont have room to insert Psalm 23 here, but read it today. Look around your valley of death and fear no evil. Bathe in the grace of God. As kids used to say, You better recognize. Im just saying recognize, represent and be blessed. Today, this is what Im asking for you in Jesus name. May God bless and keep you always.In Trying Times, Christians Can Count on Hope S S P P I I R R I I T T U U A A L L L L Y Y S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G During the 111th Annual Session of the National Primitive Baptist Convention, in Miami, Florida, Elder Dr. Kenneth A. Duke was elected to lead the Convention. As its 14th General President. The position became available after the announcement that Elder Dr. Bernard Yates was stepping down from the post after seven years. Duke had previously served as the Vice President of the National Primitive Baptist Convention, USA from August 2011 to July 20, 2018. As the seventh leader from the State of Florida to serve as its General President since its inception, Elder Dr. Duke is the Senior Pastor/Teacher of the New Jerusalem Primitive Baptist Church, Miami, FL. President Duke has led his church to facilitate the opening and operation of the Abundant Life Christian Learning Center (The Center). The Center consists of the Safe Haven Child Development Center and the New Jerusalem Christian Academy whichprovides elementary education for children from Kindergarten through Grade 5. The facility houses a full-time staff and follows the ABeka Curriculum. In addition, Elder Dr. Duke serves as President and Chief Executive Officer of the New Jerusalem Community Development Corporation, a community based initiative which provides afterschool care and a summer program for youth in K-12 grades. It also focuses on economic development opportunities for adults. A product of Bishop College, President Duke completed his post-graduate studies at Virginia Theological Seminary, Richmond, Virginia; and, he received an honorary doctorate from St. Thomas Christian University, Jacksonville, Florida. Elder Dr. Duke is married to Julia Duke and they are the parents of three adult children. Dr. Kenneth A. Duke Elder Kenneth Duke Elected to Lead the ational Primitive Baptist Convention

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August 23 29, 2018 Ms. Perrys Free Press Page 7 Offering you a full range of quality services that includes a full range of accounting services (audits, reviews, compilations, and nontraditional engagements) for small businesses and tax services for individuals, corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts. Darryl Jackson, CPA provides extensive professional experience with a wide variety of industries and clients Enterprise Center 101 East Union Street, Suite 400 Jacksonville, FL32202 904-633-8099 www.drj-cpa.com DARRYL R. JACKSON, C.P.A., P.A. Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) awarded its first-ever First Generation Scholarship to Daisha Bullard, a recent graduate of Englewood High School. The two-year scholarship was established from a 1:1 match opportunity provided by the Florida Prepaid College Foundation. As a result of the scholarship, Daisha will become the first in her family to attend college. She was selected for the award based on the nominations she received from FSCJ Student Recruitment representatives who were impressed by her discipline, respectfulness and confidence. This scholarship has allowed me to be able to start college without the worry of where the money would come from for my classes or books,Ž said Ms. Bullard. Beginning this Fall Term, Daisha will pursue her Associate in Arts degree at FSCJ. Upon completion, her goal is to transfer to Florida A&M University where she hopes to study to become a nurse. The Florida Prepaid College Foundation announced in February that the Challenge Match Scholarship program would contribute half of the cost for one twoor four-year Florida Prepaid College Plan for first-in-family incoming freshmen of state universities and colleges in Florida. The remaining funds are to be supplied by the institution. FSCJ Awards First Generation Scholarship You Can Attend YU Medical School for Free The news is shaking up the education world: New York University School of Medicine just announced that all current and future medical students can attend without paying a dime in tuition. The NYU School of Medicine announced it is offering full-tuition scholarships to all current and future students in its MD degree program regardless of need or merit a bold effort to simultaneously address the rising costs of medical education and still attract the best and brightest students to careers in medicine. It is the only top 10…ranked medical school in the nation to do so. The announcement from the medical schools trustees, leaders, and faculty was first delivered to first-year medical students and family members as a surprise ending to the annual White Coat Ceremony, where each new student is presented with a white lab coat to mark the start of their medical education and training. Thanks to the extraordinary generosity of our trustees, alumni, and friends, our hope„and expectation„is that by making medical school accessible to a broader range of applicants, we will be a catalyst for transforming medical education nationwide,Ž says Kenneth G. Langone, chair of the Board of Trustees of NYU Langone Health. The yearly tuition costs covered by the scholarship are $55,018 which covers the entire tuition. Many graduate with staggering debt. That debt may make attending medical school cost-prohibitive, reducing the number of doctors and negatively impacting healthcare. The news is particularly beneficial for people of color. There is a crisis in the number of black people applying to medical school. A lack of black doctors is overall detrimental to the black community. A recent Johns Hopkins School of Medicine study shows that black doctors generally have more positive attitudes toward patients. (L to R) Christy Vint (FSCJ Foundation Support Manager), Daisha Bullard, Tiphanie Campbell-Brown (Mom), Marshun Middleton (FSCJ Enrollment Development Coordinator) White Enrollment at HBCUs Increasing at Alarming RatesHeres the good news: Enrollment at historical Black colleges and universities (HBCU) has never been higher, with the trend showing no signs of slowing anytime soon. As that spike in students bolsters the bottom lines for schools which may not have been on the firmest of financial footings, it has also been threatening to change the typical racial makeup of HBCU students. In many cases, AfricanAmerican students have ceased being a majority at HBCUs, according to a new report from Diverse Issues in Higher Education published last week. At some, they are even a small minority among a White majority. The report did not single out schools that fell under that category, but a closer look at recent statistics showed an increasing number of white people have been enrolling as undergraduates at HBCUs over the years. Additionally, graduate, professional and online programs at HBCUs tend to draw non-Black students at higher rates. The percentage of white students at HBCUs stood at 17 percent. That figure was up from 13 percent in 1980. Data provided by the National Center for Education Statistics confirm the rise in white students enrolling in HBCUs from 1976 through 2004. That could be the reason, at least in part, why HBCUs saw growth in 2017. However, coinciding with that rise in white students at HBCUs was the lower shares of Blacks attending these institutions,Ž according to the Pew Center. Its unclear just how historic the 2018 primaries have been for Black women who are running for Congress. Theres no conclusive data on how many Black female candidates filed to run for Congress in the past to determine if 2018 is a record year, Kelly Dittmar, a political science assistant professor at Rutgers University, told NewsOne. What we do know is that there are a record number of women running, and of those women, theres a significant portion of women of color, including Black women,Ž she explained. We havent collected that data, and I dont know of anyone else who has„otherwise we would use it.Ž Dittmar, a scholar at the Rutgers Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP), said this is the first year that the center has kept race data for the primaries. In the past, data on race was collected on nominees. Its likely true that the 2018 primary season has been a record setting year for Black women, but thats not possible to determine, she added. Accurately determining race figures during the primary season is no easy task. For race data, we do self-identified race, which means we have to go to every candidate and ask them how they identify. We dont just look at pictures and make assumptions. And thats why in the past weve done it once nominees win their primary election,Ž Dittmar explained. So far, CAWP determined that Black women represent about 15 percent of female congressional candidates in the primaries and about 17 percent of the female nominees. Once the primaries are over, CAWP will be able to compare the number of Black female nominees for Congress with nominee data from the past. The Reported Record umber of Black Women Candidates May Be a Myth

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Comedian Gary OwenCatch comedian Gary Owen at the Comedy Zone August 23rd 26th for two shows at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Gary recently released his new special, I Got My AssociatesŽ on Showtime and starred in his own docuseries The Gary Owen ShowŽ on BET. The Comedy Zone is located at 3130 Hartley Rd. For more info visit www.comedyzone.com.Empowerment Resources Open HouseJoin Empowerment Resources Inc. for a free event focused on learning more about the Journey Into Womanhood (JIW) Program. JIW is a rites of passage and mentoring program for girls ages 9 to 17 that helps cultivate a healthy transition from girls to young women. Come meet current JIW girls, volunteers, mentors, and learn more about the JIW program over games and food Saturday, August 25th, from 10 a.m. 1p.m. Location is the Spirit Cafe located inside the First United Methodist Church, 225 East Duval Street. For more info call JIW office at (904) 268-8287.Stage Aurora Golf TournamentThe Stage Aurora 18th Annual Invitation Golf Tournament is scheduled for Saturday, August 25th for an 8 a.m. shotgun start at Deerfield Lakes Golf Club, 54002 Deerfield Country Club Rd, Callahan, FL. Entry fee includes green fee, cart fee, lunch bar-b-que chicken and ribs, gift bags and door prizes. For more info contact Stage Aurora at (904) 765-7373.CI Golf TournamentThe Northside Community Involvement 13th Annual Golf Tournament will be held August 25th at 7 a.m. at the Omni Resort located at 39 Beach Lagoon Rd, Amelia Island, FL. Meet new friends for a round of golf, food, fun and scholarship presentation. For more info call (904) 660-2157.Comedian Bruce BruceComedian Bruce Bruce will be on stage at the Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd, August 31st September 2nd, 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. shows. Bruce hosted BET's "Comic View," among other high profile comedic performances. For more information call 242-4242.Comedian London Brown in ConcertComedian and actor London Brown from HBOs Ballers, will be in concert August 31st September 1st at 7 p.m. at the Comedy Club located at 11000 Beach Blvd. For tickets visit www.jacksonvillecomedy.com.Brian McKnight in ConcertR&B artist Brian McKnight will be in concert Friday, August 31st 8 p.m. at the Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St. For tickets and more info visit www.floridatheatre.com.Monster Jam is back!Monster Jam will be back in Jax, Saturday, September 1st, 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Stadium, 300 A Philip Randolph Blvd. Enjoy customized high-powered vehicles and more! For tickets visit www.ticketmaster.comComedian Aries SpearsComedian Aries Spears at the Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd, September 6th 8th, 7: 30 p.m. and 10 p.m. shows! Aries starred in "Mad TV," and his sketch "Talkin' American" was the shows most popular bit. For tickets and more info visit www.comedyzone.com.Community Dialogue on Race & LawThe Northside Coalition will present a Community Dialogue on Race and Law Enforcement,Ž scheduled for Thursday, September 6th 7 p.m. in the FSCJ downtown Main Auditorium. Take an honest look at trust, transparency and accountability between the community and the Jacksonville Sheriffs office. For more info contact Ben Frazier at (904) 662-2748.First ThursdaysThe First Thursday entrepreneurial business meeting is scheduled for Thursday, September 6th, at 5:30 p.m. at the Urban League Office, 903 Union St. For more info visit www.firstthursdayjacksonville.org.P.R.I.D.E. Book Club MeetingThe People Reading for Inspiration, Discussion and Enjoyment (P.R.I.D.E.) Book Club will host their monthly meeting on Saturday, September 8th, at 4 p.m. Host and location is: Jennifer King, 211 Worthington Parkway. The book for discussion is  Small Great Things Ž by Jodi Picoult. For more info call (904) 755-1993.COJ African Culture CelebrationJoin the Northside Coalition of Jacksonville as they present Celebrating Our African American CultureŽ with education, food, music and family fun Saturday, September 8th, 11:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. at the Party Spot located at 10934 Lem Turner Rd. For more info contact Ben Frazier at (904) 662-2748.Sting & Shaggy in Jax!Sting and Shaggy will bring their dynamic and vibrant joint live tour to Jacksonville Friday, September 14th, 7 p.m. at Dailys Place, One TIAA Field Dr. For tickets visit www.ticketmaster.comMasquerade Extrav Heart & Soul EventThe 2018 Masquerade Extravaganza Heart and Soul Event,Ž is scheduled for Saturday, September 15th at 6 p.m. at the Ramada Conference Center, 3130 Hartley Rd. Guest is actor Tony Grant star of Tyler Perrys  Love Thy eighbor .Ž For tickets contact Diddy Coffee at (904) 576-2692.Civic Cinema The Florida Theatres Civic CinemaŽ screening on Tuesday, September 19th, 7 p.m. will feature the movie Philadelphia Ž followed by a discussion on the state of LGBTQ rights and relations in Jacksonville. For free tickets visit www.floridatheatre.com. QuiltFestQuilt Fest will take place September 20th 22nd, 10 a.m. at the Prime F. Osborn Convention Center located at 1000 Water St. For more info visit www.quiltfest.com.Lemon BallThe Lemon Ball is scheduled for Thursday, September 20th at 6 p.m. at WJCT, 100 Festival Park Ave. Come celebrate Alexs Lemonade Stand Foundation (ALSF) to raise funds to support families battling cancer and survivors struggling with treatment side effects. For tickets and more info contact Dallas Hempstead at (904) 5567504.Jax Legal Aid Justice AwardsPiper Kerman, author of  Orange is the ew Black: My Year in a Womens Prison,  will deliver the keynote address at Jacksonville Area Legal Aids annual Equal Justice Awards Thursday, September 20th, 5:30 p.m. at the Omni Hotel, 245 Water St. Kermans memoir was adapted into the Netflix hit series. For tickets visit www.JaxLegalAid.org.Sister Strut 3KSister Strut 3K Breast Cancer Walk is back and will be held at the Jacksonville Landing, Saturday, September 22nd, 8 a.m. 12 p.m. To register and for more info visit www.933thebeatjamz.com.Magnolia Community Baby ShowerThe Magnolia Project Community Baby Shower hosted by Florida House of Representatives District 13 Rep. Tracie Davis is scheduled for Saturday, September 22nd, 10 a.m. 1 p.m. The event is for women currently or with a new baby, 0 2 months living in 32202, 32204, 32206, 32208, 32209, 32219 and 32254. Enjoy food, fun, activities and clothes giveaway! For more info contact Rep Davis office at (904) 353-2180.Throwback FestivalThe Throwback Festival is back featuring Cameo, Michelle, Klymaxx and Ruff Endz at the Morocco Shrine, 3800 St. Johns Buff Rd, Saturday, September 22nd at 5 p.m. For tickets visit www.throwbackconcert.com.Im A Star Celebrity Basketball GameThis year's Im A Start Jacksonville HELPS Celebrity Basketball Game is set for Saturday, September 22nd, at 6 p.m. at Paxon School for Advanced Studies, located at 3239 Norman E Thagard Blvd. For more info visit www.imastarfoundation.org.WFA MeetingThe Womens Food Alliance will meet Monday, September 24th, 11 a.m. … 4 p.m. at the Palencia Golf Clubhouse, 600 Palencia Club Dr., St. Augustine. Topic is: Hospitality Etiquette Training, a two-Part Interactive Seminar Luncheon to learn the basic rules of etiquette. For tickets contact Leigh Cort at (904) 806-3613.Howie Mandel & Preacher Lawson ShowExperience one great night of comedy with Howie Mandel Live and Preacher Lawson at the Thrasher-Horne Center, 283 College Dr, Orange Park, on Saturday, September 29th at 8 p.m. For tickets visit www.THcenter.org.COJ Public Health FairThe Northside Coalition of Jacksonvilles health fair is scheduled for Saturday, September 29th, 10 a.m. at the Clanzel Brown Community Center, 4575 Moncrief Rd. There will be health screenings, line dancing, games, prizes and food trucks! For more info visit www.NorthsidecoalitionofJackonvi lle.com.Darius RuckerCountry star Darius Rucker will perform at Dailys Place, One TIAA Field Dr. on Sunday, September 30th at 7:30 p.m. For tickets and more info visit at www.dailysplace.com.D.L. Hughley is back!D.L. hosted "D.L. Hughley Breaks the News," NY's WYKD-FM's morning show and has been on HBO, BET, and starred in "The Hughleys. Hear his comedy routine October 4 7th for two shows 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. at the Comedy Zone located at 3130 Hartley Rd. For more info call 242-4242.JAX Infrastructure Innovation SummitThe JAX Infrastructure Innovation Summit is scheduled for Friday, October 5th 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Prime F. Osborn III Convention Center located at 1000 Water Street. This one-day event will explore topics featuring Exponential Energy, Advanced Transportation, the Crypto-Blockchain Revolution, Exponential Teams and Adaptive Intelligence and more. To register and for more info emailRachel.Harris@myjaxchamber.com.LIT AF TourComedian Martin Lawrences LIT AF TourŽ comes to town, Friday, October 5th, with comedians Rickey Smiley, Michael Blackson, Adele Givens, Clayton Thomas at the Veterans Memorial Stadium, 300 A. Philip Randolph St. For tickets and more info visit www.martinlawrence.aegpresents.c om.A Symphonic Celebration of PrinceA symphonic celebration of PRINCE,Ž Curated, produced and directed by Ahmir QuestloveŽ Thompson, featuring the Jacksonville Rock Symphony Orchestra is scheduled for Saturday, October 6th, at 8 p.m. at the Florida Theatre, 128 E Forsyth St. For tickets visit www.floridatheatre.com.Ranky TankyRanky Tanky will be in concert Friday, October 12th at 7:30 p.m. at the Ritz Theatres, 829 N. Davis St. This Charleston, SC based quintet performs timeless music of Gullah culture. From playful game songs to ecstatic shouts, from heartbreaking spirituals to delicate lullabies come hear the sounds. For tickets and more info visit www.ritzjacksonville.com. Page 8 Ms. Perrys Free Press What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene AROUND TOWN AROUND TOWN August 23 29, 2018 Enclosed is my __ check __ money order for $38.50 (within city limits) __$43.00 (outside of Jacksonville) NAME ___________________________________________________________________ ADDRESS ________________________________________________________________ CITY____________________________________ STATE______ ZIP_________________ If this is a gift subscription it is provided by (so gift notification card can be sent) ______________________________________ Please send check or money order to: Jacksonville Free Press P.O. Box 43580, Jacksonville, FL32203 If you would like to pay by Visa or Mastercard, give us a call at (904) 634-1993 Enclosed is my __ check __ money order for $40.50 (within city limits) __$45.00 (outside of Jacksonville) SUBSCRIPTION RATES Do You Have an Event for Around Town ?The Jacksonville Free Press is pleased to print your public service announcements and coming events free of charge. ews deadline is Monday at 6 p.m. of the week you would like your information to be printed. Information can be sent via email, fax, brought into our office or mailed in. Please be sure to include the 5Ws who, what, when, where, why and you must include a contact number.Email JFreePress@aol.com Fax (904) 765-8611 Mail: ComingEventsJacksonville Free Press 1122 W.Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32208 SUBSCRIBE TODAY FOR ONLY $40.50

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August 23 29, 2018 Page 9 Mrs. Perrys Free Press Get your Free Press on the go! Seach for us on Facebook at T h e J a c k s o n v i l l e F r e e P r e s s o r v i s i t u s o n t h e w e b a t w w w j a c k s o n v i l l e F r e e P r e s s c o mP P H H O O T T O O S S | | N N E E W W S S C C O O M M M M E E N N T T A A R R Y YStop by our offices located at Stop by our offices located at 1122 West Edgewood Avenue 1122 West Edgewood Avenue Jacksonville, Florida 32208 Jacksonville, Florida 32208 Remember Oprah Winfreys splashy Legends Ball in 2005, where she serenaded and splurged on many of Americas Black female achievers? It was a grand affair where Oprah vowed to honor Black female icons while their still alive rather than when their gone. Black women across the country are making history in politics, business, entertainment and media. But the Legends Ball recognized the achievements of women of color who were ahead of their time as they paved the way for future generations of successful women. Sixteen years later, a chunk of Oprahs esteemed guest list have died, the latest being the indisputable Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin, who succumb to cancer on Thursday, August 16. These are the other Black icons and guests of Oprahs Legends Ball who have left us: Maya Angelou, Elizabeth Catlett, Ruby Dee, Katherine Dunham, Aretha Franklin, Dorothy Height, Lena Horne, Coretta Scott King,Rosa Parks, Della Reese, Naomi Sims and Natalie Cole. Aretha Franklin Among a Growing List of Deceased Icons from Oprahs Legends Ball in 2005 Aretha Franklin's Four Day Funeral Arrangements Planned Aretha Franklin Aretha Franklin, who died last week, will lie in repose on August 28th and 29th at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit. The public will be able to view her body in an open casket each of those days from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. A private funeral for family and friends will be held 10:00 a.m. on August 31 at Greater Grace Temple, a 4,000-member church in Detroit. The funerals for Rosa Parks and Levi Stubs of the singing group the Four TopsŽ were held at Greater Grace. On the same day, she will be buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in Detroit. Her father, Rev. C. L. Franklin, her brother, Cecil Franklin and her two sisters, Carolyn Franklin and Emma Franklin are also buried there. Ms. Franklin, who was 76, died last week from pancreatic cancer, an aggressive form of cancer that develops in the tissues of the pancreas. The disease affects a high percentage of blacks. She died in her Detroit home where she was receiving hospice care. Located in the abdomen behind the lower part of the stomach, the pancreas aids in digestion. The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center at Johns Hopkins Medicine reported the incidence rate for pancreatic cancer among blacks is 30% to 70% higher than other racial groups in America. Not only is the incidence rate of pancreatic cancer higher among African Americans, they also have the poorest survival rates because their cancer is often diagnosed at more advanced stages. Smoking, growing older, diabetes and obesity increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. Some 37.1 percent of black men and 56.6 percent of black women are obese, according to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the nations largest public health philanthropy. Grab your lawn chairs and get ready! Musical Ear Events is bringing one of the most extraordinary old-school, outdoor festivals of the year back to Jacksonville. Scheduled for Saturday, September 22nd the Third Annual Throwback Festival Concert will be held at 4.30 pm at the Morocco Shrine Grounds, 3800 St. Johns Bluff Road, S. Along with award-winning, legendary artists, such as Cameo, the festival features entertainers HTown, Shai, Klymaxx, Michel'le, Ruff Endz and more. But not only is Musical Ears Events, LLC bringing this extraordinary festival to town, it will be bringing commerce, jobs and a cultural flair to its citizens. Merchandise and food vendors also attract hundreds of festival goers as they fill up on the array of festival food and enjoy the entertainment from the renown artists from the 70s, 80s and 90s. Nearly 4,000 festival goers attended last years festival and this year the numbers are projected to increase as festival goers enjoy popular billboard hits. This years festival will be hosted by Tyler Craig, star of Def Comedy Jam and BETs Comic View. Mr. Craig is known for his signature line, And the moral of the story isŽ, followed by a funny, but meaningful one liner. Tickets can be purchased at several ticket outlets and on line at www.throwbackconcert.eventbrite. com. For more information, visit the website www.throwbackconcert.com. Throwback Festival Headlined by Cameo Cameo Issa Rae Wants to Change the Way Dark-Skinned Women Are Portrayed Ever since Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl premiered on YouTube in 2011„well before Insecure landed on HBO and became a huge hit in 2016„Issa Rae has been showcasing a different kind of Black women on screen. Now, she wants to change the way darker-skinned women are portrayed specifically. In a recent interview, Rae said darker-skinned Black women in Hollywood are still relegated to stereotypical roles far too often. Dark-skinned women still portray a certain archetype and I want to change that,Ž she said at Insecure Fest. Theyre either super strong, emotionless, robotic „ or hyper-sexual, and you dont get the in-between very much.Ž On Insecure Rae is already widening the opportunities for nuanced, complicated roles for darker-skinned Black women, allowing them to showcase a range of human experiences and emotions from being in love and killing it at work, to making mistakes. On Insecure, theres no one way to be a Black woman, and thats one reason fans love the show so much. Yvonne Orji, who plays Molly on the popular HBO series, agrees with Raes mission to broaden the scope of how darker-skinned women are seen. I want the portrayal of dark-skinned women to evolve in such a way that you see us as multifaceted,Ž she told Vogue. We are more than just the sassy friend or the maid. Were so dynamic. We can be the leads.Ž While Hollywood still has a long way to go before darker-skin actors are cast at similar rates and in similar roles as their lighter-skinned counterparts, with projects like Black Panther and Insecure enjoying massive success, its clear audiences are hungry for more. Issa Rae

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By Stacy M. Brown Women of color activists and social justice allies are planning a demonstration at Senate office buildings in Washington D.C. to rally, chant and creatively disperse paper messages demanding senators vote noŽ on Brett Kavanaughs nomination to the Supreme Court. According to an alert, activists will be wearing matching T-shirts declaring that JUSTICE IS fair wages, strong unions, voting rights, health care for all, immigrant rights, abortion access, and LGBTQ liberation. If Kavanaugh is appointed, the balance of the Court will turn against the rights of women, people of color, young people, immigrants, workers, and LGBTQ people, said rally organizers. This #ReproductiveJustice Day of Action coincides with a broader week of action to illuminate the devastating impact a Kavanaugh Supreme Court will have on women, said Destiny Lopez, codirector of All Above All, the nonprofit Washington DC-based group that unites organizations and individuals to build support for lifting the bans that deny abortion coverage. The groups vision is to restore public insurance coverage so that every woman, regardless of her income, can receive affordable, safe abortion care. The rallies are planned for Thursday, August 23rd. August 23 29, 2018 Page 10 Ms. Perrys Free Press A A S T T our Y Yo $5 f C or f fo C Tha n an d p u b Women of Color Plan Demonstration in DC Against Trumps Supreme Court ominee Brett Kavanaugh The best Kiki Challenge to date was issued on the first week of school at Busbee Elementary School in Wagena, South Carolina. Rapper Drake has been getting people in their feelings, but the elementary school wants to get its kids into college. Busbee Elementary School posted a photo of one of its bulletin boards that features a likeness of the Toronto MC below a variation of the lyrics to his hit song In My Feelings.Ž Kiki, are you reading? Are you writing? Are you down with knowledge?Ž the bulletin board reads. Cause I need ya and I want ya to go to college!Ž The bulletin board features Drakes hands in the shape of a heart, showing how passionate he is about molding future generations. It is Gods Plan,Ž after all. SC School Issues the Best In My FeelingsŽ Challenge to Date Nurse Sues Hospital for Honoring a Patients Racist RequestDearborn, MI „ Teoka Williams, an African American nurse has filed a lawsuit against her employer, Beaumont Hospital, claiming that she was discriminated against when the hospital decided to honor a white patients request to remove her from their care just because she is Black. She believes her civil rights were violated by the incident. Williams, who worked as a nurse at Beaumont Hospital in Dearborn for 10 years, was very humiliated, embarrassed, and disappointed after an incident in October 2017 where the hospital accommodated a patients request to forbid her from taking care of the patient. According to the lawsuit, Williams has finished checking up on the two patients on her assigned room when she overheard one of the patients saying she didnt want a black b„-Ž taking care of her. Williams told the clinical manager about what she heard and expected that the decision would be that they wont accommodate requests based on race. However, Williams was eventually forbidden to enter the room while still being required to give reports when her shift was over. There were also times that patients in that room needed care but she couldnt provide nor enter just because of her race. Williams added that she also informed human resources but she was just told that patient requests are honored all the time and the next time it happens, she would simply be taken off the assignment altogether. Supreme Court ominee Brett Kavanaugh with President Trump Enough is Enough: UC Protesters Knock Down Silent Sam Confederate Statue About 250 protesters on the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's campus have knocked over the school's controversial Silent Sam Confederate statue. The statue is the latest among several Confederate monuments to be removed, and its toppling comes as communities grapple with the legacy of a contentious chapter in American history. Circulated videos and pictures show the statue coming down as students chant, "I believe that we will win." Video footage from CNN affiliate WRAL-TV shows protesters putting up poles and banners around the statue during daylight. By nightfall, video from WRAL shows the statue falling and students cheering. Protesters can also be seen kicking and putting dirt on the statue. In a statement, UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt said she appreciates the actions taken by police to ensure the campus community's safety during Monday's demonstration. "Last night's actions were unlawful and dangerous, and we are very fortunate that no one was injured," Folt said in an open letter posted on the school's official website. "The police are investigating the vandalism and assessing the full extent of the damage." The statue came down around 9:20 p.m. ET on the eve of the first day of classes, the university said. one person was arrested. Police stand guard after the confederate statue was toppled. urse Teoka Williams is suing Beaumont Hospital in Dearborn, Michigan