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The Jacksonville free press ( December 27, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
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Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
December 27, 2012

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00396

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
December 27, 2012

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00396

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

Full Text




The Year
in Review in

Black Colleges:

Challenges

and Shifts
Page 2


Douglas

Anderson

Grand

Reunion

Honors the

Class of 1962
Page 12


Local Male

Chefs Explore
Gender Bias
and the Easy
Bake Oven
Page 3


2012
Remembering
an Unforgettable
Year of Events
Page 4


FLA LIBRARY HISTORY


I- L I) K 1 ) A'b


1-iJ Il COAS' QLALI-1 Y BLACK V 'ELKLY
50 Cents


Volume 26 No. 10 Jacksonville, Florida December 27 January 9, 2013


( I


Chuck Brown
8'22'1936


Jimm Castor
6.23 1940


Maria Cole
8/1 1922


Don Cornelius
9'271936


Bett Davis
11 11940


Jordan Da\is
2/16/1995


\Vill e Dennis
3/14/1926


Michael C. Duncan
12/10,/1957


Al Freeman
3,21I 1934


Sherman Hemsle>
2/1 38


\\hitnev Houston
9/9/1963


Etta James
1/25/1938


Erica Kennedh
3/24/1970


F77A-


Rodney King
4/2,1965


Trayvon Martin
2/5/1995


Rep. Donald Payne
7/16/1934


David Peaston
3'13/1957


William Raspberr.
10/12/'1935


1 A


Ilita


Donna Summer
12/31/1948


Dick Tony 1Williams
1938-2012


. 1

'I,.ONS
Slh.i.


/ etle /1ilson
3/6/1964


Sylia WVoods
2/2/1926


President Obama is Historically
Re-elected for a Second Term


The Death of Trayvon Martin Sparks
Protests Around the Country


Supreme Court Approves
Affordable Care Act


CT Gunman Kills 26 Kids and Adults
Bringing New Attention to Guns


Dontasies
Boa turight
7/12/1978


L-1F


Paricia Due
12/9/39


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Pag 2- ecemM erl.j i JIanuary O, Ui

The Year in Review in Black Colleges: Challenges and Shifts

In 2012, Black colleges saw upheaval from a death at Florida A&M and a number of changes in presidencies g_


by John Hicks, BETC
The year 2012 saw some highly
challenging moments for historically
Black colleges and universities as
well as a number of changes at the
helms of many colleges.
There was also huge student par-
ticipation in voter registration for this
year's presidential election and what
many describe as a high level of en-
ergy regarding the presidential race.
The most notable challenge was at
Florida A&M University, which dealt
with the fallout from the hazing death
of a member of the school's famed
marching band the year before.
Robert Champion, the 26-year-old
drum major, was beaten by band
members who used drumsticks, bass
drum mallets and their hands to hit
him as he walked to the back of the
bus in a hazing ritual.
Champion's death focused the na-
tion's attention on the culture of haz-
ing and led to investigations that
exposed some financial and adminis-


trative shortcomings at the university,
specifically related to the famed
Marching 100 band.
In the aftermath, the university's
president, James H. Ammons, re-
signed; the band director, Julian
White, was fired; and 12 band mem-
bers were charged with felonies in
the death of Champion. Meanwhile,
other hazing activity was exposed,
including an incident in which a
young woman's leg was broken.
However, there was some good
news for historically Black colleges
and universities in the form of federal
funds. Earlier this year, the Education
Department awarded $228 million in
grants to historically Black colleges
and universities.
The five-year grants went to
schools in 19 states plus the District
of Columbia and the universities are
able to use the money to expand their
campuses, acquire science equip-
ment, develop counseling programs
and train faculty.


Education Secretary Arne Duncan
said the grants will enable HBCUs to
help students who grapple with fi-
nancial challenges as they pursue
post-secondary education.
Meanwhile, there were some sig-
nificant shifts in the leadership of
some of the nation's historically
Black colleges in 2012.
For example, Bennett College, the
historic women's school in North
Carolina, saw its president, Julianne
Malveaux, step down after five years
of running the school. Malveaux, re-
spected economist, writers and com-
mentator, said she wanted to pursue
other interests.
Similarly, there was a leadership
shift at Morehouse College, the
renowned men's school in Atlanta.
John S. Wilson, who served as direc-
tor of President Obama's House Ini-
tiative on Historically Black Colleges
and Universities, was named as
Morehouse's 11lth president.
Wilson succeeds Robert M.


Franklin, who served as president of
Morehouse for five years.
At Bethune-Cookman University
in Florida, president Trudie Kibbe
Reed retired after leading the college
for seven years. Reed presided over
the school being upgraded from col-
lege to university. However, she also
presided over the school while it was
censured by the American Associa-
tion of University Professors over its
firing of faculty.
The school named as interim pres-
ident Edison 0. Jackson, a longtime
college administrator and former
president of Medgar Evers College in
Brooklyn for 20 years.
Students at Bethune-Cookman
made headlines during the elections
by participating in a march to cast
their votes and to advocate the im-
portance of voting. In fact, this year
saw a wave of student activism that
focused on voter registration and ad-
vocacy, urging their fellow college
students to go to the polls.


Estate Planning 101: Secrets You Should Tell


by Marlene Cooper
One of the primary reasons that
living trusts are favored is that, un-
like a will, they are not subject to
public inspection. A will becomes a
public document when it goes
through probate. On the other hand,
a living trust is not subject to probate
and thus the grantor can keep his or
her affairs private. Privacy however,
can be carried too far. It is important
that a person creating an estate plan
tell those who need to know (1) that
an estate plan has been created, (2)
the identity of persons appointed as
successor trustees, agents under a
power of attorney and health care di-
rective, and guardian for minor chil-
dren, and (3) where to find the estate
planning documents.
The following situation illustrates
what can happen if information con-
cerning an estate plan is not disclosed
to successor trustees and agents. I
once received an urgent call from a
young lady who explained that her
grandfather, whose estate plan I had
prepared a couple of years prior, was
in the hospital with a serious illness.
One of his daughters (her aunt) had
been to the hospital and was "raising
Cain" with the doctors and other
family members. This aunt had also
tried to gain access to his house and
assets. The problem was that this
aunt was a known drug addict and, in
general, a "bad actor". Because she
was legally the next of kin, however,
she was seeking to assert authority
over her father's affairs.
Fortunately for my client, he had
foreseen the potential problems that
this daughter could present. He had
created an estate plan that put control
of his financial affairs and medical
decisions in the hands of his mature,
responsible granddaughter through
his living trust, power of attorney and
advance health care directive. The
problem was, however, that he had


never disclosed those facts to the
granddaughter. Had he told her
about the power he had given her in
his estate plan and told her where to
find the relevant documents, chaos
could have been avoided.
On the subject of privacy, it should
be noted that a relatively recent fed-
eral law concerning privacy of med-
ical information may affect some


existing estate plans. Many common
provisions in living trusts, powers of
attorney and advance health care di-
rectives require that a doctor render
an opinion as to a person's mental
and/or physical capacity in order for
others to assume power over that per-
son's affairs. However, under the fed-
eral law, called the Health Insurance
Portability and Accountability Act


(HIPAA), many doctors and health
care providers will not provide the
necessary opinions or access to med-
ical information to third parties with-
out an express waiver of the HIPAA
privacy provision. Thus, if you have
an estate plan that is more than a cou-
ple of years old, you may wish to
have a HIPAA waiver prepared and
included in your estate plan.


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iHEALTI


Phi Delta Kappa Adopts and

Nurtures Pinedale Elementary
Life is a gift, and it offers us the privilege, the opportunity, and the respon-
sibility to give something back to by being a blessings to other., Recently, the
National Sorority of Phi Delta Kappa, Inc., Delta Delta Chapter, donated
warm clothing, supplies, and snacks to their adopted school, Pinedale Ele-
mentary. Soror Latonia Mitchell, a third grade teacher, along with the princi-
pal, Ms. Alicia Hinson collected the items to store at the school for the
students use. "we never get tired of doing little things for others because
sometimes those little things occupy the biggest parts of their hearts," said
Baselius Flora Parker.


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FLORI DA UNIVERSITY-;


t's Possible


Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press


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2013 New Years Edition __Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


Friends and Family Enjoy 80th

Birthday of Harvey Harper


First time Kwanzaa attendee, Nigerian native Oluwafunmike
Olubodun, lit the candles for the first time at the Ritz Kwanzaa event.

Ritz Kicks Off First Coast

Kwanzaa Celebrations


The Ritz Theater and Museum
celebrated the first principle of
Kwanzaa "Umojo" (Unity) with an
audience that was excited to learn
the history of Kwanzaa. Many of
the attendees have celebrated
Kwanza for over 40 years.
Hostess Frances Bradley and
Emmanuel Washington of
Nocturnal Escape gave testimonials
of their "Umojo" efforts in the com-
munity. First time Kwanzaa
attendee Oluwafunmike Olubodun
lit the candles for the first time and
exclaimed, "I know that other faiths
have their celebrations. But I want-
ed to know what our culture does.
In Nigeria people do celebrate
Kwanzaa, yet I have never experi-
enced this historic holiday."
Washington also was instrumen-
tal in informing the audience, "We
have to utilize the seven principles


in our everyday life." Community
activist and Chair of the Ritz Board
of Directors Rahman Johnson
smiled and reminisced on the past,
"I've celebrated Kwanzaa for 36
years. I grew up in a single parent
home and the Kwanzaa principles
have stuck with me and I use them
to do business." Frances Bradley
chimed in and reminded the crowd,
"There was a time that we were
segregated and had to help one
another in life. Lets stay in tune
with one another and continue to
take advantage of the museum and
its legacy and support Kwanzaa,
let's do an uncommon thing in and
uncommon way and become a part
of history."
Kwanzaa is a seven-day festival
beginning on Dec 26 when African-
Americans celebrate family, com-
munity, and culture.


This past weekend, an 80th birthday celebration was held for
Harvey J. Harper. Mr. Harper's birthday theme was "celebrating 80
years of blessed living." On the premises were many family and
friends. Heralded birthday tributes and presentations were given by
longtime friend and pastor, Bishop Rudolph McKissick, Kappa Alpha
Psi Fraternity brother George Flowers and words of blessings from
his lovely wife, Jimmie Pearl Harper. Shown above enjoying the cele-
bration are the Harper family: Heather Carter, Jimmie Harper, hon-
oree Harvey Harper, Joyce Quiller and Beverly Harper.


Nasitra Donates to Families of Slain Children
The Nasitra Club, organized in September 1959 by trades men of the
Naval Air Station, celebrated their holiday season with a donation to
Families of Slain Children. Shown aboveat the presentation is Henry
Roberson, Kennedy Mumfor, Gedrge Greealhill, Roger Sherles, William
Lewis, Beverly McClain, Harold Weston, Ronald Covington, and Ulysses
Stockling.


Springfield resident and advo-
cate for change Chevarra Orrin,
recently hosted a thought provok-
ing issues forum dubbed, "Culinary
Arts, Cocktails and Conversation:
Easy-Bake Ovens and Gender
Stereotypes".
Several popular local male chefs-
backed the new movement for
Hasbro to make a gender-neutral
Easy-Bake Oven. Chef Amadeus,
winner of Food Network's Extreme
Chef "Mexican Showdown," and
Executive Chef Matt Blinkhorn
with Ashley Street Catering/Clara
White Mission, used years of train-
ing and skills to showcase their
culinary ability in a cook-off using
an Easy-Bake Oven.
Following the competition, there
was a tasting and discussion about
the effects of gender-biased toy
marketing, gender stereotypes, and
the most recent debate involving
the Change.org petition in an effort
to encourage Hasbro, makers of the
Easy-Bake Oven, to design a gen-
der-neutral Easy Bake Oven.
Participating chefs shared their
experiences of bias and support as
young boys interested in cooking.
Chef Matt Blinkhorn recalls
using his cousin's Easy-Bake Oven
when he was only eight or nine


years old. Matt exclaimed, "I was
the kid who always wanted the
curly fry maker or sandwich press-
er from the television infomer-
cials."
Chef Amadeus was quite
adamant when he informed the
crowd, "as a young boy I was bul-
lied because I was so short, so I
wound up in the kitchen with my
grandmother and aunt and I learned
how to cook. Now the fella's that
bullied me are my clients that I
cook for!" Unlike many boys who
are steered towards more "manly"
play activities, Pedro Cohen one of
the home chefs asked to participant
proclaimed, "there was no way my
father would let me have an easy
bake oven in his house. I learned to
cook by watching my mother and I
love to see how my girlfriends react
when I cook."
Participants in the discussion
included administrators, hair-
dressers, and community residents.
The cook-off and discussion was
also audio and video taped and
aired on a segment of blogtalkradio
"Southern Passion Lounge" hosted
by Chef Amadeus. Chevarra stated,
"I host these events so we can
engage the community, gain feed-
back aniid network" ..


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Shown above is Chef Amadeus and Pedro Cohen
Local Male Chefs Explore Gender

Bias and the Easy Bake Oven








Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press


How will we ever forget the year
2012? From one of the most com-
petitive and nasty campaign sea-
sons we have seen in decades to the
senseless murder of two Florida
teens with the assailants' defenses
the infamous Stand Your Ground
law to Hurricane Sandy and the
unbelievable Newtown elementary
school murders.
The year 2012 will be a year that
many of us will remember for the
rest of our lives. In February of this
year we watched the Trayvon
Martin murder case and all the
media surrounding it begin.
Trayvon was shot while walking
back from the store by a
Neighborhood Watch volunteer,
George Zimmerman, who felt like
the black teen looked out of place
in his neighborhood.
Most of us have heard the story
time and time again and it still
upsets many parents to think that
your child could be stereotyped and
murdered and the killer can turn
around and use a self-defense law
that should only be used when a
person is being attached by an arm
assailant.
But who would have thought that
several months later some two
hours away in the same state anoth-
er young black male would be
killed by someone claiming the
same ridiculous defense.
Jordan Davis, a 17-year-old
Jacksonville teen was killed after
an exchange about loud music at a
gas station on the Southside of
town. Michael David Dunn, 45,
fired eight to nine shots into the red
SUV where Davis and three friends
were sitting outside after the loud
music argument occurred. How an
argument over loud music could
escalate toward murder is unbeliev-
able.
Having the Davis and Martin
murders in the state of Florida is
more than a coincidence to many
gun control advocates. Florida
now owns the proud privilege of
having over 1 million people with
concealed weapons permits more
than any other state.
And that figure doesn't include


individuals who work in law
enforcement or for security compa-
nies.
Whew We! Welcome to the Wild
Wild Florida cowboys and girls!
If I learned anything from being
in the Florida Legislature it's that
most laws have both intended and
unintended consequences and this
state's Stand Your Ground law may
have been crafted with decent
intentions, but it has truly become
Frankenstein's Monster! It's time
to make major modifications to the
law.
Some say that Hurricane Sandy
helped President Obama win re-
election because it gave him that
"Presidential Moment," but I don't
know if that is really the case. I do
know that it was a devastating
Hurricane many in the Northeast
are still recovering from.
Hurricane Sandy will definitely
go down in the history books along
side Hurricane Katrina.
How could you talk about 2012
without talking about the
Newtown, Conn. mass murders?
This horrendous massacre of 26
children and staff at a Connecticut
elementary school, along with
other mass shootings have to make
us wonder what is going on in our
society.
Having a daughter that is 6 years
old only makes the tragedy worse
for me because I feel for those par-
ents who will never see their inno-
cent babies grow up.
And how do we begin to even
rationalize something so evil and
irrational? For those who say that
guns aren't a problem here in the
United States I say tell that to the
parents of those children.
So much happened in 2012, I'll
never be able to touch it all. The
resignation of David Petraeus as
CLX director because of an affair he
conducted with his biographer,
Paula Broadwell was a big story
too.
Of course President Obama win-
ning a second term has to be a top
story. Obama's victory was so spe-
cial because it defied the odds.
With a slow recovering economy


and an opponent (and the Super
PACs supporting him) with more
money than the U.S. Treasury, it
seemed that President Obama was
primed to be taken out.
But as sports personality Lee
Corso always says, "Not so fast my
friend!"
Voters were basically faced with
the option of moving forward with
President Obama or changing
direction with Mitt Romney. The
problem for most voters and so-
called political analyst is that not
enough of the electorate was ever
comfortable enough with Romney
to fully get on board.
Most voters would agree that
they expected change to come
much sooner, but you can't argue
with 33 straight months of job
growth, health care for our most
needy citizens, Wall Street reforms,
and better federal financial aid for
students, etc.
Not only did Obama get reelect-
ed, but he also won a major victory
in 2012 for Obamacare. By a 5-4
margin, the Supreme Court upheld
the core elements of the President's
much-debated health care overhaul.
Then his victory in November
ensured the plan would continue to
be implemented.
Then there is the "Fiscal Cliff"


political show. President Obama
and Republican House Speaker
John Boehner have been engaged
in high-stakes negotiations over a
deal to avert the so-called "fiscal
cliff' that would trigger automatic
tax hikes and spending cuts. Very
little progress has been made -
stayed turned for the developing
story.
The economy was still a major
issue in 2012. So was the yearlong
turmoil in Libya and struggles get-
ting U.S. United Nations ambassa-
dor Susan Rice confirmed as
Secretary of State. Gay marriage
survived several legal test in 2012,
and two states legalized marijuana.
There was the accidental death of
Pop Icon Whitney Houston. The
Whitney tragedy was not as big as
Michael Jackson's accidental
death, but it was another reminder
of a great artist with a very trouble
personal life.
So many things happened in
2012 worth discussing, but I just
don't have enough space.
Hopefully 2013 will be a better
year for us all. God Bless and
Happy New Year!
Signing off from my sofa watch-
ing "A Christmas Story" for the
110th time,
Reggie Fullwood


2012 Has Been an Unforgettable Year


Adding Cops and Arming Teachers Don't Enhance Student Safety


by George E. Curry
NNPA Editor-in-Chief
WASHINGTON (NNPA) -
Rather than deter violence, placing
more police officers in schools has
led to more students becoming
entangled in the criminal justice
system for such minor infractions as
disorderly conduct, an in-depth
study of the issue has concluded.
Despite that finding by the Justice
Policy Institute, a nonprofit group
that seeks ways to decrease incar-
ceration, National Rifle Association
(NRA) officials continue to argue
that the best way to prevent
tragedies such as the killing of 26
people in Newtown, Conn. is to arm
teachers and place more police offi-
cers in schools.
In an appearance Sunday on
NBC's "Meet the Press," Wayne
LaPierre, executive vice president
of the NRA said, "If it's crazy to call
for putting police and armed securi-
ty in our schools to protect our chil-
dren then call me crazy." He added,


"I think the American people think
it's crazy not to do it. It's the one
thing that would keep people safe."
After LaPierre made that sugges-
tion Friday at a news conference in
which he would not take questions
from reporters, Rep. Chris Murphy
[D-Conn.] called it "the most revolt-
ing tone deaf statement I've ever
seen."
After the shooting rampage at
Sandy Hook Elementary School in
Connecticut, President Obama said
he will push for gun legislation
early next year. Many elected offi-
cials are supporting the move.
"I have found the statements by
the NRA over the last couple of
days to be really disheartening,
because the statements seem not to
reflect any understanding about the
slaughter of children," said Senator
Joe Liberman [I-Conn.]. "But it's
obviously also true that the easy
availability of guns, including mili-
tary style assault weapons, is a con-
tributing factor, and you can't keep


that off the table."
The Justice Policy Institute pub-
lished a report in November of last
year titled, "Education Under
Arrest: The Case Against Police in
Schools."
It stated, "Fueled by increasingly
punitive approaches to student
behavior such as 'zero tolerance
policies,' the past 20 years have
seen an expansion in the presence of
law enforcement, including school
resource officers (SROs), in
schools. According to the U.S.
Department of Justice, the number
of school resource officers
increased 38 percent between 1997
and 2007. Some cities, like New
York City, employ more officers in
schools than many small cities'
entire police force."
The expansion of police has had
an adverse impact on many stu-
dents.
"With this rapid increase in the
presence of law enforcement,
including SROs, in schools, districts


from around the country have found
that youth are being referred to the
justice system at increased rates and
for minor offenses like disorderly
conduct. This is causing lasting
harm to youth, as arrests and refer-
rals to the juvenile justice system
disrupt the educational process and
can lead to suspension, expulsion,
or other alienation from school," the
report stated. "All of these negative
effects set youth on a track to drop
out of school and put them at greater
risk of becoming involved in the
justice system later on, all at
tremendous costs for taxpayers as
well as the youth themselves and
their communities."
The push to add more police at
school began at the federal level
with the concept of zero tolerance.
The Gun Free Schools Act of 1994,
signed into law by President Bill
Clinton, required any jurisdiction
receiving money through the
Elementary and Secondary
Education Act to adopt a policy that


suspends a student for at least a year
for bringing a firearm to school.
By the time 15 people were killed
at Columbine High School in
Littleton, Col. In 1999, President
Clinton had already called for more
police officers in the schools.
Clinton was reacting to some
highly-publicized acts of violence
rather than facts.
According to a 1996 study by the
Centers for Disease Control,
between 1992 and 1994, a youth
had less than one in a million
chance of suffering a violent death
at school, including as a victim of
homicide or committing suicide.
In addition, the National School
Safety Center found that there was a
27.3 percent drop in the number of
school-related homicides and sui-
cides between 1992 (55) and 1998
(40) the same period in which
Clinton was calling for more police
officers in schools.
Increased presence of police in
schools has contributed to the


school-to-prison pipeline, according
to the Justice Policy Institute study.
"No data exists showing that
SROs arrest youth of color more
often than white students, but other
data shows that youth of color are
disproportionately arrested com-
pared to white youth," the report
stated. "In school, youth of color are
far more likely to be subjected to
harsh punishments in school than
whites. A study from the Applied
Research Center shows that African
American students are disciplined
more often and more harshly than
white students. Related to suspen-
sions, a 1998 study from the
Department of Education Office for
Civil Rights shows that African
American and Hispanic students are
suspended from schools at dispro-
portionate rates compared to white
students."
In South Carolina, for example,
Black students make up 42 percent
of the enrollment, but 75 percent of
Continued on page 8


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Does 'Django Unchained' make

slavery safe for the masses?

by Javier David, TG
For lovers of the Blaxploitation genre, Django played with unrepentant
swagger (because "swagga" wasn't yet part of the vernacular in the slave
era) by Jamie Foxx as he shoots and cusses his way through Django
Unchained, which hit theaters on Christmas day may remind audiences
of that throwback era when black leading men had testosterone in spades,
and weren't afraid to show it.
Take Shaft, add in Alan Ladd's gunslinging Shane and throw in a dash of
Charles Bronson's Paul Kersey in for good measure, and you'll have an
idea of what to expect from the slave turned bounty-hunting freeman at the
center of Quentin Tarantino's award nominated movie.
Django is one cool character, the bad mother..."shut your mouth" all the
dudes want to be and all the women want to be with. Alas, ladies: he's only
got eyes for his missing wife.
In fact, it's Django's bold manner that prompts one of the characters to
declare that he "ain't never seen a ni**er like [him] before". This being a
Tarantino joint, the n-word factors very prominently into our story, and car-
ries with it grave cultural implications. But more on that in a moment.
Foxx's character is an anti-hero on a mission in this homage to the
spaghetti western, and like most cowboys he is singularly focused on
vengeance. This involves finding his wife Broomhilda (played by Kerry
Washington), who has been traded away after an escape attempt. Along the
way, he is offered manumission from King Schultz, an erudite German
bounty hunter with a fondness for florid, polysyllabic phrases.
Posing as an itinerant dentist, Schultz rescues Django from slave traders,
where the two forge a bond as they make their way across pre- Civil War
America to find Schultz's bounties.
Schultz, however, is far less interested apprehending his marks than he is
in eliminating them, which is both more lucrative and expedient.
Through a series of hilarious and cringeworthy events, the unlikely odd
couple leave a profusion of gore and bullets in their wake.
All of this makes for great fun, but hardly Golden Globe worthy. The
mega-watt presence of the versatile Foxx, the brilliant Christoph Waltz,
and the ageless Leonardo DiCaprio all of them either past nominees or
outright winners of Hollywood's top accolade makes the movie shine
with talent.
What it doesn't do, though, is convince you the movie is anything other
than what it is: an action packed, semi-parodic revenge flick that playfully
diverts but never mesmerizes.
One thing Django Unchained is not, however, is what Ms. Washington
ludicrously proffered in a recent interview as an "opportunity" to talk about
a touchy subject. Viewers should disabuse themselves of this disingenuous
idea immediately. If an education on slavery is what you seek, best rent
Roots, the most transcendent picture about slavery ever to grace the cine-
ma. Perhaps the only person Ms. Washington is fooling with that nonsen-
sical argument is herself.
This being a Tarantino production, be prepared for a bloody good time -
literally. With Django the reining king of gore and profanity appears to go
further than he ever has.
The scene introducing viewers to DiCaprio's Calvin Candie involves a
display of brutality so raw it crosses a pulsating line into sadism. By the
end of the film, one man has been horse-whipped, ripped apart by rabid
dogs, and various bodies lay riddled with bullets. All in a day's work for
Mr. Tarantino, who is always willing to push the boundaries of decorum.
Yet here's the part.e\ervane,kne. was coming, but for which one still
feels unprepared. thle imi6 ie''torfetribal downpour ofthe'd srsfacial epi-
thet on the books, Like,.fiee.zing,.rain. or an ice storm otAer/baretskin, the
unrelenting and unrepentant use of the n-w\ord leaves you numb.
An unscientific count yielded at least 95 separate instances of the word's
use throughout the movie's 160 minutes. The most jarring part was the lack
of reaction it triggered at a recent screening of the movie. The overwhelm-
ingly black audience whooped and cheered without the slightest bit of com-
punction every time the word was used. Continued on page 8


BUTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald Fullwood,
ichinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Marsha Oliver, Marretta
Phyllis Mack, Tonya Austin, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver,
rown, Rahman Johnson, Headshots, William Jackson.


11









December 27, 2012


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MF K H Black Panthers Continue Protest of Darrel Guilyard :


Sashi Brown

Named Jaguars

General Counsel
The Jacksonville Jaguars may
have more than dissapointing first
season under the new ownership of
Shad Khan, but their legal affairs
were in good hands. Harvard
trained African-American attorney
Sashi Brown was named General
Counsel for the team in January.


In late February, the New Black Panther Party launched a walking protest against former Shiloh
Metropolitan Baptist Church pastor turned convicted pedophile, Rev. Darrel Guilyard. The gifted evan-
gelist took over the pulpit of Christ Tabernacle Missionary Church located across the street from a play-
ground on the Eastside. Following his installation as pastor, the church's membership grew 1000% from
ten to close to 200 in a matter of weeks. Shown above is Min. Mikhail Muhammad with New Black Panther
Party members protesting at the church.


Jax's Black Girls DO Run
As the rate of obesity in the African American community soars to new
heights, Black Girls Run, a local running group, is dispelling the myth
about Black women and exercise. Formed in 2009 by Toni Carey and
Ashley Hicks of Atlanta, Georgia, the nonprofit sporting organization has
spread throughout the country to 69 chapters in 29 states. Several of the
members are shown above at the 1 OK Resolution Run 2012 in Orange Park.


Saluting Our Living Legends


SITTING: J. Williams, J.H. Jackson (Deceased), E. Hall, S. Meeks and Harold "Buster Hair. STANDING:
HL Danielh. W. Rasberry, J. Wheeler, A. White, Jimmie Johnson.
Local Coaches and Game Officials Honored
The African American Coaches, Game Officials and Athletic Association (AACGOA) recently held its second
annual recognition banquet at the Legends Center. Eight outstanding community leaders and coaches were hon-
ored. PH,Lnorees included the late recreational workers Essie McCray and Emmett Reed both honored for their
many years of service throughout Duval county. The event was held in February.


Nathaniel "Coach" Washington
An appreciation banquet was held in March for the
man affectionately called "Coach" Nathaniel
Washington. The longtime school administrator has
inspired and influenced countless students to excel
and prepare for the future as an athlete on and off the
field. Shown above is Calvin Burney presenting a
proclamation to Coach Washington.


Camilla Thompson
Friends and family joined together to surprise communi-
ty matriarch Camilla P. Thompson at a surprise birthday
celebration in March at the airport Holiday Inn. Known
as the "Mother of Black History" for the city, Mrs.
Thompson has given of her time and resources for decades
in enlightening the community on the city's history.
Sharing accolades is Rev. Rudoplh McKissick with the
honoree.


Justice Finally in the Future

for City's Minority Firefighters
(April 26, 2012) Black firefighters in the city may finally find justice
with the U.S. Justice Department. After a decades long battle, the Justice
Department recently released findings that the Jacksonville Fire and
Rescue Department has a history of discrimination against blacks seeking
promotions. The federal government's three-year investigation into pro-
motional practices by the Fire Department determined "the city has
engaged in a pattern of practice of employment discrimination against
African Americans on the basis of their race." A federal lawsuit is expect-
ed to be filed any day against the city of Jacksonville and the Jacksonville
Association of Firefighters demanding promotions and back pay for those
affected.

Former Students Celebrate


Life of Norma White


Shown above sitting in the center is Dr. Norma White flanked by spe-
cial guests at the celebration.
Friday night, May 25, 2012 was a night to remember for Dr. Norma Ruth
Solomon White when more than 100 former band students, a band parent
from the 1950's and family members and friends gjil.icLd to honor her as
their "First Lady of Music." Dr. White began her teaching career at Isaiah
Blocker Junior High School in 1955 and organized the band in 1956.
Juliann McIntosh Blackmon, Flautist and Clarence Ronald Belton, clar-
inetist presided over the affair held at the University Club.


Tony Hill

Hill Earns


Doctorate
Former State Senator and current
city Federal Policy Director, Tony
Hill, has been bestowed one of the
highest honors given an individual
- the honorary degree of Doctor of
Law. Last weekend in addition to
being the commencement speaker
at Bethune Cookman University in
Daytona Beach.
Hill's long political career
includes three terms as a State rep-
resentative and two terms as a State
Senator. He is a member of the
board of directors of the 5 By 2015
Task Force Black Male Teacher
Initiative and also sponsored a bill
to create the first Civil Rights Hall
of Fame into which Dr. Mary
McLeod Bethune was an inaugural
inductee to exist in any state
Capitol.


Zeta Honors Community Pears The Beta Alpha Zeta Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta
Sorority, Inc. recently held their Royal Blue Gala with over 200 guests at the Wyndham Riverwalk. The
highlight of the evening were the 2012 Community Pearl Honorees which included Rose Anderson, Pauline
E. Davis, B. Dolores Fleming, Annie M. Hopkins, Beverly McClain, CDR Andrea Petrovanie, Teresa White
and Winifred Houston Zanders.

Club Baron Celebrates 66 Years of Trusteeship
(April 26, 2006) The 64th annual
Baron Club dance was held with
nearly 200 celebrants reminiscing
and fellowshipping. The classic
Baron handbook describes a Baron
as "a modem day business man of
great influence." Started in 1946,
lthe Baron Club, has goals to mold
the character of children in their
I formative years, instill pride, and
promote political registration. The
theme for the event was "Clean
Hearts Club Baron 66 years of
Shown above are David Manor, Carrie Manor, Geanene White, Community Service from 1946 -
Yolanda Jenkins and Baron Reginald Robinson. 2012."


December 27 January 9, 2012


Page 6 Ms. Perry's Free Press










Decembe 27 auay9,212M.Ker'sFeePes01Pg


Patricia Ann Richardson Crowned

Ms. Senior Jacksonville 2012
The 4th Annual Ms. Senior Jacksonville Pageant crowned Patricia Ann
Richardson as Ms. Senior Jacksonville 2012. At the age of 66, the
Jacksonville native wowed the judges with her personal interview and
rousing rendition of the gospel classic "Amazing Grace". In her spare time,
she loves to sing, bake, listen to classical, gospel, and country music.
Challenged with Lymphedema, she will continue her passion in the com-
munity serving as a Foster Grandparent Program, a voice for senior citi-
zens, and being a positive role model to all onlookers. Founded in 2008,
the Ms. Senior Jacksonville Pageant was established to enhance the quali-
ty of life for women aged 60 and over. Next, she will compete in the Ms.
Florida Senior America in April 2013 and if successful, onto Ms. Senior


Men Cook for Fun and Scholarships


I _.. T",2 ,'P1 .. -, ... .
The 3rd Annual "Fathers Who Cook" Youth Summer Camp fundraiser was held at Gateway Town Center and
over 3,000 people were in attendance to taste the amazing cuisine of fathers who cook. Fathers were lined up at
their stations taking pride in their food dish. 2011 reigning champion, Bracey Taylor, an Anheuser Busch execu-
tive proudly exclaimed "Last year I won with my Italian smoked chicken dish, this year I added some special
ingredients! The event, held annually around Fathers Day, nets funds for youth to experience summer camp.


Marvin "D.J." Roach
Old Timers

Honor Their Own
(June 21, 2012) The "Old
Timers", a long standing organiza-
tion of community centered gentle-
man, held their annual Fathers Day
Softball Game in the Grand Park.
The long awaited game held since
the 90s, brings the young at heart in
a battle against the younger genera-
tion. As part of this year's festivi-
ties, Marvin "DJ" Roach received a
surprise honor for his service to the
organization and other community
services. If it is up to the commu-
nity to keep DJ Roach on the scene,
he will no doubt be around for a
very long time.


Lt. Governor Under Fire for Lesbian Related Comment


Lt. Governor
Jennifer Carroll
came under fire
in JUly for a
Comment she
Rt^ made regarding
lesbians.
"The problem
is that when you
Jennifer Carroll have these accu-
sations that come out," Florida Lt.


Shown above at the unveiling were Brewster Nurses and city officials: (L-R) Lemira Henson, Albertha Bevels,
Doris Putnam, Mia Jones, Glorious Johnson, Tony Hill, Mayor Brown, Doretha Brown (President of the
Brewsters Nurses Association), Sylvania Dawson and Councilman Warren Jones. (SEATED) Nanye Campbell
Fletcher, Muriel Exson, Almetya Lodi, Hellen Bargeron and Agnes Freeman.
Legacy of Brewster Hospital Honored Brewster Hospital, the health facility that
served Jacksonville's African-American community for decades during the era of segregation, has officially been
written in the annals of our city's history. Mayor Alvin Brown joined over a dozen of the institution's original
nurses at the marker unveiling of the historic Old Brewster Hospital and Nurse Training School in May.


Florida Schools to Set

Learning Goals by Race


There's a new plan underway
by the state education system that
will lower the playing field when
it comes to Florida's Black stu-
dents.
The Florida State Board of
Education recently passed a set of
controversial reading and math
standards for students based
entirely upon race.
Under the new guidelines, the
schools are aiming to achieve
reading proficiency levels of 90
percent for Asian students, 88
percent for white students, 81 per-
cent for Latino students and 74
percent for Black students by
2018.
Although placed at the bottom
of the achievement rung, African-
Americans and Latinos aren't the
only groups upset about the new
goals. Florida's Asian communi-


ties are also concerned about what
effect the tiered program will
have on their students.
According to the Florida
Department of Education, the
goals are meant to be "realistic."
State Board of Education chair-
woman Kathleen Shanahan told
the Post that the race-specific
goals were necessary for the
schools to comply with terms of a
waiver that Florida and 32 other
states have from the federal No
Child Left Behind Act.
And Florida's board of educa-
tion isn't the only one to pass such
measures. Washington, D.C., and
Virginia's school boards ignited
similar furor when they adopted
race-based benchmarks for learn-
ing in their school systems.
"One-hundred percent of our
students should be reading [at or


Election Night Brings Joy and

Tears for Obama Supporters
The hard fought race for the White House between Barak Obama
and Mitt Romney ended with jubilation on election night for Obama
supporters. Shown above at Corrine Brown headquarters, others
jumped for joy when the final electoral count was announced for the
night declaring President Obama the victor.


Governor Jennifer Carroll told
Tampa 10, "it's not just one person
you're attacking. It's an entire fami-
ly. My husband doesn't want to hear
that. He knows the type of woman I
am. I mean, my kids know the type
of woman I am... Usually black
women that look like me don't
engage in relationships like that."
While the allegations that Carroll
and her female travel aide were in a
"compromising position" in
Carroll's capitol office may be seen
as an attack on her family, Carroll's


defense -- that she couldn't have
engaged in homosexual acts
because she doesn't look like a les-
bian -- was seen as an attack on the
lesbian community at large and-
black lesbians in particular.
"You have labeled lesbian gender
expression as being deviant,"
Alysia, a self-identified black femi-
nine lesbian woman wrote to the Lt.
Governor, "and have both denied
and revoked black lesbian feminin-
ity. Since I don't have a visual les-
bian identifier you have tried to


silence me." Another woman, Jaye,
wrote, "Black women who are pro-
fessional, well educated, well spo-
ken and well dressed just might be
lesbians, too!"
In response to Carroll's state-
ments, several websites asked les-
bian women to post pictures of
themselves. The sites were flooded
with pictures from contributors
wanting to show the world as one
respondent put it, that lesbians
come in "all colors, all sizes, all
hairstyles!"


Gamma Rho Omega Celebrates 70


Shown (L-R) Juliann M. Blackmon (Luncheon Co-Chair), Willetta R. Richie (Vice-President), Prudence
Williams (Chaplain), Mary L. Brown (Luncheon Co-Chair), Norma Solomon White (25th International
President and Luncheon Chair) and Brenda R. Simmons-Hutchins (LuncheonChair). David Demery photo


The Gamma Rho Omega Chapter
of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority,
Incorporated celebrated seven
decades of contributions to the
Jacksonville community in August.
More than 300 sorority members
and guests attended "Platinum and
Pearls: Celebrating 70 years of
Timeless Service."


Throughout the past seven
decades, more than $650,000 in
funding has been awarded to young
women in pursuit of higher educa-
tion. Last year, more than $25,000
in financial assistance was awarded
to students.
Other chapter highlights through-
out the years include breaking


racial barriers by presenting operat-
ic legend Marian Anderson before
an integrated audience in 1952 to
the purchase of its first sorority
house in 1965,. The current sorority
house, located at 1011 West 8th
Street, was purchased in 1976 and
currently has no mortgage liability.


Teen Killed for Playing


Music Too Loud


A grand jury indicted 46 year old
Micahel Dunn for first degree mur-
der in the shooting death of
unarmed Jordan Davis, a 17 year
old Terry Parker student after an
argument over loud rap music.
The software developer shot the
high school junior Jordan Davis,
17, through the window of a sport
utility vehicle at a Baymeadows
Gate station on Nov. 23, before
driving away, authorities say.
Dunn, who is white, faced
charges of attempted first degree
murder for firing at the car which
contained three other passengers,
all friends of Davis. He was arrest-
ed the day after the shooting for
second degree murder and pleaded
not guilty.
Davis's father, Ron Davis, has
pledged to turn his son's shooting
death into a crusade against guns


and Florida's controversial Stand
Your Ground law which allows
people to defend themselves if they
"reasonably believe" someone will
hurt them.
Widespread opposition to the law
emerged after the shooting of
Trayvon Martin, also an unarmed,
black 17-year-old, in February by
neighborhood watch volunteer
George Zimmerman in Orlando. He
will stand trial next June for mur-
der.
Dunn asked the teens to turn
down the volume of the music, but,
his attorney said, the teens turned
up the volume, threatened Dunn
and brandished a shotgun. Dunn
grabbed a pistol from the glove
compartment of his car and opened
fire, before driving away, authori-
ties say. Police said no weapon was
found on the teens.


Years


December 27 January 9, 2012


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7









Pag 8T s er' rePesDcme 7-Jnay9 02~


AROUND TOWN



Shat to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene


The Chocolate
Nutcracker
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.,
will present the Chocolate
Nutcracker Saturday, December
29th, at the Times-Union Center in
Downtown Jacksonville. The per-
formance is an urban spin on the
holiday classic The Nutcracker
incorporates African dance, Ballet,
Hip-Hop and Jazz, while telling the
story of a young girl named Claire
who travels the world in a dream
with her Chocolate Nutcracker. For
more information, call 768-2255.

Noon Year's Eve
On December 31st, 10 a.m. to 1
p.m., celebrate New Year's Eve at
the Zoo with our Annual Noon
Year's Eve Celebration! Count
down the hours until 2013 with spe-
cial entertainment, games, prizes,
and an apple juice toast at noon. For
further details visit www.jack-
sonvillezoo.org or contact the office
at (904) 757-4463.

1st 2013 Art Walk
The first Wednesday Art Walk,
January 2nd. A free, self-guided
tour that combines astounding visu-
al and live art, engaging events and
more in the core of Downtown
Jacksonville. The Artwalk is held
each month from 5 p.m. to 9
p.m.(rain or shine). For more infor-
mation contact Katherine Hardwick
at (904) 634-0303 ext. 230 or email


katherine@downtownj a ck-
sonville.org or on the web at
www.downtownjacksonville.org.
Annual Matthew
Gilbert Grand Reunion
The Matthew W. Gilbert Junior-
Senior High School will hold their
Annual Grand Reunion for students
and teachers 1952-1970 at the Hyatt
Hotel January 4th & 5th. For tick-
ets or more information contact
Ken Manuel at 705-1835 or Lula
Jones at 766-9978.

Cyrus Chestnut
in Concert
Ritz Jazz Jamm present Cyrus
Chestnut, Saturday, January 5th at 7
& 10 p.m. Chestnut has earned a
reputation for his skillful versatility,
his ability for blending sounds and
for unabashedly bringing gospel
into his club performances. For
tickets or more information visit the
Museum at 829 North Davis Street
or call (904) 632-5555 or via the
web at www.ritzjacksonville.com.

B.B. King
B.B. King the King of the Blues
in concert Sunday, January 6th at
8 p.m. at the Florida Theater. The
King of Blues continues to wear his
crown, singing and playing the
blues with relentless passion. For
ticket information call (904) 355-
2787 or visit floridatheatre.com or
email kendall@floridatheatre.com.


Ringling Brothers
Presents Amazing Act
Ringling Brothers and Barnum
Bailey circus, presents "built to
amaze" January 17th 21st at
Veterans memorial Stadium, 300 A.
Phillip Randolph. Come see ele-
phants, tigers, acrobats and aerial-
ists join together from across the
globe, each a spectacular piece of
the puzzle, forming one exquisite
design of magnificence and preci-
sion. The show starts at 7:30 p.m.
For more information call (904)
630-3900 or visit www.jaxevents.

26th Annual
MLK Breakfast
The City of Jacksonville is proud
to announce the 26th annual Martin
Luther King Jr. breakfast, Friday,
January 18th at 7:30 a.m. at the
Prime Osborn Convention Center,
1000 Water St.. The event honors
the life and legacy of service of Dr.
King. U.S. Ambassador and civil
rights leader Andrew Young is the
keynote speaker. For more informa-
tion or to purchase tickets visit
www.makeascenedowntown.com
or call (904) 630-3690.

R.A.C.E
The Respecting Anybody Cultural
Experience juried art show will run
January 24th through March 7,
2013. Attend the opening reception,
Thursday, January 24th, 5 7 p.m.


at the Art Center Premier Gallery,
Bank of America Tower, 50 N.
Laura Street. For more information
email Annelies at amdafrican-
mk@msn.com or visit www.tac-
jacksonville.org

Discussing
Family Matters
Real Talk, Real Change IV an
"All in the Family" candid dialogue
on the changing face of families,
their values and environment for
raising children. Discussion starts at
6:30 p.m., Thursday, January 24th.
For more information visit
www.e3northflorida.org or email
info@e3northfloirda.org.

Universoul Circus
The Universoul Circus returns to
Jacksonville at the Prime F Osborn
III Convention Center January
29th through February 3rd, 1000
W.Forsyth. For tickets and special
group rates call (800) 316-7439 or
visit www.ticketmaster.com or
email sburtonusc@yahoo.com.

Genuine Negro Jig
The band Carolina Chocolate
Drops in concert at the Ponte Vedra
Concert hall, 1050 A1A North,
PonteVedra, Florida, Sunday,
February 17th. Their album
Genuine Negro Jig, garnered a best
traditional folk album Grammy.
The band dips into styles of


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S U B S C R I P T I O N R AT E S
___$36 One year in Jacksonvillle _$65 Two years $40.50 Outside of City

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Please send check or money order to: Jacksonville Free Press
P.O. Box 43580, Jacksonville, FL 32203
If you would like to pay by Visa or Mastercard, give us a call at 634-1993


Southern black music from the
1920s and '30s-string-band
music, jug-band music, fife and
drum and early jazz. For more
information call (904) 209-0399 or
email eglasgow@sjcfl.us or visit
www.pvconcerthall.com.

Driving Ms. Daisy
at the Alhambra
One of the most heralded plays
comes to town "Driving Miss
Daisy" starring actress Michael
Learned. Made into an Academy
Award winning movie, the story
details the 25 year relationship of
Daisy Werthan, a well to do Jewish
widow and her Black driver Hoke


Coleburn in the 1950s. February
6th March 17th at the Alhambra
Theater, 12000, Beach Blvd. For
more information call 641-1212.

A Holy Ghost Party
Comedian Funnybone will pres-
ent a Christian Comedy and Rap
explosion, Saturday, February 9th
at 6 p.m. at the Florida Times Union
Center, 300 Water St. Featuring
comedians Chip, Ms. Jen and head-
liner Albert Harris Jr., aka
Funnybone. For tickets and more
information email latonyahar-
ris36@yahoo.com or call
(407) 914-6519 or visit www.come-
dianfunnybone.net.


Last Few Weeks of Black

Art Exhibits at the Cummer
Visit the Cummer Museum, December 12th December 30th and take
pleasure in the Histories of Africa: 20 years of photography by Elizabeth
Gilbert, displaying images that portray a continent in transition, both polit-
ically and culturally. Also on display through January 14th artist Lois
Mailou Jones: A life in Vibrant Color. For more information and exhibit
details call (904) 356-6857 or visit www.cummer.org or visit the Cummer
Musuem, 829 Riverside Avenue. Adminssion is free on Tuesday.



Do You Have an event


for Around Town?

The Jacksonville Free Press is please to print your pub-
lic service announcements and coming events free of
charge. news deadline is Monday at 6 p.m. by the week
you would like your information to be printed.
Information can be sent via email, fax, brought into our
office or mailed in. Please be sure to include the 5W's -
who, what, when, where, why and you must include a
contact number.
Email JFreePress@aol.com Fax (904) 765-3803
Mail: Coming Events Jacksonville Free Press
903 W. Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32203


Out of Control with Django
The broad takeaway of Django Unchained appears to be this: whether
you love the movie or hate it, it's clear the movie represents a cultural
inflection point. When the movie is released, the n-word will have come
full circle as a mainstream term, with little negative connotation left. When
a director of any color can use the word nearly 100 times, it's time to hoist
the white flag of surrender in a linguistic battle that's been raging for
decades.
Years of relativism and equivalence that often grants permission to some
to use the word, while selectively shaming others for the same indignity
has drained the argument of any moral authority. When standards that, in
theory, would apply for Clint Eastwood and does anyone actually believe
a similarly nonchalant reaction would have greeted him had he done the
same thing in a movie production? are relaxed for Tarantino, and when
an overwhelmingly Caucasian press corps goes gaga over said film with
nary a peep of protest (and nominates it for one of the industry's highest
awards!), its time to admit the obvious.
The Rubicon is now in the rear view mirror. Let's face it: the war against
the n-word has been irretrievably lost.

Adding Cops and Arming Teachers


Continude from page 4
of disorderly conduct charges, of
which 90 percent are referred to
law enforcement agencies. Blacks
make up 19 percent of the students
in Pinellas County, Fla. but 54 per-
cent of the student arrests.
Communities should improve the
learning environment rather than
placing so much emphasis on
adding police officers, according to
some experts.
"Educating all youth and keeping
them in school benefits communi-
ties in a variety of ways. Youth that
are in schools are engaged during
the day, preventing them from
engaging in illegal behaviors. High
school graduation increases social
bonds and community ties which
promote responsibility in young
adults. In addition, keeping stu-
dents in school saves communities
millions in the long run."
Some past supporters of NRA are
now calling for a ban on assault
weapons.
The Violence Policy Center pro-
duced a list of 33 mass shootings
involving high-capacity ammuni-
tion magazines, including Sandy
Hook Elementary School
(Bushmaster assault rifle); Century
Movie Theater in Aurora, Col.
(Smith & Wesson M&P assault
rifle); and Virginia Tech University


(Glock 19 pistol).
The Violence Policy Center noted
that the NRA's corporate partners
include many gun manufacturers,
including the Freedom Group, the
gun industry conglomerate of
which Bushmaster, the manufactur-
er of the AR-15 assault rifle used in
the Newtown, Conn. school mass
shooting, is part of as well as Smith
& Wesson, the manufacturer of
another model of AR-15 assault
rifle that was used in the Aurora,
Colorado, movie theater mass
shooting.
Supporters of tougher gun laws
say they are not suggesting that
school safety should be de-empha-
sized.
The Justice Policy Institute report
concluded, "School safety should
be a priority: it is not only impor-
tant for protecting the physical
safety of students, teachers, and
staff, but also for maintaining a pro-
ductive learning environment.
However, law enforcement in
schools is not the best nor most
cost-effective way to achieve those
goals. SROs and law enforcement
in schools are not needed to keep
kids safe, especially when youth
pay the price of becoming involved
in the juvenile justice system and
suffer a lifetime of negative effects
as a result."


IL --- - - - ----------------------------.11


Page 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press


December 27 January 9, 2012 ,








December 27, 2012


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Choosing


FAMILY FEATilRES
-Millions of working Americans are still without health insur-
ance, and many more worry about whether they'll be able
to afford their existing coverage due to rising health costs.
"With the rising cost of care, individuals want more affordable
options when it comes to health insurance," says Scott Krienke,
senior vice president, marketing and product lines at Assurant Health.
"Consumers want coverage tailored to their budget and how they man-
age their health. Before choosing a health insurance plan, it's important
to understand all the options to find the best fit for your needs."

What You Need to Know
Whether you're looking for additional coverage to supplement your employer's
plan, or want an individual plan because you're self-employed or uninsured,
here are a few tips to get you started.
Major Medical
Under the Affordable Care Act, major medical plans now cover 100 percent
of many preventive services. Many people are familiar with major medical
insurance, which can be offered by employers and which is usually most
comprehensive in covering serious illness or injuries. Major medical plans
generally offer the broadest protection and protect against large, unexpected
medical expenses.
Fixed-Benefit Plans
In general, fixed-benefit plans pay a set amount of money when you have a
covered medical service, regardless of the actual cost. For example, if the plan
pays $50 when you have an X-ray, but it costs $125, after applying the plan
payment of $50, you would owe $75.
Unlike a traditional plan that has deductibles, coinsurance and copays, fixed-
benefit plans pay a benefit for covered services immediately. Some provide
access to network discounts that can significantly decrease the total cost of care.
These plans can cover a range of services from everyday office visits, preventive
care and prescriptions, to hospitalization and surgery. Check to see if there are
pre-existing condition limitations for the first 12 months of coverage.
Fixed-benefit plans can offer significant coverage. For example, hospitaliza-
tion reimbursement can be as much as $6,000 per day depending on the plan.
Some even offer tools to help manage costs, like guaranteed cost estimates for
common services and treatments.

Analyzing Your Insurance Needs
How do you decide what type of plan is right for you? It depends on your needs,
what's most important to you, and sometimes the tradeoffs you are willing to
make to get the coverage you want at an affordable price. Here is information
on those types of plans to help in your decision-making:


Fixed-Benefit Plan
* Gives you help with everyday, common
medical needs that you are more likely
to have.
" Helps you pay for immediate expenses
that you are most likely to encounter.
* Gives you more control over your monthly
medical expenses. You are willing to take
the risk that out-of-pocket costs may
exceed the amount of the fixed benefit,
and that you would be required to pay
remaining balances.


Major Medical Plan
* Provides major medical pro-
tection and coverage for your
unexpected health care expenses.
* Protects your assets and income
while you pay for everyday
smaller costs.
* Helps you prepare for unexpec-
ted medical expenses. You pay
premium, deductibles and
coinsurance in exchange for
knowing your costs are capped.


Identify Supplemental Insurance Plans
You May Want to Round Out Your Plan
Once a decision is made to purchase a major medical plan or fixed-benefit product,
supplemental plans can be used to fill gaps in coverage and create additional pro-
tection. Supplemental insurance, which can be offered through the workplace or
sold individually, offers limited coverage for specific health care needs such as
in-hospital care, dental checkups or vision.
"Do your homework, and weigh your options there are affordable plans
that can fit into your budget and give you the coverage you need to help protect


Health Insurance




HAT M E ETS YOU RNE EDS


Comparing health and
supplementary insurance
coverage
To do a comparison of costs and cover-
age with any plans you're considering,
it's wise to look at:
Premiums, which are the amount paid
each month for your plan.
Coverage/benefits.
Access to doctors, hospitals and other
providers.
After-hours access and emergency care.
Out-of-pocket costs.
Exclusions and limitations.



yourself and your family," said Tim Knott, senior
vice president of strategic markets and product
management for Assurant Employee Benefits.
"Supplemental insurance provides a wide array
of iienilIit, that can help employees cope with
out-of-pocket expenses including those associ-
ated with serious accidents or illnesses."
Plans may include:
Dental Provides benefits for dental
checkups and treatment, which can contrib-
ute to better overall health. Many plans
provide benefits for additional services
such as crowns and orthodontia.
Vision Generally will cover vision
exams and pay a portion of glasses and
contact lens expenses. Some also provide
network discounts.
Accident Provides benefits for medical
care necessary due to an accident. Some
also provide benefits for death expenses,
dismemberment and disability.
Critical Illness and Cancer Provides
benefits for diagnosis and treatment of
specifically named diseases such as cancer,
heart disease and stroke. Many provide a
lump sum payment upon diagnosis.
Hospital Indemnity Provides benefits
for a period of continuous in-hospital care.
Some provide benefits for certain outpatient
services and costs associated with necessary
surgery.

Learn more about choosing health and supple-
mental insurance plans at www.assuranthealth.com
and www.assurantemployeebenefits.com.


I


How to design a custom, affordable health
insurance plan that's right for you
* Decide what's most important to you paying for every-
day health care needs or catastrophic coverage that caps
your costs.
* Check to see if a high-deductible plan with lower premiums is
right for you. If you choose this option, you may want to look
into the benefits of a pre-tax Health Savings Account to cover
out-of-pocket costs.
* If you choose a higher deductible plan, you may want to use
a portion of the money saved on premiums for supplemental
coverage that can help pay your deductible or other expenses
if you have a costly accident or critical illness.
* Consider a no-copay plan. Under the Affordable Care Act,
major medical plans now cover 100 percent of many preven-
tive services, so copays may not be worth the additional cost.


s. erry s ree Press Pa
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Rita Perry, Publisher


Sylvia Perry, Editor
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Jaqueline Haynes


Lynn Jones


Rometa Porter


Rhonda Silver


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Reggie Fullwood


Tonya Austin


Frank Powell


Rahman Johnson


Marsha Oliver


3


Page 10 Ms. Perry's Free Press


December 26, 2012


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Page 11 Mrs. Perry's Free Press


December 27 January 8. 2013


FOR THE WEEK OF DEC. 25 31, 2012















A WRAP

ON THE

2012 FINISHING TOUCHES:

FOOTBALL The BCSP takes its final
look atthe 2012 black col-
SEASON lege football season

2012 "BAAD TEAM" UNVEILED: FINAL 2012
INDIVIDUAL STATS, ATTENDANCE NUMBERS





STAT CORNER

WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


HIGHEST ATTENDANCE AT
2012 BLACK COLLEGE FOOTBALL GAMES
(Last year's finish in parenthesis)

1. MAGIC CITY.CLASSIC Oct. 27 Legion Field, Birmingham
Alabama A&M vs. Alabama State (1st) 58,201
2. BAYOU CLASSIC Nov. 24 Super Dome, New Orleans
Southern vs. Grambling State (5th) 45,980
3. SOUTHERN HERITAGE CLASSIC Sept. 8 Liberty Bowl, Memphis
Jackson State vs. Tennessee State (4th) 42,257
4. ATLANTA CLASSIC Sept. 29 Georgia Dome, Atlanta
Florida A&M vs. Southern (3rd) 41,042
5. STATE FAIR CLASSIC Oct. 6 Cotton Bowl, Dallas
Prairie View A&M vs. Grambling State (7th) 33,133
6. SWAC CHAMPIONSHIP GAME Dec. 8 Legion Field, Birmingham
Arkansas-Pine Bluff vs. Jackson State (17th) 32,480
7. FLORIDA CLASSIC Nov. 17 Citrus Bowl, Orlando
Florida A&M vs. Bethune-Cookman (2nd) 32,317
8. TENNESSEE STATE HOMECOMING Sept. 29 LP Field Nashville
vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff 31,765
9. ALCORN STATE HOME GAME Nov. 17 Spinks Stad. Lorman, MS
vs. Jackson State 30,000
10. CLARK-ATLANTA HOMECOMING Oct. 13 Panther Stad. Atlanta
vs. Benedict 27,533
11. TURKEY DAY CLASSIC Nov. 22 New ASU Stad. Montg., AL
Alabama State vs. Tuskegee 27,500
12. SOUTHERN'S HOMECOMING Oct. 13 Mumford Stad. BR, LA
vs. Teas Southern 25,400
13. LABOR DAY CLASSIC Sept. 1 Price Stadium Norfolk, VA
Norfolk State vs. Virginia State 24,322
14. MOREHOUSE HOMECOMING Oct. 22 Harvey Stad. Atlanta
vs. Fort Valley State 24,239
15.,..CAGO CLASSIC, Sept. 29 Soldier's Field Chicago
Albany. late.vs. Kentucky State (9th) 23,762
`16. LABOR DAY CLASSIC Rel. Stadium Houston
Texas Southern vs. Prairie View A&m 22,516
17. FOUNTAIN CITY CLASSIC Nov. 3 McClung. Stad., Col.., GA
Albany State vs. Fort Valley State (15th) 22,251
18. JACKSON STATE HOMECOMING Oct. 20 Mem. Stad. Jackson
vs. Miss. Valley State (6th) 22,123
19. ALABAMAA&M vs. TUSKEGEE Sept. 1 Legion Field, B'ham
21,400
20. W.C. GORDON CLASSIC Memorial Statd. Jackson, Ms.
Jackson State vs. Southern 20,713
21. NC A&T HOMECOMING Oct. 27 -Aggie Stadium, Greensboro, NC
vs. Norfolk State (24th) 20,356
22. S. C. STATE HOME GAME Sept. 29 Dawson Stad., Or'burg, SC
vs. Norfolk State 20,025


2012 TOTAL

2011 TOTAL

2010 TOTAL


649,315
29,514 average (22 games over 20,000)
800,224
32,008 average (25 games over 20,000)
853,723
31,619 average (27 games over 20,000)



HIGHEST ATTENDANCE AT
2012 HOMECOMING GAMES
(Last year's finish in parenthesis)


1 TENNESSEE STATE vs. UAPB Sept. 29 N'ville, TN (8)
2 CLARK ATLANTA vs. Benedict Oct. 13 -Atlanta (7)
3 ALABAMA ST. vs. Tuskegee Nov. 22 M'gmery, AL (11)
4 SOUTHERN vs. Tx. Southern Oct. 13 B. Rouge, LA (14)
5 MOREHOUSE vs. Ft. Valley State Oct. 27 Atlanta (9)
6 JACKSON STATE vs. MVSU Oct. 20 Jackson, MS (1)
7 NC A&T vs. Norfolk State Oct. 27 Greensboro, NC (9)
8 SC STATE vs. Howard Oct. 27 Orangeburg, SC (4)
9 KENTUCKY STATE vs. Miles Oct. 13 (16)
10 W-SALEM STATE Oct. 20 vs. Livingstone W-S. NC (6)
11 ALABAMAA&M vs. Alcorn State Oct. 13 H'jille,i AL (12)
12 TUSKEGEE vs. Kentucky State Oct. 20 Tuskegee, AL (3)
13 NORFOLK STATE vs. Say. State Nov. 3 Norfolk, VA (10)
14 FORT VALLEY STATE vs. Concordia Oct. 13 FV, GA (22)
15 ARK. PINE BLUFF vs. MVSU. Oct. 27 PB, AR (18)
16 MILES vs. Clark Atlanta Oct. 6 Fairfield, AL (17)
17 NC CENTRAL vs. DelState Nov. 3 Durham, NC (19)
18 GRAMBLING vs. Va. Univ. of L'burg Oct. 20 Gram., LA (14)
19 FLORIDAA&M vs. Say. State Oct. 13 Tallahassee, FL (4)


31,765
27,533
27,500
25,400
24,239
22,123
20,356
19,187
17,873
17,123
16,781
16,566
16,269
14,632
14,604
13,783
12,742
12,569
12,561


20 ALBANY STATE vs. Clark.-Atlanta Oct. 20 Albany, GA (NR) 12,387
21 PRAIRIE VIEW A&M vs. Alcorn State Oct. 20 Pr. V, Tx 12,000
22 BENEDICT vs. Morehouse Oct. 20 Columbia, SC (NR) 10,592
23 SAVANNAH STATE vs. Hampton Oct. 29 Say, GA (NR) 10,325
24 MORGAN STATE vs. NC Central Oct. 13 B'more (15) 10,324
25 HOWARD vs. Morgan State Oct. 20 Washington, DC (NR) 10,305
26 BETHUNE-COOKMAN vs. NC A&T- Oct, 7 D. B., FL (NR) 10,181


2012 HOMECOMINGS TOTAL

2011 HOMECOMINGS TOTAL

2010 HOMECOMINGS TOTAL


439,720
16,912 Average (26 games over 10,000)
412,840
17,949 Average (23 i.ij =-.. over liI,yl1I I)
375,297
17,871 average (21 games, over 10,000)


FIRST TEAM OFFENSE
QB -Kameron Smith, Sr., Winston-Salem State RB Derrick Washington, Sr., Tuskegee;
Trabis Ward, Jr., Tenn. State; WR- Rico Richardson, Sr., Jackson State; TravisTarpley,
Sr., Delaware State TE A. C. Leonard, So., Tenn. State C- Sherman Carter, Sr.,
Tenn. State OL Roger Gaines, Sr., Tenn. State; Terrance Hackney, So., B-Cookman;
Terron Armstead, Sr., Ark.-Pine Bluff; Christopher Tolbert, Jr., Tuskegee PK Jamin
Godfrey, Jr., Tenn. State KR Tyrone Laughinghouse, Sr., St. Augustine's
FIRST TEAM DEFENSE
DL Brad Davis, Sr., Eliz. City State; Brandon Thurmond, Sr., Ark.-Pine Bluff; Barry
Tripp, Sr., W-Salem State; Vauchard Goodridge, Sr., Clark Atlanta LB Bill Ross,
Sr., Ark.-Pine Bluff; Carlos Fields, Jr., W-Salem State; Leon Furr, Jr., Fort Valley State
DB Kejuan Riley, Jr., Alabama State; Steven Godbolt III, So., Tenn. State; Malcolm
Rowe, Sr., W-Salem State; William Buford, Sr., Tuskegee P Bobby Wenzig, Jr.,
Alabama State

SECOND TEAM OFFENSE
QB Nick Elko, Sr., Delaware State RB Daronte McNeill, Sr., ECSU; Jeremy Schwartz, Sr., Hampton;
WR Jameze Massey, Sr., W-Salem State; Chris Slaughter, Sr., Fort Valley State TE Dezmond Beverly,
Jr., Ark.-Pine Bluff C Markus Lawrence, Sr., W-Salem State OL Nathaniel Hartung, Jr., W-Salem State;
Kadeem Edwards, Jr., Tenn. State; Christopher Wilson, Sr., Ark.-Pine Bluff; Drew Wilkins, So., Morehouse
PK -Chase Vanadore, So., Florida A&M KR Damell Evans, Jr., Shaw
SECOND TEAM DEFENSE
DL-Joseph LeBeau, Sr., Jackson State; Damon Gresham-Chisholm, Fr., Howard; Justin Blash, Sr.,Albany State;
LeBrandon Richardson, So., B-Cookman LB Keith Pough, Sr., Howard; Chaz Robinson, Jr., St.Augustine's;
Brandon Roberts, Sr., Alabama State DB Julien David, So., Howard; Qua Cox, Jr., Jackson State; Dexter
Moody, Jr., Albany State; Nigel Rios, Jr., Eliz. City State P -Justin Rosenbaum, Sr., Fort Valley State

THIRD TEAM OFFENSE
QB Dray Joseph, Jr., Southern RB Isidore Jackson, Jr., B-Cookman; David Carter, Sr., Morehouse WR
- Tyrone Laughinghouse, Sr., St.Augustine's; Travis Harvey, Sr., FloridaA&M TE Khari Lee, So.,. Bowie State
C Eugene Solomon, Sr., B-Cookman OL David Garbo, Sr., Fort Valley State; Terren Jones, Sr., Alabama
State; Stephen Capler, Sr., Jackson State; Nail Muradymov, Jr., Delaware State PK Tyler Strickland, So.,
Ark.-Pine Bluff KR Spencer Nelson, Sr., Prairie View
THIRD TEAM DEFENSE
DL Javarous Faulk, So., St. Augustine's; Antonio Harper, Jr., Tenn. State; Bernard Little, So., Fort Valley
State; Stephen Young, Sr., NC Central LB Corey Jones, Sr., Lane; Jerkevis Fields, Jr., B-Cookman; Quavon
Taylor, So., Tuskegee DB Vernon Marshall, Sr., Alabama A&M; Daniel Fitzpatrick, So., Tenn. State; Ryan
Shaw, Jr., Ark.-Pine Bluff; Curtis Pumphrey, Fr., Bowie State P Robert Hersh, Sr. Texas Southern


Smith Washington Ward


Richardson Tarpley


Leonard


Armstead Hackney


Thurmond


Davis Fields Ross


Buford


Pair of offensive,



defensive performers



top 2012 "Baad Team"


LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor
The Christmas week edition of the Black College Sports Page puts a wrap on the 2012
black college football season with a final look at individual and attendance numbers and the
selection of the 19th annual "Baad Team" of black college all-stars and top players.

The 2012 "Baad Team"
The 2012 "Baad Team" brings together the most prolific performers from the just-com-
pleted football season.
The first team skill positions are dominated by seniors led by quarterback Kameron
Smith of Winston-Salem State, running back Derrick Washington of Tuskegee and wide
receivers Rico Richardson of Jackson State and Travis Tarpley of Delaware State.
Smith set a number of WSSU and CIAA single-season and career records while leading
the Rams to the NCAA Div. II championship game. He finished the season atop the black col-
lege lists with 3,312 passing yards (see STAT CORNER 2) and 43 touchdowns. Washington,
a Missouri transfer, led black college rushers with 1,679 yards averaging a gaudy 7.8 yards
per carry with 14 touchdowns. His play was key to the Golden Tigers regaining the top spot
in the SIAC. The two share the BCSP offensive player of the year award.
Tarpley (1,058) and Richardson (1,158) bothtopped 1,000 yards inreceiving with Tarpley
setting the pace with 86 catches (7.8 per game) while Richardson led with 96.5 yards per
game. Two Tennessee State underclassmen, junior running back Trabis Ward and sophomore
tight end A. C. Leonard, man dic oil ei I m o %kill positions. Ward finished behind Washington
in rushing stats with 1,422 yards and 15 TDs. Leonard, a Florida transfer, had tremendous
numbers for a tight end with 51 receptions, 733 yards and 6 TDs.
Two Tennessee State senior linemen also made it onto the first team. center Sherman
Carter (6-2, 315), perhaps the top black college NFL prospect, and tackle Roger Gaines
(6-7, 320). The other linemen are Arkansas-Pine Bluff senior Terron Armstead, Bethune-
Cookman sophomore Terrance Hackney and Tuskegee junior Christopher Tolbert.
The first-team defense is led by two senior sack specialists. Arkansas-Pine Bluff end
Brandon Thurmond topped the FCS with 16 sacks while Brad Davis of Elizabeth City State
was best in Div. II with 15.5. They share the BCSP defensive player of the year awards.
WSSU run-stuffer Barry Tripp and Clark Atlanta's Vauchard Goodridge complete
the defensive line. UAPB senior Bill Ross, WSSU junior Carlos Fields and Fort Valley State
junior Leon Furr hold down the linebacker positions. Ross (117 tackles) and Furr (110) were
prolific tacklers while Fields patrolled the middle for the Rams' defense.
Three seniors William Buford of Tuskegee, Kejuan Riley of Alabama State and
Malcolm Rowe of WSSU join sophomore Steve Godbolt IH of Tennessee State in the
defensive backfield. The specialists are Saint Augustine's senior kick returned extraordinaire
Tyrone Laughinghouse, TSU junior placekicker Jamin Godfrey and Alabama State junior
Bobby Wenzig at punter.
Choosing this year's top coach was quite a task but it was hard to pick against WSSU
third-year head man Connell Maynor who led the Rams to the NCAA Div. II Championship
Game. Maynor, who also won last year's award, beat out a list on candidates that includes
Howard's GaryHarrell (2ndinMEAC), UAPB's MonteColeman (SWAC champ),Tuskegee's
Willie Slater (SIAC champ) and Bethune-Cookman's Brian Jenkins (MEAC champ).

Attendance Matters
The Oct. 27th Magic City Classic in Birmingham (Alabama State vs. Alabama
A&M) drew 58,201 fans to repeat as the top attended game in black college football
(see STAT CORNER). The biggest drop belonged to the Florida Classic (Florida
A&M vs. Bethune-Cookman) which dipped from 2nd to 7th with just 32,317 fans
this %,-. The biggest rise was the SWAC Championship Game which drew 32,480
to the battle between Jackson State and Arkansas-Pine Bluff to move from 17th to
6th, Tennessee State topped the homecoming list with 31,765 fans for its matchup
iii ... year with Arkansas-Pine Bluff. Overall, attendance was slightly down.


| STAT CORNER 2 ]

FINAL 2012 INDIVIDUAL
FOOTBALL STATISTICS LEADERS


RUSHING YARDS CL
WASHINGTON, Der-TUS SI
WARD, Trabis TNS JF
SCHWARTZ, Jer. HAM SI
McNEIL, Daronte ECSU SI
ANDERSON, Dedric JCS SF
WASHINGTON, Jerr- VUU SI
CARTER, David MHC SI
BAILEY, Colin FSU JF
HOYTE, Nathan ALB SI
GRIZZLE, M. SHAW JF
JACKSON, Isidore BCU JF
PASSING YARDS CL
STALLONS, J. SHA SR
COOK, Doug LINP SO
POWELL, Drew LIV FR
ELKO, Nick DSU SR
GERMAN, Michael TNS SO
SMITH, Kameron WSS SR
STOVER, Cam CHO JR
JOSEPH, Dray SU JR
WALLACE, Keahn JCS SO
HENTON, Antonio FVS SR
BACOTE, Ted SAC
JONES, Namon ECS
RECEPTIONS CL C
TARPLEY, Trav. DSU SR
JEAN-JUSTE, P. LINP SR
COSTON, M. LINP SR
LENNON, Len. FAM SO
WILSON, Justin DSU SR
HARVEY, Trav. FAM SR
MOORE, Hollis LAN FR
DOSS, Lee SOU JR
L'HOUSE, Tyr. SAC SR
NELSON, Spencer PV SR
RECEIVING YARDS CL
RICHARDSON, R. JSU SR
TARPLEY, Trav. DSU SR
MASSEY, Jam. WSS SR
SLAUGHTER, C. FVS SR
BUTLER, J. WSS SR
COSTON, M. LINP SR
JEFFRIES, Matt JCS SR
L'HOUSE, Tyr. SAC SR
TOTAL OFFENSE CL
COOK, Doug LINC SO
STALLONS, J. SHA SR
POWELL, Drew LIV FR
WILSON, Michael CSU JR
SMITH, Kameron WSS SR
GERMAN, Mike TNS SO
STOVER, Ca CHO JR
ELKO, Nick DSU SR
DRAY, Joseph SU JR
SCORING CL
CARTER, David MHC SR
L'HOUSE, T. SAC SR
CROWELL, I. -ALS SO
WARD, Trabis TNS JR
WASHINGTON, D. TUS FR
WASHINGTON, J.- VUU
McNEILL, D. ECS SR
SCHWARTZ, J. HAM SR

ALL PURPOSE CL
ANDERSON, D. JCS SR
WASHINGTON, D. TUS SR
L'HOUSE, Tyr.- SAC SR
TAYLOR, Aubura WVS SR
WAR4b6,Trabis-TNS JR
TARPLE'EV, Tray.- DSU SR
MASSEY, J. WSS SR
GOFORTH, A. NCC SR
WASHINGTON, J. VUUSR
OWENS, James FAM JR
McNEILL, D. ECS SR
SCHWARTZ, J. HAM SR
PUNT RETURNS CL
EVANS, Darnell. SHA JR
BRASWELL, Q. ALB JR
NELSON, Spenc. PV JR
L'HOUSE, T. SAU SR


KICKOFF RETURNS
L'HOUSE, T. SAC
WASHINGTON, J. HAM
WILLIAMS, Thom. MIL
EVANS, D. SHA
HEN'SON, M. LINM


PUNTING CL
WENZIG, Bobby -ALS JR
ROSENBAUM, J. FVS SR
HERSH, Robert TXS SR
KEABLE, J. ALB JR
SANCHEZ, C. MVS SR
SHADDIX, D. NSU JR
JASKI, Kyle LINP SO
ARORO, Tem.- MHC FR
BROUGHTON, C WVS FR
CARTER, F. GSU SR

FIELD GOAL PCT. CL
VARNADORE, C. FAM SO
BARRICK, Chris PV SO
GODFREY, J. TNS
DURHAM, T. HAM SR
HERSH, Robt. TXS SR
CHAMBERS, P. MIL JR
STICKLAND, T. APB SO
WARD, D. DSU SO
GOLDBERG, E. NSU SR
GONZALEZ, E. MSU SR

TACKLES CL
WILSON, Darris CSU SR
JONES, Corey LAN SR
ROSS, Bill -APB SR
FLEMING, I. CHE SO
WHITE, Ken LIV SO
JULIEN, David HOW JR
ROBERTS, E. MSU
HOUSTON, Bran. MHCSR
WILLIAMS, Bern. CAU SO
MARSHALL, Vern -AAM SR
FURR, Leon FVS JR
TAYLOR, Q. TUS FR
SACKS CL
THURMOND, Br. -APB SR
FAULK, Jarvis SAU JR
DAVIS, Brad ECS SR
BATCHELOR, TJ CHO JR
WARE, Carlos KSU SR
ROBINSON, C. MSU SO
DELE, Peter STL SO
LeBEAU, Jos. JSU SR
SIMPSON, R. MVS JR
DANIELS, Jim -ALS SR
RICHARDSON, L. BCUSO
INTERCEPTIONS CL
MOODY, Dexter -ALB JR
LUCAS, Adam-TUS FR
PUMPHREY, C. BSU FR
WILSON, Carlos STL JR
WILLIAMS, C. FVS SR
HOWARD, Jack LAN JR
WOLFE, Thomas FVS JR
SMITH, Sean VSU JR
KATES, Andre VUU SR


L G CAR YDS
R 12 214 1679
R 11 309 1422
R 9 196 1043
R 12 316 1344
R 10 194 1063
R 10 199 1061
R 8 201 841
R 10 178 1015
R 10 190 927
R 9 143 803
R 12 191 1069
G COM-ATT-INT PC'
10 228-413-12 55
9 257-447-12 57
9 197-349-5 56
11 259-412-5 62
11 215-360-10 59
14 214-360-11 59
10 182-299-9 60
11 210-359-7 58
10 175-278-10 62
12 199-394-19 50
10 189-334-12 56
11 185-315-8 58


REC YDS
86 1058
75 615
71 806
71 699
66 806
65 8087
41 543
65 698
59 801
60 577
REC YDS
60 1158
86 1058
65 1324
52 1051
62 1236
71 806
49 802
59 801
RUSH PASS
-20 2752
-164 3101
259 2322
796 2329
360 3312
40 2756
161 2358
-75 2828
129 2511
TDS FGS
13 0
16 0
15 0
15 0
15 0
12 0
15 0
11 0

Rush Rec '
1063 282
1679 305
21 801
651 184
1422 248f
0"' 1058
86 1220
575 258
1061 77
341 170
1344 196
1043 82
RET YDS
15 282
14 242
14 231
12 184


G RET
10 14
9 12
9 13
10 12
10 14
G NO
11 61
12 67
11 75
10 62
11 65
10 53
10 52
7 29
11 69
11 60

G MAI
11 15
11 9
11 16
10 8
11 7
11 8
11 11
11 12
11 11
11 14


PLAYS YDS
514 2732
455 2937
468 2581
504 3125
475 3644
406 2796
381 2519
448 2753
455 2640
PAT PTS
0 78
0 96
0 90
0 90
0 90
0 78
0 90
0 66


YDS/G
169.9
165.3
156.8
1563

145.2
143.6
134.9
131.8
128.6
128.3
125.0


LNG AVG
95 40.1
34.9
95 34.5
31.7
31.1


YDS LNG AVG
2780 67 45.6
2945 66 44.0
3121 67 41.6
2559 61 41.3
2676 64 41.2
2149 58 40.5
2109 52 40.5
1165 63 40.2
2771 69 40.1
2400 72 40.0

ATTS LNG PCT
18 83.3
11 81.8
20 46 80.0
11 72.7
10 70.0
12 35 66.7
17 64.7
19 63.2
18 61.1
23 60.9

AST TOT AVG
60 135 12.2
69 114 11.4
54 117 10.6
39 94 10.4
56 103 10.3
41 108 9.8
48 107 9.7
44 94 9.4
49 93 9.3
54 101 9.2
50 110 9.2
43 100 9.1
AST TOT AVG
2 16.0 1.5
4 13.0 1.3
1 15.5 1.2
3 12.5 1.2
1 10 1.0
3 7.5 .83
1 7.5 .75
2 8.0 .73
4 7.0 .64
2 7.0 .64
1 7.5 .62
YDS TD AVG
154 2 .70
105 2 .64
86 0 .60
83 1 .55
197 3 .50
108 2 .50
37 0 .50
77 1 .50
43 0 .50


AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XIX, No. 21


12 1 A A D E A O L A K O L E E O O B A L A L S A R


TDS AVG/G
14 139.9
15 129.2
11 115.9
15 112.0
8 106.3
12 106.1
13 105.1
10 101.5
10 92.7
7 89.2
11 89.1
DS TDS AVG/G
101 22 310.1
752 15 305.8
322 18 258.0
828 15 257.1
756 18 250.5
312 43 236.6
358 19 235.8
511 25 228.3
280 22 228.0
?604 20 217.0
1092 17 209.2
231 9 202.8
YDSIG REC/G
96.2 7.8
61.5 7.5
80.6 7.1
69.9 7.1
73.3 6.0
73.5 5.9
77.6 5.9
63.5 5.9
80.1 5.9
52.5 5.5


AVG/G
303.5
293.7
286.7
284.0
260.2
254.1
251.9
250.3
240.0
AVG/G
9.8
9.6
8.2
8.2
8.2
7.8
7.5
7.3


* ,






Page 12 Ms. Perry's Free Press


Douglas Anderson Reunion Honors the Class of 1962

Douglas Anderson Reunion Honors the Class of 1962


The welcoming committee: Flora Gacene Coleman (68'),
Veronica Turner (64'), Phyliss Webb (66') and Bobbie Brooks (61')


Willie Bartley (62'), Phyliss Webb (66') and Sam Davies (66')


Married 49 years: Flossie and Richard Johnson, Jr.


Friends for life: Methis Lane (65'), Carrie Mims (65') and Thelma Brown (65')


Catherine Calvin (71') and Benny Rivers (60')


Wanda Baldwin (68'), Mariam Hadgett (69') and Lincoln Brooks (68')


Herbert Wright (60'), Eddie Brown (60')
Lavale Paulin (65') and Henry Brown (60')


Teachers of DA : Coach Nathanial Washington, Ira Washington,
Elizabeth Hunter, Queen Burton, Pauline Davis, Cornelius Lockett
and Ida (Logan) Harris.


Rudine Marshall (66') and Shirley Graham (66')


Alphonso Neal (67') and Patricia Neal (68') Josephine Jones (66') and Carlton Grissett (66')


Benny Rivers (60'), Brenda Rivers (60') and Beverly White (66')
...iii ,'p--r itiSBBM IHB^iBB


The evening's presenters: Marvin White (62'), Hazel Martin (60'), Veronica Turner (64'), DelorIs Johnson McMillan (61'), Bobbie Brooks (61'), Samuel Davis (66'),
Phyliss Thomas Wohb (i,'), I toirt Davis (NO'), Matthew Turner (59'), Richard Johnson, Jr. (62') and Scholarship awardee (seated), Krystal Alston, D.A. class of
2012. Photos by Brannon and KFP
Douglas Anderson Ili li S<,h Ini .a,ci,:lniiini held a 50th year and 34th grand reunion affair at the Wyndham Hotel with over 600 people in
attendance. 1lits i us, kicked off Ilih a Meet and Greet followed by a banquet on Saturday. The highlight of the event was the presentation of
the Sadie .hllihi s Siahol.s slhilji ;.i ,1rdi to i atP vid Alston, a 2012 D)iunglas Anderson graduate pursuing her studies at FSCJ.
Originally erected in 12 1ih. school was named The Souili Jacksonville School and included grades 1-9. At the time it was the only school
on the Soiuilhidi serving AfriecanAinerican students,. lclteen the years of 1955 and 1959, the grade 1-9 school expanded to become a high
school, with the Fiery Di a',*," as its mascot, The class rl' 195'9 became the school's first graduating senior class. Douglas Anderson School closed
in 1968 to become the San Ii.gon Cujnpus of Florida Junior College. In 1971, it reopened as Douglas Anderson Seventh Grade Center. Today
Douglas Anderson operates as a puhblit school for students with a focus on the arts.


Helen Knox (59') and Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Brazer (64')


pn


*hk4
A-T_ .


rp",J


1i
ll


November 8 14 2012








Page 13 Ms. Perry's Free Press


NEW YEAR'S EVE AND
WATCH NIGHT SERVICES


Reverend Torin Terrell Dailey of First Baptist Church of Oakland
extends an invitation for everyone to attend their New Years Eve service,
Monday, December 31st, 7- 9 p.m. For more information call the church
office at (904) 354.5295, or visit the church at 1027 Jessie Street or via the
web at www.theoakmedia.org.
Pastor Eugene W. Diamond and the congregation of Abyssinia
Missionary Baptist Church will hold New Years Eve service, Monday,
December 31st. 6 p.m. service will be held at 2360 Kings Rd. location and
at 10 p.m. service at 10325 Interstate Dr. near 1-95. For more information
call the church office at (904) 696-1770 or visit www.abyssinia.org
Pastors Bishop Rudolph W. McKissick, Jr. and Bishop Rudolph W.
McKissick, Sr. of Bethel Baptist Institutional Church will have a Watch
Night/and New Years' Eve service Monday, December 31st, featuring spe-
cial guest Psalmist Trent Cory. Service begins at 7 p.m., 215 Bethel Baptist
Street. For more information call (904) 354-1464 or visit
www.bethelite.org.
Pastor Jeffrey K. Rumlin of Dayspring Baptist Church will present New
Years Eve Service, Monday, December 31st. For further details visit
www.dayspringjax.com or visit the church at 5654 Dunn Avenue or call the
office at (904) 764-0303.
Praising in the New Year with Pastor R. J. Washington, Sr. Monday,
December 31st at 9:30 p.m. until Tuesday, January 1, 2013, 12:30 a.m. at
the Titus Harvest Dome Spectrum Church, 12335 Atlantic Blvd. Fore
more details visit www.rjwashington.org or call (904)724-6769 or email
titusharvestdome@aol.com.
Potters House Bishop Vaughn McLaughlin says "Don't miss our New
Year's Eve Celebration," Monday, December 31st at 9:30 p.m. Fore more
information visit www.tphim.org or call (904) 695-0181. Potters House is
located at 5119 Normandy Blvd.
Saint Paul AME Church New Year's Services The Rev. Dr.
Marvin C. Zanders, II invite all friends and surrounding communities to
share in their New Year's events. An End of Year Praise and Worship
Service is slated for Sunday, December 30th at 6:00pm. New Year's Eve
Watch Night Service will be held on Monday, December 31,2012 at
10:00pm. Saint Paul is located at 6910 New Kings Road. Contact the office
of the church at 904-764-2755 for more information.


Greaer aceonia

'Bpis huc
1880 W st 000 venu


Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20


Pastor Landon Williams


History
Many will greet the new year by
toasting with glasses of champagne,
perhaps singing a few remembered
lines of "Auld Lang Syne" or tuning
in to watch the throng of merrymak-
ers on New York City's Times
Square.
A more powerful observance will
be unfolding simultaneously
churches locally and nationally.
Those familiar with Black com-
munities in the United States have
probably heard of "Watch Night
Services," the gathering of the faith-
ful in church on New Year's Eve.
The service usually begins any-
where from 7 -10 p.m. and ends at
midnight with the entrance of the
New Year.
Some folks come to church first,
before going out to celebrate.
For others, church is the only
New Year's Eve event.
In churches throughout north
Florida, as in dozens of other
American cities, Sunday-size
crowds of people will gather to wit-
ness the passing of the old year and
the dawn of the new, much as of our
ancestors did at a more contentious
time.
There is a reason for the impor-
tance of New Year's Eve services in
African American congregations.
The vigils won the devotion of
Black America in 1862, many say,
when Abraham Lincoln decreed that
his Emancipation Proclamation
would take effect Jan. 1.
Abolitionists and slaves are said to
have congregated on "Freedom's


PI-


S:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship
9:30 a.m. Sunday School
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday 2 PM 3 PM

**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


Disciples of Cbrist Cbristia) Fellowsbip
* *A Full Gospel Baptist Church *

JOIN US FOR

Sunday School

9 a.m.

Morning


Worship

10 a.m Pastor Robert Lecount, Jr

A church that's on the move in

worship with prayer, praise and power!
2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


of Watch Night Services


Eve" to a
would bri
On tha
together
homes al
iously a
Emancipa
had becor
of midnig
and all s
States we:
When
there were
of joy as
and thank(
gathered
New Year
God for b


Slaves waited eagerly to hear the word on their Emancipation for the origination of Watch Night.
await what the new year another year. have gathered annually on New
ng. But even before 1862 and the pos- Year's Eve since the earliest days,
at night, Blacks came sibility of a Presidential praising God for bringing us safely
in churches and private Emancipation, African people had through another year and praying
1 across the nation, anx- gathered on New Year's Eve on for the future. Certainly, those tradi-
waiting news that. the plantations across the south. Many tional gatherings were made more
ition Proclamation actually slave owners tallied up their busi- poignant by the events of 1863
ne law. Then, at the stroke ness accounts on the first day of which brought freedom to the slaves
:ht, it was January 1, 1863, each new year. Human property was and the Year of Jubilee. Many gen-
laves in the Confederate sold along with land and furnishings erations have passed since and mosi
re declared legally free .. to satisfy debts. F anulies.andiriends .of us v. ere never taught the African
the news was recel\ ed, were separated. Often Tfie% neer' -miencan history of Watch Night.
e prayers, shouts and songs saw each other again in this earthly Yet our traditions and our faith still
people fell to their knees world. Thus coming together on bring us together at the end of every
:ed God. Black folks have December 31 might be the last time year to celebrate once again "how
in churches annually on for enslaved and free Africans to be we got over."


r's Eve ever since, praising
ringing us safely through


together with loved ones.
So, Black folks in North America


Harasm




GLub H


Presents




allekujah


Club Hallelujah is looking for youth

and adult gospel based entertainers.

Searching for all level of talent, DJ's,

dancers, singers, choirs and comedi-




Bethel Baptist Institutional Church
215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


A | Weekly Services


Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Sr.
Senior Pastor


Sunday Morning Worship
7:40 a.m. and 10:40 a.m.
Church school
9:30 a.m.
Bible Study
6:30 p.m.


Midweek Services
Wednesday Noon Service
"Miracle at Midday"
12 noon-1 p.m.
The Word from the Sons
and Daughters of Bethel
3rd Sunday 4:00 p.m


Come share in IHoly Communiononn 1st Sundayat .A an 1040a.m.


Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Jr.
Senior Pastor


Grace and Peace


in W .. !-- visit www.Bethelite.org '


Worship with us LIVE
on the web visit
www.truth2powerministries.org


December 27 January 8, 2013







Page 14 Ms. Perry's Free Press


December 26, 2012


jIj