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The Jacksonville free press ( December 22, 2011 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
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Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
December 22, 2011
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00346

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
December 22, 2011
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00346

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

Full Text






.Fat Chance

at Success
4 out 5 Black
Women are obese,
leading the nations
in health risks
Page 7



'Tis the season

for holiday

parties

Stantonians
rejoice the

yuletide spirit
Page 5


President's approval rating on the rise
After a difficult summer and a contentious fall, President Obama's job-
approval ratings are showing signs of improvement -- a crucial indicator
of his reelection chances as he seeks to overcome voters' doubts about his
economic stewardship.
A new Washington Post-ABC News poll finds that Americans are still
broadly disapproving of Obama's handling of the economy and jobs, the
top issues, but that views of his overall performance have recovered
among key groups, including independents, young adults and seniors.
At the same time, the public's opinion of Republicans in Congress has
continued to deteriorate, potentially putting the president in a position to
benefit politically from his standoff with the GOP-led House over
extending the payroll tax cut.

Don King's free turkeys hijacked
MIAMI Hundreds of needy South Floridians were disappointed to
learn last week that a truck loaded with Christmas turkeys to be donated
by boxing promoter Don King had been hijacked.
The truck full of 2,000 turkeys bound for South Florida went missing
over night. The truck was found abandoned near Pompano Beach, FL the
next day. While the turkeys were still inside, the fowl had to be discard-
ed because nobody was sure whether they'd been temperature-controlled
and safe to eat.
King, a resident of Delray Beach, has been giving away turkeys at
Christmas time for years. But unfortunately, hundreds of people in West
Palm Beach, Deerfield Beach and Miami came away empty-handed this
year.
"They tell me that the truck has been hijacked," said King, "and that
we ain't got no turkeys to give, so we've got to figure out a plan "b" of
when we can get a truck."
There is some good news however. Weneck said a date to replace the
turkeys will be determined on Monday.

Malcolm X's daughter Malikah
Shabazz held on probation violation
NEW YORK Authorities say a daughter of Malcolm X is being held
without bail after violating terms of her probation.
According to the New York Post, Malikah Shabazz (muh-LEE'-kuh
shuh-BAHZ') is due back before a New York City judge on Jan. 6.
She was arrested at her home in Mars Hill, N.C., in February and later
extradited to New York. She was sentenced to five years of probation in
July for stealing a family friend's identity to run up credit card bills.
Prior to her recent arrest, Shabazz had been living in St. Albans, Vt.,
where the St. Albans Messenger says she was working to open a restau-
rant. Vermont prosecutor Jim Hughes says New York officials thought
Shabazz was still in New York.

MLK Parade attempted bomber
sentenced to 32 years in prison
SPOKANE, Wash. An Army veteran with extensive ties to white
supremacists was sentenced to 32 years in prison this week for planting
a poison-laced bomb along a Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade route in
what he said was meant to be an attack against the cultural diversity cel-
ebrated by the event.
Kevin Harpham tried unsuccessfully to withdraw his earlier guilty plea
just before receiving the maximum punishment. Harpham told the judge:
"I am not guilty of the acts that I am accused of and that I plead guilty
to." He said he only agreed to the deal in September to avoid a possible
life sentence.
The statement prompted Quackenbush to impose the higher end of the
possible prison sentence, which was negotiated in the plea bargain as
between 27 and 32 years.
"I am distressed that you appear not the least bit apologetic,"
Quackenbush said.
Harpham blamed the judge for not giving his defense team enough
time. The 37-year-old said he did not intend to injure people with the
bomb he placed in downtown Spokane prior to the January parade.
Rather, he intended for the shrapnel to hit the side of a building as a show
of protest against the multiculturalism celebrated by the parade, he said.

MSNBC apologizes for segment
linking Romney to the KKK


Churches

turning to

technology for

convenience of

Pastors and

parishoners
Page 6


FAMU's

history of
success far

outweighs
current

challenges
Page 4


KLY50 Cents
50 Cents


Volume 25 No. 10 Jacksonville, Florida December 22-28, 2011

FAMU Head Keeps Job

During Hazing Death Probe


by G. Fineout
Florida A&M's president will
keep his job after the university
board of trustees Monday rejected a
call from Gov. Rick Scott that
James Ammons be suspended while
the hazing death of a band member


is investigated.
The decision comes three days
after the state medical examiner
ruled that 26-year-old Robert
Champion's Nov. 19 death was a
homicide. Officials say he was -
Continued on page 3


Shown above accepting the gavel of leadership from outgoing
President Khsmil Ojoyo is new President Anita Shepherd (left) with
Brenda Simmons (center) who swore her in. R. Silver photo
The Association for the Study of African American Life and History
(ASALH), James Weldon Johnson Branch, recently hosted their Holiday
Appreciation Party which celebrated their 16th anniversary and marked
the 'changing of the guard". ASALH promotes and preserved Black cul-
ture through education and study. Throughout the year they provide rele-
vant programs and presentations.


Simmons surprised two students Jonnika Freeman (left) and Rikia
Jones (right) with tickets and vip passes to his Jacksonville concerts.
Raines' Students Treated to Start

Power to Encourage Healthy Eating


by Willie Hall
The latest young superstar, Diggy
Simmons, attended an event at
William Marion Raines High
School to support the 5-2-1-0
Healthy Food initiative.
Representative Mia Jones read a
proclamation for "5-2-1-0" Day;
Diggy Simmons also received a
certificate naming him as a "5-2-1-
0" Youth Health Ambassador from
the General Manager of the
Jacksonville Giants, Kevin Waters.
"5-2-1-0 Healthy NH" is a
statewide public education cam-
paign to bring awareness to the
daily guidelines for nutrition and
physical activity. Its message is


simple and clear and represents
some of the most important steps
families can take to prevent child-
hood obesity:
5 Fruits and vegetables. 2 Cut
screen time to 2 hours or less a day.
1 Participate in at least one hour
of moderate to vigorous physical
activity every day. 0 Restrict soda
and sugar-sweetened sports and
fruit drinks.
Simmon's appearance included a
performance with the Raines
Marching Viking Band where they
performed "Do it Like You" one of
Simmons hit songs. The Vikettes
also demonstrated how dancing
could be considered exercise.


Millions More Movement celebrates


the season with holiday giving

MORE MOVEMENT
JATMMM.com b i-.t
1775 *904-240- i3 dJ 3
4. MYRTLE AVE.


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MSNBC has apologized to Mitt Romney's presidential campaign for
airing a segment that connected Romney's use of the expression "Keep
America American" to the Ku Klux Klan.
"During the 11AM hour on MSNBC, we reported on a blog item that
compared a phrase used by the Romney campaign to one used by the
KKK in the 1920s," Chris Matthews said.. "It was irresponsible and
incendiary of us to do this and showed an appalling lack ofjudgment. We
apologize, we really do, to the Romney campaign."
The aforementioned segment was anchored by Thomas Roberts.
"So you may not hear Mitt Romney say 'Keep America American' any-
more,' Roberts said in his report. "That's because it was a rallying cry
for the KKK group, and intimidation against blacks, gays and Jews. The
Progressive American blog was the first to catch on to that." (Roberts
also apologized on Thursday.)
A Romney campaign spokeswoman told the New York Times that it
accepted MSNBC's apology: "We are pleased they have issued a correc-
tion and apology. That was the right thing to do."


Seated is Harts Harbor Health Care resident Sharon Sheffield
receiving a haircut from master barber Lester Muhammad, Chair of
the JLOC MMM Inc., Hair Cut Project Team. Andr'eXphoto
The Jacksonville Local fare of the holiday spirit, the MMM
Organizing Committee for the is focusing on giving back.
Millions More Movement (MMM) They recently held back to back
Inc., a non-profit organization, is events that included free hair cuts
continuing their mission throughout for seniors at the Harts Harbor
the holiday season. While much of Center and the very next day a mas-
the city is participating in the fan- sive clothing and food give away.


-;i :.: .: .?,A .

Sharon Martin and Mark Ford that participated in the recent Clothes
Give-A-Way at Myrtle and King Street. Hundreds of attendees
received free clothes, dinners and food baskets.
The bi-monthly 'Clothes Give- Additionally free boxes of food and
A-Way' was a labor of love, dedi- Christmas trees were available for
cation and commitment. Not only all of the people that participated.
were clean clothes available for To donate money, support or vol-
people to select, they also provided unteer your service call 240-9133
free healthy food including beef hot or 354-1775 or visit www.real-
dogs and complete chicken dinners, pagessite.com/jacksonvilleloc.







- M


S-


-I-, -~i'' I


A (


I.-..


You may have heard. AT&T and T-Mobile are planning to come together.


What will that mean to you?


More cell sites and spectrum means better service sooner.
And it means your Internet is about to take a big leap forward
with LTE a super-fast mobile broadband technology.
We are going to deploy it to more than 97 percent of all Americans,
giving you access to a cutting-edge wireless network and all the
opportunities it brings.


So, the moment something worth celebrating happens in your
friends' lives, you'll know.


, at&t


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2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved.


Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press


December 22-28. 2011


Sr-llil'












FAMU President Will Keep Job During Hazing Probe


Guest Mixed and Mingle with Empowerment

Resources Volunteers Guest were welcomed to
Empowerment Resources Inc.'s recent holiday mixer at the SUITE.
Participants enjoyed a night of night of socializing, networking, compli-
mentary tapas and information on Empowerment Resources Inc. Money
was also raised by selecting an ornament off of the holiday giving tree.
Each ornament represented an item from the nonprofit organizations' wish
list. For more information on this all volunteer organization, call 268-
8287 or www.empowermentresourcesinc.org. Shown above is Elexia
Coleman-Moss,Tiffany Green and Cherrise Wilks at the event.

Work Source Director to Chair


JJC Community Relations
Members of the Jacksonville Job
Corps Community Relations .
Council recently elected Faron
Miles as the Center's Community MO
Relations Chair and the Interim
Chair of the Industry Council. The
councils are an integral part of the
link between community and the
career development of the students
who attend the center.
Faron Miles is the center direc-
tor of WorkSource in North
Jacksonville and Baker County
career centers. He began his '
career at WorkSource in 2000 as a 4
customer service representative .:'
and quickly rose to the rank of his
current position. Faron is respon- Faron
sible for managing the day-to- day of Jacksonville
operations of the career centers, enforcement spe
including participating in commu- ers who park ill
nity relations activities as they reserved for peo
relate to the services available ties. He has alsc
through WorkSource. touring youth thrc
Faron's community service in Schools and
includes volunteering with the City Children.


Council


Miles
as a parking
:ialist, citing driv-
egally in parking
ple with disabili-
spent time men-
ough Community
Take Stock in


ty strong as we move through this
challenging time," said Kelvin
Lawson, a board member from
Jacksonville.
The only action related to the
investigations that the board took
was to agree to meet weekly for the
next day 60 days while the investi-
gations continue. There was scant
discussion of the homicide ruling or
the opening of a new criminal
investigation into the finances of
the Marching 100.
Scott said in a statement issued
before the meeting that he was not
singling out FAMU and called on
all universities in the state to exam-


Dr. James Ammons
continued from front
beaten so severely that he bled
internally and went into shock. He
died within an hour.
"We will stand firm against out-
side influence, no matter how well
intended," Solomon Badger, the
FAMU board chairman, said during
a board meeting that was held by
conference call.
Scott said he would abide by the
board's decision.
Ammons and other university
leaders have been criticized for not
doing enough to stop a culture of
hazing within the university's
famed "Marching 100" band. Band
director Julian White has been
placed on temporary leave and the
board had already publicly repri-
manded Ammons.
Students had largely stood by both
leaders. Students protested outside
the governor's mansion on
Thursday to show support for
Ammons, and the president of the
national alumni association at a
news conference Sunday contested
Scott's involvement and recom-
mend Ammons not be suspended.
Badger said that the board should
keep Ammons status unchanged
until an investigation with all the
"official facts" was concluded.
None of the FAMU board members
disagreed with Badger.
"I think we all have the number
one priority of keeping the universi-


I *. *M igi
Mrs. Barbara Walker-Silas
Celebrated her 80th birthday with
family and friends on Dec 17, 2011
at Clanzel Brown Community
Center, Jacksonville Fl., given by
her daughter Patrice Walker
Robinson.
Barbara Hill Walker is the daugh-
ter of the late Rev William and
Bessie Hill, who was the pastor of
Mt. Calvary Missionary Baptist
church until his demise; she is the


ine their hazing and harassment
policies. He said he was offering his
opinion and counsel regarding
Ammons and would abide by the
board's decision.
"I merely suggested it would be
wise for Dr. Ammons to step aside
until these investigations are com-
pleted," Scott said. "It is up to the
FAMU Board of Trustees and Dr.
Ammons to determine how to pro-
ceed. I have not and will not try to
influence their decision."
Champion's death has exposed
years of hazing that has plagued the
band and left several students
injured. In 1998, Ivery Luckey, a


mother of four children, six grand-
children, and thirteen great-grand
children. She is a graduate of Old
Stanton High school class of 1950
and furthered her education at
Florida Memorial College and
Florida A&M University. She is a
well known educator of the Duval
County School System where she
taught school for over 36 years
which included Mary McLeod
Bethune, Rufus E. Payne,


clarinet player from Ocala, Fla.,
was hospitalized with kidney dam-
age after being paddled as part of an
initiation to become a member of a
group known as "The Clones."
Three years later, band member
Marcus Parker was also hospital-
ized with kidney damage after
being paddled.
Ammons, a FAMU alumni,
became president in 2007 at a time
when the university was under con-
siderable distress. There had been
four presidents within the previous
six years and an audit in 2007
uncovered 35 findings, including
$4.5 million in unaccounted sports


Normandy and Norwood
Elementary schools. She is also an
accomplished musician, having
taught piano lessons at Florida State
College and played for several
churches. Presently she is a mem-
ber of Mt Calvary Baptist Church
and has always loved and mentored
children. The event was a joyous
occasion and everyone had a great
time.
FM Powell Photo


Friends and Family Celebrate 80th

Birthday of Barbara Walker-Silas


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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


December 22-28, 2011










Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press December 22-28, 2011


FAMU History of Success Outweighs Current Challenges
"A child cannot be taught by tremendous pride that the FAMU drum major, all band per- judgment. Now is definitely not
someone who despises him," were school'salumni have. formances were halted amid an the time to start playing politics.
the famous words of James In fact, Rattler pride can be investigation into the death, which Recently, Governor Rick Scott,
Baldwin. downright overbearing and leaves the historic Marching 100's suggested to the Florida A&M
It is that mindset or that reality admirable at the same time. The future in limbo. University Board of Trustees place
that spawned the creation of histor- Rattlers have a history of high aca- This inexcusable death was only FAMU President James Ammons
ically black colleges around the demic achievement and of course the tip of the iceberg to some on suspension.
nation with most being located the school is internationally known because it is an unfortunate micro- My first reaction to the
strategically in Southern states, for the Marching 100 it's stellar cosm of a much larger issue. Back Governors statement was that the
Makes sense right that's where marching band. in 2001, a FAMU band member brother needs to stay in his lane.
most of the African Americans While some tout the band for suffered kidney damage after being The governance of each state col-
were. building the school's reputation I beaten with a paddle some 300 lege is the responsibility of its
Colleges like Edward Waters would argue that Rattler academics times. And three weeks before the board of trustees,not the
College, Florida Memorial is not too far behind. The school November 19th death, a female Governor's Office.
College, and Bethune Cookman consistently leads the nation in the band member's femur was broken In fact, state law clearly states,
College (now University) were recruitment of the most talented when she was severely beaten; "University boards have all of the
born to help educate blacks who in black scholars and has topped which landed three male band powers and duties necessary and
most cases were not allowed in Harvard and a host of other presti- members in jail for the incident, appropriate for the direction, oper-
majority white colleges. gious institutions in the competi- So obviously there is a problem ation, management and accounta-
Perhaps the most famous tion to lure the country's smartest that has to be fixed. In any arena, ability of each state university."
Historically Black African-American students azing and rituals have to stop. As the investigation continues to
College/University (HBCU) is National Achievement Scholars. But let's be fair the Marching move forward it is important that
FAMU or Florida Agricultural and So if Rattler academics is the 100 shouldn't be disbanded or sus- we acknowledge that there is a
Mechanical University or "The Ferrari engine then the band is the pended for a long period of time. A hazing problem at FAMU and
Hill". The school's history is well body, tires and rims. From per- culture change is needed and dozens of other colleges through-
documented. FAMU was founded forming at the Super Bowl to the sometimes that involves new lead- out the country. The question now
as the State Normal College for Olympics, the Marching 100 has ership on the student and facility is: how to we fix the problem with-
Colored Students; and on October truly been "the best band in the level. When a football team vio- out damaging the school further?
3, 1887, it began classes with fif- land" for decades. But as Winston lates NCAA rules, an investigation The bottom line is simple -
teen students and two instructors. Churchill once said, "The price of is launched and after findings are FAMU is a university that's overall
The school remains the only his- greatness is responsibility." announced punishment is adminis- goal is to educate students. Over
torically black university in the Unfortunately, because of the tered to the programs. 110 years of educational achieve-
eleven member State University worldwide fame associated with We need the same type of ment can't be thrown out because
System of Florida. the band, many members have cre- process here. The FAMU Board of of recent events. This is a process
Most black folk from around the ated a fraternal environment that Trustees has launched an investi- that will require patience and corn-
state of Florida have family mem- includes hazing and other member- gation as well as the Florida Dept. mitment to change.
bers or friends that have attended shiprituals. of Law Enforcement. Signing off from The Hill,
FAMU, and all would attest to the Last month, after the death of a So now is not the time to rush to Reggie Fullwood


by Dr. Ben Chavis
The issue of incon
the United States
attention and social
ticular in the Afri
community, the
inequities are so re
tionalized; we are n
aware of how th
impact of income ii
tinues cause a down
the quality of
Americans and otl
entrapped in the
poverty, pain and
The dream of The
Martin Luther King
relevant today as
2012 as it was back
March on Washingto
Dr. King's dream
American dream of
tice and equality for
should be reminded
beginning of 1968
Luther King Jr was v
and focused on the
poverty and system
injustice. The
Movement, with the
tion between the
organized labor, li
Latinos, students
activists, and many
diversity of organ
reached a transform
its evolution. The t
to expose and challei
ic connection between
tice and economic in
The Southern
Leadership Confer
under Dr. King's lea
called for a "Po
Campaign" to pla
"occupation" of Wa
in 1968 to challenge
hold of economic inj
for Black people, for


Occupy
s children." Re
ie inequality in that time was
demands our most trusted
action. In par- respect to the
can American People's Cam]
economic "We intended
al and institu- science of the
nore and more issues of pove
e devastating lenged the nati
nequality con- tion. We hop
ward spiral of mobilization w
life African people in a ne
hers who are that transcended
deep mire of Today, in jus
hopelessness, since their ini
Reverend Dr. the Occupy W
Jr. is just as has been suc
we move into major non-viol
in 1963 at the protests from
cn. Los Angeles
am was the United States
freedom, jus- income inequw
all. Yet we all injustice. But
d that by the number and s
8, Dr Martin Wall Street pr
iery concerned accomplishme:
questions of the raising o
nic economic national level
Civil Rights tions of pr
historic coali- inequities and
Black church, That is wh'
liberal whites, the vision and
and peace of Russell S
others from a Jamal Bryant
lizations, had Bishop John
native stage in Carroll A. B
ime had come many other B
nge the diabol- from across
en racial injus- affirmed, "Occ
Equity. ecumenical c
Christian leaders who a
ence (SCLC) brothers and si
dership boldly Wall Street me
oor People's economicjusti(
n a massive cy of the dreai
ashington, DC Luther King Jr
e the strangle- 99% who are
justice not only who control th
r all of "God's prosperity of tl


the Dream
v. Andrew Young at The Black church in America
one of Dr. King's continues to be the backbone of the
assistants. With Civil Rights Movement and all
Scall for the Poor successful movements for change
paign, Young stated, in this nation in last 100 years have
to arouse the con- involved the presence and the
Nation around the visionary activism of the Black
-rty as we had chal- church. Now with the increasing
ion to reject segrega- poverty, disproportionately high
ed of training and home foreclosure rates and loss of
wouldd empower poor property, unemployment, the lack
-w social movement of the best quality education for
ed race." our children, absence of good
st a few months time health care delivery, discriminato-
tial demonstrations, ry and unjust intergenerational
all Street movement incarceration, fiscal crisis for
:cessful in staging Historically Black Colleges and
lent civil disobedient Universities (HBCUs); deteriora-
New York City to tion of our communities and busi-
and throughout the ness, and a growing sense of
around the issues of despair among millions of our
ality and economic youth, it is imperative that African
beyond the growing Americans should not wait pas-
size of the Occupy sively for someone else to speak
otests, their greatest out and take action for the econom-
nt thus far has been ic recovery of Black America.
)f awareness on a Occupy the Dream is the revi-
about the contradic- talization and revival of the spirit,
esent-day income consciousness and activism of the
injustice. Black church community working
y I am so grateful for in strategic coalitions with others
responsible outreach to demand and acquire economic
immons, Rev. Dr. justice and equality. Thank God for
,Zach McDaniels, the Occupy Wall Street movement
R. Bryant, Rev. Dr. and for reminding us of our chal-
3altimore, Sr., and lenges, responsibilities and oppor-
lack clergy leaders tunities to make a big sustainable
America who have differences in the quality of life in
cupy the Dream" as our communities and for all people
coalition of church who cry out for a better way of life.
re joining with the On January 16, 2012, we will be
sisters of the Occupy calling on the Black church and
movement to push for other people who believe in free-
ce for all in the lega- dom, justice and equality to come
m of the Dr. Martin out and demonstrate with us in
We are part of the front of Federal Reserve Banks
challenging the 1% across the nation in both a symbol-
le wealth and future ic and substantive visible protest
he nation, against the growing massive


income inequality in America.
Occupy the Dream is about
building the "Beloved
Community" that Dr. King envi-
sioned. Dr King said it best,
"Change do not roll on the wheels
of inevitability, but comes through
continuous struggle. And so we
much straighten our backs and
work for our freedom." Yes, we
must straighten our minds, backs,
money, spirits and souls. We have
to work for economic justice.....
We have to work for the empower-
ment of all people. Occupy the
Dream! Stop income inequality.
The American Spring is coming in
2012. The freedom train is
rolling.... Get on board today.
Occupy the Dream.


AL~k


r 9
.., f *
OrRID .\5 F R 5 T COAT U ALIT \ BtLACK C EEKL Y

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December 22-28, 2011


Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press


Robert Champion to Become


a Drum Major for Change
Most parents of college students look forward to December, when their stu-
dents come home for the holidays. Some are so excited to see their offspring
home that they actually come to their colleges to pick them up. Others pre-
pare special treats and goodies as an antidote to the oft complained about cafe-
teria food.
Robert and Pam Champion won't have that opportunity. Their son, Robert,
died on November 19. His death has been ruled a homicide and he is alleged-
ly the victim of hazing. Florida A&M University one of our nation's most
respected HBCUs, is in the headlines now, not because of its excellent aca-
demic programs, but because its celebrated marching band has apparently had
a culture of hazing.
Robert and Pam Champion are to be commended for turning their pain into
a force for change. In a recent media interview, they indicated that they have
set up a Facebook page in honor of their son, who they describe as a "drum
major for change" because they will use his story to help other victims of haz-
ing. Mrs. Champion also indicated that she would set up an anti-hazing hot
line so that young people can, anonymously, deal with issues of hazing. The
younger Robert Champion has apparently not been the only victim of hazing
in the FAMU Marching Band. In the past, one student has had her hip broken,
and two have been hospitalized with kidney damage. And these are only the
cases we know about.
The FAMU Marching Band isn't the only organization that hazes.
Sororities and fraternities, whether part of the African American Divine Nine,
or part of the larger Greek-letter organization atmosphere, seem to think haz-
ing is part of the culture. Whether it is yelling and screaming at pledges, to
the use of actual physical violence, hazing is prevalent. The National Study
of Student Hazing, which got results from more than 11,000 students at 53 col-
leges indicated that "8 percent of women in Greek life have experienced haz-
ing". This study didn't focus on HBCUs, but it would not be surprising to
learn that our numbers mirror these. Two questions why is membership in
a group so important that you'd risk your life; and why must people verbally
and physically abuse those who want to join their group.
Our young people are no better than what we show them they can be. I
have heard sorority women make the distinction between "pledging hard" and
"pledging soft", with the implication that the brutal former is better. Young
men and some not so young men, sport brands, some of which have been
infected, as symbols of their fraternity and their "manhood". Many of those
branded were either willing or subject to coercion. When elders show their
sons these brands, they may well co-sign the continuation of a brutal trend.
What is hazing about? It's bullying, it's coercion, and it's descent into
groupthink in the worst way. I've got something you want, and I'm going to
make you suffer to get it. In order to join a band you ought to be able to play
music, not survive a beating. How does the beating make you a better band
member? Actually, it allows some folks to play a game of false superiority to
the detriment of others.
The bottom line, though, is that it has to stop. The college experience
should not be a brutal experience, or an experience where coercion and intim-
idation are ingrained into the process of joining a group. To be sure, there are
bonding opportunities in ritual in learning songs, history, steps, or chants.
And there may be penalties when band members or pledges don't toe the mark
in learning things on time. But the penalties should not be physical abuse, and
that abuse has become too acceptable.
What do we do about it? Some parents whose children have been hazed
have brought criminal charges or civil lawsuits. Others have pushed for sys-
temic change. Leaders in higher education must assert zero tolerance for haz-
ing and enforce zero tolerance policies with appropriate actions. Four mem-
bers of the FAMU band have been dismissed from school, but only after
young Robert Champion's death. Had they been expelled sooner, might
Champion still be among us?
Robert and Pam Champion are to be commended for turning their pain into
change. But if hazing cannot be stopped, those organizations that allow it sim-
ply need to be disbanded.













'Tis the season Stantonians celebrate the holiday season


I *l # r ,- m I. q ua -M "UNU 1-. SNMEN Am ', IU.
New Stanton Class of 1956: Pat Greene, Virginia Johnson, Thelma Shootes, Connie Stephens, Vacina Jones, Lillie Rosella Wilson, Juanita Wilson, Frances Baker, Elzabeth Byars, Tamer Britton, Alberta Jones, Deloris
Robinson, Marva McKinnon, Samuel Elps, Mary Clayton, Amenia Green, James Mosley, Laurence Tunsill, Sr., Nellie Tunsill, Willie Boss, Andrea Jackson and Kay Palmer.


WY .


[ gIIr_ "'" 'RClass of 1966: Carolyn Williams, Cynthia Rawls, Francina Williams, Felicia Vanler, Olivia Thomas, Jimmy
Stanton Class of 1965 Luther Rucker, Patsy Barnes Bailey, Azelia Floyd, Barbara Logan, Maxine Gadson, Greene, Michael StuartAllen Tuken, Annie Washington, Shirley Willis, Sandy Jones, Irvlyn Kennebrew,
John Lee, Jackie Washington, Alma Rine, Maxine Baker, Jimmy Clark, Betty Davis and Langston Harley. Beverly Johnson, Charlie Kennebrew, Kenneth Brockington, Gilda Brown, Jackie Darby, Harrell Buggs,
Charles Reddick and Ronnie Belton.


Class of 1968: Jessie Lowe, Juanita Hooks, Valeria Jones, Michael Campbell, Joyce Dixon, Justine
Redding, Joann Buggs, Jerome Ashby, Janet Hawkins, Joyce Green, Joe Ross, Fatima Whatley, Errol
Schell, Pat Schell, Andrew Barker, Barbara Brown, Margie M. Daniel, Larry Calloway Jvuette Dixon,
Juanita Hooks, Phyllis Seabrooks-Wkliams, Rosemary Williams, Edna Walker, Balah Brown, Maxine
Carter, Linda Campbell, Wanda Lang, Deloris Milton, Gloria Lovett, Sandra Milton, Josie Armstrong and
Josephine Bell.


Class of 1969: Helen Holloway, Kenneth Mc Tear, Sonya Pollard, Matt Thompson, Rose Jackson, Shelia
Jones, Jacqueline Lindsey, Pennie Junches, Ava Mitchell, Michael Mitchell, Claretha Mc Kenzie, Angela
Bonnett, Janice Gayles, Leon Greene, Joan Walton, Maxie Gillespie, Rosa Johnson and Rosemary Young.


Class of 1970: Raymond Boyd, Patricia Barker, James Arness, Texann Scott, Kanatha Stewart, Patricia
Turner, Shann Johnson, Benjamin Scott, Denise Gomillion, Vermalyn Frazier, Darcell Dawson-Bell and
Betty Clark.


Class of 1971: Carol Davis, Hazel Westbrook, Carla Whiteside, Victor Ravnell, Val Williams, Brenda
Scantling, Lynda Ravnell and Rose Harper. FIMPPhotos


Ammons
continued from page 3
sports tickets and lost equipment.
The university was placed under
probation by the Southern
Association of Colleges and
Schools.
Under Ammons' leadership, the
accreditation was restored and its
finances improved. An audit done


two years later found the universi-
ty still needed to do a better job at
paying bills on time and keeping a
closer eye on employee use of
state-owned cell phones, but those
problems paled in comparison to
the previous report.
But hazing continued to be a
problem. White has provided let-
ters of suspension issued to dozens
of band members for hazing,


including many of which Ammons
was reportedly provided a copy.
Less than two weeks before
Champion's death, band member
Bria Hunter was hospitalized with
a broken leg and blood clots in
what authorities say was another
act of hazing. Three band members
have been charged in the beating.
And two days before Champion
died, White sent a letter to alumni,


urging them not to "return and per-
petuate the myth of various sec-
tional names."
But FAMU alumni have insisted
that the problem of hazing is wide-
spread across the country and that
too much attention is being focused
on their university.
"Name another university presi-
dent that suspended a president for
hazing." said Tommy Mitchell,


president of the FAMU National
Alumni Association. Mitchell also
went so far as to question "why is
that this hazing has gotten so much
attention?"
Ammons suspended the band after
Champion's death, dismissed
White and expelled four students in
connection with the hazing. White
was later placed on temporary
leave and the students were


allowed to attend class after state
authorities urged the university not
to take disciplinary action before
the investigation was complete.
The Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools Commission
on Colleges has warned Scott's
push to suspend Ammons could
affect the school's accreditation
because of "undue influence" on
the board from outside.


I


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5


December 22-28, 2011





























Churches Turning to Technology for Congregants


by Trymaine Lee, HP across the board, y
There was a time when the only people into their se
tablets discussed in most churches ing in with iPads."
were the two inscribed with the Ten From the smaller
Commandments, and church bul- neighborhood chui
letin boards and telephone megachurches, tec
grapevines were the most effective leaders and congre
means of spreading information to a unique ways to inc
flock. But these days more and more ogy in order to
Bishop TD. Jakes often preaches at his
Potter's House church in Dallas, Texas,
from an iPad rather than from handwrit-
ten notes.
The Abyssinian Baptist Church in
Harlem, N. Y, saves an estimated 2 million
sheets of paper a year by sending out its
bulletins and announcements via weekly
email blasts.
And the Rev. Thomas Bowen of Shiloh
Baptist Church in Washington, D.C., has
even used an iPadfor musical accompani-
ment during a funeral service.

churches are stepping up their tech- much easier. (They
nology game, outfitting their sanctu- $650 to $1195.)
aries with Wi-Fi and encouraging Some churches
congregants to use their smart the collection p
phones, iPads and other electronic instead taking tith
devices to follow along with the via electronic ki
minister's message, look up from the pews tl
Scripture or to send Twitter and Paypal. Others a
Facebook messages about the good funerals for out-o
word to their friends and followers, or Sunday service
"It used to be that every other per- shut in. The day
son was carrying a Bible when they sound guy, oversee
came to church," said Lance Goudy, phones, speakers
a member of Potter's House and the amplifier, have b
head of its IT department. "Now, church IT depart


young adults up to
eventies are walk-

r, more traditional
rches to the huge
h-savvy religious
:gants are finding
corporate technol-
modernize the
church-going
experience.
Some compa-
nies are begin-
ning to market
specialty prod-
ucts to the more
technology-
minded minis-
ters. One com-
pany, Little
Mountain, has
created the
iPulpit, a lectern
with a slot for
the iPad to
make preaching
from it that
y sell for between

are even passing
late less often,
ies and offerings
osks or directly
through sites like
re livestreaming
f-town mourners
s to the sick and
s of the church
being a few micro-
and perhaps an
een replaced by
nents, technology


ministries and in-house social media
machines.
"Technology is allowing families
to worship together again," said
Andre Barnes, the technology direc-
tor at Impact Church in Atlanta, Ga.,


ing behind her home church, St.
Paul Baptist Church, she said it was
comforting to know that her pastor
was just a few mouse-clicks away.
"I get daily devotionals from my
pastor. I can download his sermons


it has become a tool, with Bishop
Jakes pulling out his cellphone dur-
ing church and telling people to pull
out theirs and please text and tweet."
Even Pope Benedict XVI, the
Vatican and the Roman Catholic


The iPad has replaced the traditional paper made Bible in many pulpits across the country.


which has developed its own iPhone
app and where Twitter hashtags are
routinely flashed on a pair of big
screens during services. "While
mom is in the church with her
paperback Bible, the daughter is on
her cellphone. Mom is taking notes
with a pen and paper, but daughter is
taking notes, too, just through
Twitter."
When Theryl Jones moved from
Peoria, Ill., to Atlanta recently, leav-


i.





Seeking the lost for Christ -
Matthew 28:19 20


Pastor Landon Williams


8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship

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11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday 2 PM 3 PM

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A church

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School of Ministry Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.

Thursday High Praise Worship 7:00 p.m.

2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


and the notes and be a part of small
groups," said Jones, who also con-
fessed that "my iPhone IS my
Bible."
She also said her pastor, Rev.
Deveraux Hubbard Sr., is a "true
techie" and made his stance on
social networking during church
plain from the beginning.
"My pastor's favorite saying is, 'I
know you're going to text, tweet and
Facebook in church, so give them
some Jesus while you're at it!'" she
said. "It's a good way to share the
Gospel with your friends and fol-
lowers."
Popular religious leaders like
Jakes, whose Potter's House
Facebook page has 505,954 likes
and nearly 240,000 followers on
Twitter, have managed to expand
their reach in ways almost unimag-
inable in the days before the social
media and Internet explosion.
His followers and friends live as
far away as Nigeria, Europe and
Australia, and receive inspirational
tweets throughout the day, like this
tweet from last week:
The frequent tweeting, some
5,579 on a weekly basis, is an
important part of the church's larger
outreach strategy to keep people
connected to the church's message,
said Marc Jeffrey, head of social
media, at Potter's House.
"Our goal in the ministry is to
continue to find ways to connect
with people on any given platform
that is out there," said Jeffrey,
adding that most of the services at
Potter's House are streamed online.
"At a lot of churches several years
ago, you probably would have heard
the pastor make an announcement to
please silence your cellphone. Now


Church, perhaps the most traditional
of religious organizations, have
been bitten by the Twitter bug. The
Vatican's English-language Twitter
account has about 73,448 followers,
which is not world-shattering in the
Twitterverse, where Rev. Run (of
Run-DMC fame) has more than 2.5
million followers. The Dali Lama,
besting the both of them combined,
has over 3 million.
The introduction of technology
into the church can be a delicate
undertaking, several ministers said.
Older congregants sometimes see
the sanctuary and their faith as
sacred, not to be crossed with too
many wires and gizmos, while their
younger counterparts often want to
enjoy their religion on the go, or to
share their faith with others via
social media, sometimes before the
minister has even finished preach-
ing.
"I think some of the older people
say, 'We don't really need that in the
church, it's not sacred' -- that they
didn't need it when they were grow-
ing up, so why do they need it
now?" said Rev. Nicholas Richards,
a minister at Abyssinian Baptist
Church. "And young people want to
be able to have the same experience
that they have outside of the church,
inside of the church."
"I think the task for us, the leader-
ship at Abyssinian, is to blend both
of those perspectives," Richards
said. "We don't want to just take
wholeheartedly everything that's
happening outside of the church, but
at the same time, there are so many
things that we can learn from, espe-
cially from technology and how it
can help us spread the word and the
Gospel of Jesus."


There are also concerns about iso-
lating church members who might
not be technologically inclined due
to economic circumstances.
Abyssinian Baptist Church is in a
Harlem neighborhood that is slowly
gentrifying, but one that remains
largely poor.
"Technology requires a certain
amount of income," Richards said.
"Abyssinian by and large is a com-
munity church and reflects the
income and the economy of the
community, which right now is
depressed. We'd never want to get to
the point where we are exclusively
high-tech. I think that's not really
fair to the majority of the people
who are low-tech."
Rev. Michel Faulkner, pastor of
the 50-member New Horizon
Church in Harlem, said that, despite
some grumblings, his members have
opened up to using more modem
technologies. Not that they had
much of a choice.
"I let everyone know that, as
much as I love you, if you don't
have email, I can't really communi-
cate with you," said Faulkner, who
also said that PowerPoint replaced
Bibles and hymnals in his church
services nearly 15 years ago. Nearly
a third of the church's offerings are
donated online now through a web-
site called Acceptiva, similar to
Paypal, he said.
At Shiloh Baptist Church, the
church's two-person tech committee
wired most of the church, including
the sanctuary, with Wi-Fi -- as
announced by a 12-foot-high black-
and-gold sign that hangs outside one
of the church's entrances, reading
"Wi-Fi Zone." The church has
worked out deals with Microsoft to
offer church members hundreds of
dollars in discounts on Windows
and Office Suite, and once a month,
technicians are brought in to give
tutorials, install applications and
make computer repairs on the spot,
all free of charge. Some of the
teenagers from the church often vol-
unteer to help with texting support.
In just five years the church has
also been outfitted with a computer
lab, a projection system and a digi-
tal dashboard that streams informa-
tion to a number of monitors located
throughout the church, replacing the
old bulletin board, said Joy
Patterson, who serves on the
church's tech committee. Before the
digital dashboard, "it looked junky,"
Patterson said, with prayer requests
and announcements layered with
pushpins.
"Everyone laughs and says we are
pulling them and dragging them into
the modem era," said Patterson. "It's
amazing how just a lot of hand hold-
ing and constantly talking to people
about technology broke down some
of the fear and barriers."


[^li. ._ -... ~visit www.Bethelite.org


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church

215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


Weekly Services

A-, Sunday Morning Worship Midweek Services
7:40 a.m. and 10:40 a.m. Wednesday Noon Service
,"Miracle at Midday"
Church school 12 noon-1 p.m.
S '& 9:30 a.m. The Word from the Sons S
Bible Study and Daughters of Bethel
Bishop Rudolph 6:30 p.m. 3rd Sunday 4:00 p.m Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Sr. McKissick, Jr.
McKissick, Sr. Come share in Holy Communion on 1st Sundl at A40 and 10:40 a.m. M isi r
Senior Pastor Senior Pastor

Worship with us LIVE
;: on the web visit

| www.truth2powerministries.org
IM Iiil


Grace and Peace









December 22-28, 2011 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


0 P E1 RA T I ) N


C RI IT IC A L


Obesity and Black Women


Sharpton Sets Healthy

Example by Losing 1001b
Sby Amelia McGriff
SFried chicken, mac
and cheese and a side
of civil rights -- the
third item on the menu

S- but not when you are
talking to Rev. Al
Sharpton. He's lost
over 100 pounds and is
determined to keep it
off. Even President
Barack Obama recently
urged him to "go ahead and let loose a bit on Thanksgiving." Sharpton
responded:" I will not break my diet even with a presidential pardon."
The reason is all very simple for the host of MSNBC's PoliticsNation.
"I can speak much more easily now. I'm gliding rather than struggling."
The new stamina comes with sacrifice and one of the first thing
chopped out of the Reverend's diet was meat. As for the payoff, he says
he hopes it's one the entire black community reaps. "You can't address
our issues and demand social justice when you are a prisoner in your
own body, and you can't have a reckless social life when you are look-
ing for social justice."
In 2009, nearly 63 percent of all African-American men were obese,
and that number jumped to just over 77 percent for black women,
according to the National Stroke Association.
Although Rev. Sharpton did not plan on his own weight loss to be a
platform to address the overwhelming health issues that plague black
America, he's vocal about unveiling the demons that have shackled gen-
erations after generations into unhealthy lifestyles.
"Plenty of times in our neighborhoods you can't even get a salad. You
have to cross the tracks and go downtown to get a nutritious meal. We'll
never be healthy as a people until we take our communities back."
Rev Sharpton not only charges black entrepreneurs to open restau-
rants that embrace healthy menus, but says pastors bear a responsibili-
ty too.
Rev Sharpton's weight loss is a picture of self control at its best. He
says he weighed more than 300 pounds, but lost 30 in 2001 during a 40-
day fast in a Puerto Rican jail.
Sharpton admits a lengthy fast isn't the best or most healthy way to
start a weight loss program, but adds he liked the way he looked and
decided to stay the course. Motivation comes in all forms and often the
best source is family. It's something Reverend Sharpton cautions you to
keep in mind when you and your loved ones sit down to enjoy the "soul
food" feasts for the holidays.
"You should not celebrate being reckless. You are with your family,
the people you love, so why celebrate in a way that could take you away
from them. Celebrate in a way that shows you are thankful for another
year of life and plan to see another."


professor at the University of
Pennsylvania.
Research shows that opportuni-
ties for recess, sports, physical edu-
cation or just to go outside -
aren't spread evenly among chil-
dren.
"If you kind of add up those situ-
ations in urban, inner-city neigh-
borhoods where most African-
Americans live they are not as
available. That's been document-
ed," says Kumanyika, who studies
patterns of illness and health
behavior.
But research suggests that even
those girls who do engage in
sports and other forms of


American women are obese regular physical activity tend
to abandon it in their teen
or overweight ... carrying years and that's true not
those excess pounds can spike just for urban girls or black
the risk for several conditions girls, but all girls.
A National Institute. of
including heart disease, Health study that follov.ed


Type 2 diabetes, high
blood pressure and stroke.

women. Black women not only
carry more weight, but they start
adding extra pounds years before
their white counterparts.
So when does it begin, this
excess and unhealthy weight?
Research suggests the problem
starts early, and it may have a lot to
do with when girls give up regular
exercise.
Experts want kids to exercise at
least 60 minutes every day, but
among all children, black girls are
most likely to report they got no
physical activity in the past week.
A lack of access to exercise oppor-
tunities may be one big reason
why, says Shiriki Kumanyika, an
epidemiologist and public health


found a lot of competing interests
- be it part-time jobs or caring for
younger siblings or other family
members."
Researchers are beginning to
count up the cost of obesity, and
say women can pay a hefty price in
dollars- and health.
A sedentary lifestyle and obesity
may account for 25 to 30 percent of
some major cancers, including
colon, kidney and breast cancer in
postmenopausal women, according
to the National Cancer Institute.
Avoiding weight gain, by contrast,
can cut cancer risk.
In September 2011,
researchers at Boston ll0
University reported
that overweight and
obesity in African-
American women
increases
litheii iisk 1 l


girls for 10 years, begin-
ning at age 8 or 9, found
that, over time, leisure-
time physical activitN
declined dramatically. That
drop off was steepest for
African-Americans girls.
"What they found was that
by the age of 17 so that's .
the junior, senior year of
high school more than
half of black girls, and near-
ly a third of white girls were
reporting no leisure time
physical activity at all," sa,
Temple University researcher
Clare Lenhart.
There are lots of reasons \ i\
teen girls drop exercise from their
lives, says Lenhart: "They hate
found changes in enjoyment of
activities, in peer support or social
support for physical activity. The,,


death, particularly from heart dis-
ease. The investigators reviewed
body mass index-a measure of
body fat-and death rates for partic-
ipants in the ongoing Black
Women's Health Study. A BMI of
25 is considered overweight. The
study found a significant increased
death risk at a BMI of 27.5-that's
the BMI for a 5-foot-4-inch tall
woman who weighs 160 pounds.
Nearly 10 percent of all health
care spending in the United States,
$147 billion a year, is related to the
obesity epidemic. Individually,
obese people cost nearly $1,500
more a year in medical expens-
es compared to healthy-
weight people, according
to estimates from
researchers at George
Washington
University. Some of
that e\ia expense is
paid b\ IndiL iduals,
sonie is passed
along to their
employ. ers


In loving memory

of our mother,

MRS. DERRELL CYNTHIA

)OHNSON RICHARDSON
20 years has passed and Andreia, Karen,
Frederick III and Derrick look forward to when we
can Meet You at the Gate
A beautiful garden now stands alone,
missing the one who nurtured it
But now she is gone,
Her flowers still bloom, and the sun it still shines,
But the rain is like tear drops, for the ones left behind,
The weeds lay waiting to take the gardens beauty away,
But the beautiful memories of its keeper
are in our hearts to stay, she loved
every flower even some that were weeds,
So much love she would plant with each little seed,
But just like her flowers she was part of Gods plan,
So when it was her time he reached down his hand,
He look through the Garden searching for the best,
That's when he found Derrell, it was her time to rest,
It was hard for those who loved her, to just let her go, But
God had a spot in his garden, that needed a gentle soul,
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She'll meet you at the gate....


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December 22-28, 2011


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


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AROUND TOWN


What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene


FlaJax Dance
The FlaJax Club will hold its 82nd
Anniversary Dance on Friday,
December 23rd at the Wyndham
Riverwalk. Doors open at 9 p.m.
The festive event includes door
prizes, appetizers and music
Tickets or more information for the
formal event are available by call-
ing 945-3267.

Christmas Carol
at the Alhambra
The Alhambra Dinner Theater is
presenting the holiday show
"Christmas Carole," thru
December 24th to support the 2nd
annual Alhambra holiday toy drive.
Please bring a new unwrapped toy
for local charities. For reservations
call (904) 641-1212 or visit
www.alhambrajax.com.

Nunsense the Musical
The Alhambra Theater presents
the play "Nunsense," opening
December 30th through February
5th starring former Miss America
Jacksonville Native Leanza
Cornett. Tickets on sale at the
Alhambra Box office, 12000 Beach
Blvd or call (904) 641-1212 or visit
www.alhambrajax.com.

P.R.I.D.E. Book
Club Meeting
The next P.R.I.D.E. Book Club
meeting will be Saturday, January
7th at 2 p.m., at the American
Beach Community Center, 1600


Julia Street, American Beach,
Fernandina Beach, Fl. 32034.
"Smarty Pants" by G. W. Reynolds,
III will be discussed. For more
information contact host Marsha
Phelts at 904-945-0837.

Wicked from Broadway
After breaking box office records
and selling out in record time in
2009, "WICKED," Broadway's
biggest blockbuster will return to
Jacksonville at the Times-Union
Center's Moran Theater, 501 W.
State St., from January 4-22, 2012
for 24 performances. For tickets or
more information contact Sarah
Roy at (904) 632-3211.

25th Annual
MLK Breakfast
Mayor Alvin Brown invites you to
commemorate the 83rd anniversary
of Dr. Kings birth with a breakfast
honoring his life and his dream for
social change. Activities include
keynote speaker Dr. Bernice A.
King, breakfast and entertainment
at the Prime Osborn Convention
Center, Friday, January 13, 2012,
7:30 a.m. 9:00 a.m. For more
information call COJ special events
department at (904) 630-CITY.

Katt Williams
in Concert
Funnny man Kat Williams will be
in concert for one night only at the
Times Union Center for performing
arts. The talented comedian who
has also appeared in several movies


will be here on Saturday, January
15th. Contact Ticketmaster for your
ticket.

Annual Old Timers
MLK Day Tournament
The annual Old Timers tribute and
celebration on MLK Day, now in
honor of the last Ronald Elps, will
be held on Monday, January 16th at
the Charles "Boobie" Clark Park.
The celebration includes a youth
basketball tournament at 10 a.m.
and the Old Timers Football
Tournament at 3 p.m. wth music by
DJ Roach. To participate or donate,
call 405-3723.

Ringling Bros. Circus
Ringling Bros. and Barnum &
Bailey Circus will be in town
January 19 22, 2012, at the
Jacksonville Veterans Memorial
Arena. For tickets call (904) 630-
3900.

Jax Diversity
Network Meeting
Mark your calendar for the next
Jacksonville Diversity Network
meeting, Thursday, January 26th, at
6 p.m. For location info, email
info@JacksonvilleDiversityNetwork.org.

Real Talk...Real
Change III: Youth
Rights Right Now!
Youth Real Talk conversation will
take place Thursday, January 26,


2012 from 5:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m., at
the Jacksonville Public Library, 303
N Laura St. The exchange will deal
with youth rights, issues in health,
justice, family, social, and govern-
ment arenas. For more information
contact the JPL at (904) 630-2665.

Ribault Class of '78
travels to Atlanta
Come join the Ribault High
School Class of 1978 as they pre-
pare to come together for the Honda
Battle Of The Bands at the Georgia
Dome in Atlanta, Georgia,
Saturday, January 28, 2012 at 3:00
p.m. For more information on the
trip, call 410-9603 or email
rhsco 978@gmail.com.

Tyler Perry's New Play
Tyler Perry, has assembled an all-
new cast of performers "The Haves
and The Have Nots." The play
arrives at the Times-Union Center
Moran Theater, Wednesday,
February 1, 2012 at 8:00 p.m. For
tickets, call 353-3309.

"Seize the Date" Single
Lawyer Auction
Tickets are now on sale for the
Carpe Circa "SEIZE THE DATE"
Bachelor/Bachelorette Auction
hosted by the Jacksonville Women
Lawyers Association (JWLA). The
event to benefit Jacksonville Area
Legal Aid (JALA) will take place
on February 9, 2012 at The River
Club. The Bachelor and
Bachelorettes will be made up of


single local attorneys. Tickets are
on sale for $30.00 in advance or
two for $50.00. For more informa-
tion. contact Christa Figgins at
356-8371, ext. 316.

Gladys Knight
on Stage!
Gladys Knight has long been one
of the greatest! Come hear the
seven-time Grammy winner,
Saturday, February 18th at 8 p.m.


at the Florida Theater. For tickets
visit www.floridatheater.com or call
(904) 355-2787.

UniverSoul Circus
The UniverSoul Circus will return
to Jacksonville February 28-
March 4th. The big top tent will be
headquartered by the Prime
Osborne Convention Center. For
more information, contact
Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000.


Appeal for your excess clothes
The Millions More Movement, Jacksonville Local Organizing
Committee Inc.,a non-profit organization is appealing for your excess
clothes,clothes hangers, shoes of all sizes for women, men,children and
school supplies.These items will be used in their organization's next
"Clothes Give-A-Way". These items can be brought to 916 N.Myrtle
Avenue, Monday through Friday between the hours of 9:00a.m. 5:00
p.m.You can also call us to pickup your donations.Our contact number is
904-240-9133 .If you would like to learn more about JLOC Inc., MMM
visit their website, www.jaxloc.org. Pick ups are available.

Kuumba Festival wants your old

newspapers for fund raising efforts
The Kuumba African-American Arts Festival is raising funds by recy-
cling your old papers. Bring your newspapers to their special recycling bin
located at the WinnDixie on Moncrief and Soutel.


Stanton Class of 1963 now meeting
New Stanton Sr. High School Class of 1963 will meet the third Sunday of
each month to prepare for their 50th class reunion in the year 2013. The
meetings will be held at the Highlands Branch Library, 1826 Dunn
Avenue, 3:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. Contact Gracie Smith Foreman or call (904)
766-5221.


Do You Have an event

for Around Town?

The Jacksonville Free Press is please to
print your public service announcements
and coming events free of charge, news
deadline is Monday at 6 p.m. by the week
you would like your information to be
printed. Information can be sent via
email, fax, brought into our office or
mailed in. Please be sure to include the
5W's who, what, when, where, why and
you must include a contact number.


Email JFreePress@aol.com


Fax (904) 765-3803


Mail: Coming Events Jacksonville Free Press
903 W. Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32203



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Page 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press


December 22-28, 2011











December 22-28. 2011


Mrs. Perry's Free Press Page 9


FOR THE WEEK OF DECEMBER 20 26, 2011


WSSU Sports Photo
"BAADEST" BOY: WSSU
DB Alton Keaton named
top black college defender
in final BCSP selections.


I 18th ANNUAL BCSP "BAAD TEAM" OF
BLACK COLLEGE ALL-STARS SELECTED






STAT CORNER

WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


HIGHEST ATTENDANCE AT
2011 BLACK COLLEGE FOOTBALL GAMES
(Last year's finish in parenthesis)

1. MAGIC CITY CLASSIC Oct. 29 Legion Field, Birmingham
Alabama A&M vs. Alabama State (1st) 66,473
2. FLORIDA CLASSIC Nov. 19 Citrus Bowl, Orlando
Florida A&M vs. Bethune-Cookman (2nd) 60,218
3. ATLANTA CLASSIC Sept. 24 Georgia Dome, Atlanta
Florida A&M vs. Tennessee State (3rd) 59,373
4. SOUTHERN HERITAGE CLASSIC Sept. 10 Liberty Bowl, Memphis
Jackson State vs. Tennessee State (4th) 43,532
5. BAYOU CLASSIC Nov. 26 Super Dome, New Orleans
Southern vs. Grambling State (6th) 40,715
6. JACKSON STATE HOMECOMING Oct. 8 Mem. Stad. Jackson
vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff (7th) 38,722
7. STATE FAIR CLASSIC Oct. 1 Cotton Bowl, Dallas
Prairie View A&M vs. Grambling State (5th) 37,311
8. CIRCLE CITY CLASSIC Oct. 1 Lucas Oil Stadium, Indianapolis
Albany State vs. Kentucky State (8th) 36,831
9. CHICAGO CLASSIC, Sept. 3 Soldier's Field Chicago
Hampton vs. Alabama A&M INA) 35,653
10. CAPITAL CITY CLASSIC Nov. 19 Mem. Stadium Jackson, MS
Alcorn State @Jackson State (10th) 31,501
11. TUSKEGEE HOMECOMING Nov. 5 -Abbott Stad. Tuskegee, AL
vs. Miles (17th) 26,645
12. JACKSON ST. HOME GAME Sept. 29 Mem. Stad. Jackson, MS
vs. Texas Southern 26,000
13. JOHN MERRITT CLASSIC Sept. 3 Titans Stadium, Nashville, TN
Tennessee State vs. Alabama A&M (19th) 25,209
14. NY URBAN LEAGUE CLASSIC Sept. 24 M'lands, E. R'ford, NJ
Morgan State vs. Howard (9th) 24,996
15. DELTA LITERACY CLASSIC Sept. 3 Mem. Stad., Lil Rock, AR
Langston vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff (12th) 24,474
16. MOREHOUSE HOMECOMING Oct. 22 Harvey Stad. -Atlanta
vs. Benedict 23,589
17. SWAC CHAMPIONSHIP GAME Dec. 10 Legion Field, Birmingham
Grambling State vs. Alabama A&M (20th) 23,476
18. FLORIDA A&M HOMECOMING Oct. 8 Tallahassee, FL
vs. Morgan State (11th) 23,400
19. WSSU HOMECOMING GAME Oct. 1 B-G Stad., W-S, NC
vs. Johnson C.Smith 22,000
20. S. C. STATE HOMECOMING Oct. 8 Dawson Stad. Or'burg, SC
vs. NC Central (22nd) 22,181
21. FOUNTAIN CITY CLASSIC Nov. 5 Mem. Stad., Columbus., GA
Albany State vs. Fort Valley State (15th) 21,953
22. SOUTHERN HOME GAME Sept.17 Mumford Stad. Baton Rouge
vs. Jackson State 21,734
23. JACKSON STATE HOME GAME Nov. 5 Mem. Stadium Jackson
vs. Grambling State (NR) 21,576
24. NC A&T HOMECOMING Oct. 9 -Aggie Stadium, Greensboro, NC
vs. Morgan State (25th) 21,500
25. FLORIDAA&M HOME GAME Sept. 3 Bragg Stad. -Tallah., FL
vs. Fort Valley State 21,162


800,224
32,008 average (25, games over 20,000)
853.723
31,619 average (27 games over 20,000)



HIGHEST ATTENDANCE AT
2011 HOMECOMING GAMES
(Last year's finish in parenthesis)


1 JACKSON STATE vs. Ark. PB. Oct. 8 Jackson, MS (2)
2 TUSKEGEE vs. Miles Nov. 5 Tuskegee, AL (3)
3 MOREHOUSE vs. Benedict Oct. 22 Atlanta (9)
4 FLORIDA A&M vs. Howard Oct. 8 T'hassee, FL (1)
5 SC STATE vs. NC Central Oct. 8 Orangeburg, SC (4)
6 W-SALEM STATE Oct. 1 vs. JC Smith., W-S. NC (10)
7 CLARK ATLANTA vs. Miles Oct. 8 -Atlanta (11)
8 TENNESSEE STATE vs. UT-Martin Nov. 12 N'ville, TN (5)
9 NC A&T vs. Delaware State Oct. 15 Greensboro, NC (6)
10 NORFOLK STATE vs. NC A&T Oct. 29 Norfolk, VA (7)
11 ALABAMA STATE vs. Tuskegee Nov. 24 M'gmery, AL (12)
12 ALABAMA A&M vs. Miss. Valley St. Oct. 8 H'ville, AL (19)
13 ALCORN STATE vs. Con.-Selma Oct. 22 -Alcorn, MS (NR)
14 SOUTHERN vs. Alcorn St. Oct. 29 Baton Rouge, LA (8)
15 MORGAN STATE vs. Sav. State Oct. 8 B'more (15)
16 KENTUCKY STATE vs. Ft. Valley St. Oct. 8 (NR)
17 MILES vs. Lane Oct. 22 Fairfield, AL (17)
18 ARK. PINE BLUFF vs. Alabama St. Nov. 5 PB, AR (13)
19 NC CENTRAL vs. B-Cookman Oct. 29 Durham, NC (16)
20 GRAMBLING vs. Miss. Valley St. Oct. 22 Grambl., LA (14)
21 PRAIRIE VIEW A&M vs. Alab. A&M Nov. 19 Tucsal'sa, AL
22 FORT VALLEY STATE vs. Stillman Oct. 22 FV, GA (18)
23 SAVANNAH STATE vs. Hampton Oct. 29 Sav, GA (NR)


2011 HOMECOMINGS TOTAL


2010 HOMECOMINGS TOTAL


38,722
26,645
23,589
23,400
22,181
22,000
21,939
19,537
19,454
18,752
18,587
16,827
16,000
15,011
14,356
13,841
13,613
13,473
12,516
11,137
10,500
10,435
10,325


412,840
17,949 Average (23 games over 10,000)
375,297
17,871 average (21 games, over 10,000)


FIRST TEAM OFFENSE
QB Kameron Smith, So., Winston-Salem State RB David Carter, Jr., Morehouse;
Nicholas Cooper, Sr., Winston-Salem State WR Nick Andrews, Sr., Alabama State;
RaphaelAmey, Sr., Kentucky State TE Renty Rollins, Sr., Jackson State OL Darrell
Billiot, Sr., Winston-Salem State; Kendall Noble, Sr., Norfolk State; Sanford Banks,
Jr., Grambling State; Tim Tussey,Sr., Prairie ViewA&M; Marion Jones, Jr., Morehouse
PK Ryan Estep, Sr., Norfolk State KR Demario Barber, Sr., Fort Valley State
FIRST TEAM DEFENSE
DL -Akeem Ward, Sr., Winston-Salem State; Ryan Davis, Sr., Bethune-Cookman;
Joseph Lebeau, Jr., Jackson State; Josh Turner, Sr., Norfolk State LB Corwin Ham-
mond, Sr., Norfolk State; Keith Pough, Jr., Howard; Cliff Exama, Sr., Grambling State
DB Kejuan Riley, Jr., Alabama State; Justin Ferrell, Sr., NC A&T; Alton Keaton, Sr.,
Winston-Salem State; Moses Ellis, Sr., Prairie View A&M P Marquette King, Sr.,
Fort Valley State

SECOND TEAM OFFENSE
QB Chris Walley, Sr., Norfolk State RB Daronte McNeill, Jr., ECSU; Mike Mayhew, Sr., NC A&T; WR
- Wallace Miles, Sr., NC A&T; Mario Louis, Sr., Grambling State TE Lamont Bryant, Sr., Morgan State OL
- Roderick Gladney, Jackson State; Jessie Mitchell, Sr., Kentucky State; Natiel Curry, Sr., Bethune-Cookman;
Jamal Johnson, Alabama A&M; Steven Robinson, Sr., Florida A&M PK Godfrey Jarmin, Sr., Tennessee
State KR James Sanders, Jr., Shaw
SECOND TEAM DEFENSE
DL Corey Hart, Sr., Alabama A&M; Sackie Kerkulah, Sr., Howard; Adrian Hamilton, Prairie View A&M; Tim
Green, Jr., Lincoln (Pa) LB Willie Fuller, Alabama A&M; Donovan Richard, Sr., SC State; Jeremy Pruitt, Sr.,
Virginia State DB Micah Pellerin, Sr., Hampton; Dominique Ellis, Sr. SC State; Christian Thompson, Sr.,
SC State; Kenny Turner, Sr., Bowie State P -Bobby Wenzig, Jr., Alabama State

THIRD TEAM OFFENSE
QB Casey Therriault, Sr., Jackson State RB Dawrence Roberts, So., GSU; Carlos Ross, Jr.,Langston WR
- Chris Slaughter, Jr., FVSU; Robert Holland, Jr., Chowan TE Jovan Washington, Sr., Kentucky State OL
- Marion Jones, Jr., Morehouse; Hakeem Lassiter, Jr., Albany State; Baron Coffin, Sr.,Elizabeth City State;
Blake Matthews, Sr., Norfolk State; Terren Jones, Alabama State PK Blake Erickson, Sr., SC State; KR
- Dominique Fitzgerald, Sr., Winston-Salem State
THIRD TEAM DEFENSE
DL- Pat Washington, Sr., SC State; Charles Deas, Jr., Shaw; Marquis Jackson, Sr., Alcorn State; Brad Davis,
Jr., Elizabeth City State LB Carlos Fields, So., Winston-Salem State; Jamie Payton, Southern; Brandon
Mcllwee, Sr., Lincoln (Pa) DB John Ojo, Jr., Florida A&M; Josh Scales, So.,Fayetteville State; Justin Oliver,
Jr., Morehouse; Rico Porch, Alabama A&M P Arturo Tomayo, Sr., Alcorn State


Carter Amey


Ward


Davis
Davis


Andrews


Maynor


D. Ellis Ferrell Turner


Cooper, Keaton,



Maynor, WSSU sweep



"Baad Team" honors

LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor
This week's pre-Christmas edition of the BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS PAGE puts a
wrap on the 2011 black college football season with a final look at individual and
attendance numbers and the selection of the 18th annual "Baad Team" of all-stars.
The "Baad Team"
Six-foot, 245-pound running back Nicholas Cooper of CIAA champion and
final BCSP No. 1 Winston-Salem State is our selection as the 2011 BCSP player
of the year.
Cooper ran for over 1,800 yards while leading the Rams on an unprecedented
run to the NCAA Div. II semifinals. The Rams 'sledgehammer' running back rambled
for an average of 129 yards per game, getting 6.8 yards per carry and scoring 22
touchdowns. He heads a list of seven WSSU Rams' players selected to the BCSP
"Baad Teams."
WSSU defensive back Alton Keaton wins the BCSP defensive player of the
year award based on his outstanding leadership of the Rams' defense. Keaton, by
no means a one-man wrecking crew, still was able to stand out on a team full of
standouts. He led the Rams with 104 total tackles including a whopping 71 solos,
tied for the team lead (with first team Baad Team selectee, defensive lineman Akeem
Ward) with 13 tackles for losses, recorded two sacks, two interceptions, two forced
fumbles, two blocked kicks and one fumble recovery. The 5-7, 180-pound senior,
who was selected as the CIAA defensive player of the year, beat out a host of great
defensive performers for the award.
Second-year WSSU head coach Connell Maynor takes home the 2011 BCSP
Coach of the Year award after guiding the Rams to an undefeated regular season, the
CIAA championship and two wins in the NCAA Div. II playoffs to reach the Final
Four. His selection gives the Rams a clean sweep of the top team and individual
awards for the 2011 season. Maynor edged Pete Adrian, who guided the Norfolk
State Spartans to their first-ever MEAC title and FCS playoff berth, and first-year
head coach Reginald Ruffin who led the Miles Golden Bears to a win in the first
SIAC championship game.
Attendance Matters
The Oct. 29 Magic City Classic in Birmingham repeated as the top attended game
in black college football. The 'Classic' match-up of Alabama A&M and Alabama
State at Legion Field drew 66,473 fans for this year's barn-burner. A&M won this
year's game 20-19 en route to earning place in the SWAC Championship Game in
December. Jackson State's Oct. 8 homecoming date vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff, that
drew 38,722 fans, topped the homecoming attendance list (see STAT CORNER).


FINAL 2011 INDIVIDUAL
FOOTBALL STATISTICS LEADERS


RUSHING YARDS
CARTER, David MHC
McNEILL, Daronte ECSU
COOPER, Nicholas WSS
ROBERTS, Daw. GSU
MAYHEW, Mike NCAT
ROSS, Carlos LANG
LACEY, Kedarius -AAM

PASSING YARDS CL
THERRIAULT, C JSU SI
NOLAND, Jerrel KSU SI
STOVER, Cam. CHO SI
PHILLIPS, Ricky WVS
BACOTE, Teddy SAC SI
COOK, Doug LIV FI
WALLEY, Chris NSU SI
JENNINGS, Stan-ALB SI
ELKO, Nick DSU JR
LEGREE, David HAM SI
WALLACE, Keahn JCS FI
SMALLS, Riko TXS JF
SMITH, Kameron WSS JF


RECEPTIONS CL
ANDREWS, Nick-ALS SR
RICHARDS, Brian SAC SO
AMEY, Raphael KSU SR
MILES, Wallace NCAT SR
BOYCE, Xavier NSU JR
SMITH, Jamian SAC SR
WILSON, Justin DSU SR
TARPLEY, Tray DSU SR

RECEIVING YARDS CL
AMEY, Raphael KSU SR
ANDREWS, Nick-ALS SR
SLAUGHTER, C. FVS JR
MILES, Wallace NCA SR
LOUIS, Mario GSU SR
HOLLAND, Robt. CHO JR
RICHARDS, Brian SAC SO
COSTON, Matt LINP JR

TOTAL OFFENSE CL
THERRIAULT,C. JSU SR
NOLAND, Jerrel KSU SR
PHILLIPS, Ricky WVS
WALLACE, Keahn JCS FR
WALLEY, Chirs NSU SR
STOVER, Cam CHO SO
JENNINGS, Stan-ALB SR
COOK, Doug LINP FR
BACOTE, Teddy SAC SO

SCORING CL
McNEILL, Dar. ECS JR
CARTER, David MHC JR
COOPER, Nick -WSS SR
LOUIS, Mario GSU SR
HOLLAND, Rob't- CHO JR
BAILEY, Colon FSU SO
JONES, Steph. -APB SR

KICKOFF RETURNS CL
LANGFORD, J. SHA JR
RANDALL, Ant. CHO FR
WILLIAMS, Jr. CHO FR
ANDERSON, T. LIV FR
MASSEY, Keith KSU SR
PATTERSON, E. GSU JR

PUNT RETURNS CL
BARBER, Dem. FVS SR
FITZGERALD, D. WSS SR
AMEY, Raphael KSU SR
ELLIS, Dominniq. PV SR
DRUMMOND, D. SCS SO
RANDALL, Ant. CHO FR

ALL PURPOSE CL
CARTER, David MHC JR
AMEY, Raphael KSU SR
COOPER, Nick WSS SR
TARPLEY, Travis DSU JR
McNEILL, Dar. ECS JR
WADDY, Jerm- PV SR
BABB, Justin SSU SR
PUNTING CL
KING, Marquette FVS SR
TAMAYO, Arturo -ALC SR
WENZIG, Bobby-ALS JR
PATRIDGE, Ron STL JR
RUDD, William VSU SR
TYLER, Rabb JCS SR
THAYER, Landon WSS JR
SACKS CL
HAMILTON, Adr. PV SR
GREEN, Tim LINP JR
LEBEAU, Jos. JSU JR
ROBINSON, Don. JSU SR
HART, Corey -AA&M SR
WILLIAMS.Scot- MHC JR
DAVIS, Ryan BCU SR
HARRISKentrell-VUU JR
KERKULAH, S.- HOW SR

TACKLES cL
PRUITT, J. VSU LB SR
WILSON, D. CSU LB SR
McELWEE, L. LINP LB SR
JONES, D.- LINP LB SR
POUGH, Keith HOW JR
RICHARD, Don. SCS SR
EXAMA, Cliff GSU SR
JONES,C LAN LB JR

INTERCEPTIONS CL
SCALES, Josh FSU SO
RILEY, Kejuan -ALS JR
FUTCH,Tyren LAN JR
AVERY,Justin LIV FR
EVANs, Darnell SHW SO


YDS AVG
1495 6.4
1647 4.7
1808 6.8


TDS AVG/G
19 149.5
22 137.2
22 129.1


SO 10 199 1102 5.5 8 110.2


SR 11 231
IR 10 162
IR 12 285

G COM -A INT
11 272-453-15
9 194-324-7
8 153-283-10
10 206-377-10
10 188-325-16
9 185-348-10
12 206-362-6
12 169-344-13
10 206-362-16
8 141-229-4
10 167-300-12
11 166-316-9
14 208-355-10


REC YDS
78 1095
63 758
68 1038
70 1048
68 750
611 704
54 563
66 735

REC YDS
68 1038
78 1095
49 957
70 1048
51 1129
67 914
63 758
54 821

RUSH PASS
103 3808
90 2294
267 2460
473 2005
287 2672
49 1881
86 2662
-23 2054
-74 2782

TDS FGS
23 0
19 0
24 0
18 0
13 0
12 0
12 0

RET YDS
15 556
11 333
11 333
20 556
25 644
24 603

RET YDS
23 452
19 327
18 269
26 377
20 272
11 148

Rush Rec
1495 47
0 1038
1808 233
116 735
1647 73
227 116
525 103


1120 4.8
362 5.9
1143 4.(

PCT
60.0
59.9
54.1
54.6
57.8
53.2
68.7
49.1
56.9
61.6
55.7
52.5
58.6


TD
10
8
7
6
4
5
6
4

TD
7
10
10
6
18
13
8
7

PLAYS
547
403
490
463
446
352
426
411
354

PAT
2
0
0
0
6
0
0

TD
3
1
1
2
3
0


YPC
14.0
12.0
15.3
15.0
11.0
11.5
10.4
11.1


104.8
96.2
95.2


8
9


Y
3
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2


DS TDS
808 27
294 15
881 19
460 18
282 22
054 12
672 19
662 24
060 15
636 10
005 16
177 12
706 33

YDSIG
99.5
84.2
103.8
95.3
62.5
70.4
62.6
66.8


AVGIG
346.2
254.9
235.1
246.0
228.4
228.2
222.7
221.8
206.0
204.5
200.5
197.9
193.3

REC/G
7.1
7.0
6.8
6.4
5.7
6.1
6.0
6.0


YPC YDSIG
15.3 103.8
14.0 99.5
19.5 95.7
15.0 95.3
22.1 94.1
13.6 91.4
12.0 84.2
15.2 82.1

YDS AVG/G
3911 355.5
2384 264.9
2727 272.7
2478 247.8
2959 246.6
1930 241.7
2748 229.0
2031 225.7
2208 220.8

PTS AVGIG
140 11.7
114 11.4
144 10.3
108 9.0
84 8.4
72 8.0
72 8.0

LNG AVG
37.0
30.2
30.2
100 27.8
85 25.8
56 25.1

LNG AVG
19.6
17.2
14.9
14.5
13.6
13.4


G NO
10 60
10 67
11 71
11 57
10 58
11 48
14 46

G SOL
11 17
10 14
11 15
10 13
12 15
8 9
11 11
8 7
9 9

G SOL
8 42
9 51
10 77
10 70
11 71
11 60
12 76
10 44

G INT
8 7
11 9
9 6
8
10 6


20111 -LA K O LE EBA KE B LL(ens -tndns and eeklyHonos t 1/8


ACIAA CENTRAL INTERCOLLEGIATE
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
CONF ALL
N. DIVISION W L W L
Virginia Union 1 0 6 7
Bowie State 0 0 8 1
Eliz.CityState 0 0 6 4
Chowan 0 0 5 5
Lincoln 0 0 5 6
Virginia State 0 1 1 7


S. DIVISION
Winston-Salem St;
Shaw
Livingstone
St. Augustine's
J. C. Smith
Fayetteville State


ate 0
0
0
0
0
0


CIAA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER-Trevin Parks, 5-11,Jr., G,JCSU- Had29points
vs Charleston Averaging 23 2 points on season
ROOKIE Glenn Patterson, 5-8, Fr., G. ECSU In
three games, averaged 8.3 points Also had 8 assists
and 2 steals.
NEWCOMER Junius Chaney, 6-8, Jr.. C, SHAW
- Averaged 14 points, 93 rebounds in 2-1 week In
win over Columbus Slate, had 20 points. 14 rebounds
and 3 blocks
COACH c Darrell Brooks, BSU- His Bulldogs improved
to 8-1 with 94-93 win over Mercyhurst.


RMEAC MID EASTERN
M EA C ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CONF ALL
W L W L
Norfolk State 2 0 7 4
NC Central 1 0 5 5
Bethune-Cookman 1 0 3 7
Delaware State 1 1 4 6
Hampton 1 1 4 7
Savannah State 1 1 4 8
Howard 1 1 3 8
N. Carolina A&T 0 1 4 7
South Carolina State 0 1 4 7
Md.-Eastern Shore 0 1 3 9
Florida A&M 0 1 2 8
CoppinState 0 0 4 5
Morgan State 0 0 1 7
MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER Tony Gallo, 5-11, Sr., G, CSU Had career-
high 27 points in win over Towson. Had 6 3-pointers. 4
assists. 2 rebounds and 1 steal in the win
ROOKIE-Taariq Cephas, 5-9, Fr.,G,CSU Had 19poinis
on 5-of-8shooting from the field 3-of-5 from behind the arc.
5 assists, 3 steals and 2 rebounds vs Towson
DEFENSE- Kevin Thompson, 6-8, Sr., F. MSU- Had 12
rebounds, 4 blocks and 1 steal in in over UMBC Added
17 points and 4 assists in the win


SIA C SOUTHERN INTERCOLLEGIATE
S ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CONF ALL
W L W L
LeMoyne-Owen 4 0 4 1
Paine 3 0 4 1
Benedict 2 0 3 1
Miles 4 1 4 3
Fort Valley 2 2 2 3
Clark Atlanta 1 1 1 5
Claflin 3 5 3 6
Morehouse 1 2 1 4
Tuskegee 1 2 1 4
Stillman 1 3 3 3
Albany State 1 3 2 4
Kentucky State 1 3 1 3
Lane 0 2 0 4

SIAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Calvin Sloudemire, 6-7, Sr., F/C, LOC In win
over Miles, had 18 points. 8 rebounds 3 assists
3 blocksand a steal Is Ith in scoring (13 8 ppg )
and ninth in rebounding (7 0 rpg.).
NEWCOMER
Eric Lipkin, 6-1, Sr., G, MILES Averaged 153
points. 6 8 assists 4 5 rebounds, 1 steal in four
games NWCC transfer leads SIAC in assists (5.9
per game) and is fourTh in scoring (16 6 ppg )


SWAC sf.OUTHWESTERN
S W W r ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CONF ALL
W L W L
Alabama A&M 0 0 2 4
PrairieView A&M 0 0 3 7
Southern 0 0 3 8
Jackson State 0 0 3 9
Alabama State 0 0 2 7
Miss. Valley St. 0 0 2 7
Texas Southern 0 0 1 7
Alcom State 0 0 1 8
Ark. Pine Bluff 0 0 1 8
GramblingState 0 0 0 7
SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
Kelsey Howard, 6-3. Fr., G, JACKSON STATE Scored
27 ponlson 9 of 14 shooting including 5 of 9 on 3s in win
over SMU Also had four rebounds. two assists and two
steals Came back to get 10 points, 4 rebounds in loss
to North Texas
NEWCOMER
Demondre Chapman, 6-7, Soph., F, PRAIRIE VIEW
A&M Scored 21 points and pulled down 10 rebounds in
win over Dallas Chr sian


AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XVIII, No. 21


0


201 A TAMOFBLCKCOLEE OOTAL L-SA


WHO'S

BAAD??


2011 TOTAL


2010 TOTAL


_ ________ I 1






December 22-28, 2011


PEACE OF MIND, REINVENTED


C-


AAAAA


5-STAR OVERALL SAFETY RATING'
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2012 BEST RESALE VALUE AWARD'
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Pa e 10 Ms Perry's Free s


x gr V-I K%, .


I


~r--1,--- .~..~*n ---I:-- rr-*~---~--


.4- .. ..,v -- "- ,












Jennifer Williams: The Serious Business Woman Behind the Basketball Wives


By Renee Flagler (The
Network Journal)
Reality TV star Jennifer
Williams of Basketball Wives
is more than just a pretty face.
This savvy entrepreneur
knows how to maximize
opportunities. Before signing
on to the hit reality show,
Basketball Wives, Williams
was part owner of Flirty Girl
Fitness, a unique women-only
fitness studio that places an
entertaining spin on staying
fit.
With studios currently
located in Toronto and
Chicago, the gym offers typi-
cal fitness classes, yoga, box-
ing, and zumba in addition to
unique workout experiences
and social gatherings. When
Williams signed on to do the
show, she decided it was time
to begin a new business ven-
ture. She knew that being on
the show would offer a vast
amount of exposure, so she
came up with a product to
manufacture and sell. It was
then that Williams launched


Lucid Cosmetics, along with
cosmetic veteran, Michael
Todd Cosmetics, and celebri-
ty graphic artist and designer.
J. Shaw Designs.
"I designed everything from
the container and packaging
to the colors. I was very
hands on. It was time-con-
suming to film the show
while trying to launch a prod-
uct line. I learned a lot and
have had some challenges,"
says Williams.
Contrary to what fans of the
show think, Williams wasn't
always a basketball wife. She
graduated cum laude with a
degree in political science
from Fairleigh Dickerson
University with goals of
becoming an attorney.
However, after she began
working at a law firm, she
decided to pursue other inter-
ests. She also worked in the
real estate industry and is a
licensed real estate broker in
the state of New Jersey where
she has sold upscale proper-
ties.


Beyonce's parents
o divorce after 31 years
The countdown has been
long -- two years to be
exact -- but Beyonce's par-
ents, Mathew and Tina
Knowles, have finally
ended their 31-year mar-
riage,
News of the split first
surfaced in 2009 after it
Emerged that Mathew had
fathered a child with for-
mer Scrubs actress Alexsandra Wright.
Though the original divorce filing was dropped last year after both
Mathew and Tina failed to appear in court, Tina filed a divorce petition
again in August of this year, claiming that the marriage was "insupportable
because of discord or conflict of personalities which prevents any reason-
able expectation of reconciliation," according to TMZ.
The final decree of divorce was issued last month in a Texas court.
Earlier this year, Mathew Knowles was accused of stealing money from
Beyonce on a tour and taking funds to which he was not entitled.
Knowles refuted the claims while the singer ordered an audit of his Music
World Entertainment company. The pair ended their management relation-
ship in March.

Legendary Singer Etta


James Terminally Ill


Grammy-winning R&B singer
Etta James is terminally ill, her
live-in physician said in an inter-
view this week that confirmed
reports of the singer's fading health.
Dr. Elaine James, who is no rela-
tion to the singer, told a California
newspaper in a video interview that
the 73-year-old "At Last" singer has
leukemia, dementia and kidney dis-
ease among her "many, many ill-
nesses."
"At the present time, Etta is con-
sidered terminally ill," the doctor
told the Press-Enterprise newspaper
in Riverside, California, east of Los
Angeles. Dr. James added that the
diagnosis was made about two
weeks ago by three medical spe-
cialists including an oncologist and
an internist from a local hospital
where the singer is frequently treat-
ed.
James' two sons, Donto and
Sametto, told Reuters on Friday
that they were not sure the termi-
nally ill diagnosis was accurate and
it was announced without the fami-
ly's agreement.
The singer's sons are currently
involved in a court battle with their
stepfather Artis Mills over conser-
vatorship of James' $1 million
estate.
Both sons agree that their moth-
er's health is deteriorating and felt
that she should be admitted to hos-
pital rather than receiving care at
her home in Riverside.
"I saw her the day before yester-
day, and I think she needs to be in
the hospital. She doesn't look
good," said Donto James.
With songs like "The
Wallflower" and "Good Rockin'
Daddy," James, a three-time


Etta James
Grammy winner, was a key figure
in the early days of rock 'n' roll and
was inducted into the Rock and
Roll Hall of Fame in 1993.
The singer has battled obesity
and heroin addiction throughout her
life. She lost more than 200 pounds
after undergoing gastric bypass sur-
gery in 2003.
More recently, she was hospital-
ized in 2010 with numerous ail-
ments including a bloodstream
infection. She become ill while
being treated for an addiction to
painkillers and over-the-counter
medicine in a detoxification center.
James has remained active in the
music industry despite her ail-
ments, and she released an album in
November this year entitled "The
Dreamer."
"I don't think it was meant to be
her final album, of course she wants
to make more music," said Sametto
James.


"I didn't get into real estate
just to sell houses. I was inter-
ested in investment proper-
ties. I always considered
myself a business woman. I
knew that corporate America
wasn't for me," say Williams.
It was during the time that she
worked in real estate that she
met former basketball player
Eric William. They later mar-
ried, which led to her being a
candidate for the successful
reality show. William spends
countless hours each day
managing her businesses
including her foundation,
Project Save the World,
which supports several chari-
ties and causes.
"I'M always thinking of
new ideas. What can I do next
and what can I do to expand
my brands? I just finished
designing the displays for
Lucid for retail stores and I'm
waiting for prototypes to


come in. We are going to start something that I
planning an event for stores in been able
New York," says Williams. .-
Each of William busi- '


nesses takes her in
different
directions:
reality
TV fit-
ness,
beau-
t y
and
phi-
lan-
thropy.
However
she's pas-
sionate about all
of her endeavors.
"I take something away
from all of them. Right now
Lucid is highest on the things
to do list because it's new.
With my foundation, I'm
extremely blessed and I feel
like I have to give back. It's


t o
describe, but it's a great feel-
ing. I love all of my business-
es, says Williams.
According to CelebrityNet-
worth.com Williams' com-


book for women about diet,
exercise, wardrobe, and beau-
ty. It's expected to be in stores
by the end of 2012.


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December 22-28, 2011


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Page 12 Ms. Perry's Free Press


December 22-28, 2011