The Jacksonville free press

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Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00434

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U.S. "deeply concerned" Volume 27 No. 11 Jacksonville, Florida January 16-22, 2014

Over Nigeria Anti-gay Law OoenstSesi oHl colt rsnPpln
Secretary of State John Kerry condemned a new Nigerian law that pro- Go e nntS psi toH lScoloPr on ieie
hibits samne-sex marriages and vastly restricts the rights of gay and lesbian The Obama administration is dents without disabilities were
citizens to even gather together sun e eomnain nmr hntretmsa ieya
Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan quietly signed the strict measure clssrm disrcplinatiosee on wmotes toa bhe xpele a or el suspedd
into law earlier this month, but the news began circulating the globe thi n h parnuprteswh acing to gepelormuendcivi
wee. hereeltin re aswftreposeflm ery.students of different races are pun- rights data collection from 2011
"Beyond even prohibiting same sex marriage, this law dangerously
restricts freedom of assembly, association, and expression for all ished for violating school rules. 2012. Although black students
Nigerians," Kenry said in a statement Civil rights advocates have long made up 15 percent of students in
said that a "school-to-prison"thdaacleiohymdeu According to the law, anyone who enters into a same-sex marriage, civilthdaacleiohymdeu unonordmeti arnesipcol fceu t 1 eas nprso. pipeline stems from overly zealous : more than a third of students susAdditionally, same-sex marriages legally performed in other countries scoldciinplcestrtng edeoc,44ecntfthe
wudbcosdrdvibyteNgragoenetblack and Hispanic students that suspended more than once and
andldlesbianscitizensofromy meetingeinapublicrset- bring them out of school and into more than a third of students
Th lw ls rstics aythe court system. expelled.
"npesnwho registers, operates or participates in gay clubs, societies Attorney General Eric Holder More than half of students
and organizations or directly or indirectly makes public show of same-sex said the problem often stems from involved in school-related arrests or
amruIsrltosi nNgracmisa fec n hl ahb ibe well intentioned "zero-tolerance" referred to law enforcement were
amoousreltioshp i Nieri comis a ofenc an salleac beliale policies that too often inject theHspncoblkaorigtth
on conviction to a term of 10 years in prison," the law says. criminal jusic system intodin the reshdta

A d**olution of problems. Zero tolerance The recommendations being
Writer A dActivist policies, a tool that became popular issued Wednesday encourage
in the 1 990s, often spell out uni- dle wihaciia eor.ee eerltolwefreet shools to ensure that all school
Amiri Baraka Dies At Age 79 form and swift punishment for "Ordinary troublemaking can and then you end up with kids that personnel are trained in classroom
Amiri Baraka, the writer who was born LeRoi offenses such as truancy, smoking someies provoke responses that end up in police precincts inta management, conflict resolution
Jones, has died at age 79. Baraka's career spanned or carrying a weapon. Violators can are overly severe, including out of the principal's office," Holder said. and approaches to de-escalate classart and activism: He was an influential poet and an lose classroom time or become sad- school suspensions, expulsions and In American schools, black stu- room disruptions. Cont. on page 3
award-winning playwright who didn't shy awayBl c
frm ocalcitcim ndpliic. edidoco- 0 Bac M nScholarship Fair Nets Thousands for Students
plications fromn diabetes.
0'Re Pf )Jak' prwjg wpiements stands as the cataloging of black culture and history in Blues People, "a panoramic sociocultural history of African-American music," as Eugene Holley, Jr.,

wrote for NPR last year
The book was published in 1963 and has never been out of print q i
As The Los Angeles Times reports, "Baraka led the Black Arts Movement, an aesthetic sibling to the Black Panthers. Although the movement was fractious and short-lived, it involved significant authors such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Eldridge Cleaver, Gil-Scott Heron, Nikki Giovanni, Ish mael Reed and Quincy Troupe."

Racism May Make

Black Men Age Faster
Black men who experience "high levels" of racism and internalize it may age, more quicly, according to a new University of Maryland study
Though it is well known that African-Americans suffer disproportionally from illness compared to other race, the university said the study is the first to link racism to accelerated aging and age-related disease. The study found that the more racial discrimination the men experienced and the more they reported a "stronger bias against their own racial group," the greater their




Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press January 16-22, 2014


AJi14 Millions of Women at Risk of Economic Pov'er1V
by Daniel Arkin, NBC country's voters the report are low-income females: that Shriver highlighted on
'7 .......... 75 percent wish they had Meet the Press on Sunday was
Although in recent decades says that millions of women
women have made historic ad- are still struggling on the mar devoted more time and energy for women to think of them dances in nearly all areas of gins of American society, to education and career rel- selves "as providers, not being American public life, a stag- bruised by the recent recession ative to 58 percent of the gen- provided for. gearing number of women and the day-to-day trials of eral population. "Many women who reacross the country are still tee- family finances. 73 percent wish they had sponded to the poll said they
tearing on the verge of poverty Women make up close to made better financial decisions wished they had stayed in
and economic disaster, a new two-thirds of minimum-wage over the course of their lives school longer and Shriver said
report shows. workers in the country and and so did 65 percent of the fathers and husbands need to
The report, co-authored by upwards of 70 percent of those total survey group. reinforce the mindset that
NBC News special anchor low-wage workers receive no Low-income women are women can set themselves up
Maria Shriver and the Center paid sick days whatsoever, ac- more likely to regret tying the to be breadwinners. for American Progress, takes a cording to the report. knot when they did 52 per- "Men are totally a part of this
Shown above are students listening to a session. wide-angle snapshot of a na- All the while, some 40 per- cent versus 33 percent. conversation, in terms of how
tional economic crisis seen cent of all American house- -And nearly one-third of they raise their daughters, and JAXPORT M entors through the eyes of women. holds with children below the low-income women with, chil- support their wives and their
S The key findings paint a por- age of 18 include mothers who dren wish they had postponed partners," she said.
Future Logistics Leader trait of an estimated 42 million are either the only or primary having children or had The report weaves together
JAXPORT has kicked off its second year as part of the Be- women and 28 million de- source of income with the fewer of them. the personal stories of working
yond School Walls mentoring program. pendent children saddled average earnings of full-time And yet despite the discour- women With "public, private
A unique twist on the Big Brothers, Big Sisters with financial hardship. female workers still just 77 aging signs of economic gen- and personal recommendations
mentor/mentee program, Beyond School Walls is focused on "These are not women who percent of the average earnings der inequality, "The Shriver that can help reignite the
workplace mentorship. Students are brought from First Coast are wondering if they can'have of their male colleagues, the Report: A Woman's Nation American Dream for women High School International Trade and Logistics Career Acad- it all,"' Shriver wrote in her in- report reads. Pushes Back from the Brink" and their families"
emy to JAXPORT to meet with employees once a month production to the report. "These The authors also presented features a wide range of poten- Shriver said that since
The partnership not only provides the students a mentor, but are women who are already the results of a survey of 3,500 tial remedies ftom prospec- women make up 54 percent of exposes them to a positive work environment, new career doing it all working hard, adults across America that of- tive policy initiatives to voters, "women are at the cenpaths and life goals. providing, parenting, and care- fers a glimpse into the on-the- community programs. The au- ter of our country," and De"Getting students interested in trade and logistics at the high giving. They're doing it all, yet ground realities of thors of the report say that mocrats and Republicans need school level is a great way to help develop our future work_ they and their families can't contemporary womanhood. turning away from historical to work together "to modernize force and ensure the growth of the logistics industry," said prosper, and that's weighing Republican and Democratic injustices and embracing a our relationships to
JAXPORT CEO Brian Taylor. "The Beyond School Walls the U.S. economy down." pollsters worked together to more equitable future will women.""When women do
program offers a unique opportunity for companies to get in- Amid an apparent boom in "write a statistical narrative" of boost the U.S. economy. well, men do well and the navolved in the community, and I encourage other businesses female empowerment and par- the women who "are an essen- One such recommendation tion does well," Shriver said.
to consider the value of participating. There is nothing more ticipation a time in which tial part of our nation's fabric important than ensuring our youth have the support and en- women earn the majority- of and economy," the report says. Employment Opportunity
couragement they need to succeed as contributing citizens of secondary degrees and repre- Among the chief findings this community." I sent more than half of the from survey respondents who D rivers: $5,000


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We've all had these moments: One small purchase quickly fol- card's expiration date. You should re- moving you from the account. Great Pay! Consistent Freight! You're at a romantic restaurant and lowed by larger ones. Thieves will ceive a replacement card several On last thought: If your card is dethe evening went great. But just as test the waters to see if a small pur- weeks beforehand. It's often mailed nied, don't shoot the messenger he's Great Miles on this Regional Account. you and your date are readying to chase is denied; if it's not, they'll in a plain envelope, so be careful only following instructions. Rather, leave, an embarrassed waiter appears quickly run up major charges. what you toss. If the new card doesn't call the card issuer and find out what W erner Enterprises: and whispers, "I'm afraid your card Exceeding daily spending limits. arrive, contact the issuer to ensure it happened. Embarrassment aside, it's has been denied." So much for ro- So e cards limit how much you can hasn't been stolen. nice to, know that, someone, is trying
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Banks and other credit card issuers online or while traveling. In fact, on your card say for a rental car or have developed complex algorithms some card issuers automatically de hotel reservation that puts you over that track credit card behavior and cline international transactions be- your credit limit. Always ask whether highlight unusual usage patterns cause of the high potential for fraud, a hold will be placed, how much and 0
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"Unusual activities" thatjump out Other common triggers for credit You miss a monthly payment. Card to card issuers include: card denials include: issuers may let this slide once or
When you ordinarily use your Outdated or incorrect personal in- twice, depending on your history card only rarely, but suddenly make formation for example, when with them, but eventually if you don't several charges in one day. you're asked to enter your zip code at make at least the minimum payment
Making multiple purchases at the a gas station. Always alert your card due, your card will probably be same store (or website) within a few issuer whenever you move. frozen. minutes of each other. Also, make sure you don't mistype The primary cardholder made
An unusually large purchase your credit card number, expiration changes on the account and forgot to




January 16-22, 2014 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


Ending the School to Prison Pipeline Retirement? Not an Option U.Se
Continued from front by school officials compared with The black students in the district
Among the other recommenda- major threats to school safety. were facing harsher punishment R etirem ent C risis has "R acial C om ponent'
tions: And, it encourages schools to col- than whites for similar misbehav-Ensure that school personnel lect and monitor data that security ior. By Jazelle Hunt Federal Reserve. In it, researchers accounts.
understand that they are responsi- or police officers take to ensure In 2010, the New York Civil NNPA Washington examine workplace retirement cov- In addition to the gap in savings,
ble for administering routine stu- nondiscrimination. Liberties Union sued the NYPD Correspondent erage, retirement account owner- a gap in access to retirement
dent discipline instead of security The recommendations are non- for wrongful arrests, harassment, WASHINGTON (NNPA) More ship, and retirement account bal- options persists, particularly for priand excessive force in the city's than three-fifths of Black working- ances among Whites, Blacks, vate-sector workers. In its larger public schools. age households 62 percent have Latinos, and Asians. retirement study, the NIRS found
Education Secretary Arne no assets in a retirement account, that private sector retirement access
Duncan acknowledged the chal- according to a new study by the "I think what the research shows is near its lowest point since 1979.
lenge is finding the balancing act National Institute of Retirement is that the U.S. retirement crisis has As of 2010, a little more than half to keep school safe and orderly, Security (NIRS), really specific racial dimensions, of all Black workers have access to
but when it comes to routine disci- Working-age households contain specifically with access and sav- employer-sponsored retirement ings," says Nari Rhee, manager of coverage (54.3 percent), and less
pline the "first instinct should not residents 25 to 64 years old. Even
be to call 911 when there's a prob those Black households with assets research at NIRS and the report's than half of them actually take lem." trail similarly situated Whites. author. "About 44 percent of Baby advantage of said plans (43 perResearch suggests the racial dis- Among the 38.3 percent of Black Boomers and Generation Xers cent). parities in how students are disci- households age 55 to 64 who do won't even have enough saved to There are several causes for the plined are not explained by more own accounts, the average savings meet their basic needs when they lack access to retirement plans frequent or more serious misbe- is $34,365. That's a fraction of the retire." among Black households. For
havior by students of color, $206,400 saved by their White In the report, Rbee describes the starters, employers are not legally
according to a letter sent to counterparts. savings gap as "stark," with the typ- required to provide benefits or
schools with the recommendations The report, "Race and Retirement ical retirement account-owning financial literacy courses to their by the departments. Security in the United States," is a household of color with a balance employees.
"For example, in our investiga- companion to a broader study of the of $23,000, which is less than half Rhee points out that in other tions, we have found cases where retirement gap using data from the the $50,500 median balance of developed nations, employmentor police officers. binding, but, in essence, the feder- African-American students were Bureau of Labor Statistics and the White households with retirement based retiree provisions tend to be
-Draw clear distinctions about al government is telling the school disciplined more harshly and more effective because of an automatic or
the responsibilities of school secu- districts around the country that frequently because of their race mandatory component.
rity personnel. they should adhere to the princi- than similarly situated white stu- Family of Unarmed M an Shot Dead Additionally, the types of jobs that
-Provide opportunities for ples of fairness and equity in stu- dents," the letter said. "In short, offer such benefits are in national
school security officers to develop dent discipline or face strong racial discrimination in school dis- in North Carolina Ffles Lawsuit decline, while lower-wage jobs
relationships with students and action if they don't. cipline is a real problem." Mecklenburg County and the city's with fewer benefits are proliferatparents. Already, in March of last year, Holder and Duncan were inter- police department are also being ing. Those that do offer retirement
The government advises schools the Justice Department spearhead- viewed on Tuesday on the Rev. Al benefits are switching from defined
to establish procedures on how to ed a settlement with the Meridian, Sharpton's radio show as part of a sued, according to a court docu- benefit (DB) pensions, which are
ment.
distinguish between disciplinary Miss., school district to end dis- national effort to draw attention to Officer Randall Kerrick opened automatic retirement savings, to
infractions appropriately handled criminatory disciplinary practices. the issue. fire on the 24-year-old, who was 401(k), IRA and other opt-in
struck 10 times by bullets and died accounts, which depend on what
employees decide to save.
at the scene in September 2013.
Annual MLK Holiday Celebrations Planned Police say Ferrell, who was Lazetta Rainey Braxton, incom
The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 2014 Parade, posthumously, is take place at Metropolitan Park unarmed ran towards them when ing president of the Association of
Memorial Foundation will begin its "Chief' L. Jerome Spates. Chief directly at the conclusion of the they arrived. African American Financial
MLK Holiday Celebration on Spates (as he was so affectionately MLK Parade. Among the park The former FAMU football play- Advisors, sums it up this way:
"Access to retirement plans is very
Saturday, January 18, 2014, with a known) was a staunch supporter of activities will be tributes to Mr. er was knocking on doors of the tied to industry, level of education,
"Let Freedom Sing" concert at the MLK Holiday Parade in Nelson (Madiba) Mandela; Dr. upscale Bradfield Farms communi- income level ... people of color are
Edward Waters College's Milne Jacksonville, Florida. Chester A. Aikens; Mr. Melvin ty near Charlotte and seeking help
still catching up to these opportuniAuditorium. The concert, featuring The Parade will start at 10:00 Alston; and Mr. William Stetson after his car crashed. One frantic ties."
songs that inspired the Civil Rights a.m. on Monday, January 20, 2014, Kennedy. Other activities include a homeowner who thought Ferrell
The retirement gap is also tied to
Movement, is free to the public. at Jefferson and Water Streets in Battle of the Bands, music for all was a threat had called 911. the wealth gap. Both Braxton and
On Monday, January 20, 2014, in Downtown Jacksonville. Among age groups, and a host of vendors. The North Carolina Attorney Rhee point out that there are sociecelebrating the legacy of one of the participants in the parade will Additional information regarding Jonathan Ferrell General's office said the case will tal and historical factors at play.
America's finest sons, Dr. Martin be Florida's Governor, Rick Scott, the MLK Holiday Grand Parade The family of Jonathan A. Ferrell go to a grand jury on Jan. 2 1. The Although African Americans are Luther King, Jr., their will be a Congresswoman Corrine Brown, and post-parade activity at continues to seek justice in his lawyer of the family is seeking an well represented in the public-secMLK Holiday Parade followed by a Jacksonville's Mayor Alvin Brown, Metropolitan Park can be found at death and filed a wrongful death indictment of Kerrick who is tor ranks where DB pensions are post-parade celebration at school groups.' churches, organiza- www.mlkfdnorg.com. or calling lawsuit Monday against the North charged with voluntary manslaugh- still the norm, lagging generational Metropolitan Park. tions, and individuals. 904-807-8358 or 904-463-2425. Carolina police officer who shot ter. wealth curtails this boost..
The Grand Marshal of the MLK The post-parade celebration will him. The city of Charlotte,












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Page 4 -Ms. Perry's Free Press January 16-22, 2014















Charles Dudley Warner Common Core Ed Standards
infamously said, "Politics

What if I told you that former F
Florida Governor Jeb Bush CraeS rn eB delw
and current president Barack unreliable standardized tests, that provides clear measurable teachers and experts from across Obama agree on more than they Of course, all of these anti- standards. the country.
probably disagree? teacher policies would help our Supporters of the standards insist The reason this debate is building L
I certainly haven't talked to Gov. children learn better. that the new benchmarksonly out- is because Common Core standards
Bush of late or maybe Ineyer have, Anyway, back to the subject at line what students are expected to are set to be fully implemented in but I know that he has strong ties to hand, what is Common Core? Well learn, while curriculum is still con- grades kindergarten through 12 in Buins Exhag by -a r Jacso
the Hispanic community and according to The Foundation for trolled at the local level, the 2014-15 school year.
believes in immigration reform Florida's Future, which was found- The standards are designed to Opposition to the standards H o h O
much like our President. ed by Gov. Bush, "Common Core ensure that students graduating seems to be building some momen-H othG O
But immigration isn't the topic State Standards are a state-led from high school are prepared to tum; and with 2014 being an elecof the day. The topic is education effort to establish clear world-class enter credit bearing entry courses in tion year, the Governor and other and why "Common Core stan- educational standards for English two or four-year college programs elected Republicans are being veryC aB osT hi
dad"is such a hot issue in language arts and mathematics that or enter the workforce. The stan- careful about how they manage thisC aB osT hi
Florida. President Obama is a States can voluntarily adopt." dards are clear and concise to issue. major supporter of Common Core Continued, "Common Core stan- ensure that parents, teachers, and Education Commissioner Pam and so is Gov. Bush, although dards are designed to ensure that students have a clear understanding Stewart said earlier this week that B a k Ot ec
many Republican-led groups are students graduating from high of the expectations in reading, writ- her department would propose coming out against the standards. school are prepared to go to college ing, speaking and listening, lan- about 40 changes to the Common By William Reed
So what's the big deal? Well in or enter the workforce; and that guage, and mathematics in school. Core benchmarks. NNPA Columnist
education the word accountabili- parents, teachers, and students have National and State teachers This move came on the heels of a "I'd go to the NAACP and talk about why the
ty, and terminology like measure- a clear understanding of what is unions are backing Common Core. vote by a caucus of the Republican ArcnAeia omnt hudb eadn
able outcomes is talked about as expected of them." Again, talk about an unholy Party of Florida's state commit- pfaych e can nomensatisfewihod stdeaps."g
much as Jesus is in the Baptist Common Core started out as a alliance. In the past, the accounta- teemen and committeewomen Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich in
church. No jab at good old Baptist joint project by officials in about bility folks and teacher's union backing a resolution opposing the 21
folks I am one of them. four dozen states; but the imple- have been at odds over most educa- Common Core standards. So the -Who's your favorite Republican Icandidate for
Accountability in education mentation of the standards has tional issues. Both groups seem to fun is just beginning. 2014? Elections for the United States Senate will be
makes a lot of sense; but where divided the Republican Party. agree that the standards establish Now the question at hand is hlonNv. 4,2014, with 33 of the 100 Senate seats
Democrats and Republicans nor- Many conservatives, especially what students need to learn, but whose politics wins out? being contested whose winners will serve six-year
mally differ is on the policies used those who associate more with the they do not dictate how teachers "There comes a time when one terms. Territorial and state elections will also occur for the U.S. House of to measure success in education. Tea Party, have grown worried that should teach. must take a position that is neither Representatives, governors in states and local elections on this date.
In the past, Republicans have the standards will lead to unprece- Unions say that under Common safe, nor political, nor popular, but As we start 2014, political polls indicate, three out of four Americans pointed the finger at teachersfor our dented federal intrusion in local Core, teachers will continue to he must take it because conscience believe that "the nation is on the wrong track." Despite their dissatisfaction public school challenges. They schools. devise lesson plans and tailor tells him it is right," said Dr. Martin with what has been going on, few Blacks have lists of Republican candihave also focused legislative efforts For those who have been promot- instruction to the individual needs Luther King, Jr. dates they are "considering voting for." The party still has a reputation of
on ending long-term teacher con- ing the values of school accounta- of the students in their classrooms. Signing off from the Florida being racist and if it doesn't get more votes from "minorities" the Grand tracts and creating policies that bility, Common Core makes sense They also point out that the stan- Capitol, Old Party (GOP) may soon go the way of the Whigs. While the
base teacher accountability on and maybe the best option available dards drafting process relied on Reggie Fullwood Republicans cannot continue competing as "a party of old White men" the
party establishment has come up with an illusion of increased number of
Black Republicans.
The ar o Pov rty and M LKRepublican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus says the party
wants to broaden its appeal and reach more Americans, particularly
Blacks. But, Republicans are simply mouthing the same staid policy and
By George E. Curry conservatives still use today, the training, and better job opportuni- Other factors also contribute to rhetoric. In Congress, Republican representatives hit new lows among
NNPA Columr ist former actor said: "In 1964 the ties,' as he put it in his address on today's poverty rate, including ris- Blacks for their role in the government swhAd wn;,_'spit of the
We are celebrating the 50th famous War on Poverty ;was*. Jan. 8, 1964. LBJ's campaign ing, income inequality, according to Republicans' exp~Asi~nofthdiv nubr CB~k9'Jbhh~t bf Blacks
anniversary of the War on Poverty declared and a funny thing hap- brought us Head Start (in 1965) as the Center for Budget and Policy still view Republicans as Whites who only care about other rich Whites. at roughly the same time we're pened. ...I guess you could say, well as Medicare and Medicaid. He Priorities. It stated that between Republicans still lack gravitas in garnering Black votes. The majority of observing the 85th birthday of Dr. poverty won the war." understood that political and social 1964 and 2012, the share of nation- Blacks believe they're supposed to be Democrats. Nine times out of 10, the
Martin Luther King, Jr. That's fit- Liberals were also misleading, empowerment were indispensable al income going to the top 1 percent average Black family feel Democrats are compassionate and care about the ting because despite the concentrat- saying instead of having a War on factors in economic betterment, so of U.S. households nearly doubled, little guy and those in need. ed effort to neuter King by overem- Poverty, it was more like a skirmish he pushed for the Civil Rights Act from 11 percent to 22 percent in The GOP is at a great political disadvantage and can only be kept relephasizing his 1964 "1 Have a on poverty. of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act 2012. Meanwhile, the share of vant by increased votes and support from racial minorities. To be competDream Speech," his last days on The truth lies somewhere of 1965." national income going to the poor- itive, the Republican Party has to take creditable and strategic. measures
earth were spent trying to uplift between those polar opposites. Still, many expected the poverty est fifth of households fell between that can counter the Democratic monopoly on the Black vote. garbage workers in Memphis, Since we began collecting such rate to be lower than it is today. 1979 (the earliest year available) Republicans continue to act in ways of old and against new ways to gain
Tenn. and planning a Poor Peoples statistics, the lowest U.S. poverty According to the Center of and 2012. interests and support from Blacks. The Republicans have no message that
Campaign that would culminate in rate was 11. 1 percent in 1973. It Budget and Policy Priorities (CPP), There is also the issue of shrink- resonates among African-American voters. To get out of the single digits a march to the nation's capital. rose to 15.2 percent in 1983 before "The 'poverty story over the last ing jobs that pay decent wages, among Blacks, Republicans must rethink their message, policies and Unlike today, when our politi- falling back to 11.3 percent. In half-century in the United States is especially those at the low end of method of delivery. cians seek to get elected and re- 2012, 13 million people lived mixed for several reasons. A much the pay scale. This time around, the Republic National Committee's (RNC) outreach to
elected by groveling and catering to below half of the poverty line, most stronger safety net along with fac- "Moreover, large racial dispari- Black voters must be more substantive. In the 2012 election, only 6 perthe middle class, President Lyndon of them children. tors such as rising education levels, ties remain, with child poverty cent of African-American voters cast ballots for the GOP's Mitt Romney.
B. Johnson declared war on pover- According to scholars at higher employment among women, much higher and the share of After their last showing, how serious can the Republicans be about getting
ty in his Jan. 8, 1964 State of the Columbia University, when recal- and smaller families helped push African Americans with a college the Black vote if they don't utilize the Black Press to present these views? Union message. culated to include expenses not poverty down. At the same time, degree much lower than among It's not "racism" against Blacks, but "benign neglect" that causes
"This administration here and counted in official statistics, the rising numbers of single-parent whites. Meanwhile, poverty in Republicans to lose Black votes. Even modest inroads into the Black comnow, declares unconditional war on poverty rate fell from more than 25 families, growing income inequali- America is high compared to other munity could tip a multitude of elections the GOP's way. To get Black poverty in America," he said. "We percent in 1967 to about 16 percent ty, and worsening labor market wealthy nations largely because our votes Republicans will have to gro into Black neighborhoods with a con-




January 16-22, 2014 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5

0 FOR THE WEEK OF JAN. 14 20, 2014 2 B C BA ( R S a W k H 1
IAA CENTRAL INTERCOLLEGIATE MID EASTERN SOC SOUTHERN INTRCOLLEGIATE SOUTHWESTERN
GIAMEAC A ...CNE... SASW INDEPENDENTS
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION ATHLETIC CONFERENCE ATHLETIC CONFERENCE %iA C ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
DIV CONF ALL CONF ALL CONF ALL DIV ALL W L
NORTHDISION W L W L W LWL W LW L EAST DMSION W LWL WL W L Central State 7 5
Virginia Union 1 0 2 4 3 12 Norfolk State 4 0 10 7 Benedict 5 0 10 3 Southern 4 0 8 9 W. Va. State 6 6
Lincoln 0 0 4 2 12 3 Hampton 3 0 8 8 Fort Valley State 5 0 9 5 Alabama State 3 1 9 6 Univ. ofDC 3 9
Eliz. City State 0 0 3 3 8 8 Savannah State 3 0 5 12 Paine 3 2 7 7 AlabamaA&M 3 1 6 8
Chowan 0 0 2 4 6 8 Pe Cheyney 2 13
Bowie State 0 0 1 5 7 10 Morgan State 2 0 4 10 Claflin 3 2 6 9 Texas Southern 2 1 6 9 Lincoln (Mo.) 2 13
Virginia State 0 1 2 4 9 7 Coppin State 2 1 5 11 ClarkAtlanta 2 2 6 6 #Ark. Pine Bluff 2 1 4 Tennessee State 2 17
SOUTH DMSION Florida A&M 2 2 6 11 Morehssee 2 3 57
Winston-Salem State 0 0 4 2 9 7 NC A&T State 1 1 4 12 Morehouse 2 3 5 8 AlcomState 2 2 5 11
Shaw 0 0 4 2 6 10 ~~SC State 1 2 5 11 Albany State 2167 Prieiw&M 1232 PAERFHWK
FytilSh a te 0 0 4 2 610 Howard 1 2 3 15 WEST DIVSION Jackson State 1 3 5 11 Patrick Miller, 61, Sr.,G, TENN. STATE -Tallied
FaetvleState 0 0 4 2 f 11r~~:hi 5 -Mati after? netn career-r;
Livingstone 0 0 3 2 10 4 North Carolina Central 0 1 9 5 Tudskegee 3 2 6 8 # Miss. Valley St. 0 3 4 12 29 points in loss toULT-alnlrencreS.Augustine's 0 0 3 210 5 Md.E.Shore 0 3 2 13 Stillman 3 3 8 8 #GramblingState 0 4 1 12 high37pointstnlasstoSEMissour.Hiton12of
St.Augstie's 0 03 210 Md E.Shoe Sillan 3 821 shots, 11 of 12 FTs vs. SEMO, 8 of14 fromthe
J. C. Smith 0 0 3 3 11 5 Bethune-oka 0 4 2 17 LeMoyne-Owen 1 1 3 6 # nlgbeo~neeclteforwt 3o 4Fsv.U-Marfin. Averaged
Delaware State 0 4 4 12 Kentucky State 2 4 3 8 28.0 points in the two games and canned 24 of
CAASWA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK 26 free throws.
PLAYER MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK MLes 1 5 2 71E NEWCOMER
Tyrell Tate, Jr., G, FAYETTEVILLE STATE. Had three solid PLAYER Miles 0 6 0 13 Jamel Waters, G, ALABAMA STATE Tallied Dominic Phillips, S-11, So., G, W. VA. STATEJSU Sports Photo gamesthis week,including a season-high 31 points s.Va. Union. Jyles Smith, 6-9, Sr., F, SAVANNAH STATE To- 27 points shooting 7 of 11 from the field, 4 of 5 Tallied 14 points in Win over Urbane.
NEWCOMER tailed 18 points and 33 rebounds, 9 blocks and 2 SIAC PLAYERS OFTHE WEEK from3and9of 10 from the line with 7 al
Are rstealsinwinsover UMES and Coppin State. Had 14 PLAYER in win over UAPB. Also had 17 points, includI 0 H E Jackson State taps Tiger getng27inwinoverChowan,23inwinoverBowieStat.Leads pts.,20rebs.,andshot6-of-6vs.CSU, 13 boards, BrandonDavey,6-6,Sr.F, FT.VALLEYSTATE-In ing9 of 10 FTs, 7 assists in win over MVSU.
IN O T Ethe CINA in scoring at 20.9 Pipg. 6 blocks and 2 steals vs. UMES. wins overLane and Kentucky State, averaged 17.0 Averaged 22.0 points, 7 assists while shooting
legend Harold Jackson as ROOKIE ROOKIE points,12.0rebounds,2.5assistsand assistst. 90% from the line in Mwo wins.
VOID its new head football coach. Joshua Dawson, Fr., G, FSt Had 16 points and 7 assists in Jeremiah Hill, 6-1, Fr., G, SAV. STATE- Avgd. Lamar Adklns, 6-8, Sr., F, BENEDICT In wins NEWCOMER
a in over Va. Union. 16.5 points in two wins getting 17 including 3 of 6 over Stillman and Miles, averaged 20.5 points, 4 Calvin Godfrey, 6-9, Jr., F, SOUTHERN -AvCOACH from 3 vs. UMES, 16 points on 6 of 8 shooting, 2 rebounds and 1 block. eraged double double of 14.5 points ana 13
John Hill, LINCOLN- Has Lions offto 11-3 start and 8-0 record rebounds, 1 block vs. CSU. NEWCOMER rebounds in two wins. Scored 14 points and NEW FOOTBALL COACHESAT MORGAN STATE, at home. Won games vs. FSU and SL Aug's while improving t DEFENSE JordanWarer,6-,JrF,PAINE-Scored l8points pulled down 12 rebounds Irwin over Jackson
3-2 in olernemplsy. Bruce Beclford, 6-7, So., F, NC A&T Had 11 with 15 rebounds and 1 block in loss to Stillman. State. Had second double double of 15 points
JACKSON STATE; WSSU, MVSU NEXT IN LINE rebounds, 2 blocks and steals vs. B-CU. Had 9 and 14 boards in win over Grambling.
points with 4 assists.
HOOPS SCORES Hoops jockeying
MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014 MEN Hoops JAcUynRbegins 1
CAA
CIAA CIAA meet Sunday (Jan. 19) at the Richmond Division and have gotten their wins vs. eowletate @ Lincoln
Chowan 93, Livingstone 90 Clark Atlanta 94, Stillman 91 St. Augustine's @ Winston-Salem State
Eliz. City State 72, W-Salem State 68 Fort Valley State 73, Miles 65 The always entertaining and com- Coliseum in their annual Martin Luther West Division teams. J. C. Smith @ Fayettelle State
Fayetteville State 70, Bowie State 66 Kentucky State 83, Paine 61 Shaw @ Livingstone
Linoln (Pa) 71, Shae 69, OT Morehouse 64, Lane 57 petitive CIAA men's basketball race ap- King Day Classic. SIAC teams begin intra-divisonal Chowan @ Eliz. City State
Virginia State 67, J. C. Smith 57 Tuskegee 90, Claflin 72 pears headed for a stellar season in that Wednesday's S. Div. schedule has play this week and tops on the schedule Morgan State @ Norfolk State
Virginia Union 75, St. Augustine's 71 SWAG N. C. Central @ Delaware State
MEAC Alabama State 77, Ark.-Pine Bluff 64 capacity this season. Livingstone at FSU, St. Aug's at JCSU is the Benedict/FVSU showdown Mon- NJIT@ N. C.A&T
Coppin State 75, S. C. State 69 Alabama A&M 68, Miss. Valley St. 59 Early season results indicate the and WSSU at Shaw. In the North, VSU day, Jan. 20 at FVSU. Bethune-Cookman @ Savannah State
Florida A&M 76, NC A&T 66 Alcom State 64, Grambling 56 Md. Eastern Shore @ Howard
Norfolk State 58, Delaware State 56 Southern 60, Jackson State 36 stronger teams are in the South, but the is at Chowan, Lincoln is at ECSU and Prior to Monday's game, FVSU Coppin State @ Hampton
N. C. Central 64, Bethune-Cookman 49 INDEPENDENTS NtStC
Savannah State 56, Howard T Martin 100, Tennessee Stat 1 North got some noteworthy scalps over BSU is at VU. hosts Paine (3-2) Saturday while Bene- Tuskegee @ Kentucky State
W. Va. State 81, 76 the two weeks. dict at State (2-1) Paine @ Fort Valley State
SlA e past t.plays atAlbany S -1 ClarkAtlanta @ Cladn
Albany State 80, LeMoyne-Owen 68 Inter-divisional games wrapped up MEAC Tuskegee emerged from the early Slman @ Lane
Benedict @ Albany State
Monday with North Division teams tak- Early results in the MEAC show January schedule with the best record in SWAC
Southern @ Akansas-Pine Bluff
ing five of six games from their Southern the league to be top heavy with the likes the West (3-2) vs. the East Division. Alabama A&M @ Alabama State UA N E RDivision counterparts. of defending regular season champ Nor- The Golden Tigers begin West Di- Pralde View @ Jackson State
U N uER TH E BA N N DMNo South Division team finished folk State (4-0), Hampton (3-0) Sa- vision play Saturday at Kentucky State INDEPENDENTS
Belmont @ Tennessee State
with a losing record vs. the North. Three vannah State (3-0) and Morgan State (2-4) and follow that up with a Monday W. Va. State @ Concord
WHAT'S GOING ON IN AND AROUND BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS Davis & Elkins @ Central State
teams (Winston-Salem State, Shaw and (2-0) off to good starts. Those teams match-up at Lane (1-5.) Queens @ UDC
Fayetteville State) finished with 4-2 re- along with N. C. Central (0-1) appear Stillman (3-3) had the second best Mlllersville @ Cheyney
MORGAN STATE HIRES LEE HULL: cords while two (Fayetteville State and to be the class of the MEAC. But don't record. The Tigers begin divisional play CAA
BALTIMORE, Md. -- Lee Hull was introduced by St. Augustine's) were 3-2. J. C. Smith count Florida A&M. with dates at Lane Saturday and at Ken- Virginia Union vs. Virginia State (Richmond)
Morgan State University Ath- finished 3-3. The Rattlers (2-2) lost two close tucky State Monday. MONDAY,JANUARY 20
letics Director Floyd Kerr as Lincoln's 4-2 record vs. the South early road games at Norfolk State (91- Bethue-Cokman@ S. C. State
as y goda ASM @ Savannah State
was the best in the North followed by 87) and Hampton (72-62), but won two SWAC Delaware State @ N. C. A&T
the new head football coach of [Coppin State @ Norfolk State
Elizabeth City State at 3-3. games at home this past week over de- Defending tournament champion Morgan State a@ Hampton
The schedule now shifts to the all- fending tournament champion N. C. Southern (4-0) is setting the early pace Stilman @ Kentucky State
has been the assistant coach at Benedict @ Fort Valley State
important intra-divisonal games that A&T (76-66) and NCCU (63-60), last in the SWAG. Tuskegee @ Lane
Paine a Albany State
Maryland since 2008, and has will play out to the end of the regular year's regular season runners-up. The Jaguars are off to a 4-0 start Claflin @ Mrehouse
miles @ LeMoyne-Owen
built an impressive coaching re- season and determine division winners In key games Saturday, Morgan with four teams behind them with one SWAC
Pririe VMew @ Grumbling
sume. and tournament seeding. It begins with State is at Norfolk State and Coppin conference loss (Alabama State, Ala- Alcorn State@Afansas-PineBluff
Hull, 48, becomes the 19thn a five-game schedule this Saturday (Jan. State (2-1) is at Hampton. The teams bama A&M, Arkansas-Pine Bluff and Texas Southern@ Jaeson State
head football coach in Morgan 18) and a six-game set-up on Wednesday switch opponents Monday with Cop- Texas Southern). Of the four, Southern WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 22
Hull (Jan. 22). pin State playing at NSU and MSU at has only faced TSU (a 79-71 win). C"A
State history. Livingstone @ Fayetteville State
In the North Saturday, Bowie State Hampton. This week Southern is at Arkansas- Virginia State @ Chowen
Hullcoms t MS aftr sendng he pst ix ea-Uncoln @ El17- City State Hull comes to MSU after spending the past six sea- (1-5) is at Lincoln and Chowan (2-4) is FAMU is at SC State Saturday and Pine Bluff (2-1, ineligible for SWAC Boi t state @Virginia Unio
St. Augustine's a Ji. C. Smith
sons (2008-13) with the University of Maryland as wide at ECSU. at Savannah State Monday. title) Saturday and at Miss. Valley State Winston-SalemState@Shaw
MEAC
vi fceivers:coach.-Hull also has experience coaching other The South gets off to arousing start., I (0-3i also ineligible) Monday. ,,, .i N.C.A&T@N.C:Centra- '
SIAC
positions. He tutored running backs his first two seasons with WSSU hosting St. Aug's, JCSU en- SIAC Alabama A&M (3-1) and Alabama Miles @ Colege of Faeth
INDEPENDENTS
at Oregon State and wide receivers the last three. tertaining FSU and Shaw welcoming in At 5-0 in conference play, Bene- State (3-1) meet Saturday in Montgom- edgeport@UDC
Prior to his five seasons at Oregon State, Hull spent Livingstone. dict and Fort Valley State are setting ery. TSU (2-1) is at Grambling (0-4, CHeynev@EstStroudsburg
North Division rivals Virginia the early pace in the SIAC race. Both also ineligible) Saturday and at Jackson five Hlyars 199 ) cathis lmacer, te oeesof State (2-4) and Virginia Union (2-4) the Tigers and FVSU are in the Eastern State (1-3) Monday.
the Holy Cross. He coached linebackers for one season
before becoming wide receivers coach, as well as overseeing the kickoff coverage and kickoff return units. He
also went on to become the passing game coordinator. C SP N notes
Hull was a standout wide receiver at Holy Cross
from 1984-87, playing under former Maryland coach. Fort Valley State's LeRon Furr Friedgen, interestingly, was the Terps' coach
Mark Duffner his final two seasons. The Crusaders posted named MVP at MOH Bowl whenAdams signed.
Florida wide receiver Solomon Patton was
a 21-1 record his last two years and were ranked No. 1 in Fort Valley State linebacker LeRon Furr the American MVP. He had three receptions for
Division I-AA in 1987. Holy Cross also won the Colonial took defensive honors despite his National team 50 Ara 33yr ru ad ah15-rdioff
League title and the Lambert Cup that season. He was a falling to the American team 20-3in Saturday's return. Patton (5-9, 177), who led the Gators in
preseason All-America choice as a junior, iagr receiving this season, set up all three American Barton Owens
He went on to play professionally with the Winnipeg Furr, who began his career at Auburn, then touchdowns.
Blue Bombers of the CFL. Hull spent 1990-92 with Win- transferred to An all-star game matching lower-tier draft Barton was a first team all-MEAC pick
nipeg where he was coached by Mike Riley in his first Memphis for two prospects, the Medal of Honor Bowl attracted and was selected to the BCSP "Baad" Team
season. Riley was the head coach at Oregon State during seasons, before upward of 100 NFL scouts at practices during third team. Owens was a first team all-CIAA
Hull's five-year tenure. The Blue Bombers won the 1990 finishing up the the week, according to the Charleston Post-Cou- and first team "Baad Team" selection. The 6-3,
Grey Cup. He also played for Toronto in 1992. last two seasons at rier. 295-pound Owens led the Rams with 10 sacks
FortVally Stte, At halftime, South Carolina State's March- and 15.5 tackles for losses while totalling 51
ALUM JACKSON TAKES JSU REINS: .totalled six tack- ing 101 performed a patriotic medley. tackles.
Jackson State has hired former NFL standout and les and two pass The game will be played at the StubHub
alum Harold Jackson as its football coach, breakups. Furr Two black college linemen Center on the campus of California State UniJackson replaces Rick Comegy, who was fired in .(6-3, 225) is con- in NFLPA Collegiate Bowl versity Dominguez Hills.
December after eight seasons. Jackson State had an 8-4 Fuirr sidered one of the Two black college linemen are set to play in Frmrn e d Cahe icka ermeis il frerecord this fall, but lost to Southern in the Southwestern better Div. II pros- this Saturday's (Jan. 18) NFLPA Collegiate Bowl 2012 and 2013. Denny Green will make his first
Athletic Conference championship game. pects for this year's NFL draft. in Carson, California. Kickoff is set for 3 p.m. apaac saNLACleit olHa
Portland State tailback D.J. Adams (5-foot- Pacific Time, 6 p.m. ET. Caceainte aaNA leriate. lea
The 68-year-old Jackson played for Jackson State in 10, 210 pounds), a Maryland transfer who ran Morgan State offensive guard Karim Bar- CahlaigteA eia em
the 1960s. He had an outstanding 16-year NFL career, for 1,600 yards and 19 TDs this season, scored ton and Winston-Salem State defensive tackle The NFLPA Collegiate Bowl practices and
including stops with the Los Angeles Rams, Philadelphia two touchdowns to lead the American team to Donnie Owens will both play for the American game will be broadcast live on the ESPN NetEagles, New England Patriots, Minnesota Vikings and the victory. American team head coach Ralph team Saturday. work. Check out the ESPN Corner for more inSeattle Seahawks. He was a five-time Pro Bowl selection. formation.
Jackson has also had a lengthy career as an assistant__coach in the NFL and has been ahead coach on the col- *0*Ae- --.... *aA
lege level at both Virginia Union (1994) and Benedict
aanaAA CNRLITROLGAEMs ERSTEnN SlAG SOTERWNEROLEIT SOUTHWETER. N DPNET
(1995-96). He also served aanassistant atN. C. Central GIA~pA ME,' RO E iSAC CA SWACINDEPENDENTS
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION ATHLEI OFRNETLETIC CONFERENCE ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
(1990), Kentucky (2001-02) and Baylor (2003-06). NODtIVSO CORP ALL CONF ALL coaF ALL DIV ALL W L
wattNtakyo oRhiTporuiH ocm OVIrgaSate W LW LW L HmtnW L WL EAST DMVSION W LW L W L W L UnIv.of DC9 3
"I wntotnkyufrtiopotnttocm VignaSae 0 0 4 1 13 1 Hmtn3 0 12 4 Benedict 5 0 11 4 Southern 4 0 7 5 W, Va. State 11 4
back home," Jackson said. "I'm not a big speaker I Lincoln 0 0 2 4 8 7 Coppin State 3 0 6 9 ClarkAtlanta 4 0 11 3 Miss. Valley St. 3 0 4 10 Central State 6 3
Chowan 0 0 2 4 8 8 NoolStt 3178 Clfn4187 Grmlntte 3169 Tnseetae 5 1
believe in action. We're going to put the excitement and Bowvie State 0 0 1 5 6 8 Norfolk State 32 Cai 4 19 8Gabln SaeLi69 Tnconse State 5 11
Virginia Union 0 0 1 5 4 10 SaanhSae 2198 Fort Valley Stat 4 1 6 8 Jackson State 3 1 5 9 Lnon(o)3 1
the product on the field. We're going to be disciplined." Eliz. City State 0 00 6 312 SSte21 9 Paine 4 16 8 Texas Southern 2 1 5 9 Cheyney 1 13
SO THDIISONSOStteJ.C. Smith 0 0 5 1 10 5 FloddaA&M 2 2 8 9 AlbanyState 0 0 8 3 PraireViewA&M 1 2 1 12
WSS M SU O AMECOA HES S. Agusin's 0 1 5 NCAT 11 1 3 WESDM~ONAlabama State 1 3 8 7 PLAYER OF THE WEEK
WSSUeviMVSU TO0 NAME COACHES: Caolin Central 1 1WE9TMskeg N 3 1 7 6 AlabamaA&M 1 3 3 11 PLAYER
WisonSle taeand Mississippi Valley State Shaw 0 0 4 2 10 6 Bethune-Cookman 134 12 Miles 1 4 7 8 Ark. Pine Bluff 0 3 1 12 A6nsandpurednlaf6r.,FW.VdoTATE-Scoer
',iso-aenSaeW-Salem State 0 0 4 2 10 6 Murgan State 0 2 2 12 Kentucky State 0 6 4 10 Alcom Stat 0 4 1 14 Urbana, Had 22 poInts and 14 rebounds In wisa
appeared close to filling their head football coach vacan- Livingstone 0 0 4 2 9 7 Md. E. Shore 0 3 3 11 Stillman 0 5 4 11 ver Notre Dame Satrday. Averaged 24.0 poitas
Delaware State 0 4~ 4 11 Lane 0 5 0 7 SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK and 15.0 rebounds 1n tetIwn wins.
eoes. BCSP ElM PLAYERS OF THE WEEK PLAYER NWOE
PLAYER MECPAESO H EKLeMoyne-Owen 0 2 0 11 JsyeadsFMVUSrdlprsad NAWOE
WSSU schedled a press conference Tuesday and AthletFreeman,Jr.,G, VA.tNlON-Sne27pintvs.Shaw LYEPLAYERAYR OTHWEKJsyeadrFMVUSod14inadpulled down l5 rboundsin in over AabamaA&M. N
ta thlp t.000 toe hon careen. Added t8 poins in win ownr FSU. Malta Tate.DeFreltas, 5-6, Fr., 0, HAMPTON- Had SIAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK Added 19 points and 7 boards Ir win over Alabsma was expected to name current Defensive Coordinator Ki- NEWCOMER 29 paints end 6 rebounds in in over DelStat. PLAYER Stat.Averaged16.5pointsandllboardltwowsins.
it n w ea m n.B ul ar srv d s Amber Calvln, Sn., 0, FSU -Avenaged mome than 20 points pan Shot It of 22 haom the field end 7-1S from the line: Erila Sampler, 6-2, Sr., C, CLARK ATLANTA In NEWCOMER enus Boulware as it e edmn olaesre s gameinduding2inthsstaVUUi. Aso hadi3assists and 2steals, win aver Lane, scored game-highs oft24 points, YasmlnFuller, SOUTHERN-Scord13pontsnwin
departed (to Hampton) head coach Connell Maynor's RyandrOF.GHOWA-cIE28ehtt sekROOKIE 1reonsndfvblcswleashvig overorambling andanssther 13 in vinoverJacon
yaeorvrn.GCOWNSadtonvhwrk Raven Bankeston,5-7, Fr., G, DELSTATE -Averaged two steals. State. Shot 9 tsr 16 from the field. defense oodiato fr he as f ur easindluding 13ithlosstaoSt.Aug's. Avnnages 5.6 ppg.,95.3 points 21.5 points, 4.5 rebounds, 2.0 steals and 1 5asolsts NEWCOMER deesv oriao o h atfu er.inlIhraegametlslstiwek. in two gsmes. Scored 27 in OTwn vs. NJlT and 17 Brittnee Hazel, 60, Jr., F, FORT VALLEY STATE
MNVSU was also expected to name recently fired COACH iIsstHapo.- In wins over Langeand Ky. State, averaged 8.5
Slpe onr rJ .SIE-a 0 on nh ek DEFENSE points, t.5 rebounds, 2 blocks and 1.5 steals.
Jackson State head coach Rick Comegy as the Delta ivnsovrlUUi.ChnenandECSU.Currerdyn8-name OmahTayong,62,So.,C,COPPINST.-t~ponts,
Devils new head man replacing Karl Morgan. 2 eons ta n lc s a.Sae
AZEEZ Communlcations, Inc. Vol. XX, No. 24
a A ,





Page 6 -Ms. Perry's Free Press January 16-22, 2014








'--VV








P.

Baptist Minister Conference Dr. R.B. Holmes Makes Bid for National Baptist Convention Presidency

of Duval M LK Celebrations By Charles Moseley most significant roles, especially for
The Baptist Minister Conference of Duval and adjacent counties is Former Jacksonville pastor Dr. African American pastors is to find
requesting your community support to celebrate their 15th Annual Prayer R.B. Holmes Jr., has officially a creative way to keep the memberbreakfast, Saturday, January 18th at 8 a.m. at Emmanuel Missionary Mufti- announced his candidacy to become ship energized and excited about
Purpose Center, 2407 S.L. Badger Jr. Circle S., Reverend Herb Anderson. the next President of the National how ministry can transform individFor more information, tickets or to make reservation call 765-3 ill. Baptist Convention, U.S.A., Inc. uals and communities.
"After giving great prayer, medita- 4. What has been your proudest
tion, and evaluation of the state of moment in ministry?
FrtC u c of amBlack America and the challenges iIt has been a tremendous blessing

Coast M LK Celebration of the Black church, I sensed an seeing members develop strong
urgent need for the Black church to Christian virtues and values while
Find out how God uses change agents like the Reverend Dr. Martin be reenergized as the main source ''concomitantly giving back to the Luther King, Jr. Come enjoy music and hear the Reverend Gillard S. Glover and resource for the strengthening, community in areas of tithes, time,
preach at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. on the celebration, life and legacy of MLK, saving and sustaining of the Black gifts, and testimonies.
Sunday, January 19th. For more information call William Mosley at 460- churches, Black family businesses, 5. What should the role of the
0346. First Church of Palm Coast is located at 91 Old Kings Rd., North, Black colleges and universities, and church be regarding serving the
Palm Coast, Florida. the Black race." needs of both members and the
Dr. Holmes began pastoring in Dr. R.B. Holmes community?
Caring for the Caregiver W orkshops 1976 at First Timothy Baptist catapult him into such a prominent Reverend Holmes has outlined a I believe the gospel of Jesus as
Comuniy Hspie "arig fr te Cregver Wokshp tkesplae, Church in Jacksonville, Florida role in the Baptist Church commu- very ambitious platform which he recorded in St. Luke 4:18 is my ComunitFbry ospic "C3arng for3p.a the Cargi er" norshoptaes, place where he served for ten years, nity. With a current congregation at calls his "12 Point Action Vision theme scripture as it relates to comSatlrday Ferry p 1st 8:0amw o ~.aher aiycaei egaen Ceprnit 513 before spending the next 27 years as Bethel Missionary Baptist Church Plan". He recently shared some of munity empowerment, encouragecount Dr.the wrorksshopais whrefail caregiv esors hae anl spportt to the spiritual leader at the Bethel estimated at 5,000 members, his insights about himself, his ment, education, evangelism, misconntecithpoesinlrn caregiving rorentokwtesourc ies s that w llisur the Missionary Baptist Church in Reverend Holmes heads up one of career, and thoughts on the issues he sion, social justice, and economic ineroei ing jouakrney nto wi thflldssavreow caregiver nitn to Tallahassee, Florida. The National Florida's largest predominantly felt should be addressed which development. (The Spirit of the profnesil senjak whomwiliscusar rieaty ofd lucagvng topics Baptist Convention, USA, Inc., the African American churches. impact society in general and the Lord is upon me, because he hath catndeeso will enoy arzs eitain sfe.T eus complimentary bekatadlnhadhv oldest and largest religious organi- Some of Reverend Holmes most African American community. anointed me to preach the gospel to
rschae or iyoor prizes. Rgrtone calJnisfree.rTo reet c.38omplimntar zation in the world. noted accomplishments read like a 1. Why, when and how did you the poor; he hath sent me to heal the rspdite are foiyurloedt onegsr call ennife Arnol at 071 For workt- He brings a plethora of experience Who's Who Among Florida decide to become a minister? brokenhearted, to preach delivershwopmetilundimmedsiae rgsraincllcoiSalam4766.oii in a vast array of leadership posi- Leaders. He has either served or is I was called into to the ministry in ance to the captives, and recovering
ww~cmmniyhspce cm.tions which include religious, civic, presently in an official capacity in a the early 70's. I always had a deep of sight to the blind, to set at liberty
NOTIE: hurc nes i pubishd fee o chrge Infrmaion educational, and business organiza- number of high profile positions concern to help people who were them that are bruised. St. Luke 4:18) must be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5 career Revrendou hlms hafesbionl ansone r of hcue; nation ave ggfinily andmoially. sirbievea ctive inShul the soc C chnmi as p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information received prior to the cre eeedHle a ul n one fteNtoa ae fnnily n oily eiv ciei h oi-cnmca
evet dte il beprite ona sac avilale ass utilth dae. ax up an impressive resume of commu- the Family Now Movement, Inc. that the spirit of God moved upon well as political issues which face eentaidate w65ll0 b e-mntedon sepacesavailabebai utl hdt.a nity service and a diverse back- Chairperson, National Anti- my heart as a teenager when I start- its congregation?
e-mil o 65-80 ore-ailtoJi~eeres~al~cm.ground, all of which he hopes will Hazing/Anti-Violence Task Force ed the first community organization I think it is incumbent upon the
________________________________________________________________Chairperson, Tallahassee in my neighborhood "CRIB" which Black church to be engaged in the
Chapter, National Action Network stood for "Community Relations In life of the congregation and the Be t e l a p tst ns itu io n l C urc -Past President of Region Blackness!" At an early age, I knew community. Jesus made it clear that
B e he B pt st In tiuton l hu chTwo/Southeast of the National the Lord was calling me into the we are the light of the world and the
215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464 Newspaper Publishers Association ministry. After accepting "the call" salt of the Earth (St. Matthew 5:16/NNPA (includes the states of in 1970, it was clear to me that 1 18). Therefore, the Black church Florida, Virginia, Mississippi, North needed to prepare myself academi- historically has always been a place Carolina, South Carolina, cally, emotionally, theologically, that we can look to for divine guidW e l Se v c sTennessee, and Alabama) and psychologically. ance, comfort, liberation, sanity,
7:4 W e kl Se vic sast- President of the National 2. What has been the single security and direction.
Sunday Morning~ WorshiD Midweek Services Cogeso hita raetcalneta o'e 7. Why did you decide to run for
7:0am. and 10:40 a.m. Wednesday Noon Service Education (1999-2009), an faced in ministry? office?
"Miracle at Midday" Auxiliary of the 7.5 million mem- It's a challenge to maintain a high After giving great prayer, meditaChurch school 12 noon-i p.m. bers National Baptist Convention, degree of integrity and motivation tion, and evaluation of the state of
9:30 a.m. The Word from the Sons UAIn.The integrity or character piece is so Black America and the challenges
Bible Study and Dauelhters of Bethel BihpRuop Member, Board of Trustees for important because if people cannot of the Black church, I sensed an
Bishop Rudolph 6:30 p.m. 3rd Sunday 4:00 p.m Bisp Jrlp three Historically Black Colleges believe what the preacher says urgent need for the Black church to
McKissick, Sr. SenioriPkstJr and Universities because of a negative behavior, then be reenergized as the main source
Senior Pastor o Currently on the Board of it destroys the credibility of the min- and resource for the strengthening,

Come share in Holy Communion on 1st Sunday at 7:40 and 10:40 a.m. Trustees of Florida Memorial ister and the message. As it relates saving and sustaining of the Black
University, Edward Waters College, to motivation and dealing with peo- churches, Black family businesses, Malone University and formerly ple, the minister has to consistently Black colleges and universities, and
Worhi served on the Board of Trustees of and practically encourage himself in the Black race. As you know, the'
Wo shp wth FAMU for eight years the Lord and know that it is really National Baptist Convention,. USA,
-~ s IV o *President and CEO of Live about God's will for His people and Inc. is the oldest and largest relius IVE onCommunications, Inc. (Parent not one's self will. Therefore, in gious institution in the world. It has

the 'web visit Company of the Capital Outlook order to maintain a strong sense Of to become more vibrant, visible, and
Newspaper); Radio Station Owner motivation, for me, it has been viable to meet the needs of our peo'j .; www.truthpowerm rnstries.omg of WTAL 1450 AM & WOCY FM through prayer, preparation and ple in the 21Ist century. I believe my
1_____________________ 106.5 FM being purpose- driven, pastoral involvement over the last
Shoul he be elctd It woul 3. Wha is the sigl mos thry-ee yer ha dqutl





January 16-22, 2014 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7



7 Things Men Hide From Women .by Dr. Marcus Williams he was forging ahead at the same 6. I'm depressed. afraid of my own feelings.
What is a man really thinking, pace you were. Depression has no gender bias: It Many men just don't handle their
For just about forever, women have 3. I get performance jitters. can strike anyone, including the feelings, such as doubt, very well, tried to interpret the male species: Do men think about sex a lot? most macho of men. However, and tend to have a hard time openwhy he didn't he call; why he did Sure they do, but their fears of sex- studies show that men who are ing up. 'Because many men are call you by a name other than yours. ual inadequacy may be just as fre- depressed are less likely to open up problem solvers and are uncomfort- ".,
While, in theory, every man is dif- quent. If a man has ever had an about their sadness or lack of ener- able talking about feelings, there ferent, research has found a number unsuccessful go at sex (and most of gy than women. Instead, they are are a number of intense feelings of surprising parallels. From his them have! flopped romps can more likely to avoid sex, say that don't get expressed with words, fears of commitment to his fond- be triggered by common missteps they're overtired, or drink more. but rather acted out," notes Firstein. ness for cuddling, certain emotions such as drinking too much), his "Some men are uncomfortable The good news? Men aren't Styling Practices Linked ,
cause many men to freeze up rather stress in the bedroom can stockpile about feeling sad, and their sadness Neanderthals. The emotions are than open up. -which can eventually lead to or depression may come out as there; they just need to be uncov- ith H-ai or. Scalp D iseases,
Here are some of the top secrets sexual dysfunction. Many men will anger," warns Firstein. Depression ered. And if 'fessing up about his '~ ''~R56..o your guy may be keeping from you: even avoid sex rather than talk hon- is one of the most dangerous secrets feelings remains a stumbling block,
1. Saying "I love you" is com- estly about their fears with their a man can keep, so if you think a he may need to seek relationship A m ong. A frican A m ericansplicated. partner, and this can harm both the male in your life could advice from a professional.Stlnprciecalado Afcn-mianw e,.ae
Those "three little words" could sexual health and the emotional be depressed, Aoher BIG secret men Syigpatcscnla.t fcnAeia oe r
be the most complex in the English health of a relationship. itsserious hair and scalp diseases for I known to shampoo their hair less,
language. While some men prema- 4. I'm not crazy about Men need (and want) some African Americans, says frequently than other ethnic,
turely pull the trigger on the "L monogamy. intimacy just as much Henry Ford Hospital dermatolo- groups, and an estimated 8,0 perword" (a recent study from the Some men stay mum about the as women do. gist Diane Jackson-Richards, cent of them use chemical relaxJournal of Personality and Social extent of their sexual desires. ''! Mutual respect, M.D. ers. Frequent use of blow dryers
Psychology found that guys tend to "Freedom, and particularly sex- ".trust, support, "ari neteeyipratadhtcms obndwt
say "I love you" first, often driven ual freedom, and variety are and communi- aspect of an, African-American popular hair..styles like 'hair
by the idea that their partner will be typically more important to cation these wmnsapaac~sy"~r evs ris'n ralcs
more likely to have sex with them) men than to women," says relations hip~ Jackson-Richards, director, of add physical stress to the hair and,
other guys just aren't that good Firstein. "Many married musts are just Hny Fr' utclua otiuet cl iesslk
at getting the words out, Instead, men feel that they love their as important Dermatology Clinic "Yt 'many alopecia, or hair loss.
they show their love through their wives and, at the same time, for a man's women who have a hair o6r scalp "Hair loss is the fifth most comactions. How can you know for have no problems cheating." emotional and disease do not feel their physician mon condition cited by patients,
sure? Those actions may be a truer This difference between sexual health as taethmsrusyPyscns weteyvithirdmtoindicator of his feelings than any men and women can be tey are for a should become more famiiliar With. gist," Dr. Jackcson-iRichards says.
passion-fueled colloquy, says Irmna one of the most d ag woman's. When th utrlyacetdtetet Dr. Jacksoni-Richards suggests
Firstein, LCSW, a relationship ing to a couple because both partners are fx s~dsa~ ''~hs roigtp o ainst
counselor who has advised couples of the sense of betrayal able to open up and Dr,> cko d ay xeuhirisofevlpna
in New York City for more than 20 it can create (even if he lt their relationship prerhi ecnhpt'n brrcapdsse
years. never actually strays). develop, at its own th one fschdsae like -Wash hir weekly with a mois2. Commitment really does 5. 1 wants you to initi- pace, that love will seboxirheic 4rnatitis an lop4e- 'turizing shampoo and conditioner.
scare me. ate sex sometimes. be nurtured by posi- 'to, bead t oa e enitisets te> -llowi~ twd coloring.ee
Men often have a harder time You may think sexual tiity rather t eoemr estv oterlxn n ooig
picking up on subtle relationship desire is hard-wired in men, than stunted by hir< anad scal plghts of Afr-ican "-Limit use of blow dryers and
cues and because of this, your but with every attempt at turn- Amt ier a has endn syigob s t oe hateekai
man may not be aware of the point ing you on comes a threat of Itr~er~ a in which your bond has moved to a rejection even in the most ~about the prevalence an 'causes -Wash braids or dreadlocks
higher expectation of commitment. established relationships. That's important to of hair and -scalp diseases in every two weeks.
In fact, some guys get anxious why it's such a tUrn-on when a let him know African Amiericans. -Avoid wearing braids too tightabout becoming attached, even if woman makes the moves, allowing that you're Understanding the unique physio- ly; don't wear longer than three
they seem to enjoy the relationship. him to skip the risk altogether. And concerned. lgccaatrsis~ f fia ots
"Men often 'rubber band,' withdraw, it's not just sex he wants: One tetrdhi7.fr1xrli 'odtngehiueawd
or pull back if they feel like the recent study from the Kinsey grows slower and has a lower hair tooth comb 'while conditioner is
relationship has moved beyond Institute at Indiana University actu- dens -ity than other ethnic groups' still in the hair.
their comfort zone," Firstein notes. ally found that cuddling and caress- will ssistdermatfologists in pre- -Use natural hir~ oils with jojoThis new territory can take a man ing in a relationship are more scribing tramn options ba, olive,' shea or coconut oils.
by surprise -even if you felt like important to men than women."


Home Schooling on the




Rise in Black Households
An increasing number of Black trend is irrefutable. ing the school day." In addition,
parents say they want to enhance "I've been studying the home Ray said, "they want to build their families' ties and their chil- school movement since 1984," Ray stronger family relationships." dren's values by educating their said, in an interview with BET.com. In rare instances, Black families S children at home. "But the blending of empirical decided to home school their chilHome schooling has generally information and anecdotal reports dren because of experiences of ~ been considered to be the exclusive from home school groups around racism
domain of white Americans. But an the country makes it clear that there
expert in the field says there is a are more and more Africanmarked increase in the number of American families who home
African-American parents who school their children."
have chosen to home school their Ray said the reasons for '
children. Black families turning to
Brian Ray, the director of the home schooling are largely
~' National Home Education Research the same as those of white
Institute, said there is strong evi- Americans.
dence more Black parents, many of "It's really quite identical," he
them inner-city residents, have cho- said. "They feel they can do at least
se to edctRhiAhlrna swlla h ulcsho neu




Page 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press January 16-22, 2014





-_ AROUND TOWN,


What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene



Generations Telling Center, 300 Water St. For tickets JU Honoring the rials, go to Universoul Circus Yachty Gras on
and more information call 633-6110 www.jaxpubliclibrary.org/musStories or visit www.jaxevents.com. late Janet Johnson limjourneys or contact Lisa Brown is back! the St. Johns River!
The 2014 Generations Telling The late Janet Johnson will be Buggs at 630-4655. The Universoul Circus returns to Celebrate Mardi Gras on the St.
Stories workshops a theatrical Genealogy Meeting honored during the Jacksonville Jacksonville, January 28th Johns! Join the Jacksonville Sail
exploration of Gullah Geeche cul- The Jacksonville Genealogist University National TRiO Day Family Night with February 2nd at the Prime Osbom and Power Squadron for a lighted
ture, takes place through January Genealogist III Convention Center parking lot, boat parade on the St. Johns River
25th. Seeking actors, debaters, Society's monthly membership 18th, 1 3 p.m.. in the Terry Blue Man Group 1000 W. Forsyth St. Come enjoy where captains and crews will
videographers and script writers meeting will be held on Saturday, Concert Hall, 2800 University The FSCJ Artist series presents this unique circus experience! For showcase their vessels decorated ages 13 to 21. Participants will January 18th from 1:30 p.m. to 5 Blvd. N. Janet Johnson was the first Family Night on Broadway with the more details call 757-5304 or email with lights and beads in true Mardi explore and document living Gullah p.m. at the Webb-Wesconnett African American Professor at JU Blue Man Group, Tuesday, gabw3promo@gmail.com or visit Gras fashion. The evening will culGeechee heritage using theater and Library, 6887 103rd Street. The and the founder of the JU Upward January 21st at 6:30 p.m. Enjoy www.universoulcircus.com. minate with a spectacular fireworks digital media to document oral his- topic is "Paparazzi in the Cemetery- Bound Program. The event is free face painting, photo booth, techno display over our majestic river,
tory interviews with local commu- -Headstone Photography for the and open to everyone. To share music, arts and crafts and more. The Public Speaking Friday, January 31st at 7 p.m. For
nity elders. Learn about theater with Genealogist." For ore details visit your stories of Janet Johnson or for Blue Man group performances take more information visit www.jaxprofessional actors. For more infor- www.jaxgen.com or e-mail more information contact Sylvia place through January 26th at the Wg-porkshops events.com or call 630-2489.
mation or to register call 962-7284 info@jaxgen.org. Cruz at 256-7150 or email Florida Times Union Center. For Sign-up for Beverly Image
or email generationstellingsto- scruz@ju.edu. more information call 442-2947 or Groups' public speaking working Dreamgirls Play at
ries@grnail.com or visit www.gen- Zeta Phi Beta visit www.artistseriesjax.org. focusing on message articulation,
erationstellingstories.com. The Founders Day Jaye Cherie audience engagement, impromptu Stage Aurora
workshops take place at Jeb Stuart Z Signing Ritz Chamber speaking and other public speaking The smash hit Broadway musical
Middle School, 4815 Wesconnect Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.'s Book etiquette. The workshop will be "DreamGirls" will play at Stage
Blvd. Omega Zeta Zeta Chapter will Jaye Cherie author of "The Cost of Players Salute MLK held on Thursday evenings, Aurora, January 31-February 9 at
observance their 94th Founders' Love and Sanity" will have a book The Ritz Chamber Players will January 30th and February 6th, the Stage Aurora Performance Hall 27th Annual Anniversary, Saturday, January signing, Saturday, January 18th present "In Remembrance of the 13th and 20th from 6 p.m. to 8 located at 5188 Norwood Avenue
18th at 11:30 a.m. at Queen's from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Books-A- Dream" concert, Wednesday, p.m. at various libraries. For more inside Gateway Mall. Dreamgirls
MLK Breakfast Harbour Yacht and Country Club. Million, 9400 Atlantic Blvd. For January 22nd at 7:30 p.m. at the information and location, visit tells the story of the up and coming
The 27th Annual Martin Luther Enjoy a day of fellowship with more details email Times-Union Center for the www.beverlyimagegroup.com or 1960's girls groups and the triKing., Jr. Breakfast will be held civic leaders, local educators, busi- gemmejane@aol.com or visit Performing Arts. For more informa- call 657-0250. umphs and tribulation that come
Friday, January 17th at 8 a.m. nesses, friends, and families. For www.youtu.be/rrMF94sMie4. tion visit www.ritzchamberplay- with fame and fortune. For more
Featured keynote speaker is jour- additional information call Deborah ers.org or call 472-4270. Coming Soon to Stage information and tickets call 765nalist Soledad O'Brian. The event Phelps at 566-9853. Library's Let's Talk Aurora, Dream Girls 7372 or visit www.stageaurora.org.
will take place at the Prime Osborn About it Series! The Evolution of the
Convention Center, 1000 Water St. Flamenco Dance"Dream Kevin Hart Boyz at
For more details call 630-3690 or The Jacksonville Public Library Cocktail at MOSH Girls! January 31 -February 9,
visit www.jaxmlkbreakfast.com or Open House continues its popular Let's Talk Join MOSH for one of the most 2014 (Weekends Only) at Stage the Comedy Zone!
email jlyons@coj.net. Join Fuego Flamenco for their About It series at Southeast popular Museum Of Science and Aurora Performance Hall, 5188 From Kevin Hart's Laugh at My
Flamenco Dance Open House, Regional Library, 10599 Regional History after dark's of the year! Norwood Avenue. The musical fol- Pain and Let Me Explain tour: Joey
Sommore and Saturday, January 18, 2014 at Library, Room B with a discussion This workshop, hosted by Bacardi- lows the story of a young female Wells, Will "Spank" Horton and
9751 Mining Rd. Come meet and about The Story of the Qur'an: Its Martini Product Development, Inc., singing trio from Chicago, Illinois Na'im Lynn are The Plastic Cup Company in Concert greet the dancers of Fuego History and Place in Muslim Life. will start at 6 p.m., January 23rd, at called "The Dreams", who become Boyz. The Laugh at My Pain comeComedian Sommore presents the Flamenco and learn a little about The discussion takes place Sunday, 6 p.m. You must be 21 years of age music superstars. For more infor- dy tour comes to the Comedy Zone, "Standing Ovation" tour showcas- the art of Flamenco Dance. For January 19th, 2 to 4 p.m. The dis- or older to participate. For more mation and tickets visit February 6th 8th. For more ing comedians Bill Bellamy, Tony more details call 730-9786 or visit cussion will be led by Dr. Parvez information call 396-MOSH (6674) www.stageaurora.org or call 765- details call 292-4242 or visit Rock and Joe Torrey, Friday, www.flamencojax.com. Ahmed. To make reservations and or visit www.themosh.org. 7372. www.comedyzone.com.
January 17th at the Times Union learn how to obtain program mateZORA! Festival 2014 Spoken Word
SC T Music, literature, theater, fashion at the. Ritz!
and the visual arts come together Hear Spoken Word at the Ritz,
for a nine day explosion of culture Thursday, February 6th at 7 p.m.,
the 25th annual Zora Neale and 10 p.m. For more information
Hurston Festival of Arts and call 632-5555 or visit www.ritzHumanities in Eatonville and jacksonville.com.The Ritz is locatOrange County. The festival will ed at 829 N. Davis Street.
culminate Saturday, February 1st,
___ with Maze Featuring Frankie at 3
.............. Night
wh a Fargr e p.m., Amiri Baraka, author Amateur
Edwidge Danticat, actress Lynn at the Ritz!
Whitfield and actor Avery Brooks. Amateur Night at the Ritz is back,
For additional information visit Friday, February 7th, at 7 p.m. and
vvwww.zorafestival.org or call 407- 10 p.m. For more information call
647-3307. 632-5555 or visit www.ritzjacksonville.com.The Ritz is located at
829 N. Davis Street.











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Page 9 Mrs. Perry's Free Press January 16-22, 2014



Beyonce Pens Feminist Essay

Beyonc6 has sharpened her femi- Myth!, of the gender pay gap ing of feminist musnist voice in a new essay she con- Beyonc6 writes: "Today, women ings), "Feminist: the tributed to The Shriver Report, a make up half of the U.S. workforce, person who believes new, multimedia initiative gaining but the average working woman in the social, political attention created by journalist and earns only 77 percent of what the and economic equalformer first lady of California average working man makes. But ity of the sexes." Maria Shriver. unless women and men both say Beyonc6 is cerThe 2014 report, A Woman's this is unacceptable, things will not tainly making her Nation Pushes Back From The change. Men have to demand that voice heard in her
Brink, is comprised of data, analy- their wives, daughters, mothers, belief that gender sis and essays that aim to change and sisters earn more--commensu- equality is something the way American society relates to rate with their qualifications and worth fighting for. women, improving their outcomes not their gender. Equality will be In addition to these in various sectors leading to social achieved when men and women are media jaunts into
Bobbi Kristina Brown and her husband Nick Gordon empowerment. granted equal pay and equal expressing this ideal,
Perhaps as an extension of the respect." the star is also the co-founder of the raised $4.3 million in ticket sales.
Bobbi Kristina Announces She's Married discussion of feminism in a song While she does not go into organization Chime for Change, feminism
Bobbi Kristina Brown and Nick Gordon may have secretly said "I do." from her latest album, specifics on the Beyonc6 album which is dedicated to creating B
The 20-year-old daughter of the late Whitney Houston took to Twitter to "***Flawless," Beyonc6 has con- track, this message is echoed in the uplifting programs for women and But, Beyonc6's costume for the .9concertmcliehrbado share a photo of the duo's wedding bands last week. tributed an essay to the report that lengthy sample featured at the heart girls around the world, ensuring femce, much like her brand of
"@nickdgordon #HappilyMarried SO#Inlove if you didn't get it the first enumerates the ways in which of "***Flawless," culled from a that women of all ages have access feminism, drew some criticism. Her time that is," she captioned the pic of the couple's hands. American women lag behind in TEDx talk given by African novel- to education, health care and leather panties topped with a sheer
The pair's relationship has raised some eyebrows as Gordon was adopt- terms of equal pay. ist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on employment, particularly in regions top were seen by some as inapproed by Brown's mother at the age of 12. In her piece, Gender Equality Is a feminism, where women are denied these pate attire for an event meant to
On the song Adichie is quoted as necessities. The organization held a empower women.
Even the release of Beyonc6, her
Will This 78=year-oId Vegan Bodybuilder fifth studio album, reignited
VVil h s 8 ye r Ol V g n B d b i er saying (at the end of a sizable serv- benefit concert in June 2013 thatdeasabthwfmisms
debates about how feminism is
u Ddefined, with white and black
Make You Reconsider Your Diet? women generally holding opposing
views on the celebration of wealth

who spend their mealtimes and all animal-derived ingredients. and physical beauty that permeates
eating lentils, a 78-year-old "The protein in animal products is Beyonc6's festive style of elevating
vegan bodybuilder is trying so laden with fats and chemicals women.
to prove the diet can be and all sorts of stuff that's harmful Yet, her recent moves are a fierce
healthy. to you", says Mr Morris. departure from merely performing
Jim Morris, a former "When I was competing and songs with titles such as
bodybuilding champion who stuffing down all of that sort of "Independent Women," and "Run
has competed against the stuff, I had lots of digestive prob- the. World (Girls)." These songs,
likes of Arnold lems. I know as a fact I would not and cute moves such as touring
Schwarzenegger, has posed be here and I would not be in this with an all-women band, could be
nude in the style of The condition now had I continued eat- perceived as mere lip service to the
Before You Eat Thinker Rodin statue, to ing the way I was." ., feminist movement that comes with
show off his still impressive Despite veganism's uncool a hefty personal and financial pay0by h- 'k,- ... physique. image, it has a number of glam- off.
diatm", and M-1ke v~s~, your,
,,y to moclah: G,,gt Mr Morris says that his orous adherents, including the Speaking to British Vogue,
health greatly improved singer-songwriter Bryan Adams, Tyler Perry and Oprah Winfrey Beyonc6 has been quoted as saying,
after he retired from compet- the model Petra Nemcova and the OW N Network Orders "I guess I am a modem-day femiitive bodybuilding in 1985 US TV host Ellen DeGeneres, who nist. I do believe in equality. Why
and became a vegetarian and had a vegan wedding when she Another Tyler Perry Sitcoms do you have to choose what type of
then later a vegan. married Portia de Rossi. woman you are? Why do you have
Jim Morris He's posed on behalf of The Peta ad encourages people to Producer Tyler Perry will soon have a fourth series on Oprah Winfrey's to label yourself anything?"
Jim Peta, the pressure group that "muscle your way to better health" OWN network. In her piece for The Shriver
In a move designed to distance campaigns for animal rights. and to a reduced risk of obesity, OWN saidthat it has ordered a Perry drama, "Single Moms Club," that Report, through which she joins veganism from its traditional image Vegans have a strict diet that heart disease, cancer, diabetes and will premiere this fall. It's about a group of mothers who create a support ranks with other strong feminist of malnourished-looking bearded excludes meat, eggs, dairy products strokes by going vegan. group after being brought together by an incident at their children's school. leaders throughout the ages through men wearing sandals (with socks) The success of Perry's series keyed a turnaround for OWN, which strug- the power of the pen, Beyonc6 is
gled at its start. The drama "The Haves and the Have Nots" and the com- staking a stronger claim on her role .. "Love Thy Neighbor" began its second season.,last week..
Y.. OWN also airshe Perry comedy.'For Better~orWorse." ... .


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LiveUnitedNortheastFlorida.org




January 16-222 2014 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 10








Servhg Others


-IS GOOD FOR THE SOUL


Volunteering is the best way to honor a man who dedicated his life to serving others. On this special holiday, Publix encourages you to keep his dream alive and create your own legacy by giving back to your community.

Celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
1/2012014



GET INVOLVED!
For information about service activities in your community, click the Service Day Tab on our Facebook page. facebook.comlpublix


91



Public
WHERE SHOPPING IS A PLEASURE










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Full Text
January 16-22, 2014


Paop 6 Ms. Perrv's Free Press


Baptist Minister Conference
of Duval MLK Celebrations
The Baptist Minister Conference of Duval and adjacent counties is
requesting your community support to celebrate their 15th Annual Prayer
breakfast, Saturday, January 18th at 8 a.m. at Emmanuel Missionary Mufti-
Purpose Center, 2407 S.L. Badger Jr. Circle S., Reverend Herb Anderson.
For more information, tickets or to make reservation call 765-3111.

First Church of Palm
Coast MLK Celebration
Find out how God uses change agents like the Reverend Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. Come enjoy music and hear the Reverend Gillard S. Glover
preach at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. on the celebration, life and legacy of MLK,
Sunday, January 19th. For more information call William Mosley at 460-
0346. First Church of Palm Coast is located at 91 Old Kings Rd., North,
Palm Coast, Florida.

Caring for the Caregiver Workshops
Community Hospice "Caring for the Caregiver" Workshop takes place,
Saturday, February 1st, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Legends Center, 5130
Soutel Dr. The workshop is where family caregivers have an opportunity to
connect with professionals and caregiving resources that will support them
in their caregiving journey, network with fellow caregivers and listen to
professional speakers who will discuss a variety of caregiving topics
Attendees will enjoy a complimentary breakfast and lunch and have a
chance to win door prizes. Registration is free. To request complimentary
respite care for your loved one call Jennifer Arnold at 807.1318. For work-
shop details and immediate registration call Mitzi Saul at 407-6165 or visit
www.communityhospice.com.

NOTICE: Church news is published free of charge. Information
must be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5
p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information received prior to the
event date will be printed on a space available basis until the date. Fax
e-mail to 765-3803 or e-mail to JFreePress@aol.com.


Bethel Baptist Institutior
215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32
Si M *I W


Weekly Service'


Sunday Morning Worship
7:40 a.m. and 10:40 a.m.
Church school
9:30 a.m.


Midweek Se
Wednesday No(
"Miracle at N
12 noon-1
The Word front


- 'Bible Study and Daughters
Bishop Rudolph 6:30 p.m. 3rd Sunday -
McKissick, Sr.
Senior Pastor
Come share in Holy Communion on 1st Sunday a


Wor
us I
the
www.truth2p


Grace an


_visit www.Beti







1880WestE*geodAvenu



Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19- 20 -l


Pastor Landon Williams


8:00 A.M. Early ]

9:30 a.m. Su

11:00 a.m. Mo
Tuesday Evening 7
Wednesday Bible
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**FREE TUTORING FOR YOU
HISTORY AND MATH EVE]


Thedoos f Mceoni. ae. awas. oen.o. ou ndyou fmil.*
toyui orsiiulwlpes otc sa 6-27o i


Dr. R.B. Holmes Makes Bid for National Baptist Convention Presidency
By Charles Moseley most significant roles, especially for
Former Jacksonville pastor Dr. African American pastors is to find
R.B. Holmes Jr., has officially a creative way to keep the member-
announced his candidacy to become ship energized and excited about
the next President of the National how ministry can transform individ-
Baptist Convention, U.S.A., Inc. uals and communities.
"After giving great prayer, medita- 4. What has been your proudest
tion, and evaluation of the state of moment in ministry?
Black America and the challenges It has been a tremendous blessing
of the Black church, I sensed an seeing members develop strong
urgent need for the Black church to Christian virtues and values while
be reenergized as the main source concomitantly giving back to the
and resource for the strengthening, community in areas of tithes, time,
saving and sustaining of the Black gifts, and testimonies.
churches, Black family businesses, 5. What should the role of the
Black colleges and universities, and church be regarding serving the
the Black race."a needs of both members and the
Dr. Holmes began pastoring in Dr. R.B. Holmes community?
1976 at First Timothy Baptist catapult him into such a prominent Reverend Holmes has outlined a I believe the gospel of Jesus as
Church in Jacksonville, Florida role in the Baptist Church commu- very ambitious platform which he recorded in St. Luke 4:18 is my
where he served for ten years, nity. With a current congregation at calls his "12 Point Action Vision theme scripture as it relates to com-
before spending the next 27 years as Bethel Missionary Baptist Church Plan". He recently shared some of munity empowerment, encourage-
the spiritual leader at the Bethel estimated at 5,000 members, his insights about himself, his ment, education, evangelism, mis-
Missionary Baptist Church in Reverend Holmes heads up one of career, and thoughts on the issues he sion, social justice, and economic
Tallahassee, Florida. The National Florida's largest predominantly felt should be addressed which development. (The Spirit of the
Baptist Convention, USA, Inc., the African American churches. impact society in general and the Lord is upon me, because he hath
oldest and largest religious organi- Some of Reverend Holmes most African American community. anointed me to preach the gospel to
nation in the world. noted accomplishments read like a 1. Why, when and how did you the poor; he hath sent me to heal the
He brings a plethora of experience Who's Who Among Florida decide to become a minister? brokenhearted, to preach deliver-
in a vast array of leadership posi- Leaders. He has either served or is I was called into to the ministry in ance to the captives, and recovering
tions which include religious, civic, presently in an official capacity in a the early 70's. I always had a deep of sight to the blind, to set at liberty
educational, and business organiza- number of high profile positions concern to help people who were them that are bruised. St. Luke 4:18)
tions. Throughout his professional some of which include; President struggling emotionally, spiritually, 6. Should the Black Church be
career Reverend Holmes has built and Founder of the National Save financially, and socially. I believe active in the socio-economic as
up an impressive resume ofcommu- the Family Now Movement, Inc. that the spirit of God moved upon well as political issues which face
nity service and a diverse back- Chairperson, National Anti- my heart as a teenager when I start- its congregation?
ground, all of which he hopes will Hazing/Anti-Violence Task Force ed the first community organization I think it is incumbent upon the
SChairperson, Tallahassee in my neighborhood "CRIB" which Black church to be engaged in the
Chapter, National Action Network stood for "Community Relations In life of the congregation and the
ia l C h urc h 1-Past President of Region Blackness!" At an early age, I knew community. Jesus made it clear that
Two/Southeast of the National the Lord was calling me into the we are the light of the world and the
202 _904) 3541464 Newspaper Publishers Association ministry. After accepting "the call" salt of the Earth (St. Matthew 5:16-
"4M 04 /NNPA (includes the states of in 1970, it was clear to me that I 18). Therefore, the Black church
___Florida, Virginia, Mississippi, North needed to prepare myself academi- historically has always been a place
S Carolina, South Carolina, call, emotionally, theologically, that we can look to for divine guid-
STennessee, and Alabama) and psychologically. ance, comfort, liberation, sanity,
j Past- President of the National 2. What has been the single security and direction.
services Baptist Congress of Christian greatest challenge that you've 7. Why did you decide to run for
oian Service ,Education (1999-2009), an faced in ministry? office?
midday" Auxiliary of the 7.5 million mem- It's a challenge to maintain a high After giving great prayer, medita-
p.m.. bers National Baptist Convention, degree of integrity and motivation. tion, and evaluation of the state of
n the Sons USA, Inc. The integrity or character piece is so Black America and the challenges
of Bethel isR o Member, Board of Trustees for important because if people cannot of the Black church, I sensed an
4:00 p.m Bishop Rudolph three Historically Black Colleges believe what the preacher says urgent need for the Black church to
McKissick, Jr. and Universities because of a negative behavior, then be reenergized as the main source
Senior Pastor
o Currently on the Board of it destroys the credibility of the min- and resource for the strengthening,
It 40and 1040 a.m. Trustees of Florida Memorial sister and the message. As it relates saving and sustaining of the Black
University, Edward Waters College, to motivation and dealing with peo- churches, Black family businesses,
Malone University and formerly ple, the minister has to consistently Black colleges and universities, and
served on the Board of Trustees of and practically encourage himself in the Black race. As you know, the
ship ithFAMU for eight years the Lord and know that it is really National Baptist Convention, USA,
LI E on President and CEO of Live about God's will for His people and Inc. is the oldest and largest reli-
Communications, Inc. (Parent not one's self will. Therefore, in gious institution in the world. It has
web visit Company of the Capital Outlook order to maintain a strong sense of to become more vibrant, visible, and
Newspaper); Radio Station Owner motivation, for me, it has been viable to meet the needs of our peo-
iowerministries.org, of WTAL 1450 AM & WOCY FM through prayer, preparation and ple in the 21st century. I believe my
106.5 FM being purpose- driven. pastoral involvement over the last
Should he be elected, it would 3. What is the single most thirty-seven years has adequately
Pe place him on a short list among the important role that a minister prepared me to use the gifts, experi-
ace nation's most powerful and influen- plays as a pastor? ences and skills to design models of
helite.org tial religious leaders. I think that perhaps one of the ministries for the up-building of the
J Black church and community.
8. What can be expected from
you should you be elected?
S Bishop Rudolph W. McKissick, Sr. If I am fortunate to be elected to
president of the National Baptist
Retirement Culmination Convention, USA, Inc., you will see
a convention that will operate its
own television and radio stations.
You will see a convention that
will develop its own financial insti-
i tutions.
You will see a convention that
will address both the physiological
and psychological health disparities
in our communities.
You will see a convention that
will embrace, nurture, involve and
celebrate its young pastors and
MIorning Worshipyonpel.
You will see a convention that
moday School will respect our senior citizens and
rnin Worhipseasoned saints.
You will see a convention that
p~. PayerSericewill become a strong voice in the
p~m.Prayr Sevicearea of economic empowerment and
Study 6:30 7 p.m. political awareness.
worship 7 p.m. You will see a convention that
iast WCGL 1360 Al i i L will become more relevant, respOn-sie n ioos

PM -3PM -On a personal note Reverend
~Holmes is the son of the late Deacon
JTH N ENLISH SCINCEand Mrs. R.B. (Lucille Johnson)
RY TESDA 6:3 8P.M.Holmes, Sr. He resides in
~Tallahassee, Florida with his wife
~Dr. Gloria Price Holmes. They have
a.. *three children and three grandchil-
dren.


A A





January 16-22,2014


Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press


K'. \\ Millions of Women at Risk of Economic Poverty


by Daniel Arkin, NBC
Although in recent decades
women have made historic ad-
vances in nearly all areas of
American public life, a stag-
gering number of women
across the country are still tee-
tering on the verge of poverty
and economic disaster, a new
report shows.
The report, co-authored by
NBC News special anchor
Maria Shriver and the Center
for American Progress, takes a
wide-angle snapshot of a na-
tional economic crisis seen
through the eyes of women.
The key findings paint a por-
trait of an estimated 42 million
women and 28 million de-
pendent children saddled
with financial hardship.
"These are not women who
are wondering if they can 'have
it all,'" Shriver wrote in her in-
troduction to the report. "These
are women who are already
doing it all working hard,
providing, parenting, and care-
giving. They're doing it all, yet
they and their families can't
prosper, and that's weighing
the U.S. economy down."
Amid an apparent boom in
female empowerment and par-
ticipation a time in which
women earn the majority, of
secondary degrees and repre-
sent more than half of the


country's voters the report
says that millions of women
are still struggling on the mar-
gins of American society,
bruised by the recent recession
and the day-to-day trials of
family finances.
Women make up close to
two-thirds of minimum-wage
workers in the country and
upwards of 70 percent of those
low-wage workers receive no
paid sick days whatsoever, ac-
cording to the report.
All the while, some 40 per-
cent of all American house-
holds with children below the
age of 18 include mothers who
are either the only or primary
source of income with the
average earnings of full-time
female workers still just 77
percent of the average earnings
of their male colleagues, the
report reads.
The authors also presented
the results of a survey of 3,500
adults across America that of-
fers a glimpse into the on-the-
ground realities of
contemporary womanhood.
Republican and Democratic
pollsters worked together to
"write a statistical narrative" of
the women who "are an essen-
tial part of our nation's fabric
and economy," the report says.
Among the chief findings
from survey respondents who


Reasons Your Credit Card Was Denied


We've all had these moments:
You're at a romantic restaurant and
the evening went great. But just as
you and your date are readying to
leave, an embarrassed waiter appears
and whispers, "I'm afraid your card
has been denied." So much for ro-
mance. ""
The same thing can happen at the
grocery store, when shopping online
or worst of all, when you're traveling
and don't have a back-up means of
payment. Why do credit card trans-
actions get denied and what can you
do to prevent it?
Banks and other credit card issuers
have developed complex algorithms
that track credit card behavior and
highlight unusual usage patterns
commonly associated with card theft
or fraud.
"Unusual activities" that jump out
to card issuers include:
When you ordinarily use your
card only rarely, but suddenly make
several charges in one day.
Making multiple purchases at the
same store (or website) within a few
minutes of each other.
An unusually large purchase -
say for a major appliance, furniture
or jewelry. Alert your card issuer be-
fore making large purchases.


One small purchase quickly fol-
lowed by larger ones. Thieves will
test the waters to see if a small pur-
chase is denied; if it's not, they'll
quickly run up major charges.
Exceeding daily spending limits.
Sqonme carimit how much you qan
charge per day, even. if you havesuf-
ficient remaining credit.
Making large purchases outside
your geographic area.
Multiple out-of-town purchases
in short succession. (Always tell your
card issuer when you'll be traveling.)
International purchases, whether
online or while traveling. In fact,
some card issuers automatically de-
cline international transactions be-
cause of the high potential for fraud,
so learn your issuer's policy before
attempting one.
Other common triggers for credit
card denials include:
Outdated or incorrect personal in-
formation for example, when
you're asked to enter your zip code at
a gas station. Always alert your card
issuer whenever you move.
Also, make sure you don't mistype
your credit card number, expiration
date, security code, address or other
identifying information.
Expired card. Always check the


card's expiration date. You should re-
ceive a replacement card several
weeks beforehand. It's often mailed
in a plain envelope, so be careful
what you toss. If the new card doesn't
arrive, contact the issuer to ensure it
hasn't been stolen. ,
SYou've reached your credit limit.
For.the sake qfyour.credjt score, ty
to keep your overall and individual
card credit utilization ratios (credit
available divided by amount used) as
low as possible ideally below 50,
or even 30, percent.
A temporary hold has been placed
on your card say for a rental car or
hotel reservation that puts you over
your credit limit. Always ask whether
a hold will be placed, how much and
for how long, and factor that into
your remaining balance calculations.
You miss a monthly payment. Card
issuers may let this slide once or
twice, depending on your history
with them, but eventually if you don't
make at least the minimum payment
due, your card will probably be
frozen.
The primary cardholder made
changes on the account and forgot to
tell other authorized users for ex-
ample, reporting his or her card
stolen, lowering credit limits or re-


What if Your Car Gets Totaled?


By Jason Alderman
Each year, auto insurance compa-
nies declare millions of vehicles to be
"totaled," meaning it's not worth the
cost to repair them. It doesn't matter
whether the car was damaged in a
collision, during a flood or after a
thief s joyride went bad.
It's hard to argue with such an as-
sessment if your car was wrapped
around a telephone pole or the gas
tank exploded. But what if the dam-
age was more cosmetic, such as
major dents on the roof and hood
from a hailstorm?
A vehicle is considered a total loss
if the insurance company determines
that the total cost to repair your car
to pre-accident condition, plus fees
for storage, salvage and a replace-
ment rental car (if included in your
policy), is more than a certain per-
centage of car's retail value. Insurers
set their own allowable percentage,
within state-mandated guidelines
(typically around 60 to 75 percent),
and use their own formulas to deter-
mine a car's value and estimated re-
pair costs.
Thus, if your $4,500-valued 2002
Honda Civic sustains $1,800 worth
of damage moderate bodywork and
repainting these days it might be
deemed totaled, even though the en-


gine still runs fine. On the other
hand, a late-model Mercedes could
sustain far greater damage and still
be considered salvageable.
What's worse, if the accident was
your fault, or you must otherwise tap
your own insurance (e.g., it was
caused by an uninsured driver), you
would only receive that $4,500
minus your deductible. Good luck
finding a comparable car for that
amount.
Other big losers when a car is to-
taled are people still paying off their
auto loan. Since the lender techni-
cally owns the car, they'll get first
crack at any insurance payment; and
you'll still be responsible for paying
off the loan balance.
As a preventative measure, you
may want to purchase gap insurance
if you owe more than the car's retail
value or if you rolled past debt into
the new car loan. It will pay the out-
standing loan balance if your car is
totaled or stolen. Most insurers will
let you add gap insurance at any time.
Here are a few additional points
you'should know about when and
why a car is declared totaled, and
precautions you can take ahead of
time to lessen the impact:
Make sure the insurance appraisal
includes the value of all extra fea-


tures and aftermarket accessories,
like heated seats, custom wheels or
an upgraded audio system.
Be prepared to show documenta-
tion of any major repairs or upgrades
you made that might boost the car's
value say you recently replaced the
engine or bought new tires.
Do your own research. Use inde-
pendent pricing sites like Kelly Blue
Book or Edmunds to determine your
car's worth, factoring in its mileage,
added features and overall condition
before the accident.
If your estimate is far off from the
proposed settlement, ask whether
your policy includes the right to hire
your own appraiser for a second
opinion. Most states have a proce-
dure for settling such disputes. Un-
derstand, however, that no matter the
arbitration outcome, you'll still have
to pay your appraiser, and likely, a
portion of arbitration costs.
Make sure the insurer's totaled car
value includes estimated sales tax to
replace the car, as well as registration
and title costs, since you wouldn't
have incurred these costs if you didn't
need to replace the car.
Let's hope your car is never totaled,
but it pays to know in advance what
to do if it is.


moving you from the account.
On last thought: If your card is de-
nied, don't shoot the messenger he's
only following instructions. Rather,
call the card issuer and find out what
happened. Embarrassment aside, it's
nice. t, ko,w th4t, some1.pis ,trying
to ensure your, card isn't being used
fraudulently.


are low-income females:
75 percent wish they had
devoted more time and energy
to education and career rel-
ative to 58 percent of the gen-
eral population.
73 percent wish they had
made better financial decisions
over the course of their lives
- and so did 65 percent of the
total survey group.
Low-income women are
more likely to regret tying the
knot when they did 52 per-
cent versus 33 percent.
*And nearly one-third of
low-income women with chil-
dren wish they had postponed
having children or had
fewer of them.
And yet despite the discour-
aging signs of economic gen-
der inequality, "The Shriver
Report: A Woman's Nation
Pushes Back from the Brink"
features a wide range of poten-
tial remedies from prospec-
tive policy initiatives to
community programs. The au-
thors of the report say that
turning away from historical
injustices and embracing a
more equitable future will
boost the U.S. economy.
One such recommendation


that Shriver highlighted on
Meet the Press on Sunday was
for women to think of them-
selves "as providers, not being
provided for.
"Many women who re-
sponded to the poll said they
wished they had stayed in
school longer and Shriver said
fathers and husbands need to
reinforce the mindset that
women can set themselves up
to be breadwinners.
"Men are totally a part of this
conversation, in terms of how
they raise their daughters, and
support their wives and their
partners," she said.
The report weaves together
the personal stories of working
women with "public, private
and personal recommendations
that can help reignite the
American Dream for women
and their families"
Shriver said that since
women make up 54 percent of
voters, "women are at the cen-
ter of our country," and De-
mocrats and Republicans need
to work together "to modernize
our relationships to
women. ""When women do
well, men do well and the na-
tion does well," Shriver said.


A A A A


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7 Things Men Hide From Women I.-


by Dr. Marcus Williams
What is a man really thinking.
For just about forever, women have
tried to interpret the male species:
why he didn't he call; why he did
call you by a name other than yours.
While, in theory, every man is dif-
ferent, research has found a number
of surprising parallels. From his
fears of commitment to his fond-
ness for cuddling, certain emotions
cause many men to freeze up rather
than open up.
Here are some of the top secrets
your guy may be keeping from you:
1. Saying "I love you" is com-
plicated.
Those "three little words" could
be the most complex in the English
language. While some men prema-
turely pull the trigger on the "L
word" (a recent study from the
Journal of Personality and Social
Psychology found that guys tend to
say "I love you" first, often driven
by the idea that their partner will be
more likely to have sex with them)
other guys just aren't that good
at getting the words out. Instead,
they show their love through their
actions. How can you know for
sure? Those actions may be a truer
indicator of his feelings than any
passion-fueled colloquy, says rina
Firstein, LCSW, a relationship
counselor who has advised couples
in New York City for more than 20
years.
2. Commitment really does
scare me.
Men often have a harder time
picking up on subtle relationship
cues and because of this, your
man may not be aware of the point
in which your bond has moved to a
higher expectation of commitment.
In fact, some guys get anxious
about becoming attached, even if
they seem to enjoy the relationship.
"Men often 'rubber band,' withdraw,
or pull back if they feel like the
relationship has moved beyond
their comfort zone," Firstein notes.
This new territory can take a man
by surprise even if you felt like


4 ,' C b . j fi


he was forging ahead at the same
pace you were.
3. I get performance jitters.
Do men think about sex a lot?
Sure they do, but their fears of sex-
ual inadequacy may be just as fre-
quent. If a man has ever had an
unsuccessful go at sex (and most of
them have! flopped romps can
be triggered by common missteps
such as drinking too much), his
stress in the bedroom can stockpile
- which can eventually lead to
sexual dysfunction. Many men will
even avoid sex rather than talk hon-
estly about their fears with their
partner, and this can harm both the
sexual health and the emotional
health of a relationship.
4. I'm not crazy about
monogamy.
Some men stay mum about the
extent of their sexual desires.
"Freedom, and particularly sex-
ual freedom, and variety are
typically more important to
men than to women," says
Firstein. "Many married l
men feel that they love their
wives and, at the same time,
have no problems cheating."
This difference between
men and women can be
one of the most damag- L
ing to a couple because
of the sense of betrayal 41
it can create (even if he
never actually strays).
5. I wants you to initi- j
ate sex sometimes.
You may think sexual
desire is hard-wired in men,
but with every attempt at turn- ...
ing you on comes a threat of
rejection even in the most
established relationships. That's
why it's such a turn-on when a
woman makes the moves, allowing
him to skip the risk altogether. And
it's not just sex he wants: One
recent study from the Kinsey
Institute at Indiana University actu-
ally found that cuddling and caress-
ing in a relationship are more
important to men than women.


i ic.^ -i r n .x| l **


6. I'm depressed.
Depression has no gender bias: It
can strike anyone, including the
most macho of men. However,
studies show that men who are
depressed are less likely to open up
about their sadness or lack of ener-
gy than women. Instead, they are
more likely to avoid sex, say
they're overtired, or drink more.
"Some men are uncomfortable
about feeling sad, and their sadness
or depression may come out as
anger," warns Firstein. Depression
is one of the most dangerous secrets
a man can keep, so if you think a
male in your life could
be depressed,
it's


...,
* 'In CII
* 1,..,


afraid of my own feelings.
Many men just don't handle their
feelings, such as doubt, very well,
and tend to have a hard time open-
ing up. "Because many men are
problem solvers and are uncomfort-
able talking about feelings, there
are a number of intense feelings
that don't get expressed with words,
but rather acted out," notes Firstein.
The good news? Men aren't
Neanderthals. The emotions are
there; they just need to be uncov-
ered. And if fessingg up about his
feelings remains a stumbling block,
he may need to seek relationship
advice from a professional.
Another BIG secret men
h keep?


Home .... Schooling g.....- ..o


Rise in Black Households


S:. An increasing number of Black
S parents say they want to enhance
'--,? :., their families' ties and their chil-
J"* ?' dren's values by educating their
-." -"; children at home.
Home schooling has generally
-.'; been considered to be the exclusive
domain of white Americans. But an
-, expert in the field says there is a
marked increase in the number of
African-American parents who
,, i. have chosen to home school their
S ; children.
Brian Ray, the director of the
National Home Education Research
Institute, said there is strong evi-
dence more Black parents, many of
them inner-city residents, have cho-
sen to educate their children at
home.
Ray said there is little in the way
of empirical data on the subject
i; from the federal Department of
Education. However, based on a
; huge amount of anecdotal evidence
and his own research, Ray said the


trend is irrefutable.
"I've been studying the home
school movement since 1984," Ray
said, in an interview with BET.com.
"But the blending of empirical
information and anecdotal reports
from home school groups around
the country makes it clear that there
are more and more African-
American families who home
school their children."
Ray said the reasons for
Black families turning to
home schooling are largely
the same as those of white
Americans.
"It's really quite identical," he
said. "They feel they can do at least
as well as the public school in edu-
cating their kids. Also, they have
strong values that they say they
want to pass on to their kids that
won't be offered in public schools."
Another reason, he added, was
that "parents want to guide the
social interaction of their kids dur-


ing the school day." In addition,
Ray said, "they want to build
stronger family relationships."
In rare instances, Black families
decided to home school their chil-
dren because of experiences of
racism


in public and
private schools, he said. He also
said there are some parents who
wanted to place greater emphasis
on Afrocentric themes and the con-
tributions of African-Americans in
the education of their children.


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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


January 16-22, 2014





January 16-22,2014


Page 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press


Generations Telling
Stories
The 2014 Generations Telling
Stories workshops a theatrical
exploration of Gullah Geeche cul-
ture, takes place through January
25th. Seeking actors, debaters,
videographers and script writers
ages 13 to 21. Participants will
explore and document living Gullah
Geechee heritage using theater and
digital media to document oral his-
tory interviews with local commu-
nity elders. Learn about theater with
professional actors. For more infor-
mation or to register call 962-7284
or email generationstellingsto-
ries@gmail.com or visit www.gen-
erationstellingstories.com. The
workshops take place at Jeb Stuart
Middle School, 4815 Wesconnect
Blvd.

27th Annual
MLK Breakfast
The 27th Annual Martin Luther
King., Jr. Breakfast will be held
Friday, January 17th at 8 a.m.
Featured keynote speaker is jour-
nalist Soledad O'Brian. The event
will take place at the Prime Osbomrn
Convention Center, 1000 Water St.
For more details call 630-3690 or
visit www.jaxmlkbreakfast.com or
email jlyons@coj.net.

Sommore and
Company in Concert
Comedian Sommore presents the
"Standing Ovation" tour showcas-
ing comedians Bill Bellamy, Tony
Rock and Joe Torrey, Friday,
January 17th at the Times Union


Center, 300 Water St. For tickets
and more information call 633-6110
or visit www.jaxevents.com.

Genealogy Meeting
The Jacksonville Genealogist
Society's monthly membership
meeting will be held on Saturday,
January 18th from 1:30 p.m. to 5
p.m. at the Webb-Wesconnett
Library, 6887 103rd Street. The
topic is "Paparazzi in the Cemetery-
-Headstone Photography for the
Genealogist." For more details visit
www.jaxgen.com or email
info@jaxgen.org.

Zeta Phi Beta
Founders Day
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.'s
Omega Zeta Zeta Chapter will
observance their 94th Founders'
Anniversary, Saturday, January
18th at 11:30 a.m. at Queen's
Harbour Yacht and Country Club.
Enjoy a day of fellowship with
civic leaders, local educators, busi-
nesses, friends, and families. For
additional information call Deborah
Phelps at 566-9853.

Flamenco Dance
Open House
Join Fuego Flamenco for their
Flamenco Dance Open House,
Saturday, January 18, 2014 at
9751 Mining Rd. Come meet and
greet the dancers of Fuego
Flamenco and learn a little about
the art of Flamenco Dance. For
more details call 730-9786 or visit
www.flamencojax.com.


JU Honoring the
late Janet Johnson
The late Janet Johnson will be
honored during the Jacksonville
University National TRiO Day
Celebration, Saturday, January
18th, 1 3 p.m. in the Terry
Concert Hall, 2800 University
Blvd. N. Janet Johnson was the first
African American Professor at JU
and the founder of the JU Upward
Bound Program. The event is free
and open to everyone. To share
your stories of Janet Johnson or for
more information contact Sylvia
Cruz at 256-7150 or email
scruz@ju.edu.

Jaye Cherie
Book Signing
Jaye Cherie author of "The Cost of
Love and Sanity" will have a book
signing, Saturday, January 18th
from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Books-A-
Million, 9400 Atlantic Blvd. For
more details email
gemmejane@aol.com or visit
www.youtu.be/rrMF94sMie4.

Library's Let's Talk
About it Series!
The Jacksonville Public Library
continues its popular Let's Talk
About It series at Southeast
Regional Library, 10599 Regional
Library, Room B with a discussion
about The Story of the Qur'an: Its
History and Place in Muslim Life.
The discussion takes place Sunday,
January 19th, 2 to 4 p.m. The dis-
cussion will be led by Dr. Parvez
Ahmed. To make reservations and
learn how to obtain program mate-


rials, go to
www.jaxpubliclibrary.org/mus-
limjourneys or contact Lisa Brown
Buggs at 630-4655.

Family Night with
Blue Man Group
The FSCJ Artist series presents
Family Night on Broadway with the
Blue Man Group, Tuesday,
January 21st at 6:30 p.m. Enjoy
face painting, photo booth, techno
music, arts and crafts and more. The
Blue Man group performances take
place through January 26th at the
Florida Times Union Center. For
more information call 442-2947 or
visit www.artistseriesjax.org.

Ritz Chamber
Players Salute MLK
The Ritz Chamber Players will
present "In Remembrance of the
Dream" concert, Wednesday,
January 22nd at 7:30 p.m. at the
Times-Union Center for the
Performing Arts. For more informa-
tion visit www.ritzchamberplay-
ers.org or call 472-4270.

The Evolution of the
Cocktail at MOSH
Join MOSH for one of the most
popular Museum Of Science and
History after dark's of the year!
This workshop, hosted by Bacardi-
Martini Product Development, Inc.,
will start at 6 p.m., January 23rd, at
6 p.m. You must be 21 years of age
or older to participate. For more
information call 396-MOSH (6674)
or visit www.themosh.org.


Universoul Circus
is back!
The Universoul Circus returns to
Jacksonville, January 28th -
February 2nd at the Prime Osbom
III Convention Center parking lot,
1000 W. Forsyth St. Come enjoy
this unique circus experience! For
more details call 757-5304 or email
gabw3promo@gmail.com or visit
www.universoulcircus.com.

Public Speaking
Workshops
Sign-up for Beverly Image
Groups' public speaking working
focusing on message articulation,
audience engagement, impromptu
speaking and other public speaking
etiquette. The workshop will be
held on Thursday evenings,
January 30th and February 6th,
13th and 20th from 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. at various libraries. For more
information and location, visit
www.beverlyimagegroup.com or
call 657-0250.

Coming Soon to Stage
Aurora, Dream Girls!
Stage Aurora present "Dream
Girls! January 31 -February 9,
2014 (Weekends Only) at Stage
Aurora Performance Hall, 5188
Norwood Avenue. The musical fol-
lows the story of a young female
singing trio from Chicago, Illinois
called "The Dreams", who become
music superstars. For more infor-
mation and tickets visit
www.stageaurora.org or call 765-
7372.

ZORA! Festival 2014
Music, literature, theater, fashion
and the visual arts come together
for a nine day explosion of culture
at the 25th annual Zora Neale
Hurston Festival of Arts and
Humanities in Eatonville and
Orange County. The festival will
culminate Saturday, February 1st,
with Maze Featuring Frankie at 3
p.m., Amiri Baraka, author
Edwidge Danticat, actress Lynn
Whitfield and actor Avery Brooks.
For additional information visit
www.zorafestival.org or call 407-
647-3307.


Yachty Gras on
the St. Johns River!
Celebrate Mardi Gras on the St.
Johns! Join the Jacksonville Sail
and Power Squadron for a lighted
boat parade on the St. Johns River
where captains and crews will
showcase their vessels decorated
with lights and beads in true Mardi
Gras fashion. The evening will cul-
minate with a spectacular fireworks
display over our majestic river,
Friday, January. 31st at 7 p.m. For
more information visit www.jax-
events.com or call 630-2489.

Dreamgirls Play at
Stage Aurora
The smash hit Broadway musical
"DreamGirls" will play at Stage
Aurora, January 31-February 9 at
the Stage Aurora Performance Hall
located at 5188 Norwood Avenue
inside Gateway Mall. Dreamgirls
tells the story of the up and coming
1960's girls groups and the tri-
umphs and tribulation that come
with fame and fortune. For more
information and tickets call 765-
7372 or visit www.stageaurora.org.

Kevin Hart Boyz at
the Comedy Zone!
From Kevin Hart's Laugh at My
Pain and Let Me Explain tour: Joey
Wells, Will "Spank" Horton and
Na'im Lynn are The Plastic Cup
Boyz. The Laugh at My Pain come-
dy tour comes to the Comedy Zone,
February 6th 8th. For more
details call 292-4242 or visit
www.comedyzone.com.

Spoken Word
at the, Ritz!
Hear Spoken Word at the Ritz,-
Thursday, February 6th at 7 p.m.,
and 10 p.m. For more information
call 632-5555 or visit www.ritz-
jacksonville.com.The Ritz is locat-
ed at 829 N. Davis Street.

Amateur Night
at the Ritz!
Amateur Night at the Ritz is back,
Friday, February 7th, at 7 p.m. and
10 p.m. For more information call
632-5555 or visit www.ritzjack-
sonville.com.The Ritz is located at
829 N. Davis Street.


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January 16-22,2014


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5


0 FOR THE WEEK OF JAN. 14 20, 2014


JSU sports Photo
BLAST FROMTHE PAST:
Jackson State taps Tiger
legend Harold Jackson as
its new head football coach.


I NEW FOOTBALLCOACHESAT MORGAN STATE,
JACKSON STATE; WSSU, MVSU NEXT IN LINE


1 2013-14 BLCGB AB A ( s uSdd Weky r h


IA A CENTRAL INTERCOLLEGIATE
SATHLEnC ASSOCIATION
DnV COW ALL
NORTH DMSION W L W L W L
VirginiaUnion 1 0 2 4 3 12
Lincoln 0 0 4 2 12 3
Eliz-CityState 0 0 3 3 8 8
Chowan 0 0 2 4 6 8
BowieState 0 0 1 5 7 10
Virginia State 0 1 2 4 9 7
SOUTH DMSION
Winston-Salem State 0 0 4 2 9 7
Shaw 0 0 4 2 6 10
Fayetteville State 0 0 4 2 11 5
Livingstone 0 0 3 2 10 4
St. Augustine's 0 0 3 2 10 5
J.C.Smith 0 0 3 3 11 5
BCSP ClAA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
TyrelI Tate, Jr., G, FAYETTEVILLE STATE Had tee solid
gaetis we, indindgaseason4i 31 pra .s. VaUmn.r.
NEWCOMER
Amere May, Jr., G, ST. AUG'S -Avgd. 20.3 points in 2-1 week
getgh9 in over Chowan, 23 in w owerBMie State. Leads
tIe CIAA sin sg at 20.9 ppg.
ROOKIE
Joshua Dawson, Fr., G, FSU Had 16 points and 7 assists in
in over Va. Union.
COACH
John Hill, ULINCOLN Has L$ o to 11-3 start aid 8-0 read
at homrre. Won games vs. FSU and SLAugws wha improving o
3-2 in conference play.


MEAC MEASTEas
"I ^E C A THo- CONFERFtNE


Norfolk State
Hampton
Savannah State
Morgan State
Coppin State
Florida A&M
NCA&T State
SC State
Howard
North Carolina Central
Md. E. Shore
Bethune-Cookmnan
Delaware State


MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Jyles Smith, 6-9, Sr., F, SAVANNAH STATE- To-
taled 18 points and 33 rebounds, 9 blocks and 2
steals in wins overUMES and Coppin State. Had 14
pts., 20 rebs., and shot 6-of-6 vs. CSU, 13 boards,
6 blocks and 2 steals vs. UMES.
ROOKIE
Jeremiah Mil, 6-1, Fr., G, SAY. STATE -Avgd.
16.5 points in two wins getting 17 induding 3 of 6
from 3 vs. ULIMES, 16 points on 6 of 8 shooting, 2
rebounds, I block vs. CSU.
DEFENSE
Bruce Beckfcrd, 6-7, So., F, NC A&T Had 11
rebounds, 2 blocks and steals vs. B-CU. Had 9
points with 4 assists.


SOUTHERN INTERCOLLEGIATE
wwIA C ATHLETIC CONFERENCE


EAST DMISION
Benedict
Fort Valley State
Paine
Claflin
Clark Atlanta
Morehouse
Albany State
WEST DIVISION
Tuskegee
Stillman
LeMoyne-Owen
Kentucky State
Lane
Miles


SIAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
BrandonDavey,6-6,Sr.,F.FT.VALL.EYSTATE-ln
wins over Lane and Kentucky State, averaged 17.0
points, 12.0 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.5 assists.
Lamar Adkins, 6-8, Sr., F, BENEDICT In wins
over Stillman and Miles, averaged 20.5 points, 4
rebounds and 1 block.
NEWCOMER
JordanWamer,6-6,Jr.,F,PAINE-Scored 18points
with 15 rebounds and 1 block in Iloss to Stilman.


C\A/A ^ SOUTHWESTERN
SWAC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
DIV ALL
W L W L
Southern 4 0 8 9
Alabama State 3 1 9 6
AlabamaA&M 3 1 6 8
Texas Southern 2 1 6 9
#Ark. Pine Bluff 2 1 4 11
AlcomState 2 2 5 11
PrairineViewA&M 1 2 3 12
Jackson State 1 3 5 11
# Miss. Valley SL 0 3 4 12
# Grambling State 0 4 1 12
# lIneM*for C nce de
SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Jamel Waters, G, ALABAMASTATE -Tallied
27 points shooting 7 of 11 from the field, 4 of 5
from 3 and 9 of 10 from the line with 7 assists
in win over UAPB. Also had 17 points, includ-
ing 9 of 10 FTs, 7 assists in win over MVStJ.
Averaged 22.0 points, 7 assists while shooting
90% from the line in two wins.
NEWCOMER
Calvin Godfrey, 6-9, Jr., F, SOUTHERN -Av-
eraged double double of 14.5 points ana 13
rebounds in two wins. Scored 14 points and
pulled down 12 rebounds in win over Jackson
State. Had second double double of 15 points
and 14 boards in win over Grambling.


INDEPENDENTS


Central State 7 5
W.Va. State 6 6
Univ.ofDC 3 9
Cheyney 2 13
ULincoln (Mo.) 2 13
Tennessee State 2 17
PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Patrick Miller, 6-1, St., G, TENN. STATE Talled
29 points in loss to UT-Marten after nettng career-
high 37 points in loss to SE Missouri. Hit on 12 of
21 shots, 11 of 12 FTs vs. SEMO, 8 of 14 fran the
floor with 13 of 14 FTs vs. UT-Matin. Averaged
28.0 points in the two games and canned 24 of
26 free throws.
NEWCOMER
Dominic Phillips, 5-11, So., G, W. VA. STATE -
Tallied 14 points in win over Urbana.


Clark Atlanta 94. Stillman 91
Fort Valley State 73, Miles 65
Kentucky State 83, Paine 61
Morehouse 64, Lane 57
Tuskegee 90, Claflin 72
SWAC
Alabama State 77, Ark.-Pine Bluff 64
Alabama A&M 68, Miss. Valley St. 59
Alcom State 64, Grambling 56
Southern 60, Jackson State 36
INDEPENDENTS
UT Martin 100, Tennessee State 81
W. Va. State 81,76


UNDER THE BANNER

WHAT'S GOING ON IN AND AROUND BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


MORGAN STATE HIRES LEE HULL:
BALTIMORE, Md. -- Lee Hull was introduced by
Morgan State University Ath-
letics Director Floyd Kerr as
the new head football coach of
the Bears on January 9th. Hull
has been the assistant coach at
Maryland since 2008, and has
built an impressive coaching re-
sume.
Hull, 48, becomes the 19th

Hull head football coach in Morgan
State history.
Hull comes to MSU after spending the past six sea-
sons (21608-13). with. the University of Maryland as wide
vimcewrscoaeh.HullalsQ-bas experience coaching other
positions. He tutored running backs his first two seasons
at Oregon State and wide receivers the last three.
Prior to his five seasons at Oregon State, Hull spent
five years (1998-2002) at his alma mater, the College of
the Holy Cross. He coached linebackers for one season
before becoming wide receivers coach, as well as over-
seeing the kickoff coverage and kickoff return units. He
also went on to become the passing game coordinator.
Hull was a standout wide receiver at Holy Cross
from 1984-87, playing under former Maryland coach.
Mark Duffner his final two seasons. The Crusaders posted
a 21-1 record his last two years and were ranked No. 1 in
Division I-AA in 1987. Holy Cross also won the Colonial
League title and the Lambert Cup that season. He was a
preseason All-America choice as a junior.
He went on to play professionally with the Winnipeg
Blue Bombers of the CFL. Hull spent 1990-92 with Win-
nipeg where he was coached by Mike Riley in his first
season. Riley was the head coach at Oregon State during
Hull's five-year tenure. The Blue Bombers won the 1990
Grey Cup. He also played for Toronto in 1992.


ALUM JACKSON TAKES JSU REINS:
Jackson State has hired former NFL standout and
alum Harold Jackson as its football coach.
Jackson replaces Rick Comegy, who was fired in
December after eight seasons. Jackson State had an 8-4
record this fall, but lost to Southern in the Southwestern
Athletic Conference championship game.
The 68-year-old Jackson played for Jackson State in
the 1960s. He had an outstanding 16-year NFL career,
including stops with the Los Angeles Rams, Philadelphia
Eagles, New England Patriots, Minnesota Vikings and
Seattle Seahawks. He was a five-time Pro Bowl selection.
Jackson has also had a lengthy career as an assistant
coach in the NFL and has been a head coach on the col-
lege level at both Virginia Union (1994) and Benedict
(1995-96). He also served as an assistant at N, C. Central
(1990), Kentucky (2001-02) and Baylor (2003-06).
"I want to thank you for this opportunity to come
back home," Jackson said. "I'm not a big speaker I
believe in action. We're going to put the excitement and
the product on the field. We're going to be disciplined."


WSSU, MVSU TO NAME COACHES:
Winston-Salem State and Mississippi Valley State
appeared close to filling their head football coach vacan-
cies.
WSSU scheduled a press conference Tuesday and
was expected to name current Defensive Coordinator Ki-
enus Boulware as its new head man. Boulware served as
departed (to Hampton) head coach Connell Maynor's
defensive coordinator for the last four years.
MVSU was also expected to name recently fired
Jackson State head coach Rick Comegy as the Delta
Devils new head man replacing Karl Morgan.


AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XX, No.24


CIAA
The always entertaining and com-
petitive CIAA men's basketball race ap-
pears headed for a stellar season in that
capacity this season.
Early season results indicate the
stronger teams are in the South, but the
North got some noteworthy scalps over
the past two weeks.
Inter-divisional games wrapped up
Monday with North Division teams tak-
ing five of six games from their Southern
Division counterparts.
No South Division team finished
with a losing record vs. the North. Three
teams (Winston-Salem State, Shaw and
Fayetteville State) finished with 4-2 re-
cords while two (Fayetteville State and
St. Augustine's) were 3-2. J. C. Smith
finished 3-3.
Lincoln's 4-2 record vs. the South
was the best in the North followed by
Elizabeth City State at 3-3.
The schedule now shifts to the all-
important intra-divisonal games that
will play out to the end of the regular
season and determine division winners
and tournament seeding. It begins with
a five-game schedule this Saturday (Jan.
18) and a six-game set-up on Wednesday
(Jan. 22).
In the North Saturday, Bowie State
(1-5) is at Lincoln and Chowan (2-4),is,
..at ECSU. .... ..
The South gets off to arousingistartc,
with WSSU hosting St. Aug's, JCSU en-
tertaining FSU and Shaw welcoming in
Livingstone.
North Division rivals Virginia
State (2-4) and Virginia Union (2-4)


BCSP Notes


Fort Valley State's LeRon Furr

named MVP at MOH Bowl
Fort Valley State linebacker LeRon Furr
took defensive honors despite his National team
falling to the American team 20-3 in Saturday's
inaugural Medal of Honor Bowl in Charleston,
S.C.
Furr, who began his career at Auburn, then
transferred to
Memphis for two
seasons, before
finishing up the
last two seasons at
Fort Valley State,
totalled six tack-
les and two pass
breakups. Furr
(6-3, 225) is con-
Furr sidered one of the
better Div. H pros-
pects for this year's NFL draft.
Portland State tailback D.J. Adams (5-foot-
10, 210 pounds), a Maryland transfer who ran
for 1,600 yards and 19 TDs this season, scored
two touchdowns to lead the American team to
the victory. American team head coach Ralph


meet Sunday (Jan. 19) at the Richmond
Coliseum in their annual Martin Luther
King Day Classic.
Wednesday's S. Div. schedule has
Livingstone at FSU, St. Aug's at JCSU
and WSSU at Shaw. In the North, VSU
is at Chowan, Lincoln is at ECSU and
BSUis atVUU.

MEAC
Early results in the MEAC show
the league to be top heavy with the likes
of defending regular season champ Nor-
folk State (4-0), Hampton (3-0) Sa-
vannah State (3-0) and Morgan State
(2-0) off to good starts. Those teams
along with N. C. Central (0-1) appear
to be the class of the MEAC. But don't
count Florida A&M.
The Rattlers (2-2) lost two close
early road games at Norfolk State (91-
87) and Hampton (72-62), but won two
games at home this past week over de-
fending tournament champion N. C.
A&T (76-66) and NCCU (63-60), last
year's regular season runners-up.
In key games Saturday, Morgan
State is at Norfolk State and Coppin
State (2-1) is at Hampton. The teams
switch opponents Monday with Cop-
pin State playing at NSU and MSU at
Hampton.
FAMU is at SC State Saturday and
at Savannah State-Monday.

SIAC
At 5-0 in conference play, Bene-
dict and Fort Valley State are setting
the early pace in the SIAC race. Both
the Tigers and FVSU are in the Eastern


Division and have gotten their wins vs.
West Division teams.
SIAC teams begin intra-divisonal
play this week and tops on the schedule
is the Benedict/FVSU showdown Mon-
day, Jan. 20 at FVSU.
Prior to Monday's game, FVSU
hosts Paine (3-2) Saturday while Bene-
dict plays at Albany State (2-1).
Tuskegee emerged from the early
January schedule with the best record in
the West (3-2) vs. the East Division.
The Golden Tigers begin West Di-
vision play Saturday at Kentucky State
(2-4) and follow that up with a Monday
match-up at Lane (1-5.)
Stillnian (3-3) had the second best
record. The Tigers begin divisional play
with dates at Lane Saturday and at Ken-
tacky State Monday.

SWAC
Defending tournament champion
Southern (4-0) is setting the early pace
in the SWAC.
The Jaguars are off to a 4-0 start
with four teams behind them with one
conference loss (Alabama State, Ala-
bama A&M, Arkansas-Pine Bluff and
Texas Southern). Of the four, Southern
has only faced TSU (a 79-71 win).
This week Southern is at Arkansas-
Pine Bluff (2-1, ineligible for. SWAC
title) Saturday and at.Miss. Valley State
(083,;alsoaineligible) Monday. t,',.i
Alabama A&M (3-1) and Alabama
State (3-1) meet Saturday in Montgom-
ery. TSU (2-1) is at Grambling (0-4,
also ineligible) Saturday and at Jackson
State (1-3) Monday.


Friedgen, interestingly, was the Terps' coach
when Adams signed.
Florida wide receiver Solomon Patton was
the American MVP. He had three receptions for
50 yards, a 33-yard run and a 15-yard kickoff
return. Patton (5-9, 177), who led the Gators in
receiving this season, set up all three American
touchdowns.
An all-star game matching lower-tier draft
prospects, the Medal of Honor Bowl attracted
upward of 100 NFL scouts at practices during
the week, according to the Charleston Post-Cou-
rier.
At halftime, South Carolina State's March-
ing 101 performed a patriotic medley.


Two black college linemen

in NFLPA Collegiate Bowl
Two black college linemen are set to play in
this Saturday's (Jan. 18) NFLPA Collegiate Bowl
in Carson, California. Kickoff is set for 3 p.m.
Pacific Time, 6 p.m. ET.
Morgan State offensive guard Karim Bar-.
ton and Winston-Salem State defensive tackle
Donnie Owens will both play for the American
team Saturday.


SATURDAY, JANUARY 18
CIAA
Bowie State @ Lincoln
St. Augustne's @ Winston-Satem State
J. C. Smith @ Fayettevtlle State
Shaw@ LUvtingstones
Chowan @ Enz. City State
MEAC
Morgan State @ Norfolk State
N. C. Central @ Delaware State
NJIT@ N.C.A&T
Florida A&M @ S.C. State
Bethune-Cookman @ Savannah State
Md. Eastern Shore @ Howard
Coppin Stale @ Hampton
SIAC
Tuskegee 0 Kentucky State
Palne @ Fort Valley State
Clark Atlanta Cladin
SUImasn @ Lane
Benedict @ Albany State
SWAC
Southern @ Arkansas-Pine Bluff
Alabama A&M @ Alabama State
Alcom State @ Miss. Valley State
Prairie View @ Jackson State
Texas Southern @ Grambling
INDEPENDENTS
Belmont @ Tennessee State
W. Va. State @ Concord
Davis & Elkins @ Central State
Queens @ UDC
Mllleraville @ Cheyney
SUNDAY, JANUARY 19
CIAA
Virginia Union vs. Virginia State (Richmond)
MONDAY, JANUARY 20
MEAC
Bethune-Cookman @ S. C. State
Floredda A&M @ Savannah State
Delaware State @ N. C. A&T
Coppin State @ Norfolk State
Morgan State @ Hampton
SIAC
Stillman @ Kentucky State
Benedict @ Fort Valley State
Tuskegee @ Lane
Paine @ Albany State
Claflin @ Morehouse
Miles @ LeMoyne-Owen
SWAC
Prairie View Grambling
Alcomrn State @ Arkansas-Pine Bluff
Texas Southemrn @ Jackson State
Southern @ Miss. Valley State
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22
CIAA
Livingstone @ Fayetteville State
Virginia State @ Chowan
Lincoln @ Elz. City State
Bowie State @ Virginia e Union
SL Augustine's @ J. C. Smith
Winston-Salem State @ Shaw
MEAC ,
N.C.A&T @N.t;.'Centrla ",
SIAC
Miles @ College of Faith
INDEPENDENTS
Bridgeport @ UDC
CHeyney @ East Stroudsburg


Barton Owens

Barton was a first team all-MEAC pick
and was selected to the BCSP "Baad" Team
third team. Owens was a first team all-CIAA
and first team "Baad Team" selection. The 6-3,
295-pound Owens led the Rams with 10 sacks
and 15.5 tackles for losses while totalling 51
tackles.
The game will be played at the StubHub
Center on the campus of California State Uni-
versity Dominguez Hills.
Former Head Coach Dick Vermeil will re-
turn to defend the National Team's title from
2012 and 2013. Denny Green will make his first
appearance as a NFLPA Collegiate Bowl Head
Coach leading the American Team.
The NFLPA Collegiate Bowl practices and
game will be broadcast live on the ESPN Net-
work. Check out the ESPN Comer for more in-
formation.


201 -13B ACK O L G -A K TBAL WoensReuls Sanigsan eeky onrsthe /1/14


C I A CENTRAL INTERCOLLEGIATE
CIAA ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
DIV CONF ALL
NORTHDIVSlON W L W L W L
Virginia State 0 0 4 1 13 1
Lincoln 0 0 2 4 8 7
Chowan 0 0 2 4 8 8
Bowie State 0 0 1 5 6 8
Virginia Union 0 0 1 5 4 10
Eliz.CityState 0 0 0 6 3 12
SOUTH DIVISION
J.C.Smith 0 0 5 1 10 5
St. Augustine's 0 0 4 1 9 5
Fayetteville State 0 0 4 2 11 4
Shaw 0 0 4 2 10 6
W-SalemState 0 0 4 2 10 6
Livingstone 0 0 4 2 9 7
BCSP CIAA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Ashle Freeman, Jr., G, VA. UNION Scored 27 points vs. Shaw
to top 1,000 lfor her career. Added 18 points in win over FSU.
NEWCOMER
Amber CaiMn, Sr., G, FSU -Averaged more an 20 points per
game including 21 in loss to VUU.
ROOKIE
Ryjae Andersen, Fr., G, CHOWAN.-Scored 28 points tin week
induding 13 in loss to StL Aug's. Averages 5.6 ppg., 9.3 points
in three games last week.
COACH
Stephen Joyner, Jr, J. C. SNMTIT Had 3-0 reco mn the week
with wins over VUU, Chwan and ECSU. Cureiny on 8-game
win streak s 5.0 C CImark


MEAC MID EASTERN
MEA ATHLETIC CONFERENCE


Hampton
Coppin State
Norfolk State
Savannah State
Howard
SC State
Florida A&M
NCA&T
North Carolina Central
Bethune-Cookman
Morgan State
Md. E. Shore
Delaware State


MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
MallaTate-DOeFremltan, 5-8, Ft., G, HAMPTON Had
29 points and 8 rebounds in win over DelState.
Shot 10 of22 from the field and 7-10 from the line.
Also had 3 assists and 2 steals.
ROOKIE
Raven Bankston, 5-7, Fr., G, DELSTATE-Averaged
21.5 points, 4.5 rebounds, 2.0 stealsand 1.5 assists
in two games. Scored 27 In OT win vs. NJIT and 17
in loss to Hampton.
DEFENSE
OmaahTayong,6-2,So.,C,COPPINST.-10points,
23 rebounds, 1 steal and 1 block vs. Sav. State.


A SOUTHERN INTERCOLLEGIATE
I ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CONF ALL
EAST DIVISION W L W L
Benedict 5 0 11 4
ClarkAtlanta 4 0 11 3
Claflin 4 1 8 7
Fort Valley State 4 1 6 8
Paine 4 1 6 8
Albany State 0 0 8 3
WEST DIVISION
Tuskegee 3 1 7 6
Miles 1 4 7 8
Kentucky State 0 6 4 10
StIImlan 0 5 4 11
Lane 0 5 0 7
LeMoyne-Owen 0 2 0 11

SIAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER.
Erika Sumpter, 6-2, Sr., C, CLARKATLANTA.-In
win over Lane, scored game-ighs of 24 points,
16 rebounds and ive blocks while also having
two steels.
NEWCOMER
BrIttnee Hazel, 6-0, Jr., F, FORT VALLEY STATE
- In wins over Lane and Ky. State, averaged 9.5
points, 8.5 rebounds, 2 blocks and 1.5 steals.


SW/AC SOUTHWESTERN
SWAC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
DIV ALL
W L W L
Southern 4 0 7 5
Miss. Valley St. 3 0 4 10
Grambling State 3 1 6 9
Jackson State 3 1 5 9
Texas Southern 2 1 5 9
Praide ViewA&M 1 2 1 12
Alabama State 1 3 8 7
AlabamaA&M 1 3 3 11
Ark. Pine Bluff 0 3 1 12
Alcorn State 0 4 1 14
SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Jasmyne Sanders, F, MVSU -Scored 14 points and
pulled down 15rebounds in win overAlabamaA&M.
Added 19 points and 7 boards in win overAlabama
State.Averaged 16.5 pointsand 11 boardsintwowhis.
NEWCOMER
YansmilnFuller,SOUTHERN-Scored 13pointsinwin
over Grambling and another 13 in win over Jackson
State. Shot 9 for 16 from the field.


INDEPENDENTS


Univ. of DC
W. Va. State
Central State
Tennessee State
Uincoln (Mo.)
Cheyney


W L
9 3
11 4
6 3
5 11
3 11
1 13


PLAYER OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Asia Grnenleaf,6-1,Sr.,F,W.VA. STATE-Scored
26 points and pulled down 16 rebounds in win over
Urbana. Had 22 points and 14 rebounds in wino
var Notre Dame Saturday. Averaged 24.0 poifs
and 15.0 rebounds in the two wins.
NEWCOMER
NA


STEPPING

INTO THE

VOID


HooPs SCORES- Hoops jockeying begins
MONDAY, JANUARY 13,2014- MEN


CIAA
Chowan 93, Livingstone 90
Eliz. City State 72, W-Salem State 68
Fayetteville State 70, Bowie State 66
Uncoln (Pa.) 71, Shaw 69, OT
Virginia State 67, J. C. Smith 57
Virginia Union 75. St Augustine's 71
MEAC
Coppin State 75, S. C. State 69
Florida A&M 76, NC A&T 66
Norfolk State 58, Delaware State 56
N. C. Central 64, Bethune-Cookman 49
Savannah State 56, Howard 54
SIAC
Albany State 80, LeMoyne-Owen 68


It ,





Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


January 16-22,2014


Ending the School to Prison Pipeline


Continued from front
Among the other recommenda-
tions:
-Ensure that school personnel
understand that they are responsi-
ble for administering routine stu-
dent discipline instead of security


or police officers.
-Draw clear distinctions about
the responsibilities of school secu-
rity personnel.
-Provide opportunities for
school security officers to develop
relationships with students and
parents.
The government advises schools
to establish procedures on how to
distinguish between disciplinary
infractions appropriately handled


by school officials compared with
major threats to school safety.
And, it encourages schools to col-
lect and monitor data that security
or police officers take to ensure
nondiscrimination.
The recommendations are non-


binding, but, in essence, the feder-
al government is telling the school
districts around the country that
they should adhere to the princi-
ples of fairness and equity in stu-
dent discipline or face strong
action if they don't.
Already, in March of last year,
the Justice Department spearhead-
ed a settlement with the Meridian,
Miss., school district to end dis-
criminatory disciplinary practices.


The black students in the district
were facing harsher punishment
than whites for similar misbehav-
ior.
In 2010, the New York Civil
Liberties Union sued the NYPD
for wrongful arrests, harassment,
and excessive force in the city's
public schools.
Education Secretary Arne
Duncan acknowledged the chal-
lenge is finding the balancing act
to keep school safe and orderly,
but when it comes to routine disci-
pline the "first instinct should not
be to call 911 when there's a prob-
lem."
Research suggests the racial dis-
parities in how students are disci-
plined are not explained by more
frequent or more serious misbe-
havior by students of color,
according to a letter sent to
schools with the recommendations
by the departments.
"For example, in our investiga-
tions, we have found cases where
African-American students were
disciplined more harshly and more
frequently because of their race
than similarly situated white stu-
dents," the letter said. "In short,
racial discrimination in school dis-
cipline is a real problem."
Holder and Duncan were inter-
viewed on Tuesday on the Rev. Al
Sharpton's radio show as part of a
national effort to draw attention to
the issue.


Annual MLK Holiday Celebrations Planned


The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Memorial Foundation will begin its
MLK Holiday Celebration on
Saturday, January 18, 2014, with a
"Let Freedom Sing" concert at
Edward Waters College's MiIne
Auditorium. The concert, featuring
songs that inspired the Civil Rights
Movement, is free to the public.
On Monday, January 20,2014, in
celebrating the legacy of one of
America's finest sons, Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr., their will be a
MLK Holiday Parade followed by a
post-parade celebration at
Metropolitan Park.
The Grand Marshal of the MLK


2014 Parade, posthumously, is
"Chief' L. Jerome Spates. Chief
Spates (as he was so affectionately
known) was a staunch supporter of
the MLK Holiday Parade in
Jacksonville, Florida.
The Parade will start at 10:00
a.m. on Monday, January 20, 2014,
at Jefferson and Water Streets in
Downtown Jacksonville. Among
the participants in the parade will
be Florida's Governor, Rick Scott,
Congresswoman Corrine Brown,
Jacksonville's Mayor Alvin Brown,
school groups, churches, organiza-
tions, and individuals.
The post-parade celebration will


take place at Metropolitan Park
directly at the conclusion of the
MLK Parade. Among the park
activities will be tributes to Mr.
Nelson (Madiba) Mandela; Dr.
Chester A. Aikens; Mr. Melvin
Alston; and Mr. William Stetson
Kennedy. Other activities include a
Battle of the Bands, music for all
age groups, and a host of vendors.
Additional information regarding
the MLK Holiday Grand Parade
and post-parade activity at
Metropolitan Park can be found at
www.mlkfdnorg.com. or calling
904-807-8358 or 904-463-2425.


Retirement? Not an Option U.S.

Retirement Crisis has "Racial Component'


By Jazelle Hunt
NNPA Washington
Correspondent
WASHINGTON (NNPA) More
than three-fifths of Black working-
age households 62 percent have
no assets in a retirement account,
according to a new study by the
National Institute of Retirement
Security (NIRS),
Working-age households contain
* residents 25 to 64 years old. Even
those Black households with assets
trail similarly situated Whites.
Among the 38.3 percent of Black
households age 55 to 64 who do
own accounts, the average savings
is $34,365. That's a fraction of the
$206,400 saved by their White
counterparts.
The report, "Race and Retirement
Security in the United States," is a
companion to a broader study of the
retirement gap using data from the
Bureau of Labor Statistics and the


Federal Reserve. In it, researchers
examine workplace retirement cov-
erage, retirement account owner-
ship, and retirement account bal-
ances among Whites, Blacks,
Latinos, and Asians.

"I think what the research shows
is that the U.S. retirement crisis has
really specific racial dimensions,
specifically with access and sawv
ings," says Nari Rhee, manager of
research at NIRS and the report's
author. "About 44 percent of Baby
Boomers and Generation Xers
won't even have enough saved to
meet their basic needs when they
retire."
In the report, Rhee describes the
savings gap as "stark," with the typ-
ical retirement account-owning
household of color with a balance
of $23,000, which is less than half
the $50,500 median balance of
White households with retirement


Family of Unarmed Man Shot Dead

in North Carolina Files Lawsuit
i Mecklenburg County and the city's
police department are also being
sued, according to a court docu-
:.,. ment.
Officer Randall Kerrick opened
fire on the 24-year-old, who was
struck 10 times by bullets and died
Jahat the scene in September 2013.
Police say Ferrell, who was
d unarmed ran towards them when
they arrived.
The former FAMU football play-
er was knocking on doors of the
upscale Bradfield Farms communi-
ty near Charlotte and seeking help
after his car crashed. One frantic
homeowner who thought Ferrell
was a threat had called 911.
The North Carolina Attorney
Jonathan Ferrell General's office said the case will
The family of Jonathan A. Ferrell go to a grand jury on Jan. 21. The
continues to seek justice in his lawyer of the family is seeking an
death and filed a wrongful death indictment of Kerrick who is
lawsuit Monday against the North charged with voluntary manslaugh-
Carolina police officer who shot ter.
him. The city "of Charlotte,


accounts.
In addition to the gap in savings,
a gap in access to retirement
options persists, particularly for pri-
vate-sector workers. In its larger
retirement study, the NIRS found
that private sector retirement access
is near its lowest point since 1979.
As of 2010, a little more than half
of all Black workers have access to
employer-sponsored retirement
coverage (54.3 percent), and less
than half of them actually take
advantage of said plans (43 per-
cent).
There are several causes for the
lack access to retirement plans
among Black households. For
starters, employers are not legally
required to provide benefits or
financial literacy courses to their
employees.
Rhee points out that in other
developed nations, employment-
based retiree provisions tend to be
effective because of an automatic or
mandatory component.
Additionally, the types of jobs that
offer such benefits are in national
decline, while lower-wage jobs
with fewer benefits are proliferat-
ing. Those that do offer retirement
benefits are switching from defined
benefit (DB) pensions, which are
automatic retirement savings, to
401(k), IRA and other opt-in
accounts, which depend on what
employees decide to save.
Lazetta Rainey Braxton, incom-
ing president of the Association of
African American Financial
Advisors, sums it up this way:
"Access to retirement plans is very
tied to industry, level of education,
income level.. .people of color are
still catching up to these opportuni-
ties."
The retirement gap is also tied to
the wealth gap. Both Braxton and
Rhee point out that there are socie-
tal and historical factors at play.
Although African Americans are
well represented in the public-sec-
tor ranks where DB pensions are
still the norm, lagging generational
wealth curtails this boost.


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The curious bank."'








fBeyonce Pens Feminist Essay


Beyoncb has sharpened her femi-
nist voice in a new essay she con-
s o d d tribute to The Shriver Report, a
new, multimedia initiative gaining
attention created by journalist and
former first lady of California
Maria Shriver.
The 2014 report, A Woman's
Nation Pushes Back From The
Brink, is comprised of data, analy-
sis and essays that aim to change
the way American society relates to
women, improving their outcomes
6in various sectors leading to social
Bobbi Kristina Brown and her husband Nick Gordon empowerment.
Perhaps as an extension of the
Bobbi Kristina Announces She's Married discussion of feminism in a song
Bobbi Kristina Brown and Nick Gordon may have secretly said "I do." from her latest album,
The 20-year-old daughter of the late Whitney Houston took to Twitter to "***Flawless," Beyonc6 has con-
share a photo of the duo's wedding bands last week. tribute an essay to the report that
"@nickdgordon #HappilyMarried SO#Inlove if you didn't get it the first enumerates the ways in which
time that is," she captioned the pic of the couple's hands. American women lag behind in
The pair's relationship has raised some eyebrows as Gordon was adopt- terms of equal pay.
ed by Brown's mother at the age of 12. In her piece, Gender Equality Is a


Will This 78-year-old Vegan Bodybuilder


Make You Reconsider Your Diet?


who spend their mealtimes
Beating lentils, a 78-year-old
vegan bodybuilder is trying
to prove the diet can be
2 Phealthy.
I a ovJim Morris, a former
bodybuilding champion who
has competed against the
likes of Arnold
S" .' Schwarzenegger, has posed
mennude in the style of The
Before You Eat Thinker Rodin statue, to
show off his still impressive
"$i ttg vegftn helps to present
obci hmt dtat d..COMM. physique.
&dt. t t, T, .h. M..11 Y- IM r M orris says th at his
health greatly improved
after he retired from compet-
itive bodybuilding in 1985
and became a vegetarian and
then later a vegan.
Jim Morris c He's posed on behalf of
Peta, the pressure group that
In a move designed to distance campaigns for animal rights.
veganism from its traditional image Vegans have a strict diet that
of malnourished-looking bearded excludes meat, eggs, dairy products
men wearing sandals (with socks)


and all animal-derived ingredients.
"The protein in animal products is
so laden with fats and chemicals
and all sorts of stuff that's harmful
to you", says Mr Morris.
"When I was competing and
stuffing down all of that sort of
stuff, I had lots of digestive prob-
lems. I know as a fact I would not
be here and I would not be in this
condition now had I continued eat-
ing the way I was."
Despite veganism's uncool
image, it has a number of glam-
orous adherents, including the
singer-songwriter Bryan Adams,
the model Petra Nemcova and the
US TV host Ellen DeGeneres, who
had a vegan wedding when she
married Portia de Rossi.
The Peta ad encourages people to
"muscle your way to better health"
- and to a reduced risk of obesity,
heart disease, cancer, diabetes and
strokes by going vegan.


Myth!, of the gender pay gap
Beyonc6 writes: "Today, women
make up half of the U.S. workforce,
but the average working woman
earns only 77 percent of what the
average working man makes. But
unless women and men both say
this is unacceptable, things will not
change. Men have to demand that
their wives, daughters, mothers,
and sisters earn more---commensu-
rate with their qualifications and
not their gender. Equality will be
achieved when men and women are
granted equal pay and equal
respect."
While she does not go into
specifics on the Beyonc6 album
track, this message is echoed in the
lengthy sample featured at the heart
of "***Flawless," culled from a
TEDx talk given by African novel-
ist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on
feminism.
On the song Adichie is quoted as
saying (at the end of a sizable serv-


ing of feminist mus-
ings), "Feminist: the
person who believes
in the social, political
and economic equal-
ity of the sexes."
Beyonc6 is cer-
tainly making her
voice heard in her
belief that gender
equality is something
worth fighting for.
In addition to these
media jaunts into
expressing this ideal,
the star is also the co-founder of the
organization Chime for Change,
which is dedicated to creating
uplifting programs for women and
girls around the world, ensuring
that women of all ages have access
to education, health care and
employment, particularly in regions
where women are denied these
necessities. The organization held a
benefit concert in June 2013 that


Tyler Perry and Oprah Winfrey
OWN Network Orders

Another Tyler Perry Sitcoms
Producer Tyler Perry will soon have a fourth series on Oprah Winfrey's
OWN network.
OWN saidthat it has ordered a Perry drama, "Single Moms Club," that
will premiere this fall. It's about a group of mothers who create a support
group after being brought together by an incident at their children's school.
The success of Perry's series keyed a turnaround for OWN, which strug-
gled at its start. The drama "The Haves and the Have Nots" and the com-
1 1 - -M X T t I


raised $4.3 million in ticket sales.
Beyonce's particular brand of
feminism
But, Beyonce's costume for the
concert, much like her brand of
feminism, drew some criticism. Her
leather panties topped with a sheer
top were seen by some as inappro-
priate attire for an event meant to
empower women.
Even the release of Beyonce, her
fifth studio album, reignited
debates about how feminism is
defined, with white and black
women generally holding opposing
views on the celebration of wealth
and physical beauty that permeates
Beyonce's festive style of elevating
women.
Yet, her recent moves are a fierce
departure from merely performing
songs with titles such as
"Independent Women," and "Run
the. World (Girls)." These- songs,
and cute moves such as touring
with an all-women band, could be
perceived as mere lip service to the
feminist movement that comes with
a hefty personal and financial pay-
off.
Speaking to British Vogue,
Beyonc6 has been quoted as saying,
"I guess I am a modem-day femi-
nist. I do believe in equality. Why
do you have to choose what type of
woman you are? Why do you have
to label yourself anything?"
In her piece for The Shriver
Report, through which she joins
ranks with other strong feminist
leaders throughout the ages through
the power of the pen, Beyonc6 is
staking a stronger claim on her role


* eay "L o Ve 1 % y N oetj o r bp nl its seco nd season n .last w eeK -,, ;-, '. .,........... ....
W Nlso a te *Per wed-F r r-r- s. ,. -. asatninist icolk' s .
a a ed v-- "Fo r B e -o rIW o rse.-
OWNf. al e r i 4%c", ?l~a *!~aFc rter r*sei~~~i..^-- 49^w^.r^. -


GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER.

United Way of
Northeast Florida


LiveUnitedNortheastFlorida.org


LIVE UNITED


January 16-22, 2014


Pace 9 Mrs. Perry's Free Press




Janur 162,21[s er'sFe rs ae1


Serving Others

- IS GOOD FOR THE SOUL -

Volunteering is the best way to honor a man who dedicated his life to
serving others. On this special holiday, Publix encourages you to keep his
dream alive and create your own legacy by giving back to your community.

Celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
112012014 -


GET INVOLVED!
For information about service
activities in your community,
click the Service Day Tab on
our Facebook page.
facebook.com/publix





WHERE SP IISx
WHR P ub lix.
W^^f H WH E RE SHO PP I NG IS A P LE A SU R E


January 16-22, 2014


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 10








Popstar

Beyonce Pens

Feminist Essay

for America
Page 9





















Secretary of State John Kerry condemned a new Nigerian law that pro-
hibits same-sex marriages and vastly restricts the rights of gay and lesbian
Sevncitizens to even gather together.
Things

Men















Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan quietly signed the strict measure
into law earlier this month, but the news began circulating the globe this
Hidweek. The revelation drew a swift response from Kerry.frm







"Beyond even prohibiting same sex marriage, this law dangerously
Page 7'







U.restricts freedom of assembly, association, and expression for alld"
OvNigeriaery said in a statementi-gay Law




According to the law, anyone who enters into a same-sex marriage, civil
Secreunionta or domestic partnKerryship could face up to 14 years inan law that prison.
hAdditionally, same-sex marriages legand vastly performed inicts the ight other countrid lesbian
citizens to even gather together.




Nigwould be conPresidentred void by the Nigerian quietly signed the strict measure
into law earlier this month, but the news began circulating the globe this




weeThe law also revelation drew and swift respobian citizens from meeting in public set-rry
ti"Beyond even prohibiting same sex marriage, this law dangerouslygs.
"Any restricts freedom of assembly, operates or participates in gay clubs, societies
and organizations or directly or indirectly makes public show of same-sexement
amording to the law, anyonigeria commuters an offence and shall each be liable, civil
union or domestic partnership could of 10 years in prison," the law says.
WAdditionally, same-sex marriages legally performed in other countries





Amiri Baraka Dies At Age 79
would be considered void by the Nigerian governmenter who was bo LeRoi





*r ^ ^^ge> ^ *Jones, has died at age 79. Baraka's career spanned
The law also restricts g a nd activism: He was anfrom meetingfluential public soet and an
tings.
"Any person who registers, operates or participates in gay clubs, societies
and orgaizations or directly or indirectly makes public show of same-sex
amorous relationship in Nigeria commits an offence and shall each be liable




on conviction to a twr of 10 yeard-wsinning playwright who didn't shy a.ay
W writer A icism and Ac poitics. He died oftcom-
Amiri Baraka Dies At Age 79
~Amidi Baraka, the writer who was born LeRoi
Jones, has died at age 79. Baraka's career spanned
art and activism: He was an influential poet and an
award-wNinning playwright who didn't shy away
fr~om social criticism and politics. He died of com-
plications from diabetes.
Ow of Baraka's crcwnirg achievements stands as
the cataloging of black culture and history in Blues
People. "a panoramic sociocultural history of
African-American music," as Eugene Holley, Jr.,
Wrote for NPR last year.
The book was published in 1963 and has never been out ofprint
As The Los Angeles Times reports, "Baraka led the Black Arts Movement,
an aesthetic sibling to the Black Panthers. Although the movement was frac-
tious and short-lived, it involved significant authors such as Gwendolyn
Brooks, Eldridge Cleaver, Gil-Scott Heron, Nikki Giovanni, Ishmael Reed
and Quincy Troupe."

Racism May Make

Black Men Age Faster
Black men who experience "high levels" of racism and internalize it may
age more quickly, according to a new University of Maryland study.
Though it is well known that African-Americans suffer disproportionally
from illness compared to other races, the university said the study is the first
to link racism to accelerated aging and age-related disease. The study found
that the more racial discrimination the men experienced and the more they
reported a "stronger bias against their own racial group," the greater their
signs of accelerated aging, according to the university.
According to the study, black men who reported more serious or frequent
racial discrimination and who had an implicit bias against their own race
had far shorter telomeres, which cap the ends of DNA chromosomes and
naturally shrink over time. Telomeres are used by scientists to measure cell
age and are known to shorten more rapidly when people experience Stress.
The study also found that black men who experienced racism but had
stronger positive feelings .about their racial group did not have the same
shrunken telomeres.

Judge OKs Pact Ending State of

Arkansas Desegregation Payments
LITILE ROCK, Ark. A federal judge has ruled that Arkansas can stop
making payments in one of the nation's most historic desegregation efforts
but cautioned that work remains to ensure Little Rock-area students receive
a proper education.
The state has made more than $1 billion in payments to three Little Rock-
area school districts since 1989 to aid desegregation efforts. Under the deal
approved by U.S. District Judge Price Marshall on Monday, those payments
will end in four years, even though one of the districts still hasn't been
declared desegregated.
"I think this is a day we can write in the book and draw a circle around


and remember that we did something important," Marshall said. He said his
objective was to ensure the agreement among lawyers for the state, the dis-
tricts and black schoolchildren was fair, reasonable and adequate.
"There comes a time ... where things should stop and things should go in
the book," Marshall said. 'This is a fair and appropriate place to have a
stop."
Little Rock was the scene of the nation's first major desegregation battle
when President Dwight Eisenhower used federal troops to escort nine black
schoolchildren into Central High School, the city system's flagship school
Court cases involving desegregation have been in place during most years
since then.
The case settled this week stemmed from a 1982 lawsuit when the Little
Rock district said policies among the state and the North Little Rock and
Pulaski County districts left all schools countywide with a racial imbalance.
Under a 1989 settlement, the state agreed to give the districts more money,
but the funding never ended.


Dr. R.B.
Holmes Sets

Eyes on Top
Office of
National Baptist

Convention
Page 6


Common Core

Education

Standards

Create Strange

Bedfellows
Page 4
r[-


FLORIDA'S FIRST COAST QUALITY BLACK


WEtKLY


Volume 27 No. 11 Jacksonville, Florida January 16-22, 2014


Government Steps in to Halt School to Prison Pipeline


The Obama administration is
issuing new recommendations on
classroom discipline that seek to
end the apparent disparities in how
students of different races are pun-
ished for violating school rules.
Civil rights advocates have long
said that a "school-to-prison"
pipeline stems from overly zealous
school discipline policies targeting
black and Hispanic students that
bring them out of school and into
the court system.
Attorney General Eric Holder
said the problem often stems from
well intentioned "zero-tolerance"
policies that too often inject the
criminal justice system into the res-
olution of problems. Zero tolerance
policies, a tool that became popular
in the 1990s, often spell out uni-
form and swift punishment for
offenses such as truancy, smoking
or carrying a weapon. Violators can
lose classroom time or become sad-


died with a criminal record, even referral to law enforcement
"Ordinary troublemaking can and then you end up with kids that
sometimes provoke responses that end up in police precincts instead of
are overly severe, including out of the principal's office," Holder said.
school suspensions, expulsions and In American schools, black stu-


dents without disabilities were
more than three times as likely as
whites to be expelled or suspended,
according to government civil
rights data collection from 2011-
2012. Although black students
made up 15 percent of students in
the data collection, they made up
more than a third of students sus-
pended once, 44 percent of those
suspended more than once and
more than a third of students
expelled.
More than half of students
involved in school-related arrests or
referred to law enforcement were
Hispanic or black, according to the
data.
The recommendations being
issued Wednesday encourage
schools to ensure that all school
personnel are trained in classroom
management, conflict resolution
and approaches to de-escalate class-
room disruptions. Cont. on page 3


100 Black Men Scholarship Fair Nets Thousands for Students


,r'


Pictured L-R: Kevin Cotton J100 Education Co-chair, Tillis DeVaughn J100 VP Programs, Candice Roberts, Raines H.S. (Alabama A&M,
Bethune Cookman-University and Kentucky State University), Thomas Raines J100 VP Operations, Charles Griggs J100 President, James
Jett J100 Chapter Monitor, Chandler Colston, Raines H.S. (Kentucky State University), Laura Dorsey-Harris, Infinite Scholars Program,
Ebonee Maxey, Raines H.S. Ron Ellis Infinite Scholars Program, Marvin Thorne, First Coast H.S. and Ken Pinnix J100 VP Economic
Empowerment.
The Infinite Scholars Program for high school graduating seniors, tion fees, onsite admission and present to interview students.
along with the 100 Black Men of Held at the University of North thousands of dollars in scholarship Approximately $150,000 in schol-
Jacksonville, Inc. (J100) recently Florida, participating colleges and funds. More than 25 universities arships were awarded to accepted
hosted their annual scholarship fair universities offered waived applica- and educational providers were and attending students.

Contract States Alabama State University President,

Gwendolyn Boyd, Unable to Cohabitate With Suitors


Gwendolyn Boyd, the new presi-
dent of Alabama State University
reportedly has a clause in her con-
tract that forbids her from having
love interests stay overnight in her
presidential residence for extended
periods of time, The Birmingham
News reports.
According to her contract, the 58-
year-old will receive an annual
salary of $300,000, a car, and the on
campus presidential residence.
However, Boyd, who is single and
lives alone, is not allowed to cohab-
itate with anyone with whom she is
romantically involved with who is
not her husband. She is also forbid-
den from allowing immediate fami-
ly members to reside in the home.
The stipulation is outlined in a


clause in her
contract:
For so long as
Dr Boyd is pres-
ident and a sin-
gle person, she
shall not be
allowed to
cohabitate in the
president's resi-
dence with any
person with
whom she has a
romantic rela-
tion.
Boyd, an ASU
alum, graduated
in 1977 with a
bachelors in
mathematics.


Dr. Gwendolyn Boyd


She went on to
attend Yale
University's
School of
Engineering in
New Haven,
Connecticut,
becoming the
school's first
African-
American woman
to receive a mas-
ters degree in
mechanical engi-
neering in 1979.
She said she has
no qualms with
the language in
the contract.
"I do live


alone, so it was not problematic for
me," she said.
However, Raymond Cotton, a
lawyer who spoke to Inside Higher
Ed about the university's move said
the clause could be illegal.
"I don't know of any state that
has the right to invade someone's
residence even if the state owns that
residence," Cotton said. "To convey
that residence and dictate what kind
of romantic relationship you can
have in that facility I mean, she's
not in prison."
Boyd's contract duration is for
two years, after which the universi-
ty's board of trustees have the
option to decide whether they'd like
to extend the agreement for another
two years or not.


50 Cents






Pare 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press January 16-22, 2014


Charles Dudley Warner
infamously said, "Politics
makes strange bedfellows."
What if I told you that former
Florida Governor Jeb Bush
and current president Barack
Obama agree on more than they
probably disagree?
I certainly haven't talked to Gov.
Bush of late or maybe Inever have,
but I know that he has strong ties to
the Hispanic community and
believes in immigration reform -
much like our President.
But imfiiigration isn't the topic
of the day. The topic is education
and why "Common Core stan-
dards" is such a hot issue in
Florida. President Obama is a
major supporter of Common Core
and so is Gov. Bush, although
many Republican-led groups are
coming out against the standards.
So what's the big deal? Well in
education the word accountabili-
ty, and terminology like measure-
able outcomes is talked about as
much as Jesus is in the Baptist
church. No jab at good old Baptist
folks I am one of them.
Accountability in education
makes a lot of sense; but where
Democrats and Republicans nor-
mally differ is on the policies used
to measure success in education.
In the past, Republicans have
pointed the finger at teachersfor our
public school challenges. They
have also focused legislative efforts
on ending long-term teacher con-
tracts and creating policies that
base teacher accountability on


Common Core Ed Standards



Create Strange Bedfellows


unreliable standardized tests.
Of course, all of these anti-
teacher policies would help our
children learn better.
Anyway, back to the subject at
hand, what is Common Core? Well
according to The Foundation for
Florida's Future, which was found-
ed by Gov. Bush, "Common Core
State Standards are a state-led
effort to establish clear world-class
educational standards for English
language arts and mathematics that
States can voluntarily adopt."
Continued, "Common Core stan-
dards are designed to ensure that
students graduating from high
school are prepared to go to college
or enter the workforce; and that
parents, teachers, and students have
a clear understanding of what is
expected of them."
Common Core started out as a
joint project by officials in about
four dozen states; but the imple-
mentation of the standards has
divided the Republican Party.
Many conservatives, especially
those who associate more with the
Tea Party, have grown worried that
the standards will lead to unprece-
dented federal intrusion in local
schools.
For those who have been promot-
ing the values of school accounta-
bility, Common Core makes sense
and maybe the best option available


that provides clear measurable
standards.
Supporters of the standards insist
that the new benchmarksonly out-
line what students are expected to
learn, while curriculum is still con-
trolled at the local level.
The standards are designed to
ensure that students graduating
from high school are prepared to
enter credit bearing entry courses in
two or four-year college programs
or enter the workforce. The stan-
dards are clear and concise to
ensure that parents, teachers, and
students have a clear understanding
of the expectations in reading, writ-
ing, speaking and listening, lan-
guage, and mathematics in school.
National and State teachers
unions are backing Common Core.
Again, talk about an unholy
alliance. In the past, the accounta-
bility folks and teacher's union
have been at odds over most educa-
tional issues. Both groups seem to
agree that the standards establish
what students need to learn, but
they do not dictate how teachers
should teach.
Unions say that under Common
Core, teachers will continue to
devise lesson plans and tailor
instruction to the individual needs
of the students in their classrooms.
They also point out that the stan-
dards drafting process relied on


The War on Poverty


By George E. Curry
NNPA Columnist
We are celebrating the 50th
anniversary of the War on Poverty
at roughly the same time we're
observing the 85th birthday of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. That's fit-
ting because despite the concentrat-
ed effort to neuter King by overem-
phasizing his 1964 "I Have a
Dream Speech," his last days on
earth were spent trying to uplift
garbage workers in Memphis,
Tenn. and planning a Poor Peoples
Campaign that would culminate in
a march to the nation's capital.
Unlike today, when our politi-
cians seek to get elected and re-
elected by groveling and catering to
the middle class, President Lyndon
B. Johnson declared war on pover-
ty in his Jan. 8, 1964 State of the
Union message.
"This administration here and
now, declares unconditional war on
poverty in America," he said. "We
shall not rest until that war is won.
The richest nation on Earth can
afford to win it. We cannot afford to
lose it."
Unfortunately, another war -
Vietnam caused Johnson to
retreat before he could declare, in
the words associated with President
George W. Bush, "Mission
Accomplished." Instead of rallying
the troops around this noble cause,
some subsequent presidents retreat-
ed. President Reagan saw fit to joke
about this serious national under-
taking.
Providing a throwaway line that


conservatives still use today, the
former actor said: "In 1964 the
famous War. on Poverty.,iwas.
declared and a funny thing hap-
pened...I guess you could say,
poverty won the war."
Liberals were also misleading,
saying instead of having a War on
Poverty, it was more like a skirmish
on poverty.
The truth lies somewhere
between those polar opposites.
Since we began collecting such
statistics, the lowest U.S. poverty
rate was 11.1 percent in 1973. It
rose to 15.2 percent in 1983 before
falling back to 11.3 percent. In
2012, 13 million people lived
below half of the poverty line, most
of them children.
According to scholars at
Columbia University, when recal-
culated to include expenses not
counted in official statistics, the
poverty rate fell from more than 25
percent in 1967 to about 16 percent
today. Over that period, the child
poverty rate declined form 30 per-
cent to less than 20 percent and the
elderly poverty rate decline dra-
matically, from 45 percent to 15
percent.
"The truth is that the nation's
investment in the War on Poverty
has yielded huge. and lasting
gains," Los Angeles Times colum-
nist Michael Hiltzik wrote. "LBJ's
program was not just a plan for
financial handouts. It also encom-
passed a broad approach encom-
passing 'better schools, and better
health, and better homes, and better


teachers and experts from across
the country.
The reason this debate is building
is because Common Core standards
are set to be fully implemented in
grades kindergarten through 12 in
the 2014-15 school year.
Opposition to the standards
seems to be building some momen-
tum; and with 2014 being an elec-
tion year, the Governor and other
elected Republicans are being very
careful about how they manage this
issue.
Education Commissioner Pam
Stewart said earlier this week that
her department would propose
about 40 changes to the Common
Core benchmarks.
This move came on the heels of a
vote by a caucus of the Republican
Party of Florida's state commit-
teemen and committeewomen
backing a resolution opposing the
Common Core standards. So the
fun is just beginning.
Now the question at hand is
whose politics wins out?
"There comes a time when one
must take a position that is neither
safe, nor political, nor popular, but
he must take it because conscience
tells him it is right," said Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr.
Signing off from the Florida
Capitol,
Reggie Fullwood


- and MLK


training, and better job, opportuni-
ties,' as he put it in his address on
Jan. 8, 1964. LBJ's campaign
brought us Head Start (in 1965) as
well as Medicare and Medicaid. He
understood that political and social
empowerment were indispensable
factors in economic betterment, so
he pushed for the Civil Rights Act
of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act
of 1965."
Still, many expected the poverty
rate to be lower than it is today.
According to the Center of
Budget and Policy Priorities (CPP),
"The poverty story over the last
half-century in the United States is
mixed for several reasons. A much
stronger safety net along with fac-
tors such as rising education levels,
higher employment among women,
and smaller families helped push
poverty down. At the same time,
rising numbers of single-parent
families, growing income inequali-
ty, and worsening labor market
prospects for less-skilled workers
have pushed in the other direction.
"Today's safety net which
includes important programs and
improvements both from the
Johnson era and thereafter cuts
poverty nearly in half. In 2012, it
kept 41 million people, including 9
million children, out of poverty,
according to the Census Bureau's
Supplemental Poverty Measure
(SPM). If government benefits are
excluded, today's poverty rate
would be 29 percent under the
SPM; with those benefits, the rate
is 16 percent."


'LORIDA S rlIRST COAST QUALITY BLACK WEEKLY


MAILING ADDRESS
P.O. Box 43580
Jacksonville, FL 32203


Sylvia Perry

PUBLISHER

S CONTRIBL
acksolnV1 E.O.Huthc
| S nv.llle Latimer, PI
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Email: JfreePress@aol.com


TELEPHONE
(904) 634-1993
Fax (904) 765-3803


Rita Perry

Publisher Emeritus


JLITORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Grlggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald Fullwood,
hinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Marsha Oliver, Marretta
hyllis Mack, Tonya Austin, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver,
wn, Rahman Johnson, Headshots, William Jackson.


Other factors also contribute to
today's poverty rate, including ris-
ingi income 'inequality, -according to
the Center for Budget and Policy
Priorities. It stated that between
1964 and 2012, the share of nation-
al income going to the top 1 percent
of U.S. households nearly doubled,
from 11 percent to 22 percent in
2012. Meanwhile, the share of
national income going to the poor-
est fifth of households fell between
1979 (the earliest year available)
and 2012.
There is also the issue of shrink-
ing jobs that pay decent wages,
especially those at the low end of
the pay scale.
"Moreover, large racial dispari-
ties remain, with child poverty
much higher and the share of
African Americans with a college
degree much lower than among
whites. Meanwhile, poverty in
America is high compared to other
wealthy nations largely because our
safety net does less to lift people
out of poverty than those of other
Western nations," the Center on
Budget and Policy Priorities noted.
The War on Poverty if far from
over. Although slow to join the bat-
tle, President Obama is now fully
engaged, underscoring our coun-
try's economic inequality. This is
no time for the president or
Congress to surrender.
George E. Curry, former editor-
in-chief of Emerge magazine, is
editor-in-chief of the National
Newspaper Publishers Association
News Service (NNPA.)

DISCLAIMER
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tunities for free expression of ideas.
The Jacksonville Free Press has its
view, but others may differ.
Therefore, the Free Press ownership
reserves the right to publish views
and opinions by syndicated and
local columnist, professional writers
and other writers' which are solely
their own. Those views do not neces-
sarily reflect the policies and posi-
tions of the staff and management of
the Jacksonville Free Press.
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Bui.Hnos w thageb G OP.racso


How the GOP



Can Boost Their



Black Outreach

By William Reed
NNPA Columnist
"I'd go to the NAACP and talk about why the
African-American community should be demanding
paychecks and not be satisfied with food stamps." -
Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich in
2013
Who's your favorite Republican candidate for
2014? Elections for the United States Senate will be
held on Nov. 4,2014, with 33 of the 100 Senate seats
being contested whose winners will serve six-year
terms. Territorial and state elections will also occur for the U.S. House of
Representatives, governors in states and local elections on this date.
As we start 2014, political polls indicate, three out of four Americans
believe that "the nation is on the wrong track." Despite their dissatisfaction
with what has been going on, few Blacks have lists of Republican candi-
dates they are "considering voting for." The party still has a reputation of
being racist and if it doesn't get more votes from "minorities" the Grand
Old Party (GOP) may soon go the way of the Whigs. While the
Republicans cannot continue competing as "a party of old White men" the
party establishment has come up with an illusion of increased number of
Black Republicans.
Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus says the party
wants to broaden its appeal and reach more Americans, particularly
Blacks. But, Republicans are simply mouthing the same staid policy and
rhetoric. In Congress, Republican representatives hit new lows among
Blacks for their 'role in the government shutdown.' r spite of the
Republicans' expat'si6rof'thdiP nmabers'f-Bllkt 4hbltiity bf Blacks
still view Republicans as Whites who only care about other rich Whites.
Republicans still lack gravitas in garnering Black votes. The majority of
Blacks believe they're supposed to be Democrats. Nine times out of 10, the
average Black family feel Democrats are compassionate and care about the
little guy and those in need.
The GOP is at a great political disadvantage and can only be kept rele-
vant by increased votes and support from racial minorities. To be compet-
itive, the Republican Party has to take creditable and strategic measures
that can counter the Democratic monopoly on the Black vote.
Republicans continue to act in ways of old and against new ways to gain
interests and support from Blacks. The Republicans have no message that
resonates among Afriican-American voters. To get out of:the single digits
among Blacks, Republicans must rethink their message, policies and
method of delivery.
This time around, the Republic National Committee's (RNC) outreach to
Black voters must be more substantive. In the 2012 election, only 6 per-
cent of African-American voters cast ballots for the GOP's Mitt Romney.
After their last showing, how serious can the Republicans be about getting
the Black vote if they don't utilize the Black Press to present these views?
It's not "racism" against Blacks, but "benign neglect" that causes
Republicans to lose Black votes. Even modest inroads into the Black com-
munity could tip a multitude of elections the GOP's way. To get Black
votes Republicans will have to go into Black neighborhoods with a con-
sistent message that explains ways, conservative principles, values and
enterprise, can and do, work for African Americans.
Newton Leroy "Newt" Gingrich has been a powerbroker in Washington
for decades. He has long relationships with Black decision makers and
influencers in the style GOPers need to employ to garner greater numbers
of Black votes. Newt knows the GOP must approach Black voters in cred-
ible and creative ways. The GOP has a Washington establishment of
entrenched congressmen and consultants who Newt can teach a thing or
two about what to do in "Black outreach." While Black newspapers are not
a part of today's Republicans' outreach, Gingrich's decades-long business
and political relationship with late Atlanta Daily World publisher C.A.
Scott should prompt some new age thinking at the old RNC.
William Reed is head of the Business Exchange Network and available
for speaking/seminar projects through the Bailey Group.org.


A A A A


v~sse~sK~.U=fss


January 16-22,2014


Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press