The Jacksonville free press

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Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00461

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Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press


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Full Text

PAGE 1

The Jacksonville Aviation Authority (JAA)invited the community to a special ceremony last week to commemorate Dr. Chester A. Aikens, former member of the JAA Board of Directors. JAA Board of Directors Terri Davlantes welcomed the attendees to the ceremony, while Rolf Riechmann Airport Manager provided an inspirational quote of Chester Aikens commitment to the community. JAA Human Resource Director Michael Rogers presided over the unveiling of the pathway that leads to the entrance of the JAA on the airport grounds. Dr. Aikens, was a member of the bi-model Jacksonville Port Authority Board of Directors from 1993-1999 and was appointed by Mayor Ed Austin and reappointed by mayor John Delany. He was also appointed to serve on the Jacksonville Aviation Authoritys Board of Directors by Mayors John Peyton in 2007 and Alvin Brown in 2011. Throughout his tenure with the Aviation Authority, Dr. Aikens represented the Jacksonville Aviation Authority in community, state and economic development affairs and with the utmost integrity and professionalism. The bridge is located near the JAA Administration Building. The inspirational quote was taken from Dr. Martin Luther King: Everybody can be great … because anybody can serve. You dont have to have a college degree to serve. You dont have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace, a soul generated by love.Ž Volume 27 o. 40 August 7-13, 2014 Jacksonville,Florida PRSTSTD U.S. Postage PAID Jacksonville, FL Permit No. 662 50 Cents The Dangers of False EyelashesPage 7 Despite Ups and Downs Obama is Building a Solid LegacyPage 4600+ Students Close Out Participation in Citys Summer Youth Jobs ProgramPage 3 ever Before Stories On Godfather of Soul James BrownPage 9 50c RETUR SERVICE REQUESTED College President Gives $90k of His Salary to Low-Paid EmployeesRaymond Burse, interim president of Kentucky State University, elected to have his salary decreased from $349,869 to $259,745 in order to boost the paychecks of the universitys lowest-paid workers. Burses pay cut will increase the salaries of 24 KSU employees, some of whom were making as little as $7.25 an hour, to $10.25 an hour, WLKY reported. Burse said that his giving up $90,124.96 is a response to tough timesŽ and wanting to ensure that university workers know the schools board and president care about them and want to do the very best by them,Ž according to the Herald-Leader. Burse has experience dealing with KSU employees -he served as KSU president from 1982 to 1989, according to KY Forward. After his presidency, Burse held an executive position at General Electric Co. He retired in 2012 after 17 years with good benefits, the Herald-Leader reported. For all of his Good Samaritanism, Burse wants to make clear that his pay cut is not a poke at other university presidents to follow suit, according to the Herald-Leader. Burse said, "I was in a position where I could do that," and he recognizes that his decision is one that many people aren't able to make.Eric Garners Death in YPD Chokehold Case Ruled a HomicideThe controversial death of a New York City man who was placed in a chokehold by police has been formally ruled a homicide a move that will almost certainly place the officers in front of a grand jury and heighten tensions between residents and the police department, city officials and policing experts said.Man Who Shot YC Choke video of Eric Garner Held on Gun Charge The man who recorded video of a fatal police chokehold in New York City has been arrested on gun charges. Police said 22-year-old Ramsey Orta was arrested Saturday night on Staten Island, a few blocks from where officers confronted his friend Eric Garner on July 17. Orta, whose recording of an officer restraining Garner with a chokehold fueled outcry against the police, is charged with two counts of criminal possession of a weapon. Police said Orta had a previous weapon conviction that prohibited him from possessing a firearm. He is due in court this month on robbery charges stemming from a May arrest and an assault charge from an arrest three days before Garners death, according to court records. Ortas latest arrest came a day after the citys medical examiner ruled Garners death a homicide caused by the officers chokehold, as well as the compression of his chest and prone positioning during physical restraint by police.ŽDiploma of Harvard College's First Black Graduate to Be Auctioned Owner of the historic document had threatened to burn it in 2013The original Harvard College diploma received by the schools first African-American graduate, Richard Greener, is up for auction. After finding the diploma while cleaning out a home in Chicago, Rufus McDonald, the current owner of Greeners diploma, made headlines in 2013 when he threatened to burn the document if he did not receive a reasonable offer for it from Harvard. He also found a number of Greeners paintings and writings. I very much hope that Harvard acquires these documents at a fairly appraised value,Ž Henry Gates Jr., of Harvards W.E.B. DuBois Institute for African-American Research, told Boston Magazine in 2013. There is no word yet on whether the diploma will find a home at Harvard. Greener graduated from the ivy league college in 1870 with honors. His long career in academia, law and social justice included a two-year term as dean of the Howard Law School and a seven-year position as the United States Commercial Agent in Vladivostok, Russia. He died of old age in Chicago in 1922.AACP Teams Up with Dunkin Brands To Grow Black FranchisesThe National Association for the Advancement of Colored People a will partner with Dunkin Donuts and Baskin-Robbins, to create an initiative to increase the number of Black-owned franchise businesses in the U.S. Franchising can be a powerful economic tool that further enables the African-American community and others to realize the American dream of business ownership,Ž said Cornell William Brooks, the newly-elected NAACP president and CEO. According to the NAACP, the initiative will focus on in-depth franchising education and trainingŽ in addition to assistance in overcoming the financial challenges related to becoming a franchise owner.Ž The Dunkin Brands Diversity in Franchising Initiative will provide education, networking opportunities and information on critical topics including access to capital,Ž said Dedrick Muhammad, senior director of the NAACP Economic Department. Standing left to right is the Back to School Committee (front row) is Sister Kanzla Parker, Sister Ilsa Jefferson, Sister Jackie Mims, Sister Zondra Williamson and Amala Taylor. Back row left to right is Oliver Martin, Donovan Trimble and Tenaro Urso. R. Silver photoGrand Lodge Holds 5th Annual Back to School Youth Give-AwayOn Saturday, August 2nd The Most Worshipful Union Grand Lodge, PHA held a Back to School bash on the Masonic Temple grounds. Activities included a school supply give-away, free haircuts, youth group registration, free lunch, music, seminars, bouncey houses and more! A steady stream of excited kids braved the heat from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and left with stuffed backpacks and renewed hope for the approaching school years. The 73 year old Gamma Rho Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. recently conducted their annual leadership planning retreat to strategize their service to the Jacksonville community. In addition to participating in workshops and activities, the chapter members began their New International Program Targets, by collecting over 250 backpacks for local students. One of the new targets is One Million Backpacks defined under Target I … Educational Enrichment by the International President, Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson. The chapter is collaborating with Jacksonville Jaguars Cecil Shorts efforts in conjunction with the United Way of Northeast Florida and three local elementary schools they service through tutoring to distribute the backpacks prior to the beginning of school. The chapter is under the leadership Mary L. Davis President and Willetta R. Richie is the Program Chairman. Memorial Bridge Dedicated in Honor of Dr. Chester Aikens Family members onhand for the occasion included the Aikens family: Chae, Jean and Chet Aikens By Jeremy Bamidele Black women are currently attending universities at historically high rates. While such achievements must be applauded, it brings to light a blaring inconsistency between the level of black male achievement to black female achievement from the same socioeconomic backgrounds. Why are black women attending universities at historic highs while their male counterparts are both attending university at historic lows, since integration, and graduating at rates of 2/3 the graduation rate of black women? Admittedly, the trend in black female achievement aligns with female educational success across the states with women now attending universities at a higher rate than men. Graduation rates for women as a whole are also statistically greater than graduation rates of men as whole. However, it is the degree of difference between the genders in the African American community compared to other ethnic communities that are truly startling. One explanation for these discrepancies is a difference of socialization, even within the same home environments. Over half of African American homes are single mother led households. As a result, many black men lack male role models within their household. While at the same time, the sisters of these same men grow up under a matriarch that whether by circumstance or choice, practice self-sufficiency. While black males and females may arise from the same households and socioeconomic classes, the way they view their gender roles vis a vis society and vis a vis each other are affected by the presence of their or lack thereof gender specific parental role model. In addition to not having black male role models in the home, black male role models are also lacking within the educational environment with less than two percent of educators being Continued on page 3 Why are Black Men Failing in School While Black Female Achievement is at a Record High? Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Initiates … Launching ew Dimensions Coretta Hill of the United Way of ortheast Florida with Gamma Rho Omega members Mary L. Brown and Willetta R. Richie

PAGE 2

by Jason Morris Dallas (CNN) -Michael Phillips has been spending most of his time these days living in a tiny room in a no-frills nursing home. Until recently, he had a roommate who slept in a bed 2 feet away, and staff brought him three square meals a day. Only a few hours passed each day in which he didn't think about his burden of four decades: being a convicted sex offender. That was before last week, when Phillips was officially exonerated by the state which determined via DNA testing that he was falsely convicted. The state will now pay him handsomely for its mistake. It was a first-of-its-kind exoneration in that Phillips wasn't clamoring for vindication. As was the case when he accepted a plea deal in 1990, he felt that his race would preclude him from getting a fair shake in the justice system, so he just accepted his plight. After entering his plea, Phillips, a 57-year-old African-American who grew up in New Orleans, served 12 years in a Texas prison for the rape of a 16-year-old white girl at a Dallas motel where he'd worked as a maintenance man. Confined to a wheelchair due to his battle with sickle cell anemia, Phillips has been out of jail since 2002. He has been living in nursing homes the past few years as his health has spiraled downward. Though he's been out of prison for 12 years, he considers his life one long sentence, as he was forced to wear the branding of a convicted sex offender. In his official first week as a free man, Phillips is overjoyed and struggles to put his emotions into words, instead pointing to the spirituality that helped him cope all these years. "A-W-E doesn't describe the feeling. I don't know if they got a word that describes how I feel. To have a leash taken off my neck and off my ankle, I know how my ancestors felt when they got free," he said. Falsely Accused According to the Dallas Police Department report from September 28, 1990, the victim identified Phillips after detectives showed her a six-picture lineup. It didn't help that Phillips had a prior conviction of a home burglary when he was 19. "Being young and foolish, there were things you do that were juvenile," he said. But at 32, he was trying to make an honest living and was shocked to hear that he was being charged with a rape that he hadn't committed. He feels that the prior burglary conviction and a "broken criminal justice system" were to blame for the bad advice he got next. A public defender convinced him to cut a deal and plead guilty in exchange for 12 years behind bars, rather than risk a trial. Fearing that a jury would not side with him after a white girl picked him out of a photo lineup, he took the deal, he said. He recalled distinctly the words of one public defender. "You are a black man. This is a young white girl who has been assaulted. You have an X on your back already. What do you think the chances are if you go before an allwhite jury?" the defense lawyer asked. Phillips wonders today how many poor folks or people of color were denied a chance at justice in Dallas. "(The system) is really broke down so bad. It's like I'm going to stab you and cut you from the neck down to your navel, and all I do is put a BandAid across it and tell you that you are going to be all right," he said. "That's how the justice system is, because all of them young black men that are getting arrested, they are doomed once the police slap the handcuffs on them and put them in the back of a police car." A living hell After his release from prison, Phillips tried to stay with his sister, but once people in the neighborhood found out his history, they put signs on her door and front yard. His niece and nephew, Karen Collins and Keith Wilkerson, concede that they didn't know for sure he was innocent. Phillips was embarrassed by the past and didn't bring it up, they said. "He never talked about it, and I can say that it's not like him to do something like that, but him not talking about it gave me doubt," Collins said. After he got out of prison, they said, Phillips struggled to make ends meet, picking up odd jobs as a handyman to pay rent on small apartments. He was forced to move around a lot, and he always had a hard time finding new places to live. Last year, he was booted from a nursing home because the staff found out he carried sex offender status. Phillips said he felt helpless: "I didn't have any say in any of my life. You have that label. You have that sticker on your front and back. Bad enough you have to do 12 years for something you didn't do. Now you have to do something for the rest of your life. You have to report." Now exonerated, Phillips says he's going to focus on dealing with his other sentence: sickle cell anemia. "It's a war. The older I get, the worse this disease gets. I'm fighting a war with my body," he said. Conviction integrity? Phillips' case is the 34th exoneration by the Dallas District Attorney's Office since the 2007 advent of the Conviction Integrity Unit. The unit is a long-term project that screens untested rape kits by reviewing DNA databases that are preserved by the Southwest Institute of Forensic Sciences. It is essentially using DNA testing to conduct an audit of all convictions in Dallas County for which testing may prove the guilt or innocence of a defendant. So far, they have tackled only sexual assault convictions from 1990 that meet the following criteria: € There was biological evidence available that included seminal fluid. € There was only one rapist (cases with biological samples from more than one person are much harder to work with). € The attacker's identity was in dispute at the time of the conviction. According to the district attorney, Phillips is the first DNA exoneration in the United States that was identified by a systematic search of old criminal convictions, as opposed to a challenge by a defendant or any other party. The semen found in the rape kit was put into the FBI's combined DNA Index System. It matched the sample of another man who also lived at the motel where the rape took place, the district attorney's office said, but that person can't be prosecuted because the statute of limitations has expired. A 2012 National Registry of Exonerations study found that among rape exonerations with eyewitness misidentifications, most involved a white victim and African-American assailant. The exoneration not only clears Phillips' name and his credit report, it will also make him a wealthy man. Texas law awards an exoneree $80,000 for each year of wrongful incarceration, so Phillips will get a lump sum of $960,000 and then $80,000 a year for as long as he lives. Texas also offers exonerees staterun health insurance and a free education, if they choose. All Phillips knows for sure about the future is that he is going to move out of his nursing home, buy a new vehicle and go to the dentist. "The first thing I am going to do is get a Ford pickup truck and a house. Or I might just hit the road. You got 50 states. I might just hit the road and visit the rest of the country. I dreamed of going to China and walking on the Great Wall of China," he said. Phillips has contemplated these possibilities for some time, never thinking that it was possible that his "crazy daydreams" could one day become reality. But before he's done with his interview, he goes back to his original message. Leaning on an old Dorothy Love Coates gospel tune, he wants to make sure we know what he is really thankful for. "Hang on to your faith. The Father works in his own time, and like the good song says: He may not come when you want to, but He's always on time." Page 2 Ms. Perrys Free Press August 7-13, 2014 Make sure youre talking to the right people. Speak with HUD-approved housing counselors, free of charge, at the Homeowners HOPE Hotline. IF YOURE FACING FORECLOSURE, TALK TO YOUR GRANDMA SECOND. CALL THE HOPE HOTLINE FIRST AT 888-995-HOPE. Drivers: $5,000 Sign-On Bonus!Great Pay! Consistent Freight! Great Miles on this Regional Account. Werner Enterprises:1-855-515-8447 Employment OpportunityFrom Convicted Sex Offender to Millionaire, Wrongly Convicted Man Gets ew Life We all love a good bargain, no matter what our age. But if you're a senior citizen on a fixed income, finding discounted goods and services can mean the difference between making ends meet and going without. The good news is that tons of senior discounts are available … often for people as young as 50. One caveat right up front: Although many senior discounts are substantial, you sometimes can find better bargains … especially on travel-related expenses like airfare, hotels and rental cars. An AARP membership costs only $16 a year for anyone over age 50, including free membership for spouses or partners (www.aarp.org). AARP's discounts website features discounts on dozens of products and services including rental cars, hotels, restaurants, clothing and department store chains. AARP also offers an inexpensive driver safety course for drivers over 50 (members and nonmembers alike) that can lower auto insurance premiums by up to 10 percent or more. Popular AARP discounts include: -20 percent discount on installation or upgrades to ADT home security. 45 percent off membership to Angie's List. 20 percent off purchases from 1-800-FLOWERS.com. Up to 25 percent off car rentals from Avis and Budget. Up to 20 percent discount at many hotel chains including Hyatt, Hilton, Wyndham, Best Western, Days Inn and Ramada, among others. 10 to 20 percent off at many restaurants including Denny's and Outback 15 percent off many Geek Squad services from Best Buy. A free 45-minute consultation with an Allstate Legal Services Network attorney, as well as 20 percent off member attorneys' fees. A quick Google search will uncover numerous other senior discount resources. One popular site is SeniorDiscounts.com, an online directory of more than 220,000 U.S. business locations that offer discounts to people over 50. Registration is free, although they also offer a $12.95/year premium that offers members-only discounts and other perks. Other good sites include Brad's Deals, Sciddy.com and Savvy Senior. Other commonly available senior discounts include: A 15 percent discount on the lowest available rail fare on most Amtrak trains for travelers over age 62. Greyhound offers a 5 percent discount on unrestricted fares (over 62). Southwest Airlines offers senior fares (over 65). Although not necessarily their lowest rates, Southwest's senior fares are fully refundable. The U.S. Geologic Survey senior pass (over 62) provides free lifetime access to more than 2,000 government-managed recreational sites (including national parks), as well as discounts on camping and other amenities. Senior passes cost $10 in person or $20 by mail (http://store.usgs.gov/pass/senior.html). Verizon Wireless offers discounted mobile service for customers over 65. Both Walgreens and Rite Aid offer monthly senior discount days for members of their rewards programs when most non-prescription items are 15 to 20 percent off. Ask your neighborhood pharmacy if they offer similar programs. In addition, many restaurants, department stores, movie theaters, museums, theme parks, banks, credit card issuers, utilities and other businesses offer special discounts or promotions for seniors. Always ask before your purchase is rung up. Bottom line: Abundant resources are available to help seniors save money on purchases large and small. You just have to do a little research … and ask whether senior discounts are available. Remember, 10 percent here and 20 percent there can really add up. Michael Phillips, a 57-year-old Texas man, was exonerated of a 1990 rape last week. MoneySaving Tips for Seniors

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Nearly 600 teens and young adults wrapped up their employment through Mayor Browns Summer Jobs program last week armed with a variety of skills and experience they acquired over the past six weeks. Theyll also have the benefit of continued education and engagement through the program. Being a student, we all know how hard it is to find a job, and Im glad there is a program out there that helps us not only get money for the summer, but some real life experience in a workplace that we can put on a resume,Ž said Brittany Ford, who worked at one of the programs private sector partners, Bank of America. Youth between the ages of 16 and 21 throughout Duval County were eligible for the program, which placed them in temporary positions lasting six to eight weeks with City of Jacksonville departments, independent authorities, local businesses, and non-profit organizations. Job coaches were assigned to each participant in the program, serving as a liaison between the youth, the program office, and the site supervisor. The program also offered preemployment training about topics such as customer service, projecting a professional image, ethics, diversity, and financial awareness. Continued engagement efforts will include seminars on money management, conflict resolution, resume development, and job search/interviewing skills. My experience with Bank of America was great this summer,Ž Ford said. I have learned so much, from the ins and outs of the banking center and what everyones role is, to customer service.Ž The program received excellent reviews from employers as well. JEAs second year with this program has reaped an abundance of fruit,Ž reported Pat Sams, program manager for JEAs Emerging Workforce Strategies, pointing to one of their interns who was invited back next year to further his aspirations of becoming an engineer. The mayors recent budget proposal adds resources to expand the Summer Jobs program in 2015. For more information visit coj.net/summerjobs. Ms. Perrys Free Press Page 3 August 7-13, 2014 Shown above is youth employment partner Pat Sams, program manager for JEA Emerging Workforce Strategies program, Mayor Alvin Brown and Brittany Ford, a Summer Jobs alumna. Continued from front both black and male. Without black male role models in the home and in schools, black men often resort to seeking out black male role models as represented by popular media, many of whom occupy admirable social positions not as a result of education but as a result of another sort of prowess, such as athletic or musical ability. Taking cues from their role models or peer group, education becomes a non-priority in the minds of many black men. The difference between the role of education in the lives of the different genders is further seen to be representative of the gender differences. Consequently, educational attainment is seen as girly or feminine, and the exact opposite of the black masculine ideal. The system that originally derives from a lack of black male role models that prioritize education becomes perpetuated by gender stereotyping, an influence which is especially strong throughout the black community. Why Are Black Men Failing 600+ Students Close Out Participation in Citys Summer Youth Jobs Program The Big 30! on the High Seas Krystal Goggins celebrated her August 3rd Big 30Ž birthday on the high seas aboard the Carnival Victory. Friends and family from Jacksonville, Detroit, Michigan and Atlanta, Georgia shared in the festivities and sailed to the ports of Key West, Florida and Cozumel, Mexico. Pictured left to right with the birthday girl in the middle is Shawnea Nelson and Marian Parker. Martha Gibson Celebrates 96th BirthdayOn Tuesday, August 5th, friends and family gathered to celebrate Mrs. Martha Gibson's 96th Birthday. "God has been good," said Mrs. Gibson. She is the second of 10 Georgia born siblings, with one brother and two sisters surviving. She is a loyal member of St. Paul AME and is cared for by her devoted daughter Mary Hawkins. "Through it all, good times and bad, God has kept me," she said. Pictured above (l-r) is daughter Mary Hawkins, honoree Martha Gibson, friends Pat Greens and Phyllis Gaines. R.Silver photo First Coast Birthday CelebrationsHester Clarks Agency Leads Mega Conference in D.C.Hester Clark Jacksonville entrepreneur Hester Clark is among three prominent Jacksonville Womenowned Business Entrepreneurs who are taking Washington, DC by storm this week for the National Minority Enterprise Development Week Conference (MED Week 2014), the nations premier event for minority businesses and the public and private sectors. Hester Clark, Founder and CEO of Hester Group, Anne Urban President and CEO, Destination Planning Corp. and Melissa Hong, President and Founder of Visual Solutions Inc. are the driving forces behind this conference. Hester Group was hired by the Minority Business Development Agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce to manage all aspects of this important 32 year old conference. Her Jacksonville based team has managed all conference strategic planning, marketing, securing speakers, sponsors and exhibitors. Ms. Clark engaged Anne Urban of Destination Planning Corp. to handle event management and logistics. Melissa Hong of Visual Solutions, Inc. will be a speaker at the event to share her expertise in travel and tourism. MED Week 2014 will provide opportunities for over 500 small business owners and entrepreneurs to gain expert knowledge on business growth strategies; connect with senior public officials, industry executives and leaders from all over the country; and, learn about cutting-edge tools that can give their business a competitive advantage. The conference also gives attendees the unique opportunity to participate in business networking, power-learning sessions, a business-to-business matchmaking session, and the MED Week Awards Luncheon recognizing minority business leaders and organizations. The conference has sponsors including AARP and Raytheon.

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by George Curry In 1984, former UN Ambassador Andrew Young described the inner circle of Democratic presidential nominee Walter Mondale as smart a… White boysŽ who thought they knew everything. Obviously, they didnt because Mondale lost the general election by a large margin to Ronald Reagan. Knowing that in a presidents second-term, the party in power usually loses 29 House seats, along with the real possibility of Democrats losing control of the Senate this year, some party leaders are trying to give the appearance they are in control and Democrats will buck that voting trend. In an interview with a group of African American reporters last week, for example, Rep. Steve Israel (D-N.Y.), chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, described how much better positioned Democrats are this year compared to past off-year elections. He spoke of the DCCC hiring a diversity director for the first time, adding a national voter training director, creating an Internet platform for vendors of color and allowing resumes to be dropped off in the field. In other words, he talked about the kind of things smart butt White boys talk about. My fear is that another group of smart butt White boys will lead Democrats down the path of defeat unless the strategists reverse course. The upcoming mid-term election may be yet another example of Black voters never getting the credit they deserve winning seats for the party but getting an overabundance of blame when Democrats get their heads handed to them. The Washington Post, carried a story under the headline, Will black voters be House Democrats midterm firewall?Ž In the story, Israel noted that in 15 of the top 25 districts being targeted by the DCCC, Blacks make up at least 10 percent of the voting population, enough to provide a victory. We have a unique challenge in offsetting drop off with African American voters, with Hispanic voters, and with young female voters,Ž Israel said. So were tackling those challenges head on.Ž In the meeting with reporters, Israel mentioned efforts from getting commercials cut by First Lady Michelle Obama to getting Black voters to sign cards committing them to vote in November. As Election Day nears, those cards will be mailed back to prospective voters, hoping that action will get them to turn up at the polls. They put more faith in such gimmicks as voter commitment cards than reaching the Black community through the Black Press. In fact, when pressed on the issue of utilizing Black media, Israel said while there may be some Black media buys, The vast majority of our budget is spent on one thing … that is buying television time. Thats it.Ž That may be itŽ for Democrats in November if they think the best way to reach Black voters is to lump them in with everyone else who watches TV. Even if television reaches more Black voters than Black newspapers, radio stations, magazines and Internet sites, it is not as trusted by African Americans as the Black Press. As a Nielsen study found, Companies mistakenly believe there are no language barriers, that a general market one-size-fits-all strategy is an effective way to reach African-Americans. Just the opposite is true.Ž If some of the powers that be were smart they would recognize that in the Black community, the messenger is as important as the message. And that is not limited to the Black Press. It also applies to the largely White-controlled 527 organizations established in recent elections that acted as though they knew more about our community than grass root organizations that are on the ground every day, yet continue to struggle for funding. Democrats face another hurdle … 67 percent of the Democratic base does not know there is a mid-term election in November, according to polling done for the DCCC. In addition, a poll conducted by the Pew Research Center in July found: Currently, 45% of registered voters who plan to support the Republican in their district say they are more enthusiastic about voting than in prior congressional elections; that compares with 37% of those who plan to vote for the Democratic candidate.Ž Democrats need to provide something to vote for other than Republican calls for impeachment to motivate the Black base. According to an analysis of the Black vote by the Associated Press, Minorities voted at a higher rate than Whites in 2008 and 2012. Obviously, having Barack Obamas name on the ballot was a key factor. Blacks can vote at high levels again in 2014 if they understand the success or failure Obamas last two years in office will be determined by who gets elected in November. But if Democrats stubbornly stick to relying on television to reach Black voters, they will lose in 2014 just as smart butt White boys lost 30 years ago.George E. Curry is editor-in-chief of the ational ewspaper Publishers Association ews Service (PA.) One of my more conservative friends jokingly asked me if I was still on the Obama bandwagon considering the constant criticism and his political ups and downs over the past six years. I smiled and said that the President is doing a pretty good job considering the mess he inherited in his first term and the dysfunction in Washington that he deals with everyday. Of course, I am a little bias, but I still call a spade a spade regardless of my political affiliation and alliances. If you were to create a Presidential report card for Obama, it would have subjects like Health Care Reform, Immigration, Wall Street Reform, Foreign Affairs, Domestic Issues, etc. Clearly he has been an honor student on several issues, and somewhat average on others; but contrary to his critics … he would have a pretty solid GPA. From his administrations aggressive support of incentives to lift up the auto industry to the affordable care act, which is now providing needed healthcare benefits to millions of Americans … the President has hit some home runs. I recall when the President announced the move to bail out the Detroit auto industry. Many critics thought that it was the worse move in the history of capitalism … the governments investment or bailout of Chrysler and GM would be a complete failure. But if you fast-forward to today, many of the naysayers are silent because clearly the bailout actually worked. The auto industry is finally turning a profit again and beginning to add jobs in cities like Detroit. And if any community needs jobs Detroit is at the top of the list. In areas like healthcare, the verdict is still out. Although the President did a great job of getting healthcare reform passed through Congress, the implementation has been difficult, and measuring the success of the program will take some time to realize. But in the short term its clear … millions of Americans now have healthcare benefits, which clearly equals success in my book. On Wall Street Reform, the President would clearly get a fairly high grade, and his toughness and management of the gulf oil spill would also get high marks. In the now infamous words of President Bill Clintons chief campaign strategist James Carville, Its the economy stupid.Ž These were the words that summed up the strategy that took President Daddy Bush down and framed the debate in the 1992 presidential election. So it was the economy then, and its the economy now.Speaking of the economy … we have seen steady growth over the past two years, and a declining unemployment rate. One would think that El Presidente would get some credit, but ummmƒ. that clearly hasnt been the case. Congressional Republicans are up to their normal shenanigans rebuking the President at every single chance possible and even preparing to sue over his authority to issue executive orders. But putting the nonsense aside, here are a few (just a few) of the accomplishments of President Obama during his term. Clearly, killing or capturing Osama bin Laden was a priority and would have been for any American President. In 2011, Obama ordered a military raid of a secret compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, where the terrorist leader was killed and critical al-Qaeda documents were discovered. Education is our passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today,Ž said Malcolm X. And President Obama knows that education is a true pathway to success in this country, so his administration targeted ways to improve federal financial aid programs. Starting July 2010, all students began getting their federal student loans directly from the federal government. The U.S.Treasury will save $67 billion over ten years, $36 billion of which will go to expanding Pell Grants to lower-income students. Bravo Mr. President! One of President Obamas campaign promises was to end the war in Iraq and Afghanistan and bring our troops home. He did that, and with so many soldiers coming home the President signed a new GI bill offering $78 billion in tuition assistance over a decade, and provided multiple tax credits for businesses to hire veterans. A big win for women, and really anyone who cares about equality, the President signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act in 2009. This bill gives women who are paid less than men for the same work the right to sue their employers after they find out about the discrimination, even if that discrimination happened years ago. Speaking of women, especially smart women, Obama nominated and obtained confirmation for Sonia Sotomayor, the first Hispanic and third woman to serve, in 2009; and Elena Kagan, the fourth woman to serve, in 2010. Anyone who reads the Free Press on a regular basis knows that I believe in mentoring as a way help minority young men stay on track. The President started the My Brothers Keeper Task Force, which recently began its work by identifying critical indicators. The initiative is focusing on five key moments that mark critical junctures on the path to healthy and productive adulthood: early learning and literacy, pathway to college and careers, ladders to jobs, mentors and support networks, and interactions with criminal justice and violent crime. Since I am in Boston, the birthplace of Benjamin Franklin, I will use a quote from the great founding father to sum up the value of mentoring. He said, Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.Ž So the President has achieved much in his first six years, despite one of the most dysfunctional Congresses in the modern era. I am sure that the Obamas wish that they could hit the fast forward button and be done with this final term, but hang in there Mr. President and finish strong. Signing off from Boston, Mass., Reggie Fullwood Page 4 Ms.Perrys Free Press SUBSCRIBE TODAY SUBSCRIBE TODAY Yes, Id like to subscribe to the Jacksonville Free Press!Enclosed is my check __ money order __for $38.00 to cover my one year subscription.AME _________________________________________ ADDRESS_______________________________________ CITY____________________STATE____ZIP________ DISCLAIMERThe United State provides opportunities for free expression of ideas. The Jacksonville Free Press has its view, but others may differ. Therefore, the Free Press ownership reserves the right to publish views and opinions by syndicated and local columnist, professional writers and other writers which are solely their own. Those views do not necessarily reflect the policies and positions of the staff and management of the Jacksonville Free Press. Readers, are encouraged to write letters to the editor commenting on current events as well as what they wouldlike to see included in the paper. All letters must be type written and signed and include a telephone number and address. Please address letters to the Editor, c/o JFP, P.O. Box 43580 Jacksonville, FL 32203. (o CALLS PLEASE)MAILTO: JACKSONVILLE FREE PRESS P.O. BOX 43580, JACKSONVILLE, FL 32203 MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 43580 Jacksonville, FL 32203 PHYSICAL ADDRESS 903 W. Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville,FL32208Email: JfreePress@aol.com TELEPHONE (904) 634-1993 Fax (904) 765-3803 Sylvia PerryPUBLISHER Rita PerryPublisher Emeritus CONTRIBUTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald Fullwood, E.O.Huthchinson, WilliamReed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Marsha Oliver, Marretta Latimer, Phyllis Mack, Tonya Austin, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver, Vickie Brown, Rahman Johnson, Headshots, William Jackson. by Lee Daniels City Chronicles Diatribes on life in the African-American Diaspora by Rep. Reggie Fullwood Despite Ups and Downs … Obama Building a Solid LegacyAugust 7-13, 2014 The GOP: Chaos is Their Goal Three events occurred in the tight confines of Capitol Hill last week that underscore the Republican Partys extraordinary institutional decline and its responsibility for the Congress fully deserving its do-nothingŽ label. First, early in the week, all but seven Republicans in the GOP … controlled House of Representatives voted to give Speaker of the House John Boehner of Ohio the go-ahead to sue President Obama because they claim his executive orders are in violation of the constitution. The purpose of that political stuntŽ … the presidents words for the lawsuit, which he and the Democrats have come to relish for the 2014 campaign … is to keep alive the GOPs rhetoric about impeaching the president if the November elections give them control of the Senate. Secondly, later in the week Boehner was forced to give up on a GOP-drafted bill to authorize emergency funds for the governments efforts to cope with the sudden crisis of undocumented immigrant children massing at the U.S-Mexico border. The first-level reason for that stunning rebuke of a Speaker of the House by his own party members was that GOP hard-line conservatives made it clear they wouldnt vote for their own partys bill. But what made the rebuke to Boehner even more humiliating was the weeks third noteworthy event …which was actually a facet the second. That was that the hard-liners had been urged on by the Tea Partys favorite U.S. Senator, Ted Cruz of Texas. According to numerous media reports, Cruz had met with a dozen or more of the House hard-liners the night before the scheduled July 31 vote to declare his opposition to it. The next day, Boehner, clearly seeing he didnt have the votes for passage, pulled the bill from consideration. Boehner allies in the House pledged to try to get a spending measure enacted before Congress broke for the summer recess. But the real point of the weeks developments had been made … reinforcing what has been evident since President Obama took office. First, in the midst of a crisis, when Americas national government needs to act swiftly, count on the Republican Party, driven by its reflexive antiObama mania, to oppose any positive action. Secondly, the GOP, which still boasts about its adherence to tradition and conservative principles, remains wracked by an internal battle between conservative extremists and establishment regulars only slightly less vicious than its war against the president. That civil war these past six years has produced the electoral primary defeats of such staunch GOP veterans as former Senators Robert Bennett of Utah and Richard Lugar of Indiana and, in June, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor … all deemed not conservative enough by the GOPs Tea Party reactionaries. Cruz, whos been running for the 2016 GOP presidential nomination since his election in 2012, has waged the war of disruption against the GOP congressional establishment in both the House and the Senate in unprecedented fashion. From the first, hes been eager to show his disrespect of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, of Kentucky, and Boehner. His meddling in House matters last week marks the second time hes undercut Boehner in order to grab the spotlight and build support among the GOPs reactionary base. Last year, he was among the loudest voices urging GOP hard-liners to stand fast for a government shutdown. Cruzs sabotage last week led New York Republican, Peter T. King, to complain to a New York Times reporter, I do wish that Ted Cruz would stay in the Senate. Nobody elected him Speaker ƒ its really a cheap shot to be coming in from the side. To have some guy come in from the outside like the Pied Piper is wrong.Ž And yet, Cruzs behavior perfectly represents the political game going on on the conservative side of American politics these days … a game whose goal is sowing chaos. Cruz and his Tea Party confederates must disrupt the GOPs own time-honored political processes and lines of authority … sow internal party chaos … if theyre to seize power from establishment figures like Boehner and McConnell. That strategy has both intensified and yet, ironically, also undercut the commitment the GOP leadership itself made at the very beginning of Obamas first term to reflexively oppose his administration proposals … to sow governmental chaos … in order to re-capture the White House. Those two dynamics adopted by the conservative movement and the Republican Party are the major reasons why the American politics of this era is so polarized: because, for them, political chaos is the goal. Democrats Smart Butt White Boys Syndrome

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August 7-13, 2014 Ms. Perrys Free Press Page 5 ’FOR THE WEEK OF AUGUST 5 11, 2014TEAM-BY-TEAM SCHEDULES; RETURNING STAT LEADERS; THINGS TO WATCH IN 2014 2 0 1 4 T E A M B Y T E A M B L A C K C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L S C H E D U L E S BOWIE STATE 9/6.................. S aint A nslem ................ 1 9/ 1 3.............@ Morgan S tate .............. 1 9/ 20 .................@ Concord .............. 12 n 9/ 2 7...............@ Livingstone ............... 1 10 / 4 ..................J. C. S mith .................. 4 10 / 11 ...............@ Chowan ..................3 10 / 1 8.........Virginia S tate ( H C) ............ 4 10 / 25 ...........@ Virginia U nion ............. 1 11 / 1 ..................@ Lincoln ................... 1 11 /8 ........... E lizabeth City S tate ........... 1 CHOWAN 9/6.............. F ayetteville S tate ........... 12 9/ 1 3.........@ A lderson Broaddus ..... 12 n 9/ 20 ................@ N. C. A & T .................6 9/ 2 7.............@ S t. A ugustine's ........ 1 :3 0 10 / 4 ......... W inston -S alem State ..........7 10 / 11 ...............Bowie S tate .................3 10 / 1 8.............Virginia U nion ................7 10 / 25 ......@ E lizabeth City S tate .... 1 :3 0 11 / 1 .............@ Virginia S tate .............. 2 11 /8 .....................Lincoln ..................... 1 ELIZABETH CITY STATE 9/6................@ N. C. Central .............. 5 9/ 1 3................... T usculum ................... 4 9/ 20 ......Benedict in R ocky Mount NC....... 4 9/ 2 7.......@ W inston -S alem S tate ........6 10 / 4 .................Livingstone .................. 110 / 11 .............@ Virginia S tate .............. 2 10 / 1 8................@ Lincoln ................... 1 10 / 25 .............Chowan ( H C) ........... 1 :3 0 11 / 1 ...............Virginia U nion ................ 1 11 /8 ..............@ Bowie S tate ............... 1 FAYETTEVILLE STATE 9/6...................@ Chowan ..................7 9/ 1 3...........@ U NC Pembroke ............6 9/ 20 ...............Virginia U nion ................6 9/ 2 7.............@ Virginia S tate .............. 2 10 / 4 ..................@ Lincoln ................... 1 10 / 11 .................@ S haw .................... 1 10 / 1 8..........Johnson C. S mith .............6 10 / 25 ..........@ S t. A ugustine's ............. 2 11 / 1 .............Livingstone ( H C) ............. 2 11 /8 ......... W inston -S alem S tate .......... 1 JOHNSON C. SMITH 9/6..............@ U NC Charlotte ............. 1 9/ 13.............. K entucky S tate ............... 2 9/ 20 .............@ W est G eorgia.............. 2 9/ 2 7...............Virginia U nion ................ 2 10 / 4 ..............@ Bowie S tate ............... 4 10 / 11 ....... W inston -S alem S tate .......... 2 10 / 1 8........@ F ayetteville S tate ...........6 10 / 25 .................@ S haw .................... 1 11 / 1 .......... S t. A ugustine's ( H C) ........... 1 11 /8 .................Livingstone .................. 1 LINCOLN (PA) 9/6.....................Cheyney ....................7 9/ 1 3...............NC W esleyan ................ 1 9/ 20 ............@ Montclair S tate ............ 1 9/ 2 7...................@ S haw .................... 1 10 / 4 ............ F ayetteville S tate ............. 1 10 / 11 ...........@ Virginia U nion ............. 1 10 / 1 8.... E lizabeth City S tate ( H C) ....... 1 10 / 25 ...........@ Virginia S tate .............. 2 11 / 1 .................Bowie S tate ................. 1 11 /8 .................@ Chowan .................. 1 LIVINGSTONE 9/6..................@ Millersville ................6 9/ 1 3...................@ Paine .................... 4 9/ 20 ......@ Va. U niv. of Lynchburg ....... 1 9/ 2 7.................Bowie S tate ................. 1 10 / 4 ........@ E lizabeth City S tate ......... 1 10 / 11 ........ S t. A ugustine's ( H C) ........... 1 10 / 1 8.................... S haw ................. 1 :3 0 10 / 25 .....@ W inston -S alem S tate ... 1 :3 0 11 / 1 ..........@ F ayetteville S tate ...........2 11 /8 ...............@ J. C. S mith ................ 1 ST. AUGUSTINE'S 9/6................@ Indiana (Pa.) .......... 12 n 9/ 1 3.................... W ingate ............... 1 :3 0 9/ 20 ..................@ S tillman ..................3 9/ 2 7....................Chowan ............... 1 :3 0 10 / 4 .............@ Virginia S tate .............. 2 10 / 11 .............@ Livingstone .......... 1 :3 0 10 / 1 8.....@ W inston -S alem S tate ... 1 :3 0 10 / 25 ...... F ayetteville S tate ( H C) ......... 2 11 / 1 ..........@ Johnson C. S mith .......... 1 11 /8 ...................... S haw ................. 1 :3 0 SHAW 9/6......................@ Miles ....................6 9/ 1 3............@ W est A labama .............6 9/ 20 .......U NC Pembroke in W ilmington ....... 1 9/ 2 7................Lincoln (Pa.) ................. 1 10 / 4 .............@ Virginia U nion ............. 1 10 / 11 .......... F ayetteville S tate ............. 1 10 / 1 8.............@ Livingstone .......... 1 :3 0 10 / 25 ......Johnson C. S mith ( H C) ........ 1 11 / 1 ......... W inston -S alem S tate .......... 1 11 /8 ............@ S t. A ugustine's ........ 1 :3 0 VIRGINIA STATE 9/6..............@ California (Pa.) ............ 1 9/ 1 3...............Lenoir -R hyne ................ 2 9/ 20 ............@ K entucky S tate ............ 4 9/ 2 7............ F ayetteville S tate ............. 2 10 / 4 ............. S aint A ugustine's ............. 2 10 / 11 ......... E lizabeth City State ........... 2 10 / 1 8............@ Bowie S tate ............... 4 10 / 25 ..............Lincoln ( H C) ................. 2 11 / 1 ....................Chowan .................... 2 11 /8 .............@ Virginia U nion ........ 1 :3 0 VIRGINIA UNION 9/6................. S iena H eights ............ 12 n 9/ 1 3..................Charleston .................. 1 9/ 20 ..........@ F ayetteville S tate ...........6 9/ 2 7...............@ J. C. S mith ................ 2 10 / 4 ...................... S haw ...................... 1 10 / 11 ..........Lincoln (Pa.) ( H C) ............ 1 10 / 1 8...............@ Chowan ..................7 10 / 25 ...............Bowie S tate ................. 1 11 / 1 ........@ E lizabeth City S tate ......... 1 11 /8 ................Virginia S tate ........... 1 :3 0 WINSTON-SALEM STATE 9/6................ U NC Pembroke ..............6 STILLMAN 9/6................. W est A labama ...............3 9/ 11 .................@ S amford .............6:3 0 9/ 20 ............. S aint A ugustine's .............3 9/ 2 7.............. K entucky S tate ...............3 10 / 4 ....................@ Lane .................... 2 10 / 11 .................Benedict .................... 2 10 / 1 8................ T uskegee ................... 1 10 / 25 .............@ Central S tate .......... 1 :3 0 11 / 1 ....................@ Miles ....................6 11 /8 ............Clark A tlanta ( H C) ............ 1 11 / 22 ..........@ A labama S tate ............. 1 TUSKEGEE 9/6................. A labama A &M ............... 1 9/ 1 3..... A lbany S tate in Phenix City ..... 1 9/ 20 .......@ W inston -S alem S tate ........6 9/ 2 7......................Lane ....................... 1 10 / 4 ............. F ort Valley S tate .............. 1 10 / 11 ......Morehouse in Col. GA ......... 2 10 / 1 8................@ S tillman .................. 1 10 / 25 ........ K entucky S tate ( H C) .......... 1 11 / 1 .............@ Central S tate ......... 1 :3 0 11 /8 ....................@ Miles ....................4 ALABAMA A&M 8/3 1 ...........NC A & T in O rlando..... 12 : 45 9/6..................@ T uskegee ................. 1 9/ 1 3.......@ A labama Birmingham .. 2 :3 0 9/ 20 ............@ T exas S outhern ............7 9/ 2 7..........@ Miss. Valley S tate ......... 4 10 / 4 ......... G rambling S tate ( H C).......... 2 10 / 11 ................. S outhern.................... 1 10 / 25 ..... A labama S tate in B'ham ... 2 :3 0 11 / 1 .............@ Jackson S tate .............6 11 /8 ................. A lcorn S tate ................. 1 11 / 15 ..........Prairie View A &M ............. 1 11 / 22 ......@ A rkansas Pine Bluff .... 2 :30 ALABAMA STATE 8/3 0 ..........@ S am H ouston S tate .....6:3 0 9/6............... T ennessee S tate ............. 5 9/ 1 3........Mississippi Valley S tate ........ 5 9/ 1 8........... A rkansas Pine Bluff ......7:3 0 9/ 2 7.............. T exas S outhern .............. 5 10 / 4 ..............@ A lcorn S tate ............... 2 10 / 11 ........@ Prairie Viiew A &M .......... 2 10 / 25 ......A labama A &M in Birmingham ... 2 :3 0 11 / 1 .................@ S outhern ................. 1 11 /8 ...............Jackson S tate................ 1 11 / 15 .........@ G rambling S tate ........... 2 11 / 22 .............. S tillman ( H C) ................ 1 ALCORN STATE 8/3 0 ........Va. U niv. of Lynchburg ......... 4 9/6.........@ S outhern Mississippi ........6 9/ 1 3............Louisiana College............. 4 9/ 20 ..........@ Miss. Valley S tate .......... 4 9/ 2 7................... S outhern.................... 5 10 / 4 .............. A labama S tate ............... 2 10 / 11 .........@ G rambling S tate ........... 2 10 / 1 8........ T exas S outhern ( H C) .......... 2 10 / 25 ........@ Prairie View A &M ........... 1 11 /8 .............@ A labama A &M ............. 1 11 / 15 ......... A rkansas Pine Bluff ........... 4 11 / 1 6 .............Jackson S tate................ 2 ARKANSAS-PINE BLUFF 8/3 0 ...............@ T exas S tate ...............6 9/6..............Concordia -S elma .............6 9/ 2 7...............Jackson S tate................6 10 / 4 .................@ S outhern ............ 5 :3 0 10 / 1 8......... A rkansas Pine Bluff ........... 2 10 / 25 ..........@ T exas S outhern ............ 2 11 / 1 ........Mississippi Valley S tate ... 2 :3 0 11 /8 ........Prairie View A &M ( H C) .... 2 :3 0 11 / 15 ............@ A lcorn S tate ............... 4 11 / 22 ............. A labama A &M .......... 2 :3 0GRAMBLING STATE 8/3 0 ...................@ Lamar ...................6 96....................@ H ouston ..................7 9/ 1 3........@ Bethune Cookman. ......... 4 9/ 20 .............@ Jackson S tate .............6 9/ 2 7.....Prairie View A &M in Dallas 4 :3 0 10 / 4 .............@ A labama A &M .............. 2 10 / 11 ............... A lcorn S tate ................. 2 10 / 1 8.... A rkansas Pine Bluff ( H C) ....... 2 11 / 1 ............@ T exas S outhern ............ 2 11 /6 ..........@ Miss. Valley S tate .....6:3 0 11 / 15 ............ A labama S tate ............... 2 11 / 2 9 ......S outhern in New O rleans .... 1 :3 0 JACKSON STATE 8/3 0 ................. F lorida A &M .................6 9/6..........Va. U niv. of Lynchburg .........6 9/ 1 3... T ennessee S tate in Memphis ....6 9/ 20 ............. G rambling S tate ..............6 9/ 2 7........@ A rkansas Pine Bluff .........6 10 / 4 ............Prairie View A &M .............6 10 / 11 ......Miss. Valley S tate ( H C) ........ 2 10 / 25 ................. S outhern....................6 11 / 1 ..............@ Jackson S tate...............6 11 /8 ............@ A labama S tate ............. 1 11 / 15 ..........@ T exas S outhern ............ 2 11 / 22 .............@ A lcorn S tate ............... 2 MISSISSIPPI VALLEY STATE 8/3 0 ............ U niversity of F aith ............ 4 9/6................@ Illinois S tate ..........6:3 0 9/ 1 3............@ A labama S tate ............. 5 9/ 20 ................. A lcorn S tate ................. 4 9/ 2 7............... A labama A &M ............... 4 10 / 4 ............@ T exas S outhern ............7 10 / 11 ...........@ Jackson S tate ............. 2 10 / 1 8......Prairie View A &M ( H C) ......... 2 11 /6 ............. G rambling S tate .........6:3 0 11 / 15 ...............@ S outhern .................1 PRAIRIE VIEW A&M 8/3 1 ...T exas S outhern ( R eliant S tad.) .... 4 9/ 1 3............@ McNeese S tate ............6 9/ 20 ................... S outhern....................6 9/ 2 7...... G rambling S tate in Dallas 4 :3 0 10 / 4 .............@ Jackson S tate .............6 10 / 11 ........ A labama S tate ( H C) ........... 2 10 / 1 8........@ Miss. Valley S tate .......... 2 10 / 25 ............... A lcorn S tate ................. 1 11 /8 ........@ A rkansas Pine Bluff .... 2 :3 0 11 / 15 ...........@ A labama A &M ............. 1 SOUTHERN 8/3 0 ........@ Louisiana Lafayette .........6 9/6..............Central Methodist .............6 9/ 1 3...........Northwestern S tate ...........6 9/ 20 ..........@ Prairie View A &M ...........6 C I A A ALL TIMES LOCAL9/ 1 3............@ Valdosta S tate ............. 4 9/ 20 .................. T uskegee ...................6 9/ 2 7........... E lizabeth City S tate ...........6 10 / 4 .................@ Chowan ..................7 10 / 11 ........@ Johnson C. S mith .......... 2 10 / 1 8........ S t. A ugustine's ( H C) ...... 1 :3 0 10 / 25 ...............Livingstone ............. 1 :3 0 11 / 1 ...................@ S haw .................... 1 11 /8 ..........@ F ayetteville S tate ...... 1 :3 0 BETHUNE-COOKMAN 8/3 0 ........@ F lorida International .........7 9/ 1 3............. G rambling S tate .............. 4 9/ 20 ............@ Central F lorida ............6 9/ 2 7................. F lorida T ech ................. 4 10 / 4 ..........Delaware S tate ( H C) ..........4 10 / 11 .................. H oward ..................... 4 10 / 1 8.........@ S avannah S tate ............6 10 / 25 ...............@ S C S tate ............ 1 :3 0 11 / 1 ................N. C. Central ................ 4 11 /8 ..............@ Norfolk S tate .............. 2 11 / 15 ...............@ H ampton ................. 1 11 / 22 ...... F lorida A &M in O rlando ... T B A DELAWARE STATE 8/3 0 ...............@ Monmouth ................ 1 9/6..................@ Delaware .................6 9/ 1 3.................... T owson ..................... 2 9/ 20 ..................@ T emple ................... 1 9/ 2 7............. S avannah S tate ..............6 10 / 4 .........@ Bethune Cookman ......... 4 10 / 11 ............@ Norfolk S tate .............. 2 10 / 1 8............N. C. A & T ( H C)............... 2 10 / 25 ................. H ampton.................... 2 11 / 1 ..................@ H oward .................. 1 11 / 15 ............... F lorida A &M ................. 2 11 / 22 ...........@ Morgan S tate .............. 1 FLORIDA A&M 8/3 0 .............@ Jackson S tate .............6 9/6.....................@ Miami ....................7 9/ 20 .............Coastal Carolina.............. 5 9/ 2 7...........@ T ennessee S tate ...........6 10 / 4 ...............Morgan S tate ................ 5 10 / 11 ........... S avannah S tate .............. 5 10 / 1 8................@ H oward .................. 1 10 / 25 ..............@ N. C. A & T ................. 1 11 / 1 ............Norfolk S tate ( H C) ............3 11 /8 .................. S C. S tate ..................3 11/ 15 ..........@ Delaware S tate ............ 2 11 / 22 ......B Cookman in O rlando.... T B A HAMPTON 8/3 0 .............@ O ld Dominion .........3:3 0 9/6................ W illiam & Mary ...............6 9/ 1 3................@ R ichmond ................6 9/ 20 ......................Miles .......................6 9/ 2 7.................. S C. S tate ..................6 10 / 11 ..............@ N. C. A & T ................. 1 10 / 1 8..............Norfolk S tate ................ 1 10 / 25 ..........@ Delaware S tate ............ 2 11 / 1 ...........Morgan S tate ( H C) ............ 2 11 /8 ..............@ N. C. Central .............. 2 11 / 15 .........Bethune Cookman ............ 1 11 / 22 ................@ H oward .................. 1 HOWARD 8/ 2 8...................@ A kron ....................7 9/6....................@ Rutgers .............. 12 n 9/ 1 3...........Morehouse at RFK .......3:3 0 9/ 20 ....Morgan S tate in E R uth. NJ ....3 9/ 2 7..................N. C. A & T ................... 1 10 / 4 ..............@ N. C. Central .............. 2 10 / 11 .......@ Bethune Cookman ......... 4 10 / 1 8.......... F lorida A &M ( H C) ............. 1 11 / 1 ..............Delaware S tate............... 1 11 /8 ...........@ S avannah S tate ............6 11 / 15 ......@ Central Conn. S tate ......... 1 11 / 22 ................. H ampton.................... 1 MORGAN STATE 8/3 0 ..........@ E astern Michigan ...........6 9/6.................@ H oly Cross ................ 1 9/ 1 3.................Bowie S tate ................. 1 9/ 20 ........ H oward in E R uth. NJ.........3 9/ 2 7..............@ Norfolk S tate .............. 4 10 / 4 ................. F lorida A &M .................5 10 / 1 8..........N. C. Central ( H C) ............ 1 10 / 25 ...............@ Villanova ............3:3 0 11 / 1 .................@ H ampton ................. 2 11 /8 ................@ N. C. A & T ................. 1 11 / 15 ................ S C. S tate .................. 1 11 / 22 ............Delaware S tate............... 1 NORFOLK STATE 8/3 0 ...................@ Maine ....................6 9/6.......................Liberty ..................... 4 9/ 1 3............@ W illiam & Mary ............7 9/ 20 ..................@ Buffalo .............. T B A 9/ 2 7...............Morgan S tate ................ 4 10 / 4 ...........@ S avannah S tate ............ 2 10 / 11 ........Delaware S tate ( H C) .......... 2 10 / 1 8...............@ H ampton ................. 1 11 / 1 ..............@ F lorida A &M ...............3 11/8 ...........Bethune Cookman ............ 2 11 / 15 ..............N. C. Central ................ 2 11 / 22 .............@ S C. S tate ........... 1 :3 0 NORTH CAROLINA A&T 8/3 1 ........A labama A &M in O rlando .. 12 : 45 9/6...............Coastal Carolina..............6 9/ 1 3....................@ E lon .....................6 9/ 20 ....................Chowan ....................6 9/ 2 7..................@ H oward .................. 1 10 / 4 .......... S C. S tate in A tlanta .....3:3 0 10 / 11 ................. H ampton.................... 1 10 / 1 8..........@ Delaware S tate ............ 2 10 / 25 .......... F lorida A &M ( H C) ............. 1 11 /8 ................@ N. C. A & T ................. 1 11 / 15 .........@ S avannah S tate ............ 2 11 / 22 ............@ N. C. Central .............. 2 NORTH CAROLINA CENTRAL 8/3 0 .............@ E ast Carolina ..............8 9/6............. E lizabeth City S tate ........... 5 9/ 1 3...................Charlotte.................... 5 9/ 20 ..................@ T owson ..................6 10 / 4 ....................H oward ..................... 2 10 / 11 .............@ S C. S tate ................ 2 10 / 1 8...........@ Morgan S tate .............. 1 10 / 25 ........... S avannah S tate .............. 2 11 / 1 .........@ Bethune Cookman ......... 4 11 /8 ............... H ampton ( H C) ............... 2 11 / 15 ............@ Norfolk S tate .............. 2 M E A C S I A C S W A C 9/ 2 7..............@ A lcorn S tate ............... 5 10 / 4 ...... A rkansas Pine Bluff ( H C) .. 5 :3 0 10 / 11 ...........@ A labama A &M ............. 1 10 / 25 .........Jackson S tate ( H C) ...........6 11 / 1 .............. A labama S tate ............... 1 11 /8 .............. T exas S outhern .............. 1 11 / 15 ......Mississippi Valley S tate ........ 1 11 / 2 9 .....G rambling in New O rleans ... 1 :3 0 TEXAS SOUTHERN 8/3 1 ....Prairie View A &M ( R eliant S tad.) ..... 4 9/ 4 ................. T exas College...........7:3 0 9/ 1 3.......Central S tate in Nassau ........ 5 9/ 20 ............... A labama A &M ..............7 9/ 2 7............@ A labama S tate ............. 5 10 / 4 ........Mississippi Valley S tate ........7 10 / 1 8............@ A lcorn S tate ............... 2 10 / 25 .... A rkansas Pine Bluff ( H C) ....... 2 11 / 1 ............. G rambling S tate .............. 2 11 /8 .................@ S outhern ................. 1 11 / 15 .............Jackson S tate................ 2 CHEYNEY 9/ 4 ....................@ Lincoln ...................7 9/ 1 3.................... G annon .................... 1 9/ 20 .....................Clarion ..................... 1 9/ 2 7.................@ K utztown ............6: 05 10 / 4 .................Bloomsburg ................. 110 / 11 ........@ E ast S troudsburg ......6: 05 10 / 1 8...........Lock H aven ( H C) ............. 1 10 / 25 ...........@ S hippensburg ......... 12 n 11 / 1 .............@ W est Chester .............. 1 11 /8 ..................Millersville............... 12 n 11 / 15 ...........@ S lippery R ock ............. 1 CONCORDIA-SELMA 9/6..........@ A rkansas Pine Bluff .........6 9/ 12 ..............Point U niversity .............. 5 9/ 20 ....... S outhwestern U niversity ... 12 n 9/ 2 7............@ W est A labama .............6 10 / 4 ................@ A ve Maria............. 12 n 10 / 11 ........ W esley College ( H C) ...... 12 n 10 / 1 8...........@ Central S tate ......... 1:3 0 10 / 25 ................@ W arner ................... 1 11 / 1 .................@ S amford .................. 1 11 /8 ...............@ Delta S tate ................ 2 EDWARD WATERS 8/ 2 3..............College of F aith .........7:3 0 8/3 0 ...........@ T ennessee S tate ...........6 9/6...................Morehouse ..................7 9/ 1 3.................@ Pikeville ............. 1 :3 0 9/ 2 7..............Point U niversity .............. 2 10 / 4 .....@ S outheastern U niversity ..... 2 10 / 11 ........ W ebber International .......... 2 10 / 1 8.................@ Paine .................... 2 10 / 25 .....Newport News A pprentice ( H C) .......6 11 / 1 .................. A ve Maria ................... 2 11 /8 .................... W arner ..................... 2 LANGSTON 9/6......Lincoln Mo. in K ansas City Mo......3 9/ 1 3.............@ T ruman S tate .............. 2 9/ 20 ............@ North A labama ............. 2 9/ 2 7...........@ H ardin -S immons ......3: 45 10 / 4 .............@ T exas College ............. 2 10 / 11 ........@ O klahoma Baptist .......... 2 10 / 1 8....... W ayland Baptist ( H C) .......... 2 10 / 25 ...... SW A ssemblies of G od ........ 2 11 /8 ........ O kla. Panhandle S tate ......... 2 11 / 15 ..................Bacone ..................... 2 LINCOLN (MO) 9/6.....Langston in K ansas City Mo.....3 9/ 1 3................. SW Baptist .................. 2 9/ 20 .....................Quincy ..................... 2 9/ 2 7.............@ T ruman S tate ..............7 10 / 4 .............@ W illiam Jewell .............610 / 11 ............... S t. Joseph's ................. 2 10 / 1 8......... T exas College ( H C) ........... 2 10 / 25 ............@ Indianapolis ...............6 11 /8 .................Mc K endree .................. 2 11 / 15 ...........@ Missouri S & T .............. 1 TENNESSEE STATE 8/3 0 .............. E dward W aters ...............6 9/6..............@ A labama S tate ............. 4 9/ 1 3.....Jackson S tate in Memphis ......6 9/ 20 ............. T ennessee T ech .............. 2 9/ 2 7............ F lorida A &M ( H C) .............6 10 / 4 ..............@ SE Missouri ............... 1 10 / 11 ..........Jacksonville S tate ............ 2 10 / 1 8................ UT Martin ................... 2 10 / 25 ..........@ E astern Illinois ........ 1:3 0 11 / 1 ............ E astern K entucky ............. 2 11 /8 ..............@ A ustin Peay ............... 4 11 / 22 ............@ Murray S tate .............. 1 TEXAS COLLEGE 8/3 0 ................@ Bellhaven ................. 2 9/ 4 ..............@ T exas S outhern .......7:3 0 9/ 1 3...................@ Lamar ...................7 9/ 20 .............. H ouston Baptist .......... 12 n 9/ 2 7........ O kla. Panhandle S tate ..... 12 n 10 / 4 .................@ Langston ................. 2 10 / 11 ................@ Bacone .................. 2 10 / 1 8............@ Lincoln (Mo.) .............. 2 10 / 25 ........@ O klahoma Baptist .......... 2 11 / 1 ......... W ayland Baptist ( H C) .......... 2 11 / 15 ....@ SW A ssemblies of G od ...... 2 VIRGINIA UNIV. OF LYNCHBURG 8/3 0..............@ A lcorn S tate ............... 4 9/6...............@ Jackson S tate .............6 9/ 1 3............@ G ardner -W ebb .............6 9/ 20 .................Livingstone .................. 1 9/ 2 7............... W est G eorgia ................ 1 10 / 11 ..... A tlanta S ports A cademy ........ 1 10 / 25 ............ W esley College .............. 1 11 / 1 .........@ A lderson Broaddus ......... 2 11 /8 ........... K entucky W esleyan ........... 1 WEST VIRGINIA STATE 9/6...................Lock H aven ................. 1 9/ 1 3....................Concord .................... 1 9/ 20 ..............@ W est Liberty............... 1 9/ 2 7............... F airmont S tate ............... 1 10 / 4 ..................@ U rbana ...................? 10 / 11 .... W est Va. Wesleyan ( H C) .. 1 :3 0 10 / 1 8.............@ Charleston ................ 1 10 / 25 ................ U V A W ise ................... 1 11 / 1 ........@ Notre Dame College ........ 1 11 /8 .................. S hepherd ................... 1 11 / 15 ..........@ G lenville S tate ............. 1 I N D E P E N D E N T S 11 / 22 ................N. C. A & T ................... 2 SAVANNAH STATE 8/3 0 .........@ Middle T enn. S tate ..........6 9/6............@ G eorgia S outhern ..........6 9/ 1 3............. F ort Valley S tate ..............6 9/ 2 7............@ Delaware S tate ............6 10 / 4 ............Norfolk S tate ( H C) ............ 2 10 / 11 ............@ F lorida A &M ............... 5 10 / 1 8.........Bethune Cookman ............6 10 / 25 ............@ N. C. Central .............. 2 11 / 1 ...............@ S C. S tate ........... 1 :3 0 11 /8 .................... H oward .....................6 11 / 15 ................N. C. A & T ................... 2 11 / 22 ..........@ Brigham Young ............ 1 SOUTH CAROLINA STATE 8/3 0 ......Benedict in Columbia S C ..... 5 9/6...................@ Clemson .......... 12 :3 0 9/ 1 3...........@ Coastal Carolina ...........6 9/ 20 .................... F urman .....................6 9/ 2 7.................@ H ampton .................6 10 / 4 .............N. C. A & T in A tlanta........3:3 0 10 / 11 ..............N. C. Central ................ 2 10 / 25 .........Bethune Cookman ....... 1 :3 0 11 / 1 ......... S avannah S tate ( H C) ..... 1 :3 0 11 /8 ..............@ F lorida A &M ...............3 11 / 15 ...........@ Morgan S tate .............. 1 11 / 2 3 ..............Norfolk S tate ........... 1 :3 0 ALBANY STATE 9/6..............@ Valdosta S tate .............7 9/ 1 3.... T uskegee in Phenix City A L ..... 1 9/ 2 7......................Miles .......................6 10 / 4 ....................@ Paine ..................... 4 10 / 11 ....................Lane .......................7 10 / 1 8.............@ Morehouse ............... 2 10 / 25 ..........Clark A tlanta ( H C) ............ 2 11 / 1 .................@ Benedict ................ 2 11 /8 ....F ort Valley S tate in Columbus GA ..... 2 BENEDICT 8/3 0 ..... S .C. S tate in Columbia S C ..... 5 9/6......................@ Lane .................... 2 9/ 20 ....E liz. City S tate in R ocky Mt. NC .... 4 9/ 2 7............. F ort Valley S tate ..............6 10 / 2 ....................@ Miles ....................7 10 / 11 .................. S tillman .................... 2 10 / 1 8............@ Clark A tlanta .............. 2 10 / 25 ...........Morehouse ( H C).............. 2 11 / 1 ................ A lbany S tate ................. 2 11 /8 ...................@ Paine .................... 2 CENTRAL STATE 9/6..................Clark A tlanta ............ 1 :3 0 9/ 1 3..... T exas S outhern in Nassau ...... 5 9/ 20 ........Morehouse in Chicago .........3 9/ 2 7...............@ Delta S tate ................6 10 / 4 ........ K entucky S tate in Indy .........3 10 / 11 ..................@ Miles .................... 4 10 / 1 8......Concordia -S elma ( H C) .... 1 :3 0 10 / 25 .................. S tillman ............... 1 :3 0 11 / 1 .................. T uskegee .............. 1 :3 0 11 /8 ......................Lane ....................... 1 CLARK-ATLANTA 9/6...............@ Central S tate ......... 1 :3 0 9/ 1 3......................Lane ....................... 2 9/ 20 ...........@ F ort Valley S tate ...........6 9/ 2 7.............@ W est G eorgia.............. 2 10 / 4 .................Morehouse ..................6 10 / 11 ............College of F aith .............. 2 10 / 1 8.................Benedict .................... 2 10 / 25 ............@ A lbany S tate .............. 2 11 / 1 .................Paine ( H C) .................. 2 11 /8 ..................@ S tillman .................. 1 FORT VALLEY STATE 9/6...................Delta S tate .................. 2 9/ 1 3...........@ S avannah S tate ............6 9/ 20 ................Clark A tlanta .................6 9/ 2 7.................@ Benedict .................6 10 / 4 ................@ T uskegee ................. 1 10/ 11 ............ K entucky S tate ............... 2 10 / 1 8................Limestone................... 2 10 / 25 ...............Paine ( H C) .................. 2 11 / 1 ...............@ Morehouse ...............7 11 /8 ....A lbany S tate in Columbus GA ..... 2 KENTUCKY STATE 9/ 4 ............. K entucky W esleyan ...........7 9/ 1 3...............@ J. C. S mith ................ 2 9/ 20 ................Virginia S tate ................ 4 9/ 2 7..........Central S tate in Indy...........3 10 / 4 ........... A lderson Broaddus............3 10 / 11 .........@ F ort Valley S tate ........... 2 10 / 1 8................Miles ( H C) ............. 1 :3 0 10 / 25 ..............@ T uskegee ................. 1 11 / 1 ......................Lane ....................... 1 11 /8 ...............@ Morehouse ............... 2 LANE 9/6.....................Benedict .................... 2 9/ 1 3..............@ Clark A tlanta .............. 2 9/ 20 ...................@ Paine .................... 4 9/ 2 7................@ T uskegee ................. 1 10 / 4 .................... S tillman .................... 2 10 / 11 ............@ A lbany S tate ..............7 10/ 25 ................Miles ( H C) .................. 2 11 / 1 ............@ K entucky S tate ............ 1 11 /8 .............@ Central S tate .............. 1 MILES 9/6........................ S haw ......................6 9/ 1 3............... W est G eorgia ................6 9/ 20 .................@ H ampton .................6 9/ 2 7..............@ A lbany S tate ..............6 10 / 2 ...................Benedict ....................7 10 / 11 ..........Central S tate ( H C) ............ 4 10 / 1 8..........@ K entucky S tate ....... 1 :3 0 10 / 25 ..................@ Lane .................... 2 11 / 1 .................... S tillman ....................6 11 /8 .................. T uskegee ................... 4 MOREHOUSE 9/6..............@ E dward W aters ............7 9/ 1 3...............H oward at RFK ...........3:3 0 9/ 20 .........Central S tate in Chicago .........3 9/ 2 7....................@ Paine ..................... 2 10 / 4 ..............@ Clark A tlanta ..............6 10 / 11 .. T uskegee in Columbus GA ..... 2 10 / 1 8.......... A lbany S tate ( H C) ............ 2 10 / 25 ...............@ Benedict ................. 2 11 / 1 ............. F ort Valley S tate ..............7 11 /8 .............. K entucky S tate .............. 2 Who and where are the next black college superstars? LUT WILLIAMSBCSP Editor Football is back and so is the BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS PAGE. The P ro Football Hall of Fame ceremony and game this weekend in C anton, O hio kind of kicks off the 2014 football season and it had a Claude Humphrey of Tennessee State Aeneas Williams Michael Strahan of Texas Southern bands of Strahan's alma mater, the T SU O cean BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS PAGE, this week, MEAC SWAC and Tennessee State the Howard RETURNING INDIVIDUAL STATS LEADERS FOR 2014 STAT CORNER WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTSA&M Texas Southern and Arkansas-Pine Bluff) and two from the MEAC (Florida A&M and Savannah State). will be the team with the best conference record regardless of N CAA ban, to be eligible for the WHICH WAY WINSTON-SALEM STATE? Before last season, Winston-Salem State Connell Maynor Hampton Kienus Boulware and former coach Bill Hayes THE EFFECTS OF APR? ing the locker rooms of black college football teams from the SWAC Southern Prairie View LEGEND IN TWO GAMES: TV Pro F ootball HOF PhotoMORE WHERE THEY CAME FROM BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS PAGE TURNS 21 THE LEGACY CONTINUES: Marquise GRIZZLEBenjamin ANDERSON Akeem JORDAN Marquis SMITHJavontay WILLIAMSDaniel FITZPATRICK KICKOFF RETURNS CL G RET YDS TD LNG AVG SCORING CL G TDS FGS PAT PTS AVG/G PASSING YARDS CL G COM ATT INT PCT YDS TDS AVG/G RUSHING YARDS CL G CAR YDS AVG TDS AVG/G RECEPTIONS CL G REC YDS TD YPC YDS/G REC/G ALL PURPOSE CL G Rush Rec PR KR YDS YDS/G PUNT RETURNS CL G RET YDS TD AVG TOTAL OFFENSE CL G RUSH PASS PLAYS YDS AVG/G TACKLES CL G SOL AST TOT AVG SACKS CL G SOL AST TOT AVG INTERCEPTIONS CL G INT YDS TD AVG PUNTING CL G NO YDS LNG AVG FIELD GOAL PCT. CL G MADE ATTS LNG PCT RECEIVING YARDS CL G REC YDS TD YPC YDS/G Pro F ootball HOF Photos

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Page 6 Ms. Perrys Free Press August 7-13, 2014 Greater Macedonia Baptist Church1880 West Edgewood Avenue The doors of Macedonia are always open to you and your family. If we may be of any assistance to you in your spiritual walk, please contact us at 764-9257 or via email at GreaterMac@aol.com. Seeking the lost for ChristMatthew 28:19 20 Pastor Landon Williams 8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Morning WorshipTuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m. Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m. Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM Sunday 2 PM 3 PM **FREE TUTORIG FOR YOUTH I EGLISH, SCIECE, HISTORY AD MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.  Walk in My Shoes Ž Communitywide Shoe DriveWalk in my ShoesŽ is a Communitywide Shoe Drive to collect 3,000 Bags of gently worn shoes for needy families. You or your organization can help by collecting at least one plastic bag containing 25 pairs of gently worn shoes per bag. All sizes, styles and color shoes for men, women, boys, girls will benefit the Adolescents Choosing Excellence Youth Programs. The Shoe Drive will end September 1st. For more information and bag pick-up call the Women of Color Cultural Foundation at 683-1757 or email helen.jackson4@comcast.net.JLOC Call to the CommunityThe Jacksonville Local Organizing Committee of the Millions More Movement Inc. (JLOC, MMM Inc.), a non-profit local organization is soliciting donation of your excess clothes, shoes, jackets and school supplies. Bring them to 916 N. Myrtle Avenue, between Kings Road and Beaver Street Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. If you have any questions or just want to learn more about the Millions More Movement visit www.jacksonvilleloc.org or call 240-9133 or email 1312@comcast.net. Southside Church Of God in Christ 12th Annual Holy Convocation The Florida Central Second Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction, Bishop Edward Robinson, Sr., Jurisdictional Prelate and Mother Mildred L. Eason, Jurisdictional Supervisor Of Women presents their 12th Annual Holy Convocation, August 12th to August 15th The theme is: We are Called to Minister and Witness to a Deeply Distressed and Troubled World,Ž Acts 26: 15-18. Schedule of events include the Holy Communion Celebration, Tuesday, August 12th at 7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, August 13th, Mother Mildred Eason, Supervisor in Charge will host the Womens Day and Women In Ministry celebration; Thursday, August 14th, workshops begin at 9:30 a.m. Topics include, At His Feet Ministry,Ž Restoring the Altar and the Altar Worker,Ž Discernment, Spiritual WarfareŽ. The same night enjoy worship service at 7:30 p.m. Workshop facilitator and worship service speaker is Evangelist Beverley Vaughn, of New Haven, CT., founder of At His Feet MinistryŽ. The Convocation official Night is Friday, August 15th at 7:30 p.m., Bishop Edward Robinson, Sr., Jurisdictional Prelate will be the speaker. The location is Southside Church Of God In Christ, 2179 Emerson Street. For more information call the church at 398-1625.Changing Lives Prayer Line Prayer ConferenceChanging Lives Prayer Line is inviting the community to their 3rd Annual Prayer Conference, Saturday, August 2, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at King Solomon United Baptist Church, 2240 Forest Street. Guest Speaker is Pastor Linda Simpson of Healing, Deliverance, Perfecting the Saints Outreach International Ministries. For more information call 703-593-1465. St. Thomas Missionary Baptist Church 28th Pastors Anniversary CelebrationThe St. Thomas Missionary Baptist Church will be celebrating their 28th Anniversary of their beloved Pastor, Ernie L. Murray, Sr., on Sunday, August 10th. The celebration will kick-off with an 8 a.m. worship service. Pastor Clifford Johnson will bring the spoken word, his choir and ushers from the Zion Hope Missionary Baptist Church. At 10:45 a.m. worship, Reverend Ernie L. Murray, Jr., of Aiken, South Carolina will bring the spoken word. The public is invited to share in the celebration. St. Thomas is located at 5863 Moncrief Rd. For more information call 768-8800.ational Fellowship Churches of God 18th Holy Convocation ContinuesThe National Fellowship Churches of God, Inc. is personally inviting the community to join them as they gather at the Holiday Inn and Suites, 620 Wells Road, Orange Park for their 18th Annual Holy Convocation. The theme is: Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, saith the Lord of hosts.Ž Zechariah 4:6. The schedule continues as follows: Call to Worship; Friday, August 8, at 6 p.m. is the Official Service with United Intercessory Prayer and Call to worship at 6:30 p.m. Ivan Grant, Jr. is the Pastor of New Beginning Family (NFCOG General Assembly), 5000 US Highway 17, Ste 18-116. Reminder: Summer Camp for ages 5 … 17 begins Friday, August 1st through Tuesday, August 5th. Participants will experience cottage lodging, a full range of group activities, meals and more! For more information on all activities call 215-3433 or visit www.nfcog.org.The H. Alvin Green Memorial Alumni Chorale in Concert at St. Paul AME In observance of their 73rd Anniversary, The Women's Progressive Club of St. Paul AME Church will present in concert, the H. Alvin Green Memorial Alumni Chorale. This celebration will take place on Sunday, August 17th, at 4 pm. The public is extended a special invitation to share in this special occasion. St. Paul AME is located at 6910 New Kings Road. Reverend Marvin C. Zanders, II is the pastor. For more details contact the church office at 764-2755 or visit www.stpaulamejax.com or email chreed10@bellsouth.net. Bethel Baptist Institutional Church215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464 Bishop Rudolph McKissick, Jr. Senior Pastor Sunday Morning Worship 8:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Church school 9:30 a.m. Bible Study 6:45 p.m.Midweek Services Wednesday oon Service Miracle at MiddayŽ 12 noon 1:00 p.m. Weekly Services Come share in Holy Communion on 1st Sunday at 7:40 and 10:40 a.m. Worship with us LIVE on the web visitwww.truth2powerministries.org Grace and Peacevisit www.Bethelite.org Bishop Rudolph McKissick, Sr.. Pastor Emeritus Beverly Vaughn Bishop Robinson Representing Primitive Baptist churches in 18 states, the National Primitive Baptist Convention, USA will convene its 107th Annual Session in Birmingham, Alabama at The Sheraton Birmingham Hotel, 2101 Richard Arrington Jr., Blvd., beginning Sunday morning, August 17, through Friday night, August 22, 2014. Elder Dr. Bernard C. Yates, pastor of Zion Hope Primitive Baptist Church, Pensacola, FL and a native of Mobile, Alabama, is the General President. Hosted by the First Southern Region and Regional Vice President Elder Dr. Oscar Montgomery and Crumbey Bethel Primitive Baptist Church (Fairfield) and Elder Melvin Robinson, Jr., approximately 20002500 members (representing national officers, auxiliaries, regional vice presidents, state presidents, moderators, pastors, elders, laity and friends) are expected to assemble in Birmingham to: 1) conduct business on behalf of the body; 2) participate in Church School Training Sessions, Lectures, and Workshops; 3) hear the Word of the Lord from the elders, share in joyous worship experiences, inspirational singing from the National Choir, Youth Congress Choir, Zion Hope Primitive Baptist Church Mass Choir (FL), Crumbey Bethel Primitive Baptist Church Mass Choir (AL), Locust Ridge Primitive Baptist Church Mass Choir (TN), North Alabama Primitive Baptist District Choir (AL), and daily Bible Expositions; 4) promote evangelism and mission; 5) fellowship with each other; and, 6) elect its General President on Thursday, August 21. For the first time, the National Primitive Baptist Convention Church School Congress and Urban Ministries, Inc. will partner with Evangelical Training Associates (ETA) of Chicago, Illinois to offer certificate courses to the convention delegation. ETA will offer two (2) courses which require 10 contact hours to be course certified. Eligible participants must be registered with the Church School Congress or National Primitive Baptist Convention, USA with the general registration fee of $100.00. Classes will be conducted Monday, August 18, through Thursday, August 21. The courses are: Biblical Leadership and Evangelism For the 21st Century. Upon satisfactory completion of each course, participants will be certified by ETA to teach courses in their home areas. Class sizes are limited and delegates are encouraged to pre-register to ensure their course registration. The theme for this year's convention is "Celebrating the Church: Taking the Gospel to the Nations" (Matthew 28, Acts 1:8, Genesis 12:1-3, Jeremiah 1:5, Luke 19:10). Confirmed guest preachers/speaker to speak at the Annual Session are Dr. Maurice Watson, Pastor of Beulahland Bible Church, Macon Georgia; Mr. Cedric D. Sparks, Sr., Executive Director, City of Birmingham Mayor's Office, Division of Youth Services; and, Dr. A. B Sutton, Jr., Founding Pastor of Living Stones Temple: The Dream Fellowship, Fulrondale, Alabama. The public is invited to attend. The National Primitive Baptist Convention Convenes Its 107th Annual Sessionin Birmingham, AL this Month Emmanuel Temple of Love Ministries Back-To-School Give-A-WayPastor Shariha Jefferson of Emmanuel Temple of Love Ministries, Inc. presents their 1st Back to School supply give-a-away and fundraiser, Saturday, August 9th, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 2564 W. Edgewood Avenue. For more information call 755-4165. Greater El-Bethel Divine Holiness ChurchBack to School Give-A-WayThe Greater El-Bethel Divine Holiness church presents an International Back-to-School give-a-away, Sunday, August 17th at 725 N. 4th St. Free Food and refreshments will be available. For more details email gospell75@aol.com or call 359-0661.P.U.SH. Ministry Annual Worship and Word ServiceThe Refreshing Women Pray Until Something Happens Ministry will celebrate their annual Worship and Word Service, September 21st at 4 p.m. This years theme is Women Igniting A revolution,Ž taken from 1st Samuel 17th verse. The speaker is Eldress Mary Palmer of Lawtey Florida. The location of the event is Power of Faith Church, 3910 Atlantic Blvd. at 4 p.m. A talent show will held and the Ms. RWPM P.U.SH 2014 will be crowned. All are welcome to attend this free event. For more information contact Reverend Mattie Freeman at 221-7322 or email revmattie@bellsouth.net or via the web at www.rwpm.info.Saint Paul Lutheran Church Presents a Praise Connection ServiceThe Saint Paul Lutheran Church 2014 Praise Connection is scheduled for Sunday, September 28th, at 4 p.m. at Saint Paul Lutheran Church, Reverend James Wiggins Jr.-Pastor, 2730 W. Edgewood Avenue. The event serves as the official debut of the A'saph Worship Team. Refreshments will be served immediately after the event. For more Information, contact the founder Jasmine J. Bullock at 352-708-0277. OTICE:Church news is published free of charge. Information must be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5 p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information received prior to the event date will be printed on a space available basis until the date. Fax e-mail to 765-8611 or e-mail to JFreePress@aol.com.

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With words such as selfieŽ and hashtagŽ added to the MerriamWebster dictionary this year, its obvious online interactions have made a significant impact on modern culture. According to Pamela Rutledge, a media psychologist and director of the Media Psychology Research Center in Newport Beach, California, social media is here to stay … whether people like the selfie culture or not. Its not going away, so it doesnt do us much good to say its negative,Ž Rutledge says. We are now creating a generation that has a voice and expects that voice to be heard.Ž Rutledge studies social interactions via technology and is working to understand online communication. Older generations engage on sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, but heavy social media use is attributed to teenagers and young adults. The selfie has become a modern obsession with teens, who post photographs of themselves in any and every situation. According to Pew Research Center's "Millennials in Adulthood" study, 55 percent of Generation Y, otherwise known as millennials, have posted a selfie, and 81 percent have a Facebook profile. There has been little data collected about Generation Z … those currently in middle school and high school … but even at a young age, this generation already has a significant online presence. While older generations may not relate to the selfie culture, as a parent, its important to understand the phenomenon and your teens social environment. What is the Selfies Purpose? A selfie is no different from arriving at a job interview looking your best, Rutledge says. The photos intend to present yourself in your best light, and with social media, young people have the power to do so whenever they want. I see selfies as primarily a form of communication that is more immediate, more authentic,Ž she says. We care what other people think of us, and we care about monitoring the social environment, so how we present ourselves matters.Ž Teenage years involve forming your identity through socializing, and in todays world, social interactions can occur 24/7 through smartphones. In fact, social media helps many introverted adolescents make connections they may not have otherwise, says David Proost, a psychologist in Dallas who specializes in child and adolescent psychology. [Adolescents] are much more closely tied to each other than they've ever been,Ž Proost says. You post [selfies] for people to see … for the world to see. There is a certain type of empowerment with that, that you can sort of choose what you do and how you present yourself.Ž Selfies contribute to the online personas teens create for themselves. From pictures to statuses, each component builds their online identity. And while this might seem overly self-interested to some adults, Rutledge says teens today are no more concerned about their appearances than teens of the past. Its the same culture, just presented in a new format. A lot of what you see in profiles is peoples aspirational self or their best self,Ž she says. This shifting in identity isnt unusual, its just people are seeing and aware of it now.Ž Proost says when a teenager posts a selfie, his or her desire for likes or comments is part of the natural desire for peer approval. You put [a selfie] out there because you're looking for that form of validation,Ž Proost says. Thats the danger with teenagers overly looking for that external form of validation rather than trying to foster internal validation.Ž When is it a Problem? Mary-Margaret West, a 14-yearold high school sophomore in North Carolina, says while social media is entertaining, she feels it has more negative than positive impacts on her social life. West recently gave up social media for the Lent holiday and says the experience was surprisingly liberating. I felt myself living in the moment with my family, and actually called my friends and talked to them and actually really interacted with people," she says, adding that she enjoyed "the feeling of not being connected." West says she does not post selfies on her social media profiles because she views them as conceited, but she says many of her peers post selfies, and it has become part of their daily lives. Theres research to say that people who post too many selfies alienate their friends … well, people who talk about themselves too much also alienate their friends,Ž Rutledge says. What were seeing is the visual version of that.Ž Rutledge and Proost agree that selfies should be posted in moderation. While there is not a specific number of selfies a teen should or shouldn't post, once it becomes an obsession he or she is constantly thinking about, it could indicate a social media addiction. August 7-13, 2014 Ms. Perrys Free Press Page 7 If you think you can can spot a person with HIV, consider this: Did you even spot the error in the “rst six words of this headline?ANYBODY CAN HAVE HIV. USE PROTECTION.Right now, AIDS is the leading cause of death among African-Americans aged 25 to 44. If youre having unprotected sex, youre at risk. Be smart: Use protection, and get tested. For a testing site near you, text your zip code to 477493. What Parents, Kids Should Know About Selfies (Part 1)Teens and Adults Use Social Media to Validate Their Identity Falsies, or fake eyelashes, is one of the cheapest and fastest ways to big, beautiful eyes. Every beauty fashionista knows she is only a pinch of glue away from having one-of-the-most desired human physical feature: ultra-feminine, large and sexy eyes. There is no doubt that falsies, encompassing both fake eyelashes and fake eyelash extensions, instantly add dimension and dazzle to your eyes. But the truth is, they can also add unnecessary discomfort and potential eye damage. Irritation, allergic reaction and natural lash damage are the three most common side effects from fake eyelashes and extensions use. If lash damage alone is not bad enough to your natural lashes, any form of eye irritation and allergic reaction can carry the risk of blindness. RISKS OF WEARIG FALSE EYELASHES #1: Traps Dirt Natural eyelashes act as a natural barrier and protection for your eyes by preventing dirt, dust, foreign particles, sweat and bacteria from entering. Fake eyelashes not only traps, but tend to hold on to anything that it comes in contact with. These trapped harmful particles can cause irritation to the eyes and eyelids; which can potentially lead to blindness, if not properly treated. #2: Allergic Reaction While fake eyelashes have nothing to do with the eyes, it is the chemicals in the adhesive used to attach the fakes on the lash line that is potentially harmful. If not properly handled, the glue can get into the eyes and cause a whole host of problems from cornea infection, inflammation, irritation and alternation to the eyes. This, in turn, will have implications on your eye's sighting abilities. To make matters worse, if the irritation is left untreated (particularly from the continual wear of falsies), eye inflammation can become a chronic disorder. Even after the causative agent is removed. A condition you may have to live with for the rest of time. #3: Damage to atural Lashes There are several ways to damage your delicate natural lashes. Frequent wearing of fake eyelashes tend to thin out natural lashes from the daily stripping and removing of chemical adhesive along the lash line. This pressure of fixing and stripping of fake lashes can also cause damage to the hair follicles of the eyelids. Combined with the strong chemical adhesive used to fix on the lash line, it can make natural eyelashes brittle, sparse and fall off easily; resulting in slower hair growth or even stopping hair growth permanently. #4: Impaired Vision I experienced this with my first (and only) pair of eyelash extensions. If you are not used to to having a thick and heavy strip of long lashes hovering over your lids, suddenly opting for an eyelash extension will take some getting used to. It felt like having a permanent umbrella over my eyes, shadowing over the top half of my eye sight. Doing regular daily activities like crossing a road or chopping veggies meant I had to open my eyes wider to 'increase' my scope of vision. It sounds funny now but at the time, my falsies were more of a hassle than a beauty extension. SO, what do you do if you still want your eyes to pop with falsies? 1. Wear on special occasions only 2. Choose false eyelashes over eyelash extensions (it's better of the two evils!) 3. Do not use excessive glue or adhesive 4. Replace your synthetic falsies with real hair fibers 5. Avoid eyelashes with glitter and other elements. The Dangers of False Eyelashes DARRYL R. JACKSON, C.P.A., P.A. Enterprise Center 101 East Union Street, Suite 400 Jacksonville, FL32202 904-633-8099 www.drj-cpa.com Offering you a full range of quality services that includes a full range of accounting services (audits, reviews, compilations,and nontraditional engagements) for small businesses and tax services for individuals, corporations, partnerships, and estates and trusts. Darryl Jackson, CPA provides extensive professional experience with a wide variety of industries and clients Authorities say this Florida teen used a stolen cellphone to take selfieŽ photos. The sheriffs office discovered the selfieŽ photo and posted it on its Facebook and Twitter pages, prompting an overwhelming responseŽ from tipsters who identified Ewald as the suspect.

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Clara White Mission Cocktails for a CauseŽ Join the Clara White Mission for Cocktails for a CauseŽ, Friday, August 8th, 5 … 7 p.m. hosted by The Young Executive Society (YES) at the University Club, 1301 Riverplace Blvd. 27th Floor. Enjoy a great evening helping Clara White Mission in their efforts to end hunger and homelessness through job training and job placement. For more information call 354-4162. St. Vincents Brighter Beginning Health FairSt. Vincents Brighter Beginnings and the Center for the Prevention of Health Disparities Health Fair will take place at Edward Waters College, 1401 Grunthal St., Saturday, August 9th, 1 … 3 p.m. Gain information on mother and baby nutrition, parenting skills, newborn care, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, breastfeeding and social life issues. For more information call Willie Roberts at 308-7558. P.R.I.D.E. August Bookclub MeetingThe next People Reading for Inspiration, Discussion and Enjoyment book club meeting is scheduled for Saturday, August 9th at 3 p.m. and will be hosted by Debra Lewis, 2416 Christi Lake Ct. For more details call 693-9859. The book for discussion is Outliers: The Story of SuccessŽ by Malcolm Gladwell.Share & Seed Lion King PerformanceThe Share and Seed Academy for the Performing Arts presents The Share and Seed Lion KingŽ with a special performance by Teenage Super Star and Former Broadway Lion King Nala NickaylaŽ, Saturday, August 9th at 7 p.m. at the Ritz Theater, 829 N. Davis St. For more details visit www.sharandseedgpc.org or call the Ritz Theater at 807-2010.Annual Caribbean FestivalThe Annual Caribbean Independence Festival will take place Sunday, August 10th 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Blue Cypress Park, 4012 University Blvd N. Enjoy music by DJ bombshell, food, soccer, fun and games! Bring your family and flag to celebrate your country. For more information call 412-8577.Eat Up Downtown Eat Up Downtown is when local eateries collaborate to bring delectable meals at even more mouthwatering prices. Each restaurant has created an exclusive three-course menu that will leave your stomach and wallet full but begging for more! The eating will take place August 11th to August 24th, 6 to 11 p.m. For more details visit www.eatupdowntown.com or call 634-0303.Empowerment Resources CelebrationEmpowerment Resources, Inc. presents the "Give 10" mixer, an exciting evening of networking, drinks and complimentary appetizers. The event will take place Thursday, August 14th, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Havana Jax, 2578 Atlantic Blvd. For more details email info@empowermentresourcesinc.org or call Elexia at 813-8737 or visit www.empowermentresourcesinc.org.Eastside Love Vendor FairThe Eastside community will receive a whole lot of love Saturday, August 16th at the Eastside Love Arts and Vendors Market from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. at A. Philip Randolph Park, 1096 A. Philip Randolph Blvd. Local business owners and area non-profits, artists and performers will come together to expose their various talents, products and services. For more information call 610-7103.JCCI Kick-Off EventJCCI Forward Kick-Off event takes place at Co-Work Jax, 5 W. Forsyth St., Thursday, August 21st at 5:30 p.m. Join Forward as they kickoff the 2014-2015 programming year and learn how young professionals can plug into their community to advance JAX2025. The event is free and open to all. For more information call Aschelle Morgan at 396-3052, ext 309.Riverside Arts Market Back to School BashThe Riverside Arts Market Backto-School Bash is scheduled for Saturday, August 16th. The BacktoSchool-Bash will feature food, vendors and entertainment. RAM is located under the canopy of the Fuller Warren Bridge. For more details call Heather Bailey at 3892449 or visit www.riversideartsmarket.comRestoring Your RightsŽ MeetingState Representative Mia Jones and the D.W. Perkins Bar Association Inc. and Three Rivers Legal Services Inc. invites the community to Project R: "Restoring Your Civil Rights" on Thursday, August 21st at 6:15pm. at the Wells Fargo Springfield Community Center, 1601 N. Main St. 2nd Flr. The subject of sealing and expunging records will be discussed as attorneys and others will be available to assist individuals. For more info call 924-1615.Jax Sister Cities Association Mandela Celebration EventThe City of Jacksonville and the Jacksonville Sister Cities Association (JSCA) will celebrate the life of Nelson Mandela by sponsoring a fundraising banquet in support of health programs for the citizens of Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality in South Africa,. South African Ambassador Ebrahim Rasool will be the keynote speaker Thursday, August 21st 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Hyatt Hotel. For further information visit www.jsca.org or call Betzy Santiago at 630-4710.Seniors Citizens Strut The RunwayOn Saturday, August 23rd come watch as senior citizens strut on the runway with senior citizen models from Jacksonville and Atlanta as they model in the first annual Senior On The Runway Fashion ShowŽ at the Prime F. Osborn Convention Center, 1000 Water St. Seniors ranging from ages 55-89 will entertain the audience with the finest clothes, shoes, and accessories that money can buy! For more information contact Carrie T. Hamilton at 957-7324 or email carriethamilton@hotmail.com.Gun, Knife & Military ShowGun collectors and concealed weapons holders attend the North Florida Arms Collectors Gun, Knife and Military Show at 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. S aturday August 23rd and Sunday, August 24th. The show is at the Prime F. Osborn Convention Center, 1000 Water St. For more information visit www.cliffhangersgunshows.com or call 633-6110.BCs Tina Lifford in The CircleŽJoin the Alhambra for a one-of-akind play featuring Tina Lifford from NBCs ParenthoodŽ with two shows of The CircleŽ August 24th and 25th. The Circle is a play about the inner journey seven women take in a Sister Circle a special way twomen support one another as they all navigate the choppy waters of their lives. For more information visit www.alhambrajax.com or call the box office at 641-1212. The theatre is located at 12000 Beach Blvd.Beres Hammond in ConcertReggae singer Beres Hammond known in particular for his romantic lovers rock and soulful voice will appear in concert, at the Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 1050 A1A North, Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, Friday, August 29th at 7 p.m. For more info visit www.pvconcerthall.com or call 209-0399.Kingsland Catfish FestivalThe 32nd Kingsland Catfish Festival is now a one day event to be held Saturday, August 30th, 9 … 6 p.m., The festival's theme this year will be Remember when it was 1982?Ž. For more details visit www. kingslandcatfishfestival.com or call 800-433-0225.BBQ & Music FestivalJerome Brown presents the BBQ & Music Festival, Saturday, August 30th, Labor Day Weekend at Metropolitan Park, 1410 Gator Bowl Blvd, 12 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Enjoy a BBQ cook-off competition, local musical guests, food and fun! National Jazz artist Najee and Rapper Kurtis Blow are the headliners. For more details email jeannie@blackpagesusa.com or call 683-6756.Brighter Beginnings Health FairThe Center for the Prevention of Health Disparities presents a Brighter BeginningsŽ community Health Fair, Saturday, September 13th, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Edward Waters College, 1401 Grunthal. St. Vincents Community Faith Ministries will provide information on basic nutrition for mother and baby, parenting skills, newborn care, SIDS risk, breastfeeding, social and life issues. For more information call Nurse Willie Roberts at 308-7558.Chrisette Michelle at the Ritz The top charting R&B Diva Chrisette Michell is coming to the Ritz Theatre and Museum, 829 N. Davis St. For one show only Friday, September 19th at 8 p.m. For more information visit www.ritzjacksonville.com or call 632-5555. Page 8 Ms. Perrys Free Press What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene Call 874-0591 to reserve your day! *Grand Openings Weddings Anniversaries Birthdays * Church events Celebration Dinners* Reunions Showers Commemorate your special event with professional affordable photos by the Picture Lady! AROUND TOWN AROUND TOWN August 7-13, 2014 P P l l a a n n n n i i n n g g Y Y o o u u r r S S p p e e c c i i a a l l E E v v e e n n t t ? ? SUBSCRIBE TODAY FOR only$35.50 SUBSCRIPTION RA TES ___$36 One year in Jacksonvillle ___$65 Two years ___ $40.50 Outside of City NAME____________________________________________________________________ ADDRESS________________________________________________________________ CITY_______________________________________ STATE______ ZIP_____________ If this is a gift subscription it is provided by (so gift notification card can be sent) ________________________________________________ Please send check or money order to: Jacksonville Free Press P.O. Box 43580, Jacksonville,FL32203 If you would like to pay by Visa or Mastercard, give us a call at 634-1993 SUBSCRIBE TODAY FOR ONLY $38 P P l l a a n n n n i i n n g g Y Y o o u u r r S S p p e e c c i i a a l l E E v v e e n n t t ? ? Fund Raisers Meetings Receptions Holiday Parties $38 $70 $42.50

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Jamie Foxx may have met his next Oscar match. In a bit of TKO casting, the 46-year-old actor is attached to play Mike Tyson in an as-yet untitled biopic about the controversial and rather fascinating former heavyweight boxing champ being penned by Boardwalk Empire creator Terence Winter. Foxx's manager, Rick Yorn, is producing and has been instrumental in getting the project off the ground, according to Variety. While it's unclear as yet which areas of Tyson's life the film will focus on, the plot is rife with possibility, considering Tyson's triumphand-tragedy-packed, rags-to-richesto-prison-to-bankrupty-to-richesto-pop-culture-infamy trajectory. Tyson himself brought his story to Broadway in the Spike Leedirected one-man show Mike Tyson: The Undisputed Truth, but that might have been it for him as far as reliving his own life night after night goes. "Listen, me and Jamie Foxx are in discussions and within a year or 18 months we're going to do the 'Mike Tyson Story,'" Tyson„who also has a new Cartoon Network show, Mike Tyson Mysteries„said during an appearance on IGN's ComicCon livestream over the weekend. "I'm never going to watch the movie of course because...Or I'll probably watch it alone," he added. Tyson also said that he thinks Martin Scorsese "is going to be involved" as well, though the Variety report made no mention of the filmmaker, who is also an executive producer of Boardwalk Empire with Winter. Foxx, who is two years younger than Tyson, is probably starting the bulking-up process as we speak, should he need to be in fighting shape for some intense boxing sequences. He won the Best Actor Oscar in 2005 for channeling R&Bsoul legend Ray Charles in Ray. by Don Kaplan (NYDN) Its the new odd couple. Funnyman Martin Lawrence is teaming up with TV veteran Kelsey Grammer to play a pair of Chicago lawyers with opposite personalities in the FX comedy Partners,Ž debuting Monday at 9 p.m. Grammer „ most famous for his portrayal of Frasier Crane, first on the classic series CheersŽ and then on its long-running spinoff, FrasierŽ „ plays Allen Braddock, an unscrupulous, money-grubbing attorney so slimy that his own father fired him from the family practice. Lawrence „ best known for films like House Party,Ž Bad Boys,Ž Big Mommas House, and A Thin Line Between Love & Hate,Ž along with his 1990s sitcom MartinŽ „ plays Marcus Jackson, a kind-hearted lawyer and community activist going through a gutwrenching divorce. They meet by chance in a courthouse bathroom and ultimately form their own tiny firm „ surrounded, of course, by wacky staffers and wisecracking family members, played by Daniel Watts, Rory OMalley, McKaley Miller, Edi Patterson and longtime sitcom star Telma Hopkins. Kelseys character is in it for the money. Hes about getting the money by any means necessary,Ž Lawrence says. I play a morally grounded guy. I do pro bono cases, they cook for me and bring me food (instead of money), things like that. Our characters kind of teach each other. We try to find out what is the right way to be principled and correct, to do the right thing. And ultimately, its all for our clients.Ž August 7-13, 2014 Page 9 Mrs. Perrys Free Press The Free Press would love to share your event with our readers We do have a few guidelines that need to be followed 1. All unsolicited photos require a $10 photo charge for each picture. Photos can be paid by check or money order. 2. Pictures must be brought into our office to be examined for quality or emailed in a digital format of .jpg or .bmp. 3.Everyone in the picture must be named. 4. All photos MUST be received within 5 days of the event. OEXCEPTIOS. 5. Event photos must be acconpanied by a story/event synopsis including the 5Ws of media: who, what, when, where and why. in addition to a phone number for more information.Call 634-1993 for more information! ever Before Told Stories About James Brown Waldorf Publishing has released the new book Inside the Godfather (ISBN: 9781628477962) featuring never before told stories of James Brown by his inner circle. The book was written by Daryl Brown, the son of James Brown and Michael P. Chabries. If you think you know the soul truth about James Brown, think again! Inside the Godfather is a history changing book, but most importantly, it sets the record straight about James Brown, the Godfather of Soul! The book tells stories that have NEVER been told. For example: Did you know that James Brown was once offered over ten million dollars to convert to a certain religion? Even more, Daryl Brown believes that his dad, James Brown, his brother-in-law and his older brother Teddy were actually murdered. The inner circle includes, but is not limited to his mistress, his limo driver, the widow, the bodyguard, band members, personal physician, an arresting officer and many more! The book is available as a paperback, eBook and audio book, and features unique photos some of which have never been seen before. The release coincided with the opening of the biographical film Get on UpŽ. In author Daryl Browns own words: How can Universal Studios distribute a movie about my dad without even talking to those that were closest to my dad including me?Ž He says that they have partnered with the VH1 Save The Music Foundation and The Fender Music Foundation, and that they will be donating 5% of all book proceeds to both foundations. James Brown, the Godfather of Soul, may be the most misunderstood man in the last century. His contributions toward modern music pale in comparison to the role he played in modern history. Brown lifted all races toward the ideals of equality and opportunity. Tragically, while he had the ability to calm the storms of social turmoil his personal life was a perpetual tempest; sex, drugs, rhythm & blues. Inside the Godfather brings together, for the first time, Browns inner circle. They will correct the distortions of the past and provide the reader a clear understanding of the brilliance and generosity that was James Brown. This book will have you question your assumptions about politics, religion, sports, money and the entire entertainment industry. You will see inside the man. You will never be the same. The name, James Brown is an international brand. His music is still being sold in over 110 countries. His face is certainly one of the most recognizable in the world, and he is loved and adored by millions. But how many people really knew him? Daryl Brown comments, "Two hundred years from now when they mention James Brown, the Godfather of Soul, they will use this book to understand the person, the mind, the genius of one of the greatest entertainers of all time." Cartoon Series Puts A injaŽ Spin on Slavery … And a Video Game is Also in the WorksThere was Roots, then 12 Years a Slave, and now in development is a cartoon series called Mortolkosbei. Picture two runaway slaves who are fighting for their freedom by becoming cyborg ninjas. They must enslave their future descendants named Mortolkosbei. Created by cartoonist Justin Serrette Jr, who also backed Aaron McGruder (creator of Boondocks) on his movie Uncle Ruckus. Mortolkosbei is also being developed into a fighting video game called Mortolkosbei Mugen. Similar to Mortal Kombat, players will be able to choose a wide list of characters, combos, and finishing moves. Mortolkosbei will take place in the 1600s then fast forward to early 1900s during the renaissance of Black Wall Street. In Black Wall Street, the slaves will befriend a scientist, chemist, and engineer to help build and rebuild them into the ultimate killing machines. The characters will feature a wide range of fighting styles ranging from Jeet Kung Do, Jiu Jitsu, Greco Roman Wresting, and so on. The character MortolKosbei first appeared in another cartoon Serrette created called Alienz Wit Afros receiving over a million YouTube views. Serrette Jr, comments, When I first read a book on Black Wall Street it shook me to the core. They wont teach this in history class. In Mortolkosbei, youll learn a lot.Ž Serrette is also the mastermind behind Crazyafroanimation, a business where he produces African American cartoons and has an obscene clothing line. He currently produces with Riley Martin, who does radio on the Howard Stern Channel as well as voices on the Cartoon Network. They have also taken his book The Coming of Tan, and produced it into a cartoon series. PartnersŽ cast includes (L-R) Kelsey Grammer, Daniele Watts, Martin Lawrence and Telma HopkinsMartin Lawrence and KelseyGrammer Team up as ew Odd Couple for Legal Show PartnersŽ Jamie Foxx to Play Mike Tyson in Planned Biopic Mike Tyson (left) will be portrayed by (right) Academy Award winning actor Jamie Foxx

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Page 10 Ms. Perrys Free Press August 7-13, 2014 Weekly ad in hand. Coupons in pocket. BOGO-vision on. Its time to save.publix.com/save Get your Free Press on the go!Seach for us on Facebook at The Jacksonville Free Press or visit us on the web at www.JacksonvilleFreePress.com P P H H O O T T O O S S | | N N E E W W S S | | C C O O M M M M E E N N T T A A R R Y Y