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The Jacksonville free press ( November 5, 2009 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Creation Date:
November 5, 2009
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 19095970
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00244

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Creation Date:
November 5, 2009
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 19095970
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00244

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

Full Text






How to tell

the difference

between the

S/A flu and

the H1N1
Page 8


Marley heirs

legally

protect

trademark

namesake
Page 10


A year later

and Obama's

election still

unbelievable
Page 4


nefe Leabes

Atlanta show's

most outspoken

housewife makes
'keeping it

real' a priority
Page 9


S A IQ L A L I'l 1 8 L --', CALK 1 E L k L


Volume 23 No.6 Jacksonville, Florida November 5-11, 2009

650,000 Jobs, Stimulus Plan Highlight Election Anniversary


versities were not scheduled to be
released publicly until Friday after-
noon. But White House economic
adviser Jared Bernstein says offi-
cials have been told the figures.
When adding in jobs linked to $288
billion in tax cuts, Bernstein says
the stimulus plan has created or
saved more than 1 million jobs.
The data will be posted on recov-


ery.gov, the web site of the inde-
pendent panel overseeing stimulus
spending.
"It's a great example of the
unprecedented transparency, where
the American taxpayer can point
and click and see their taxes creat-
ing jobs," Bernstein said.'
Government recovery plans -
everything from the $787 billion


stimulus to tax credits for buying
new homes to government deals on
new cars are credited with helping
the economy grow again after a
record four straight losing quarters.
But the job market has yet to show
signs of recovery, putting pressure
on the White House to show that the
stimulus was worth its hefty price
tag. Continued on page 3


- One Year Later
In the most pivotal mass gather-
ings of African-Americans since
the Million Man March and defi-
nately one of the most critical
moments in Black History -
November 4, 2008 is written in the
annals of history. It was in the
course of that day, months of
preparation was brought to
fruition, as record numbers of
Americans went to the polls and
elected Barack Obama as our
nation's president. On that
evening, gatherings of color small
and large occurred around the
country.
One of the largest in the city of
Jacksonville was held none other
than at the historic Ritz Theater
where businesses, organizations
and Sen. Hill along with the Ritz
presented "History in Motion". A
free, community wide party to
watch election results. Over 5,000
individuals were in the Ritz that
evening for free food, beverages,
itz Theater November 4, 2008: Ritz Director Obama paraphernalia, live music
ry, Hester Clark of the Hester Agency, State and fellowship as they joined
wing the announcement that Barack Obama forces to watch "History in
Motion" on the multitude of big
screens.


More than 650,000 jobs have been
saved or created under President
Barack Obama's economic stimulus
plan, the White House said Friday,
saying it is on track to reach the
president's goal of 3.5 million jobs
by the end of next year.
New job numbers from business-
es, contractors, state and local gov-
ernments, nonprofit groups and uni-


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Shown above are hosts for the city wide party held at the R
Carol Alexander, Jacksonville Free Press Publisher Rita Pen
Sen. Tony Hill and then ILA President Vincent Cameron folio
will be our next president.


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Urban League Continues Annual

Celebration of Equal Opportunity


Shown above is honoree Derya Wiliams accepting her award from
Jacksonville Urban League President Dr. Richard Danford at the
Annual Equal Opportunity Luncheon.
by Tanya Downs
Leading financial expert and best selling author, Ephren Taylor 11 deliv-
ered a future vision of the Urban League movement during his keynote
remarks at the Jacksonville Urban League Annual Equal Opportunity
Luncheon, held October 28th at the Hyatt Regency Riverfront.
In continuing of its longstanding tradition, the 36th Equal Opportunity
Awards Luncheon commemorated and honored corporations and individ-
uals who have excelled in the areas of diversity and equal opportunity
within the community and nationally. Honorees included Derya Williams,
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Crowley and Beaver Street
Fisheries, Inc., Talmar Britton and Isiah Williams.
For more photo highlights, see page 5


Pictured (1-r): Daisy Hicks, EWC Alumni Affairs/UNCF director
Wanda Willis, Levi Bell, Carrie DeJournett, Roy Singleton, Jr., Gloria
Mendez, UNCF keynote speaker Mayor John Peyton, Gerri Orr, EWC
president Claudette Williams, Linda Sue Holmes, and EWC National
Alumni Association president Marguerite Warren.

UNCF Mission Revitalized at

Annual Governor's Luncheon


Jacksonville Mayor John Peyton
served as the keynote speaker for
the United Negro College Fund
(UNCF) 4th Annual Governor's
Luncheon last week at the Omni
Hotel. Hundreds of community and
corporate leaders from around the
State of Florida gathered to pledge
their support to UNCF and its mis-
sion of improving educational
opportunities for deserving college
and university students.
Peyton stated that literacy contin-
ues to be a primary focus of his
administration and that supporting
UNCF is "one of the best ways to


improve life on the First Coast."
Luncheon attendees included
Florida State College President
Steven Wallace and Bethune-
Cookman University President
Trudie Kibbe Reed.
UNCF Florida member schools
include Edward Waters College,
Bethune-Cookman University and
Florida Memorial University.
Founded in 1944, UNCF has raised
more than three billion dollars for
higher education, making it the
nation's most successful African-
American educational assistance
program


I, A


50 Cents


Yes We Did












Black Enterprise Homeownership
Contest to Award 10K to One Winner
Black Enterprise Magazine along with Bank of America, have
launched the 2009 Black Enterprise Homeownership Contest, which
will award one lucky winner $10,000 toward the purchase of their first
home. Entries are being accepted now at
www.BlackEnterprise.com/HomeownershipContest, where you can
also find informative and inspirational updates on past winners and get
educated on responsible homeownership with great advice from experts.
The key to winning is filling out the application completely and, most
importantly, presenting a compelling story that will motivate the mass-
es. When people start taking steps toward homeownership-even if
they find out they can't purchase a home at
that moment-they learn what they need to
improve and, through diligence, are able to
achieve the American dream," says Alfred
Edmond Jr., Editor-in-Chief of the magazine.
Applicants may enter the 2009
Homeownership Contest at
www.BlackEnterprise.com/Homeownership
. Official Entry Forms and required attach-
ments may be submitted through Friday,
November 6, 2009, 5:00 p.m. EST. electron-
ically, by mail to the above address, or via fax to (212) 886-9633. Any
other attempt at entry is void. Find the full list of rules and requirements
here.


Black woman is the highest paid college president


The fast-growing group of mil-
lionaire private college and univer-
sity presidents hit a new record in
recent years, and it's likely more
college leaders will make seven-
figure salaries once the slumping
economy rebounds.
A record 23 presidents received
more than $1 million in total com-
pensation in fiscal 2008, according
to an analysis of the most recently
available data published by the
Chronicle of Higher Education. A
record one in four in the study of
419 colleges' mandatory IRS filings
made at least $500,000.
Topping the list is Shirley Ann
Jackson at Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute in Troy, N.Y., whose total
compensation the Chronicle pegged
at nearly $1.6 million. She was fol-
lowed by David Sargent at Suffolk
University in Boston, who made
$1.5 million. However, one-third of
his compensation had been reported
as deferred compensation last year
and counted as salary this year -- an
example of the difficulty of making
straightforward compensation com-
parisons.
Overall, median compensation
for the group rose 6.5 percent to
$359,000, and 15.5 percent at major
private research universities, to
$628,000. The figures essentially
cover the 2007-2008 academic
year.


Those averages have almost cer-
tainly flattened or perhaps fallen
since then, with numerous presi-
dents -- including Jackson -- taking
voluntary pay cuts this year amid
widespread budget-cutting at their
institutions.
But experts say the upward trend
will almost certainly resume even-
tually. It may frustrate parents who
are paying higher tuition, but
experts insist the salaries reflect
supply and demand.
But the 24-7 nature of the job and
the stresses stemming from the
recession have made it unappealing
to prospective candidates.
"Some people just don't want
anything to do with the job because
it keeps them up at night," said
Chronicle editor Jeffrey Selingo.
"In order to attract and retain good
talent they're going to have to pay
for it. They may take a little break
now because of the economy, but
these pieces are still in place."
Still, colleges will have to absorb
the public relations hit that comes
with offering seven-figure compen-
sation to an academic leader. The
average price of tuition plus room
and board at four-year private col-
leges surpassed $39,000 last year,
according to the latest figures from
the College Board.
The Chronicle noted that 58 insti-
tutions charged more than $50,000


this year, up from just five last year.
A number of those schools pay their
presidents more than $1 million,
including New York University,
Columbia and Vanderbilt.
The latest survey does not
include presidential salaries at pub-
lic universities, which have been
rising in recent years but are gener-
ally lower than at top private insti-
tutions. Last year, just one public
university president, Ohio State's
Gordon Gee, earned more than $1
million.
Nine private college presidents
exceeded the $1 million mark in
last year's survey of the 2006-2007
data.
Jackson, a physicist and former
Clinton administration official, has
clashed with Rensselaer faculty and
been criticized for spending time
away from campus to serve on six
corporate boards. But she volun-


teered this year to return 5 percent
of her base salary -- which the
Chronicle reported at just more than
$1 million in fiscal 2008 -- to be
used for student scholarships. All
salaries for senior administrators
are frozen this year, RPI said.
Jackson received a strong state-
ment of support from the university.
Applications to the school have
doubled, research volume has
tripled, and $690 million has in new
construction and renovations have
taken place in Jackson's decade as
president, said William N. Walker,
Vice President, strategic communi-
cations and external relations, in a
statement issued by the school. A
request to interview Jackson was
denied.
"The value she contributes to the
Institute far exceeds the amount she
is paid," Walker said.


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Page 2 Ms. Perry's Free Press


November 5-11, 2009


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Copyrighted Material .


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson


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.


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Need an Attorney?


Accidents

Workers

Compensation

Personal Injury

W ronglul Death

Probate


Contact Law Office of


Reese Marshall, P.A.

214 East Ashley Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32202

904-354-8429
Over 30 years experience of professional
and courteous service to our clients


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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


[Veev :)o- .m er a5


House ethics probes focusing solely on black lawmakers


by J. Breshnan
The House ethics committee is
currently investigating seven
African-American lawmakers -
more than 15 percent of the total in
the House. And an eighth black
member, Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. (D-
Ill.), would be under investigation if
the Justice Department hadn't
asked the committee to stand down.
Not a single white lawmaker is
currently the subject of a full-scale
ethics committee probe.
African-American politicians
have long complained that they're
treated unfairly when ethical issues
arise. Members of the
Congressional Black Caucus are
still fuming over Speaker Nancy
Pelosi's decision to oust then-Rep.
William Jefferson (D-La.) from the


House Ways and Means Committee
in 2006, and some have argued that
race plays a role in the ongoing
efforts to remove Rep. Charles
Rangel (D-N.Y.) from his chair-
manship of that committee.
Last week's actions by the House
ethics committee are sure to add
fuel to the fire.
The committee which has one
African-American lawmaker, Rep.
G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.), among
its 10 members, considered three
referrals from the recently formed
Office of Congressional Ethics
(OCE). It dismissed a case against
Rep. Sam Graves (R-Mo.), who is
white, but agreed to open full-
blown investigations of California
Democratic Reps. Maxine Waters
and Laura Richardson, both of
.. '''W ^ S&SP s


whom are black.
The committee was already
investigating five other African-
Americans. Rangel is the subject of
two different probes, one involving
a host of issues he has put before
the committee and another involv-
ing allegations that corporate funds
may have been used improperly to
pay for members' trips to the
Caribbean in 2007-08. Reps.
Carolyn Kilpatrick (D-Mich.),
Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) and
Donald Payne (D-N.J.) and Del.
Donna Christensen (D-U.S. Virgin
Islands) are also included in the sec-
ond of those investigations.
A document leaked to The
Washington Post last week showed
that nearly three dozen lawmakers
have come under scrutiny this year


Neighbors taking illegal northside dumping fight to City Hall
What once began as a clean up site has turned into an eyesore and dumping ground for northside neighbors. The
lot is located on a residential lot located at Grand Street and Harrison Street in zip code 32208 off of Edgewood
Avenue. Angry neighbors say they have gotten no response from the City of Jacksonville or their council repre-
sentative Denise Lee. There are currently three dumpsters on the site that others have taken to dumping their trash
wherever. The owners have emptied one trash bin once but it was immediately filled again. Neighbors plan on
gathering "en masse" and attending the next City Council meeting with complaints and pics.


by either the House ethics commit-
tee or the Office of Congressional
Ethics, an independent watchdog
created in 2008 at the insistence of
Pelosi. While the list contained a
substantial number of white law-
makers, the ethics committee has
not yet launched formal investiga-
tive subcommittees with respect to
any of them as it has with the
seven African-American members.
The OCE has also been a particu-
lar target of ire for the
Congressional Black Caucus. Black
lawmakers, including CBC
Chairwoman Barbara Lee (D-
Calif.), met with OCE officials ear-
lier this year to raise their concerns.
Spokesmen for Lee and the OCE
both declined to comment.
A number of CBC members
opposed the resolution establishing
the OCE, arguing that it was the
wrong response to the Jack
Abramoff lobbying scandal, which
helped Democrats seize control of
the House in 2006.
Setting up the OCE "was a mis-
take," Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-
Mo.) told The Hill newspaper
recently. "Congress has a long and

Anniversary
Continued from front
When it is released Friday, the
new data will be the largest and
most complete look at how the
stimulus has been spent so far. The
White House promised the data
would be far more reliable than the
first batch of numbers on federal
contracts, which the administration
initially embraced, then branded a
"test run" after thousands of errors
were discovered.


Rep. Charles Rangel
rich history of overreacting to a cri-
sis."
Cleaver, though, now finds him-
self part of the four-member sub-
committee that will investigate
Waters, who voted against the OCE.
Waters is being probed over her
intervention with the Treasury
Department on behalf of a minori-
ty-owned bank in which her hus-
band served on the board and
owned at least $250,000 in stock.
While she has flatly denied
engaging in any unethical or
improper behavior in her dealings
with OneUnited, Waters was
described by colleagues and
Democratic aides as "livid" over
the ethics committee's decision to
investigate her.
Another CBC member said black
lawmakers are "easy targets" for
ethics watchdog groups because
they have less money both per-
sonally and in their campaign
accounts to defend themselves
than do their white colleagues.
Campaign funds can be used to pay


Rep. Maxine Waters
members' legal bills.
What especially galled black law-
makers was that the ethics commit-
tee voted to move forward with the
Waters and Richardson probes fol-
lowing the OCE referrals, while
Graves who OCE also thought
should be investigated by the ethics
committee saw his case dis-
missed.
Even worse, the ethics committee
issued a 541-page document
explaining why it wouldn't look
into allegations that Graves invited
a witness to testify before the Small
Business Committee on which
he sits without revealing his
financial ties to that witness.
The nation's only black senator,
Roland Burris of Illinois, is current-
ly under investigation by the Senate
Ethics Committee. It's not clear
whether that committee is currently
investigating any white members,
although Sen. John Ensign (R-Nev.)
is likely to be in its sights if the
Justice Department doesn't pre-
empt a committee investigation.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY

RE: FY 2010 Section 5307 Formula Grant


URBANIZED AREA:
ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT:
RECIPIENT:


Jacksonville, Florida
$15,417,320
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) is providing an opportunity for a
public hearing to consider its FY 2009/2010 Program of Projects from which federal funds are being request-
ed from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Funding is generally available on an 80/20 matching basis
between federal and local sources. The public is encouraged to comment on any and all projects listed below.


Expansion/Replacement Vehicles and ADA Vehicle Equipment
Fare Collection Equipment and Information Kiosks
Property Acquisition
Bus Design Computer Software
Bus Computer Software
Bus Computer Hardware
Bus Shop Equipment
Facility Improvements
Misc. Support Equipment
Misc. Support Equipment (Office Furnishings)
Program Administration
Transit Satellite Transfer Amenities
Enhancement Projects
Security Equipment
Support Vehicles
Communications/Misc. Support Equipment
Bus Preventative Maintenance
Planning Studies
JRTC Facility Improvement/Rehab Stations
Fixed Guideway Computer Hardware
Fixed Guideway Rehab/Renovate Misc. Support Equipment
Fixed Guideway Preventative Maintenance
CTC Miscellaneous Support Equipment
CTC Computer Software
CTC Computer Hardware
CTC Communications System
CTC Replacement Vehicles
CTC Preventative Maintenance
Total Projects:


$ 2,622,223
781,250
1,875,000
312,500
373,633
16,733
9,500
50,000
24,903
86,669
56,250
1,050,000
193,750
200,000
25,000
493,750
452,454
330,000
3,750,000
125,000
312,500
2,500,000
227,499
183,053
250,957
491,250
1,200,000
1,250,000
$ 19,243,874


Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing before 5:00 p.m. on December 05,
2009. If a request is received by the stated time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the public notified.

Mail requests to:

Notice of Public Hearing, Section 5307 Grant
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Post Office Drawer "0"
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

These projects have been coordinated through the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) and the Unified
Planning Work Program (UPWP) of the North Florida Transportation Planning Organization (North Florida
TPO) of the Jacksonville Urbanized Area. No business displacements are expected to occur as a result of proj-
ect implementation. These projects will have no substantial harmful effects on the environment, nor will they
adversely affect service levels to the elderly or disabled.

Details of the Program of Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue through December
05, 2009 during normal business hours. Persons with disabilities who need accommodations to attend the meet-
ing should contact the JTA Connexion office at 904-265-6001, CTC TDD 636-7402. This notice will constitute
the final notice if no changes in scope occur and if no comments are received.

Kenneth R. Holton
kholton@jtafla.com
Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


Let's take a fresh approach


to fighting hunger.



The holidays are right around the corner, but in this economy, more and more of our
neighbors are just wondering where their next meal is coming from and that includes a lot
of children. At Winn-Dixie, we believe if one person in our neighborhood goes hungry, the
entire community suffers. That's why we're proud to partner with Second Harvest North
Florida and all they do to prevent hunger across our community Just one dollar donated to
Second Harvest can fund as many as six meals for needy families in our community. To find
out more about Second Harvest or to make a donation, go to WeNourishHope.org.



Winn/Dixie
Fresh Checked Every Day

1, 111- N 1. 1 1,-,Llll lrlr lSIIIIIlr ii


N b 511 2009








November 5-11 2009


Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press


Last week, I was interviewed by
a 15-year-old African American
male as apart of an oral history
project. One of the final questions
in the interviewed was: What was
the proudest or happiest moment of
my entire life.
I thought back to being around
nine or ten years old and the first
pair of shell toe Adidas my grand-
mother bought me I just knew that
I going to the next Run DMC.
Then there were the obvious
moments of jubilation that we all
share, high school and college
graduation, the birth of my children
and the joy and amazement that
comes with bringing a child into
the world. Of course, my wedding
day was an extremely happy day -
well, it was one of those nervous
kind of happy, kind of scared days.
Then I thought about winning
an election for Jacksonville City
Council at the age of 24. That was
a pretty exciting moment.
So as I danced around the ques-
tion trying to figure out which of
these events was number one I con-
ceded to the young man that I did-
n't have one moment, but several.
As he began to ask another ques-
tion it hit me.
I had a flash back to November
of last year. I remember it was a
Monday night the day before the
presidential election and I could not
sleep. I was up late into the evening
watching CNN and "Sportscenter"
reruns.
I had voted early for the first
time so I did not have to rush to the
polls that next day. It was hard to


focus on actually working or doing
something productive all day
because like most people I had this
nervous excitement.
Later in the day, I remember
saying a little prayer and putting it
in the Lord's hands. Either the first
black president would be elected or
we wouldsimply have to work
even harder next time to win.
Well, we all know the outcome
of that election. A year ago, this
week the United States of America,
"My country tis of thee, sweet land
of liberty," elected Barack Obama
as President. I still get butterflies
when I think about that night. I am
not an emotional person, but how
could you not shed a tear about
what had just happened.
As I thought back to that Tuesday
night, I told the young man inter-
viewing me that it would be hard
for young African Americans to
fully appreciate Barack Obama's
election.
But if you lived through the Civil
Rights or Jim Crow eras, and expe-
rienced racism, segregation, dis-
crimination and hate then last
year's election was so profound
because most blacks never thought
that they would see the day when
America would elect an African
American president.
A year later, and some days I am
still in disbelief.
Most blacks still remember elec-
tion night like it was yesterday. I
was overwhelmed with this
tremendous sense of pride. It was
as if two independent streams of
pride hit me at once. One, the pride


of a dream realized.
Dr. Martin Luther King summed
it up the best in his I Have a Dream
Speech. "Now, I say to you today
my friends, even though we face
the difficulties of today and tomor-
row, I still have a dream. It is a
dream deeply rooted in the
American dream. I have a dream
that one day this nation will rise up
and live out the true meaning of its
creed: 'We hold these truths to be
self-evident, that all men are creat-
ed equal,'" said Dr. King.
The second stream of pride was
pride in our country. During the
campaign, Michelle Obama said
that she has never been proud of the
United States until now. Many
Republicans and pundits twisted
her words to mean that she hasn't
been proud to be an American.
What the new First Lady was
really saying was that as an African
American we face so many chal-
lenges and hurdles that it's hard to
be unconditionally proud of your
country. Of course blacks love
America and the opportunities that
this great country represents, but
it's hard to understand the struggles
that blacks face in America unless
you are black.
Hank Aaron, former baseball
star, once said, "I never doubted my
ability, but when you hear all your
life you're inferior, it makes you
wonder if the other group have
something you've never seen
before. If they do, I'm still looking
for it."
Last year's presidential election
was undoubtedly the proudest day


in African American history. Some
would disagree, but if you think
about what folks as far back as the
abolitionists or the Civil Right
Movement were fighting for fair
treatment and equal rights.
I can now look into my sons' and
daughter's eyes and tell them that
they too can be President of the
United States.
One of Obama's favorite phrases
on the campaign trail was that the
election wasn't about him. It is
about all of us.
His victory was about Frederick
Douglas, Harriet Tubman, John F.
Kennedy, Martin Luther King, all
of the thousands of blacks that died
during slavery, everyone who
marched for civil rights, and every-
one who believes in true democra-
cy and equality.
Obama's election was the culmi-
nation of decades of fighting,
marching, praying and even dying
for justice and equality. There are
so many who sacrificed their safety
and eventually gave their lives so
that Tuesday, November 4, 2008
could occur.
And don't be mistaken; I am not
saying that the fight is over. But I
am saying that last year this coun-
try took a major step towards living
up to the creed in which it was
founded.
Although it has been a bumpy
start for Obama, good captains
always figure out how to right the
ship, and so will Obama and com-
pany.
Signing off from memory lane,
Reggie Fullwood


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MAILING ADDRESS
P.O. Box 43580
Jacksonville, FL 32203
I'S = d


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PUBLISHED



jock~soville,


PHYSICAL ADDRESS
903 W. Edgewood Ave.
Jacksonville, FL 32208
Email: JfreePress@aol.com


TELEPHONE
(904) 634-1993
Fax (904) 765-3803


rry Sylvia Perry
ER Managing Editor

CONTRIBUTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald
Fullwood, E.O.Huthcinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Dyrinda
Sapp, Marsha Oliver, Marretta Latimer, Phyllis Mack, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda
Burwell, Rhonda Silver, Vickie Brown, Rahman Johnson, Headshots


DISCLAIMER
The United State provides oppor-
tunities for free expression of ideas.
The Jacksonville Free Press has its
view, but others may differ.
Therefore, the Free Press ownership
reserves the right to publish views
and opinions by syndicated and
local columnist, professional writers
and other writers' which are solely
their own. Those views do not neces-
sarily reflect the policies and posi-
tions of the staff and management of
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Readers, are encouraged to write
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ten and signed and include a tele-
phone number and address. Please
address letters to the Editor, c/o
JFP, P.O. Box 43580 Jacksonville,
FL 32203. (No CALLS PLEASE)


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Enclosed is my
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one year subscription.


STATE ZIP


A Year Later and Obama's Election Still Unbelievable


MAIL TO: JACKSONVILLE FREE PRESS
P.O. BOX 43580, JACKSONVILLE, FL 32203


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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5


City Seeks Input for

------... Ethics Commission Award


Urban League Auxiliary member Jocelyn
Turner with guest speaker Ephren Taylor.


36th Urban

League

Luncheon

Honors

and Inspires
The Equal Opportunity Awards
Luncheon commemorated and hon-
ored corporations and individuals
who have excelled in the areas of
diversity and equal opportunity
within the community and national-
ly. Highlighting the event was trail-
blazing entrepreneur Ephren Taylor
who shared with the sold out crowd
the importance of communication
and how many problems can be
solved before they get out of hand.
Jacksonville Advocate founder,
Isiah (Ike) Williams III was pre-
sented with the Whitney M. Young
Jr., National Leadership Award. The
Jacksonville Advocate was a week-
ly publication created by Williams
that highlighted the lives of African
Americans in the Jacksonville com-
munity.
In addition to Williams, five other
awards were presented including


Mr. and Mrs. Isiah Williams accepting the Whitney M. Young Jr.,
National Leadership Award for JUL President Dr. Richard Danford.


The Jacksonville Ethics
Commission is seeking nomina-
tions from the public for its inaugu-
ral City of Jacksonville Ethics
Commission Annual Award for
Excellence in Ethics. This award
will be presented to a member of
the community whose works pro-
vide an example of superior ethical
practices, who labors to advance
the culture of ethics and provides
inspiration to others to the ongoing
journey of ethical practices.
Nominations should be sent to
the Ethics office within the City of
Jacksonville by November 20,
2009. Nominations should include:
name and address of person being


nominated, one to two paragraphs
as to how the nominee's works
demonstrate superior ethical prac-
tices and the name, address and
phone number of the person sub-
mitting the nomination.
This award can be presented to
any member within the local com-
munity including citizens, public
officials and city employees.
Current members of the Ethics
Commission are excluded. The
Ethics Commission will evaluate
all nominations and select the
award winner at its December
meeting.
Nominations can be sent to Susan
Stewart at sstewart@coj.net.


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Shown above are sisters in the spirit of Bethel Baptist Institutional Church Vivian Hill
Gloria McConnell, Dina Lesesne-Bernard and Karen Woodson supporting honoree Tamer Britton.


the Clanzel T. Brown Award which
honored retired home extension
agent Tamar Britton. Britton who
was recognized for her work in the
nutrition program for the Duval
County Cooperative Extension
Service. The program teaches
healthy eating habits within poor
minority areas that struggle with
obesity.
Equal Opportunity Awards were


presented to Derya Williams, CEO
and Executive Director of River
Regions Human Services Inc., Blue
Cross and Blue Shield of Florida,
Crowley and Beaver Street
Fisheries, Inc.
Government, businesses, nonprof-
its and the general public all came
together in support of the Urban
League movement and were
reminded by keynote speaker,


Ephren Taylor: "that we must all
come together with new ideas to
solve new problems in order to con-
tinue the discourse on closing the
economic gap in our community".
"Jacksonville has great potential
and can be a leader in showing
other communities how to get it
done". Photos courtesy' of the Jacksonville
Urban League


- -


United Way
of Northeast Florida


HOW TO


UNITE LIVE UNITED

V UIN JACKSONVILLE:




i
,: . .



GIVE AN HOUR. GIVE A SATURDAY.

THINK OFWE BEFORE ME.

T AI ,I '






GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER.


LIVE UNITED TM
Want to make a difference? Help create opportunities for everyone in your community.
United Way of Northeast Florida is creating real, lasting change where you live,
by focusing on the building blocks of a better life for all. That's what it means to
LIVE UNITED. To learn more, visit LiveUnitedNortheastFlorida.org.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY

RE: FY 2010 Section 5307 Urbanized Area Formula Grant


URBANIZED AREA:
ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT :
RECIPIENT:


Jacksonville, Florida
$9,313,745
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) is providing an opportunity for a
public hearing to consider its FY 2009/2010 Urbanized Area Formula Program of Projects under the American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, in which federal funds are being requested from the Federal Transit
Administration (FTA). Funding will be available on a 100 percent basis from federal sources. The public is
encouraged to comment on any and all projects listed below.


Rehab/Renovate Admin Building
Acquire Passenger Shelters
Construct Passenger Shelters
Acquire Miscellaneous Equipment
Professional Services BRT Design
Purchase 40' Buses with Associated Equipment
Operating Assistance
Design/Construct Regional Park and Ride/Hub
Right of Way Demolition
Bus Miscellaneous Support Equipment
Bus Fare Collection Equipment
Purchase Security Equipment
Enhancement Projects


Total Projects:


$ 450,000
250,000
100,000
100,000
800,000
1,931,600
1,935,990
1,350,000
580,000
1,250,000
450,000
79,841
36,314

$ 9,313,745


Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing before 5:00 p.m. on December 05,
2009. If a request is received by the stated time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the public notified.

Mail requests to:

Notice of Public Hearing, Section 5307 Urbanized Area Formula Grant
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Post Office Drawer "0"
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

These projects have been coordinated through the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) of the North
Florida Transportation Planning Organization (North Florida TPO) of the Jacksonville Urbanized Area. No
business displacements are expected to occur as a result of project implementation. These projects will have
no substantial harmful effects on the environment, nor will they adversely affect service levels to the elderly or
disabled.

Details of the Program of Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue through December
05, 2009 during normal business hours. Persons with disabilities who need accommodations to attend the meet-
ing should contact the JTA Connexion office at 904-265-6001, CTC TDD 636-7402. This notice will constitute
the final notice if no changes in scope occur and if no comments are received.

Kenneth R. Holton
(904) 630-3187
kholton@jtafla.com
Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


November 5-11 2009










1


Church and Pastor Anniversaries Churches Holding Joint


Thanksgiving Services
The time has arrived for the joint Thanksgiving Services of Summerville
Baptist Church, Mt. Lilla Baptist Church, and Silas Baptist Church. This
grand occasion of praise and worship will be held at Silas Baptist Church
located at 3000 Buckman Street on Thursday November 26, at 10:00 a.m.

Prosper through God's Word at BSEC
How to survive and grow in this economy by Biblical Principles- build
your business on a solid foundation that will not fail. Learn firsthand from
the founder of Wise Counsel how to survive the recession and prosper men-
tally, spiritually or financially knowing God's plan for you in business or
ministry. Who would attend? Entrepreneurs, Executives, New business
start ups and Ministry Leaders. This event will be Thursday November 19th
from 11:30am to 1:00pm. It is free and open to the public. Beaver Street
Enterprise Center is located at 1225 W. Beaver St. Jacksonville, FL 32203.
A reservation is required. Contact Angelia Redding at (904) 265-4702 or
email to reddinga@bscenter.net

Thanksgiving Gratitude Service
OneJax will be presenting their 91st Annual Interfaith Thanksgiving
Gratitude Service on Thursday, November 19, 2009 at Riverside Baptist
Church located at 2650 Park Street. Services begin at 6 p.m. For more infor-
mation call 354-1529.

First Church Of Palm Coast
Celebrating 17th Anniversary
Plan to attend a banquet and worship service, celebrating the 17th
Anniversary of The Rev. Gillard S. Glover and First Church of Palm Coast.
Guest will be hitting the red carpet at the Palm Coast Hilton Garden & Inn
on Saturday November 7th at 5 p.m. for fine dining, entertainment, and
awards. The celebration continues with guest speaker Bishop Derek T.
Triplett for the service on Sunday November 8 at 5 p.m. at First Church,
Bishop Triplett is founding senior Pastor of Hope Fellowship Church in
Daytona Beach. He spreads the good news in a powerfully profound man-
ner. In addition of speaking, preaching, teaching and writing, Bishop
Triplett is and extraordinary songwriter. He's a featured speaker for The
Word Network and Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN). He serves
Daytona Beach in various civic, economics, youth and educational initia-
tives For more information, call (386) 446-5759.
NOTICE: Church news is published free of charge. Information must
be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5 p.m. of
the week you want it to run. Information received prior to the event
date will be printed on a space available basis until the date. Fax e-mail
to 765-3803 or e-mail to JFreePress@aol.com.


Slated for 2nd Missionary Baptist
The Second Missionary Baptist Church locate at 954 Kings Rd. Will
Celebrate Its 159th Church Anniversary and 23rd Anniversary of the Pastor
Rev. Dr. Odell Smith Jr., November 1,4,5,6, & 8, 2009. Special services
will be held at 11:00a.m. Sunday and 7:30 p.m.weeknights. The theme for
the event is "God Answers Prayers". The public is invited to come worship
in the special celebration. Deacon James Waters, Anniversary Chairperson.
Sister Priscilla Adams, Anniversary Co-Chairperson, For more informa-
tion call the church at 354-8268.

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist
Celebrating 90th Anniversary
New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church's Pastor and Members will be
celebrating the 90th Church Anniversary November 8, 2009. It is our sin-
cere hope that you will help us commemorate this auspicious occasion by
purchasing and Ad in our Souvenir Book. Your support will aide us in our
quest to continuously impact the lives of the persons in our community in
a very powerful and positive way. The church is located at 1824 Prospect
St. in Jacksonville. For more information call (904) 764-5727 Bishop Eric
A. Lee Pastor.

Murchison Temple Women's Brunch
Murchison Temple Christian Methodist Episcopal Church located at 5817
Catoma Street, invites the community to the 50+ Women's Brunch. The
theme will be "Revitalizing Sprit, Soul & Body" on Saturday November 7,
2009 from 11.00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. This event seeks to bring women togeth-
er to inspire and motivate them to understand that it is never too late to ful-
fill the highest purpose in their lives. While feasting on a surprising menu
of temping breakfast and lunch choices we will also have door prize offer-
ings and opportunities to bid in a silent Auction. Featured guest speaker is
Dr. Martha Lue Stewart of Orlando, FL.

St. Gabriel to Celebrate Annual
Family and Friends Day
St. Gabriel's Episcopal Church invites the community to celebrate with
them for their annual Family and Friends Day. The Heavenly Angels Youth
Choir will be performing and The H. Alvin Green Memorial Alumni
Chorale will be featured. These two dynamic choirs will be under the direc-
tion of M.s Patricia Black. Comeout and enjoy. and evening of praise and
worship. The program will start promptly at 5:00 pm on Nov ember 15,
2009. Your presence will be great appreciated. Saint Gabriel's Episcopal
Church is located at 5235 Moncrief Rd. West on the Northside.
For more information call (904) 765-0964, Vontez Wright Senior Warden.




S.




Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20


Pastor Landon Williams


to yu i yor siriualwal, plaseconactus t 74-957 r vi emil t Geatrla aocom


5863 Moncrief Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32209 (904) 768-8800 FAX 764-3800


Pastor Ernie Murray
Welcomes you!


T h tGo


El Beth El Annual Role Model Banquet
The Officers and board members of The El-Beth-El Development Center
will host its Annual "Successful Role Model" Banquet on Thursday,
November 12, 2009 at 6:30 p.m. at the Community Rehabilitation Center
Banquet Hall located at 623 Beechwood Street.
Since 1980, te church has honored dedicated individuals from the com-
munity for outstanding achievements, leadership and their contributions in
helping Jacksonville build a stronger and healthier community.
The 2009 "Successful Role Model" honorees are: Judge Lance Day,
Councilman Johnny Gaffney, Councilman Reginald Brown, General
Contractor Eddie Johnson, Ann Duggar of the Justice Coalition Elder
Donald Foy C.E.O. of Madd Dad Atty. eth Rothstein, Atty. Paul
Daragjati and CEO Samuel Dave Crockett.
El-Beth-El Community Center will also present a $100.00 savings bond
to eight (8) youth for their outstanding academic accomplishments.
The guest speaker for the evening will be State Attorney Angela Corey.
For tickets or more information, contact Bishop Dr. Lorenzo Hall at (904)
710 -1586 or email: Gospell75@aol.com.


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Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers
0


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church
215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


Pastor Rudolph
McKissick, Sr.
Senior Pastor


Weekly Services


Midweek Services


7:40 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Noon Service
Church school "Miracle at Midday"
9:30 a.m. 12 noon-1 p.m.
The Word from the Sons
and Daughters of Bethel Dinner and Bible Study
3rd Sunday 3:30 p.m. at 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Bishop Rudolph
Come share in Holy Communion on 1st Sunday at 4:50 .m. Mcssick, Jr.
Senior Pastor


Radio Ministry
WCGL 1360 AM Thursday 8:15 -8:45 a.m.
AM 1400 Thursday 7:00 8:00 p.m.
TV Ministry
WTLV Channel 12 Sunday's at 6:30 a.m.


Grace and Peace


* * A Full Gospel Baptist Church * *


Sunday School
9 a.m.
Morning Worship
10 a.m.
Lord's Supper
Second Sunday
3:00 p.m.
Evening Worship
Every 3rd & 4th
Sunday
4 :00 p.m.


A church

that's on the

move in

worship with

prayer, praise

and power!


Pastor Robert Lecount, Jr

School of Ministry Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.

Thursday High Praise Worship 7:00 p.m.

2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


Sunday Morning Wors p


8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship
9:30 a.m. Sunday School
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday 2 PM 3 PM
**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


Join Us for One of Our Services
SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
1st Sunday 3:45 p.m.

Lord's Supper & Baptism
3rd Sunday 7:00 p.m.

TUESDAY
Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
******
WEDNESDAY
Noon Day Worship

THURSDAY
Youth Church 7:00 p.m.


-~sllllllllllrr


November 5-11, 2009


Page 6 Ms. Perry's Free Press


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November 5 11. 2009


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


20 Seconds for 20 Grand

Winner of Bible contest to win grand prize


If you're a quick-witted Bible
scholar there could be a $20,000
price waiting just for you.
Marketing expert Darrel Rundus
has created a contest where the only
requirement is to name the Ten
Commandments of God, in order,
in 20 seconds or less.
According to World Net Daily,
Rundus, a self-made millionaire,
will dial telephone numbers of peo-
ple who have signed up online on
his Ten And Win website, giving
each person, in the order they are
randomly selected, an opportunity


to recite the Ten Commandments in
20 seconds or less.
The first successful contestant
gets the $20,000 prize. Rundus will
make the random calls on Friday,
Nov. 13. He said he will continue
taking entries for the competition
until that date.
Rundus told WND he was dis-
tressed that Americans readily car
recite a list of 10 stores, 10 sports
teams, even 10 beers, but most
can't recite the Ten
Commandments


Valerie Cook, Edith Banner, Velvet Fields and Aisha Jiles

i
I t3 ..lQl't .[ lll s+. ,


Larry Gaines, Sarah williams, Margaret Miles
Jada Walker and Michael Crumps


Louisiana Judge resigns


A Louisiana justice of the peace
who refuses to marry interracial
couples resigned Tuesday, after
weeks of calls for his ouster from
civil rights groups and several pub-
lic officials, including the governor.
Keith Bardwell quit with a one-
sentence statement to Louisiana
Secretary of State Jay Dardenne: "I
do hereby resign the office"bf
Justice of the Peace for tfleEighth
Ward of Tangipahoa Parish,
Louisiana, effective November 3,
2009."
Gov. Bobby Jindal called
Bardwell's resignation "long over-
due."
Beth Humphrey, who is white,
has said she and her now-husband,
Terence McKay, who is black,
received their marriage license
from the parish clerk of court,
where they also got a list of people
qualified to perform the ceremony.


When she called Bardwell's office
on Oct. 6 to ask, Humphrey said
Bardwell's wife told her that the
justice wouldn't sign their marriage
license because they were a "mixed
couple."
When questioned, Bardwell, who
is white, acknowledged he routine-
ly avoids marrying interracial cou-
1 ples' because he believes children
born to them end up suffering. In
interviews, he said he refers the
couples to other justices of the
peace, who then perform the cere-
mony, which happened in this case.
"There is a problem with both
groups accepting a child from such
a marriage," Bardwell said in an
October interview with The
Associated Press. "I think those
children suffer, and I won't help put
them through it."
Bardwell didn't return repeated
calls Tuesday to comment about his


hind interracial
resignation, which followed calls
for his removal from officials
including Jindal and U.S. Sen.
Mary Landrieu.
"We're saddened that it took
national attention to this issue,
which was decided back in 1967 by
the Supreme Court, and also that it
took public admonishment from
other elected leaders in order for
him to resign," said Laura Catlett, a
lawyer for Humphrey and McKay.
Jindal said Bardwell made the
right decision.
"What he did was clearly wrong
and this resignation was long over-
due," the governor said in a state-
ment.
Landrieu said Bardwell's refusal
to marry the couple reflected terri-
bly on the state.
"By resigning ... and ending his
embarrassing tenure in office,
Justice Bardwell has finally con-


wedding flap
sented to the will of the vast major-
ity of Louisiana citizens and nearly
every governmental official in
Louisiana ... We are better off with-
out him in public service," she said.
Humphrey and McKay have filed
a federal civil rights lawsuit against
Bardwell. Catlett said the resigna-
tion won't stop the lawsuit, which
also names Bardwell's wife as a
defendant.
"This does not in any way change
the fact that he, with his wife's help,
discriminated against an interracial
couple while he was a public offi-
cial," Catlett said.
Bardwell was elected in 1975 as
justice of the peace in Ponchatoula,
La., a town 55 miles north of New
Orleans. His term was set to run
through 2014, and he had said that
even before the flap, he hadn't
intended to run for re-election.


Construction finally under-

way for King Memorial


Construction can finally begin on
the long-delayed Martin Luther
King Jr. Memorial slated for the
National Mall after the National
Park Service issued building per-
mits last Thursday for the project.
The memorial was first author-
ized in 1996. Interior Secretary Ken
Salazar joined King's only surviv-
ing sibling, Christine King Farris,
and members of the Congressional
Black Caucus to sign off on the
project. A private foundation will
build the memorial
before turning it over to
the park service.
Farris, 82, said she
was moved to tears
when she saw a video
depicting the memorial
plaza and towering stat-
ue of her brother, nes-
tled among
Washington's famous
cherry blossoms. She
said King would have Christine
been humbled. King Jr., l
"I think he would say, centerpiece
'No, don't do this for me,' National I
but we have to do it Oct. 29, 2
because future genera- struction
tions need to know about National R
Martin Luther King Jr.," she said.
A disagreement over how to
secure the site against domestic ter-
rorism delayed the project for a
year, but a federal planning agency
signed off on a compromise earlier
this week.
As Salazar signed the construc-
tion permit with Harry Johnson,
president of the King memorial
foundation, a crowd of supporters
and government officials cheered.
Salazar said the long planning
process "made absolute sense and
was in keeping with the law."
The monument will be the first
on the mall that is not dedicated to
a president or war hero, but rather


to a man who waged a battle with
peace and nonviolence.
"When future generations visit
Washington, they will see a mall
that more closely reflects the diver-
sity of our great nation," he said.
Organizers have raised $107 mil-
lion of the $120 million needed to
complete the project enough to
let them begin building.
Construction is expected to begin
within 30 days, said Deryl
McKissack, who heads the design-


King Ferris, sister of Martin Luther
books at a model of the Stone of Hope, the
:e of the Martin Luther King, Jr.
Memorial, after a ceremony Thursday,
2009 announcing the approval of con-
to begin on the memorial on the
Mall in Washington.
build firm that will manage the
project. The family business dates
back five generations to a slave
builder, she said. Organizers hope
to complete construction in 18 to 20
months with an opening in 2011.
Members of the Congressional
Black Caucus have long pushed for
the memorial and gathered at the
site between the Lincoln and
Jefferson memorials.
"Dr. King, we will break
ground," said Texas Rep. Sheila
Jackson Lee. "We will stand here
and honor you, and may I salute
you, as we say, the dream is not
deferred, and we do know that we
shall overcome."


$ 615,349
$ 615,349


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY

RE: FY 2010 Section 5309 Fixed Guideway Modernization Grant


URBANIZED AREA: Jacksonville, Florida
ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT: $ 492,279
RECIPIENT: Jacksonville Transportation Authority

Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) is providing an opportunity for a
public hearing to consider its FY 2009/2010 Modernization Project in which federal funds are being requested
from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Funding is generally available on an 80/20 matching basis
between federal, state, and local sources. The public is encouraged to comment on any and all projects listed
below.


Facility/Guideway Upgrades:
Total Program of Projects:


Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing before 5:00 p.m. on December 05,
2009. If a request is received by the stated time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the public notified.
This notice will serve as the final notice.

Mail requests to:

Notice of Public Hearing, Section 5309 Modernization Grant
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Post Office Drawer "0"
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

This project has been coordinated through the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) of the North Florida
Transportation Planning Organization (TPO) of the Jacksonville Urbanized Area. No business displacements
are expected to occur as a result of project implementation. These projects will have no substantial harmful
effects on the environment, nor will they adversely affect service levels to the elderly or disabled.

Details of the Program of Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue through December
05, 2009 during normal business hours. Persons with disabilities who need accommodations to attend the meet-
ing should contact the JTA Connexion office at 904-265-6001, CTC TDD 636-7402. This notice will constitute
the final notice if no changes in scope occur and if no comments are received.

Kenneth R. Holton
(904) 630-3187
kholton@jtafla.com
Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY

RE: FY 2010 Section 5307 Urbanized Area Formula Grant


URBANIZED AREA:
ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT:
RECIPIENT:


Jacksonville, Florida
$1,000,000
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) is providing an opportunity for a
public hearing to consider its FY 2009/2010 Program of Projects in which federal funds are being requested
from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Funding is generally available on an 80/20 matching basis
between federal, state, and local sources. The public is encouraged to comment on any and all projects listed
below.


Expansion/Replacement Vehicles
Security Equipment
Total Program of Projects:


$1,970,000
$ 30,000
$2,000,000


Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing before 5:00 p.m. on December 05,
2009. If a request is received by the stated time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the public notified.
Mail requests to:

Notice of Public Hearing, Section 5307 Urbanized Area Formula Grant
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Post Office Drawer "0"
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

These projects have been coordinated through the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) of the North
Florida Transportation Planning Organization (North Florida TPO) of the Jacksonville Urbanized Area. No
business displacements are expected to occur as a result of project implementation. These projects will have
no substantial harmful effects on the environment, nor will they adversely affect service levels to the elderly or
disabled.

Details of the Program of Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue through December
05, 2009 during normal business hours. Persons with disabilities who need accommodations to attend the meet-
ing should contact the JTA Connexion office at 904-265-6001, CTC TDD 636-7402. This notice will constitute
the final notice if no changes in scope occur and if no comments are received.

Kenneth R. Holton
(904) 630-3187
kholton@jtafla.com
Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


Timley, Kiara Hendon, Marcia Ellison,
Keyera Buggets and Erin Hendon
-'.. Z ~q k-VY W7"


Keith Fields, Maria Carsons, Alesa Gibson,
Nicole Gibson and Charles Pringle









Page 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press


November 5-11, 2009


Simple Steps to Look


Younger And Slimmer Now


When it comes to beauty and
looking your age, black women are
very lucky. Because of darker skin
pigmentation and the heightened
amount of melanin in the skin of
women of color, there is a mini-
mum amount of flaws and imper-
fections that appear with the com-
ing of age, such as: crow's feet,
wrinkles and sagging skin. And
even though we know that weight
gain knows no race, women of
color wear their weight differently;
usually in the lower half of the
body, and at times this too can
increase with each birthday.
The truth is that a great nutrition
plan, diet regiment and exercise
will all help to ensure that you stay
on Mother Nature's good side. In
the meantime, a little extra help
doesn't hurt. Here are a few simple
tips that can keep people asking,
"How old did you say you were


again?"
1. Buy a good bra, not just a
pretty one
Sometimes we get a little too
taken with lace, sheer and embroi-
dery and forget the best thing of all
is the fit. Most overweight women
wear bras that let their breasts fall
too low, making them look older
and heavier. However, a good bra
can make you look leaner and slim-
mer. If you are unsure, get fitted in
the lingerie department of your
favorite department store. You will
see the difference next time in your
favorite shirt
2. Make it a point to add color
in your wardrobe
Because black women come in so
many shades, why limit yourself to
dark and neutral colors. Venture
outside of the box. Try beautiful
pastels and earth tones, and even
some vibrant patterns. Try bright


Joys and Pains of a Weave
I know you've heard that weaves can be bad for your hair, but I'm here
to tell you once and for all that's not the case. At least that shouldn't be
the case.
There are all kinds of hair extensions, but the one that gets the worst
wrap by far is bonding. Bonding is a process where you use a special
glue to glue hair onto your scalp. Just the act of bonding alone should-
n't scare you from giving this process a try. Bonding, when done cor-
rectly, will not take your hair out. Of course the flip side of that is when
you have it done incorrectly, then you have trouble.
People who bond hair in incorrectly, and use excessive amounts of
glue are setting you up for disaster. The problem as you can imagine
then comes when you try to remove the hair which is stuck by mounds
of glue! We do a fair amount of extensions at Salon PK ...We've seen
people who've come in and their hair is balding around the edges, and
others who have extreme breakage. It is so sad because it could have
been avoi .
One of the problems is that people want their extensions to last longer
than they are supposed to. So they use entirely too much glue. The latex
bond which is a type of glue that is commonly used is much weaker glue
than the original. Each day you wear a bonded weave it gets looser and
looser and it should. This way you won't have any problems removing
the weave from your hair. You don't have to pull the hair from your
scalp and spray tons of oil to try and get it out.
Bond remover is the best thing since the invention of paper. With a lit-
tle common sense and an ounce of patience it will gently remove the
hair. I recommend 30 second bond remover.
Typically a fresh set of bonded extensions should last about four
weeks. That's provided you shampoo your hair every two weeks.
However if you shampoo your hair every week it's going to last for only
two weeks.
Please, please, please don't try to re-glue your hair yourself. I tell my
clients to call me and let me take care of it. I do that for no charge
because if you try I bet you're going to end up with a glob of glue in your
hair. That little corer that maybe lifted, leave it alone. No one can see
it. Don't pick up the glue, like I just said, if I'm your stylist simply come
see me instead. I have worn extensions for a long time, and I still have
a full head of hair. I've grown many clients hair by giving them exten-
sions. Extensions can give your hair a break from all of the curling irons
and stress we place on our hair. There are so many people that do it
wrong. Trust me a weave doesn't have to cause the damage that we've
heard about. Taking memory out of the equation we don't notice a good
weave. A good weave can be virtually undetectable. A bad weave will
stand out. For vacations, growing your hair out, or a certain look trust
me weaves can work.
To ask PK your question or learn more about the products in this arti-
cle, visit her on the web or phone at: 636-0787 or email
pk@salonpk com.


colors on your good features and
dark colors on problem areas. Since
black women come in all colors, so
should the wardrobe. Color will
make you look much younger.
3. Know yourself is knowing
your size.
Another common mistake that
plus-size women make is that they
squeeze in the wrong size trying to
look thinner. But, the unfortunate
and blatant truth is that this only
makes you look bigger and older.
Women believe that if they risk
going up a size than they have to
eventually deal with that weight
gain, which might be true. But who
says that you have to look terrible
while waiting to lose the weight. If
you look your best at any weight,
you might find yourself in a better
frame of mind to take on a diet and
exercise routine.
4. Boot camp on boot cuts
Please, please, please ladies;
throw out tapered and ill-fitting
jeans. As mentioned, black women
tend to carry weight at the bottom
making a lady looking larger and
shorter. If you want to make your
hips appear slimmer, try boot cut
jeans. These jeans flare out at the
knee and give you the appearance
of being slimmer and taller.
5. Accessorize Your Wardrobe
Black women are naturally beau-
tiful. To enhance that beauty, try a
host of attractive accessories.
Scarves, long dangling earrings,
pins, handbags and shoes all help
you look very attractive before and
after you lose weight. After all, it's
very hard to notice problem areas
on your body when you are adorned
with an array of eye-catching acces-
sories.
Lastly, don't try so hard to be
noticed, just being yourself will get
you plenty of attention. Black is
beautiful no matter what!











WITH A

TIME LOST I


ST.


If you suddenly have or see any of these symptoms, call 9-1-1 immediately:
Numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of
the body Confusion, trouble speaking or understanding Difficulty
seeing in one or both eyes Trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance
or coordination Severe headache with no known cause

Learn more at StrokeAssociation.org or 1-888-4-STROKE.


OBSTETRICAL & GYNECOLOGICAL

ASSOCIATES, P.A.

Complete Obstetrical

& Gynecological Care
Comprehensive Pregnancy Care
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Family Planning Vaginal Surgery
Osteoporosis Menopausal Disorder
Laparoscopy Menstrual Disorder


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1820 Barrs Street, Suite 521

Jacksonville, FL 32204

(904) 387-9577

www.nfobgyn.com


B. Vereen Chithriki, M.D.
William L. Cody, M.D.


A A


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305 Last Union Street

in Powntown JaclksonviLLe


For All


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Dental Insurance and Medicaid Accepted

A t


gaDn a QKBo acO d a]B


SYMPTOM COLD H1N1 Flu
Fever is usually present with the
FEVER Fever is rare with a cold flu in up to 80% of all flu cases. A
temperature of 1000F or higher
for 3 to 4 days is associated with
the H1N1 flu.
A hacking, productive (mucus- A non-productive (non-mucus
COUGHING producing) cough is often present producing) cough is usually pres-
with a cold. ent with the H1N1 flu (sometimes
referred to as dry cough).

ACHES Slight body aches and pains can Severe aches and pains are com-
be part of a cold. mon with the H1N1 flu.


STUFFY NOSE Stuffy nose is commonly present Stuffy nose is not commonly pres-
with a cold and typically resolves ent with the H1N1 flu.
spontaneously within a week.

CHILLS Chills are uncommon with a cold. 60% of people who have the
H1N1 flu experience chills.


TIREDNESS Tiredness is fairly mild with a Tiredness is moderate to severe
cold. with the H1N1 flu.


SNEEZING Sneezing is commonly present Sneezing is not common.
The H1N1 flu has a rapid onset
SUDDEN SYMPTOMS Cold symptoms tend to develop within 3-6 hours. The flu hits
over a few days. hard and includes sudden symp-
toms like high fever, aches and
pains.

HEADACHE A headache is fairly uncommon A headache is very common with
with a cold. the H1N1 flu, present in 80% of
flu cases.

SORE THROAT Sore throat is commonly present Sore throat is not commonly
with a cold. present with the H1N1 flu.

CHEST DISCOMFORT Chest discomfort is mild to mod- Chest discomfort is often severe
erate with a cold. with the H1N1 flu.


Your Dental


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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 9


TT-n _i ,g -11 Ann


by Lee
Bailey
Nene
Leakes is
known for
keeping it
real on
Bravo's hit
show "The Real
Housewives of
Atlanta." She is one
of five female


"None of this will change who I am,"
said of her humility. "I'm very blessed
be able to do this. The entertainment I
and the press that I've gotten and the thi
have come to me have not changed wh
I'm still Nene, the fun-loving person t
guys love to watch week after week."
While not exactly visibly humble, Lea
a recent interviewer that she had been it
in acting before she got the chance to d
Housewives." She explained that she ag
do the show because she's enamored
entertainment industry and recognized
would be a great marketing platform.
"I'm doing it because I love television
love the entertainment world and it's
platform to put your business out their
worldd to see and help elevate your b
and help elevate yourself," she said.
Leakes has taken advantage of
her TV time in promoting her
Twisted Hearts Foundation that
addresses domestic violence
against women. Other "Atlanta
Housewives" have also promoted
their causes, fashion lines, and
e\ en a song with a cult following.


Furthermore, Leakes has most
recently been on a promotional
tour for her new book "Never
Make the Same Mistake Twice:
Lessons on Love and Life
Learned the Hard Way" and has
goals to have her own TV talk
show or radio show. And
although the ladies have
strategically marketed
S interests and wares
'.-sho%\. Leakes re
hat "The
ouse\%w es" are v
"'The Real Hou
fAtlanta' is not sc
the h h r ie s i ve all." she said. "WI
see is what you
things that we say
things that we do
.... can'tt % rite that
stu.. I don't even
Atlantans that star- on4heory addicting reality -writer could write anything that good.
series about some very vocal and independent there are reality shows that aren't real, b
women. not scripted, at all. That's why we're #1
The show, which premiered in the fall of Leakes did reveal that the show prodt
2008, is the network's third series in this format step in to create the scenes.
(following "The Real Housewives of Orange "Now, the producers may say, 'Toda
County" and "The Real Housewives of New you and Sheree are going to meet up ata
York City"), and the most widely popular and rant with Kim and confront her on the is
the highest rated of the franchise. you guys have with her,'" she said. "T


Leakes
to even
business
ngs that
Lo I am.
hat you

kes told
involved
lo "Real
greed to
by the
that it

on and I
a great
e for the
business


Atlanta's "realest"

housewife speaks up

and out taking her tal-
ents to the literary world
they say, but they have to do that. We can't go
to a restaurant or a nail salon without getting
clearance through production, so they have to
call ahead of time. Our show is truly reality."
Leakes is joined on the show by Sheree
Whitfield, Lisa Wu-Hartwell, Kim Zolciak,
and Kandi Burress. The women have quite
diverse personalities, but all share a panache for
the good life.
"People like the show. We all have great lives.
Most people don't get to live the way we live.
Most people don't get to do what we do. People
are making comments, but they can't do what
we do. We're a little different. We're definitely
blessed; all five of us."
"We also have differences with each other,"
she continued. "We've known each other for a
long time, but we all have our differences. We're
five women with five big personalities and we
make it work."
However it doesn't always work out pretty.
The show didn't become great television
because everyone got along drama-free. Both
seasons of the show have had their elements of
drama and infighting. With that as an attraction,


for better or worse,
"I'm the kind of girl... Leakes maintains that
I really don't care what you the drama is real.
think about me," Leakes "I don't argue for
declared. "(It) is not my the camera," she
goal to walk out of here and promised. "I don't
o even know the cam-
worry about what the man era is there half the
in the red shirt thought time. You get used to
about me. I don't really the camera, you get
care. I'm just giving you me used to the camera-
men; the camera crew
and you either like me or men; the camera crew
and the camera are
you don't I'm not trying just there and you
to impress you." don't know what it's
going to capture. You
forget the camera is even there. I don't do any-
d their thing for the camera, but the arguing does get
s on the very tiring. People take things personally and it
,assured becomes a big argument."
Real Catfights, arguments, or fundraising for her
ery real. charity, Leakes said that she is not concerned
isewives about what people think.
ripted at "I'm the kind of girl, I really don't care what
hat you you think about me," she declared. "That is not
get. The my goal to walk out of here and worry about
and the what the man in the red shirt thought about me.
- you I don't really care. I'm just giving you me and
kind of you either like me or you don't. I'm not trying to
think a impress you. So when the show wraps and it's
I know over with and whatever people think about me,
ut we're I really can't think about that. Whether I was on
the show or not, it really doesn't matter.
ucers do Whether it's a reality show or a stay-at-home
mom, I've been talked about. It's not a big deal."
y, Nene, "You know, you can't please everybody," she
a restau- added "You just have to do what makes you
sues that happy and you'll be fine. I'm very happy."
'hat's all


Former Massachusetts Sen. Edward Brooke, center, is applauded by,
from left, President Barack Obama, Senate Majority Leader Harry
Reid of Nev., Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., and
Sen. john Kerry, D-Mass., in the Rotunda on Capitol Hill in
Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009, during a ceremony where he
received the Congressional Gold Medal.

Edward Brooke Honored with

Congressional Gold Medal


With Democrats and Republicans
engaged in a heated debate over
health care, former Sen. Edward
Brooke, the first black man elected
by popular vote to the U.S. Senate,
pointedly suggested Wednesday
that lawmakers put aside their parti-
san differences awhile.
At a Capitol ceremony honoring
him, the 90-year-old Massachusetts
Republican addressed issues on
Congress' plate in addition to health
care: overseas wars, -restoring the
economy and providing Americans
with adequate housing.
"We've got to get together,"
Brooke said, turning his eyes to
Senate GOP Leader Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky. "We have
no alternative. There's nothing left.
It's time for politics to be put aside
on the back burner."
Brooke was presented the
Congressional Gold Medal, the
highest award Congress has to
honor civilians for achievements
and contributions to society.
Attending the ceremony,
President Barack Obama called
Brooke "a man who's spent his life
breaking barriers and bridging
divides across this country."
Brooke grew up in Washington
and served in a segregated unit in
the Army during World War II
before entering the political arena
and winning election to the Senate
in 1966 as the first black senator
since Reconstruction.
As senator, he took on the pop-
ulist causes of low-income housing,
increasing the minimum wage and


.C.








Former Massachusetts Senator
Edward Brooke.
mass transit before losing re-elec-
tion in 1978. President George W.
Bush presented him with the
Presidential Medal of Freedom in
2004.
Obama said he followed the trail
that Brooke blazed.
"He ran for office, as he put it, to
bring people together who had
never been together before,"
Obama said. "He didn't care
whether a bill was popular or polit-
ically expedient, Democratic or
Republican -- he cared about
whether it helped people, whether it
made a difference in their daily
lives."
The late Sen. Edward Kennedy,
D-Mass., and other lawmakers
introduced the legislation to give
Brooke Congress' highest award.
Two-thirds of the House and Senate
had to co-sponsor the measure in
order for the medal to be awarded.
Kennedy's son, Rep. Patrick
Kennedy, D-R.I., and Kennedy's
widow, Victoria Kennedy, attended
the ceremony in the Capitol
Rotunda.


Vehicle purchase and Associated Equipment
Total Program of Projects:


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY

RE: 49CFR Part 37, U.S.C. 5310


ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT: $ 45,000
RECIPIENT: Jacksonville Transportation Authority

Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) is providing an opportunity for a
public hearing to consider its FY 2010/2011 Program of Projects in which federal capital funds are being
requested from the State of Florida, Department of Transportation. Funding is available on an 80/10/10 match-
ing basis between federal, state and local sources. The public is encouraged to comment on any and all proj-
ects listed below:


$ 50,000
$ 50,000


Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing before 5:00 p.m. on December 05,
2009. If a request is received by the stated time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the public notified.

Mail requests to:

Public Hearing, Section 5310 CTC Grant
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Post Office Drawer "0"
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

This project has been coordinated through the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) of the North Florida
Transportation Planning Organization (TPO) of the Jacksonville Urbanized Area. No business displacements
are expected to occur as a result of project implementation. This project will have no substantial harmful
effects on the environment, nor will they adversely affect service levels to the elderly or disabled. The FDOT
contact person for District 2 is:

Gwendolyn H. Pra, District Rural Transportation Coodinator
FDOT District II
2198 Edison Avenue
Jacksonville, Fl 32204-2730
904-360-5687
gwendolyn.pra.@dot.state.fl.us

Details of the Program of Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue through December
05, 2009 during normal business hours. Persons with disabilities who need accommodations to attend the meet-
ing should contact the JTA Connexion office at 904-265-6001, CTC TDD 636-7402. This notice will consti-
tute the final notice if no changes in scope occur and if no comments are received.

Kenneth R. Holton
kholton(jtafla.com
Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY

RE: 49CFR Part 37, U.S.C. 5311


ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT:
RECIPIENT:


$ 140,129
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) is providing an opportunity for a
public hearing to consider its FY 2010/2011 Program of Projects in which federal operating are being request-
ed from the State of Florida, Department of Transportation. Funding is available on a 50/50 matching basis
between federal, state and local sources. The public is encouraged to comment on any and all projects listed
below:


Operating Assistance
Total Program of Projects:


$ 280,258
$ 280,258


Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing before 5:00 p.m. on December 05,
2009. If a request is received by the stated time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the public notified.

Mail requests to:

Notice of Public Hearing, Section 5311 Grant
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Post Office Drawer "0"
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

This project has been coordinated through the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) of the North Florida
Transportation Planning Organization (TPO) of the Jacksonville Urbanized Area. No business displacements
are expected to occur as a result of project implementation. This project will have no substantial harmful
effects on the environment, nor will they adversely affect service levels to the elderly or disabled. The FDOT
contact person for District 2 is:

Gwendolyn H. Pra, District Rural Transportation Coodinator
FDOT District II
2198 Edison Avenue
Jacksonville, Fl 32204-2730
904-360-5687/1-800-207-8236
gwendolyn.pra.@dot.state. fl.us

Details of the Program of Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue through December
05, 2009 during normal business hours. Persons with disabilities who need accommodations to attend the meet-
ing should contact the JTA Connexion office at 904-265-6001, CTC TDD 636-7402. This notice will consti-
tute the final notice if no changes in scope occur and if no comments are received.
Kenneth R. Holton
kholton@jtafla.com
Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


iIovemIer :) j-i,.Luuy


46 0










iI]


wf


What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports


T0


activities to self enrichment and the civic scene


Holiday Grief Workshops
Haven Hospice is hosting holiday
grief workshops open to anyone in
the community who would like tips
on how to get through the holidays
after a loss. They will be held once
a week throughout November and
December at various locations
throughout the city. They are free
of charge. For more information,
contact Margaret Rose Glenn,
LCSW, at (904) 733-9818 or (866)
733-9818 for more information

Fair in Town
The Greater Jacksonville
Agriculture Fair will be in town to
to celebrate heritage, culture and
community with good wholesome
family fun, great entertainment,
friendly competition and education-
al experiences for the whole family.
the dates for this year's events are
November 4-15 at the fairgrounds.

Anthony Hamilton
in Concert
R&B crooner Anthony Hamilton
will be in concert on Friday,
November 6th for the First Friday
event at Uptown 21 at 5921 Richard
Street in San Marco. For VIP/tables
or Tickets call 864-1115.

Ritz Amateur Night
Come to Amateur Night on Friday,
November 6th for some of the
hottest talent in Jacksonville. Like
the Apollo's show in Harlem, con-


testants compete for cash prizes and
the cheers or jeers of the audience
decide who goes home with the
cash. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. For
tickets or more info call 632-5555.

Jazz-n-Jam
Join the Ritz Theatre on Saturday
Nov. 7, 2009 at 8:00 p.m. for Jazz-
n-Jam, an evening of jazz flavors,
smooth sounds and cool people. It's
an experience of relaxing music,
beverages and a unique atmosphere.
Na'im and the Jazz Band welcomes
you to bring your instrument or
vocals and Jam with the band. Or
just bring your "Ears on Jazz"! For
more information, call 632-5555.

Diversity Network
Book Club Meeting
The Jacksonville Diversity
Network Book Club will meet on
Saturday, November 7, 2009, from
2:30 4:30 p.m.The book for dis-
cussion will be "On the Road to
Freedom: A Guided Tour of the
Civil Rights Trail" by Charles Cobb
Jr. The uthor will be attending the
discussion. It will be held at
Chamblin's Uptown located at 215
N Laura Street. For more informa-
tion, call 674-0868.

Ritz Voices Auditions
The Ritz Theatre and Museum is
calling young vocalists ages 12-18
to audition for the all city youth
choir Ritz Voices and experienced
vocalists ages 18 and up to audition


for the new all city adult choir Ritz
Voices of Distinction. Auditions
will be held Saturday, Nov. 7th at
10 a.m. and Monday, Nov. 9th at
4:30 p.m. For more info call 632-
5555.
Family Night
at The Cummer
The Cummer Museum of Art &
Gardens is hosting a family night
with live music, artist demonstra-
tions and art making inspired by
Discoveries in Detail: Jacques Le
Moyne and Theodor de Bry. It will
be held on Tuesday, November 10,
2009, from 4 to 9 p.m. at the
Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens
located at 829 Riverside Ave.
Admission is free. For more infor-
mation call 355-0630.

Jazz at the River Club
Physicians and Friends will be
hosting a Networking and Jazz
Reception at. The River Club on
Thursday, November 12th from
5-9 p.m. For more information,
email tpeacock@executive-
circle.com.

Sigma Gamma Rho
Founders Luncheon
Sigma Gamma Sorority, Inc. will
celebrate 87 years of history and
sisterhood in November. The ladies
of the Gamma Omicron Sigma
Chapter are hosting a Founders Day
Luncheon Saturday, November 14,
2009 at noon at the Omni Hotel in


Downtown Jacksonville (245 Water
Street). Florida State Senator Tony
Hill will be the guest speaker. For
tickets or more information call
Kaisha Johnson or Angela Spears,
at (904) 521-3826 or email
sigmal 922@gmail.com.

Springfield Bazaar
The SPAR Council will present
the Springfield Bazaar in the 1300
block of North Main Street on
November 14th from 9 a.m. 4
p.m. The sale will feature antiques,
jewelry, pet supplies, home & decor
and much more. For more informa-
tion call 353-7727.

PRIDE Book Club
16th Anniversary
PRIDE Book Club, northeast
Florida's oldest and largest book
club of color, will be celebrating
their 16th anniversary on Saturday,
November 14, 2009 at the Clara
White Mission Cafe, 613 West
Ashley Street at 7 p.m. The book
for discussion will be "Convictions
of the Heart" by K.A. Murray.
Books or more information can be
obtained by calling 703-8264.

From Quilts
to Freedom
The Jacksonville Consortium of
African American Artists (JCAAA)
will be presenting "Form Quilts to
Freedom", an original theatrical
event written by and starring mem-


bers of JCAAA in a depiction of
historical fact and fiction. It will be
held on November 15th at 4 p.m. at
the Karpeles Manuscript Library
and Museum, 101 W. 1st Street in
Springfield. For tickets or more
information, call 472-6097.

JCCI Lunchtime
Conversations Nov.
Topic is Homelessness
The Jacksonville Community
Council, Inc.'s Lunchtime
Conversation for November will be
with Audrey Moran, President/CEO
for I.M. Sulzbacher Center for the
Homeless, and Bill Scheu, attorney
with Rogers Towers, Inc. as they
explain how homelessness is
changing and its impact on our
community. Participants are asked
to bring your own lunch.
Refreshments and dessert will be
provided. It will be held on
Monday, November 16 from Noon
to 1:00pm at JCCI headquarters
located at. RSVP to Earlene@jcci.org
as seating is limited.

Oprah's Winfrey
Color Purple
The touring production of Oprah
Winfrey's "The Color Purple" will
be in Jacksonville Nov. 17-22, 2009
at the Times Union Center for the
Performing Arts. For tickets or
more information, call 633-6110.

Thanksgiving
Gratitude Service
OneJax will be presenting their
91st Annual Interfaith
Thanksgiving Gratitude Service on
Thursday, November 19, 2009 at
Riverside Baptist Church located at
2650 Park Street. Services begin at
6 p.m. For more information call
354-1529.


Carla Harris Keynotes
Speaker's Forum
Amelia Island will host leading
investment banker, singer, author,
and community service advocate
Carla Harris November 20, 2009.
The talented Jacksonville native
and Morgan Stanley Managing
Director will be featured at the 3rd
Annual Boys & Girls Clubs
Speakers Forum to be held at The
Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island. The
Friday evening gala fund-raiser also
features a cocktail reception, sit-
down dinner, and silent auction. For
more information, contact the Boys
& Girls Clubs of Nassau County
Foundation at 904-261-8666.


Cufflinks & Pearls Gala
The Clara White Mission will pres-
ent their annual Cufflinks & Pearls
Gala on Friday, November 20th at
the St. Johns Cathedral Taliafero
Hall. The evening kicks off with a
VIP reception at 6 p.m. followed by
the program and performance. A
silent auction will also be held
throughout the evening. For tickets
or more information, call 354-4162.

Genealogy Meeting
The Jacksonville Genealogical
Society, will hold their monthly
meeting at the Webb-Wesconnett
Branch Library, 6889 103rd Street
on November 21,2009. The meet-
ing will commence at noon and end
at 2 p.m. Besides the election of
officers, the program will consist of
"Reminiscing". Participants are
asked to be prepared to discuss for
two to four minutes, a memorable
event in their life, which may be of
interest to other members. For addi-
tional information please contact,
Mary Chauncey, (904) 781-9300.


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JLOC Open Meeting
The Jacksonville Local Organizing Committee for the Millions More
Movement Inc., will have 'Open Meetings' on the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Sunday of
each month. The time is 6:00 8:00 p.m, at 916 N.Myrtle Avenue. The meet-
ings are open to the public. If you are concerned and want to see improvement
in the quality of life and living conditions in your community, you are invit-
ed to attend. For more information call 904-240-9133.


SbM Your NewS ad Co"in Evept
News deadline is Monday at 6 p.m. by the week you would like
your information to be printed. Information can be sent via
email, fax, brought into our office or mailed in. Please be sure to
include the 5W's who, what, when, where, why and you must
include a contact number.
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Page 10 Ms. Perryr's Free Press


November 5-11, 2009


UliN9









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WHITNEY'S NJ MANSION UP FOR
SALE:
Whitney Houston has placed her New Jersey
home on the market for $5.6 million a steal, con-
sidering it's less than half of its assessed value.
The five-bedroom, 12,561-sq.-ft. Menham, N.J.,
home is described by the real-estate Web site where
it's listed as modern-styled home full of natural light
and containing "circular-themed interior spaces," as
well as a four-car garage, three fireplaces, walk-in
closets, a bar and skylights and floor-to-ceiling windows.
It's also the house where she married her ex-husband Bobby Brown. The
couple divorced in 2007 after a notoriously abusive relationship.
SERENA BREAKS WTA SEASON PRIZE RECORD:
Tennis star banks $6.5 mil to beat previous earnings champ
Serena Williams has set the record for single-season prize money in
women's tennis by topping $6.5 million in 2009.
Williams broke the WTA mark of slightly under $5.5 million, earned by
Justine Henin in 2007.
Serena won the season-ending tour championships Sunday, beating older
sister Venus in the final, and ends the year ranked No. 1. The younger
Williams also won the Australian Open and Wimbledon in 2009.
Williams' career prize money is now at a record $28.5 million.
'THIS IS IT' EARNS $101
MILLION IN GLOBAL DEBUT:
Despite the usual dip in box office num-
bers during a Halloween weekend,
"Michael Jackson's This Is It" managed to
top the US box office with $21.3 million,
and dominate worldwide with an estimated
$101 million in its opening frame.
Sony announced it is extending the film's
domestic run through Thanksgiving week-
end, or by three weeks which means that
the movie's DVD release has also been
pushed back by roughly the same amount of
time.
The disc was originally set to be released
prior to Christmas, but due to a regulation
that usually forces studios to wait a mini-
mum 90 days before releasing a new film to
DVD, "This Is It" will now make its debut
in late January or early February, 2010.
Meanwhile, Sony has decided to sub-
mit the documentary for Academy Award
consideration in categories ranging from
film editing and sound to best picture and
best director. As previously reported, the
deadline has already passed for films com-
peting in best documentary, the category in which "This Is It" had the best
chance of competing.
Friedman points out that "This is It" is on track to be the third-largest-
grossing documentary in history, putting it right behind Michael Moore's
"Fahrenheit 911? and "Earth," and ahead of Moore's other films, as well.
as AI Gore's "An Inconvenient Truth"a: id M Madonna's "*T~Dif' -D i-]

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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 11


November 5-11, 2009








Page 12 Ms. Perry's Free Press November 5-11, 2009


349
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169
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Prices effective Thursday, November 5 through Wednesday, November 11, 2009. Only in Orange, Seminole, Brevard, Flagler, Columbia, Volusia, Marion, Duval,
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