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The Jacksonville free press ( 8/11/2011 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF






r


Why do our

students score

so poorly on

standardized

tests?


Is retirement

even an option

for those of

age in this

economy?
Page 7


CO AS I QUALI Y BLACK h tEKLY L Y
50 Cents


Tiger Woods still losing sponsors
Poor Tiger Woods cannot catch a break. Not only is his career taking a
hit after a three-month leave due to an injury, but his endorsements are
struggling well. According to Golf World, a long-time deal by Swiss
watch company Tag Heuer has come to an end, the latest in a string of
dropped sponsorships. Other lost corporate sponsorships include Gillette,
Gatorade, Accenture, AT&T and Golf Digest.

Station tied to Emmett Till's

1955 killing to be restored
The gas station involved in the story of Emmett Till, who was lynched
in 1955 for allegedly whistling at a white woman, will be restored. The
Mississippi Department of Archives and History is providing $152,000 to
restore Ben Roy's Service Station, which stands next to what used to be
Bryant's Grocery and Meat Market, once owned by Carolyn Bryant-the
woman Till was said to have whistled at.
Till, a Black 14-year-old from Chicago visiting relatives in the
Mississippi Delta, was killed and mutilated by Roy Bryant and his half-
brother, J.W. Milam, in 1955. They were both acquitted by an all-white
jury, but confessed to the crime in an article in Look magazine.
In July, hope for an Emmett Till memorial became lost when Carolyn
Towns, who promised Till's mother that she would build a museum for
her son, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for her part in a $100,000
grave-digging scheme.

Feds settle with AL School

Board over racial disparities
WASHINGTON The U.S. Justice Department announced today that
it has reached a settlement with the Pickens County, Ala., school board to
eliminate racial disparities in its system.
Under terms of the agreement, the board, working with state officials,
will develop policies and programs to eliminate racial disparities in stu-
dent discipline, grade retention, graduation rates and post-graduate schol-
arships, the Justice Department stated in a release.
The agreement further obligates the board to intensify its efforts to
recruit minority applicants for faculty and administrative positions, and
to take steps to ensure that the assignment of certified and non-certified
staff to district schools doesn't racially identifiable schools.
In conjunction with the parties' agreement, the state of Alabama will
establish and operate an early learning center that will provide educa-
tional services to four-year old children in Pickens County at no cost to
parents. The state has also agreed to provide substantial training and edu-
cational expertise to assist the board in executing its obligations under the
agreement, as well as its desegregation obligations more broadly.

Young, gay black men lead the
banner for HIV infection rates
The number of new HIV infections in the United States has remained
steady, at around 50,000 cases a year over the past four years, according
to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. However, the largest
increases were among bisexual men and men who have sex with men
(MSM). Of that group, young, black men had what the agency called
"alarming increases." Young gay and bisexual men are the only group in
which infections are increasing, and this increase is particularly concern-
ing among young African American MSM.
The CDC estimates that MSM make up 2% of the U.S. population but
61% of 2009's new infections. Young men between the ages of 13 and 29
who had sex with men had the highest new infection rate/increase more
than a quarter of all new cases. The agency says while young MSM of all
ethnic backgrounds have been hit hard, young blacks were the only group
to see significant increases over the four-year period. Infection rates
among this population jumped 48% during that time.

Ex students sues former

school for 'Wigger Day"
MINNEAPOLIS For at least two years, dozens of students at a
Minnesota high school caricatured African-Americans in a homecoming
week dress-up day by wearing low-slung pants, oversized sports jerseys
and flashing gang signs, according to a federal lawsuit.
The lawsuit filed last week claims officials at Red Wing High School
knew of the activity and had a duty to stop it because it created a racial-
ly hostile environment. It follows a state investigation that found school
officials did not fulfill their obligation "to provide an educational atmos-
phere free of illegal racial discrimination."
The lawsuit said about 60 to 70 students were involved in the activity
during the 2008 and 2009 school years. Red Wing is about 50 miles
southeast of Minneapolis along the Minnesota-Wisconsin border.
According to the Minnesota Department of Education, the high school
has about 880 students and is 89 percent white, 4 percent Hispanic, 3 per-
cent black, 3 percent American Indian and 1 percent Asian.
The day was unofficially known in the school as Wigger Day. The law-
suit said wigger is a pejorative word for a white person who imitates the
mannerisms, language and clothes associated with black culture.
The state investigated after a student complained to Minnesota
Department of Human Rights in September 2010. The state ruled last
month that there was probable cause to believe she was discriminated
against. The investigative report said school officials didn't dispute the
event happened in 2009, but claimed they could not have foreseen it.


Volume 24 No. 44 Jacksonville, Florida August 11-17, 2011


Black America should brace themselves for the long haul


By Lee A. Daniels
The debt-ceiling crisis that threat-
ened America's economic founda-
tion has abated for now.
But the iobs crisis and the foreclo-


sure crisis, which continue to
threaten the present and future of
millions of ordinary Americans,
have not.
If the resolution; albeit temporary,
of the fierce political war waged in


Washington these past several
months marks "a change in behav-
ior from spend, spend, spend to cut,
cut, cut," as Republican Senator
Lamar Alexander, of Tennessee,
Said on the floor of the
Senate, in what shape
does that leave the
nation's already-frayed
social safety net? If this
compromise inaugurates
"a regime," as a New
York Times article put it,
"of steep spending cuts aimed at
reducing the deficits so far, with-
out new revenues sought by the
White House," what does that mean
for the millions of Americans slid-
ing with increasing velocity toward


the margins of society?
These facts of political and eco-
nomic life make it especially imper-
ative that Black Americans ponder
an alarming question: What will the
economic catastrophe that is only

Mayor Brown


just beginning to sweep over Black
America look like?
Catastrophe is not too strong a
description of the prospect a signif-
icant proportion of Blacks includ-
Continued on page 2

signs first bill


Mayor Alvin Brown, shown
above, has signed his first piece of
legislation for the city since taking
office in his historic election.
The bill sets the tentative millage
rate for the next fiscal year.
During his campaign, Brown said
he would not raise taxes, and he


said this bill sticks to that commit-
ment.
A final millage rate will be set
when the City Council finalizes the
new budget and it's signed into law,
which must happen by the end of
September.
T M. Austin


The solution to the education


Annecia Scott, Marion Nunn, Dena Williams, Wilma Harreu, Linda
Smith, Gaile Harrell, Cora Woodard, Frankie Stepherson and Patrice
Williams trekked to N.C. for the Diva event.
The Fabulous Bells Red Hats' along with The Gainesville Divas traveled
by motor coach to Cary, N.C. for the 3rd annual Dazzling Black Hat Diva
weekend, which included a Diva luncheon, Black Denim and Diamond
Dinner and Black Hat Pajama Breakfast.
There were over 300 people in attendance
The Red Hat Society (RHS) is a social organization founded in 1998 for
women 50 and over established purely for 'fun'.. There are over 70,000
registered members and 24,000 chapters in the United States and abroad.
It is the largest women's social group in the world.


gap is more male teachers
by William Jackson tures are not effective educa
Dr. William Cosby, (Bill Cosby) but from my personal experience
stated, "Education is the most pow- the influences of Black male te
erful weapon which
you can use to change
the world."
As a third genera- R
tion teacher I wanted
to encourage, inspire,
empower, bless and
provide confidence to 36
my brother educators.
Education as a
whole needs more
certified male teachers to e i ers mi my vTe ecuTra au


tive role models, but the need for
Black males in education is impor-
tant. This is not to say other cul-


Dr. Landon Williams honored with street marker
State Senator Anthony C. "Tony"
Hill, Sr., Congresswoman Corrine ,.
Brown and members of Greater
Macedonia Baptist Church assem-
bled together Sunday, August 7,
2011 for the dedication ceremony
and unveiling of the road designa-
tion marker, saluting their pastor,
Dr. Landon L. Williams, Sr. The
road designation was passed unani-
mously by the City Council.
Dr. Williams has received many
awards and honors for being leader
of the community. He has been the
pastor of Greater Macedonia
Baptist Church for over 35 years.
For his dedication he has received a
Community Service Award from
the A. Philip Randolph Institute.
He has also been a fighter for civil
rights and the labor movement.
In his commitment to help eradi-
cate the health disparities in the
Jacksonville community, Rev. Dr.
Williams serves as the Agape
Community Health Center
Chairman of the Board and over-
sees the health ministry at Greater
Macedonia. The health ministry Shown above is Sen. Hill, Dr. Williams and Cong. Brown at the marker.
coordinates activities and informa- partnership with MCCI Medical Dr. Williams is only the second
tion that promotes a healthy Group to open primary care clinics living citizens to be honored as a
lifestyle. He has also entered into a throughout Jacksonville. marker designate.


Ltors,
nces,
each-


ness, relevance to life experiences
and need to see a face that is my
color was important to me and oth-
ers growing up in an urban setting.
It provided a sense of stability,
encouraged self worth and even
though my father was not a part of
my life other men stepped up and
took upon the roles as father, men-
tor and educator. Even though all
my friends had fathers in their
homes and I did not, I'm as success-
ful as them because of the influence
and support of other Black males.
Black Males in Education
(BMEs) understand the importance,
value and need of education to be
successful in American society.
They know education is the key to
economic stability.
BMEs take responsibility for
helping young Black boys and
young Black girls to grow into
mature and responsible Black
adults.
BMEs understand the challenges
of being Black and male in
American society and try to share
their positive experiences with
Black children that are not their
own. They want to help them value
education, hard work and teach
morals and values.
BMEs understand that they will
be viewed as Black first above their
degrees, salaries, cars, and clothes
so must display professionalism
and confidence at all times.
Continued on page 7


4 4


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Sp Has Jennifer

Pr 1Hudson

gotten
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/ Page 8


Page 11


Red Hat's Fabulous Bells caravan

to N.C. for Dazzling Diva Weekend


Time to

consider major

A changes

in our state's

education laws
Page 4

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Pae2 s.Prr' Fe Pes uus 1-7 21


Robinson returns

to lead Beaver St.

Enterprise Center


Rum Robinson
Executive Rumbellis (Rum) Robin-
son, the first Director of Beaver
Street Enterprise Center back in 2003
when it opened its doors, has re-
turned to lead the expanding business
incubator as the Program Manager.
Over the past eight years, Robinson
has continued to be actively involved
as the Center has grown into an inter-
nationally renowned business incu-
bator under the leadership of
Executive Director Jackie Perry.
Robinson also serves as Chief Ex-
ecutive Officer and owner of Flantas-
tic Enterprises, Inc. which was
named Minority Manufacturing firm
of the year in 1995
. As program manager Rum will be
responsible for all aspects of the
Technical Assistance program ensur-
ing that tenants receive the coaching,
mentoring and training needed to be
successful. In addition he will be re-
sponsible for ensuring that clients
have access to capital and other key
resources to help grow their business.
Rum's passion for entrepreneurship
and his corporate business expertise
make him the ideal man for this po-
sition said Perry. His former role as
incubator director and a board mem-
ber bring additional value and addi-
tional value and insight to his new
role.
"We're excited that he's returned to
us as we launch our eight year of
growth and success," says Perry.


Donnell Neal
Neal to lead E. Jax
Resource Center
FreshMinistries, a Jacksonville-
based multi-faith humanitarian or-
ganization, recently appointed
Donell Neal as Director of the East
Jacksonville Neighborhood Resource
Center, a FreshMinistries initiative
serving residents in core-city Jack-
sonville.
The center located at 616 A. Philip
Randolph Boulevard and provides
neighbors in East Jacksonville with
the information and guidance they
need to connect with civic and social
organizations that meet their specific
immediate needs. The center also
provides the community with a com-
puter lab for job searches, resume
building, homework research, and
internet access to apply on-line for
assistance and job applications.
The facility also serves as a com-
munity center for neighborhood
gatherings; and, houses other com-
munity service organizations and
programs such as Children's Cham-
pion and Network for Strengthening
Families.
Neal has more than 30 years expe-
rience in the client service industry
serving as Senior Health Plan Rep-
resentative and Business Analyst
with the Member Services Depart-
ment of Kaiser Foundation Health
Plan, Inc. and most recently, as an
Independent Consultant with JEA.
For further information on the cen-
ter, contact Pam Kearney, at 355-
0000


Milestone birthdays celebrated on the First Coast
I"-.


Birthday celebrations were held above left was Mrs Martha Mae
all over the First Coast last weekend Gibson joined by family and friends
commemorating milestones. Shown at her home, celebrating her 93rd


What will "
Continued from front
-ding many who recently lost their
middle-income jobs may face over
the next decade.
Not when, as the overall U.S.
poverty rate has risen to an all-time
high of more than 14 percent, the
proportion of Black Americans at or
below the poverty line rose a full per-
cent to nearly 26 percent.
Not when the dynamics of the
country's jobless recovery promise
no reduction in the Black unemploy-
ment rate of more than 16 percent-
double that of whites with rates in
some urban areas being higher.
Not when that racial ratio Black
unemployment being one-third to
fully twice that of whites holds for
every population segment of the two
groups, including college graduates.
Not when public-sector jobs, long
a crucial foundation of Black upward
mobility, are being severely cut back,
and the private sector, has in mass
terms put a "not hiring" sign on its
U.S. operations.
Not whenAfrican Americans, who
are 12 percent of the population,


Birtday. Shown (L-R) are Marva Over 200 guests and family attended
McKinnon, (daughter) Mary Gibson the event. Shown (L-R) re Donald
Hawkins, honoree Martha M Gib- Eric Highsmith, Shana Lesesne-
son. Robinson, Honoree-Emily Reddick-
On Friday night, Emily Reddick- Lesesne, Sheldon Paul Hihgsmith
Lesesne celebrated her 70th birthday and Kenneth Andrew Highsmith.
at the Legends Center on Soutel Dr. R. Silver photos


catastrophe" look like for Black America?
make up just over 19 percent of the class Blacks are desperately trying to enough by itself because ol
nation's more than 14 millionjobless hold onto the gains which trans- namics of the globalized e
workers and nearly 23 percent of the formed their status and the shape of and the slow recovery man:
6.3-million of them who've been out the Black class structure over the last mists project for the U.S. ec
of work for 12 months or more. 40 years: From one in which fully But it is further complicate
Not when the epidemic of foreclo- two-thirds of Black households extraordinary polarization
sures among Black Americans has earned no better than a lower-middle- debt crisis revealed exists ar
not only driven Black homeowner- class income to one in which, before national political elite; and,
ship rates back to 1990s and under- 2007, half of employed Blacks had ing to a recent Pew Researc
mined the stability of predominantly middle-class or blue-collar incomes. survey, the increasing move
Black neighborhoods but also robbed Unfortunately, as political scientist white voters from the Dei
Black America as a whole of any Michael C. Dawson recently wrote, Party to the Republican Part
chance of accumulating significant the Great Recession and jobless re- The implications of that
wealth for the foreseeable future. cover are "eroding the traditional the 2012 presidential campai
And not when, as a new study by foundation for the Black middle class derscored by the continuing
the Pew Research Center has charted, while appearing to all but block roads ples of right-wing political
the gap in median wealth between for less affluent Blacks to move into both officeholders or party o]
white households, on the one hand, the middle class." criticizing President Ob
and Black and Hispanic households, This is not to ignore the broader overtly-racist terms not see
on the other, is at record dimensions. crisis, which has left millions of once level of respectable polit:
All three groups lost a portion of gainfully-employed white workers course since the early 1960s
their net worth as the Great Reces- bereft and pushed to the margins of That means that, in order i
sion ran its course, the society they, too, once invigor- Americans to have a chance
These are just a few of the distress- ated with their on-the-job productiv- the economic crisis they ar
ing signs indicating that, for all the ity. In fact, the only hope of solving they will have to win the
valuable, necessary and well-publi- the Black jobs crisis lies in crafting a battle immediately ahead of
cized achievements of the still-rela- comprehensive effort that will rescue LeeA. Daniels is Director oj
likely small Black strata of most of the jobless. nicationsfor theNAACPLega
upper-class Blacks, many middle- That task would be difficult and Educational Fund.


f the dy-
economy
y econo-
onomy.
ed by the
that the
nong the
accord-
h Center
ement of
mocratic
y.
shift for
gn is un-
g exam-
figures,
peratives
ama in
en at the
ical dis-
s.
for Black
to defeat
e facing,
political
'them.
SCommu-
'Defense


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AIn!ust 11-17. 2011 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


August 11-17, 2011


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Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 11-17, 2011


Time to consider major changes in state education laws


I have quickly learned that many
of the people who write the laws
that govern our public educational
system here in Florida are not pro-
ponents of public schools.
Many of these policymakers are
voucher supporters or have charter
school ties or politically supported
by educational management organ-
izations, which are in business to
run schools for a profit. None of
these things make you a bad per-
son, but they do alter your perspec-
tive about public education.
I have sat in committee after
committee where my Republican
colleagues have talked about the
need to offer parents choice. And I
agree that parents and students
need choices that is why magnet
programs were born.
But what unsettles me is that
these same legislators that are
pushing vouchers, charter schools
and virtual learning (choice) seem
to ignore the gigantic elephant in
the room. That elephant is our
struggling neighborhood public
schools. Education giants such as
Ribault, Raines, Jackson,
Northshore, Ed White, etc.
Offering choice is fine, but what
about offering solutions that help
turn schools around versus results
that encourage the "brain drain" or
the flight of good students away
from struggling schools.
Many folks who push education


reform support the notion of
"Choice" as one solution. The
notion is simple all students
should have various options when
it comes to their education versus
being forced to attend failing or
marginal schools.
A main arguments for increasing
educational choice is that choice
induces competition among
schools vying for students, and this
improves student performance in
all schools private and public.
Perhaps this makes sense in an
alternate universe. However, the
concept of "brain drain" is real. So
when most of the high achieving
students leave struggling schools
,how do you continue to fix those
schools and make them attractive
options for students and parents?
I have heard choice advocates
contend that parents have a right to
choose their child's school and if
public schools cannot handle the
competition then maybe they
shouldn't be open. These advo-
cates feel that increased competi-
tion for students among schools,
public and private, results in all
schools improving their education-
al delivery and raising student
achievement.
That is not the reality of our pub-
lic school system.
I believe that good charters have
a place, but I am not willing to
trade off neighborhood public


NFL's Hall of Fame


speeches more about


ego than reality


schools for charters schools. Strong
quality neighborhood schools and
charters can coexist. In fact, I think
that we need to start using the best
practices of good charter and pri-
vate schools to help make our pub-
lic schools better.
And that is what has been miss-
ing.
The same amount of effort that
gets put into creating new voucher
and charter school laws needs to go
into creating new public school
policies that will help our strug-
gling schools.
Let's really put our children first.
Well one of the problems with
this concept is that there is no
money to be made by focusing on
everyday public schools. There is
money to be made from vouchers
and most of the companies that
manage charter and intervening
schools are making major profits.
Public education was never sup-
posed to be an opportunity for pri-
vate companies to make a buck.
To make matters worse, there is
no real evidence that proves that
charters, voucher or magnet pro-
grams are helping our students, but
lawmakers keep pushing for more
charter schools.
Under a new law passed this
year, parents with kids in a public
school that received even a single
D or F grade can put their kids in a
charter instead.


The Miami Herald did a study of
all public schools including char-
ters and found that most charters
are struggling.
"The governor and the
Legislature have invested their
rhetoric and your money in the
notion that charter schools will
improve student achievement.
Except the results haven't been so
grand," said the writer from the
Herald.
The report added, "Less than 12
percent of the state's schools are
charters, but they account for 15 of
Florida's 31 failing schools. In
Broward [County], for example, all
four of the schools deemed failures
were charters. Statewide, charters
were more likely to receive a D rat-
ing, but less likely to earn A's, B's
or C's than traditional schools."
Again, I truly believe that charter
schools and other choice options
have a place, but it is time to shift
our focus back on fixing our strug-
gling public schools versus focus-
ing heavily on choice options.
Not only do we need policy
changes in Tallahassee, we need a
renewed sense of urgency from
parents, students, teachers, admin-
istrators and the community as a
whole.Let's shift our focus on our
public schools becoming the right
"choice."
Signing off from Ribault High
School,


A broader perspective of our social construct.


I'm sure they meant well.
After all, they were only profes-
sional athletes not Greek philoso-
phers or great civil rights orators.
Last Saturday, former National
Football League standouts
Marshall Faulk, Shannon Sharpe
and Deion Sanders were among a
group of seven inducted into the
NFL Hall of Fame. As customary,
inductees get to have their moment
in the sun by giving remarks as a
salute to enshrinement.
Traditionally, this opportunity is
used to reflect on how the road
traveled and to thank those who
hold special places in the lives of


inductees. And because it is their
special time to shine, inductees are
allowed to take particular liberty
with speeches in hopes of scoring
one more touchdown.
Faulk, Sharpe and Sanders chose
to make it particularly clear that
they survived insurmountable odds
to make it to the big stage of the
NFL. Faulk emerged out of the


Rita Perry

PUBLISHER

CONTRI
TE.O.Hutl
acksonville Latimer,
(Chamber of commerce Vickie B


crime ridden Wards of New
Orleans. Sharpe, and his brother
Sterling, lived in a 1,000 square
foot cinder block house with his
grandparents in tiny Glennville,
Georgia. Sanders confided that he
was embarrassed that his mom
cleaned the halls and rooms at a Ft.
Myers hospital.
And while poverty was the com-
mon thread during their presenta-
tions, they all decided to bow to the
same alter for a way out.
Professional football.
That's right, Faulk, Sharpe and
Sanders decided that, through foot-
ball, they would get rich or die try-


ing.
Now I'm no
dream killer but
there is one thing
that should have
been obvious
here. Yes Faulk,
Sharpe and
Sanders were
incredible ath-
letes. However
they should have
realized that their
athletic prowess
alone did not put


them in the Hall of Fame. Just like
fate dealt them the ultimate recog-
nition for their success on the field,
it also made nomads out of a multi-
tude of athletes with even greater
talents.
So why wasn't I satisfied with
the highlights, dedications and
thank yous?
I believe that after the conclusion


of the careers of these successful
winners, years of reflection should
have brought about a fair amount of
reality checking. The streets are lit-
tered with young men who shared
similar stations in life. Those guid-
ing forces that eventually changed
their lives may have never connect-
ed with their brethren. And in keep-
ing with reality these all-time all-
stars should have focused more on
what should be, versus the conver-
sion of their immortality.
Make no mistake, Faulk, Sharpe
and Sanders made good use of their
ability. And in their cases have
seemingly achieved financial secu-
rity as a result of successful profes-
sional football careers. They also
made a lot of money for their NFL
owners and agents along the way.
The problem is they never admitted
this s not the norm. The impression
they left is that hard work and ded-
ication will take you to the NFL.
And that assessment simply is not
true.
Deion Sanders was born with
something that through no amount
of hard work or dedication can be
achieved, 4.2 per 40-yard dash
speed. And the fact that Sanders
thanked more than 100 people dur-
ing his speech says his speed and
talent had very little to do with his
success. That's why out of the
seven busloads that accompanied
Sanders on his Hall of Fame cele-
bration tour there may be one indi-
vidual who has the potential to
develop and maintain that sort of
athletic prowess. Even Sanders'


Sylvia Perry

Managing Editor


BUTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald Fullwood,
hchinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Marsha Oliver, Marretta
Phyllis Mack, Tonya Austin, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver,
rown, Rahman Johnson, Headshots, William Jackson.


own son is probably absent the
tools to make it to the ultimate
level. The difference is that if
Sanders' offspring falls prey to the
black hole of professional sports,
he will have a cushion to embrace
his fall back to Earth.
The reality is that if you're black
you probably grew up entrenched
or exposed to poverty in some
form. Chances are that you are
dealing with some sort of social
adversity, life challenges or
depressed circumstances just like
Faulk, Sharpe and Sanders. Their
messages may have provided a bet-
ter road map to success for children
experiencing similar challenges as
their own if they would have
focused on how they became better
people, not ball players.
On the field Faulk, Sharpe and
Sanders produced numbers that
speak for themselves. They were
great. However, even after retire-
ment and Hall of Fame status, they
have an opportunity to tighten up
their game. Talk more about educa-
tion, not athletics. Drive it home as
if the game depended on it. Treat
the promotion of education as if it
were the free agent status to the
future. For the hope of the many
outweigh the prospect of the
few...or the Hall of Famers.
Because being rich has nothing
to do with becoming a millionaire.
Breed truth.
Visit our blog @
www.novaljones.wordpress.com.
Follow us on twitter @
twitter/novaljones. Email your com >


DISCLAIMER
The United State provides oppor-
tunities for free expression of ideas.
The Jacksonville Free Press has its
view, but others may differ.
Therefore, the Free Press ownership
reserves the right to publish views
and opinions by syndicated and
local columnist, professional writers
and other writers' which are solely
their own. Those views do not neces-
sarily reflect the policies and posi-
tions of the staff and management of
the Jacksonville Free Press.
Readers, are encouraged to write
letters to the editor commenting on
current events as well as what they
wouldlike to see included in the
paper. All letters must be type writ-
ten and signed and include a tele-
phone number and address. Please
address letters to the Editor, c/o
JFP, P.O. Box 43580 Jacksonville,
FL 32203. (No CALLS PLEASE)


Dedicating I.

the Dream
A week of events is planned in Washington, D.C.
around the unveiling of the Martin Luther King, Jr.
National Memorial. The official dedication of the King
National Memorial on the National Mall will take place at 11 a.m. Sunday,
August 28, 2011, the 48th anniversary of the day King delivered his
famous "I Have a Dream" speech. Preceding, and following, the dedica-
tion will be star-studded concerts, luncheons, dinners and receptions
attended by an array of African-American leadership.
A quarter-million people will gather on and adjacent to the four-acre plot
on the northeast corer of the Tidal Basin to dedicate a monument to
Martin Luther King's legacy and its location on American History's Main
Street. The event will feature the first African-American President of the
United States as he honors the first African-American with a memorial on
the National Mall and the first non-president so honored. Thousands of
contributors and community leaders will join President Barrack Obama at
the site. Central to the thinking of Martin Luther King was the concept of
the "Beloved Community." The MLK National Memorial's centerpiece is
the "Stone of Hope", a 30-foot statue of Dr. King, with a 450-foot inscrip-
tion wall with excerpts of his sermons and public addresses.
The process of designing, funding and constructing the memorial was
coordinated by the nonprofit Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial
Project Foundation. Harry E. Johnson, Sr., and his Alpha Phi Alpha fra-
ternity deserve credit for arriving at this historical reality. Johnson has
served as president and CEO of the foundation since 2002. A former
Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity president, Johnson reports that the MLK
Memorial cost $120 million to build. The U.S. Congress gave $10 million
in matching funds.
In his public invitation, Jonson said: "We look forward to sharing with
you a joyous and historic day for our nation". To many, King symbolizes
the Civil Rights era's great American Revolution. The MLK Memorial to
open on August 22. After MLK's assassination in 1968, his fraternity
Alpha Phi Alpha proposed a permanent memorial in Washington, D.C.
Alpha Phi Alpha's efforts gained momentum in 1986, after King's birthday
was designated a national holiday. In 1996, Congress authorized Secretary
of the Interior Bruce Babbitt to permit Alpha Phi Alpha to establish a
memorial in the District of Columbia, and gave the fraternity until
November 2003 to raise $100 million and break ground. In 1998,
Congress authorized the fraternity to establish the foundation to manage
the fundraising and design and approve building of the memorial.
It was an uphill climb for Johnson's foundation to build the MLK
Memorial. A MLK King Family company, Intellectual Properties
Management Inc. proved to be a significant obstacle. The family wanted
the foundation to pay licensing fees to use MLK's name and likeness. The
King family pledged that any money would go to the King Center's char-
itable efforts. The King Center in Atlanta is the location of King's grave
and a National Historic Site. Established in 1968 by the late Coretta Scott
King, the King Center is the official, living memorial dedicated to the lega-
cy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Estimates suggest that the King family
charged the MLK Memorial Foundation $800,000 in fees. Now, it's all
"OK" between the foundation and the MLK Family. Children of MLK,
Bernice and Martin Luther King III toured the National Mall site in
October 2010 and are expected to attend the dedication.
Black Americans have reason to be proud and to be MLK Memorial
benefactors. As we raise a toast, it would be "significant" if Blacks con-
tribute to this cause. Most of the MLK Memorial's construction costs were
underwritten by American corporations and organizations such as the
National Basketball Association (NBA). General Motors Corporation
gave more than $10 million and will serve as dedication chair. The
Tommy Hilfiger Corporate Foundation is dedication co-chair, as is Stevie
Wonder, who wrote MLK's "Happy Birthday" song. A minority, female-
owned and operated firm, McKissack & McKissack, is a part of the MLK
Memorial Design-Build Team. To make a donation, visit
www.MLKmemorial.org


SYes, I'd like to

subscribe to the
Jacksonville Free Pressl

..-. ^ Enclosed is my
check money order
Sfor $36.00 to cover my
one year subscription.


NAME

ADDRESS

CITY STATE ZIP

MAIL TO: JACKSONVILLE FREE PRESS
P.O. BOX 43580, JACKSONVILLE, FL 32203


Sharpe, Faulk and Sanders made sure that everyone knew they used football to shed poverty


"I made a promise...

I said momma, I'm

gonna be rich one day.

And you will never

have to work another

day of your life."
Deion Sanders


FLORIDA'S F FIRST COAST QUALITY BLACK WEEKLY


MAILING ADDRESS PHYSICAL ADDRESS TELEPHONE
P.O. Box 43580 903 W. Edgewood Ave. (904) 634-1993
Jacksonville, FL 32203 Jacksonville, FL 32208 Fax (904) 765-3803
Email: JfreePress@aol.com


I I


August 11-17, 2011


Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press












Auut1-7,21-s erysFe res-Pg


Congressional Black Caucus areas
in da
launches national job tour to an
than
Saying jobs and the economy must become central to the economic
debate, and responding to continued high levels of unemployment, the
Congressional Black Caucus f
(CBC) launched a "For the
People" Jobs Initiative this
week, including nationwide job
C fairs and town hall meetings.
The initiative kicks off in
Cleveland, Ohio with a job fair
and town hall at Cleveland State
University, hosted by Rep.
Marcia Fudge.
"Recently, the CBC Members
unanimously introduced the Congressional Black Caucus 'For the People'
Jobs Initiative Resolution (H. Res. 348) to encourage the House of
Representatives to immediately consider and pass critical jobs legislation
to address the growing jobs crisis throughout America," CBC Chairman
Chairman Emanuel Cleaver, II said on Friday, in response to the release of
July jobs numbers. "We want to get 10,000 people hired. There is no time
to waste. The time to act is now, and we are on the move."
More than 120 employers have registered to participate in the jobs fairs,
and more than 30 members of the CBC will take part in town halls in
Cleveland (August 8t, Detroit (August 16), Atlanta (August 18-19), Miami
(August 22-23) and Los Angeles (August 30). Information on the town
halls can be found below, and you can participate via TheGrio's Facebook
page. Selected questions from Facebook will be asked directly to members
of Congress during the town halls.


Miss. Klansmen convicted


decades later dies in prison

Mississippi James Ford Seale,
a long-time member of the
Mississippi KKK who very nearly
at nnwit h idir hm dipr ;d ~


gut away wiu llnmuriu, laa u iu.
After serving less than four years of
three life sentences for the 1964
Freedom Summer murders of
Henry Hezekiah Dee and Charles
Eddie Moore, both 19, Seale, 76,
died in prison last week.
The Dee/Moore double murder
was a classic horror story of the
unreconstructed South battling
against efforts to end segregation
and racial terrorism. Even though
Seale's fellow murderer, Charles
Marcus Edwards, gave the FBI a
signed confession at the time and
both men were arrested, a
Mississippi justice of the peace
promptly dismissed the case against
the Klansmen with no explanation
at all. Earlier, a local sheriff told
Moore's mother, who had reported
her son missing, that Charles
Moore was staying with relatives of
the Moores in Louisiana -- a lie.
The killings came during what
civil rights workers called
"Freedom Summer," a period that
may have seen the worst racial ter-
rorism of the civil rights movement.
When activists vowed to come to
Mississippi that summer to undo
segregation, White Knights chief
Samuel Bowers ordered his mem-
bers to carry out a series of "coun-
terattacks" against "selected tar-
gets." Six weeks later, White
Knights abducted and murdered
James Chaney, Andrew Goodman
and Michael Schwemer in a case
that was later recounted in the
movie Mississippi Burning. It was
while dredging the Mississippi
River near Tallulah for those three
civil rights workers that the disfig-
ured bodies of Dee and Moore were
found -- two more Southern black
men in a group of murdered racial
martyrs whose entire roster will
never be known.
According to Edwards' confession,
he and Seale selected their victims
because Moore had just been
expelled from college for taking
part in a student demonstration and
Dee had lived in Chicago -- and
because they believed a wild tale


Jury convicts 5 police officers post Katrina


EWC Alumni to honor Mayor,

Williams at 2011 Convention
This year's Edward Waters
College National Alumni
Convention is scheduled for
August 18-21, 2011 at the Crowne
Plaza Jacksonville Riverfront
Hotel, 1201 Riverplace Blvd.
The convention will include
activities such as the Tiger's Toast
Opening Reception, Recognition
Luncheon, White Linen Soiree
and the Alumni Awards Banquet
on Saturday, August 21st at 7p.m.
A number of outstanding alumni
will be honored including
Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown
and Dr. Ted Williams, Associate
Vice President of Diversity and
Equal Opportunity, University of
South Florida.
For more information, please Dr. Ted Williams
contact Marguerite Warren at 904-
765-2210 or ewcnatalumni- assn@gmail.com.


IILLcers W. lere re lLUling l1re a lln
)nably believed their lives were
nger as they rushed to respond
other officer's distress call less
a week after Katrina struck.


NEW ORLEANS A federal jury
has convicted five current or for-
mer police officers in the deadly
shootings on a New Orleans bridge
after Hurricane Katrina.
All five officers were convicted
of charges stemming from the
cover-up of the shootings. The four
who had been charged with civil
rights violations in the shootings
were convicted on all counts.
However, the jury didn't find that
Brisette or Faulcon's shootings
amounted to murder
Prosecutors contended during the
five-week federal trial that officers
shot unarmed people without justi-
fication and without warning,
killing two and wounding four oth-
ers on Sept. 4, 2005, then embarked
on a cover-up involving made-up
witnesses, falsified reports and a
planted gun.
Defense attorneys countered that
the n^ffin e t wer. rhiminr fire dril


Convicted were former officer
Robert Faulcon, Sgts. Robert
Gisevius and Kenneth Bowen,
Officer Anthony Villavaso and
retired Sgt. Arthur Kaufman.
Faulcon, Gisevius, Bowen and
Villavaso were convicted in the
shootings and with taking part in
the alleged cover-up. Kaufman,
who investigated the shootings, was
charged only in the alleged cover-
up.
The trial was a high-profile test of
the Justice Department's effort to
clean up a police department
marred by a reputation for corrup-
tion and brutality. A total of 20 cur-
rent or former New Orleans police
officers were charged last year in a
series of federal probes. Most of the
cases center on actions during the
aftermath of the Aug. 29, 2005,
storm, which plunged the flooded
city into a state of lawlessness and
desperation.
Assistant U.S. Attorney Theodore
Carter said in closing arguments
Tuesday that police had no justifi-
cation for shooting unarmed,


defenseless people try-
ing to cross the bridge
in search of food and
help mere days after
Katrina struck.
"It was unreasonable
for these officers to
fire even one shot, let
alone dozens," he had
said.
Defense attorneys
argued, however, that
police were shot at on
the bridge before they
returned fire.
"None of these peo-
ple intentionally decided to go out
there and cause people harm," said
Timothy Meche, Villavaso's lawyer.
He said they did their best, operat-
ing under "terrible, horrible circum-
stances" after Katrina.
Faulcon, the only defendant to
testify, said he was "paralyzed with
fear" when he shot and killed a 40-
year-old mentally disabled man,
Ronald Madison, as he chased him
and his brother, Lance Madison.
Faulcon didn't dispute that he shot


James Ford Seale
about the two being part of planned
black Muslim uprising. They
abducted their victims from a rural
stretch of highway in southwest
Mississippi and took them into the
Homochitto National Forest, where
they tied them to trees and beat
them unconscious. Then they tied
heavy weights to their bodies and
threw them in the river. When the
bodies were discovered, one had
been cut in half and the other
decapitated.
The case was reopened in 2005
after Jerry Mitchell of the Clarion-
Ledger of Jackson, Miss., reported
that Dee and Moore might have
been killed in the national forest,
meaning the government could
bring federal charges. In 2007,
Seale was convicted of two counts
of kidnapping and one of conspira-
cy to kidnap. Last year, an appeals
court refused to throw out the con-
viction.
Imperial Wizard Bowers, who
himself served time in the
Mississippi Burning case and
another before dying in prison in
2006, led what at the time was the
South's most violent Klan group.
His organization started its
response to the Freedom Summer
by burning 64 crosses in a single
night throughout Mississippi.
Before the summer was over, more
than 80 people had been beaten, 35
shot at, five murdered and more
than 20 black churches had been
burned in Mississippi alone.


unarmed man in the back, but he
testified that he had believed
Ronald Madison was armed and
posed a threat.
Prosecutors contended at trial
that Kaufman retrieved a gun from
his home weeks after the shootings
and turned it in as evidence, trying
to pass it off as a gun belonging to
Lance Madison. He also is accused
of fabricating two nonexistent wit-
nesses to the shootings.


August 11-17, 2011


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5













" 6I Ms


ASALH sponsors trip to D.C.
The James Weldon Johnson of The Association of the Life and Study of
African American Life and History will be sponsoring a bus trip to the
Martin Luther King Memorial Dedication, August 27th to Washington,
D.C. The trip will also include a tour of African American Heritage histor-
ical sites as well and the national monument. A meal package is included
with brunch on Sunday, August 28th at b. Smith's Restaurant and Dinner at
Phillips Flagship on the Potomac River. Lodging continental breakfast and
a box lunch is included for the trip home. Meals traveling to D.C. and din-
ner on the return trip are at your own expense. For more information, go to
http://asalh-jaxfl.org and download the flyer and registration form. You
may also call 551-0372 or 228-3132 if you have questions.

Revival at Mt. Bethel Missionary
There will be a revival at Mt. Bethel Missionary Baptist Church located
at 1620 Helena Street, Dr. Robert E. Herring, Sr., Pastor, on August 17th
thru 19th, 7 p.m. nightly. The speaker will be Pastor Darien Bolden of First
Missionary Baptist Church of Fernandina Beach, FL. The Dance Ministry
Recital will be on Saturday, August 20th at 6:30 p.m. and Family & Friends
Day will be Sunday, August 21st at 11 a.m. with Pastor James Williams of
Lighthouse Church of Restoration, Jacksonville, FL as the speaker. All are
invited. For more information call 764-8032.

Women's Day at First Church
Palm Coast "Women's Day" will be celebrated August 14th at the First
Church of Palm Coast. "Standing On The Promises of God" will be the
theme preached by the Rev. Cheryl Daniels for the 8 a.m. service, and the
Rev. Mattie Riley-Hayes, for the 10 a.m. service.
First Church, under the pastorate of the Rev. Gillard S. Glover, is at 91
Old Kings Road North. The church can be reached at 386-446-5759.

Mt. Zion AME celebrates
145th Anniversary August 21st
Historic Mt. Zion AME Church, located at 201 E. Beaver Street in
Downtown Jacksonville, invites the public to join in celebrating their 145th
anniversary. The celebration will begin on Sunday, August 21st with morn-
ing service at 10 a.m. Historic Mt. Zion AME Church is the second oldest
AME church in the state of Florida. It was founded in 1866. It is also, the
second oldest AME church in the City of Jacksonville. There will also be
a special service from 1 2:30 p.m.
For more information call Wanda Mitchell at 355-4475.


Free school supplies, clothes and food
at New Birth Christian Assembly
The Love Reach Ministry of New Birth Christian Assembly where the
Pastor is Rev. Michael J. McClendon, is hosting a FREE clothing and food
giveaway from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on August 13, 2011 on the church grounds.
There will be school supplies available for the youth to help prepare them
for success. For more information please contact Lady Janice E.
McClendon or Sister Cynthia Matthews at (904) 396-4949. The church is
located at 2185 Jernigan Road.

Christ Resurrection 4th Anniversary
The Christ Resurrection Power Assembly located at 1127 Bert Rd.
Jacksonville, Fl 32211, will be celebrating their 4th Anniversary
Convention and Celebration. The theme for the event is "Arise Shine" and
will be held August 18-21st, at 7 p.m.nightly and 10 a.m on Sunday.
Sharing the Word will be Bishop Francis Wale Oke, Dr. Ade Ajala Host
Bishop and Rev Mrs. Abiola Idown..

Hat Show at Friendship Primitive Baptist
The Usher Board Number 1 of Friendship Primitive Baptist Church is
having a Hat Fashion Show on Saturday August 13, 2011 at 4 p.m. This is
a FREE event. The church is located at 1106 Pearce St. Elder Bobbie
Sheffield is Pastor. For more information contact Mother Gloria Wilcox at
633-9165.

Free Kutz for Kids at Central CME
The public is invited to join Pastor Marquise Hardrick of Central
Metropolitan CME for the Sunday morning worship service, August 21st at
10:45a.m. Following the morning worship service, the Central Young
Adult Ministry will present free back to school hair "Kutz 4 Kidz," for par-
ticipants' ages 4 to 12 years old, from 2- 7 p.m.
Registration is required. Participation forms are available for picked up
Monday Friday from 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. at the church's front office located
at 4611 North Pearl Street. For more information, call 904 354-7426.

NOTICE: Church news is published free of charge. Information
must be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday,
at 5 p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information received
prior to the event date will be printed on a space available basis


until the date. Fax e-mail
JFreePress@aol.com.


to 765-3803 or e-mail to


Health & Wellness Fair
at Christian Fellowship Center
The Christian Fellowship Center Church will host a Health and Wellness
Fair featuring various screenings including blood pressure, gluose, hiv and
STD among others. Other presentations and workshops include healthy
meals, massage therapy and childhood obesity. The church is located at
5210 University Blvd. West from 9 a.m. 3 p.m. For more information, call
731-7970.

Clothes & Food Give-a-way at New Birth
The Love Reach Ministry of New Birth Christian Assembly, located at
2185 Jernigan Rd. where the Pastor is Rev. Michael J. McClendon, is host-
ing a free clothing and food giveaway from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. on August 13th
on the church grounds. There will be school supplies available for the youth
to help prepare them for success. For more information, contact Lady
Janice E. McClendon or Sister Cynthia Matthews at (904) 396-4949.

Women of the Word Outreach
A Prophetic Conference for Women Only Wednesday August 17, Friday
August 19, 2011 at 7:00p.m., nightly to be held at the Crowne Plaza at
14670 Duval Rd.

Installation services at St. Andrews
The congregation of St. Andrew Missionary Baptist Church invites the
public to attend the celebration and installation services for Rev. Charles E.
Cooper, Jr. The Celebration Services will be held Monday August 22nd
through Friday August 26th at 7 p.m. nightly. The Service of Installation
will be held on Sunday August 28th at 4 p.m. RSVP your attendance to
Jacquelyn Flowers (904) 743-8693 by August 12th with the dates you will
attend. The church is located at 2600 West 45th Street.

Blodgett Homes Reunion
Blodgett Homes and surrounding areas communities will celebrate their
llth annual reunion on Friday, August 19, 2011 at the Council of
Deliberation 29 Eest 6th Street, Jacksonville Florida 32206 from 7 p.m.
until midnight. The theme is Unity IS THE KEY. This is a Glass House
Production Featuring D. J. Kenny Leggett ( Uncle Jam ) and other local
entertainers. Residents from the old neighborhood of Blodgett Homes and
all surrounding areas are invited to participate.
For more information please contact Mrs. E. Bing at 904-765-6170.


Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20


Pastor Landon Williams


8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship

9:30 a.m. Sunday School

11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday 2 PM -3 PM

**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


Sunday School
9 a.m.
Morning Worship
10 a.m.
Lord's Supper
Second Sunday
3:00 p.m.
Evening Worship
Every 3rd & 4th
Sunday
4 :00 p.m.


A church

that's on the

move in

worship with

prayer, praise

and power!


Pastor Robert Lecount, Jr

School of Ministry Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.

Thursday High Praise Worship 7:00 p.m.

2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


St. Thomas Missionary Baptist celebrating

Pastor Ernie Murray's Silver Anniversary


St. Thomas Missionary Baptist
Church is celebrating the 25th
Silver Anniversary of Pastor Emie
L. Murray, Sr..
Festivities will kick off with a
Semi-Formal banquet on Saturday,
August 13, 2011 at 7 p.m. at the St.
Thomas Family Life Center located
at 2119 Rowe Avenue. Dr. James B.
Sampson, President of the Florida
General Baptist Convention will be


the guest speaker.
The anniversary will climax with
Worship Services, Sunday August
14, 2011 beginning at 8 a.m. with
Pastor Jimmie Green of the Zion
Missionary Baptist Church,
Blackshear, Georgia as the guest
preacher. Pastor Murray will take to
the pulpit for 10:45a.m.
services.That afternoon, a 4 p.m.
celebration service will take place


featuring Bishop Rudolph W.
McKissick Sr. of the Bethel Baptist
Institutional Church bringing the
spoken word. Churches from
throughout the city will be the spe-
cial guests. The community is invit-
ed to share in these services.
The church is located at 5863
Moncrief Road. For more informa-
tion call 768-8880 or E-mail:
stthomasmbc@bellsouth.net.


NBCI invites African American men back to church


The National Black Church
Initiative (NBCI) a faith-based
coalition of 34,000, church com-
prised of 15 denominations and 15.7
million African Americans is com-
mitted to bringing African American
men back to church.
According to the Pew Forum 2007
survey, people of black ethnicity
were most likely to be part of a for-
mal religion, with 85 percent being
Christians. However according to
the Barna Research Group, more
than 90 percent of American men
believe in God, and 5 out of 6 call
themselves Christian. But only 2 out


of 6 attend church on any given
Sunday.
This means that in American, 60
percent of church attendees are
women. The iniatives focus is to
open doors, arms and hearts to
understand the complex sociologi-
cal and psychological factors that
prohibit African American men
from being consistent churchgoers.
NBCI believes that the first step
for African American brothers is to
return to church-atoning for their
sins and reestablishing their rela-
tionship with God through Christ.
The Kick-off of this 7 year program


is September 25, 2011 but the first
step in reengaging African
American men. The goal is to reach
over 10 million African American
men nationwide, providing techni-
cal assistance to aid churches in
reaching African American males
and sustaining their membership.
Visit the website to learn more
about NBCI's Healing Family
Initiative at http://www.nalt-
blackchurch.com/healing-
family.html.
The National Black Church
Initiative (NBCI) is under the lead-
ership of Rev. Tony Evans.


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church

215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Sr.
Senior Pastor


Weekly Services


Sunday Morning Worship
7:40 a.m. and 10:40 a.m.


Church school
9:30 a.m.
Bible Study
6:30 p.m.


Midweek Services
Wednesday Noon Service
"Miracle at Midday"
12 noon-1 p.m.
The Word from the Sons
and Daughters of Bethel
3rd Sunday 4:00 p.m


Come share IIn 1ly Communlon on Ist Suradayt 740 al 10d40 ant


rIoGrace and Peace
visit www.Bethelite.org


Disciples of Cbrist Cbristiap Fellowsbip
*A Full Gospel Baptist Church *


Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Jr.
Senior Pastor


Worship with us LIVE
on the web visit
www.truth2powerministries.org


I


Page 6 Ms. Perry's Free Press


August 11-17. 2011


;SI


II:
I


I















Sign of the time$: should you put your retirement on hold?


By Jason Alderman
One indicator our economy is
still hurting is that more and more
people are postponing retirement.
According to the Department of
Labor, those over 55 and still work-
ing have increased steadily since
the recession began 28.9 million
at last count and some surveys
show more than a third of employ-
ees expect to work past age 70 or
never retire.
Would-be retirees have faced a
perfect storm of negative situa-
tions:
Having to tap retirement savings
early to cover bills or tide them
through unemployment.
Plunging home values dimin-
ished or erased the equity many had
hoped to draw on in retirement.
Unable to afford or qualify for
- health insurance they'll need until
Medicare kicks in.
And many boomer parents have
put their own savings on hold while


helping their kids struggle through
the recession.
If you're hoping to retire in the
next few years, consider the fol-
lowing:
How much will you need?
Financial planners often suggest
people may need 70 percent or
more of pre-retirement income to
maintain their current lifestyle, but
it's difficult to generalize. For
example, some people downsize
housing or retire to less expensive
areas and thus need less. Others can
expect increased medical, utility
and other bills to outpace earnings
on their savings.
Start estimating your retirement
needs by using online calculators:
The Retirement Estimator at
www.ssa.gov/estimator automati-
cally enters your earnings informa-
tion to estimate your projected
Social Security benefits under dif-
ferent scenarios, such as age at
retirement, future earnings projec-


tions, etc. You can also download a
more detailed calculator to make
more precise estimates.
Check whether your
401(k) plan administra-
tor's website has a cal-
culator to estimate
how much you will
accumulate under
various contribution RETI
and investment sce-
narios. If not, try the
various retirement
calculators at
www.bankrate.com.
AARP offers a retire-
ment calculator to help deter-
mine your current financial status
and what you'll need to save to


meet your retirement needs.
After you've explored various
retirement scenarios, con-
sider paying a financial
planner to help work
out an investment
and savings game
plan. If you don't
have a personal
ENT referral, good
resources
include
www.cfp.net,
www.napfa.org
a n d
www.fpanet.org.
Social Security issues.
To make ends meet, many peo-
ple begin drawing reduced benefits


from Social Security before reach-
ing full retirement (65 for those
born before 1938 and gradually
increasing to 67 thereafter). This
can have several financial conse-
quences:
Your monthly benefit will be
reduced by up to 30 percent.
(Conversely, if you postpone bene-
fits until after reaching full retire-
ment age, your benefit increases by
7 to 8 percent per year, up to age
70.)
Although many states don't tax
Social Security benefits, they are
counted as taxable income by the
federal government. So, depending
on your overall income, you could
owe federal tax on a portion of your


benefit. IRS Publication 915 at
www.irs.gov has full details.
If you begin drawing Social
Security while still working, your
benefit could be significantly
reduced depending on your
income. Read "How Work Affects
Your Benefits" at www.ssa.gov for
details. (Rest assured, however:
Those reductions aren't truly lost
since your benefit will be recalcu-
lated upward at full retirement
age.)
One last suggestion: Once you've
settled on what you think will be a
sufficient retirement budget, try
living on it for a few months first
before retiring to make sure it actu-
ally works.


Don't underestimate the value of our male educators


Continued from front
BMEs understand they may be the
only positive Black male role
model in a young students' life.
They must try to inspire, motivate,
and educate at all times.
BMEs understand that they are
always under a microscope by par-
ents, administrators and society so
must always conduct themselves
professionally.
BMEs understand the sacrifices in
choosing education as a career
choice. They do it for the love of
children and the opportunity to be a
positive influence in society.
BMEs understand they are some-
times viewed as the custodian, ath-
letic coach, yard person, bus driver
or cafeteria worker, but no matter
someone else's perception they are
still positive forces in the education
of youth.
BMEs understand their responsi-
bility for their families, but some-
times must put others before them-
selves and their families.
Sometimes they sacrifice to save
another life outside of their family
or bring others into their family.
BMEs understand that they are not
Superman and cannot save every
child no matter how hard they try.
They still try their best to make a
difference for all children.
BMEs do not always get the emo-
tional, spiritual and mental support
they need when working with chil-
dren in school and the community,


but they press forward and do
important work.
BMEs Are sometimes viewed as
arrogant, cocky, indifferent, and
thuggish when in fact they emanate
intelligence, creativity, drive,
accountability, spirituality, disci-
pline and strength of mind and will.
These attributes and more are the
strengths that Black male teachers
display in their classrooms schools
and communities.
C. G. Woodson wrote in the Mis-
Education of the Negro, "Real edu-
cation means to inspire people to
live more abundantly, to learn to
begin with life as they find it and
make it better."
BMEs understand when they show
caring, peacefulness, love, empa-
thy, and sympathy they maybe
viewed as soft, gay, unintelligent,
incompetent and unprofessional.
They are smart enough to know
when to be tough with kids and
when to show compassion.
BMEs understand that they have a
responsibility to be the best they
can be every day because they
know someone is always watching
and judging them. W
What has happened to the Black
community today when our schools
are threatened with closure, sanc-
tions and state intentions? Black
male teachers though few in num-
ber, carry a power and influence
that can raise the potential of Black
students.


Article author William Jackson is a third generation educator.


Sometimes it is just the presence
of a teacher that inspires. I'm proud
to be an educator because I know
who I am, how important I am, and
my importantance to my students,
my peers, and my community.
I'm not ashamed to say I love my
students for their talents, abilities
and potential to make the world a
better place. Society should not feel
threatened by the Black male
teacher's intellectualism. Nor
should they be apprehensive about
their articulation, and definitely not


intimidated by their dedication.
Society should encourage male
teachers, praise them, pray for
them, and support them. Black male
teachers show society not all Black
men are thuggish, undisciplined,
irresponsible, lazy and uneducated.
We have a responsibility to our
families, our communities, our
churches and our children.
Malcolm X stated "Education is the
passport to the future, for tomorrow
belongs to those who prepare for it
today."


The Jacksonville Free Press

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Death rates for African-American

women in childbirth on the rise
High rates of obesity, high blood pressure
and inadequate prenatal care cause death from
childbirth more often for African-Americans
in the United States than for whites and other
ethnic groups. Worsening this trend are the
increasing numbers of cesarean sections
nationally. These procedures can result in
deadly complications for women dangerously
overweight or suffering from hypertension or
other ailments.
Nationally, blacks have a four-times greater risk of pregnancy-related
death than whites-a rate of 36.1 per 100,000 live births compared with
9.6 for whites and 8.5 for Hispanics, according to a 2008 report by the
Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
Maternal mortality rates have been rising in the United States since
the mid-1990s. In 1997, the black maternal mortality rate was 21.5 per
100,000 live births compared with 8.0 for Hispanics and 5.2 for whites,
according to the CDC. The rate for other races was 8.8.
By 2007, the black maternal mortality rate had jumped to 28.4, rough-
ly three times the rates among whites and Hispanics at 10.5 and 8.9
respectively. Statistics were not broken out for Asians/Pacific Islanders
and Native Americans.
Trends show that black maternal mortality rates are increasing in
some parts of the country, and two recent studies highlighting the prob-
lem have renewed calls for increased focus on reducing the deaths.
According to the new reports, the pregnancy-related mortality rate in
some states rivals that in some developing nations. The problem is par-
ticularly acute in New York City, where blacks are nearly eight times
more likely to die from pregnancy-related complications than whites,
and in California where pregnant blacks are four times as likely to die


. Laser Surgery


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


Auust 11-17 2011


II~ [iSB












Pg8 sPry Fr Prs-1 2011


U


AROUND TOWN


What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene


U


Jacksonville Sharks
Arena Bowl XXIV
Are you ready for some football!
Jacksonville Sharks Arena Bowl
XXIV, Friday, August 12, 2011 at
8:00 p.m., at the Veterans Memorial
Arena. For tickets visit www.ticket-
master.com or call the Sharks office
at (904) 621- 0700.

Call all BCC alumni
Come out for a free event and join
Bethune-Cookman University
Alumni from around the city for a
night of food, fun, door prizes, and
entertainment at the Zodiac Bar N'
Grill, located at 120 W. Adams
Street on Friday, August 12, 2011
from 6-8 p.m. Pick-up information
on Wildcat football, tickets, bus
trips, upcoming Duval/Nassau
Alumni Chapter events, and current
B-CU news For further information
contact Channell Jones at 764-9924
or email flandersl@att.net.

C4aCz for Clara
The University Club will host
"Cocktails For A Cause" supporting
The Clara White Mission. It will be
held Friday, August 12th from 5:30
- 7 p.m. at the University Club. For
more info visit www.clarawhitemis-
sion.org or call (904) 354-4162.

Florida Blue 5K
Stadium Challenge
Register now for the Florida Blue
5K Stadium Challenge, Saturday,
August 13th, 6-10 p.m. at
EverBank Field. The "stadium run"
will take runners up all seven levels
of the stadium. This event is a
fundraising event with proceeds
benefitting Duval County Sports to
help save athletic programs in
Duval County Public High Schools.


To register visit www.lstplaces-
ports.com or call (904) 731-3676.

P.R.I.D.E. Book Club
The August meeting of the
P.R.I.D.E Book Club will be held
Saturday, August 13th at 4 p.m.
Author and socialite Marsha Phelts
will host a discussion with Yolanda
M. Tucker, author of the book "All
I Ever Wanted To Do Is Love You."
The reading will be held at 5400
Ocean Blvd, American Beach. For
more info call 389-8417 or 703-
8264.

Issues & Answers
The Jacksonville Community
Council Inc. (JCCI) next Issues and
Answers Lunchtime Discussion
will be on Wednesday, August 17th
from noon to 1 p.m. The discussion
will be "taking the mystery out of
the FCAT". Bring a bag lunch!
Location is the JCCI Conference
Room, 2434 Atlantic Blvd.For more
information call 396-3052.

Eat Up Downtown
Downtown Vision, Inc. is dishing
out exquisite cuisine at an afford-
able price during Eat Up
Downtown. From hip caf6s to ele-
gant steak houses, Downtown's
finest restaurants collaborate each
year to bring you a three course
meal at one unbeatable price. Save
the dates and your appetite!. Eat Up
Downtown will run for two weeks,
August 15 August 28, 2011, you
have two weeks to dine!

Learn to be
a better volunteer
Join the members of JCCI and
JCCI Forward for a professional
development skills seminar on serv-


ing as a volunteer in the
Jacksonville community. Hear what
it takes to get the most out of your
volunteer efforts. Skills Training is
Thursday, August 18th from 5:30 -
7:30 p.m., JCCI Conference Room,
2434 Atlantic Blvd. RSVP by call-
ing (904) 396-3052.

Toast to the Animals
Grab a glass and toast the First
Coast's furriest friends at the
Jacksonville Humane Society's
13th annual Toast to the Animals on
Friday, August 19, 2011 from 6 to
9 p.m. at the Omni Hotel. Guests
will enjoy more than 100 varieties
of wine and beer, gourmet hours
d'oeuvres, desserts and a silent and
live auction. Tickets are available at
www.jaxhumane.org or 725-8766.

Comedian Sheryl
Underwood
Sheryl Underwood the comedian
that continues to push the envelope
discussing sex, politics, current
events and relationships will be in
concert at the Comedy Zone,
August 19 20, 2011. 3130 Harts
Rd. inside the Ramada Inn. Call
292-4242 for more information.

Women's Health
Channel 7 Symposium
The Annual WJCT Women's
Health symposium is scheduled for
Saturday, August 20th from 7:30
a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Hyatt
Regency Riverfront. The full day
event will feature speakers, break-
out sessions with local health and
wellness experts, free health screen-
ings, continental breakfast, catered
lunch and more. For tickets visit
www.wjct.org or call 549-2938.


Spoken Word
at the Ritz
Join the Ritz Theatre for a free
evening of Spoken Word, Thursday,
September 1st at 7 p.m. Call 632-
5555.

Raines '81 Reunion
The Raines High School class of
1981 will celebrate their 30th class
reunion September 2 3, 2011 at
the Hyatt Riverfront Hotel.
For more information email cecili-
adorsey@bellsouth.net or call (904)
766-8784.

Tattoo Convention
The 7th Annual Jacksonville
Tattoo Convention will be held this
year at the Renaissance Resort at
World Golf Village, 500 S. Legacy
Trail, St. Augustine, Florida,
September 2nd at 11 a.m. and
September 4th at 8:00 p.m. For
more information call 877-888-
2002.
Jazz Cruise
Labor Day Weekend will be the
time for a grand evening of smooth
jazz on A Jazz on the Water Cruise.
It will be held on Saturday,
September 3rd from 10 p.m.-1:30
a.m. taking off from 1501
Riverplace (next to Charthouse
Restaurant). The evening will fea-
ture include live jazz, hors d'oeu-
vres served and TJ The DJ. For
more information call Ms. Charo at
520-3238.

Mali Vai Washington
Golf & Tennis Gala
The Mali Vai Washington Golf &
Tennis Gala is marked for
September 12th and 13th and
includes a Tennis Pro-Am, Golf
Pro-Am and Gala Dinner. For more


information on this event call (904)
359-KIDS (5437) or email
info@malwashington.com.

Jacksonville's Dancing
with the Stars
Help choose Jacksonville's favorite
dancer. The Jacksonville Children's
Chorus is presenting Jacksonville's
Dancing with the Stars event on
Saturday, September 17th at 7 p.m.
at the Times-Union Center for
Performing Arts. Local 'celebrities'
will compete in two show dances
and your votes decide who will get
to bring home the mirror ball tro-
phy. Email carolyna@asocialaf-
fair.net for more information..

Icons and
Legends concert
Erykah Badu, The O'Jays and
Ricky Smiley will be in concert
together on Saturday, September
17, 2011 at the arena. For tickets
call (800) 745-3000, or visit online
at www.ticketmaster.com.

N.W. Library
Annual Book Sale
The Bradham Brooks Northwest
library will hold their annual book
sale Thursday, September 23,
noon 8 p.m., Friday, September
24, 10 a.m. 5 p.m., and Saturday,
September 25, 10 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Visit Bradham Brooks library at
1755 Edgewood Avenue W. or call
(904) 765-5402.

Dog Days in
the Park 2011
Join the Springfield Animal Care
& Rescue Club (SACARC) for Dog
Days in the Park 2011, celebrating
fun for the whole family including
the four-legged members. Bring the
kids and the dogs to Confederate


Park 956 Hubbard Street,
Jacksonville, FL 32206 on
Saturday, September 24, 2011 from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. for food, beer and
fun. For more information visit
www.sacarc.org or email contac-
tus@sacarc.org or call 633-9308.

A Taste of Jacksonville
To celebrate the tenth anniversary
of the Florida Black Expo, there
will be a "A Taste of Jacksonville"
event showcasing area chefs, cater-
ers, bakers and restaurants to local
area and national companies. It will
held Thursday October 6, 2011. For
more information call 403-6960 or
call (352) 327-1977.

Florida Black Expo
The 2011 Florida Black Expo is set
for Saturday, October 8th at the
Prime Osbom Convention Center.
Guests include CNN commentator
Roland Martin, vocalist Oleta
Adams, actress Wendy Raquel
Robinson, and House of Payne
actor David Mann. For more infor-
mation visit call 800-419-2417.

Urban League
Golf Tournament
The Jacksonville Urban League
10th Anniversary Celebrity Golf
Tournament will be held Monday,
October 17, 2011 at the Timuquana
Country Club, located at 4028
Timuquana Rd. To RSVP call (904)
366-3461 or (904) 366-6493.

Regina Carter
in concert
The Riverside Fine Arts Series wil
present Regina Carter, the distinc-
tively diverse and musical personal-
ity in concert on Thursday, Oct. 20,
at the Florida Theatre. The show
begins at 8 p.m., for tickets visit
www.floridatheatre.com.


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August 11-17 2011


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August 11-17, 2011 Mrs. Perry's Free Press Page 9


SFOR THE WEEK OF AUGUST 9 15, 2011






S, A: -







Pro Football HOF Photos
THE HALLCALLS: Richard
Dent (top) of Tennessee
DESERVING State and Shannon Sharpe
(bottom) of Savannah State
DUO pose with HOF busts.

DENT, SHARPE INDUCTED INTO HOF; 2011
CLASSICS, SWAC BROADCAST SCHEDULES



2011 SWAC

BROADCAST SCHEDULE

BIRMINGHAM, AL The Southwestern Athletic
Conference released its football broadcast schedule in-
cluding a 10-game slate on SWAC TV, the league's internet
broadcast site. The schedule has eight games across ESPN
networks, plus national and regional television dates with
NBC, Versus, and SportSouth. In all, 21 SWAC games are
scheduled to be televised during the 2011 football season.

SAT., SEPT. 3
Alabama State at Mississippi Valley State 15 pm SWAC TV
Grambling vs. Alcorn State (Tape Delay) 9:30 pm ESPNU
SUN., SEPT. 4
Prairie View A&M vs. Bethune-Cookman 11 am ESPN
SAT., SEPT. 10
Alcorn State at Arkansas-Pine Bluff 6 pm SWAC TV
Jackson State vs. Tennessee State 6 pm Fox SportSouth
SAT., SEPT. 17
Jackson State at Southern 6 pm SWAC TV
SAT., SEPT. 24
Southern vs. Florida A&M 2:30 pm VERSUS
Alabama A&M at Grambling 5 pm SWAC TV
THUR., SEPT. 29
Texas Southern at Jackson State 5 or 6:30 pm ESPNU
SAT., OCT. 1
Alcorn State at Alabama State 7 pm SWAC TV
SAT., OCT. 8
Mississippi Valley State at Alabama A&M 1 pm SWAC TV
THUR., OCT. 13
Texas Southern at Alabama A&M 6:30 pm ESPNU
SAT., OCT. 15
Southern at Arkansas-Pine Bluff 6 pm SWAC TV
SAT., OCT. 15
Prairie View A&M at Alabama State (Tape Delay) 9:30 pm ESPNU
Live on ESPN3.com
SAT., OCT. 29
Jackson State vs. Prairie View A&M 4 pm SWAC TV
Alabama A&M vs. Alabama State (Tape Delay) 9:30 pm ESPNU
Live on ESPN3.com
SAT., NOV. 5
Grambling at Jackson State 2 pm SWAC TV
SAT., NOV. 12
Texas Southern at Grambling 8 pm SWAC TV
THUR., NOV. 24
Tuskegee at Alabama State 3 pm ESPNU
SAT., NOV. 26
Southern vs. Grambling 1 pm NBC
SAT., DEC. 10
SWAC Championship Game 12 pm ESPNU





THE STAT CORNER
WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS

HBCU ALUMNI IN
PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME
(with year of induction)
1. Marion Motley, FB, South Carolina State2 (1968)
2. Roosevelt Brown, OT, Morgan State (1975)
3. Len Ford, DE, Morgan State1 (1976)
4. Deacon Jones, DE, S. C. State St./Miss. Valley St. (1980)
5. Willie Davis, DE, Grambling State (1981)
6. Willie Brown, Grambling State (1984)
7. Ken Houston, SS, Prairie View A&M (1986)
8. Willie Lanier, LB, Morgan State (1986)
9. Mel Blount, CB, Southern (1989)
10. Art Shell, OT, Maryland State (Now- Eastern Shore) (1989)
11. Buck Buchanan, DT, Grambling State (1990)
12. Lem Barney, CB, Jackson State (1992)
13. Larry Little, OG, Bethune-Cookman (1993)
14. Walter Payton, RB, Jackson State (1993)
15. Leroy Kelly, RB, Morgan State (1994)
16. Charlie Joiner, WR, Grambling State (1996)
17. Jackie Slater, OT, Jackson State (2001)
18. John Stallworth, WR, Alabama A&M (2002)
19. Elvin Bethea, DE, North Carolina A&T (2003)
20. Harry Carson, South Carolina State (2006)
21. Rayfield Wright, OT, Fort Valley State (2006)
22. Emmitt Thomas, CB, Bishop College (2008)
23. Bob Hayes, WR, Florida A&M (2009)
24. Jerry Rice, WR, Miss. Valley State (2010)
25. Shannon Sharpe, Savannah State (2011)


26. Richard Dent, Tennessee State (2011)
'Ford transferred to the University of Michigan after one year.
SMotley transferred to the University of Nevada-Reno after one year.

BY SCHOOL


Grambling State
Morgan State
Jackson State
S. C. State
Alabama A&M
Bethune-Cookman
Bishop
Florida A&M


Fort Valley State
Maryland State
Miss. Valley State
N. C. A&T
Prairie View
Savannah State
Southern
Tennessee State


BCSP Notes


Pro Football HOF Photos
ENSHRINED: (L.) The bust of Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee Richard Dent is between Dent (I.)
and his presenter, formerTennessee State coach Joe Gilliam Sr. (r.) at Saturday's induction ceremony.
(R.) Sterling Sharpe (I.) helps his brother Shannon put his HOF coat on at the induction ceremony.
Sterling Sharpe presented his brother for induction.


Sharpe, Dent inducted into
Pro Football Hall of Fame
Saturday in Canton, Ohio, formerblack college
football standouts Richard Dent and Shannon
Sharpe became the 25th and 26th players from HB-
CUs inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame for
their stellar NFL careers (See STAT CORNER).
Both came from humble beginnings and were
blackcollege superstars-Dent, fromAtlanta became
an outstanding two-time all-American at Tennessee
State who registered 39 sacks in his career there
and Sharpe, from Glenville, Ga., became a two-time
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
player of the year at Savannah State.
Both were late-round NFL draft choices that
proved all the doubters wrong, going on to set
NFL records during their pro playing days. Dent
was drafted by Chicago in the eighth round of the
1983 draft while Sharpe was taken by Denver in
the seventh round of the 1990 draft.
The black college products were inducted
along with fellow players Deion Sanders, Marshall
Faulk, Chris Hanburger, Les Richter and NFLFilms
founder Steve Sabol.
A four-time Pro Bowl pick and MVP of Super
Bowl XX during the 1985 championship season,
Dent was a member of the storied mid-1980s Bears'
defense and played his first ten years in Chicago
establishing a reputation as the NFL's most feared
sack artist. He played 15 years, 11 with the Bears,
and finished his career third in the NFL in career
sacks with 137 1/2. That mark is now tied for sixth
with John Randle on the NFL's all-time list. He set
a Bears' record with 17 1/2 sacks in 1984, led the
NFL with 17 sacks a year later and finished with
10 or more sacks eight times in.his career.,Dent had
missed out as a finalist six of the previous seven


years.
He was presented by his former Tennessee
State defensive coach, Joe Gilliam Sr. and during
his acceptance speech acknowledged the role that
university played in his career.
"I didn't worry about the day coming," Dent
said. "I more or less worried about the people who
I wanted to thank, make sure they were living. I
lost my high school coach who just died a couple
years ago. My mother passed in '89, and I think the
last guy living here that played a big part of it was
Coach Gilliam."
Dent is the first alum from the storied TSU pro-
gram to be inducted into the Hall. Ironically, former
TSU stars Claude Humphrey and Ed "Too Tall"
Jones, like Dent outstanding NFL defensive ends,
have not made it into the Hall. Humphrey, a first
round pick of the Atlanta Falcons in 1968, played
14 years in the league and registered 126/1/2 sacks
in his career with the Falcons and Eagles. He has
been a Hall finalist three times and was named one
of two senior candidates for the 2009 Hall of Fame
election.
Jones, the first pick of the 1974 draft, played
all of his 14 years with the Dallas Cowboys and
posted 106 career sacks.
Like Dent ofTSU, Sharpe is the first Savannah
State player voted into the Hall. After a stellar college
career under former SSU head coach Bill Davis,
Sharpe retired 14 pro seasons later as the all-time
NFL leader for catches, yards and touchdowns by
a tight end and with three Super Bowl rings.
His breakout year came during his third sea-
son when he led the Broncos in receiving with 53
catches for 640 yards to earn his first of eight Pro
Bowl nods. Other than an injury-shortened 1999
campaign, Sharpe never caught less than 60 passes
in a season for the remainder of his career.


SHANNON SHARPE'S CAREER STATS AT SAVANNAH STATE
1986 14 receptions for 323 yards, 23.1 yards per catch
1987 60 receptions for 1078 yards, 18.0 yards per catch, 10 touchdowns
1988 57 receptions for 1031 yards, 18.1 yards per catch, 12 touchdowns
1989 61 receptions for 1312 yards, 21.5 yards per catch, 18 touchdown


He played in 204 regular season games and
started in four AFC championship games. He was
named first-team All-Pro and All-AFC in 1993,
1996, 1997 and 1998 and was selected to the NFL's
All-Decade Team of the 1990s. He was the starting
tight end in Denver's back-to-back Super Bowl titles
(XXXII and XXXIII) and the Ravens' Super Bowl
XXXV victory.
Sharpe was presented by his brother Sterling,
a former five-time Pro Bowl wide receiver for the
Green Bay Packers and gave an emotional plea for
his brother to also be elected to the Hall.
"I am the only player who has been inducted into
the Pro Football Hall of Fame and am the second-best
player in my family," Shannon said.

46 Football Classics get off to
rousing start Labor Day weekend
From a 13-game Labor Day weekend package
to the December 19 SWAC Championship Game in
Birmingham, a total of 46 exciting Classic, Bowl and
Championship games are in store for the 2011 black
college football season (SEE LIST BELOW).
The classic battle between the two HBCUs in
Pennsylvania, Cheyney and Lincoln, dubbed this
year's Wade Wilson Classic, kicks off the season
of special games with a 1 p.m. battle on Saturday,
September 3.
Nine other classics will be played that Satur-
day with games as far north as the Chicago Classic
(Hampton vs. Alabama A&M), as far West as
Little Rock, Arkansas's Delta Classic 4 Literacy
(Arkansas-Pine Bluff vs. Langston), as far South
as Shreveport, Louisiana's Port City Classic (Alcorn
State vs. Grambling) and as far East as Norfolk,
Va.'s Labor Day Classic pitting Norfolk State vs.
Virginia State.
Another three classic games follow on Sunday,
Sept. 4 including this year's MEAC/SWAC Chal-
lenge with Bethune-Cookman facing Prairie View
A&M.
New classics this year come to Cleveland
(Cleveland Classic, Sept. 10, Central State vs. N.
C. Central), Washington, D.C. (Nation's Classic,
Sept. 10, Howard vs. Morehouse) and Valdosta,
Ga. (South Georgia Heritage Classic, Oct. 22, Clark
Atlanta vs. Albany State).
A key classic match-up that will be a little
different this season is Atlanta's Bank of America
Classic which has Southern rather than Tennessee
State facing Florida A&M on Sept. 24.
Three championship games are now on the
docket as the SIAC this season joins the CIAA (Nov.
12) and SWAC with title game tilts.
The first SIAC Championship Game pitting East
and West Division champions is scheduled for Nov.
12 at a time and place to be announced soon.


1 01C ASSIC BO L'A DC AMPO S I AME


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3
Wade Wilson Classic
Cheyney vs. Lincoln (PA) in Cheyney, PA..........................................
4th W.C. Gorden Classic
Jackson State vs. Concordia-Selma in Jackson, MS........................:30p
Chicago Football Classic
Hampton vs. Alabama A&M in Chicago, IL.....................................4p
Delta Classic 4 Literacy
Arkansas-Pine Bluff vs. Langston in Little Rock, AR...........................5p
Music City Classic
Albany State vs. Savannah State in Macon, GA.................................5p
Palmetto Kick-Off Classic
Benedict vs. Virginia Union in Columbia, SC.........................................5p
Port City Classic
Alcom State vs. Grambling State in Shreveport, LA ............................6p
John Merritt Classic
Tennessee State vs. Southern in Nashville, TN .................................6p
Two Rivers Classic
Fayetteville State vs. UNC Pembroke in Fayetteville, NC...................6p
Labor Day Classic
Norfolk State vs. Virginia State in Norfolk, VA ....................................6p

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4
MEAC/SWAC Challenge
Bethune-Cookman vs. Prairie View A&M in Orlando, FL ..................12n
Dayton Classic
Central State vs. Kentucky State in Dayton, OH .................................5p
5th Labor Day Golden Classic
Miles vs. Morehouse in Birmingham, AL .................................... ..6p

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
Cleveland Classic
Central State vs. NC Central in Cleveland, OH ...............................12n
Nation's Football Classic
Howard vs. Morehouse in Washington, DC.......................................3:30p
8th Ralph J. Bunche Football Classic
Edward Waters vs. Virginia Univ. of Lynchburg in Kingsland, GA..........4p
14th Down East Viking Football Classic
Elizabeth City State vs. Livingstone in Rocky Mount, NC ...................4p
Southern Heritage Classic
Jackson State vs. Tennessee State in Memphis,TN ............................6p

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
South Carolina HBCU Classic
Benedict vs. Shaw in Columbia, SC...........................................5p
Louis Crews Classic
Alabama A&M vs. Tuskegee in Huntsville, AL........................................6p

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
St. Louis Gateway Classic
Lincoln (MO) vs. Missouri Southern in St. Louis, MO..................11a (CT)
St. Louis Gateway Classic
Arkansas-Pine Bluff vs. Clark Atlanta in St. Louis, MO .........................3p
Bank of America Atlanta Football Classic
Florida A&M vs. Southern in Atlanta, GA ........................................3:30p
NY Urban League Classic
Morgan State vs. Howard in East Rutherford, NJ ................................4p

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1
Lucille M. Brown Community Youth Bowl
Virginia Union vs. Chowan in Richmond, VA ....................... ........1p
Augusta City Classic
Benedict vs. Miles in Augusta, GA....................... ......... .............. 2p


28th Circle City Classic
Kentucky State vs. Albany State in Indianapolis, IN ........................ 2:30p
State Fair Classic
Prairie View A&M vs. Grambling State in Dallas, TX............................. 6p
3rd Diabetes Classic
Florida A&M vs. Delaware State in Tallahassee, FL............................... 6p

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8
76th Morehouse-'Skegee Classic
Tuskegee vs. Morehouse in Columbus, GA ........................................... 2p

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15
Battle of the Bay
Norfolk State vs. Hampton in Norfolk, VA........................................... p
Biker Classic
Bethune-Cookman vs. Fort Valley State in Daytona Beach, FL.............. 4p

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22
South Georgia Heritage Classic
Clark Atlanta vs. Albany State in Valdosta, GA ............................... ...... 3p

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29
Tri-City Classic
Virginia Univ of Lynchburg vs. Lincoln (PA) in Petersburg, VA................. 1p
70th Magic City Classic
Alabama State vs. Alabama A&M in Birmingham, AL ................ 2:30p (CT)
Shreveport Classic
Prairie View A&M vs. Jackson State in Shreveport, LA ........................ 4p

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5
Battle of the "Real" HU
Hampton vs. Howard in Hampton, VA.................................. ........... p
Commemorative Classic
Livingstone vs. Johnson C. Smith in Charlotte, NC ................................ p
22nd Fountain City Classic
Albany State vs. Fort Valley State in Columbus, GA ............................ 2p

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12
CIAA Championship
CIAA North Champ vs. CIAA South Champ in Durham, NC .................. p
SIAC Championship
SIAC West Champ vs. SIAC East Champ in TBA.................................TBA

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19
Capital City Classic
Alcorn State vs. Jackson State in Jackson, MS .............................. p (CT)
32nd Florida Classic
Florida A&M vs. Bethune-Cookman in Orlando, FL ........................... 2:30p

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24
88th Turkey Day Classic
Alabama State vs. Tuskegee in Montgomery, AL........................... 3p (CT)

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26
Bayou Classic XXXVIII
Grambling State vs. Southern in New Orleans, LA........................ p (CT)

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10
SWAC Championship
East Champion vs. West Champion in Birmingham, AL ............. 12n (CT)


2011 The Onnidan Group All Rights Reserved


SOURCE: Onnidan.com


AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XVIII, No. 2


August 11-17, 2011


Mrs. Perry's Free Press Page 9











Page 10 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 11-17, 2011


Is Jennifer

Hudson too thin?
Jennifer Hudson didn't stop her weight-
loss journey. The singer is now down to a
size zero! Yes, believe it or not, the for-
mally full figured woman was either
obsessed with her weight or just never
o stopped losing.
She became the
celebrity spokes-
woman for Weight
SP.Watchers and is
inspiring women
L ^/ dall over to do what
S she did.
Although ques-
tionable, the
singer's appear-
ance has never
Imfl been a personal
Piissue, she claims.
Hudson explained
that it was all a
matter of a health change and a more
appealing look.
As far as her fiance, he is not too excit-
ed about the new look.
"He fusses at me like, 'Why do you have
to get all dressed up to go out? Why can't
you just go out like you used to?' And I'm
like, 'I'm a walking billboard now
honey!'"
Joy Behar from "The View" spilled the
beans about the star when she ran into her
while shopping. The talk show host heard
the salesperson tell Hudson she was a size
zero.
When asked how it feels, she said, "I feel
like they're talking to someone else."
Going from thick to thin is no easy task
to maintain. She also shared that it's work
be skinny. In fact, she feels obligated and
responsible to the world to continue look-
ing trim.
"Being skinny, it's a job. It's not easy. I
feel this responsibility to the world now -
people are watching, so I have to keep
going in the right direction in terms of my
weight loss."


VH1 explores hip-hop and crack


cocaine in new documentary


NEW YORK--Crack cocaine. In
the 1980s, it was the newest thing.
By 1986 it was raging through the
inner cities of America, like wild-
fire, leaving pain, grief and death
in its wake. Now, after 25 years, a
new documentary explores how
the drug also transformed pop
culture, especially hip-hop.
"Planet Rock: The Story of Hip
Hop and the Crack Generation,"
premieres Sunday, September 18
at 10 PM on VH1.
Narrated and executive produced
by Ice-T, "Planet Rock: The Story
of Hip Hop and the Crack
Generation" is the first documen-
tary to focus specifically on the
connections between crack and
hip-hop. Based primarily on the
first-person accounts of four


famous dealers-turned-rappers,
the film also widens its lens at
points to show how crack
changed America culturally,
socially and politically. Using
rare footage, photos, and anima-
tion, all set to the beats and
rhymes of the iconic hip hop
tracks of the day, the documen-
tary explores how media hysteria,
racism and political reaction pro-
duced policies and laws that have
left us with the largest and
most disproportionately African-
American -- prison population in
the world.
With candid, never-before-seen
interviews from survivors, includ-
ing Snoop Dogg, Cypress Hill's
B-Real, and the Wu-Tang Clan's
RZA and Raekwon, "Planet


Rock" examines the hardships
young men encountered growing
up in impoverished neighbor-
hoods, which led many to deal
crack cocaine as their only way
out. This destructive drug provid-
ed an escape ans also paved the
way for an entrance into hip-hop.
More than any other art form,
hip-hop reflected and document-
ed the crack epidemic. The chaos
and madness of the crack phe-
nomenon was fused with the
sound and style of hip-hop during
its formative years. From the gold
dookie chain to Gucci, many hip-
hop artists were influenced by the
look and fashion of infamous
dealers like Azie Faison in
Harlem, who is prominently fea-
tured in the documentary, along
with Freeway Ricky Ross, the
Godfather of Crack in LA.
As hip-hop became increasingly
popular, the fascination with
crime and gangster culture,
specifically the violence inherent
in crack culture, became
ingrained in the music. And soon
the very kids dealing crack were
turning their street tales into hit
-records.
After serving hard time in jail,
Snoop Dogg became the biggest
rapper of his day; after a bullet in
the back nearly killed him, B Real
went legit with Cypress Hill; and
after crafting their business model
on the crack hustle, RZA and
Raekwon turned the Wu Tang
Clan into a hip hop empire.
As journalist Cheo Choker
reflects, "it's fascinating to think
that Jay Z, a global icon who had
better seats at President Obama's
inauguration than Jesse Jackson,
was once a New York City crack
dealer."


II lBolliwood

G.OC)SIP SCOOP

Wire actress pleads guilty in MD drug case
BALTIMORE An actress who played a
Baltimore drug gang assassin in HBO's "The Wire"
pleaded guilty to conspiring to distribute heroin,
caught by a wiretap in a joint federal-state drug probe
of an alleged drug gang. Felicia "Snoop" Pearson, 31,
pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute heroin, a
day before her trial was set to begin. The judge
accepted the plea, suspending a seven-year sentence
with credit for time served and ordering three years of supervised proba-
tion with provisions for out-of-state travel for work.
The plea allows Pearson to move on with her acting career, instead of
spending more than a year with charges hanging over her.
This was not Pearson's first brush with the law. She was convicted of sec-
ond-degree murder in a slaying committed when she was 14. She served
five years of an eight-year sentence and was released in 2000. Pearson was
arrested on a minor drug charge in 2008 when police went to her home to
pick her up for refusing to cooperate as a witness in a murder trial. She was
found not guilty.


Rihanna pays her stylist over $1 million a year
For the cost of one year's in-state college tuition, Rihanna keeps her hair
laid for a week. According to a member of the singer's entourage, Rih-
Rih spends a whopping $22,400 a week to employ the services of super
stylist Ursula Stephen.
The hair maven, who's responsible for all of Rihanna's trendsetting 'dos,
charges a daily retainer fee of $3,200. "She makes several public appear-
ances a week, and the cost soon stacks up," reveals the source to the UK's
Daily Mail. "Ursula is a close confidante and they are together all the time.
You have to wonder why she insists on keeping such an expensive mem-
ber of her entourage on the payroll 24/7. Most of these costs are paid for
by her management."
Rihanna just recently abandoned her infamous red tresses for brown, two-
toned waves. Guess you really do have to pay the cost to be the boss.
Real Housewives filming in Atlanta
Though the season hasn't started yet, details have leaked about Season 4
of Bravo's "The Real Housewives of Atlanta" filming in South Africa. Get
the deets on the ladies trip inside...
As you know, reality stars are sworn to secrecy when it comes to dis-
cussing their story lines, however, we've learned that South Africa will be
a part of the story line this season on "RHOA."
The entire case was spotted filming in South Africa this week. The ladies
filmed in-and-around Cape Town as well as Port Elizabeth Supposedly
the trip will be part of the final few episodes. And we hear the season may
air this fall. But don't expect to see Kim Zolciak. She stayed home after
giving birth recently.
Outkasts Big Boi arrested in Miami
Grammy-winning OutKast rapper Big Boi has been
arrested in Miami on charges of illegally possessing
drugs, including ecstasy and Viagra pills.
The rapper, whose real name is Antwan Patton, was
charged with three counts of possession of a controlled
substance and one count of possession of drug para-
i i pheralia on Sunday. According to the Miami-Dade
County Corrections website, the 36-year-old Patton
was also carrying MDMA, which is the main ingredi-
ent in Ecstasy. He was booked on $16,000 bond.


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Page 10 Ms. Perry's Free Press


August 11-17, 2011







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August 11-17, 2011


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 11










Page 12 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 11-17, 2011


LS -aJO ..p


Nichelle Floyd, Pia Badger, and Challnon Steven


D'Marter, Stevie, Curtis, Darryl, and Kiona Alston


Black leaders call for less talk and

more action at NABJ Convention


Dr. Cornel West


Angela Smith and Tori Smith
P-v. Ifr 9mg


Lakeisha, Samayyah and Nasiha Shakur and Kenny Dennard


Black leaders are fed up and are
speaking out, again. This time how-
ever, they're complaining that it's
time for less talk and more action
for the Black community.
In a panel at the recent National
Association of Black Journalist
convention entitled, "Black Out or
Black In" key leaders including Dr.
Cornel West, former Republican
National Committee Chairman
Michael Steele, Atlanta Mayor
Kasim Reed and noted journalist
debated their expectations of the
nation's first Black president as
well as the clash between the Black
middle and lower classes.
"Some of us are so caught up
with things and stuff that we refer
to our own people as 'those peo-
ple,"' West said. "There are too
many field generals and too few
field troops."


Roland Martin joined in to
encourage the minority audience
that it's time to stop criticizing your
friend or neighbor's kids about how
bad and ill-behaved they are and
it's time to say I'll help you raise
your children.
The group disagreed on their
approval, and some strong disap-
proval, of the president, but they all
agreed that some of the hardships
Blacks face, till this day, are still
unprecedented and it's time for less
"feel-good" summits and conversa-
tions, and more action.
With an already nasty 2012 pres-
idential election approaching and
many differentiating agendas on the
table amongst candidates, it may be
time to have all Blacks "in," fight-
ing for something affecting their
communities, rather than out.


Why do
Standardized tests like the
SAT can make any student
nervous, but a new study
from Stanford University
finds that Black students are
especially susceptible to
nerves.
The study concluded that
African-American students
perform poorly on standard-
ized tests because they fear
incorrect answers will con-
firm negative stereotypes
about their race, The Journal


Black students perform poorly on standardized tests?


of Blacks in Higher
Education writes in an article
published this week.
When students aren't think-
ing about these stereotypes,
they perform better on the
tests.
The Journal of Blacks in
Higher Education writes:
A new study at Stanford has
shown that this "stereotype
threat" can also hinder black
students in learning new
material. In an experiment,


groups of black and white words. One group was placed
students were asked to study in a threatening environment
the meanings of 24 obscure by being told that they were


participating in an experiment
to see "how well people from
different backgrounds learn."
Another group was simply
told the researchers were
examining different learning
styles and there was no hint
of any racial undertones.
One to two weeks later, the
students were quizzed infor-
mally about the words they
had studied. The results
showed that black students
who were initially in the


group that was told racial dif-
ferences were being exam-
ined, scored 50 percent lower
than black students who had
studied in the nonthreatening
environment. But when an
actual test was administered,
the stereotype threat kicked in
and both groups of black stu-
dents performed poorly.
The new study was pub-
lished in the August issue of
the Personality and Social
Psychology Bulletin.


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Page 12 Ms. Perry's Free Press


August 11-17, 2011


I


"'1.- I;




MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00331

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002042477
oclc - 19095970
notis - AKN0341
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00331

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press


This item has the following downloads:


Full Text





~i,.


Why do our

students score

so poorly on

standardized

tests?


Page 11


QUALITY BLACK WEEKLY Ce
50 Cents


Tiger Woods still losing sponsors
Poor Tiger Woods cannot catch a break. Not only is his career taking a
hit after a three-month leave due to an injury, but his endorsements are
struggling well. According to Golf World, a long-time deal by Swiss
watch company Tag Heuer has come to an end, the latest in a string of
dropped sponsorships. Other lost corporate sponsorships include Gillette,
Gatorade, Accenture, AT&T and Golf Digest.

Station tied to Emmett Till's

1955 killing to be restored
The gas station involved in the story of Emmett Till, who was lynched
in 1955 for allegedly whistling at a white woman, will be restored. The
Mississippi Department of Archives and History is providing $152,000 to
restore Ben Roy's Service Station, which stands next to what used to be
Bryant's Grocery and Meat Market, once owned by Carolyn Bryant-the
woman Till was said to have whistled at.
Till, a Black 14-year-old from Chicago visiting relatives in the
Mississippi Delta, was killed and mutilated by Roy Bryant and his half-
brother, J.W. Milam, in 1955. They were both acquitted by an all-white
jury, but confessed to the crime in an article in Look magazine.
In July, hope for an Emmett Till memorial became lost when Carolyn
Towns, who promised Till's mother that she would build a museum for
her son, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for her part in a $100,000
grave-digging scheme.

Feds settle with AL School

Board over racial disparities
WASHINGTON The U.S. Justice Department announced today that
it has reached a settlement with the Pickens County, Ala., school board to
eliminate racial disparities in its system.
Under terms of the agreement, the board, working with state officials,
will develop policies and programs to eliminate racial disparities in stu-
dent discipline, grade retention, graduation rates and post-graduate schol-
arships, the Justice Department stated in a release.
The agreement further obligates the board to intensify its efforts to
recruit minority applicants for faculty and administrative positions, and
to take steps to ensure that the assignment of certified and non-certified
staff to district schools doesn't racially identifiable schools.
In conjunction with the parties' agreement, the state of Alabama will
establish and operate an early learning center that will provide educa-
tional services to four-year old children in Pickens County at no cost to
parents. The state has also agreed to provide substantial training and edu-
cational expertise to assist the board in executing its obligations under the
agreement, as well as its desegregation obligations more broadly.

Young, gay black men lead the
banner for HIV infection rates
The number of new HIV infections in the United States has remained
steady, at around 50,000 cases a year over the past four years, according
to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. However, the largest
increases were among bisexual men and men who have sex with men
(MSM). Of that group, young, black men had what the agency called
"alarming increases." Young gay and bisexual men are the only group in
which infections are increasing, and this increase is particularly concern-
ing among young African American MSM.
The CDC estimates that MSM make up 2% of the U.S. population but
61% of 2009's new infections. Young men between the ages of 13 and 29
who had sex with men had the highest new infection rate/increase more
than a quarter of all new cases. The agency says while young MSM of all
ethnic backgrounds have been hit hard, young blacks were the only group
to see significant increases over the four-year period. Infection rates
among this population jumped 48% during that time.

Ex students sues former

school for 'Wigger Day"
MINNEAPOLIS For at least two years, dozens of students at a
Minnesota high school caricatured African-Americans in a homecoming
week dress-up day by wearing low-slung pants, oversized sports jerseys
and flashing gang signs, according to a federal lawsuit.
The lawsuit filed last week claims officials at Red Wing High School
knew of the activity and had a duty to stop it because it created a racial-
ly hostile environment. It follows a state investigation that found school
officials did not fulfill their obligation "to provide an educational atmos-
phere free of illegal racial discrimination."
The lawsuit said about 60 to 70 students were involved in the activity
during the 2008 and 2009 school years. Red Wing is about 50 miles
southeast of Minneapolis along the Minnesota-Wisconsin border.
According to the Minnesota Department of Education, the high school
has about 880 students and is 89 percent white, 4 percent Hispanic, 3 per-
cent black, 3 percent American Indian and 1 percent Asian.
The day was unofficially known in the school as Wigger Day. The law-
suit said wigger is a pejorative word for a white person who imitates the
mannerisms, language and clothes associated with black culture.
The state investigated after a student complained to Minnesota
Department of Human Rights in September 2010. The state ruled last
month that there was probable cause to believe she was discriminated
against. The investigative report said school officials didn't dispute the
event happened in 2009, but claimed they could not have foreseen it.


Volume 24 No. 44 Jacksonville, Florida August 11-17, 2011


Black America should brace themselves for the long haul


By Lee A. Daniels
The debt-ceiling crisis that threat-
ened America's economic founda-
tion has abated for now.
But the jobs crisis and the foreclo-


^ --dML..flfH --.. -.f" _*
sure crisis, which continue to
threaten the present and future of
millions of ordinary Americans,
have not.
If the resolution, albeit temporary,
of the fierce political war waged in


Washington these past several
months marks "a change in behav-
ior from spend, spend, spend to cut,
cut, cut," as Republican Senator
Lamar Alexander, of Tennessee,
Said on the floor of the
Senate, in what shape
does that leave the
nation's already-frayed
Social safety net? If this
compromise inaugurates
"a regime," as a New
York Times article put it,
"of steep spending cuts aimed at
reducing the deficits so far, with-
out new revenues sought by the
White House," what does that mean
for the millions of Americans slid-
ing with increasing velocity toward


the margins of society?
These facts of political and eco-
nomic life make it especially imper-
ative that Black Americans ponder
an alarming question: What will the
economic catastrophe that is only

AlJ yor Brown



"'Ua


just beginning to sweep over Black
America look like?
Catastrophe is not too strong a
description of the prospect a signif-
icant proportion of Blacks includ-
Continued on page 2

signs first bill


Mayor Alvin Brown, shown
above, has signed his first piece of
legislation for the city since taking
office in his historic election.
The bill sets the tentative millage
rate for the next fiscal year.
During his campaign, Brown said
he would not raise taxes, and he


said this bill sticks to that commit-
ment.
A final millage rate will be set
when the City Council finalizes the
new budget and it's signed into law,
which must happen by the end of
September.
T M. Austin


The solution to the education


Annecia Scott, Marion Nunn, Dena Williams, Wilma Harrell, Linda
Smith, Gaile Harrell, Cora Woodard, Frankie Stepherson and Patrice
Williams trekked to N.C. for the Diva event.
The Fabulous Bells Red Hats' along with The Gainesville Divas traveled
by motor coach to Cary, N.C. for the 3rd annual Dazzling Black Hat Diva
weekend, which included a Diva luncheon, Black Denim and Diamond
Dinner and Black Hat Pajama Breakfast.
There were over 300 people in attendance
The Red Hat Society (RHS) is a social organization founded in 1998 for
women 50 and over established purely for 'fun'.. There are over 70,000
registered members and 24,000 chapters in the United States and abroad.
It is the largest women's social group in the world.


gap is more male teachers
by William Jackson tures are not effective educa
Dr. William Cosby, (Bill Cosby) but from my personal experiel
stated, "Education is the most pow- the influences of Black male te
erful weapon which
you can use to change
the world."
As a third genera- :.i
tion teacher I wanted
to encourage, inspire,
empower, bless and
provide confidence to
my brother educators.
Education as a i
whole needs more


cerunea male teachers to Ce posi-
tive role models, but the need for
Black males in education is impor-
tant. This is not to say other cul-


Dr. Landon Williams honored with street marker
State Senator Anthony C. "Tony"
Hill, Sr., Congresswoman Corrine
Brown and members of Greater
Macedonia Baptist Church assem-
bled together Sunday, August 7,
2011 for the dedication ceremony
and unveiling of the road designa-
tion marker, saluting their pastor,
Dr. Landon L. Williams, Sr. The
road designation was passed unani-
mously by the City Council.
Dr. Williams has received many
awards and honors for being leader
of the community. He has been the
pastor of Greater Macedonia
Baptist Church for over 35 years.
For his dedication he has received a
Community Service Award from
the A. Philip Randolph Institute.
He has also been a fighter for civil
rights and the labor movement.
In his commitment to help eradi-
cate the health disparities in the
Jacksonville community, Rev. Dr.
Williams serves as the Agape
Community Health Center
Chairman of the Board and over-
sees the health ministry at Greater
Macedonia. The health ministry Shown above is Sen. Hill, Dr. Williams and Cong. Brown at the marker.
coordinates activities and informa- partnership with MCCI Medical Dr. Williams is only the second
tion that promotes a healthy Group to open primary care clinics living citizens to be honored as a
lifestyle. He has also entered into a throughout Jacksonville. marker designate.


Ltors,
nces,
.ach-


ers in my mle; ihe cultural aware-
ness, relevance to life experiences
and need to see a face that is my
color was important to me and oth-
ers growing up in an urban setting.
It provided a sense of stability,
encouraged self worth and even
though my father was not a part of
my life other men stepped up and
took upon the roles as father, men-
tor and educator. Even though all
my friends had fathers in their
homes and I did not, I'm as success-
ful as them because of the influence
and support of other Black males.
Black Males in Education
(BMEs) understand the importance,
value and need of education to be
successful in American society.
They know education is the key to
economic stability.
BMEs take responsibility for
helping young Black boys and
young Black girls to grow into
mature and responsible Black
adults.
BMEs understand the challenges
of being Black and male in
American society and try to share
their positive experiences with
Black children that are not their
own. They want to help them value
education, hard work and teach
morals and values.
BMEs understand that they will
be viewed as Black first above their
degrees, salaries, cars, and clothes
so must display professionalism
and confidence at all times.
Continued on page 7


Is retirement

even an option

for those of

age in this

economy?
Page 7


Red Hat's Fabulous Bells caravan

to N.C. for Dazzling Diva Weekend


Time to

W consider major

changes

in our state's

r education laws
Page 4


Size 0

Has Jennifer

Hudson

gotten

too thin?
Page 8
.. .- _.'_ d-a


I V ^ /,








A.7e2A AM r1


Robinson returns

to lead Beaver St.

Enterprise Center


Milestone birthdays celebrated on the First Coast


Rum Robinson
Executive Rumbellis (Rum) Robin-
son, the first Director of Beaver
Street Enterprise Center back in 2003
when it opened its doors, has re-
turned to lead the expanding business
incubator as the Program Manager.
Over the past eight years, Robinson
has continued to be actively involved
as the Center has grown into an inter-
nationally renowned business incu-
bator under the leadership of
Executive Director Jackie Perry.
Robinson also serves as Chief Ex-
ecutive Officer and owner of Flantas-
tic Enterprises, Inc. which was
named Minority Manufacturing firm
of the year in 1995
As program manager Rum will be
responsible for all aspects of the
Technical Assistance program ensur-
ing that tenants receive the coaching,
mentoring and training needed to be
successful. In addition he will be re-
sponsible for ensuring that clients
have access to capital and other key
resources to help grow their business.
Rum's passion for entrepreneurship
and his corporate business expertise
make him the ideal man for this po-
sition said Perry. His former role as
incubator director and a board mem-
ber bring additional value and addi-
tional value and insight to his new
role.
"We're excited that he's returned to
us as we launch our eight year of
growth and success," says Perry.


Donnell Neal
Neal to lead E. Jax

Resource Center
FreshMinistries, a Jacksonville-
based multi-faith humanitarian or-
ganization, recently appointed
Donell Neal as Director of the East
Jacksonville Neighborhood Resource
Center, a FreshMinistries initiative
serving residents in core-city Jack-
sonville.
The center located at 616 A. Philip
Randolph Boulevard and provides
neighbors in East Jacksonville with
the information and guidance they
need to connect with civic and social
organizations that meet their specific
immediate needs. The center also
provides the community with a com-
puter lab for job searches, resume
building, homework research, and
internet access to apply on-line for
assistance and job applications.
The facility also serves as a com-
munity center for neighborhood
gatherings; and, houses other com-
munity service organizations and
programs such as Children's Cham-
pion and Network for Strengthening
Families.
Neal has more than 30 years expe-
rience in the client service industry
serving as Senior Health Plan Rep-
resentative and Business Analyst
with the Member Services Depart-
ment of Kaiser Foundation Health
Plan, Inc. and most recently, as an
Independent Consultant with JEA.
For further information on the cen-
ter, contact Pam Kearney, at 355-
0000


SBirtday. Shown (L-R) are Marva Over 200 guests and family attended
McKinnon, (daughter) Mary Gibson the event. Shown (L-R) re Donald
^ Hawkins, honoree Martha M Gib- Eric Highsmith, Shana Lesesne-
son. Robinson, Honoree-Emily Reddick-
iday celebrations were held above left was Mrs Martha Mae On Friday night, Emily Reddick- Lesesne, Sheldon Paul Hihgsmith
the First Coast last weekend Gibson joined by family and friends Lesesne celebrated her 70th birthday and Kenneth Andrew Highsmith.
norating milestones. Shown at her home, celebrating her 93rd at the Legends Center on Soutel Dr. R. Silver photos

What will "catastrophe" look like for Black America?


Continued from front
-ding many who recently lost their
middle-income jobs may face over
the next decade.
Not when, as the overall U.S.
poverty rate has risen to an all-time
high of more than 14 percent, the
proportion of Black Americans at or
below the poverty line rose a full per-
cent to nearly 26 percent.
Not when the dynamics of the
country's jobless recovery promise
no reduction in the Black unemploy-
ment rate of more than 16 percent-
double that of whites with rates in
some urban areas being higher.
Not when that racial ratio Black
unemployment being one-third to
fully twice that of whites holds for
every population segment of the two
groups, including college graduates.
Not when public-sector jobs, long
a crucial foundation of Black upward
mobility, are being severely cut back,
and the private sector, has in mass
terms put a "not hiring" sign on its
U.S. operations.
Not whenAfican Americans, who
are 12 percent of the population,


make up just over 19 percent of the
nation's more than 14 millionjobless
workers and nearly 23 percent of the
6.3-million of them who've been out
of work for 12 months or more.
Not when the epidemic of foreclo-
sures among Black Americans has
not only driven Black homeowner-
ship rates back to 1990s and under-
mined the stability of predominantly
Black neighborhoods but also robbed
Black America as a whole of any
chance of accumulating significant
wealth for the foreseeable future.
And not when, as a new study by
the Pew Research Center has charted,
the gap in median wealth between
white households, on the one hand,
and Black and Hispanic households,
on the other, is at record dimensions.
All three groups lost a portion of
their net worth as the Great Reces-
sion ran its course.
These are just a few of the distress-
ing signs indicating that, for all the
valuable, necessary and well-publi-
cized achievements of the still-rela-
tively small Black strata of
upper-class Blacks, many middle-


class Blacks are desperately trying to
hold onto the gains which trans-
formed their status and the shape of
the Black class structure over the last
40 years: From one in which fully
two-thirds of Black households
earned no better than a lower-middle-
class income to one in which, before
2007, half of employed Blacks had
middle-class or blue-collar incomes.
Unfortunately, as political scientist
Michael C. Dawson recently wrote,
the Great Recession and jobless re-
covery are "eroding the traditional
foundation for the Black middle class
while appearing to all but block roads
for less affluent Blacks to move into
the middle class."
This is not to ignore the broader
crisis, which has left millions of once
gainfully-employed white workers
bereft and pushed to the margins of
the society they, too, once invigor-
ated with their on-the-job productiv-
ity. In fact, the only hope of solving
the Black jobs crisis lies in crafting a
comprehensive effort that will rescue
most of the jobless. ,
That task would be difficult


enough by itself because of the dy-
namics of the globalized economy
and the slow recovery many econo-
mists project for the U.S. economy.
But it is further complicated by the
extraordinary polarization that the
debt crisis revealed exists among the
national political elite; and, accord-
ing to a recent Pew Research Center
survey, the increasing movement of
white voters from the Democratic
Party to the Republican Party.
The implications of that shift for
the 2012 presidential campaign is un-
derscored by the continuing exam-
ples of right-wing political figures,
both officeholders or party operatives
criticizing President Obama in
overtly-racist terms not seen at the
level of respectable political dis-
course since the early 1960s.
That means that, in order for Black
Americans to have a chance to defeat
the economic crisis they are facing,
they will have to win the political
battle immediately ahead of them.
Lee A. Daniels is Director of Commu-
nications for the NAACPLegal Defense
and Educational Fund.


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Pare 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 11-17, 2011


Time to consider major changes in state education laws


I have quickly learned that many
of the people who write the laws
that govern our public educational
system here in Florida are not pro-
ponents of public schools.
Many of these policymakers are
voucher supporters or have charter
school ties or politically supported
by educational management organ-
izations, which are in business to
run schools for a profit. None of
these things make you a bad per-
son, but they do alter your perspec-
tive about public education.
I have sat in committee after
committee where my Republican
colleagues have talked about the
need to offer parents choice. And I
agree that parents and students
need choices that is why magnet
programs were born.
But what unsettles me is that
these same legislators that are
pushing vouchers, charter schools
and virtual learning (choice) seem
to ignore the gigantic elephant in
the room. That elephant is our
struggling neighborhood public
schools. Education giants such as
Ribault, Raines, Jackson,
Northshore, Ed White, etc.
Offering choice is fine, but what
about offering solutions that help
turn schools around versus results
that encourage the "brain drain" or
the flight of good students away
from struggling schools.
Many folks who push education


reform support the notion of
"Choice" as one solution. The
notion is simple all students
should have various options when
it comes to their education versus
being forced to attend failing or
marginal schools.
A main arguments for increasing
educational choice is that choice
induces competition among
schools vying for students, and this
improves student performance in
all schools private and public.
Perhaps this makes sense in an
alternate universe. However, the
concept of "brain drain" is real. So
when most of the high achieving
students leave struggling schools
,how do you continue to fix those
schools and make them attractive
options for students and parents?
I have heard choice advocates
contend that parents have a right to
choose their child's school and if
public schools cannot handle the
competition then maybe they
shouldn't be open. These advo-
cates feel that increased competi-
tion for students among schools,
public and private, results in all
schools improving their education-
al delivery and raising student
achievement.
That is not the reality of our pub-
lic school system.
I believe that good charters have
a place, but I am not willing to
trade off neighborhood public


NFL's Hall of Fame


speeches more about


ego than reality


schools for charters schools. Strong
quality neighborhood schools and
charters can coexist. In fact, I think
that we need to start using the best
practices of good charter and pri-
vate schools to help make our pub-
lic schools better.
And that is what has been miss-
ing.
The same amount of effort that
gets put into creating new voucher
and charter school laws needs to go
into creating new public school
policies that will help our strug-
gling schools.
Let's really put our children first.
Well one of the problems with
this concept is that there is no
money to be made by focusing on
everyday public schools. There is
money to be made from vouchers
and most of the companies that
manage charter and intervening
schools are making major profits.
Public education was never sup-
posed to be an opportunity for pri-
vate companies to make a buck.
To make matters worse, there is
no real evidence that proves that
charters, voucher or magnet pro-
grams are helping our students, but
lawmakers keep pushing for more
charter schools.
Under a new law passed this
year, parents with kids in a public
school that received even a single
D or F grade can put their kids in a
charter instead.


The Miami Herald did a study of
all public schools including char-
ters and found that most charters
are struggling.
"The governor and the
Legislature have invested their
rhetoric and your money in the
notion that charter schools will
improve student achievement.
Except the results haven't been so
grand," said the writer from the
Herald.
The report added, "Less than 12
percent of the state's schools are
charters, but they account for 15 of
Florida's 31 failing schools. In
Broward [County], for example, all
four of the schools deemed failures
were charters. Statewide, charters
were more likely to receive a D rat-
ing, but less likely to earn A's, B's
or C's than traditional schools."
Again, I truly believe that charter
schools and other choice options
have a place, but it is time to shift
our focus back on fixing our strug-
gling public schools versus focus-
ing heavily on choice options.
Not only do we need policy
changes in Tallahassee, we need a
renewed sense of urgency from
parents, students, teachers, admin-
istrators and the community as a
whole.Let's shift our focus on our
public schools becoming the right
"choice."
Signing off from Ribault High
School,


A broader perspective of our social construct.


Sharpe, Faulk and Sanders made sure that everyone knew they used football to shed poverty


I'm sure they meant well.
After all, they were only profes-
sional athletes not Greek philoso-
phers or great civil rights orators.
Last Saturday, former National
Football League standouts
Marshall Faulk, Shannon Sharpe
and Deion Sanders were among a
group of seven inducted into the
NFL Hall of Fame. As customary,
inductees get to have their moment
in the sun by giving remarks as a
salute to enshrinement.
Traditionally, this opportunity is
used to reflect on how the road
traveled and to thank those who
hold special places in the lives of

"I made a pro

I said momr

gonna be rich o

And you wii

have to work i

day of yoi
-D

inductees. And because it is their
special time to shine, inductees are
allowed to take particular liberty
with speeches in hopes of scoring
one more touchdown.
Faulk, Sharpe and Sanders chose
to make it particularly clear that
they survived insurmountable odds
to make it to the big stage of the
NFL. Faulk emerged out of the


crime ridden Wards of New
Orleans. Sharpe, and his brother
Sterling, lived in a 1,000 square
foot cinder block house with his
grandparents in tiny Glennville,
Georgia. Sanders confided that he
was embarrassed that his mom
cleaned the halls and rooms at a Ft.
Myers hospital.
And while poverty was the com-
mon thread during their presenta-
tions, they all decided to bow to the
same alter for a way out.
Professional football.
That's right, Faulk, Sharpe and
Sanders decided that, through foot-
ball, they would get rich or die try-
Smise ing.
mise.. Now I'm no
a, dream killer but
ha, inm there is one thing
that should have
ne day. been obvious
here. Yes Faulk,
It never Sharpe and
Sanders were
another incredible ath-
letes. However
1lfe" ,, they should have
ir if realized that their
Weion Sanders athletic prowess
alone did not put
them in the Hall of Fame. Just like
fate dealt them the ultimate recog-
nition for their success on the field,
it also made nomads out of a multi-
tude of athletes with even greater
talents.
So why wasn't I satisfied with
the highlights, dedications and
thank yous?
I believe that after the conclusion


of the careers of these successful
winners, years of reflection should
have brought about a fair amount of
reality checking. The streets are lit-
tered with young men who shared
similar stations in life. Those guid-
ing forces that eventually changed
their lives may have never connect-
ed with their brethren. And in keep-
ing with reality these all-time all-
stars should have focused more on
what should be, versus the conver-
sion of their immortality.
Make no mistake, Faulk, Sharpe
and Sanders made good use of their
ability. And in their cases have
seemingly achieved financial secu-
rity as a result of successful profes-
sional football careers. They also
made a lot of money for their NFL
owners and agents along the way.
The problem is they never admitted
this s not the norm. The impression
they left is that hard work and ded-
ication will take you to the NFL.
And that assessment simply is not
true.
Deion Sanders was born with
something that through no amount
of hard work or dedication can be
achieved, 4.2 per 40-yard dash
speed. And the fact that Sanders
thanked more than 100 people dur-
ing his speech says his speed and
talent had very little to do with his
success. That's why out of the
seven busloads that accompanied
Sanders on his Hall of Fame cele-
bration tour there may be one indi-
vidual who has the potential to
develop and maintain that sort of
athletic prowess. Even Sanders'


P^LnL r
LORIDA S rFRST COAST Q UALITY1 BLACK \V C K L

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Rita Perry

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acksonville Latimer,
L'hobumber of LCommete Vickie Bi


Sylvia Perry

Managing Editor


BUTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald Fullwood,
ichinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Marsha Oliver, Marretta
Phyllis Mack, Tonya Austin, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver,
rown, Rahman Johnson, Headshots, William Jackson.


own son is probably absent the
tools to make it to the ultimate
level. The difference is that if
Sanders' offspring falls prey to the
black hole of professional sports,
he will have a cushion to embrace
his fall back to Earth.
The reality is that if you're black
you probably grew up entrenched
or exposed to poverty in some
form. Chances are that you are
dealing with some sort of social
adversity, life challenges or
depressed circumstances just like
Faulk, Sharpe and Sanders. Their
messages may have provided a bet-
ter road map to success for children
experiencing similar challenges as
their own if they would have
focused on how they became better
people, not ball players.
On the field Faulk, Sharpe and
Sanders produced numbers that
speak for themselves. They were
great. However, even after retire-
ment and Hall of Fame status, they
have an opportunity to tighten up
their game. Talk more about educa-
tion, not athletics. Drive it home as
if the game depended on it. Treat
the promotion of education as if it
were the free agent status to the
future. For the hope of the many
outweigh the prospect of the
few...or the Hall of Famers.
Because being rich has nothing
to do with becoming a millionaire.
Breed truth.
Visit our blog @
www.novaljones. wordpress.com.
Follow us on twitter @
twitter/novaljones. Email your con >


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tunities for free expression of ideas.
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Therefore, the Free Press ownership
reserves the right to publish views
and opinions by syndicated and
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and other writers' which are solely
their own. Those views do not neces-
sarily reflect the policies and posi-
tions of the staff and management of
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Readers, are encouraged to write
letters to the editor commenting on
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Dedicating

the Dream
A week of events is planned in Washington, D.C.
around the unveiling of the Martin Luther King, Jr.
National Memorial. The official dedication of the King
National Memorial on the National Mall will take place at 11 a.m. Sunday,
August 28, 2011, the 48th anniversary of the day King delivered his
famous "I Have a Dream" speech. Preceding, and following, the dedica-
tion will be star-studded concerts, luncheons, dinners and receptions
attended by an array of African-American leadership.
A quarter-million people will gather on and adjacent to the four-acre plot
on the northeast corer of the Tidal Basin to dedicate a monument to
Martin Luther King's legacy and its location on American History's Main
Street. The event will feature the first African-American President of the
United States as he honors the first African-American with a memorial on
the National Mall and the first non-president so honored. Thousands of
contributors and community leaders will join President Barrack Obama at
the site. Central to the thinking of Martin Luther King was the concept of
the "Beloved Community." The MLK National Memorial's centerpiece is
the "Stone of Hope", a 30-foot statue of Dr. King, with a 450-foot inscrip-
tion wall with excerpts of his sermons and public addresses.
The process of designing, funding and constructing the memorial was
coordinated by the nonprofit Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial
Project Foundation. Harry E. Johnson, Sr., and his Alpha Phi Alpha fra-
ternity deserve credit for arriving at this historical reality. Johnson has
served as president and CEO of the foundation since' 2002. A former
Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity president, Johnson reports that the MLK
Memorial cost $120 million to build. The U.S. Congress gave $10 million
in matching funds.
In his public invitation, Jonson said: "We look forward to sharing with
you a joyous and historic day for our nation". To many, King symbolizes
the Civil Rights era's great American Revolution. The MLK Memorial to
open on August 22. After MLK's assassination in 1968, his fraternity
Alpha Phi Alpha proposed a permanent memorial in Washington, D.C.
Alpha Phi Alpha's efforts gained momentum in 1986, after King's birthday
was designated a national holiday. In 1996, Congress authorized Secretary
of the Interior Bruce Babbitt to permit Alpha Phi Alpha to establish a
memorial in the District of Columbia, and gave the fraternity until
November 2003 to raise $100 million and break ground. In 1998,
Congress authorized the fraternity to establish the foundation to manage
the fundraising and design and approve building of the memorial.
It was an uphill climb for Johnson's foundation to build the MLK
Memorial. A MLK King Family company, Intellectual Properties
Management Inc. proved to be a significant obstacle. The family wanted
the foundation to pay licensing fees to use MLK's name and likeness. The
King family pledged that any money would go to the King Center's char-
itable efforts. The King Center in Atlanta is the location of King's grave
and a National Historic Site. Established in 1968 by the late Coretta Scott
King, the King Center is the official, living memorial dedicated to the lega-
cy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Estimates suggest that the King family
charged the MLK Memorial Foundation $800,000 in fees. Now, it's all
"OK" between the foundation and the MLK Family. Children of MLK,
Bernice and Martin Luther King III toured the National Mall site in
October 2010 and are expected to attend the dedication.
Black Americans have reason to be proud and to be MLK Memorial
benefactors. As we raise a toast, it would be "significant" if Blacks con-
tribute to this cause. Most of the MLK Memorial's construction costs were
underwritten by American corporations and organizations such as the
National Basketball Association (NBA). General Motors Corporation
gave more than $10 million and will serve as dedication chair. The
Tommy Hilfiger Corporate Foundation is dedication co-chair, as is Stevie
Wonder, who wrote MLK's "Happy Birthday" song. A minority, female-
owned and operated firm, McKissack & McKissack, is a part of the MLK
Memorial Design-Build Team. To make a donation, visit
www.MLKmemorial.org


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Subscribe to the
.., Jacksonville Free Press!

***-TV : Enclosed is my

i. ;. : : check _money order
for $36.00 to cover my
one year subscription.


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ADDRESS

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MAIL TO: JACKSONVILLE FREE PRESS
P.O. BOX 43580, JACKSONVILLE, FL 32203


August 11-17, 2011


Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press









Au2ust 11-17, 2011 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5


EWC Alumni to honor Mayor,

Williams at 2011 Convention
This year's Edward Waters
College National Alumni
Convention is scheduled for
August 18-21, 2011 at the Crowne
Plaza Jacksonville Riverfront
Hotel, 1201 Riverplace Blvd.
The convention will include
activities such as the Tiger's Toast
Opening Reception, Recognition
Luncheon, White Linen Soiree
and the Alumni Awards Banquet
on Saturday, August 21st at 7p.m.
A number of outstanding alumni
will be honored including
Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown
and Dr. Ted Williams, Associate
Vice President of Diversity and
Equal Opportunity, University of
South Florida.
For more information, please Dr. Ted Williams
contact Marguerite Warren at 904-
765-2210 or ewcnatalumni- assn@gmail.com.


Congressional Black Caucus

launches national job tour
Saying jobs and the economy must become central to the economic
debate, and responding to continued high levels of unemployment, the
Congressional Black Caucus
(CBC) launched a "For the
People" Jobs Initiative this
week, including nationwide job
a fairs and town hall meetings.
The initiative kicks off in
Cleveland, Ohio with a job fair
and town hall at Cleveland State
University, hosted by Rep.
Marcia Fudge.
"Recently, the CBC Members
unanimously introduced the Congressional Black Caucus 'For the People'
Jobs Initiative Resolution (H. Res. 348) to encourage the House of
Representatives to immediately consider and pass critical jobs legislation
to address the growing jobs crisis throughout America," CBC Chairman
Chairman Emanuel Cleaver, II said on Friday, in response to the release of
July jobs numbers. "We want to get 10,000 people hired. There is no time
to waste. The time to act is now, and we are on the move."
More than 120 employers have registered to participate in the jobs fairs,
and more than 30 members of the CBC will take part in town halls in
Cleveland (August 8t, Detroit (August 16), Atlanta (August 18-19), Miami
(August 22-23) and Los Angeles (August 30). Information on the town
halls can be found below, and you can participate via TheGrio's Facebook
page. Selected questions from Facebook will be asked directly to members
of Congress during the town halls.


Jury convicts 5 police officers post Katrina


NEW ORLEANS A federal jury
has convicted five current or for-
mer police officers in the deadly
shootings on a New Orleans bridge
after Hurricane Katrina.
All five officers were convicted
of charges stemming from the
cover-up of the shootings. The four
who had been charged with civil
rights violations in the shootings
were convicted on all counts.
However, the jury didn't find that
Brisette or Faulcon's shootings
amounted to murder
Prosecutors contended during the
five-week federal trial that officers
shot unarmed people without justi-
fication and without warning,
killing two and wounding four oth-
ers on Sept. 4, 2005, then embarked
on a cover-up involving made-up
witnesses, falsified reports and a
planted gun.
Defense attorneys countered that
the officers were returning fire and
reasonably believed their lives were
in danger as they rushed to respond
to another officer's distress call less
than a week after Katrina struck.


Convicted were former officer
Robert Faulcon, Sgts. Robert
Gisevius and Kenneth Bowen,
Officer Anthony Villavaso and
retired Sgt. Arthur Kaufman.
Faulcon, Gisevius, Bowen and
Villavaso were convicted in the
shootings and with taking part in
the alleged cover-up. Kaufman,
who investigated the shootings, was
charged only in the alleged cover-
up.
The trial was a high-profile test of
the Justice Department's effort to
clean up a police department
marred by a reputation for corrup-
tion and brutality. A total of 20 cur-
rent or former New Orleans police
officers were charged last year in a
series of federal probes. Most of the
cases center on actions during the
aftermath of the Aug. 29, 2005,
storm, which plunged the flooded
city into a state of lawlessness and
desperation.
Assistant U.S. Attorney Theodore
Carter said in closing arguments
Tuesday that police had no justifi-
cation for shooting unarmed,


defenseless people try-
ing to cross the bridge
in search of food and
help mere days after
Katrina struck.
"It was unreasonable
for these officers to
fire even one shot, let
alone dozens," he had
said.
Defense attorneys
argued, however, that
police were shot at on
the bridge before they
returned fire. .
"None of these peo-
ple intentionally decided to go out
there and cause people harm," said
Timothy Meche, Villavaso's lawyer.
He said they did their best, operat-
ing under "terrible, horrible circum-
stances" after Katrina.
Faulcon, the only defendant to
testify, said he was "paralyzed with
fear" when he shot and killed a 40-
year-old mentally disabled man,
Ronald Madison, as he chased him
and his brother, Lance Madison.
Faulcon didn't dispute that he shot


an
unarmed man in the back, but he
testified that he had believed
Ronald Madison was armed and
posed a threat.
Prosecutors contended at trial
that Kaufman retrieved a gun from
his home weeks after the shootings
and turned it in as evidence, trying
to pass it off as a' gun belonging to
Lance Madison. He also is accused
of fabricating two nonexistent wit-
nesses to the shootings.


I i


Miss. Klansmen convicted


decades later dies in prison


Mississippi James Ford Seale,
a long-time member of the
Mississippi KKK who very nearly
got away with murder, has died.
After serving less than four years of
three life sentences for the 1964
Freedom Summer murders of
Henry Hezekiah Dee and Charles
Eddie Moore, both 19, Seale, 76,
died in prison last week.
The Dee/Moore double murder
was a classic horror story of the
unreconstructed South battling
against efforts to end segregation
and racial terrorism. Even though
Seale's fellow murderer, Charles
Marcus Edwards, gave the FBI a
signed confession at the time and
both men were arrested, a
Mississippi justice of the peace
promptly dismissed the case against
the Klansmen with no explanation
at all. Earlier, a local sheriff told
Moore's mother, who had reported
her son missing, that Charles
Moore was staying with relatives of
the Moores in Louisiana -- a lie.
The killings came during what
civil rights workers called
"Freedom Summer," a period that
may have seen the worst racial ter-
rorism of the civil rights movement.
When activists vowed to come to
Mississippi that summer to undo
segregation, White Knights chief
Samuel Bowers ordered his mem-
bers to carry out a series of "coun-
terattacks" against "selected tar-
gets." Six weeks later, White
Knights abducted and murdered
James Chaney, Andrew Goodman
and Michael Schwemer in a case
that was later recounted in the
movie Mississippi Burning. It was
while dredging the Mississippi
River near Tallulah for those three
civil rights workers that the disfig-
ured bodies of Dee and Moore were
found -- two more Southern black
men in a group of murdered racial
martyrs whose entire roster will
never be known.
According to Edwards' confession,
he and Seale selected their victims
because Moore had just been
expelled from college for taking
part in a student demonstration and
Dee had lived in Chicago -- and
because they believed a wild tale


James Ford Seale
about the two being part of planned
black Muslim uprising. They
abducted their victims from a rural
stretch of highway in southwest
Mississippi and took them into the
Homochitto National Forest, where
they tied them to trees and beat
them unconscious. Then they tied
heavy weights to their bodies and
threw them in the river. When the
bodies were discovered, one had
been cut in half and the other
decapitated.
The case was reopened in 2005
after Jerry Mitchell of the Clarion-
Ledger of Jackson, Miss., reported
that Dee and Moore might have
been killed in the national forest,
meaning the government could
bring federal charges. In 2007,
Seale was convicted of two counts
of kidnapping and one of conspira-
cy to kidnap. Last year, an appeals
court refused to throw out the con-
viction.
Imperial Wizard Bowers, who
himself served time in the
Mississippi Burning case and
another before dying in prison in
2006, led what at the time was the
South's most violent Klan group.
His organization started its
response to the Freedom Summer
by burning 64 crosses in a single
night throughout Mississippi.
Before the summer was over, more
than 80 people had been beaten, 35
shot at, five murdered and more
than 20 black churches had been
burned in Mississippi alone.


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5


August 11-17, 2011


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ASALH sponsors trip to D.C.
The James Weldon Johnson of The Association of the Life and Study of
African American Life and History will be sponsoring a bus trip to the
Martin Luther King Memorial Dedication, August 27th to Washington,
D.C. The trip will also include a tour of African American Heritage histor-
ical sites as well and the national monument. A meal package is included
with brunch on Sunday, August 28th at b. Smith's Restaurant and Dinner at
Phillips Flagship on the Potomac River. Lodging continental breakfast and
a box lunch is included for the trip home. Meals traveling to D.C. and din-
ner on the return trip are at your own expense. For more information, go to
http://asalh-jaxfl.org and download the flyer and registration form. You
may also call 551-0372 or 228-3132 if you have questions.

Revival at Mt. Bethel Missionary
There will be a revival at Mt. Bethel Missionary Baptist Church located
at 1620 Helena Street, Dr. Robert E. Herring, Sr., Pastor, on August 17th
thru 19th, 7 p.m. nightly. The speaker will be Pastor Darien Bolden of First
Missionary Baptist Church of Fernandina Beach, FL. The Dance Ministry
Recital will be on Saturday, August 20th at 6:30 p.m. and Family & Friends
Day will be Sunday, August 21st at 11 a.m. with Pastor James Williams of
Lighthouse Church of Restoration, Jacksonville, FL as the speaker. All are
invited. For more information call 764-8032.

Women's Day at First Church
Palm Coast "Women's Day" will be celebrated August 14th at the First
Church of Palm Coast. "Standing On The Promises of God" will be the
theme preached by the Rev. Cheryl Daniels for the 8 a.m. service, and the
Rev. Mattie Riley-Hayes, for the 10 a.m. service.
First Church, under the pastorate of the Rev. Gillard S. Glover, is at 91
Old Kings Road North. The church can be reached at 386-446-5759.

Mt. Zion AME celebrates
145th Anniversary August 21st
Historic Mt. Zion AME Church, located at 201 E. Beaver Street in
Downtown Jacksonville, invites the public to join in celebrating their 145th
anniversary. The celebration will begin on Sunday, August 21st with morn-
ing service at 10 a.m. Historic Mt. Zion AME Church is the second oldest
AME church in the state of Florida. It was founded in 1866. It is also, the
second oldest AME church in the City of Jacksonville. There will also be
a special service from 1 2:30 p.m.
For more information call Wanda Mitchell at 355-4475.


Free school supplies, clothes and food
at New Birth Christian Assembly
The Love Reach Ministry of New Birth Christian Assembly where the
Pastor is Rev. Michael J. McClendon, is hosting a FREE clothing and food
giveaway from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on August 13, 2011 on the church grounds.
There will be school supplies available for the youth to help prepare them
for success. For more information please contact Lady Janice E.
McClendon or Sister Cynthia Matthews at (904) 396-4949. The church is
located at 2185 Jemigan Road.

Christ Resurrection 4th Anniversary
The Christ Resurrection Power Assembly located at 1127 Bert Rd.
Jacksonville, Fl 32211, will be celebrating their 4th Anniversary
Convention and Celebration. The theme for the event is "Arise Shine" and
will be held August 18-21st, at 7 p.m.nightly and 10 a.m on Sunday.
Sharing the Word will be Bishop Francis Wale Oke, Dr. Ade Ajala Host
Bishop and Rev Mrs. Abiola Idown..

Hat Show at Friendship Primitive Baptist
The Usher Board Number 1 of Friendship Primitive Baptist Church is
having a Hat Fashion Show on Saturday August 13, 2011 at 4 p.m. This is
a FREE event. The church is located at 1106 Pearce St. Elder Bobbie
Sheffield is Pastor. For more information contact Mother Gloria Wilcox at
633-9165.

Free Kutz for Kids at Central CME
The public is invited to join Pastor Marquise Hardrick of Central
Metropolitan CME for the Sunday morning worship service, August 21st at
10:45a.m. Following the morning worship service, the Central Young
Adult Ministry will present free back to school hair "Kutz 4 Kidz," for par-
ticipants' ages 4 to 12 years old, from 2- 7 p.m.
Registration is required. Participation forms are available for picked up
Monday Friday from 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. at the church's front office located
at 4611 North Pearl Street. For more information, call 904 354-7426.

NOTICE: Church news is published free of charge. Information
must be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday,
at 5 p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information received
prior to the event date will be printed on a space available basis
until the date. Fax e-mail to 765-3803 or e-mail to
JFreePress@aol.com.


Health & Wellness Fair
at Christian Fellowship Center
The Christian Fellowship Center Church will host a Health and Wellness
Fair featuring various screenings including blood pressure, gluose, hiv and
STD among others. Other presentations and workshops include healthy
meals, massage therapy and childhood obesity. The church is located at
5210 University Blvd. West from 9 a.m. 3 p.m. For more information, call
731-7970.

Clothes & Food Give-a-way at New Birth
The Love Reach Ministry of New Birth Christian Assembly, located at
2185 Jernigan Rd. where the Pastor is Rev. Michael J. McClendon, is host-
ing a free clothing and food giveaway from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. on August 13th
on the church grounds. There will be school supplies available for the youth
to help prepare them for success. For more information, contact Lady
Janice E. McClendon or Sister Cynthia Matthews at (904) 396-4949.

Women of the Word Outreach
A Prophetic Conference for Women Only Wednesday August 17, Friday
August 19, 2011 at 7:00p.m., nightly to be held at the Crowne Plaza at
14670 Duval Rd.

Installation services at St. Andrews
The congregation of St. Andrew Missionary Baptist Church invites the
public to attend the celebration and installation services for Rev. Charles E.
Cooper, Jr. The Celebration Services will be held Monday August 22nd
through Friday August 26th at 7 p.m. nightly. The Service of Installation
will be held on Sunday August 28th at 4 p.m. RSVP your attendance to
Jacquelyn Flowers (904) 743-8693 by August 12th with the dates you will
attend. The church is located at 2600 West 45th Street.

Blodgett Homes Reunion
Blodgett Homes and surrounding areas communities will celebrate their
llth annual reunion on Friday, August 19, 2011 at the Council of
Deliberation 29 Eest 6th Street, Jacksonville Florida 32206 from 7 p.m.
until midnight. The theme is Unity IS THE KEY. This is a Glass House
Production Featuring D. J. Kenny Leggett ( Uncle Jam ) and other local
entertainers. Residents from the old neighborhood of Blodgett Homes and
all surrounding areas are invited to participate.
For more information please contact Mrs. E. Bing at 904-765-6170.


Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20


Pastor Landon Williams


8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship

9:30 a.m. Sunday School

11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday 2 PM 3 PM

**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


Sunday School
9 a.m.
Morning Worship
10 a.m.
Lord's Supper
Second Sunday
3:00 p.m.
Evening Worship
Every 3rd & 4th
Sunday
4 :00 p.m.


A church

that's on the

move in

worship with

prayer, praise

and power!


Pastor Robert Lecount, Jr


School of Ministry Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.

Thursday High Praise Worship 7:00 p.m.

2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


St. Thomas Missionary Baptist celebrating

Pastor Ernie Murray's Silver Anniversary


St. Thomas Missionary Baptist
Church is celebrating the 25th
Silver Anniversary of Pastor Ernie
L. Murray, Sr..
Festivities will kick off with a
Semi-Formal banquet on Saturday,
August 13, 2011 at 7 p.m. at the St.
Thomas Family Life Center located
at 2119 Rowe Avenue. Dr. James B.
Sampson, President of the Florida
General Baptist Convention will be


the guest speaker.
The anniversary will climax with
Worship Services, Sunday August
14, 2011 beginning at 8 a.m. with
Pastor Jimmie Green of the Zion
Missionary Baptist Church,
Blackshear, Georgia as the guest
preacher. Pastor Murray will take to
the pulpit for 10:45a.m.
services.That afternoon, a 4 p.m.
celebration service will take place


featuring Bishop Rudolph W.
McKissick Sr. of the Bethel Baptist
Institutional Church bringing the
spoken word. Churches from
throughout the city will be the spe-
cial guests. The community is invit-
ed to share in these services.
The church is located at 5863
Moncrief Road. For more informa-
tion call 768-8880 or E-mail:
stthomasmbc@bellsouth.net.


NBCI invites African American men back to church


The National Black Church
Initiative (NBCI) a faith-based
coalition of 34,000, church com-
prised of 15 denominations and 15.7
million African Americans is com-
mitted to bringing African American
men back to church.
According to the Pew Forum 2007
survey, people of black ethnicity
were most likely to be part of a for-
mal religion, with 85 percent being
Christians. However according to
the Barna Research Group, more
than 90 percent of American men
believe in God, and 5 out of 6 call
themselves Christian. But only 2 out


of 6 attend church on any given
Sunday.
This means that in American, 60
percent of church attendees are
women. The iniatives focus is to
open doors, arms and hearts to
understand the complex sociologi-
cal and psychological factors that
prohibit African American men
from being consistent churchgoers.
NBCI believes that the first step
for African American brothers is to
return to church-atoning for their
sins and reestablishing their rela-
tionship with God through Christ.
The Kick-off of this 7 year program


is September 25, 2011 but the first
step in reengaging African
American men. The goal is to reach
over 10 million African American
men nationwide, providing techni-
cal assistance to aid churches in
reaching African American males
and sustaining their membership.
Visit the website to learn more
about NBCI's Healing Family
Initiative at http://www.nalt-
blackchurch.com/healing-
family.html.
The National Black Church
Initiative (NBCI) is under the lead-
ership of Rev. Tony Evans.


Disciples of Christ Cbristiai Fellowship
* A Full Gospel Baptist Church *


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church

215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


Weekly Services

S -Sunday Morning Worship Midweek Services
7:40 a.m. and 10:40 a.m. Wednesday Noon Service
.4 "Miracle at Midday"
-4 Church school 12 noon-1 p.m.
9:30 a.m. The Word from the Sons
Bible Study and Daughters of Bethel
Bishop Rudolph 6:30 p.m. 3rd Sunday 4:00 p.m Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Sr. McKissick, Jr.
Senior Pastor Come mBshra In oCoMMmmunlon on Ist Suondmat 7oMm MAndU Senior Pastor

S Worship with us LIVE
on the web visit
*-- www.truth2powerministries.org


Grace and Peace
visit www.Bethelite.org


Greater Macedonia I ~


I I


August 11-17. 2011


Pa e 6 Ms Perr
'
s Free s


I


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Il


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Sign of the time$: should you put your retirement on hold?


By Jason Alderman
One indicator our economy is
still hurting is that more and more
people are postponing retirement.
According to the Department of
Labor, those over 55 and still work-
ing have increased steadily since
the recession began 28.9 million
at last count and some surveys
show more than a third of employ-
ees expect to work past age 70 or
never retire.
Would-be retirees have faced a
perfect storm of negative situa-
tions:
Having to tap retirement savings
early to cover bills or tide them
through unemployment.
Plunging home values dimin-
ished or erased the equity many had
hoped to draw on in retirement.
Unable to afford or qualify for
- health insurance they'll need until
Medicare kicks in.
And many boomer parents have
put their own savings on hold while


helping their kids struggle through
the recession.
If you're hoping to retire in the
next few years, consider the fol-
lowing:
How much will you need?
Financial planners often suggest
people may need 70 percent or
more of pre-retirement income to
maintain their current lifestyle, but
it's difficult to generalize. For
example, some people downsize
housing or retire to less expensive
areas and thus need less. Others can
expect increased medical, utility
and other bills to outpace earnings
on their savings.
Start estimating your retirement
needs by using online calculators:
The Retirement Estimator at
www.ssa.gov/estimator automati-
cally enters your earnings informa-
tion to estimate your projected
Social Security benefits under dif-
ferent scenarios, such as age at
retirement, future earnings projec-


tions, etc. You can also download a
more detailed calculator to make
more precise estimates.
Check whether your
401(k) plan administra-
tor's website has a cal-
culator to estimate
how much you will
accumulate under
various contribution RETI
and investment sce-
narios. If not, try the
various retirement
calculators at
www.bankrate.com.
AARP offers a retire-
ment calculator to help deter-
mine your current financial status
and what you'll need to save to


meet your retirement needs.
After you've explored various
retirement scenarios, con-
sider paying a financial
planner to help work
out an investment
and savings game
plan. If you don't
have a personal
ENT referral, good
resources
include
www.cfp.net,
www.napfa.org
a n d
www.fpanet.org.
Social Security issues.
To make ends meet, many peo-
ple begin drawing reduced benefits


from Social Security before reach-
ing full retirement (65 for those
born before 1938 and gradually
increasing to 67 thereafter). This
can have several financial conse-
quences:
Your monthly benefit will be
reduced by up to 30 percent.
(Conversely, if you postpone bene-
fits until after reaching full retire-
ment age, your benefit increases by
7 to 8 percent per year, up to age
70.)
Although many states don't tax
Social Security benefits, they are
counted as taxable income by the
federal government. So, depending
on your overall income, you could
owe federal tax on a portion of your


benefit. IRS Publication 915 at
www.irs.gov has full details.
If you begin drawing Social
Security while still working, your
benefit could be significantly
reduced depending on your
income. Read "How Work Affects
Your Benefits" at www.ssa.gov for
details. (Rest assured, however:
Those reductions aren't truly lost
since your benefit will be recalcu-
lated upward at full retirement
age.)
One last suggestion: Once you've
settled on what you think will be a
sufficient retirement budget, try
living on it for a few months first
before retiring to make sure it actu-
ally works.


Don't underestimate the value of our male educators


Continued from front
BMEs understand they may be the
only positive Black male role
model in a young students' life.
They must try to inspire, motivate,
and educate at all times.
BMEs understand that they are
always under a microscope by par-
ents, administrators and society so
must always conduct themselves
professionally.
BMEs understand the sacrifices in
choosing education as a career
choice. They do it for the love of
children and the opportunity to be a
positive influence in society.
BMEs understand they are some-
times viewed as the custodian, ath-
letic coach, yard person, bus driver
or cafeteria worker, but no matter
someone else's perception they are
still positive forces in the education
of youth.
BMEs understand their responsi-
bility for their families, but some-
times must put others before them-
selves and their families.
Sometimes they sacrifice to save
another life outside of their family
or bring others into their family.
BMEs understand that they are not
Superman and cannot save every
child no matter how hard they try.
They still try their best to make a
difference for all children.
BMEs do not always get the emo-
tional, spiritual and mental support
they need when working with chil-
dren in school and the community,


but they press forward and do
important work.
BMEs Are sometimes viewed as
arrogant, cocky, indifferent, and
thuggish when in fact they emanate
intelligence, creativity, drive,
accountability, spirituality, disci-
pline and strength of mind and will.
These attributes and more are the
strengths that Black male teachers
display in their classrooms schools
and communities.
C. G Woodson wrote in the Mis-
Education of the Negro, "Real edu-
cation means to inspire people to
live more abundantly, to learn to
begin with life as they find it and
make it better."
BMEs understand when they show
caring, peacefulness, love, empa-
thy, and sympathy they maybe
viewed as soft, gay, unintelligent,
incompetent and unprofessional.
They are smart enough to know
when to be tough with kids and
when to show compassion.
BMEs understand that they have a
responsibility to be the best they
can be every day because they
know someone is always watching
and judging them. W
What has happened to the Black
community today when our schools
are threatened with closure, sanc-
tions and state intentions? Black
male teachers though few in num-
ber, carry a power and influence
that can raise the potential of Black
students.


Article author William Jackson is a third generation educator.


Sometimes it is just the presence
of a teacher that inspires. I'm proud
to be an educator because I know
who I am, how important I am, and
my importantance to my students,
my peers, and my community.
I'm not ashamed to say I love my
students for their talents, abilities
and potential to make the world a
better place. Society should not feel
threatened by the Black male
teacher's intellectualism. Nor
should they be apprehensive about
their articulation, and definitely not


intimidated by their dedication.
Society should encourage male
teachers, praise them, pray for
them, and support them. Black male
teachers show society not all Black
men are thuggish, undisciplined,
irresponsible, lazy and uneducated.
We have a responsibility to our
families, our communities, our
churches and our children.
Malcolm X stated "Education is the
passport to the future, for tomorrow
belongs to those who prepare for it
today."


The Jacksonville Free Press

would love to share your

event with our readers.


GUIDELINES
1. All unsolicited photos require a $10 photo charge
for each picture. Photos can be paid by check, money
order or credit card,
2. Pictures must be brought into our office to be
examined for quality or emailed in a digital format
of .jpg or .bmp.
3. Everyone in the picture must be named.
4. All photos MUST be received within 5 days of
the event. NO EXCEPTIONS.
5. Event photos must be accompanied by a
story/event synopsis including the 5W's of media:
who, what, when, where and why. in addition to a
phone number for more information.

Call 634-1993 for more information!


NORTH FLORIDAOBSTETRICAL &

GYNECOLOGICAL Associates, P.A.


visit

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Death rates for African-American
women in childbirth on the rise
High rates of obesity, high blood pressure
and inadequate prenatal care cause death from
childbirth more often for African-Americans
in the United States than for whites and other
ethnic groups. Worsening this trend are the
increasing numbers of cesarean sections
nationally. These procedures can result in
deadly complications for women dangerously
overweight or suffering from hypertension or
other ailments.
Nationally, blacks have a four-times greater risk of pregnancy-related
death than whites-a rate of 36.1 per 100,000 live births compared with
9.6 for whites and 8.5 for Hispanics, according to a 2008 report by the
Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
Maternal mortality rates have been rising in the United States since
the mid-1990s. In 1997, the black maternal mortality rate was 21.5 per
100,000 live births compared with 8.0 for Hispanics and 5.2 for whites,
according to the CDC. The rate for other races was 8.8.
By 2007, the black maternal mortality rate had jumped to 28.4, rough-
ly three times the rates among whites and Hispanics at 10.5 and 8.9
respectively. Statistics were not broken out for Asians/Pacific Islanders
and Native Americans.
Trends show that black maternal mortality rates are increasing in
some parts of the country, and two recent studies highlighting the prob-
lem have renewed calls for increased focus on reducing the deaths.
According to the new reports, the pregnancy-related mortality rate in
some states rivals that in some developing nations. The problem is par-
ticularly acute in New York City, where blacks are nearly eight times
more likely to die from pregnancy-related complications than whites,
and in California where pregnant blacks are four times as likely to die


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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


August 11-17, 2011









PP


AROUND


What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports


TOWN


activities to self enrichment and the civic scene


Jacksonville Sharks
Arena Bowl XXIV
Are you ready for some football!
Jacksonville Sharks Arena Bowl
XXIV, Friday, August 12, 2011 at
8:00 p.m., at the Veterans Memorial
Arena. For tickets visit www.ticket-
master.com or call the Sharks office
at (904) 621- 0700.

Call all BCC alumni
Come out for a free event and join
Bethune-Cookman University
Alumni from around the city for a
night of food, fun, door prizes, and
entertainment at the Zodiac Bar N'
Grill, located at 120 W. Adams
Street on Friday, August 12, 2011
from 6-8 p.m. Pick-up information
on Wildcat football, tickets, bus
trips, upcoming Duval/Nassau
Alumni Chapter events, and current
B-CU news For further information
contact Channell Jones at 764-9924
or email flandersl@att.net.

C4aCz for Clara
The University Club will host
"Cocktails For A Cause" supporting
The Clara White Mission. It will be
held Friday, August 12th from 5:30
- 7 p.m. at the University Club. For
more info visit www.clarawhitemis-
sion.org or call (904) 354-4162.

Florida Blue 5K
Stadium Challenge
Register now for the Florida Blue
5K Stadium Challenge, Saturday,
August 13th, 6-10 p.m. at
EverBank Field. The "stadium run"
will take runners up all seven levels
of the stadium. This event is a
fundraising event with proceeds
benefitting Duval County Sports to
help save athletic programs in
Duval County Public High Schools.


To register visit www.lstplaces-
ports.com or call (904) 731-3676.

P.R.I.D.E. Book Club
The August meeting of the
P.R.I.D.E Book Club will be held
Saturday, August 13th at 4 p.m.
Author and socialite Marsha Phelts
will host a discussion with Yolanda
M. Tucker, author of the book "All
I Ever Wanted To Do Is Love You."
The reading will be held at 5400
Ocean Blvd, American Beach. For
more info call 389-8417 or 703-
8264.

Issues & Answers
The Jacksonville Community
Council Inc. (JCCI) next Issues and
Answers Lunchtime Discussion
will be on Wednesday, August 17th
from noon to 1 p.m. The discussion
will be "taking the mystery out of
the FCAT". Bring a bag lunch!
Location is the JCCI Conference
Room, 2434 Atlantic Blvd.For more
information call 396-3052.

Eat Up Downtown
Downtown Vision, Inc. is dishing
out exquisite cuisine at an afford-
able price during Eat Up
Downtown. From hip caf6s to ele-
gant steak houses, Downtown's
finest restaurants collaborate each
year to bring you a three course
meal at one unbeatable price. Save
the dates and your appetite!. Eat Up
Downtown will run for two weeks,
August 15 August 28, 2011, you
have two weeks to dine!

Learn to be
a better volunteer
Join the members of JCCI and
JCCI Forward for a professional
development skills seminar on serv-


ing as a volunteer in the
Jacksonville community. Hear what
it takes to get the most out of your
volunteer efforts. Skills Training is
Thursday, August 18th from 5:30 -
7:30 p.m., JCCI Conference Room,
2434 Atlantic Blvd. RSVP by call-
ing (904) 396-3052.

Toast to the Animals
Grab a glass and toast the First
Coast's furriest friends at the
Jacksonville Humane Society's
13th annual Toast to the Animals on
Friday, August 19, 2011 from 6 to
9 p.m. at the Omni Hotel. Guests
will enjoy more than 100 varieties
of wine and beer, gourmet hours
d'oeuvres, desserts and a silent and
live auction. Tickets are available at
www.jaxhumane.org or 725-8766.

Comedian Sheryl
Underwood
Sheryl Underwood the comedian
that continues to push the envelope
discussing sex, politics, current
events and relationships will be in
concert at the Comedy Zone,
August 19 20, 2011. 3130 Harts
Rd. inside the Ramada Inn. Call
292-4242 for more information.

Women's Health
Channel 7 Symposium
The Annual WJCT Women's
Health symposium is scheduled for
Saturday, August 20th from 7:30
a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Hyatt
Regency Riverfront. The full day
event will feature speakers, break-
out sessions with local health and
wellness experts, free health screen-
ings, continental breakfast, catered
lunch and more. For tickets visit
www.wjct.org or call 549-2938.


Spoken Word
at the Ritz
Join the Ritz Theatre for a free
evening of Spoken Word, Thursday,
September 1st at 7 p.m. Call 632-
5555.

Raines '81 Reunion
The Raines High School class of
1981 will celebrate their 30th class
reunion September 2 3, 2011 at
the Hyatt Riverfront Hotel.
For more information email cecili-
adorsey@bellsouth.net or call (904)
766-8784.

Tattoo Convention
The 7th Annual Jacksonville
Tattoo Convention will be held this
year at the Renaissance Resort at
World Golf Village, 500 S. Legacy
Trail, St. Augustine, Florida,
September 2nd at 11 a.m. and
September 4th at 8:00 p.m. For
more information call 877-888-
2002.
Jazz Cruise
Labor Day Weekend will be the
time for a grand evening of smooth
jazz on A Jazz on the Water Cruise.
It will be held on Saturday,
September 3rd from 10 p.m.-1:30
a.m. taking off from 1501
Riverplace (next to Charthouse
Restaurant). The evening will fea-
ture include live jazz, hors d'oeu-
vres served and TJ The DJ. For
more information call Ms. Charo at
520-3238.

Mali Vai Washington
Golf & Tennis Gala
The Mali Vai Washington Golf &
Tennis Gala is marked for
September 12th and 13th and
includes a Tennis Pro-Am, Golf
Pro-Am and Gala Dinner. For more


information on this event call (904)
359-KIDS (5437) or email
info@malwashington.com.

Jacksonville's Dancing
with the Stars
Help choose Jacksonville's favorite
dancer. The Jacksonville Children's
Chorus is presenting Jacksonville's
Dancing with the Stars event on
Saturday, September 17th at 7 p.m.
at the Times-Union Center for
Performing Arts. Local 'celebrities'
will compete in two show dances
and your votes decide who will get
to bring home the mirror ball tro-
phy. Email carolyna@asocialaf-
fair.net for more information. .

Icons and
Legends concert
Erykah Badu, The O'Jays and
Ricky Smiley will be in concert
together on Saturday, September
17, 2011 at the arena. For tickets
call (800) 745-3000, or visit online
at www.ticketmaster.com.

N.W. Library
Annual Book Sale
The Bradham Brooks Northwest
library will hold their annual book
sale Thursday, September 23,
noon 8 p.m., Friday, September
24, 10 a.m. 5 p.m., and Saturday,
September 25, 10 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Visit Bradham Brooks library at
1755 Edgewood Avenue W. or call
(904) 765-5402.

Dog Days in
the Park 2011
Join the Springfield Animal Care
& Rescue Club (SACARC) for Dog
Days in the Park 2011, celebrating
fun for the whole family including
the four-legged members. Bring the
kids and the dogs to Confederate


Park 956 Hubbard Street
Jacksonville, FL 32206 oi
Saturday, September 24, 2011 fron
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. for food, beer ant
fun. For more information visi
www.sacarc.org or email contact
tus@sacarc.org or call 633-9308.

A Taste of Jacksonville
To celebrate the tenth anniversary
of the Florida Black Expo, their
will be a "A Taste of Jacksonville
event showcasing area chefs, cater
ers, bakers and restaurants to loca
area and national companies. It wil
held Thursday October 6, 2011. Fo
more information call 403-6960 c
call (352) 327-1977.

Florida Black Expo
The 2011 Florida Black Expo is se
for Saturday, October 8th at th
Prime Osborn Convention Cente:
Guests include CNN commentatc
Roland Martin, vocalist Olet
Adams, actress Wendy Raque
Robinson, and House of Payn
actor David Mann. For more infoi
nation visit call 800-419-2417.

Urban League
Golf Tournament
The Jacksonville Urban Leagu
10th Anniversary Celebrity Go:
Tournament will be held Monda,
October 17, 2011 at the Timuquan
Country Club, located at 402
Timuquana Rd. To RSVP call (90z
366-3461 or (904) 366-6493.

Regina Carter
in concert
The Riverside Fine Arts Series w
present Regina Carter, the distinct
tively diverse and musical persona
ity in concert on Thursday, Oct. 24
at the Florida Theatre. The sho,
begins at 8 p.m., for tickets vis
www.floridatheatre.com.


_$65 Two years


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Mrs. Perry's Free Press Page 9


FOR THE WEEK OF AUGUST 9 15, 2011


Pro Football HOF Photos
THEHALLCALLS: Richard
Dent (top) of Tennessee
DESERVING State and Shannon Sharpe
(bottom) of Savannah State
DUO pose with HOF busts.

DENT, SHARPE INDUCTED INTO HOF; 2011
CLASSICS, SWAC BROADCAST SCHEDULES




2011 SWAC

BROADCAST SCHEDULE

BIRMINGHAM, AL The Southwestern Athletic
Conference released its football broadcast schedule in-
cluding a 10-game slate on SWAC TV, the league's internet
broadcast site. The schedule has eight games across ESPN
networks, plus national and regional television dates with
NBC, Versus, and SportSouth. In all, 21 SWAC games are
scheduled to be televised during the 2011 football season.

SAT., SEPT. 3
Alabama State at Mississippi Valley State 15 pm SWAC TV
Grambling vs. Alcorn State (Tape Delay) 9:30 pm ESPNU
SUN., SEPT. 4
Prairie View A&M vs. Bethune-Cookman 11 am ESPN
SAT., SEPT. 10
Alcorn State at Arkansas-Pine Bluff 6 pm SWAC TV
Jackson State vs. Tennessee State 6 pm Fox SportSouth
SAT., SEPT. 17
Jackson State at Southern 6 pm SWAC TV
SAT., SEPT. 24
Southern vs. Florida A&M 2:30 pm VERSUS
Alabama A&M at Grambling 5 pm SWAC TV
THUR., SEPT. 29
Texas Southern at Jackson State 5 or 6:30 pm ESPNU
SAT., OCT. 1
Alcorn State at Alabama State 7 pm SWAC TV
SAT., OCT. 8
Mississippi Valley State at Alabama A&M 1 pm SWAC TV
THUR., OCT. 13
Texas Southern at Alabama A&M 6:30 pm ESPNU
SAT., OCT. 15
Southern at Arkansas-Pine Bluff 6 pm SWAC TV
SAT., OCT. 15
Prairie View A&M at Alabama State (Tape Delay) 9:30 pm ESPNU
Live on ESPN3.com
SAT., OCT. 29
Jackson State vs. Prairie View A&M 4 pm SWAC TV
Alabama A&M vs. Alabama State (Tape Delay) 9:30 pm ESPNU
Live on ESPN3.com
SAT., NOV. 5
Grambling at Jackson State 2 pm SWAC TV
SAT., NOV. 12
Texas Southern at Grambling 8 pm SWAC TV
THUR., NOV. 24
Tuskegee at Alabama State 3 pm ESPNU
SAT., NOV. 26
Southern vs. Grambling 1 pm NBC
SAT., DEC. 10
SWAC Championship Game 12 pm ESPNU





THE STAT CORNER
WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS

HBCU ALUMNI IN
PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME
(with year of induction)
1. Marion Motley, FB, South Carolina State2 (1968)
2. Roosevelt Brown, OT, Morgan State (1975)
3. Len Ford, DE, Morgan State1 (1976)
4. Deacon Jones, DE, S. C. State St./Miss. Valley St. (1980)
5. Willie Davis, DE, Grambling State (1981)
6. Willie Brown, Grambling State (1984)
7. Ken Houston, SS, Prairie View A&M (1986)
8. Willie Lanier, LB, Morgan State (1986)
9. Mel Blount, CB, Southern (1989)
10. Art Shell, OT, Maryland State (Now- Eastern Shore) (1989)
11. Buck Buchanan, DT, Grambling State (1990)
12. Lem Barney, CB, Jackson State (1992)
13. Larry Little, OG, Bethune-Cookman (1993)
14. Walter Payton, RB, Jackson State (1993)
15. Leroy Kelly, RB, Morgan State (1994)
16. Charlie Joiner, WR, Grambling State (1996)
17. Jackie Slater, OT, Jackson State (2001)
18. John Stallworth, WR, Alabama A&M (2002)
19. Elvin Bethea, DE, North Carolina A&T (2003)
20. Harry Carson, South Carolina State (2006)
21. Rayfield Wright, OT, Fort Valley State (2006)
22. Emmitt Thomas, CB, Bishop College (2008)
23. Bob Hayes, WR, Florida A&M (2009)
24. Jerry Rice, WR, Miss. Valley State (2010)
25. Shannon Sharpe, Savannah State (2011)
26. Richard Dent, Tennessee State (2011)
'Ford transferred to the University of Michigan after one year.
2 Motley transferred to the University of Nevada-Reno after one year.

BY SCHOOL


Grambling State
Morgan State
Jackson State
S. C. State
Alabama A&M
Bethune-Cookman
Bishop
Florida A&M


Fort Valley State
Maryland State
Miss. Valley State
N. C. A&T
Prairie View
Savannah State
Southern
Tennessee State


BCSP Notes


Pro Football HOF Photos
ENSHRINED: (L.) The bust of Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee Richard Dent is between Dent (I.)
and his presenter, formerTennessee State coach Joe Gilliam Sr. (r.) at Saturday's induction ceremony.
(R.) Sterling Sharpe (1.) helps his brother Shannon put his HOF coat on at the induction ceremony.
Sterling Sharpe presented his brother for induction.


Sharpe, Dent inducted into
Pro Football Hall of Fame
Saturday in Canton, Ohio, former black college
football standouts Richard Dent and Shannon
Sharpe became the 25th and 26th players from HB-
CUs inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame for
their stellar NFL careers (See STAT CORNER).
Both came from humble beginnings and were
black college superstars-Dent, fromAtlanta became
an outstanding two-time all-American at Tennessee
State who registered 39 sacks in his career there
and Sharpe, from Glenville, Ga., became a two-time
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
player of the year at Savannah State.
Both were late-round NFL draft choices that
proved all the doubters wrong, going on to set
NFL records during their pro playing days. Dent
was drafted by Chicago in the eighth round of the
1983 draft while Sharpe was taken by Denver in
the seventh round of the 1990 draft.
The black college products were inducted
along with fellow players Deion Sanders, Marshall
Faulk, Chris Hanburger, Les Richter and NFL Films
founder Steve Sabol.
A four-time Pro Bowl pick and MVP of Super
Bowl XX during the 1985 championship season,
Dent was a member of the storied mid-1980s Bears'
defense and played his first ten years in Chicago
establishing a reputation as the NFL's most feared
sack artist. He played 15 years, 11 with the Bears,
and finished his career third in the NFL in career
sacks with 137 1/2. That mark is now tied for sixth
with John Randle on the NFL's all-time list. He set
a Bears' record with 17 1/2 sacks in 1984, led the
NFL with 17 sacks a year later and finished with
10 or more sacks eight times in.his career..Dent had
missed out as a finalist six of the previous seven


years.
He was presented by his former Tennessee
State defensive coach, Joe Gilliam Sr. and during
his acceptance speech acknowledged the role that
university played in his career.
"I didn't worry about the day coming," Dent
said. "I more or less worried about the people who
I wanted to thank, make sure they were living. I
lost my high school coach who just died a couple
years ago. My mother passed in '89, and I think the
last guy living here that played a big part of it was
Coach Gilliam."
Dent is the first alum from the storied TSU pro-
gram to be inducted into the Hall. Ironically, former
TSU stars Claude Humphrey and Ed "Too Tall"
Jones, like Dent outstanding NFL defensive ends,
have not made it into the Hall. Humphrey, a first
round pick of the Atlanta Falcons in 1968, played
14 years in the league and registered 126/1/2 sacks
in his career with the Falcons and Eagles. He has
been a Hall finalist three times and was named one
of two senior candidates for the 2009 Hall of Fame
election.
Jones, the first pick of the 1974 draft, played
all of his 14 years with the Dallas Cowboys and
posted 106 career sacks.
Like Dent ofTSU, Sharpe is the first Savannah
State player voted into the Hall. After a stellar college
career under former SSU head coach Bill Davis,
Sharpe retired 14 pro seasons later as the all-time
NFL leader for catches, yards and touchdowns by
a tight end and with three Super Bowl rings.
His breakout year came during his third sea-
son when he led the Broncos in receiving with 53
catches for 640 yards to earn his first of eight Pro
Bowl nods. Other than an injury-shortened 1999
campaign, Sharpe never caught less than 60 passes
in a season for the remainder of his career.


SHANNON SHARPE'S CAREER STATS AT SAVANNAH STATE
1986 14 receptions for 323 yards, 23.1 yards per catch
1987 60 receptions for 1078 yards, 18.0 yards per catch, 10 touchdowns
1988 57 receptions for 1031 yards, 18.1 yards per catch, 12 touchdowns
1989 61 receptions for 1312 yards, 21.5 yards per catch, 18 touchdown


He played in 204 regular season games and
started in four AFC championship games. He was
named first-team All-Pro and All-AFC in 1993,
1996, 1997 and 1998 and was selected to the NFL's
All-Decade Team of the 1990s. He was the starting
tight end in Denver's back-to-back Super Bowl titles
(XXXII and XXXIII) and the Ravens' Super Bowl
XXXV victory.
Sharpe was presented by his brother Sterling,
a former five-time Pro Bowl wide receiver for the
Green Bay Packers and gave an emotional plea for
his brother to also be elected to the Hall.
"I amn the only player who has been inducted into
the Pro Football Hall of Fame and am the second-best
player in my family," Shannon said.

46 Football Classics get off to
rousing start Labor Day weekend
From a 13-game Labor Day weekend package
to the December 19 SWAC Championship Game in
Birmingham, total of 46 exciting Classic, Bowl and
Championship games are in store for the 2011 black
college football season (SEE LIST BELOW).
The classic battle between the two HBCUs in
Pennsylvania, Cheyney and Lincoln, dubbed this
year's Wade Wilson Classic, kicks off the season
of special games with a 1 p.m. battle on Saturday,
September 3.
Nine other classics will be played that Satur-
day with games as far north as the Chicago Classic
(Hampton vs. Alabama A&M), as far West as
Little Rock, Arkansas's Delta Classic 4 Literacy
(Arkansas-Pine Bluff vs. Langston), as far South
as Shreveport, Louisiana's Port City Classic (Alcorn
State vs. Grambling) and as far East as Norfolk,
Va.'s Labor Day Classic pitting Norfolk State vs.
Virginia State.
Another three classic games follow on Sunday,
Sept. 4 including this year's MEAC/SWAC Chal-
lenge with Bethune-Cookman facing Prairie View
A&M.
New classics this year come to Cleveland
(Cleveland Classic, Sept. 10, Central State vs. N.
C. Central), Washington, D.C. (Nation's Classic,
Sept. 10, Howard vs. Morehouse) and Valdosta,
Ga. (South Georgia Heritage Classic, Oct. 22, Clark
Atlanta vs. Albany State).
A key classic match-up that will be a little
different this season is Atlanta's Bank of America
Classic which has Southern rather than Tennessee
State facing Florida A&M on Sept. 24.
Three championship games are now on the
docket as the SIAC this season joins the CIAA (Nov.
12) and SWAC with title game tilts.
The first SIAC Championship GamepittingEast
and West Division champions is scheduled for Nov.
12 at a time and place to be announced soon.


1 01C A SC O LA DCAM:PION S HIP AME


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3
Wade Wilson Classic
Cheyney vs. Lincoln (PA) in Cheyney, PA............................................ p
4th W.C. Gorden Classic
Jackson State vs. Concordia-Selma in Jackson, MS........................:30p
Chicago Football Classic
Hampton vs. Alabama A&M in Chicago, IL........................................... 4p
Delta Classic 4 Literacy
Arkansas-Pine Bluff vs. Langston in Little Rock, AR.............................5p
Music City Classic
Albany State vs. Savannah State in Macon, GA.................................5p
Palmetto Kick-Off Classic
Benedict vs. Virginia Union in Columbia, SC.........................................5p
Port City Classic
Alcorn State vs. Grambling State in Shreveport, LA ............................6p
John Merritt Classic
Tennessee State vs. Southern in Nashville, TN .................................6p
Two Rivers Classic
Fayetteville State vs. UNC Pembroke in Fayetteville, NC..................6p
Labor Day Classic
Norfolk State vs. Virginia State in Norfolk, VA ....................................6p

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4
MEAC/SWAC Challenge
Bethune-Cookman vs. Prairie View A&M in Orlando, FL ..................12n
Dayton Classic
Central State vs. Kentucky State in Dayton, OH .................................5p
5th Labor Day Golden Classic
Miles vs. Morehouse in Birmingham, AL .............................................. 6p

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
Cleveland Classic
Central State vs. NC Central in Cleveland, OH ...............................12n
Nation's Football Classic
Howard vs. Morehouse in Washington, DC.......................................3:30p
8th Ralph J. Bunche Football Classic
Edward Waters vs. Virginia Univ. of Lynchburg in Kingsland, GA..........4p
14th Down East Viking Football Classic
Elizabeth City State vs. Livingstone in Rocky Mount, NC ...................4p
Southern Heritage Classic
Jackson State vs. Tennessee State in Memphis,TN ............................6p

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
South Carolina HBCU Classic
Benedict vs. Shaw in Columbia, SC ...................................................5p
Louis Crews Classic
Alabama A&M vs. Tuskegee in Huntsville, AL.......................................6p

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
St. Louis Gateway Classic
Lincoln (MO) vs. Missouri Southern in St. Louis, MO..................11a (CT)
St. Louis Gateway Classic
Arkansas-Pine Bluff vs. Clark Atlanta in St. Louis, MO .........................3p
Bank of America Atlanta Football Classic
Florida A&M vs. Southern in Atlanta, GA ........................ ...........3:30p
NY Urban League Classic
Morgan State vs. Howard in East Rutherford, NJ ................................4p

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1
Lucille M. Brown Community Youth Bowl
Virginia Union vs. Chowan in Richmond, VA ........................................lp
Augusta City Classic
Benedict vs. Miles in Augusta, GA................................ .............. 2p


28th Circle City Classic
Kentucky State vs. Albany State in Indianapolis, IN .......................... 2:30p
State Fair Classic
Prairie View A&M vs. Grambling State in Dallas, TX............................. 6p
3rd Diabetes Classic
Florida A&M vs. Delaware State in Tallahassee, FL............................. 6p

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8
76th Morehouse-'Skegee Classic
Tuskegee vs. Morehouse in Columbus, GA ...................................... ... 2p

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15
Battle of the Bay
Norfolk State vs. Hampton in Norfolk, VA................................ ....... .... 1p
Biker Classic
Bethune-Cookman vs. Fort Valley State in Daytona Beach, FL.............. 4p

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22
South Georgia Heritage Classic
Clark Atlanta vs. Albany State in Valdosta, GA ................................. .... 3p

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29
Tri-City Classic
Virginia Univ of Lynchburg vs. Lincoln (PA) in Petersburg, VA................. 1p
70th Magic City Classic
Alabama State vs. Alabama A&M in Birmingham, AL ................ 2:30p (CT)
Shreveport Classic
Prairie View A&M vs. Jackson State in Shreveport, LA ........................ 4p

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5
Battle of the "Real" HU
Hampton vs. Howard in Hampton, VA.................................................... p
Commemorative Classic
Livingstone vs. Johnson C. Smith in Charlotte, NC ........................... ... p
22nd Fountain City Classic
Albany State vs. Fort Valley State in Columbus, GA ............................ 2p

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12
CIAA Championship
CIAA North Champ vs. CIAA South Champ in Durham, NC .................. p
SIAC Championship
SIAC West Champ vs. SIAC East Champ in TBA.................................TBA

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19
Capital City Classic
Alcorn State vs. Jackson State in Jackson, MS ............................. p (CT)
32nd Florida Classic
Florida A&M vs. Bethune-Cookman in Orlando, FL ........................... 2:30p

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24
88th Turkey Day Classic
Alabama State vs. Tuskegee in Montgomery, AL........................... 3p (CT)

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26
Bayou Classic XXXVIII
Grambling State vs. Southern in New Orleans, LA........................ p (CT)

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10
SWAC Championship
East Champion vs. West Champion in Birmingham, AL ............. 12n (CT)


2011 The Onnidan Group -All Rights Reserved


SOURCE: Onnidan.com


AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XVIII, No. 2


August 11-17. 2011








Pare 10 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 11-17, 2011


Is Jennifer

Hudson too thin?
Jennifer Hudson didn't stop her weight-
loss journey. The singer is now down to a
size zero! Yes, believe it or not, the for-
mally full figured woman was either
obsessed with her weight or just never
t- stopped losing.
01t- She became the
celebrity spokes-
woman for Weight
i Watchers and is
inspiring women
/s\ all over to do what
I /she did.
p I : / Although ques-
.^ "tionable, the
singer's appear-
ance has never
Imnf been a personal
'l 11 Pissue, she claims.
S / Hudson explained
that it was all a
matter of a health change and a more V 1
appealing look.
As far as her fiancee, he is not too excit-
ed about the new look.
"He fusses at me like, 'Why do you have
to get all dressed up to go out? Why can't NEW Y
you just go out like you used to?' And I'm the 1980
like, 'I'm a walking billboard now By 1986
honey!'" inner cit:
Joy Behar from "The View" spilled the fire, leave
beans about the star when she ran into her in its wa
while shopping. The talk show host heard new doc
the salesperson tell Hudson she was a size the drug
zero. culture,
When asked how it feels, she said, "I feel "Plane
like they're talking to someone else." Hop and
Going from thick to thin is no easy task premiere
to maintain. She also shared that it's work at 10 PMl
be skinny. In fact, she feels obligated and Narrate
responsible to the world to continue look- by Ice-T
ing trim. of Hip
"Being skinny, it's a job. It's not easy. I Generati
feel this responsibility to the world now tary to i
people are watching, so I have to keep connect
going in the right direction in terms of my hip-hop.
weight loss." first-per

You could be the arisl for the,
2012 Jacksonvllle Jqrz E lvalposterl
)I..al,


HI explores hip-hop and crack


cocaine in new documentary


YORK--Crack cocaine. In
s, it was the newest thing.
it was raging through the
ies of America, like wild-
ring pain, grief and death
ke. Now, after 25 years, a
cumentary explores how
g also transformed pop
especially hip-hop.
et Rock: The Story of Hip
Sthe Crack Generation,"
es Sunday, September 18
Son VH1.
d and executive produced
, "Planet Rock: The Story
Hop and the Crack
on" is the first documen-
focus specifically on the
ons between crack and
Based primarily on the
son accounts of four


famous dealers-turned-rappers,
the film also widens its lens at
points to show how crack
changed America culturally,
socially and politically. Using
rare footage, photos, and anima-
tion, all set to the beats and
rhymes of the iconic hip hop
tracks of the day, the documen-
tary explores how media hysteria,
racism and political reaction pro-
duced policies and laws that have
left us with the largest and
most disproportionately African-
American -- prison population in
the world.
With candid, never-before-seen
interviews from survivors, includ-
ing Snoop Dogg, Cypress Hill's
B-Real, and the Wu-Tang Clan's
RZA and Raekwon, "Planet


20 vle Jazz Fes
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Enr ~~r ldl,: Splinembr 6,20

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Rock" examines the hardships
young men encountered growing
up in impoverished neighbor-
hoods, which led many to deal
crack cocaine as their only way
out. This destructive drug provid-
ed an escape ans also paved the
way for an entrance into hip-hop.
More than any other art form,
hip-hop reflected and document-
ed the crack epidemic. The chaos
and madness of the crack phe-
nomenon was fused with the
sound and style of hip-hop during
its formative years. From the gold
dookie chain to Gucci, many hip-
hop artists were influenced by the
look and fashion of infamous
dealers like Azie Faison in
Harlem, who is prominently fea-
tured in the documentary, along
with Freeway Ricky Ross, the
Godfather of Crack in LA.
As hip-hop became increasingly
popular, the fascination with
crime and gangster culture,
specifically the violence inherent
in crack culture, became
ingrained in the music. And soon
the very kids dealing crack were
turning their street tales into hit
. records.
After serving hard time in jail,
Snoop Dogg became the biggest
rapper of his day; after a bullet in
the back nearly killed him, B Real
went legit with Cypress Hill; and
after crafting their business model
on the crack hustle, RZA and
Raekwon turned the Wu Tang
Clan into a hip hop empire.
As journalist Cheo Choker
reflects, "it's fascinating to think
that Jay Z, a global icon who had
better seats at President Obama's
inauguration than Jesse Jackson,
was once a New York City crack
dealer."


11 E Hollywood

GCO.SP ,COOP

Wire actress pleads guilty in MD drug case
BALTIMORE An actress who played a
Baltimore drug gang assassin in HBO's "The Wire"
pleaded guilty to conspiring to distribute heroin,
caught by a wiretap in a joint federal-state drug probe
of an alleged drug gang. Felicia "Snoop" Pearson, 31,
pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute heroin, a
day before her trial was set to begin. The judge
accepted the plea, suspending a seven-year sentence
with credit for time served and ordering three years of supervised proba-
tion with provisions for out-of-state travel for work.
The plea allows Pearson to move on with her acting career, instead of
spending more than a year with charges hanging over her.
This was not Pearson's first brush with the law. She was convicted of sec-
ond-degree murder in a slaying committed when she was 14. She served
five years of an eight-year sentence and was released in 2000. Pearson was
arrested on a minor drug charge in 2008 when police went to her home to
pick her up for refusing to cooperate as a witness in a murder trial. She was
found not guilty.


Rihanna pays her stylist over $1 million a year
For the cost of one year's in-state college tuition, Rihanna keeps her hair
laid for a week. According to a member of the singer's entourage, Rih-
Rih spends a whopping $22,400 a week to employ the services of super
stylist Ursula Stephen.
The hair maven, who's responsible for all of Rihanna's trendsetting 'dos,
charges a daily retainer fee of $3,200. "She makes several public appear-
ances a week, and the cost soon stacks up," reveals the source to the UK's
Daily Mail. "Ursula is a close confidante and they are together all the time.
You have to wonder why she insists on keeping such an expensive mem-
ber of her entourage on the payroll 24/7. Most of these costs are paid for
by her management."
Rihanna just recently abandoned her infamous red tresses for brown, two-
toned waves. Guess you really do have to pay the cost to be the boss.
Real Housewives filming in Atlanta
Though the season hasn't started yet, details have leaked about Season 4
of Bravo's "The Real Housewives of Atlanta" filming in South Africa. Get
the deets on the ladies trip inside...
As you know, reality stars are sworn to secrecy when it comes to dis-
cussing their story lines, however, we've learned that South Africa will be
a part of the story line this season on "RHOA."
The entire case was spotted filming in South Africa this week. The ladies
filmed in-and-around Cape Town as well as Port Elizabeth Supposedly
the trip will be part of the final few episodes. And we hear the season may
air this fall. But don't expect to see Kim Zolciak. She stayed home after
giving birth recently.
Outkasts Big Boi arrested in Miami
Grammy-winning OutKast rapper Big Boi has been
arrested in Miami on charges of illegally possessing
drugs, including ecstasy and Viagra pills.
The rapper, whose real name is Antwan Patton, was
charged with three counts of possession of a controlled
substance and one count of possession of drug para-
phernalia on Sunday. According to the Miami-Dade
County Corrections website, the 36-year-old Patton
was also carrying MDMA, which is the main ingredi-
ent in Ecstasy. He was booked on $16,000 bond.


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August 11-17, 2011


Page 10 Ms. Perry's Free Press


MPRE.NRF.W






Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 11


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THE STARS HAVE ALIGNED.

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cards are accepted. Call or visit comcast.com for restrictions and complete details. 2011 Comcast. All rights reserved. NPA82565-0007


ugus
-
,


._


A t 11 17 2011









Pane 12 Ms. Perry's Free Press August 11-17, 2011


ISights and Sce- J oaa rs ctcpos


Nichelle Floyd, Pia Badger, and Challnon Steven


D'Marter, Stevie, Curtis, Darryl, and Kiona Alston


Black leaders call for less talk and


more action at NABJ Convention


Dr. Cornel West


Angela Smith and Tori Smith


Lakeisha, Samayyah and Nasiha Shakur and Kenny Dennard


Black leaders are fed up and are
speaking out, again. This time how-
ever, they're complaining that it's
time for less talk and more action
for the Black community.
In a panel at the recent National
Association of Black Journalist
convention entitled, "Black Out or
Black In" key leaders including Dr.
Cornel West, former Republican
National Committee Chairman
Michael Steele, Atlanta Mayor
Kasim Reed and noted journalist
debated their expectations of the
nation's first Black president as
well as the clash between the Black
middle and lower classes.
"Some of us are so caught up
with things and stuff that we refer
to our own people as 'those peo-
ple,'" West said. "There are too
many field generals and too few
field troops."


Roland Martin joined in to
encourage the minority audience
that it's time to stop criticizing your
friend or neighbor's kids about how
bad and ill-behaved they are and
it's time to say I'll help you raise
your children.
The group disagreed on their
approval, and some strong disap-
proval, of the president, but they all
agreed that some of the hardships
Blacks face, till this day, are still
unprecedented and it's time for less
"feel-good" summits and conversa-
tions, and more action.
With an already nasty 2012 pres-
idential election approaching and
many differentiating agendas on the
table amongst candidates, it may be
time to have all Blacks "in," fight-
ing for something affecting their
communities, rather than out.


Why do Black students perform poorly on standardized tests?

Standardized tests like the of Blacks in Higher participating in an experiment group that was told
SAT can make any student Education writes in an article to see "how well people from ferences were beir


nervous, but a new study
from Stanford University
finds that Black students are
especially susceptible to
nerves.
The study concluded that
African-American students
perform poorly on standard-
ized tests because they fear
incorrect answers will con-
firm negative stereotypes
about their race, The Journal


published this week.
When students aren't think-
ing about these stereotypes,
they perform better on the
tests.
The Journal of Blacks in
Higher Education writes:
A new study at Stanford has
shown that this "stereotype
threat" can also hinder black
students in learning new
material. In an experiment,


groups of black and white words. One group was placed
students were asked to study in a threatening environment
the meanings of 24 obscure by being told that they were


different backgrounds learn."
Another group was simply
told the researchers were
examining different learning
styles and there was no hint
of any racial undertones.
One to two weeks later, the
students were quizzed infor-
mally about the words they
had studied. The results
showed that black students
who were initially in the


racial dif-
ig exam-


ined, scored 50 percent lower
than black students who had
studied in the nonthreatening
environment. But when an
actual test was administered,
the stereotype threat kicked in
and both groups of black stu-
dents performed poorly.
The new study was pub-
lished in the August issue of
the Personality and Social
Psychology Bulletin.


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August 11-17, 2011


Page 12 Ms. Perry's Free Press


,1 --11
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