The Jacksonville free press

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The Jacksonville free press
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Rita Luffborough Perry ( Jacksonville Fla )
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Full Text



CBC Nominates
Rep. Sheila
Jackson Lee
to Head Up
Department of
Homeland Security
Page 10



The Real

Story Behind

the New

Hit Movie

The Butler
Page 9



Jazz Legend George Duke Dies at 67
Keyboard pioneer George Duke passed away August 5th at the age of
67.
Known as a virtuoso in his field, Duke was a multifaceted musician
in jazz, funk, R&B and fusion and, and produced and composed for
Miles Davis, Gladys Knight, Anita Baker and Johnny Gill, among
many others. He collaborated with Jill Scott and Frank Zappa. And, he
created more than 30 of his own solo projects, including his most recent
album, DreamWeaver, which was dedicated to his wife Corine, who
died of cancer just last year.
Duke also worked as music director, including for the 1989 Nelson
Mandela tribute concert in London and NBC's music performance pro-
gram Sunday Night.
His work has been sampled by Kanye West (for Common's "Break My
Heart" off Finding Forever), Ice Cube ("True to the Game"), MF Doom
("I Hear Voices," "Someday"), Spice 1 ("In My Neighborhood") and
9th Wonder (for NC rapper Kaze's "Spirit of '94").
Duke was also featured on Jill Scott's "Whenever You're Around" off
her third album, The Real Thing: Words and Sounds Vol. 3.

Tawana Brawley Begins Making
Restitution Payments
NEW YORK A black woman who set off a racial firestorm as a
teenager after alleging she was raped by a group of white men in 1987
has begun making defamation payments to one of them.
Tawana Brawley has paid just over $3.700 to former county prose-
cutor Steven Pagones, the Ne\w York Post reported. Pagones won a
claim against her and her advisers, including the Rev. Al Sharpton, after
he was named as an attacker.
Brawley claimed she had been sexually assaulted by white men who
who smeared her with feces and scra%% led racial epithets on hei body.
The case quickly made headlines and drew the attention of Sharpton.
who became an outspoken advocate for the teen.
A special state grand jury later determined that Brawley had fabricat-
ed her claims, perhaps to aoid punishment for staying out late.
Pagones sued Brawley for defamation and won a $185.000 judgment.
She now owes himmore than $400.000 with interest.
Brawley lives in Virginia and works as a nurse. The Post reported her
location in December. and Pagones then filed papers to have her wages
garnished for the payments owed him.
Her parents have insisted Brawley's claim of being raped was true.

FAMU Hazing Defendant Accepts
Plea Deal, Avoids Jail
Lasherry Codner, 22, has accepted a plea deal and pleaded no contest
to felony hazing in the death of FAMU student Robert Champion,
according to the Orlando Sentinel. A manslaughter charge against
Codner was dropped and she was sentenced to four years of probation
and must complete an anti-hazing course.
The lone woman charged in the 2011 hazing incident must also do 100
hours of community service and 50 hours of public speaking to middle
and high school students about making poor decisions.
Former drum major Ryan Dean, who was involved in the incident,
told investigators that Codner was behind Champion during the hazing
either holding him back or pushing him.

Black Unemployment
Rate Lowest Since 2009
The unemployment rate for Blacks fell from 13.7 percent in June to
12.6 percent in July, the lowest jobless rate for Blacks since January
2009, according to the latest jobs report from the Labor Department.
Although economists warn against being too optimistic about one
month's jobs numbers, some economists found it unusual for the Black
unemployment rate to fall more than a percentage point from June to
July, as the jobless rate for Whites remained stagnant at 6.6 percent.
The unemployment rate for Black men over 20 was 13 percent in June
and 12.5 percent in July. The jobless rate for White men over 20 was
6.2 percent in June and rose slightly to 6.3 percent in July.
The unemployment rate for Black women over 20 plummeted from
12 percent in June to 10.5 percent in July. The jobless rate for White
women over 20 dipped from 6 percent to 5.8 percent over the same
time period.


Smithsonian Seeks Trayvon

Hoodie for Permanent Display
The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and
Culture wants to acquire the hoodie Trayvon Martin wore the night he
was shot and killed by George Zimmerman for its permanent collec-
tion.
The hoodie became an international symbol in "Justice for Trayvon"
rallies and social media campaigns to support the teen and his family
before and during the trial for his murder. George Zimmerman was
acquitted of second-degree murder charges in July.
Prosecutors brought the gray hooded sweatshirt in as evidence dur-
ing the trial. The U.S. Department of Justice currently has the hoodie,
as they investigate the case for civil rights violations.
The National Museum of African American Museum will open in
2015 in Washington, D.C.


Black Students
Found to Continue
Education at

Underfunded
'Racially
Separate' Colleges
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Florida lawmakers will hold
hearings this fall on the state's
"Stand Your Ground" self-defense
law, which has become a lightning
rod for criticism following the
acquittal of George Zimmerman.
TThe announcement by Will
Weatherford, the speaker of
Florida's House of Representatives,
marked the biggest concession yet
by the state's Republican leaders to
protesters' demands for a top-to-
bottom review of the law, which
allows people in fear of serious
injury to use deadly force to defend
themselves rather than retreat.
Since Zimmerman's acquittal
on July 13, Martin's grieving par-
ents, backed by African-American

Drives


Dream

Defenders

"Doing the

Right Thing"

by Sitting In
Page 4


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Volume 26 No. 41 Jacksonville, Florida Augus 8-14, 2013
1 -


Gun Violence Leading Cause

of Death of Black Children
by Freddie Allen ; !
Gun violence is the
leading cause of death ao
among Black children
and teens, according
to a newreport by the
Children's Defense
Fund.
The report titled,
"Protect Children,
Not Guns 2013,"
painted grim picture of the national gun violence epidemic that is the
second-leading cause of death among all children ages 1-19. Only car
accidents claim the lives of more children and teenagers than guns.
According to the report, White children were nearly three times more
likely to be killed in a car accident than by a gun. In stark contrast,
"Black children and teens were twice as likely to be killed by a gun than
to be killed in a car accident." Continued on page 3


Back To School


Benefitting Our Communities


Masons and Eastern Stars present 4th year of giving back This past Saturday, the
Prince Hall Affiliated (PHA) family of Masons and Order of the Eastern Star (OES) held their annual "Back to
School Bash," where school supplies were given away along with haircuts, vision screening and many other com-
munity services. This event joins countless free services organized to benefit Duval County youth. Assistant
District Deputy Grandmaster Chief 0. Martin commented "we strive to build community relations through vari-
ous outreach projects, and feel that the youth in our community are our future; and as such we are investing in
our city's future." The event was held at the Pictured are Ms. Latwanda Brown and her children receiving
bags of school supplies from OES Sister Amala Taylor.

How We Were Changed by the Voting Rights Act


The Voting Rights Act, which
was signed into law by President
Lyndon Johnson exactly 48 years
ago this week, is widely credited
with transforming the demograph-
ics of political representation in
America. When the law was passed,
five members of the U.S. Congress
were black. Today's Congress has
44 black members as well as 38
Latinos, 13 Asian Americans or
Pacific Islanders and 2 Native
Americans, making it the most
diverse Congress in history.
But civil rights advocates worry
we may soon see a reversal of that


trend. The June Supreme Court rul-
ing that overturned a key provision
of the Voting Rights Act severely
restricted the federal government's
ability to control the electoral poli-
cies of jurisdictions with extensive
histories of discrimination, includ-
ing a number of states in the South.
Soon after the court's 5-4 decision
came down, six southern states took
advantage of their newfound free-
dom by embracing voting policies
that could not or did not pass
muster under the previous law.
Meanwhile, more than 30 states
have passed voter ID laws in recent


years, in what critics portray as a
veiled attack on the voting rights of
minorities.
Among the 44 black members of
the current Congress is civil rights
veteran John Lewis, a Georgia
Democrat who was brutally beaten
while marching for civil rights in
1965. "The record clearly demon-
strates numerous attempts to
impede voting rights still exist," he
said, "and it does not matter that
those attempts are not 'pervasive,
widespread or rampant' as they
were in 1965."


civic leaders, celebrities, students
and political figures, including
President Barack Obama and
Attorney General Eric Holder, have
all said the Stand Your Ground law
needs to be re-examined.
"Across Florida, representatives
are receiving calls, letters, visits
and emails from constituents with
diverse opinions on 'Stand Your
Ground,'" Weatherford said.
"Passions are high, but every per-
son has the right to express their
views on this matter of great impor-
tance."
"It's a critical step," said Phillip
Agnew, who heads a group of
young demonstrators calling them-
selves the Dream Defenders who
have staged a nearly month-long
sit-in outside Governor Rick Scott's
office in a bid to change the law.
Advocates of the law, the first of
its kind in the country and now
copied in more than 20 other states,
say violent crime has fallen since it
was enacted.
But critics see the self-defense
law as emblematic of racial bias
and unequal justice in America,
since some studies have shown that
defense claims made under the law
are far more likely to be successful
when the victim is black.

Mrs. Ruth Solomon
Succumbs at 99


Mrs. Ruth C. Solomon
Ruth Alma Cummings Solomon
was the matriarch of her family and
a vast extended family of friends,
associates, church members, soror-
ity members, students and former
co-workers whom she counseled,
comforted, corrected when needed,
and thoroughly cherished. She
spent most of her life here in
Jacksonville and taught in the pub-
lic schools for thirty-nine years.
During that time she joined West
Union Baptist Church and married
Gilbert Solomon. From this union,
one daughter was born.
A native of Aiken, South
Carolina, she attended the local
public schools, Florida Normal
College, received her Bachelor of
Science Degree from Florida A &
M College and a Master of Science
Degree from Columbia University.
Her teaching career began in
Cosmo, then to Arlington and
Oakland Elementary Schools. The
major portion of her career was
spent at Stanton High School where
she taught mathematics and served
as comptroller. Continued on page 7


FL Lawmakers Agree to

Stand Your Ground Hearings


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How TO REV UP YOUR RETIREMENT ACCOUNT


by Michelle Singletary
Nearly half of all African-Ameri-
cans in the U.S. have workplace re-
tirement plans and about 8 in 10 who
are eligible to contribute are doing
so, yet many continue to contribute
less than their employer match.
Worse yet, a high percentage of
African-Americans take out loans
against their plans, thus minimizing
their chances of being financially
prepared for their golden years.
A new Prudential Research report,
The African-American Financial Ex-
perience, states that a major barrier to
maximizing participation is the lack
of education about how these plans
work. Given the plans' valuable tax
breaks, it makes sense to invest the
maximum if you can. Here are six
tips to help you rev up your own re-
tirement plan this year:
Get serious about your contribu-
tions. Try to contribute at least
enough to qualify for your company's
maximum matching contribution.
Prudential's research shows that
about one-third of 401 (k) participants
don't contribute enough to qualify for
the maximum matching contribution


from their employer.
Ask questions about your "free
money." Your company's HR depart-
ment should be able to answer your
retirement account questions and/or
point you in the right direction. One
particularly important point, for ex-
ample, is your employer's matching
contribution. It may be 50 cents for
every dollar you contribute (up to a
predetermined maximum), a percent-
age of your salary or even a dollar
amount. But it is really free money


Second Chance at Life
l r Mr. Ibrahim Nyei. Ibrahim
'I recently graduated from JJC
with a certification in the
electrical trade. Before
leaving the center he en-
fisted with the United States
Army and was deployed
May 2013. His background
1 is similar to many students
at Job Corps, students who
are in search of an opportu-
33 .,, ,. ~ nity to improve their lives.
Ibrahim came to the
V United States from Sierra
Leone West Africa. His
family arrived here to start a
life for their children. He
Kenderson Hill-Center Director attended a local high school


and graduate Ibrahim Nyei
Job Corps is a taxpayer-supported
education and career technical train-
ing program administered by the
United States Labor Department.
The program helps 16 to 24 year old
men and women to improve the qual-
ity of their lives through career tech-
nical and academic training.
The Jacksonville Job Corps Center
showcases their outstanding students
through the Faces of Success series.
This series shares success stories of
the program's graduates. Students
graduate from the program weekly
but a formal graduation is held twice
a year. This years' graduation will be
held at the Jacksonville Job Corps
Center on August 23rd.
A 2013 graduate of the program is


here in Jacksonville but could
not past the FCAT. He was
disappointed with himself but his
mother was determined that her son
would get his high school diploma
and finally decided to enroll her son
in Job Corps to get his HSD and a
trade.
Following completion of the pro-
gram, Ibrahim enlisted in the United
States Army where he successfully
completed his training in Combat
Lifesaving, Basic Training and Field
Artillery Cannon Crew member
Training. He is currently stationed in
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
Ibrahim returned to Jacksonville
this week and shared his journey with
the students at the Jacksonville Job
Corps Center. He said. "I've been


that you should be taking advantage
of.
There will be a vesting period. The
money that your employer con-
tributes to your retirement account
usually "vests" or in plain lan-
guage, the vesting period is the pe-
riod of time before your shares are
fully owned by you. The typical time
frame is three to four years, but it
may be different depending on the
firm that you work for. Be sure to ask
about the vesting period and realize


to Youth
where you are and I know what it
feels like to be uncertain of your fu-
ture, but because I struck with the Job
Corps program I am a living witness
as to what believing in your self and
your dreams can do for you. If there
is anything I can leave with you it is
to never give up on your dreams and
to always stay positive. He plans to
remain in the military as a career to
become a captain in the Army.
Mr. Kenderson Hill, Center Direc-
tor stated how proud he was of
Ibrahim and all the students who
make life altering decisions to
change their lives through the Job
Corps program.
Jacksonville Job Corps center
trains about 525 students per year.
The young men and women study to
become: carpenters, electricians, cer-
tified nurse assistants, office admin-
istrators, pharmacy, Computer and
HVAC technicians and other profes-
sionals. The center's top priority is to
teach eligible young people the skills
they need to become employable and
to help place them into meaningful
careers. It is self evident that Job
Corps works.....and it works for our
community.
The Job Corps program serves
about 60,000 students each year at
124 centers across the U.S. and
Puerto Rico. The Jacksonville Job
Corps Center is currently enrolling
student in the program. For addi-
tional contact 1-800-733-5627.


that you'll have to put the time in on
the job in order to be eligible for the
matching funds.
Know the limits. There are annual
limits on your retirement contribu-
tions. According to the IRS' new
2013 rules, if you are under 50 years
old, you can contribute a maximum
of $17,500 a year. If you're 50 or
older, you can make an additional
catch-up contribution of as much as
$5,500, for a total of up to $22,500.
Choose your investments wisely.


According to CNN Money's Ulti-
mate Guide to Retirement, employ-
ees can choose among various
investment options within their
401(K) plans. And while your com-
pany may give you information
about the funds, you'll need to figure
out which ones are best for you.
"Since you're bearing all the risk, it's
important that you choose wisely."
CNN Money advises.
Educate yourself about retirement
savings. You can use tools like Wells


Fargo's IRA Center to decide what
type of retirement account you'd like
to set up, review account options,
compare traditional vs. Roth IRAs
and calculate your IRA potential. You
can also use the resource to consoli-
date retirement accounts, roll over
your 401 (k) or other employer-spon-
sored retirement plans or convert to
a Roth IRA. Other good resources to
check out include Bankrate's retire-
ment calculators and Wells Fargo's
Retirement Quick View.


Coping With Your Kids Expensive Extracurricular Activities


By Jason Alderman
When budgeting for back-to-
school expenses, parents generally
include routine fare like clothes,
school supplies and maybe a new
backpack. But if your kids participate
in extracurricular activities, whether
it's sports, music lessons or art
classes, you could be on the hook for
hundreds or even thousands of
dollars in additional expenses
throughout the year if you're not
careful.
As parents, we hesitate to stifle our


children's athletic and creative urges,
especially when it can be so difficult
to drag them away from their iPods
and Xboxes. But sometimes you've
just got to step back, weigh the dif-
ferent options available and decide
what you can afford without upset-
ting your other financial goals and re-
sponsibilities.
You'll face tough questions like, "Is
it better for my child's future to spend
$500 on a soccer day camp he'll re-
ally enjoy or to invest the money in a
529 College Savings Plan?"


My wife and I commonly wrestle
with these types of questions. For ex-
ample, last fall our son had outgrown
his baseball equipment and was beg-
ging us for a new bat that cost $125.
A year later, it sits on the sidelines
because he prefers to use a friend's
bat. (We're not complete pushovers,
however: When he recently obsessed
over a $200 pair of high-tech gym
shoes, we said no.)
Among the best advice I've re-
ceived from other parents is, when
your kids are exploring new activi-
ties, don't overcommit your time or
money until you know whether
they'll stick with it or quickly move
on to the next thing.
For example, before you sink a
small fortune into private swimming
lessons, start small with a summer
class at your local Y or recreation
center. If your kid shows a genuine
aptitude and doesn't balk at long
hours of practice, then you can ex-
plore more costly alternatives. Just


remember who'll be driving to prac-
tice and out-of-town swim meets; in
other words, make sure you can
honor the time commitment before
signing on.
Here are a few tips for prioritizing
extracurricular events and keeping
your costs down:
Focus on one sport or activity per
kid, per season, especially if they in-
volve multiple practice sessions or
games per week.
Form carpools with other parents.
You'll save gas money and time, es-
pecially if your kids are practicing at
different locations.
Learn how much equipment and
instruction the sport requires. Some,
like soccer and basketball can be rel-
atively inexpensive; while others,
like horseback riding, golf and ice
skating involve expensive equipment
or facility rental time.
Rent or buy used sporting equip-
ment (or musical instruments) until
you're sure they'll stick with the ac-


tivity. Visit Play It Again Sports
stores, online ad sites like Craigslist
and yard sales.
Seek out or form a sports equip-
ment exchange in your community
where families can donate outgrown
or cast-off equipment and uniforms
for others to use.
It's probably better to invest in new
safety gear, like helmets and masks,
than to buy it used and potentially
damaged. The same goes for items
like shoes or baseball gloves that be-
come molded to a child's body un-
less they were hardly used.
Sometimes the cost of an elective
program is worth making sacrifices
elsewhere in your budget. Our
daughter loves theater arts, so we de-
cided it was worth shaving our vaca-
tion budget to send her to theater
camp. She'll make new friends and
hone her dramatic and social skills in
an environment that public school
just can't duplicate.


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Job Corps Delivering a Successful


Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press


Ausust 8-14.2013








Augus 8-4 203M.PrysFrePes-Pg


Angela Corey Subject of $5M


Lawsuit After Zimmerman Case


Jacksonville State Attorney
Angela Corey, who found her way
on the national stage as prosecutor
at the center of the George
Zimmerman trial, has been served
with a lawsuit by a former employ-
ee claiming he was unlawfully
fired.
Ben Kruidbos, a former IT work-
er for the state attorney's office, is
seeking more than $5 million in
damages from the Florida State
Attorney's office.
He claims he was fired in retalia-
tion for testifying at a June hearing,
in which Zimmerman's attorneys
sought sanctions against prosecu-
tors for withholding evidence the
evidence in question being unflat-
tering photos taken from the cell-
phone of Trayvon Martin.
During the hearing, Kruidbos tes-
tified that he recovered images
from Martin's phone, including
photos of jewelry, marijuana plants,
and a hand holding a gun. The pic-
tures and some texts would later be
ruled inadmissible but became a
point of contention in the trail as
Zimmerman's defense team
claimed the evidence was withheld


from them by the state until shortly
before the murder trial began.
Kruidbos, through his attorney,
informed Zimmerman's defense
team that the images existed. He
would later explain in court that he
felt compelled to do so saying, "All
the information is important in the
process to ensure it's a fair trial"
and that he feared he would be
liable if he didn't.
On the day jurors began deliber-


ating in the case, Kruidbos received
a six-page termination letter that
slammed him for his actions.
"Florida law provides whistle-
blower protection making a termi-
nation in such a circumstance
'wrongful.' Florida has taken the
protection of the law a significant
step further by making that conduct
'unlawful' if the individual testified
pursuant to a subpoena. The lawsuit
alleges that Corey's office acted
unlawfifully," said Kruidbos' attor-
ney, Wesley White, in a statement.
Corey's office will not comment
on the lawsuit but has published
Kruidbos' termination letter on the
State Attorney's website in
response.
Zimmerman's defense team, led
by attorney Mark O'Mara, is also
seeking sanctions against Corey's
office. During the trial, they filed a
motion against the prosecution
claiming that evidence was with-
held. Just Friday, at a luncheon in
Orlando, O'Mara said to a crowd of
attorneys, "I am not done with that
motion. I'm not done with Angela
Corey. And we are going to be see-
ing more of each other.


Marissa Alexander case: Will there be a pardon?


There has been a renewed interest in repealing
"stand your ground" laws in the state of Florida. No
other case has garnered as much interest or illustrated
the misapplication of the controversial law more than
that of the case of Marissa Alexander.
Alexander was sentenced to 20 years for firing a
warning shot, that hit no one, during a confrontation
with her then-husband who had a history of abusing
her physically. The fact that Alexander, a domestic
violence victim, was denied use of 'Stand Your
Ground' to facilitate her claim of self-defense has
served as an example for some of how the law is not
equally applied to all races and all genders.
The Florida cabinet meets with Governor Rick Scott
every Tuesday morning, and State Senator Dwight
Bullard sent letters to three members of the gover-


nor's cabinet Monday, requesting that Alexander be
granted a pardon and released from prison. The letter
was sent to Attorney General Pam Bondi, the state's
Chief Financial Officer Jeff Attwater, and the
Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putman.
In order for the governor to grant a pardon, two
members of the cabinet must also support it.
According to the Florida constitution the governor
has the authority to "suspend collection of fines and
forfeitures, grant reprieves not exceeding sixty days
and, with the approval of two members of the cabinet,
grant full or conditional pardons, restore civil rights,
commute punishment, and remit fines and forfeitures
for offenses." The state's constitution gives the gov-
ernor '"unfettered discretion" to deny clemency at any
time for any reason.


Gun Violence Leading Cause of Death of Black Children


Continued from front
Examining the most recent data
available, the CDF study reported
that 18,270 children and teens were
killed or injured by guns in 2010.
Despite the claims of pro-gun
advocates, having a gun in the
home does not make kids safer. In
some cases, those homes are even
more dangerous, because guns are
present.
"A gun in the home makes the
likelihood of homicide three times
higher, suicide three to five times
higher, and accidental death four
times higher," stated the report.
The CDF report continued: "More
than half of youth who committed
suicide with a gun obtained the gun


from their home, usually a parent's
gun.,
In the last 50 years, White chil-
dren and teenagers accounted for 53
percent of the gun deaths, and
Black children and teenagers
accounted for 36 percent.
Looking at the gun deaths in 2010
alone, 45 percent of gun deaths and
46 percent of gun injuries were
among Black children and teens,
according to the report, even
though they account for only 15
percent of all children and teens liv-
ing in the U.S.. Nearly 2,700 chil-
dren died from gun violence.
The report said that the NRA
claims nearly 5 million members,
but somewhere between 52 million


and 68 million adults living in the
United States own the roughly 310
million guns in circulation. That
means that the NRA represents less
than 10 percent of all adult gun
owners in the United States.
The report offered a number of
solutions to address the gun vio-
lence that youth face growing up in
America, including universal back-
ground checks that cover sales on
the Internet and at gun shows, lim-
its on assault weapons and high-
capacity ammunition magazines,
boycotting products that glamorize
violence and "supporting non-vio-
lent conflict resolution in our
homes, schools, congregations and
communities."


FRONT (L-R) Joyce Lawson and Monique McCarthy; BACK: Santhea Hicks Brown, Carol Marshall,
Kimberly Naylor, Tamla Simmons, Valarie Donalson and Alice Venson.
Hampton Women Celebrate HBCU's Legacy at Ladies Luncheon


Alumnae from Hampton
University met in Jacksonville
August 2-3, 2013 for the 34th
Annual Hampton Ladies Luncheon.
The weekend began with a Friday
evening reception at lEast
Forsyth. The big event was a fabu-
lous luncheon at the University


Club attended by Hampton Ladies
and guests from TX, NY, DE, GA,
NC, VA, MD, DC, NJ and FL rep-
resenting classes from 1947 to
2006. The theme for this year's
luncheon was "Hampton Ladies:
Bonding Across the Years. "
Angela Spears, Special Assistant


to the Mayor, presented a letter
form Mayor Alvin Brown in which
he welcomed the Hampton Ladies
to Jacksonville, invited them to
return and wished them, "... a pleas-
ant gathering, filled with fellowship
and fond memories of your "'Home
by the Sea.'"


THE WORST DAY AT



WORK BEATS THE BEST



DAY IN FORECLOSURE.


SEEKING A SOLUTION FOR THOSE
SEEKING JOBS
With job loss responsible for up to half of
all mortgage delinquencies, getting people
back on their feet became our focus. But
the economy and the job market have changed.
People desperately looking for work need
help. Which is where Fifth Third Bank
and NextJob, a nationwide reemployment
solutions company, came in.

Last year we initiated a pilot program that
provides mortgage customers up to 39 weeks
of job training including live coaching, job
search training and software fully paid for by
Fifth Third Bank. Participating Fifth Third


customers at risk of defaulting on their
mortgages had experienced, on average, 22
months of unemployment. After six months
of reemployment assistance, nearly 40% of
participants had secured meaningful employment.

BUSINESS AS UNUSUAL
Our commitment to reemployment continues
to grow with the signing of a multiyear contract
with Nextjob, which allows us to move the
program out of the pilot phase and incorporate
it into the way we do business. Curious behavior
for a bank? Maybe. But we're proud to be the
first financial institution to offer such assistance
and hope we won't be the last.


FIFTH THIRD BANK
The curious bank.






ifth TWI Bak Member FDIC. Equa Hous lad.


I A


August 8-14, 2013


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


1 1







Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press


When speaking about the Civil
Rights Movement, comedian and
activist Dick Gregory may have
said it best. He said, "This isn't a
revolution of black against white,
this is a revolution of right against
wrong. And right has never lost."
It is that same spirit that dozens
of young people from various
backgrounds and races have "occu-
pied" the Florida state capital by
camping out outside of the
Governor's office going on four
weeks now.
There is nothing like a little civil
disobedience to keep an issue
alive.
They call themselves the "The
Dream Defenders," and they mean
business. Most are college aged
young people that have staged a


three plus week sit in aimed at fix-
ing a broken law.
The Dreamers are insisting that
the Governor call a special session
to address the state's controversial
self-defense laws, especially the
"Stand Your Ground" section of
the statue.
Many are also calling for need a
comprehensive review of our
entire criminal justice system,
which includes jury sizes, mini-
mum mandatory sentences, and


change of venue requirements.
Many of these key issues came to
light after George Zimmerman was
acquitted of killing 17-year-old
Trayvon Martin.
Let's be realistic about it. It will
not be easy to change these laws
with a Republican in the
Governor's seat, and GOP lead leg-
islature. There is a disconnect. The
Speaker of the House has
expressed some interest in at least
having some dialogue about stand
your ground, however the
Governor and Senate President


have rejected calls for a special
session.
That probably will not happen,
but it is worth a try. There are peo-
ple elected and non-elected that
simply do not care about justice
and equality. There are people who
feel that it was unfortunate that
Trayvon was killed, but
Zimmerman had a right to defend
himself.
These are people who are out of


touch with reality and out of touch
with the black experience in
America.
And in this great country of ours,
equality still continues to be an
issue. I often think of a quote from
Langston Hughes who said, "I
swear to the Lord I still can't see
Why Democracy means
Everybody but me."
The Zimmerman case has been
profound in so many ways. "This
case says so much show us so
much about race, fear, crime,
media, gun laws, prosecutorial dis-
cretion, minimum mandatory sen-
tences, public trials," said H. Scott
Fingerhut of FIU College of Law.
Some have assumed that the
Dreamer movement would go
away after a week or so, but that
hasn't been the case at all. The
momentum seems to be building,
and visits from people like Rev.
Jesse Jackson, and singer activist
Harry Belafonte seem to have
inspired the students and other
activists even more.
Dreamers are coming from
around the country to sit in as a
part of the protest. Most are wear-
ing black t-shirts that say, "Can we
dream together?" in Haitian,
English, Spanish and Arabic.
The movement is inspiring.
Religious leaders have gotten
engaged as well. As I sat in the bar-


bershop last week it was a key
topic of conversation.
In the words of Pastor R. L.
Gundy who is also the President of
Florida Southern Christian
Leadership Conference "That
marble floor is hard, but it's worth
it." Gundy has led a cadre of reli-
gious and civic leaders over to
Tallahassee to also sit in or sleep in
at the Capital.
Last week, over a dozen Florida
religious leaders joined over 100
Dreamers for an interfaith service.
The beauty of the service was the
diversity prayers were offered by
a Rabbi, an Imam, and representa-
tives from Baptist, Catholic,
Episcopal, Lutheran, Methodist
and Presbyterian communities.
Dreamers have crafted three
demands of the Governor and State
Legislature, and they call these
demands Trayvon's Law. They
want to repeal stand your ground,
end the school-to-prison pipeline
and end racial profiling.
And who said that this young
generation lacked leadership and
vision? As the Dreamers continue
to fight for change remember the
words ofE.D. Nixon a former Civil
Rights Activists.
"The spark became a flame and
it changed everything."
Signing off from Tallahassee,
Reggie Fullwood


a a


Dream Defenders "Doing


the Right Thing" by Sitting In


August 8-14, 2013


The Riches of International Travel


By George E. Curry
NNPA Columnist
CASABLANCA, Morocco -
When I left Dulles Airport near
Washington, D.C. last week on Air
France Flight #39, changed planes
at Charles de Gaulle Airport in
Paris, and arrived Friday morning
in the capital city of Rabat aboard
Air France Flight # 1258, I knew I
was in for an enriching experience
that always accompanies interna-
tional travel.
Since last August, I have traveled
to Brazil, China, South Africa,
Zimbabwe and now Morocco. And
the year isn't over yet. Largely
because of my career as journalist,
I have also traveled to Cairo,
Beijing, Shanghai, Vienna,
Bangkok, Accra, Paris, Rome,
Kuala Lumpur, London, Havana,
Dakar, Nuremburg, Montreal,
Vancouver and Doha, Mexico City,
among other places.
Growing up in Tuscaloosa, Ala.,
my Uncle Buddy Harris, who was
in the Navy, was the first person to


trhet my appetite for.international
travel. He would'send cards apd let-'
ters to Big Mama and for some rea-
son; I remember him bringing back
a colorful jacket from Okinawa,
Japan. I couldn't have been more
than 7- or 8-years-old at the time.
As I grew older, Uncle Buddy
would regale me with stories about
his time in the Navy. And my step-
father, William H. Polk, introduced
me to the wonders of Africa.
On the domestic front, I was
excited whenever my Uncle Percy
Harris would let me tag along with
him and Big Mama to Johnson City,
Tenn. to visit his sister, my Aunt
Julia Mae. Although in the state just
north ofAlabama, Johnson City had
desegregated its schools in the early
1960s when Alabama was bringing
up the rear, ranking ahead of only
Mississippi in education.
I knew that one day I wanted to
travel like Uncle Buddy. Today, he
marvels at all the places I visit, but
refuses to accept the credit he
deserves for stirring that interest in
me.
More than anything else, travel-
ing abroad reminds me that we live
in a global society and people else-
where know a great deal about the
U.S. while we are too ignorant and
arrogant to study other societies.
On a trip to China last December,
first-grade students in Xi'an hur-
riedly ran to visit a group of Black
journalists from the U.S. so that
they could practice their English.
Students around the globe also learn


to speak English at an early age.
And'" where Idoes that leave
Americans who stubbornly cling tod
the misguided notion that others
should learn our language but we
shouldn't learn other languages?
Once on a trip to Paris, I over-
heard a huffy White American
woman complain: "Why don't they
speak English here?" She was in
France complaining about them
speaking their native language.
Whether seeing the pyramids in
Egypt or visiting the Vatican in
Italy, there is so much to learn about
history and other cultures. Visiting
the birthplace of civilization can't
help but instill pride, something that
can benefit our Black youth in par-
ticular.
No trip has been more emotional
than visiting Goree Island, on the
edge of Dakar, Senegal. Standing in
the "Door of No Return" is a chill-
ing reminder of what our ancestors
faced and, more important, sur-
vived.
There is never enough time to
fully experience any new destina-
tion. For example, on the trip to
Morocco, I spent most of the time
in the capital city of Rabat, only a
few hours in Casablanca, and a day
in Dakhla, a 3.5 hour flight to the
South.
As our traveling group learned,
there are even surprises within sur-
prises. About 30 minutes on the out-
skirts of Dakhla is Dakhla Attitude,
an impressive resort snuggled in the
middle of the desert. After turning


off of the main road, visitors are
surrounded by desert as far as the
*! tff '^ !-Jt -1 "* ,- ". I
eye can see. Then, after a 10-minute
bumpy ride through the sand, this
gorgeous resort suddenly comes
into view. It features Dragon Camp,
three bungalows, with a strildking
view of the ocean. Windsurfing and
kitesurfing are popular sports in this
hideaway. There is boating, sailing
and an opportunity to eat with a per-
fect view of the pristine water.
Even after visiting three cities in
Morocco, my trip back home left


me wanting more. I wanted to see
other cities as welj. Marrakesh, the
Holy city of Fez and Tangier, where
the Mediterranean and the Atlantic
Ocean meet, were high on my list.
Just as my Uncle Buddy intro-
duced me to a world that I could
only imagine as a kid, I am eager to
introduce my grandchildren -
Neyah and Austin and my
nephews and nieces to the wonders
of international travel. I want them
to see everything from "The Door
of No Return" in Senegal to Egypt,


the cradle of democracy, to the
i- '; v di- 4i -uy ~ .ij iit-
; Eiffel. Tower in Paris and the
Vatican in Rome; .
Uncle Buddy told me about so
many interesting places. In my role
as PaPa and Uncle George, I would
enjoy taking the young ones on a
live civics trip, knowing that once
they have that experience, they will
pass it down to the next generation.
George E. Curry, former editor-in-
chief of Emerge magazine, is editor-in-
chief of the National Newspaper
Publishers Association News Service
(NNPA.)


FLORIDA'S FIRST COAST QUALITY BLACK WEEKLY


MAILING ADDRESS
P.O. Box 43580
Jacksonville, FL 32203


Sylvia Perry

PUBLISHER

S CONTRIBL
E.O.Huthcl
|acksonville Latimer, PI
h Cmber r Cammuee Vickle Broa'


PHYSICAL ADDRESS
903 W. Edgewood Ave.
Jacksonville, FL 32208
Email: JfreePress@aol.com


TELEPHONE
(904) 634-1993
Fax (904) 765-3803


Rita Perry

Publisher Emeritus


Let's Have an Honest


Discussion about Race
If we talk about what ails us, that will make it better. When will Black
Americans stop getting short shrift? After the Supreme Court's invalidated
Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) described it
as "a central pillar of the civil rights laws that helped bring America's
ideals closer to reality for all." Leahy said he "feared the ruling would
jeopardize the rights of racial minorities."
A familiar activist chant ofactivists is. "Black life is valued less than
White life." And that has gained currency in the aftermath of the fatal
shooting of Trayvon Martin. Now, the national conversation is about "race
in America." What we really need across America is "a conversation on
race" that helps Blacks to rearrange some priorities.
As President Barack Obama said after the Zimmerman verdict, "We
should ask ourselves if we're doing all we can to widen the circle of com-
passion and understanding in our communities. What Americans need are
a series of race dialogues toward garnering ongoing commitments to com-
batprejudice and strengthening understanding among all."
Republican Sen. John McCain should be recognized as an ally for saying
America has "a long way to go" before racial disparities end. The senior
senator from Arizona said that Obama's impromptu speech about being a
Black in America, "...proved there needs to be more conversation about
the issue of race. We cannot become complacent when we still have a dra-
matic disparity in Black youth unemployment"
It wouldn't be as ironic as some Blacks think that Republicans might fol-
low McCain's lead to bringabout a conversation on race in America. Race
and racism are the most challenging issues confronting America. Yet,
polite society refuses to discuss it. Racial inequality in the United State
underlies a wide range of societal issues that affect different groups dis-
proportionately. The total wealth gap between White and African-
American families increased from $85,000 in 1984 to $236,500 in 2009.
The biggest drivers of the racial wealth gap are homeownership; household
income; employment; inheritance; financial support from families or
friends; and pre-existing family wealth. Whites have 22 times more wealth
than Blacks.
The story of race in America has been at the center of some of our great-
est national traumas, as well as serving as the yardstick by which progress
toward a more equal and fair society is measured. It's apparent both from
the varied reactions to Obama's presidency and events beyond it, that race
still serves as a critical stumbling block in American society.
Don't let the "'talking heads" that regularly represent the country's wealth
interest have you believe "all things are equal." White Americans have con-
tinued to enjoy material advantages based 6n past racially exclusionary
practices and current institutionalized discrimination.
As \%e march from one unemployment line to another, don't let American
politicians and media weasel out on this one. A dialogue on the role race
currently plays in the economy from the workplace to the criminal justice
system is needed. Politicians should be encouraged to expedite a series of
conversations on race across the country.


Some have assumed that the Dreamer movement
would go away after a week or so, but that hasn't been
the case at all The momentum seems to be building,
and visits from people like Rev. Jesse Jackson,
and singer activist Harry Belafonte seem to have
inspired the students and her activists even more.


ITORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald Fullwood,
hinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Marsha Oliver, Marretta
hyllis Mack, Tonya Austin, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver,
wn, Rahman Johnson, Headshots, William Jackson.









August 8-14, 2013


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5


S FOR THE WEEK OF AUGUST 5 11, 2013



















B-CU Sports Photo

COMING HARD RUNNER: Isidore
Jackson leads the way for

RIGHT a tough Bethune-Cookman
Steam poised for a repeat in
AT YA! theaMEAC.

TEAM-BY-TEAM SCHEDULES; RETURNING
STAT LEADERS; THINGS TO WATCH FOR IN '13






STAT CORNER

WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


RETURNING INDIVIDUAL

STATS LEADERS FOR 2013
(Classification for 2013)


Isaiah Crowell


Colon Bailey


RUSHING YARDS
BAILEY, Colin FSU
GRIZZLE, M. SHAW
JACKSON, Isidore BCU
SMALLS, E. CHO


Doug Cook

AVG TDS AVGIG
5.7 10 101.5
5.2 7 89.2
5.6 11 89.1
6.1 5 86.6


LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor
As August begins the countdown towards
the 2013 black college football season, it also
marks the 20th anniversary of the publishing of
the BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS PAGE.
Timune has flown by since we began the BCSP
in August 1994 full of hope and expectations with
Alcorn State quarterback extraordinaire, Steve
McNair, gracing the Top Box.
Our hope was that the BCSP would become
a reliable source for up-to-date information on
black college sports that gets so little coverage in
the mainstream press. We think we've done our
part and we've enjoyed every minute of it.
Fortunately for us, so have those that cherish
the black college experience alumni forever
linked to these great institutions and fans who
identify with the historical struggle for inclusion
and recognition that their existence embodies.
African-American newspapers around the
country responded then as they continue to do
now. In August 1994, the BCSP generated a full
58 African-Newspapers on its list of subscribers.
They touched all comers of the American land-
scape, from East to West, North to South.
Now 20 years later, that list has dwindled to
single digits as black publishers face the same
challenges and dilemmas as their much larger
white counterparts brought on by the digital age.
But we trudge on. We enter the 2013-14 sea-
son with as much enthusiasm and excitement as
our debut in 1994. And we'd still rather watch a
black college classic between competing powers
than anything else offered.


again be the Rams chief challenger in the CIAA.


S ^ / WHAT GIVES WITH GRAMBUNG?
While the fortunes of WSSU were on the rise,

Things could not have been worse for perhaps the
most storied program in black college football, the
a Grambling State Tigers.

ABERRATIONS OR NOT?: Winston-Salem With black college icon DougWflliams inhis
State's Connell Maynor (I.), Grambling's Doug second year back in the saddle, the Tigers suffered
Williams (c.) and Tennessee State's Ron Reed through an uncharacteristic 1-10 record, winless at
(r.) have teams with different kinds of questions 0-9 in the SWAC.
to answer in 2013. Surely that can't happen again, can it?


So what can we look for as the 2013 black
college football season gets underway.


WHAT CAN WINSTON-SALEM
STATE DO FOR AN ENCORE?
The top blackcollege sports story ofthe 2012-
13 season had to be Winston-Salem State's run
to the NCAADiv. II national championship game.
In just his third year at the helm, former black
college standout Connell Maynor guided the
Rams to an unblemished 14-0 record, winning his
second straight CIAA football title and knocking
off three playoff opponents en route to a national
title game showdown with Valdosa State.
Though his squad fell short in the title game,
their impressive and determined run at making
black college sports history was the latest example
ofmagicborne frombeatingnear-impossible odds.
The ultra-competitive Maynor is surely not
finished. Though lastyear's featwillbe hardto top,
don't bet against the Rams making another deep
run into the postseason. Elizabeth City State will


BEST OF THE REST?
WSSU was clearly at the top of the black col-
lege food chain but some other teams were quite
impressive and will look to be better in 2013.
Tennessee State could only muster a third-
place finish inthe Ohio Valley Conference,butbeat
MEAC champion Bethune-Cookman, SWAC
champ Arkansas-Pine Bluff, not to mention
Jackson State and Florida A&M. But it appears
head coach Ron Reed's troops will have to climb
this year's mountain without starting quarterback
Michael Germain (off-the-field issues).
Arkansas-Pine Bluff returns proven veterans
at every skill position, at key positions on defense
and on special teams. They are a clear favorite in
the SWAC. Ditto for Bethune-Cookman in the
MEAC where it's anybody's guess who is the top
challenger.
Miles and Fort Valley State made the Div.
II playoffs out of the SIAC but the Golden Tigers
of Tuskegee once again exerted their dominance.
The Tigers will be hard to beat.


1 2013 TEAM0BY-TEAM BLA CK COLLEGE FOOTB ALL SCHEaDULESI


PASSING YARDS
COOK, Doug LINP
POWELL, Drew LIV
STOVER, Cam CHO
JOSEPH, Dray SU
WALLACE, Keahn JCS

RECEPTIONS
LENNON, Len. FAM
MOORE, Hollis LAN
DOSS, Lee SOU
GRANT, Derek SHA
COLLINS, A. LIV


CL G COM-ATT-INT
JR 9 257-447-12
SO 9 197-349-5
SR 10 182-299-9
SR 11 210-359-7
JR 10 175-278-10


TOTAL OFFENSE CL 0
COOK, Doug-LINP JR 9
POWELL, Drew LIV SO 9
WILSON, Michaeil CSUSR 11
STOVER, Ca CHO SR 10
DRAY, Joseph SU SR 11
ANDERSON, Ben -APB JR 11


SCORING CL
CROWELL, I. ALS JR
WARD, Trabis-TTNS SR
WASHINGTON, D. TUS SO
GODFREY, J-TNS SR

ALL PURPOSE CL
WARD, Trabis-TNS SR
OWENS, James FAM SR
HEBERT, John PV SO
STAFFORD, J.-MVS JR

PUNT RETURNS CL
EVANS, Damell. SHA SR
BRASWELL, Q. -ALB SR
NELSON, Spenc. PV SR
SCOTT, F. JCS SO
RANDALL, A. CHO JR

KICKOFF RETURNS CL
WASHINGTON, J. HAM JR
WILLIAMS, Thorn. MIL SR
EVANS,D. SHA SR
HEN'SON, M. LINM SR
STAFFORD, J MVS SR

PUNTING CL
WENZIG, Bobby -ALS SR
KEABLE, J. ALB SR
SHADDIX, D. NSU SR
JASKI, Kyle LINP JR
ARORO, Tem. MHC SO
BROUGHTON, C WVS SO


FIELD GOAL PCT. CL
VARNADORE, C. FAM JR
BARRICK, Chris PV JR
GODFREY, J. TNS
CHAMBERS, R MIL SR


TACKLES CL
FLEMING, I. CHE JR
WHITE, Ken LIV JR
JULIEN, David HOW SR
ROBERTS, E. MSU
WILLIAMS, Bern. CAU JR


SACKS CL
FAULK, Jarvis SAU SR
BATCHELOR, TJ CHO SR
ROBINSON, C. MSU JR
DELE, Peter STL JR
SIMPSON, R. MVS SR


PCT YDS TDS AVG/G


.2752
2322
2358
2511
2280


305.8
258.0
235.8
228.3
228.0

REC/G
7.1
5.9
5.9
5.3
5.1


RUSH PASS PLAYS YDS AVOG/G
-20 2752 514 2732 303.5
259 2322"468 '2581 '286.7
796 2329 504 3125 284.0
161 2358 381 2519 251.9
129 2511 455 2640 240.0
483 2121 373 2604 236.7


Rush Rec
1422 248
341 170
217 196
24 779


YDS
282
242
231
106
176

YDS
419
449
381
436
472

YDS
2780
2559
2149
2109
1165
2771


MADE ATTS
15 18
9 11
16 20
8 12


G SOL.
9 55
10 47
11 67
11 59
10 44


0 SOL
10 11
10 11
9 6
10 7
11 5


YDSIG
151.8
128.6
121.7
115.9


TD AVG
1 18.8
1 17.3
0 16.5
0 13.2
0 12.5

TD LNG AVG
1 34.9
1 95 34.5
1 31.7
2 31.1
2 29.5

LNG AVG
67 45.6
61 41.3
58 40.5
52 40.5
63 40.2
69 40.1


LNG PCT
83.3
81.8
46 80.0
35 66.7


TOT AVG
94 10.4
103 10.3
108 9.8
107 9.7
93 9.3


INTERCEPTIONS
MOODY, Dexter ALB
LUCAS, Adam TUS
PUMPHREY, C. BSU
WILSON, Carlos STL
HOWARD, Jack-LAN


Dexter Moody Robert Simpson David Julien


AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XX, No.1


BOWIE STATE
9/7............... @ Saint Anslem.............. 1
9/14............... @ J. C. Smith................2
9/21 .....................Concord.................... 1
9/28.............Saint Augustine's............. 1
10/5....... @ Winston-Salem State........ 1
10/12............. Chowan (HC)................1
10/19...........@ Virginia State..............2
10/26............. Virginia Union................ 1
11/2......................Lincoln..................... 1
11/9........ @ Elizabeth City State......... 1
CHOWAN
9/7.............. @ UNO Charlotte........... 12
9/14...........Alderson Broaddus.....12:05
9/21............. @ Sacred Heart.............. 1
9/28.......................Shaw...................... 6
10/5.......... @ Fayetteville State...........4
10/12............ @ BowieState...............1
10/19...........@ Virginia Union.............1
10/26.... Elizabeth City State (HC).......3
11/2...............Virginia State................ 1,
11/9.............L... Lincoln..:.......... 1
ELIZABETH CITY STATE
9/7......................Newberry...................6
9/14................ @ Tusculum............1:30
9/21.............. @ Albany State ..............7
9/28.. Fayetteville State In Rocky Mount, NO... 4
10/5............ @ St. Augustine's........ 1:30
10/12 ...............Virginia State................ 1
10/19.............. Lincoln (HC)............ 1:30
10/26............... @ Chowan..................3
11/2.............@ Virginia Union.............1
11/9.................Bowie State................. 1
FAYETTEVILLE STATE
9/7................. Virginia State................ 6
9/14..............UNC Pembroke ..............6
9/21.............@ Virginia Union .............7
9/28....EIiz. City State in Rocky Mt., NC ...4
10/5.....................Chowan....................4
10/12.....................Shaw......................4
10/19........ @ Johnson C. Smith.......... 2
10/26........ St. Augustine's (HC)...........2
11/2............... @ Livingstone..........1:30
11/9....... @ Winston-Salem State... 1:30
JOHNSON C. SMITH
9/7................... ULivingstone.................. 4
9/14.................Bowie State.................2
9/21 ...................Davidson...................2
9/28............. @ Virginia State..............3
10/5.....................ULincoln..................... 2
10/12.....@ Winston-Salem State... 1:30
10/19.......... Fayetteville State..............2
10/26................Shaw (HC).................. 1
11/2............@ St.Augustine's........1:30
11/9............. @ Central State.........1:30
LINCOLN (PA)
9/7................... @ Cheyney................. 1
9/14............. @ Sacred Heart.............. 6
9/21............. @ Saint Francis.............. 2
9/28.................ULivingstone..................2
10/5..........@ Johnson C. Smith ..........2
10/12............. Virginia Union................2
10/19...... @ Elizabeth City State....1:30
10/26......... Virginia State (HC)............2
11/2..........@ Bowie State (HC)...........1
11/9.....................Chowan.................... 1
LIVINGSTONE
9/7................. @ J. C. Smith................4
9/14................. @ Catawba .................6
9/21 ............ @ Edward Waters ............2
9/28.................. @ ULincoln...................2
10/5............... Virginia Union................ 1
10/12.......... @ St Augustine's.............2
10/19................. @ Shaw.................... 1
10/26...Winston-Salem State (HC)1...1
11/2............ Fayetteville State........1:30
11/9...... @ Va. Univ. of Lynchburg....... 1
ST. AUGUSTINE'S
917................@ N. C. Central.............. 2
9/14................. @ Wingate.............1:30
9/21 .................... Stillman............... 1:30
9/28.............. @ Bowie State...............1
10/5...............Eliz. City State ..........1"30
10/12........... Livingstone (HC) .............2
10/19....... Winston-Salem State..... 1:30
10/26........ @ Fayettevtlle State...........2
11/2............Johnson C. Smith........ 1:30
11/9................... @ Shaw....................1
SHAW
9/7....................Charleston.................. 1
9/14.............@ Virginia Union .............7
9/21.. UNC Pembroke in Wilmington... 1
9/28................. @ Chowan..................6
10/5................Virginia State................ 1
10/12........ @ Fayetteville State...........4
10/19...........ULivingstone (HC) .............1
10/26........@ Johnson C. Smith ..........1
11/2....... @ Winston-Salem State...130
11/9..............SL Augustine's...............1
VIRGINIA STATE
9/7............ @ Fayetteville State........... 6
9/14.........Benedict in Bronx Y......... 3
9)21.............. Kentucky State............... 4
9/28............ Johnson C. Smith.............3
10/5.................. @ Shaw....................1
10/12...... @ Elizabeth City State........ 1
10/19.......... Bowie State (HC)............. 2
10/26................ @ ULincoln...................2
11/2................. @ Chowan................. 1
11/9............... Virginia Union........... 1:30
VIRGINIA UNION
9/7.......... @ Bethune-Coolonan .....4
9/14.....................Shaw.....................7
9/21............ Fayetteville State ............7
9/28......... Winston-Salem State.......... 1
10/5 .............. @ Livingstone............... 1
10/12............... @ Lincoln.................2
10/19............. Chowan (HC)................ 1
10/26............ @ Bowie State............... 1
11/2...........Elizabeth City State...........1
11/9............. @ Virginia State......... 1:30
WINSTON-SALEM STATE
9/5............. @ UNC Pembroke............8


9/14........ Va. Univ. of Lynchburg.........6
9/21........ Tuskegee in Cleveland......... 1
9/28.............@ Virginia Union .............1
10/5.................Bowie State ............1:30
10/12.....Johnson C. Smith (HC) .. 1:30
10/19.......... @ St. Augustine's........ 1:30
10/26.............@ Uvlngstone ..........1:30
11/2.......................Shaw................. 1:30
11/9............ Fayetteville State........1:30
BETHUNE-COOKMAN N
9/1 .............@ Tennessee State...........7 E
9/7................. Virginia Union................ 4 A
9/14........ @ Florida International......... 6 c
9/21..............@ Florida State......... TBA
10/5............@ Delaware State............2
10/12................ @ Howard.................. 1
10/19........... Savannah State ..............4
10/26.............SC State (HC) ...............4
11/2............... @ NC Central.............. 12
11/9................Norfolk State ................4
,11/16................. Hampton....................4
11/23......Florida A&M in Orlando........2
DELAWARE STATE
9/7.................. @ Delaware............3:30
9/14.................. @ Towson .............7:30
9/21........... @ N. Dakota State.......3:30
9/28........... @ Savannah State............6
10/5........... Bethune-Cookman............ 2
10/12..........Norfolk State (HC)............2
10/19.......... @ N.C.A&T(HC)............ 1
10/26...............@ Hampton................. 1
11/2....................Howard.....................2
11/16............ @ Florida A&M...............2
11/23............. Morgan State................2
FLORIDA A&M
9/1 ...........Miss. Valley State In 0dando.. 11:45
9/7...............Tennessee State .............2
9/14....................Samford....................2
9/21............... @ Ohio State........... TBA
10/5............. @ Morgan State.............. 1
10/12......... @ Savannah State............6
10/19..............Howard (HC) ................2
10/26................ N. C. A&T...................2
11/2..............@ Norfolk State ..............2
11/9............... @ S. C. State........... 1:30
11/16............ Delaware State...............2
11/23...... B-Cookman in Orlando.........2
HAMPTON
8/29............@ Western Illinois............7
9/7.............. @ William & Mary ............7
9/14............. Tennessee Tech..............6
9/21...........@ Coastal Carolina........... 6
9/28............... @ S. C. State...............2
10/12............N.C.A&T(HC)...............2
10/19............@ Norfolk State.............. 1
10/26............ Delaware State............... 1
11/2............. @ Morgan State.............. 1
11/9................N. C. Central ................1
11/16....... @ Bethune-Cookman .........4
11/23.................. Howard..................... 1
HOWARD
8/31..........@ Eastern Michigan...........6
9/7................... Morehouse............. 3:30
9/14.............@ Old Dominion......... TBA
9/26................@ N. C. A&T............7:30
10/5................ N. C. Central ................1
10/12......... Bethune-Cookman............ 1
10/19............ @ Florida A&M...............2
10/26......... Morgan State (HC)............1
11/2............@ Delaware State............2
11/9............. Savannah State.............. 1
11/16.......... @ Texas Southern ............2
11/23............... @ Hampton................. 1
MORGAN STATE
8/30.................... @ Army ....................7
9/7............... @ Robert Morris............ 12
9/14...................@ Uberty...................7
9/21......... @ Western Kentucky.......... 6
9/28................Norfolk State ................1
10/5............ Florida A&M (HC).............1
10/19............ @N. C. Central.............. 2
10/26................ @ Howard..................1
11/2...................Hampton....................1
11/9.................. N. C.A&T..............TBA
11/14............. @ S. C. State........... 7:30
11/23.......... @ Delaware State ............ 2
NORFOLK STATE
8/31..................... Maine................. 6
9/7....................@ Rutgers................12
9/21 ..........Charleston Southern.......... 4
9/28............. @ Morgan State.............. 1
10/5............. Savannah State..............1
10/12. .........0 Delaware State ............ 2
10/19................. Hampton.................... 1
10/26............. Old Dominion................ 1
11/2............ Florida A&M (HC)............. 2
11/9..... @ Bethune-Cookman n. 4
11/16............ @ N. C. Central .............. 2
11/23................S. C. State .................. 1
NORTH CAROULINA A&T
9/7........... @ Appalachian State..........6
9/14....................... Elon..................... 6
9/26........ ..... Howard............... 7:30
10/5......... S. C. State in Atlanta.....330
10/12..............0@ Hampton................ 2
10/19............ Delaware State......... 1
10/26........... @ Florida A&M.............. 2
11/2. Va. Univ. of Lynchburg (HC).-1
11/9.............@ Morgan State. TBA
11/16......... Savannah State..........1
11/23............ N. C. Central ........... 1
NORTH CAROLINA CENTRAL
8/31 ..................@ Duke..... .... 4
9/7......... SaintAugustine's ...........2
9/14......... @ UNC Chariotte.......12
921 .................. Towson.................. 2
10/5 ............... @ Howard ............... 1
10/10..............S. C. State...- 7....730
10/19-......Morgan State (HC). -2
10/26--...... @ Savaninah State.........2
11/2......... Bethune-Coomnan........-12
11/9................ @ Hampton................ 1
11/16.............Norfok State............... 2
11/23............ @ N. C.A&T................ 1


SAVANNAH STATE
9/1............. @ Oklahoma State............6
9/8................@ Florida State ..............6
9/22................ N. C. Central ................7
9/29..................@ Howard.................. 1
10/6............... Morgan State ................7
10/13............ @Florida A&M............... 6
10/20. Edward Waters (HC) ..........2
10/27...............@ Hampton .................2
11/3..............@ Norfolk State..............2
I 11/10......... Bethune-Cookman............ 5
- 11/17............. @ S. C. State .......1:30
A SOUTH CAROLINA STATE
C 8/31.............Coastal Carolina.............6
9/7................... @ Clemson............ TBA
9/14...............Alabama A&M ...............6
9/21...... Benedict in Colunbia, SC 4.......
9/28................... Hampton.................... 2
10/5............. N. C. A&T inAtlanta. 3:30
10/10............@ N. C. Central.........7:30
10/26.......@ Bethune-Cookman .........4
11/2........... @ Savannah State............ 1
11/9............ Florida A&M (HC) 1:30
11/14............. Morgan State........... 7:30
11/23............@ Norfolk State.............. 1
ALBANY STATE
9/7............. @ North Greenville........... 7
9/14..................Tuskegee................... 7
9/21 ...........Elizabeth City State........... 7
9/28....................0@ Miles................6
10/12. .................. @ Lane................2
10/19...........Morehouse (HC).............. 2
10/26............ @ Clark Atlanta ..............2
11/2............. ...... Benedict .............. 7
11/9 Fort Valley State in Columbus, GA...2
BENEDICT
9/7 ............... @ Central State.........1:30
9/14..... Virginia State In Bronx, NY......3
9/21......SC State in Columbia, SC......4
9/28....... Fort Valley State inAugusta,GA... TBA
10/5 ......................Miles .......................2
10/12 ................ @ Stillman.................. 6
10/19..........Clark Atlanta (HC) ............ 2
10/26....... ...... Morehouse ............... 2
11/2................Albany State ................. 7
11/9......................Lane..................2
CENTRAL STATE
9/7.................... Benedict............... 1:30
9/14..............Kentucky State.......... 1:30
9/21........ Morehouse in Chicago....1:30
9/28. Tenn. State In St Louis........ 2
10/5.......... @ West Texas A&M...........3
10/12..........; Miles (HC).............1:30
10/19.................. @ Lane................2
10/24................ @ Stillman.............6:30
11/2 ................ @ Tuskegee............TBD
11/9...................JC Smith............... 1:30
11/16 .......... @ West Alabama ............. 6
CLARK-ATLANTA
9/7.............. @ West Alabama............. 6
9/14 .................... Stillman................. 6
9/21.. Fort Valley State in Griffin, GA...3
10/5............... @ Morehouse ............... 7
10/12............College of Faith .............. 6
10/19............... @ Benedict ................. 2
10/26..........Albany State (HC) ............2
11/2.................... Shorter................6
11/9 ..............Edward Waters............... 6
11/16............... @Southern ................. 6
FORT VALLEY STATE
9/7.....Valdosta State in Macon, GA...12n
9/14........... @ Savannah State ............ 7
9/21..... Clark Atlanta in Griffin, GA.....6
9/28....... Benedict in Augusta, GA.......2
10/5.................. Tuskegee................... 1
10/12.......... @ Kentucky State............ 6
10/17 ............. @ Washburn ................ 2
10/26...... Concordia-Selma (HC).........3
11/2 ................. Morehouse.................. 2
11/9..Albany State in Columbus, GA...2
KENTUCKY STATE
9/5 .......... @ Kentucky Wesleyan.. 6
9/14............. @ Central State.........1:30
9/21............. @ VirginiaState .............. 4
9/28....................Stillman ....................7
10/5...........Alderson Broaddus..........12
10/12-.. Fort Valley State (HC) ....1:30
10/19..................0 Miles ... .......... 4
10)26................ Tuskegee................... 1
11/2.................... @ Lane ................ 2
11/9................. Morehouse.................. 2
LANE
9/7....... @ Va. Univ. of Lynchburg ... 1
9/14................. Morehouse .................. 2
9/28..................Tuskegee................... 2
10/5.................. @ Stillmrnan.................. 5
10/12.............Albany State................. 2
10/19..........Central State (HC)............ 2
10/24................. @ Miles ....................6
11/2 .............. Kentucky State ............... 2
11/9 ................ @ Benedict ................. 2
MILES
9/5.............@ North Alabama.. 6:30
9/14........ 0@ WestGeorgia............. 7
9/21 ...........Conconrdia Selmkna ............. 6
9/28 ...........Albany State................ 6
10/5............ @ Benedict .................2
10/1O2. .......... @ Central State .........1:30
10/19. Kentucky State (HC) .......... 4
10/24....... e... .............. 6
11/2l............@Stilman. ... 5
11/9... ... @ Tuskegee....... 1
MOREHOUSE
9/7...... .....@ Howard.............3:30
9/14 @Lane ..................... 2
9/21--......Certal State in Chicago....130
9/28 ........ Edward Waters................ 7
105... ... lark Atlanta ................ 7
10112- Tuskegee in Columbus, GA.2
10/19.... @ Abany State.............. 2
1026 ene....... dict (HC)............... 2
11/2...........@ Fort Valley State ........... 2
11/9.......... @ Kentucky State ........... 2


ALL TUSME LOCAL -


STILLMAN
9/7............ .Concordia Selma.............5
9/14.............. @ Clark Atlanta..............6
9/21.......... @ Saint Augustine's. 1:30
9/28 ............ @ Kentucky State ............ 7
10/5......................Lane..................5
10/12.............Benedict (HC)................ 6
10/19.............. @ Tuskegee................. 1
10/24...............Central State ............6:30
11/2......................Miles.......................5
11/9..............College of Faith .............. 5
11/28.......... @ Alabama State ............. 3
TUSKEGEE
9/7....... @ Alabama A&M in B'ham......6
9/14.............. @ Albany State .............. 7
9/21 ....W-Salem State In Cleveland .... 1
9/28.................... @Lane................2
10/5 ........... @ Fort Valley State........... 6
10/12...... Morehouse In Col., GA. 2
10/19..................Stillman ....................1
10/26.......... @ Kentucky State ...........1
11/2............Central State (HC). TBD
11/9...................... Miles...-.. .......1


9/14............ Prairie View A&M ............. 6
9/21 ..........@ Miss. Valley State.......... 1
9/28...............Jackson State................ 6
10/12.............AlabamaA&M............... 6
10/19.. Arkansas-Pine Bluff..2:30
10/26..........Alcomrn State (HC). 5:30
11/2 ............ @ Texas Southern ............ 6
11/9............ @ Alabama State............. 1
11/16.............. Clark Atlanta.................6
11/30..... Grambling In New Orleans.. 1:30
TEXAS SOUTHERN
8/31............ Prairie View A&M ............. 7
9/14........ @ Sam Houston State.........2
9/19............. @Jackson State........ 6:30
9/28............. @ AilabarnmaA&M ............ 6
10/5 ............ @ Alabama State.............6
10/12...... @ Arkansas-Pine Bluff......... 6
10/19..........Alcornm State (HC)............. 2
10/26@. 0 Grambling State ...........2
11/2...................Southern...................6
11/9. @ Mississippi Valley State... 1
11/16..................Howard................2


CHEYNEY
ALABAMA A&M 9/1.......... @ Lincoln...................1
8/31.. @ Grambling State.. .. 6 .9/8............. Indiana (PA) ................. 1
9/7....................Tuskegee.. 6 9/15..................C.W Post..................1
3 9/14 @ SC State ............6 A9/22. @ East Stroudsburg...... 1:05
I 9/21 .. Prairie View A&M........... 6 C 9/29.. Mercyhurst .................. 1
A 9/28.. .Texas Southern.............. 6 10/6...................Kutztown............... 1
C 10/5........Miss. Valley State (HC)........1 10/13.............. @ Millersville...........1:30
10/12............... @ Southern .................1 10/20.......... Bloomsburg (HC)............. 1
10/26..Alabama State in B'ham. 7 10/27........... @ West Chester.............. 1
11/2....@ Alcom State...............4 11/3 ............. @ Shippensburg............. 1
11/9...Jackson State................1 11/10............ @ Lock Haven............... 1
11/16..-.Arkansas-Pine Bluff. 1:30


11/23........... Georgia Tech.........TBA
ALABAMA STATE
8/31............. Jacksonville State.............. 5
9/7............... @ Jackson State ............. 5
9/14........ @ Arkansas-Pine Bluff. 4
9/21............. Grambling State.............. 5
9/28.................Alcom State ................. 5
10/5 ............ @ Texas Southern ............ 6
10/12.......... Prairie Viiew A&M............. 1
10/26...AlabamaA&M in Birmninghiam rn. 7
11/2 ................. @ Kentucky............TBA
11/9...................Southern....................1
11/16........ @Miss. Valley State .......... 1
11/28..................Stillman ....................3
ALCORN STATE
8/31..............Edward Waters ............... 4
9/7 ................. @ Miss. State...........TBA
9/14............Miss. Valley State ............. 2
9/21........ @ Arkansas-Pine Bluff. 6
9/28 ............ @ Alabama State............. 5
10/5 ................ Warner (HC)................. 2
10/12 ....GramblINg Siate In Indianapolis .......4
10/19..........@ Texas Southern............ 2
10/26............... @Southern ................. 5
11/2...............AlabamaA&M............... 4
11[7............ Prairie View A&M ............. 6
11/16 ........... @ Jackson State ............. 2
ARKANSAS-PINE BLUFF
9/1.......Langston in Little Rock,AR.....5
9/8.................AlabamaA&M ............... 5
9/15.............. @ Alcom State ............... 4
9/20............ @ Alabama State6.:30
9/29........... @ Tennessee State...........5
10/6...............Jackson State................ 6
10/20............... @ Southern................. 6
10/27. Miss. Valley State (HC) ...2:30
11/3 ............ @ Texas Southern............ 2
11/10@. Grambling State ........... 2
11/17.......... Prairie View A&M. 2:30
GRAMBLING STATE
9/1 Alcom State In Slureveport, LA 6
9/8 ...................... @ TCU................TBA
9/15.............. Alabama State...............8
9/29............. @ Alabama A&M ............. 6
10/6.... Prairie View A&M In Dallas..6
10/13... Mississippi Valley State......2
10/20. Va. Univ. of Lburg (HC) ........ 2
10/27 .......... @ Texas Southern............ 4
11/3...............Jackson State................ 3
11/10-. Arkansas-Pine Bluff ........... 2
11/24. Southern I New Orleans.... 130
JACKSON STATE
8/29 ................... @ Tulane ................... 7
9/7 ............... Alabama State ............... 5
9/14...Tennessee State in Memphis....6
9/19..............Texas Southern ...6:30
9/28 ................. @ Southern .................8
10/5...........Arkansas-Pine Bluff ........... 6
10/12. @ Miss. Valley State .......... 2
10/19. Grambling State (HC) .......... 2
10/26...Prairie View in Shreveport, LA .4
11/9 ............. @ Alabama A&M.............1
11/16 ..............Alcorn State ................. 2
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY STATE
9/1..........Florida A&M In Orlando. 11:45
9f7................... Delta State .................. 1
9/14............. @ Alcorn State ............... 2
9/21...................Southern....................1
10/5 ............. @ Alabama A&M ............. 1
10/12 ............ Jackson State................ 2
10/19. @ Prairie View A&M ........... 2
10/26 Arkansas-Pine Bluff (HC) ....... 1
11/2........... @ Grambling State ...........2
11/9..............Texas Southern .............. 1
11/16............Alabama State ............... 1
PRAIRIE VIEW A&M
8/31..............Texas Southern.............. 7
9/7 ................@Texas State............... 6
9/14 ................. @ Southern ................. 6
9/21...............AlabamaA&M .............. 6
9/28.......... @ Stephen F. Austin .......... 6
10/5. Grambling State in Dallas .4:30
10/12 ......... @ Alabama State............. 1
10/19. Miss. Valley State (HC) 2
10/26..Jackson State in Shreveport....4
11/7 .............. Alcorn State .......... 6:30
11/16 ...........Abilene Christian ............. 1
11/23........Arkansas-Pine Bluff........... 1
SOUTHERN
8/30................. 0 Houston.............730
9/7...........0 Northwestern State.........6


CONCORDIA-SELMA
8/31.......... @ Abllene Christian...........6
97....................0 @Stillman.................. 5
9/21 ....................@ Miles ....................6
9/26............ @ West Alabama ............. 7
10/5 .............. Ave Maria (HC)............12
10/12. @ Arkansas Baptist........... 2
10/19.... @ Va. Univ. of Lynchburg....... 1
10/26. @Fort Valley State ........... 2
11/2............. Georgia Millltary .............. 1
11/9............... @ Delta State................ 2
11/16.................. Warner.................. 1
EDWARD WATERS
8/31.............. @ Alcorn State............... 4
9/7 ................ @ Point.................. 12
9/14....................Pikevllle........ 2
9/21.................Uvingstone .................. 2
9/28............... @ Morehouse ............... 7
10/5.... Va. Univ. of Lynchburg (HC).....2
10/12. @ Webber International........ 5
10/26 @ Newport News Apprentice....1
11/2................ @ Ave Mada................ 1
11/9 .............. @ Clark Atlanta .............. 6
11/16..........College of Faith .............. 2
LANGSTON
8/14............ @ Incarnate Word ............6
8/31 ......... @ Northern Colorado... 1:30
9/21 ............. @ Nichols State .............. 6
9/28. 0@ Northwestern State-. 7
10/12............SW Assemblies .............. 2
10/19.............Texas College ................ 2
10/26..........Oklahoma Baptist............. 2
11/2 ........... @ Panhandle State........... 2
LINCOLN (MO)
9/5 ................ @ Undenwood............... 7
9/14.. Grambling In Kansas City, MO...4
9/21. 0 Missouri Southern. 2:37
9/28.............. Plttsburg State ............... 2
10/5 ...........Emporia State (HC) ........... 2
10/12 ............. @ Washburn ................ 1
10/19. Nebraska-Kearney............ 1
10/26 .................Fort Hays ..............2:30
11/2. @ Central Oklahoma.......... 2
11/9..............N. E. Oklahoma.............. 2
11/16..........Southwest Baptist ............ 2
TENNESSEE STATE
9/1 ............. Bethune-Cookman ............ 7
9/7 ................ @ Florida A&M............... 2
9/14. Jackson State In Memphis......6
9/28. Central State in St. Louis .......2
10/5 ........... Southeast Missouri............ 6
10/12........@ Jacksonville State .......... 3
10/19@. Tennessee-Martin.......... 1
10/26. Eastern Illinois (HC). TBA
11/2.......... @ Eastem Kentucky. 12
11/9.................Austin Peay ............ TBA
11/16..............Murray State ................. 2
TEXAS COLLEGE
8/31..................Bellhaven ................... 7
97 ................ Incarnate Word............... 6
9/14.............Hardin-Simmons...........12
9/28........... @ Wayland Baptist ........... 2
10/12..... Panhandle State ........... 1
10/19 ............... @ Langston ................. 2
10/26 ..................Bacone.....................2
11/2........... @ Houston Baptist ............ 7
11/9..............SWAssemblies .............. 2
11/16 ..........Oklahoma BaptistL ............ 2
VIRGINIA UNIV. OF LYNCHBURG
9/7 ........................ Lane.......................1
9/14 @ Winston-Salem State...6
9/21.......... @ Southern Virginia........... 1
9/28.........@ Alderson Broaddus.......12
10/5............ @ Edward Waters ............ 2
10/12 ............... @ Wesley................... 1
10/19 ..........Concordia Selma............. 1
11/2 ................@ N. C.A&T................ 1
11/9.............Livingstone (HC) .............1
11/16. @ UNC Pembroke............ 2
WEST VIRGINIA STATE
8/14 ............. @ West Liberty .............. 1
917 ................ @ LockHaven ............... 1
9/14 ................ @ Concord .................. 1
9/28............ @ Fairmont State.............1
10/5 ................ Urbana (HC)............ 1:30
10/12........ @ W. Va. Wesleyan. 1:30
10/19................Charleston.................. 1
10/26.............. @ UVA Wise................. 1
11/2..........Notre Dame College........... 1
11/9................ @ Shepherd...............12
11/16.............Glenvilie State ........... 1


BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS PAGE TURNS 20




Here we go again ... Football




kicks off BCSP's 20th year


rpi-i*"Il
1 m


" ""-.wow








Page 6 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 8-14, 2013
I k~r4~~ ~fly - -


El-Beth-El Soulful
Food Kitchen Opens
Dr. Lorenzo Hall Sr. and Greater El-Beth-El Divine Holiness Church
invite you to the El-Beth-El Soul Food Kitchen. Proceeds support local
youth and community programs. Enjoy weekly menu specials! The restau-
rant is located at 725 West 4th Street. For more information call 374-3940
or email gospell75@aol.com.

Gospel Superfest Returns in August
The Allstate Gospel Superfest Battle of the Bands national competition
heads to Jacksonville, Saturday, August 24th. The tour stop will feature live
auditions and produce one regional semi-finalist. National celebrities and
recording artists will also be featured during the tour. The superfest will
be held at the Potter's House Church, 5119 Normandy Blvd. Audition time
is 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. To apply for the competition and see the complete con-
test rules and restrictions visit www.gospelsuperfest.com.

T.B.I.C. 4th Annual Marriage Retreat
Pastor Michael C. Edwards and First Lady Faydra Edwards of Tabernacle
Baptist Institutional Church, 903 E. Union St. are inviting couples to join
this year's "Marriage retreat," September 27th 29th at Epworth by the
Sea in St. Simons, Georgia. Pastor Edwards and Lady Faydra are asking all
Christian marriage couples who love having a great marriage and the desire
to further enrich their marriage or just enjoy having a great time and lots of
fun with other married couples to enjoy the retreat in a beautiful and spiri-
tually uplifting environment. For more information email michaelced-
wards@msn.com or call 356-3362.

Breaking the Chains Women Conference
The ladies of Disciples of Christ Christian Fellowship church invite the
community to their 2nd annual Women's Conference, August 14 16th.
The conference starts at 7 p.m. Wednesday night and 7:30 p.m. Thursday
and Friday. The schedule includes an open forum rap session and speakers
are Sister Camilla Nesbitt of Philippians Community Church and Rev.
Paula Banks of St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church. The church will also be
celebrating the annual Pastor's Birthday appreciation service, Friday,
August 2nd at 7 p.m. For more information call the church at 765-5683 or
email dccfinbc@yahoo.com. Disciples of Christ Fellowship Church is
located at 2061 Edgewood Ave. W.


Community Stop the Violence Festival
at Nehemiah Family Life Center
On Saturday, August 10th, from 11a.m. to 3 p.m. The Nehemiah Family
Life Center will host a family focused festival with the theme "Take It to
the Community, Stop the Violence." The festival will focus on fathers and
families and will feature back to school supplies giveaway, bounce house,
puppet shows, face painting, food and healthcare screenings! The event will
be held at Mt. Sinai Missionary Baptist Church, 2036 Silver Street. For
more information call the church 354-7249.


Pastor Leroy C. Kelly


Delaney Williams


Pastor Leroy C. Kelly

Celebrates 10 Year Anniversary
West Union Missionary Baptist Church is sponsoring a "Decade of
Faithful Service" program honoring Pastor Leroy C. Kelly in his 10th year
anniversary as pastor and faithful saints of the church. The affair will take
place Saturday, August 10th, at 5 p.m. at Emanuel Missionary Baptist
Church Fellowship Hall, 2407 Rev. S.L. Badger Circle. Dr. Kelly Brown
is the featured speaker. For further information contact Delaney Williams at


745-5434.


Greatr Macdoni

Bats Cuc
180Ws deodAeu


Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20


Pastor Landon Williams


AIR


8:00 A.M. EarlyMorning Worship
9:30 a.m. Sunday School

11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday2PM 3 PM

**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


Disciples of Cbrist Cbristiai) Fellowsbip
* * *A Full Gospel Baptist Church ****

JOIN US FOR


Sunday School

9 a.m.

Morning


Worship

10 a.m. Pastor Robert Lecount, Jr

A church that's on the move in

worship with prayer, praise and power!
2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Sr.
Senior Pastor


Help For Homeowners Outreach
The Community Homeownership Center, Inc. will present a Homeowner
Assistance outreach event, August 28th through August 30th. Come let A
HUD-Approved Housing expert review your loan documents and submit a
completed package directly to your service. Hear information on short
sales, foreclosures and refinancing. Also meet one-on-one with a HUD-
approved housing expert. Dates and locations are as follows: Wednesday,
August 28th, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at First Timothy Baptist Church, 12103
Biscayne Blvd. Thursday, August 29th, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Union
Progressive Baptist Church, 613 Pippin Street and Friday, August 30th, 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. at Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church, 2407 S.L. Badger
Jr. Circle E., For more information contact Adrienna Wright, Community
Homeownership Center, Inc. at 355-2837.

8th Annual Golf "Tournament
of Unity" Fundraiser
Join NCI on the green Saturday, August 31st, for the 8th Annual Northside
Community Involvement "Tournament of Unity" Fundraiser at the World
Golf Village. Play the Slammer & Squire Golf Course, enjoy great golf, a
lesson at the PGA Tour Golf Academy, treatments at the PGA Tour Laterra
Spa & Resort, or a day trip to historic St. Augustine and the beaches of
Florida's First Coast. For more information email unitygolf06@aol.com or
call 302-0772.

Emanuel Missionary Baptist 121st
Anniversary Homecoming Celebration
From Mixon Town to Grand Park Emanuel Missionary Baptist Church
will celebrate 121 years of spreading the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Celebrate
this glorious anniversary celebration Sunday, August 18th, beginning with
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. The celebration will continue during morning
worship with the message by guest minister, the. Reverend Michael Warren,
Pastor of Pleasant View Baptist Church of Apopka, Florida, and end with a
reunion concert, presented by present and former members of the choir at 3
p.m. All friends, former members, and the general public are invited to
attend. Emanuel Missionary Baptist Church is located at 2407 Rev. S. L.
Badger, Jr. Circle. For more information call the church office at 356-9371.
Rev. Dr. Herb Anderson is the pastor.


Dr. Robert Smith, Jr. is
Speaker at St. Joseph
Rev. Dr. Robert Smith, Jr., renowned
prolific pastor teacher will be the
guest speaker for the SPIRITUAL
REVIVAL services to be held at St.
i [Joseph Missionary Baptist Church,
Rev. Dr. H.T. Rhim, Senior Pastor.
Services are scheduled nightly,
Tuesday Thursday, August 20th -
22nd, 7:00 PM.
Dr. Smith Dr. Smith currently serves as Pastor of
New Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church, Detroit, MI and is one of the distinguished pas-
tors in the National Baptist Convention of America,
USA. He has a passion for the down and out and has
led the church to minister beyond the walls of New
Bethel. In addition, he is the founder of the Haiti
Mission Alliance, and travels to Haiti at least six times
a year to minister to those souls.
The public is invited to the special revival services. St.
Joseph is located 485 W. First Street (comer of 1st &
Broad Streets), downtown Jacksonville.

Sunday Service at Greater
El-Beth-El Divine Holiness
Greater El-Beth-El Divine Holiness Church, Bishop
Lorenzo Hall, is inviting everyone to come for Sunday
school at 10 a.m. and Sunday morning worship at 11
a.m. and weekly Tuesday night prayer service at 7 p.m.
and Thursday Saints nights at 7 p.m. Greater El-Beth-El
Divine Holiness Church is located at 723 W. 4th Street
For more information call 374-3940.


147th Anniversary at
Historic Mount ZionAM.E,
The Historic Mount Zion A.M.E. ChIrIh1 located at
201 East Beaver Street, will culminate its 147th Church
Anniversary celebration, Sunday, August llth, at the
regular Church Services at 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Pastor
Karl V. Smith of the Greater Bethel A.M.E. Church of
Gainesville, Florida, is the guest speaker for the after-
noon Services. For additional information contact
Thelma Royal at 355-9475.

Mt. Lebanon Annual
Men's Day Celebration
Pastor Freddie Sumner of Mount Lebanon Missionary
Baptist Church located at 9319 Ridge Boulevard will
celebrate their Annual Men's Day, Sunday, August 11th
at 4 p.m. Guest speaker is Pastor John Peoples of St.
Mark Missionary Baptist church, 1435 W. State St. The
worship theme is "persistence, penitence and prayer,"
Luke 1:18, "And he spake a parable unto them to this
end, that men ought always to pray and not to faint".
The public is invited to celebrate with Mt Lebanon and
come together and give God the glory. For more infor-
mation call 527-1762.

NOTICE: Church news is published free of
charge. Information must be received in the
Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5
p.m. of the week you want it to run.
Information received prior to the event date
will be printed on a space available basis until
the date. Fax e-mail to 765-3803 or e-mail to
JFreePress@aol.com.


Sunday Morning Worship
7:40 a.m. and 10:40 a.m.
Church school
9:30 a.m.
Bible Study
6:30 p.m.


Midweek Services
Wednesday Noon Service
"Miracle at Midday"
12 noon-1 p.m.
The Word from the Sons
and Daughters of Bethel
3rd Sunday 4:00 p.m


Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Jr.
Senior Pastor


Worship with us LIVE
on the web visit
www.truth2powerministries.org


Grace and Peace


Visit www.Bethelite.org N


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church
215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


Weekly Services


m suia&NOl& l yamnoau lsth iSoSAt 7M4 ami lOAM Jm


Page 6 Ms. Perry's Free Press


August 8-14, 2013










Black Students Continue Education at ..h....

Underfunded 'Racially Separate' Colleges A f


By Freddie Allen
Despite high test scores and
access to higher education, Black
students often attend poorly-funded
colleges and receive certificates
instead of earning degrees, accord-
ing to a recent report.
The report titled "Separate and
Unequal," by the Georgetown
University Center on Education and
the Workforce, found that, "White
students are increasingly concen-
trated today, relative to population
share, in the nation's 468 most
well-funded, selective four-year
colleges and universities while
African-American and Hispanic
students are more and more concen-
trated in the 3,250 least well-fund-
ed, open-access, two- and four-year
colleges."
According to the report, Black
freshman enrollment increased by
73 percent compared to 15 percent
for Whites freshman from 1995-
2009, but 72 percent of Black col-
lege students attend resource-bare
schools. Blacks were underrepre-
sented at the nation's top schools by
8 percentage points, Whites were
overrepresented by 13 percentage
points compared to their share of


the college age (18-24 years-old)
population, the study found.
Blacks accounted for just 7 per-
cent of freshmen student enrollment
at the best 468 colleges and univer-
sities in the nation, compared to
Whites students who captured a 75
percent share of the students attend-
ing top schools.
According to the report, "Eighty-
two percent of the growth in white
freshman enrollment has been in
the nation's 468 most selective
four-year colleges from 1995-
2009." On the other hand, Blacks
represented 48 percent of the
enrollment in open-access schools,
while Whites accounted for just 21
percent of growth in such schools.
Open-access schools are defined
as"public four-year colleges and
universities that admit at least 80%
of applicants."
Georgetown researchers found
that even when Blacks and
Hispanics finish high school with
good SAT/ACT test scores, they are
still don't go to college as much as
their White counterparts and are
often guided into two-year and
open-access colleges.
Even as colleges and universities


Educator and Matriarch Ruth

C. Solomon Succumbs at 99


continued from front
She was often heard stating her
favorite expression, "If I can help
somebody as I pass along the way,
my life will not have been in vain."
She has been a member of West
Union Baptist Church for many
years and served as President of the
Baptist Training Union (BTU) for
more than sixty years;
Superintendent of the Beginners
Department of the Sunday School
for more than fifty years; organizer
of the Youth Choir, Male Chorus,
and Choir Number Three; conduct-
ed the Vacation Bible School for
more than thirty years, Director of
Youth Missions; Director of the
Board of Christian Education; and
the first female Ghaiman' .of the.
Board of Trustees. -... .
She is a Golden, National Life
and Chapter Life Member of Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, inc. She
served as President of Gamma Rho
Omega Chapter for five years and
during her term, the first sorority
. house was purchased on Cleveland
Road. She is also the founder and
was the volunteer coordinator for
the "4 Wheels for Cancer Program"
sponsored by Gamma Rho Omega
Chapter for more than twenty years,
coordinated the AKA-ACS
Christmas Giftwrap project and
served as volunteer coordinator for
the American Cancer Society
Crusade, Northside Unit.
She leaves to cherish her memo-
ry a loving and devoted daughter,
Norma Ruth Solomon White,
grandson, Marcel Kevin White,
Great granddaughter, Danielle
LaMyse White Britt (Yazid),
Gainesville, VA.; Great-great
grandson, Isiah Britt, Gainesville,
VA; sister, Thelma Howard, nieces,


Mrs. Solomon held her sorority,
Alpha Kappa Alpha close to her
heart. One of her proudest contri-
butions included seeing- her
daughter, Dr. Norma S. White,
become the sorority's 25th
Supreme Basileus.
Rosemarie Howell, Nashville, TN;
Constance Anderson, Sandra Y.
Thompson and Deborah L. Bell;
nephews, Roosevelt Thomas
(Mary), Birmingham, Al; Robert
Williams (Helen), Dayton, OH;
Andre' Bell (Deborah), several
grand nephews and nieces includ-
ing Darryl Thompson, Devritt
Thompson, Doun Lymone Perkins,
Evin Bell, Devritt Thompson, Jr.
and Kyla Bell. Longtime care-
givers: Monique Walker and
Gwendolyn Glover Daniels.
Final services will be held on
Thursday, August 8th at West
Union Baptist Church.
In lieu of flowers, donations can
be sent to the Solomon White Beta
Alpha Leadership Scholarship,
Educa-tional Advancement
Foundation, 5656 South Stony
Island Avenue, Chicago, 1 60637.


are urged to adopt race-neutral
diversity policies for admission, the
report found that admission policies
based on class or income alone
would not improve racial diversity
in the our colleges and universities.
Only 12 percent of low-income
Black college students graduate
with bachelors' degrees, compared
to 23 percent of low-income Whites
that earn bachelors' degrees.
The bachelor's degree is often
seen as the gateway to higher life-
time earnings with more than $2
million in earnings separating those
with bachelors' degrees and those
without them.
"African Americans and
Hispanics gain 21 percent in earn-
ings advantages when they attend
the more selective schools com-
pared with 15 percent for whites
who attend the same colleges," stat-
ed the report.
Researchers admitted that admis-
sion policies alone would not
change the enrollment numbers for
Blacks at high-achieving selective
colleges and universities; that
would take a concerted effort
among policymakers.


Mrs. Martha Mae Gibson Celebrates 95! On August 5th, family and
friends gathered at the home of Mrs. Martha Mae Gibson to celebrate her 95th birthday. Mrs. Martha was
showered with flowers, presents, gifts and most of all love. Ms. Martha is pictured (l-r) with Gwen Daniels,
Pat Greene, Brother James Kelley, Phyllis Gaines and daughter Mary Hawkins. R. Silver photo


Why You Should Be Drinking Coconut Water


What are the health benefits of
coconut water?
Coconut water is all the rage
right now and for good reason!
Coconut water is said to be the
most valuable super food on earth
and nature's most refreshing drink.
Consumed worldwide, coconut
water is packed with a variety of
health benefits. It is the purest liq-
uid second only to water itself. If
that's not enough to sell you on this
delicious, healthy and beneficial
drink, here are a few more reasons.
What is coconut water?
Coconut water is a liquid that
forms naturally inside the shell of a
coconut. It's a common drink in
many tropical countries and is
becoming more popular in the U.S.
Some companies market it as a nat-
ural sports drink.
Why do 'people dink coconut
water?
In many countries, coconut
water is thought to have health
benefits. Coconut water is 94%
water and fairly low in calories. It
seems to be a good source of B
vitamins and potassium. Coconut
water contains electrolytes, various
plant hormones, enzymes, and
amino acids. Some substances in
coconut water could theoretically
have antioxidant benefits in the
body.
Scientific studies of coconut
water have been limited. One study
suggested that drinking coconut
water might be associated with a
lower rate of heart attacks. Another
small study found that coconut
water significantly lowered sys-
tolic blood pressure in 71% of peo-
ple with hypertension.
Coconut water has been used as
a way to rehydrate after exercise or
illness. Coconut water has even
been used as an emergency substi-


tute for IV solutions. Also, it may
be a good storage solution for a
tooth that has been knocked out
until someone can see a dentist.
However, for now, there is no
scientific evidence that coconut
water offers clear heath benefits.
How much coconut water should
you take?
Coconut water
has not been well-
studied as a treat-
ment. There are no
officially recom-
mended doses.
Can you get
coconut water nat-
urally from foods?
Coconut water is
a food. If you
crack open a raw
coconut, coconut
water is the liquid
in the center.
Don't confuse
coconut water with
other liquids
derived from
coconuts. Coconut '-
milk is made by i
grating the meat of
the coconut and .
collecting the liq- '
uid. Coconut milk
is high in saturated fat and is an
ingredient in many recipes.
Coconut oil is made from coconut
milk or dried coconut meat. It's
used for cooking, skin care, and
engine lubrication, among other
things.
What are the risks of taking
coconut water?
Side effects. Coconut water has
not been well-studied. But there's
no evidence that it poses side
effects. Like fruit or vegetable
juices, coconut water seems quite
safe. However, coconut milk con-


tains a fair amount of sodium, so it
may not be a good choice for peo-
ple who need to reduce their salt
intake.
Risks. Check with a doctor
before you begin using coconut
water as a treatment if you have
any health conditions.
Interactions. If you take regular


medications or supplements, talk
to your doctor before you start
using coconut water as a treatment.
6 Health Benefits
of Coconut Water
1. Prevents dehydration.
Refuels and rehydrates -
coconut water maintains the
body's fluid levels and its potassi-
um content helps maintain water
pressure within cells and blood.
2. Fuel for brain and muscles.
Due to its electrolyte content,
coconut water improves nervous
system functioning and nerve


transmission.
Prevents cramps and spasms in
the muscles.
3. Heart and kidney healthy.
Reduces the risk of hypertension
and strokes and helps prevent or
resolve kidney stones.
4. Anti-aging.
Contains compounds


(cytokinins) that protect cells from
aging and cancer.
5. Digestive Aid.
Improves digestion and metabo-
lism via bioactive enzymes. Aids
absorption of food and efficacy of
drugs due to its electrolytic effect.
Soothes intestinal pain/spasm.
6. Supports immune function.
Its Lauric acid content is anti-
fungal, anti-bacterial and anti-
viral. It boosts the immune system
in fighting infection whilst helping
to eradicate intestinal worms and
candida.


Dr. C(bester Aikeos

505 fSi UniOn SRM
In DOWTOWN 01iGONVLf


For All


Your Dental


Needs


358-3827

Monday Friday

8:30 AM-5 PM
Saturday Appointments
Dental Insurance and


Medicaid Accepted
Medicaid Accepted


Complete Obstetrical


Personal
Individualized
Care
Comprehensive
Pregnancy Care
* Board Certified


visit

www.nfobgyn.com

& Gvnecoloical Care


* Family Planning
* Vaginal Surgery
Osteoporosis
Menopausal
Disorders
Laparoscopy


R. Veeren Chithriki, M.D.
SLaser Surgery William L. Cody, M.D.


St. Vincent's Division IV 1820 Barfs Street, Suite 521

Jacksonville, Florida 32204 (904) 387-9577


NORTH 17 M North Florida Obstetrical &


b Gynecological Associates, PA


I


I


August 8-14, 2013


Ms. Perry's Free Press Pape 7








Page 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 8-14, 2013


AR- A


UND


TO


What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports


activities to self enrichment and the civic scene


U


Jaguar Preseason
Attend the Jacksonville Jaguars vs.
Miami Dolphins Pre-Season Game
Friday, August 9th at EverBank
Field, 1 Everbank Field Drive. For
more information visit
www.jaguars.com or call 633.6100.

Upcoming Back
to school events:
Free clothing, school supplies, stu-
dent parent empowerment dinner
and a clothing event Friday,
August 9th at Matthew Gilbert
Middle School, 1424 Franklin St at
5 p.m. For more details call 354-
5295. Next is the Back to School
Jam & Health Fair, Saturday,
August 10th, 10 1 p.m. Over
1,000 backpacks and school sup-
plies will be distributed. Live phys-
icals, health exams and Baptist
Health will be on the premises.
Retrieve the backpacks at
Metropolitan Park.

Downtown Office Party
The Inaugural 'Downtown Office
Party' takes place Friday, August
9th from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. in
Hemming Plaza. Come network
and enjoy the downtown atmos-
phere, food trucks, merchandise,
vendors and downtown retailers.
For more information visit
www.coj.net or call 630-CITY.

Flagler NAACP
Golf Tournament
The Flagler County NAACP will
sponsor the 12th Annual Jacqueline
A. Browne Memorial Golf tourna-
ment Saturday, August 10th at Pine
Course of the Grand Club, 400 Pine


Lakes Parkway. Registration begins
at 7 a.m. For more information call
Harry Davis at 386-437-5082.

3 Divas and a Guy
Named Darryl on Stage
Stage Aurora presents "3 Divas
and a Guy Named Darryl," a lavish
musical evening hosted by Angela
Robinson of Tyler Perry's The
Haves and the Have Nots featuring
Darryl Reuben Hall. The produc-
tion will take place, August 10th at
7 p.m. at the Stage Aurora
Performance Hall, 5188 Norwood
Avenue (Inside Gateway Town
Center). For more information call
the Box office at 765-7372.

Ritz Sound & Vocal
Performers Audition
RSVP is the combined musical
force of the Ritz Voices youth choir
and the Ritz Sound instrumental
ensemble. It brings together youth
as they discover the power of
singing learning and playing music
together. Auditions are open for
youth's ages 12 18, Tuesday,
August 13th, 6-8 p.m. The Ritz is
located at 829 N. Davis St. For
more details call 632-5555.

Ritz Amateur Night
Audition Dates
The Ritz is currently auditioning
acts to compete on the September
and October shows. All auditions
times are from 5:00-6:15 p.m.,
Thursday, August 15th and
Thursday, September 12th The
Ritz is located at 829 N. Davis St.
For more details call 632-5555 or
visit www.ritzjacksonville.com.


P.R.I.D.E. August
Bookclub Meeting
The next P.R.I.D.E. Book Club
meeting is scheduled for Saturday,
August 10th at 4 p.m. The book
for discussion is "The Boy from
Jessie Street" by Landon L.
Williams w/ Marsha Dean Phelts.
Meeting location is at the home of
Marsha Phelts, 5400 Ocean Blvd,
American Beach, Fla. For more
information call 389-8417.

Stanton Class of
1953 60th Reunion
The Stanton High School Class of
1953 is preparing for their 60th
Reunion, August 15-18th. All
grads and non-grads are welcome!
Come and be a part of the planning
and celebration. For information on
planning meetings, date, time and
location, call 765-5402.

Rights Restoration
Conference
The Florida Rights Restoration
Coalition invite the public to attend
the 2013 Annual Convening in
Orlando, August 16 17. This two
day conference will address the
recent legislative changes concern-
ing voting practices and voter regis-
tration in Florida and address the
steps to restoring voting rights for
people with past felony convictions.
For more info visit www.flnewma-
jority.org or call 503-0455.

15th Annual Toast
to the Animals
The Jacksonville Human Society
will present a night of tag wailing


fun, Friday, August 16th, 6 10
p.m., Come raise your glass for a
Purr-feet cause! Enjoy food, fun
and an auction at the Hyatt
Riverfront, 225 E Coastline Dr. For
more information call 725.8766 or
visit www.jaxhumane.org.

Ritz Sound Auditions
Come audition for the Ritz Sound
& Vocal Performers (for middle &
high school singers), Tuesday
August. 20th, 5:30-8 p.m. The Ritz
is located at 829 N. Davis St. For
more information call 632-5555 or
visit www.ritzjacksonville.com.

2013 Black Expo
Gospel Best Showcase
The 5th Annual Florida Gospel
Best Competition will be held
Saturday, October 5th at the Prime
Osbom Convention Center. BET's
Dr. Bobby Jones will host the event
and showcase the winner on his TV
Show! Singers, dancers, mimes,
and instrumentalists can compete
for cash prizes totaling $5,000!
Those interested, can submit an
application or in person at Shands
Towers, 580 West 8th Street on
these dates and times: Thursday,
August 22nd at 5 p.m., Friday,
August 23rd at 4 p.m. and
Saturday, August 24th at 11 a.m.
Applications are available at
www.blackexposouth.com or at the
Black Pages USA, local office,
located at 101 Century 21 Drive,
Suite 120. For more information
contact Sun City Events and
Entertainment at eventsbysunci-
ty@gmail.com or call 924-7444.


You IeIknoIwht I Ih

youwa mssm te re Pes


SUBCRIE ODAY FOmony $6.0


Get Your Brew On
MOSH after dark: "Beer
Workshop with Girls Pint Out,"
Thursday, August 22nd at Museum
of Science & History, 1025
Museum Circle. Learn about home
brewing and cooking with beer.
The beer workshop is at 6 p.m. For
more details call 396.MOSH
(6674), ext. 238 or visit www.the-
mosh.org.

Founders of Black
History Month in Jax
ASALH is holding its 98thAnnual
Conference in historic Jacksonville,
October 2-6th. Association for the
Study of African American Life and
History will hold their next local
arrangements committee meeting
Thursday, August 22nd, 6 to 8 p.m.
at the Ritz Theater, 829 N. Davis St.
For more information call (202)
238-5910 or email gjackson@aps-
plan.com or visit www.asalh.org.

March on Washington
Bus Trip
To register a seat for the tour bus
for the 50th Anniversary March on
Washington, August 23-26, call the
office at 764-7578 or visit
www.jacksonvillenaacp.com. The
Jacksonville NAACP meets every
2nd Thursday of each month.

Gospel at the Ritz
Gospel concert featuring Maurette
Brown Clark, Hope Chapel Mass
Choir & Gospel Violinist Eric
Taylor at 8 p.m, Friday, August
23rd at the Ritz Theater located at
829 N. Davis St. For more informa-
tion call 632-5555 or visit
www.ritzjacksonville.com.
Womens Health
Symposium
Blossom into the new you at the
Speaking of Women's Health and
wellness expo, Saturday, August
24th, 7:30 3:30 p.m. at the Hyatt
Regency Riverfront 245 Water St.
The all day event includes free
health screenings, a luncheon
keynote speakers, breakout sessions


and gift bags! For more infroma-
tion visit www.wjctorg/swh or call
549-2938.

HabiJax Homeowner
Orientation
Habitat for Humanity of
Jacksonville is offering an interest-
free mortgage to potential home-
buyers at an orientation session
Tuesday, August 27th and
Tuesday September 24th at 6 p.m.
and will be held at 2404 Hubbard
Street. For more information call
HabiJax at 798-4529 or visit
www.habijax.org.

Ax Handle Sunday
Conversation
Rodney L. Hurst, Sr. WILL pres-
ent Ax Handle Saturday, August
27th at 7 p.m. at the Stage Aurora
Performance, 5188 Norwood
Avenue. Hurst will speak about his
personal account of the 1960 sit-in
demonstrations in Jacksonville.
Admission is free. For more details
call 765-7372.

American Idol
Fantasia in Concert
Next Level, Inc. presents
Fantasia's "Side Effects Of You
Tour" Thursday, August 29th at 8
p.m. See American Idol Fantasia at
the Florida Theater 128 E. Forsyth
St. For more information visit
www.floriatheater.com or call the
box office at 353-3251

"Sanctified Theft" Play
Comes to the Ritz
Is doing wrong ever the right
thing? Pastor Thomas, a loving hus-
band and father is faced with a deci-.
sion that, will put his.Faith and his,
family to the ultimate test. When
doing the wrong thing for the right
reason, God forgives all...right?
Come see the play "sanctified
Theft, Saturday, August 31st at
7:30 p.m. The Ritz is located at 829
N. Davis St. For more details call
632-5555 or visit www.ritzjack-
sonville.com.


3Upte sl ]Eveilta

r~P LIA L "u &


Commemorate your special event with
professional affordable photos by the Picture Lady!


Call 874-0591
to reserve your day!


N


August 8-14, 2013


Page 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press


,3.4el










The Real Story Behind "The Butler" m ; i1


by T. Pendleton
When "The Butler" comes out on
August 16, there will be three Black
men that made it happen director
Lee Daniels, White House butler
Eugene Allen and journalist Wil
Haygood, who wrote the original
"Washington Post" article, "A
Butler Well Served by This
Election" that inspired the movie.
Haygood's book "The Butler: A
Witness to History," Allen's true-
life story, is in stores now, though
the movie version takes some dra-


matic liberties. You can hear Sybil's
interview with Haygood here.
For anyone skeptical of a movie
about a Black man who spent years
in servitude, think again. "The
Butler" is much more of rich expe-
rience than you would imagine,
aided by stellar performances by its
varied cast including Forest
Whitaker, Oprah Winfrey, Jane
Fonda, Liev Schrieber, Lenny
Kravitz, Robin Williams, Cuba
Gooding, Jr. and David Oyewolo.
Haygood says the idea behind the


movie came from an experience he
had on the Obama campaign trail
before the 2008 election.
"After a rally I came outside of
this big stadium and saw two young
ladies crying. They happened to
have been white young ladies and I
asked if there was anything I could
do," Haygood told The Tom Joyner
Morning Show. "They were crying
because their father stopped speak-
ing to them because they supported
this African-American candidate
and they were not going to change


Feeling too Fat for Fame? Kelly


Price Wants to Tell Your Story


their minds because they had
angered their father. It was a very
powerful moment
I said to myself, Senator Barack
Obama is going to win. I just told
myself. He was still down in the
polls, Hillary Clinton was still in
the race, but I told myself he was
going to win. And when he does
win, I want to be ready with a story
from someone from the era of seg-
regation who has worked in the
White House. I launched a nation-
wide search and he was right here in
Washington, D.C."
Allen served in the White House
from 1952 -1986, through 8 admin-
istrations spanning Truman to
Reagan. In the movie, his personal
story is used to showcase the coun-
try's changing views of racial issues
in America. Alien is not a progres-
sive character that side is shown
through his rebellious son but
what happens to him is also reflec-
tive of the evolution of Black
America.
"I found him here in Washington,
D.C. He lived on a little quiet street,
just him and his wife," Haygood
says. "On the eve of the 2008 elec-
tion, the day before, his wife told
their only son Charles that she was
so happy because a writer had come
by arid somebody was going to
write a story about her husband.
She said 'I'm so at peace,' and then
went upstairs to go to bed and died.
Three days later my story came out
on the front page of the Washington
Post and now it's this big, epic
Hollywood movie."
Haygood's book "The Butler: A
Witness to History" is in stores
now. "The Butler" is in theaters on
August 16th.


Dr. Conrad Murray to be released from
prison early Dr. Conrad Murray, the former doctor
of pop star Michael Jackson, will be released from a
Los Angeles County Jail on October 28th, three years )
ahead of schedule. A source close to the Jackson fam- "
ily says they are "devastated" that he is getting an early
release.
In November 2011, Murray was sentence to four
years in prison on involuntary manslaughter charges.
In 2009, he allegedly gave Jackson a fatal overdose of
Propofol, a sleeping anesthetic, to help him prepare for his "This is It"
comeback tour.
So just why is Murray getting out early? According to legal analysts,
Murray is receiving an early release because of good behavior and a over-
filled jail system. "He has been a model inmate and the authorities have
granted him an early release due to that good behavior and the over-
crowded California jail system," comments a friend of his.
Singer Toni Braxton Loses Rights to 27
Hof Her Songs Due to 2nd Bankruptcy
SR&B singer Toni Braxton is no longer the owner of
the rights to 27 of her songs including "You're
Making Me High," "How Many Wars," and
S"Always" after losing them in a bidding war. She
Does, however, get to keep her hit song, "Un-Break
my heart."
S Just how much debt is Toni in? According to TMZ,
the six-time Grammy award winner filed for bank-
ruptcy in 2010 claiming debts as high as $50 million. And this is her sec-
ond bankruptcy; She filed bankruptcy the first time back in 1998 on debts
of about $4 million. Toni, who is 45-years old, also just last week official-
ly ended her 12-year marriage to Keri Lewis.
Rihanna Surpasses Janet Jackson's Record
Rihanna's career continues to shock fans. This time
the singer earned her 20th No. 1 on Billboard's
Dance/Club Play chart, surpassing none other than
Janet Jackson for the most singles at the top of the chart
from an R&B/pop artist.
Previously, Jackson held the spot with 19 second
place overall behind Dance/Club queen Madonna, who
has 43 No. 1s.
Rih Rih began her ascent to 20 with her debut, "Pon De Replay." Her
current single, "Right Now," featuring David Guetta, reached No. 1 in its
16th week on the charts (after opening at No. 50).


Singer Kelly Price has always
struggled despite her enormous
vocal talent because of her weight.
Even after losing over 100 pounds
some years ago, her success has
been limited by perceptions about
her size. Now the reigning diva on
"R&B Divas L.A.," Price wants to
use her newfound reality TV plat-
form to help other overweight-by-
Hollyv6od itandards_-alent get dis-
covered. She is now casting for a
new reality series "Too Fat for
Fame."
"I'm really excited about it. I've
always and to talk about my weight
in this industry no matter what it
always comes up," Price told The
Tom Joyner Morning Show. "Too
Fat for Fame" is a reality platform
that's going to be giving plus-size
people an opportunity through vari-
ous challenges to make their way to
their own platform. "There are a lot
of singers and dancers, actors and
actresses, models and television
personalities all around who can't
get a yes because they're plus-
sized. So the first prerequisite of the
show is that you've got to be plus
sized but you've got to be really tal-
ented, too."
Price is not just looking for
singers. She is interesting in seeing
anyone who is overweight and
looking to showcase their talents.
Her aim with this show is to find
people whose talent transcends the
notion that being plus-sized means
a Hollywood career is out of reach,
and she's looking to cast men or
women who fit the bill.
"I guess anything that the indus-
try would consider too big, which is
almost everybody if you're not like
spaghetti-thin. In my eyes, I kind of
know what they look at and say is
acceptable and what's not accept-


able.
These are
people who
are extremely
talented and
cannot get a
foot in the
door or get a
yes because
of their
weight."'
As for her
role on "R&B
Divas L.A."
which is
already as
successful as
it's original
Atlanta ver-
sion, Price diplomatically says
there's no one diva that overshad-
ows the others (Sybil disagrees,
outing Chante Moore as the show's
top diva so far.) When asked if she
would vote anyone off the diva
island, Price says not yet.


Kelly Price
"I don't think we get to vote. If
we could, there might not be any-
body left on the show. Truthfully,
we all are [divas]. It's getting inter-
esting and we all get to watch it roll
out. I watched with my jaw on the
floor last night."


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Forest Whitaker and Cuba Gooding, Jr. in a scene from The Butler


Big Stars Emerge for

Latifah's New Talk Show
When Queen Latifah launches her new daytime talk show this fall,
names from her celebrity rolodex will help in the cause. Alicia Keys and
Lenny Kravitz are two of the big names, aiding The Queen Latifah
Show but in different capacities.
Keys has appeared as a guest during the test run, and Kravitz' design
firm constructed the set. More celebrity names include executive pro-
ducers Will Smith and Jada Pinkett Smith.
Aside from the star power involved, the Queen has "already invited
the Obamas to be guests, but that doesn't mean the show will be politi-
cally based. "We probably won't get too heavy into politics," she said.
There also won't be any attempts at copying Oprah's legacy and sala-
cious run-ins. Guests won't be asked to "set the record straight" or
"blindsided by crazy stuff." "If you don't want to talk about that, I'm
not going to make you talk about it because, guess what I don't want
to talk about it either," she said.
The Queen Latifah Show debuts Sept. 16.


Page 9 Mrs. Perry's Free Press


August 8-14, 2013









l CBC Nominates Cong.Sheila Jackson Lee

S. to Head Up Department of Homeland Security


President Barack Obama greets James "Red" Moore during a greet with former Negro League baseball
players in the Grand Foyer of the White House, Aug. 5, 2013.

President Honors Negro League Players


President Barack Obama honored
former baseball players in the
Negro League this week. The
Negro Leagues were established as
a haven for African-American play-
ers who for decades were prevented
from competing with white players
in professional baseball.
The White House said Obama
invited about a dozen players to the
White House to mark their contri-
butions to American history, civil
rights and athletics. The players
competed for teams like the
Philadelphia Stars, New York Black
Yankees, Indianapolis Clowns and
Boston Blues.
Among the attendees were Pedro
Sierra, Minnie Minoso, Ron
Teasley, and the last living owner of
a Negro League team, Minnie
Forbes, of the Detroit Stars.
"You brought a sense of pride to
the African-American community
during the tough social climate of
segregation," The President said to
the group in the Grand Foyer of the
White House.


Obama shook hands with each of
the players before his remarks.
"I want to make sure I get your
names right," The President joked.
Obama, a life-long student of histo-
ry, is well-versed on the Negro
Leagues.
African-American players were
forced to ply their trade in their own
Leagues for decades segregation
because they weren't allowed to
compete with White players in the
Major Leagues. But over time, they
developed their own highly enter-
taining brand of baseball with blaz-
ing speed on the basepaths, power
hitting, tight defense and stellar
pitching that was popular with
baseball fans-Black and White.
The Leagues declined and even-
tually disbanded after Jackie
Robinson in 1947 became the first
Black in modem times to play in
the Major Leagues, clearing a path
for other Black players to follow to
the majors.
After the President's remarks, the
group broke into an impromptu ren-


edition of "happy birthday" in belat-
ed honor of Obama's 52nd birthday
Sunday.
"Wow, you can sing too!" Obama
quipped.


Former Negro League Minnie
Minoso, stands behind the podi-
um and jokingly gives a speech
during his visit to the West Wing
of the White House following his
meeting with President Obama.
Minoso, who also played major
leagues with the Chicago White
Sox, is the only ball player to
appear professionally in seven
different decades.


U.S. Congresswoman Sheila
Jackson Lee of Houston received a
huge boost to her resume, as the
Congressional Black Caucus
(CBC) gave their official endorse-
ment to encourage President
Obama to nominate her as the
replacement for the outgoing
Department of Homeland Security
(DHS) Secretary Janet Napolitano,
who recently announced she will
resign as Department of Homeland
Security in late August
to become the first
woman to serve as pres-
ident of the University
of California system.
Congresswoman
Jackson Lee, who repre-
sents the 18th
Congressional District
of Texas, is known as an
influential and forceful
voice in Washington and
is serving her ninth term
(18 years) as a member
of the United States
House of
Representatives.
In a letter dated July 25 to
President Barack Obama, the
Congressional Black Caucus and
CBC Chairman Rep. Marcia Fudge,
an Ohio Democrat who has led the
CBC since January, asked President
Obama to nominate Rep. Sheila
Jackson Lee to the federal appoint-
ment, highlighting the key commit-
tees she has served on since becom-
ing a member of Congress in 1995.
The letter says that
Congresswoman Jackson Lee
"would serve as an effective DHS
secretary because she understands
the importance of increasing border
security and maintaining homeland
safety." The letter notes that in her
former position as chairwoman of
the Homeland Security
Subcommittee on Transportation
Security and Infrastructure
Protection, Jackson Lee advocated
for increased airplane cargo inspec-
tions and increased railroad safety.
Congresswoman Jackson Lee
held posts on Foreign Affairs,
Judiciary and Homeland Security


committees, where during her serv-
ice on the Homeland Security com-
mittee, she served as the
Chairwoman of the Homeland
Security Subcommittee on
Transportation Security and
Infrastructure Protection.
Currently, she serves as the rank-
ing member of the Homeland
Security Subcommittee on Border
and Maritime Security, where the
CBC says in the letter that


Congresswoman Jackson Lee
stands as a "strong and honest
'voice of reason.'"
Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss.,
the ranking member of the House
Committee on Homeland Security,
was being considered for the
Cabinet position by the CBC as
well, before he released a statement
saying that he was not interested.
Instead, he has chosen to endorse
and throw his support behind
Congresswoman Jackson Lee.
The Department of Homeland
Security was created after the
September llth terrorist attacks in
2001. The office oversees and coor-
dinates the national strategy to safe-
guard the country against terrorism
and respond to any future attacks.
Dealing with border and cyber
security will be extremely impor-
tant issues that President Obama
and the Senate will have to consid-
er when deciding Napolitano's
replacement. Because of the current
political climate in Washington,
whoever President Obama nomi-


nates for the position, will be sure
to receive tons of pushback from
his Republican opponents.
The CBC recommendation
should be taken extremely serious,
as the CBC has experienced some
recent successes with a few of their
recent nominations. After receiving
a strongly-worded letter from CBC
Chairman Rep. Fudge in March
complaining about his second term
appointments, President Obama


chose two CBC nominees to head
up key spots.
President Obama nominated for-
mer Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx
as U.S. transportation secretary and
U.S. Rep. Mel Watt of North
Carolina to lead the Federal
Housing Finance Agency. They
both had to face Senate confirma-
tion hearings; Foxx was sworn in as
the nation's 17th Secretary of
Transportation on July 2nd, while
Rep. Watt's nomination to be the
next regulator of mortgage finance
firms Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
has faced severe Republican oppo-
sition.
Senate Republicans have made it
extremely difficult for many of
President Obama's nominees to
make it out of the Senate, so if he
chooses Congresswoman Jackson
Lee, there is still a challenge.
However, many conservatives are
extremely concerned. Conservative
bloggers and websites have been all
over this news and are taking it very
seriously.


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Page 10 Ms. Perry's Free Press


August 8-14, 2013