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The Jacksonville free press ( 8/25/2011 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF






Number one

rated The Help

entlightens and

educates on

a bygone era
Page 11


West & Smiley
Impact on
Obama Voters:

Real or


Fleeting?
Page 8
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Entertainment

community

mourns loss of

talented Nick

Ashford at 70
Page 14


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AKA sorors get second chance at
lawsuit against former Basileus
WASHINGTON Eight members of the nation's
oldest black sorority are getting a second chance
to question what they say were improper pay-
ments to their group's former president and her
spending of sorority money on clothing, jewelry
and a wax statute of herself.
The members of the Chicago-based Alpha Kappa
Alpha sorority sued the sorority and its then-pres-
ident Barbara McKinzie in Washington in 2009.
The sorority sisters questioned $375,000
McKinzie McKinzie had received in one year as president of
the group, saying the money had not been approved by members. They
also alleged she bought designer clothing, jewelry and lingerie with
sorority money.
A judge threw out the lawsuit in early 2010, saying the women brought
the wrong kind of lawsuit and citing other problems. Last week, a three-
judge panel of the D.C. Court of Appeals said the first judge had erred
and the lawsuit should be allowed to go forward.
A lawyer for the sorority members, Christian R. Eriksen, said his clients
were pleased and "look forward to resolving this matter." A spokes-
woman for the sorority, Melody McDowell, said the group was review-
ing the decision but would have no comment while the case is pending.
The group's lawyer, Dale Cooter, said he was disappointed and that his
clients maintain that they did nothing wrong.

Tea Partier jokes about killing Obamas
The Chair of the Sumter South Carolina Tea Party posted -- and then
quickly pulled -- a post on her Facebook page earlier this month that
joked about throwing the Obamas out of a helicopter.
Shery Lanford Smith posted the the joke on her Facebook page on
August 11th. The page is now private.
In the joke, the Obamas are on a helicopter talking about how they
could make people happy if they threw money out the window. The pilot
says: "I could throw both of them out of the window and make 256 mil-
lion people very happy!" Smith added: "If you're one of 256 million,
PASS IT ON."

GOP lawmaker resigns after wife's
racist email to Carl Lewis
TRENTON, N.J.- A freshman Republican lawmaker resigned because
his wife sent "an offensive and racist" email to the Democratic state
Senate campaign of nine-time Olympic gold medalist Carl Lewis.
Pat Delany stepped down from the state Assembly this month and said
he wouldn't seek a full term in November because of his wife's letter to
Lewis' campaign, Burlington County. Delany and his wife, Jennifer
Delany, are white. Lewis, a political novice who's among the greatest ath-
letes of all time, is black.
Jennifer Delany's e-mail to Lewis' campaign said, in part, "Imagine hav-
ing dark skin and name recognition and the nerve to think that equaled
knowing something about politics."
Lewis is running for state Senate in New Jersey's 8th Legislative
District. Delany was part of the opposing GOP Assembly slate in the dis-
trict.
'SlutWalk' comes to South
Africa, where rape is crisis
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- An international protest against the
notion that a woman's appearance can explain or excuse attacks has come
to South Africa, a country where rape is seen as a national crisis.
Men wore mini skirts and women draped sexy lingerie over their street
clothes during Saturday's "SlutWalk" in Cape Town. Some 2,000 pro-
testers walked a route where fans partied during last year's football World
Cup.
The protest movement originated in Toronto, Canada, sparked by a
police officer's remark that women could avoid being raped by not dress-
ing like "sluts."
According to the most recent police statistics, more than 55,000 cases
of rape and indecent assault were reported in South Africa from 2009 to
2010.

Sharpton officially tapped as TV host
MSNBC has named the Rev. Al Sharpton as host
of a weeknight program on the network.
The announcement comes after the civil rights
activist spent several weeks as a tryout in the 6
p.m. time slot.
His new program, to be called "PoliticsNation,"
will premiere next Monday.
Sharpton is a well-known civil rights activist and
minister. He calls the hosting job "a natural exten-
sion of my life work and growth."
In addition to being a guest on MSNBC through-
Sharpton out the network's history, he has also served as an
occasional guest host on several of its programs. He hosts a nationally
syndicated radio show, as well.
The 6 p.m. hour serves as an important lead-in to MSNBC's weeknight
slate that includes Chris Matthews, Laurence O'Donnell, Rachel
Maddow and Ed Schultz.


Volume 24 No. 45 Jacksonville, Florida August 25-31, 2011

What you won't hear in the news
as America celebrates King's dream


Shown (L-R) are Joseph Burton, Wanda Mitchell, Leona Jones and
Charles Brown who helped organize activities for the 145th celebration.
Historic Mt.Zion AME Church celebrated their 145th anniversary.
last weekend with a grand celebration. The institution is the second
oldest AME church in the state of Florida. Continued on page 9

"The Oak's" Youth Explosion sends
over 1,000 students to school prepared
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Shown above are First Baptist Church of Oakland volunteers India
Gibson, Pat Williams, Syann Daniels, Niko Robinson give free back-
packs and school supplies to students.
The First Baptist Church of Oakland's Fifth Annual Back to School Jam
was held last Saturday at Metropolitan Park to give Duval students a prop-
er start. Over 1,000 students benefitted from free backpacks and school
supplies provided by the church. High school students received USB flash
drives and free physical were also be offered at the Health Fair. The mas-
sive event concluded the church's Youth Explosion weekend, which also
included a Parent and Student Empowerment Dinner, seminar and clothes
give away.
"Our prayer and hope was for everyone to join us in this great endeav-
or to help make Jacksonville a truly great city," Pastor Torrin Dailey said.


Joined by his newly appointed
Commissioner of Education, Dr.
Donnie Horer, Mayor Alvin
Brown canvassed several Duval
County Public Schools on opening
day to welcome students.
The visits which included the
seven intervene schools began
Monday at 6:45 a.m. and continued
on Tuesday.
At Raines, he greeted the Val fam-
ily who transferred their son for his
senior year into the intervene
schools because they were opti-
mistic on the many good things
they heard about the school.
The visits came just days after
Mayor Brown created the
Education Commissioner's Office.
The position enables City Hall to
fundraise and advocate for Duval
County Public Schools. The city
pays $1 annually for Dr. Homer's
services.
Continuing with his mantra of
developing a successful public/pri-
vate partnership, Monday's 'Back
to School Blitz' ended with Mayor
Brown collecting 10 pallets of
donated school supplies from a
local Walmart.


by George Curry
In the hoopla surrounding
Sunday's dedication of the Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. statue on
the National Mall in Washington,
Harry E. Johnson, Sr., the visionary
and fundraising engine behind the
project, will finally get his due.
Placing Dr. King on the Mall was a
project of Alpha Phi Alpha fraterni-
ty, but it was Johnson, a Houston
attorney and former president of the
fraternity, who made it all happen,
raising more than $100 million.


In the excitement of placing a
statue of the first African-American
on the Mall, there are three stories
that readers should be aware of,
though few journalists, if any, will
cover.
The first story is surprising.
Among the million dollar-donors to
the MLK memorial project, only
two African-Americans had joined
that select club as of July, according
to the list of donors compiled by the
Martin Luther King, Jr. National
Memorial Continued on page 3


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Pictured l-r: EWC Tri-County Alumni President and c/o '88 member
Yolanda Hoyt; EWC Alumni President and c/o '65 member Margurite
Warren; alumni banquet honoree and EWC c/o '93 member Melva
Rozier.
EWC Alumni host convention, tribute
graduates and community trustees


This past weekend, the EWC
Alumni Association hosted its bien-
nial convention and hundreds of
alumni from around the country
travelled to Jacksonville for the cel-
ebration. Held August 18-21 at
Crowne Plaza, the convention was
a four-day experience filled with
training workshops and social
activities designed to enrich and
entertain participants. Immediate
past national president Marguerite
Warren, EWC Class of 1965, state
that the convention's theme
"Passing the Torch: A Focus on


Membership, Chapter Develop-
ment, Scholarship and Student
Services" reflected the organiza-
tion's goals and accomplishments.
"We are gathered here to reconnect
with friends, strengthen our organi-
zation and honor outstanding alum-
ni. We are in a building process and
have elected new national officers,
led by our new president, Eric
Johnson. Our college and commu-
nity-at-large will see some fantastic
new things from the alumni," said
Warren.
Continued onpage 6


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Shown above escorting their son to school opening day are Deborah Val Raines' senior Demetius Val,
Mayor Alvin Brown, proud father Pasco Val and the city's new Education Comm. Dr. Donnie Horner. TrM


Mentoring is

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a i : give back and

save the next

B. r -generation
Page 11


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Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 25 -31. 2011


Lowes Hero's join forces with Kirby Smith PTSA to rescue school Kirby Smith Mid-
dle School struggled last year with a blighted area of the school's campus being in need of a beautification project.
The Kirby Smith staff and members of the PTSA searched high and low for a solution.. The answer came when Val
Johnson of Lowe's Department called his store's Hero team to the rescue. They adopted Kirby Smith Middle School
and transformed the space into a beautiful landscaped area as a Back to School Project. Val Johnson says that "Lowe's
Department has been reaching out to the community to do worthwhile service projects for a while". The Lowe's
Hero is an initiative of Lowe's Department where its employees will come out and perform a service project. "We
are thankful that Kirby Smith is the recipient of the Lowe's Hero Project this year. It is great that Lowe's believe in
school partnerships, says Mrs. Marshall, principal. Joyce Couch

Bill Gates Announces 2012 Scholarship

Program For Minority Students *
The Gates Millennium Scholarship Program (GMS) will select 1,000
talented students next year to receive a good-through-graduation scholar- -
ship to use at any college or university of their choice. '
Scholars will also be provided with personal and professional develop-
ment through their leadership programs, along with academic support
throughout their college career.
The program, funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Founda-
tion, was established to provide outstanding low income minority students ..
with an opportunity to complete an undergraduate college education in
any discipline area of interest. To date, the program has given scholarships
to more than 15,000 students.
Continuing scholars may request funding for a graduate degree program
in one of the following discipline areas: education, engineering, library
science, mathematics, public health or science.
The deadline for submitting an application is Wednesday, January 11,
2012.
To apply, visit www.blackstudents.com/billgates.


Secrets credit card companies don't want you to know
While it may seem like you're at calling your credit card company and sider negotiations with a credit card
the mercy of credit card companies asking for the charge to be removed company, they often picture them-
and others that you owe, in reality, from your monthly statement, selves asking for a lower interest rate.
you probably have more power and The key to a successful request is While that's a good starting point,
leverage than you suspect when it that you have to have a pretty good there are a host of other things you
comes to dealing with creditors, track record of paying your bills on can also ask of your credit card is-
Once you discover a few profound time. If you missed four payments suer. Among them:
truths about credit card companies, out of the past dozen that were due, Change your payment due date
you'll not only more successfully jug- you're not likely to find a sympa- (so that all your bills don't come due
gle your financial obligations, but thetic ear on the other end of the at once)
you'll also know how to maximize phone if you call your credit card Upgrade your account from
your credit cards for all they're worth, company. "past due" to "current" status
Here are a few little known secrets By contrast, if you have an excel- Remove a negative mark from
about credit card companies that a lent payment history, the vast major- your credit
banker isn't likely to tell you. ity of banks empower their customer Accept a partial payment in lieu
Creditors will give you a break service representatives to waive a of the total due
The abundance of tempting credit late fee, usually once a year. Waive a card's annual fee
card offers available means you can To get the late fee removed, simply They can only raise
pick and choose among the best deals call your creditor, briefly explain your rate for six months
being offered. It will also give you yourself and ask: "Can you please re- If you've been dinged with a higher
room to negotiate with credit card move the late fee from my state- interest rate, perhaps because you
companies like never before. ment?" Most representatives will were late in paying a past credit card
They'll forgive you once reply by saying something like: "Yes, bill, don't despair. That "penalty" or
Speaking of negotiating, have you as a courtesy, we can do that for you "default" interest rate doesn't have to
ever been burned by one of those this one time." last more than six months.
vexing $35 late fees when your pay- You can negotiate One provision of the CARD Act, is
ment failed to reach a credit card Getting a late fee removed isn't the that there are limits on how long
company on time? What most con- only thing you can accomplish when banks can hit you with so-called "de-
sumers don't know is that you can negotiating with your credit card fault rates" after you've been late
easily have this fee waived simply by company. When most people con- paying a bill.


What you won't hear


Continued from front
Project Foundation. The Website list
of all donors of a million dollars or
more has been removed from the
site. But records examined in July
showed that Sheila Johnson-New-
man, co-founder of Black Entertain-
ment Television (BET), and Victor
B. MacFarlane, a San Francisco real
estate developer, were the only
Blacks who had made personal or
corporate contributions of $1 million
or more.
Many Black stars hosted fundrais-
ers or provided other support, but
only MacFarlane and Johnson-New-
man put up the super bucks. Missing
in action were the big-name athletes
and entertainers. I don't have to list
them you know who they are.
It is also interesting to look at cor-
porate donations. The General Mo-
tors Foundation, under the leadership
of Rod Gillum, was in a class by it-
self, giving $10 million. It was fol-
lowed by Tommy Hilfiger Corporate
Foundation with a $5 million contri-
bution. The Bill and Melinda Gates
Foundation, W.K. Kellogg Founda-
tion and the National Basketball As-
sociation each donated $3 million.
The Walt Disney Company donated
$2.7 million. Contributing $2 million
each were the Coca-Cola Founda-
tion, the Ford Motor Fund, MetLife
Foundation, Toyota Foundation and
the Verizon Foundation.
The federal government provided
approximately $10 million and
Alpha Phi Alpha, the driving force
behind the King memorial, donated
$3.4 million.
An additional 39 companies or in-
dividuals gave at least $1 million, in-
cluding Delta Airlines, General
Electric, Star Wars creator George
Lucas, and the American Federation
of State, County and Municipal Em-
ployees (AFSCME).
The second story unlikely to be
covered this week is the lack of do-
nations from certain Fortune 100
companies. More than a dozen com-
panies contributed less than
$100,000 or nothing at all to the
King memorial. They include: Citi-
group, Philip Morris, Home Depot,
J.P. Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo,
AOL Time Warner, Goldman Sachs
Group, United Parcel Service (UPS),
Allstate, Sprint and American Ex-
press, according to records available
as of July.
Many of those companies actively
court Black consumers. Some even
quote Dr. King's "I Have a Dream"
speech from time to time. Yet, when
it is time to honor the dreamer, they


are asleep at the switch.
The third story you won't be read-
ing about this weekend is in equal
parts sad and familiar. It is yet an-
other example of the King. children's-
greediness. Harry Johnson, head of
the Mall project, should be given the
Nobel Peace Prize for being able to
deal with the family dysfunction.
According to documents examined
by the Associated Press, the mall
foundation has paid Intellectual
Properties Management, a company
owned by the King children, approx-
imately $800,000 for the use of Dr.
King's words and image.
Records show that the foundation
paid the King entity $761,160 in
2007 to use Dr. King image and
words in fundraising materials. It
also charged the memorial a manage-
ment fee $71,000 in 2003.
The firm representing the Kings is-
sued a statement saying the fees
would go to the Martin Luther King
Jr. King Center for Social Change in
Atlanta. It said the fees will help off-
set donations that would go toward
erecting the memorial instead of the
King center, where both parents are
buried.
The King family has had its own
version of the television show "Fam-
ily Feud" for years. Dexter, the
youngest brother, was named head of
the King center but was released
within months by his mother, Coretta
Scott King. In 2008, Martin III and
Bernice sued Dexter, claiming he
had misused MLK center assets and
failed to properly involve them in
family business matters.
Dexter counter sued, charging that
his two siblings had misused King
Center funds and kept money that
should have gone to the center.
Under pressure from the judge, the
Kings settled out of court.
But they have never been able to
shed the image of profiting from the
name of their father.
David Garrow, who won a Pulitzer
Prize for his biography of Dr. King,
said the civil rights leader would
have been "absolutely scandalized
by the profiteering behavior of his
children."
He told the AP, "I don't think the
Jefferson family, the Lincoln fam-
ily...I don't think any other group of
family ancestors has been paid a li-
censing fee for a memorial in Wash-
ington. One would think any family
would be so thrilled to have their
forefather celebrated and memorial-
ized in D.C. that it would never dawn
on them to ask for a penny."


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I


Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press


August 25 -31, 2011


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August 25-31, 2011 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


Is West & Smiley's impact on


Obama voters real or fleeting?
Black voters. Obama's approval
rate is slowly dwindling. In 2008,
96 percent of African Americans
voted for Obama. In March, Black
Entertainment Television (BET)
conducted a poll, where 85 percent
of people supported the president.
But in a recent Washington
Post/CBS poll, African American
support dropped sharply-from 77
percent in October 2010 to nearly
half of that this month, according to
Newsweek.
Steve Harvey disagreed with the
tour and said Smiley should let go
of the grudge he had when Obama
did not make it to his town hall
meeting.
aileys and West's national tour continues to raise eyebrows. "You don't have any real basis
ugh Princeton professor us?" behind your dislike for this
arihete gon p o u?"l man...you keep masking it saying
West supported President Buddies West and Smiley have it's not aout hate. Then wat is i
Obama in 2008, his recent teamed to launch a two-week it's not about hate. Then what is it
m of the nation's first Black "Poverty Tour," which will take the aonu t Poer20, 2 here ws ore
nt may be trouble for 2012. duo to different cities as they dan u hen e Harvy sa
personality Tavis Smiley has encourage the president to "wake
ined in the Black chorus of up." The purpose of the tour is sup- American.
dissatisfaction of Obama. posed to be to help America refocus He continued: "Who in the hell
unclear whether calling the on the "least among us," according got 2-3 days for your [expletive]? I
nt "Black mascot of Wall to Newsweek. got time to sit down with your




ut Rev. Otis Moss III, pastor the two outside the Coleman A. to sit down with Tavis [expletive]
ama' fr chain't got time to s it do wn with r dyyour


ama's former churchtion next in Young Municipal Center to protest. t s d ys
"-for three days?-


Chicago, said tne intellectual s
remarks could increase African
Americans' trust of Congress.
"The negative discussion Dr.
West is having can only put more
apathy in the hearts of African-
Americans and could ultimately
cause them to lose more faith in the
entire political process," Moss told
Newsweek. "Where will that leave


we will not stana silent as
Smiley and West criticize the man
who brought us health-care reform,
one of the greatest accomplish-
ments for the poor in this country's
history," a spokesperson for
Detroiters for Better Government
told Newsweek.
The West and Smiley approach
may or may not have an impact on


What's next in Libya key

to US politics, economy


by J. Kuhenman
The dramatic advance of Libyan
rebels over the forces of longtime
strongman Moammar Gadhafi
offers vindication, at least for now,
for President Barack Obama's deci-
sion to refrain from using U.S.
troops on Libyan soil and to let
NATO take the lead. But the chaot-
ic scene on the streets of Tripoli on
this week illustrated the uncertain
path to stability and the hazards that
still face the White House.
How Libya moves away from the
current turmoil will present the next
challenge for Obama and could
determine how the public views not
only his foreign policy, but in some
measure the U.S. economy as well.
Underscoring the volatility,
Gadhafi's whereabouts remained a
mystery, fighting between rebels
and Gadhafi loyalists continued,
and oil prices remained in flux.
Still, the news for Obama could
not have been much better. The
Libyan street was euphoric, rebels
overran Gadhafi's main military


compound and hope grew that over
time the price of oil a contribu-
tor to dangerous economic lethargy
- would dip.
"The Libyan intervention demon-
strates what the international com-
munity can achieve when we stand
together as one," Obama said at his
vacation retreat in Martha's
Vineyard, Mass. He was careful to
emphasize that uncertainty
remained and that Gadhafi's regime
could still pose a threat.
Obama telephoned French
President Nicolas Sarkozy to talk
about the situation in Libya, among
other things. They agreed to contin-
ue to work with allies and partners
to protect the people of Libya and
to support a peaceful transition to
democracy. The State Department
also said it wants to give the Libyan
opposition between $1 billion and
$1.5 billion in frozen Gadhafi
regime assets. The U.S. froze about
$37 billion in regime holdings in
the U.S., but most are in real estate
or other property assets.


Social injustice: Welfare reform


leaving more in poverty


by J. Ross, HP
Fifteen years after President
Clinton joined with congressional
Republicans and affixed his signa-
ture to a law that "ended welfare as
we know it" -- imposing a five-
year time limit on federal cash
assistance for poor families, while
allowing states to set shorter limits
-- the social safety net is failing to
keep pace with the needs of strug-
gling Americans, many experts
say. Millions of single mothers are
falling through the cracks, scram-
bling to support their families with
neither paychecks nor government
aid.
Welfare reform, one of the hall-
mark events of the Clinton presi-
dency, was supposed to be a
healthy tradeoff: Single mothers
who had grown dependent on gov-
ernment checks would instead go
out and work. The federal govern-
ment gave the states lump sums of
money, known as block grants, to
create programs that would pre-
pare, prompt and push poor single
mothers accustomed to living on
welfare into the workforce, pro-
viding job training, resume-writ-
ing tutorials and subsidized child
care.
But the time limits on cash aid


were enacted in the mid-1990s, in
the midst of one of the most
vibrant job markets in modern
times. Today, with nearly 14 mil-
lion people officially out of work
and jobseekers outnumbering
available positions by more than
four-to-one, the logic of those
reforms is being overwhelmed by
the reality of a stark shortage of
paychecks, experts say.
"Today, everybody is expected
to work," said Sheila Zedlewski,
an economist at the Urban Institute
and co-author of an institute study
released last week that examines
the consequences of welfare
reform during the recession. "The
problem is finding a job is incredi-
bly hard."
Since the beginning of the reces-
sion in late 2007, the nation's
unemployment rate has increased
by 88 percent, while welfare case-
loads have grown just 14 percent,
according to the Urban Institute
report.
Experts say this disparity
reflects the inadequacy of remain-
ing welfare programs in the face of
a veritable epidemic of jobless-
ness. During a period of national
distress, fewer and fewer people
have been able to secure help to


meet their basic needs, according
to the report.
Between 2007 and 2010 -- just
as the economy was contracting
and joblessness was rising, gener-
ating greater demand for public
assistance -- welfare caseloads
dropped in 13 states, according to
the Urban Institute report. In
Arizona, which faced a particular-
ly powerful blow to its finances in
the form of a sustained plunge in
housing prices, the welfare case-
load dropped by 48 percent during
that timeframe.
Many of those who advocated
for ending welfare as an unlimited
entitlement say the change has
been beneficial -- the share of sin-
gle, never married mothers in the
workforce climbed from 62.9 per-
cent in 1996 to 72.4 percent a
decade later, according to federal
data.
The share of people who both
live in poverty with no reported
income and lack welfare assistance
has changed significantly since
welfare reform. In 1996, 1 in 8 sin-
gle mothers fit this profile, accord-
ing to Zedlewski. By 2008, the
most recent year for which this
data is available, that figure had
climbed to 1 in 5, she said.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS REGARDING ORDINANCE 2011-544
REAPPORTIONMENT OF JACKSONVILLE CITY COUNCIL DISTRICTS
AND AT-LARGE RESIDENCY AREA BOUNDARIES AND SCHOOL
BOARD DISTRICTS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE 2010 CENSUS DATA


Pursuant to Chapter 18 (Reapportionment of Council and School Board Districts), Ordinance
Code, the City Council Rules Committee is conducting reapportionment public hearings in order
to inform the public about the reapportionment proposal and to compile an official record of
citizen input on the proposed Council reapportionment plan and Ordinance 2011-554. The
meetings are scheduled as follows:

Wednesday, August 24, 2011 at 6:00 p.m.
North Campus
Florida State College at Jacksonville
Auditorium Room C126
4501 Capper Road
Jacksonville, FL 32218

Thursday, August 25, 2011 at 6:00 p.m.
Kent Campus
Florida State College at Jacksonville
Main Auditorium, Room F128
3939 Roosevelt Blvd.
Jacksonville, FL 32205

Monday, August 29, 2011 at 6:00 p.m.
South Campus
Florida State College at Jacksonville
Lakeside Conference Center
11901 Beach Blvd.
Jacksonville, FL 32246

Thursday, September 1, 2011 at 6:00 p.m.
Deerwood Center
Florida State College at Jacksonville
Room B 1204
9911 Old Baymeadows Road
Jacksonville, FL 32256


All interested citizens are urged to attend this meeting.
reapportionment process and proposed maps may be obtained
Services Division, City Hall, 117 West Duval Street, Suite 430,
line at http://www.coi.net/City-Council.aspx.


Information concerning the
in the City Council Legislative
by calling: 904-630-1404 or on-


If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to access public
hearing facilities or participate in a public hearing proceeding, for this meeting, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. To request such an accommodation,
please contact the Legislative Services Division Jacksonville City Council at least three
business days prior to the required service by using one of the following methods: Phone (904)
630-1404; Fax (904) 630-1242; TTD- (904) 630-1580.

Stephen C. Joost
Council President

Bill Bishop, Chair
Rules Committee

Cheryl L. Brown
Council Secretary



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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


August 25-31, 2011
















Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 25-31, 2011


It's no secret that young African
American males are the highest at-
risk group for everything from
criminal behavior, to dropping out
of school, to being jobless.
Identifying the problems facing
our communities has never been an
issue, but finding solutions to those
problems has always been a major
challenge.
One way to help young black
males is through mentoring.
Booker T. Washington once said,
"There are two ways of exerting
one's strength: one is pushing
down, the other is pulling up."
Mentoring essentially allows folks
who care, the opportunity to give
back to young men or women who
need attention, guidance and expo-
sure.
At the heart of the challenges
facing the our community is the
disarray of African American
males. Black men are not stepping
up as fathers, falling behind in edu-
cation and going to jail at alarm-
ing rates.
We all see these young men in
the inner city either walking down
the street using one hand to hold up
their pants with their underwear
clearly exposed.
It seems like we have lost sever-
al generations of young black men.
Finishing high school is no
longer cool. Having a legal job is
no big deal and if you have been
arrested it is a badge of honor.
Former US Senator and presiden-
tial candidate John Edwards per-
haps said it best during an MTV
political forum in 2007.

Is the N


too mesmer
As the National Football Le
for the start of the season, th
little sympathy for fans after i


By Noval Jones
"The NFL is definitely tar-
nished. I mean, we went through a
lockout, and ticket prices still went
up. Parking went up $5, too." -
Steve Weddel, Kansas City Chiefs
fan
It seemed likejust yesterday that
the Green Bay Packers defeated the
Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl
XLVI by the score of 31-25. While
the game was fairly exiting, no one
could predict the drama yet to
come.
Shortly after the season ended
and the athletes cleaned out their
lockers, NFL team owners pad-
locked the gates to hold out for a
new collective bargaining agree-
ment with the National Football
League Players Association
(NFLPA).
If that didn't beat all, the NFLPA
decided to decertify its union in an
attempt to throw owners off the
lockout path.
It didn't work.
As a result, the NFL owners and
players took us on a six-month
journey into selfishness that fea-
tured billionaires versus million-
aires. They managed to keep their
self-serving interest on the front
page of most newspapers and the
lead segments of my evening
broadcasts. They took their fans for
granted for the sake of greed and
personal gain. Then, in the end,
they once again laughed all the way
to bank.
What drama, intrigue and sus-


I Prii8i~biRr~~


Mentoring: The best way for Black


professionals to help at risk youth
"The idea that we can keep incar- father or father figure in your life. incarcerated. By their mid-30's, 6
cerating and keep incarcerating -- Sure there are hundreds of folks in 10 black men who had dropped
pretty soon we're not going to have who have been successful without out of school had spent time in
a young African-American male their fathers in their lives, but most prison.
population in America. They're all people who were raised without So now that I have painted a pret-
going to be in prison or dead. One their fathers would easily agree that ty bleak picture let's figure out how
of the two," said Edwards. they would prefer to have a dad you attack the issue. Of course
What is even more disturbing around, there is no one solution, but it is my
than the black male incarceration Very few people would debate belief that if black professionals
rates is the notion that many young the fact that strong father figures give back to the community
black men think that it's so cool to make a difference in the lives of through mentoring we can save one
have a baby without accepting any their children. child at a time.
responsibility for helping to raise Although we all may agree that That's where African American
the child. this is the case, there seems to be a fraternities and other nonprofit
This is a very disturbing statistic, huge pool of poorly educated black organizations like The 100 Black
but it gets to the core of the prob- men that are becoming more and Men come into play.
lem. According to a National more disconnected from traditional And the 100 is only one of the
Center for Health Statistics study in family values. National statistics organizations making a difference
2007, nearly 40 percent of babies are showing that the situation is not one child at a time. Local fratemi-
born in the U.S. that same year getting better, but worse. ties like Omega Psi Phi and Kappa
were delivered by unwed mothers. In 2000, 65 percent of black male Alpha Psi also have very successful
While 28 percent of white high school dropouts in their 20's mentoring programs.
women gave birth out of wedlock, were jobless that is, unable to Even the city of Jacksonville has
nearly 72 percent of black women find work, not seeking it or incar- promoted mentoring through
and more than 51 percent of cerated. By 2004, that figure had organizations like Kessler and Take
Latinas did. grown to 72 percent, compared Stock in Children. Some may say
Again, this gets directly back to with 34 percent of white and 19 that mentoring is only making a
one of the core issues that plague percent of Hispanic dropouts. marginal difference, but I say if we
the black community. Single moth- Even when high school graduates can save a few young men it is well
ers are raising too many young men were included, 50 percent of black worth the effort.
without real support from fathers. men in their 20's were jobless in Marcus Garvey once said, "Black
Now don't over analyze my point. 2004, up from 46 percent in 2000. men, you were once great; you
There are plenty of single mothers Incarceration rates skyrocketed shall be great again."
who do an outstanding job of rais- in the 1990's and continue grow On the eve of the unveiling of the
ing black males. In fact, my mother every year. In 1995, 16 percent of MLK monument, let's not forget
is a testament to that fact. black men in their 20's who did not the dream!
However, I don't feel that there is attend college were in jail or Signing off from the monthly
a substitute for having a strong prison; by 2004, 21 percent were J100 meeting, Reggie Fullwood


FL


"izing?
'ague prepares
ey seem to have
the long timeout


pense we were all
privy to instead of the customary
training camp blah, blah, blah. And
as the financial point of no return
drew nearer and nearer, the owners
and players some how found a way
to work everything out. Just in time
before their pockets got one cent
lighter. Just in time.
And after it was all said and done
we are expected to once again line
up at the ticket booth and shell out
our hard earned bucks to keep our
resident millionaires and billion-
aires fat and happy. Just like noth-
ing ever happened.
Since the signing of the new col-
lective bargaining agreement
between the NFL and NFLPA, all
has been well. The hype has been
over the top for individual league
teams and even more by the NFL
itself. Right here in Jacksonville
the hometown Jaguars are prepar-
ing for the start of the season by
declaring it "Go time."
For almost six months the gates
have been locked, the practice
fields have been silent and the play-
ers were out of reach. But it's go
time?
Nevertheless, the NFL seems to
be so mesmerizing that fans just
can't help but to fall in line behind
the logo and revel in points spreads
and touchdowns. And without apol-
ogy, the players and owners expect
for fans to pick up where they left
off at Super Bowl XLVI, ticket
prices, blackouts and all. Folks are
so crazy for football until they rou-


A broader perspective of our social construct.


tinely forsake things of real impor-
tance to find relief in rich guys
slamming into each other.
Truth is, no matter what was
accomplished during the most
recent negotiations that brought
peace to the NFL workforce, most
of the players will eventually find
their way to the poor house. The
excessive lifestyles of professional
athletes make me wonder why we
chose to live through their short-
term successes.
NFL football players have over
time proven to be the worst exam-
ples of success models on the face
of the Earth. For all of the work that
it takes to eventually wear an NFL
uniform, the ultimate return is very
much suspect. From Pop Warner
football to the NFL draft, players
spend a lot of time and energy
chasing the pro football scheme. If
they are fortunate enough to be one
of the one percent who get a chance
to take a snap, their careers and
earnings are too short for the
investment. Yes, they can always
say that they were one of the few
who played under the big lights of
the NFL. However, as many have
found out, that doesn't go very far
when the money runs out.
The NFL has done a good of
invading the lives of millions of
Americans and, at the same time,
convincing fans that touchdowns
are more important than supporting
suffering communities. Even dur-
ing this time of a repressed econo-
my, in a few short weeks, the NFL


has managed to suck all of the air
out of the room of things that real-
ly matter. And without regret, is
demanding even more attention
during this nation's season of haves
versus have-nots.
Breed truth.
Visit my blog @ www.novaljones.word-
press.com. Follow us on twitter @ twit-
ter/novaljones. Email your comments:
novalthinks@yahoo.com.


C Cr l


fLORIDA S FIRST COAST QUALITY BLACK IVrEKLY


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PUBLISHER

-CONTRII
SE.O.Hutt
acksonville Latimer,
l'babebr of Caniume Vickle BI


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Fax (904) 765-3803


Sylvia Perry

Managing Editor


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BUTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald Fullwood,
ichinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Marsha Oliver, Marretta
Phyllis Mack, Tonya Austin, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver,
rown, Rahman Johnson, Headshots, William Jackson.


Dedicating the Dream
A week of events is planned in Washington, D.C.
around the unveiling of the Martin Luther King, Jr.
National Memorial. The official dedication of the King
National Memorial on the National Mall will take place
at 11 a.m. Sunday, August 28, 2011, the 48th anniver-
sary of the day King delivered his famous "I Have a
Dream" speech. Preceding, and following, the dedication will be star-stud-
ded concerts, luncheons, dinners and receptions attended by an array of
African-American leadership.
A quarter-million people will gather on and adjacent to the four-acre plot
on the northeast corer of the Tidal Basin to dedicate a monument to
Martin Luther King's legacy and its location on American History's Main
Street. The event will feature the first African-American President of the
United States as he honors the first African-American with a memorial on
the National Mall and the first non-president so honored. Thousands of
contributors and community leaders will join President Barrack Obama at
the site. Central to the thinking of Martin Luther King was the concept of
the "Beloved Community." The MLK National Memorial's centerpiece is
the "Stone of Hope", a 30-foot statue of Dr. King, with a 450-foot inscrip-
tion wall with excerpts of his sermons and public addresses.
The process of designing, funding and constructing the memorial was
coordinated by the nonprofit Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial
Project Foundation. Harry E. Johnson, Sr., and his Alpha Phi Alpha fra-
ternity deserve credit for arriving at this historical reality. Johnson has
served as president and CEO of the foundation since 2002. A former
Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity president, Johnson reports that the MLK
Memorial cost $120 million to build. The U.S. Congress gave $10 million
in matching funds.
In his public invitation, Jonson said: "We look forward to sharing with
you a joyous and historic day for our nation". To many, King symbolizes
the Civil Rights era's great American Revolution. The MLK Memorial to
open on August 22. After MLK's assassination in 1968, his fraternity
Alpha Phi Alpha proposed a permanent memorial in Washington, D.C.
Alpha Phi Alpha's efforts gained momentum in 1986, after King's birthday
was designated a national holiday. In 1996, Congress authorized Secretary
of the Interior Bruce Babbitt to permit Alpha Phi Alpha to establish a
memorial in the District of Columbia, and gave the fraternity until
November 2003 to raise $100 million and break ground. In 1998,
Congress authorized the fraternity to establish the foundation to manage
the fundraising and design and approve building of the memorial.
It was an uphill climb for Johnson's foundation to build the MLK
Memorial. A MLK King Family company, Intellectual Properties
Management Inc. proved to be a significant obstacle. The family wanted
the foundation to pay licensing fees to use MLK's name and likeness. The
King family pledged that any money would go to the King Center's char-
itable efforts. The King Center in Atlanta is the location of King's grave
and a National Historic Site. Established in 1968 by the late Coretta Scott
King, the King Center is the official, living memorial dedicated to the lega-
cy of Dr. Martin Luther.King Jr. Estimates suggest that the King family
charged the MLK Memorial Foundation $800,000 in fees. Now, it's all
"OK" between the foundation and the MLK Family. Children of MLK,
Bernice and Martin Luther King III toured the National Mall site in
October 2010 and are expected to attend the dedication.
Black Americans have reason to be proud and to be MLK Memorial
benefactors. As we raise a toast, it would be "significant" if Blacks con-
tribute to this cause. Most of the MLK Memorial's construction costs were
underwritten by American corporations and organizations such as the
National Basketball Association (NBA). General Motors Corporation
gave more than $10 million and will serve as dedication chair. The
Tommy Hilfiger Corporate Foundation is dedication co-chair, as is Stevie
Wonder, who wrote MLK's "Happy Birthday" song. A minority, female-
owned and operated firm, McKissack & McKissack, is a part of the MLK
Memorial Design-Build Team. To make a donation, visit
www.MLKmemorial.org
(William Reed is available for speaking/seminar projects via
BaileyGroup.org)


August 25-31, 2011


Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press


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ASALH sponsors trip to D.C.
The James Weldon Johnson of The Association of the Life and Study of
African American Life and History will be sponsoring a bus trip to the
Martin Luther King Memorial Dedication, August 27th to Washington,
D.C. The trip will also include a tour of African American Heritage histor-
ical sites as well and the national monument. A meal package is included
with brunch on Sunday, August 28th at b. Smith's Restaurant and Dinner at
Phillips Flagship on the Potomac River. Lodging continental breakfast and
a box lunch is included for the trip home. Meals traveling to D.C. and din-
ner on the return trip are at your own expense. For more information, go to
http://asalh-jaxfl.org and download the flyer and registration form. You
may also call 551-0372 or 228-3132 if you have questions.

Installation services at St. Andrews
The congregation of St. Andrew Missionary Baptist Church invites the
public to attend the celebration and installation services for Rev. Charles E.
Cooper, Jr. The Celebration Services will be held Monday August 22nd
through Friday August 26th at 7 p.m. nightly. The Service of Installation
will be held on Sunday August 28th at 4 p.m. RSVP your attendance to
Jacquelyn Flowers (904) 743-8693 by August 12th with the dates you will
attend. The church is located at 2600 West 45th Street.

Gospel Concert at New Life
The New Life Fellowship Church located at1451 Mt. Herman Street on
the northside will present a free gospel concert on August 28th from 4 8
p.m. On stage will be the New Life Fellowship Choir, The Spiritone Gospel
Singers "Special Guest" The Gospel Tones (Waynesboro, Ga.).
For more information contact Robert Woodard (904) 534-1825.

Pastor's Appreciation at New Bethel
New Bethel AME Church will host a Pastor's Appreciation Celebration
for Rev. Ricardo Bright and First Lady Barbara Bright on Sunday Aug. 28th
at 4 p.m. The speaker for the Celebration is Elder J.B. Keels, Presiding
Elder South District. The church is located at 5031 Halls Drive, 32207 on
the southside. For more information contact Joyce Phillips at 396-0265.

6th Annual Golf "Tournament of Unity"
The (NCI) Northside Community Involvement will have their 6th Annual
Golf "Tournament of Unity", an outreach ministry of the Northside Church
of Christ. They will be teeing off September 3rd at the World Golf Village
in historic St. Augustine, Florida.
To register visit www.ncijax.org or call NCI at (904) 765-9830.


-w


The Gospel Truth's 3rd Anniversary
The Revelation Prayer House will present The Gospel Truth's 3rd
Anniversary on Sunday, September 11th at 5 p.m. The church is located at
1725 W. 28th Street, 32209. For more information call 674-4370.

Christian Comedy Show
Krystal Faye Productions in conjunction with Lynn & Friends and the
Jacksonville Christian Comedy Network is presenting a Christian comedy
show entitled "Christian Can't Laugh." Comedians Big Chip, Ms. Jen and
Da Cleaner will headline this hilarious show. This funny bone, laugh out
loud show will be held at the Clara White Mission, 613 W. Ashley St.,
Friday, August 26, 2011. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. For tickets and more infor-
mation contact Robert White at (904) 677-6083.

Greggs Temple Community Fun Day
The Greggs Temple AME Church, located at 1510 West 45th Street will
hold a Community Fun and Service day for the Moncrief Springs
Community on Saturday, August 27th from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. There will be
food distribution in partnership with Trinity Rescue Mission, and fun activ-
ities for youth. On Sunday August 28, 2011, at 11 a.m. there will be a
Homecoming Service where Elder, Rev. Thomas B. DeSue will be the
speaker. For further information contact Rev. Roger Williams at 768-4416.

"Don't Crack Under Pressure"
The "Don't Crack Under Pressure" Conference will be held at the Hope
Plaza Conference Center, Friday, August 26, 2011 at 7 p.m. and Saturday,
August 27th at 6 p.m.. Evangelist Tammy Roberts will be the guest speak-
er. Hope Plaza is located at 435 Clark Road off of Dunn Avenue. For more
information contact Tammy Lynn Roberts at (229) 415-2274. or email tam-
myroberts2010@yahoo.com.

Empowerment Season at The Mount
Dr. John Allen Newman and the congregation at The Sanctuary at Mt.
Calvary on Jacksonville's northside invite the public to their 3rd annual
"Empowerment Season". The week is filled with empowering preaching
from preachers who seek to empower the congregation to become better
and stronger and more adept at doing ministry. The grand finale is the com-
munity fair which includes vendors, job fair, legal clinic, continuing edu-
cation, free haircuts and manicures, health fairs and even pre-need funeral
services. Everything is free and open to the public. Festivities kick off
September 28th October 1st. For more information, call 765-7620.


Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20


Pastor Landon Williams


Disciples of Christ Cbristiai Fellowship
*A Full Gospel Baptist Church *


Sunday School
9 a.m.
Morning Worship
10 a.m.
Lord's Supper
Second Sunday
3:00 p.m.
Evening Worship
Every 3rd & 4th
Sunday
4 :00 p.m.


A church

that's on the

move in

worship with

prayer, praise

and power!


Pastor Robert Lecount, Jr


School of Ministry Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.

Thursday High Praise Worship 7:00 p.m.

2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


- .
EWC President and c/o '66 member Nathaniel Glover with
Recognition Luncheon Honoree Dr. Dorothy Young during the EWC
Alumni Convention activities.
EWC Celebrates Alumni Convention


Continued from front
Convention highlights included an
opening reception hosted by Orange
Park Kennel Club, a Recognition
Luncheon honoring EWC faculty
and staff, an all-white party, and a
picnic.
The convention's culminating
event, the Alumni Banquet, recog-
nized four alumni for their outstand-
ing contributions and professional
achievements: Jacksonville, FL
Mayor Alvin Brown; keynote


speaker Dr. Ted Williams, a member
of the EWC Class of 1965 and Vice
President at the University of South
Florida; Dayna Kent, EWC Class of
2004, an exemplary educator and
recruiter of students; and attorney
Melva Rozier, EWC Class of 1993,
a community leader and contributor
to EWC athletic programs.
According to honoree Mayor Alvin
Brown, attending the convention
was like coming home. "I am an
EWC Tiger and will always be a
Tiger. EWC is a vital part of our
community and provides deserving
students with a quality education
and positive educational experi-
ences. I feel honored and privileged
to be here."


THE UNRULY PULPIT
Priest charged with gambling off congregations tithes
CHICAGO Rev. John Regan Regan faced up to 15 years in deposited $125,000 in his personal
described himself as an "action prison after pleading guilty in June bank account during the two-year
gambler" who frequented riverboat to felony theft for stealing the cash span when he served as pastor at St.
casinos in Elgin and Joliet for fast- between 2006 and 2008 while he led Walter, though he earned only
paced games of blackjack and craps the west suburban parish. $25,000 annually as a priest.
- often at tables where the mini- He tearfully apologized for the Regan, however, testified that
mum bet was $25. thefts before being sentenced but money came from casino winnings
But the Catholic priest was betting said he couldn't control actions he and other sources not from stolen
heavily with money he stole from knew were wrong because of a gam- church funds.
the Roselle church where he was bling addiction. Regan, who remains a priest
pastor, sneaking out of the rectory to Prosecutor Helen Kapas sought a though he is not assigned to a
gamble in the middle of the night so 10-year prison term for him. parish, nonetheless asked Judge
he wouldn't be seen by parishioners. "He likes games, action games," Kinsella to place him only on pro-
Regan was sentenced last week to Kapas said of Regan. "This defen- bation, saying he has "suffered
60 days in jail for looting nearly dant has betrayed the trust and mightily" as he struggled with his
$300,000 from St. Walter Parish by authority placed in him by his addiction.
funneling church offerings and con- church and by his parishioners." "You're going to leave this court-
tributions from parishioners into a Kapas contended Regan stole as room in handcuffs. Such a sentence
secret bank account he controlled. much as $410,000 from the parish is warranted in this case there's
The judge also ordered Regan to he served. He steered $295,000 in no doubt in my mind," Kinsella said
pay $295,000 in restitution, serve church contributions into a "special as he ordered Regan taken into cus-
150 days of work-release and per- needs" account he created, Kapas tody to immediately began serving
form 500 hours of community serv- said, then withdrew that money at his jail term. After Regan completes
ice work. In addition, Regan was ATMs in several casinos or trans- his 60-day jail term, he will spend
placed on four years' probation and ferred it into a personal account. 150 nights in jail, but be freed to
ordered to abstain from gambling. But she noted that Regan also work during the day.


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church

215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


Weekly Services

r .a Sunday Morning Worship Midweek Services
7:40 a.m. and 10:40 a.m. Wednesday Noon Service
y-;y "Miracle at Midday"
SChurch school 12 noon-1 p.m.
S9:30 a.m. The Word from the Sons
Bible Study and Daughters of Bethel
Bishop Rudolph 6:30 p.m. 3rd Sunday 4:00 p.m Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Sr. McKissick, Jr.
Senior Pastor Came sha$ In hoII cnmmunlion on Ist Sunlalat o a4 anld 0-D .m. Senior Pastor

SWorship with us LIVE
S' on the web visit
S' www.truth2powerministries.org


Grace and Peace
visit www.Bethelite.org


NOTICE: Church news is published free of charge. Information
must be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5
p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information received prior to the
event date will be printed on a space available basis until the date. Fax
e-mail to 765-3803 or e-mail to JFreePress@aol.com.


8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship

9:30 a.m. Sunday School

11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday 2 PM 3 PM

**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


I


Greater Macedonia


Baptist Churchr~rrrrrr


Page 6 Ms. Perry's Free Press


August 25-31 2011


""'
~~















S- Teachers receive free admission to

- ,,St. Augustine sites in September


Celebration held to honor Gwendolyn Leapheart's 90th birthday
Last Friday, friends and family gathered at the home of community matriarch Gwendolyn Leapheart to celebrate her 90th birthday. Born
August 19, 1921, the longtime educator has made Florida her home for several decades and is still active in many church and civic organiza-
tions. Shown above in attendance are (L-R) FrankM Powell III, Theresa Waters, Clarence Fields, Mary Christie, Raymond Lee, Tina Heck,
Father Eddie Jones, Jeanine Jones, Myrtle Turner, Audrey Kelley, Shannon McBride, Gwendolyn Leapheart, Anest McCarthy, Begonia Collier,
Pat Sims, Vanessa Boyer, Earl Sims, Adoc Stanford, Karen Kincade, Perselphone Coleman, Cheryl Winters, and Richardean Demps wheelchair.
The honoree is also shown in the lower right inset.


Skin mistakes you'


When it comes to your skin,
there's a lot of information out
there, along with a lot of products,
and a lot of skin care myths, that
may be making it harder for you to
take care of your skin.
So what are some things that you
definitely need to avoid in order to
maintain healthier skin?
Skin No-No's That Are Hurting
You
1. You have no idea what your
skin type is. If you don't know your
skin type, then you're probably
using the wrong products. Using
the right ingredients can make a
significant difference in the appear-
ance of your skin.
2. You're not using SPF. This is
one skin health fact worth repeatin-
ng darker skin tones need sun pro-
tection, too! One unpublished study
by Unilever showed that using just
SPF 5 every day for five years pre-
vented significant sun damage. Do


yourself and your skin a favor and
use a moisturizer with a SPF 15.
3. You're getting too much sun
exposure. 10 to 15 minutes of
unprotected sun a few times a week
can help your body get its vitamin
D fix, but if you're outside for an
hour a day without sunscreen, your
skin will soon remind you of this.
4. You're not using the right
cleanser for you. If you have dry
skin, a foaming cleanser will only
make matters worse. But
But for oily skin, cleansers that
are too rich may make those seba-
ceous glands go crazy. Talk to your
dermatologist about the best skin-
care products that meet your per-
sonal needs.
5. You're not using a retinoid.
Most dermatologist's agree that the
family of vitamin A creams known
as retinoids are the best night
creams, and that everyone over the
age of 20 should be using a retinoid


*e making right now
at night. Why? Retinoids may help well as talking
prevent aging and will smooth to youi doc-
wrinkles you already have along tor, eating
with preventing acne and exfoliat- h e alth h.
ing the skin. (including
6. You're exfoliating too much. drinking 8- .
How do you know how much to 10 glasses otlf
exfoliate? Again, it depends on your water e er
skin type. If your skin is dry, too day) and exer- .
much exfoliation strips lipids from cising, you can-
the skin, and sensitive types can have more beautifulI
experience even more inflamma- and healthy skin not
tion. Exfoliation is best for oily. lust for toda.
resistant types of skin. but tomor-
7. You're not getting an annual ro% as
skin exam. Did you know that your \.ell
skin is your largest organ? Just as
you'd (hopefully) get your other
body parts checked out at least once
a year, you should also be checking
in with a dermatologist for a full-
body skin exam.
Believe it or not, it's not that hard
to have healthier skin. By follow-
ing the above guidelines, as _, .


Several businesses and attractions
in St Augustine, Florida will be cel-
ebrating Teacher Appreciation
Month from September 6th -
October 9th, 2011.
Teachers in the state of Florida and
one guest are invited to attend the
following attractions for FREE dur-
ing those dates:
Ripley's Believe it or Not!
Ripley's Red Sightseeing Trains
Ripley's Bayfront Mini-Golf
Saint Augustine Pirate and
Treasure Museum
Fort Menendez
The Fountain of Youth
Teachers and guests can also get a
sneak peek at Ripley's new ghostly
experience at the old Sugar Mill.
The Ripley's Museum in Orlando,
Florida will also be participating.


Teachers are welcome to bring
additional guests who will receive a
50% discount to the attractions.
Several hotels, restaurants and
shops in Saint Augustine are offer-
ing discounts to participating teach-
ers as well.
To receive the free admission,
teachers must report to Ripley's
Believe it or Not! Museum located
at 19 San Marco Avenue in Saint
Augustine, or to the Orlando
Museum, located at 8201
International Drive, to receive tick-
ets to that attraction, and present a
recent pay stub along with a photo
ID. Everyone who attends in Saint
Augustine will also receive a FREE
gift from Ripley's.
For more information, please con-
tact Kim Kiff at 624-9349.


Free tutoring for students
Duval County Public Schools is offering free tutor-
ing to students who meet certain qualifications. As a
result of the federal No Child Left Behind Act, stu-
dents can be eligible to receive extra help in the areas
of math, reading, language arts and science. In order
to participate in this opportunity, the student must be
-- enrolled in an eligible Title I school and qualify for
7. free or reduced price lunch.
Tutoring applications will be mailed to eligible students on August 18
and must be returned to the Title I Office by September 2, 2011.
For more information about this free tutoring program, call the Title I
Office at 390-2123.

Last chance for kids to


show off their
The City of Jacksonville's Dept.
of Elder Affairs are inviting local
youth to share their favorite memo-
ry of their grandparents for a
chance to win season passes to the
Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens and
other prizes.
Finalists will be chosen by a
Times-Union professional and each
category will have a winner and a
People's Choice winner. All final-
ists receive free admission to the
zoo on Saturday, September 10.
The contest will feature three sub-
mission categories: Elementary,
Middle and High School.
Each essay should be 250 words of
less. Submit your essay by going to


grandparents
www.jacksonville.com/contests
and finding the Grandparents Day
page. The deadline for entries is
Sunday, August 28 at midnight.
Finalists will be announced on
Saturday, September 10 and win-
ners will be announced at the event.
For more details, check out
www.jacksonville.com/contests.
For questions or sponsorship
opportunities, contact Amy Moring,
Development Director, Friends of
ElderSource, 904-391-6617 or
amy@myeldersource.org.
Be sure to VOTE for your favorite
at www.jacksonville.com, under
contest page, beginning after
August 30th.


The Jacksonville Free Press

would love to share your

event with our readers.

GUIDELINES
1. All unsolicited photos require a $10 photo charge
for each picture. Photos can be paid by check, money
order or credit card,
2. Pictures must be brought into our office to be
examined for quality or emailed in a digital format
of .jpg or .bmp.
3. Everyone in the picture must be named.
4. All photos MUST be received within 5 days of
the event. NO EXCEPTIONS.
5. Event photos must be accompanied by a
story/event synopsis including the 5W's of media:
who, what, when, where and why. in addition to a
phone number for more information.

Call 634-1993 for more information!


* .-,
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NORTH FLORIDAOBSTETRICAL &

GYNECOLOGICAL Associates, P.A.


visit

www. nfobgyn. com


Complete Obstetrical & Gynecological Care


* Personal Family Planning
Individualized Vaginal Surgery
Care Osteoporosis
Comprehensive Menopausal
pregnancy Care Disorders


SBoard Certified


. Laparoscopy


William L. Cody, M.D.
SLaser Surgery B. Veeren Chithriki, M.D.

St. Vincent's Division IV 1820 Barrs Street, Suite 521

Jacksonville, Florida 32204 (904) 387-9577


Dr. Chester Aikeos

505 fflS unon SfET
SIn DOWTOWIln IflCKSOnlVll



For All I


Your Dental


Needs -\


358-3827

Monday- Friday ^

8:30 AM- 5 PM
Saturday Appointments Available
Dental Insurance and Medicaid Accepted


.
I


August 25-31, 2011


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7















I 8 .


Ryan Davis


U



'-A



Wilson







gh
Ellis


THURSDAY, AUGUST 25
Langston vs. New Orleans in Langston, OK 7pm

SATURDAY, AUGUST 27
Bellhaven vs. Texas College in Jackson, MS 6pm
Delta State vs. Elizabeth City State in Cleveland, MS 6pm
Virginia Union vs. Saint Augustine's in Richmond, VA 6pm




STAT CORNER

WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


RETURNING INDIVIDUAL
FOOTBALL STATS LEADERS
IN 2011


RUSHING YARDS
McNEIL, Daronte ECSU
CARTER, David MHC
COOPER, Nicholas WSS S
ANDERSON, Josh CNST
WRIGHT, Marcus TXS
MAYHEW, MIKE NCAT
PASSING YARDS CL
THERRIAULT, C JSU SR
JENNINGS, Stan-ALB SR
BRIDGE, Brandon ALC SO
POWELL,Creven ECS SR
PHILLIPS, Ricky- WVS
WALLEY, Chris NSU SR
PERRY, Jeremy TNST SR
RECEPTIONS CL
HOLLAND, Robt. CHO JR
WILSON, J. DSU JR
WILDER, Marcell JSU SR
WILLIAMS, R. CNST
ANDERSON, Jos. -TEX SR
HAIRSTON, Vic- NSU SR
RECEIVING YARDS CL
WILSON, J. DSU JR
HOLLAND, Robt. CHO JR
ANDERSON, Jos. TSU SR
BRANTLEY, T. WSSU SO
WILDER, Marcell JSU SR
TOTAL OFFENSE CL
THERRIAULT,C. JSU SR
BRIDGE, Brandon -ALC SO
JENNINGS, Stan-ALB SR
PHILLIPS, Ricky WVS
BENJAMIN, R. FSU SR
SMITH, Kameron WSS JR
ALL PURPOSE cL
JOHNSON, Land. WVS
McNEILL, Daronte ECSJR
CARTER, David MHC JR
COOPER, Nick WSS SR
SCORING cL
ANDERSON, J CNST SR
COOPER, Nich. WSS SR
ERICKSON, BI. SCS SR
REID, Tony FVSU SR
McNEILL, Dar. ECS JR
PUNT RETURNS CL
BARBER, Demar. FVS JR
GOODMAN, T -CHO JR
FITZGERALD, D WSS SR
PONDER, Orion -ALB JR
KICKOFF RETURNS CL
L'HOUSE,T. SAC JR
FERRELL, J. NCAT SR
MOORE, Jamel LIV SR
PROCTOR, J.-BSU SR
MARDIS, Jeremy MIL JR


CL G
JR 10
JR 11
SR 10
7
SR 12
SR 11


TDS AVG/G
10 132.1
10 122.5
15 113.4
12 102.6
8 101.0
7 98.4


G COM-ATT-INT PCT YDS TDS
11 255-437-8 58.4 3436 31
12 139-253-11 54.9 2392 26
11 150-291-13 51.5 2086 19
9 124-219-5 56.6 1662 10
10 162-265-11 61.1 1758 18
11 167-272-8 61.4 1859 10
9 131-244-6 53.7 1469 9


REC YDS
65 804
59 937
57 726
34 393
56 818
52 580
REC YDS
59 937
65 804
56 818
38 608
57 726
RUSH PASS
164 3436
601 2086
142 2392
310 1758
418 1558
396 1522
Rush Rec
15 541
1321 133
134737
1134 57


AVGIG
327.3
244.3
211.2
206.8
197.6
191.8
YDS
1555
1454
1384
1240
AVG/G
12.0
9.0
7.8
7.6
7.3
AVG
15.7
15.0
12.3
11.1
AVG
29.5
26.7
25.0
24.3
24.3


AVG/G
312.4
199.3
189.6
184.7
175.8
169.0
163.2
RECIG
6.5
5.4
5.2
1.8
1.7
1.7


YDSIG
155.5
145.4
125.8
124.0


2011 football season gets underway


FOR THE WEEK OF AUGUST 23 29, 2011
















Jackson State Sports Photo

B-CU THE DECIDERS: Despite
postseason ban, Jackson
STARTS State quarterback Casey
Therriault primed to deliver
AT NO. 1 big numbers.

HOMECOMING SCHEDULES; RETURNING
STAT LEADERS; PLAYERS WORTH WATCHING


LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor
There's a good reason why the
surprise of the 2010 football season,
Bethune-Cookman, ran out to a 10-
0 start en route to winning a share
of the MEAC title.
The Wildcats had the football
version of the perfect storm a
prolific offense and an opportunistic
defense.
Under new head coach Brian
Jenkins, the B-CU fast-break of-
fense designed by coordinator Mark
Orlando with MEAC Player of
the Year, senior quarterback Matt
Johnson at the controls, was virtu-
ally unstoppable, leading the MEAC
with averages of 425 total yards,
212 rushing yards and 38 points per
game.
On top of that, B-CU's cat-quick
defense placed sixth in total defense
in the MEAC, but had a whopping
+27 in turnover margin, the largest
in all of black college football and
+24 better than anyone in the MEAC
(Delaware State, +3).
This year, the productive John-
son is gone as is Orlando who left
to take the same position at Prairie
View A&M. And it's unlikely that
Jenkins's defense will get as big a
margin in turnovers as it did a year
ago.
But there's also a reason the
Wildcats are the pick for the top
spot on the preseason BCSP Top
Ten. They return a solid nucleus
from last year's squad including
holdovers up front on offense and
defense and likely has replacement
for the Johnson.
Additionally, nearly all of the
other top teams are going thru seri-
ous re-tooling.
Jenkins returns playmakers in
running backs Isidore Jackson (514
yards, 8 TDs) and Androse Bell
450 yards, 8 TDs) and wide receiv-
ers Eddie Poole (33 receptions, 8


BCSP Notes

MEAC announces 2011

football television schedule
NORFOLK, Va., August 18, 2011- The Mid-Eastern Athletic Con-
ference (MEAC) announced its 2011 television football slate last week
featuring eight exciting matchups scheduled to broadcast on ESPN, ES-
PNU and ESPN Classic. The nationally televised games are a part of the
MEAC's ongoing partnership with ESPN.
The 2011 television schedule kicks off with the MEACISWAC Chal-
lenge presented by Disney featuring Bethune-Cookman and Prairie View
A&M on Sunday, September 4. The game will air live beginning at noon
ET on ESPN.
The Thursday night lineup commences with Hampton against defend-
ing co-champion Florida A&M on September 8 at 7:30 p.m.
Bethune-Cookman and South Carolina State, who both also earned
a share of the conference title, will meet on Saturday, September 10 in
Daytona Beach, Fla. The Wildcats will also host Hampton in a Thursday
night game on September 22.
Morgan State and Howard will be featured on Saturday, September
24 as the two teams compete in the New York Urban League Football
Classic at the New Meadowlands Stadium, in East Rutherford, N.J.
Bethune-Cookman will travel to Norfolk, Virginia on October 20 to
take on Norfolk State in the MEAC's final Thursday night televised game.
The game will air live on ESPNU with a 7:30 p.m. kick off time.
Florida A&M will compete in two additional conference televised
games beginning on the road in Orangeburg, South Carolina against
South Carolina State on Saturday, October 22. FAMU will conclude the
MEAC's television slate with its annual matchup against B-CU in the
Florida Classic. The game will be played at the Florida Citrus Bowl and
will air live on ESPN Classic at 2:30 p.m.
For more information on MEAC football, visit www.MEACSports.
com


2011 MEAC FOOTBALL TELEVISION SCHEDULE
DATE GAME NETWORK
9/4 B-Cookman v. Prairie View A&M ESPN
9/8 Florida A&M at Hampton ESPNU
9/10 S. C. State at B-Cookman ESPNU
9/22 Hampton at B-Cookman ESPNU
9/24 Morgan State v. Howard ESPNU
10/20 B-Cookman at Norfolk State ESPNU
10/22 Florida A&M at S. C. State ESPNU
11/19 Florida A&M v. B-Cookman ESPN Classic


TIME
12n
7:30p
4p
7:30p
3:30p
7:30p
1:30p
2:30p


BROADCASTTIME
Live
Live
10:30p (Tape)
Live
10:30p (Tape)
Live
10:30p (Tape)
Live


Atlanta to host inaugural
SIAC Football Championship Game
Atlanta, GA-The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference an-
nounced last week that the first SIAC Football Championship game will be
held in Atlanta, GA.
"We're excited to have the city of Atlanta host our inaugural SIAC cham-
pionship football game. In light of the many SIAC fans and alumni living in
or in close proximity to Atlanta, this game will not only showcase our two
most outstanding football teams, but also feature a college fair, battle of the
bands competition, as well as game day tailgating and vending activities to
make this event a significant community engagement experience for our
fans," said SIAC Commissioner Greg Moore.
The SIAC Football Championship game will be held Saturday, November
12th at 3 p.m. at Lakewood Stadium, a newly renovated 10,000-seat stadium
located in SoutheastAtlanta, Georgia. The game will feature the regular season
champions from the SIAC East and West divisions.
This is first championship game in the 98-year history of the conference
and also makes the SIAC one of only two conferences (along with the CIAA)
with a designated championship football game in NCAA Division II.


1. Bethune-Cookman
2. South Carolina State
3. Florida A&M
4. Grambling State
5. Texas Southern
6. Prairie View A&M
7. Norfolk State
8. Hampton
9. Winston-Salem State
10. Morehouse
11. Fort Valley State 12. Albany State
13. Jackson State 14. Shaw
15. Elizabeth City State

TDs), Pat Brown (30 receptions,
337 yards) and Courtney Keith.
Three offensive linemen (Natiel
Curry, Alex Monroe and Marquell
Rozier) were named to the preseason
all-MEAC team while the defense
has all-MEAC selections in line-
man Ryan Davis, linebackers Ryan
Lewis and Reggie Sandilands and
safety Michael Williams.
Jenkins has 2010 back-up
Jackie Wilson, Troy Dannehower
and talented newcomer Quentin
Williams competing to replace John-
son. Jenkins will replace Orlando
calling the plays.
One glaring B-CU weakness last
year was the inefficiency of young
placekickers Sven Hurd and Kory
Kowalski (2 of 10 field goals, 52
of 62 PATs). Jenkins feels the two
will be better with a year under their
belts.
The Wildcats will have their
mettle tested with a daunting early
season stretch that has them facing
Prairie View A&M and Orlando
in Orlando at the season-opening
MEAC/SWAC Challenge on Sept.
5, hosting MEAC contenders South
Carolina State (Sept. 10) and
Hampton (Sept. 22) before travel-
ling to Div. I Miami for an Oct. 1
date.
MEAC co-champ South Caro-


lina State, which saw its 21-game
MEAC win streak halted by B-CU
last season, has to retool some key
positions (QB, OL, LB) but still holds
down the No. 2 spot. Florida A&M,
the other MEAC co-champ, handed
B-CU its only regular season loss but
also has some key holes to fill. Joe
Taylor's Rattlers are third.
SWAC contenders Grambling
State where Doug Williams is re-
turning as head coach-Texas South-
ern (Kevin Ramsey) and Prairie
View A&M (Heishma Northern)
all will be breaking in new coaches
andplaymakers. They hold down the
4-6 slots.
Norfolk State and Hampton,
the top challengers to B-CU, SCSU
and FAMU in the MEAC, hold down
the seventh and eighth spots.
My CIAA pick, Connell
Maynor's Winston-Salem State
Rams, and my SIAC favorite, Rich
Freeman's Morehouse Maroon
Tigers, round out the Top Ten.
Fort Valley State, Albany
State, Jackson State, Shaw and
Elizabeth City State make up the
next five.

Toughest Schedule
While Bethune-Cookman may
have the toughest early season dates,
SIAC contenderFort Valley State has
this year's most challenging out-of-
conference games.
The FVSU Wildcats get a
double-dose of MEAC co-champi-
ons as they travel to Florida A&M
(Sept. 3) and Bethune-Cookman
(Oct. 15). They also host NCAA
Div. II national runner-up Delta
State (Sept. 10). Fortunately, Donald
Pittman's Wildcats get perennial
SIAC contenders Tuskegee (Oct.
1) and Morehouse (Oct. 29) at home
before its traditional season-ending
battle with rival Albany State in Co-
lumbus, Ga. (Fountain City Classic)
on Nov. 5.


0 0EI


Bowie State vs. Livingstone


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
@ Bowie, MD


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1
Edward Waters vs. Concordia-Selma @ Jacksonville, FL
Lincoln (MO) vs. Fort Hays State @ Jefferson City, MO
West Virginia State vs. Seton Hill @ Institute, WV
Winston-Salem State vs. J. C. Smith @ W-S, NC B-Gray Stadium


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8


Alabama A&M vs. Miss Valley State @ Huntsville, AL Crews Stadium
Clark Atlanta vs. Miles @ Atlanta, GA Panther Stadium
Concordia-Selma vs. Texas College @ Selma, AL
Fayetteville State vs. Virginia State @ Fayetteville, NC
Florida A&M vs. Howard @ Tallahassee, FL Bragg Stadium
Jackson State vs. Ark.-Pine Bluff @ Jackson, MS Veterans Stadium
Kentucky State vs. Fort Valley State @ Frankfort, KY
Lincoln (PA) vs. Chowan @ Lincoln Univ., PA-Avon Grove HS
Morgan State vs. Savannah State @ Baltimore, MD Hughes Stadium
SC State vs. NC Central @ Or'burg, SC Dawson Stadium
Shaw vs. Johnson C. Smith @ Durham, NC County Stadium
Virginia Union vs. Elizabeth City State @ Richmond, VA


3p
2p
1:30p
Ip


lp
6p
5p
lp
3p
4p
1:30p
Ip
1p
1:30p
1p
Ip


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15
Benedict vs. Clark Atlanta @ Columbia, SC Johnson Stadium 2p
Central State vs. Southwest Baptist @ Wilberforce, OH McPherson Stadium 1:30p
Cheyney vs. West Chester @ Cheyney, PA 1 p
Elizabeth City State vs. Virginia State @ Eliz. City, NC Roebuck Stadium 1:30p
Johnson C. Smith vs. Virginia Union @ Charlotte, NC 1p
Lane vs. Tuskegee @ Jackson, TN 2p
Langston vs. SW Assemblies @ Langston, OK 2p
N. C. A&T vs. Delaware State @ Greensboro, NC Aggie Stadium 1:30p
Va. Univ. of Lynchburg vs. Wesley @ Lynchburg, VA- City Stadium 12n


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22


Alcorn State vs. Concordia-Selm
Chowan vs. Shaw
Fort Valley State vs. Stillman
Grambling State vs. Miss. Valley State
Hampton vs. NC Central
Howard vs. NC A&T
Livingstone vs. Fayetteville State
Miles vs. Lane
Morehouse vs. Benedict
St. Augustine's vs. J. C. Smith
Texas Southern vs. Central State


@ Alcorn State, MS Spinks Stadium 2p
@ Murfreesboro, NC 6p
@ Fort Valley, GA 2p
@ Grambling, LA- Robinson Stadium 2p
@ Hampton, VA-Armstrong Field 2p
@ Wash, DC Greene Stadium 1p
@ Salisbury,NC 1:30p
@ Fairfield, AL 4p
@ Atlanta, GA Harvey Stadium 2p
@ Raleigh, NC 2p
@ Houston, TX Delmar Stadium 2p


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29
@ Albany, GA
State @ Dover, DE -Alumni Stadium
is Southern @ Itta Bena, MS Rice-Totten Stadium
Cookman @ Durham, NC O'Kelly-Riddick Stad.
@ Norfolk, VA- Price Stadium
:on @ Savannah, GA- Wright Stadium
@ Baton Rouge, LA 5:3
@ Tyler, TX
Jnion @ Ettrick, VA 1:3


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5
Ark-Pine Bluff vs. Alabama State @ Pine Bluff, AR Lions Stadium
Bethune-Cookman vs. Morgan State @ Daytona Beach, FL
Tuskegee vs. Miles @ Tuskegee, AL Abbott Stadium


1:30p


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19
Prairie View A&M vs. Alabama A&M @ Pr. View, TX Blackshear Field

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24
Alabama State vs. Tuskegee @ Montgomery, AL Cramton Bowl


2p
lp
2p
2p
2p
2p
l0p
2p
30p


2:30p
4p
Ip



5p


2p


3p


AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XVIII, No. 4


South Carolina State opens
with three tough dates on the road.
The Sept. 10th MEAC showdown
at Bethune-Cookman is sandwiched
around Div. I games at Central Michi-
gan (9/3) and at Indiana (9/17).

Players to Watch
Jackson State quarterback
Casey Therriault is easily the most
prolific offensive performer return-
ing (See STAT CORNER) but his
aura is somewhat diminished by the
fact that his Tigers can not play for
the SWAC championship. But it will
still be interesting to see what kind
of numbers he puts up.
Also lookforproductive seasons
out of Alcorn State sophomore quar-
terback Brandon Bridge, Albany
State senior signal-caller Stanley
Jennings and ECSU's productive
Creven Powell.
Five 1,000-yard rushers return
led by Elizabeth City State's Da-
ronte McNeill. Bruising Winston-
Salem State tailback Nicholas Coo-
per leads the returnees averaging 6.2
yards per carry and scoring 15 TDs
a year ago. The 6-2, 225-pounder
averaged 18.4carries and 113.5 yards
per game. The lowest average of any
of the top nine returning rushers is
4.6 yards per carry.
Though no 1,000-yard receivers
return, Robert Holland of Chowan
who led all wideouts with 65 recep-
tions andJustinWilson of Delaware
State topped black college receivers
in yardage and TDs (57 receptions,
937 yards, 11 TDs) are back. Fort
Valley State's Tony Davis who
totalled 50 receptions a year ago to
lead all tight ends, also begins his
senior campaign.
Prairie View defensive back
Moses Ellis, Shaw defensive
lineman Charles Deas, Howard
linebacker Keith Pough are top
defenders to watch.


Jenkins
tY Mmw


Natiel Curry


ECSU's Daronte McNeill


Holland


Jennings Doug Williams


Albany State vs. Benedict
Delaware State vs. Morgar
Miss. Valley State vs. Texa
N. C. Central vs. Bethune-(
Norfolk State vs. NC A&T
Savannah State vs. Hampt
Southern vs. Alcorn State
Texas College vs. Bacone
Virginia State vs. Virginia I


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12
Stillman vs. Concordia-Selma @ Tuscaloosa, AL
Tennessee State vs. Tenn.-Martin @ Nashville, TN


Page 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press


August 25-31, 2011


1


R


4
4
4












August 25-31, 2011 Mrs. Perry's Free Press Page 9


Lawmakers target high Black


MIAMI Taking the microphone
at a church in a predominantly
black neighborhood of Miami, the
Rev. Jesse Jackson asked how
many in the crowd knew someone
looking for a job.
Most of the several hundred
people in the televised town hall
gathering stood up. How many
knew someone facing foreclosure?
Student loan debt? In jail?
Considered suicide? Crowds of
people stood up in answer to each
of his questions.
The Congressional Black Caucus
organized a town hall gathering in
Miami to address black unemploy-
ment rates Monday evening, one of
five taking place in August in dis-
tressed communities across the
country. At issue is the stubbornly
high unemployment rate in the
black community, now at 16.8 per-
cent nationwide, more than double
that for whites and a figure that
doesn't even include those who've
stopped looking for work.
U.S Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, D-
Mo. and the caucus chairman, said


(L-R) are longtime Historic Mount Zion members with city officials: Jean Pettis, Sollie Mitchell, State Rep.
Mia Jones, Event Committee Chair Alexis Goodman, Sen. Tony Hill, Charlotte Stewart and Dr. C.B.
McIntosh. R. Silver. R. Silver
Dignitaries join Mt. Zion family for 145th Anniversary


Continued from page 1 City of Jacksonville.Generat
by Rhonda Silver generation, working together
Founded in 1866, it is also, the fresh anointing, was the
second oldest AME church in the theme for the Historic Moun

Waters under fire for telling off Tea Pa
The Tea Party isn't happy with the Democratic Party especially,
Maxine Waters.
The 11-term California Democrat recently made a comment at a
ing where she told the Tea Party to go where the sun doesn't shine
"I'm not afraid of anybody," Walters told the crowd. "This is a 1
game. You can't be intimidated. You can't be frightened. And as
I'm concerned, the Tea Party can go straight to hell.




The CtyofJackonvile an


tion to AME Church's 145th Anniversary.
with a The grand celebration was held
central Sunday, August 21st, 2011. The
it Zion venerable downtown institution
under the leadership of Rev. Pearce
rty Ewing has been a beacon in the
community as an institutution of
p faith for nearly a century and a half.
The church celebrated in their
meet-
century old building located in the
heart of downtown at the corner of
tough Beaver and Newnan Streets. The
far as
edifice, rich with history, has
housed everything from the origins
of Stanton High School to the civil
rights struggle.
"My word of encouragement and
prayer for the members of Historic
Mount Zion is that you continue to
be a light for the unfortunate, the
down rodden and the faithless, as
they go through trying times," said
Rev. Ewing.


representatives are frustrated at
being unable to advance bills in
Congress aimed at encouraging job
growth. Caucus members have
introduced more than 40 such bills
since January and none of them
have passed. Republicans took
control of the House nearly nine
months ago.
Now, the lawmakers are taking to
the road to ensure angry con-
stituents that they are doing all in
their power to help, while offering
a job fair in each city as assistance.
In Atlanta, Cleveland and Detroit,
the events have drawn thousands,
and more than 1,000 people
streamed into a downtown conven-
tion center for the Miami job fair.
Another will be held in Los
Angeles at the end of the month.
"We left the complaint counter
and that's why we're on this tour,"
Cleaver said.
The frustration over jobs is begin-
ning to have political repercussions
in black communities.
"Unemployment in South Florida,
especially in the black community,


Back to school: There were no first day jitters for John E. Ford
students Diajion Foxworth, 12, (1) and his brother Dekevian George, 8. The
two youngsters who attend the foreign language elementary magnet school
are shown with their mother Jennifer Peterson. The soon to be star pupils
were ready and prepared for the start of their school year.


unemployment
is no longer a crisis," U.S. Rep.
Frederica Wilson, said before the
event. "It's an epidemic."
The job fairs come amid a grow-
ing debate within the black com-
munity about the Obama adminis-
tration's urban agenda. While black
lawmakers have been reluctant to
criticize the country's first black
president, some are beginning to
voice concern about the adminis-
tration's focus on deficit reduction
at a time of high joblessness and
poverty in urban areas.
"I think the president is doing as
much as he can, and I'm anxious to
hear his proposal when we go back
in September," Wilson said, refer-
ring to the president's job creation
plan. "But if it includes any fund-
ing, we're going to have to fight.
Because the tea party will stop
him."


Company hired

to manage

growing list of

intervene schools
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- The
Duval County School Board has
made it official. The same company
it hired to help manage four of the
district's intervene schools will
now be working in all seven of the
intervene schools.
The unanimous decision was
made in a specially called meeting
Tuesday morning.
The board recently hired the
group Educational Directions to
work in Raines, Ribault and
Andrew Jackson high schools, and
North Shore Elementary School.
They'll now work in Ed White
and Forrest high schools, and A.
Philip Randolph Academies.
"We want to make sure that these
schools are very successful,"
School Board Chairman W.C.
Gentry said. "We want to get them
out of intervene (status). We don't
want to wait until we have a crisis
to bring in additional resources."
Adding the additional schools to
the contract comes at an additional
cost of $825,000. However, the dis-
trict won't be spending additional
money.
The funding will come from
grants and federal funds.


FOREVER FIT
50 & BEYOND

2011 JACKSONVILLE SENIOR GAMES
MEN AND WOMEN AGES 50 AND OVER

OCTOBER 1-8, 2011
The Forever Fit 50 & Beyond: Jacksonville Senior Games is an Olympic-style event series
designed for seasoned athletes to participate on a competitive level and novice athletes to
participate for their own enjoyment, promoting healthy and active lifestyles for seniors.

Events
Cycling Track & Field ~ Road Race ~- Chess
Chinese Mah Jong Golf Croquet ~ Croquet
Power Lifting ~ Racquetball ~ Bowling Tennis
Table Tennis ~ Golf- Basketball ~ Bridge
Horseshoes ~ Softball ~ Line Dancing
Pickleball ~ Swimming ~ Bid Whist

For more information and a registration packet,
visit MakeASceneDowntown.com or call (904) 630-3690.

RITZ THEATRE AND MUSEUM PRESENTS




I JACISINY IL 1900.115
1?1'f 'A0 1 u111111


During the era of segregation,
Jacksonville's black community
developed high school sports
programs with far-reaching impact.
Challenged and nurtured by their
coaches and supported by the
community, Jacksonville athletes
not only went on to fill the ranks of
college and professional teams, but
also became leaders in the fields of
education, civic service, business,
and countless other professions.
This proud heritage and the spirit
of conquering adversity must never
be forgotten.


PUBLIC LEGAL NOTICE
FOR TAX EXEMPTIONS HEARINGS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT:

THE VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD ("VAB") HEARS DISPUTED OR APPEALED APPLICATIONS FOR PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION. THE VAB MUST
ACT IN ACCORDANCE WITH CRITERIA ESTABLISHED BY LAW.

ANY PERSON WISHING TO BE HEARD BEFORE THE VAB WITH REGARD TOAD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION APPLICATIONS MAY
FILE A PETITION AT CITY HALL, ST. JAMES BUILDING, 117 WEST DUVAL STREET, 3RD FLOOR, SUITE 305, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, 32202.
FILING DEADLINES, FILING FEES AND OTHER LEGAL CRITERIAAPPLY.

SPECIAL MAGISTRATE HEARINGS REGARDING FILED VAB PETITIONS ARE SCHEDULED TO OCCUR MONDAYS THROUGH THURSDAYS, BE-
GINNING OCTOBER 17, 2011 AND CONTINUING UNTILALL 2011 VAB PETITIONS HAVE BEEN HEARD OR RESOLVED. NOTICES OF SCHEDULED
SPECIAL MAGISTRATE HEARINGS ARE MAILED TO PETITIONERS.

THE 2011 VAB WILL MEET PERIODICALLY TO CONSIDER SPECIAL MAGISTRATE RECOMMENDED DECISIONS. THE VAB ORDINARILY MEETS
AT 9:00 A.M., IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 1ST FLOOR, CITY HALL, ON THE THIRD THURSDAY OF EACH MONTH, BEGINNING IN NOVEMBER,
AND CONTINUING EACH MONTH (EXCEPT DECEMBER AND JULY) UNTIL ALL BUSINESS OF THE 2011 VAB IS CONCLUDED.

CONSULT THE VAB WEBSITE: (http://www.coj.net/Departments/Regulatory-Boards-and-CommissionsNalue-Adjustment-Board.aspx) OR TELEPHONE
904.630.7370 FOR SPECIFIC VAB MEETING TIMES, DATES AND LOCATIONS.

A LIST OF ALL APPLICATIONS FOR TAX EXEMPTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN WHOLLY OR PARTIALLY APPROVED, AND A LIST OF ALL APPLICA-
TIONS THAT HAVE BEEN DENIED ARE AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC IN THE INFORMATION CENTER OF THE PROPERTY APPRAISER'S OFFICE,
231 EAST FORSYTH STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, 32202, FROM 8:00 AM TO 5:00 PM, MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, PURSUANT TO CHAP-
TER 196.194, FLORIDA STATUTES.

THESE LISTS WILL REFLECT THE FOLLOWING TYPES OF EXEMPTIONS:


Homestead Exemption
Blindness Exemption
Disability Exemption
'Granny Flat' (Assessment Reduction for Living Quarters of Par-
ents or Grandparents)
Historic Preservation Exemption
Service-Connected Total
and Permanent Disability Exemption


Armed Forces Homestead Allowance
Conservation Exemption
(Land Dedicated in Perpetuity)
Disability Veteran Exemption
Senior Citizen Exemption
Widow/Widower Exemption
Totally and Permanently Disabled Exemption


If you require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, please call 904.630.7370 no later than two business
days prior to the hearing for assistance.

IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEALANY DECISION MADE BY THE VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED
AT SUCH MEETING OR HEARING, HE OR SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS. FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE OR SHE MAY NEED
TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE
UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.

JOHN CRESCIMBENI, CHAIR, DUVAL COUNTY VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD
CHERYL L. BROWN, CLERK, DUVAL COUNTY VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD

VAB eMail address: VAB@COJ.net; Telephone: 904.630.7370; Fax: 904.630.0576


August 25-31, 2011


Mrs. Perry's Free Press Page 9






Page 10 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 25-31, 2011


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A


Page 10 Ms. Perry's Free Press


August 25-31, 2011











Page 11 Mrs. Perry's Free Press August 25 31, 2011


Harvey developing 'Act

Like a Lady' television show


Steve Harvey
The multi-talented Steve Harvey
is developing what is being
described as a "comedy show with
talk show elements" that would fea-
ture the entertainer as host of a for-
mat that mixes his best-selling book
"Act Like a Lady, Think Like a
Man" and syndicated radio pro-
gram, Steve Harvey Morning Show.
The show is set for a fall 2012
launch in syndication and will also
feature Harvey as executive pro-
ducer.
Harvey, also host of the syndicat-
ed "Family Feud," is aiming to
bring his comedic sensibility to the


show, which will focus on relation-
ship topics, including parenting,
workplace, body issues, co-workers
and more, according to the
Hollywood Reporter.
"Steve Harvey is a multi-talented
entertainer, a best-selling author,
host of a No. 1-rated radio program
and a huge TV personality Steve
is a proven ratings winner in the day
part, said Barry Wallach, presi-
dent of NBCUniversal Domestic
TV Distribution. "
The Harvey-hosted "Family
Feud" has seen its ratings increase
since he took over last fall, includ-
ing a 55 percent boost among
women 25-54.
Meanwhile, "Act Like a Lady" is
being adapted for the big screen by
Screen Gems and is slated for a
2012 release.
Harvey is just the latest personal-
ity to have a talk show on deck for
fall 2012. "Survivor" host Jeff
Probst recently signed a deal with
CBS TV Distribution, Katie Couric
has a deal with ABC, and Ricki
Lake has a pact with Twentieth TV.
Also, Bravo's Bethenny Frankel is
working with Ellen DeGeneres on a
Telepictures-produced project.


*


,, oopfl 1nui


-

Reality television star Evelyn Lozada and fiancee Chad Ocho Cinco.

Evelyn and Chad set a date


After their excitement for each
other's love stunned everyone,
Evelyn Lozada and her fiancee
Chad Ochocinco slowed down, but
made a date to perform their nup-
tials.
The pair didn't waste any time get-
ting engaged last year, but now that


vsV ie: 'The Help' entertains


and enlightens on a bygone era


W 'I' I BI
Viola Davis gives a poignant performance in "The Help" which gives
domestics' point of view in a pre-civil rights era Mississippi.


By K. Williams
After great reviews and a lot of
word of mouth advertising for the
film, The Help took the top spot at
the box office this weekend, in it's
second week in theatres. It's
expected to continue doing well in
the weeks to come earning more
then $20,000,000.
Kathryn Stockett made an auspi-
cious debut in 2009 with the publi-
cation of The Help, a poignant peri-
od piece examining the unques-
tioned relationships of entitled,
white socialites and their deferen-
tial black maids in Mississippi.
Although the story is set in the
author's hometown of Jackson in
the early sixties, her best-selling
novel is more fictional than autobi-
ographical in nature.
The screen adaptation unfolds
from the point of view of Aibileen
Clark (Viola Davis), a long-suffer-


ing nanny left bone-weary by a life
spent looking after white babies."
Born in 1911, she is currently rais-
ing little Mae Mobley Leefolt
(Emma and Eleanor Henry), a
recent addition to a prominent
Southern family.
As narrator, Aibileen is able to
admit to the audience the existence
of a "bitter seed" planted deep
inside of her soul since the recent
death of her only son. Still, she is
not one to risk her job by allowing
her face to reveal even a trace of
that resentment in the presence of
her employers. Instead, the gram-
matically-challenged domestic
dutifully nourishes the impression-
able toddler in her care by regularly
reciting the same spiritual mantra
she's shared with all 17 other chil-
dren entrusted to her over the years,
namely, "You is kind; you is smart;
you is important."


By contrast, Aibileen's relatively-
mercurial best friend, Minny
(Octavia Spencer), is not nearly as
stoic, which explains why she fre-
quently finds herself fired for
insubordination. After all, the strict-
ly-enforced housekeeper code of
conduct calling for no spanking,
touching or sassing white folks, and
especially no using their bathrooms
tends to test her patience.
Passive-aggressive Minny is
lucky even to be alive after her lat-
est outburst which led to her being
dismissed by Hilly Holbrook
(Bryce Dallas Howard), an insuf-
ferable shrew who only got what
she deserved. Minny next lands a
position with Celia Foote (Jessica
Chastain), a newcomer ostracized
by other well-to-do ladies because
of her white trash roots.
The plot thickens, upon the
arrival back in town of cotton plan-
tation heiress Skeeter Phelan
(Emma Stone). Having spent time
away from the racist region, the
aspiring journalist now finds herself
offended by a way of life everyone
else around her seems to take for
granted.
Feeling for the plight of the long-
suffering black servants who had
raised her and her friends so loving-
ly despite the discrimination,
Skeeter decides to write a book
recounting what life in Jackson is
like from their perspective. So,
starting with Aibileen and Minny,
she starts approaching sisters to
cooperate with the project, which is
no mean feat, given that this is
Mississippi at a time when it was
often fatal to challenge the status
quo.


things have settled down, the two
have taken it easy.
However, Lozada said she's not
trying to be engaged forever.
Something needs to happen, so they
made a tentative date.
"There's nothing set in stone, but
either way we're going to get mar-
ried in 2012 whether it's televised
or not," she stated, adding that they
would likely get hitched next sum-
mer. And Evelyn was quick to clar-
ify that her wedding day would be
scheduled around what's most con-
venient for her and Chad not TV.
"We're not opposed, but obviously
if it works with scheduling.
Obviously, you know he has a foot-
ball schedule. We would need to
work that out."
While they are in the middle of
planning their wedding, it turns out
the two have different ideas about
the ceremony.
"I would like something small,"
Evelyn admitted, "but Chad being
who he is wants something bigger
and more over-the-top. We'll see if
we can meet somewhere in the mid-
dle."
In he meantime, they've been dis-
cussing kids. The couple went to
the fertility clinic in hopes of con-
ceiving twins, but Lozada is
adamant about waiting until after
they are married.


ENTERTAINMENT WORLD



GOSSIP SCOOP


Macy Gray austions chance to sing on
new album
An auction house is giving Macy Gray fans the
chance to join her in the studio as she records her
new album.
For $1,350, the devotee will get to sing on the
chorus of a track and dine with the singer in the
studio's zen garden.
The package, created by the online luxury gift
store www.GiltCity.com, also features credit on
the album and a signed copy when it is complet-
ed.
The session will take place on Sept. 4 and fans can apply now.
Nicole Arie-Parker, Underwood headed to Broadway
NAACP Image Award winner Nicole Ari Parker
is set to star opposite Blair Underwood in the
upcoming Broadway revival of Tennessee
Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire," directed by
Emily Mann.
Parker will play Blanche Du Bois in the produc-
tion, which is set to open in the spring of 2012.
The Tennessee Williams Pulitzer Prize winning
S I drama is set against the backdrop of New Orleans'
," gritty French Quarter, It tells the tale of former
school teacher and socialite Blanche DuBois, as
she's forced to move in with her sister Stella and
her animalistic husband (Underwood). But the
fragile, Blanche quickly gets a gritty life lesson in the seamy, steamy
underbelly of 1940s New Orleans.
Real Housewife Lisa Wu splits with
husband
Real Housewives of Atlanta recurring guest
Lisa Wu, who appeared on season one and two
as a cast member, and husband, former NFL
linebacker Ed Hartwell, have split.
"Sadly. We r separated but wld NEVER b over
money. That is sofarfrom the truth. Wish ppl cld
respect ppl's privacy during time like these," she
tweeted.
Chiwetel Ejiofor tapped for Brad Pitt slavery drama
British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor has signed on to topline
an adaptation of "Twelve Years a Slave," an autobiogra-
phy written in 1853 by Solomon Northup, a free black
man who became enslaved. Brad Pitt and his Plan B
banner are producing.
Ejiofor will play Northup, a married and educated free
black man living in New York when two men
approached him with a job offer in Washington. When he
showed up in D.C., he was kidnapped and put in a slave
pen, paving the way to his grueling life under numerous owners.
The book is studied for everything from its details of the slave markets
that existed in D.C. to the type of food served to slaves.
Northup was able to secure his freedom when a white carpenter from
Canada, who didn't believe in slavery, was able to smuggle out letters to
Northup's wife, initiating a court case that saw him set free.


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Page 11 Mrs. Perry's Free Press


August 25 31, 2011


**V ^





















4- AR UND TOWN


S- .. ... What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene


Eat Up Downtown
Downtown Vision, Inc. is dishing
out exquisite cuisine at an afford-
able price during Eat Up
Downtown. From hip caf6s to ele-
gant steak houses, Downtown's
finest restaurants collaborate each
year to bring you a three course
meal at one unbeatable price. Save
the dates and your appetite!. Eat
Up Downtown will run for two
weeks, August 15 August 28,
2011, you have two weeks to dine!

Christian Comedy Show
There will be Christian Comedy
show themed "Christians Can't
Laugh." Join comedians Big Chip,
Ms. Jen and Da Cleaner for a laugh
out loud show. It will be held at the
Clara White Mission, 613 W.
Ashley St., Friday, August 26th.
Showtime is 7:30 p.m. For tickets
and more information contact
Robert White at (904) 677-6083.

Truly Tina
Tribute Show
Latitude 30 will host the Truly
Tina Tribute Show Friday, August
26th at 8 p.m. and Saturday,
August 27th for two shows at 6
and 8 p.m. Latitude 30 located at
10370 Phillips Highway,
Jacksonville, FL 32256. For more
information, call 705-5574.

Joy Dennis
Birthday Soiree
Vocalist Joy Dennis birthday
soiree and HBCU tour Kickoff
Party will be held Saturday,
August 27, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. River
City Brewing Company, 835
Museum Circle on the Riverwalk.
Come enjoy dinner and music by


Joy Dennis and DJ Goodlife. For
more information call (904) 398-
2299.

Jazz at American Beach
The American Beach Property
Owners Association will present
Jazz at Burney Park on historic
American Beach. Bring your chairs
and grills and sit oceanside while
listening to the smooth sounds of
the jazz band Instant Groove. The
free event will be Saturday, August
27th from 5-8 p.m. For more infor-
mation call 514-6611.

Spoken Word
at the Ritz
Join the Ritz Theatre for a free
evening of Spoken Word, Thursday,
September 1st at 7 p.m. Call 632-
5555.

Raines '81 Reunion
The Raines High School class of
1981 will celebrate their 30th class
reunion September 2 3, 2011 at
the Hyatt Riverfront Hotel.
For more information email cecil-
iadorsey@bellsouth.net or call
(904) 766-8784.

Ritz Amateur Night
Ritz Amateur Night is back. Come
to the Ritz Theatre in historic
LaVilla in downtown Jacksonville
on Friday, September 2nd to wit-
ness the best amateur talent in
Jacksonville Apollo style with the
audience deciding the winner.
Showtime is 7 p.m. and is always a
sell out. For more information, call
632-5555.

Tattoo Convention
The 7th Annual Jacksonville


Tattoo Convention will be held this
year at the Renaissance Resort at
World Golf Village, 500 S. Legacy
Trail, St. Augustine, Florida,
September 2nd at 11 a.m. and
September 4th at 8:00 p.m. For
more information call 877-888-
2002.
Jazz Cruise
Labor Day Weekend will be the
time for a grand evening of smooth
jazz on A Jazz on the Water Cruise.
It will be held on Saturday,
September 3rd from 10 p.m.-l:30
a.m. taking off from 1501
Riverplace (next to Charthouse
Restaurant). The evening will fea-
ture include live jazz, hors d'oeu-
vres served and TJ The DJ. For
more information call Ms. Charo at
520-3238.

Mali Vai Washington
Golf & Tennis Gala
The Mali Vai Washington Golf &
Tennis Gala is marked for
September 12th and 13th and
includes a Tennis Pro-Am, Golf
Pro-Am and Gala Dinner. For more
information on this event call (904)
359-KIDS (5437) or email
info@malwashington.com.

Sesame Street Live!
All of the classic Seasme Street
characters will be in performance
for Sesame Street Live "Elmo's
Super Heroes" at Times Union
Center for Performing Arts (Moran
Theater). The show is scheduled for
Friday, Sept. 16th 18th. For more
information call (904) 630-3900.

Jacksonville's Dancing
with the Stars
Help choose Jacksonville's favorite


dancer. The Jacksonville Children's
Chorus is presenting Jacksonville's
Dancing with the Stars event on
Saturday, September 17th at 7 p.m.
at the Times-Union Center for
Performing Arts. Local 'celebri-
ties' will compete in two show
dances and your votes decide who
will get to bring home the mirror
ball trophy. Email carolyna@aso-
cialaffair.net for more information..

Icons and
Legends concert
Erykah Badu, The O'Jays and
Ricky Smiley will be in concert
together on Saturday, September
17, 2011 at the arena. For tickets
call (800) 745-3000, or visit online
at www.ticketmaster.com.

N.W. Library
Annual Book Sale
The Bradham Brooks Northwest
library will hold their annual book
sale Thursday, September 23,
noon 8 p.m., Friday, September
24, 10 a.m. 5 p.m., and Saturday,
September 25, 10 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Visit Bradham Brooks library at
1755 Edgewood Avenue W. or call
(904) 765-5402.

Zeta Phi
Beta Greek Picnic
The ladies of Zeta Phi Beta
Sorority, Inc. invite the community
to attend their Greek Picnic, located
in Zeta Phi Beta Park, 3721 Owen
Road Jacksonville, Florid 32208. It
will be held Saturday, September
24th from 1 6 p.m. Activities
include a step show, stroll contest,
volleyball, raffle, food and more.
For more information, call Denise
Everett at 704-5181.


Dog Days in
the Park 2011
Join the Springfield Animal Care
& Rescue Club (SACARC) for Dog
Days in the Park 2011, celebrating
fun for the whole family includ-
ing the four-legged members.
Bring the kids and the dogs to
Confederate Park 956 Hubbard
Street, Jacksonville, FL 32206 on
Saturday, September 24, 2011
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. for food,
beer and fun. For more information
visit www.sacarc.org or email con-
tactus@sacarc.org or call 633-9308.

Ride for Justice
The 6th annual Ride for Justice
will take place on September 24,
2011 to benefit the Justice
Coalition. The ride will begin at the
Jacksonville Landing lead by
Sheriff John Rutherford and Clay
County Sheriff Rick Beseler on a 50
mile scenic route, ending at Old
Plank Baptist Church where riders


will be served a barbecue lunch.
Register by calling 783-6312 or
online at www.justicecoalition.org.

Cruise with Raines
Class of 1970
The Raines Class of 1970 is sailing
on a cruise September 22-29, 2012.
The ports of call are Port Canaveral,
Nassau Bahamas, St. Thomas, and
St. Maarten. For more information
contact Toby Byrd at (904) 879-
2605 or email tobybyrd@wind-
stream.net.

Honorary Tribute
for Gene Hollomon
An Honorary Tribute for Eugene
(Gene) Hollomon: a fundraiser, jazz
and variety show will be held at the
Karples Manuscript Library and
Museum Saturday, October 1st, 6
9 p.m., 101 East Laura Street,
Jacksonville FL 32201.
For more information call Roxann
Hilbert at (904) 699-5952.


Artists sought to design for Jazz Fest
You could be the artist! The City of Jacksonville is calling all artists to
design the 2012 Commemorative Jacksonville Jazz Festival Poster. Entry
deadline is September 6, 2011. Mail a photo or email your entry to
events@coj.net. For further information call (904) 630-CITY (2489).

Stanton Class of 1963 now meeting
New Stanton Sr. High School Class of 1963 will meet the third Sunday of
each month to prepare for their 50th class reunion in the year 2013. The
meetings will be held at the Highlands Branch Library, 1826 Dunn
Avenue, 3:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. Contact Gracie Smith Foreman or call (904)
766-5221.
Kuumba Festival wants your old

newspapers for fund raising efforts
The Kuumba African-American Arts Festival is raising funds by recy-
cling your old papers. Bring your newspapers to their special recycling bin
located at the WinnDixie on Moncrief and Soutel.


I U I I I II U I C
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Please send check or money order to: Jacksonville Free Press
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like your information to be printed. Information can be sent
via email, fax, brought into our office or mailed in. Please be
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P1Sianning Your

P U Ae, 94


Page 12 Ms. Perry's Free Press


August 25-31, 2011











Page 13 Mrs. Perry's Free Press August 25- 31, 2011


Flipping Through


the


Free Press Files


During the year of our 20th Anniversary, we paid tribute to the many people, places and events, that have graced the Free Press pages. Though our celebration is official-
ly over, and we are on the cusp of our 25th, we received such overwhelming response to the "Flipping" page, we have decided to flashback the page! We continue to share
with you some of the many memories that have shaped our publication.


NAACP Advocate Dr. C.B. McIntosh awards a life
membership to a new recipient during the annual banquet.


Celebrating after the Bold City Classic are Wendy Henton, Hosts Terry Fields and Denise Lee, the late
Taye Brown, and Carlottra Guyton.


Sharon Quarterman shows off her
sassy silver outfit.


Attending the Annual NAACP Banquet Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Griffen
and Mr. & Mrs. Isiah Rumlin.


Rev. and Mrs. John Newman are congratulated by then State
Representative Tony Hill and Willye Dennis at a receptionin honor of
their marriage.


Shown above at the Jacksonville Chapter 100 Black Men's 5th Annual Recognition
Banquet are Chapter President Marion Graham, Jr., Actor Charles Dutton and Banquet Attorney Kim Nesmith and Adrian Noel chat it
Chair Doug Brown. up during a networking event.
r -, l .


Celebrating at a surprise party in her honor are Antwaune Ponds,
Faye Johnson, Dominique Torrance and honoree Maretta Lattimer.


Gertrude Peele awards a plaque to the late Ms. Lillie Rubin on behalf
of Zeta Phi Beta, Sorority.


Shown here at a networking event in this early 90's photo was then
Jacksonville General Counsel Fred Franklin, Ju'Coby Pittman and Al
Randolph.


Eric Oliver and Marsha Oliver instilled the importance of communi-
ty involvement in their son Joel at an early age as they attend a circa Celebratory social couple Josephine Fiveashe-Porter and husband
2000 building dedication. Robert are all smiles at the annual FlaJax dance.


H^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ T ^* iiB'-~i^S.4I


IU


Page 13 Mrs. Perry's Free Press


August 25 31, 2011


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7
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Page 14 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 25-31, 2911


Sights and Scns- Jacksonvill e .JaA Falconsp. .i hs .



_ ~C h 3C1 .... .... .... Tlllll
1. N Al ftp~
iin~ ~iX(w
16lilt


Kaliya,Kamaria and Kamiya Bowden


Gwandos Ward and Charlette Lee


Public gets first glimpse
Tourists and Washingtonians got National Mall between memorials
their first up-close look this week at honouring Presidents Abraham
the memorial to the U.S.civil rights Lincoln and Thomas Jefferson. It
leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. includes a 9-metre-tall sculpture of
King and a 137-metre-long
granite wall inscribed with 14
S6 quotations from his speeches.
The sheer size of the sculpture
of King sets it apart from nearby
Statues of Jefferson and Lincoln,
which are both about 6 metres
tall, though inside larger monu-
ments.
A panel of scholars chose the
The site opened without fanfare engraved quotations from speeches
to kick off a week of celebrations by King in Atlanta, New York,
ahead of its' official dedication. Washington, Los Angeles and
The memorial sits on the Montgomery, Alabama, as well as


John Shepard, Deborah Shepard, Jennifer Shepard, Brian Shepard
John Shepard, Deborah Shepard, Jennifer Shepard, Brian Shepard


Super Cheerleaders Autumn Hill, McKenna Houston and Mia Hill

of Rev. King Jr. memorial


from King's books and his letter
from a Birmingham, Alabama, jail.
One of the stone engravings
reads: "We shall overcome because
the arc of the moral universe is
long, but it bends toward justice."
Sunday's dedication ceremony
will mark the 48th anniversary of
the March on Washington and
King's famous "I Have a Dream"
speech. President Barack Obama is
scheduled to speak at the dedica-
tion.
The Chinese sculptor, Lei Yixin,
said he wanted the memorial to be a
visual representation of the ideals
King spoke of in his "I Have a
Dream" speech.


The sculpture depicts King with a
stem expression, wearing a jacket
and tie, his arms folded and clutch-
ing papers in his left hand. Lei said
through his son that "you can see
the hope" in King's face, but that his
serious demeanour also indicates
that "he's thinking."
The statue depicts King emerging
from a stone. The concept for the
memorial was taken from a line in
the "I Have a Dream" speech,
which is carved into the stone: "Out
of the mountain of despair, a stone
of hope." Visitors to the memorial
pass through a sculpture of the
mountain of despair and come upon
the stone of hope.


Music lovers stunned by

the death of Nick Ashford


Nick Ashford, one-half of the
legendary Motown songwriting duo
Ashford & Simpson that penned
elegant, soulful classics for the
likes of Diana Ross and Marvin
Gaye and funk hits for Chaka Khan
and others, died Monday at age 70,
his former publicist said.
Ashford, who along with wife
Valerie Simpson wrote some of
Motown's biggest hits, died in a
New York City hospital, said Liz
Rosenberg, who was Ashford's
longtime friend. He had been suf-
fering from throat cancer and had
undergone radiation treatment.
Though they had some of their
greatest success at Motown with
classics like "Ain't No Mountain
High Enough" and "Reach Out And
Touch" by Ross and "You're All I
Need To Get By" by Gaye and
Tammi Terrell, Ashford & Simpson
also created anthems for others, like
"I'm Every Woman" by Khan and
Whitney Houston.
"They had magic and that's what


Asnhor a & lmpson, close rinenas
of Ritz Theater's Executive Director
Carol Alexander, performed on the
First Coast for the historic venue's
10th anniversary in 2007. Ashford is
shown above with fan Tommy
Chandler at the event.
creates those wonderful hits, that
magic," Verdine White of Earth,
Wind and Fire said after learning of
his friend's death. "Without those
songs, those artists wouldn't have
been able to go to the next level."
Ashford & Simpson also had suc-
cess writing for themselves includ-
ing the hit "Solid As A Rock."
Their relationship stretched more
than four decades. They met in


Talented husband and wife team
Nick Ashford and Valerie Simpson
performed and created under the
name Ashford & Simpson.
1964 in a New York City church;
Ashford, a South Carolina native,
had come to the city to pursue a
dance career. Simpson was a music
student, and after connecting with
her, they decided to start to write
songs together.
"They were always comfortable
with each other and they made all
of us comfortable, because they
were comfortable," White said.
Their first major success
occurred when they came up with
"Let's Go Get Stoned" for Ray
Charles. That song became a huge
hit, and soon, they came to the
attention of Motown Records and
began penning hits for their artists.
"Ain't No Mountain High Enough"
was originally their hit, until Ross
later rerecorded it and made it her
signature song.
The duo, who were married for
38 years, helped sell millions of
records for several artists. They
also had success as their own entity,
but despite "Solid As a Rock," their
songs were dwarfed by those they
penned for others.
In recent years, the pair contin-
ued to perform. They also were
owners of the New York City
restaurant Sugar Bar, where many
top names and emerging talents
would put on showcases.
Ashford is survived by his wife
and two daughters.


It's Publix, and the




savings are easy.


Every week we publish our hundreds of sales items


in the newspaper insert and also online, so you can


take advantage of all our special offers. Our easy-to-spot


shelf signs point out the deals and your register receipt


will tally up your savings for you. Go to publix.com/save


right now to make plans to save this week.


to save here.


Page 14 Ms. Perry's Free Press


August 25-31, 2011


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MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00333

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00333

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press


This item has the following downloads:


Full Text





Number one

rated The Help

entlightens and

, educates on

Sy a bygone era
Page 11n




Entertainment


West & Smiley

Impact on
Obama Voters:

Real or


Fleeting?
Page 8


Mentoring is

S the best way to

give back and

save the next

generation
Page 11


community

mourns loss of

talented Nick

Ashford at 70
Page 14


C'OAS I QLALLIFY BLACK


KLY 50 Cents
50 Cents


AKA sorors get second chance at
lawsuit against former Basileus
WASHINGTON Eight members of the nation's
oldest black sorority are getting a second chance
to question what they say were improper pay-
ments to their group's former president and her
spending of sorority money on clothing, jewelry
and a wax statute of herself.
The members of the Chicago-based Alpha Kappa
Alpha sorority sued the sorority and its then-pres-
ident Barbara McKinzie in Washington in 2009.
The sorority sisters questioned $375,000
McKinzie McKinzie had received in one year as president of
the group, saying the money had not been approved by members. They
also alleged she bought designer clothing, jewelry and lingerie with
sorority money.
A judge threw out the lawsuit in early 2010, saying the women brought
the wrong kind of lawsuit and citing other problems. Last week, a three-
judge panel of the D.C. Court of Appeals said the first judge had erred
and the lawsuit should be allowed to go forward.
A lawyer for the sorority members, Christian R. Eriksen, said his clients
were pleased and "look forward to resolving this matter." A spokes-
woman for the sorority, Melody McDowell, said the group was review-
ing the decision but would have no comment while the case is pending.
The group's lawyer, Dale Cooter, said he was disappointed and that his
clients maintain that they did nothing wrong.

Tea Partier jokes -about killing Obamas
The Chair of the Sumter South Carolina Tea Party posted -- and then
quickly pulled -- a post on her Facebook page earlier this month that
joked about throwing the Obamas out of a helicopter.
Shery Lanford Smith posted the the joke on her Facebook page on
August llth. The page is now private.
In the joke, the Obamas are on a helicopter talking about how they
could make people happy if they threw money out the window. The pilot
says: "I could throw both of them out of the window and make 256 mil-
lion people very happy!" Smith added: "If you're one of 256 million,
PASS IT ON."

GOP lawmaker resigns after wife's
racist email to Carl Lewis
TRENTON, N.J.- A freshman Republican lawmaker resigned because
his wife sent "an offensive and racist" email to the Democratic state
Senate campaign of nine-time Olympic gold medalist Carl Lewis.
Pat Delany stepped down from the state Assembly this month and said
he wouldn't seek a full term in November because of his wife's letter to
Lewis' campaign, Burlington County. Delany and his wife, Jennifer
Delany, are white. Lewis, a political novice who's among the greatest ath-
letes of all time, is black.
Jennifer Delany's email to Lewis' campaign said, in part, "Imagine hav-
ing dark skin and name recognition and the nerve to think that equaled
knowing something about politics."
Lewis is running for state Senate in New Jersey's 8th Legislative
District. Delany was part of the opposing GOP Assembly slate in the dis-
trict.
'SlutWalk' comes to South

Africa, where rape is crisis
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- An international protest against the
notion that a woman's appearance can explain or excuse attacks has come
to South Africa, a country where rape is seen as a national crisis.
Men wore mini skirts and women draped sexy lingerie over their street
clothes during Saturday's "SlutWalk" in Cape Town. Some 2,000 pro-
testers walked a route where fans partied during last year's football World
Cup.
The protest movement originated in Toronto, Canada, sparked by a
police officer's remark that women could avoid being raped by not dress-
ing like "sluts."
According to the most recent police statistics, more than 55,000 cases
of rape and indecent assault were reported in South Africa from 2009 to
2010.

Sharpton officially tapped as TV host
MSNBC has named the Rev. Al Sharpton as host
of a weeknight program on the network.
The announcement comes after the civil rights
activist spent several weeks as a tryout in the 6
p.m. time slot.
His new program, to be called "PoliticsNation,"
will premiere next Monday.
Sharpton is a well-known civil rights activist and
minister. He calls the hosting job "a natural exten-
sion of my life work and growth."
In addition to being a guest on MSNBC through-
Sharpton out the network's history, he has also served as an
occasional guest host on several of its programs. He hosts a nationally
syndicated radio show, as well.
The 6 p.m. hour serves as an important lead-in to MSNBC's weeknight
slate that includes Chris Matthews, Laurence O'Donnell, Rachel
Maddow and Ed Schultz.


Volume 24 No. 45 Jacksonville, Florida August 25-31, 2011

What you won't hear in the news

as America celebrates King's dream


Shown (L-R) are Joseph Burton, Wanda Mitchell, Leona Jones and
Charles Brown who helped organize activities for the 145th celebration.
Historic Mt.Zion AME Church celebrated their 145th anniversary.
last weekend with a grand celebration. The institution is the second
oldest AME church in the state of Florida. Continued on page 9

"The Oak's" Youth Explosion sends
over 1,000 students to school prepared

-


Shown above are First Baptist Church of Oakland volunteers India
Gibson, Pat Williams, Syann Daniels, Niko Robinson give free back-
packs and school supplies to students.
The First Baptist Church of Oakland's Fifth Annual Back to School Jam
was held last Saturday at Metropolitan Park to give Duval students a prop-
er start. Over 1,000 students benefitted from free backpacks and school
supplies provided by the church. High school students received USB flash
drives and free physical were also be offered at the Health Fair. The mas-
sive event concluded the church's Youth Explosion weekend, which also
included a Parent and Student Empowerment Dinner, seminar and clothes
give away.
"Our prayer and hope was for everyone to join us in this great endeav-
or to help make Jacksonville a truly great city," Pastor Torrin Dailey said.


by George Curry
In the hoopla surrounding
Sunday's dedication of the Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. statue on
the National Mall in Washington,
Harry E. Johnson, Sr., the visionary
and fundraising engine behind the
project, will finally get his due.
Placing Dr. King on the Mall was a
project of Alpha Phi Alpha fraterni-
ty, but it was Johnson, a Houston
attorney and former president of the
fraternity, who made it all happen,
raising more than $100 million.


In the excitement of placing a
statue of the first African-American
on the Mall, there are three stories
that readers should be aware of,
though few journalists, if any, will
cover.
The first story is surprising.
Among the million dollar-donors to
the MLK memorial project, only
two African-Americans had joined
that select club as of July, according
to the list of donors compiled by the
Martin Luther King, Jr. National
Memorial Continued on page 3


Pictured l-r: EWC Tri-County Alumni President and c/o '88 member
Yolanda Hoyt; EWC Alumni President and c/o '65 member Margurite
Warren; alumni banquet honoree and EWC c/o '93 member Melva
Rozier.
EWC Alumni host convention, tribute
graduates and community trustees


This past weekend, the EWC
Alumni Association hosted its bien-
nial convention and hundreds of
alumni from around the country
travelled to Jacksonville for the cel-
ebration. Held August 18-21 at
Crowne Plaza, the convention was
a four-day experience filled with
training workshops and social
activities designed to enrich and
entertain participants. Immediate
past national president Marguerite
Warren, EWC Class of 1965, state
that the convention's theme
"Passing the Torch: A Focus on


Membership, Chapter Develop-
ment, Scholarship and Student
Services" reflected the organiza-
tion's goals and accomplishments.
"We are gathered here to reconnect
with friends, strengthen our organi-
zation and honor outstanding alum-
ni. We are in a building process and
have elected new national officers,
led by our new president, Eric
Johnson. Our college and commu-
nity-at-large will see some fantastic
new things from the alumni," said
Warren.
Continued onpage 6


I* ri aii d .1 Ii ioCm mis Is'ioner greets 1tuden1tsonfiifrso II


Joined by his newly appointed
Commissioner of Education, Dr.
Donnie Homer, Mayor Alvin
Brown canvassed several Duval
County Public Schools on opening
day to welcome students.
The visits which included the
seven intervene schools began
Monday at 6:45 a.m. and continued
on Tuesday.
At Raines, he greeted the Val fam-
ily who transferred their son for his
senior year into the intervene
schools because they were opti-
mistic on the many good things
they heard about the school.
The visits came just days after
Mayor Brown created the
Education Commissioner's Office.
The position enables City Hall to
fundraise and advocate for Duval
County Public Schools. The city
pays $1 annually for Dr. Homer's
services.
Continuing with his mantra of
developing a successful public/pri-
vate partnership, Monday's 'Back
to School Blitz' ended with Mayor
Brown collecting 10 pallets of
donated school supplies from a
local Walmart.


Shown above escorting their son to school opening day are Deborah Val Raines' senior Demetius Val,
Mayor Alvin Brown, proud father Pasco Val and the city's new Education Comm. Dr. Donnie Horner. TM.4


-L--


momolommummm








Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 25 -31, 2011


Lowes Hero's join forces with Kirby Smith PTSA to rescue school Kirby Smith Mid-
dle School struggled last year with a blighted area of the school's campus being in need of a beautification project.
The Kirby Smith staff and members of the PTSA searched high and low for a solution.. The answer came when Val
Johnson of Lowe's Department called his store's Hero team to the rescue. They adopted Kirby Smith Middle School
and transformed the space into a beautiful landscaped area as a Back to School Project. Val Johnson says that "Lowe's
Department has been reaching out to the community to do worthwhile service projects for a while". The Lowe's
Hero is an initiative of Lowe's Department where its employees will come out and perform a service project. "We
are thankful that Kirby Smith is the recipient of the Lowe's Hero Project this year. It is great that Lowe's believe in
school partnerships, says Mrs. Marshall, principal. Joyce Couch


Secrets credit card companies don't want you to know
While it may seem like you're at calling your credit card company and sider negotiations with a credit card
the mercy of credit card companies asking for the charge to be removed company, they often picture them-
and others that you owe, in reality, from your monthly statement, selves asking for a lower interest rate.
you probably have more power and The key to a successful request is While that's a good starting point,
leverage than you suspect when it that you have to have a pretty good there are a host of other things you
comes to dealing with creditors, track record of paying your bills on can also ask of your credit card is-
Once you discover a few profound time. If you missed four payments suer. Among them:
truths about credit card companies, out of the past dozen that were due, Change your payment due date
you'll not only more successfully jug- you're not likely to find a sympa- (so that all your bills don't come due
gle your financial obligations, but thetic ear on the other end of the at once)
you'll also know how to maximize phone if you call your credit card Upgrade your account from
your credit cards for all they're worth, company. "past due" to "current" status
Here are a few little known secrets By contrast, if you have an excel- Remove a negative mark from
about credit card companies that a lent payment history, the vast major- your credit
banker isn't likely to tell you. ity of banks empower their customer Accept a partial payment in lieu
Creditors will give you a break service representatives to waive a of the total due
The abundance of tempting credit late fee, usually once a year. Waive a card's annual fee
card offers available means you can To get the late fee removed, simply They can only raise
pick and choose among the best deals call your creditor, briefly explain your rate for six months
being offered. It will also give you yourself and ask: "Can you please re- If you've been dinged with a higher
room to negotiate with credit card move the late fee from my state- interest rate, perhaps because you
companies like never before. ment?" Most representatives will were late in paying a past credit card
They'll forgive you once reply by saying something like: "Yes, bill, don't despair. That "penalty" or
Speaking of negotiating, have you as a courtesy, we can do that for you "default" interest rate doesn't have to
ever been burned by one of those this one time." last more than six months.
vexing $35 late fees when your pay- You can negotiate One provision of the CARD Act, is
ment failed to reach a credit card Getting a late fee removed isn't the that there are limits on how long
company on time? What most con- only thing you can accomplish when banks can hit you with so-called "de-
sumers don't know is that you can negotiating with your credit card fault rates" after you've been late
easily have this fee waived simply by company. When most people con- paying a bill.


Bill Gates Announces 2012 Scholarship

Program For Minority Students
The Gates Millennium Scholarship Program (GMS) will select 1,000
talented students next year to receive a good-through-graduation scholar-
ship to use at any college or university of their choice.
Scholars will also be provided with personal and professional develop-
ment through their leadership programs, along with academic support
throughout their college career.
The program, funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Founda-
tion, was established to provide outstanding low income minority students
with an opportunity to complete an undergraduate college education in
any discipline area of interest. To date, the program has given scholarships
to more than 15,000 students.
Continuing scholars may request funding for a graduate degree program
in one of the following discipline areas: education, engineering, library
science, mathematics, public health or science.
The deadline for submitting an application is Wednesday, January 11,
2012.
To apply, visit www.blackstudents.com/billgates.



What you won't hear


Continued from front
Project Foundation. The Website list
of all donors of a million dollars or
more has been removed from the
site. But records examined in July
showed that Sheila Johnson-New-
man, co-founder of Black Entertain-
ment Television (BET), and Victor
B. MacFarlane, a San Francisco real
estate developer, were the only
Blacks who had made personal or
corporate contributions of $1 million
or more.
Many Black stars hosted fundrais-
ers or provided other support, but
only MacFarlane and Johnson-New-
man put up the super bucks. Missing
in action were the big-name athletes
and entertainers. I don't have to list
them you know who they are.
It is also interesting to look at cor-
porate donations. The General Mo-
tors Foundation, under the leadership
of Rod Gillum, was in a class by it-
self, giving $10 million. It was fol-
lowed by Tommy Hilfiger Corporate
Foundation with a $5 million contri-
bution. The Bill and Melinda Gates
Foundation, W.K. Kellogg Founda-
tion and the National Basketball As-
sociation each donated $3 million.
The Walt Disney Company donated
$2.7 million. Contributing $2 million
each were the Coca-Cola Founda-
tion, the Ford Motor Fund, MetLife
Foundation, Toyota Foundation and
the Verizon Foundation.
The federal government provided
approximately $10 million and
Alpha Phi Alpha, the driving force
behind the King memorial, donated
$3.4 million.
An additional 39 companies or in-
dividuals gave at least $1 million, in-
cluding Delta Airlines, General
Electric, Star Wars creator George
Lucas, and the American Federation
of State, County and Municipal Em-
ployees (AFSCME).
The second story unlikely to be
covered this week is the lack of do-
nations from certain Fortune 100
companies. More than a dozen com-
panies contributed less than
$100,000 or nothing at all to the
King memorial. They include: Citi-
group, Philip Morris, Home Depot,
J.P. Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo,
AOL Time Warner, Goldman Sachs
Group, United Parcel Service (UPS),
Allstate, Sprint and American Ex-
press, according to records available
as of July.
Many of those companies actively
court Black consumers. Some even
quote Dr. King's "I Have a Dream"
speech from time to time. Yet, when
it is time to honor the dreamer, they


are asleep at the switch.
The third story you won't be read-
ing about this weekend is in equal
parts sad and familiar. It is yet an-
other example of the King.children's -
greediness. Harry Johnson, head of
the Mall project, should be given the
Nobel Peace Prize for being able to
deal with the family dysfunction.
According to documents examined
by the Associated Press, the mall
foundation has paid Intellectual
Properties Management, a company
owned by the King children, approx-
imately $800,000 for the use of Dr.
King's words and image.
Records show that the foundation
paid the King entity $761,160 in
2007 to use Dr. King image and
words in fundraising materials. It
also charged the memorial a manage-
ment fee $71,000 in 2003.
The firm representing the Kings is-
sued a statement saying the fees
would go to the Martin Luther King
Jr. King Center for Social Change in
Atlanta. It said the fees will help off-
set donations that would go toward
erecting the memorial instead of the
King center, where both parents are
buried.
The King family has had its own
version of the television show "Fam-
ily Feud" for years. Dexter, the
youngest brother, was named head of
the King center but was released
within months by his mother, Coretta
Scott King. In 2008, Martin III and
Bernice sued Dexter, claiming he
had misused MLK center assets and
failed to properly involve them in
family business matters.
Dexter counter sued, charging that
his two siblings had misused King
Center funds and kept money that
should have gone to the center.
Under pressure from the judge, the
Kings settled out of court.
But they have never been able to
shed the image of profiting from the
name of their father.
David Garrow, who won a Pulitzer
Prize for his biography of Dr. King,
said the civil rights leader would
have been "absolutely scandalized
by the profiteering behavior of his
children."
He told the AP, "I don't think the
Jefferson family, the Lincoln fam-
ily...I don't think any other group of
family ancestors has been paid a li-
censing fee for a memorial in Wash-
ington. One would think any family
would be so thrilled to have their
forefather celebrated and memorial-
ized in D.C. that it would never dawn
on them to ask for a penny."


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August 25 -31, 2011


Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press


onld









Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


Auumiot 7-11. 2011


Is West & Smiley's impact on


Obama voters real or
-


Although Princeton professor
Cornel West supported President
Barack Obama in 2008, his recent
criticism of the nation's first Black
president may be trouble for 2012.
Radio personality Tavis Smiley has
also joined in the Black chorus of
public dissatisfaction of Obama.
It is unclear whether calling the
president "Black mascot of Wall
Street oligarchs," and publicly
denouncing the policies of Obama
in a majority of recent interviews
will hurt the Obama's election next
year. But Rev. Otis Moss III, pastor
of Obama's former church in
Chicago, said the intellectual's
remarks could increase African
Americans' trust of Congress.
"The negative discussion Dr.
West is having can only put more
apathy in the hearts of African-
Americans and could ultimately
cause them to lose more faith in the
entire political process," Moss told
Newsweek. "Where will that leave


us?"
Buddies West and Smiley have
teamed to launch a two-week
"Poverty Tour," which will take the
duo to different cities as they
encourage the president to "wake
up." The purpose of the tour is sup-
posed to be to help America refocus
on the "least among us," according
to Newsweek.
But recently citizens have started
to fight back. In Detroit, when the
"Call to Conscience" bus pulled up
in August, a group of people met
the two outside the Coleman A.
Young Municipal Center to protest.
"We will not stand silent as
Smiley and West criticize the man
who brought us health-care reform,
one of the greatest accomplish-
ments for the poor in this country's
history," a spokesperson for
Detroiters for Better Government
told Newsweek.
The West and Smiley approach
may or may not have an impact on


What's next in Libya key

to US politics, economy
by J. Kuhenman compound and hope grew that over
The dramatic advance of Libyan time the price of oil a contribu-
rebels over the forces of longtime tor to dangerous economic lethargy
strongman Moammar Gadhafi would dip.
offers vindication, at least for now, "The Libyan intervention demon-
for President Barack Obama's deci- states what the international com-
sion to refrain from using U.S. munity can achieve when we stand
troops on Libyan soil and to let together as one," Obama said at his
NATO take the lead. But the chaot- vacation retreat in Martha's
ic scene on the streets of Tripoli on Vineyard, Mass. He was careful to
this week illustrated the uncertain emphasize that uncertainty
path to stability and the hazards that remained and that Gadhafi's regime
still face the White House. could still pose a threat.
How Libya moves away from the Obama telephoned French
current turmoil will present the next President Nicolas Sarkozy to talk
challenge for Obama and could about the situation in Libya, among
determine how the public views not other things. They agreed to contin-
only his foreign policy, but in some ue to work with allies and partners
measure the U.S. economy as well. to protect the people of Libya and
Underscoring the volatility, to support a peaceful transition to
Gadhafi's whereabouts remained a democracy. The State Department
mystery, fighting between rebels also said it wants to give the Libyan
and Gadhafi loyalists continued, opposition between $1 billion and
and oil prices remained in flux. $1.5 billion in frozen Gadhafi
Still, the news for Obama could regime assets. The U.S. froze about
not have been much better. The $37 billion in regime holdings in
Libyan street was euphoric, rebels the U.S., but most are in real estate
overran Gadhafi's main military or other property assets.


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Social injustice: Welfare reform


leaving more in poverty


fleeting?
Black voters. Obama's approval
rate is slowly dwindling. In 2008,
96 percent of African Americans
voted for Obama. In March, Black
Entertainment Television (BET)
conducted a poll, where 85 percent
of people supported the president.
But in a recent Washington
Post/CBS poll, African American
support dropped sharply-from 77
percent in October 2010 to nearly
half of that this month, according to
Newsweek.
Steve Harvey disagreed with the
tour and said Smiley should let go
of the grudge he had when Obama
did not make it to his town hall
meeting.
"You don't have any real basis
behind your dislike for this
man...you keep masking it saying
it's not about hate. Then what is it
about? Poverty existed before
January 20, 2008. Where was your
damn bus then?" Steve Harvey said,
according to the St. Louis
American.
He continued: "Who in the hell
got 2-3 days for your [expletive]? I
ain't got time to sit down with your
monkey behind for two, three days,
let alone the President of the United
States. We got three wars going on,
the economy crashing and we going
to sit down with Tavis [expletive]
for three days?"


by J. Ross, HP
Fifteen years after President
Clinton joined with congressional
Republicans and affixed his signa-
ture to a law that "ended welfare as
we know it" -- imposing a five-
year time limit on federal cash
assistance for poor families, while
allowing states to set shorter limits
-- the social safety net is failing to
keep pace with the needs of strug-
gling Americans, many experts
say. Millions of single mothers are
falling through the cracks, scram-
bling to support their families with
neither paychecks nor government
aid.
Welfare reform, one of the hall-
mark events of the Clinton presi-
dency, was supposed to be a
healthy tradeoff: Single mothers
who had grown dependent on gov-
ernment checks would instead go
out and work. The federal govern-
ment gave the states lump sums of
money, known as block grants, to
create programs that would pre-
pare, prompt and push poor single
mothers accustomed to living on
welfare into the workforce, pro-
viding job training, resume-writ-
ing tutorials and subsidized child
care.
But the time limits on cash aid


were enacted in the mid-1990s, in
the midst of one of the most
vibrant job markets in modem
times. Today, with nearly 14 mil-
lion people officially out of work
and jobseekers outnumbering
available positions by more than
four-to-one, the logic of those
reforms is being overwhelmed by
the reality of a stark shortage of
paychecks, experts say.
"Today, everybody is expected
to work," said Sheila Zedlewski,
an economist at the Urban Institute
and co-author of an institute study
released last week that examines
the consequences of welfare
reform during the recession. "The
problem is finding a job is incredi-
bly hard."
Since the beginning of the reces-
sion in late 2007, the nation's
unemployment rate has increased
by 88 percent, while welfare case-
loads have grown just 14 percent,
according to the Urban Institute
report.
Experts say this disparity
reflects the inadequacy of remain-
ing welfare programs in the face of
a veritable epidemic of jobless-
ness. During a period of national
distress, fewer and fewer people
have been able to secure help to


meet their basic needs, according
to the report.
Between 2007 and 2010 -- just
as the economy was contracting
and joblessness was rising, gener-
ating greater demand for public
assistance -- welfare caseloads
dropped in 13 states, according to
the Urban Institute report. In
Arizona, which faced a particular-
ly powerful blow to its finances in
the form of a sustained plunge in
housing prices, the welfare case-
load dropped by 48 percent during
that timeframe.
Many of those who advocated
for ending welfare as an unlimited
entitlement say the change has
been beneficial -- the share of sin-
gle, never married mothers in the
workforce climbed from 62.9 per-
cent in 1996 to 72.4 percent a
decade later, according to federal
data.
The share of people who both
live in poverty with no reported
income and lack welfare assistance
has changed significantly since
welfare reform. In 1996, 1 in 8 sin-
gle mothers fit this profile, accord-
ing to Zedlewski. By 2008, the
most recent year for which this
data is available, that figure had
climbed to 1 in 5, she said.


Smileys and West's national tour continues to raise eyebrows.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS REGARDING ORDINANCE 2011-544
REAPPORTIONMENT OF JACKSONVILLE CITY COUNCIL DISTRICTS

AND AT-LARGE RESIDENCY AREA BOUNDARIES AND SCHOOL

BOARD DISTRICTS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE 2010 CENSUS DATA


Pursuant to Chapter 18 (Reapportionment of Council and School Board Districts), Ordinance
Code, the City Council Rules Committee is conducting reapportionment public hearings in order
to inform the public about the reapportionment proposal and to compile an official record of
citizen input on the proposed Council reapportionment plan and Ordinance 2011-554. The
meetings are scheduled as follows:

Wednesday, August 24, 2011 at 6:00 p.m.
North Campus
Florida State College at Jacksonville
Auditorium Room C126
4501 Capper Road
Jacksonville, FL 32218

Thursday, August 25, 2011 at 6:00 p.m.
Kent Campus
Florida State College at Jacksonville
Main Auditorium, Room F128
3939 Roosevelt Blvd.
Jacksonville, FL 32205

Monday, August 29, 2011 at 6:00 p.m.
South Campus
Florida State College at Jacksonville
Lakeside Conference Center
11901 Beach Blvd.
Jacksonville, FL 32246

Thursday, September 1, 2011 at 6:00 p.m.
Deerwood Center
Florida State College at Jacksonville
Room B 1204
9911 Old Baymeadows Road
Jacksonville, FL 32256

All interested citizens are urged to attend this meeting. Information concerning the
reapportionment process and proposed maps may be obtained in the City Council Legislative
Services Division, City Hall, 117 West Duval Street, Suite 430, by calling: 904-630-1404 or on-
line at http://www.coj.net/City-Council.aspx.


If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to access public
hearing facilities or participate in a public hearing proceeding, for this meeting, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. To request such an accommodation,
please contact the Legislative Services Division Jacksonville City Council at least three
business days prior to the required service by using one of the following methods: Phone (904)
630-1404; Fax (904) 630-1242; TTD- (904) 630-1580.


Stephen C. Joost
Council President

Bill Bishop, Chair
Rules Committee

Cheryl L. Brown
Council Secretary


LU UV~ ~U vr)











Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 25-3 1, 2011,


It's no secret that young African
America.n males are the highest at-
risk group tor everything from
crinunalI beh ior, to dropping out
ot' school, to being jobless.
Identitying the problems facing
our communities has never been an
issue, but finding solutions to those
problems has always been a major
challenge.
One way to help young black
males is through mentoring.
Booker T: Washington once said,
"There are two ways of exerting
one's strength: one is pushing
down, the other is pulling up."
Mentoring essentially allows folks
who care, the opportunity to give
back to young men or women who
need attention, guidance and expo-
sure.
At the heart of the challenges
facing the our community is the
disarray of African American
males. Black men are not stepping
up as fathers, falling behind in edu-
cation and going to jail at alarm-
ing rates.
We all see these young men in
the inner city either walking down
the street using one hand to hold up
their pants with their underwear
clearly exposed.
It seems like we have lost sever-
al generations of young black men.
Finishing high school is no
longer cool. Having a legal job is
no big deal and if you have been
arrested it is a badge of honor.
Former US Senator and presiden-
tial candidate John Edwards per-
haps said it best during an MTV
political forum in 2007.


By Noval Jones
"The NFL is definitely tar-
nished. I mean, we went through a
lockout, and ticket prices still went
up. Parking went up $5, too." -
Steve Weddel, Kansas City Chiefs
fan
It seemed like just yesterday that
the Green Bay Packers defeated the
Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl
XLVI by the score of 31-25. While
the game was fairly exiting, no one
could predict the drama yet to
come.
Shortly after the season ended
and the athletes cleaned out their
lockers, NFL team owners pad-
locked the gates to hold out for a
new collective bargaining agree-
ment with the National Football
League Players Association
(NFLPA).
If that didn't beat all, the NFLPA
decided to decertify its union in an
attempt to throw owners off the
lockout path.
It didn't work.
As a result, the NFL owners and
players took us on a six-month
journey into selfishness that fea-
tured billionaires versus million-
aires. They managed to keep their
self-serving interest on the front
page of most newspapers and the
lead segments of my evening
broadcasts. They took their fans for
granted for the sake of greed and
personal gain. Then, in the end,
they once again laughed all the way
to bank.
What drama, intrigue and sus-


"The
ceratin
pretty s
a youi
popular
going t
of the t
Wha
than th
rates is
black r
have a
response
the child
This
but it g
lem.
Center
2007, i
born ii
were de
Whil
women
nearly
and m
Latinas
Agaii
one of
the black
ers are i
without
Now do
There a
who do
ing blac
is a test
Howe
a subst


professionals to help at risk youth
idea that we can keep incar- father or father figure in your life. incarcerated. By their mid-30's
g and keep incarcerating -- Sure there are hundreds of folks in 10 black men who had drop
soon we're not going to have who have been successful without out of school had spent time
ng African-American male their fathers in their lives, but most prison.
tion in America. They're all people who were raised without So now that I have painted a p
to be in prison or dead. One their fathers would easily agree that ty bleak picture let's figure out h
wo," said Edwards. they would prefer to have a dad you attack the issue. Of cou
t is even more disturbing around. there is no one solution, but it is
ie black male incarceration Very few people would debate belief that if black profession
the notion that many young the fact that strong father figures give back to the commur
nen think that it's so cool to make a difference in the lives of through mentoring we can save
baby without accepting any their children. child at a time.
sibility for helping to raise Although we all may agree that That's where African Ameri
Id. this is the case, there seems to be a fraternities and other nonpr
is a very disturbing statistic, huge pool of poorly educated black organizations like The 100 Bl
;ets to the core of the prob- men that are becoming more and Men come into play.
According to a National more disconnected from traditional And the 100 is only one of
for Health Statistics study in family values. National statistics organizations making a differe
nearly 40 percent of babies are showing that the situation is not one child at a time. Local fratel
n the U.S. that same year getting better, but worse, ties like Omega Psi Phi and Ka]
delivered by unwed mothers. In 2000, 65 percent of black male Alpha Psi also have very success
e 28 percent of white high school dropouts in their 20's mentoring programs.
gave birth out of wedlock, were jobless that is, unable to Even the city of Jacksonville
72 percent of black women find work, not seeking it or incar- promoted mentoring throat
lore than 51 percent of cerated. By 2004, that figure had organizations like Kessler and T
did. grown to 72 percent, compared Stock in Children. Some may
n, this gets directly back to with 34 percent of white and 19 that mentoring is only making
the core issues that plague percent of Hispanic dropouts. marginal difference, but I say if
ck community. Single moth- Even when high school graduates can save a few young men it is v
raising too many young men were included, 50 percent of black worth the effort.
Real support from fathers. men in their 20's were jobless in Marcus Garvey once said, "Bl
don't over analyze my point. 2004, up from 46 percent in 2000. men, you were once great; Y
ire plenty of single mothers Incarceration rates skyrocketed shall be great again."
San outstanding job of rais- in the 1990's and continue grow On the eve of the unveiling of
ck males. In fact, my mother every year. In 1995, 16 percent of MLK monument, let's not for
lament to that fact. black men in their 20's who did not the dream!
ever, I don't feel that there is attend college were in jail or Signing off from the mont
:itute for having a strong prison; by 2004, 21 percent were J100 meeting, Reggie Fullwood


pense we were all
privy to instead of the customary
training camp blah, blah, blah. And
as the financial point of no return
drew nearer and nearer, the owners
and players some how found a way
to work everything out. Just in time
before their pockets got one cent
lighter. Just in time.
And after it was all said and done
we are expected to once again line
up at the ticket booth and shell out
our hard earned bucks to keep our
resident millionaires and billion-
aires fat and happy. Just like noth-
ing ever happened.
Since the signing of the new col-
lective bargaining agreement
between the NFL and NFLPA, all
has been well. The hype has been
over the top for individual league
teams and even more by the NFL
itself. Right here in Jacksonville
the hometown Jaguars are prepar-
ing for the start of the season by
declaring it "Go time."
For almost six months the gates
have been locked, the practice
fields have been silent and the play-
ers were out of reach. But it's go
time?
Nevertheless, the NFL seems to
be so mesmerizing that fans just
can't help but to fall in line behind
the logo and revel in points spreads
and touchdowns. And without apol-
ogy, the players and owners expect
for fans to pick up where they left
off at Super Bowl XLVI, ticket
prices, blackouts and all. Folks are
so crazy for football until they rou-


I, 6
ped
in

ret-
low
irse
my
lals
lity
one

can
ofit
ack

the
nce
mrni-
ppa
sful

has
ugh
ake
say
Sa
we
well

ack
you

the
*get

hly


A broader perspective of our social construct.


tinely forsake things of real impor-
tance to find relief in rich guys
slamming into each other.
Truth is, no matter what was
accomplished during the most
recent negotiations that brought
peace to the NFL workforce, most
of the players will eventually find
their way to the poor house. The
excessive lifestyles of professional
athletes make me wonder why we
chose to live through their short-
term successes.
NFL football players have over
time proven to be the worst exam-
ples of success models on the face
of the Earth. For all of the work that
it takes to eventually wear an NFL
uniform, the ultimate return is very
much suspect. From Pop Warner
football to the NFL draft, players
spend a lot of time and energy
chasing the pro football scheme. If
they are fortunate enough to be one
of the one percent who get a chance
to take a snap, their careers and
earnings are too short for the
investment. Yes, they can always
say that they were one of the few
who played under the big lights of
the NFL. However, as many have
found out, that doesn't go very far
when the money runs out.
The NFL has done a good of
invading the lives of millions of
Americans and, at the same time,
convincing fans that touchdowns
are more important than supporting
suffering communities. Even dur-
ing this time of a repressed econo-
my, in a few short weeks, the NFL


has managed to suck all of the air
out of the room of things that real-
ly matter. And without regret, is
demanding even more attention
during this nation's season of haves
versus have-nots.
Breed truth.
Visit my blog @ www.novaljones.word-
press.com. Follow us on twitter @ twit-
ter/novalijones. Entail your comments:
novalthinks@yahoo.com.


Mentoring: The best way for Black


,
LOID I 5 FIR T CO T QTULALITY BLACK WEC K L Y

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Dedicating the Dream
A week of events is planned in Washington, D.C. C '
around the unveiling of the Martin Luther King, Jr. ,
National Memorial. The official dedication of the King.
National Memorial on the National Mall will take place
at 11 a.m. Sunday, August 28, 2011, the 48th anniver-
sary of the day King delivered his famous "I Have a
Dream" speech. Preceding, and following, the dedication will be star-stud-
ded concerts, luncheons, dinners and receptions attended by an array of
African-American leadership.
A quarter-million people will gather on and adjacent to the four-acre plot
on the northeast corer of the Tidal Basin to dedicate a monument to
Martin Luther King's legacy and its location on American History's Main
Street. The event will feature the first African-American President of the
United States as he honors the first African-American with a memorial on
the National Mall and the first non-president so honored. Thousands of
contributors and community leaders will join President Barrack Obama at
the site. Central to the thinking of Martin Luther King was the concept of
the "Beloved Community." The MLK National Memorial's centerpiece is
the "Stone of Hope", a 30-foot statue of Dr. King, with a 450-foot inscrip-
tion wall with excerpts of his sermons and public addresses.
The process of designing, funding and constructing the memorial was
coordinated by the nonprofit Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial
Project Foundation. Harry E. Johnson, Sr., and his Alpha Phi Alpha fra-
ternity deserve credit for arriving at this historical reality. Johnson has
served as president and CEO of the foundation since 2002. A former
Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity president, Johnson reports that the MLK
Memorial cost $120 million to build. The U.S. Congress gave $10 million
in matching funds.
In his public invitation, Jonson said: "We look forward to sharing with
you a joyous and historic day for our nation". To many, King symbolizes
the Civil Rights era's great American Revolution. The MLK Memorial to
open on August 22. After MLK's assassination in 1968, his fraternity
Alpha Phi Alpha proposed a permanent memorial in Washington, D.C.
Alpha Phi Alpha's efforts gained momentum in 1986, after King's birthday
was designated a national holiday. In 1996, Congress authorized Secretary
of the Interior Bruce Babbitt to permit Alpha Phi Alpha to establish a
memorial in the District of Columbia, and gave the fraternity until
November 2003 to raise $100 million and break ground. In 1998,
Congress authorized the fraternity to establish the foundation to manage
the fundraising and design and approve building of the memorial.
It was an uphill climb for Johnson's foundation to build the MLK
Memorial. A MLK King Family company, Intellectual Properties
Management Inc. proved to be a significant obstacle. The family wanted
the foundation to pay licensing fees to use MLK's name and likeness. The
King family pledged that any money would go to the King Center's char-
itable efforts. The King Center in Atlanta is the location of King's grave
and a National Historic Site. Established in 1968 by the late Coretta Scott
King, the King Center is the official, living memorial dedicated to the lega-
cy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Estimates suggest that the King family
charged the MLK Memorial Foundation $800,000 in fees. Now, it's all
"OK" between the foundation and the MLK Family. Children of MLK,
Bemice and Martin Luther King III toured the National Mall site in
October 2010 and are expected to attend the dedication.
Black Americans have reason to be proud and to be MLK Memorial
benefactors. As we raise a toast, it would be "significant" if Blacks con-
tribute to this cause. Most of the MLK Memorial's construction costs were
underwritten by American corporations and organizations such as the
National Basketball Association (NBA). General Motors Corporation
gave more than $10 million and will serve as dedication chair. The
Tommy Hilfiger Corporate Foundation is dedication co-chair, as is Stevie
Wonder, who wrote MLK's "Happy Birthday" song. A minority, female-
owned and operated firm, McKissack & McKissack, is a part of the MLK
Memorial Design-Build Team. To make a donation, visit
www.MLKmemorial.org
(William Reed is available for speaking/seminar projects via
BaileyGroup.org)


Is the NFL


too mesmerizing?
As the National Football League prepares
for the start of the season, they seem to have
little sympathy for fans after the long timeout


_


ZIP


August 25-31, 2011,


Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press


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ASALH sponsors trip to D.C.
The James Weldon Johnson of The Association of the Life and Study of
African American Life and History will be sponsoring a bus trip to the
Martin Luther King Memorial Dedication, August 27th to Washington,
D.C. The trip will also include a tour of African American Heritage histor-
ical sites as well and the national monument. A meal package is included
with brunch on Sunday, August 28th at b. Smith's Restaurant and Dinner at
Phillips Flagship on the Potomac River. Lodging continental breakfast and
a box lunch is included for the trip home. Meals traveling to D.C. and din-
ner on the return trip are at your own expense. For more information, go to
http://asalh-jaxfl.org and download the flyer and registration form. You
may also call 551-0372 or 228-3132 if you have questions.

Installation services at St. Andrews
The congregation of St. Andrew Missionary Baptist Church invites the
public to attend the celebration and installation services for Rev. Charles E.
Cooper, Jr. The Celebration Services will be held Monday August 22nd
through Friday August 26th at 7 p.m. nightly. The Service of Installation
will be held on Sunday August 28th at 4 p.m. RSVP your attendance to
Jacquelyn Flowers (904) 743-8693 by August 12th with the dates you will
attend. The church is located at 2600 West 45th Street.

Gospel Concert at New Life
The New Life Fellowship Church located at1451 Mt. Herman Street on
the northside will present a free gospel concert on August 28th from 4 8
p.m. On stage will be the New Life Fellowship Choir, The Spiritone Gospel
Singers "Special Guest" The Gospel Tones (Waynesboro, Ga.).
For more information contact Robert Woodard (904) 534-1825.

Pastor's Appreciation at New Bethel
New Bethel AME Church will host a Pastor's Appreciation Celebration
for Rev. Ricardo Bright and First Lady Barbara Bright on Sunday Aug. 28th
at 4 p.m. The speaker for the Celebration is Elder J.B. Keels, Presiding
Elder South District. The church is located at 5031 Halls Drive, 32207 on
the southside. For more information contact Joyce Phillips at 396-0265.

6th Annual Golf "Tournament of Unity"
The (NCI) Northside Community Involvement will have their 6th Annual
Golf "Tournament of Unity", an outreach ministry of the Northside Church
of Christ. They will be teeing off September 3rd at the World Golf Village
in historic St. Augustine, Florida.
To register visit www.ncijax.org or call NCI at (904) 765-9830.


Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20


Pastor Landon Williams


Sunday School
9 a.m.
Morning Worship
10 a.m.
Lord's Supper
Second Sunday
3:00 p.m.
Evening Worship
Every 3rd & 4th
Sunday
4:00 p.m.


I


The Gospel Truth's 3rd Anniversary
The Revelation Prayer House will present The Gospel Truth's 3rd
Anniversary on Sunday, September 11th at 5 p.m. The church is located at
1725 W. 28th Street, 32209. For more information call 674-4370.

Christian Comedy Show
Krystal Faye Productions in conjunction with Lynn & Friends and the
Jacksonville Christian Comedy Network is presenting a Christian comedy
show entitled "Christian Can't Laugh." Comedians Big Chip, Ms. Jen and
Da Cleaner will headline this hilarious show. This funny bone, laugh out
loud show will be held at the Clara White Mission, 613 W. Ashley St.,
Friday, August 26, 2011. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. For tickets and more infor-
mation contact Robert White at (904) 677-6083.

Greggs Temple Community Fun Day
The Greggs Temple AME Church, located at 1510 West 45th Street will
hold a Community Fun and Service day for the Moncrief Springs
Community on Saturday, August 27th from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. There will be
food distribution in partnership with Trinity Rescue Mission, and fun activ-
ities for youth. On Sunday August 28, 2011, at 11 a.m. there will be a
Homecoming Service where Elder, Rev. Thomas B. DeSue will be the
speaker. For further information contact Rev. Roger Williams at 768-4416.

"Don't Crack Under Pressure"
The "Don't Crack Under Pressure" Conference will be held at the Hope
Plaza Conference Center, Friday, August 26, 2011 at 7 p.m. and Saturday,
August 27th at 6 p.m.. Evangelist Tammy Roberts will be the guest speak-
er. Hope Plaza is located at 435 Clark Road off of Dunn Avenue. For more
information contact Tammy Lynn Roberts at (229) 415-2274. or email tam-
myroberts2010@yahoo.com.

Empowerment Season at The Mount
Dr. John Allen Newman and the congregation at The Sanctuary at Mt.
Calvary on Jacksonville's northside invite the public to their 3rd annual
"Empowerment Season". The week is filled with empowering preaching
from preachers who seek to empower the congregation to become better
and stronger and more adept at doing ministry. The grand finale is the com-
munity fair which includes vendors, job fair, legal clinic, continuing edu-
cation, free haircuts and manicures, health fairs and even pre-need funeral
services. Everything is free and open to the public. Festivities kick off
September 28th October 1st. For more information, call 765-7620.


A church

that's on the

move in

worship with

prayer, praise

and power!


Pastor Robert Lecount, Jr


School of Ministry Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.

Thursday High Praise Worship 7:00 p.m.

2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


EWC President and c/o '66 member Nathaniel Glover with
Recognition Luncheon Honoree Dr. Dorothy Young during the EWC
Alumni Convention activities.
EWC Celebrates Alumni Convention


Continued from front
Convention highlights included an
opening reception hosted by Orange
Park Kennel Club, a Recognition
Luncheon honoring EWC faculty
and staff, an all-white party, and a
picnic.
The convention's culminating
event, the Alumni Banquet, recog-
nized four alumni for their outstand-
ing contributions and professional
achievements: Jacksonville, FL
Mayor Alvin Brown; keynote


speaker Dr. Ted Williams, a member
of the EWC Class of 1965 and Vice
President at the University of South
Florida; Dayna Kent, EWC Class of
2004, an exemplary educator and
recruiter of students; and attorney
Melva Rozier, EWC Class of 1993,
a community leader and contributor
to EWC athletic programs.
According to honoree Mayor Alvin
Brown, attending the convention
was like coming home. "I am an
EWC Tiger and will always be a
Tiger. EWC is a vital part of our
community and provides deserving
students with a quality education
and positive educational experi-
ences. I feel honored and privileged
to be here."


THE UNRULY PULPIT
Priest charged with gambling off congregations tithes


CHICAGO Rev. John Regan
described himself as an "action
gambler" who frequented riverboat
casinos in Elgin and Joliet for fast-
paced games of blackjack and craps
- often at tables where the mini-
mum bet was $25.
But the Catholic priest was betting
heavily with money he stole from
the Roselle church where he was
pastor, sneaking out of the rectory to
gamble in the middle of the night so
he wouldn't be seen by parishioners.
Regan was sentenced last week to
60 days in jail for looting nearly
$300,000 from St. Walter Parish by
funneling church offerings and con-
tributions from parishioners into a
secret bank account he controlled.
The judge also ordered Regan to
pay $295,000 in restitution, serve
150 days of work-release and per-
form 500 hours of community serv-
ice work. In addition, Regan was
placed on four years' probation and
ordered to abstain from gambling.


Regan faced up to 15 years in
prison after pleading guilty in June
to felony theft for stealing the cash
between 2006 and 2008 while he led
the west suburban parish.
He tearfully apologized for the
thefts before being sentenced but
said he couldn't control actions he
knew were wrong because of a gam-
bling addiction.
Prosecutor Helen Kapas sought a
10-year prison term for him.
"He likes games, action games,"
Kapas said of Regan. "This defen-
dant has betrayed the trust and
authority placed in him by his
church and by his parishioners."
Kapas contended Regan stole as
much as $410,000 from the parish
he served. He steered $295,000 in
church contributions into a "special
needs" account he created, Kapas
said, then withdrew that money at
ATMs in several casinos or trans-
ferred it into a personal account.
But she noted that Regan also


deposited $125,000 in his personal
bank account during the two-year
span when he served as pastor at St.
Walter, though he earned only
$25,000 annually as a priest.
Regan, however, testified that
money came from casino winnings
and other sources not from stolen
church funds.
Regan, who remains a priest
though he is not assigned to a
parish, nonetheless asked Judge
Kinsella to place him only on pro-
bation, saying he has "suffered
mightily" as he struggled with his
addiction.
"You're going to leave this court-
room in handcuffs. Such a sentence
is warranted in this case there's
no doubt in my mind," Kinsella said
as he ordered Regan taken into cus-
tody to immediately began serving
his jail term. After Regan completes
his 60-day jail term, he will spend
150 nights in jail, but be freed to
work during the day.


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church

215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


S | Weekly Services


Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Sr.
Senior Pastor

!- .; .


Sunday Morning Worship
7:40 a.m. and 10:40 a.m.
Church school
9:30 a.m.
Bible Study
6:30 p.m.


Midweek Services
Wednesday Noon Service
"Miracle at Midday"
12 noon-1 p.m.
The Word from the Sons
and Daughters of Bethel
3rd Sunday 4:00 p.m


NOTICE: Church news is published free of charge. Information
must be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5
p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information received prior to the
event date will be printed on a space available basis until the date. Fax
e-mail to 765-3803 or e-mail to JFreePress@aol.com.


8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship

9:30 a.m. Sunday School

11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday 2 PM 3 PM

**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


Disciples of Christ Cbristia) Fellowship
*A Full Gospel Baptist Church *


Come share In Holy Communlon on Ist Sunday at 7MO and 1040 a.m.


Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Jr.
Senior Pastor


Worship with us LIVE
on the web visit
www.truth2powerministries.org


iBi Grace and Peace
__ visit www.Bethelite.org


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August 25-31, 2011"


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August 25-31. 2011 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


Celebration held to honor Gwendolyn Leapheart's 90th birthday
Last Friday, friends and family gathered at the home of community matriarch Gwendolyn Leapheart to celebrate her 90th birthday. Born
August 19, 1921, the longtime educator has made Florida her home for several decades and is still active in many church and civic organiza-
tions. Shown above in attendance are (L-R) FrankM Powell III, Theresa Waters, Clarence Fields, Mary Christie, Raymond Lee, Tina Heck,
Father Eddie Jones, Jeanine Jones, Myrtle Turner, Audrey Kelley, Shannon McBride, Gwendolyn Leapheart, Anest McCarthy, Begonia Collier,
Pat Sims, Vanessa Boyer, Earl Sims, Adoc Stanford, Karen Kincade, Perselphone Coleman, Cheryl Winters, and Richardean Demps wheelchair.
The honoree is also shown in the lower right inset.


Skin mistakes you're


When it comes to your skin,
there's a lot of information out
there, along with a lot of products,
and a lot of skin care myths, that
may be making it harder for you to
take care of your skin.
So what are some things that you
definitely need to avoid in order to
maintain healthier skin?
Skin No-No's That Are Hurting
You
1. You have no idea what your
skin type is. If you don't know your
skin type, then you're probably
using the wrong products. Using
the right ingredients can make a
significant difference in the appear-
ance of your skin.
2. You're not using SPF. This is
one skin health fact worth repeatin-
ng darker skin tones need sun pro-
tection, too! One unpublished study
by Unilever showed that using just
SPF 5 every day for five years pre-
vented significant sun damage. Do


yourself and your skin a favor and
use a moisturizer with a SPF 15.
3. You're getting too much sun
exposure. 10 to 15 minutes of
unprotected sun a few times a week
can help your body get its vitamin
D fix, but if you're outside for an
hour a day without sunscreen, your
skin will soon remind you of this.
4. You're not using the right
cleanser for you. If you have dry
skin, a foaming cleanser will only
make matters worse. But
But for oily skin, cleansers that
are too rich may make those seba-
ceous glands go crazy. Talk to your
dermatologist about the best skin-
care products that meet your per-
sonal needs.
5. You're not using a retinoid.
Most dermatologist's agree that the
family of vitamin A creams known
as retinoids are the best night
creams, and that everyone over the
age of 20 should be using a retinoid


e making i
at night. Why? Retinoids may help
prevent aging and will smooth
wrinkles you already have along
with preventing acne and exfoliat-
ing the skin.
6. You're exfoliating too much.
How do you know how much to
exfoliate? Again, it depends on your
skin type. If your skin is dry, too
much exfoliation strips lipids from
the skin, and sensitive types can
experience even more inflamma-
tion. Exfoliation is best for oil}.
resistant types of skin.
7. You're not getting an annual
skin exam. Did you know that youi
skin is your largest organ? Just a,
you'd (hopefully) get your othei
body parts checked out at least once
a year, you should also be checking
in with a dermatologist for a full-
body skin exam.
Believe it or not, it's not that hard
to have healthier skin. By follow-
ing the above guidelines, as


Teachers receive free admission to

St. Augustine sites in September


Several businesses and attractions
in St Augustine, Florida will be cel-
ebrating Teacher Appreciation
Month from September 6th -
October 9th, 2011.
Teachers in the state of Florida and
one guest are invited to attend the
following attractions for FREE dur-
ing those dates:
Ripley's Believe it or Not!
Ripley's Red Sightseeing Trains
Ripley's Bayfront Mini-Golf
Saint Augustine Pirate and
Treasure Museum
Fort Menendez
The Fountain of Youth
Teachers and guests can also get a
sneak peek at Ripley's new ghostly
experience at the old Sugar Mill.
The Ripley's Museum in Orlando,
Florida will also be participating.


Teachers are welcome to bring
additional guests who will receive a
50% discount to the attractions.
Several hotels, restaurants and
shops in Saint Augustine are offer-
ing discounts to participating teach-
ers as well.
To receive the free admission,
teachers must report to Ripley's
Believe it or Not! Museum located
at 19 San Marco Avenue in Saint
Augustine, or to the Orlando
Museum, located at 8201
International Drive, to receive tick-
ets to that attraction, and present a
recent pay stub along with a photo
ID. Everyone who attends in Saint
Augustine will also receive a FREE
gift from Ripley's.
For more information, please con-
tact Kim Kiff at 624-9349.


Free tutoring for students
Duval County Public Schools is offering free tutor-
ing to students who meet certain qualifications. As a
SR result of the federal No Child Left Behind Act, stu-
dents can be eligible to receive extra help in the areas
fr of math, reading, language arts and science. In order
\, to participate in this opportunity, the student must be
enrolled in an eligible Title I school and qualify for
.~ L free or reduced price lunch.
Tutoring applications will be mailed to eligible students on August 18
and must be returned to the Title I Office by September 2, 2011.
For more information about this free tutoring program, call the Title I
Office at 390-2123.

Last chance for kids to


show off their
The City of Jacksonville's Dept.
of Elder Affairs are inviting local
youth to share their favorite memo-
ry of their grandparents for a
chance to win season passes to the
Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens and
other prizes.
Finalists will be chosen by a
Times-Union professional and each
category will have a winner and a
People's Choice winner. All final-
ists receive free admission to the
zoo on Saturday, September 10.
The contest will feature three sub-
mission categories: Elementary,
Middle and High School.
Each essay should be 250 words of
less. Submit your essay by going to


grandparents
www.j acksonville.com/contests
and finding the Grandparents Day
page. The deadline for entries is
Sunday, August 28 at midnight.
Finalists will be announced on
Saturday, September 10 and win-
ners will be announced at the event.
For more details, check out
www.jacksonville.com/contests.
For questions or sponsorship
opportunities, contact Amy Moring,
Development Director, Friends of
ElderSource, 904-391-6617 or
amy@myeldersource.org.
Be sure to VOTE for your favorite
at www.jacksonville.com, under
contest page, beginning after
August 30th.


The Jacksonville Free Press

would love to share your

event with our readers.

GUIDELINE S


1. All unsolicited photos require a $10 photo charge
for each picture. Photos can be paid by check, money
order or credit card,
2. Pictures must be brought into our office to be
examined for quality or emailed in a digital format
of .jpg or .bmp.
3. Everyone in the picture must be named.
4. All photos MUST be received within 5 days of
the event. NO EXCEPTIONS.
5. Event photos must be accompanied by a
story/event synopsis including the 5W's of media:
who, what, when, where and why. in addition to a
phone number for more information.

Call 634-1993 for more information!


NORTH FLORIDAOBSTETRICAL &

GYNECOLOGICAL Associates, P.A.


Complete Obstetrical &


Personal
Individualized
Care
SComprehensive
Pregnancy Care
SBoard Certified


visit -

www.nfobgyn.com

Gynecological Care 1n I1


* Family Planning
* Vaginal Surgery
Osteoporosis
Menopausal
Disorders
Laparoscopy


William L. Cody, M.D.
SLaser Surgery B. Veeren Chithriki, M.D.

St. Vincent's Division IV 1820 Barrs Street, Suite 521

Jacksonville, Florida 32204 (904) 387-9577


Dr. Chester Aikers

i 3505 [S UnflOn 1 Iff
,\ ^ In DOWinTOWn JflcK(onlVILL



For All


Your Dental


Needs


358-3827 p1

Monday Friday

8:30 AM- 5 PM
Saturday Appointments Available 1
Dental Insurance and Medicaid Accepted


Apwk


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


August 25-31, 2011










x.-MUerr' F e1r7Ag t2- 0


FOR THE WEEK OF AUGUST 23 29, 2011





isrilM









Jackson State Sports Photo

B-CU THE DECIDERS: Despite
postseason ban, Jackson
STARTS State quarterback Casey
S Therriault primed to deliver
AT NO. I big numbers.

HOMECOMING SCHEDULES; RETURNING
STAT LEADERS; PLAYERS WORTH WATCHING






A

Tc '-



O .W, -
C




U Jenkins Natiel Curry Ryan Davis
T







H T _

E ECSU's Daronte McNeill Holland Wilson
S
E M *


2011 football season gets underway


LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor
There's a good reason why the
surprise of the 2010 football season,
Bethune-Cookman, ran out to a 10-
0 start en route to winning a share
of the MEAC title.
The Wildcats had the football
version of the perfect storm a
prolific offense and an opportunistic
defense.
Under new head coach Brian
Jenkins, the B-CU fast-break of-
fense designed by coordinator Mark
Orlando with MEAC Player of
the Year, senior quarterback Matt
Johnson at the controls, was virtu-
ally unstoppable, leading the MEAC
with averages of 425 total yards,
212 rushing yards and 38 points per
game.
On top of that, B-CU's cat-quick
defense placed sixth in total defense
in the MEAC, but had a whopping
+27 in turnover margin, the largest
in all of black college football and
+24 better than anyone in the MEAC
(Delaware State, +3).
This year, the productive John-
son is gone as is Orlando who left
to take the same position at Prairie
View A&M. And it's unlikely that
Jenkins's defense will get as big a
margin in turnovers as it did a year
ago.
But there's also a reason the
Wildcats are the pick for the top
spot on the preseason BCSP Top
Ten. They return a solid nucleus
from last year's squad including
holdovers up front on offense and
defense and likely has replacement
for the Johnson.
Additionally, nearly all of the
other top teams are going thru seri-
ous re-tooling.
Jenkins returns playmakers in
running backs Isidore Jackson (514
yards, 8 TDs) and Androse Bell
450 yards, 8 TDs) and wide receiv-
ers Eddie Poole (33 receptions, 8


1. Bethune-Cookman
2. South Carolina State
3. Florida A&M
4. Grambling State
5. Texas Southern
6. Prairie View A&M
7. Norfolk State
8. Hampton
9. Winston-Salem State
10. Morehouse
11. Fort Valley State 12. Albany State
13. Jackson State 14. Shaw
15. Elizabeth City State

TDs), Pat Brown (30 receptions,
337 yards) and Courtney Keith.
Three offensive linemen (Natiel
Curry, Alex Monroe and Marquell
Rozier) were named to the preseason
all-MEAC team while the defense
has all-MEAC selections in line-
man Ryan Davis, linebackers Ryan
Lewis and Reggie Sandilands and
safety Michael Williams.
Jenkins has 2010 back-up
Jackie Wilson, Troy Dannehower
and talented newcomer Quentin
Williams competing to replace John-
son. Jenkins will replace Orlando
calling the plays.
One glaring B-CU weakness last
year was the inefficiency of young
placekickers Sven Hurd and Kory
Kowalski (2 of 10 field goals, 52
of 62 PATs). Jenkins feels the two
will be better with a year under their
belts.
The Wildcats will have their
mettle tested with a daunting early
season stretch that has them facing
Prairie View A&M and Orlando
in Orlando at the season-opening
MEAC/SWAC Challenge on Sept.
5, hosting MEAC contenders South
Carolina State (Sept. 10) and
Hampton (Sept. 22) before travel-
ling to Div. I Miami for an Oct. 1
date.
MEAC co-champ South Caro-


lina State, which saw its 21-game
MEAC win streak halted by B-CU
last season, has to retool some key
positions (QB, OL, LB) but still holds
down the No. 2 spot. Florida A&M,
the other MEAC co-champ, handed
B-CU its only regular season loss but
also has some key holes to fill. Joe
Taylor's Rattlers are third.
SWAC contenders Grambling
State where Doug Williams is re-
turning as head coach- Texas South-
ern (Kevin Ramsey) and Prairie
View A&M (Heishma Northern)
all will be breaking in new coaches
and playmakers. They hold down the
4-6 slots.
Norfolk State and Hampton,
the top challengers to B-CU, SCSU
and FAMU in the MEAC, hold down
the seventh and eighth spots.
My CIAA pick, Connell
Maynor's Winston-Salem State
Rams, and my SIAC favorite, Rich
Freeman's Morehouse Maroon
Tigers, round out the Top Ten.
Fort Valley State, Albany
State, Jackson State, Shaw and
Elizabeth City State make up the
next five.

Toughest Schedule
While Bethune-Cookman may
have the toughest early season dates,
SIAC contender FortValley State has
this year's most challenging out-of-
conference games.
The FVSU Wildcats get a
double-dose of MEAC co-champi-
ons as they travel to Florida A&M
(Sept. 3) and Bethune-Cookman
(Oct. 15). They also host NCAA
Div. II national runner-up Delta
State (Sept. 10). Fortunately, Donald
Pittman's Wildcats get perennial
SIAC contenders Tuskegee (Oct.
1) and Morehouse (Oct. 29) at home
before its traditional season-ending
battle with rival Albany State in Co-
lumbus, Ga. (Fountain City Classic)
on Nov. 5.


South Carolina State opens
with three tough dates on the road.
The Sept. 10th MEAC showdown
at Bethune-Cookman is sandwiched
around Div. I games at Central Michi-
gan (9/3) and at Indiana (9/17).

Players to Watch
Jackson State quarterback
Casey Therriault is easily the most
prolific offensive performer return-
ing (See STAT CORNER) but his
aura is somewhat diminished by the
fact that his Tigers can not play for
the SWAC championship. But it will
still be interesting to see what kind
of numbers he puts up.
Also lookforproductive seasons
out of Alcorn State sophomore quar-
terback Brandon Bridge, Albany
State senior signal-caller Stanley
Jennings and ECSU's productive
Creven Powell.
Five 1,000-yard'rushers return
led by Elizabeth City State's Da-
ronte McNeill. Bruising Winston-
Salem State tailback Nicholas Coo-
per leads the returnees averaging 6.2
yards per carry and scoring 15 TDs
a year ago. The 6-2, 225-pounder
averaged 18.4carries and 113.5 yards
per game. The lowest average of any
of the top nine returning rushers is
4.6 yards per carry.
Though no 1,000-yardreceivers
return, Robert Holland of Chowan
who led all wideouts with 65 recep-
tions and Justin Wilson ofDelaware
State topped black college receivers
in yardage and TDs (57 receptions,
937 yards, 11 TDs) are back. Fort
Valley State's Tony Davis who
totalled 50 receptions a year ago to
lead all tight ends, also begins his
senior campaign.
Prairie View defensive back
Moses Ellis, Shaw defensive
lineman Charles Deas, Howard
linebacker Keith Pough are top
defenders to watch.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 25
Langston vs. New Orleans in Langston, OK 7pm

SATURDAY, AUGUST 27
Bellhaven vs. Texas College in Jackson, MS 6pm
Delta State vs. Elizabeth City State in Cleveland, MS 6pm
Virginia Union vs. Saint Augustine's in Richmond, VA 6pm




STAT CORNER

WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


RETURNING INDIVIDUAL
FOOTBALL STATS LEADERS
IN 2011


RUSHING YARDS c
McNEIL, Daronte ECSU ,
CARTER, David MHC
COOPER, Nicholas WSS
ANDERSON, Josh CNST
WRIGHT, Marcus TXS
MAYHEW, MIKE NCAT
PASSING YARDS CL
THERRIAULT, C JSU SR
JENNINGS, Stan -ALB SR
BRIDGE, Brandon -ALC SO
POWELL,Creven ECS SR
PHILLIPS, Ricky- WVS
WALLEY, Chris NSU SR
PERRY, Jeremy TNST SR
RECEPTIONS CL
HOLLAND, Robt. CHO JR
WILSON, J. DSU JR
WILDER, Marcell JSU SR
WILLIAMS, R. CNST
ANDERSON, Jos. TEX SR
HAIRSTON,Vic- NSU SR
RECEIVING YARDS CL
WILSON, J. DSU JR
HOLLAND, Robt. CHO JR
ANDERSON, Jos. TSU SR
BRANTLEY, T. WSSU SO
WILDER, Marcell JSU SR
TOTAL OFFENSE CL
THERRIAULT,C. JSU SR
BRIDGE, Brandon -ALC SO
JENNINGS, Stan-ALB SR
PHILLIPS, Ricky WVS
BENJAMIN, R. FSU SR
SMITH, Kameron WSS JR
ALL PURPOSE CL
JOHNSON, Land. -WVS
McNEILL, Daronte ECSJR
CARTER, David MHC JR
COOPER, Nick WSS SR
SCORING cL
ANDERSON, J CNST SR
COOPER, Nich. -WSS SR
ERICKSON, Bl. SCS SR
REID, Tony FVSU SR
McNEILL, Dar. ECS JR
PUNT RETURNS CL
BARBER, Demar. FVS JR
GOODMAN, T. -CHO JR
FITZGERALD, D WSS SR
PONDER, Orion-ALB JR
KICKOFF RETURNS CL
L'HOSE,T. SAC JR
FERRELL, J. NCAT SR
MOORE, Jamel LIV SR
PROCTOR, J. -BSU SR
MARDIS, Jeremy- MIL JR


TDS AVGIG
10 132.1
10 122.5
15 113.4
12 102.6
8 101.0
7 98.4


G COM -ATT INT
11 255-437-8
12 139-253-11
11 150-291-13
9 124-219-5
10 162-265-11
11 167-272-8
9 131-244-6


PCT YDS TDS AVGIG
58.4 3436 31 312.4
54.9 2392 26 199.3
51.5 2086 19 189.6
56.6 1662 10 184.7
61.1 1758 18 175.8
61.4 1859 10 169.0
53.7 1469 9 163.2
D YPC YDSIG RECIG
12.4 80.4 6.5
1 16.0 85.2 5.4
12.7 66.0 5.2
11.6 56.1 4.8
14.6 68.2 4.7
11.2 52.7 4.7


PASS PLAYS YDS
3436 538 3600
2086 411 2687
2392 359 2534
1758 346 2068
1558 330 1976
1522 278 1918


Rush Rec
15 541
1321 133
1347 37
1134 57


YDSIG
155.5
145.4
125.8
124.0


BCSP Notes

MEAC announces 2011
football television schedule
NORFOLK, Va., August 18, 2011- The Mid-Eastern Athletic Con-
ference (MEAC) announced its 2011 television football slate last week
featuring eight exciting matchups scheduled to broadcast on ESPN, ES-
PNU and ESPN Classic. The nationally televised games are a part of the
MEAC's ongoing partnership with ESPN.
The 2011 television schedule kicks off with the MEAC/SWAC Chal-
lenge presented by Disney featuring Bethune-Cookman and Prairie View
A&M on Sunday, September 4. The game will air live beginning at noon
ET on ESPN.
The Thursday night lineup commences with Hampton against defend-
ing co-champion Florida A&M on September 8 at 7:30 p.m.
Bethune-Cookman and South Carolina State, who both also earned
a share of the conference title, will meet on Saturday, September 10 in
Daytona Beach, Fla. The Wildcats will also host Hampton in a Thursday
night game on September 22.
Morgan State and Howard will be featured on Saturday, September
24 as the two teams compete in the New York Urban League Football
Classic at the New Meadowlands Stadium, in East Rutherford, N.J.
Bethune-Cookman will travel to Norfolk, Virginia on October 20 to
take on Norfolk State in the MEAC's final Thursday night televised game.
The game will air live on ESPNU with a 7:30 p.m. kick off time.
Florida A&M will compete in two additional conference televised
games beginning on the road in Orangeburg, South Carolina against
South Carolina State on Saturday, October 22. FAMU will conclude the
MEAC's television slate with its annual matchup against B-CU in the
Florida Classic. The game will be played at the Florida Citrus Bowl and
will air live on ESPN Classic at 2:30 p.m.
For more information on MEAC football, visit www.MEACSports.
corn


2011 MEAC FOOTBALL TELEVISION SCHEDULE
DATE GAME NETWORK
9/4 B-Cookman v. Prairie View A&M ESPN
9/8 Florida A&M at Hampton ESPNU
9/10 S. C. State at B-Cookman ESPNU
9/22 Hampton at B-Cookman ESPNU
9/24 Morgan State v. Howard ESPNU
10/20 B-Cookman at Norfolk State ESPNU
10/22 Florida A&M at S. C. State ESPNU
11/19 Florida A&M v. B-Cookman ESPN Classic


TIME
12n
7:30p
4p
7:30p
3:30p
7:30p
1:30p
2:30p


BROADCAST TIME
Live
Live
10:30p (Tape)
Live
10:30p (Tape)
Live
10:30p (Tape)
Live


Atlanta to host inaugural
SIAC Football Championship Game
Atlanta, GA-The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference an-
nounced last week that the first SIAC Football Championship game will be
held in Atlanta, GA.
"We're excited to have the city of Atlanta host our inaugural SIAC cham-
pionship football game. In light of the many SIAC fans and alumni living in
or in close proximity to Atlanta, this game will not only showcase our two
most outstanding football teams, but also feature a college fair, battle of the
bands competition, as well as game day tailgating and vending activities to
make this event a significant community engagement experience for our
fans," said SIAC Commissioner Greg Moore.
The SIAC Football Championship game will be held Saturday, November
12th at 3 p.m. at Lakewood Stadium, a newly renovated 10,000-seat stadium
located in SoutheastAtlanta, Georgia. The game will feature the regular season
champions from the SIAC East and West divisions.
This is first championship game in the 98-year history of the conference
and also makes the SIAC one of only two conferences (along with the CIAA)
with a designated championship football game in NCAA Division II.


Bowie State vs. Livingstone


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1
Edward Waters vs. Concordia-Selma @ Jacksonville, FL
Lincoln (MO) vs. Fort Hays State @ Jefferson City, MO
West Virginia State vs. Seton Hill @ Institute, WV
Winston-Salem State vs. J. C. Smith @ W-S, NC B-Gray Stadium


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8


Alabama A&M vs. Miss Valley State @ Huntsville, AL Crews Stadium
Clark Atlanta vs. Miles @ Atlanta, GA Panther Stadium
Concordia-Selma vs. Texas College @ Selma, AL
Fayetteville State vs. Virginia State @ Fayetteville, NC
Florida A&M vs. Howard @ Tallahassee, FL Bragg Stadium
Jackson State vs. Ark.-Pine Bluff @ Jackson, MS Veterans Stadium
Kentucky State vs. Fort Valley State @ Frankfort, KY
Lincoln (PA) vs. Chowan @ Lincoln Univ., PA-Avon Grove HS
Morgan State vs. Savannah State @ Baltimore, MD Hughes Stadium
SC State vs. NC Central @ Or'burg, SC Dawson Stadium
Shaw vs. Johnson C. Smith @ Durham, NC County Stadium
Virginia Union vs. Elizabeth City State @ Richmond, VA


1p


3p
2p
1:30p
1p


1p
6p
5p
1p
3p
4p
1:30p
1p
1p
1:30p
1p
1p


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15
Benedict vs. Clark Atlanta @ Columbia, SC Johnson Stadium 2p
Central State vs. Southwest Baptist @ Wilberforce, OH McPherson Stadium 1:30p
Cheyney vs. West Chester @ Cheyney, PA 1 p
Elizabeth City State vs. Virginia State @ Eliz. City, NC Roebuck Stadium 1:30p
Johnson C. Smith vs. Virginia Union @ Charlotte, NC 1p
Lane vs. Tuskegee @ Jackson, TN 2p
Langston vs. SW Assemblies @ Langston, OK 2p
N. C. A&T vs. Delaware State @ Greensboro, NC Aggie Stadium 1:30p
Va. Univ. of Lynchburg vs. Wesley @ Lynchburg, VA- City Stadium 12n


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22


Alcorn State vs. Concordia-Selm
Chowan vs. Shaw
Fort Valley State vs. Stillman
Grambling State vs. Miss. Valley State
Hampton vs. NC Central
Howard vs. NC A&T
Livingstone vs. Fayetteville State
Miles vs. Lane
Morehouse vs. Benedict
St. Augustine's vs. J. C. Smith
Texas Southern vs. Central State


Albany State vs. Benedict
Delaware State vs. Morgar
Miss. Valley State vs. Texa
N. C. Central vs. Bethune-(
Norfolk State vs. NC A&T
Savannah State vs. Hamp
Southern vs. Alcorn State
Texas College vs. Bacone
Virginia State vs. Virginia I


@ Alcorn State, MS Spinks Stadium 2p
@ Murfreesboro, NC 6p
@ Fort Valley, GA 2p
@ Grambling, LA- Robinson Stadium 2p
@ Hampton, VA- Armstrong Field 2p
@ Wash, DC Greene Stadium 1p
@ Salisbury,NC 1:30p
@ Fairfield, AL 4p
@ Atlanta, GA Harvey Stadium 2p
@ Raleigh, NC 2p
@ Houston, TX Delmar Stadium 2p


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29
@ Albany, GA
n State @ Dover, DE -Alumni Stadium
as Southern @ Itta Bena, MS Rice-Totten Stadium
Cookman @ Durham, NC O'Kelly-Riddick Stad.
@ Norfolk, VA- Price Stadium
ton @ Savannah, GA- Wright Stadium
@ Baton Rouge, LA 5:
@ Tyler, TX
Jnion @ Ettrick, VA 1:


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5
Ark-Pine Bluff vs. Alabama State @ Pine Bluff, AR Lions Stadium
Bethune-Cookman vs. Morgan State @ Daytona Beach, FL
Tuskegee vs. Miles @ Tuskegee, AL -Abbott Stadium


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12
Stillman vs. Concordia-Selma @ Tuscaloosa, AL
Tennessee State vs. Tenn.-Martin @ Nashville, TN


1:30p


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19
Prairie View A&M vs. Alabama A&M @ Pr. View, TX Blackshear Field

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24
Alabama State vs. Tuskegee @ Montgomery, AL Cramton Bowl


2p
1p
2p
2p
2p
2p
30p
2p
30p


2:30p
4p
1p



5p


2p


3p


AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XVIII, No. 4


0 M C I


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
@ Bowie, MD


August 25-31, 2011 '


Page 8 Ms Perry's Free s


1









August 25-31. 2011


Mrs. Perry's Free Press Page 9


Lawmakers target high Black


MIAMI Taking the microphone
at a church in a predominantly
black neighborhood of Miami, the
Rev. Jesse Jackson asked how
many in the crowd knew someone
looking for a job.
Most of the several hundred
people in the televised town hall
gathering stood up. How many
knew someone facing foreclosure?
Student loan debt? In jail?
Considered suicide? Crowds of
people stood up in answer to each
of his questions.
The Congressional Black Caucus
organized a town hall gathering in
Miami to address black unemploy-
ment rates Monday evening, one of
five taking place in August in dis-
tressed communities across the
country. At issue is the stubbornly
high unemployment rate in the
black community, now at 16.8 per-
cent nationwide, more than double
that for whites and a figure that
doesn't even include those who've
stopped looking for work.
U.S Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, D-
Mo. and the caucus chairman, said


g na. Ikh
(L-R) are longtime Historic Mount Zion members with city officials: Jean Pettis, Sollie Mitchell, State Rep.
Mia Jones, Event Committee Chair Alexis Goodman, Sen. Tony Hill, Charlotte Stewart and Dr. C.B.
McIntosh. R. Silver. Silver
Dignitaries join Mt. Zion family for 145th Anniversary


Continued from page 1 City of Jacksonville.Gener
by Rhonda Silver generation, working togeth
Founded in 1866, it is also, the fresh anointing, was the
second oldest AME church in the theme for the Historic Mo

Waters under fire for telling off Tea P
The Tea Party isn't happy with the Democratic Party especially
Maxine Waters.
The 11-term California Democrat recently made a comment at
ing where she told the Tea Party to go where the sun doesn't shit
"I'm not afraid of anybody," Walters told the crowd. "This is
game. You can't be intimidated. You can't be frightened. And a
I'm concerned, the Tea Party can go straight to hell.




T eCiyofJcsovll n


ration to AME Church's 145th Anniversary.
erwith a The grand celebration was held
e central Sunday, August 21st, 2011. The
unt Zion venerable downtown institution
under the leadership of Rev. Pearce
arty Ewing has been a beacon in the
community as an institutution of
y, Rep. faith for nearly a century and a half.
The church celebrated in their
a meet- century old building located in the
ne. heart of downtown at the corer of
a tough Beaver and Newnan Streets. The
s far as
ar as edifice, rich with history, has
housed everything from the origins
of Stanton High School to the civil
rights struggle.
"My word of encouragement and
prayer for the members of Historic
Mount Zion is that you continue to
be a light for the unfortunate,..the.
down ridden and the faithless, as
they go through trying times," said
Rev. Ewing.


representatives are frustrated at
being unable to advance bills in
Congress aimed at encouraging job
growth. Caucus members have
introduced more than 40 such bills
since January and none of them
have passed. Republicans took
control of the House nearly nine
months ago.
Now, the lawmakers are taking to
the road to ensure angry con-
stituents that they are doing all in
their power to help, while offering
a job fair in each city as assistance.
In Atlanta, Cleveland and Detroit,
the events have drawn thousands,
and more than 1,000 people
streamed into a downtown conven-
tion center for the Miami job fair.
Another will be held in Los
Angeles at the end of the month.
"We left the complaint counter
and that's why we're on this tour,"
Cleaver said.
The frustration over jobs is begin-
ning to have political repercussions
in black communities.
"Unemployment in South Florida,
especially in the black community,


.


Back to school: There were no first day jitters for John E. Ford
students Diajion Foxworth, 12, (1) and his brother Dekevian George, 8. The
two youngsters who attend the foreign language elementary magnet school
are shown with their mother Jennifer Peterson. The soon to be star pupils
were ready and prepared for the start of their school year.


unemployment
is no longer a crisis," U.S. Rep.
Frederica Wilson, said before the
event. "It's an epidemic."
The job fairs come amid a grow-
ing debate within the black com-
munity about the Obama adminis-
tration's urban agenda. While black
lawmakers have been reluctant to
criticize the country's first black
president, some are beginning to
voice concern about the adminis-
tration's focus on deficit reduction
at a time of high joblessness and
poverty in urban areas.
"I think the president is doing as
much as he can, and I'm anxious to
hear his proposal when we go back
in September," Wilson said, refer-
ring to the president's job creation
plan. "But if it includes any fund-
ing, we're going to have to fight.
Because the tea party will stop
him."


Company hired

to manage

growing list of

intervene schools
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- The
Duval County School Board has
made it official. The same company
it hired to help manage four of the
district's intervene schools will
now be working in all seven of the
intervene schools.
The unanimous decision was
made in a specially called meeting
Tuesday morning.
The board recently hired the
group Educational Directions to
work in Raines, Ribault and
Andrew Jackson high schools, and
North Shore Elementary School.
They'll now work in Ed White
and Forrest high schools, and A.
Philip Randolph Academies.
"We want to make sure that these
schools are very successful,"
School Board Chairman W.C.
Gentry said. "We want to get them
out of intervene (status). We don't
want to wait until we have a crisis
to bring in additional resources."
Adding the additional schools to
the contract comes at an additional
cost of $825,000. However, the dis-
trict won't be spending additional
money.
The funding will come from
grants and federal funds.


FOREVER FIT
50 & BEYOND


2011 JACKSONVILLE SENIOR GAMES
MEN AND WOMEN AGES 50 AND OVER

OCTOBER 1-8, 2011
The Forever Fit 50 & Beyond: Jacksonville Senior Games is an Olympic-style event series
designed for seasoned athletes to participate on a competitive level and novice athletes to
participate for their own enjoyment, promoting healthy and active lifestyles for seniors.

Events
Cycling Track & Field Road Race Chess
Chinese Mah Jong Golf Croquet ~ Croquet
Power Lifting Racquetball ~ Bowling Tennis
Table Tennis Golf ~ Basketball ~ Bridge
Horseshoes ~ Softball ~ Line Dancing
Pickleball ~ Swimming ~ Bid Whist

For more information and a registration packet,
visit MakeASceneDowntown.com or call (904) 630-3690.

RI THEATRE AND MUSEUM PRESENTS






1I JAC SINYI LLE 1LE1 15M


PUBLIC LEGAL NOTICE
FOR TAX EXEMPTIONS HEARINGS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT:

THE VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD ("VAB") HEARS DISPUTED OR APPEALED APPLICATIONS FOR PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION. THE VAB MUST
ACT IN ACCORDANCE WITH CRITERIA ESTABLISHED BY LAW.

ANY PERSON WISHING TO BE HEARD BEFORE THE VAB WITH REGARD TO AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION APPLICATIONS MAY
FILE A PETITION AT CITY HALL, ST. JAMES BUILDING, 117 WEST DUVAL STREET, 3RD FLOOR, SUITE 305, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, 32202.
FILING DEADLINES, FILING FEES AND OTHER LEGAL CRITERIAAPPLY.

SPECIAL MAGISTRATE HEARINGS REGARDING FILED VAB PETITIONS ARE SCHEDULED TO OCCUR MONDAYS THROUGH THURSDAYS, BE-
GINNING OCTOBER 17, 2011 AND CONTINUING UNTILALL 2011 VAB PETITIONS HAVE BEEN HEARD OR RESOLVED. NOTICES OF SCHEDULED
SPECIAL MAGISTRATE HEARINGS ARE MAILED TO PETITIONERS.

THE 2011 VAB WILL MEET PERIODICALLY TO CONSIDER SPECIAL MAGISTRATE RECOMMENDED DECISIONS. THE VAB ORDINARILY MEETS
AT 9:00 A.M., IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 1ST FLOOR, CITY HALL, ON THE THIRD THURSDAY OF EACH MONTH, BEGINNING IN NOVEMBER,
AND CONTINUING EACH MONTH (EXCEPT DECEMBER AND JULY) UNTIL ALL BUSINESS OF THE 2011 VAB IS CONCLUDED.

CONSULT THE VAB WEBSITE: (http://www.coj.net/Departments/Regulatory-Boards-and-CommissionsNalue-Adjustment-Board.aspx) OR TELEPHONE
904.630.7370 FOR SPECIFIC VAB MEETING TIMES, DATES AND LOCATIONS.

A LIST OF ALL APPLICATIONS FOR TAX EXEMPTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN WHOLLY OR PARTIALLY APPROVED, AND A LIST OF ALL APPLICA-
TIONS THAT HAVE BEEN DENIED ARE AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC IN THE INFORMATION CENTER OF THE PROPERTY APPRAISER'S OFFICE,
231 EAST FORSYTH STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, 32202, FROM 8:00 AM TO 5:00 PM, MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, PURSUANT TO CHAP-
TER 196.194, FLORIDA STATUTES.

THESE LISTS WILL REFLECT THE FOLLOWING TYPES OF EXEMPTIONS:


Homestead Exemption
Blindness Exemption
Disability Exemption
'Granny Flat' (Assessment Reduction for Living Quarters of Par-
ents or Grandparents)
Historic Preservation Exemption
Service-Connected Total
and Permanent Disability Exemption


Armed Forces Homestead Allowance
Conservation Exemption
(Land Dedicated in Perpetuity)
Disability Veteran Exemption
Senior Citizen Exemption
Widow/Widower Exemption
Totally and Permanently Disabled Exemption


If you require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, please call 904.630.7370 no later than two business
days prior to the hearing for assistance.

IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEALANY DECISION MADE BY THE VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED
AT SUCH MEETING OR HEARING, HE OR SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS. FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE OR SHE MAY NEED
TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE
UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.

JOHN CRESCIMBENI, CHAIR, DUVAL COUNTY VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD
CHERYL L. BROWN, CLERK, DUVAL COUNTY VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD


VAB eMail address: VAB@COJ.net; Telephone: 904.630.7370; Fax: 904.630.0576


--~b--- ----~----


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Pag 1 -Ms Prrys re Pes Auus 2-3, 01


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August 25-31, 2011


Page 10 Ms. Perry's Free Press


_


i

61









Pan 11-Ms er' rePesAgs 5-3,21


Harvey developing 'Act

Like a Lady' television show


Steve Harvey
The multi-talented Steve Harvey
is developing what is being
described as a "comedy show with
talk show elements" that would fea-
ture the entertainer as host of a for-
mat that mixes his best-selling book
"Act Like a Lady, Think Like a
Man" and syndicated radio pro-
gram, Steve Harvey Morning Show.
The show is set for a fall 2012
launch in syndication and will also
feature Harvey as executive pro-
ducer.
Harvey, also host of the syndicat-
ed "Family Feud," is aiming to
bring his comedic sensibility to the


k,


show, which will focus on relation-
ship topics, including parenting,
workplace, body issues, co-workers
and more, according to the
Hollywood Reporter.
"Steve Harvey is a multi-talented
entertainer, a best-selling author,
host of a No. 1-rated radio program
and a huge TV personality Steve
is a proven ratings winner in the day
part, said Barry Wallach, presi-
dent of NBCUniversal Domestic
TV Distribution. "
The Harvey-hosted "Family
Feud" has seen its ratings increase
since he took over last fall, includ-
ing a 55 percent boost among
women 25-54.
Meanwhile, "Act Like a Lady" is
being adapted for the big screen by
Screen Gems and is slated for a
2012 release.
Harvey is just the latest personal-
ity to have a talk show on deck for
fall 2012. "Survivor" host Jeff
Probst recently signed a deal with
CBS TV Distribution, Katie Couric
has a deal with ABC, and Ricki
Lake has a pact with Twentieth TV.
Also, Bravo's Bethenny Frankel is
working with Ellen DeGeneres on a
Telepictures-produced project.


After their excitement for each
other's love stunned everyone,
Evelyn Lozada and her fiancee
Chad Ochocinco slowed down, but
made a date to perform their nup-
tials.
The pair didn't waste any time get-
ting engaged last year, but now that


RUs Vlws: 'The Help' entertains


and enlightens on a bygone era


| A h 1 i L
Viola Davis gives a poignant performance in "The Help" which gives
domestics' point of view in a pre-civil rights era Mississippi.
By K. Williams ing nanny left bone-weary by a life
After great reviews and a lot of spent looking after white babies."
word of mouth advertising for the Born in 1911, she is currently rais-
film, The Help took the top spot at ing little Mae Mobley Leefolt
the box office this weekend, in it's (Emma and Eleanor Henry), a
second week in theatres. It's recent addition to a prominent
expected to continue doing well in Southern family.
the weeks to come earning more As narrator, Aibileen is able to
then $20,000,000. admit to the audience the existence
Kathryn Stockett made an auspi- of a "bitter seed" planted deep
cious debut in 2009 with the publi- inside of her soul since the recent
cation of The Help, a poignant peri- death of her only son. Still, she is
od piece examining the unques- not one to risk her job by allowing
tioned relationships of entitled, her face to reveal even a trace of
white socialites and their deferen- that resentment in the presence of
tial black maids in Mississippi. her employers. Instead, the gram-
Although the story is set in the matically-challenged domestic
author's hometown of Jackson in dutifully nourishes the impression-
the early sixties, her best-selling able toddler in her care by regularly
novel is more fictional than autobi- reciting the same spiritual mantra
ographical in nature, she's shared with all 17 other chil-
The screen adaptation unfolds dren entrusted to her over the years,
from the point of view of Aibileen namely, "You is kind; you is smart;
Clark (Viola Davis), a long-suffer- you is important."


By contrast, Aibileen's relatively-
mercurial best friend, Minny
(Octavia Spencer), is not nearly as
stoic, which explains why she fre-
quently finds herself fired for
insubordination. After all, the strict-
ly-enforced housekeeper code of
conduct calling for no spanking,
touching or sassing white folks, and
especially no using their bathrooms
tends to test her patience.
Passive-aggressive Minny is
lucky even to be alive after her lat-
est outburst which led to her being
dismissed by Hilly Holbrook
(Bryce Dallas Howard), an insuf-
ferable shrew who only got what.
she deserved. Minny next lands a
position with Celia Foote (Jessica
Chastain), a newcomer ostracized
by other well-to-do ladies because
of her white trash roots.
The plot thickens, upon the
arrival back in town of cotton plan-
tation heiress Skeeter Phelan
(Emma Stone). Having spent time
away from the racist region, the
aspiring journalist now finds herself
offended by a way of life everyone
else around her seems to take for
granted.
Feeling for the plight of the long-
suffering black servants who had
raised her and her friends so loving-
ly despite the discrimination,
Skeeter decides to write a book
recounting what life in Jackson is
like from their perspective. So,
starting with Aibileen and Minny,
she starts approaching sisters to
cooperate with the project, which is
no mean feat, given that this is
Mississippi at a time when it was
often fatal to challenge the status
quo.


things have settled down, the two
have taken it easy.
However, Lozada said she's not
trying to be engaged forever.
Something needs to happen, so they
made a tentative date.
"There's nothing set in stone, but
either way we're going to get mar-
ried in 2012 whether it's televised
or not," she stated, adding that they
would likely get hitched next sum-
mer. And Evelyn was quick to clar-
ify that her wedding day would be
scheduled around what's most con-
venient for her and Chad not TV.
"We're not opposed, but obviously
if it works with scheduling.
Obviously, you know he has a foot-
ball schedule. We would need to
work that out."
While they are in the middle of
planning their wedding, it turns out
the two have different ideas about
the ceremony.
"I would like something small,"
Evelyn admitted, "but Chad being
who he is wants something bigger
and more over-the-top. We'll see if
we can meet somewhere in the mid-
dle."
In he meantime, they've been dis-
cussing kids. The couple went to
the fertility clinic in hopes of con-
ceiving twins, but Lozada is
adamant about waiting until after
they are married.


ENTERTAINMENT WORLD



GOSSIP SCOOP


Macy Gray austions chance to sing on
new album
An auction house is giving Macy Gray fans the
chance to join her in the studio as she records her
new album.
For $1,350, the devotee will get to sing on the
chorus of a track and dine with the singer in the
studio's zen garden.
The package, created by the online luxury gift
store www.GiltCity.com, also features credit on
the album and a signed copy when it is complet-
ed.
The session will take place on Sept. 4 and fans can apply now.
Nicole Arie-Parker, Underwood headed to Broadway
NAACP Image Award winner Nicole Ari Parker
f is set to star opposite Blair Underwood in the
upcoming Broadway revival of Tennessee
Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire," directed by
Emily Mann.
Parker will play Blanche Du Bois in the produc-
tion, which is set to open in the spring of 2012.
The Tennessee Williams Pulitzer Prize winning
S. drama is set against the backdrop of New Orleans'
gritty French Quarter, It tells the tale of former
S school teacher and socialite Blanche DuBois, as
she's forced to move in with her sister Stella and
her animalistic husband (Underwood). But the
fragile, Blanche quickly gets a gritty life lesson in the seamy, steamy
underbelly of 1940s New Orleans.
Real Housewife Lisa Wu splits with
husband
Real Housewives of Atlanta recurring guest
Lisa Wu, who appeared on season one and two
as a cast member, and husband, former NFL
linebacker Ed Hartwell, have split.
"Sadly. We r separated but wld NEVER b over
money. That is sofarfrom the truth. Wish ppl cld
respect ppl's privacy during time like these," she
tweeted.
Chiwetel Ejiofor tapped for Brad Pitt slavery drama
British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor has signed on to topline
an adaptation of "Twelve Years a Slave," an autobiogra-
phy written in 1853 by Solomon Northup, a free black
man who became enslaved. Brad Pitt and his Plan B
banner are producing.
Ejiofor will play Northup, a married and educated free
black man living in New York when two men
approached him with a job offer in Washington. When he
showed up in D.C., he was kidnapped and put in a slave
pen, paving the way to his grueling life under numerous owners.
The book is studied for everything from its details of the slave markets
that existed in D.C. to the type of food served to slaves.
Northup was able to secure his freedom when a white carpenter from
Canada, who didn't believe in slavery, was able to smuggle out letters to
Northup's wife, initiating a court case that saw him set free.


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Reality television star Evelyn Lozada and fiancee Chad Ocho Cinco.

Evelyn and Chad set a date


August 25 31, 2011


Page 11 Mrs. Perry's Free Press


Rl~t*p~p~_ld]p










Pa e 12 Ms Perry's Free s


A__g__A_,______A____ya_.__ -___I_


August 25-31, 2011


AROUND TOWN


If hat to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene


Eat Up Downtown
Downtown Vision, Inc. is dishing
out exquisite cuisine at an afford-
able price during Eat Up
Downtown. From hip caf6s to ele-
gant steak houses, Downtown's
finest restaurants collaborate each
year to bring you a three course
meal at one unbeatable price. Save
the dates and your appetite!. Eat
Up Downtown will run for two
weeks, August 15 August 28,
2011, you have two weeks to dine!

Christian Comedy Show
There will be Christian Comedy
show themed "Christians Can't
Laugh." Join comedians Big Chip,
Ms. Jen and Da Cleaner for a laugh
out loud show. It will be held at the
Clara White Mission, 613 W.
Ashley St., Friday, August 26th.
Showtime is 7:30 p.m. For tickets
and more information contact
Robert White at (904) 677-6083.

Truly Tina
Tribute Show
Latitude 30 will host the Truly
Tina Tribute Show Friday, August
26th at 8 p.m. and Saturday,
August 27th for two shows at 6
and 8 p.m. Latitude 30 located at
10370 Phillips Highway,
Jacksonville, FL 32256. For more
information, call 705-5574.

Joy Dennis
Birthday Soiree
Vocalist Joy Dennis birthday
soiree and HBCU tour Kickoff
Party will be held Saturday,
August 27, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. River
City Brewing Company, 835
Museum Circle on the Riverwalk.
Come enjoy dinner and music by


Joy Dennis and DJ Goodlife. For
more information call (904) 398-
2299.

Jazz at American Beach
The American Beach Property
Owners Association will present
Jazz at Burney Park on historic
American Beach. Bring your chairs
and grills and sit oceanside while
listening to the smooth sounds of
the jazz band Instant Groove. The
free event will be Saturday, August
27th from 5-8 p.m. For more infor-
mation call 514-6611.

Spoken Word
at the Ritz
Join the Ritz Theatre for a free
evening of Spoken Word, Thursday,
September 1st at 7 p.m. Call 632-
5555.

Raines '81 Reunion
The Raines High School class of
1981 will celebrate their 30th class
reunion September 2 3, 2011 at
the Hyatt Riverfront Hotel.
For more information email cecil-
iadorsey@bellsouth.net or call
(904) 766-8784.

Ritz Amateur Night
Ritz Amateur Night is back. Come
to the Ritz Theatre in historic
LaVilla in downtown Jacksonville
on Friday, September 2nd to wit-
ness the best amateur talent in
Jacksonville Apollo style with the
audience deciding the winner.
Showtime is 7 p.m. and is always a
sell out. For more information, call
632-5555.

Tattoo Convention
The 7th Annual Jacksonville


Tattoo Convention will be held this
year at the Renaissance Resort at
World Golf Village, 500 S. Legacy
Trail, St. Augustine, Florida,
September 2nd at 11 a.m. and
September 4th at 8:00 p.m. For
more information call 877-888-
2002.
Jazz Cruise
Labor Day Weekend will be the
time for a grand evening of smooth
jazz on A Jazz on the Water Cruise.
It will be held on Saturday,
September 3rd from 10 p.m.-1:30
a.m. taking off from 1501
Riverplace (next to Charthouse
Restaurant). The evening will fea-
ture include live jazz, hours d'oeu-
vres served and TJ The DJ. For
more information call Ms. Charo at
520-3238.

Mali Vai Washington
Golf & Tennis Gala
The Mali Vai Washington Golf &
Tennis Gala is marked for
September 12th and 13th and
includes a Tennis Pro-Am, Golf
Pro-Am and Gala Dinner. For more
information on this event call (904)
359-KIDS (5437) or email
info@malwashington.com.

Sesame Street Live!
All of the classic Seasme Street
characters will be in performance
for Sesame Street Live "Elmo's
Super Heroes" at Times Union
Center for Performing Arts (Moran
Theater). The show is scheduled for
Friday, Sept. 16th 18th. For more
information call (904) 630-3900.

Jacksonville's Dancing
with the Stars
Help choose Jacksonville's favorite


dancer. The Jacksonville Children's
Chorus is presenting Jacksonville's
Dancing with the Stars event on
Saturday, September 17th at 7 p.m.
at the Times-Union Center for
Performing Arts. Local 'celebri-
ties' will compete in two show
dances and your votes decide who
will get to bring home the mirror
ball trophy. Email carolyna@aso-
cialaffair.net for more information..

Icons and
Legends concert
Erykah Badu, The O'Jays and
Ricky Smiley will be in concert
together on Saturday, September
17, 2011 at the arena. For tickets
call (800) 745-3000, or visit online
at www.ticketmaster.com.

N.W. Library
Annual Book Sale
The Bradham Brooks Northwest
library will hold their annual book
sale Thursday, September 23,
noon 8 p.m., Friday, September
24, 10 a.m. 5 p.m., and Saturday,
September 25, 10 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Visit Bradham Brooks library at
1755 Edgewood Avenue W. or call
(904) 765-5402.

Zeta Phi
Beta Greek Picnic
The ladies of Zeta Phi Beta
Sorority, Inc. invite the community
to attend their Greek Picnic, located
in Zeta Phi Beta Park, 3721 Owen
Road Jacksonville, Florid 32208. It
will be held Saturday, September
24th from 1 6 p.m. Activities
include a step show, stroll contest,
volleyball, raffle, food and more.
For more information, call Denise
Everett at 704-5181.


Dog Days in
the Park 2011
Join the Springfield Animal Care
& Rescue Club (SACARC) for Dog
Days in the Park 2011, celebrating
fun for the whole family includ-
ing the four-legged members.
Bring the kids and the dogs to
Confederate Park 956 Hubbard
Street, Jacksonville, FL 32206 on
Saturday, September 24, 2011
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. for food,
beer and fun. For more information
visit www.sacarc.org or email con-
tactus@sacarc.org or call 633-9308.

Ride for Justice
The 6th annual Ride for Justice
will take place on September 24,
2011 to benefit the Justice
Coalition. The ride will begin at the
Jacksonville Landing lead by
Sheriff John Rutherford and Clay
County Sheriff Rick Beseler on a 50
mile scenic route, ending at Old
Plank Baptist Church where riders


will be served a barbecue lunch.
Register by calling 783-6312 or
online at www.justicecoalition.org.

Cruise with Raines
Class of 1970
The Raines Class of 1970 is sailing
on a cruise September 22-29, 2012.
The ports of call are Port Canaveral,
Nassau Bahamas, St. Thomas, and
St. Maarten. For more information
contact Toby Byrd at (904) 879-
2605 or email tobybyrd@wind-
stream.net.

Honorary Tribute
for Gene Hollomon
An Honorary Tribute for Eugene
(Gene) Hollomon: a fundraiser, jazz
and variety show will be held at the
Karples Manuscript Library and
Museum Saturday, October 1st, 6
- 9 p.m., 101 East Laura Street,
Jacksonville FL 32201.
For more information call Roxann
Hilbert at (904) 699-5952.


Artists sought to design for Jazz Fest
You could be the artist! The City of Jacksonville is calling all artists to
design the 2012 Commemorative Jacksonville Jazz Festival Poster. Entry
deadline is September 6, 2011. Mail a photo or email your entry to
events@coj.net. For further information call (904) 630-CITY (2489).

Stanton Class of 1963 now meeting
New Stanton Sr. High School Class of 1963 will meet the third Sunday of
each month to prepare for their 50th class reunion in the year 2013. The
meetings will be held at the Highlands Branch Library, 1826 Dunn
Avenue, 3:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. Contact Gracie Smith Foreman or call (904)
766-5221.
Kuumba Festival wants your old

newspapers for fund raising efforts
The Kuumba African-American Arts Festival is raising funds by recy-
cling your old papers. Bring your newspapers to their special recycling bin
located at the WinnDixie on Moncrief and Soutel.


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Pae1 r. er' re rs uut 5-3,21


Flipping Through


the


Free Press Files


During the year of our 20th Anniversary, we paid tribute to the many people, places and events, that have graced the Free Press pages. Though our celebration is official-
ly over, and we are on the cusp of our 25th, we received such overwhelming response to the "Flipping" page, we have decided to flashback the page! We continue to share
with you some of the many memories that have shaped our publication.
.......... .. .. %m......


NAACP Advocate Dr. C.B. McIntosh awards a life
membership to a new recipient during the annual banquet.


Celebrating after the Bold City Classic are Wendy Henton, Hosts Terry Fields and Denise Lee, the late
Taye Brown, and Carlottra Guyton.


Sharon Quarterman shows off her
sassy silver outfit.


Attending the Annual NAACP Banquet Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Griffen
and Mr. & Mrs. Isiah Rumlin.


Rev. and Mrs. John Newman are congratulated by then State
Representative Tony Hill and Willye Dennis at a receptionin honor of
their marriage.


Shown above at the Jacksonville Chapter 100 Black Men's 5th Annual Recognition
Banquet are Chapter President Marion Graham, Jr., Actor Charles Dutton and Banquet Attorney Kim Nesmith and Adrian Noel chat it
Chair Doug Brown. up during a networking event.


Celebrating at a surprise party in her honor are Antwaune Ponds,
Faye Johnson, Dominique Torrance and honoree Maretta Lattimer.


Gertrude Peele awards a plaque to the late Ms. Lillie Rubin on behalf
of Zeta Phi Beta, Sorority.
rT'--^^


Shown here at a networking event in this early 90's photo was then
Jacksonville General Counsel Fred Franklin, Ju'Coby Pittman and Al
Randolph.


Eric Oliver and Marsha Oliver instilled the importance of communi-
ty involvement in their son Joel at an early age as they attend a circa Celebratory social couple Josephine Fiveashe-Porter and husband
2000 building dedication. Robert are all smiles at the annual FlaJax dance.


SBRB CA
Sr-eS0 5


inddeivre i V 1111t nallpo
usuallyno latr thanFridav


August 25 31, 2011


Page 13 Mrs. Perry's Free Press









Page 14 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 25-31, 2011


- t *. .
--
.. .4 a... .


Kaliya,Kamaria and Kamiya Bowden


Gwandos Ward and Charlette Lee


Public gets first glimpse
Tourists and Washingtonians got National Mall between memorials
their first up-close look this week at honouring Presidents Abraham
the memorial to the U.S.civil rights Lincoln and Thomas Jefferson. It
leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. includes a 9-metre-tall sculpture of
King and a 137-metre-long
granite wall inscribed with 14
..-^ V quotations from his speeches.
pi The sheer size of the sculpture
of King sets it apart from nearby
S statues of Jefferson and Lincoln,
which are both about 6 metres
ii tall, though inside larger monu-
ments.
A panel of scholars chose the
The site opened without fanfare engraved quotations from speeches
to kick off a week of celebrations by King in Atlanta, New York,
ahead of its' official dedication. Washington, Los Angeles and
The memorial sits on the Montgomery, Alabama, as well as


John Shepard, Deborah Shepard, Jennifer Shepard, Brian Shepard


Super Cheerleaders Autumn Hill, McKenna Houston and Mia Hill

of Rev. King Jr. memorial


from King's books and his letter
from a Birmingham, Alabama, jail.
One of the stone engravings
reads: "We shall overcome because
the arc of the moral universe is
long, but it bends toward justice."
Sunday's dedication ceremony
will mark the 48th anniversary of
the March on Washington and
King's famous "I Have a Dream"
speech. President Barack Obama is
scheduled to speak at the dedica-
tion.
The Chinese sculptor, Lei Yixin,
said he wanted the memorial to be a
visual representation of the ideals
King spoke of in his "I Have a
Dream" speech.


The sculpture depicts King with a
stem expression, wearing a jacket
and tie, his arms folded and clutch-
ing papers in his left hand. Lei said
through his son that "you can see
the hope" in King's face, but that his
serious demeanour also indicates
that "he's thinking."
The statue depicts King emerging
from a stone. The concept for the
memorial was taken from a line in
the "I Have a Dream" speech,
which is carved into the stone: "Out
of the mountain of despair, a stone
of hope." Visitors to the memorial
pass through a sculpture of the
mountain of despair and come upon
the stone of hope.


Music lovers stunned by

the death of Nick Ashford


Nick Ashford, one-half of the
legendary Motown songwriting duo
Ashford & Simpson that penned
elegant, soulful classics for the
likes of Diana Ross and Marvin
Gaye and funk hits for Chaka Khan
and others, died Monday at age 70,
his former publicist said.
Ashford, who along with wife
Valerie Simpson wrote some of
Motown's biggest hits, died in a
New York City hospital, said Liz
Rosenberg, who was Ashford's
longtime friend. He had been suf-
fering from throat cancer and had
undergone radiation treatment.
Though they had some of their
greatest success at Motown with
classics like "Ain't No Mountain
High Enough" and "Reach Out And
Touch" by Ross and "You're All I
Need To Get By" by Gaye and
Tammi Terrell, Ashford & Simpson
also created anthems for others, like
"I'm Every Woman" by Khan and
Whitney Houston.
"They had magic and that's what


Asnioru o~ Smpson, close Irienus
of Ritz Theater's Executive Director
Carol Alexander, performed on the
First Coast for the historic venue's
10th anniversary in 2007. Ashford is
shown above with fan Tommy
Chandler at the event.
creates those wonderful hits, that
magic," Verdine White of Earth,
Wind and Fire said after learning of
his friend's death. "Without those
songs, those artists wouldn't have
been able to go to the next level."
Ashford & Simpson also had suc-
cess writing for themselves includ-
ing the hit "Solid As A Rock."
Their relationship stretched more
than four decades. They met in


Talented husband and wife team
Nick Ashford and Valerie Simpson
performed and created under the
name Ashford & Simpson.
1964 in a New York City church;
Ashford, a South Carolina native,
had come to the city to pursue a
dance career. Simpson was a music
student, and after connecting with
her, they decided to start to write
songs together.
"They were always comfortable
with each other and they made all
of us comfortable, because they
were comfortable," White said.
Their first major success
occurred when they came up with
"Let's Go Get Stoned" for Ray
Charles. That song became a huge
hit, and soon, they came to the
attention of Motown Records and
began penning hits for their artists.
"Ain't No Mountain High Enough"
was originally their hit, until Ross
later rerecorded it and made it her
signature song.
The duo, who were married for
38 years, helped sell millions of
records for several artists. They
also had success as their own entity,
but despite "Solid As a Rock," their
songs were dwarfed by those they
penned for others.
In recent years, the pair contin-
ued to perform. They also were
owners of the New York City
restaurant Sugar Bar, where many
top names and emerging talents
would put on showcases.
Ashford is survived by his wife
and two daughters.


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August 25-31, 2011


Page 14 Ms. Perry's Free Press