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The Jacksonville free press ( August 2, 2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
August 2, 2012

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00377

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
August 2, 2012

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00377

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press


This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




. The Joys

and Pains

of Caring

for an

Aging Parent
Page 7


Revisiting


the 1968


Olympics

Page 10


Black Diabetes Deaths

Double That of Whites
Almost 19 percent of all African-Americans in the country are living
with diabetes. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the
country, but twice as many African-Americans are dying as Whites.
This disparity is closely linked to disparities in healthcare and also
increased rates of obesity in the Black community. Nationwide, 35.7
percent of African-Americans are obese while only 23.7 percent of
Whites are obese.
Black adults are also significantly more likely to report diabetes.
Black adults were significantly more likely to report diabetes testing
than Whites.
Several environmental factors contribute to high obesity rates in the
Black community including decreased access to full service grocery
stores, the high cost of healthy foods, the low cost of unhealthy foods,
and decreased access to safe places to play and be active. In order to
combat this, Seidel said communities need to promote the availability
of healthy food and beverages, support healthy food and beverage
choices, encourage breast feeding, encourage physical activity, and
limit sedentary activity among children and youth.

Spike Lee Comes to the

Rescue of the Malcolm X Estate
The estate of slain civil rights leader Malcolm X reportedly owes $2,
447 to the Manhattan Mini storage company.
Since the amount has been outstanding for quite some time and no
one has paid the running tab, the storage powers-that-be are threaten-
ing to hold an auction to sell off contents from the unit. When film-
maker Spike Lee got wind of the monies owed, he decided to take care
of it himself, reports the New York Post.
"Have them call me; I'll take care of it," Lee said at a Grand Classics
screening of "Midnight Cowboy" at the famed hotel, the W Downtown,
last Thursday. Since Lee co-wrote, co-produced and directed the his-
toric 1992 biopic,"Malcolm X," starring Denzel Washington, he prob-
ably felt compelled to settle the storage company bill.
Well, according to the New York Post's Page Six column, Lee won't
have to take care of the storage fees after all because the Malcolm X
estate plans on paying. The estate also says that the contents inside of
the storage unit does not contain anything of value that once belonged
to the great Black leader.

Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr.

in Mayo Clinic for Depression
Illinois Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr., whose whereabouts haven't
been disclosed since he quietly took a medical leave from Congress
several weeks ago, is being treated for depression at the Mayo Clinic in
Minnesota.
Jackson is undergoing an extensive inpatient evaluation for depres-
sion and for gastrointestinal issues, the hospital said, providing the first
details about his medical condition.
The timing of his medical leave has raised questions, in part because
Jackson is facing an ethics investigation in the U.S. House connected
to imprisoned former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich.
The House Ethics Committee is investigating allegations that Jackson
was involved in discussions about raising money for Blagojevich's
campaign in exchange for the then-governor appointing him to
President Barack Obama's vacated U.S. Senate seat. Blagojevich is
serving a 14-year prison sentence for corruption.
Jackson was not charged and has repeatedly denied wrongdoing.
Jackson faces a Republican and independent candidate in November,
though he's widely expected to win re-election. He first won office in a
1995 special election and has easily won each race since. His district
includes parts of Chicago and some suburbs.

FL Attempted Murderer Feels No

Remorse Saying 'he only shot a n&#"
Authorities in Port St. Joe, Florida say a man charged with a hate
crime felt inconvenienced by his arrest because he had "only shot a
n*gger."
Walton Henry Butler, 59, was arrested by Gulf County Sheriff's
deputies for shooting 32-year-old Everett Gant, who is black, in the
head with a .22 caliber rifle.
According to a charging affidavit, Butler had referred to Pamela
Rogers' child and other children at his apartment complex with racial
slurs. Gant was shot between the eyes when he went to Butler's apart-
ment to confront him over the remarks, the documents said. Butler
allegedly closed his sliding glass door and left Gant bleeding on ground
outside.
The suspect contacted 911 and had finished his dinner before Gulf
County Sheriff Joe Nugent arrived.
"He was brought to the investigation unit where he was interviewed
and basically admitted to shooting the victim and said he shot a, used a
racial slur, and said that is what he shot and acted like it was not like a
big deal or anything to him," Nugent told WJHG
Butler was charged with attempted murder with a hate crime enhance-
ment. He was being held in the Gulf County Jail after an appearance in
court on Tuesday morning.
Gant was in stable condition at Bay Medical Center and is expected
to survive.



I I,


RIL A 'b I K b 1 (C. OA i QL. ALI 1 Y BLA C K :h k KLY
50 Cents


Volume 25 No. 41 Jacksonville, Florida August 2-8, 2012


Rep. Corrine Brown joined by local pastors and members of the SCLC, NAACP and the Democratic Party announcing the filing of the lawsuit.

2012: Still Fighting for the Right to Vote


U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown joined
by members of the Southern
Christian Leadership Conference,
the Democratic Party, the NAACP
and church pastors and held a press
conference in front of the new
courthouse announcing they have
filed a federal lawsuit alleging that
the Florida Legislature's changes to
the election law eliminating Sunday
early voting are discriminatory.
Under the new law, early voting
will begin on Saturday, Aug. 4, giv-


ing voters five fewer days to cast a
ballot than under the old law, and
giving local supervisors more dis-
cretion to decide exactly when polls
will be open for early voting. It also
eliminated voting on the Sunday
before Election Day. Florida voters
have been able to go to the polls
ahead of Election Day since 2004.
The lawsuit is being filed on
behalf of the Middle District of
Florida in Jacksonville. The goal is
for a judge to block the state and the


Duval County elections supervisor
from enforcing the changes.
While a decision isn't likely in
time to add early voting days before
the primary, critics of the law say
it's more important to allow for
additional early voting in the
November general election. They
argue the new reduced voting times
hit Democrats harder, in part
because early voting has proven
very popular in African American
communities.


The lawsuit alleges that the
changes violate the First and
Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S.
Constitution and violate the federal
Voting Rights Act.
"Early voting has worked
extremely well for all Floridians
and especially for African
American voters," Brown said. "In
fact, more than any other racial or
ethnic group, African Americans
have come to rely on early voting."
Continued on page 3


Former Rep. Party Chair Admits

Conspiracy to Quell the Black Vote
by Alan Wald sure from civil rights groups
'File Salon over his purging of voter rolls in
In the debate the state, an effort that critics
over new laws say has disproportionately tar-
A.
meant to curb geted minorities and other
voter fraud in Democratic voters. One group
Florida and suing, the state claims tip to 87
1) e y o ii d percent of the voters purged
Florida's for- from tile rolls so far have been
Jim Greer mer Republican people of color, though other
Party chairman Jim Greer, estinia(es place that number far
blew the lid off what lie claims lower. Scott has defended the
was a systemic effort to still- purge, even though lie was erro-
press (lie Black vote. In a 630- neously listed as (lead himself
page deposition recorded over oil the rolls in 2006.
two davs in late Xlav, Creer, As Vanih, Fair note([ in a big
who is currentIN oil trial for 2004 story oil the Sunshine
corruption charges, unloaded a State's votillo problems.
harraue of charoes aoainst the "Florida is et state with a history
"whack-a-do, right-wing cra- of disenfi-anchisinq blacks. fit
zies" in his part-,-, including tile the state's noforioiisj, botched
effort to Suppress the Black 2000 election, the state sent a list
vote. o '50, 000 alleg-ed ex-
.f ftlons to the
In the deposition, Greer men- counties, instructin,- thein to
tioned a December 2009 meet- ptir,-e those itaines fi-ont their
ing with 1) arty officials. "I was rolls. But it turned out that fist
upset because tile political con- included 20,000 innocent people.
sultans and staff' were talking 54 percent q1'whont were black,"
about voter suppression and tile magazine reported.
keeping Blacks from voting," lie A poll in December of 2000
said, according to the Tampa found that 68 percent of Black
Bay Tinics. He also said part%, nationally felt black voters were
officials discussed how "ininori- less likely to have (heir voles
ty outreach progranis were no( counted fairly in Florida. In
fit for the Republican Party." addition, a recent study froll)
accordillo to tile AR (lie Brennan Centel- for Justice
The comments, if true (lie is at NYU Law School found that
facin- feloliv corruption voter 11) laws disproportionate-
charues), ivould confirm what Iv affect pool-. minority and eld-
critics have long suspected. eriv voters. Fifteen percent of'
Florida Gov. Rick Scott is cur- Florida's population is African-
rently facing inquiries from the American.
Justice Department and pres-


The national foreclosure crisis
that came after years of preju-
diced sub-prime home loans, con-
tinues to take away the most
important asset many Americans
have: their homes. Since 2007,
there have been 6.6 million fore-
closure filings in the United
States, 5 million of which have
gone through already. And of
those foreclosed
upon, a dispropor- .
tionate number -.-
have been Blacks
and Latinos. who
were frequently
targeted with toxic ''
sub-prime loans
even if they were
eligible for prime
loans. But while
many minority
families are still struggling with
how best to keep their homes, or
how to get a new home if they've
lost theirs, a different and less
talked about group is also being
devastated by foreclosures: senior
citizens
According to a new report from
the AARP, the foreclosure crisis
has already claimed nearly 1.5
million older Americans homes.
Millions of others are at serious
risk of losing theirs, as well.
Reports the Associated Press:
-About 600,000 Americans
who are 50 or older are in foreclo-
sure.
-About 625,000 in the same
age group are at least three
months behind on their mort-


gages.
-About 3.5 million-16 per-
cent of older homeowners-are
underwater, meaning the home
value has gone down and home-
owners now owe more than their
homes are worth.
-AARP said that over the past
five years, the proportion of loans
held by older Americans that are


seriously delinquent jumped more
than 450 percent.
What makes foreclosing on a
home particularly bad for elders is
that, unlike young people who can
still work, older people have less
time and ability to get back into
the labor force to make up what
they've lost. Worse still, just as
with other foreclosures, Blacks
and Latinos are hardest hit when it
comes to elderly foreclosures.
African-American and Hispanic
borrowers age 50+ had foreclo-
sure rates of 3.5 percent and 3.9
percent, respectively, on prime
loans in 2011, double the foreclo-
sure rate of 1.9 percent for white
borrowers in 2011, according to
the report.


Up Close


and Personal f


with Actor


Boris Kodjoe

Page 9 k LO


Seniors Losing Homes


in Record Numbers







Pan 2 s er' rePesAgs -,21


Seniors Beware of Finacial


By Jason Alderman
Many people find it increasing-
ly difficult to make ends meet in
today's troubled ecoilomny,
whether because of mortgage
woes, high fuel costs, job inse-
curity or olither financial prob-


lems. If that weren't bad enough,
predatory con artists target these
vulnerable folks with increas-
ingly sophisticated scams
designed to cheat them just
when they can least afford it.
Seniors are particularly at risk
because they often live on fixed
incomes, face increased medical
costs and are looking for ways


by Michael G. Shinn,
CFP
Contributing Writer
July 31, 2012 will go
down in infamy as the
day that the boat sank.
Sunday afternoon, after
Church, a couple of T h
friends, my wife and I I
took a leisurely boat
ride on Lake Erie. We docked at
an on-the-water restaurant for
lunch that we have visited many
times. As we were finishing up
lunch, someone yelled, "a
freighter just hit a boat!" Having
one of the eight pleasure boats
docked at the restaurant, we had
more than a casual interest. As
we approached the dock, we
could see the Beverly II, mortal-
ly wounded; take her last gasp
before succumbing to the depths
of the Cuyahoga River.
A six hundred-twenty foot
Great Lakes freighter, ironically
named the "Cuyahoga" had just
rammed head-on into our
beloved boat of seventeen years.
Our range of emotions went
from panic-what can we do to
save her? Then next to anger-
what in the heck could that cap-
tain have been thinking or drink-
ing? To relief-thank God that no
one was hurt! And finally to res-
ignation-we've lost her, what do
we do next?
Life Comes at You Fast
In less than a minute, we went
from yacht cruisers to boatless
people looking for a ride. The
Nationwide Insurance commer-


to make their savings keep up
with inflation.
Here are a few troubling
frauds making the rounds:
Retirement investment scams.
If you're over 50, your mailbox
has likely been flooded with
offers to attend free-lunch
financial seminars that prom-
ise to significantly boost your
retirement savings returns.
While some are legitimate,
others use high-pressure
sales tactics to steer seniors
into risky, fee-heavy invest-
ments or annuities, or sell
them products they don't
' need or that are impractical
for their situation.
Before entrusting your
hard-earned money with
anyone, particularly from an
unsolicited offer, do your
homework. The U.S.
Securities and Exchange
Commission offel'l'r compre-
hensive advice to help sen-
iors manage their invest-
ments, including key questions
to ask investment advisors
(www.sec.gov/investor/sen-
iors.shtml)
Other helpful sites include the
North American Security
Administrators' Fraud Center,
which provides tips for -.potting
con artists, top investor traps
and more (go to www.nasaa.org


and type "Fraud Center" in the
search ctiinic), and AARP's
Investment Fraud Center (visit
www.aarp.org/sitemap and click
on "Be a Wise Consumer" under
"Money and Work").
"Foreclosure rescue" scams.
The Better Business Bureau
reports an alarming increase in
unscrupulous companies prey-
ing on homeowners facing pos-
sible foreclosure because they
can't meet their mortgage pay-
ments. Some companies prom-
ise to negotiate with the lender
on the owner's behalf for a
sizeable upfront fee.
Others use more nefarious
practices such as "equity skim-
ming," where they convince the
homeowner to add an investor's
name to the home's title, in
exchange for lowered payments
while supposedly working out a
payment plan with the lender.
This ruse drains equity from the
home and often results in own-
ers losing their homes and being
left even further in debt.
It's far wiser to call your lender
directly as soon as you think
you may have trouble paying
your mortgage. Also consider
% working with a U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban
Development-approved hous-
ing counselor. To find one, call
800-569-4287.


Fake check scams. The count-
less variations on this scheme
usually involve someone offer-
ing to buy something you're
selling, provide an advance on a
contest you supposedly won or
pay you to work at home.
They'll send an authentic-look-
ing check for more than the cor-
rect amount and ask you to wire
them the difference.
Meanwhile, the check you
deposited is fraudulent. Even
though your bank may initially
clear it, you are responsible for
making good on the money
when the check ultimately
bounces you could even face
legal charges. Bottom line:
There's no legitimate reason for
someone giving you money to
ask for funds to be wired back.
For tips on spotting and avoid-
ing these and other check scams,
visit the National Consumers
League's fraud center at
www.fraud.org.
It's a good idea to consult a
financial professional about any
decisions concerning your
money. If you don't know one,
www planncersearch org is a
good place to start your search.
Bottom line, remember the old
sayings: "There's no such thing
as a free lunch," and "If it
sounds too good to be true, it
probably is."


YOUJ MOESEY U-ATiTE$R


ie Day the Boat Sank


cial says it all, "sometimes, life
comes at you fast." Every day,
lives are changed by normali"
tragedies such as: fire, flood,
accidents, theft, injury, illness
and even death. Each circum-
stance brings with it the potential
for a second traged\-a financial
catastrophe. Besides being
blessed and lucky, successfully
surviving a tragedy olicni
depends on two major factors.
Being Prepared
It is impossible to prepare for
every type of emergency that
might affect you and your fami-
ly. However, it is possible to
create an atmosphere within
your family, where family mem-
bers are able to respond quickly
and confidently. Developing a
Family Emergency Plan pro-
vides a basic framework for the
family to work with during an
emergency. Examples of what a
plan would include are:
Discussion of the major risks
to your home and community;
for example, floods, tornados,
hurricanes, fire, etc.
- Determining the safest places
in your home in case of an emer-
gency.
Determining the best escape


routes from your home during an
emergency.
Choosing a common contact
outside of the immediate area if
the family is separated.
- Emergency water, food, flash-
lights, first aid supplies, etc..
- First aid and CPR training.
T1 o websites that can provide
additional information on
Family Enmcrgenc,. Planning are:
www.TL'dkros orn- and
www.fema.gov.
Adequate Insurance
An adequate insurance plan
should cover nearly all cata-
strophic losses that may occur
without pendingii money on cov-
erage and extras that are not
needed. Some of the m.ijor areas
where most families need cover-
age are:
- Disability income insurance is
paycheck protection against dis-
abling illness or injury that could
render the bread winner inca-
pable of working.
Life insurance is needed to
replace the financial support that
a breadwinner provides for
dependents and family.
- Health Insurance in needed to
provide coverage for illness or
injury that could deplete the


family's assets and destroy finan-
cial security.
Property and Casualty
Insurance would include
replacement coverage of the
home and its contents, auto
insurance and owner's liability
coverage. Boat insurance is a
specialty area in property and
casualty insurance.
It is important to review your
insurance coverage with your
insurance professional regularly
to assure that you are adequately
managing your risk and effTec-
tively utilizing your insurance
dollars.
- Although the Beverly II is his-
tory, we do have the confidence
of being prepared for most of the
ciierenciic that we could antic-
ipate on the water. Additionally,
we have adequate insurance to
cover most anticipated fi.in.ci.al
losses. "Sometimes life can
come at you fast", but being pre-
pared and having adequate insur-
ance can help you and your fam-
ily successfully survive.
Michael G Shinn, CFP. Registered
Representative and Advisory Associate of and
securities and investment advisory services
offered through Financial Network Investment
Corporation, member SIPC. Visit www.shinn-
financial.com for more information or to send
your comments or questions to shinnm@finan-
cialnetwork.com. C' Michael G Shinn
2008.


What Happens to Child

Support, Alimony when

%. Your Ex Declares


.According
to the AP Former
New Jersey Governor James
McGreevey was quoted as saying:
"I want to pay child support. I want
to fulfill my obligations.
Unfortunately, I have had to bank-
rupt myself to pay legal fees upon
legal fees." What if this happened
to you? What would you do?
40 percent of individuals who file
for bankruptcy do so as a direct
result of divorce, medical crisis or
unemployment.
How a bankruptcy affects some-
one who is divorced depends a lot
on the settlement agreement. A pri-
mary concern, for the spouse owed
money, is what will happen to
spousal support, child support and
property settlements, said Mathew
Weber, a CPA and forensic account-
ant. "The rules (for bankruptcy) are
pretty straightforward," he said,
adding, "The cases are pretty com-
plicated."
If your ex files for bankruptcy, all
creditors -- including you if you're
owned spousal or child support --
would receive notification from the
court. Then you have to file a claim
right away or the court can dis-
chalre" the debt, Weber said.
"People who are creditors in bank-
ruptcy would be well advised to
assume the worst about what the
judge will decide," said attorney
and divorce mediator Lee Borden.
Thanks to the Bankruptcy Abuse
Prevention and Consumer
Protection Act of 2005 (BAPCPA),
individuals who are owed child or
spousal support are protected from
losing those funds in court.
According to Borden, the laws that
served primarily as a bankers' pro-
tection bill al-o bliped with family
law claims. "All family law claims
are now called first priority. That
means that they enjoy a priority
when it comes time for the trustee
to decide who gets paid and who
doesn't." Borden said.
Before the protection act, Borden
said lawyers couldn't prosecute the
family law claims until the end of
the automatic stay a period where
creditors left you alone. That, how-
ever, is no longer the case when it
comes to child support and spousal
support. "Child support and alimo-
ny, both of these are current sup-
ports, can be processed and prose-
cuted even despite the stay,"
Borden said. "It in fact, now enjoys
a privileged position."
"Support, whether it's child sup-
port, maintenance, alimony, are not
discharged," Borden said. This rule
does not apply to property settle-
ments or back support. Borden


Bankruptcy?

Sal so warned that bankruptcy
Judges have a primary
objective to assist the
debtor, not the creditor.
"Bankruptcy judges view
i the world through discharged
colored glasses. They are all about
helping debtors to get back on their
feet," he said. "They want to get the
debtor as fully discharged as possi-
ble."
Property settlements are another
big issue in bankruptcy court.
Settlements can include situations
in which an ex-spouse agreed to
pay for the mortgage or car pay-
ment, Borden said. Settlements can
also entail the owing of any kind of
monetary family court award, other
than support.
In another example, Borden said
if an ex-spouse agrees to take over
a car payment that was financed
under the couple's names, and the
individual files bankruptcy, he or
she is no longer required to pay that
debt. In return, however, the lend-
ing agency can turn to the other
spouse and request that money
from him or her, even if the ex-
spouse still has the vehicle.
A lot of times bankruptcy cases
involving family court claims that
are discharged eventually wind up
back in family court, Weber said.
"When somebody files for bank-
ruptcy, that really only applies to
the collection of debt," Weber said.
"When child support and mainte-
nance are involved you now have to
go back to the family court."
"The court is going to take a look.
They want to know who it is going
to harm more, the payer of the
recipient," Weber said. In a recent
case, Weber said a woman was
owed $1 million and her ex-hus-
band filed bankruptcy. "I did an
analysis of both of their lifestyles,"
Weber said. "She had basically
nothing." On the other hand, Weber
said the ex-husband was maintain-
ing his lifestyle despite the folding
of his business.
The main question the family
court is going to ask, Weber said, is
who is most harmed by the proper-
ty settlement and bankruptcy. "We
compare the harmfulness to him as
opposed to her," he said. "It would
certainly harm her worse (to lose
the payout)."
It is Weber's task to review each
individual's lifestyles and deter-
mine what, if anything has really
changed in terms of economic
income. The court's decision is
going to ride on the judge's opin-
ion. "There is going to be two con-
flicting experts and the judge will
believe, who he believes based on
what is presented," Weber said.
"Sometimes, they try to paint a pic-
ture that is many times not accurate
of their true economic income.
Many times somebody is just trying
to shift income around."


10 Things NEVER to Say to a Black Coworker


Think you have been a little bit touchy about what co-workers
may say? You are not alone. Diversity.com has revealed the top
ten things NEVER to say to a Black co-worker. See if you agree
or pass it on to someone who just may need to read it!


"Fried chicken anyone?" "You
speak really well." "Is that your
real hair?"
In 2008, you'd think the taboo
subjects and phrases would be
clearly outlined and understood
by all when it comes to what is
and is not acceptable to say to a
Black colleague. But that's far
from the case. Here are 10 things
you never want to say to a Black
coworker or boss.
1) You're so articulate
You're so ... articulate? Smart?
Different? Yes, the speaker may
intend a compliment, but what
may be meant as praise instead
comes across as being conde-
scending. It implies the person
being complimented is an excep-
tion to the rule and is exhibiting
behavior atypical of others of his
or her ethnic background.
"I haven't had it said to me,
maybe I'm not articulate enough,
but I've heard a number of Blacks
say they've had it said to them ...
you're so articulate or you're so


smart or intelligent," says
Berlinda Fontenot-Jamerson, for-
mer director of diversity at
Disney ABC Television Group. In
her many years in the diversity
industry, Fontenot-Jamerson has
seen and heard it all. Some of it
still makes her cringe.
"I feel like education and aware-
ness is my mission, so I try to be
kind when I check people to help
them understand what they just
said," she says. "1 might make a
joke to help them understand that
it was a faux pas, and hopefully I
have good enough relationships
with them to have further conver-
sations with them."
2) Is That Your Real Hair?
Danielle Robinson, director of
diversity, talent and organization-
al design at Diageo, a wine, beer
and spirits company, said she was
amazed when she got this ques-
tion from a colleague. But instead
of getting angry, Robinson
explained to her coworker why
the question was inappropriate.


"There are a number of ways to
respond. But I told the person
they had no idea if they might be
asking that question to someone
uillfering from a medical condi-
tion [such as] someone recover-
ing from cancer treatmeiitn." she
says. "I wound up giving this one
woman a little lesson because you
never know what the situation
might be of the person you're ask-
ing a question."
3) "You" people
"I've heard this one several
times," says Fontenot-Jamerson.
Who exactly are "You people,"
and how do they differ from regu-
lar people'? Use this poorly cho-
sen phrase at your own risk.
4) Do you eat a lot of ... (plug
in the offending stereotype
here)
Some 'tercolype. simply refuse
to die. There's nothing wrong with
natural curiosity about the ethnic
eating habits of some of your
coworkers. The problem lies in
focusing on ,leieoi picil Black


fare such as fried chicken, water-
melon, etc. It reveals the speaker
has a very limited and narrow per-
ception of Black culture and cui-
sine.
"One of my young relatives told
me when flihe go out on inter-
views thel may get queries about
fried chicken and the stcicolypcs
about the food that we like to cat."
says Fontenot-Jamerson.
5) Why are you so angry?
This one is more often directed
at Black males, thanks in large
part to the media, which often
portrays Black men as being
angry and/or criminals.
6) Why are you acting white?
Consider this a relative of
"You're so articulate." Why would
exhibiting proper behavior, man-
ners or dialect be c.iegioliicd as
acting white? If that's the case,
what does it mean to act BI.Ack '
7) You don't sound Black over
the phone.
What does Black sound like'?
8) 1 don't think of you as
Black.
Diversitylnc Partner and
Cofounder Luke Visconti
received a letter from a reader
who was presented with this par-
ticular compliment. lle respond-


ed, "What you are -\pericncing is
the first instance of a person
accepting nothici person who is
outside of their 'tribe.' Altliough
the words and the sentiment are
initiltiii. the person expressing
them is (usually) not consciously
living to insult you. In their back-
ward and ignorant way. t.he are
actually trying to give you a com-
pliment."
9) You graduated from where?
This particular offense came to
our attention directly from one of
our readers. Beatriz Mallory, who
wrote, "In a career of nearly 30
years, I've heard them all. I am
both African American and
Hispanic, so I get it from both
sides, on top of being a female. In
trying to recall the worst, I'd have
to nominate this one. It is the
unguarded question "YOU went
to CORNELL? WOW!" The
implication is that in their mind,
someone like me isn't automati-
cally woithy of such an accom-
plishment. I never express my
.iinli \ ,i. nc.' "
10) 'The N-word
The ultimate faux pas. Just
because you've seen repeats of
Dave Chapelle's show where the
word is used liberally, that doesn't


give you--or anyone--license to
make conversational use of the
word. To read more on the debate,
read Double Standard: Can You
Use the N-\Votd' in the Jan Feb
2008 issue of DiversityInc.
And don't fall into the trap of
hiiiiking substituting an "A" for
the "er" makes the word accept-
able. Fontenot-Janmerson believes
it's a word used far too c.isa.illy
among youths, both white and
Black.
"The new generation uses the N-
word very loosely [and] white
kids do it too," she says. "I've
been in comp.may where the
youngsters use the word because
they don't understand the history
that comes with it."
Like Fontenot-Jamerson,
Robinson looks at each misspo-
ken phrase as an opportunity to
teach and educate. "A lot of the
questions are usually out of igno-
rance or genuine curiosity. So I
always look at opportunities like
these as a chance to educate,"
says Robinson. "Instead of getting
angry, you don't want them to
make this mistake \\ ith someone
else. There are ways to ask a
question more inquisitively :hal
won't otffend."


August 2-8, 2012


Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press








State Representative Swears in New Job Corps Student Leadership


Mrs. Lindsey Bivens
Bivens Holds Poetry Book
Signing at Friday Musicale
Lindsey Bivens author of "Living Words, a collection of poems" host-
ed a signing and book release Saturday, July 28, 2012. It was intimate and
well attended. There was a question and answer period followed by a read-
ing. Below is a poem from her book featuring the poem, Never Defeated.


Defeat, it's not me.
I refuse to press rewind,
replay, or repeat!
Defeat, it ain'tfor me.
Ya 'll can have that!
And everything that
sounds like
Unh, Unh, Unh...
this drum beat
Chasing after me.


I can hear it, I can feel it
Messing with my psyche.
Defeat, this ain 'tfor me!
I said, it ain 't my speed.
Nothing can subdue or
subside
The power and the drive
In the depths of me.
Defeat...ain 't for me!
LINDSEY BIVINS


On Monday July 30, 2012 State
Representative Reginald Fullwood
swore in the newly elected and
appointed members of the
Jacksonville Job Corps Student
Government Association. The stu-
dents stood proudly in front of 350
of their peers and Jacksonville Job
Corps staff as they committed to
upholding the constitution and
bylaws of the Association.
Center Director Kenderson Hill
congratulated the newly elected
officers of the Jacksonville Job
Corps Center and charged them to
lead by example. The student lead-
ers are President Robert Brooks,
Vice President Jason Slosh,
Secretary Yasenia Zurtuche,
Treasurer Diamonque Osborne,
Sergeant of Arms Alex Shively,
Activities Coordinator Joseph
Thomas Jr., Male Chief Justice Paul
Mincey, Female Chief Justice Anisa


L-R Kenderson Hill-Center Director, Florida State Representative Reginald Fullwood, Giovanna Flammia, Tatyana
Gee, Robert Brooks, Jason Slosh, Yasenia Zurtuche, Diamonque Osborne, Alex Shively, Paul Mincey, Joseph Thomas
Jr., Gabriel Smith, and Ms. Yvonne Lomax.
Taylor, Non Res Representative Meet representatives in local and committees and represent the 350
Leslie Anderson and Student congressional government, members of the Jacksonville Job
Advisor Giovanna Flammia. The Leadership Training, lead on-center Corps Center.
students will have the opportunity
to serve in community projects,


Voting Battle


Continued from front
Duval County's Supervisor of
Elections, Jerry Holland, said that
while there are fewer days of early
voting, there really is just as much
access to vote early.
"Before, in 14 days of early vot-
ing, we had 96 hours of early vot-
ing. Now, in eight days, we still
have 96 because they went from
eight-hour days to 12-hour days,
which means now that people can
vote before and after work, which
may actually increase the chance
for those to take advantage of early
voting," Holland said to Channel 4.
Voters can also request an absen-
tee ballot, allowing voting by mail
anytime up to Election Day.
Early voting began in Florida after
thousands were turned away from
overcrowded polls. Since 2004,
Floridians have had access to the
polls for eight hours a day, for 15
days right up until the last weekend
before Election Day.
The lawsuit cites statistics from
Dr. Daniel A. Smith, University of
Florida professor of political sci-
ence and research professor. The


research determined that that 22
percent of those voting early in the
2008 general election were Black
despite only being 13 percent of
the state's registered voters.
His research also found more
African Americans voted during the
early voting period than on Election
Day or and absentee ballot com-
bined. In 2008, African-Americans
accounted for roughly 34 percent of
votes cast on the Sunday before the
election -- an early voting day that
will not occur under the new rules.
In Duval County where 58 percent
of African Americans voted early in
2008, blacks cast roughly 34 per-
cent of the early votes, even though
they comprised less than 30 percent
of the electorate, and the majority
of those who voted on the Sunday
before the election were Black.
"There is absolutely no explana-
tion for restricting early voting
other than intentional voter sup-
pression. In fact, it seems that Gov.
Scott simply does not want people
to vote," Brown said. "We should
be making it easier for people to get
to the polls, not harder."


In Loving Memory

of

Raymond Howard

10/28/30 8/2/05


Gone


but Not Forgotten
THELMA


ME "
C-...'
4 .!..-I (4,-s.-,.


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July 26 -August 2, 2012


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3









Page 4 Ms, PerryEXCsAFreebPresseJuly 26 -Augsn ,21


Sometimes you have to deal with
the reality of an issue. For example,
I would love to say that everyone
graduating from a Duval County
High School should attend college.
I agree with that notion because I
believe that education is critical to
one's success.
In fact, Malcolm X said,
"Education is our passport to the
future, for tomorrow belongs to the
people who prepare for it today."
However, I am also a realist and I
fully understand and concede that
college just simply isn't for every-
one. While it would undoubtedly
be controversial, I feel that we
should target students who proba-
bly aren't going to college and
attempt to get them interested in
rewarding careers that don't
involve a college degree.
For example, you don't need a
degree to be a fireman, long shore-
man, carpenter, electrician, etc.
These are great careers that pay
high wages and provide good bene-
fits. How do we stabilize inner city
communities?
High wage jobs provide so many
opportunities for individuals and
families. With a good job you can
buy a house, help pay for your
child's college costs, invest in your
retirement, provide for your fami-
ly's well being, etc.
In order for the black middle
class to grow we have to start back
promoting trade professions as
viable options for creating strong
well paid careers.
In the late 1800s W.E.B. Dubois


College Isn't for Everyone: We Have to

Promote Professional Trades as Careers


and Booker T. Washington were
black leaders who both fought for
economic and social equality for
freed slaves. Although the overall
goals was the same the means in
which they suggested we achieve
the goal was very different.
Washington felt that blacks
should focus more on farming and
skilled labor, while Dubois felt that
every black should receive an edu-
cation. He also felt that ten percent
of the race would provide the lead-
ership we needed. Dubois called,
this group the "Talented Tenth."
Actually, Washington was a pro-
ponent of education as well, but he
realized that in order for freed
slaves to survive economically we
had to focus on the jobs that were
available at the time.
Washington said, "Education is
the sole and only hope of the Negro
race in America."
Today, I agree with both men in a
sense. I feel that all people, not just
blacks should receive some sort of
education after high school.
However, again I realize that col-
lege is not an option for everyone
so we should deal with the reality
of matter and aggressively do as
Booker T. Washington suggested.
It will not be popular to those in
the academic arena, but we have to
focus more of our youth's attention
on viable career options like skilled
trades.


With the national unemployment
rate still higher than it needs to be,
it's clear that jobs are not plentiful.
And ask anyone that's been unem-
ployed there continues to be a
shortage of high wage jobs, espe-
cially for blacks that don't have
college degrees.
Professional trades, which
include electricians, carpenters,
plumbers, heating and air condi-
tioning technicians are some of the
jobs that require a high level of
training, and can be very rewarding
in the long term.
The Northeast Florida Builders
Association, several local unions
and Florida State College all pro-
vide great trade programs for indi-
viduals. Once you become a
licensed professional in any of the
areas I just mentioned the opportu-
nities are limitless.
Many people start off working
for large companies and once they
reach the level of a master crafts-
man they start their own compa-
nies.
But just like going to college -
you have to be committed to finish-
ing the program if you want to be
successful. Too many of our youth
want instant gratification in life.
That's not how you build success.
Willie Bady, Jr, once said,
"Living a life is like constructing a
building; if you start wrong, you'll
end wrong."


And there are definitely positions
that are available in these fields.
Another area that blacks can excel
is the maritime industry. The
Jacksonville Port Authority along
with its clients have a $1.3 billion
dollar impact on our local econo-
my.
The average annual salaries for
port jobs are $45,000, which is well
above the state average.
I have often written about the
need to grow the African American
middle class, and its jobs like these
that can help grow and sustain a
strong black middle class. Again, I
can't say it enough, but the oppor-
tunities provided by the trade pro-
fessions and Jaxport are critical our
local economy.
As we slowly climb out of this
recession, construction trades jobs
will be critical to the country's eco-
nomic rebound.
Again, as we deal with the reali-
ties of life, college cannot continue
to be the only primary option that
we promote to youth. Professional
trades can be a means of helping
young men establish long-term
careers that lead towards entrepre-
neurship and long-term economic
stability.
Signing off from the IBEW
Union Hall,
Reggie Fullwood


Crucifying Chick-fil-A Owner for his Beliefs


By George E. Curry
In an attempt to drum up more
business, Chick-fil-A has ads and
billboards featuring black and
white spotted cows acting in what
the company calls their "enlight-
ened self-interest' -. urging pepple..
to "Eat Mor Chikin."
But that's not what gay rights
advocates want in the aftermath of
the president of Chick-fil-A
expressing his opposition to same-
sex marriage. They don't want the
public to eat less chicken at Chick-
fil-A they don't want consumers
to eat any chicken served by the
Atlanta-based chain.
In a June 12 radio interview on
"The Ken Coleman Show," Chick-
fil-A President and CEO Dan Cathy
said: "As it relates to society in
general, I think we are inviting
God's judgment on our nation
when we shake our fists at Him and
say, 'We know better than You as to
what constitutes a marriage.' I pray
God's mercy on our generation that
has such prideful, arrogant attitude
to think that we have the audacity
to try to redefine what marriage is
all about."
When asked about his support of
traditional marriage by the Biblical
Recorder, Cathy responded, "Well,
guilty as charged."
It is surprising that anyone would
be surprised by the position taken
by the Chick-fil-A officials.
Its restaurants are closed on
Sunday. In fact, there is a sign in
front of one of its Fayettville, Ga.
restaurants proclaiming they're
open "24/6." It's no secret that on
the seventh day, employees rest
and/or go to church.
The company says on its Web
site, "From the day Truett Cathy


started the company, he began
applying biblically-based princi-
ples to managing his business. For
example, we believe that closing on
Sunday, operating debt-free and
devoting a percentage of our profits
.back to -out communities are what
make us a stronger company and
Chick-fil-A family."
Fifteen years ago, the company
became the chief sponsor of the
Peach Bowl and renamed it the
Chick-fil-A Bowl.
"We are the only bowl that has an
invocation,"' Cathy said in the
Biblical Recorder interview. "It is
our agreement that if Chick-fil-A is
associated in this, there's going to
be an invocation. Also, we don't
have our bowl on Sunday, either."
Both Dan Cathy and his father
are devout Christians. And given
their religious beliefs and their atti-
tude about working or playing foot-
ball on Sunday, it should come as
no surprise that they believe homo-
sexuality is a sin. As U.S. citizens,
they were exercising their First
Amendment rights to free speech
and religion.
And many people, including me,
find that honorable.
The problem with many gay
rights advocates is that they try to
bully people into subscribing to
their point of view. If you don't
believe in same-sex marriages or
object to their trying to re-frame
their position as an issue of "mar-
riage equity," they are quick to dis-
miss your opinion as homophobia.
No, many opponents of gay mar-
riages are not homophobic they
simply believe it is a sin. Most
major religions including
Christianity, Catholicism, Islam,
Mormonism and Orthodox Judaism


- reject homosexuality. The prob-
lem with some opponents of same-
sex marriage is that want to invoke
the Bible selectively instead of fol-
lowing all its teachings.
In arguing that gay rights
activists shouldn't boycott Chick-
fil-A, some liberals are also wrong.
Whether you agree with them or
not, gay rights activists and their
supporters have the right to spend
their money with whom they
please. And by urging a boycott of
Chick-fil-A, which is a $4 billion a
year business, activists are borrow-
ing a page from what leaders of the
civil rights movement did in the
1950s and 1960s to break down the
walls of segregation.
Politicians on the left and on the
right have injected themselves into
the controversy.
Former Arkansas governor and
Republican presidential candidate
Mike Huckabee picked Aug. 1 as
the day for people to eat at Chick-
fil-A to show their support for the
company. The Gay & Lesbian
Alliance Against Defamation
(GLADD) is promoting a National
Same-Sex Kiss Day to be held Aug.
3 at Chick-fil-A restaurants across
the country.
The most disturbing part of this
controversy is that elected officials
are threatening to block Chick-fil-
A from expanding in their commu-
nities. Chicago Mayor Rahm
Emanuel and Boston Mayor
Thomas Menino have said they
might seek to block Chick-fil-A
from expanding in their cities. That
would amount to government cen-
sorship; no one should be punished
by elected officials for exercising
their right to free speech.
As the Boston Herald observed,


w,:7.)


fLORIDA' 5 FIRST COAST QUALITY BLACK W EEKLY


MAILING ADDRESS
P.O. Box 43580
Jacksonville, FL 32203


Rita Perry

PUBLISHER

-CONTRIBt
SE.O.Huthc
acksonville Latimer, Pt
CJ('hamber oCommerce Vickle Bro


PHYSICAL ADDRESS
903 W. Edgewood Ave.
Jacksonville, FL 32208
Email: JfreePress@aol.com


TELEPHONE
(904) 634-1993
Fax (904) 765-3803


Sylvia Perry

Managing Editor


JTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald Fullwood,
hinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Marsha Oliver, Marretta
hyllis Mack, Tonya Austin, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver,
wn, Rahman Johnson, Headshots, William Jackson.


"Which part of the First"
Amendment does [Mayor] Menino
not understand?" The editorial con-
tinued, "'If the mayor of a conserva-
tive town tried to keep out gay-
friendly Starbucks or Apple, it
would be an outrage.".-
It's outrageous that the president
of Chick-fil-A, is bemg persecuted
for expressing support for the
Bible. It's outrageous to try to pre-
vent gay and lesbian advocates
from directing dollars away from a
business that they deem unsupport-
ive. And it's outrageous for anyone
on the left or right to think that they
should dictate the personal views
and opinions of others.


DISCLAIMER
The United State provides oppor-
tunities for free expression of ideas.
The Jacksonville Free Press has its
view, but others may differ.
Therefore, the Free Press ownership
reserves the right to pub-
lish views and opinions by syndicat-
ed and local columnist, professional
writers and other writers' which are
solely their own. Those views do not
necessarily reflect the policies and
positions of the staff and mnanage-
iment of the Jacksonville Free Press.
Readers, are encouraged to write
letters to the editor commenting on
current events as well as what they
wouldlike to see included in the
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address letters to the Editor, c/o
JFP, P.O. Box 43580 Jacksonville,
FL 32203. (No CALLS PLEASE)


Amazingly, Black
folks in this country still Black Economic
don't get it. After all we
have been through and

accomplished, prior to
and after integration, our relative collective economic position in America
has changed very little. In some cases we have regressed in terms of owner-
ship of land, from some 20 million acres of land (31,000 square miles) in
1910; and in our ownership of banks, of which 128 were founded between
1888 and 1934 and 64 Black-owned banks existed in 1912. As for other
necessities such as supermarkets, manufacturing concerns, and distribution
networks, we are not even on the radar screen.
In light of the latest news reports that predict yet another recession just
around the comer, and the financial "cliff" from which we will soon fall, as
reported on CNN's, "Your Money," one would think Black folks are busy
getting our economic act together, our history of business ownership and
mutual support notwithstanding.
Sad to say, we are still floundering, enamored by the trappings of the "good
life" and living vicariously through reality television shows and the shallow
personalities thereon. Instead of working on our own economy we seem to
be more interested in the economies of others, like the Kardashians who
make about $30 million per year, not counting Lamar Odom's contribution.
We just love to check in on those "wives" of wherever and listen to their vul-
garity and watch their extravagance. We can't seem to get enough of the gos-
sip shows and things that will take us nowhere while making others wealthy.
Bob Law once said, "Black folks are just happy because Oprah is rich," as
he pointed out how ridiculous we have gotten when it comes to our own col-
lective economic empowerment. He also chided us for just wanting to see a
Black man in the White House that's all, just to know he is there.
Most of the people we follow and nearly worship are multi-millionaires
and couldn't care less about us. They wouldn't give most of us the time of
day if we saw them on the street. Yet we idolize and follow them in all that
they do, as we slip further and further behind in building (or should I say
rebuilding) our collective economic base.
Recent reports cite how important the Hispanic consumer market is and
that it comprises more than $1 trillion in buying power. They also point out
that Hispanics are the second largest population group in the U.S. and by
2015 they will be 18 percent of the total population at nearly 58 million per-
sons. Those of us who were paying attention to Claud Anderson 15 years ago
heard him predict just that. He also warned that if we didn't get anything
from this society when we were in second place, what do we think we will
get when we fall to third place? He begged us to get prepared but we were
too busy helping everyone else build up their wealth and take care of their
children. As the saying goes, "It's time to pay the piper."
What can we do now? For starters we can look into a mirror and admit how
we have played a role in our own economic demise; and then ask, "What can
I do to contribute to our collective economic uplift?"
Remember when the lady on the school bus was harassed by students, and
a couple of days later more than $660,000 was raised for her through
Facebook? That's how easy it is for us to do something collectively to help
ourselves, yet we fail to take advantage of models that have been and could
be implemented to help ourselves.
There was, and could be again, the Blackonomics Million Dollar Club that
sent money to 20 Black institutions; we tried to get just 200,000 people to
send $5 each to a designated charitable entity, but at its height there were no
more than 1,000 participants involved. We have the Collective
Empowerment Group (formerly Collective Banking Group) that should have
a chapter in every major city across this country, but some heads of church-
es are too egotistical and individualistic to get involved. We had the 10-10-
50 Movement, the Nationalist Black Leadership Coalition, the Bring Back
Black Movement, and even a Black-owned and operated distribution net-
work, The MATAH among others.
Now we have the Unity Movement (myunitymovement.com), which is
calling for 2 million people to simply sign up on its website in an effort to
capture a critical mass of folks to begin a collective effort to inform and edu-
cate, and to start, support, and grow Black businesses. Will you at least do
that?
Please, let's reverse our economic dysfunction and help create a meaning-
ful, pragmatic, and sustained economic movement. Don't you think our chil-
dren deserve that as a legacy from us?


SU SC IBITDA


NAME


Yes, I'd Ilk*to

subscribe to th

Jacksonville Free i'rssf

Enclosed is' my
check money order'.,.
for $36.00 to cover i
one year subscriptl y.

,,.".. '


ADDRESS


CITY


_______ STATE .. Z ZY?<

MAIL TO: JACKSONVILLE FREePRaSSl
P.O. BOX 43580, JACKSONVILLE, FL 32203 ,,.


1


I d.


m


July 26 August 2, 2012


Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press


I







U I


-. I,-""
I~ltw^i^"


I


Dialogue on Changing
Public Schools
JCCI invite you to a lunch-hour
conversation about the future of
public schools, Thursday, August
2nd, 11 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. in the
JCCI Conference Room, 2434
Atlantic Boulevard. For more
information call (904) 396-3052 or
email mail@jcci.org.

Marion Meadows
in Concert
The Ritz Theater Jazz Janmm will
feature jazz artist Marion Meadows
on Saturday, August 4th at 7 and
10 p.m. Tickets are currently on
sale. Call 632-5555.

Teen TV Talk
Show Debut
Local teen pop star Celina Lina and
Douglas Anderson student Chelsi
Boyd will host the new teen televi-
sion talk show 44th & Norwood.
The shows focus is student excel-
lence, teen health issues, celebrity
guest, dancing and more. The first
episode taping is Saturday, August
4th, 12:00 p.m. at Abzsolute Gym,
5290 Norwood Avenue. For more
information call Destiny Whitehead
at (904) 738-7487 or email des-
tiny@lynnandfriends.com.


We Remember
Raines Screening
Director and Raines alumnus
Emanuel Washington's captures the
essence of how one school inspired
a whole community in his
acclaimed documentary, We
Remember Raines. The film screen-
ing is scheduled for Wednesday,
August 8th beginning with a 5:30
p.m. networking reception at
WJCT, 100 Festival Park Ave. For
more information contact Tiffany
Duhart at (904) 626-2812 or visit
www.nokturnalescape.com.

Beaver Street Center
9th Anniversary
The Beaver Street Enterprise
Center located at 1225 W. Beaver
St., will celebrate their 9th
Anniversary and Awards luncheon
Thursday August 9th, from 11:30
a.m. to 1:00 p.m., celebrating the
theme "How I got here from there:
Lessons from the Journey." For
more information email info@bse-
center.net or call (904) 265-4700.

PRIDE Bookclub
Meeting
The next PR.I.D.E. Bookclub
meeting is scheduled for Saturday,
August 11th at 4:00 p.m. at the
home of author Marsha Phelts,


5400 Ocean Blvd, American
Beach,Fl. The book for discussion
is "Silver Sparrow" by Tayari
Jones. For more information call
(904) 261-0175 or email
felicef@bellsouth.net.

Zeta House "Back
Pack" Give-a-way
The Beta Alpha Zeta Chapter of
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority will hold a
"Back Pack" give-a-way at the Zeta
Round- Up, Saturday August llth,
at 9 a.m. at the Zeta house located
at 3805 Moncrief Road. Parents are
invited to stop by with their school
aged children to receive a free back
pack and school supplies. For more
information email Donte Thomas at
donte.thomasll @gmail.com.

Charlie Murphy at
Comedy Zone
Comedian Charlie Murphy of the
Dave Chappell show is performing
at the Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley
Road, August 16 19. For tickets
and more information email
info@comedyzone.com or call
(904) 292-HAHA.

Deen Wellness
Center Health Fair
The Deen Wellness Center is pre-
senting its 1st Annual Health


Awareness Fair, Saturday, August
18th. Healthcare vendors will be
on site providing awareness, educa-
tion, exercising and good eating
habits. There will also be music,
food, prizes, motorcycle rides, pro-
fessional sports players, vendors,
blood drive and more! The event
will be held at The Abzsolute
Fitness Center, 5290-4 Norwood
Avenue, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
near Gateway. For more info con-
tact Mrs. Darling at 207-5232 .

Toast to the Animals
Raise your glass for a Purr-fect
cause! It's the 14th annual "Toast to
the Animals" event to benefit the
Jacksonville Humane Society,
Friday, August 24th at the Omni
Hotel, 245 Water St. For more
information call (904) 725-8766 or
visit www.jaxliumiane.org.

AKA Platinum &
Pearls Luncheon
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.
Gamma Rho Omega Chapter, Inc.
presents their Platinum and Pearls:
Celebrating 70 Years of Timeless
Service 70th Year Anniversary
Luncheon. Saturday. August 25th
at 11 a.m. at the Hyatt Hotel, 225
East Coastline Drive. For more
Information call (904) 655-6539 or
(904) 234-2307.


Amateur Night
at the Ritz
Amateur Night at the Ritz will be
held on Friday, September 7th at
7:30 pm. $5.50. Call 632-5555.

Anthony Hamilton
in Concert
Grammy award winning singer
Anthony Hamilton is returning to
Jacksonville for his "Back to Love"
tour, Sunday, September 9th at 8
p.m. featuring Estelle and Antoine
Dunn, at the Times Union Center
Moran Theater, 300 Water Street.
For more information contact the
Times Union box office at (904)
633-6110 or visit www.ticketmas-
ter.com.

Prince and
Princess Pageant
The Spiritual Hands of Alpha and
Omega, Inc. will conduct its first
annual "Prince and Princess
Pageant" Saturday, September
29th at the Marriott, Salisbury
Road. The pageants goal is to pro-
vide an enriching and positive
experience for youth ages 5-16.


Contestants will experience charm,
etiquette, fashion and poise as they
compete for the title of Prince and
Princess. For additional informa-
tion, contact Cynthia Britton,
Pageant Director at (904) 307-6950
or e-mail Cynthia@cyn-
thia9660@gmail.com.


Kevin Hart in Concert
Comedian Kevin Hart will be in
concert Friday, October 12th at the
Veterans Memorial Arena. Tickets
are on sale now at Ticketmaster.

14th Annual Georgia
Literary Festival
The annual Georgia Literary
Festival will be held November
9th and 10th in Jekyll Island,
Georgia.. Featured will be U.S. Poet
Laureate, Natasha Tretheway, as
well as the state Poet Laurette, to
the festival. Now in its 14th year,
the festival focuses on authors with
Southern links and showcases the
wide range of abilities for regional
readers and writers. For more infor-
mation, visit www.georgiacenter-
forthebook.org or contact Anna
Hall at (912) 635-4046.


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What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene







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Historic Mount Zion AME Celebrates
Church 146th Church Anniversary
Historic Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church, under the
direction of Reverend Pearce Ewing, Sr. Pastor began their 146th Church
Anniversary July 21st with events through August 10th under the theme,
"On the Right Track Engineered by the Power of the Holy Spirit". The cel-
ebration continues Saturday, August 4th with a Church Bazaar and a 3on3
Basketball Tournament from 8:00 a.m.5:00 p.m. Worship Services is
Thursday, August 9th & Friday August 10th at 7 p.m. with worship service
Sunday August 12th at 10 a.m. For more information contact Sister Ruth
Carter or Sister Vivian Toston or Brother Allen Vining at (904) 355-9475.
Five Week Sermon & Bible Study
St. Paul Lutheran Church located at 2730 Edgewood Ave. where Rev.
James Wiggins, Jr., is pastor, has announced a five-week Sermon & Bible
study series July 28th to August 26th. The series kicks off with the movie
"FireProof," at William M. Raines High School Auditorium at 4 p.m. and
is free and open to the public. It will continue each Sunday morning at 9:30
a.m.with adult study and 11 a.m. Worship Service. For more information
call the Church (904) 765-4219 or email sharon59@bellsouth.net or
jameswiggins3@gmail.com.

GOTV Cookout at El Beth-El
The Greater El Beth-El Divine Holiness Church is holding a "Get Out to
Vote Community Cookout" Sunday, August 5th, at 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
at 723 W. 4th Street. Everyone is welcome to attend this great event. For
more information call (904) 374-3940 or email gospell75@aol.com.

Women's Conference
The Disciples of Christ Christian Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church
presents its 2012 Women's Conference, celebrating the theme:"Drop it Like
it's Hot." Sister Camilla Nesbit of Philippian Community Church starts off
the conference Thursday, August 9th at 7:00 p.m., on Friday, August 10th
at 7:00 p.m. Elect Lady Diane LeCount of Disciples of Christ Church will
speak and on Saturday, August 11th at 8:00 a.m. Dr. Felicia Harris of No
Limit Ministries will end the spiritual conference. Join this three day con-
ference, featuring three strong anointed Women of God, speaking on how
to be free of your issues! For more information call (904) 762-3625).


Pastor Landon Williams


Shown above (1-r) are new Bethel Elders: Sharon Bell, Michele
Brown, Terrance Pickett and Karen Woodson. R. Silver photo

Bethel Baptist Elevate

Four to the Role of Elder
The 8th annual Bethel Ministers In Training (BMIT) graduation at Bethel
Baptist Institutional Church was held Sunday, July 29th in the Main
Sanctuary. Those graduating ranged
from teacher training, ministry leaders, MI SSI
preaching fellow and more. The high-
est level of elevation was the 4 minis-
ters to Elders. Black Co


Jackson, MISS Charles and
Te'Andrea Wilson had planned to
marry this month at the First Baptist
Church of Crystal Springs in
Mississippi, but were asked at the
last minute to move.
Their pastor, Stan Weatherford,
made the request on behalf of some
congregants who didn't want to see
the couple married there, according
to CNN affiliate WLBT. He per-
formed the ceremony at a nearby
church.
"This was, had not, had never
been done here before so it was set-
ting a new (precedent) and there
were those who reacted to that,"
Weatherford told WLBT.
"I didn't want to have a controver-
sy within the church, and I didn't
want a controversy to affect the
wedding of Charles and Te' Andrea.
I wanted to make sure their wedding
day was a special day," he reported-
ly said.
Last Sunday, some church mem-
bers reacted to news of the wedding
with surprise, many hadn't known
what happened to the Wilsons until
they heard about it on the news, and
offered apologies.
"I would say I'm sorry this hap-
pened and would you forgive the
people who caused it? Because
we're gonna try to," Bob Mack said.
Talking about the group that
opposed the wedding he said: "We
hope we can straighten them out,
you know, get them to understand


8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship

9:30 a.m. Sunday School

11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday 2 PM 3 PM

**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


Disciples of bCrist Cbristia0 Fellowship
* *A Full Gospel Baptist Church *

JOIN US FOR


Sunday School

9 a.m.

Morning


Worship

10 a.m Pastor Robert Lecount, Jr

A church that's on the move in

worship with prayer, praise and power!
2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


Refreshing Women Push TV Ministry
Refreshing Women is looking for Christian Talent, soloist, speakers,
praise dancers and poem readers for a free service that is free to the pub-
lic. The show will be air Saturday mornings at 8A.M. on Comcast 29.
Any Pastor wishing to come on the show in the near future are welcome,
and can have their church name and worship service added to the
Community Shout or Roll, by sending their, church name, address and time
of service to P.O. Box 350117 Jacksonville, Fl. 32235-0117. For more
information, call Rev. Mattie W. Freeman at 220-6400 or email CFIGC-
PUSH TV@Yahoo.com.

St Thomas Missionary Baptist Church
Celebrating Pastor's 26th Anniversary
The St. Thomas Missionary Baptist Church will celebrate the 26th
Anniversary of their Pastor beginning with a Banquet on Saturday, August
11, 2012, at 7 p.m., at their Family Life Center, 2119 Rowe Avenue. Pastor
Clifford Johnson of the Zion Hope Missionary Baptist Church family will
be the guest preacher. The public is invited to attend these services at 5863
Moncrief Rd. Ernie L. Murray, Sr. Pastor. For Ticket information call
Carolyn Moore or Clarisa Morton (904) 768-8800.

Men's Day Celebration
Mount Lebanon Missionary Baptist Church, under the direction of Pastor
Freddie Summer, will be celebrating their Annual Men's Day, August 12,
2012, at 4 p.m. The celebration theme is "Men Becomes as Little Children
in Humility Matthew 18:4 "Whosoever therefore shall humble himself as
this little child, the same is greatest in the Kingdom of heaven." Guest
Pastor is Rev. Anthony Webster, of Peace Missionary Baptist Church,
Jacksonville, Florida. The public is invited to come out to the church locat-
ed at 9319 Ridge Blvd and experience this great worship service in the lord.
For more information call the church office at (904) 527-1762.

ssippi Church Bans

pie from Wedding Inside


Charles and Te'Andrea Wilson


what Christianity is all about
because they have some misconcep-
tions about it."
But for Charles and Te'Andrea
Wilson, support from the church
now might be too little, too late.
"I had dreams of having my wed-
ding the way I wanted it, and I also
dreamed of having it at the church
and unfortunately, it didn't happen,"
Te'Andrea Wilson told CNN.
Her husband said if there was a
time to "step up and be Christ-like,"
it was before their wedding.
Hindsight is 20/20.
"If it was such a minority of peo-
ple, why didn't the majority stand up
and say, 'in God's house we don't do
this?'" said Charles Wilson.
WLBT reported that church offi-
cials now say they welcome any


race. They plan to hold internal
meetings on how to move forward.
Church member Casey Kitchens
said she and other members of the
congregation are outraged by the
church's refusal to marry a black
couple, a decision she says most of
the congregation knew nothing
about.
"This is a small, small group of
people who made a terrible deci-
sion," Kitchens told The Clarion-
Ledger. "I'm just ashamed right now
that my church would do that. I can't
fathom why. How unfair. How
unjust. It's just wrong."
"I blame the First Baptist Church
of Crystal Springs, I blame those
members who knew and call them-
selves Christians and didn't stand
up," said Charles Wilson.


Church news is published free of charge. Information must be received in the Free Press
offices no later than Monday, at 5 p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information
received prior to the event date will be printed on a space available basis until the date.
Fax e-mail to 765-3803 or e-mail to JFreePress@aol.com.


es SO Avn






Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church
215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


Weekly Services

Sunday Morning Worship Midweek Services
7:40 a.m. and 10:40 a.m. Wednesday Noon Service
"Miracle at Midday"
Church school 12 noon-1 p.m.
9:30 a.m. The Word from the Sons
Bible Study and Daughters of Bethel
Bishop Rudolph 6:30 p.m. 3rd Sunday 4:00 p.m Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Sr. McKissick, Jr.
Senior Pastor $Senior Pastor

Worship with us LIVE
S .. on the web visit
www.truth2powerministries.org


*Grace and Peace
visit www.Bethelite.org


August 2 8, 2012


Page 6 Ms. Perrv's Free Press





Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


August A-, VA


The Rewards and Demands of Caring for an Aging Parent


Beth Witrogen McLeod had
never even heard the term "caregiv-
er" until six months after her par-
ents died. But during the roughly
two years that she served as their
primary caregiver -- from 1991 to
1993 -- she amassed a wealth of
knowledge on the topic.
Her caregiving journey
inspired her to write a 1995
series for the San Francisco
Examiner, The Caregivers, in
which she explored the bur-
geoning trend of adults car-
ing for aging parents. In
1997, she left to write a
book, Caregiving: The
Spiritual Journey of Love,
Loss, and Renewal. Eachl
received a Pulitzer Prize
nomination.
Witrogen's immersion into the
unfamiliar world of family care-
giving began when her 69-year-old
father, who had a recurring type of
cancer, failed to improve with sur-
gery, and her 70-year-old mother
was diagnosed with amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's dis-
ease) with dementia. Suddenly, she
was flying back to Wichita, Kan.,
every six to eight weeks on unpaid
leave from her newspaper job to
assist her terminally ill parents.
"I was just stunned by what their
needs were all the time, I didn't
really have much family that could
help, and I didn't know about the


network of aging services," she
said. "So, things sort of got
p pieced together through
that time, but it was
never organized."
Caregiver is a role
for which adults are-
often ill prepared.
Sometimes people
are thrust into it
when Mom has a
stroke or


I/I


begins showing signs of dementia,
or when people begin to worry
about Dad living alone in a big
house with lots of stairs, explained
Suzanne Mintz, president and co-
founder of the National Family
Caregivers Association (NFCA).
But care-giving experts say it is a
role that is becoming more visible
as the nation's baby boomers strug-
gle to secure the resources they
need to help their ill and elderly
parents, often while balancing the
demands of their own career and
family.
Nationally, more than 50 million
Americans care for chronically ill,


I-


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disabled or aged family members or
friends in any given year. Most
faunily caregivers are
women, typically a 46-
year-old caring for her
widowed mother. All
told, family caregivers
provide an estimated
$306 billion a year
in unpaid services,
according to the
NFCA.
"In terms of
preparation, I
think it's
important
for people to
t th in k
about the
Mintz
suggested. "What if Mom has a
stroke or heart attack or falls and
breaks her hip or we think her safe-
ty's at risk? What are we going to
do? Assuming Mom doesn't live
anywhere near the kids, who could
be the first responder? Does Mom
have all her paperwork in order'?"
Mintz had that conversation with
her own brother, after her 89-year-


old mother, who lives in Florida,
had a bad concussion, prompting
terrible headaches and a problem
with her eyes. "And so, I called him
up and said, 'Who knows what's
going to happen here, but if some-
body has to go down immediately,
you're more flexible than I am
because I can't leave my husband
by himself,' she said. Mintz is a
family caregiver for her husband,
Steven, who has multiple sclerosis.
Preparation is critical because the
toll that care-giving can exact is
immense. Witrogen now teaches an
online course through Barnes &
Noble University called "Taking
care of Your Aging Parents." In it,
she covers issues that caregivers are
likely to confront along their jour-
ney, from legal and financial mat-
ters to emotional and self-care con-
cerns.
"I did not eat well, I did not
hydrate well, I did not rest,"
Witrogen recognized after the fact.
She also suffered severe depression
during her mother's ordeal.
Care-giving's toll, of course, varies
depending on circumstances.
"If you're helping Mom with the


10th Annual Tom Joyner Family

ReunionSet for Labor Day Weekend
Come celebrate your family at the Allstate Tom Joyner Family Reunion
Labor Day Weekend, Thursday August 30th to September 3rd in Orlando,
Florida. Join morning radio hosts Tom, Sybil, J. Anthony Brown and the
crew at the Gaylord Palms Hotel 6000 West Osceola Parkway, Kissimmee,
Florida for a fun filled weekend that is also a party with a ourpose bene-
fitting Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Enjoy concerts,
celebrity performances, seminars and games for the entire family. For
additional information email familyretunion@reachmediainc.com or call
the TJFR Info Line at (407) 248-9191 or visit www.familyreunion.black-
americaweb.com.


groceries every week and her
finances once a month and she's
still living on her own, that's very
different than 24/7 care-giving and
Mom's living with you," Mintz
observed. Plus, if your parents have
money to buy services, say hiring a
home health aide, that makes things
a lot easier, she said. "But for many
people, the money isn't there."
Witrogen suspects that she and her
husband, who died last year, spent
$20,000 in the one month that her
parents died, considering the cost of
plane trips, rental cars, funerals and


other bills that had to be paid.
Yet, despite the stress and strain of
care-giving, her experience also
proved to be life-changing in pro-
foundly positive ways.
"You learn to live day-to-day, you
learn to live more in the moment,"
Witrogen said. Most of all, she said,
you learn how to give and how to
receive love. "We create a more
loving world by doing this, by
being caregivers," she insisted. "It's
a higher calling. I'm convinced of
it."


Areas Of Specialty:

* Hypertension

* Diabetes

* Bariatric & Weight Loss

* Hormone Replacement
for Men & Women

* Well Women Exams

* Drug Addiction Therapy


We drink coffee, guzzle down
energy drinks and inhale power
bars all in the hopes of regaining
some of that long lost energy. As
we get older energy becomes less
and less abundant, even though we
seem to need it more and more.
We've tried everything under the
sun to get more of it; we've tried
ginseng and more coffee, but they
have only manifested in short-term
results. We need something that
will spawn long-term results.
Pulling energy from food is main-
ly about carbohydrates. You can
always carbo-load for a quick ener-
gy burst, but consuming too many
sugary carbs can lead to weight
gain. You're probably more inter-
ested in staying awake in the after-
noon and feeling fresh after a hard
day's work.
Carbs are broken down into glu-
cose, your muscles' main energy


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source. But your body can only
process and store so many carbs.
Too few and you're not getting
enough energy. Too many and the
extra is turned into fat. Big meals
and lots of caffeine throw your
body into a glucose roller coaster,
where dizzying heights are fol-
lowed quickly by energy levels
crashing back down to earth (along
with drooping eyelids and yawns).
What's the solution? Keep your
carb levels on an even keel, which
means avoiding those sugary
spikes. Since your blood sugar
drops four hours after eating, it
means eating more frequent, small-
er meals. It means concentrating on
low-fat, high-fiber foods and com-
plex carbs these are broken down
slowly and steadily, giving you reg-
ular energy throughout the day.
This combo will boost your physi-
cal and mental energy as high as
possible, without sending extra
sugary carbs through the fat-mak-
ing factory.
10 Favorite Energy Foods
1. Whole Wheat Pasta
2. Oatmeal
3. Fruit Smoothies made with
low- fat yogurt
4. Peanut Butter
.5. Dried Fruit (agorio, cranber-
ries, kiwis, pears, pineapples,
figs)
6. Yams
7. Lima Beans
8. Apples
9. Carrots
10. Chickpeas
Also:
Eat breakfast! This is absolutely
the #1 "eating for energy" strategy.
It gets your metabolism off to a
strong start and makes nighttime
snacking a thing of the past.
(Coffee is not breakfast.)
Avoid grease and dairy (pizza,
burgers, ice cream, cheese) and
their simple and sugary carbs that
can throw blood sugar levels out of
whack.
Focus on whole grains, which are
good sources of vitamin B, aiding
the metabolic production of energy.


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A t 2 8 2012


-4


A i









August 2-9 2012


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 8


FOR THE WEEK OF JULY 31 AUGUST 6, 2012


HISTORIC

GRIDIRON

SEASON

IN STORE


WSu opulit rnutsu
TOP FIELD GENERAL:
WSSU QB Kameron Smith
threw for 33 TDs a year ago
in leading Rams to Div. II
national semifinals.


I TEAM-BY-TEAM SCHEDULES; RETURNING
STAT LEADERS; PLAYERS TO WATCH IN '12






STAT CORNER

WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


RETURNING INDIVIDUAL

STATS LEADERS FOR 2012
(Classification for 2012)


Carter


RUSHING YARDS
CARTER, David MHC
McNEIL, Daronte ECSU
ROBERTS, Dawr. GSU
MAYHEW, MIKE NCAT
ROSS, Carlos LANG
LACEY, Kedarius AA&M
WARD, Trabis TENNST

PASSING YARDS
STOVER, Cam CHOW
BACOTE, Teddy SAC
COOK, Doug LIV
ELKO, Nick DSU
WALLACE, Keahn JCS
SMALLS, Riko TXS
SMITH, Kameron WSS


RECEPTIONS CLC
RICHARDS, Brian SAC JR
NELSON, Spenc. PV SR
WILDER, Marc JSU SR
SLAUGHTER, C FVS SR
IRVINE, Giovanni NCC SR

RECEIVING YARDS CL
SLAUGHTER, C FVS SR
HOLLAND, Robt CHO SR
RICHARDS, Brian SAC JR
COSTON, Matt LINP SR
RICHARDSON, R. JSU SR
TUBBS, Ronnie ALB SR

TOTAL OFFENSE CL
WALLACE, Keahn JCS SO
STOVER, Cam CHO JR
COOK, Doug LIV SO
BACOTE, Teddy SAC JR
SMALLS, Riko TXS SR
THOMAS, David MIL SR
SMITH, Kameron WSS SR
MASON, Deaunt. AAM SR
INGRAM, Byron MHC SR
McGHEE, Greg HOW SO

ALL PURPOSE YARDS CL
CARTER, David MHC SR
TARPLEY, Travy DSU SR
McNEILL, Dar. ECSU SR
WASHINGTON, J. VUUSO
LANGFORD, J. SHA SO
SCORING CL
McNEILL, Dar. ECSU SR
CARTER, David MHC SR
HOLLAND, Robt. CHO SR
BAILEY, Colon FSU JR
PAGE, Lavonte FAMU SR

PUNT RETURNS CL
DRUMMOND, D SCS JR
RANDALL, Ant. CHO SO
HOLLAND, Robt. CHO SR
LEWIS, Terr. -ALC SR
TRIMBLE, Wm. JCS SO
C'PERWOOD, M. NSU SR
DIXON, Roger STL SO


KICKOFF RETURNS
LANGFORD, J. SHA
RANDALL, Ant CHO
ANDERSON, T. LIV
PATTERSON, E. GSU
LEWIS, Terr. ALC
DABNEY, Ken MVS
CABRERA, A. BCU

SACKS
GREEN, Tim LINP
LEBEAU, Jos. JSU
WILLIAMS, Scot MHC
HARRIS, Kentrell VUU
JOHNSON, Derr. JCS
DAVIS, Brad ECSU

TACKLES
POUGH, Keith HOW
JONES, C. LAN
TYLER, Delbert HAM

INTERCEPTIONS
SCALES, Josh FSU
RILEY, Kejuan ALS
FUTCH, Tyrone LAN
AVERY, Justin LIV
EVANS, Darnell SHW


Mayhew


Slaughter


TDS AVGIG
19 149.5
22 137.2
8 110.2
9 104.8
8 96.2
8 95.2
11 86.6


CL G COM ATT INT
JR 8 153-283-10
JR 10 188-325-16
SO 9 185-348-10
SR 10 206-362-16
SO 10 167-300-12
SR 11 166-316-9
SR 14 208-355-10


REC YDS
63 758
52 654
55 719
49 957
47 580

REC YOS
49 957
67 914
63 758
54 821
36 853
45 845

RUSH PASS
473 2005
49 1881
-23 2054
-74 2782
215 2177
489 2088
226 2706
512 1996
245 1790
388 1784

Rush Rec
149547
116 735
1647 73
610 61
270 66


CL G-
SR 8
SO 8
SO 8
SR 12
SR 10
JR 11
SO 9

CL G
SR 10
SR 11
SR 8
SR 8
SR 10
SR 10


PCT YOS TDS AVO/G
54.1 1881 19 235.1
57.8 2282 22 228.4
53.2 2054 12 228.2
56.9 2060 15 206.0
55.7 2005 16 200.5
52.5 2177 12 197.9
58.6 2706 33 193.3


TD YPC
8 12.0
5 12.6
6 13.1
10 19.5
5 12.3

TO YPC
10 19.5
13 13.6
8 12.0
7 15.2
11 23.7
10 18.8

PLAYS YDS
463 2478
352 1930
411 2031
354 2208
412 2392
383 2577
481 2932
449 2508
338 2035
437 2172

PR KR
0 0
56 678
0 0
32 202
0 556
PAT PTS
2 140
0 114
6 84
0 72
0 84

TD AVG
1 13.6
0 13.4
0 13.0
1 13.0
1 12.7
0 11.4
0 11.0

TD LNG
3
1
2 100
0 56
2 92
0 80
0 40

TOT AVI
15.0 1.5
15.5 1.'
10 1.;
8.5 1.(
9.5 .9!
11 .92

TOT AV
120 10
107 10
110 10


YDSIG
95.7
91.4
84.2
82.1
77.5
70.4

AVG/G
247.8
241.7
225.7
220.8
217.5
214.9
209.4
209.0
203.5
197.5


G INT
8 7
11 9
9 6
8
10 6


Green Pough


Scales


0


I[I I-19th Year of the BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS PAGE




Countdown begins to 120th




season of black college football


LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor
With the advent of the month of August, the
countdown has begun to the start of the historic
2012 black college football season.
Most of the 53 football-playing teams will
report to preseason camp this week to begin
preparations for the upcoming season which
officially kicks off with two games on Saturday,
August 25th.
Texas College gets to christen the schedule
with a 12 noon home date against St. Francis in
Tyler, Texas.
Edward Waters will be the second team to
take the gridiron when it hosts Point University
in Jacksonville, Florida at 2 p.m.
The long Labor Day weekend is when the
rubber hits the road with a full schedule of 36
games on tap.
Four of those games will kick off on Thursday,
Aug. 30, followed by a packed Saturday, Sept. 1
menu of 30 games. The final two games of the
weekend will be played on Sunday, Sept. 2.


HISTORY MAKING YEAR
It was way back on December 27, 1892
when Biddle College, now Johnson C. Smith
Unilersit) in Charlotte, N.C., faced off ,.in.,tt
Livingstone College in Salisbury, N.C. in the
first black ollcgc football a.ine
That means the 2012 season represents the
120th anniversary of what's become known as
the "African-American national pastime."
Livingstone and J. C. Smith will meet this
yearon November 3rd in Charlotte, N.C. in what's


The original boys of Biddle College.

now known as the Commemorative Classic.
The start of the 2012 football season also
coincides with the beginning of the BLACK COL-
LEGE SPORTS PAGE'S 19th year of publication.
The BCSP began back in August 1994 with late
former Alcorn State star quarterback Steve
McNair gracing the top box.
Look for the BCSP to bring you another year
of the latest black college sports news, scores,
standings, stats, photos and features, in print and
on-line at www.hbcusports.com, also known as
Onnidan.com.


THE SCHEDULE
This week you can peep your favorite team's
schedule below i and the stats for the top re-
turning players for the upcoming season (STAT
CORNER). Over the next couple of weeks,
we'll preview this year's schedules for classics,
homecomings and TV games and give you the
BCSP Preseason Top Ten.
And beginning this week, we'll also clue
you in on some things to keep your eye on as
the season unfolds. Here goes.


TOP RETURNEES
Five 1,000-yard rushers return for the 2012
season including the top two ground gainers from
a year ago Morehouse senior David Carter and
Elizabeth City State senior Daronte McNeill.
Carter rushed for a black-college best 1,495
yards, 145.9 per game, and scored 19 touchdowns.
McNeill amassed 1,647 yards and scored 22 TDs
to tie departed Winston-State senior Nic Cooper
for the lead in rushing scores.
Grambling's Dawrence Roberts (1,102
yards), N. C. A&T's Mike Mayhew (1,120) and
Alabama A&M's Ledarius Lacey (1.143) are
the others to top the 1,000-yard mark last season
who are back for 2012.
Chowan rising junior quarterback Cam Sto-
ver tops the leaders in returning passing yards per
game with 235.1 per game.
Winston-Salem State senior Kameron
Smith however had the most gaudy stats. Playing
in 14 games a year ago while leading the Rams to
the national semifinals, Smith threw for a black
college best 2,706 yards and 33 TDs with only 10
interceptions.
The three 1,000-yard receivers from last sea-
son (Nick Andrews of Alabama State, Raphael
Amey of Kentucky State and Wallace Miles of
N. C.A&T) were all seniors. Of the returnees, Fort
Valley State senior-to-be Christopher Slaughter
was the closest with 947 yards, averaging 19.5
yards per catch.
St. Augustine's junior Brian Richards is the
leading returning pass-catcher after hauling in 63
or 7.0 per game a year ago.


BOWIE STATE
9/1 .. Assumption 1
9/6 .............. Benedict 8
9/15 Fairmont State .. 1
9/22 ..... ., .. 1
10/6 ......... .. I Chowan ....... .. .. 6
10/13 .... Virginia Slate HC) ......... 1
1020 ....... Virgia Union 1...
10,27 ..... .. Lincoln ,
11/3 ...........Elizabeth City State 1 30

CHOWAN
9 1 .... _. (4 Ltvingstonre 6
9/8 .... ........ VM I .. ... 1 :30
9/15 .............. Shorter 6
922 ............... Shaw 1
9/29 F :.,l0."-. i
10/6 6.:.V. l.'i i
10/13 .....Virginia Union (HC) .... 6
10 20 .... i.,: C', i.'.. 1:30
10o27 ........ . i' 1 30
11 L3 ..c.............. Lincoln .. 12n

ELIZABETH CITY STATE
9/1 ............. Newberry .......... 630
9/8 Delta State ........ 6.
9/15 ...... Albany Stale 6.
9/22 ........ Fayetlleville State 6
9/29 S Augusxtnes n Rocky Mi. NC 4
105 .............. Virginia State 1
10/13 ............. Lincoln .... 1
1020 ........ Chowan (HC). 130
10/27 ........ Virginia Union... 1
11/3 .... .. Bowie State ... 1:30

FAYETTEVILLE STATE
9/1 ........... N C Central 6.
9/8 ........ ( UNC Pembroke .6
9/15 ... Virginia Union 6.. ..
9/22 Eli:,eth Otr, Sntr 6
9/29 *...
10/6 .......... ...... Shaw .... ...... 1
10/13 JohnsonC. Smith ..6
10/20 3 .,,J. .., ,
10/27 L,. -'.. '.
11/3 ......... Winston-Salem State .. 1:30

JOHNSON C. SMITH
9/1 ............... W Va Stalte. .......... 1
9/8 Tuskegee in Atlanta...... 7:30
9/15 Concordia-Selma............ 2
9/22 .......... Virginia State............ 2
9/29 ............... @ Lincoln... 1
10/6 ........ Winston-Salem State 2.......2
10/13 .. @ Fayetteville State ...........6
10/20 ................ @ Shaw........... 1
10/27 .... St Augustine's (HC). 1
11/3 .......... Livingstone. 1

LINCOLN (PA)
9/1 .................... C heyney .............. 1
9/8 ...................@ W offo rd ..................7
9/15 ............. Kentucky State ............ 6
9/22 ^ L. ..-; i.,,-P 1
9/29 i. r,., .. *- r, 1
10/6 ......... ..@ Virginia Union ........ 1
10/13 ....... Elizabeth City State ......... 1
10/20 .......... @ Virginia State......,. 1:30
10/27 .... Bowie State (HC) ........ 1
11/3................. @ Chowan.............. 12n

LIVINGSTONE
9/1 ....................C how an .... .......... 6
9/8 ....................C ataw ba.... ..... 7
9/15 ............. Edward W aters ...............,
9/22 .................. Lincoln ..... ... ....... 1
9/29 ............ @ Virginia Union ........... 1
10/6 ......... St, Augustine's (HC)...........2
10/13 ..................S haw ..................... 1
10/20 .... @ Winston-Salem State... 1:30
10/27 ....... @ Fayetteville Slate........... 2
11/3..........@ Johnson C. Smith.......... 1
ST. AUGUSTINE'S
9/1 .....................W ngate ...............1:30
9/8 ..................New Haven ............1:30
9/15...... @S. Connecticut Slate........ 1
9/22 ................Bowie State............1:30
9/29 .. Eliz. City St. in Rocky Mt. NC....4
10/6 .............. @ Livingstone ............... 2
10/13 .... @ Winston-Salem State... 1:30
10/20 ..... Fayetlleville State (HC).........2
10/27 .......( Johnson C. Smith .......... 1
11/3................... Shaw .... ... 1:30
SHAW
8/30 .............. @ Charleston................7
9 /8 ......................... M ile s.... .......... ...... 1.
9/15 ...................Stilllm an ............... .. 1
9/22 ................. Chowan .................... 1
9/29 ............ @ Virginia State..............6
10/6 ........... Fayetteville State.............1
10/13 ...........@ Livingstone ...............1
10/20 .....Johnson C. Smith (HC)........ 1
10/27 ...... Winston-Salem State.......... 1
11/3.............. St. Augustine's..........1:30

VIRGINIA STATE
9/1 ............... @ Norfolk State..............6
9/8 .............West Liberty State............4
9/15 ............... @ Benedict .................4
9/22 .........@ Johnson C. Smith.......... 2
9/29 ................... Shaw ...................6...
10/6 ..........Elizabeth City State........... 1
10/13 ........... @ Bowie State............... 1
10/20 ............. Lincoln (HC)............ 1:30
10/27 .................Chowan ............... 1:30
11/3............. Virginia Union .............1

VIRGINIA UNION
9/1 .................. Benedict.................... 7
9/8 ................... Brovard .................. 6
9/15 .........Q Fayeltteville State......... 6
9/22 ...... @ Winston-Salem State........6
9/29 ................ Livingstone..................1
10/6 ............... Lincoln (HC )................1
10/13 .............. @ Chowan.................6
10/20 ..............Bow ie State ................. 1
10/27 .... @ Elizabeth City State.........1
11/3...............Virginia State ................1

WINSTON-SALEM STATE
9/1 ...............UNC Pembroke.............. 1


9/8 .... ........ Concord ... .. .... 1
9/15 Morehouse in Cleveland 12n
922 VirWinia Union .....,.. 6
9/29 -..... State.... ... 1
106 ... JohnsonrC Smith.. 2
10/13 St Augusine 's 1. 30
101720 i H ~ rnn il 1 30
10/27 Iri,.. 1
11 .3 Fayettevllle State 1.30

BETHUNE-COOKMAN
90 Alabama Stale in Orlando.. 12n
98 ..... ......... S. C State ..... 6
9/15 ........... M iam i.............. 12n
9,22 .....Tennessee State .............4
9,29 ... Hampton.... 6
106 ....N C A&T (HC) 4..........
1020 .........Norfolk State 4
10a27 N. C Central 4.
113 ..... .. Morgan State 1.........
11 10 ... Savannah State..... 5.
1117. FloridaA&M in Orando.. 230

DELAWARE STATE
9! 1 VM I ....................... 2
91"S Delaware............ 3:30
9 15 Cincinnat 7.........
9q22 Florida A&M. 6.
1016 C Noolk State ............. 1
10.13 South Carolina Slate 1:30
1020.... N. C. A&T (HC) ........1:30
10 27 ....... Morgan State ....... 7:30
113 ........... N C Central ........2....
11 10 Hampton ...................
11 17 .... .. How ard ................

FLORIDA A&M
9/ 1 ......... Tennessee State .......... 6
98 ... ....... Oklahoma ...............6
9/15 ..... ..... Ham pton .................6
922 ...... Delaware State ............6
929 .....Southern in Allanta... 3:30
10/6 ... .... Howard ................. 1
10 13 ...Savannah State (HC).......... 6
10/20 ............ S. C State ... 6...........
11/3 .............. N C, A&T ... 1:30
11/10 ..... N C. Central ...... .3
11/17 B-Cookman in Orlando 2:30

HAMPTON
8/30 ......... @ Tennessee Tech ........... 7
9/8 ............. Old Dom inion ............ .. 6
9/15 ............. @ Florida A&M............... 6
9/29 .......... Bethune-Cookman............ 6
10/13 ........ Norfolk State .......... 1
10/18 .............N. C. Central ...........7:30
1027 ...... Savannah State (HC) ........2..
11/3...... ............ Howard ............... 1
11/10 @. .... @ Delaware State...........1
11/17........... @ Morgan State............. 1

HOWARD
9/1 ............... Morehouse............3:30
9/15 ............. @ Norfolk State.............4
9/29 ........... Savannah State.............. 1
10/6 .............. Florida A&M ......1..........
10/13 .... ....@ N.C.A&T ..........1:30
10/20 ....... Morgan State (HC)............
10/27 ..........@S.C. State...... 1:30
11/3.... .... Hampton .......... ....1
11/10..... ..@ Georgia Southern ..... 2
11/17............ Delaware State ............. 1
MORGAN STATE
9/1 .................Sacred Heart .... ... 1
9/8 ................ @ Buffalo.......... 66
9/15 ............. @ Akron........ 3:30
9/27 .......... @ N, C. A&T .....7:30
10/6 .......... Savannah Slate ......... 7
10/13 N....... C. Central (HC).......... 1
10/20 .... ..... Howard ..................
10/27..........Delaware State ....7:30
11/3.....- .. Bethune-Cookman ........1
11/10......... @ Norfolk Stlate.............. 1
11/17.................Hampton....... ...1

NORFOLK STATE
9/1 .............. Virginia State...........6.....
9/8 .... .........@ Liberty-...........7....
9/15 ..........H .......... 4
9/22 ............. @ Ohio...............2
9/29 .............. @ S. C. State .........2
10/6 ............. Delaware State .............. 1
10/13 .............. Hampton ........... 1
10/20 ..... @0 Bethune-Cookman .........4
10/27 ........... N. C. A&T ...........1:30
11/3...... Savannah State (HC).......... 2
11/10............. M organ State................ 1
NORTH CAROLINA A&T
9/1 ............ @ Coastal Carolina..... TBA
9/8 .... .......... W Va. State.................6
9 /15 ... ... V a Li. i .:- L ,...:i.b ...-i 6
9/27 .. -. .1.:....i... i'"" ', "
10/6 ........ Bethune-Cookman ......... 4
10/13 ................. Howard...... ......... 1:30
10/20 .........@ Delaware State.......1:30
10/27 ........Norfolk State (HC),.......1:30
11/3................ Florida A&M ............1:30
11/10........... S. C. State.............1:30
11/17........... N. C. Central2..............2
NORTH CAROLINA CENTRAL
9/1 ............. Fayetteville State.............6
9/8 ............... ..... 7
9/15 ............@ Duke..............7
9/22 .......... @ Savannah State.............7
10/6 .....S. C. State In Indianapolis. 2:30
10/13 ......... @ Morgan State.............. 1
10/18 ............. Hampon .............7:30
10/27 ...... @ Belhune-Cookman .........4
11/3..........Delaware Slate (HC).........,2
11/10............ Florida A&M .............. 3
11/17 ............... N. C A&T..... .......... 2
SAVANNAH STATE
9/1 ....-....... @ Oklahoma State............ 6
9/8 ...............S@ Florida State ..............6
9/22 ............. N, C. Central ............. 7
9/29 ................. @ H ow ard ..................1
10/6 .............. Mnrqann Snt 7
10/13 ........... ,,, i ii t
10/20 .......Edward Waters (HC).......... 2
10/27 .............@ Hampton.. ....... ..2..


11/3 ............. Norlolk Slate .. .... 2
11/10 .......Bethune-Cookman ..........
11/17 ..... @ S C. State 1:30

SOUTH CAROLINA STATE
9/1 ........... Georgia State 7... 30
9/8 .......@ Belhune-Cookman ......6
9/15 ... .......... Arizona .......... 7:30
9/22 .......... Texas A&M TBA
9/29 .... Norfolk Stale ............ 2
10/6 N C Central in Indianapolis. 2:30
1013 ....... Delaware State 1:30
M 10/20........... FloridaA&M .....6......
E 10/27 ............. Howard (HC) ...........1:30
A 11/10 ..............@ N. C. A&T ...........1:30
C 11/17... Savannah State 1:30

ALBANY STATE
9/1 ............ North Greenville .............. 7
9/8 .................. W ingatle............ 1:30
9/15 ....... Elizabeth City State ..6......
9/22 ......... ....... M miles. ....... ...... .. 7
9/29 Kentucky State in Chicago........4
10/6 .......... Lane in Macon. GA .5
10/13 ............@ Morehouse ..............7
10/20 .......Clark Atlanta (HC) ............2
10/27 .,,Benedict in Augusta, GA....... 2
11/3 .. Fort Vaey Slate inColumbus. GA.....2

BENEDICT
9/1 .............. @ Virginia Union ............. 7
9/6 ................Bowie Stale ................. 8
9/15 ......... Virginia State ............. 4
9122 .......... Fort Valley State....... 2
9/29 ................ @ M iles .2.................
10 6 ........ ... S illm an ... ......... 3
10,'13 ...........@ Clark Atlanta ....... 2
10/20 .... Morehouse (HC) .... 2
10/27 Albany State in Augusta. GA....2
11/3 .. ....... .. ... Lane ............... 2

CLARK-ATLANTA
9/1 ................ West Alabama...... 6
9/8 ................... Lane .. ... ....... 2
9/15 .......... Fort Valley State ..........6
9/22 ...... Concordia-Selma .....6..... 6
9/29 .... ... Morehouse.......7..........
10/6 ................... M iles ........ ..4........
10/13............Benedict (HC)..........2.....
10/20 .......... @ Albany State ....... 2:30
10/27 ........... Tuskegee.................. 4
11/3 ..................@ Stillm an .................. 5

FORT VALLEY STATE
9/1 ......... ... Delta State............ 12n
9/8 ............. @ Valdosta State.............7
9/15 ............... Clark Atlanta.................6
9/22 .................Benedict....................2
9/29 ............... @ Tuskegee................. 1
10/6 .............Kentucky State...............6
10/13.....Concordia-Selma (HC).........2
10/20 ... Stillman in Valdosta, GA. ...... 3
10/27 ...........@ Morehouse ...............2
11/3..Albany State in Columbus, GA.,.2

KENTUCKY STATE
9/1 ........... Kentucky Wesleyan........... 7
9/15 ............. @ Lincoln (PA)...............6
9/22 ................,@ Stillman.......5......
9/29 ...... Albany Si, i. ci. :., .. v- 1
10/6 ..........@ Fo.' "ii.:, Silni ',
10/13 ...............M iles (HC).............1:30
10/20 ........... @ Tuskegee................. 1
10/27 .................. Lane................. 1:30
11/3.............. @ Morehouse ............... 2
11/17 ...... ..... Central State ...............2

LANE
9/1 ........... Edward Waters ..............2
9/8 .................C lark Atlanta.................2
9/15 ............... @ Tuskegee.................1
9/22 ............ @ Morehouse .......7_... 7
9/29 ... ........... Stillman ................ 2
10/6 ....Albany State in Macon, GA.....5
10/13 ...........Point in Atlanta............... 1
10/20 ..............M iles (HC) ..... ...... 2
10/27 ...... Kentucky State ...... 1:30
11/3................ Benedict..... ..... 2

MILES
9/2 ........North Alabama in B'han ....... 6
9/8 ..... ............ @ Shaw ...................... 1
9/15 .............. W est Georgia................6
9/22 ............. Albany State ...........7
9/29 ............ Benedict.................... 2
10/6 .......... Clark Atlanta (HC)............4
10/13 ......... @ Kentucky State ....... 1:30
10/20 ................. Lane .. ... ........... 2
10/27 .................Stillm an ....................6
11/3........... Tuskegee in B'ham ........... 1

MOREHOUSE
9/1 ...................@ Howard ............. 3:30
8 El, alr '.' I.- '.'. '., ..... ", ...3
i r1; r. L .',i.:.,,, .-i.i ,,, ,ir '',,1 12n
9/22 ..................... Lane.... ........ ........... 7
9/29 .............@ Clark Atlanta ..............7
10/6 ... Tuskegee In Columbus, GA......2
10/13 ............. Albany State.................7
10/20 .............. @ Benedict.................2
10/27 ......Fort Valley State (HC).........2
11/3.............. Kentucky State ..............2

STILLMAN
9/1 Cr.in,,ii 5Ii.:. i,, Di i,i,'.i CH
9/8 ,, 1. 1,',, ipI. :- 5
9/15 ............... @ Shaw .................... 1
9/22 ......... Kentucky State............... 5
9/29 ... ..... Lan .............. ......... 2
10/6 ... .. ....... Benedict.................2
10/13 ........ T -...1-,.o '
10/2 0 .,..Ft.'..'i.., ; i ,, .,,, ,., it
10/25 ................. M miles ,...... ...... 6
11/3 ............. C laik Atlanta.............. 5
11/10.......... Concordla-Selina ,.......1:30

TUSKEGEE
9/1 ........ Alabama A&M In B'am ........ 6
9/8 ...........J. C. Smith in Atlanta..., 7:30
9 /15 ..................... La ne........................ 1
9/29 ............ Fort Valley State.............. 1
10/6 ......Morehouse in Col., GA.........2

ALL TIMES LOCAL


10/13 ..............@ Stillm an ..................5
10/20 ..-:.T..: ':.ll- IMC i 1
10/27r ,'.i, Aia-.ia 4
11/3 .....Miles in Birmingham........... 1
11/22 ........Alabama State (HC)...........3

ALABAMA A&M
9/1 ....... Tu .eye .. Bi;..r,,,- rT, 6
9/8 ....... Ai 'ra:.l-ne Eiun 5
9/15 ...... Prairie View A&M.............6
9/22 .......... @ Texas Southern........ 11a
9/29 ............ Grambling State..............6
10/6 ......... Miss. Valley State..........2
10/13 ...... Alcom State (HC).............1
10/27 Alabama State in B'ham...2:30
11/3............ Southern ................... 1
11/10 ........... Jackson State ............. 4
11/17 .............. @ Auburn ..............1:30

ALABAMA STATE
9/2 ......Bethune-Cookman in Orlando. 12n
9/8 ......Mississippi Valley State........6
9/15 .......... @ Grambling State ........... 6
9/20 ........ Arkansas-Pine Bluff.....6:30
9/29 ............ @ Alcom State...........2....
10/6 .....Texas Southern ........ 1
10/13 ............Jackson State ...............7
10/27...Aabamrna AM in Brm nham...2:30
11/3... Prairie Viiew A&M .......... 1
11/10 .......... So uthern ................. 6
11/22 ......... Tuskegee (HC)..............3

ALCORN STATE
9/1 .. Grambling Stale in Shevepor, LA....6
9/8 _... @ James Madison.........6...
9/15 ........ Arkansas-Pine Bluuff.......... 4
9/22 ...........@ Arkansas State ............ 6
9/29. Alabama State (HC)...........7
10/6 ........ ... Southern ...................2
10/13 ..@ Alabama A&M............. 1
10/20 .. @ Prairie View A&M........... 2
113 ,. @ Mississippi Valley State...... 1
11/10 ............Texas Southern ..............2
11/17.............Jackson State ............... 1
ARKANSAS-PINE BLUFF
9/1 ......Langston in Little Rock, AR .... 5
9/8 ................Alabama A&M ............... 5
9/15.............@ Alcom State4......... 4
9/20 ........... @ Alabama State........ 6:30
9/29 .......... @ Tennessee State........... 5
10/6 ..............Jackson State .........6......
10/20..............@ Southern.................6
10/27 .....Miss. Valley State (HC) .2:30
11/3...........@Texas Southern............ 2
11/10.........@ Grambling State ...........2
11/17.......... Prairie View A&M....... 2:30

GRAMBLING STATE
9/1 ........Alcomrn State in Shreveport, LA ....... 6
9/8 ............. @ TCU................TBA
9/15 ............. Alabama State....6.... 6
9/29 ...........@ Alabama A&M.............6
10/6 ,..Prairie View A&M in Dallas .....6
10/13 .. @ Mississippi Valley State,.....2
10/20 .... Va. Univ. of L'burg (HC).....2...
10/27 ........ @ Texas Southern ...........4
11/3...............Jackson State ...............3
11/10........ Arkansas-Pine Bluff...........2
11/24...... Southern in New Orleans... 1:30

JACKSON STATE
9/1 ............@ Mississippi State..........6
9/8 .... Tennessee State in Memphis...6
9/15..........@Texas Southern.......7:30
9/22 .................Southern .. .....4...
9/29 ......... Prairie View A&M.............4
10/6 ....... @ Arkansas-Pine Bluff.........6
10/13 ......... @ Alabama Stale.............7
10/20 .,. Miss. Valley State (HC)........3
11/3...........@ Grambling State ...........3
11/10............. Alabama A&M ..........4
11/17...........@ Alcorn State........1......
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY STATE
9/1 ............. Concordia-Selma.....5.......
9/8 ............. @ Alabama State..............6
9/13 ...............@Southern............6:30
9/22 ....... Northwestern State.........6
10/6 ..........Alabama A&M (HC) ..........2
10/13 ......... Grambling State ..............2
10/20 ..........@ Jackson State .............3
10/27 ..... @ Arkansas-Pine Bluff ....2:30
11/3... ... Alcorn State .. ......
11/10.......... Prairie View A&M .............1
11/17......... @ Texas Southern............ 1
PRAIRIE VIEW A&M
9/1 .............Texas Southern .....7.........
9/8 ...... .......... Lam ar ...................7
9/22........@ North Dakota State.........3
9/29 ........... @ Jackson State............. 4
10/6 .... Grambling State in Dallas ...... 6
10/20........ Alcorn State (HC)........... 2
10/27....Southern in Shreveport........4
11/3 ............. Alabama State .......1.......
11/10... @ Mississippi Valley State...... 1
11/17...... @ Arkansas-Pine Bluff....2:30

SOUTHERN
9/1 .......... ... New Mexico..........3.....
9/13 ......Mississippi Valley State...6:30
9/22............@ Jackson State.............4
9/29........Florida A&M in Atlanta. ..3:30
10/6 ............ @ Alcorn State...............2
10/13 ..... Texas Southern (HC).,., 5:30
10/20 ....... Arkansas-Pine Bluff ...........6
10/27 Prairie View A&M in Shreveport.......4
11/3.............@ Alabama A&M ............. 1
11/10,..........Alabama S ate.............6
11/24,_. Grambling in New Orleans... 1:30

TEXAS SOUTHERN
9/1 ........... Prairie View A&M............7
9/8 .......... North Texas..............6
9/15 ...... ... Jackson State ...7:30
9/22 ...........Alabama A&M ..........11a
9/27 ..........Sam Houston State ....7.....
10/6 ......... @ Alabama State............ 1
10/13 .............. Southern......... 5:30
10' 2" ,,.,I :ir. J
11/10............ @ Alcorn State...............2
11/17......Mississippi Valley State........1


CENTRAL STATE
9/1 .........Stillman in Dayton, OH.........5
9/8 .............. @ Northern Iowa.....6........
9/15 .......... ... Urbana................1:30
9/22 ..........@ St. Joseph's (IN) .......12n
9/29 ............@ Willliam Jewel..........1
10/6 .......... Missouri S&T (HC)......1:30
10/13 .... @ Univ. Of Indianapolis........6
10/27 .................. Q uincy................1:30
11/3...............@ McKendree..........1:30
11/10........ Kentucky Wesleyans......1:30
11/17..........@ Kentucky State............2

CHEYNEY
9/1 ................... @ Lincoln.................. 1
9/8 ................ Indiana (PA).. .............. 1
9/15 ...............C. W Post .................. 1
9/22......... @ East Stroudsburg...... 1 05
9/29 .............. Mercyhurst................. 1
10/6 ..................Kutztown................ 1
10/13.............@ Millersville...........1:30
10/20......... Bloomsburg (HC)............. 1
10/27 .......... @ West Chester..............1
11/3.............@ Shippensburg .............1
11/10............ @ Lock Haven...............
CONCORDIA-SELMA
9/1 ...... @ Mississippi Valley State......5
9/8 ...................@ Point..............1
9/15 .........@ Johnson C, Smith..........2
9/22 .... .. @ Clark Atlanta..............6
9/29 .............College of Faith ..............2
10/6 ........Va.Univ. of Lynchburg......... 1
10/13 ........ Fort Valley State...........2
10/20 ....... @ Southern Virginia...........1
10/27 ..........@Texas College.............2
11/3............New Orieans (HC)....2.. 2
11/10................@ Stillman.............1:30
EDWARD WATERS
8/25 ............... Point.................2
9/1 .....................@ Lane ........... ...2
9/8 .....Morehouse in Waycross, GA....3
9/15 .............. Livingstone..........1.....
9/22 ...............New Orieans...........2.....
9/29 ........... @ Valdosta State.............7
10/13 .. Webber International (HC)......2
10/20 ........ @ Savannah State......... 2
10/27 .... @ Charleston Southern,..1:30
11/3...... ... Ava Maria..............12n
11/10...... Southern Virginia.........2....
11/17... @ Va. Univ. of Lynchburg..1.....

LANGSTON
9/1 ..... Ark.-Pine Bluff in Little Rock .... 5
9/8 ...........Bacone in Tulsa, OK.........3
9/15 ...... St. Xavier in Chicago........7
9/22..................@Lamar..............TBA
9/29 ..........Southern Nazarene ...........7
10/6 .......... @ Wayland Baptist ......2....
10/13 .......Texas College (HC) .....1......
10/27 ..... ...... McMurry .................2
11/ ............ S W. Assemblies....1.........
11/10.........@ Panhandle State..2.........

LINCOLN (MO)
9/1 ..................Lindenwood.................2
9/9 ..............@ Truman State..............7
9115.........Missouri Southern .........2
9/22 ............ Emporia State.............2
9/29 ........... Pittsburg State............. 7
10/6 ................W ashburn ...................2
10/13 Nbrski Vua mevv IHC\ ?
10/20 '...'1 Hi,, !
10/27 ........Central Oklahoma.........2
11/3...........@N. E.Oklahoma...2.........
11/10............@ S. W, Baptist..............
TENNESSEE STATE
9/1 ................. Flodda A&M .................6
9/8 ...... Jackson State in Memphis......6
9/15 ...............Austin-Peay............ TBA
9/22........ @ Bethune-Cookman ........ 4
9/29 .. Arkansas-Pine Bluff (HC) ......5
10/6 ...........Eastern Kentucky........TBA
10/13..........@ S. E. Missouri.............6
10/20 ....... Jacksonville State..........3
10/27 .........Tennessee Tech.............1
11/3.............@ Murray State..........1
11/17............. @ UT Martin................2
TEXAS COLLEGE
8/25 .............St. Francis.............12n
9/1 .............@ Incarnate Word............ 2
9/8 ............ Southern Arkansas .....2....2
9/15 ......... Hardin-Sirmmons .......... 2
9/29 ............ Wayland Baptist........... 2
10/6 ...... Panhandle State ............2
10/13 ............@ Langston................1
10/20 ................. Bacone..........2.......... 2
10/27 ...Concordia-Selnma (HC).........2
11/3.................@ McMurry ...2.. ...... 2
11/10........ @ SW Assemblies............ 2
VIRGINIA UNIV. OF LYNCHBURG
8/30 .......... @ Ohio Dominican......6......
9/8 ............@ College of Faith............
9/15 ....... N. C. A&T............6...
9/22 .............UNC Pembroke..............1
9/29....... @ Southern Virginia..1.....
10/6.........@ Condordia-Selma......... 1
10/13 ........ @ 1:lt ., '.:-".i i
10/20 ........ @ L,',T.Cl.,-'.] Sti e
11/3...........Alderson-Broaddus....... 12n
11/10.........@ North Greenville .....1......
11/17_.......Edward Waters (HC) ....1......
WEST VIRGINIA STATE
9/1 .............Johnson C. Smith........... 1
9/8 ... .... N. C. A&T..........._6
9/15 ...... ......... @ Elon.....................3
9/22..... .....Concord..... ........... 1
9/29 .............. Seton Hill ...........12n
10/6 ...... West Liberty (HC).......1:30
10/13 ......... @ Glenville State............. 1
10/20 ....... Shepherd ......... 1....1
10/27..........W. Va. Wesleyan.........
11/3..........@ Fairmont State............1
11/10........... @ Charleston-............. 1


AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XVIII, No. 53


*


1 01 T. B -T A B AC OL EG OO BA L SC E U SI


X-V~rU3L Ad-, A








Auut28,21 rs er' FrePes-Pn


Talented Teen Celina Lina Hosts Sweet 16


1, !' --4


50 Cent, Mike Tyson and Kanye West

Tyson Joined by 50 Cent and West for Broadway Debut


Show above are Alex Edwards, birthday girl Celina Lina, Chelsi Boyd, and Lynn Jones
Celebrating her Sweet 16 birthday is local Jacksonville pop singer and 44th & Norwood Teen talk show host
Celina Lina and her co-host Chelsi Boyd. Over 50 teens showed up to the Compound on St. Johns Bluff to party,
and sing happy birthday and prepare for the upcoming taping of her new show. Show producer Lynn Jones was
in the audience, while guest Alex Edwards congratulated the pop singer on her success. Invited guests enjoyed a
live DJ, birthday cake and dancing.


As Mike Tyson: Undisputed
Truth opens on Broadway the star
was joined backstage by none other
than Kanye West and 50 Cent.
Written by Kiki, Tyson's wife,
with the aide of playwright Randy
Johnson, and directed by Spike Lee,
the piece is a one-man performance
chartering the life of one of the
most controversial sports figures of
all time.


"I'm very vulnerable and I'm just
telling you who I am and where I'm
from and how this happened," he
said speaking of the accusations of
domestic violence, rape and drug
abuse that form the narrative of his
life, and the performance.
In 1986 Tyson became the
youngest boxer to hold the heavy-
weight championship title at just
20-years-old, and this play marks


his Broadway debut, running for 12
performances until mid-August.
"This is not some dog-and-pony
show," Lee told USA Today. "This
is legit theater. We want people who
have never been to a boxing match
to come see this. Because who else
in America, in the 20th century, had
a life like Mike's? The peaks and
valleys you couldn't make it up!"


ENTERTAINMENT WORLD



GOSSIP SCOOP


Robin Roberts takes an Early Medical
Leave from Good Morning America
"Good Morning America" anchor Robin Roberts is
f taking a little time off, saying she's feeling the effects
of her blood and bone marrow disease.
; ~ 1 Roberts said Tuesday that she's "not feeling too well"
and would take some time off "just to get some
vacay.
ABC said Roberts would be taking a few weeks of
previously scheduled time off, but it came earlier than her planned medical
leave for a bone marrow transplant. Roberts told reporters last week that
her medical leave would probably start at the end of August or early
September.
Roberts announced last month that she has MDS, a blood and bone mar-
row disease once known as preleukemia.
Cuba Gooding Jr. Sought on Warrant in New Orleans
New Orleans police say a warrant has been issued for actor Cuba
Gooding Jr. after a morning incident at a French Quarter bar.
Police spokeswoman Remi Braden said the warrant issued Tuesday
morning was for alleged municipal battery. She was working to confirm
details.
Gooding is in New Orleans filming "The Butler." His publicist said a
statement would be issued later.
Dennis Rodman Writes Children's Book
Children will have a new idol to look up to soon because Dennis Rodman
is turning soft to get back in touch with his younger side.
The former basketball player has written a children's book entitled,
"Dennis the Wild Bull," which will be released in September.
Co-authored by Dustin Warburton, a screenwriter and children's author,
the book's purpose is to teach kids great lessons based on the life experi-
ences of a wild Bull. Don't worry moms, it's the G rated version.


O.J. Blames Oprah

for Incarceration


'..


W


O.J. Simpson has no love for
Oprah Winfrey, partly because he
feels she was a factor in his current
stint in prison.
Following an article in the New
York Daily News on The
Unpromotable, a film about
Simpson, a producer for Winfrey's
OWN network contacted Norman
Pardo, the 51-year-old former pro-
moter for the jailed football legend
who is putting the film together. He
is often in contact with Simpson.
According to Pardo, Kayla
McCormick, a co-producer of"
Winfrey's prime-time series
Oprah's Next Chapter, requested to


get the first interview with Simpson
from the Nevada jail where he is
serving 33 years for kidnapping,
robbery and using a deadly weapon.
Specifically, said Pardo,
Winfrey's producers want Simpson
"to go on her show and confess" to
the 1994 murders of his ex-wife,
Nicole Brown, and Ronald
Goldman. In 1995 Simpson was
tried and acquitted of both murders.
Winfrey has publicly said she's
had a dream about Simpson con-
fessing the murders to her.
What hinders the interview from
happening is, according to Pardo,
"O.J. doesn't like Oprah. He feels
like she's partially responsible for
him being in jail now."
Pardo says, "She never let anyone
like me come on the [The Oprah
Winfrey Show] and talk about
him." Winfrey's famed talk show
ended last year.
But there is one way Oprah can
get the interview with O.J., Pardo
says.
"She can get him to confess,
don't get me wrong everyone
has their price," he claims. "If she
can get him out of prison, that is."
The former promoter says he will
ask Simpson to do the interview
with Oprah from behind bars the
next time the former footballer calls
him, though he thinks Simpson will
not change his mind.


U IA 3SI


7,


by Evelyn Diaz, BET
While it's easy to get caught up in
the handsome facade, look a little
closer at Boris Kodjoe and you'll
see an actor who has overcome
numerous odds to make it in
IHollywood. From teaching himself
English to the Bond-like way he
adopted an American accent, this
German and Ghanaian former
model is out to prove he's more than
just a (very) pretty face. Kodjoe,
opens up about his early days in the
business, getting jealous of wife
Nicole Ari Parker's co-stars and
what being biracial means to him.
Q: Boris Kodjoe in itself is a
pretty unusual name, but that's
only part of the story. Tell us your
full name and what it means.
My full name is Boris Frederic
Cecil Tay-Natey Ofuatey-Kodjoe.
Boris comes from Boris Pasternak,
who wrote Dr. Zhivago, my parents'
favorite movie. Frederic is my
uncle's name. Cecil is my grandfa-
ther. Tay-Natey means "first born
child" in Ghana. And Ofuatey-
Kodjoe is my family name. My ori-
gin is from Ghana, my father is
from there, in West Africa.
Q: You come from a very
diverse background and you
weren't raised in this country.
Can you talk about the challenges
you faced adapting to a new
home?
It was pretty rough at first. I was
19 when I moved to the U.S., after I
had already finished high school. I
couldn't speak English very well
when I came here. I grew up speak-
ing German. That's actually how I
got into acting-I took acting class-
es to help me get rid of my accent. I
just stumbled into acting from
there.
Q: How did you manage to
launch a career in America as an
actor?
When I first started on Soul Food,
Nicole [Ari Parker] would read my
lines to me and I would mimic them
back because I had a hard time pro-
nouncing difficult words. It took me
a long time to feel comfortable
learning dialogue on my own. But I
had friends who were very support-
ive.
Q: You've come a very long
way. I don't think most people
could tell you aren't from around
here.
It's actually a compliment that
people forget. I work really hard to
adopt these behaviorisms so people
identify me as an African-
American, because I'm not. I'm
from a tiny, tiny, small town in the
south of Germany. But if I still had


my German accent, I don't think I
would ever work here as an actor.
Q: There can be a bias in this
country against biracial people.
What's your experience with
that?
To not consider somebody Black
because they're biracial is a little bit
short-minded. Im biracial. I was
born to a white mother from
Germany and a Black father from
Ghana. And I represent both cul-
tures. But at the end of the day,
when I walk the earth, I walk the
earth as a black man. That's what
I'm being perceived as, that's what I
look like and that's what I feel like.
Q: Morgan Freeman made an
interesting comment recently,
implying that President Obama is
not our first Black
president because
he has a white
mother. Reaction?
[Laughs] He said
that? I guess he
expressed his per-
spective, and all we
can do is accept that
and maybe start
some kind of dia-
logue about it. In 50
years, there won't be
any more "pure race"
people. Everybody's
going to be mixed. I
hope in 50 years it
won't be an issue
anymore. But
humans will proba-
bly find some new
way to discriminate
against each other.
Q: You recently
made a guest
appearance on
Franklin & Bash as
Garcelle Beauvais'
love interest, I
know you guys are
friends.
I've known
Garcelle for 16 years
and before this I had
never worked with
her. So when they
asked me to do this, I
was delighted to
have the chance.
Q: Tell us about
your character.
He's an artist who
works as a court
sketch artist. He has
a passion for drawing
faces. He meets
Garcelle's character,
who he knew from
before, and they
rekindle their affair


after she realizes she had judged
him before and felt that he was a
slacker who didn't have any motiva-
tion or drive.
Q: You and your wife are both
actors and often find yourselves
in intimate situations with other
people. Do you have any' ruled
First of all, we both know it's
make believe. But we do have cer-
tain rules. The "no tongue" rule, for
instance.
Q: Do you ever get jealous?
My wife has worked with every-.
one from Denzel [Washington] to
Martin Lawrence, Eddie Murphy-,
literally, every leading man.- So
people ask me that all the time. And
I say, the moments that make me
more jealous than even the. love


I-.


V,






scenes, are the intimate .scenes]
Like a laugh, or, a truly. te.nd
moment that is usually reseved
me. When I see thaton oscreen,- I
a little uncomfortable, like,.'
thought that giggle was only
me!" But we've been.together.for
long' nd we've '.doing-this
so long that it's not really an issue
Q: We can't-end this entire
without talking about your loo1
Do you ever feel self-consdousi
how much attention youwget |,t
that? .
[Laughs] It's not somethig-I. ,
control, influence or take credit
It's flattering, but it's not simethm4
I .ponder. When people say,.:4r
handsome or whatever, it's
"Thank you! 'Keep it movn'i"


August 2-8, 2012


Mrs. Perry's Free Press Page 9








Page 10 Ms. Perry's Free Press


August 2-8, 2012


Logan West has been
crowned Miss Teen
USA 2012.
The 18-year-old
Connecticut teen was
crowned on Saturday in
the Bahamas where the
competition took place.
West outperformed 15
other finalist en route
to her victory. She and
other contestants were
quizzed on issues The
finalists also competed
in swimsuit and evening
gown competitions.


by Robin Almer, The Blaze
It was expected that Americans
would dominate the track at the
1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico
City. Indeed, when the men's 200-
meter began, American Tommie
Smith led the pack, sprinting ahead
to take gold. Heading into the home
stretch, it looked as if teammate and
world-record holder John Carlos
would win silver, but Australian
Peter Norman edged him out,
bounding down the straightaway to
take silver and leaving Carlos with
bronze. But it's what happened next
that would make history.
.Smith and Carlos stood on the
podium wearing black socks with-
out shoes to symbolize black pover-
ty in the U.S. Carlos wore a strand
of colorful beads to protest lynch-
ing. They bowed their heads as The
Star Spangled Banner played, and
raised their fists clad in black
leather gloves in salutes to
Black Power and unity. It was a
gesture seen 'round the world, and
an enduring symbol of political
resistance.
This fleeting moment, though,
came out of the deep-rooted strug-
gle for racial equality gripping
America. Smith and Carlos had
been part of the Olympic Project for
Human Rights, which, founded in


____ Millions of Ex-offenders Given a Voting 'Death Sentence'


By Freddie Allen
WASHINGTON Nearly 6 mil-
lion former prisoners -I million of
them Black will not be able to
vote in the November presidential
election because of state laws that
continue to punish them even after
they have completed their sen-
tences, according to a recent report
by the Sentencing Project.
The report said 5.85 million citi-
zens who were formerly incarcerat-
ed will be prevented from voting.
That's five times the entire popula-
tion of Rhode Island and more than
the adult population (18-65 years


old) of Virginia.
"The most telling indicator of cit-
izenship in the U.S. is that ability to
cast a vote," stated Desmond
Meade, president of the Florida
Righl, Restoration Coalition, a
non-profit gioup focused on restor-
ing the civil rights of ex-offenders.
"If you don't have a voice you
might as well be a slave."
He explained, "Everyday a per-
son is being disenfranchised in the
minority community that weakens
that community's political voice."
Eleven states disenfranchise ex-
offenders after they have completed


their sentences: Alabama, Arizona,
Delaware, Florida, Kentucky,
Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada,
Tennessee, Virginia and Wyoming.
Those 11 states account for 45 per-
cent of the entire disenfranchised
population.
The report also found that Blacks
lose their right to vote at a rate that
is four times higher than non-
Blacks. If the presidential election
were held today, more than 20 per-
cent of Blacks living in Florida,
Kentucky, and Virginia wouldn't be
able to vote.
Meade, a Florida native, served a
prison sentence from 2001-2004 for
multiple crimes, the most serious
being an ex-felon in possession of a
firearm. He won't be able to vote in
this year's presidential election and
maybe the next, because Florida has
some of the toughest felon disen-
franchisement laws on the books.
Meade said that Florida's disenfran-
chisement laws basically amount to
a lifetime ban from the polling
booth for many ex-offenders.
According to the Florida Rights
Restoration Coalition, in Florida, an
ex-felon automatically loses his or
her civil rights and must apply to
have those rights restored through
the Board of Executive Clemency.
That board consists of the governor,
attorney general, chief financial
officer and commissioner of agri-
culture and consumer services.
The governor and two cabinet
members must sign an executive
order for an ex-felon to ultimately
have his or her rights restored.
Advocates such as Meade liken the
ban to a lifetime ban, because of the
arduous process it takes for citizens
to have their rights restored once
they've been taken away.
Disenfranchisement laws first
rose to prominence shortly after the
passage of the 15th amendment in
1870 that outlawed disenfranchise-
ment based on race and past
enslavement. But southern states
with large Black populations found
ways around the constitution.
Georgia, for example, passed the
poll tax in 1871 that limited voter
turnout among Blacks and poor
Whites. By 1904 every state in the


Deep South had amended their state
constitution to limit Black voter
participation.
"In some respects, disenfran-
chisement policies go back to the
time of the founding of the country;
the country was founded as a great
experiment in democracy of
course it was a very limited experi-
ment," said Marc Mauer, executive
director of the Sentencing Project.
The Sentencing Project was one
of the first groups in the late 1990s
to study the impact of the disen-
franchisement restrictions facing
citizens flowing through the crimi-
nal justice pipeline. Once the infor-
mation from the studies started get-
ting out, momentum to change the
laws began to build.
In 2007, Maryland lifted the life-
time voting ban on ex-felons and
Maine and Vermont allow prisoners
to vote. In Iowa, however,
Republican Governor Terry
Branstad overturned an executive
order that restored voting rights to
ex-felons, an executive order
signed into law by the former
Governor [now Secretary of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture]
Tom Vilsack, a Democrat. Florida's
Republican Governor Rick Scott
reinstated a five-year waiting peri-
od for non-violent ex-offenders
before they could apply to regain
their voting privileges.
According to Barbara Arnwine,
executive director of the Lawyers'
Committee for Civil Rights Under
Law, is not surprised by the move to
disenfranchise ex-offenders.
She said, "I predicted [in 2000]
that we were seeing a new move-
ment where people would attempt
to win elections by destroying the
opportunity to vote for people who
would not vote in their favor."
Arnwine said that ex-offenders,
need to organize and see their fight
for voting rights as a larger chal-
lenge facing the community.
"Most states that have done away
with the permanent bans did it
through their state legislature," said
Amwine. "People need to be look-
ing at their House members and the
state senators. They need to make
sure those people are with them."


Tommie Smith (center), raised his fist high with
his team mate John Carlos (right) at the 1968 Olympics.


1967, had originally called upon
black athletes to boycott the
Summer Games. The movement's
mission statement asked, "Why
should we run in Mexico only to
crawl home?" Ultimately the group
decided against the boycott, but
Smith and Carlos embodied their
message of protest. Australian Peter
Norman wore an OPHR patch on
his jacket during the ceremony as a
symbol of solidarity.
In a 2008 op-ed for the L.A.
Times, basketball legend Kareem
Abdul-Jabbar, who had been asked
to try out for the '68 Olympic bas-
ketball team, described what watch-
ing that moment meant. "Whites
were outraged, blacks felt some
rush of pride," he wrote.
Carlos, who would go on to equal
the world record in the 100-meter,
win an NCAA championship title
and even play a short stint in the
NFL, spoke in Chicago this year.
Speaking to an audience of young
poets and activists, he said that
now, when asked by photographers
to raise his fist for the camera, he
instead instructs them to find a
young person to photograph. "Let
some young man or woman raise
their fist," he said. "I want them to
see that we've moved on to the next
generation."


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The 1968 Black Power Salute: An



Iconic Olympic Moment Revisited