The Jacksonville free press

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00436

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Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press


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Full Text



Secrets Your Richard GetCmetr

Credit ScoreShrnDo'Le

Reveals from -Stand Your

AbutYo Compton to Ground

Page 2 Standford KI You
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F -FLA LIBRARY HISTORY
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History Gainesville FL 32611

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Page 9' kLLKILA'S kIR ST C 0ASIT Q U AL IY B LA CK W E tKL Y
50, Cents


Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Volume 27 No. 13 Jacksonville, Florida January 30- February 5, 2014

Nagin Set to Stand Trial for Bribery
A trial is set to open for the corrption caueagainst former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin, who is charged with
accepting bribes and free trips among other things from
contractor in exchange for helping them secure millions
of dollars in city work. ., .
Hunicaine Jury selection for Nagin's federal trial has began for the -* 7
HimiaineKammera mayor who served two terms before leaving office 7
in 2010. He was living mna Dallas suburb when a grand jury indicted him a
year ago on charges that include bribery and wire frauid.CRS :15 ofteP p l in, 0% fth od eVi IM
The charges are the product of a City Hall investigation tha ahd CRSSh5as h ~ltSH 5% S h om cd itm
resulted in several convictions or guilty pleas by former Nagin associates Black Americans are 13 percent about seven times more likely to, be homicide victimization rate include gun violence. This followed by who could be key prosecution witnesses at the trial, of the U.S. population, but made up victim of homicide. The Black Nebraska, Missouri, Michigan, kniives and cutting instruments,
50 percent of the homicide victims homicide rate was 17.51 per Pennsylvania and Oklahoma. In bodily force and blunt objects. And
Fortune 400 Hold WVealth in the nation in 2011, according to a 100,000, while for whites the Nebraska, the Black homicide rate when the circumstances could be
recent study by the Violence Policy national homicide rate was 2.64 per was 34.43 per 100,000 in 2011. In identified 73 percent of Black vicEqual to All of Black A mnerica Center. The report makes a call for 100,000. Black men made up 86 Missouri, the rate was 33.38 per tims knew the person who mr
Thebilioaieson heForun 40 lsthav aleel f ealh ha iseqal policymakers to place the dispro- percent of Black homicide deaths 100,000. In Michigan, the rate was dered them.
the llonaso the o tunofe 00ithaed Satleve fwat.ta se portionate deaths among Blacks at compared to 14 percent of Black 31.54 per 100,000. The report urges for more focus
t all the laki oion of nlssb the nted tute frPlc.Suis the front line of issues that need to females. The average age of a vic- IIn cases when the cause of death to be put on reducing access and Tatoase f bind oaalisc y hegnsti tuefonoic.tdis be addressed. tim is 30 years old. could be identified, 86 percent of exposure to firearms in the future in
Wasintonbaed ubic olcy rgniztin.Overall African-Americans were The states with the highest Black the homicide victims died due to an effort to end the epidemic.
The net worth of just 400 billionaires, a group that could fit into a high
school gymi is on par with the collective wealth of our more than 14 million
Afican-American households. Both groups possess some $2 trillion, about Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Celebrates 50 Year Doves
3 percent of our national net worth of $77 trilon.
There has been consistent disparities in the net worth of white Americans -by Lynn Jones
and that ofAfrican-Americans and Latinos. The rate of homeownership for ** *Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Beta
white Americans is 73.3 percent re with 43.1 percent for African- ~* kApaZt hpe eetyhn
Amnericans-tind 47.,6 percent for Latinos. ordtheir fifty 'year members.
Experts say the disparity is rooted ini deep-seated historical roots. The Zeta "Doves"
that was forbidden from reading and writing, you have some systemic prob- Wtheir sorority members Truth for
lems that don't go away overnight" Andrews said. "When you add to it __Living Ministries. Zeta member
only ~ hat frian-Aerians avenar
issues of voting rights and other laws regarding discrimination and access, Alpha Hay narrated the history of
you're onytalkin" about 40 to 50 yasta fia-mnashv a each member and beamed with
any viable economic role in American society." pride as she remarked, "we appre-,
ciate you and want to convey how

Ha. High Court OKs Medical 1W we respect your legacy and wl
__always hold you up with high Marij ana or B llotesteem." Each Dove was presentA Florida measure that would allow the. use of medical maijan hsfed s w thomeortiei andve
cleared its final hurdle and will be on the November ballot. floerto.oo hirahee
The state Supreme Court has approved the language for the proposed con- 5. 1"This is truly an honor, I am
stitutional amendment "Al~ip. pik
The justices gave its approval by a 4-3 vote just three days after a petition .-thankful to be here today with my
drive reached the required number of signatures topac the measure on the sisterss" said Dove honoree Ida
~ot Sheilman-Harris. The longtime
The eciionis deeatforAttrneyGenml am ond wh chllegededucator joined the sorority in thedeallonuagefbyeayit's mileadng.la~niwhcalne 1953 ad recently celebrated her
the allt lnguae b saing ts isladin. d .~60th year as a Zeta. "I joined a
Personal injury lawyer John Morgan has spent about $4 million to plce~ U long time ago and now I am able
the issue before voters.


of~~t Unarme Jonatha Ferreg Angela Core forPrfi





Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press January 30 February 5, 2014


Secrets Your Credit Saving More for Retirement, Some Earners
May Qualify for Tax Breaks and Bigger Subsidies
Early reports are showing that don't buy it must pay a fine when fl- You can deduct a number of items young adults aren't flocking to the ing 2014 taxes; for individuals its 1 from MAGI, including college tuScore R eveals A bout Y ou new state health care market places. percent of income or $95, whichever ition, student loan interest, pretax

That numerical expression other- specific credit scores focus on how you to be denied credit or pay a price Some theorize that it's because they is higher. (The fine rises yearly to a money put into health savings acwiseknon a th crditscoe i th wel yu hndl spcifc kndsof ighr tat ou oul oterwse.So:think the plans offered there will be maximum of 2.5 percent of income counts and individual retirement acabsolute authority of your creditwor- debt obligations. .Be on the lookout for those ad- too expensive relative to the potential or $695 per person, whichever is counts, and other expenses and
thiness, right? Consumers seem to For example, the Equifax TIP Au- verse actions, including being denied benefits. But they-and others with higher, in 2016; after that it's ad- deductions available to self-emthink so; every year we spend more tomnotive Score cross-tabulates bad wireless or another utility service, low-to-moderate incomes-should justed for inflation.) ployed people. As you'll see here,
than $1 billion to buy them, along credit risk with a shopper's true in- being charged a higher-than-market think again, To determine subsidy eligibility, you can also reduce your MAGI with
wit or redt eprts Bt he IC mrke popnsiy o ctull by, n at fo a ato oa, r hvig og No one is immune from a potential the marketplaces consider an individ- contributions to 401 (k)s and other withor crdithreprs. But thcIamaktpopniytoatal buy, hvasclof1t10anasoponpt rtie reuoeoan or havin yof. health crisis, which makes insurance uals or households estimated 2014 qualified retirement accounts. less value than advertised. As we dealers to push certain car models .Ask the business or lender if the worthwhile regardless of age. In modified adjusted gross income Consider a 28-year-old-single man have reported before, they're not the over others. Wireless phone compa- action is the result of scoring. If it most states, those older than 26 who (MAGI). In this insurance calcula- in California with a MAGI of sam on crditrs ctullyuseto nie ta Eqifa Wieles Rsk as as toseethescoe. f nt, sk are not covered by an employer's tion, MAGI is similar to adjusted $23,000 a year, no employer-based same onecritos atetuniall n use o es tp EiaxsWreess Rlapins hws asto sede the soe. fnoakplan, either on their own or through gross income (AGI), but adds tax-ex- coverage, and low expected use of a parent, will have to buy their own empt interest back in, as well as the medical services. In Covered CaliforHre'st canord raon you. should derig dtaaei aelo ells hoheu-thuh thngsias ablled-laer insurance. But with a bit of savvy, income and housing cost of a citizen nia, that states marketplace, the lownr't water meaonyo onuiiil man t s a lsoel s w heelllr orc utiy aun or chleckinge anyone with a relatively modest in- or resident living abroad, and the est-priced "silver" policy with cret wscoes Caur delrcllrmrmone carrifcalmayi er utomater, wich scea qrualiy ascredt unr then come-can boost retirement savings, nontaxable portion of Social Security Anthem Blue Cross-considered midcredt sore: Cr daler, clluar-fro onecarierto noter, hic sevic qulifyas redt uderthe cut federal and state income taxes, income that normally isn't part of the dle-of-the-road coverage-would service providers, credit card issuers, could reveal bargain hunters willing Fair Credit Reporting Act, we believe and save on premiums, all at once, if AGI calculation.Cotneonpg3 insurers, retailers, and other business to switch again for a better deal. that's why businesses score you, s0 you 're not in that demographic butCotneonpg3 rate you up, down and sideways Deposit-account scores are used you should be entitled to see the yr gls tosmoewo s o a
using a whole slew of still other when you open a checking account. number. If you don't get it, file a scores. Banks, which are still in the habit of complaint with the Consumer Finan- help. E poy etpotnt
And guess what? "The consumer authorizing account overdrafts so cial Protection Bureau at www.con- Cut Income, Boost the Subsidy has no way to proactively get these they can levy outrageous penalty sumerfinance.gov/complaint The trick is to reduce reported in-D re s: $ 0
other scores, and there's generally no fees, use ChexSystems QualiFile To keep your secret back-office come With the new exchanges, aD r vs: $ 0
obligation for businesses to share Scores to determine the likelihood FICO scores in shape, that company premium subsidy kicks in for those them," says John Ulzheimer, a con- that a customer will bounce checks advises you to pay all of your bills on with income 100 percent to 400 per-Sin fl Rn l
sumer-credit expert at Credit- (without the bank's blessing) in the time, every time; get revolving-credit cent to 400 percent of the federal Sig.O B onU A.F'L u s!.
Sesame.com. next year and which "bad" customers balances below 30 percent of your poverty level. For individuals in
Last November, FICO, the com- are worth keeping for an added "lift" available credit line; and open new 2014, the ceiling for subsidies will be Great Pay! Consistent Freight! pany that invented its eponymous rat- from higher-fee "second-chance" ac- credit accounts only when necessary. $45,200. The subs iy s esetalyaGrauilsortiego a
ings in 1958, began letting customers counts. "A consumer who follows the basic $9,0.TesbiysesntalaGr tM lson hsR go alA cu .
of two lenders see the actual scores And there are more: Good cus- tenets of good credit management new kind of refundable tax credit.We n rE t p is :
used to grant them credit. But the tomer/bad customer scores measures will have a good FICO score across You can use it now to pay for cover-W rn rE t p is .
other behind-the-scenes scores re- your profit and loss potential, while the board," says a company spokes- age, or apply it to your 2014 federal 1 8 5 5 15 8 4
main secret. FICO Bankruptcy Scores aim to tip woman. thosetwho can aford ceagens but5 518 4
Your legal safeguards may be near off lenders that you'll still go bust de-thswocaafrdovagbu nil, but you can still protect yourself spite your good payment history. by knowing how businesses, data FICO Transaction Scores monitor brokers, and credit bureaus use your your credit-card activity and look for ,
credit report and other information to money-trouble behavior, such as takkeep tabs on you. Here's a rundown ing out a series of cash advances. of some of the scores that are being Watto do
used behind your back. Although you can't buy these
FICO Revenue Scores assess your scores, you should be able to see at likelihood of generating income on a least some of them if their use results A<
credit card by using it a lot. Industry- in an "adverse action" that causes



Old Electronics? Get


Cash for Your TrashWSo9me retailers, including Amiazon, Best Buy, Taiget, and XWahnart, h4.e .I.i j~'~.,.~ i; ~ 'r
trade-in programs that give you gift cards in exchange for used electronics. You may also be able to trade in DVDs, books, and other items. The
amount you'll get depends on the product and its condition.
For example, Best Buy was recently offering a $150 gift card for a
Toshiba Satellite notebook in good condition. One in poor shape would
fetch you $67.50. Can't bear to hear Desi Arnaz croon "Babalu" one IL
more time? Amazon was offering up to $22.3 8 to owners of the complete X
"I Love Lucy" series on DVD.
Trade-in programs can be less of a hassle than trying to sell an item
yourself, but you might not get as much. To use the programs, you first al
get an estimate from the retailers' website. Then you ship it to the retailer,
usually at its expense. After the items condition is verified, you'll receive0090",0 your card. Some retailers will also allow you to have products evaluated
in its stores. 00i o
Trade-in prices can vary widely. For example, among the four retailers 0 1 ,
we checked, prices for a Fuji XIl00 digital camera in top condition ranged 0I 00$i
from a low of $135 at Walmart to $471.25 at Amazon. (We found used a .,i
Fuji Xl100 cameras selling on Amazon for $690 to $ 1,000 in very good 0i
to like-new condition.) o
To get a sense of what the item you want to trade in might be worth, do 0e--*s
a Web search. You might find used versions offered on Amazon and other sites. But remember that the gift card you'll receive can probably be used i
only to makep puirhasesq from the. retaile~r that issued~i it, so be suire. you'll 6i s b6 ai ****: *





January 30 February 5, 2014 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


President Declares His Independence


from Congress in Annual Address
"America does not stand still and
neither will 1. Wherever and when- I E
ever I can take steps without legislation to expand opportunity for
more American families, that's
what I'm going to do," he said.
Obama said he would lift the
wages of people working under
federal contracts to at least $10.10
per hour, even if Congress would
not pass a minimum wage increase
for all Americans. He would
restructure training programs to
help jobless Americans get hired,
even if Congress refuses to expand
unemployment insurance. He
would work with officials in states,
by Perry Bacon, Jr. criticize directly GOP. But the businesses and philanthropists to
President Obama had a message theme of his speech, more than his expand early childhood education,
for Republicans in his State of the long list of policy ideas, was sim-evnithRpulcswodnt
Union address: he's not letting ply the determination of the presi- agree to a national, universal pre-them block all of his initiatives in dent. Obama, as he said over and kindergarten program.
20 14, as they did most of last year. over again in the speech, is going to ThsidatbeurrelgThe tone of Obama's fifth State of act on whatever policy issues he ly small-bore. The increase in pay
the Union was not particularly feels appropriate, with or without for contractors is likely to benefit Jacksonville area AKA's pose for a day of service
aggressive or fiery. He did little to Congress. 'fewer than 1 million Americans. It A K Spend a D ay "O n" for D isadvantaged
will be hard to expand early educa50th Anniversary Bob Hayes tion programs without funding The Jacksonville graduate (Gamma Rho Omega) and undergraduate (Mu Theta, Nu Iota and Omicron Delta)
from Congress or support from chapters of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. spent the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday assembling toiletry bags Invitational Track & Field MVeet Republicans. None of the presi- to distribute to the less fortunate in Jacksonville. Members of the organization donated over 5.000 personal size
dent's executive actions on the items from lotion to toothpaste and many other items that were delivered to Clara White Mission and the Time to celebrate the 50th Amniversary of the Bob Hayes Invitational economy would help as many women's division of the City Rescue Mission. The 25th Intemnational President, Norma Solomon White was in Track & Field meet and the Hall of Fame Inductee Banquet Week. Americans as Congress extending attendance and Mrs. Mary L. Davis serves as the president of Gamma Rho Omega Chapter.
The Bob Hayes invitational track and field meet originated from the late unemployment benefits for an esti- Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. is an international service organization founded on the campus of Howard Robert "Bullet Bob" Hayes, a Jacksonville native, an Olympic gold medal- mated 1.6 million Americans. University, January 15, 1908. It is the oldest greek letter organization established by African- American college_______________ist and Dallas Cowboys receiver. The schedule And the biggest goals of Obama's educated women.
of events includes a worship service, Sunday, administration, reforming the March 9th at 10:55 a.m. at Bethel Baptist imgainsse n aig D la S g i
41, Institutional Church, 215 Bethel Baptist St. On major steps to reducing income
Monday, March 10th at 9 a.m. is the James inequality, still require congres- Thetar Sorority
(Coach) Day Scholarship Golf Tournament at sional approval. T e a S r rt A11
Eagle Landing Golf Club, 3989 Eagle Landing Bttesec lutae hf
Pkwy, Orange Park, Florida, in the evening at from the White House. The admin- Scholarships T
6:30 p.m. is the Officials workshop and dinner istration spent its first three years ~ e i r at W.M. Raines High School Cafeteria. On trying to cut bipartisan deals with forSe i r
Tuesday, March 11th at 10 a.mn is the Bob Reulcnbeoesitgtoa TeJkovleAum e
Hayes invitational press conference at W.M. more confrontational approach dur- Catr(A)o et im
Raines Earl Kitchings stadium. On Thursday, ing the 2012 election. Once Obama ThtSoriyIn.asppcMarch 13th at 6 p.m. is the Bob Hayes Hall of won reelection, he again spent tosaalbefrter21 Fame Banquet at Jacksonville Wyndham much of the year courting s~hlrhp.Apiain a
Na ahntn Hotel, 1515 Prudential Dr. On Friday, March Republican members of Congress. be obtained via their website,.II
Bob Hayes Meet Chair 14th at 11 a.m. is the Bob Hayes Track and This new tact is unlikely to ww-dtaxor.Th-shlashp
Field Developmental Clinic at 2 p.m. is the Bob Hayes Middle School chngwowRpulcasscualtae avalblog h scholasnirs
Track and Field meet; both events will be held at W.M. Raines Earl reson toaaa i tkn nDvalal Cot wihhoo emost
Kitchings stadium. In the evening on Friday, March 14th is the Officials, eeuieatoswntfrete cdmcaheeet omnt
Coaches and VIPs Cookout at the home of Jimmie Johnson, 4359 Homer into negotiations on anything. At involvement, and leadership abili*Rd. Rounding out the Bob Hayes 50th anniversary celebration is the Bob the same time, there is little risk ty. This year seven scholarships Hayes Invitation Track and Field Meet starting at 8 a.m. at W.M. Raines that taking these actions will limit wl eaadd plctosms Earl Kitchings stadium. W.M. Raines High School and the W.M. Earl ba 's bityowrk with be postarked. byplMarchn 24t
*Kitchings stadium are located at 3663 Raines Ave. ongress Rpbilicansor werhe 204pormred info r tio hai
For more details, updates and tickets call 359-0550 or visit already opposing most of his agen- 2e0ta.Fotjaxorg.nomto mil"I- .WO
www.bhitm.org. da. 6 S 0xorg



S a v in g M o re fo r R e tire m e n t In the first year driving for Walmart, the average full time Walmart Driver will earn

continued from page 2 Lower-and middle-income work- The savers credit applies to Roth savings. That's not money directly $7,0peyarwkiga.5dyokwe.
cost him $1,356 a year, with a sub- ers who contribute to traditional accounts, too. Those after-tax con- in his pocket, but it effectively Walmart drivers earn: sidy of $1,836. IRAs, 401(k)s, and other qualified tributions won't lower MAGI or makes his insurance free. Mileage Pay -Training Pay
Contributing $2,000 to a tradi- retirement accounts are also eligible current taxes, or improve health Many at that salary range might Activity Pay -Weekend Premium Pay
tional IRA would reduce his MAGI for the federal savers credit. Its 10 insurance subsidy eligibility. But not want to sacrifice 9 or 10 percent Hourly Pay -Quarterly Safety Bonus
to $21,000. At that level, he'd pay percent t o 50 percent of the first distributions are tax- and penalty- of income toward retirement say- *Regular schedule and reset hours at home, -*Average length of haul is 300 miles $1,056 for coverage, saving $300 a $2,000 contributed. For tax-year free after age 59 Y, which could ings. That's where the help comes not on the road year and gaining a higher subsidy 2013 it was available only to single mean major benefits over tradition- in. If he agrees to contribute the iProtect and provide for yourself and your family with comprehensive medical/dental for out-of-pocket costs. Assuming workers with AGI of $29,500 or al retirement accounts. $2,000, you offer to reimburse him plans and a
income tax rates are stable between less, and couples with AGI of What if, instead of investing in an all or some of that amount. Not only company-matched 401 (k) retirement plan. 2014 and 2013, he'd also save $300 $29,500 or less, and couples with IRA, our worker contributed $2,000 would you be helping him do the LerI buorPoesoa~ukrvrpotnte~iwh iiu o
in federal taxes and $71 in AGI of $59,000 or less (limits are to a 401(k) with an employer right thing for his health, you'd be qualifications and apply online at www.drive4walmart.com. California state taxes. You could slightly higher for 2014). In this match? His savings would be the improving his prospects for a view the total $671 in savings as example, the credit is $200. That same as if he had contributed to an healthy retirement. Wal-Martitores, Inc. isan Equal Opportunty Employer- ByChoce.






Page 4 -Ms. Perry's Free Press January 30 February 5, 2014





C t Don't Let Stand Your



Ground KilYou

Is Black History Still Relevant Today? "Black on black"' crime has made it easy for some mainstream media
organizations, many Fox News-loving Republicans and sometimes even

I almost want to start this article No one really knows if Woodson in the history of the NFL just won a tive, the immortal words of Marin mebs law "teforent toilooaiag "them prsoblem.ngBlc off by saying "Surprise it's Black ever foresaw this country's evolu- Superbowl and no one is talking Luther King, Jr. ring true today. A oga te"aeklig"hmevsi' oehn lc
History month!" tion to the point where a black man about the fact that he is black. He He said, "Being a Negro in America needs to figure out.
Why the big surprise you might could be elected to President so just so happens to also be the America means trying to smile As gang violence continues to escalate in many of our major cities, some
ask? Well, I thought that it was just soon. I have a feeling that a sunset youngest coach to ever when a when you want to cry. It means try people are made to feel like prisoners in their own neighborhoods and me, but it seems that the recent date never entered Woodson's Superbowl at the age of 36. ing to hold on to physical life amid commuities.
President Obama frenzy has almost mind. So what does that tell you? psychological death. It means the Let's be honest, no matter where we live, most of us will gladly patronovershadowed the fact that we are If it was supposed to sunset then Because he wasn't the first, the his pain of watching your children ize businesses in the 'hood to get haircuts, soul food and, um, independnow in midst of Black History what's the trigger? Is it a black man race simply was not as significant. grow up with clouds of mnferinIty mles oupltsid oogcommunies ifunt to l bute to holatsagnicenml month. being elected to President of the A recent email that said that said in their mental skies."mieousdofurc mnteifotolvbttohpataieral
Most of us try to celebrate black United States? If you would have we have a black man in the White One of the aspects about being orc tatchoie w ee wh e'r ast ikely tea getrhssm.in fmi history and educate our children asked me a couple of years back I House, a black man as the youngest black that I love the most is the ence (tlg wer meigge afrtenn our" thata u o esss and ourselves year round, but I still would have said that it will be coach to win a Superbowl, and a sense of togetherness blacks gener- hr egwa ed n vnwa esy
enjoy the programs and tributes another 20 to 30 years before that black man is now running the ally have. Our communities use to where wed go,a we'r doaeven a,(tl wit ay.eth Stn that are highlighted in February. happens, and it would have seemed national Republican Party it must emulate the very essence of black ore arond" more wsae're se toangry,(mostly)hwhiteementuseathee"Stand
Now, I must ask the obvious like a pretty good prompt. be Black History Year. pride and support for one another. Yu rud a sa xuet ho epete el"hetnd y
question. Does Barack Obama's I guess we can fault Obama for Let's not forget that fact that Eric That' s sort of a side bar issue, but Even though people tried their best to make us believe electing President
election represent an end to being the ultimate overachiever. Holder just became the first African isn't having a strong sense of black Obamna would be the end of racism in this country, it may have had the inequality, injustice and racism in The nerve of him to actually stock American U.S. Attorney General. pride at the very core of Black opposite effect. America? Of course is doesn't. the world and put together probably Now if we can just get Tiger History Month? Electing a black man president caused some to realize their biggest fears.
Maybe a more realistic question is the best presidential campaign ever. Woods to admit that he is black Obama's election should not Add to that the president's support for gun control and more radicals than does Obama's election water-down Some would argue that over then we would really have some- diminish the need for Black History ever are arming themselves with weapons and they're ready and willing to
or make Black History month less time, the relevance of Black thing to brag about. Or better yet, if Month and I don't believe that we use them. significant? History month has diminished. I Michael Jackson would on second should ever stop celebrating our The number of guns confiscated by TSA from January 1 st to December
Perhaps that's a debate worth can understand that argument thought, Michael hasn't been a past and present accomplishments. 16th, 2013 jumped 20 percent.
having. First, let's start the conver- because with each generation of black man for a while now. President Obama's election does Almost every day there's a bizarre story proving that people's fuses are sation from a view 10,000 feet in African American youth they are So does Obama's election signify signify that America has changed getting shorter, and I'm telling anyone who will listen that this isn't the the air. Was Black History Month more removed from the Civil that Black History Month is no and continues to evolve in all time to demonstrate your toughness. meant to last forever? Was the des- Rights era and the legacy slavery, longer needed? Keep in mind that aspects of its existence socially, George Zimmerman's acquittal has set a scary precedent in this country ignation ever supposed to sunset? No one living today has ever slavery still existed 145 years ago. governmental make up and eco- where people can use fear and their own anger as a defense for killing
We know that Black History experienced slavery directly and Keep in mind that less than 45 nomically. another person.
Month originated in 1926 by Carter most of your youth can't begin to years ago we were legally segregat- Let's celebrate Black History Not only can it be a used in black on white crimes, but it's being used in G. Woodson as Negro History fathom the impact that slavery has ed in the South and institutionally Month in February, but make the crimes between people of the same race.
Week. Why February? Well, had on black culture so they have segregated in the North. education of our children an ongo- If you're in a movie theater and somebody is upset with you for texting,
Woodson selected the month in no frame of reference. Most blacks feel that we are still ing affair. proving you're not scared isn't worth your life.'
deference to Frederick Douglas and Many Americans don't see race far from equal despite major Signing off from Martin Luther If an irate shopper is upset because you have too many groceries n the Abraham Lincoln who were both relations as a major problem in advancements in equal opportuni- King ElementaryReggie Fullwood 20 items or less line, either gather your groceries and leave or, as J. born in February. America. The second black coach ties. To put this issue into perspec- Anthony Brown says, start eating until you've reduced the right number.
If someone curses you out, you start cursing and they shoot you claiming they felt threatened, even if they lose the case using the "Stand Your

The Significance of Black history in the Age of Obama Gruddensy'estlda.
There was a time when black people had to back down, avert their eyes,
January 20, 2009, the day that achievements, tragedies and tri- learn from Black History because, our President to realize that the and move to the other side of the sidewalk when a white man was passing. Barack Hussein Obama took the umphs ofAfrican people now that a we must understand from whence attainment of "a more perfect I'm not suggesting any of that. oath of office as the 44th President Black man and his family occupy we'ye come and how far we have union" means mounting an all out But I am saying a similar kind of fear and hatred is alive and well among of the United States of America, the White House? yet to travel even with a distin- assault to finish the unfinished civil a lot of white people today. They are stirred up by the Tea Party, ultra conwill forever be remembered as one Those who would suggest guished son of Africa in the White rights/human rights agenda of the servative Republicans and, yes, announcers on "Christian" 'radio stations.
of the great moments in the history devaluing the significance of Black House. Malcolm X once said, "of sons and daughters of Africa whose These people who would never have the guts to make a move themselves of this nation and the world. Few History do so at the peril of Black all our studies, history is most qual- blood, sweat, toil and tears have make their audiences believe that it's. their duty to stop whatever they can forget Nelson Mandela's people and the nation as a whole.. ified to reward allyesearph," Like been the redeeming gracpe of this claim the president is doing to our country. release from prison and his subse- First and foremost, it is imperative Carter G. Woodson, the father of nation. Now more than ever, the They're made to believe that their "American" values and democracy quent journey from prisoner' to that we remember that President Black History Month, Malcolm study of Black History must fuel itself is being threatind '0 '1 '
president in South Africa, over- Obama is a product and beneficiary understood that knowledge of self the determination to keep our We can't stop the tide of fear-based hatred, but history teaches us that at coming decades of oppression of Black History -- the steady and through an awareness of history minds "stayed on freedom" for some point, the battle must be fought.
under the vicious system of unrelenting march of people of had healing power for a people bat- Black people and all oppressed But let's just not be baited into an altercation that ends mn nothing but apartheid. This was truly a hall- African descent from the horrors of tered and despised by a racist, humanity! tragedy.
mark of history. Similarly, Barack the holocaust of enslavement and white supremacist nation, that Dr Ron Daniels is President of the "Stand Your Ground" is no joke, whether you're white or black. But if Obama's ascension to the presiden- the free labor that built Wall Street within our unique worldview, cul- Institute of the Black World 21st you do happen to be a brotha or sista in a bad situation, get out of it cy marks a triumph over centuries and the White House, to being ture and illustrious history is to be Century and Distinguished Lecturer at because if you're keeping score, and I am, the law is not on our side. of denigration of Africans in defined as 3/5th of a human being found the strength, courage and York CleeCt nvriyo e
America, most often under horrific in the Constitution to becoming the inspiration to triumph over adversiconditions. No one can deny the person elected to "protect and ty and our adversaries. The study of magnificence of this moment. defend the Constitution of the Black History should never be seen ~2 '
From the very inception of United States." The venerable as an esoteric exercise. It is about A W PVR A %R5 ACTF
Obama's improbable quest for the Elder, Rev. Joseph Lowery, was the survival, sustenance and develhighest office of the land, however, courageous and correct to com- opment of a people. u~I~
ity and authenticity of his cam- Inauguration with verses from the of Black History during the month GO'

paign. Early on there were ques- Black National Anthem, Lift Every of February, we must recognize 0 TAW I 7 Iju
tions about was he "Black enough," Voice and Sing .."God of our that Barack Obama's milestone A ""
which to some degree was rooted in weary years, God of our silent achievement is a monumental J
his mixed race background and tears, thou who has brought us thus stride forward along that path o'" ~ Ii
lack of history in the longstanding far on the way..." "through the blood of the slaugh- K
civic rights/human rights struggle Fannie Lou Hamer once said tered." The gaps and disparities





January 30 February 5, 2014 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5


FOR THEWEEK OF JAN. 28 -FEB. 3, 2014 2 0e 1 4 B L A C K LL(e' eutSadnsa ekyHnr hu12/4

CENTRAL INTERCOLLEGIATE MIo EASTERN SA SOUTHERN INTERCOLLEGIATE SOUTHWESTERN
GIAA ..MEAC S.. IWA ..T~~"E"N' INDEPENDENTS
I A ATHLEIC ASSOCIATION M A ATHLETIC CONFERENCE SIC ATHLETC CONFERENCE SWU5C~ATHLETIC CONFERENCE IDPNET
DE CONF ALL CONF ALL CONF ALL DIV ALL W L
NORTHDIVISION W L W L W L W L W L EASTDIVSIDN W L W L W L W L CentralState 8 5
Eliz. City State 2 1 5 4 10 9 NorthCarlinaCentra 5 1 14 5 Fort Valley State 9 0 13 5 Southern 7 1 11 10 W.Va.State 7 8 Virginia State 2 1 4 4 11 7 Norfolk State 6 2 12 9 Benedict 7 3 12 6 Alabama State 5 2 11 7 Univ. ofDC 3 12
Bowie State 2 1 3 6 9 11 Hampton 5 2 10 10 ClarkAtlanta 5 3 9 7 Texas Southern 5 2 9 10 Cheyney 2 16
Virginia Union 2 2 5 6 5 14 Savannah State 5 2 7 14 Albn tt5 4 8 9 Acom Stat 5 3 8 12
Lincoln 1 2 5 4 13 5 Sabnnh~ate5 574 8 9 Lincoln (Mo.) 2 16
Chowan 0 2 2 6 6 10 Morgan State 4 2 6 12
SOUTH DMSlON Coppin State 4 3 7 13 Paine 5 4 9 Prairie View A&M 4 3 6 13 Tennessee State 2 21
FayettevitleState 2 1 6 3 13 6 NCA&TState 3 3 7 14 Claflin 5 5 8 12 Jackson State 3 4 7 12
Winston-Salem State 2 1 6 3 11 8 FloridaA&M 3 3 7 12 Morehouse 2 7 5 12 AlabamaA&M 3 4 6 11 IND.PLAYEROFTHEWEEK
J. C. Smith 2 1 5 4 13 6 Howard 3 3 5 16 WESTDIVISION #Miss.ValteySL 2 5 6 14 PLAYER
Livingstone 2 1 5 4 12 6 SCState 3 4 7 13 Tuskegee 7 2 10 8 #Ark. Pine Bluff 2 5 4 15 Patrick Miller, 60, Sr.,G, TENN. STATE-Avraged34.5
St.Augustine's 1 2 4 5 6 13 Bethune-Cookman 2 6 4 19 Kentucky State 6 5 8 9 #GramblingState 0 7 1 15 pointinntwo Imes geting36ith6reboudsaaIdd2assists vs. Morehoed State and 33 with 6 rebounds and 4 assst
Shaw 0 3 4 5 6 13 Md.E.Shore 0 5no w vs.EasterKertucky.
Delaware State 0 6 4 15 LeMoyne-Owen 4 5 6 It NEWCOMER
CIAP A E SO H E KSWAG PLAYERS OF THE WEEK NA
Broncos Sports Photo PLAYER Miles 1 9 1 17 PLAYER
PLAYER MEACPLAYERSOFTHEWEEK Lone 1 16 3 12 Aaic Marray, 610,Sr., C, TEXASSOUITHERN.AverRODGERS-CROMARTIE: Emilio Parks, Jr., F, JC SMITH- Averaged 19 points and 9.5 PLAYER
rebounds in two wins getting 20 points, 10 boards vs. St Aug's Adams Adams, 6-1, Sr., G, S. C. STATE- Averaged 18.0 aged double-double of 30.0 points and 13.5 rebounds Denver's mercurial corner and 18 prints and 9 boards vs. Lings9ore. points, 4.0 rebounds, 6-5 assists and 1.5 steals in pair o SIAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK in two wins. Got 34 points and 8 boards in win over
ONEback from Tennessee NEWCOMER conference wins. Had 13 points, 3 boards and 8 assists in PLAYER UAPBand26pontsand19reboundsInwinoverMVSU.
LeMarquisLetchaw, Jr.,G,JCSMIT-Had16poits,6assists, 2-pointwin vs. B-CU. Had 23 points, 5 boards, 5 assists and Brandon Darret, 6-7, Sr., F, KENTUCKY STATE In Shotcombined 21 of 35, 60% in thetwo games. State one of three black 2stealsandnoTOsindnoverSLAug'sand19points,6assist, 3stealsvs.NorfolkState. three games lastweek, averaged 167 points, 11 rebounds NEWCOMER college players in Super 5boardsanti5stealsvs.Lvingstone. ROOKIE and 3.3 blocks. NA
ROOIEr JamesDaniel, 5-11, Fr.,G, HOWARD -Scored 31 points, shot NEWCOMER
3.0 rebounds 56% rm the field induding four from long range and canned Deonte Johnson, 64, Jr., F, BENEDICT In two conference
in three games. 9 of 11 FTs in win over Flodda A&M. games vs. FVSU and Morehouse, averaged 15.0 points, 8.0
COACH DEFENSE rebounds and 1 assisL
MEN'S BASKETBALL STATS LEADERS; NEW Stephen Joyner, JCSU Had 2-0 w ek with wins over SL Du'Vaughn Maxwell, 6-7, r-Jr., F, NCCU -Averaged 10.5
Augustine's andi Livingstone. rebounds, 2.5 blocks and 1.5 steals in a pair ol conference
COACH AT MVSU; SlAC CENTENNIAL HOFers games.Alsoscored20.Spli.


HOOPS SCORES Hoops Round-up

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014 MEN
MEAC Kentucky State 68, LeMoyne-Owen 57 CIAA three games behind at (5-3).
B-Cookman 58, Howard 47 Miles 78, Lane 59 One piece of big news in the CIAA FVSU knocked off Claflin 68-58
Coppin State 70, N. C. A&T 54 Paine 72, Morehouse 63 is Shaw's loss of league-scoring leader THIS WEEK
Hampton 67, S. C. State 56 Tuskege 89, Stillman 87 The o SATRDAY, FEBRUARY 1
N JIT 65, D elaw are S tate 59 S W A C C u r tis H in e s (2 0 .2 p p g .) w h o w a s ru le d T h W ild c ats h o st 1
Norfolk State 56, Sav. State 49 Alcom State 70, Alabama A&M 64 by the NCAA to have used up his eligi- day and Clark Atlanta Monday before WSSU @ Livngstene
Norsolk Fayetteville State @ St. Augustnes
N. C. Central 53, Morgan State 52 MIss. Valley St. 81, Prairie View 72 bility. 6-4, Sr., travelling to Paine next Wednesday. Virginia ninate @ Chowanin
SlAC Southern 68, Alabama State 55 Otherwise the January part of the KClskegee has won five straight af- Joson C. Smith @ Shaw
Clark Atlanta 81, Benedict 79 Texas Southem 72, Ark-Pine Bluff 71 regular season is winding down without Citn NC t kgee hs on ie straigt La- Ct a
20.2la ppgniswnin.on ihu ter getting wins on the road over Lane MEAC
Savannah State @ B-Cookman
Fort Valley State 68, Claflin 58 a lot of separation betwe(85-76) and Stillman (89-87) and now Delaware Slate @ Morgan Slate
Norfolk State @ Miami
divisions. has a three-game lead in the West. The S.C. 60ate @ FlordaA&M
__________________________________________________________N. c. A&'r 6 UMES This past week, Bowie State (2-1 emerged as the big winner sweeping Golden Tigers are at home vs. Miles Hampton @ Coppn Slate
N. C. Central @ Howard
North) posted wins over Virginia Union games at home and North Carolina Thursday and vs. LeMoyne-Owen Sat- SIAC
Paine 60 Benedict
(80-71) and Chowan (80-74) to get back A&T (84-44), Coppin State (87-63) urday. amen @6e0Mie
SLemaye-wn @ Milee
in the North Division race. Virginia and Morgan State (53-52). SWAC Lae@s Mm
WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS State handed Elizabeth City State its Four teams are perched just a game Mississippi Valley State handed Albany late6@ Fort Valler Stata
Monehouse 6 Clark Atanta
first loss in the division (70-59). BSU, behind the Eagles: Norfolk State (6-2), Southern its first conference loss (72- SWAC
BLACK OLLEG BASKEBALL TA LEADER aco Stat @ isaState
BLACK COLLEGE BASKETBALL STAT LEADERS ECSU and VSU now enter this week Savannah State (5-2), Hampton (5-2) 64) is a game that was made up last Jan Slate 0 MiSS. Valley State
Prairie View 60 Alabamae Sate
tied atop the North at 2-1. and Morgan State (4-2). Norfolk State Wednesday after a bomb scare cancelled TexasSouthem @AlabamaA&M
Grrmbing Slate 60 Arkansas-Pine BluRf
MEN'S SCORING, REBOUNDING BSU and VSU tangled this Wednes- was tripped up at South Carolina State Monday's game in Itta Bena. MAY, BlRff
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3
day. VSU is at Lincoln Saturday while Saturday (73-61). The Jaguars (7-1) bounced back to MESc
SCORING. C. nI @ UMES Bowie State is at ECSU. The league-leading Eagles head get wins over Alabama A&M (66-52) S.C. State 6@ B-Cookman
AESHCnG FG 3FG FT PTS AVG. nn @ Morgan State
NAME/SCHOOL CL GIn the South, Johnson C. Snth North to play at Maryland Eastern Saturday and second-place Alabama Savannah State @RoddaA&M
MILLER, Patrick TNST SR 23 173 29 158 533 23.2 the big winner getting naow Shore Saturday and at Howard Mon- S (6855) Monday Delaware State@ 0Ceppin State
was th i inr etignro tate (85)Mna.N. C. AMT 60 Howard
MURRAY, Aaric-TXS SR 18 141 23 110 415 23.1 home wins over Saint Augustine's day. Savannah State has the Florida The Jaguars will entertain Alcorn @t
day., -Clark Atlanta @ Fart Valley State CURTIS, Deshawn CHEY SR 17 119 20 107 365 21.6 (84-80) and Livingstone (76-73), while swing through Bethune-Cookman State (5-3) Saturday. Morehouse @Albany State
DANIEL, James HOW FR 15 92 54 80 318 21.2 Winston-Salem State, Livingstone (Sat.) and Florida A&M (Mon.). Texas Southern transfer center Kentoe yStteWAberfrC
JONES, Marquez WSSU JR 19 119 47 87 372 20.2 and Fayetteville State split two games. Hampton is in Baltimore for dates Aaric Murray continued his torrid pace Gnambing @ Mis. Valley State
INGRAM, Jeremy NCCU SR 18 103 32 114 352 19.6 The longjam at the top now has JCSU, with Coppin (Sat.) and Morgan (Mon.). averaging 30 points per game in wins Texas Souter@AabamaStae
MAY, Amere-SAU JR 18 112 33 88 345 19.2 WSSU, Livingstone and FSU at 2-1. over MVSU (94-56, 26 points, 19 re- WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY5
BLACK, Justin-MSU SR 17 109 23 78 319 18.8 WSSU hosted JCSU Wednesday SIAC bounds) and UAPB (72-71, 34 points, BarberScotia@FayettevilleState
TATE Tyell FS SR19 11 2 68 07 8.1Bluefield State @ Chowan TATE, Tyrell FSU SR 19 101 22 68 307 18.1 before travelling to Livingstone Satur- Fort Valley State (8-0) has now- 8 rebounds). TSU (5-2) is at Alabama VrgnlaState@ StAugustine's
HILL, Jody LIV SR 17 103 55 59 324 18.0 day. won 10 straight and increased its lead A&M Saturday and at Alabama State THURSDAY, FEBRUARY
THOMAS, Mark- LIV SR 17 102 25 99 328 18.0 over Benedict in the SIAC East to three Monday. ASU is also at 5-2 in SWAG Miles6Lane
PARKS, Emilo-JCSU JR 19 12? 0 97 341 17.9 -MEAC games following Benedict's 81-79 loss play. ._ .- FottValley~ate'.id ine,
Albany State @ Benedict
GATLING, Ray BSU SR 18 17.7 North Carolina Central i5-1)' to Clirk Atlanta Mdhday. CAU is also ..Clanin@ ClarkAtlanta
ADAMS, Jamie FAM U 20 94 46 I1-6 350 17.5 .. 1.. ,, . .. Leloyne-Owen @ Kentucky Stlte.
PACK, Richaud NCAT JR 20 93 34 129 349 17.5
ROSS, Preston WSSU SR 19 110 25 86 331 17.4
MIDDLETON, Lamont-NCATSR 20 89 32 129 339 17.0 B
HAWKINS, Malcolm NSU SR 19 97 37 86 317 16.7 B,,No e
OKOROH, Prince HOW JR 20 116 8 86 326 16.3
SHINE, A'Torri GSU 16 81 21 72 255 15.9 Comegy's winning record who was 8-35 in his four seasons at the institugood enough for MVSU tion including 2-10 this past season. Morgan's
contract was not renewed.
REBOUNDING Apparently, winning was not enough for o 'r e wa y a litle b
NAMEISCHOOL CIL G OFF DEF TOT AVG Jackson State but it appears to be plenty for "You're always a little bit hurt," Coregy
WEST, Brandon JSU 19 75 132 207 10.9 SWAG East Division rival Mississippi Valley told the Jackson Clarion-Ledger of his firing
KILO, Lenjo UDC 15 149 9.9 State as the school announced last week that it from JSU but said in an ESPN interview that he
DAVEY, Brandon FVSU Sr 17 162 9.5 had hired successful former JSU head football feels good about what he accomplished with the
BAZEMORE, Wyk. WSSU JR 19 74 97 171 9.0 coach Rick Comegy as the Delta Devils new "It's not just about winning on the football
BRIGGS, Omar-VUU SR 19 53 114 167 8.8 headman.
DOMINECK, Nigel FVSU SR 17 150 8.6 h e mpin field, but in the classroom," Comegy said upon
GODFREY, Calvin SU SR 20 59 112 171 8.6 seasons including an 8-4 mark this season his hiring at MVSU. "I know a lot of people just COMEGY: At microphone at Miss. Valley State.
WILKERSON, Antw. JCSU SR 19 29 135 164 8.6 earns in thenas two m a C this ion say that. But if you're not winning in the classPARKS, Emilio JCSU JR 19 54 108 162 8.5 appearances in the last two SWAC Champion-coach
CRAWLEY, Jonathan SAU SR 18 62 85 147 8.2 ship Games, Comegy was fired by JSU in mid- m, then you're going to have a hard time former Temple University head basketball coach
MURRAY, Aaric TXSU SR 19 47 107 154 8.1 December. The school said that decision was not thefie eamed $191580 annually from John Chaney, headline the class of inductees
BYRD, Dominique ECSU 19 8.1 based on winsJackson State after an extension in 2012. Fi- that will be introduced as the SIAC's centennial
SMITH, Jyles SSU SR 20 51 111 162 8.1 cal recruiting and discipline as reasons for his nancial terms of Coegy's contract were not re-of Fame Class.
BECKFORD, Bruce NCAT SO 17 28 105 133 7.8 dismissal. JSU endured three years (2008-11) of leased lat. eek, bu omVs dnrctwr ote Other Inductees include: Betty Austin
BUTLER-P LE, P. CHOW 16 7.4 NCAA sanctions including loss of scholarships, k t
KINDRED, Joel SAU SR 18 54 79 133 7.4 practice time and postseason bans for low Aca- DinhaFr-e adi safu-erda. (Albany State), Lonnie Bartley (Fort Valley
HAYNES, Devon UAPB 19 50 91 141 7.4 demic Progress Rates (APR) while Comegy was State), Greg Lloyd (Fort Valley State), Tyrone
MAYO, Eric-LIV JR 17 60 74 134 7.3 head coach. SIAC Hall of Fame inductees Poole (Fort Valley State), Clemon Johnson
BROWN, Octavius -ALC 20 39 102 141 7.1 The school also said it was looking for ATLANTA--The Southern Intercollegiate (Florida A&M), Willie "Galloping Gal" GaliGRAY, KendallI-DSU JR 18 45 81 126 7.0
GOODE, Brandon NSU JR 20 54 84 138 6.9 someone familiar with Jackson State culture and Athletic Conference ("SIAG") will induct its more (Florida A&M), William Nicks (Morris
WIGINS K SU16 .9 followed through by hiring former JSU standout first Hall of Fame class since 2000, by honoring Brown), Donn Clendenon (Morehouse), HiarCOPELAND, Jay NCCU 18 60 63 123 6.8 Harold Jackson as its new head man. a heralded group of 15 former student-athletes, old ElIs (Morehouse) and Samuel "Here"
PALMER, Darryl SCSU 19 37 92 129 6.8 Comegy moves on to head a SWAG pro- coaches and administrators. Goodwin (South Carolina State).
MAXWELL, Du'Vn HAM SR 19 41 88 129 6.8 gram that has not won a division championship Shannon Sharpe (Savannah State) and Induction will be held at the SIAC Cen-'
SMITH, Carlos BSU SR 20 6.8 nor made an appearance in the league champi- Deacon Jones (South Carolina State), a pair tennial Hall of Fame Gala on March 5th, 2014
HUBBARD, Anthony -MSU SR 17 43 71 114 6.7 onship game since the conference went to that of Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees, along in Birmingham, Alabama. The event will take
format in 1999 and has had just three winning with Major League Baseball Hall of Famer An- place the week of the STAG Centennial Basket______________________________________ seasons since 1990. He replaces Karl Morgan, dre "The Hawk" Dawson (Florida A&M), and ball Tournament, (March 3-8, 2014).

STAT CORNER II a--- .ae-aWHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS CIAA CENTRAL INTERCOLLEGIATE M EAC ONFSERNC SAEonnNITRCLEI~ W C SUHWOEIDPNET
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION ATHLTCONENEAhLETIC CONFERENCE ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
FR E BL C COLG PL YR IN CONF ALL CONF ALL CONF AU. DIV ALL
FO M RBA KC LE EPAESINORTOMSDN W L W L W L W L W L EASTDIMSION W L W L W L W L UnivofDC 12 3
SUPER BOWL LXVIIII Virginia State 2 6 6 1 15 1 Hampton 7 0 16 4 FordValteyState 7 2 10 B Southern 8 0 11 5 W.Va.State 12 6
Lincoln 2 1 4 5 11 6 Coppin State 6 1 9 10 ClafIm 7 2 11 6 Texas Southern 6 1 9 9 Central Stale 6 6
SE T L E H W SEliz. City Stale 2 1 4 5 5 13 Savannah State 5 2 12 9 Benedict 7 2 13 6 Grmhling State 4 3 7 11 Tennessee Stat 7 13
7 Tarvaris Jackson QB 8th Alabama State Bowie Slate 1 2 2 7 7 10 NC& 4 ClarkrAtanta 6 2 13 5 Jacison State 4 3 6 11 Lnon(o)3 1
83 RcroLcet R 2d Fr alySaeVirginia Union 0 3 1 8 4 13 Howard 4 2 6 11 AbanyStta 4 2 12 4 Miss.ValteySt. 4 3 5 13 Cheyney 3 14
83 RcroLcet R 2d Fr alySaeS0UTh DIWSI0N Norfolk Stale 5 3 9 10
Fayefleville State 3 6 7 2 14 4 North Carolina Cenhral 3 3 6 11 Paine 4 4 6 11 PririeViewA&M 4 3 4 13 DENVER BRONCOS Shaw 3 6 7 2 13 6 SC State 3 4 5 12 WESTDiIlS0N PNcom State 3 5 4 15 IND. PLAYER oFTHE WEEK
St.Augustine's 1 2 5 3 10 7 FloddaA&M 3 4 9 11 Tuskegee 6 2 16 7 Aabama State 2 5 9 g PLAYER
45 Dominique CB 6th Tennessee State W-Salem State 1 2 5 4 11 8 Bethune-Cxokkman 3 5 6 14 LeMoyne-Owen 3 5 3 14 AlabamaA&M 1 6 3 14 20rkk pointing 5-S shotin win, wDCn oer teaw-ig.
Rodgers-Cromartie Livingstone 1 2 5 4 10 9 Md. E. Shore 0 5 3 13 Miles 2 6 6 16 Ark. Pine Bluff 6 7 1 16 NEWCOMER
J.C.Smith 0 3 5 4 10 6 Delaware State 0 6 5 13 Kentucky State 2 6 6 12 NA
Mongan State 6 6 2 17 Stilman 1 6 5 14 SWAC PLAYERS6OF ThEWEEK
CiAA PLAYERS OF ThE WEEK Lana 6 6 0 11 PLAYER
.. .PLAYER MEAC PLAYERS OF ThE WEEK Jazmln Parker, 5-10, Jr., G, TEXAS SOUTERN-. Tallied
Diamnond Mitchell,.Sr., PC, SHAW-Heod a 23pnt performance PLAYER 24 points or 11 ot 23 ahooning and had 8 rebounds ir win ovr
invdrnover WSSU and 13points ande8assists vs SLtAugusires. Jasmine Goce. 6-10, Sr., G, FLORIDA A&M Totlled 5T SIAC PLAYERS OF ThE WEEK MVSU.Added r9opoints or D9 tft1 shouting ir win coer OAPB. SNEWCOMER points, 17 rebounds and ir sleols in r-1 week. Poure in 34 PLAYER Averaged 21.5 points in two games, stiootng 20 Ut 41
Ariel Catcher, Sr., F, SIIAW. Had 23 points oRf he bnch vs. points 12 o 17 sbooltng, stats and p reb Jndis in wi BrleaWarner, -O., F, KENTCEKY STATE*-Led Laly fo e kl. J WSSU. Averaged 16.5 poInts and 6.5 ieboundo pA" game. overlHoward. Had 23 points and t0 rebounds In loos to SSU. "Thonreds tl 1-rcordblasweekl(vs. Si1 andIs, veel ee NEWCOMER
ROOKIE ROOKIE ingt1.5pcints,8.5rebouds,2 sststs, 2nstosand 1.5 d s. NA
Courtot Williams, Fr., G, CIO WAN- Hod 14 points induding 5 Kaigyn Williams, 6-5, r-Fr., C, B-COOKMAN. -Averaged 12.0 NEWCOMER
twogamassaverage 11.5poins, reboundsd. Got 17 points, I1 reboundsavs. SCSU, 0 rebounds, points KSU,finished vith16 points 8rebounds,2b lo ndand1tel. COACH and 4 biocls vs. UMES.
Jacques Curtis, SHIAW-. His Lady Doom bout W550 934 DEFENSE
and boot SL Augs 67-50. Ladsa Carter. 6-0, Sr., F, C0PPIN STATE -21 rebounds
Jackon ocktteR-Comatiein poir ot wins over NCCU andi NSU. Had 14 rebounds 16 JacksonLockete R-Crmartiepoints vs. NCCU. rebounds. 3 bodrs inwinvs. Nontolk Stte.

AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XX, No, 26

t b ,5





Page 6 -Ms. Perry's Free Press January 30 -February 5, 2014



















Christian Comedian and Historic Mount Zion A.M.E. Greater Macedonia Celebrates

Quartets in Concert Family & Friends'Celebration 38th Pastoral Anniversary
Jacksonville welcomes popular Christian comedian Mark Lowry with The family of Historic Mount Zion AME Church requests your presence at Come celebrate Pastor Landon L. Williams, Sr. 38th Anniversary with special guests the Nelons and Lefevre Quartet of Atlanta, Georgia. This their Family and Friends Day Worship service, Sunday, March 6th at the 10 two Sunday celebrations! On Sunday, February 9th hear spoken word exiting evening will take place at Trinity Baptist Church, located at 800 a.m. and 3 p.m. worship service. The theme is: "Standing together in Christ." by Bishop Virgil Jones of Philippian Community Church. On Sunday, Hammond Dr., Thursday, January 30th at 7 p.m. For more information visit The event will include celebration through worship, music and dance. Guest February 16th hear spoken word by Dr. John Guns or St. Paul Baptist online at www.cnsentertairnentgroup.com or call 1-800-965-9324. includes Meachumn Clark and True Purpose, the Restoration Dance group and Church. Each services starts at 4 p.m. The event is free and everyone much more! Come out and worship and bring a friend! The celebration will is invited to attend. For more details call 764-9257 or visit
So etoGos el hoi inCon erttake place at Historic Mount Zion A.M.E., Pastor Pearce Ewing, 201 East www.gmbc.net Greater Macedonia Baptist Church is located at 1880
So eoG s e h i nC n et Beaver St. For more information call 355-9475. W. Edgewood.
The Soweto Gospel Choir will launch their 5th major North American
tour, Friday, February 7th, in Jacksonville Beach at St. Paul's by-the Sea Naturopathic Herbalist Dr. Scott W omen Of Prayer and
Episcopal Church, 465 11 th Avenue N. The internationally renowned vocal
ensemble is performing in over 30 cities in concerts to reflect the color and W hitaker at M asjid El-S alam Purpose Prayer Breakfast
Nhelsonbande Fofer manoe detils viit wwhoeorigopelhirnlgcm or Join Dr. Scott Whitaker Board Certified Naturopathic Doctor and author You are cordially invited to the Florida Central Second Ecclesiastical callso 270-1771.Fomoedtisvstwwswtgslciromr with over 20 years experience in herbology, iridology, homeopathy, natural Jurisdiction Spring Conference Prayer Breakfast, Sponsored by the
cal 27-171.healing and detoxification. Hear Dr. Whitaker, Sunday, April 27th at 1 p.m. Jurisdictional Deacon Wives, Wednesday, March 12th at Deerwood
at Masjid El-Salaam, 1625 North Pearl Street. For more information visit Country Club, 10239 Golf Club Drive at 8:30 a.m. For more informaCaring for the Caregiver W orkshops www.salaamimasjid.com or call 359-0980. to alMsinr ateFrela 3-15
Community Hospice "Caring for the Caregiver" Workshop takes place,
Saturday, February 1st, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Legends Center, 5130
Soutel Dr. The workshop is where family caregivers have an opportunity to Th Si ofB nga WteRhti gC rsin
connect with professionals and caregiving resources that will support them
in their caregiving journey, network with fellow caregivers and listen to By James Strong, chin hung icicles in the subzero interpretation of Acts 17:26, taught hymns and white spiritual songs.
professional speakers who will discuss a variety of caregiving topics New Journal and Guide cold. The deer had speed, but the ever since its founding by Bob By the end of her junior year, she
Attendees will enjoy a complimentary breakfast and lunch and have a I have seen many PBS specials wolves had grit. The wolves ran Jones and Billy Sunday in 1927 that rejected the historical and illustrious chance to win door prizes. Registration is free. To request complimentary chronicling how predators stalk slower than the deer, but they ran segregation was divinely ordained, eloquence of black preaching and respite care for your loved one call Jennifer Arnold at 807.1318. For work- their prey. I saw one program in with patience, until the deer finally The school has accepted black joined a white fundamentalist shop details and immediate registration call Mitzi Saul at 407-6165 or visit which several wolves stalked a collapsed out of fatigue and became students for many years, but did not protestant church, where the white www.communityhospice.comn. swifter deer across mountains with a meal for the wolves, renounce its policy prohibiting ladies encouraged her to not date or
yellow and brown leaves on the In a similar fashion, white right- interracial dating among its students kiss the white boys.
NOTICE: Church news is published free of charge. Information ground, though dead cornfields, wing Christianity chases after until 2000, when a controversial By the end of her senior year, she
must be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5 amid grass surpassing six feet and blacks and black Christians. What appearance by then presidential can- had renounced Martin Luther King, p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information received prior to the among trees leafless or green. do I mean by associating white- didate George W. Bush at the cam- Jr., civil rights, the Democratic event date will be printed on a space available basis until the date. Fax They hunted the innocent deer for wing Christianity with wolves? pus ignited a national firestorm. Party, love for her fellow human e-mail to 765-3803 or e-mail to HJreePress@aol.com. miles until it breathed so heavily Well, perhaps I should give a defmri- The story tells how this jewel of a beings, and integration.
that its breath turned into fog and its tion of the term first. black girl grew wom and scarred If we look at her mutation allegor_________________________________________________________________ I define white right-wing during her four years at Bob Jones. ically, we might feel the damage
Christianity a little differently than i the beginning her character was personally. In her first year she was

B ethel B aptist I nstitutio na lI C hu rc h most theologians and the definitions sweet, her morals mild, her theology a lonely teapot sitting on a stove. By
you may read in dictionaries and clean and her beliefs pure. the second year the teapot was filled
21 5 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, Fl 32202 (904) 354-1464 encyclopedias. Is it a movement? But by the end of her freshman with the water of doubt. By the third
No it s ,pi-a puy djtccult., year, she stopped, having ,her 1ai year corrosion had turned on the
Is it truth? Not even a little bit. It is braided, wearing corn rows and cut- heat, scorching doubt to the point I~ e kly Ser ice A hresy, 'as ruthless and terrifying ting her hair short. 'The 'Bob Jones that it changed into rjection of its
Catas any angry, schizophrenic kanga- clan had convinced her that 1 Peter innocent and wholesome past. And
Croo. 3:3 only warranted straight, long by the fourth year the teapot had
Sunday Mornirne Worship Midweek Services Let me show, though, how it is a hair, like blond and brunette white boiled with enthusiasm for the new
7:40 a.m. and 10:40 a.m. Wednesday Noon Service wolf. women wear, nagging terror of white evangelical
"Miracle at Midday" I remember a story concerning the By the end of her sophomore year, Christianity.
Church school 12 noon-i p.m. daughter of black Baptists from she stopped listening to Christian The sista left Canton a flower; she
9:30 a.m. The Word from the Sons Canton, Ohio. Her parents had rap and buying hip-hop DVDs. At a returned to Canton a cripple. She
Bible Study and Daughters of Bethel Bishop Rudolph saved thousands of dollars to send chapel service one week-day mom- left as a black Baptist; she returned
Bishop Rudolph 6:30 p.m. 3rd Sunday 4:00 p.m Mc~issick, Jr. their only child to Bob Jones ing, a Bob Jones music professor as a white fundamentalist. She left
McKissick, Sr. Senior Pastor University in Greenville, South characterized rap and hip hop as as a follower of Christ; she returned
Senior Pastor Carolina. The university is a protes- trash and, ripping the original mean- as a worshipper of idols.

Come share in Holy Communion on 1st Sunday at 7:40 and 10:40 am. tant fundamentalist institution ing away from Ephesians 5:18-19,
which through a wicked and satanic argued that God only sanctioned


Worship with

~- us LIVE on

the web visit Bishop Rudolph W. McKissick, Sr.

WWW~truth2powerministries.orgI Retirement Culmination





January 30 February 5, 2014 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7




America'Is Prison Juggernaut To Love, Honor and


Continues to Crush Black Males ToInfect with HIV....
Toyears ago, Sandra's seeming- is the high incarceration rate of
by E. 0 Huthcinson offenses has had staggering conse- hire those with criminal records, State legislators haven't helped iy perfect world with her husband black men.
For a brief moment in the late quences. It has wreaked massive and the gaping racial disparity in things. Many are scared stiff that a and two children was shattered. "Prisons have become a revolving 1990s there was a glimmer of hope social and political havoc on fami- the drug sentencing laws are the too aggressive push for increased During a routine physical, her doc- HIV/AIDS factory in the black that America's incarceration jug- lies and communities. it has been major reasons why far more blacks funding and expansion of drug tor noticed Sandra had swollen community," says Marie. "Cycles gemnaut would slow down. The the single biggest reason for the than whites are behind bars. diversion and probation programs lymph glands in her neck. Sandra of imprisonment and release Sentencing Project which compiles bloat in federal and state spending The scapegoat of blacks for will stir voter backlash. The big didn't worry when the doctor among black males help contribute an annual report on crime and pun- on prison construction, mainte- America's crime and drug problem dread is that they will be tarred as ordered an HIV test; after all she to the high HIV/AIDS rates in ishment in the nation found a slight nance, and the escalation in the actually began in the 1980s. Much soft on crime, and could be dumped The Straight-Up Truth African American women. Black percentage drop in the incarceration number of prosecutors needed to of the media quickly turned the from office. About the Down-Low men in the prison system engage in
rate in state prisons. handle the continuing flood of drug problem into a black problem That's turned a horrid situation high-risk sexual behaviors and
That was due to a mix of better criminal cases. and played it up big in news sto- into a public policy nightmare. many of them continue to sleep
economic times, a slight up tick in The stock reason ries and features, States now do one of two things to with men upon their release. Many
drug and counseling and rehabilita- for criminal- M a n y deal with an out control prison pop- of these men lie to their wives and
tion programs, and better commum- izin a uato.Te eacorry o girlfriends about their homosexual
ty outreach by police departments. strengthen drug treatment and activities and their HIV status as
The thaw in the hard-line take no diversion programs or release pris- .,well. One prison guard shared how
prisoner approach to crime and oners. This has little to do with a during his twelve years on duty, he
punishment didn't last. In 2012, new found enlightenment on pun- JWwitnessed countless married
according to a report from the ishment. Prisons are big, danger- Women drtheiskiisol inmates engaging in sexual acts
Pew Center of the States, more os, and inefficient and most of ]*40 an n TIO with other men."
persons were in American all expensive. It costs twenty JO ae"The black community needs to
jails than ever, times more to lock up inmates ______________ wake up and address this elephant
So many, that the United than to support community was married to a wonderful, God- in the room," says Marie. "Our
Stats nw hs te same basd crretios pogrms.fearing man and she had tested community leaders would rather
ful distinction of being the States such as California HLV-negative prior to their mar- turn their heads than admit that the
world's runaway jail- have been slapped with riage. Five days later, the test came secretive homosexual practices of
hous leder Itlock upfedralcour orersto ro-back positive and Sandra was dev- many black men are endangering
one-quarter of the vide better medical treat- astated. That evening she tearfully the lives of innocent black women
world's prison popula- ment to inmates, and to told her husband of her positive test and their children. We have to take
tion reiveovecrodin. ~ results. Later that night he went to control of our lives. We must
The Pew report found costs money; money that the store.. .never to return. She later demand HIV tests in our presence.
three more disturbing many states don't have. But discovered love letters her husband We must demand monogamy. We
problems in America's any talk of the release of had written to his former prison must demand respect and accountastaggering jail numbers. thousands of prisoners mate. Today, Sandra and her two bility from our men. In addition,
One s tat udgs wo rngs n istat vteroutry.children reside in her parents' base- we as black women should learn all
would likely opt for commu- Te states, though, created the ment while Sandra struggles with we can about HIY/AIDS and how
nity based corrections pro- problem with their policy ofjail depression, illness, and debt. it's transmitted and the lifestyle facgrams such as fines, restitution; frst, rather than rehabilitation "Unfortunately Sandra's story is tors that put us at risk for this dishome detention', probation, elec- prgrams. It's a problem that they one of many e-mails we receive on ease, especially our involvement
tronic monitoring, and drug diver- can no longer dodge. a daily basis," says Joy Marie, the with secretive down-low men."
sion programs don't because tese With increasing hard economic author of the explosive book, The "There are many warning signs to
options are scare. The programs are times, the prospects of even more Straight-Up Truth About The detect men on the DL, which we
poory fnde an opratd, r ae hge oun, ad por lacs bing Down-Low: Women Share their addressed in our book," says Marie.
non-existent. Another problem is segment Americans steamrolled by the prison jugger- Storviesl ofCetrayal ain andks "eeieeth account of oure
that black males still make up more of a generation scared stiff of naut looms even greater. This Suval(rtieWsoBok- xpincsndw twehe
than half of America's prison of young blacks is thtthe drug crisis readily increases the urgency for prison and March 2008). Joy Marie is the pen learned from other women will
inmates. They are four times more they are crime-prone and lack fam- gave their blessing to drug sweeps, state officials to cease squandering name of two women who have sur- bring about awareness and a likely than whites and twice as like- ily values. But reports and studies random vehicle checks, marginally scarce resources on wasteful, vived marriages to down-low men. heightened sense of self-responsily as Hispanics to be jailed. The dis- by the Justice Department, the U.S. legal searches and seizures, evic- racially-flawed criminal Justice Once the down-low was exposed, bility. March 10, 2009 is the proportionate number of blacks Sentencing Commission, as well as tions from housing projects and policies that target mostly, poor, its link to the spread of HIV/AIDS National Women and Girls jailed hasn't budged in the past universities and foundations con- apartments. When it came to law and desperate non violent offend- in African-American women was HIV/AIDS Awareness Day and we decade. The other problem is that a firm that broken homes and bad enforcement practices in the ghettos ers. The answer is to rely on more obvious, despite the lack of scien- want black women to become significant percent of them are genes have little to do with crime and barrios, the denial of civil liber- sound cost effective and humane tfc dt. ArcnAeia nomdadpoettesle
locked 'up for non violent petty rates. Highjblsnss, failing pub- ties protections, due process and prgas'ph ascfug, job, skllswoearnomepoisus adthrcilengisttes
crime and drug offenses. lic schools, budget cutbacks in privacy made a mockery of the and family support programs to than their white counterparts, l 6w- xhAyoa~tei etitr
Putting thousands of black men skills training and placement pro- criminal justice system to many bring to a screeching halt the incar- ever there is a higher HIV infection est at heart."
behind bars for mostly non-violent grams, the refusal of employers to blacks and Latinos. ceration juggernaut. rate amongst black women. One For more information, please visit
reason, as Sandra's story suggests, www.straightuptruth.com






rl.4.)

I have friends and loved ones suffering from Maya An Id
Alzheimer's. But I can imagine.., and hopeauorPoted
for... a world without this terrible disease.
You can help make a difference. A major brain imaging study led by
FAESM0 the National Institutes of Health may help us learn how to stop the
progression of Alzheimers.
Please consider joining the study if you are between 55 and 90 and:
are in good general health with no memory problems, OR
are in good general health but have memory problems
or concerns, OR
*have a diagnosis of early Alzheimer's disease.




Page 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press January 30 February 5, 2014









77 What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene


Coming Soon to Stage Dreamgirls Play at Boyz. The Laugh at My Pain come- held Saturday, February 8th at the Saturday, February 8th, for a race 442-2929 or visit
Aurora, Dream Girls! Stage Aurora dy tour comes to the Comedy Zone, Jacksonville Fairgrounds. The to solve clues at the "Checkpoint www.artistsseriesjax.org.
February 6th 8th. For more event is a Western Gala with a Challenge," benefiting *the JT Second Annual Jax
Stage Aurora present "Dream The smash hit Broadway musical details call 292-4242 or visit Bling Twist! Enjoy dancing, gain- Townsend Foundation. Opening
Girls! January 31 -February 9, "DreamGirls" will play at Stage www.comedyzone.com. bling tables, great food, door prizes Ceremonies begin at 1 p.m. and the Talent Competition
2014 (Weekends Only) at Stage Aurora, January 31-February 9 at and line dance lessons. Not only race start at 1:30 p.m. at the Jax Talent 2014 is an opportunity
Aurora Performance Hall, 5188 the Stage Aurora Performance Hall Spoken Word can you wear western outfits, but Jacksonville Landing. Participants to showcase your talents. Singing,
Norwood Avenue. The musical fol- located at 5188 Norwood Avenue you can wear semi-formal, formal, can register and receive further dancing, music or drama, whatever
lows the story of a young female inside Gateway Mall. Dreamigirls at the Ritz! Sunday best, or just be comfortable, details by calling 728-4722. you have to show; bring it on! The
singing trio from Chicago, Illinois tells the story of the up and coming Hear Spoken Word at the Ritz, DJ Charles 'Jazzco' Scantling will show is open for registration until
called "The Dreams", who become .1960's girls groups and the tri- Thursday, February 6th at 7 p.m. be on the turntable! For more Buddy Guy in Concert February 28th. Contestants must
music superstars. For more infor- umphs and tribulation that come and 10 p.m. For more information information call 704-3152. Leedr hcg lemn register online at
mation and tickets call 765-7372. with fame and fortune. For more call 632-5555 or visit www.ritz- Legenday iand gBusmn www.ecolatino.com or www.yourinformation and tickets call 765- jacksonville.com.The Ritz is locat- FAMUII Alumni Buddyn Gug an d gutrit Jhnndy jax .com. General audition is
Yachty Gras on 7372 or visit www.stageaurora.org. ed at 829 N. Davis Street. The FAMU M.. eeFrLang in t cocet Whednesrda Saturday, March 15th, at UNF. The
the St. Johns River! Her faPbi eknJacksonville Alumni Chapter will Theatre, 128 E. Fosyth St. For more fnshFiay, Ma 3thensti at UNFine
Celebrate Mardi Gras on the St. Her faP bi paig hold its monthly meeting Saturday, information and tickets call Thew Braoo, S3tdent UnFin
Johns! Join the Jacksonville Sail Woman Luncheon Workshops February 8th at 10. Spread the 355.2787 or visit www.floridathe- TBuilg, 58W Stuhid.n F onr
and Power Squadron for a lighted You are cordially invited to attend Sign-up for Beverly Image word as the chapter kicks off their atre.com deaisumildg5 WstneThird.mForcmr
boat parade on the St. Johns River the exclusive "Heart of a Women," Groups' public speaking working 2014 membership drive. The meet- dtisealJsiehygalcm
where captains and crews will Red luncheon, Saturday, February focusing on message articulation, ing will be held at FAMU College Temptations and Harlem Globetrotters
showcase their vessels decorated 1st at WJCT Public Studios. Enjoy audience engagement, impromptu of Pharmacy, Jax Campus, 2050 Art Fu osi ocr
with lights and beads in true Mardi door prizes, speakers and vendors, speaking and other public speaking Museum Dr., Bldg, 4800, Suite 200. ForTp nC netin Jax! Gras fashion. The evening will cul- Bring a friend! For tickets and more etiquette. The workshop* will be For more information call Dr. It's a Motown, Rock and Roll Hall See the Harlem Globetrotters "You inate with a spectacular fireworks information call 635-5191 or visit held on Thursday evenings, Ephraim Riggins at 307-1962. of Fame and Grammy Lifetime Write the Rules" World Tour at
display over our majestic river, www.wjxt.org. February 6th, 13th and 20th from Achievement double header featur- Jacksonville Veterans Memorial
Friday, January 31st at 7 p.m. For 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at various libraries. r.iR.I..E erur ing the Temptations and the FourArn,30 .PhlpR doh
more information visit www.jax- Ritz Jazz Jamm with For more information and location, BoklbTops, Thursday, February 20th at Blvd, Friday, February 28, 2014 at
events.com or call 630-2489. visit www.beverlyimagegroup.com BoklbMeeting 8 p.m. at the Florida Theater, 128 E 7 p.m. Fans will decide the rules,
Nick Colionne or call 657-0250. The Next P.R.I.D.E. book club Forsyth St For more information from playing with two basketballs
ZORA! Festival 2014 Nick Colionne jazz style is both meeting will take place Saturday call the box office at 355-5661or at once, to getting double the points
Muiltrtr, haefsin urban and contemporary, combin- Amateur NgtFebruary, 8th at 3 pm at the down- visit www.floridatheater.com. for each basket made. Call 630Muic ltraurthatr fsho ing jazz, R&B, blues and funk! Ngttown Jacksonville Public Library, 3900 for more information.
and the visual arts come together Hear Nick at the Ritz Theater, at the Ritz! Room G-4, 303 N. Laura Street. Duval County's
for a ine day explosion of culture Sunday, February 2nd for two Amateur Night at the Ritz is back, The February book for discussion is at the 25th annual Zora Neale shows 7 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. For Friday, February 7th, at 7 p.m. and Zora Neale Hurston in and Around Day of Gardening Zeta Phi Beta
Hurston Festival of Arts and more information visit www.ritz- 10 p.m. For more information call Jacksonville, Florida In The 1920's, "A Day of Gardening" program is Pearls Breakfast
Oranes on Teftvawille adjacksonville.com or call 632-5555. 632-5555 or visit www.ritzjack- 1930's and 1940's by M. Arlene scheduled for Saturday, February Celebrate local heroes as they are
Orane Cunt. Te fstial illsonvil le.com.The Ritz is located at Murrell. For additional information 22nd, 8:30 2:30 p.m. The dead- honored at the Zeta Phi Beta,
culminate Saturday, February 1st, Kvi Hart Boz at 829 N. Davis Street. contact Felice Franklin at 389-8417 line to register is Feb. 18th. The Sorority, Inc, Beta Alpha Zeta
with Maze Featuring Frankie at 3 evnByor email felicef@bellsouth.net. Duval County Extension program is Chapter Community Pearls
p.m. For additional information the Comedy Zone! JasJe ls&a fun day for gardening enthusiastBrafsStdyM ch1tt9
visit www.zorafestival.org or call -From Kevin Hart's Laugh at My ,&JI Townsend to listen to exciting speakers, Bakfast SeeatdayPMars at9
407-647-3307. Pain and Let Me Explain tour: Joey Everything In-Between! ,, plants, garden themned items, yen- Emanuel Missionary Baptist
Wells, Will "Spank" Horton and The Jacksonville Chapter of the "Checkpoint Challenge" dors and lunch! The workshop will Church, 2407 Division St. For more
Na'im Lynn are The Plastic Cup Links' annual fuindraiser will be Join friends and family on be held at 10 10 N. McDuff Ave. information email docvallie@aol.com.
For more information email beck- ~~~yd@coj.net or call 255-7450. w '1nu ra

p 3*I SAlvin Ailey Danice' Golf Tournament
Theater is back! The Clara White Mission
Expeiene te poer f Avin Inaugural Golf Tournament takes
~v AiEyxAericaDnce Theatoer fAvn place Monday, March 3rd, from 12
-- fel te plseracig trillof on-p.m. to 5 p.m. at Deercreek Country
tmoayfavorites and sprit lifting Cu,71 carnR.N lr
tempraryWhite Mission Inaugural Charity
joy of beloved classics. The Alvin Gl oraetwl eert
Aile materpecetake plcetheir 109th Anniversary of service
Tuesday, February 25th at 7:30 t h onuiy o oeifr
4 p.m. at The Times Union Center, mation call 354-4162.
300 Water St. For more details call








~I N




Page 9 Mrs. Perry's Free Press January 30 February 5, 2014










Saturday. February 1st Putnam County, Georgia to her recognition as Deep South in what's become known as the testimonies from some of mainstream and
LIFETIME at 8 p.m. a key writer of the 20th Century. Second Middle Passage. gospel music's biggest an stars. The new sea"The Gabby Douglas Story" The inspir- son premieres with a special hour-long
ing true story of the international gymnastics Friday, February 7th Sunday.February 9th episode featuring Arsenio Hall. February's
phenomenon who overcame overwhelming BOUNCE TV at 2 p.m. WJCT at 9 p.m. guests also include music stars Ja Rule &
odds to become the first African American "Ghost of Mississippi" The widow of mur- "The Abolitionists: American Experience Adrienne .Bailon, "Real Husbands of ever to be named Individual All-Around dered civil rights leader Medger Evers and a Part One: 1820s-1838" Part 1 of 3. Hollywood" stars Kevin Hart, Boris Kodjoe, Champion in artistic gymnastics at the district attorney, struggle to finally bring the Dramatic scenes and documentary segments Nick Cannon, Duane Martin and Angel Olympic Games. murderer to justice. Cast: Alec Baldwin, tell the stories of abolitionists Frederick Conwell & Redaric Williams.
Whoopi Goldberg, James Woods,* Craig T. Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Angelina
Sunday, February 2nd Nelson, William H. Macy, Virginia Madsen Grimk6, Harriet Beecher Stowe and John Saturday February 15th
WJCT at 9 p.m. Brown. CENTRIC at 9 p.m.,
"The Black Atlantic (1500-1800)" Henry Sunday, February 7th "Being" A one-hour documentary series
Louis Gates Jr. chronicles the history of WJCT at 10 p.m. Sunday.February 9th that highlights the careers of seminal actors,
African-Americans, beginning with the years "Harlem in Montmartre: A Paris Jazz WJCT at 10 p.m. musicians, and television icons. Each week
1500 to 1800. Story" Great Performances talked to Alice "The Abolitionists: American Experience the show chronicles the life, career success,
Sparberg Alexiou, scholar and author, to dis- Part Two: 1838-1854" Frederick Douglass struggle, and triumph of one subject, throughSunday. February 2nd cuss the importance of Louis Mitchell. escapes slavery, joins William Lloyd Garrison out their journey. These stories are told in all
SHOWTIME AT 8:30 p.m. Mitchell is most famous for recording the first in the abolitionist movement, writes his auto- their glamour, glitz, guts, and glory, with con"B rooklyn Boheme. Nelson George film jazz record (1922) in Paris, the iconic "Ain't biography and flees to England to avoid being centrated focus on how they persevered that documents the black arts movement of the We Got Fun". captured by his former owner; and Harriet through it all.
'80s and '90s in Fort Greene. Graduates Beecher Stowe publishes "Uncle Tom's
include Spike Lee and Chris Rock. Friday. February 7th Cabin." Tuesday. February 18th
BOUNCE TV at 6 a.m. PBS at 10 p.m.
Sunday. February 2nd "A Raisin in the Sun" An all-time classic Sunday. February 9th "The Powerbroker: Whitney Young's
PBS at 10 p.m. concerning the struggles of an African- WJCT at 11 p.m. Fight for Civil Rights" Civil rights leader
"Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock." American family who suddenly comes into a "The Abolitionists: American Experience Whitney Young, Jr. has no national holiday Powerful show on a woman who was both an financial windfall. Cast: Sidney Poitier, Part Three: 1854-Emancipation and bearing his name. You won't find him in most integrationist and a feminist in a town that was Claudia McNeil, Ruby Dee, Diana Sands, Victory" John Brown's 1859 raid on Harpers history books. In fact, few today know his highly suspicious of both in the 1950s. Louis Gossett Jr. Ferry, an attempt to spark a slave revolt, is name, much less his accomplishments. But he
recounted, as is the 1860 election of Abraham was at the heart of the civil rights movement
Monday. February 3rd Saturday, February 8th Lincoln and what followed: the Civil War, an inside man who broke down the barriers
WJCT at 3 a.m. BET at 6 p.m. Emancipation Proclamation and adoption of that held back African Americans.
"The Long Walk of Nelson Mandela" "106 & Park" Hosted by Bow Wow and the 13th Amendment.
Nelson Mandela's friends, colleagues and Keshia Chant6, BET's flagship show cele- Saturday. February 22nd
apartheid-era officials trace the one-time brates Black History Month with four special- Sunday, February 9th LIFETIME at 8 p.m.
South African president's life. ly themed weeks that put that spotlight on WJCT at 12 p.m. "The Trip to Bountiful" The television
defining moments and events in Black History "AfroPop:- The Ultimate Cultural adaptation of American playwright and Monday, February 3rd (Week One); Black Love (Week Two); Exchange: Stories From Lakka Beach" Life screenwriter Horton Foote's Tony nominated
PBS at 10 p.m. Achievements in Sports (Week Three) con- in the beachfront village of Lakka, Sierra play. Set during the final years of the Jim
"American Promise" The story spans 13 cluding with the Fine Arts (Week Four). Leone, is examined. Crow South, the film follows one woman's
years as Joe Brewster and Mich~le This year's Black History Month on-air quest to reconnect with her past in order to
Stephensoii;- middle-class African-American campaign "Say ItLu'am'oilsrt~e~-~ensu parents in. Broklyn',MY, turn their cameras connection between "'Black History -Month" BOUNCE TV at 7:30 P.m. _101 V. ~~f
on their son, Idris, and his best friend, Seun, trailblazers and other famous Americans in "The Color Purple" Based on the Pulitzer Monday, February 24th who make their way through one of the most the fields of the arts, sciences, athletics, poli- Prize-winning novel by Alice Walker, The BET at 9 p.m. prestigious private schools in the country. tics and entertainment. Curated by the award- Color Purple spans the years 1909 to 1949, "BET Honors" Celebrating its seventh Chronicling the boys' divergent paths from winning actor Michael K Williams the stories relating the life of a Southern black woman year with new host Wayne Brady, BET kindergarten through high school graduation of these African American icons, told under virtually sold into a life of servitude to her Honors celebrates and recognizes the gifts and at Manhattan's Dalton School, this provoca- this unique perspective, will highlight how brutal sharecropper husband. Cast: Whoopi contributions of six African American exceptive, intimate documentary presents compli- "Black History is American History". Goldberg, Danny Glover, Oprah Winfrey, tional leaders. Each year this powerful and cated truths about America's struggle to come Margaret Avery, Adolph Caeser, Rae Dawn inspirational event aims the spotlight on the
of age on issues of race, class and opportuni- Saturday. February 8th Chong, Akosua Busia achievements of distinguished leaders in the
ty. WJCT at 6 p.m. fields of music, literature, entertainment,
"Classic Gospel" Archival performances Sunday, February 9th media, service and education.
Tuesday. February 4 from Southern gospel concerts hosted by Bill BOUNCE TV ay 11 p.m.
WJCT at 10 p.m. and Gloria Gaither spotlight the genre's icons, "The Jackie Robinson Story" Jackie Monday. February 24th
"The Clinton -12" James Earl Jones nar- including J.D. Sumner, James Blackwood, Robinsons stars as himself in this inspirational BET at 11 p.m. rates the story of 12 black students who, on Sandi Patti, CeCe Winans and the Hoppers. biopic that chronicles his life, from youth "BET Takes Hollywood" -Veteran celebriAugust 27, 1956 in Clinton, Tenn., walked through his college career at UCLA, to his rise ty journalist Shaun Robinson of Access
into the first public high school in the South to Saturday, February 8th to a legend with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Hollywood will sit down with this year's top
desegregate after the U.S. Supreme Court's WJCT at 10 a.m. African American nominees along with past
Brown vs. the Board of Education decision. "The Education of Harvey Gantt" The Sunday. February 9th Oscar winners to candidly discuss their amaz-





January 30 February 5, 2014 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 10


Richard Sherman: From Compton to Stanford,

IS MEDIOCRITY Calls Crabtree Incident 'good-natured'
by Erin Delmore
Seattle Seahawks
FOR BIACK STUDENTS? cornerback Richard
Sherman pushed back
on the media and the
public's view of him
Florida adopts race-based
as a "thug," saying
academic goals, stop tying to label
people" and using his
com own backgroundt
unity in uproar as
Stanford-educa ed
black man from
Compton to illustrate
his point.
"I've kind of had to
be a chameleon of
sorts because you
walk, I mean, you
drive from Compton to Stanford office and every office is are you Don't you open your mouth about and you've got to be able to flip the taunting him in that moment ... is the best! Or I'm going to shut it for switch. The culture's too different that a good faith 'hey hell of a you real quick!"
to treat them both the same, and I game' or do you realize you're, Asked by Hayes what he thinks think it's not right to treat them both like, putting it in his face?" Hayes watching the interview clip, the same," said Sherman told asked Sherman. Sherman said, "It looks fine to me.
msnb-c's Chris Hayes on Monday, "I mean the game is going to end I don't think too much of it. A big by Carla St. Louis and Gigi lowered expectations for Black The SPLC encouraged communi- describing his first encounter with in twenty-two seconds... it's one of play was made; you're going to get Tinsley youths. ty members to play an active role in Stanford as -culture shock.,, those things where the game is a big reaction."
Special from The Miami Times "If the idea of goals based on race combating these measures by con- "Where I'm from, there isn't a lot gonna be over in twenty-two sec- The "big reaction that ensued While many thought Jim Crow isn't problematic enough, people of acting the Department of Justice at of culture, a lot of diversity," onds, if the guy walks to the locker included the labeling of Sherman as politics ended with the Civil Rights color are expected to do worse than education@usdoj.gov, telling them Sherman said of Compton, a rough room, I don't get a chance to say a "thug" a word that was uttered movement, the Southern Poverty any other race," wrote Ashley the plan should be reversed and neighborhood in south Los good game, so I guess it's as good 625 times on TV the day after the Law Center alleges otherwise in Greene, president of the Dream asking for an investigation against Angeles. "I was kind of shocked [at natured as you can do in a football game. their most recent complaint against Defenders at Broward College in a Florida's Department of Education. Stanford]: shocked at the way game. I was going to give the guy a "Webster's definition of [a thug] the Florida Department of letter. "Ironically, there are about 3 Other attendees echoed the senti- they're talking, the conversation, handshake before the season's is a criminal," Sherman said. "And Education. million students in Florida's public ments of the complaint, accusing the dialogue." over," Sherman said. I'm far from a criminal, you can
The complaint alleges that the school system and of those. Half of Florida's Department of Education Sherman earned a 4.2 GPA at his Sherman said he was surprised check my record, it's pretty clean. Department of Education adopted a these students are African American of creating a culture of lowered high school in Compton. when Crabtree then swatted at his And I think people confuse, with discriminatory strategic plan that or Hispanic which paints the picture expectations for students of color, a "A kid from Compton who hadn't helmet. the way they use it ... but I think
sets lower academic expectations that even if minorities are the plight the Civil Rights era actively seen too much outside the city, to "I mean, if he didn't want to people are tying to use it, like I for Black and Hispanic students majority in size, they are still the fought to end. tell you the truth, had to really shake, all he had to do was just said before, as a substitute for the nbased on race and nationality. minority in everything else." "We have reached a new low in adjust and really acclimate to that wave it off and I would have turned word. It's an accepted way to say
The plan is particularly troubling "As an African American student America when we start using chil- environment," Sherman said. around and celebrated with my it."
for Miami-Dade County Public who is full time dually enrolled in dren to promulgate discrimination," Sherman came under fire earlier teammates you know, so I was a lit- Sherman's critics included School considering it has the largest both high school and college, race said Mack Samuel, Chairman of the this month for a passionate post- tle surprised by the push," Sherman Senator John McCain, who called enrollment of Black and Hispanic based goals come as a slap in the Board of Directors for the African game interview that he says many said. him "that loudmouth from Seattle."
youths in the state. face," she said. "It is possible for all Heritage Culture Arts Coalition. "I misconstrued. "It's as good natured -- Seconds later, he joined Fox's "I don't see it that way," Sherman
Under these new standards set for students to achieve with proper am very angry and ready to do as you can do in a football game," Erin Andrews for a post-game said, "but I'm sure he's said worse math and reading, nearly the entire guidance and dedication." whatever is needed to stop this fool- he said. report. than that."
population of the Miami-Dade Community speaks: 'Academic ishness." "So this is the big debate," Chris "Well, I'm the best comer in the "His opinion is what it is and he's
County Public Schools district measures are racist' MD-C Public Schools stands Hayes said. "After the last game, game!" Sherman said. "When you entitled to it," Sherman said. "I got
which is more than 90 percent At an educational meeting held with community after the NFL films tape came out in try me with a sorry receiver like caught up in the moment. I'm sure
Black and Hispanic-is held to an on January 9th at the African The plan sparked commentary which you're miked and you make Crabtree, that's the result you're he's gotten caught up in the academic standard far lower than Heritage Cultural Arts Center by from two members of Miami-Dade the play you celebrate for a moment going to get." moment but if everybody labeled
their white and Asian counterparts. the Dream Defenders, community County Public Schools, both of and you run up to [49ers wide "Don't you ever talk about me!" him off of a sound bite, then I'm A move that has one current stu- members expressed their outrage whom candidly spoke against it. receiver Michael] Crabtree, and he said to the camera. Pressed by sure everybody have a different dent of Florida's public school sys- over the* new measure citing it as you're like, 'heck of a game, heck Andrews to name who was talking view of him."
tem very upset about the state's discriminatoryy." of a game,'and the big debate in my about him, Sherman said "Crabtree!









41k


,11 i,4





...... .....




Full Text


January 30 February 5, 2014


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5


SCIAA cENTRALm MEACRCOU-EGMATE I C EASTERN
CIA---ATHEX soinN Ilii^ M AC HFT OMFPC


e FOR THE WEEK OF JAN. 28 FEB. 3, 2014
















Broncos Sports Photo
RODGERS-CROMARTIE:
O E MO E Denver's mercurial comer
ONE MORE back from Tennessee
SUPER State one of three black
college players in Super
GAME Bowl LXVIII Sunday.

MEN'S BASKETBALL STATS LEADERS; NEW
COACH AT MVSU; SlAG CENTENNIAL HOFers


oar si
W L W L
5 4 10 9
4 4 11 7
3 6 9 11
5 6 5 14
5 4 13 5
2 6 6 10
6 3 13 6
6 3 11 8
5 4 13 6
5 4 12 6
4 5 6 13
4 5 6 13


PLAYER
Emio Parks, Jr., F, JC SMITH Av-aged 19 ports and 9.5
rebounds in teW wns getting 20 ponis, 10 board St. ASA 's
and 18 points and 9 boards vs. LNingsrne.
NEWCOMER
LeMarquisLetchaw,Jr.G,JCSMtfH.Had 16prints,6assiste,
2 steals and no TOs in wi over SLAog's and 19 points, 6 assists,
5 boards and 5 steals vs. Lgslone.
ROOKIE
Ray Andenson, Fr., G, VIJU -Averaged 9.7 ponIs, 3.0 minds
in throe games.
COACH
Stephen Joyner, JCSU Had 2.0 aeek with wins over StL
Agustine's and Lvngstone.


North Carot Ceal
Norfolk State
Hampto
Savannah State
Morgan State
Coppi State
NCA&T State
FtoridA&M
SC State
Bethune-Cokrn
Md. E.Shore
Ddeawre State


CONF ALL
W L W
5 1 14
6 2 12
5 2 10
5 2 7
4 2 6
4 3 7
3 3 7
3 3 7
3 3 5
3 4 7
2 6 4
0 5 2
0 6 4


MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
AdMat Adams, 6-1, Sr., G, S. C. STATE Aeragaed 18.0
poits, 4.0 rebounds, 6-5 assists and 1.5 steals in pair of
conference wis. Had 13 points, 3 boards and 8 assists in
2.point win vs. B-CU. Had 23 points, 5 boards, 5 assists and
3 stealsvs. Norf Sate.
ROOKIE
Jame Dane, 5-11, Ert. G, HOWARD Scored 31 poils, shot
56% fhm lie felu d dqn o bo b arn g range and carned
9ofll FTsiewinoveRFloidaAM.
DEFENSE
DuVauglhn Maxwell 6-7, r-Jr., F, NCCU Avmaged 10.5
rebounds, 2.5 blocks and 1.5 steals in a pair of conference
games. Also scored 20.5 ppg.


A SOUTHERN INTERCOLLEGIATE
w AC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE


EAST DVII
Fort Valey State
Benedict
CteA anta
Arbany State
Pane

Motehose
WEST DIVISION
Tuskegee
Kentucky State
Stiman
LeMoyne-Owen
Mies
Lane


CONF
W L
9 0
7 3
5 3
5 4
5 4
5 5
2 7

7 2
6 5
5 5
4 5
1 9
1 10


SIAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Brandoe Darrett, 6-7, Sr., F, KENTUCKY STATE In
three g tres last week averaged 16.7 points, 11 rebounds
and 3.3 blocks.
NEWCOMER
DeohteJnson, 64, Jr.,F,BENEDICT-ln t, conference
games vs. FVSU and Morehouse, averaged 15.0 points, 8.0
rebounds and 1 assist.


SWAC
QI~fA f* SOUTHWESTERN
SWWACATHLETIC CONFERENCE
DIV ALL
W L W L
Souten 7 1 11 10
Alabama State 5 2 11 7
Texas Southem 5 2 9 10
AlcomrState 5 3 8 12
PraireViewA&M 4 3 6 13
JacksontState 3 4 7 12
AlabarmaA&M 3 4 6 11
#Miss.Valley St 2 5 6 14
#Ak.PiteBluff 2 5 4 15
#Grambling State 0 7 1 15
tbmrue oCortew-,ce

SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Aadc Murray, 6-10, Sr., C, TEXAS SOUTHERN -Aver-
aged doubleduble of 30.0 points and 13.5 rebounds
in two wvins. Got 34 points and 8 boards in win over
UAPB and 26 points and 19 Sreboundsin over MVSU.
Shot combined 21 of 35,60% in the two games.
NEWCOMER
NA


INDEPENDENTS


Central State 8 5
W. Va. State 7 8
Univ.ofDC 3 12
Cheyney 2 16
Lincoln (Mo.) 2 16
Tennessee State 2 21
IND. PLAYER OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Padtrick Miler, .0, Sr, TENRI STATE Aeraged 34.5
points ina wo losses go3ng 36 with 6rebiounsanld2asssts
vs. MooneSad Sate and 33 wil 6 rebonttsan 4 assists
vs. Eastem Kentucky.
NEWCOMER
NA


HooPs SCORES Hoops Round-up
MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014 MEN


Kentucky State 68, LeMoyne-Owen 57
Miles 78, Lane 59
Paine 72, Morehouse 63
Tuskege 89, Stillman 87
SWAC
Alcom State 70, Alabama A&M 64
Miss. Valley St. 81, Prairie View 72
Southern 68, Alabama State 55
Texas Southern 72, Ark.-Pine Bluff 71


STAT CORNER

WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS

BLACK COLLEGE BASKETBALL STAT LEADERS

MEN'S SCORING, REBOUNDING


SCORING
NAME/SCHOOL CL
MILLER, Patrick TNST SR
MURRAY, Aaric TXS SR
CURTIS, Deshawn CHEY SR
DANIEL, James HOW FR
JONES, Marquez WSSU JR
INGRAM, Jeremy NCCU SR
MAY, Amere SAU JR
BLACK, Justin MSU SR
TATE, Tyrell FSU SR
HILL, Jody-LIV SR
THOMAS, Mark LIV SR
PARKS, Emilio JCSU JR
-GATLING,-Ray BSU .- : SR
ADAMS, Jamie FAMU
PACK, Richaud NCAT JR
ROSS, Preston WSSU SR
MIDDLETON, Lamont NCAT SR
HAWKINS, Malcolm NSU SR
OKOROH, Prince HOW JR
SHINE, ATorri-GSU


REBOUNDING
NAMESCHOOL CL G
WEST, Brandon JSU 19
KILO, Lenjo UDC 15
DAVEY, Brandon FVSU Sr 17
BAZEMORE, Wyk. WSSU JR 19
BRIGGS, Omar VUU SR 19
DOMINECK, Nigel FVSU SR 17
GODFREY, Calvin SU SR 20
WILKERSON, Antw. JCSU SR 19
PARKS, Emilio JCSU JR 19
CRAWLEY, Jonathan SAU SR 18
MURRAY, Aaric TXSU SR 19
BYRD, Dominique ECSU SO 19
SMITH, Jyles SSU SR 20
BECKFORD, Bruce NCAT SO 17
BUTLER-POOLE, P. CHOW 16
KINDRED, Joel SAU SR 18
HAYNES, Devon UAPB 19
MAYO, Eric-LIV JR 17
BROWN, Octavius ALC 20
GRAY, Kendall DSU JR 18
GOODE, Brandon NSU JR 20
WIGGINS, K. VSU 16
COPELAND, Jay NCCU 18
PALMER, Darryl SCSU 19
MAXWELL, DuVn HAM SR 19
SMITH, Carlos BSU SR 20
HUBBARD, Anthony MSU SR 17


FG 3FG FT PTS
173 29 158 533
141 23 110 415
119 20 107 365
92 54 80 318
119 47 87 372
103 32 114 352
112 33 88 345
109 23 78 319
101 22 68 307
103 55 59 324
102 25 99 328
122 0 97 341

94 46 'H-'e350
93 34 129 349
110 25 86 331
89 32 129 339
97 37 86 317
116 8 86 326
81 21 72 255


AVG.
23.2
23.1
21.6
21.2
20.2
19.6
19.2
18.8
18.1
18.0
18.0
17.9
17.7
17.5
17.5
17.4
17.0
16.7
16.3
15.9


OFF DEF TOT AVG
75 132 207 10.9
149 9.9
162 9.5
74 97 171 9.0
53 114 167 8.8
150 8.6
59 112 171 8.6
29 135 164 8.6
54 108 162 8.5
62 85 147 8.2
47 107 154 8.1
8.1
51 111 162 8.1
28 105 133 7.8
7.4
54 79 133 7.4
50 91 141 7.4
60 74 134 7.3
39 102 141 7.1
45 81 126 7.0
54 84 -138 6.9
6.9
60 63 123 6.8
37 92 129 6.8
41 88 129 6.8
6.8
43 71 114 6.7


CIAA
One piece of big news in the CIAA
is Shaw's loss of league-scoring leader
Curtis Hines (20.2 ppg.) who was ruled
by the NCAA to have used up his eligi-
bility.
Otherwise the January part of the
regular season is winding down without
a lot of separation between teams in both
divisions.
This past week, Bowie State (2-1
North) posted wins over Virginia Union
(80-71) and Chowan (80-74) to get back
in the North Division race. Virginia
State handed Elizabeth City State its
first loss in the division (70-59). BSU,
ECSU and VSU now enter this week
tied atop the North at 2-1.
BSU and VSU tangled this Wednes-
day. VSU is at Lincoln Saturday while
Bowie State is at ECSU.
In the South, Johnson C. Smith
was the big winner, getting narrow
home wins over Saint Augustine's
(84-80) and Livingstone (76-73), while
Winston-Salem State, Livingstone
and Fayetteville State split two games.
The longjam at the top now has JCSU,
WSSU, Livingstone and FSU at 2-1.
WSSU hosted JCSU Wednesday
before travelling to Livingstone Satur-
day.

-MEAC '-.- ),
North Carolina Cenitrali(5-l)


BCSP Notes


Comegy's winning record

good enough for MVSU
Apparently, winning was not enough for
Jackson State but it appears to be plenty for
SWAC East Division rival Mississippi Valley
State as the school announced last week that it
had hired successful former JSU head football
coach Rick Comegy as the Delta Devils new
head man.
Despite compiling a 55-35 mark over eight
seasons including an 8-4 mark this season and
appearances in the last two SWAC Champion-
ship Games, Comegy was fired by JSU in mid-
December. The school said that decision was not
based on wins and losses but cited lack of lo-
cal recruiting and discipline as reasons for his
dismissal. JSU endured three years (2008-11) of
NCAA sanctions including loss of scholarships,
practice time and postseason bans for low Aca-
demic Progress Rates (APR) while Comegy was
head coach.
The school also said it was looking for
someone familiar with Jackson State culture and
followed through by hiring former JSU standout
Harold Jackson as its new head man.
Comegy moves on to head a SWAC pro-
gram that has not won a division championship
nor made an appearance in the league champi-
onship game since the conference went to that
format in 1999 and has had just three winning
seasons since 1990. He replaces Karl Morgan,


4 Curtis Hines,
6-4, Sr., G
Kinston, NC

A 20.2 ppg.

emerged as the big winner sweeping
games at home and North Carolina
A&T (84-44), Coppin State (87-63)
and Morgan State (53-52).
Four teams are perched just a game
behind the Eagles: Norfolk State (6-2),
Savannah State (5-2), Hampton (5-2)
and Morgan State (4-2). Norfolk State
was tripped up at South Carolina State
Saturday (73-61).
The league-leading Eagles head
North to play at Maryland Eastern
Shore Saturday and at Howard Mon-
day. Savannah State has the Florida
swing through Bethune-Cookman
(Sat.) and Florida A&M (Mon.).
Hampton is in Baltimore for dates
with Coppin (Sat.) and Morgan (Mon.).

SlAG
Fort Valley State (8-0) has now-
won 10 straight and increased its lead
over Benedict in the SIAC East to three
'games following Benedict's 81-79 loss
to Clark 'Atlanta Mdhday. CAU is also
.li,' li# - -... f


three games behind at (5-3).
FVSU knocked off Claflin 68-58
Monday to keep its win streak alive.
The Wildcats host Albany State Satur-
day and Clark Atlanta Monday before
travelling to Paine next Wednesday.
Tuskegee has won five straight af-
ter getting wins on the road over Lane
(85-76) and Stillman (89-87) and now
has a three-game lead in the West. The
Golden Tigers are at home vs. Miles
Thursday and vs. LeMoyne-Owen Sat-
urday.
SWAC
Mississippi Valley State handed
Southern its first conference loss (72-
64) is a game that was made up last
Wednesday after a bomb scare cancelled
Monday's game in Itta Bena.
The Jaguars (7-1) bounced back to
get wins over Alabama A&M (66-52)
Saturday and second-place Alabama
State (68-55) Monday.
The Jaguars will entertain Alcorn
State (5-3) Saturday.
Texas Southern transfer center
Aaric Murray continued his torrid pace
averaging 30 points per game in wins
over MVSU (94-56, 26 points, 19 re-
bounds) and UAPB (72-71, 34 points,
8 rebounds). TSU (5-2) is at Alabama
A&M Saturday and at Alabama State
Monday. ASU is also at 5-2 in SWAC
play. ". -'";


who was 8-35 in his four seasons at the institu-
tion including 2-10 this past season. Morgan's
contract was not renewed.
"You're always a-little bit hurt," Comegy
told the Jackson Clarion-Ledger of his firing
from JSU but said in an ESPN interview that he
feels good about what he accomplished with the
resources he was given.
"It's not just about winning on the football
field, but in the classroom," Comegy said upon
his hiring at MVSU. "I know a lot of people just
say that. But if you're not winning in the class-
room, then you're going to have a hard time on
the field."
Comegy earned $191,580 annually from
Jackson State after an extension in 2012. Fi-
nancial terms of Comegy's contract were not re-
leased last week, but MVSU director of athletics
Dianthia Ford-Kee said it is a four-year deal.


SIAC Hall of Fame inductees
ATLANTA--The Southern Intercollegiate
Athletic Conference ("SIAC") will induct its
first Hall of Fame class since 2000, by honoring
a heralded group of 15 former student-athletes,
coaches and administrators.
Shannon Sharpe (Savannah State) and
Deacon Jones (South Carolina State), a pair
of Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees, along
with Major League Baseball Hall of Famer An-
dre "The Hawk" Dawson (Florida A&M), and


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1
CIAA
WSSU @ Livingstone
Fayetteville State @ St. Augustine's
Virginia Union @ Chowan
Virginia State @ Unoln
Johnson C. Smith @ Shaw
Bowie State @ Elizabeth City State
MEAC
Savannah State @ B-Cookman
Delaware State @ Morgan State
Norfolk State @ Miami
S.C. State @ Florida A&M
N. C.A&T @ UMES
Hampton @ Copptn State
N. C. Central @ Howard
SIAC
Paine @ Benedict
LeMoyne-Owen @ Tuskegee
Stilman @ Miles
Lanea@Selma
Albany State @ Fort Valley State
Morehouse @ ClarkAtlanta
SWAC
Alcom State @ Southern
Jackson State @ Miss. Valley State
Prairie View @Alabama State
Texas Southernm @Alabama A&M
Grambling State @ Arkansas-Pine Bluff
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3
MEAC
N. C. Central @ UMES
S. C. State @ B-Cookman
Hampton @ Morgan State
Savannah State @ Florlda A&M
Delaware State @ Coppin State
N. C.A&T @ Howard
SIAC
Clafflln @ Benedict
Clark Atlanta @ Fort Valley State
Morehouse @Albany State
Kentucky State @ Wilberforce
SWAC
Grambling @ Miss. Valley State
Prairie View @ Alabama A&M
Texas Southern @ Alabama State
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY
ClAA
Barber Scotia @ Fayetteville State
Bluefleld State @ Chowan
Virginia State @ St. Augustine's
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6
SIAC
Miles @ Lane
S'. Fort Valley State'@t4ilnSI-
Albany State @ Benedict
S Claflin @ClarkAttanta : ".
LeMoyne-Owen @ ((epntulw Stae. ,


*1.


COMEGY: At microphone at Miss. Valley State.


former Temple University head basketball coach
John Chaney, headline the class of inductees
that will be introduced as the SIAC's centennial
Hall of Fame Class.
Other Inductees include: Betty Austin
(Alabama A&M), Hampton "Hamp" Smith
(Albany State), Lonnie Bartley (Fort Valley
State), Greg Lloyd (Fort Valley State), Tyrone
Poole (Fort Valley State), Clemon Johnson
(Florida A&M), Willie "Galloping Gal" Gali-
more (Florida A&M), William Nicks (Morris
Brown), Donn Clendenon (Morehouse), Har-
old Ellis (Morehouse) and Samueld "Herc"
Goodwin (South Carolina State)..
Induction will be held at the SIAC Cen-
tennial Hall of Fame Gala on March 5th, 2014
in Birmingham, Alabama. The event will take
place the week of the SIAC Centennial Basket-
ball Tournament, (March 3-8, 2014).


STAT CORNER II

WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


FORMER BLACK COLLEGE PLAYERS IN
SUPER BOWL LXVIII


SEATTLE SEAHAWKS
7 Tarvarls Jackson QB 8th
83 Rlcardo Lockette WR 2nd

DENVER BRONCOS
45 Dominique CB 6th
Rodgers-Cromartie


Alabama State
Fort Valley State


Tennessee State


Ii


Jackson Lockette


AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XX, No.26


R-Cromartie


2t 13- BLA C0L GEB KET LL(W me' RsltStninsan. eel Hnrstru1271


CIAA CENTRAL INTERCOLLEGIATE
A ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
N coF AIL
KORTH DIVISION W L W L WI L
Virginia State 2 0 6 1 15 1
Lincoln 2 1 4 5 11 8
Eliz. City State 2 1 4 5 5 13
Chowan 1 1 3 5 9 9
BowieState 1 2 2 7 7 10
Virginia Union 0 3 1 8 4 13
SOUTH DMSION
FayettevilleState 3 0 7 2 14 4
Shaw 3 0 7 2 13 6
StL Augustine's 1 2 5 3 10 7
W-SalemState 1 2 5 4 11 8
Livingstone 1 2 5 4 10 9
J.C.Smith 0 3 5 4 10 8
CIAA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Diamond Mtchell,Sr.,PG,SHAW-Hada23-pntpefornaOnce
in dnoverWSSU and13porintsali8assists vs. SLAugustne's.
NEWCOMER
ket HtldIcer, Sr., F, SHAW- IHad 23 points of e bench vs.
WSSU.Averaged 16.5 points and 6.5 rebounds per game.
ROOKIE
Courtnil Williams, Fr., G, CHOWAN Had 14 points induding 5
of 5 FTs in an over Bowie State. Jasnmin Dancy, Fr., G, VUU In
two games average 11.5 points, 9.0 rebounds.
COACH
Jacques Curtds, SHAW His Lady Bears beat WSSU 93-49
and beat St Augn's 67.56.


MEAC o EASTERN
MEAC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CONF ALL
W L W L
Hampton 7 0 16 4
Coppin State 6 1 9 10
Savannah State 5 2 12 9
NCA&T 4 2 14 4
Howard 4 2 8 11
NorfolkState 5 3 9 10
North Carolina Central 3 3 8 11
SCState 3 4 5 12
FloridaA&Ml 3 4 9 11
Bethune.Cookmran 3 5 6 14
Md.E.Shore 0 5 3 13
Delaware State 0 6 5 13
Morgan State 0 6 2 17
MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Jasmine Grice, 5-10, Sr., G, FLORIDA A&M Totalled 57
points, 17 rebounds and 11 steals i 1-1 week. Poured in 34
ponts on 12 o 17 shootig, 8 steals and 7 rebounds iwin n
overHoward. Had 23 points and 10 rebounds in teloss to SSU.
ROOIiE
Katyn Williams, 6-5, r-Fr., C, B-COOKIAAN -Averaged 12.0
points,9.5 rebounds, 3.5 blocksingames vs. SCSUandtUMES.
Got 17 points, 11 rebounds vs. SCSU, 8 rebounds, 7 paints
and 4 blocks vs. UMES.
DEFENSE
Larisesa Carter, 6.0, Sr., F, COPPIN STATE- 21 rebounds
in pair of wins over NCCU and NSU. Had 14 rebounds, 18
points vs. NCCU, 7 rebounds, 3bocks in in wn vs. Norfolk State.


IA SOUTHERN INTERCOLLEGIATE
SIA C ATHLETIC CONFERENCE


EAST DIVISION
Fort Valley State
Claflin
Benedidt
Clark AtIanta
Albany State
Paine
WEST DIVISION
Tuskegee
LeMoyne-Owen
Miles
Kentucky State
Sbllman
Lane


SIAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
BeotWarr, 5.10,Jr.,F,KBEnTUCKYSTATE.-LedLady
T"i) tstbl1.lrind leiaiSas llianld ),8ag.
igl9.5poit,8.5renlds,2asss,2steatad1,.5tiodB.
NEWCOMER
Samantha Thomas, 6-0, Jr., C, STILLMAN In 81-69 loss to
KSU, sedwith16 points,80hrounds,2biotdssand steal.


Qi~fA <^ SOUTHWESTERN
SWA ATHLETIC CoNFERENCE
DIV ALL
W L W L
Southernm 8 0 11 5
Texas Southern 6 1 9 9
Grambling State 4 3 7 11
Jackson State 4 3 6 11
Miss. Valley SL 4 3 5 13
PrairieVewA&M 4 3 4 13
Alcomn State 3 5 4 15
Alabama State 2 5 9 9
Alabama A&M 1 6 3 14
At.Pine Bluff 0 7 1 16
SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Jazzmln Parker, 5.10, Jr., G, TEXAS SOUTHERN Tailed
24 points on 11 of 23 sholng and had 8 rbounds wi n over
MVSU. Added 19 points on 9 of 18 shoolnin win ovne UAPB.
Averaged 21.5 points in to gawes, sting 20 of 41
tonte ki.W
NEWCOMER
HA


INDEPENDENTS


Univ. ofDC 12 3
W.Va. State 12 6
Central State 6 6
Tennessee State 7 13
Lincoln (Mo.) 3 14
Cheyney 3 14
IND. PLAYER OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Degdkk a Bret 5-11, Jr., GF, UDC Scored teaiN
20 points on 9 of16 s ooing win win over Dowing.
NEWCOMER
HA


NORTH DVMSION
Biz. City State
Virginia State
Bowie State
Virginia Union
Lincoln
Chowan
SOUTH DIVISION
Fayetteville State
Winston-Salem State
J. C. Smith
Livingstone
St Augustine's
Shaw
CIAA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK


MEAC
B-Cookman 58, Howard 47
Coppin State 70, N. C. A&T 54
Hampton 67, S. C. State 56
NJIT 65, Delaware State 59
Norfolk State 56, Say. State 49
N. C. Central 53, Morgan State 52
SIAC
Clark Atlanta 81, Benedict 79
Fort Valley State 68, Claflin 58


2 0 1 1 B L C K 0 L E G B A K E B A L (Me's ReultsStandngs ad Weely Hoors thru 127/14




January 30 February 5, 2014


Page 6 Ms. Perry's Free Press


Christian Comedian and

Quartets in Concert
Jacksonville welcomes popular Christian comedian Mark Lowry with
special guests the Nelons and Lefevre Quartet of Atlanta, Georgia. This
exiting evening will take place at Trinity Baptist Church, located at 800
Hammond Dr., Thursday, January 30th at 7 p.m. For more information visit
online at www.cnsentertainmentgroup.com or call 1-800-965-9324.

Soweto Gospel Choir in Concert
The Soweto Gospel Choir will launch their 5th major North American
tour, Friday, February 7th, in Jacksonville Beach at St. Paul's by-the Sea
Episcopal Church, 465 lth Avenue N. The internationally renowned vocal
ensemble is performing in over 30 cities in concerts to reflect the color and
the vibrancy of their rainbow nation while honoring the life and legacy of
Nelson Mandela. For more details visit www.sowetogospelchoir.com or
call 270-1771.

Caring for the Caregiver Workshops
Community Hospice "Caring for the Caregiver" Workshop takes place,
Saturday, February 1st, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Legends Center, 5130
Soutel Dr. The workshop is where family caregivers have an opportunity to
connect with professionals and caregiving resources that will support them
in their caregiving journey, network with fellow caregivers and listen to
professional speakers who will discuss a variety of caregiving topics
Attendees will enjoy a complimentary breakfast and lunch and have a
chance to win door prizes. Registration is free. To request complimentary
respite care for your loved one call Jennifer Arnold at 807.1318. For work-
shop details and immediate registration call Mitzi Saul at 407-6165 or visit
www.communityhospice.com.

NOTICE: Church news is published free of charge. Information
must be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5
p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information received prior to the
event date will be printed on a space available basis until the date. Fax
e-mail to 765-3803 or e-mail to JFreePress@aol.com.


Historic Mount Zion A.M.E.

Family & Friends Celebration
The family of Historic Mount Zion AME Church requests your presence at
their Family and Friends Day Worship service, Sunday, March 6th at the 10
a.m. and 3 p.m. worship service. The theme is: "Standing together in Christ."
The event will include celebration through worship, music and dance. Guest
includes Meachum Clark and True Purpose, the Restoration Dance group and
much more! Come out and worship and bring a friend! The celebration will
take place at Historic Mount Zion A.M.E., Pastor Pearce Ewing, 201 East
Beaver St. For more information call 355-9475.

Naturopathic Herbalist Dr. Scott

Whitaker at Masjid El-Salam
Join Dr. Scott Whitaker Board Certified Naturopathic Doctor and author
with over 20 years experience in herbology, iridology, homeopathy, natural
healing and detoxification. Hear Dr. Whitaker, Sunday, April 27th at 1 p.m.
at Masjid El-Salaam, 1625 North Pearl Street. For more information visit
www.salaammasjid.com or call 359-0980.


Greater Macedonia Celebrates

38th Pastoral Anniversary
Come celebrate Pastor Landon L. Williams, Sr. 38th Anniversary with
two Sunday celebrations! On Sunday, February 9th hear spoken word
by Bishop Virgil Jones of Philippian Community Church. On Sunday,
February 16th hear spoken word by Dr. John Guns or St. Paul Baptist
Church. Each services starts at 4 p.m. The event is free and everyone
is invited to attend. For more details call 764-9257 or visit
www.gmbc.net Greater Macedonia Baptist Church is located at 1880
W. Edgewood.

Women Of Prayer and

Purpose Prayer Breakfast
You are cordially invited to the Florida Central Second Ecclesiastical
Jurisdiction Spring Conference Prayer Breakfast, Sponsored by the
Jurisdictional Deacon Wives, Wednesday, March 12th at Deerwood
Country Club, 10239 Golf Club Drive at 8:30 a.m. For more informa-
tion call Missionary Mattie Ferrell at 434-2195.


The Sin of Being a White Right Wing Christian


By James Strong,
New Journal and Guide
I have seen many PBS specials
chronicling how predators stalk
their prey. I saw one program in
which several wolves stalked a
swifter deer across mountains with
yellow and brown leaves on the
ground, though dead cornfields,
amid grass surpassing six feet and
among trees leafless or green.
They hunted the innocent deer for
miles until it breathed so heavily
that its breath turned into fog and its


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church

215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464
..in iiii1 'i : ' "' """ " ': "" ' ** i t^tm.iiiai i lt 3 V : iJ,^^ .ii .


...Weekly Services

Sunday Morning Worship Midweek Services
7:40 a.m. and 10:40 a.m. Wednesday Noon Service L
^^ "Miracle at Midday"
Church school 12 .n..n. n ,,1


Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Sr.
Senior Pastor


9:30 a.m.
Bible Study
6:30 p.m.


JL1= JuWM~o--- JJ,.JU.
The Word from the Sons
and Daughters of Bethel
3rd Sunday 4:00 p.m


Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Jr.
Senior Pastor


Come share in Holy Communion on 1st Sunday at 7:40 and 10:40 a.m.


Grace and Peace
visit www.Bethelite.org












Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20


Pastor Landon Williams


8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship
9:30 a.m. Sunday School

11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday2PM 3 PM

**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


chin hung icicles in the subzero
cold. The deer had speed, but the
wolves had grit. The wolves ran
slower than the deer, but they ran
with patience, until the deer finally
collapsed out of fatigue and became
a meal for the wolves.
In a similar fashion, white right-
wing Christianity chases after
blacks and black Christians. What
do I mean by associating white-
wing Christianity with wolves?
Well, perhaps I should give a defini-
tion of the term first.
I define white right-wing
Christianity a little differently than
most theologians and the definitions
you may read in dictionaries and
encyclopedias. Is it a movement?
No. it is as c ut-a; p, pny,,saIsc Iult,
Is it truth? Not even a little bit. It is
a heresy, as ruthless and terrifying
as any angry, schizophrenic kanga-
roo.
Let me show, though, how it is a
wolf.
I remember a story concerning the
daughter of black Baptists from
Canton, Ohio. Her parents had
saved thousands of dollars to send
their only child to Bob Jones
University in Greenville, South
Carolina. The university is a protes-
tant fundamentalist institution
which through a wicked and satanic


interpretation of Acts 17:26, taught
ever since its founding by Bob
Jones and Billy Sunday in 1927 that
segregation was divinely ordained.
The school has accepted black
students for many years, but did not
renounce its policy prohibiting
interracial dating among its students
until 2000, when a controversial
appearance by then presidential can-
didate George W. Bush at the cam-
pus ignited a national firestorm.
The story tells how this jewel of a
black girl grew worn and scarred
during her four years at Bob Jones.
In the beginning her character was
sweet, her morals mild, her theology
clean and her beliefs pure.
But by the end of her freshman
year, she stopped having her hair
braided, wearing corn rows and cut-
ting her hair short. The 'Bob Jones
clan had convinced her that 1 Peter
3:3 only warranted straight, long
hair, like blond and brunette white
women wear.
By the end of her sophomore year,
she stopped listening to Christian
rap and buying hip-hop DVDs. At a
chapel service one week-day morn-
ing, a Bob Jones music professor
characterized rap and hip hop as
trash and, ripping the original mean-
ing away from Ephesians 5:18-19,
argued that God only sanctioned


hymns and white spiritual songs.
By the end of her junior year, she
rejected the historical and illustrious
eloquence of black preaching and
joined a white fundamentalist
protestant church, where the white
ladies encouraged her to not date or
kiss the white boys.
By the end of her senior year, she
had renounced Martin Luther King,
Jr., civil rights, the Democratic
Party, love for her fellow human
beings, and integration.
If we look at her mutation allegor-
ically, we might feel the damage
personally. In her first year she was
a lonely teapot sitting on a stove. By
the second year the teapot was filled
with the water of doubt. By the third
year corrosion had turned on the
".-'i' IIJ 'J .ll 1 J ll-J,./s ./l^U JA '*,
heat, scorching doubt to the point
that it changed into rejection of its
innocent and wholesome past. And
by the fourth year the teapot had
boiled with enthusiasm for the new
nagging terror of white evangelical
Christianity.
The sista left Canton a flower; she
returned to Canton a cripple. She
left as a black Baptist; she returned
as a white fundamentalist. She left
as a follower of Christ; she returned
as a worshipper of idols.


100 WaerStree

Jacson illFlrd

Inivdul icet ae 6 .00o



$500U e tbeo e


Th dos of Macedona ae away opn*t yo an yor*fmil.SI wemaybe f ay asisanc
to yo i y ursp ri ua w lk p es e con act s at764-257 r vi emal atGrea er a 5 o.5 .


Worship with

us LIVE on

the web visit
www.truth2powerministries.org


;*. -





January 30 February 5, 2014


Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press


Secrets Your Credit


Score Reveals About You


That numerical expression other-
wise known as the credit score is the
absolute authority of your creditwor-
thiness, right? Consumers seem to
think so; every year we spend more
than $1 billion to buy them, along
with our credit reports. But the FICO
scores and others we can buy have
less value than advertised. As we
have reported before, they're not the
same one creditors actually use to
make decision about extending a loan
or credit card to you.
Here's another reason you should-
n't waste your money on artificial
credit scores: Car dealers, cellular-
service providers, credit card issuers,
insurers, retailers, and other business
rate you up, down and sideways
using a whole slew of still other
scores.
And guess what? "The consumer
has no way to proactively get these
other scores, and there's generally no
obligation for businesses to share
them," says John Ulzheimer, a con-
sumer-credit expert at Credit-
Sesame.com.
Last November, FICO, the com-
pany that invented its eponymous rat-
ings in 1958, began letting customers
of two lenders see the actual scores
used to grant them credit. But the
other behind-the-scenes scores re-
main secret.
Your legal safeguards may be near
nil, but you can still protect yourself
by knowing how businesses, data
brokers, and credit bureaus use your
credit report and other information to
keep tabs on you. Here's a rundown
of some of the scores that are being
used behind your back.
FICO Revenue Scores assess your
likelihood of generating income on a
credit card by using it a lot. Industry-


specific credit scores focus on how
well you handle specific kinds of
debt obligations.
For example, the Equifax TIP Au-
tomotive Score cross-tabulates bad
credit risk with a shopper's true in-
market propensity to actually buy, on
a scale of 1 to 10, and also prompts
dealers to push certain car models
over others. Wireless phone compa-
nies tap Equifax Wireless Risk
Scores to assess how well applicants
have paid their telecom bills. The un-
derlying database also tells how
many times a customer has switched
from one carrier to another, which
could reveal bargain hunters willing
to switch again for a better deal.
Deposit-account scores are used
when you open a checking account.
Banks, which are still in the habit of
authorizing account overdrafts so
they can levy outrageous penalty
fees, use ChexSystems QualiFile
Scores to determine the likelihood
that a customer will bounce checks
(without the bank's blessing) in the
next year and which "bad" customers
are worth keeping for an added "lift"
from higher-fee "second-chance" ac-
counts.
And there are more: Good cus-
tomer/bad customer scores measures
your profit and loss potential, while
FICO Bankruptcy Scores aim to tip
off lenders that you'll still go bust de-
spite your good payment history.
FICO Transaction Scores monitor
your credit-card activity and look for
money-trouble behavior, such as tak-
ing out a series of cash advances.
What to do
Although you can't buy these
scores, you should be able to see at
least some of them if their use results
in an "adverse action" that causes


Old Electronics? Get


....Cash for Your Trash

So'ime retailers., including Amazon,., estBuy, Target, and Walmart, have.
trade-in programs that give you gift cards in exchange for used electron-
ics. You may also be able to trade in DVDs, books, and other items. The
amount you'll get depends on the product and its condition.
For example, Best Buy was recently offering a $150 gift card for a
Toshiba Satellite notebook in good condition. One in poor shape would
fetch you $67.50. Can't bear to hear Desi Amrnaz croon "Babalu" one
more time? Amazon was offering up to $22.38 to owners of the complete
"I Love Lucy" series on DVD.
Trade-in programs can be less of a hassle than trying to sell an item
yourself, but you might not get as much. To use the programs, you first
get an estimate from the retailers' website. Then you ship it to the retailer,
usually at its expense. After the items condition is verified, you'll receive
your card. Some retailers will also allow you to have products evaluated
in its stores.
Trade-in prices can vary widely. For example, among the four retailers
we checked, prices for a Fuji X1 00 digital camera in top condition ranged
from a low of $135 at Walmart to $471.25 at Amazon. (We found used
Fuji X100 cameras selling on Amazon for $690 to $1,000 in very good
to like-new condition.)
To get a sense of what the item you want to trade in might be worth, do
a Web search. You might find used versions offered on Amazon and other
sites. But remember that the gift card you'll receive can probably be used
only to make purchases from the retailer that issued it, so be sure you'll
be happy shopping there.
If you're trading in electronics, back up stored data and then securely
delete it from the device before you hand it over.








H IRE~t










You too can discover
REAL RESULTS with
Employ Florida. I






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F,'


you to be denied credit or pay a price
higher that you would otherwise. So:
SBe on the lookout for those ad-
verse actions, including being denied
wireless or another utility service,
being charged a higher-than-market
rate for an auto loan, or having your
credit line reduced or cut off.
SAsk the business or lender if the
action is the result of scoring. If it
was, ask to see the score. If not, ask
how it made the decision.
SAlthough there is debate over
whether such things as a billed-later
cellular or utility account or checking
service qualify as credit under the
Fair Credit Reporting Act, we believe
that's why businesses score you, so
you should be entitled to see the
number. If you don't get it, file a
complaint with the Consumer Finan-
cial Protection Bureau at www.con-
sumerfinance.gov/complaint
STo keep your secret back-office
FICO scores in shape, that company
advises you to pay all of your bills on
time, every time; get revolving-credit
balances below 30 percent of your
available credit line; and open new
credit accounts only when necessary.
"A consumer who follows the basic
tenets of good credit management
will have a good FICO score across
the board," says a company spokes-
woman.


Saving More for Retirement, Some Earners

May Qualify for Tax Breaks and Bigger Subsidies
Early reports are showing that don't buy it must pay a fine when fil- You can deduct a number of items
young adults aren't flocking to the ing 2014 taxes; for individuals its 1 from MAGI, including college tu-
new state health care market places, percent of income or $95, whichever ition, student loan interest, pretax
Some theorize that it's because they is higher. (The fine rises yearly to a money put into health savings ac-
think the plans offered there will be maximum of 2.5 percent of income counts and individual retirement ac-
too expensive relative to the potential or $695 per person, whichever is counts, and other expenses and
benefits. But they-and others with higher, in 2016; after that it's ad- deductions available to self-em-
low-to-moderate incomes-should justed for inflation.) played people. As you'll see here,
think again, To determine subsidy eligibility, you can also reduce your MAGI with
No one is immune from a potential the marketplaces consider an individ- contributions to 401(k)s and other
health crisis, which makes insurance uals or households estimated 2014 qualified retirement accounts.
worthwhile regardless of age. In modified adjusted gross income Consider a 28-year-old-single man
most states, those older than 26 who (MAGI). In this insurance calcula- in California with a MAGI of
are not covered by an employer's tion, MAGI is similar to adjusted $23,000 a year, no employer-based
plan, either on their own or through gross income (AGI), but adds tax-ex- coverage, and low expected use of
a parent, will have to buy their own empt interest back in, as well as the medical services. In Covered Califor-
insurance. But with a bit of savvy, income and housing cost of a citizen nia, that states marketplace, the low-
anyone with a relatively modest in- or resident living abroad, and the est-priced "silver" policy with
come-can boost retirement savings, nontaxable portion of Social Security Anthem Blue Cross-considered mid-
cut federal and state income taxes, income that normally isn't part of the die-of-the-road coverage-would -
and save on premiums, all at once, if AGI calculation. Continued on page 3
you're not in that demographic but
are close to someone who is, you can
help. E p y nOp t i
Cut Income, Boost the Subsidy
The trick is to reduce reported in- r iv r 0
come. With the new exchanges, a D r v r : $ ,
premium subsidy kicks in for those
with income 100 percent to 400 per- S n on
cent to 400 percent of the federal S B u s
poverty level. For individuals in
2014, the ceiling for subsidies will be Great Pay! Consistent Freight!
$45,960; for a family of four,
$94,200. The subsidy is essentially a Great Miles on this Regional Account.
new kind of refundable tax credit. W e ntpr se
You can use it now to pay for cover- W erner Enterprises:
age, or apply it to your 2014 federal 8 1 8
tax retumrn.With some exceptions, 1-855-515-8447
those who can afford coverage but____________________




January 30 February 5, 2014


Page 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press


i E


AROUND


TOWN


What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene


Coming Soon to Stage
Aurora, Dream Girls!
Stage Aurora present "Dream
Girls! January 31 -February 9,
2014 (Weekends Only) at Stage
Aurora Performance Hall, 5188
Norwood Avenue. The musical fol-
lows the story of a young female
singing trio from Chicago, Illinois
called "The Dreams", who become
music superstars. For more infor-
mation and tickets call 765-7372.

Yachty Gras on
the St. Johns River!
Celebrate Mardi Gras on the St.
Johns! Join the Jacksonville Sail
and Power Squadron for a lighted
boat parade on the St. Johns River
where captains and crews will
showcase their vessels decorated
with lights and beads in true Mardi
Gras fashion. The evening will cul-
minate with a spectacular fireworks
display over our majestic river,
Friday, January 31st at 7 p.m. For
more information visit www.jax-
events.comrn or call 630-2489.

ZORA! Festival 2014
Music, literature, theater, fashion
and the visual arts come together
for a nine day explosion of culture
at the 25th annual Zora Neale
Hurston Festival of Arts and
Humanities in Eatonville and
Orange County. The festival will
culminate Saturday, February 1st,
with Maze Featuring Frankie at 3
p.m. For additional information
visit www.zorafestival.org or call
407-647-3307.


Dreamgirls Play at
Stage Aurora
The smash hit Broadway musical
"DreamGirls" will play at Stage
Aurora, January 31-February 9 at
the Stage Aurora Performance Hall
located at 5188 Norwood Avenue
inside Gateway Mall. Dreamgirls
tells the story of the up and coming
1960's girls groups and the tri-
umphs and tribulation that come
with fame and fortune. For more
information and tickets call 765-
7372 or visit www.stageaurora.org.

Heart of a
Woman Luncheon
You are cordially invited to attend
the exclusive "Heart of a Women,"
Red luncheon, Saturday, February
1st at WJCT Public Studios. Enjoy
door prizes, speakers and vendors.
Bring a friend! For tickets and more
information call 635-5191 or visit
www.wjxt.org.

Ritz Jazz Jamm with
Nick Colionne
Nick Colionne jazz style is both
urban and contemporary, combin-
ing jazz, R&B, blues and funk!
Hear Nick at the Ritz Theater,
Sunday, February 2nd for two
shows 7 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. For
more information visit www.ritz-
jacksonville.com or call 632-5555.

Kevin Hart Boyz at
the Comedy Zone!
From Kevin Hart's Laugh at My
Pain and Let Me Explain tour: Joey
Wells, Will "Spank" Horton and
Na'im Lynn are The Plastic Cup


Boyz. The Laugh at My Pain come-
dy tour comes to the Comedy Zone,
February 6th 8th. For more
details call 292-4242 or visit
www.comedyzone.com.

Spoken Word
at the Ritz!
Hear Spoken Word at the Ritz,
Thursday, February 6th at 7 p.m.
and 10 p.m. For more information
call 632-5555 or visit www.ritz-
jacksonville.com.The Ritz is locat-
ed at 829 N. Davis Street.

Public Speaking
Workshops
Sign-up for Beverly Image
Groups' public speaking working
focusing on message articulation,
audience engagement, impromptu
speaking and other public speaking
etiquette. The workshop will be
held on Thursday evenings,
February 6th, 13th and 20th from
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at various libraries.
For more information and location,
visit www.beverlyimagegroup.com
or call 657-0250.

Amateur Night
at the Ritz!
Amateur Night at the Ritz is back,
Friday, February 7th, at 7 p.m. and
10 p.m. For more information call
632-5555 or visit www.ritzjack-
sonville.com.The Ritz is located at
829 N. Davis Street.

Jeans, Jewels &
Everything In-Between!
The Jacksonville Chapter of the
Links' annual fundraiser will be


held Saturday, February 8th at the
Jacksonville Fairgrounds. The
event is a Western Gala with a
Bling Twist! Enjoy dancing, gam-
bling tables, great food, door prizes
and line dance lessons. Not only
can you wear western outfits, but
you can wear semi-formal, formal,
Sunday best, or just be comfortable.
DJ Charles 'Jazzco' Scantling will
be on the turntable! For more
information call 704-3152.

FAMU Alumni Meeting
The FAMU J.R.E. Lee
Jacksonville Alumni Chapter will
hold its monthly meeting Saturday,
February 8th at 10. Spread the
word as the chapter kicks off their
2014 membership drive. The meet-
ing will be held at FAMU College
of Pharmacy, Jax Campus, 2050 Art
Museum Dr., Bldg, 4800, Suite 200.
For more information call Dr.
Ephraim Riggins at 307-1962.

P.R.I.D.E February
Bookclub Meeting
The Next P.R.I.D.E. book club
meeting will take place Saturday
February, 8th at 3 pm at the down-
town Jacksonville Public Library,
Room G-4, 303 N. Laura Street.
The February book for discussion is
Zora Neale Hurston in and Around
Jacksonville, Florida In The 1920's,
1930's and 1940's by M. Arlene
Murrell. For additional information
contact Felice Franklin at 389-8417
or email felicef@bellsouth.net.

JT Townsend
"Checkpoint Challenge"
Join friends and family on


Saturday, February 8th, for a race
to solve clues at the "Checkpoint
Challenge," benefiting the JT
Townsend Foundation. Opening
Ceremonies begin at 1 p.m. and the
race start at 1:30 p.m. at the
Jacksonville Landing. Participants
can register and receive further
details by calling 728-4722.

Buddy Guy in Concert
Legendary Chicago Bluesman
Buddy Guy and guitarist Johnny
Lang in concert Wednesday,
February 12th at the Florida
Theatre, 128 E. Fosyth St. For more
information and tickets call
355.2787 or visit www.floridathe-
atre.com

Temptations and
Four Tops in Concert
It's a Motown, Rock and Roll Hall
of Fame and Grammy Lifetime
Achievement double header featur-
ing the Temptations and the Four
Tops, Thursday, February 20th at
8 p.m. at the Florida Theater, 128 E
Forsyth St For more information
call the box office at 355-5661or
visit www.floridatheater.com.

Duval County's
Day of Gardening
"A Day of Gardening" program is
scheduled for Saturday, February
22nd, 8:30 2:30 p.m. The dead-
line to register is Feb. 18th. The
Duval County Extension program is
a fun day for gardening enthusiast
to listen to exciting speakers,
plants, garden themed items, ven-
dors and lunch! The workshop will
be held at 1010 N. McDuff Ave.
For more information email beck-
yd@coj.net or call 255-7450.

Alvin Alley Dance
Theater is back!
Experience the power of Alvin
Ailey American Dance Theater and
feel the pulse-racing thrill of con-
temporary favorites and sprit lifting
joy of beloved classics. The Alvin
Ailey masterpiece takes place,
Tuesday, February 25th at 7:30
p.m. at The Times Union Center,
300 Water St. For more details call


442-2929 or visit
www.artistsseriesjax.org.
Second Annual Jax
Talent Competition
Jax Talent 2014 is an opportunity
to showcase your talents. Singing,
dancing, music or drama, whatever
you have to show; bring it on! The
show is open for registration until
February 28th. Contestants must
register online at
www.ecolatino.com or www.your-
jax.com. General audition is
Saturday, March 15th, at UNF. The
final stage of the contest is a live
show, Friday, May 30th at UNF in
The Ballroom, Student Union
Building 58 West, Third. For more
details email JasmineRhey@gmail.com.

Harlem Globetrotters
in Jax!
See the Harlem Globetrotters "You
Write the Rules" World Tour at
Jacksonville Veterans Memorial
Arena, 300 A. Philip Randolph
Blvd, Friday, February 28, 2014 at
7 p.m. Fans will decide the rules,
from playing with two basketballs
at once, to getting double the points
for each basket made. Call 630-
3900 for more information.

Zeta Phi Beta
Pearls Breakfast
Celebrate local heroes as they are
honored at the Zeta Phi Beta,
Sorority, Inc, Beta Alpha Zeta
Chapter Community Pearls
Breakfast, Saturday, March 1st at 9
a.m. Celebrate the Pearls at
Emanuel Missionary Baptist
Church, 2407 Division St. For more
information email docvaUllie@aol.com.

CWM Inaugural
Golf Tournament
The Clara White Mission
Inaugural Golf Tournament takes
place Monday, March 3rd, from 12
p.m. to 5 p.m. at Deercreek Country
Club, 7816 McLaurin Rd. N. Clara
White Mission Inaugural Charity
Golf Tournament will celebrate
their 109th Anniversary of service
to the community. For more infor-
mation call 354-4162.


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K ArC;Prr' re rs Jnay 0-Feray ,21


Is Black History Still Relevant Today?


I almost want to start this article
off by saying "Surprise it's Black
History month!"
Why the big surprise you might
ask? Well, I thought that it was just
me, but it seems that the recent
President Obama frenzy has almost
overshadowed the fact that we are
now in midst of Black History
month.
Most of us try to celebrate black
history and educate our children
and ourselves year round, but I still
enjoy the programs and tributes
that are highlighted in February.
Now, I. must ask the obvious
question. Does Barack Obama's
election represent an end to
inequality, injustice and racism in
America? Of course is doesn't.
Maybe a more realistic question is
does Obama's election water-down
or make Black History month less
significant?
Perhaps that's a debate worth
having. First, let's start the conver-
sation from a view 10,000 feet in
the air. Was Black History Month
meant to last forever? Was the des-
ignation ever supposed to sunset?
We know that Black History
Month originated in 1926 by Carter
G. Woodson as Negro History
Week. Why February? Well,
Woodson selected the month in
deference to Frederick Douglas and
Abraham Lincoln who were both
born in February.


No one really knows if Woodson
ever foresaw this country's evolu-
tion to the point where a black man
could be elected to President so
soon. I have a feeling that a sunset
date never entered Woodson's
mind.
If it was supposed to sunset then
what's the trigger? Is it a black man
being elected to President of the
United States? If you would have
asked me a couple of years back I
would have said that it will be
another 20 to 30 years before that
happens, and it would have seemed
like a pretty good prompt.
I guess we can fault Obama for
being the ultimate overachiever.
The nerve of him to actually stock
the world and put together probably
the best presidential campaign ever.
Some would argue that over
time, the relevance of Black
History month has diminished. I
can understand that argument
because with each generation of
African American youth they are
more removed from the Civil
Rights era and the legacy slavery.
No one living today has ever
experienced slavery directly and
most of your youth can't begin to
fathom the impact that slavery has
had on black culture so they have
no frame of reference.
Many Americans don't see race
relations as a major problem in
America. The second black coach


in the history of the NFL just won a
Superbowl and no one is talking
about the fact that he is black. He
just so happens to also be the
youngest coach to ever when a
Superbowl at the age of 36.
So what does that tell you?
Because he wasn't the first, the his,
race simply was not as significant.
A recent email that said that said
we have a black man in the White
House, a black man as the youngest
coach to win a Superbowl, and a
black man is now running the
national Republican Party it must
be Black History Year.
Let's not forget that fact that Eric
Holder just became the first African
American U.S. Attorney General.
Now if we can just get Tiger
Woods to admit that he is black
then we would really have some-
thing to brag about. Or better yet, if
Michael Jackson would on second
thought, Michael hasn't been a
black man for a while now.
So does Obama's election signify
that Black History Month is no
longer needed? Keep in mind that
slavery still existed 145 years ago.
Keep in mind that less than 45
years ago we were legally segregat-
ed in the South and institutionally
segregated in the North.
Most blacks feel that we are still
far from equal despite major
advancements in equal opportuni-
ties. To put this issue into perspec-


tive, the immortal words of Martin
Luther King, Jr. ring true today.
He said, "Being a Negro in
America means trying to smile
when you want to cry. It means try-
ing to hold on to physical life amid
psychological death. It means the
pain of watching your children
grow up with clouds of inferiority
in their mental skies."
One of the aspects about being
black that I love the most is the
sense of togetherness blacks gener-
ally have. Our communities use to
emulate the very essence of black
pride and support for one another.
That's sort of a side bar issue, but
isn't having a strong sense of black
pride at the very core of Black
History Month?
Obama's election should not
diminish the need for Black History
Month and I don't believe that we
should ever stop celebrating our
past and present accomplishments.
President Obama's election does
signify that America has changed
and continues to evolve in all
aspects of its existence socially,
governmental make up and eco-
nomically.
Let's celebrate Black History
Month in February, but make the
education of our children an ongo-
ing affair.
Signing off from Martin Luther
King Elementary,Reggie Fullwood


The Significance of Black history in the Age of Obama


January 20, 2009, the day that
Barack Hussein Obama took the
oath of office as the 44th President
of the United States of America,
will forever be remembered as one
of the great moments in the history
of this nation and the world. Few
can forget Nelson Mandela's,
release from prison and his subse-
quent journey' froti prisoner to
president in South Africa, over-
coming decades of oppression
under the vicious system of
apartheid. This was truly a hall-
mark of history. Similarly, Barack
Obama's ascension to the presiden-
cy marks a triumph over centuries
of denigration of Africans in
America, most often under horrific
conditions. No one can deny the
magnificence of this moment.
From the very inception of
Obama's improbable quest for the
highest office of the land, however,
questions surfaced about the valid-
ity and authenticity of his cam-
paign. Early on there were ques-
tions about was he "Black enough,"
which to some degree was rooted in
his mixed race background and
lack of history in the longstanding
civic rights/human rights struggle
of Black people in this country. For
others this question represented an
earnest inquiry into the degree to
which Obama was committed to
responding to "Black interests."
For many conservatives, some
liberals and a surprising number of
Blacks, the answer to the latter
question was affirmative; Obama's
astounding victory proved that race
has been rendered a minor matter,
an insignificant barrier to any
Black person achieving the
"American dream." Consequently,
as Black History Month begins,
some might ask, what is the signif-
icance or value of recalling the


achievements, tragedies and tri-
umphs ofAfrican people now that a
Black man and his family occupy
the White House?
Those who would suggest
devaluing the significance of Black
History do so at the peril of Black
people and the nation as a whole,.,.
First and foremost, it is imperative
that we remember that President
Obama is a product and beneficiary
of Black History -- the steady and
unrelenting march of people of
African descent from the horrors of
the holocaust of enslavement and
the free labor that built Wall Street
and the White House, to being
defined as 3/5th of a human being
in the Constitution to becoming the
person elected to "protect and
defend the Constitution of the
United States." The venerable
Elder, Rev. Joseph Lowery, was
courageous and correct to com-
mence the benediction of the
Inauguration with verses from the
Black National Anthem, Lift Every
.Voice and Sing ..." God of our
weary years, God of our silent
tears, thou who has brought us thus
far on the way..."
Fannie Lou Hamer once said
something to the effect that we
should always remember where we
came from and honor the bridges
that brought us over ... "we have
come over the way that with tears
has been watered. We have come
threading the path through the
blood of the slaughtered." The
teary eyes of elderly Black folks we
witnessed on the National Mall,
January 20th peering up at a son of
the struggle, were consciously and
sub-consciously remembering,
reflecting and celebrating the tribu-
lations and triumphs of Black
History!
We must continue to study and


learn from Black History because,
we must understand from whence
we've come and how far we have
yet to travel even with a distin-
guished son of Africa in the White
House. Malcolm X once said, "of
all our studies, history is most qual-
ified o rewd 1, alles arch," Like
Carter G. Woodson, the father of
Black History Month, Malcolm
understood that knowledge of self
through an awareness of history
had healing power for a people bat-
tered and despised by a racist,
white supremacist nation, that
within our unique worldview, cul-
ture and illustrious history is to be
found the strength, courage and
inspiration to triumph over adversi-
ty and our adversaries. The study of
Black History should never be seen
as an esoteric exercise. It is about
the survival, sustenance and devel-
opment of a people.
As we intensify our examination
of Black History during the month
of February, we must recognize
that Barack Obama's milestone
achievement is a monumental
stride forward along that path
"through the blood of the slaugh-
tered." The gaps and disparities
between Blacks and Whites in
America in health, education, eco-
nomic well being and wealth are
well documented as are the statis-
tics on the casualties of institution-
alized racism reflected in the crim-
inal justice system and the prison-
jail industrial complex.
Therefore, while we accept and
celebrate the momentous accom-
plishment of the election of the first
Black President, now more than
ever we must be encouraged, moti-
vated and inspired to finish the
course. Now more than ever we
must be determined to seize the
moment to challenge America and


our President to realize that the
attainment of "a more perfect
union" means mounting an all out
assault to finish the unfinished civil
rights/human rights agenda of the
sons and daughters of Africa whose
blood, sweat, toil and tears have
been the redeeming. grace of this
nation. Now more than ever, the
study of Black History must fuel
the determination to keep our
minds "stayed on freedom" for
Black people and all oppressed
humanity!
Dr Ron Daniels is President of the
Institute of the Black World 21st
Century and Distinguished Lecturer at
York College City University of New
York


Don't Let Stand Your


Ground Kill You
"Black on black" crime has made it easy for some mainstream media
organizations, many Fox News-loving Republicans and sometimes even
members of law enforcement, to look at it as a "them" problem.
As long as "they" are killing "themselves", it's something Black
America needs to figure out.
As gang violence continues to escalate in many of our major cities, some
people are made to feel like prisoners in their own neighborhoods and
communities.
Let's be honest, no matter where we live, most of us will gladly patron-
ize businesses in the 'hood to get haircuts, soul food and, urn, independ-
ently duplicated (bootlegged) videos. But we also have no problems going
miles outside of our communities, if not to live, but to shop at a nicer mall
or to watch movies where we're least likely to get the same kind of ambi-
ence (talking) we might get at "our" theaters.
But lately we're seeing a frightening shift that may cause us to reassess
where we go, what we do and even what we say.
More and more, we're seeing angry, (mostly) white men use the "Stand
Your Ground" law as an excuse to shoot people they feel "threatened" by.
Even though people tried their best to make us believe electing President
Obama would be the end of racism in this country, it may have had the
opposite effect.
Electing a black man president caused some to realize their biggest fears.
Add to that the president's support for gun control and more radicals than
ever are arming themselves with weapons and they're ready and willing to
use them.
The number of guns confiscated by TSA from January 1st to December
16th, 2013 jumped 20 percent.
Almost every day there's a bizarre story proving that people's fuses are
getting shorter, and I'm telling anyone who will listen that this isn't the
time to demonstrate your toughness.
George Zimmerman's acquittal has set a scary precedent in this country
where people can use fear and their own anger as a defense for killing
another person.
Not only can it be a used in black on white crimes, but it's being used in
crimes between people of the same race.
SIf you're in a movie theater and somebody is upset with you for texting,
proving you're not scared isn't worth your life.
If an irate shopper is upset because you have too many groceries n the
20 items or less line, either gather your groceries and leave or, as J.
Anthony Brown says, start eating until you've reduced the right number.
If someone curses you out, you start cursing and they shoot you claim-
ing they felt threatened, even if they lose the case using the "Stand Your
Ground" defense, you're still dead.
There was a time when black people had to back down, avert their eyes,
and move to the other side of the sidewalk when a white man was passing.
I'm not suggesting any of that.
But I am saying a similar kind of fear and hatred is alive and well among
a lot of white people today. They are stirred up by the Tea Party, ultra con-
servative Republicans and, yes, announcers on "Christian" radio stations.
These people who would never have the guts to make a move themselves
make their audiences believe that it's. their duty to stop whatever they
claim the president is doing to our country. ,- .' -
They're made to believe that. their "American" values and democracy
itself is being threaatnedl- . ,, ,,- ..
We can't stop the tide of fear-based hatred, but history teaches us that at
some point, the battle must be fought.
But let's just not be baited into an altercation that ends in nothing but
tragedy.
"Stand Your Ground" is no joke, whether you're white or black. But if
you do happen to be a brotha or sista in a bad situation, get out of it
because if you're keeping score, and I am, the law is not on our side.


1 A FFOJ1


FLORIDA'S FIRST COAST QUALITY BLACK WEEKLY


MAILING ADDRESS
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January 30 February 5, 2014


Paeo d Ms. Perrv's Free Press






Jaur 3 erur 201 M. ery' FrePrs Pg


America's Prison Juggernaut



Continues to Crush Black Males


by E. 0 Huthcinson
For a brief moment in the late
1990s there was a glimmer of hope
that America's incarceration jug-
gernaut would slow down. The
Sentencing Project which compiles
an annual report on crime and pun-
ishment in the nation found a slight
percentage drop in the incarceration
rate in state prisons.
That was due to a mix of better
economic times, a slight up tick in
drug and counseling and rehabilita-
tion programs, and better communi-
ty outreach by police departments.
The thaw in the hard-line take no
prisoner approach to crime and
punishment didn't last. In 2012,
according to a report from the A
Pew Center of the States, more
persons were in American
jails than ever.
So many, that the United
States now has the shame-
ful distinction of being the
world's runaway jail-
house leader. It locks up
one-quarter of the
world's prison popula-
tion.
The Pew report found
three more disturbing
problems in America's
staggering jail numbers.
One is that judges who
would likely opt for commu-
nity based corrections pro-
grams such as fines, restitution;
home detention, probation, elec-
tronic monitoring, and drug diver-
sion programs don't because these
options are scare. The programs are
poorly funded and operated, or are
non-existent. Another problem is
that black males still make up more
than half of America's prison
inmates. They are four times more
likely than whites and twice as like-
ly as Hispanics to be jailed. The dis-
proportionate number of blacks
jailed hasn't budged in the past
decade. The other problem is that a
significant percent of them are
lo dked ii1p for' n6n-viidlent petty
crime and drug offenses.
Putting thousands of black men
behind bars for mostly non-violent


offenses has had staggering conse-
quences. It has wreaked massive
social and political havoc on fami-
lies and communities. It has been
the single biggest reason for the
bloat in federal and state spending
on prison construction, mainte-
nance, and the escalation in the
number of prosecutors needed to
handle the continuing flood of
criminal cases.
The stock reason
for criminal-
izing a m"


huge
segment
of a generation
of young blacks is that
they are crime-prone and lack fam-
ily values. But reports and studies
by the Justice Department, the U.S.
Sentencing Commission, as well as
universities and foundations con-
firm that broken homes and bad
genes have little to do with crime
rates. Hi]ghjoblessness, failing pub-
lic schools, budget cutbacks in
skills training and placement pro-
grams, the refusal of employers to


hire those with criminal records,
and the gaping racial disparity in
the drug sentencing laws are the
major reasons why far more blacks
than whites are behind bars.
The scapegoat of blacks for
America's crime and drug problem
actually began in the 1980s. Much
of the media quickly turned the
drug problem into a black problem
and played it up big in news sto-
risand features.
M .a n y


Americans
scared stiff of
Sthe drug crisis readily
gave their blessing to drug sweeps,
random vehicle checks, marginally
legal searches and seizures, evic-
tions from housing projects and
apartments. When it came to law
enforcement practices in the ghettos
and barrios, the denial of civil liber-
ties protections, due process "and
privacy made a mockery of the
criminal justice system to many
blacks and Latinos.


State legislators haven't helped
things. Many are scared stiff that a
too aggressive push for increased
funding and expansion of drug
diversion and probation programs
will stir voter backlash. The big
dread is that they will be tarred as
soft on crime, and could be dumped
from office.
That's turned a horrid situation
into a public policy nightmare.
States now do one of two things to
deal with an out control prison pop-
ulation. They enact or try to
strengthen drug treatment and
diversion programs or release pris-
oners. This has little to do with a
new found enlightenment on pun-
ishment. Prisons are big, danger-
ous, and inefficient and most of
all expensive. It costs twenty
times more to lock up inmates
than to support community
based corrections programs.
States such as California
have been slapped with
federal court orders to pro-
vide better medical treat-
Sment to inmates, and to
relive overcrowding. This
costs money; money that
many states don't have. But
any talk of the release of
thousands of prisoners
brings an instant voter outcry.
The states, though, created the
problem with their policy ofjail
first, rather than rehabilitation
programs. It's a problem that they
can no longer dodge.
With increasing hard economic
times, the prospects of even more
young, and poor blacks being
steamrolled by the prison jugger-
naut looms even greater. This
increases the urgency for prison and
state officials to cease squandering
scarce resources on wasteful,
racially-flawed criminal justice
policies that target mostly, poor,
and desperate non violent offend-
ers. The answer is to rely on more
sound cost effective and humane
programs scl> as &ug, job, skills
and family support programs to
bring to a screeching halt the incar-
ceration juggernaut.


Two years ago, Sandra's seeming-
ly perfect world with her husband
and two children was shattered.
During a routine physical, her doc-
tor noticed Sandra had swollen
lymph glands in her neck. Sandra
didn't worry when the doctor
ordered an HIV test; after all she
The Straight-Up Truth
About the Down-Low


Wom. i uuNwri
wra o3l, p.in am, ,tuvvl,,
Joy Mult
was married to a wonderful, God-
fearing man and she had tested
HIV-negative prior to their mar-
riage. Five days later, the test came
back positive and Sandra was dev-
astated. That evening she tearfully
told her husband of her positive test
results. Later that night he went to
the store...never to return. She later
discovered love letters her husband
had written to his former prison
mate. Today, Sandra and her two
children reside in her parents' base-
ment while Sandra struggles with
depression, illness, and debt.
"Unfortunately Sandra's story is
one of many e-mails we receive on
a daily basis," says Joy Marie, the
author of the explosive book, The
Straight-Up Truth About The
Down-Low: Women Share their
Stories of Betrayal, Pain and
Survival (Creative Wisdom Books-
March 2008). Joy Marie is the pen
name of two women who have sur-
vived marriages to down-low men.
Once the down-low was exposed,
its link to the spread of HIV/AIDS
in African-American women was
obvious, despite the lack of scien-
tific data. African-American
women are no more promiscuous
than theli white counterparts, llw-
ever there is a higher IRV infection
rate amongst black women. One
reason, as Sandra's story suggests,


is the high incarceration rate of
black men.
"Prisons have become a revolving
HIV/AIDS factory in the black
community," says Marie. "Cycles
of imprisonment and release
among black males help contribute
to the high HIV/AIDS rates in
African American women. Black
men in the prison system engage in
high-risk sexual behaviors and
many of them continue to sleep
with men upon their release. Many
of these men lie to their wives and
girlfriends about their homosexual
activities and their HiIV status as
well. One prison guard shared how
during his twelve years on duty, he
witnessed countless married
inmates engaging in sexual acts
with other men."
"The black community needs to
wake up and address this elephant
in the room," says Marie. "Our
community leaders would rather
turn their heads than admit that the
secretive homosexual practices of
many black men are endangering
the lives of innocent black women
and their children. We have to take
control of our lives. We must
demand HIV tests in our presence.
We must demand monogamy. We
must demand respect and accounta-
bility from our men. In addition,
we as black women should learn all
we can about HIV/AIDS and how
it's transmitted and the lifestyle fac-
tors that put us at risk for this dis-
ease, especially our involvement
with secretive down-low men."
"There are many warning signs to
detect men on the DL, which we
addressed in our book," says Marie.
"We believe the account of our
experiences and what we have
learned from other women will
bring about awareness and a
heightened sense of self-responsi-
bility. March 10, 2009 is the
National Women and Girls
HIV/AIDS Awareness Day and we
want black women to become
informed and protect themselves
and their children against others
whoI may not have their best inter-
est at heart."
For more information, please visit
www.straightuptruth.com


EDUCATING. INSPIRING. CHANGING PERCEPTION.

People with HIV are fathers, grandmothers, friends and
neighbors. They are people you pass on the street and p0
you meet. And they have one important characteristic in
common with us all: they are human beings.


4ople 1


The Faces of HIV project offers an intimate look at Florida '
residents living with HIV and AIDS through captivating portraits,
insightful interviews and poignant journal writing. To watch their
stories, read their journals and to view the mobile art exhibit
schedule, visit wemakethechange.com/faces.





A PROJECT FROM THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF.HEALTI


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To Love, Honor and


Infect with HIV....


-m"


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


January 30 February 5, 2014





Page 9 Mrs. Perry's Free Press January 30 February 5, 2014


Saturday. February 1st
LIFETIME at 8 p.m.
"The Gabby Douglas Story" The inspir-
ing true story of the international gymnastics
phenomenon who overcame overwhelming
odds to become the first African American
ever to be named Individual All-Around
Champion in artistic gymnastics at the
Olympic Games.

Sunday. February 2nd
WJCT at 9 p.m.
"The Black Atlantic (1500-1800)" Henry
Louis Gates Jr. chronicles the history of
African-Americans, beginning with the years
1500 to 1800.

Sunday. February 2nd
SHOWTIME AT 8:30 p.m.
"Brooklyn Boheme." Nelson George film
that documents the black arts movement of the
'80s and '90s in Fort Greene. Graduates
include Spike Lee and Chris Rock.

Sunday. February 2nd
PBS at 10 p.m.
"Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock"
Powerful show on a woman who was both an
integrationist and a feminist in a town that was
highly suspicious of both in the 1950s.

Monday. February 3rd
WJCT at 3 a.m.
"The Long Walk of Nelson Mandela" -
Nelson Mandela's friends, colleagues and
apartheid-era officials trace the one-time
South African president's life.

Monday. February 3rd
PBS at 10 p.m.
"American Promise" The story spans 13
years as Joe Brewster and Michele
Stephenson 'moiddle-class African-American
parents in-Breoklyn;,N.Y., turn their cameras
on their son, Idris, and his best friend, Seun,
who make their way through one of the most
prestigious private schools in the country.
Chronicling the boys' divergent paths from
kindergarten through high school graduation
at Manhattan's Dalton School, this provoca-
tive, intimate documentary presents compli-
cated truths about America's struggle to come
of age on issues of race, class and opportuni-
ty.

Tuesday. February 4
WJCT at 10 p.m.
"The Clinton 12" James Earl Jones nar-
rates the story of 12 black students who, on
August 27, 1956 in Clinton, Tenn., walked
into the first public high school in the South to
desegregate after the U.S. Supreme Court's
Brown vs. the Board of Education decision.

Wednesday. February 5th
BOUNCE TV at 9 a.m.
"To Kill a Mockingbird" Atticus Finch, a
lawyer in the Depression-era South, defends a
black man against an undeserved rape charge,
and his kids against prejudice

Wednesday. February 5th
BOUNCE TV at 7 p.m.
"Shadrach" A 99-year-old ex-slave has a
simple wish: to live out his last days days and
be buried on the plantation of his birth, and be
buried on the plantation of his birth.

Wednesday. February 5th
BOUNCE TV at 2 p.m.
"Mandela & de Klerk" The story of the
negotiations between Civil rights activist
Nelson Mandela and South African President
F.W. De Klerk -- onetime ideological enemies
-- for South Africa's ordered, legal, and peace-
ful transition to a full democracy.

Friday. February 7th
PBS at 9 p.m.
"American Masters -- Alice Walker:
Beauty in Truth" In honor of Alice Walker's
70th birthday, American Masters presents:


Alice Walker: Beauty In Truth a feature docu-
mentary film which tells the compelling story
of an extraordinary woman's journey from her
birth in a paper-thin shack in cotton fields of


Putnam County, Georgia to her recognition as
a key writer of the 20th Century.

Friday. February 7th
BOUNCE TV at 2 p.m.
"Ghost of Mississippi" The widow of mur-
dered civil rights leader Medger Evers and a
district attorney struggle to finally bring the
murderer to justice. Cast: Alec Baldwin,
Whoopi Goldberg, James Woods, Craig T.
Nelson, William H. Macy, Virginia Madsen

Sunday. February 7th
WJCT at 10 p.m.
"Harlem in Montmartre: A Paris Jazz
Story" Great Performances talked to Alice
Sparberg Alexiou, scholar and author, to dis-
cuss the importance of Louis Mitchell.
Mitchell is most famous for recording the first
jazz record (1922) in Paris, the iconic "Ain't
We Got Fun".

Friday. February 7th
BOUNCE TV at 6 a.m.
"A Raisin in the Sun" An all-time classic
concerning the struggles of an African-
American family who suddenly comes into a
financial windfall. Cast: Sidney Poitier,
Claudia McNeil, Ruby Dee, Diana Sands,
Louis Gossett Jr.

Saturday. February 8th
BET at 6 p.m.
"106 & Park" Hosted by Bow Wow and
Keshia Chant6, BET's flagship show cele-
brates Black History Month with four special-
ly themed weeks that put that spotlight on
defmining moments and events in Black History
(Week One); Black Love (Week Two);
Achievements in Sports (Week Three) con-
cluding with the Fine Arts (Week Four).
This year's Black History Month on-air


Deep South in what's become known as the
Second Middle Passage.

Sunday. February 9th
WJCT at 9 p.m.
"The Abolitionists: American Experience -
Part One: 1820s-1838" Part 1 of 3.
Dramatic scenes and documentary segments
tell the stories of abolitionists Frederick
Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Angelina
Grimk6, Harriet Beecher Stowe and John
Brown.

Sunday. February 9th
WJCT at 10 p.m.
"The Abolitionists: American Experience -
Part Two: 1838-1854" Frederick Douglass
escapes slavery, joins William Lloyd Garrison
in the abolitionist movement, writes his auto-
biography and flees to England to avoid being
captured by his former owner; and Harriet
Beecher Stowe publishes "Uncle Tom's
Cabin."

Sunday. February 9th
WJCT at 11 p.m.
"The Abolitionists: American Experience -
Part Three: 1854-Emancipation and
Victory" John Brown's 1859 raid on Harpers
Ferry, an attempt to spark a slave revolt, is
recounted, as is the 1860 election of Abraham
Lincoln and what followed: the Civil War,
Emancipation Proclamation and adoption of
the 13th Amendment.

Sunday. February 9th
WJCT at 12 p.m.
"AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural
Exchange: Stories From Lakka Beach" Life
in the beachfront village of Lakka, Sierra
Leone, is examined.


campaign "Say It Loudf'aims to'-illusmrteithe--.Sunda) Felw 91* .-
,connection between 'Black 'History-Mo 'ffi"- BOUNCE TV*at 7:30,p.m i- a N a ,,
trailblazers and other famous Americans in "The Color Purple"- Based on the Pulitzer
the fields of the arts, sciences, athletics, poli- Prize-winning novel by Alice Walker, The
tics and entertainment. Curated by the award- Color Purple spans the years 1909 to 1949,
winning actor Michael K Williams the stories relating the life of a Southern black woman
of these African American icons, told under virtually sold into a life of servitude to her
this unique perspective, will highlight how brutal sharecropper husband. Cast: Whoopi
"Black History is American History". Goldberg, Danny Glover, Oprah Winfrey,
Margaret Avery, Adolph Caeser, Rae Dawn


Saturday. February 8th
WJCT at 6 p.m.
"Classic Gospel" Archival performances
from Southern gospel concerts hosted by Bill
and Gloria Gaither spotlight the genre's icons,
including J.D. Sumner, James Blackwood,
Sandi Patti, CeCe Winans and the Hoppers.

Saturday. February 8th
WJCT at 10 a.m.
"The Education of Harvey Gantt" The
story of Harvey Gantt, who became the first
African-American student to attend a former-
ly all-white school in South Carolina when he
was admitted to Clemson in 1963. Phylicia
Rashad narrates.

Saturday. February 8th
WJCT at 10:30 a.m.
"One Night in March" A look at
Mississippi State's appearance in the NCAA
Tournament in 1963, when coach Babe
McCarthy defied the school's policy of boy-
cotting racially integrated tournaments. The
team had to sneak out of the state to play and
lost 61-51 to Loyola, a team with four black
starters.

Saturday. February 8th
WJCT at 9:30 p.m.
"Great Performances" A performance of
the Tony Award-winning musical "Memphis,"
about a white high-school dropout in 1950s
Tennessee who becomes a disc jockey in order
to promote the music of a black singer he's
fallen for.

Sunday. February 9th
WJCT at 9 p.m.
"The Age of Slavery (1800-1860)" The
years 1800 to 1860 are covered. The burgeon-
ing cotton industry led to the expansion of
slavery to new territories during this time; and
many slaves were forcibly relocated to the


Chong, Akosua Busia

Sunday. February 9th
BOUNCE TV ay 11 p.m.
"The Jackie Robinson Story" Jackie
Robinsons stars as himself in this inspirational
biopic that chronicles his life, from youth
through his college career at UCLA, to his rise
to a legend with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Sunday. February 9th
BOUNCE TV at 1 a.m.
"A Defining Moment" The personal sto-
ries of four of the famed Tuskegee Airmen
whose contribution to the civil rights move-
ment helped pave the way for an historic
event: the inauguration of the first African-
American president of the United States.

Monday. February 10th
PBS at 11:30 p.m.
"Spies of Mississippi" The story of a
secret spy agency formed by the state of
Mississippi to preserve segregation during the
1950s and '60s. Granted broad powers, this
commission investigated citizens and organi-
zations in attempts to derail the civil rights
movement, by Dawn Porter.

Monday. February 10th
WJCT at 7 p.m.
"Independent Lens Soul Food Junkies" -
Filmmaker Byron Hurt examines the soul-
food tradition of black culture. Because soul
food is often cooked with lots of fat, sugar and
salt, it can lead to obesity and other health
issues, as happened to Hurt's father, who died
at age 63.

Sunday. February 12th
BET at 10 a.m.
"Life Every Voice" Fonzworth Bentley
takes the reins of the half-hour, Sunday morn-
ing program featuring even more insightful


testimonies from some of mainstream and
gospel music's biggest an stars. The new sea-
son premieres with a special hour-long
episode featuring Arsenio Hall. February's
guests also include music stars Ja Rule &
Adrienne Bailon, "Real Husbands of
Hollywood" stars Kevin Hart, Boris Kodjoe,
Nick Cannon, Duane Martin and Angel
Conwell & Redaric Williams.

Saturday. February 15th
CENTRIC at 9 p.m.
"Being" A one-hour documentary series
that highlights the careers of seminal actors,
musicians, and television icons. Each week
the show chronicles the life, career success,
struggle, and triumph of one subject, through-
out their journey. These stories are told in all
their glamour, glitz, guts, and glory, with con-
centrated focus on how they persevered
through it all.

Tuesday. February 18th
PBS at 10 p.m.
"The Powerbroker: Whitney Young's
Fight for Civil Rights" Civil rights leader
Whitney Young, Jr. has no national holiday
bearing his name. You won't find him in most
history books. In fact, few today know his
name, much less his accomplishments. But he
was at the heart of the civil rights movement -
an inside man who broke down the barriers
that held back African Americans.

Saturday. February 22nd
LIFETIME at 8 p.m.
"The Trip to Bountiful" The television
adaptation of American playwright and
screenwriter Horton Foote's Tony nominated
play. Set during the final years of the Jim
Crow South, the film follows one woman's
quest to reconnect with her past in order to
ensiatfsui(iue. .. M .,ii i>g

Monday. February 24th
BET at 9 p.m.
"BET Honors" Celebrating its seventh
year with new host Wayne Brady, BET
Honors celebrates and recognizes the gifts and
contributions of six African American excep-
tional leaders. Each year this powerful and
inspirational event aims the spotlight on the
achievements of distinguished leaders in the
fields of music, literature, entertainment,
media, service and education.

Monday. February 24th
BET at 11 p.m.
"BET Takes Hollywood" Veteran celebri-
ty journalist Shaun Robinson of Access
Hollywood will sit down with this year's top
African American nominees along with past
Oscar winners to candidly discuss their amaz-
ing race to the Academy Awards. Plus, she'll
take a look back at the Oscar's best-dressed
stars and look into the future to predict which
stars will impress the Academy next year in
the network's third annual Oscar special.

Friday. February 28th
PBS at 9 p.m.
"Jazz at the Philharmonic" A unique,
generational and wholly American concert
experience that highlights two of the greatest
musical art forms the world has ever seen,
classical and jazz. With performances by
artists such as Chick Corea, Bobby McFerrin,
Terence Blanchard and Elizabeth Joy Roe,
this special emphasizes the works of leg-
endary past composers such as Bach and
Mozart with these contemporary artists.
Songs are performed with the Henry Mancini
Institute Orchestra from the University of
Miami Frost School of Music and National
YoungArts Foundation alumni.

Friday. February 28th
PBS at 10:30 p.m.
"Becoming an Artist" An inspiring tribute


to the power of mentoring and the vital role it
plays in passing on our artistic cultural her-
itage from one generation to the next. The
documentary features acclaimed African-
America artist and entertainers.


January 30 February 5,2014


Page 9 Mrs. Perry's Free Press




























criticize directly GOP. But the
theme of his speech, more than his
long list of policy ideas, was sim-
ply the determination of the presi-
dent. Obama, as he said over and
over again in the speech, is going to
act on whatever policy issues he
feels appropriate, with or without
Congress.


50th Anniversary Bob Hayes
Invitational Track & Field Meet
Time to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Bob Hayes Invitational
Track & Field meet and the Hall of Fame Inductee Banquet Week.
The Bob Hayes invitational track and field meet originated from the late
Robert "Bullet Bob" Hayes, a Jacksonville native, an Olympic gold medal-
ist and Dallas Cowboys receiver. The schedule
of events includes a worship service, Sunday,
March 9th at 10:55 a.m. at Bethel Baptist
Institutional Church, 215 Bethel Baptist St. On
Monday, March 10th at 9 a.m. is the James
i (Coach) Day Scholarship Golf Tournament at
Eagle Landing Golf Club, 3989 Eagle Landing
Pkwy, Orange Park, Florida, in the evening at
6:30 p.m. is the Officials workshop and dinner
at W.M. Raines High School Cafeteria. On
Tuesday, March llth at 10 a.m is the Bob
Hayes invitational press conference at W.M.
Raines Earl Kitchings stadium. On Thursday,
March 13th at 6 p.m. is the Bob Hayes Hall of
Fame Banquet at Jacksonville Wyndham
Nat Washington Hotel, 1515 Prudential Dr. On Friday, March
Bob Hayes Meet Chair 14th at 11 a.m. is the Bob Hayes Track and
Field Developmental Clinic at 2 p.m. is the Bob Hayes Middle School
Track and Field meet; both events will be held at W.M. Raines Earl
Kitchings stadium. In the evening on Friday, March 14th is the Officials,
Coaches and VIPs Cookout at the home of Jimmie Johnson, 4359 Homer
Rd. Rounding out the Bob Hayes 50th anniversary celebration is the Bob
Hayes Invitation Track and Field Meet starting at 8 a.m. at W.M. Raines
Earl Kitchings stadium. W.M. Raines High School and the W.M. Earl
Kitchings stadium are located at 3663 Raines Ave.
For more details, updates and tickets call 359-0550 or visit
www.bhitm.org.


Saving More
continued from page 2 Lower-and middle-income work-
cost him $1,356 a year, with a sub- ers who contribute to traditional
sidy of $1,836. IRAs, 401(k)s, and other qualified
Contributing $2,000 to a tradi- retirement accounts are also eligible
tional IRA would reduce his MAGI for the federal savers credit. Its 10
to $21,000. At that level, he'd pay percent to 50 percent of the first
$1,056 for coverage, saving $300 a $2,000 contributed. For tax-year
year and gaining a higher subsidy 2013 it was available only to single
for out-of-pocket costs. Assuming workers with AGI of $29,500 or
income tax rates are stable between less, and couples with AGI of
2014 and 2013, he'd also save $300 $29,500 or less, and couples with
in federal taxes and $71 in AGI of $59,000 or less (limits are
California state taxes. You could slightly higher for 2014). In this
view the total $671 in savings as example, the credit is $200. That
reducing his premium $685. brings his effective cost of insur-
Reap the Savers Credit ance to $485 a year.


"America does not stand still and
neither will I. Wherever and when-
ever I can take steps without legis-
lation to expand opportunity for
more American families, that's
what I'm going to do," he said.
Obama said he would lift the
wages of people working under
federal contracts to at least $10.10
per hour, even if Congress would
not pass a minimum wage increase
for all Americans. He would
restructure training programs to
help jobless Americans get hired,
even if Congress refuses to expand
unemployment insurance. He
would work with officials in states,
businesses and philanthropists to
expand early childhood education,
even if the Republicans would not
agree to a national, universal pre-
kindergarten program.
These ideas, to be sure, are large-
ly small-bore. The increase in pay
for contractors is likely to benefit
fewer than 1 million Americans. It
will be hard to expand early educa-
tion programs without funding
from Congress or support from
Republicans. None of the presi-
dent's executive actions on the
economy would help as many
Americans as Congress extending
unemployment benefits for an esti-
mated 1.6 million Americans.
And the biggest goals of Obama's
administration, reforming the
immigration system and taking
major steps to reducing income
inequality, still require congres-
sional approval.
But the speech illustrates a shift
from the White House. The admin-
istration spent its first three years
trying to cut bipartisan deals with
Republicans before shifting to a
more confrontational approach dur-
ing the 2012 election. Once Obama
won reelection, he again spent
much of the year courting
Republican members of Congress.
This new tact is unlikely to
change how Republicans actually
respond to Obama. His taking
executive actions won't force them
into negotiations on anything. At
the same time, there is little risk
that taking these actions will limit
Obama's ability to work with
Congress: Republicans were
already opposing most of his agen-


Jacksonville area AKA's pose for a day of service
AKA's Spend a Day "On" for Disadvantaged
The Jacksonville graduate (Gamma Rho Omega) and undergraduate (Mu Theta, Nu Iota and Omicron Delta)
chapters of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. spent the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday assembling toiletry bags
to distribute to the less fortunate in Jacksonville. Members of the organization donated over 5.000 personal size
items from lotion to toothpaste and many other items that were delivered to Clara White Mission and the
women's division of the City Rescue Mission. The 25th International President, Norma Solomon White was in
attendance and Mrs. Mary L. Davis serves as the president of Gamma Rho Omega Chapter.
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. is an international service organization founded on the campus of Howard
University, January 15, 1908. It is the oldest greek letter organization established by African-American college-
educated women.


Delta Sigma

Theta Sorority

Scholarships

for Seniors
The Jacksonville Alumnae
Chapter (JAC) of Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority, Inc. has applica-
tions available for their 2014
sOOcholarships. Applications can
be obtained via their website,
www.dstjax.org. The scholarships
are available to high school seniors
in Duval County who demonstrate
academic achievement, community
involvement, and leadership abili-
ty. This year seven scholarships
will be awarded. Applications must
be postmarked by March 24th,
2014. For more information email
deltas@dstjax.org.


for Retirement


The savers credit applies to Roth
accounts, too. Those after-tax con-
tributions won't lower MAGI or
current taxes, or improve health
insurance subsidy eligibility. But
distributions are tax- and penalty-
free after age 59 V2, which could
mean major benefits over tradition-
al retirement accounts.
What if, instead of investing in an
IRA, our worker contributed $2,000
to a 401(k) with an employer
match? His savings would be the
same as if he had contributed to an
IRA. But a typical match of, say,
dollar for dollar up to his retirement


savings. That's not money directly
in his pocket, but it effectively
makes his insurance free.
Many at that salary range might
not want to sacrifice 9 or 10 percent
of income toward retirement sav-
ings. That's where the help comes
in. If he agrees to contribute the
$2,000, you offer to reimburse him
all or some of that amount. Not only
would you be helping him do the
right thing for his health, you'd be
improving his prospects for a
healthy retirement.


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President Declares His Independence -

from Congress in Annual Address ..


by Perry Bacon, Jr.
President Obama had a message
for Republicans in his State of the
Union address: he's not letting
them block all of his initiatives in
2014, as they did most of last year.
The tone of Obama's fifth State of
the Union was not particularly
aggressive or fiery. He did little to


p.,


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


January 30 February 5,2014


ORNW.11


lvr '






January 30 February 5. 2014 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 10


IIS MEDIOCRITY



FOR BLACK STUDENTS?


Florida adopts race-based

\ Academic goals,
community in uproar


9


by Carla St. Louis and Gigi
Tinsley
Special from The Miami Times
While many thought Jim Crow
politics ended with the Civil Rights
movement, the Southern Poverty
Law Center alleges otherwise in
their most recent complaint against
the Florida Department of
Education.
The complaint alleges that the
Department of Education adopted a
discriminatory strategic plan that
sets lower academic expectations
for Black and Hispanic students
based on race and nationality.
The plan is particularly troubling
for Miami-Dade County Public
School considering it has the largest
enrollment of Black and Hispanic
youths in the state.
Under these new standards set for
math and reading, nearly the entire
population of the Miami-Dade
County Public Schools district -
which is more than 90 percent
Black and Hispanic-is held to an
academic standard far lower than
their white and Asian counterparts.
A move that has one current stu-
dent of Florida's public school sys-
tem very upset about the state's


lowered expectations for Black
youths.
"If the idea of goals based on race
isn't problematic enough, people of
color are expected to do worse than
any other race," wrote Ashley
Greene, president of the Dream
Defenders at Broward College in a
letter. "Ironically, there are about 3
million students in Florida's public
school system and of those. Half of
these students are African American
or Hispanic which paints the picture
that even if minorities are the
majority in size, they are still the
minority in everything else."
"As an African American student
who is full time dually enrolled in
both high school and college, race
based goals come as a slap in the
face," she said. "It is possible for all
students to achieve with proper
guidance and dedication."
Community speaks: 'Academic
measures are racist'
At an educational meeting held
on January 9th at the African
Heritage Cultural Arts Center by
the Dream Defenders, community
members expressed their outrage
over the new measure citing it as
"discriminatory."


The SPLC encouraged communi-
ty members to play an active role in
combating these measures by con-
tacting the Department of Justice at
education@usdoj.gov, telling them
the plan should be reversed and
asking for an investigation against
Florida's Department of Education.
Other attendees echoed the senti-
ments of the complaint, accusing
Florida's Department of Education
of creating a culture of lowered
expectations for students of color, a
plight the Civil Rights era actively
fought to end.
"We have reached a new low in
America when we start using chil-
dren to promulgate discrimination,"
said Mack Samuel, Chairman of the
Board of Directors for the African
Heritage Culture Arts Coalition. "I
am very angry and ready to do
whatever is needed to stop this fool-
ishness."
MD-C Public Schools stands
with community
The plan sparked commentary
from two members of Miami-Dade
County Public Schools, both of
whom candidly spoke against it.


by Erin Delmore -
Seattle Seahawks
cornerback Richard
Sherman pushed back
on the media and the
public's view of him
as a "thug," saying
"stop trying to label .-.
people" and using his
own background as a
Stanford-educated
black man from
Compton to illustrate
his point.
"I've kind of had to
be a chameleon of
sorts because you
walk, I mean, you
drive from Compton to Stanford
and you've got to be able to flip the
switch. The culture's too different
to treat them both the same and I
think it's not right to treat them both
the same," said Sherman told
msnbc's Chris Hayes on Monday,
describing his first encounter with
Stanford as "culture shock."
"Where I'm from, there isn't a lot
of culture, a lot of diversity,"
Sherman said of Compton, a rough
neighborhood in south Los
Angeles. "I was kind of shocked [at
Stanford]: shocked at the way
they're talking, the conversation,
the dialogue."
Sherman earned a 4.2 GPA at his
high school in Compton.
"A kid from Compton who hadn't
seen too much outside the city, to
tell you the truth, had to really
adjust and really acclimate to that
environment," Sherman said.
Sherman came under fire earlier
this month for a passionate post-
game interview that he says many
misconstrued. "It's as good natured
as you can do in a football game,"
he said.
"So this is the big debate," Chris
Hayes said. "After the last game,
after the NFL films tape came out in
which you're miked and you make
the play you celebrate for a moment
and you run up to [49ers wide
receiver Michael] Crabtree, and
you're like, 'heck of a game, heck
of a game,' and the big debate in my


office and every office is are you
taunting him in that moment... is
that a good faith 'hey hell of a
game' or do you realize you're,
like, putting it in his face?" Hayes
asked Sherman.
"I mean the game is going to end
in twenty-two seconds... it's one of
those things where the game is
gonna be over in twenty-two sec-
onds, if the guy walks to the locker
room, I don't get a chance to say
good game, so I guess it's as good
natured as you can do in a football
game. I was going to give the guy a
handshake before the season's
over," Sherman said.
Sherman said he was surprised
when Crabtree then swatted at his
helmet.
"I mean, if he didn't want to
shake, all he had to do was just
wave it off and I would have turned
around and celebrated with my
teammates you know, so I was a lit-
tle surprised by the push," Sherman
said.
SSeconds later, he joined Fox's
Erin Andrews for a post-game
report.
"Well, I'm the best comer in the
game!" Sherman said. "When you
try me with a sorry receiver like
Crabtree, that's the result you're
going to get."
S"Don't you ever talk about me!"
he said to the camera. Pressed by
Andrews to name who was talking
about him, Sherman said "Crabtree!


Don't you open your mouth about
the best! Or I'm going to shut it for
you real quick!"
Asked by Hayes what he thinks
watching the interview clip,
Sherman said, "It looks fine to me.
I don't think too much of it. A big
play was made; you're going to get
a big reaction."
The "big reaction" that ensued
included the labeling of Sherman as
a "thug" a word that was uttered
625 times on TV the day after the
game.
"Webster's definition of [a thug]
is a criminal," Sherman said. "And
I'm far from a criminal, you can
check my record, it's pretty clean.
And I think people confuse, with
the way they use it...but I think
people are trying to use it, like I
said before, as a substitute for the n-
word. It's an accepted way to say
it."
Sherman's critics included
Senator John McCain, who called
him "that loudmouth from Seattle."
"I don't see it that way," Sherman
said, "but I'm sure he's said worse
than that."
"His opinion is what it is and he's
entitled to it," Sherman said. "I got
caught up in the moment. I'm sure
he's gotten caught up in the
moment but if everybody labeled
him off of a sound bite, then I'm
sure everybody'd have a different
view of him."


Whether shopping for the week or for the items you need to prepare your favorite
dish, with a little planning, you can take advantage of savings that are just as satisfying
as the meal itself. There are deals throughout the store. Bring in your coupons and
save even more. With all the ways Publix helps you stretch your grocery dollars, you
can plan on leftovers of the green kind regularly. And we don't mean lettuce.


Sh Here. Love To Save Here.


Publix.
WHERE SHOPPING IS A PLEASURE


Richard Sherman: From Compton to Stanford,

Calls Crabtree Incident 'good-natured'


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 10


January 30 February 5,.2014







Secrets Your

Credit Score

Reveals

About You
Page 2


Black

History b

Month

Programming

Guide 3
Page 9


Former New Orleans Mayor Ray
Nagin Set to Stand Trial for Bribery
* A trial is set to open for the corruption case against for-
mer New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin, who is charged with
accepting bribes and free trips among other things from
contractors in exchange for helping them secure millions
of dollars in city work.
Jury selection for Nagin's federal trial has began for the
Hurricaine Katrina era mayor who served two terms before leaving office
in 2010. He was living in a Dallas suburb when a grand jury indicted him a
year ago on charges that include bribery and wire fraud.
The charges are the product of a City Hall investigation that already has
resulted in several convictions or guilty pleas by former Nagin associates
who could be key prosecution witnesses at the trial.

Fortune 400 Hold Wealth
Equal to All of Black America
The billionaires on the Fortune 400 list have a level of wealth that is equal
to all of the Black population of the United States.
That was the finding of an analysis by the Institute for Policy Studies, a
Washington-based public policy organization.
The net worth ofjust 400 billionaires, a group that could fit into a high
school gym, is on par with the collective wealth of our more than 14 million
African-American households. Both groups possess some $2 trillion, about
3 percent of our national net worth of $77 trillion.
There has been consistent disparities in the net worth of white Americans
and that ofAfrican-Americans and Latinos. The rate of homeownership for
white Americans is 73.3 percent, compared with 43.1 percent for African-
Americans and 47.6 percent for Latinos. .....
Experts say the disparity is rooted in deep-seated historical roots.
"When you talk about a population that started in this country as property
that was forbidden from reading and writing, you have some systemic prob-
lems that don't go away overnight," Andrews said. "When you add to it
issues of voting rights and other laws regarding discrimination and access,
you're only talking about 40 to 50 years that African-Americans have had
any viable economic role in American society."

Fla. High Court OKs Medical
Marijuana for Ballot
A Florida measure that would allow the use of medical marijuana has
cleared its final hurdle and will be on the November ballot
The state Supreme Court has approved the language for theproposed con-
stitutional amendment
The justices gave its approval by a 4-3 vote just three days after a petition
drive reached the required number of signatures to place the measure on the
ballot
The decision is a defeat for Attorney General Pam Bondi, who challenged
the ballot language by saying it's misleading.
Personal injury lawyer John Morgan has spent about $4 million to place
the issue before voters.
Gov. Rick Scott is opposed to medical marijuana. His Democrats chal-
lengers, state Sen. Nan Rich and former Gov. Charlie Crist, both support it.

Former Cop Indicted in Shooting
of Unarmed Jonathan Ferrell
CHARLOTE, N.C. A grand jury has indicted a Charlotte police officer
for voluntary manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed former
Florida A&M football player.
The indictment came this week after a judge ruled the North Carolina
Attorney General's office could resubmit the case to a grand jury.
Investigators say Randall Kerrick shot 24-year-old Jonathan Ferrell on
Sept 14 as Ferrell looked for help after a car crash.
Last week, a Mecklenburg County grand jury refused to indict the 27-year-
old Kerrick, a former animal control officer, on a voluntary manslaughter
charge. The voluntary manslaughter charge carries a prison sentence of up
to 11 years.
Police say that Ferrell wrecked his car and went to a nearby house and
banged on the door, apparently for help. The resident called police, and three
officers responded. Investigators say Kerrick fired 12 shots, 10 of which hit
FerrelL Kerrick was the only officer who fired his gun.

Arizona State Fraternity Expelled
After 'offensive' MLK Day Party
Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity atArizona State University has been expelled
after the organization held an "'MLK Black Party" on the Dr. King holiday
that was deemed offensiveve"
Students who attended the party posted photos on social media showing
attendees wearing basketball jerseys, throwing up gang signs and drinking
out of watermelons. The photos quickly spread and drew harsh criticism
from civil rights leaders and many members of the black community.
According to USA Today, the university has released a statement saying
that the school has revoked its recognition as a Greek organization on its
campus and that the 65-year-old chapter is no longer affiliated with ASU.
The university's president, Michael Crow, says that the students of Tau
Kappa Epsilon violated four provisions the school's code of conduct
engaging in discriminatory activities, violating alcohol rules, violating the
terms of earlier disciplinary sanctions and off-campus conduct that may
present a risk or danger.


FLORIDA'S kIRSI COAST QUALITY BLACK WEEKLY 5 Cn
50 cents


Volume 27 No. 13 Jacksonville, Florida January 30 February 5,2014


CRISIS: 15% of the Population, 50% of the Homicide Victims


Black Americans are 13 percent
of the U.S. population, but made up
50 percent of the homicide victims
in the nation in 2011, according to a
recent study by the Violence Policy
Center. The report makes a call for
policymakers to place the dispro-
portionate deaths among Blacks at
the front line of issues that need to
be addressed.
Overall African-Americans were


about seven times more likely to be
victims of homicide. The Black
homicide rate was 17.51 per
100,000, while for whites the
national homicide rate was 2.64 per
100,000. Black men made up 86
percent of Black homicide deaths
compared to 14 percent of Black
females. The average age of a vic-
tim is 30 years old.
The states with the highest Black


homicide victimization rate include
Nebraska, Missouri, Michigan,
Pennsylvania and Oklahoma. In
Nebraska, the Black homicide rate
was 34.43 per 100,000 in 2011. In
Missouri, the rate was 33.38 per
100,000. In Michigan, the rate was
31.54 per 100,000.
In cases when the cause of death
could be identified, 86 percent of
the homicide victims died due to


gun violence. This followed by
knives and cutting instruments,
bodily force and blunt objects. And
when the circumstances could be
identified 73 percent of Black vic-
tims knew the person who mur-
dered them.
The report urges for more focus
to be put on reducing access and
exposure to firearms in the future in
an effort to end the epidemic.


Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Celebrates 50 Year Doves
|by Lynn Jones
r ~ *, 'B 9Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Beta
|j, I -, Alpha Zeta Chapter recently hon-
... ...... .............. . .. ........... ... ored their fifty year members.
AP ,s The Zeta "Doves"
A i B "\ Bwere recognized at a breakfast by
.their sorority members Truth for
S--r Living Ministries. Zeta member
S Alpha Hay narrated thehistory of
^ 0 'Q1 each member and beamed with
S| V pride as she remarked, "we appre-
,ciate you and want to convey how
we respect your legacy and will
always hold you up with high
I esteem." Each Dove was present-
led with a commemorative pin and
4l flowers to honor their achieve-
ment.
. "This is truly an honor, I am
S' thankful to be here today with my
sisters," said Dove honoree Ida
SBShellman-Harris. The longtime
educator joined the sorority in
1953 ad recently celebrated her
,. *60th year as a Zeta. "I joined a
v long time ago and now I am able
. *.^ ^ ^ to help other young ladies in the
Pictured Zeta Doves, members who have been apart of the sorority for over fifty years: (L-R) Dorothy to help other" young ladies in the
Kennerly, Esther Barton, Ida Shellman-Harris, Nancy B. Scriven-Watts and Bernice Harrison. chapter"


Zimmerman Paints

Angela Corey for Profit

RFSPLCT FO-,m


George Zimmerman's latest art-
work takes aim at Jacksonville's
State Attorney Angela Corey, who
charged him with second-degree
murder in the killing of Trayvon
Martin in 2012.
The piece, titled "Angie," shows
Corey holding her hand pinched
and the words, "I have this much
respect for the American Judicial
System," written above it.
Zimmerman's brother tweeted a
photo of the painting last week.


Last month, Zimmerman sold a
painting of an American flag on
eBay for $100,099.99. "I found a
creative way to express myself, my
emotions and the symbols that rep-
resent my experiences," he wrote
on the sale page. Zimmerman still
has a $2.5 million debt over his
head that he owes to his defense
attorneys. In the meantime, the
Associate Press has issued a cease
and desist order to him for unau-
throized use of the photos depicted.


Pictured is Helen Bradley, Enroll America and Raquel Arline,
Volunteer with Organizing for Action.
Affordable Care Act Hits the Road


Northside residents had the
opportunity to sign-up for health
plans through the Affordable Care
Act Saturday, January 25th at the
Legends Center on Soutel Dr.
State Rep. Mia Jones and multi-
ple healthcare professional were on
hand to help people sign up. Over
500 people attended the event to
hear representatives discuss the
process and shop deals on health
insurance.
"Many people are skeptical about


the Affordable Care Act. We are
here to help and get them enrolled
immediately. It really is a simple
process." Said Raquel Arline,
Volunteer with Organizing For
Action. Vendors were also on sight
to provide healthcare information
and screenings.
For more details on the next
planned information session call
State Representative Mia Jones
local district office at 924-1615.


Richard

Sherman

from

Compton to

Standford
Page 10


Guest Commentar

Don't Let

Stand Your

Ground

Kill You
Page 4