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The Jacksonville free press ( May 13, 2010 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Jacksonville free press
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - AKN0341
oclc - 19095970
alephbibnum - 002042477
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00268

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Jacksonville free press
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - AKN0341
oclc - 19095970
alephbibnum - 002042477
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00268

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

Full Text






F~I


Legendary

icon and

activist

Lena Horne


Musician gets
second chance
at life after
spending 30
years behind bars
wrongly accused
.Page 10



Sights and Scenes

Funk Fest

brings super-

stars to the

First Coast
Page 3


92
Page 10 A
S FLA LIBRARY HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV
Sp.n. Bo\ FI 11-


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Men's Health

Summit

A Much
Needed
Awareness Tool
Page 4
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50 Cents


Haiti president to extend
term if election not held
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti Haitian President Rene Preval said he will
stay in office up to three months past the end of his term if his earth-
quake-ravaged nation does not hold a presidential election as scheduled.
His aide said the extension is needed to avoid chaos in case a ballot can-
not be held to choose Preval's successor. The announcement set off an
outcry from opposition lawmakers, who called the move unconstitution-
al and compared Preval to brutal dictators of the past.
Preval's five-year term is scheduled to end Feb. 7. But electoral offi-
cials are struggling to hold the election as scheduled this fall as it copes
with the loss of its headquarters and records, destroyed polling places and
some 1.6 million displaced or deceased voters.
The electoral council, now operating out of a gym seized in a drug raid,
is also embroiled in controversy. Opposition candidates barred from
February legislative elections that were canceled after the quake have
accused council members of favoring Preval's newly formed Unity party.
One council member also faces dismissal on charges of embezzlement.
In a decree dated Tuesday, the 67-year-old Preval said that if an election
is not held before Nov. 28 he can remain in office for an extra three
months until May 14, 2011. That date falls five years after Preval's
delayed 2006 inauguration, which was pushed back by wrangling over
the vote count.

More jobs being created but
Black joblessness stays high
There was mixed economic news from the Labor Department last week.
The agency's monthly report showed that businesses had created
290,000 new jobs in April but the unemployment rate for African
Americans remained stuck at an usually high 16.5 percent the same as
it was in March.
Thus, while employers were creating nearly 300,000 new jobs, an even
larger number of people were re-entering the labor market seeking work.
The net result was that the unemployment rate rose from 9.7 percent in
March to 9.9 percent last month.
As indicated, the Black jobless rate remained stuck at 16.5 percent while
that for whites rose slightly from 8.8 percent in March to 9.0 percent in
April.
Meanwhile, the unemployment rate for Hispanics improved slightly
going from 12.6 percent in March to 12.5 percent last month.

Student group disbanded
after Blacks-only field trip
The Michigan school district investigating whether an elementary
school field trip that excluded white students was illegal has disbanded
the black-students-only academic support group that participated in the
outing two weeks ago.
Thirty members of the Dicken Elementary School's AA Lunch Bunch,
a support group designed to bridge the gap in test scores between white
and black students, were taken on a field trip two weeks ago to meet Alec
Gallimore, an African-American rocket scientist who is an aerospace
engineering professor and propulsion lab director at the University of
Michigan.
The school principal, Mike Madison, who is black, helped organize the
trip, said he hoped to encourage the students to pursue a career in the sci-
ences. Despite a letter from him to parents hoping to quell rising tensions
from the trip, the letter fueled a week of controversy and an onslaught of
parental complaints that culminated late last week in the school district's
launch of an investigation into whether the field trip violated a new state
law that bans racial favoritism in public schools.
The investigation is ongoing, and the Lunch Break will be out to lunch
until it's wrapped up.

Chicago man dies in

chokehold after stealing toothpaste
Anthony Kyser of Chicago walked out of a
CVS store last Saturday night, holding tooth-
paste that didn't belong to him. He never expect-
ed that this toothpaste would cost him his life.
A store employee saw him and chased him out
of the store and in to the alley. He caught up with
Kyser and put him in to a choke hold. "I can't
breathe, I can't breathe!" were the words coming
out of Kyser's mouth, as he was being restrained
by the employee. Three other men were attempt-
ing to control Kyser as well, according to wit-
nesses. That is when he died.
The medical examiner ruled Kyser's death a homicide, citing that the
autopsy showed he was strangled. The police, however, are saying that
the employee who killed him won't be charged. The death is being treat-
ed as "accidental," according to Chicago Police Spokesman Daniel
O'Brien.
Kyser's family is outraged by the decision.
"Why would you kill someone over toothpaste?" said Kyser's ex-wife,
Ann Balboa (pictured above right). "Why would you even chase them,
and how is this not murder -- it doesn't make sense."
According to family members, Kyser has served prison time on drug
convictions and has had a drug problem for some time. They do not,
however, believe that what he did should have cost him his life.


Volume 23 No.32 Jacksonville, Florida May 13-19, 2010

Majority of Minority Seniors in Financial Crisis


Millions of African-American and
Latino seniors are living on the
edge of financial collapse.
Recent reports finds that African
American and Latino seniors face
widespread financial insecurity
during retirement, a trend accelerat-
ed by the current economic crisis.
According to the study, 9 in 10 sen-
ior households of color lack suffi-
cient resources for long-term eco-
nomic security.
A combination of inadequate pen-
sions and savings, high housing


costs, accelerating health expenses,
and other trends that affect seniors,
will likely get worse, unless poli-
cies are enacted to address them.
"The current economic crisis will
compound economic vulnerabilities
that have been building for
years unless policies are developed
to reverse these trends," said
Tatjana Meschede, lead author
of "Severe Financial Insecurity
among African American and
Latino Seniors".
Particular vulnerabilities identified


in the report include:
- More than three-fourths of sen-
ior households of color do not have
adequate financial resources from
savings, Social Security, or pension
income to cover essential expenses
for their expected
life spans.
Out-of-pocket health care
expenses are burdensome for 34
percent of African American and 39
percent of Latino seniors.
High housing expenses put the-
Continued on page 7


Thousands flock to annual TPC


S . .

Shown above on the green at the Tournament Players Championship are (L-R): Gene Beverly, Connice
Beverly, Richard Danford, Artis Gilmore, Joyce Danford, and Christine Fletcher. FMPP hoto
For those aspiring to have a few Tiger sightings at the annual Tournament Players Championship, they left more
than a little disappointed as the beleaguered golfer withdrew on the seventh hole because of a neck injury. For
fans out to experience great weather and some of the best golfers in the world, they got exactly what they came
for. Thousands attended the annual Ponte Vedra Beach tournament where Tim Clark of South Africa prevailed as
the victor. He became only the second player to make the Players Championship his first PGA Tour victory. He
had gone more than eight years and 204 tournaments with nothing more to show than eight runner-up finishes.
For more of the TPC's sights and scenes, see page 3.


Sen. Tony Hill
Florida to

establish Civil

Rights Hall

of Fame
What began as a single-minded
determination to recognize a little-
known corridor bordered to the
south by Jacksonville culminated
recently with passage of landmark
legislation establishing the Florida
Civil Rights Hall of Fame.
Sponsored by Senator Tony Hill,
HB 523 will for the first time pay
tribute to leaders in Florida's strug-
gle for equality by creating a public
display in their honor within the
columned walls of the state Capitol.
Each year, the commission will
submit 10 names to the governor,
who will choose three for induc-
tion.
"My hope is that the creation of
the Hall of Fame within the Capitol
will help showcase the unsung
heroes and the forgotten places that
played pivotal roles in the civil
rights movement. Said Sen. Hill.
"The mission to create this tribute
grew out of my work to publicize
the Gullah/Geechee Cultural
Heritage Corridor."
Several halls of fame already have
been created by the legislature,
including the Florida Women's Hall
of Fame, the Florida Artists Hall of
Fame, Florida Educator Hall of
Fame and Florida Sports Hall of
Fame.


Mothers Day celebrated around the First Coast

~ Fl |I Flowers and luncheon highlight St
,1 1 Philip's Mother's Day Celebration


Shown above is (L-R) Pat Lockett-Felder, Roy Campbell, Elizabeth
Means, andJoan Turner who all assisted in the event.
Locket -Felder presents 3rd Annual Mothers
Day Luncheon Community trustee Pat Lockett-Felder joined
forces with friends and community leaders to present her 3rd Annual
Mothers Day Luncheon. held in honor of seniors in the community. The
free catered event is an afternoon of fellowship, prizes and fun. For more
photos from the event, see page 7.


Arlene Jones, Chawna Newman, Kyndall Hogan, Michael Gaskins,
Michael Gaskins II, Dorothy Gaskins, Claudette Newman, Javon
McQuaker, Mcisha Sudiene, Chawnette McKenny, Mitchell Gaskins,
and Richard Sudiene. FMP Photo
The members of St. Philip's Episcopal church celebrated Mother's Day
with praise, worship, fresh flowers and fellowship. The congregation offi-
cially recognized all mothers of the church, "because not all mothers are
biological" and presented each of them with roses. The service was fol-
lowed by a luncheon.


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Dollar$ and Sense: Know how your credit scores are calculated


There is a lot of misinformation
about what goes into your credit
score.
However, officials at Fair Isaac
Corp. -- the creator of FICO scores
-- have said many times that this is
the heart of what happens: Your
credit files currently those from
Equifax and TransUnion are
reviewed. Certain information
(roughly 22 items) about how
you've managed your credit is sta-
tistically analyzed. Ultimately, five
different categories are weighted to


produce your FICO score.
Here is the breakdown of those
five areas that contribute to your
FICO score:
The Formula That
Governs Your FICO Score
1. Payment History: Approxi-
mately 35% of your score is based
on this category.
2. Amounts Owed: About 30% of
your score is based on this category.
(Mainly, you're evaluated based on
how much credit card debt you
have).


3. Length of Credit History:
Roughly 15% of your score is based
on this category.
4. New Credit or Inquiries:
Around 10% of your score is based
on this category.
5. Types of Credit in Use: About
10% of your credit score is based on
this category. (Having a good mix
of credit in your credit files is
viewed favorably, although some
forms of debt, such as mortgage
debt, is scored more positively than
other forms of debt, like depart-


ment-store cards or furniture-store
cards).
Based on this information, as
well as other advice FICO freely
disseminates on its Web site
(www.myfico.com) and elsewhere,
you can draw some good general
conclusions about what actions can
help your credit and what could
hurt it. For example, to increase
your credit scores:
Pay Your Bills on Time
Payment track record is the


largest component of your FICO
score.
Even if you must make "mini-
mum" payments, do it!
One late payment can drop your
FICO score by 60 to 110 points.
Maintain Low Credit Card
Balances
Don't "max out" any cards.
Try to not to use up too much of
your available credit limit.
Spread out debt over several
cards instead of carrying big bal-


ances.
Keep Your Older, Established
Accounts Open
Longer credit history is scored
favorably.
Resist the urge to close an
account when you pay it off.
Closing accounts can some-
times lower your credit scores.
Remember these facts the next
time you're tempted to do some-
thing that might damage your cred-
it rating.


lion in loan capital.
The high repayment rate of over 99% is a testament
to the program's success. All loans are provided in the
peer-lending model and each loan is spent on starting
or expanding an existing business.
Wells Fargo's EQ2 investment will help Grameen
America launch its operations in the San Francisco Bay
Area beginning this summer. Grameen America cur-
rently has three branches in New York City and a fourth
in Omaha, Nebraska. Interested entrepreneurs should
visit: www.grameenamerica.com.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING



JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY


RE: FY 2009 Section 5317 Formula Grant

URBANIZED AREA: Jacksonville, Florida
ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT: $340,051
RECIPIENT: Jacksonville Transportation Authority

Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) is providing an opportunity for a
public hearing to consider its FY 2008/2009 Program of Projects from which federal funds are being request-
ed from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Funding is generally available on an 80/20 matching basis
between federal and local sources for Capital projects and on a 50/50 matching basis between federal and local
sources for Operating projects. The public is encouraged to comment on any and all projects listed below.

Agency: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Project Description: Administrative Costs (up to 10%)
Agency Type: Local or Regional Transit Authority
Service Area: Duval County
Funding Amount: $34,005 (Federal) = $34,005
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services; Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility; and Develop a mar-
keting plan to educate and inform the community of all available and evolving mobility options in the region

Agency: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Project Description: Provide Travel training programs to encourage people with disabilities, senior adults and
persons with low income to use lower cost trip option
Agency Type: Local or Regional Transit Authority
Service Area: Duval County
Funding Amount: $108,150 (Federal) + $108,150 (Local) = $216,300
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Educate and inform the community of all available mobility options

Agency: ARC Jacksonville, Inc.
Project Description: Provide transportation to those clients who live outside the 3/4 mile boundary line of pub-
lic transportation and are not eligible for ADA services
Agency Type: Not For Profit
Funding Amount: $134,470 (Federal) + $134,470 (Local) = $268,940
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operations of the NF service route that is designed to transport individuals with
developmentally disabilities from Clay County for employment at NAS JAX in Duval County
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Funding Amount: $49,738 (Federal) + $49,738 (Local) = $99,476
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services and Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operations of the NF service route that begins in Middleburg and ends at the
Clay County Health Department at Bear Run
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Funding Amount: $13,688 (Federal) + $13,688 (Local) = $27,376
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services and Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Total Projects: $ 646,097

Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing before 5:00 p.m. on June
14, 2010. If a request is received by the stated time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the pub-
lic notified. Mail requests to:

Notice of Public Hearing, Section 5317 Grant
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Post Office Drawer "0"
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

This formula grant program has been coordinated through the Transportation Improvement Program
(TIP) of the North Florida Transportation Planning Organization (North Florida TPO) for the
Jacksonville Urbanized Area, with projects selected by the Northeast Florida Mobility Coalition.
No business displacements are expected to occur as a result of project implementation. These proj-
ects will have no substantial harmful effects on the environment, nor will they adversely affect serv-
ice levels to the elderly or disabled.

Details of the Program of Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue through
June 14, 2010 during normal business hours. Persons with disabilities who need accommodations to
attend the meeting should contact the JTA Connexion office at 904-265-6001, CTC TDD 636-7402.
This notice will constitute the final publication unless the Program of Projects is amended.


Kenneth R. Holton
(904) 630-3187
kholton@jtafla.com
Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY


RE: FY 2009 Section 5316 Formula Grant


URBANIZED AREA:
ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT:
RECIPIENT:


Jacksonville, Florida
$530,286
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


Wells Fargo, the banking empire who recently pur-
chased Wachovia Bank, is investing $1 million into
Grameen America a non-profit microfinance organi-
zation that gives low income entrepreneurs access to
EQ2 (Equity-Equivalents) loans. They also help with
business credit establishment and other services.
An EQ2 loan is a limited below market rate loan
reserved for community development organizations
and businesses. Grameen America has provided nearly
3,000 of these loans to entrepreneurs living below the
federal poverty line. They have loaned out over $5 mil-


Total Projects:


$ 1,007,544


Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing before 5:00 p.m. on June 14,
2010. If a request is received by the stated time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the public
notified. Mail requests to:

Notice of Public Hearing, Section 5316 Grant
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Post Office Drawer "0"
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

This formula grant program has been coordinated through the Transportation Improvement Program
(TIP) of the North Florida Transportation Planning Organization (North Florida TPO) for the
Jacksonville Urbanized Area, with projects selected by the Northeast Florida Mobility Coalition. No
business displacements are expected to occur as a result of project implementation. These projects
will have no substantial harmful effects on the environment, nor will they adversely affect service lev-
els to the elderly or disabled.

Details of the Program of Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue through
June 14, 2010 during normal business hours. Persons with disabilities who need accommodations to
attend the meeting should contact the JTA Connexion office at 904-265-6001, CTC TDD 636-7402.
This notice will constitute the final publication unless the Program of Projects is amended.

Kenneth R. Holton
(904) 630-3187
kholton@jtafla.com
Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


Wells Fargo announces $1 Million in funding

available for low income entrepreneurs


Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) is providing an opportunity for a
public hearing to consider its FY 2008/2009 Program of Projects from which federal funds are being request-
ed from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Funding is generally available on an 80/20 matching basis
between federal and local sources for Capital projects and on a 50/50 matching basis between federal and local
sources for Operating projects. The public is encouraged to comment on any and all projects listed below.

Agency: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Project Description: Administrative Costs (up to 10%)
Agency Type: Local or Regional Transit Authority
Service Area: Duval County
Funding Amount: $53,028 (Federal) = $53,028
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services; Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility; and Develop a mar-
keting plan to educate and inform the community of all available and evolving mobility options in the region

Agency: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Project Description: Continued operation of the Highlands Community Shuttle service
Agency Type: Local or Regional Transit Authority
Service Area: Duval County
Funding Amount: $79,305 (Federal) + $79,305 (Local) = $158,610
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: St. Johns County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operations of the Purple and Connector service routes from St. Augustine to
Jacksonville
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Service Area: Duval County, St. Johns County
Funding Amount: $232,026 (Federal) + $232,026 (Local) = $464,052
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operations of the CC-51 route with enhanced mid-day service from Green Cove
Springs to Orange Park Mall
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Service Area: Duval County, Clay County
Funding Amount: $66,656 (Federal) + $66,656 (Local) = $133,312
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services and Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operations of the CC 51 route with Saturday service from Green Cove Springs
to Orange Park Mall
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Service Area: Duval County, Clay County
Funding Amount: $8,463 (Federal) + $8,463 (Local) = $16,926
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services and Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operations of the CC-53 route with enhanced mid-day service from Middleburg
to Orange Park Mall
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Service Area: Duval County, Clay County
Funding Amount: $57,839 (Federal) + $57,839 (Local) = $115,678
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services and Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operation of the JARC route for mid-day service which connects passengers to
the employment centers in the Town of Orange Park
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Service Area: Duval County, Clay County
Funding Amount: $32,969 (Federal) + $32,969 (Local) = $65,938
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services and Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility


Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press


May 13-19, 2010







Mags13-19ha2010 Ms. Perry's Free-Pres


FunkFest Cynthia Phelps, Yvette Jefferson, Linda Barfield, George
Harttey, LaRose Tookes and Darrell Tookes.


FunkFest Valentina Williamms, Jacqui Rivera and Dawn Dobbs.


FunkFest LeVon Burnett, Gloria Spradley Brown, Angelo Leon,
Effie William and Janice Spradley.


TPC Truda and Favion Thompson and daughter Alana enjoy the
tournament. Thomspon is a U.S. Navy second class petty officer in
from the Northern Arabian Gulf on the USS Sullivaws to see his baby
born next week.


The annual Funk Fest concert, held over two days in Metropolitan
Park broughtentertainers such as the members of New Edition,
Frankie Beverly and Maze, Babyface, SWV, Heavy D, Keith Sweat
and others to the well attended event. Shown above is Sweat (left) and
Babyface (right) performing. News of the concert went worldwide as
Bobby Brown publicly proposed to his girlfriend on stage to the
delight of the audience. FMPPhotos


FunkFest Tonya Robinson, Yulanda Glenn and Sonya Sams


TPC Richetta, David David Jr. and Dayia Bright


FunkFest Necole Ellison, Cheryl Danzler, Cynthia Cross, Tova
Nelson, and Leon Nelson.


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AMLVIN ACE TILEY


AMERICAN NCE THi n.1


1 Performance Only

Tuesday, May 18* 7:30 PM
Times-Union Center
Moran Theater


D n g s es



S- The Artist Series Presented by the Florida State College at Jacksonville


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


Mav 13-19, 2010










Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press May 13-19, 2010


Men's Health Summit A Much Needed Awareness Tool


If you put a pink ribbon on your
shirt or wear one of those pink
wristbands everyone knows that
you are supporting breast cancer
awareness.
It's a disease that thousands, if
not millions recognize as a major
problem amongst women, and sur-
vivors and supporters have done an
excellent job raising awareness and

A man's pride is often the
biggest hindrance because
no self-respecting man
wants to ask for help or
be seen in the free health
clinic. That is ludicrous.

funds for research.
Heart disease and cancer are the
number one and two causes of
death amongst men and women,
respectively. While women have
done an excellent job of bringing
their health issues out to the fore-
front and celebrating their success-
es, men have been extremely silent.
I guess it's not macho to be
health conscious or celebrate sur-
viving prostate cancer. Us men typ-
ically don't want anyone to know
when we are going through a health
crisis.
To make matters worse, we don't
even like to go to the doctor, and I
am including myself in my asser-
tion. But for black men, the situa-
tion is even worse. Statistically,
African American men suffer far
worse health problems than any
other racial group in America.


There are several contributing
factors including: lack of afford-
able health services or no health-
care coverage at all, a lack of
understanding or health education,
cultural beliefs, and even racial dis-
crimination in some cases.
Culture and tradition are major
factors that plague many African
Americans. While "Soul Food"
may taste great, it normally
depends on fat, sugar and sodi-
um to flavor many of the dishes.
If you combine soul food with
a lack of exercise and it's a
recipe for eventual heart dis-
ease, diabetes, and a lot of other
health issues.
But men are finally starting to
get the picture. Many nonprofits
and medical groups are combining
to better educate men especially
black men on the importance of
preventive health.
From June 11th to June 13th, the
Duval County Health Department
and 100 Black Men of Jacksonville
are hosting a "Man Up for Health
Summit." The only way to success-
fully change the way men view the
importance of their health is to
raise awareness, and actually reach
out to men with the preventative
services they need.
The Summit's has three impor-
tant goals:
Educate men at risk of develop-
ing preventable chronic diseases.
Provide free screenings to
detect early signs of disease/illness.
Provide a unique point of entry
into the healthcare system for the


target population.
Provide a forum for the
exchange of ideas and strategies
among invested community part-
ners.
The Summit will be held at two
locations, Florida State College of
Jacksonville's Downtown Campus
and Ribault Middle School. A
unique component of the event will
also be a young males summit that
is designed to engage young men,
male celebrities and community
leaders in intergenerational dia-
logue.
It's critical that men start focus-
ing on health as the leaders of our
families especially black men. If
we make healthy living a priority,
then so will our families.
African American men are 60
percent more likely to get prostate
cancer than whites. And black men
also twice as likely to die from it
than any other group.
A man's pride is often the biggest
hindrance because no self-respect-
ing man wants to ask for help or be
seen in the free health clinic. That
is ludicrous. We all need assistance
at some point in life and if you do
not have health insurance there is
nothing wrong with seeking help
versus the alternative of dying.
I have heard numerous men say
that they don't feel comfortable
getting their prostate checked, but
it is necessary discomfort for your
survival.
Black men in particular, are
dying unnecessarily from com-
pletely preventable and treatable


causes. Someone once said, "An
ounce of prevention is worth a
pound of cure."
Black men have to start doing a
better job of taking care of their
bodies. Prostate cancer is the most
frequently diagnosed cancer in
men, accounting for 36% of all
cancer cases. An estimated 180,000
men will be newly diagnosed this
year, and 37,000 will die.
According to the Centers for
Disease Control, adjusting for age,
men lead in all of the 10 most com-
mon causes of death in the United
States, and women live on average
six years longer than men. A figure
that gets much gloomier for the
black male demographic alone.
Another key reason why black
men's health lags in comparison to
others is simply access to services.
Poor black men are 6 times more
likely to be uninsured as our white
counterparts 25 percent of Black
males are uninsured.
The Man Up Health Summit is a
major step in the right direction.
The summit will be offering
"FREE" health screenings, and not
just the simple stuff. I am talking
about blood pressure, diabetes,
HIV & STD, prostate cancer, vision
and hearing.
Men, we can't afford to be lazy
about our health. Tell a friend or
family member and "Man Up" and
get checked out. And the best part
is that it's free.
Signing off from the Florida
State College and Ribault Middle
School,
Reggie Fullwood


Kagan's Affirmative Action Achilles Heel


by Earl Ofari
Hutchinson
Supreme Court
p nominee Elena
Kagan will plop
'ani issue ba6k' on
the nation's table
that hasn't been
seen or heard
/ from or about in
what seems like ages. And that's
affirmative action. Even before her
nomination the word furiously cir-
culated in some circles that during
her six year tenure as dean of
Harvard University Law School,
Kagan had an abominable record
on recruiting and hiring minority
professors.
At first glance, her record indeed
looks atrocious. There were 29 new
hires. They were 23 white men, 5
white women, and one Asian
American woman; not one black or
Latino professor in the bunch.
When the dismal figure was
released, the White House quickly
pushed back. It issued a detailed
fact sheet that essentially said that
her zero hire of a black or Latino
faculty member was grossly mis-
leading. That Kagan had offered
several African-American and
Latino candidates visiting offers;
visiting offers meaning invites to
be a visiting lecturer. That's not the
same as a permanent offer for fac-
ulty spot. But the inference was
that a visiting offer, if accepted,
could lead to an offer of a perma-
nent faculty position. That didn't
happen. The visiting offers were
not accepted. That in itself is not a
prima facie case to say that Kagan
deliberately pushed diversity to the


back burner at Harvard. Or even
that she did not make a sincere
effort to recruit minority faculty
members. There are always factors,
big, little and unseen in the busi--
rhtess-o" f-,cuil) hires at itaj6, C\ cn
prestigious, universities. But
Kagan's motives and the effort she
may have made to get a diverse fac-
ulty at Harvard Law in the end or a
moot point.
Her record on minority hires still
stands-- 29 faculty hires, and no
black or Latino hires. This is hard-
ly a moot point. There are two
major reasons that President
Obama nominated Kagan. The first
is pragmatic politics. She already
went through the confirmation
wars as the administration's solici-
tor general and is widely consid-
ered as a consensus building, judi-
cial moderate. That's least likely to
ignite a prolonged, heated, and
divisive fight over her nomination.
The second reason is just as crucial.
She is the supposedly the breathing
embodiment of diversity.
At a presidential campaign
appearance in 2007 Obama was
emphatic in demanding that a
Supreme Court pick be someone
who had empathy for the poor,
minorities, disabled and old. In the
Senate he ferociously attacked and
voted against the confirmation of
Bush nominees John J. Roberts and
Samuel Alito again precisely
because they were hardly cheer
leaders for diversity. In their views
and rulings they were hard line
conservative ideologues who did
everything possible to subvert
diversity. Obama promised there
would be no ideological litmus test


in his court picks. However diversi-
ty seemed clearly a prime consider-
ation in his choice of a high court
judge.
'This is not an academic numbers
balancing' act t 'get 'the requisite
black, Latino and women on the
court. The issue of diversity is a
fierce battleground in law and pub-
lic policy. There are countless cases
that invariably wind up contested
before the high court on gender,
age, disability, and racial discrimi-
nation, abortion, the death penalty,
prisoner and victim rights, and cor-
porate practices. The issues are
highly complex, raise important
legal and social questions, and are
always contentious. Kagan will be
in the thick of the court debate on
these cases for years to come.
Conservative judicial watchdog
groups know the importance of the
diversity battle in court rulings bet-
ter than any other group. They
watch hawk like all potential
Supreme Court picks, and they
wage endless war in their journals,
news articles, on blogs, and in posi-
tion papers on the need for strict
constructionist, diversity neutral
judicial picks. They have and will
continue to rush to the barricades in
their fight to insure that a high
court pick will be free of any lean-
ing toward opinions and views that
tilt toward a bias for minority
rights. They will rally public opin-
ion and Senate Republicans to bat-
tle against any such judicial pick.
The irony is that Kagan's blurred
record on diversity faculty hiring at
Harvard Law School may be a plus
and actually keep her out of harm's
way from conservative critics at


least on the issue of affirmative
action. This will and should trouble
liberals and progressives who want
and expect that President Obama's
high court nominee take a stand, a
firm stand on the one issue that
matters a lot to them and from the
president's oft spoken words to him
as well, and that's a solid commit-
ment to diversity. The jury is still
out on Kagan on this one.
Earl Ofari Hutchinson is an author
and political analyst. His new book is
How Obama Governed: The Year of
Crisis and Challenge
Follow Earl Ofari Hutchinson on
Twitter: http://vtwittet: conm/earl-
hutchinson


Charlie's revenge

and the Dems get


I.


their groove back V
Imagine Governor Charlie Crist in a bid whist championship, without a
partner. He's playing against his party rival, Marco Rubio (Jeb Bush in dis-
guise) and the Republican Party of Florida (also Jeb Bush for real). Crist
makes his stay here bid, and leaves the GOP to run in the US Senate race
with no party affiliation. Crist leads in a three way race so why not? The
R's never liked the guy and were stomping the man to death trying to drive
him out of the race. They very effectively created quite the nightmare for
themselves because Crist won't be bullied. He has a long memory and he
holds a grudge. As it stands now, he has outflanked the Bush brigade hand-
ily.
Crist's a planner. He purposefully took on Democratic icon Bob Graham,
ran, lost and went to the next step. He was a state senator, education com-
missioner, attorney general and then governor. Jeb Bush was not a Charlie
fan then or now. It did not go unnoticed. Immediately after Crist was sworn
in as Governor he began ridding the state agencies of "Bushies" and Bush
contract consultants. Recently Bush passed the controversial teacher tenure
bill SB6 and Crist vetoed it, endearing himself to about 2 million teachers
and their families who vote.
The Republicans backed off the Medicaid overhaul and the crazy voucher
amendment because Christ could have humiliated them again with a veto
that could not be overridden. Crist just signed into law tougher graduation
standards that will replace Bush's cherished FCAT, the hallmark of the plan
to undermine public schools while placing Black children in a chokehold.
The mainstream media has stopped calling Crist a lame duck because clear-
ly he's driving the train.
Meanwhile, the Florida Republican Party implodes amid a revolving scan-
dal that touches all Crist's enemies. Rubio had one of the infamous party
credit cards, and is under scrutiny. He looks worried on national television
these days because the RPOF has huge problems with its expenditures,
shakedowns and tax issues. There's also a court battle underway with their
former Party Chairman Greer over his contract and party moneymen are
enraged by the executive director who paid his own consulting firm nearly
$500k in fees.
The Florida Department of Law Enforcement is investigating. There are
those "forensic" audits rumbling forth. And Crist joined Alex Sink, the
Democratic candidate for governor, and successfully called for an outside
investigation. So now the FBI, IRS and every other investigative arm of the
federal government is in state GOP business looking for answers.
Reportedly, last week, the FBI was questioning lobbyists about contributions
connected to bills passed by the Republican legislature... and so forth. That
is a death knell for a political party. Financial contributions tend to dry up
when the recipient is under a microscope.
Meanwhile, Democratic Chairwoman Karen Thurman has been quietly
assembling an aggressive staff that actually triggered these investigations
starting with the downfall of Republican Speaker Ray Sansom. Thurman
was a state senator and Congresswoman with strong and longstanding rela-
tionships with her former colleagues and contributors. The Party fundrais-
ing has increased and Thurman will pound her fist and get what she wants
politically. She hired Scott Arceneaux as Executive Director who was born
reading cross tabs. There is something to be said for political Louisiana pedi-
gree, meaning he's quick to show you the door, if you "ain't in it to win it,"
and he, and the boss have plans. In sharp contrast to his republican coun-
terpart, Arceneauix; has made frugality an art form. But more importantly the
new direction means the Democrats take the Black vote very seriously.
Blacks vote democratic 80 95% of the time and their place at the political
table is a lock. Those odds have been winning elections over the last decade
with the same strength as independent voters. We have to remember that the
D's aren't the only ones paying attention. So no bluffing allowed this elec-
tion cycle. Stay tuned.
Gayle Andrews is a former member of the Capitol Press Corps, adjunct
Journalism instructor at Florida A & M University, where she was awarded
Distinguished and Outstanding Graduate status. She is a corporate & polit-
ical consultant in Tallahassee.


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Email: JfreePress@aol.com


Rita Perry


PUBLISHED




Jacksonville
(-haahr mb t c (io inmC-rce


ER


Sylvia Perry

Managing Editor


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F O I A ,I RS U T E- '

FLORIDA'S FIRST COAST QUALITY BLACK WEEKLY


CONTRIBUTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald
Fullwood, E.O.Huthcinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Marsha
Oliver, Marretta Latimer, Phyllis Mack,Tonya Austin, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda
Burwell, Rhonda Silver, Vickie Brown, Rahman Johnson, Headshots.


May 13-19, 2010


Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press


I UA 49 i^








Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5


Landmark civil rights case 1


The judge and prosecutor in a
40-year-old civil rights murder
trial that helped produce major
gains for the civil rights movement
must move quickly to resolve their
differences before witnesses die.
It has been four decades since
former Alabama state trooper
James Bonard Fowler (pictured
above) was indicted for the death
of Jimmie Lee Jackson in 1965.
Jackson had participated in a
nighttime civil rights march.
Violence erupted when authorities
tried to halt the march. Historians


and prosecutors say Jackson inter-
vened to prevent troopers from
beating his mother and grandfather
and was shot by Fowler. The now-
76-year-old former trooper claims
that Jackson reached for his gun
and actions were in self-defense.
After Jackson died, activists
attempted a march from Selma,
Ala., to Montgomery but were
beaten in Selma by authorities.
That march was named "Bloody
Sunday" and later prompted the
Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. to
complete a march all the way to


being delayed
the state capitol. That march
helped Congress approve the 1965
Voting Rights Act, which cleared
the way for millions of blacks in
the South to register to vote.
"Millions of people are voting
today who might not be voting if
not for that case," Pulitzer Prize-
winning author Taylor Branch,
who wrote three books about the
civil rights movement.
A grand jury declined to indict
Fowler just a few months after the
incident. Prosecutor Michael
Jackson reopened the case, after
becoming the first black district
attorney in the county where the
killing occurred.
"I feel like my rights have been
violated. If I was black, it wouldn't
be like that, and everybody knows
that," Fowler said.
Fowler's comments say a lot
about his attitude toward blacks.
This case is necessary to show that
justice will be pursued regardless
of the amount of time that has
passed. If the South were not so
blatantly racist, when the shooting
first occurred, maybe a jury could
have had the chance to hear the
case and make a decision by now.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING



JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY

RE: FY 2009 Section 5317 Formula Grant

URBANIZED AREA: Jacksonville, Florida
ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT: $340,051
RECIPIENT: Jacksonville Transportation Authority

Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) is providing an opportunity for a
public hearing to consider its FY 2008/2009 Program of Projects from which federal funds are being request-
ed from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Funding is generally available on an 80/20 matching basis
between federal and local sources for Capital projects and on a 50/50 matching basis between federal and local
sources for Operating projects. The public is encouraged to comment on any and all projects listed below.

Agency: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Project Description: Administrative Costs (up to 10%)
Agency Type: Local or Regional Transit Authority
Service Area: Duval County
Funding Amount: $34,005 (Federal) = $34,005
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services; Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility; and Develop a mar-
keting plan to educate and inform the community of all available and evolving mobility options in the region

Agency: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Project Description: Provide Travel training programs to encourage people with disabilities, senior adults and
persons with low income to use lower cost trip option
Agency Type: Local or Regional Transit Authority
Service Area: Duval County
Funding Amount: $108,150 (Federal) + $108,150 (Local) = $216,300
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Educate and inform the community of all available mobility options

Agency: ARC Jacksonville, Inc.
Project Description: Provide transportation to those clients who live outside the 3/4 mile boundary line of pub-
lic transportation and are not eligible for ADA services
Agency Type: Not For Profit
Funding Amount: $134,470 (Federal) + $134,470 (Local) = $268,940
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operations of the NF service route that is designed to transport individuals with
developmentally disabilities from Clay County for employment at NAS JAX in Duval County
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Funding Amount: $49,738 (Federal) + $49,738 (Local) = $99,476
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services and Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operations of the NF service route that begins in Middleburg and ends at the
Clay County Health Department at Bear Run
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Funding Amount: $13,688 (Federal) + $13,688 (Local) = $27,376
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services and Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility


Total Projects:


$ 646,097


Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing before 5:00 p.m. on June
14, 2010. If a request is received by the stated time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the pub-
lic notified. Mail requests to:

Notice of Public Hearing, Section 5317 Grant
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Post Office Drawer "0"
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

This formula grant program has been coordinated through the Transportation Improvement Program
(TIP) of the North Florida Transportation Planning Organization (North Florida TPO) for the
Jacksonville Urbanized Area, with projects selected by the Northeast Florida Mobility Coalition.
No business displacements are expected to occur as a result of project implementation. These proj-
ects will have no substantial harmful effects on the environment, nor will they adversely affect serv-
ice levels to the elderly or disabled.

Details of the Program of Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue through
June 14, 2010 during normal business hours. Persons with disabilities who need accommodations to
attend the meeting should contact the JTA Connexion office at 904-265-6001, CTC TDD 636-7402.
This notice will constitute the final publication unless the Program of Projects is amended.


Kenneth R. Holton
(904) 630-3187
kholton@jtafla.com
Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


providing book scholarships


Jaguar player
Leading
Jacksonville
Jaguar wide
receiver and
Orlando native
Mike Sims-
Walker is mak-
ing the transi-
tion a little eas-
ier to college
Sims-Walker this year. With
the launch of his "Playmaker 11
Scholarship," students graduating
from Orlando and Jacksonville-area


They will be awarded June 19,
2010 in Orlando, FL
Sims-Walker is entering his 4th
NFL season. A graduate of the
University of Central Florida, he
holds a B.A. degree in Liberal
Studies. In 2009, he changed his
name to Sims-Walker to honor his
father.
The deadline to apply for the
scholarship is June 4, 2010. Visit
www.playmaker 1 lscholarship.com
for scholarship details and to down-
load the application.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY

RE: FY 2009 Section 5316 Formula Grant


URBANIZED AREA:
ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT:
RECIPIENT:


Jacksonville, Florida
$530,286
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) is providing an opportunity for a
public hearing to consider its FY 2008/2009 Program of Projects from which federal funds are being request-
ed from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Funding is generally available on an 80/20 matching basis
between federal and local sources for Capital projects and on a 50/50 matching basis between federal and local
sources for Operating projects. The public is encouraged to comment on any and all projects listed below.

Agency: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Project Description: Administrative Costs (up to 10%)
Agency Type: Local or Regional Transit Authority
Service Area: Duval County
Funding Amount: $53,028 (Federal) = $53,028
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services; Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility; and Develop a mar-
keting plan to educate and inform the community of all available and evolving mobility options in the region

Agency: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Project Description: Continued operation of the Highlands Community Shuttle service
Agency Type: Local or Regional Transit Authority
Service Area: Duval County
Funding Amount: $79,305 (Federal) + $79,305 (Local) = $158,610
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: St. Johns County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operations of the Purple and Connector service routes from St. Augustine to
Jacksonville
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Service Area: Duval County, St. Johns County
Funding Amount: $232,026 (Federal) + $232,026 (Local) = $464,052
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operations of the CC-51 route with enhanced mid-day service from Green Cove
Springs to Orange Park Mall
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Service Area: Duval County, Clay County
Funding Amount: $66,656 (Federal) + $66,656 (Local) = $133,312
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services and Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operations of the CC 51 route with Saturday service from Green Cove Springs
to Orange Park Mall
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Service Area: Duval County, Clay County
Funding Amount: $8,463 (Federal) + $8,463 (Local) = $16,926
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services and Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operations of the CC-53 route with enhanced mid-day service from Middleburg
to Orange Park Mall
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Service Area: Duval County, Clay County
Funding Amount: $57,839 (Federal) + $57,839 (Local) = $115,678
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services and Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continued operation of the JARC route for mid-day service which connects passengers to
the employment centers in the Town of Orange Park
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Service Area: Duval County, Clay County
Funding Amount: $32,969 (Federal) + $32,969 (Local) = $65,938
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate "seamless" transportation across jurisdictional boundaries
and/or between services and Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility


Total Projects:


$ 1,007,544


Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing before 5:00 p.m. on June 14,
2010. If a request is received by the stated time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the public
notified. Mail requests to:

Notice of Public Hearing, Section 5316 Grant
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Post Office Drawer "0"
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

This formula grant program has been coordinated through the Transportation Improvement Program
(TIP) of the North Florida Transportation Planning Organization (North Florida TPO) for the
Jacksonville Urbanized Area, with projects selected by the Northeast Florida Mobility Coalition. No
business displacements are expected to occur as a result of project implementation. These projects
will have no substantial harmful effects on the environment, nor will they adversely affect service lev-
els to the elderly or disabled.

Details of the Program of Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue through
June 14, 2010 during normal business hours. Persons with disabilities who need accommodations to
attend the meeting should contact the JTA Connexion office at 904-265-6001, CTC TDD 636-74012.
This notice will constitute the final publication unless the Program of Projects is amended.
Kenneth R. Holton
(904) 630-3187
kholton@jtafla.com
Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


May 13-19, 2010


high schools are eligible for the
grants ranging from $200-$1000.
To help educate the community
about colon cancer, a disease that
shorten the life of Sims-Walker's
father, Michael Sims, in 2008,
applicants must complete a short
application and craft an essay of no
more than 500 words about the
"Prevention and Early Detection of
Colon Cancer." Sims-Walker is
providing the option of submitting a
YouTube video no longer than 11
minutes in lieu of a written essay.


1%4_-. 11 10t '711 A








May 13-19, 2010


Pa e 6 Ms Perr
'
s Free P s


Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church and Pastor Anniversaries


Celebrates 102nd Anniversary
Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church, Pastor R.L. Gundy, officers and
members invitethe public to their 102nd Anniversary Celebration of the
Church May 11-16. The Anniversary theme is 'Grounded and Assured in
Christian Hope in Christ' taken from Romans 8. The celebration dates, are
as follows: Nightly 5/11-13 -at 7:00 p.m., concluding on Sunday May 16th
2010 at 4:00 p.m. Call the church at 354-7249 for more information.

Norma White to keynote
St. Gabriel's Women's Day
The women of St. Gabriel's Episcopal Church invite the community to
their Women's Day Celebration on Sunday, May 16, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. The
church is located at 5235 Moncrief Rd. Please join us in worship, praise
and song. The theme is' Christian Women Standing on the Promises". Dr.
Norma White is the keynote speaker. For information call 708-8672.

Nat Glover to keynote Epiphany
Baptist's youth program
Epiphany Baptist Church located at 663 South Mcduff Avenue on the
Westside where Rev. Williams L. Robinson is the Pastor, will be presenting
a youth program on Sunday, May 23rd at 5:00 p.m. themed, "I Can Be a
Solution Not the problem (saving our youth)" Former Sheriff Nathan
Glover will be the guest speaker. All our welcome. Refreshlunents will be
served. For more information, call the church at (904) 384-8129.

Central CME continues

Unity Day Gatherings
"Uniting on the Pearl through Worship, Ministry, and Fellowship" is this
year's theme for Central Metropolitan CME Church Unity Day Celebration
Gatherings. The speaking schedule will continue on Saturday, May 15th
starting at 9 a.m. with a Fish Fry and Evangelistic Outreach; Sunday, May
16, 9:30 a.m.- Unity Day Breakfast; Sunday, May 16, 10:45 am, Rev.
Clarence Kelby Heath, Morning Worship Speakerand Sunday, May 16,
4:00 pm, Unity Day Celebration Concert For directions or information, call
(904) 354-7426.

Summer Camp Registration
"The Gifts Within Summer Camp 2010" is conducting early registration
for ages 3-17. Camp convenes June 14-August 6th. Sign-up with Minister,
Dr. Tanya Brooks, Camp Director. For more information please call (904)
389-7373.


0 0 0 0

A-, T


Celebrated at Revelation Prayer
Revelation Prayer House will celebrate their Pastor And Church
Anniversary May 20 May 23, 2010. The community is invited to come
and share in their celebration at 7:00 p.m. It is the 24th year for the Pastor
and 17th years forthe church family. The church is located at 1725 W. 28th
Street. For more information call 766-2861.

St. James AME Gospel Concert
Marvin Green and the Stewardess Board of New St. James AME Church
is presenting Jeffery McIntyre in a Gospel Concert, Sunday May 23rd at
4:00 p.m. in the sanctuary of the Church. The title of the program is
"Because He Lies." McIntyre is a well-known gospel singer and a member
of Greater Sunday Morning Spiritual House of Prayer. Rev. Alton Coles is
the host pastor. The church is located at 2128 Forest Street.

Leona Daniels' Day at
New Fountain Chapel AME
New Fountain Chapel AME Church, located at 737 Jessie Street on the
Eastside, invite the community to join in celebration of their 63rd Annual
Leona Daniels' Day to be held on Sunday, May 16th. The service schedule
is as follows: Church School 9:00 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:45 a.m. and
Evening Worship 3:30p.m. Come to the Fountain so rich and sweet cast
your soul and the savior's feet. For more information call (904) 358-2258.

Gospel Cavaliers in Concert May 16th
The Gospel Cavaliers Of Jacksonville will be in concert at Greater St.
Mathew Missionary Baptist Church located at 649 Franklin St. where Rev.
Earnest Williams is Pastor. The special concert will be held on Sunday
May 16th at 5:00 p.m.

Women's Conference at 1st New Zion
First New Zion Missionary Baptist Church will have their annual
Christian Women's Conference & Luncheon on Saturday May 29, 2010 at i
8:30 a.m. The conference and luncheon will be held at Zion's Fellowship
Hall located at 4810 Soutel Drive. i
. Registration begins at 8:30a.m "Conference begins at 9:00 a.m and lunch
will be served after the conference 12:30 to 2:00 p.m. The theme: Allowing
God to be Real Though Praise Prayer
and His Presence: Keynote Speaker: Sisters Celebrate
Sis Cynthia Robinson, New Zion
Missionary Baptist Church of
Fernandina Beach Fl. To register or
more information, call 765-3111.' --


Mr. Robert S. Blue
Living history in our midst with trailblazing
law enforcement officer Mr. Robert Blue


Not many citizens of Jacksonville
realize that they have a historical
icon living in their midst. Mr.
Robert Lee Blue Sr. who was born
in St. Augustine has lived in
Jacksonville for over eighty years.
He was one of the first six African
American deputy sheriffs in Duval
County. Mr. Blue was hired in 1956
during Sheriff Dale Carson's admin-
istration. Of the original six Mr.
Blue is the only survivor. He served
as a deputy sheriff for 12 years. In


1968 Mr. Blue was offered a job in
the Jacksonville Public Defenders
Office as a total of 48 years in law
enforcement. Today Mr. Blue
enjoys life with his wife of 62 years,
six children and a host of grand and
great grandchildren. W
hen asked what kept him going
strong for so long as a servant of
this city, Mr. Blue smiles with is
broad trademark smile and says, "I
had a passion for my work.


Mothers at Baker-Warren home


Sunday School
9 a.m.
Morning Worship
10 a.m.
Lord's Supper
Second Sunday
3:00 p.m.
Evening Worship
Every 3rd & 4th
Sunday
4 :00 p.m.


A church

that's on the

move in

worship with

prayer, praise

and power!


Pastor Robert Lecount, Jr

School of Ministry Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.

Thursday High Praise Worship 7:00 p.m.

2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


Standing (1-r): Joyce Lawson, Karen Dunn, Francina Gamble, Edwin "Butch" Lawson, Ellsworth
Alexander, Edyal Alexander, Japhus Baker, Gwen Baker, and hostess Marguerite Baker-Latimer; kneeling
(1-r): Doug Lawson, John Latimer, and Joy Lawson.
Joined by blood and marriage, but bonded by love and friendship, sisters celebrated Mother's Day this past week-
end at the home of Marguerite Baker-Latimer. The event was a celebratory gathering of family and friends to honor
the matriarchs and mothers of the Alexander, Baker, Gamble, Latimer and Lawson clans. Guests enjoyed a pool-
side feast, great conversation, good music and lots of laughs over old family photos. "This was such a joyous event.
I can't remember the last time I was so relaxed. It was a lot of fun," said Joyce Lawson.


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church
215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


Pastor Rudolph
McKissick, Sr.
Senior Pastor


Weekly Services


Sunday Morning Worship
7:40 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.
Church school
9:30 a.m.
The Word from the Sons
and Daughters of Bethel
3rd Sunday 3:30 p.m.


Midweek Services
Wednesday Noon Service
"Miracle at Midday"
12 noon-1 p.m.

Dinner and Bible Study
at 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m.


Come share in Holy Communion on 1st Sunday at 4:50 P.m.


Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Jr.
Senior Pastor


Radio Ministry
WCGL 1360 AM Thursday 8:15 -8:45 a.m.
AM 1400 Thursday 7:00 8:00 p.m.
TV Ministry
WTLV Channel 12 Sunday's at 6:30 a.m.


Grace and Peace ,


-~ -~ -.


Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20


Pastor Landon Williams


8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship
9:30 a.m. Sunday School
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday 2 PM 3 PM
**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


* * *A Full Gospel Baptist Church * *


rageU- vin. vly LU A V


/








May 13-19, 2010 Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


Joyce Jackson, Roy L. Campbell and hostess Pat Lockett-Felder


Luella Nelson, Willetta Cummings and Ruby Holmes


Johnetta Jordan, Iris Brown, Rosemary James and Joyce Jackson.


Oldest Mother in attendance Rosa Williams (89 years old)


Centurion Eliza Caffey-Dilligard
celebrates 100th birthday


Shown above (L-R) is Ruth Anderson-Stephens with her mother,
honoree Eliza Caffey-Dilligard. R. Silver photo


Longtime Jacksonville resident
Eliza Caffey-Dilligard celebrated
her 100th birthday over the
Mother's Day weekend with a fes-
tive celebration attended by family
and friends. The mother of three
served as a Notary Public and was


known as a lover of hats and fash-
ionable clothes. She also enjoyed
crafts such as pottery and silk flow-
ers. When she can, she enjoys
attending church at Bethel Baptist
Institutional Church and spending
time with her daughter.


Pat Lockett-Felder hosts 3rd Annual


Mother's Day Luncheon for 100 seniors


by Lynn Jones
While most celebrated Mothers
Day with their own or in remem-
brance of their loved one, former
city councilwoman and community
Seniors in Crisis
Continued from front
budgets of 6 out of 10 senior house-
holds of color at risk.
"These data show that millions of
African American and Latino sen-
iors are living on the edge of finan-
cial collapse, unable to rely on
assets, income, or other pillars of
financial stability. Their circum-
stances are only made worse by the
recent economic downturn, which
has been characterized by dramatic
losses in assets and housing val-
ues," said economist Thomas
Shapiro.
Policies must not only strengthen
the existing safety-nets and pro-
mote asset building opportunities
for vulnerable seniors, they also
must protect younger families to
help them enter retirement on a
stronger economic footing.
"Future retirees will be worse off
unless we attend to policies that
grow their resources for the future,
and combat the rising costs of
essential expenses for seniors,"
said Jennifer Wheary, report co-
author and a Senior Fellow at
Demos.
The Jacksonville Free
Press would love to
share your event
with our readers.
Call 634-1993 for
more information


activist Pat Lockett-Felder spent
her Mother's Day weekend and
months leading up to it honoring
local mothers in the city.
For the third year, her annual
Mother's Day Luncheon took place
at the Crowne Plaza Hotel honoring
100 mothers. Her only requirement
for attendance to the free event was
that participants be over 60 years of
age. Women from throughout the
community came together for an
afternoon of fellowship and fun.
Eastside native Elizabeth Means
addressed the honorees and proudly
testified about her grandmother .
"She taught me how to read the


scriptures," said Means. She also
shared how her upbringing influ-
enced her decision to have a nurs-
ing career. "Blacks were only
allowed to go to the hospital at
night, and I knew I had to make a
difference." She shared.
Also on hand was business man
Roy Campbell who graciously dis-
tributed "The Bible Experience".
The new spiritual media lets you
hear the words of the Bible brought
to life like never before. The audio
CDis a fully-dramatized reading of
the complete Bible performed by
distinguished African-American
actors, musicians, and personalities.


Pat's inspiration for the luncheon
stems from her commitment to the
Jacksonville's seniors and children
established when she was in office.
Following the passing of her own
mother, sharing her love with
dozens of them in her honor seemed
like a natural honor.
"Elected or not, it's my mission
to look after our senior communi-
ty," said Lockett-Felder.
And look after them she did. No
one left empty handed carrying a
bevy of gifts ranging from gift
cards and flat screen televisions to
Coach purses and Bibles.


Reunion planning meetings
underway for Jackson Class of '76
The Andrew Jackson Class of 1976 will be having a planning meeting for
their 35th Class reunion. The meeting will be held on Thursday, May 20th
at 6:30p.m.inside the Andrew Jackson High School cafeteria.
For more information call Ms. Crawford at (904) 520-0166.
Raines / Ribault Class of '78 hold
joint Charity Basketball Game
Raines & Ribault have joined forces to lay aside their high school rival-
ry to benefit the stakeholders of their respective schools. On July 31, 2010,
the Old School/New School Charity Basketball Game to bring together
families and friends for a memorable time of fun and fellowship. To par-
ticipate or more information call 410-9603. Stay tuned for details.


Simmons Pediatrics





,. i '






Charles E. Simmons, III, M.D.

Hospital Expert!
ive yor newom arsick c seen
Sin he hosp# ibbyher own Dodor.
Baptist-Woffson Children's Hospital
S. Vincents- Memorial & St. Lukes Hospital

(904) 766-1106
Primary Care Hours;
9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. M-F
1771 Edgewood Avenue, W., Ste 1
Jacksonville, Florida 32208


OBSTETRICAL & GYNECOLOGICAL

ASSOCIATES, P.A.

Complete Obstetrical | .

& Gynecological Care '
Comprehensive Pregnancy Care
Board Certified Laser Surgery
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Osteoporosis Menopausal Disorder
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B. Vercen Chithriki, M.D.
St. Vincent's Division IV William L. Cody, M.D.

1820 Barrs Street, Suite 521 ,

Jacksonville, FL 32204 ,

(904) 387-9577
www.nfobgyn.com


Alumni and


Administration

Your help is needed to document
the History and Legacy of William
M. Raines. If so we would like to interview you for our
up-coming documentary film:

"WE REMEMBER RAINES"
ICHIBANS FOREVER

Producers will be doing interviews _at Raines High School on Saturday
mornings. If you are interested in sharing your memories, please call to set-
up an appointment 607-3314 or 365-1906.


( \ Pr. Ches5ter Aikens

305 Last Union street
in PowntoWn Jack5onviLLe


For All "

Your Dental

Needs -


358-3827

Monday Friday .
8:30 AM 5 PM
Saturday Appointments Available / f
Dental Insurance and Medicaid Accepted


May 13-19, 2010


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7























OneJax Humanitarian
Awards Dinner
This year's One Jax Humanitarian
Award Dinner will be held on May
13, 2010 at the Hyatt Regency
Jacksonville Riverfront This year's
event will honor Cleve E. Warren
Martha "Marty" Lanahan John J.
"Jack" Diamond. For tickets or
more information, call 354-1529.

Miracle on Ashley Street
The 16th Annual Miracle on
Ashley Street will be held on
Friday, May 14th at 11 a.m. at 613
W. Ashley Street. Community and
corporate leaders serve a gourmet
lunch prepared by 16 area restau-
rants and culinary students. All
proceeds supports the daily feeding
program for the homeless. For
more information, call 354-4162.

Florida Theatre Old
Hollywood Party
The Florida Theatre will bring
back Jacksonville's Hollywood's
glamour days of old with the Old
Hollywood Party. See real artifacts
from the silent movies provided by
Norman Studios, the Florida
Theatre and the Historical Society
reminiscent of the theatre produc-
tion era. Includes FREE beer and
drinks, music and popcorn. It will
be held Friday, May 15th at 8 p.m.
and benefits the Florida Theatre.

Ritz Voices
Spring Concert
The Ritz Voices and guests will put
on a riveting, uplifting performance
for their upcoming Spring Concert.


It will be held on Sunday, May Chicago the Musical Links Old School Gala
16th at 5 p.m. This concert is a Straight from Broadway, the musi- The Bold City Chapter of Links
fundraiser for the Ritz Voices trip cal "Chicago" will be performed will present their annual Old School
the to McDonald's Gospelfest in atthe Times Union Center for Gala on Saturday, May 22, 2010 at
New Jersey, June 19th, 2010. It will Performing Arts May 21 -23. For Jacksonville Municipal Stadium.
be held at the Ritz Theatre. For tickets or more information, call Guests don their favorite 70s or era
more information call 632-5555. 632-3373. attire and groove to old school
sounds. Contact any Bold City Link


Alvin Ailey at TUCPA
The Alvin Ailey American Dance
Theater will inspire, enlighten and
entertain Jacksonville at the Times
Union Center's Moran Theater on
Tuesday, May 18th at 7:30 p.m.
The performance continues the cel-
ebration of the legendary Judith
Jamison's 20th year as artistic
director. For tickets or more infor-
mation, call 632-3373.

Job Fair
Congresswoman Corrine Brown
invites the community to join her at
the 18th Annual Job and Resource
Fair. Monday, May 18th from 9
a.m. 2 p.m. at the Prime Osborne
Convention Center. Applicants are
encouraged to be prepared, bring
resumes and dressed for success.
Last year over 60 employers met
with over 10,000 job seekers.

African-American
Cultural Arts Festival
The Jacksonville African
American Cultural arts is set for
May 21-22 2010. This event will
feature African performers on stage
and on the park grounds, interna-
tional food and craft vendors all at
A. Phillip Randolph Park.
For more information visit
www.africanamericanculturalarts-
festival.com.


Craft and Import
Beer Festival
An impressive selection of
American craft beers and imported
beers from around the world will be
available to sample at the 2nd
Annual Jacksonville Craft and
Import Beer Festival. Available for
sample will be over 35 different
breweries with over 200 beers to
taste. Several local restaurants are
participating and serving up great
food to pair with the wide selection
of beer samples. Live music acts
will keep you entertained and your
feet taping. Mark your calendar for
Friday, May 21st at 7 p.m. to be at
the Veterans Memorial Arena.

Raines Class of
1970 40th Reunion
The William Raines Class of
1970, in conjunction with their 40th
reunion is sponsoring a "Sports
Wear Cruise Party" aboard the Lady
St. Johns. The event will take place
on Friday, May 21st at 6 p.m. For
tickets and more information call
elsa at 520-1884.

Kevin Hart in Concert
Comedian Kevin Hart will be in
concert at the Florida Theatre on
Friday May 21st. Tickets are now
on sale via Ticketmaster at 353-
3309.


or call 634-1993.

Meet Cornbread
Meet literacy icon Cornbread at
the upcoming Superintendent's
Reading Celebration. It will be held
on Saturday, May 22, 2010 at
Metropolitan Park The event is free
for all Duval County Public School
students and Cornbread will be
signing autographs and books from
10 a.m. 1 p.m.

Free African-American
Art at JMOCA
On Sunday, May 23, from noon
- 4 p.m, the public is invited to
visit the Jacksonville Museum of
Contemporary Art. Located down-
town across from Hemming Plaza,
experience the African American
art exhibition Tradition Redefined
with art activities, performances,
and special experiences for the
whole family. For more informa-
tion call 366-3911.

Jacksonville Jazz
Festival
The annual Jacksonville Jazz
Festival will be held May 27-30,
2010 in downtown Jacksonville at
various locations. The lineup will
include Patti LaBelle, Spyro Gyra,
Tito Puente Jr., Chris Botti, Ledisi,
Irvin Mayfield, Spanish Harlem


Orchestra, Bernie Williams, Basia,
Superstars of Jazz Fusion,
Buckwheat Zydeco, among many
others. For more information call
630-3690.


Free Evening
of Spoken Word
Come out and enjoy an evening of
Spoken Word at the Ritz Theater on
June 3, 2010. The free event will
start at 7 p.m. Spoken word night is
held on the first Thursday of every
month where poets, writers, vocal-
ists and sometimes musicians gath-
er to present and hear some of the
area's most powerful and profound
lyrical voices in a casual open-mic
setting. For more info call 632-
5555.

PRIDE Book
Club Meeting
The June meeting of PRIDE Book
Club will be held on Friday, June
4, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. hosted by
Linda Riley. The book for discus-
sion will be "The Return of Simple"
by Langston Hughes. For directions
and more information, call 683-
9854.

Brooklyn, Campbell
Hill and Mixontown
Annual Picnic
The Jacksonville Westside com-
munities of Brooklyn, Campbell
Hill and Mixontown will have their
Annual Picnic on Saturday, June
5th from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the
Johnson Community Center located
at Jackson & Chelsea Streets. For
more information call 768-2665 or
945-7888.

Lavell Crawford at
the Comedy Zone
Comedian Lavell Crawford will
bring his urban brand of comedy to


Do You Have

forAround


the Comedy Zone in Mandarin
June 10-12 for multiple shows. For
tickets and times call 292-4242.

Soul Food
Music Festival
The annual Soul Food Music
Festival will be held on Saturday,
June 19th starting at 4 p.m. at
Metropolitan Park. Artists this year
include Chaka Khan, Tevin
Cambell and Jody Whatley. Call
Ticketmaster for details at 353-
3309.

Tommy Davidson
in Concert
Comedian Tommy Davidson of
"In Living Color" fame, will be
inconcert at the Comedy Zone for
multiple shows July 15-17. For
showtimes or more information,
call 292-4242.

Ms. Senior
Jacksonville Pageant
The Ms. Senior Jacksonville
Pageant 2010for ladies age 60 and
up will be held on June 26th at 2
p.m. at the Times Union Center for
the Performing Arts. Tickets are
available via Ticketmaster. For
more information visit www.asea-
sonedaffair.com or call Ms. Demps
at 887-8156.

Cocktails for a Cause
In celebration of the National
Urban League's 100th year, the
local affiliate will be holding
"Cocktails for a Cause" to learn
about their Centennial Movement,
other events and to network with
community leaders. It will be held
at the University Club,1301
Riverplace Boulevard 27th floor
on Wednesday, August 18th from
4:30 7:30 p.m. RSVP your atten-
dance to l.finley@jaxul.org or 904-
366-3461.


an ever

Town?


The Jacksonville Free Press is please to print your public
service announcements and coming events free of charge.
news deadline is Monday at 6 p.m. by the week you would
like your information to be printed. Information can be sent
via email, fax, brought into our office or mailed in. Please be
sure to include the 5W's who, what, when, where, why and
you must include a contact number.
Email JFreePress@aol.com Fax (904) 765-3803
Mail: Coming Events Jacksonville Free Press
903 W. Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32203









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I








Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 9


1%4- 1- 1 A aini fl


DENZEL DONATES $1M TO
STEVE HARVEY FOUNDATION
Steve Harvey held a black-tie affair
last week in New York to support
young Black men for his Foundation.
Harvey and Robin Roberts of "Good
Morning America" hosted the premier
Steve Harvey Foundation Gala at
Cipriani Restaurant. The event was a
fundraiser for his mentoring weekends,
which are aimed at guiding young
Black men down the right path.
Steve has already been doing an on-
air drive during his morning radio show to fund the weekends, attempt-
ing to raise the $1 million required to make his vision a reality.
The fundraiser wasn't all about the kids, though. The gala was also held
to honor Denzel Washington, Geoffrey Canada and Pam El for the things
they've done for the Black community. However, keeping the original
purpose of the gala in mind, Denzel and his wife, Pauletta, surprised
Steve with a generous donation of $1 million.
JUDGE ORDERS DWYANE WADE'S WIFE TO COURT
A Chicago judge has ordered the
estranged wife of basketball star Dwyane .
Wade to court after she failed to show up
for her divorce hearing. K
Cook County Circuit Judge Maiya Nega -
said the contentious breakup involving the
Miami Heat guard and Siohvaughn Wade
was "beginning to spiral out of control."
Wade showed up for the hearing but '
Siohvaughn never made it. The judge 'v s
delayed the hearing until the afternoon to .
give her time to get to court..
Siohvaughn Wade has filed a lawsuit
claiming her husband's relationship with actress Gabrielle Union is caus-
ing her and their children distress.
Lawyer James Pritikin plans to argue that Dwayne Wade be given phys-
ical custody of their two children.


Teen in Taylor case


details alleged abuse


Lawrence Taylor in court
The 16-year-old prostitute
allegedly raped by Lawrence Taylor
in a Rockland County hotel room
told The New York Post about how
her alleged pimp brutally forced her
to have sex with the former NFL
linebacker after she initially
refused.
"I told him I wasn't going to the
hotel, and he said, 'It's $300," she
said 36-year-old Rasheed Davis
screamed at her early Thursday
morning. "He hit me in the face, so
I covered my face."
She crouched down on the ground
to avoid Davis' blows, but "[he]
started kicking and stomping on
me," said the girl (name withheld).
Davis then dragged her to the
Holiday Inn to meet with the Hall


of Fame athlete, barking instruc-
tions at her along the way, she
recalled.
"He told me to tell him my name
is Carmen and I'm 19 years old,"
she said. "He told me repeatedly
and I had to repeat it back to him."
When she arrived at the hotel in
Suffern, "the lights were off and
[Taylor] didn't see my face was
bruised," the girl recounted.
"Lawrence asked me my age and I
told him I was 19."
She said she feared for her life if
she didn't go through with it.
"If I didn't go through with it,
[Taylor] would've called Rasheed
and there would have been conse-
quences," she said. "God knows
what would've happened if I didn't
go through with it."
On the drive back to The Bronx,
the girl frantically text-messaged
her uncle about the alleged assault
and prostitution.
"Tio [the uncle] help me," she
typed, while still in the alleged
clutches of Davis, according to a
copy of the text shown exclusively
to The Post. "I don't want to live
like this."
After getting the message, he
called 911 and cops were waiting at
Davis' home to arrest him.
The uncle said the girl is now in
foster care, and her biological
father is seeking custody.


NEW YORK Legendary per-
former and African-American icon
Lena Home died this week at the
age of 92 at New York Presbyterian
Hospital.
Home was known for her work in
musical after musical in the 1940's,
her lengthy singing career including
a memorable rendition of "Stormy
Weather" and for her outspokeness
about civil rights.
Home, whose striking beauty and
magnetic sex appeal often over-
shadowed her sultry voice, was
remarkably candid about the under-
lying reason for her success.
"I was unique in that I was a kind
of black that white people could
accept," she once said. "I was their
daydream. I had the worst kind of
acceptance because it was never for
how great I was or what I con-
tributed. It was because of the way
I looked."
In the 1940s, she was one of the


first black performers hired to
sing with a major white
b.,in. 1 il first to play the
. '.e --h.ina nightclub
d.,,1 .,nong a handful
SIl ,., Hollywood con-

I 1943, MGM
Stu dios loaned her to
2Th lCentury-Fox to
S pl.,y the role of
',elina Rogers in
the all-black
Movie musical

Weather." Her
rendition of the
title song
became a major
hit and her sig-
nature piece.
On screen,
on records and
in nightclubs
and concert
halls, Hornme
was at home
b vocally with a
.. bt wide musical
range, from
blues and jazz
to the sophisti-
cation of
Rodgers and
Hart in songs
like "The Lady Is
., Tramp" and
"Bewitched,
Bothered and
Bewildered."
In her first big
Bloadway success,
a the star of
"Jmaioca" in 1957,
evic % ier Richard Watts
I called her "one of the
incomnp.iable performers
ot 111 laine." Songwriter
Budd' d% Sylva dubbed her
"lliei bet female singer of

Butil Hoi n '...i perpetually frus-
liuled ,. nlih, public humiliation of
t'c I'. !'
"I wi. I, ,- battling the system-
to I I ~~ 'iI to be with my people.
Finally, I wouldn't work for places
that kept us out ... it was a damn
fight everywhere I was, every place
I worked, in New York, in
Hollywood, all over the world," she
said in Brian Lanker's book "I
Dream a World: Portraits of Black
Women Who Changed America."
While at MGM, she starred in the
all-black "Cabin in the Sky," in
1943, but in most of her other


movies, she appeared only in musi-
cal numbers that could be cut in the
racially insensitive South without
affecting the story. These included
"I Dood It," a Red Skelton comedy,
"Thousands Cheer" and "Swing
Fever," all in 1943; "Broadway
Rhythm" in 1944; and "Ziegfeld
Follies" in 1946.
Early in her career Home culti-
vated an aloof style out of self-
preservation, becoming "a woman
the audience can't reach and there-
fore can't hurt" she once said.
Later she embraced activism,
breaking loose as a voice for civil
rights and as an artist. In the last
decades of her life, she rode a new
wave of popularity as a revered
icon of American popular music.
Her 1981 one-woman Broadway
show, "Lena Home: The Lady and
Her Music," won a special Tony
Award. In it, the 64-year-old singer
used two renditions one straight
and the other gut-wrenching of
"Stormy Weather" to give audi-
ences a glimpse of the spiritual
odyssey of her five-decade career.
Lena Mary Calhoun Home, the
great-granddaughter of a freed
slave, was born in Brooklyn June
30, 1917, to a leading family in the
black bourgeoisie. Her daughter,
Gail Lumet Buckley, wrote in her
1986 book "The Homes: An
American Family" that among their
relatives was a college girlfriend of
W.E.B. Du Bois and a black adviser
to Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Dropping out of school at 16 to
support her ailing mother, Home
joined the chorus line at the Cotton
Club, the fabled Harlem night spot
where the entertainers were black
and the clientele white.
She left the club in 1935 to tour
with Noble Sissle's orchestra as
Helena Home, the name she contin-
ued using when she joined Charlie
Bamet's white orchestra in 1940. A
movie offer from MGM came when
she headlined a show at the Little
Troc nightclub with the Katherine
Dunham dancers in 1942.
Her success led some blacks to
accuse Home of trying to "pass" in
a white world with her light com-
plexion. Max Factor even devel-
oped an "Egyptian" makeup shade
especially for the budding actress
while she was at MGM.
Home was only 2 when her
grandmother, a prominent member
of the Urban League and the
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,


enrolled her in the NAACP. But she
avoided activism until 1945 when
she was entertaining at an Army
base and saw German prisoners of
war sitting up front while black
American soldiers were consigned
to the rear.
That pivotal moment channeled
her anger into something useful.
She got involved in various social
and political organizations and -
along with her friendship with Paul
Robeson got her name onto black-
lists during the red-hunting
McCarthy era.
By the 1960s, Home was one of
the most visible celebrities in the
civil rights movement, once throw-
ing a lamp at a customer who made
a racial slur in a Beverly Hills
restaurant and in 1963 joining
250,000 others in the March on
Washington when Martin Luther
King Jr. gave his "I Have a Dream"
speech. Home also spoke at a rally
that same year with another civil
rights leader, Medgar Evers, just
days before his assassination.
It was also in the mid-'60s that
she put out an autobiography,
"Lena," with author Richard
Schickel.
The next decade brought her first
to a low point, then to a fresh burst
of artistry.
She had married MGM music
director Lennie Hayton, a white
man, in Paris in 1947 after her first
overseas engagements in France
and England. An earlier marriage to
Louis J. Jones had ended in divorce
in 1944 after producing daughter
Gail and a son, Teddy.
In the 2009 biography "Stormy
Weather," author James Gavin
recounts that when Home was
asked by a lover why she'd married
a white man, she replied: "To get
even with him."
Her father, her son and her hus-
band, Hayton, all died in 1970-71,
and the grief-stricken singer seclud-
ed herself, refusing to perform or
even see anyone but her closest
friends. One of them. comedian
Alan King, took months persuading
her to return to the stage, with
results that surprised her.
"I looked out and saw a family of
brothers and sisters," she said. "It
was a long time, but when it came I
truly began to live."
And she discovered that time had
mellowed her bitterness.
"I wouldn't trade my life for any-
thing," she said, "because being
black made me understand."


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May 13-19, 2010








May 13-19, 2010


Page 10 Ms. errys ree ress


Ohio man finds freedom after


30 years, exonerated By DNA


CLEVELAND, OH His case is
not unique, but the way it ended
was uniquely moving. It may serve
to galvanise a national movement
of lawyers and activists who have
used DNA evidence to free more
than 250 inmates since 1992,
almost all of them black men, but
who have so far lacked the
resources to tackle thousands of
other cases in which experts' fear of
"junk science" and racial bias have
produced unsafe convictions.
An Ohio man tasted freedom for
the first time in nearly 30 years last
week after a judge vacated his con-
viction because DNA evidence
showed he did not rape an 11-year-
old girl.
"It finally happened, I've been
waiting," Raymond Towler, 52, said
as he hugged sobbing family mem-
bers in the courtroom. His celebra-
tion would be an "everything on it"
pizza party. When asked how he
would adjust, Towler responded:
"Just take a deep breath and just
enjoy life right now."
Towler had been serving a life
sentence for the rape of a girl in a
Cleveland park in 1981.
Prosecutors received the test results
Monday and immediately asked the
court to free him.
In a brief, emotionally charged
session, Cuyahoga County
Common Pleas Court Judge Eileen
Gallagher recapped the case, dis-
cussed the recently processed DNA
evidence and threw out his convic-
tion. She also told him that he can
sue over his ordeal.
Under state law, Mr Towler is
entitled to $40,330 for every year of
his wrongful imprisonment, not
including lost wages and any dam-
ages he may win by suing the Ohio
Department of Corrections a fig-
ure with a minimum payout of $1.4
million.
Towler smiled lightly, nodded
and kept his intertwined fingers on
his lap.
The judge was not without emo-
tion as she offered him a traditional


CBC urges approval
Black lawmakers are urging the
Senate to pass a summer jobs bill
even if it adds to the deficit.
Congressional Black Caucus
(CBC) Chairwoman Barbara Lee
and others said unemployment
rates in the inner cities are well
above the national average and
could lead to violence by inner-city
youth during the hot summer.
They said their $1.5 billion jobs
bill should be approved as "emer-


of $1.5B jobs bill to stem summer violence


agency" legislation, which would
negate pay-as-you-go rules stipu-
lating that bills must be offset with
other spending cuts or revenue-
raisers. The legislation has already
been approved by the House, but is
stalled in the Senate.
Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.)
said youth violence had already
begun but would likely escalate
over the summer after school lets
out and the young are turned out


onto the streets with no job to keep
them out of trouble.
"This is an emergency," he said.
"If we don't act quickly, we will
regret it sometime over the middle
of the summer."
The unemployment rate in March
for African-American males was
16.6 percent, compared to the 9.7
percent national rate, according to
the Bureau of Labor Statistics.


Raymond Towler, center, hugs his sister Debbie Settles, left, and his
brother Clarance Settles, after being released from prison Wednesday,
May 5, 2010, in Cleveland. Towler, who spent nearly 30 years in
prison, was released after new DNA tests showed he didn't rape an 11-


year-old girl.
Irish blessing.
"May the road rise to meet you,
may the wind be always at your
back. May the sun shine warm on
your face, may the rain fall softly
upon your fields. May God hold
you in the palm of his hand, now
and forever."
Wiping tears from her face, the
judge stepped forward to shake the
hand of a man known to the state of
Ohio for more than quarter of a cen-
tury as Inmate A16468. "Good luck
to you, Mr Towler," she said.
"You're free."
The Ohio Innocence Project, an
organization that uses DNA evi-
dence to clear people wrongfully
convicted of crimes, said Towler
was among the longest incarcerated
people to be exonerated by DNA in
U.S. history. The longest was a man
freed in Florida in December after
serving 35 years, according to the
project.
Towler was arrested three weeks
after the crime when a park ranger
who had stopped him on a traffic
violation noticed a resemblance
with a suspect sketch. The victim
and witnesses identified him from a
photo, police said.
Carrie Wood, a staff attorney with


the project, said the identifications
were questionable.
The latest technology allowed
separate DNA testing of a semen
sample and other genetic material,
possibly skin cells, she said.
Attorneys with the project have
been working on the Towler case
since 2004, and Towler said that
and his faith had given him hope.
"That's how I've been living these
last years, I've just been keeping
hope," Towler said as relatives and
friends crowded around him after
the court session, some whooping,
"Alleluia."
Clarence Elkins, who was freed
in 2005 in Akron on the basis of
DNA evidence after serving seven
years in the rape and murder of his
mother-in-law and the rape of a 6-
year-old relative, watched from a
rear courtroom seat.
"One of the leading causes of
these wrongful convictions is wit-
ness misidentification, especially
with crossracial identification,"
Carrie Wood, one of Mr Towler's
lawyers, said. "There is still racial
prejudice in our society. Anyone
who tells you different just doesn't
have those interactions."


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