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The Jacksonville free press ( July 31, 2008 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Jacksonville free press
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - AKN0341
oclc - 19095970
alephbibnum - 002042477
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00178

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Jacksonville free press
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - AKN0341
oclc - 19095970
alephbibnum - 002042477
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00178

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press


This item has the following downloads:


Full Text







25,000 AKA's

Converge on the

Nation's Capital

for Sorority's

> B 100th Anniversary
Page 3




Pros and

SCons of Debt

^ r Consolidation
-' in Today's

Economy
Page 2


New Yorker has No Regrets Over
Cover Regarded as Tasteless
The editor of the New Yorker said this week -.- ._
he has no regrets about running a cover illus- N _ER
tration that portrays Barack Obama in Muslim
garb and wife Michelle Obama as a gun-toting
militant, despite widespread criticism of the
image.
Obama's campaign has sharply criticized the
publication's latest cover, which appears to -
portray the presumptive Democratic presiden-
tial nominee and his wife as terrorist enemies
of the United States.
The cover, published Sunday, shows Obama
in the Oval Office dressed in traditional Muslim attire. His wife,
Michelle, wears an Afro hairstyle and has a machine gun slung over her
back. An American flag can be seen burning in the fireplace, and a pic-
ture of Osama bin Laden hangs on the wall.
"The New Yorker may think, as one of their staff explained to us, that
their cover is a satirical lampoon of the caricature Sen. Obama's right-
wing critics have tried to create," Obama spokesman Bill Burton said in
a statement. "But most readers will see it as tasteless and offensive. And
we agree."

Death Row Records Auctioned for $24M
Death Row Records, the hip-hop label that released ground breaking
gangster rap albums by Tupac Shakur, Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg, has been
auctioned for $24 million by New York-based Global Music Group Inc.
The sale included its' back catalog and current artist contracts.
The purchase concluded the roller-coaster saga of one of hip-hop's most
famous labels. Under owner Marion "Suge" Knight, Death Row sold tens
of millions of albums in the heyday of early '90s rap its artists often
flashing the spoils of the high life in music videos before collapsing
in debt and mismanagement.
A former couple, Lydia and Michael Harris, claimed they helped found
the label, and won a judgment of $107 million, which they tried to col-
lect in 2006. Unable to pay, Death Row and Knight filed for bankruptcy
in April 2006, claiming debts of more than $100 million.
Other assets are believed to include unreleased material from Shakur
that could result in another posthumous release from the rapper.

N.C. Considers Execution Imbalance
RALEIGH, N.C. Efforts by black leaders to address the racial imbal-
ance in death sentences may be paired with a move to restart executions
in North Carolina, observers say.
The North Carolina branch of the NAACP is working with Democrats
in the state Senate to introduce a measure forcing judges and juries in
capital cases to consider statistics showing far more blacks are given
death sentences than whites.
But for the measure to gain enough support from Republicans to pass,
it may have to be paired with a move to restart the state's stalled execu-
tions. North Carolina's Medical Board last year adopted ethics rules pro-
hibiting doctors from participating in executions, which has halted trips
to North Carolina's death chamber.
State NAACP President William Barber doesn't want the two issues
combined, saying, "It should stand alone. This is about people dying sim-
ply because of their race."

Green Party Picks Cynthia
McKinney as Nominee
Democratic Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney of Georgia has been
chosen as the Green Party's presidential nominee.
Ruth Weill, the party's national convention coordinator, said the dele-
gates selected McKinney as they wrapped up their national convention
here on Saturday.
McKinney tapped Rosa Clemente, a hip-hop artist, journalist and
activist, as her running mate.
McKinney, 53, entered politics by following her father, an Atlanta
policeman who later served in the Georgia State House. She won her first
seat in 1988, and later ran for and won a House race in 1992, becoming
the first African American woman to represent Georgia in Congress.
She was reelected several times but suffered a primary defeat in 2002,
before winning her final term in the House in 2004.


BET Major

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Volume 23 No. 12 Jacksonville, Florida July 17-23, 2008

King Children Sue Each Other

Squabbling Over Family's Estate


The King children, Dexter, Berneice and Martin, Jr., shown above at
their mother's funeral, have yet to recover.


The surviving children of Martin
Luther King are embroiled in an
ugly legal squabble over the estate
of the iconic civil rights leader.
Bernice King, 45, and Martin
Luther King III, 50, claim Dexter
King, 47, has taken "substantial
funds" from the estate of their
mother Coretta Scott King, who
died in 2006.
The pair also allege that he "mis-
applied or wasted" assets from a
company set up to license their
father's image and intellectual prop-
erty.
They also say he is hiding docu-
ments concerning the company's
operations and are demanding he
lets them see the books.


Dexter King is president of the
Estate of Martin Luther King Jr. -
a company set up in 1993 and
worth millions of dollars. His
brother and sister are shareholders.
The pair claim Mr. King took the
money from their mother's estate
and transferred it to his company.
Their lawyer, Jock Smith, said,
"This was very heartfelt on their
part and very taxing on them to
have to do this. They are not happy
that they had to bring this action.
All they're asking for is ... to be
included in their daddy's legacy."
Mr. King has 30 days to respond to
the lawsuit.
In a statement, he said, "I'm disap
Continued on page 7


CeCe Tarver and her Godmother Dr. Carolyn Love share a moment.

The Power of Favor
Miracles Consistently Bless the Life of Local Pastor


by Crisitin Wilson
Dr. Carolyn Love of Truth for
Living Ministries is all too familiar
with the power of "Favor". On one
more than one occasion, her loved
ones from adults to the unborn,
have looked death in the face and
are walking testimonies today.
Armed with the shield of experi-
ence and nearly thirty-five years as
a christian, the faith leader has
penned her testament in a the new
book, Favor Rewrote My Life.
Readers will get a face to face
look at the death defying car colli-
sion of God-daughter CeCe Tarver
and her children with a train and
another life threatening incident
that induced the labor of her five
month pregnant daughter bringing


her grand-daughter to this earth
premature that inspired the book.
"We just had to pray and believe
in God," said the pastor.
Needless to say, her prayers were
answered
With such a powerful testimony
Love felt that she needed to write a
book. She wanted to make sure
other Christians knew they didn't
have to be bystanders in their own
lives and that they had the power to
change things.
Tarver who's learned a great deal
about Favor and the power of God
from Dr Love said the book was an
easy read. "For any Christian who
wants to go to the next level, Favor
Rewrote My Life will do just that,"
she said


America's Mortgage Crisis Worsens


by C. Muhammad
The presidential race, rising costs
of oil and gas, extreme weather and
food shortages offer enough to hold
one's attention, but eyes remained
glued on America's mortgage crisis.


Home values have dropped again,
homes sales are lagging, home
equity credit lines are drying up and
lenders have tightened standards for
getting home loans.
Blacks have seen neighborhoods


hit hard by foreclosures that have
devastated families, left blocks of
seemingly abandoned homes, and
equity that once was considered a
safety net for disasters, isn't much
security anymore. The loss of Black


wealth from the crisis has been esti-
mated into billions of dollars.
"This could be a fairly unique cri-
sis in that it should, unlike Katrina
that particularly devastated the
Continued on page 5


AmerICan Calling for Jackson's

Resignation After Comments
Chicago, Ill. A group of men calling themselves 'AmeriCan' want
Jackson to step down from his position with the Rainbow Push Coalition.
Before an appearance on Fox News, Jackson said Obama had talked
down to African Americans during a Father's Day speech.
The reverend did apologize to Obama, who accepted his apology.
Jackson later said he thought the controversy had helped the Obama
campaign.
"He didn't receive any pain, I felt the pain and the embarrassment and
the hurt," said Rev. Jesse Jackson, Rainbow Push Coalition.
"You can't tell me that Jesse Jackson has been in the media for over 40
years, that when somebody hooks a mic up to him, that he don't realize
that it's live," said Harold Davis, AmeriCan.
The members of AmeriCan say it is hard to teach young people about
respect when they hear comments like Jackson's.


FRONT ROW: Charlotte William, Sheina Ruth, Irvin Paterson, Gevak Rogers, Darrelle Davis, Breanna Elliott, Jessica Powell, Kaela Sloon,
Justin Williams, Mary Burke, Probation Officer. (SECOND ROW) Anthony Cooper, Parris Wilson, John Hickson, Courtney Townsend, Jerrika
Battle, Anita Travis, Cuianna Burch, R. P. Smith, Bailiff T.R. Bortune, Judicial Officer; M. L. Kennedy, ASA; James Smith, Darien Sulph, Corey
Townsend, Leroy Jackson, Brandon, Ross, Tiffany Harris, Agnes Malone, Justin Felix, Eva Earven, Kevin T. Bryant Jay Stewart and Judge
James Ruth. FMP Photo

A.L. Lewis Teens Get Scared Straight Tour of Judicial System


With so much violence among
inner city youth leading to convic-
tions and death, Carla McIntosh,
the Director of Community
Connection's A.L. Lewis Center,


wanted the kids in her summer
camp to experience first hand what
happens when you become an
accused criminal. Assisted by
Judge James Ruth, a product of


Jacksonville's inner city, she got her
wish and the teens toured the Duval
County J ail and a visit to his court-
room.
Their first and hopefully last hard


knocks tour included the holding
cell area, the booking process and a
walk through inmate cells. One
camper, age 13, thought that the
inmate cells Cont. on page 3











July 17-23, 2008


Pros and Cons of Debt Consolidation


.. 4 by George Fraser



of Conversation

Networking affairs are not places for going into detail on the finer
points of your laser printer. Save that for the sales meetings. If you can't
answer a question or describe your latest five-speed turbo widget in
under two minutes, save it for the follow-up meeting. Even nonstop
humorous monologues wear thin.
Long-winded jokes are even worse, and there is no place for blue or
sexist humor at a networking meeting. Save it for the back room. In fact,
I'd suggest that you not tell jokes at all in networking situations.
The best humor springs from real-life situations, and if you can tell a
funny story about yourself or your family that fits into the conversation-
al flow, fine. Most "jokes," however, do little more than interrupt the
flow of networking conversation, and all too often, they are told at some-
one's expense.
On the occasion when I encounter a monologist, I slip in a quick ques-
tion when he or she pauses to draw a breath. Thank goodness, everyone
has to breathe.
Effective networking can only take place when there is a dialogue, or
when the conversation includes several people. If all you talk about is
yourself, then prepare to have a one-man network, which is about as
effective as a one-hand clap. Remember these good conversation rules:
Never talk for more than three or four minutes without including
someone else in the conversation.
- Ask relevant questions of other speakers and LISTEN to their answers.
- Encourage others to get involved by asking: "Do you have any ques-
tions about this?"
- Acknowledge new people and invite them into the conversation.
- Interrupt only when there is a give-and-take flow going.
Don't make gender or status-based power plays in conversation, or
talk condescendingly.
Bottum Line: Remember, the words you speak today are waiting
for you tomorrow.


Auto Refinancing Can Lower

Interest Rates And Payments
Q: I got a car loan 18 months offers from retailers. I bought
ago with an interest rate that's furniture recently and used the
even higher than my credit cards. finance plan offered by the store.
I think I might qualify for a lower I don't have to make a payment
interest rate now. Can I get a new for 12 months. In that time I'll be
loan and pay off the old one? able to save enough money to pay
A: Automobile refinancing, while off the balance.
not as common as mortgage refi- A: Buy now, pay later offers sound
nancing, can lower your interest like a sweet deal, but they can cost
rate, lower your monthly payment you more in the long run.
and save you thousands of dollars Buy now pay later offers allow
over the life of the loan. For people you to take something home today
who have excellent credit, the rates and not worry about paying for it
are as low as 5.49 percent and there for sometimes as long as a year. But
are usually no fees involved. Visit during that year, interest is accruing
Bankrate.com to see how the inter- on that purchase, and that can be
est rates are running today. something to worry about.
Your best bet for finding the low- If the purchase is not paid for in
est rates is through an online bro- full by the time that one-year grace
ker, such as eloan.com, or your cur- period is up, all the interest that has
rent bank or credit union. In most been accruing since the day you
cases the application is simple. If made the purchase will be added to
you apply through an online service the balance of the purchase. If you
you can find out in as little as a few can stick to your plan and pay off
hours if you qualify for the lowest the furniture before the due date
rates. you will have gotten a great deal
Q: You might want to share with and free financing. If not, you're
your readers that they should going to end up owing a lot more
take advantage of interest free that the original purchase price.

Putting Your Teenager's

Cell Phone to Good Use


In a nation where consumers have
accumulated more than $800 billion
in high-interest credit card debt, it
would be safe to say that Americans
are obsessed with plastic.
Tack credit card debt onto mort-
gages, auto loans and student loans,
and it's easy to see how regular
monthly bills can become over-
whelming. One solution: debt con-
solidation.
In an effort to reduce or eliminate
debt, a consumer takes out a debt
consolidation loan at a low or fixed
rate in order to pay off additional
forms of debt at higher interest
rates. The loan used to consolidate
debt is often a home equity loan;
however, any loan or line of credit
can be used, including credit cards.
"Debt consolidation may help
some individuals and families get a
grip on their daily finances, but it's
certainly not for everyone," said
Mike Sullivan, director of educa-
tion for Take Charge America, a


national non-profit credit counsel-
ing company. "If you have a friend
or family member that has success-
fully consolidated debt, it doesn't
mean the same process will work
for you. Cookie-cutter solutions
don't work when it comes to
finances."
Sullivan examines the pros the
cons of debt consolidation:
-PRO: Take Control of
Temporary Debt Debt issues are
not always associated with over-
charging credit cards. A debt con-
solidation loan can help financially
stable consumers who have
acquired a large amount of debt that
is associated with a temporary
issue, like an illness, accident or job
loss.
- PRO: Opportunity to Save As
long as the monthly payment on
your debt consolidation loan is less
than the sum of the monthly pay-
ments on your individual loans,
debt consolidation can help you


take control of your
daily finances.
Making one lower
payment can help a
consumer get a reality
check on the extent of
his or her credit prob-
lem. If the payment is
lower than the sum of
the payments on the
consolidated bills, it i
may free up extra
money in the monthly
budget to purchase
necessities, start an -'
emergency fund or
contribute to a college
fund, among other
money-saving moves.
PRO: Tax
Advantages
Consumers who take
out home equity loans can reap
advantages at tax time. Some or all
of the interest on the loan may be
deductible. However, individuals
and families with poor credit histo-
ries or a track record of overcharg-
ing are generally advised to avoid
home equity loans.
CON: You Can Get Deeper in
Debt Paying off your credit cards
means you have credit available. If
you keep charging, you'll just have
more debt and fewer options for
dealing with it. Consolidation only
works if you stop charging.
CON: Lower Rate Doesn't
Mean You'll Pay Less Don't be
fooled by low interest rates. If the
term of your debt consolidation
loan is longer than the terms of your
smaller existing loans, you may end
up paying more in total interest,
even if the interest rate on your con-


solidation loan is lower. You won't
be saving money in the long run,
even though your monthly pay-
ments will be less.
CON: You Can Lose Your
Home If you use a home equity
loan to consolidate your debts, the
loan is secured by a lien on your
home. That means the lender can
foreclose on your home if you
default on the loan.
Before consolidating debt, Sullivan
suggests talking with a credit coun-
selor.
"There is no magic formula when
it comes to debt consolidation.
Every financial situation is unique,
and a credit counselor has the tools
to help you decide which path is
right for you," he said.
Visit the Better Business Bureau at
www.bbb.org to check out rep-
utable credit counselors.


by Jason Alderman
Many American teenagers seem
to have a cell phone permanently
glued to their.ear. With more than
200 million U.S. cell phones now in
use, they're clearly not going away,
especially as cell phone manufac-
turers and service operators target
younger audiences with ever-
increasing features, including
games. Parents usually foot the
bill and many are torn between the
convenience and security of being
able to keep closer tabs on their
children and the annoyance and
expense these hunks of chirping
metal can engender. Plus, some
worry that cell phone Internet
access may allow their children to
access inappropriate Web sites.
In fact, a whole subspecies of
"kid-friendly" cell phones and serv-
ices that parents can monitor has
emerged, including products from
TicTalk (www.tictalk.com), FireFly
(www.fireflymobile.com) and
Disney (www.disneymobile.com).
Common features include allowing
parents to limit who can call and be
called from the phone, limit the
number of minutes allowed each
month, set hours of operation and
even include Global Positioning
System (GPS) tracking, so they
know their kids' whereabouts.
One bit of good news is that in
addition to photos, songs and
annoying ring tones, more and


more cell phone-downloadable
educational games and software
programs are becoming available
that do everything from teach
young children basic math, phonics
and logic skills, to translate foreign
languages, to help older students
study for placement exams. While
some of these programs are free,
others charge a one-time download
or monthly service fee for use.
Financial Football combines the
structure and rules of the NFL with
financial education questions.
Players can pick the teams they
want to compete, choose the game
length and set the level of question
difficulty to make the game more or
less challenging. Gamers gain
yards and score points by answer-
ing questions correctly and lose
yardage for wrong answers.
Parents, kids and teachers can
download the free Financial
Football by texting "Visa" to
24421. The game itself is free,
though your cell phone carrier may
charge you for airtime
Remember, four out of five high
school students graduate without
taking a personal financial manage-
ment class, yet they'll soon need to
balance a checkbook, file taxes and
manage credit cards. You might as
well turn the necessary evil of cell
phones into something a little more
productive.


Pa e 2 Ms Perr
'
s Free P s


BLACK $$ FACTS

For every $25.15 the average white household
spends on men's suits, the average black household
spends $30.41.
Black Americans spend 33 percent more on
boys' pants. They also shell out more for women's
hosiery and shoes. The average black American
household spends $204.24 for women's shoes, com-
pared with the $142.46 spent in white households;
and about $74 for girls' footwear, compared with
less than $30 in white households.


I gu & V xuIyaXA cAI a


NFRA









aUly A7-A, 7,M e s e sP


The American Medical
Association, the largest physi-
cians' group in the United States, 1
apologized to black doctors last
week for a history of racial dis-
crimination.
The AMA said it will work to
increase the ranks of minority
physicians and their participation in
the association.
The apology arose from the work
of an independent panel of experts
commissioned in 2005 to study the
history of what the AMA called "the
racial divide in organized medi-
cine."
"The point of the apology is to
acknowledge our policies and prac-
tices in the past that discriminated
against African American physi-
cians," Dr. Ronald Davis, the
AMA's immediate past president,
said in a telephone interview.
Details of the AMA panel's work
will be released next week on the
Web site of the association's
Institute for Ethics to coincide with
publication in the Journal of the
American Medical Association.
Dr. Nelson Adams, president of
the National Medical Association


Public Apology
which represents black physicians
in the United States, said the NMA
was founded in 1895 because of the
AMA's discrimination.
"Black doctors couldn't be mem-
bers of the American Medical
Association," Adams said in a tele-
phone interview.
"AMA looked the other way when
local medical associations worked
to exclude most black physicians
from becoming members. Back
then and even as recently as the
early '70s, in order to get hospital
privileges, lots of times you had to
be a member of the county medical
society," Adams said.
"If you couldn't get on the county
medical society, you couldn't get
hospital privileges," he said.
Adams said the AMA also refused
to oppose the construction of segre-
gated hospitals funded by the feder-
al government.
Davis called such incidents
"pieces of history that have come to


to African-American Doctors


light as a result of the work of the
independent writing team which the
AMA established and supported."
REGRET AND
EMBARRASSMENT
Davis said the AMA has "a feel-
ing of profound regret and embar-
rassment for what has been uncov-
ered. That is why we are issuing
this apology, but also because we
believe that by confronting our past
we can build a better future."
Adams said the AMA's discrimi-
natory policies have hurt health
care for blacks. "In the vast majori-
ty of the leading causes of death,
black folk are still at the top of the
heap," he said.
Blacks in the United States have a
25 percent higher rate for all can-
cers; a 30 percent higher rate of
heart disease, a 40 percent higher
rate of stroke and a 50 percent high-
er rate of diabetes, Adams said.
Several studies have shown that
even when blacks have the same


income, insurance and education as
whites, they do not fare as well
when it comes to getting medical
care.
"When AMA doesn't get on board
with these things, it impacts all of
us. It certainly impacts the black
community disproportionately,"
Adams said.
He said the AMA's apology will
allow the groups to join forces to
help address some of these prob-
lems.
He is particularly eager to increase
numbers of black physicians, who
make up only 3 percent to 4 percent
of all doctors in the United States.
According to the 2000 U.S. Census,
blacks account for 13 percent of the
U.S. population.
"There are fewer African
American physicians per capital to
date than there were in 1910,"
Adams said.
The AMA, founded in 1847, has
250,000 members.


25,000 Celebrating 100th Anniversary of Alpha Kappa Alpha

K ~ / -


9l


/





9AI


I %


Brenda Simmons,


Lois Prime, Gwen Thompson and Janie Robinson.


Thousands of members of the
nation's first black sorority have
gathered in Washington this week
for a weeklong convention marking
the group's 100th anniversary -
including many members from
Jacksonville.
The centennial meeting has attract-
ed nearly 25,000 "sisters" from 975
chapters around the world.
Alpha Kappa Alpha was founded
on the campus of Howard
University in Washington by an
undergraduate named Ethel
Hedgeman Lyle who started it as a


social and service organization.
Today the sorority has more than
200,000 members with civil rights
leaders, judges, doctors, lawyers
and educators among its ranks.
Famous. members include civil
rights activists Rosa Parks and
Coretta Scott King, actresses
Phylicia Rashad and Jada Pinkett,
and singer Alicia Keys.
Among the events planned this
week are a bevy of receptions, teas
and parties as well as discussions of
the sorority's future.
For those in a shopping mood, the


Sorors Essie, Gwen and Maxine enjoy shopping together.


exhibition hall at the Walter E.
Washington Convention Center fea-
tures everything Alpha Kappa
Alpha from pink and green station-
ary to diamond and gold jewelry.
Many of the celebrants in DC are
daughters of AKA sisters who
themselves are AKA sisters. One of


the event's organizers,
Jacksonville's own Norma White
who is also a past president, is a
legacy.
This week, AKA is making
Michelle Obama an honorary mem-
ber, although the organization is
non-partisan and does not endorse


Obama Sticking to Call for Responsibility white
House hopeful Barack Obama spoke to attendees at the 99th annual con-
vention of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored
People (NAACP) July 14, 2008 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Obama took aim at
critics of his tough-love approach to African-American social issues
Monday, telling a mostly black audience that he is going to keep talking
about "this responsibility stuff.


Teens Scared Straight


The teens even got to play Jud
Continued from front
were inhabitable. The afterthought
was that if you commit crimes you
should not be afforded the same
luxuries as a productive citizen.
The scared straight experience
reached another level when the
teens were able to speak with four
of their incarcerated peers. Kids
from the same neighborhoods and
age group were behind bars for
making decisions they have soon
come to regret. Some of the juve-
nile inmates have been in the jail
for 3 or 4 years and are facing sen-
tences of up to 20 years behind
bars. The police officer who
served as the tour guide reminded
the visiting teens that in order to


avoid becoming a prisoner,
S they should make wise
decisions and surround
themselves with positive
People.
The second part of their
experience involved sitting
in on several of Judge
Ruth's cases as he presided
S and rendered sentencing.
The Lewis Center teens
ge. were pre-assigned court-
room roles and jobs that were put
into action by participating in a
mock trial about an accused serial
killer.
Visiting the jail and courtroom
was a life experience for the teen
campers from the Lewis Center
that many of them felt they would
take with them for the rest of their
life. The group of teens had to
admit that while skating, bowling,
and Adventure Landing field trips
are fun, no field trip would ever
compare to their experience with
the justice system.
In the end, organizers hoped they
sentenced themselves to LIFE
with education and endless possi-
bilities.


American Medical Association Issues


DUVAL COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS


Invitation To Bid

for a

Roofing Contractor


Sealed bids will be received by Duval County Public Schools, Division of Facilities, Room 535, 1701 Prudential Drive, Jacksonville, Fl
32207 until the time and date(s) recorded below and immediately thereafter publicly opened and recorded in the Duval County Public
Schools, School Board Building, located at 1701 Prudential Drive, Jacksonville, Florida, 5th Floor, Room 513-D.

BIDS ARE DUE ON OR BEFORE August 19, 2008

AND WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL 2 PM

Districtwide Roof Replacement at Grand Park Career Center No. 14, Loretto Elementary School No. 30, Robert E. Lee High
School No. 33, Hyde Park Elementary School No. 77
DCPS PROJECT NO. M-84740, Stage III

SCOPE OF WORK: Remove and replace of all old deteriorated roofing that is beyond its useful life. The estimated construction cost
"Budgeted Not to Exceed" is $1,337,745.

All contractors that are interested in bidding are required to attend a mandatory pre-bid conference to be held on August 7, 2008; 9:00
a.m. at 129 King Street, Room 37, Jacksonville, Florida 32204. Failure to attend the pre-bid conference shall result in disqualification
of that firm's proposal. Attendees will be required to sign an attendance register.

All bidders and subcontractors shall be licensed Contractors and registered corporations as required by the laws of the State of Florida.

Contract documents for bidding may be obtained for a refundable fee of $75.00 at the office of:

Akel, Logan & Shafer, P.A., 704 Rosselle Street, Jacksonville, Florida 32204

DCSB Point of Contact: Dale Hughes, (904) 858-6362

Contract documents for bidding may be examined at:

F.W. Dodge McGraw Hill Plan Room Construction Bulletin
Construction Market Data, Inc. National Association of Minority Contractors

MBE Participation Goal: 10% Overall

The Duval County Public Schools has begun prequalifying all contractors who intend to submit bids for all construction projects exceed-
ing $200,000 and electrical projects exceeding $50,000. Effective May 31, 2003, all Contractors submitting bids must be prequalified
with Duval County Public Schools. No bids will be accepted from Contractors who are not prequalified with Duval County Public
Schools.

Prequalification forms and information may be obtained by contacting: Richard Beaudoin or Ronald A. Fagan at 1701 Prudential Dr.,
Jacksonville, FL. 32207; Ph. 904-390-2358 or 904-390-2922, Fax: 904-390-2265, Email: beaudoinr@dreamsbeginhere.org or
faganr@dreamsbeginhere.org

The Bid Award Recommendation will be posted on the first floor bulletin board at the Duval County School Board Building, 1701
Prudential Drive, Jacksonville, Florida 32207-8182.


"
"


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


luJ 17-23 2008









Page 4 Ms. Perry's Free Press July 17-23, 2008


summam~


"Wherever we are on the face of
the earth, we are an African peo-
ple," said John Henrik Clarke.
W.E.B. DuBois said, "The spell of
Africa is upon me."
I don't know if I would call it a
spell, but it's hard to read or envi-
sion the struggles that many
African nations face without feel-
ing a great deal of empathy. I have
visited Africa and I must say that it
was extremely nostalgic.
It is really hard to explain it did-
n't feel like I had been there before,
but there was a sense of pride and
belonging that you feel as an
African American that others may
not understand.
Since colonial days Africa has
been plagued by civil wars within
countries, tribal disputes, famine
and epidemics like AIDS. It's hard
not to feel a sense of sorrow when
thinking about the social, political
and economic climate in many
African nations.
I must give a disclaimer that
although I am writing about some
of the challenges many African
nations face, many countries are
very stable and have fairly strong
governments and economies.
In the words of James Robinson,
"The darkest thing about Africa is
America's ignorance of it."
One of the issues in most African
nations is the need to build a mid-
dle class. In many cases there are
drastic economic situations.
You basically have the "haves"
and the "have-nots" and very little
in between. Even a country as sta-
ble as South Africa is struggling
with developing a middle class.
And education is becoming more
of a priority throughout the conti-
nent. Although primary education
numbers are still not where they
should be. Enrollment in secondary
education and college is at an all


Zimbabwe Situation a Reminder


of the Struggles of a
time high. and the country is now in a eco-
So Africa presents somewhat of a nomic and food crisis.
mix bag. There are many positives Mugabe's leadership certainly is
and many negatives, but like not making the situation better. His
Cornel West "I'm a prisoner of dictator-like ways have lead to gov-
hope." ernment economic mismanagement
The situation in Zimbabwe is and also government prohibitions
another reminder of the troubles of on relief efforts from foreign not
many African nations. The coun- for profit.
try's newly reelected President The Heritage Foundation says
Robert Mugabe is more of a ruth- Zimbabwe has one of the "least
less dictator than an elected leader. free" economic systems in the
Mugabe became President in world.
1987 after the government amend- Add those issues mixed with a
ed the constitution to provide for an drought that is affecting the entire
executive president and abolished region and major healthcare issues
the office of prime minister, which like the AIDS epidemic's rapid
he also held. spread throughout the country and
Of course prior to being prime you now have a recipe for chaos
minister he was the leader of the and disaster.
opposition group that eventually What has many around the world
took over the Zimbabwean govern- up in arms today is Mugabe's role
ment. Some would call him the for- in intimidating members of the
mer leader of a guerilla organiza- Movement for Democratic Change
tion, but where did that term come Party.
from anyway? The group's presidential candi-
He began his rise to prominence date, Morgan Tsvangirai backed
as far back as 1960. During that out of the race prior to the election
time he was the Secretary general because of the acts of violence
of the Zimbabwe African National being taken out on his supporters.
Union (ZANU). The outspoken Mugabe easily won the June 27
President became increasingly pop- run-off election. Tsvangirai also
ular because he promoted the redis- said that he has evidence of not
tribution of land from whites back only violence and intimidation tac-
to natives of Zimbabwe. tics being used, but also vote-rig-
As one could imagine after being going.
under British rule for decades it Leaders from around the world
was an extremely popular vision have criticized Mugabe for the con-
that many rallied around. This "lib- edition that Zimbabwe is in. Being
eration" movement became a criti- the outspoken leader he is Mugabe
cal issue throughout the 1990s. has responded accordingly.
Many feel that the liberation He recently talked about U.S.
movement helped Mugabe President's criticism calling him a
strengthen his political base. hypocrite for appealing for human
Unfortunately, fast forward to 2008 rights in Zimbabwe while running


Continent
the Guantanamo Bay prisoner
camp.
Regardless of if you like or agree
with Mugabe's management and
leadership, the facts are simple.
Zimbabwe is in desperate need of
help.
Many people are fleeing the coun-
try and African nations seem to be
deeply divided on how they view
Mugabe's actions. Some applaud
him for standing up to West nations
while others simply have a "none
of my business" attitude.
The United Nations has talked
about sanctions and the prospects
for a power-sharing arrangement,
but no consensus has been reached.
Unfortunately, the situation in
Zimbabwe is only one of many
contentious socio-economic issues
facing African nations. But then
again, controversy is often times in
the eye of the beholder.
Marcus Garvey believed that
black Americans should go back to
African and help stabilize the con-
tinent. Take what we have learned
in the United States and the West
and help build a new Africa.
Garvey had a noble idea. The
problem was and is that not many
African Americans are that com-
mitted to the cause. Most of us
would like to help in some way, but
in order to truly help leaders like
Mugabe must extend a hand.
Writer John A. Williams summed
it up best saying, "I have been to
Africa and know that it is not my
home. America is; it is my country,
too, and has been for generations."
Signing off from the Movement
for Democratic Change,
Reggie Fullwood


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Special Thanks
Dear Editors:
This is a note of thanks from us to
your paper for your coverage of the
very significant (to us) observation
of the 60th anniversary of our grad-
uation from "THE" Stanton High
School.
This event took place at the
Clarion Hotel on June 20 & 21.
Your contributing photogra-
pher/reporter Marretta Latimer
gave us courtesy and expertise
beyond our expectations.
Wishing you continuing success
with your publication.
Andrew Daigeau
Class of 1948


FLORIDA' S FIRST COSI QUL- BLACK LEKL
FLOR1DA S FIR 5T COAS5 Q UALIT 1 BLACK l\ELEkL \


MAILING ADDRESS
P.O. Box 43580
Jacksonville, FL 32203


Rita Perry

PUBLISHER

CONTRI
Reginald
|acksonville Dyrinda
J Cbhber r -CoLmmene Guvton.


PHYSICAL ADDRESS
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Jacksonville, FL 32208
Email: JfreePress@aol.com


TELEPHONE
(904) 634-1993
Fax (904) 765-3803


Sylvia Perry

Managing Editor


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IBUTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson,
Fullwood, E.O.Huthcinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell,
Sapp, Marsha Oliver, Marretta Latimer, Phyllis Mack, Carlottra
Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver,Vickie Brown, Rahman Johnson,


tjuit Chro l~clJ

Diatrieson life in te Aria n-AmerImanDispra byI ~lt Reggie uJw


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JuI~ly 17 I-23,J,9 z~t
T..1., '7 1 IfflQ s. err's Fee ress- Pge


Dennis Hayes, interim president of the NAACP, releases their
Economic Reciprocity Initiative during a news conference at the
NAACP national convention, Tuesday, July 15, 2008, in Cincinnati.
The initiative grades corporate America on how the NAACP thinks Benjamin Todd Jealous, president-elect of the NAACP, speaks at th
companies are doing on reinvestment in the black community and 99th NAACP Convention.
diversity efforts.

NAACP Convenes in Cincinnati with New President

Emphasizing Need to Recognize Own Strength


Standing before his first NAACP
convention as president and CEO-
elect, 35-year-old Benjamin Todd
Jealous recalled a pivotal moment
in his life.
It was during a birthday party
when someone toasted a Black
male friend for having survived
until the age of 21, he said in pre-
pared remarks.
"I went to my grandmother and
said, 'Tell me the rest of the story
Grandma. Tell me what hap-
pened... things aren't getting bet-
ter'", he recalled before the audi-
ence of thousands gathered this
week in Cincinnati.
"She just looked at me and said,
'It's simple, baby... we got what we
fought for, but we lost what we
had.'"
When that, Jealous, with a back-
ground of civil rights achievements
even at his young age, cited one
gain then loss after another.
"We gained the right to send our
children to any school, but local
schools are falling apart and they
seem to be resegregating by the
day;
"We gained the right to live in any
neighborhood, but the cost of hous-
ing in too many cities and towns
has become exclusively high;
"We gained the right to join the


local union, but it is harder to
unionize and union jobs are hard to
find;
"We gained the right to go to any
hospital, but the cost of health care
is exorbitant, good coverage is too
scarce, and too often the act of sav-
ing your own life...
"We gained the right to not be ter-
rorized by the Klan, but street gangs
are now bigger, more widespread,
and just as deadly."
But, Jealous, who will star next
year as he leads the organization
into its 100th anniversary, said the
answer to the dilemma lies in the
NAACP embracing its own legacy
and realizing its own strength and
the pivotal moment in which
America finds itself.
"We are the NAACP. We are the
direct descendents of the abolition-
ists," he said. "We are the boldest,
most successful band of nonviolent
agitators in the history of this coun-
try. And for almost 100 years we
have built bridges to the
future...better, more efficiently, and
against great odds."
Those bridges started from then
NAACP's founding in 1909,
through Jim Crow in the 1930s and
'40s, through desegregation in the
1950s and the civil rights move-
ment of the 1960s.


"We are the biggest grassroots army
for human rights in this nation. We
have presence not just in every
state. But in thousands of cities,
counties, and campuses. We have
the ability to pull deep support from
the ranks of the religious communi-
ty, labor, the media, and small and
big businesses," Jealous said. "We
know what we must do... and we
know how to do it."
Also on tap was the much antici-
pated corporate report card.
The NAACP said corporate
America has made progress in
diversity efforts but needs to do a
better job of buying from black
vendors when acquiring goods and
services.
At the conference, it released its
annual report card on U.S. compa-
nies.
Forty-three companies participat-
ed in a survey that tracks reinvest-
ment in the black community, hir-
ing practices and charitable giving.
Wal-Mart scored the highest in the
general merchandising Category,
but department-store chain Dillard's
Inc. didn't participate in the survey
and got an "F."
NAACP Interim President and
CEO Dennis Hayes said Dillard's
hasn't participated for the past five
years, and the group plans a petition


ie


to urge the company to agree.
In his speech, Sen. Barack Obama
paid tribute to the black leadership
in the civil rights battles of the '60s
and '70s, but reminded members
that those leaders "were not much
older than many of you when they
made their mark on history."
"If I have the privilege of serving
as your next president, 100 years
after the founding of the NAACP, I
will stand up for you the same way
that earlier generations of
Americans stood up for me -- by
fighting to ensure that every single
one of us has the chance to make it
if we try," Obama said.
"That means removing the barriers
of prejudice and misunderstanding
that still exist in America. It means
fighting to eliminate discrimination
from every corner of our country. It
means changing hearts and chang-
ing minds and making sure that
every American is treated equally
under the law."
The senator's speech was a historic
first: an African-American poised
to be the presidential nominee of a
major party addressing the nation's
oldest civil rights organization.
The presumptive Republican pres-
idential nominee, Arizona Sen.
John McCain, addressed attendees
later in the week.


Major Companies Pull


Advertising from BET









www enoughisenoughcampaign.o
30 21"S 8 "JH^''^' '* ,







Leaders of the Enough is Enough campaign a movement for
corporate responsibility in entertainment began petioning
BET's top advertisers to pull ads from the "Rap City" and "106


& Park" programs.
Media watchdogs are declaring
it a victory. Black Entertainment
Television hasn't said much, and
advertisers are mum. What is
clear, though, is that at least two
top advertisers automaking
giant General Motors and con-
sumer goods manufacturer
Procter & Gamble have pulled
ads from BET's "Rap City" and
"106 & Park" programs.
"Rap City" features music
videos and artist interviews, and
"106 & Park" is a top 10 music
video countdown. They air at 4
and 5 p.m. (CDT) respectively-
attracting a large under-18, after-
school audience.
An April Parent Television
Council study highlighted high
levels of sex, violence and profan-
ity in both programs and reported,
among other things, that "Rap
City" featured on average 31.6
instances of sex, 25.3 instances of
explicit language and 11.7
instances of violence per hour.
The study also examined "Sucker
Free," a music video countdown
that airs on MTV.
Armed with the report, leaders of
the Enough is Enough campaign -
a movement for corporate respon-
sibility in entertainment began
petitioning BET's top advertisers
to pull ads from the, programs


Rev. Delman Coates, 35, a
Harvard graduate and chairman of
the campaign, led the charge.
"We let (advertisers) know that
the Enough is Enough campaign
is seeking to challenge lyrical and
visual content, in the hip hop
industry in particular, that sexual-
ly objectifies black women, por-
trays black men as pimps, gang-
sters and thugs, glorifies violence,
criminal activity, drug use. We
made them aware that they're cur-
rently running commercials dur-
ing (programs that feature this
content)," Coates said.
Procter & Gamble and GM qui-
etly pulled ads from "Rap City"
and "106 & Park." Coates claims
that Pepsi and Walmart did so
also, although the companies did
not confirm this.
Kelly Cusinato, advertising and
marketing communications man-
ager for GM, said that conversa-
tions with Coates influenced the
company's decision.
"We asked (BET) for a better
monitoring process to allow us as
an advertiser to understand which
videos were running within an
hour-long program," Cusinato
said. But BET dismisses the
report as "misleading and inaccu-
rate."


IIt's Not Over- America's Mortgage Crisis Continues to Devastate Minority Communities

It's Not Over America's Mortgage Crisis Continues to Devastate Minority Communities


Continued from front
the poorest of the Black commu-
nity, this hurricane of subprime
loans and of massive debt foreclo-
sures might hit more so the Black
middle class and upper middle class
because these are the people who
are often times more likely targeted
by the subprime lending industry as
people who had income and could
be talked into a refinance, which is
why you're seeing places like
Atlanta or Prince Georges County,
the wealthiest Black county of the
country, being particularly devastat-
ed by this crisis," said Dedrick
Muhammad, of the Institute for
Policy Studies in Washington, D.C.
According to the National
Association of Realtors, home re-
sales increased slightly between
April and May. But new home sales
dropped 2.5 percent in May, which
means it can take more than 10
months to sell current new homes
on the market, said the U.S. Census
Bureau and the Department of
Housing and Urban Development.
Skittish homebuyers are seeing
more properties on the market, but
are afraid to buy because the
home's worth may fall, say ana-
lysts. Standard & Poor's, a U.S.
corporate credit rating agency,
reports that Las Vegas, Miami and
Phoenix are the weakest housing
markets with home values falling
by about 25 percent.
Of California's 113,676 foreclo-
sure notices, the highest increase in
15 years, more than 110,000 per-
tained to homes, while the others
were for defaults on multiple loans
including primary mortgages and
lines of credit, according to
DataQuick, a California-based real
estate information and data compa-
ny.
There are some 10,000 vacant or
abandoned properties in Cleveland,
Ohio alone.
Kristopher Harsh, head organizer
with ACORN Cleveland
(Association of Community
Organizations for Reform Now)
said the last time home values
dropped this far was in the 1930s.
Many foreclosed homes are sold
for as little as $2,000 to $5,000.
They are worth about that much


because within weeks, the homes
are stripped of copper piping and
scrap metal.
"They have all the windows shat-
tered, any metal that can be
scrapped stripped, and this often
means the water in the basement
runs until the city can come and
shut down the water because they
will take the copper pipes right out
of the basement while the water's
running, so that means there's foun-
dation damage to many of these
houses," Harsh said.
The vacant homes are often used
by drug addicts and dealers, and in
rare occasions the homeless take up
residence and are actually good
neighbors because they take care of
the homes, he said.
In January, Cleveland's Mayor
Frank Jackson filed a lawsuit
against 21 major investment banks


(including Deutsche Bank Trust
Co., Wells Fargo, Ameriquest
Mortgage Co., Countrywide
Financial Corp., HSBC Holdings,
JP Morgan Chase, Washington
Mutual Inc., Citigroup Inc., Bank of
America Corp., NovaStar Financial
Inc., The Bear Stearns Cos.,
IndyMac Bancorp and Credit
Suisse) for enabling the subprime
crisis there, he said.
Besides losing funds by boarding
up properties, there is added stress
on Cleveland's police and fire
departments, which are being called
out to more vacant properties.
"I don't know if it it's enough
heads or the right heads rolling
about this. I was glad to see the FBI
picking up those Wall Street people.
I think most of the criminal activity
was done at the highest level among
the financiers and heads of mort-


gage companies who colluded
throughout the late '90s and early
part of this decade to turn mort-
gages into a profitable venture on
Wall Street," he said.
"I sort of look at the local people
(bankers and lenders) in a way as
fleas on a dog. They're a nuisance;
nobody wants them; but if you want
to get rid of them you go for the dog
itself. You don't try to call off a mil-
lion fleas to get rid of the flea prob-
lem, you get rid of the dog," Harsh
added.
The Illinois and California attor-
neys general have filed lawsuits
against Countrywide Financial
Corp. The states are charging that
the largest U.S. home loan lender
should be held liable for thousands
of foreclosures that have hurt
economies and wrecked housing
markets.


Worst predictions come true
"Assisting homeowners and the
mortgage market in the short run is
only the first thing that needs to be
done," said Miles Rapoport, presi-
dent of Demos, a D.C.-based non-
profit. "For the long term, we need
a set of rules for the mortgage and
financial industry that give people
confidence that this will never hap-
pen again."
A Demos report, "Beyond the
Mortgage Meltdown," was released
June 25 at the National Press Club.
Demos senior fellow James Lardner
wrote, "The damage has been as
bad as anyone imagined so far.
Foreclosures, after roughly dou-
bling in the past year, are running at
a rate of close to 25,000 a week.
That's an alarming figure in itself,
and it points toward the loss of
more than two million homes in


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home is for grass and shrubs. That's too much. Do your part to conserve starting in your own backyard. Use these
money-saving tips and find many more at floridaswater.com.


2008 and 2009-a number very
close to the estimates made by con-
sumer groups (and widely dis-
missed by lenders) in early 2007,"
he noted.
"Many African -mericans and
Latinos were steered away from
safer, lower interest loans by bro-
kers and sales agents who, on top of
their commissions, received bonus-
es for jacking up the interest rate,"
Lardner continued.
"Home equity, at its current total
value of $20 trillion, represents the
biggest source of wealth for most
Americans; that is even more true,
by and large, for African-
Americans and Latinos. As a result,
says Citigroup vice president Eric
Eve, many families may lose 'the
little bit of wealth (they) have been
able to accumulate through home-
ownership.'"


florida's water
it's worth saving


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5


.i.l. 1'7 -7 1 i2 0









July 17-23, 2008


St. Andrew Celebrates Women's Day
St. Andrew Missionary Baptist Church, located at 2900 W 45th Street will
host its 27th annual Women's Day Celebration on Sunday July 20th at
11:00am. The guest speaker will be First Lady Sandra Waldrop and the
theme for the day will be: God's Promises to Virtuous Women (Ruth 3:11),
Chairpersons for the event are Roberta Cotton and Jackie Braclet.
For further information call Sister Dominique Mann at 302-2075.

Vacation Bible School at St. John MB
St. John Missionary Baptist Church will present a traditional Vacation
Bible School, July 28-31st 2008. The church is located at 135 Brickyard
Road in Middleburg, Florida. The church is providing free transportation
and dinner before class nightly from 6:30 p.m. 8 p.m. For more informa-
tion, call 272-5100.

Jax Gospel Announcers Guild to Hold
Conference & Award Celebration
The Radisson Hotel, 4700 Salisbury Road will be the headquarters for
the Jacksonville Gospel Announcers Guild Conference and Award
Celebration, Saturday, August 30th, so make your plans now to attend.
The VIP Gospel Industry Roundtable featuring Stellar Awards Board
Members, Top Gospel Labels, National Gospel Radio Announcers, man-
agers, and producers; will be held at 12 noon, Saturday, August 30, 2008..
Make your reservations now by calling (904) 766-2266.
Headliners at the conference include Bishop Bruce Allen, Twinkie Clark,
CBS-47's Dawn Lopez, Pastor Merry Racheal, V. Michael McKay, NtoU
Magazine, Dr. Yvonne Capehart, VShawn Mitchell, Ken Amaro, Destiny
Praise Atlanta, and the UNF Gospel Choir.

National Worship Beyond Measure
Retreat Kicks Off in September
Lance Williams announces the True Worship Retreat 2008: "Worship
Beyond Measure: An Intimate Experience."
The retreat kicks off Thursday, September 11th, with featured perform-
ances by Tye Tribbet, with multi-Stellar Award winning artist Dewayne
Woods & many others.
The retreat will be held at the Christian Pentecostal Church, 971 Clinton
Avenue in Irvington, NJ from Thursday September 11 Saturday,
September 13.
On Friday, September 12 "The Intimate Place" Concert will highlight
the ministries of Lance Williams & True Worship, Maurette Brown-Clark,
and JJ Hairston & Youthful Praise, along with other premier Gospel artists.
Each nightly event begins at 7:30 p.m. and general admission is free
(preferred seating has a fee). For preferred seating or to register for the sem-
inars/workshops logo onto www.TrueWorship.org.


Pastor Ernie Murray
Welcomes you!


"Women United in Prayer" at First
AME of Palm Coast Women's Day
The Women of First Coast AME Church, 91 Old Kings Road North, in
Palm Coast, FL will continue their women's celebration July 30, 31, and
August 1, 7 p.m., in a Women's Revival; Saturday, August 30, a Health and
Beauty Pamper Party, accessorized by vendors from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and
the culmination of Women's Day on Sunday, September 14, at the 10:45
a.m. service.
The women are wearing shades of purple for the service. A wonderful
meal has been planned, and a Women's Day Choir is underway, directed by
Sophia Booker, for making adoration at the actual event of Women's Day.
Also on schedule is their Third Annual Music Workshop and Concert
conducted by Music Direct Michael Booker. It will be held on Friday,
Saturday and Sunday, August 8-10, 2008.
The Reverend Dr. Gillard S. Glover, Senior Pastor; invites old and new
friends. For directions, please call (386) 437-5142.

Plan Now to Attend Vacation Bible
School at Abyssinia Baptist Church
The Abyssinia Baptist Church, 10325 Interstate Center Dr. (off 1-95
North & Dunn Ave.) invites you for a week of nonstop action as you learn
how to live God's unshakeable truth. Explore the five Bible truths: *God is
real. *Jesus is God's Son. *Jesus is the only way. *The Bible is God's Word.
And, *My actions show what I believe.
By the end of the week you will have learned what it means to know,
speak, and live the truth. All ages from children through adults can attend,
free. This one-week adventure with Bible study, will also allow you to par-
ticipate in cool crafts, motivating music, delicious snacks, and exciting
learning opportunities.
This will be a week to remember of fun, food and learning opportuni-
ties, Monday, July 28th thru Friday, August 1st, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.,
that is open to everyone. For information, call 859-6328.

Flagler NAACP to Sponsor Health Fair
Robert Williams, President, Flagler County NAACP; and Ruby Wyche
have announced that the NAACP Branch will sponsor a Health Fair that
will cover family health, eye, hearing, nutrition, physical fitness, elder care
home care, and that facilitators will be available from Hospice and the
Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP). Pure tone screening will be pro-
vided, as well as screening on diabetes and blood pressure, chair massages,
health information, and much more. A Martial Arts demonstration and a
Jewelry display will provide diversity for this "Super Size Your Health"
opportunity, Saturday, August 16th, at the Palm Coast community Center,
10 a.m. 2 p.m., 305 Palm Coast Parkway NE. For information, call (386)
446-7822 or (386)437-5142.


Join Us for One of Our Services
SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
1st Sunday 3:45 p.m.

Lord's Supper & Baptism
3rd Sunday 7:00 p.m.
*******
TUESDAY
Bible Stud) 7:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY
Noon Day Worship

THURSDAY
Youth Church 7:00 p.m.


Sheriff to Speak at NAACP Breakfast
The NAACP will hold a Breakfast Forum at 10 a.m. on Saturday, July
26th at the St. Paul AME Church Annex, 85 Martin Luther King Avenue,
St. Augustine. Casual Dress, appropriate.To reserve your space, please call
(904) 810-5593.
St. Paul AME (St. Aug.) Concert
The Verle Eleanor Foundation will present a Summer Concert at 4 p.m.
on Sunday, July 20, 2008, at the St. Paul AME Church, 85 Martin Luther
King Ave., St. Augustine. There is no charge.

Evangelist Fosters Women's Ministry
Evangelist Janet Wilcox founded "Frontline Ministries Mighty Women
in Battle" with the goal of winning souls for Christ. Countless souls have
been saved, encouraged, healed, delivered, and set free. Many women now
volunteer for "Dreams Come True", HIV-AIDS Outreach, Prayer Bands,
"New Day, New Life" (a jail ministry). They are able to teach and preach
through this ministry under the leadership of the Holy Ghost.
Whoever you are, if you have been wounded then healing through this
Ministry begins with you.. Just call (904)517-9144, to begin.


Potter's House Men and Mad Dads'
Sponsor Violence & Crime Rally


The Potter's House Christian
Fellowship Church MEN and Mad
Dads will host a neighborhood rally
around the shooting of a 14-year-old
young lady on the Westside on
Thursday, July 17th. Speakers will
include representation from the
State Attorney's office, Mayor,
Sheriff, City Council and other local


and state leaders. The Rally will be
held at 6 p.m. on the parking lot of
the Bright Star Learning Center,
5661 Timaquana Road. Mr. Glenn
Caplin, the girl's father will also
speak. Support this rally against
crime, and support this grieving
family.


Life Enrichment Christian Assembly
Church and Pastor Anniversary
The members of LECA, 625-2 Cassat Ave., will be celebrating our 3rd
church anniversary and appreciation for our Pastor, Dr. Samuel D. Adams
on Wednesday July 16, and Thursday July 17, at 7:00 pm and commencing
with a Banquet on Saturday July 19, at the Rodeway Inn & Conference
Center, 300 Park Ave, of Orange Park, Fl (just west of 1-295) at 6:00 pm.
All are welcome to come out and help us celebrate this momentous occa-
sion and tickets are still available for the Banquet.Call 904-384-3900 for
more information.


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church
215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


Pastor Rudolph
McKissick, Sr.
Senior Pastor


Weekly Services


Sunday Morning Worship
7:40 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.
Church school
9:30 a.m.
The Word from the Sons
and Daughters of Bethel
3rd Sunday 3:30 p.m.


Midweek Services
Wednesday Noon Service
"Miracle at Midday"
12 noon-1 p.m.

Dinner and Bible Study
at 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m.


Come share In Holy CommnlonD oni st Sundaat 4-50 p.m.


Pastor Rudolph
McKissick, Jr.
Senior Pastor


Radio Ministry
WCGL 1360 AM Thursday 8:15 -8:45 a.m.
AM 1400 Thursday 7:00 8:00 p.m.
TV Ministry
WTLV Channel 12 Sunday's at 6:30 a.m.


Grace and Peace


Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20


S:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship
9:30 a.m. Sunday School


Pastor Landon Williams


11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday 2 PM 3 PM
**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


Th door.of acednia re awaysopento yu an*you fml. Ifwe-ay-e.o-anasistance


* * *A Full Gospel Baptist Church * *


Sunday School
9 a.m.
Morning Worship
10 a.m.
Lord's Supper
Second Sunday
3:00 p.m.
Evening Worship
Every 3rd & 4th
Sunday
4 :00 p.m.


A church

that's on the

move in

worship with

prayer, praise

and power!


Pastor Robert Lecount, Jr


School of Ministry Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.

Thursday High Praise Worship 7:00 p.m.

2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


5863 Moncrief Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32209 (904) 768-8800 FAX 764-3800


age s. erry s ree ress


P 6 M P
'
F P








Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


lT..l, .1I 2 I ifo


July 17- ,
I


Bradley Fowler
Bradley LaShawn Fowler, 39, of
Canton, Michigan is seeking $60


million from Zondervan Publishers
and another $10 million from
Thomas Nelson Publishing in law-
suits flied in U.S. District Court of
the Easton District of Michigan,
reports the Grand Rapids Press.
Fowler states that he's suing the
two major Christian publishers for
violating his constitutional rights
and causing emotional pain,
because the Bible versions they
publish refer to homosexuality as a
sin.
Fowler alleges the companies'
bibles' references to homosexuality
as a sin has made him an outcast
from his family and contributed to


Free Air Traffic Control

Camp for Teens at FCCJ


Florida Community College is
offering an Air Traffic Control
Summer Experience for 40 high-
school students, preferably in
grades 11 and 12, from Duval,
Nassau, Clay and St. Johns coun-
ties. It begins July 28 and runs
through Aug. 8, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.,
at the FCCJ Cecil Center South-
Aviation Center of Excellence. The
two-week session will provide
hands-on experience with high-tech
air traffic control simulators and the
chance to explore career opportuni-
ties in this high-skill/high-wage
field. Tuition is free for accepted
students.
With a projected critical shortage
of air traffic controllers due to
upcoming retirement of about 70
percent of current controllers, the
Federal Aviation Administration is
increasing efforts to recruit and
train replacements. By collaborat-

Regina Belle

Extends Gospel

Competition
Grammy Award winning singer
Regina Belle along with Pendulum
Records, in association with
Walker Davis Entertainment,
extends the,"God is Good 2008
Summer Gospel Choir
Competition" from now until
September 19, 2008.
To participate in the competi-
tion, churches nationwide are being
asked to teach their choir Belle's
Gospel radio hit "God is Good" and
upload a digitally videotaped per-
formance to
www.GospelTube.com.
The choir then needs to email a
link of their performance to
Pendulum Records at www.pendu-
lumrecords.biz/contact.htm no later
than September 19th for a chance
to win a three track performance by
Regina Belle at their church this
winter and have their choir perform
with the Grammy Award winner.
Winners will be selected in two
categories (1)the highest number of
video views on GospelTube.com
and (2) the overall performance
quality, which is to be determined
by Pendulum Records, Walker
Davis Entertainment and D3
Entertainment.
No purchase is necessary to
enter or win. For more information
please visit www.pendulum-
records.biz or
www.myspace.com/msreginabelle


ing with colleges qualified and
equipped to provide the FAA-certi-
fied training, the FAA hopes to fill
as many as 17,000 vacancies in the
next decade with the Air Traffic-
College Training Initiative (AT-
CTI). FCCJ was authorized in 2007
as one of only 23 colleges nation-
wide to provide this training. FCCJ
will begin its program in Fall 2008
in a newly renovated facility, com-
plete with the same simulators used
in FAA training.
This Air Traffic Control Summer
Experience is ideal for students
with an interest in aviation and
high-tech careers, who might then
enroll in one of the local Aerospace
Career Academies and/or in the
FCCJ Aviation Center's AT-CTI
program.
The instructor is John B. Slate,
Aviation teacher at Frank H.
Peterson Academies of Technology
and an adjunct professor in the
FCCJ Aviation program.
For more information, call 904-
317-3814 or e-mail
tmeyer@fccj.edu.


physical discomfort and periods of
"demoralization, chaos and bewil-
derment."
He filed suit against Tennessee
publisher Thomas Nelson in June.
Meanwhile, Zondervan said that
even if Fowler's claim is credible,
he is suing the wrong party. A com-
pany spokesman told WOOD-TV
in Grand Rapids that Zondervan
doesn't translate the Bible or own
the copyright for any of the transla-
tions.


Fowler alleges both Zondervan
and Thomas Nelson, with its King
James Bibles, manipulated scrip-
ture without informing the public
by using the term "homosexuals" in
a New Testament passage, 1
Corinthians 6:9.
He told local media he wants to
be compensated for the past 20
years of emotional duress and men-
tal instability.
He has been representing himself
throughout his legal process.


Ask Dy irUvdoa

hakr anivd selnA tips for todays woman of color

Texturizer vs. Relaxer


I heard that
instead of
getting a
relaxer I
could get a texturizer and get the
same results is that true?
Tasha, Westside
It depends on what sort of styles
you like to wear. For instance if
you want to wear your hair natural
then a texturizer might be perfect
for you. In that case a texturizer
would give your natural curls
more definition.
Now if you want to wear your
hair straight, then you may not get
the look you were hoping for. A
texturizer won't straighten out
your hair as much as you would
like, so don't expect long silky
hair with a texturizer.
Now if you think you may want
to put some color in your hair then
a texturizer is a good considera-
tion, because certain colors like
blondes and auburns can actually
help to straighten your hair as
well.
Understand a texturizer is still a
chemical based product. It uses
the same chemicals that are found
in a relaxer but in a milder form.
I? pointing this out because some


people feel that by getting a tex-
turizer they're not putting chemi-
cals in their hair, but that's not the
case. Texturizers are quicker than
a relaxer, because it's basically a
relaxer that you're not leaving on
for as long. Processing time
depends on the person's hair and
texture. A texturizer won't give
you an unnatural curl it will work
with what's there. I advise you to
talk with your stylist to make sure
you won't be disappointed. It's
been my experience that they
work best with short hair.
Now if you don't want to go the
chemical route then there's the
Brazilian Keratin Treatment.
Keratin will take your hair to the
point that it looks like it's been
texturized or relaxed without
using chemicals, depending on
your hair texture. When you apply
heat such as a flat iron you could
get the results you want. You can
use this even if you have a relaxer
already.
Forward your questions to
JFreePress@aol.com. DS Spa
and Salon is located at 9810
Baymeadows Rd Suite #2.
Dyrinda can be reached at 855-
0045.


King Children Publicly Squabble Over Family's Millions in Lawsuit


Continued from front
pointed that our personal family
disagreement, as it relates to the
family business, has evolved into
being handled in a public legal
forum. It is my hope that this inap-
propriate and false claim by my sib-
lings will be swiftly resolved and
we can go about the business of
focusing on our parents' tremen-
dous legacy."
"We are private family," King said.
"It is a private business matter, you


OBSTETRICAL & GYNECOLOGICAL

ASSOCIATES, P.A.


B. Vereen Chithriki, M.D.
William L. Cody, M.D.


know, a family dispute, if you will.
It's probably blown out of propor-
tion, but until I've had a chance to
thoroughly review the complaint,
it's just kind of difficult for me to
address it."
At stake are millions of dollars in
assets linked to King's intellectual
property rights, including the $32
million that donors in Atlanta
recently paid to acquire 10,000
pages of his papers.
Dexter King said one of the rea-


sons he was stunned by the lawsuit
is that his siblings never picked up
the phone to call him. Now they
aren't answering their phone.
"I left them a message to call me, so
we could talk, and they have not
returned the call," he said. "I
assumed they were busy. I just ... I
don't understand it."
Juanita Abernathy, wife of the late
Ralph David Abernathy, who was
the civil rights leader's closest con-
fidant, told the Atlanta Journal-


Constitution, "It tugs at the heart-
strings because I know that their
parents would not want this.
"I taught my children that you
may fight behind closed doors but
come out together, because you are
the same blood and come from the
same parents," she said. "I teach
that every day. I know Martin and
Coretta taught their children that."
"They taught their children to get
along."


EaCh- year m Fo, r i
Iesill over 26 times-
." ...r


Door locks won't work. Mace won't help. So, how do you fend off the nation's deadliest killer?
Simple, don't smoke. By leading to lung cancer, heart disease and countless other ailments, smoking kills
438,000 smokers each year. If you never light up, you'll never be one of them. And if you'd like to save
someone else, tell them to visit tobaccofreeflorida.com or call the Quitline at 1-877-U-CAN-NOW
for free cessation aids like patches, gum and lozenges while supplies last.

Florida Department of Health


Gay Man Sues Bible Publishers for Emotional Distress


Black Community Awarded $11 Million
After Being Denied Water for Decades
Columbus, OH Residents of a mostly black neighborhood in rural
Ohio were awarded nearly $11 millionlast week by a federal jury that
found local authorities denied them public water service for decades
out of racial discrimination.
President Kennedy urged civil rights in 1963. An Ohio community
was discriminated against from 1956 to 2003.
Each of the 67 plaintiffs was awarded $15,000 to $300,000, depend-
ing on how long they had lived in the Coal Run neighborhood, about
5 miles east of Zanesville in Muskingum County in east-central Ohio.
The money covers both monetary losses and the residents' pain and
suffering between 1956, when water lines were first laid in the area,
and 2003, when Coal Run got public water.
The lawsuit was filed in 2003 after the Ohio Civil Rights
Commission concluded the residents were victims of discrimination.
The city, county and East Muskingum Water Authority all denied it
and noted that many residents in the lightly populated county don't
have public water.
Coal Run residents either paid to have wells dug, hauled water for
cisterns or collected rain water so they could drink, cook and bathe.


Simmons Pediatrics
S . V ,.














Charles E. Simmons, III, M.D.

Hospital Expert!

Have your newborn or sick child seen
in the hospital by their own Doctor.
Baptist-Wolfson Children's Hospital
St. Vincents- Memorial & St. Lukes Hospital

(904) 766-1106

Primary Care Hours: 9AM to 5:30PM
177 Edgewood Avenue, W., Ste 1
Jacksonville, Florida 32208


Complete Obstetrical

& Gynecological Care
Comprehensive Pregnancy Care
Board Certified Laser Surgery
Family Planning Vaginal Surgery
Osteoporosis Menopausal Disorder
Laparoscopy Menstrual Disorder

St. Vincent's Division IV

1820 Barrs Street, Suite 521

Jacksonville, FL 32204

(904) 387-9577

www.nfobgyn.com


30 Minutes of Inhaling Secong Hand Smoke is

the Equivalent of Smoking One by Yourself

I I


4








July 17-23, 2008


P 8 M P
'
F Press


age s. erry s ree


SRO1


TO


SWhat to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene
U LstS^W sa^' e'** ~ *'"i'"*' /*


Southern Genealogists
Exchange Society
The Southern Genealogist's
Exchange Society will meet at the
Argyle Branch Library, 7973 Old
Middleburg Road South on
Saturday, July 19th, at 10:15 A.M.
Guest speaker is Bob Morgan,
President of the Jacksonville
Maritime Society and Museum. Mr.
Morgan will share Jacksonville's
deep relationship with the St. John's
River. Free and open to the public.
We preserve your family history.
For additional information call
(904) 778-1000.

Jaguar Players Bowl
To Strike Out Hunger
Jacksonville Jaguar Scott Starks
will host this year's Celebrity
Charity Bowling event to benefit
the Clara White Mission. It will be
held on Saturday, July 19, 2008 at
Jax Lane Bowling Center, 8720
Beach Blvd. from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00
p.m. Other players in attendance
include Rashean Mathis, Maurice
Williams, Reggie Nelson and
Gerald Sensabaugh among others.
No experience necessary, just the
willingness to have fun. The "Stars
& Strikes Celebrity Charity
Bowling" will include 2 hours of
bowling, food, door prizes, music,
silent auction, trophies and awards.
To register or more information call
(904) 354-4162 or visit our website
at www.clarawhitemission.org.


Kite Workshop at
Fernandina Beach
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's Fort
Clinch State Park will host a Kite
Workshop on July 19. The program
will begin with a short introduction
to the history and basics of kite fly-
ing. Attendees will have the oppor-
tunity to create their own kite and
fly it on the beach.
The event will take place at 10:00
a.m. on Saturday, July 19th at Fort
Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic
Avenue. Call the park to sign up as
participation is limited. For addi-
tional information, call 277-7274 or
visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.

Free Health
Screening at CVS
The public is welcome to come
and enjoy FREE hot dogs, ham-
burgers, ice cream and health
screenings at the "Choices for a
Safe Summer" Health & Safety Fair
at the CVS Pharmacy, 2672
Blanding Blvd. in Middleburg. It
will be held from 10 a.m. 1 p.m.
on Saturday, July 19th from 10
a.m. 1 p.m. For further informa-
tion, contact 739-2338.

Guided Bird Walk
Fort Mose Historic State Park in
St. Augustine, Florida along with an
experienced birder from the
Audubon Society of St. Augustine


'V -
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Yes, I'd like to subscribe to


will host a guided bird walk on July
20th from 8:30 10:30 a.m.
Enthusiasts will find a variety of
herons, egrets, wood storks, hawks
and owls, and are encouraged to
bring binoculars and a field guide.
Guests who require assistance or
for more information, call (904)
823-2232.

Executive Circle
Reception
The Executive Circle will present
a free Networking Reception at
Bourbon Bayou in the Jacksonville
Landing on Thursday, July 24th
from 5:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m.
Networking minded individuals are
welcome to the free event to enjoy
meeting similar like minded indi-
viduals.

Frankie Beverly and
Maze in Concert.
Join veteran soul crooner Frankie
Beverly and Maze along with Keith
Sweat, Trey Sonz and Carl Thomas
at the Veterans Memorial Arena on
Friday, July 25th for the first
annual Back to Camp Concert.
Showtime is 8 p.m. Call 355-3309
for tickets.
Save on Your
Water Bill Class
Staffers from the Duval County
Extension office will present a
workshop on how to save money by
fine tuning your own irrigation sys-
tem plus low volume and drip irri-


gation. They will also go over the
new fertilizer rules for homeown-
ers. The seminar will be held on
Saturday, July 26, 2008, from
10:00 a.m. 2:00 PM, at the Duval
Co. Extension, 1010 N. McDuff
Ave. The deadline to register is
Thursday, July 24th. Light refresh-
ments will be served. Pre-register
by calling 387-8850.

Unyfyed Social Club
All White Party
The Unyfyed Social Club will
have an All White Party on
Saturday, July 26th at the Knights
of Columbus Hall,1501 Hendricks
Avenue from 8:00 p.m.- 2:00 a.m.
Ticket priced includes appetizers
and door prizes. There will also be a
Bachelor/Bachelorette Charity
Raffle!Everyone is welcome.

Candidates Forum
The Perkins Bar Association and
the NAACP are sponsoring a
Candidates Forum on Tuesday,
July 29th and Saturday, August
5th featuring the judicial races in
July and the house of representa-
tives, city council and school board
in August. All will occur at FCCJ
downtown starting at 6:30 p.m.
Email your questions to
info@dwperkinsbar.org.

Horsin' Around
The City of Jacksonville will pres-
ent "Horsin' Around", an educa-


I look forward to receiving the Free
Press each and every week. I've even
given several gift subscriptions and
truly feel that it is a viable part of our
community. If you care about what's
going on in our community and our
world, I encourage you to join the Free
Press family!
Rometa Porter, Entrepreneur






9 .. -


.. .- ,.-. ,"


the Jacksonville Free Press


Name

Addresss


City


Telephone

Enclosed is my check money ord

This is a gift subscription from_
is fo


Mail this form to: S
P.O. Box


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Zip I


Jer for $35 1- Please give me a call to pay with a credit card

Please send gift care

subscriptions c/o Jacksonville Free Press
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tional seminar for youth and adults.
The free forum will be held on
Thursday July 31st from 5:30 -
9:15 p.m. at the Jacksonville
Equestrian Center, 13611
Normandy Blvd. Topics covered:
Stretching your hay supply, emer-
gency preparedness for horses,
guide to basic vet care, riding trails
in Florida and Composting 101.Call
Brad Burbaugh at 387-8850 to pre-
register.

Forum on Being "P.C."
The Jacksonville Diversity
Network will present a one evening
seminar on "Beyond PC".
Examining the role of political cor-
rectness in our society, nationally
recognized diversity advocate and
author Phillip Milano says, go
ahead. Ask! The free event will
take place on Thursday, July 31st
from 7 8:30 p.m. at the Karpeles
Manuscript Museum, 101 West 1st
Street. For more information call
630-8073.

HobNob '08
The Annual Jacksonville Chamber
Hob Nob will be held Thursday,
August 7 from 4:30 7:30 at
Metropolitan Park Park. This year's
event will include the always antic-
ipated Presidential Straw Poll.The
free event is a non-partisan political
venue to meet the candidates run-
ning for office in our upcoming
elections. Food and beverages will
be provided. For more information
call 366-6646.

Aaron Bing in Concert
Jacksonville's own saxophonist
Aaron Bing will be in concert on
Friday, August 8th at 7:30 p.m.
and 10:30 p.m. at the Times Union
Center Terry Theater. For tickets
call 353-3309, or online at
www.ticketmaster.com.

10th Annual
Toast to the Animals
Tickets are now available to the
Jacksonville Humane Society's
10th annual "Toast to the Animals."
The wine tasting event is Aug. 15 at
the Florida Theatre from 6- 9 p.m.
This year's event will feature
gourmet hors d'oeuvres, desserts
and more than 200 varieties of wine
in addition to a live and silent auc-
tion. Tickets are available at
www.jaxhumane.org or by calling
904-725-8766.


Creative Entrants Sought for

Stage Aurora Black Arts Festival
Stage Aurora Theatrical Company, Inc. will present the 1 st Annual Aurora
Jacksonville Black Arts Festival July 24 -30, 2008, at their new
Performance Space located at 5188 Norwood Avenue. The Festival invites
African American performers and creative artists of all kinds to participate
in the free activities of the Festival, which will be held on three different
stages.
The Aurora Jacksonville Festival is a week-long festival showcasing the
African-American experience and culture in relation to the human experi-
ence in the Arts and Humanities. All events and entertainment are for the
sole purpose of providing opportunities for participation and exposure to
quality entertainment and Stage Aurora's goal of producing "theatre that
enlightens."
To register or volunteer, interested persons should send an e-mail to
contact@stageaurora.org or by phone at (904) 765-7372.



Do Youk anEyen


6or Aroidm Tom2

The Jacksonville Free Press is please to print
your public service announcements and coming
events free of charge. news deadline is Monday at
6 p.m. by the week you would like your informa-
tion to be printed. Information can be sent via
email, fax, brought into our office or mailed in.
Please be sure to include the 5W's who, what,
when, where, why and you must include a con-
tact number.
Email JFreePress@aol.com Fax (904) 765-3803
Mail: Coming Events Jacksonville Free Press
903 W. Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32203

I


Ribault Class of 1978
The Ribault class of 1978 will
have it's 30th social social gathering
on Saturday, August 16, 2008 at the
Commonwealth Holiday Inn start-
ing at 6:30 p.m. Call 651-0567 for
more info or to stay connected.

Reggae Legend Beres
Hammond in Concert
Reggae legend Beres Hammond
will be in concert for one show only
at the Plush Nightclub. The show
will be on Thursday, August 21st.
For tickets or more information,
call 353-3309.

FCCJ Family Literacy
Fair at North Campus
The Sixth Annual FCCJ Family
Literacy Fair will be held on
Saturday August 23, 2008 from 10
a.m.-2 p.m. It is free and open to the
public. The annual event includes
live performances by celebrity
readers, storytelling, age-appropri-
ate reading activities and lists, free
books, face painting, prizes, sur-
prises and free lunch. For reserva-
tions (appreciated) or more infor-
mation call 904-766-6553.FCCJ's
North Campus is located at 4501
Capper Road.

Gospel Artists Sought
for Talent Showcase
The Jacksonville Gospel
Announcers Guild is looking for
soloists & groups to take part in
their upcoming Gospel Industry
Showcase, Aug. 30th in
Jacksonville. Showcase your talent
to industry professionals, record
company execs, national radio
announcers, Stellar Award board
members and more. For details,
call (904)766-2266 or log onto
www.jaxgag.com.

Sickle Cell
Walk-A-Thon
The time is now to get your teams
together to walk for sickle cell. The
Annual Sickle Cell Walk-A-thon
will be held on Saturday,
September 6, 2008 at Florida
Community College Jacksonville
(FCCJ) Downtown Campus loca-
tion. Registration begins at 8:00
am, the run begins at 9:00 am and
the walk will begin promptly at
9:15 am. If you have any questions,
please call (904) 244-4472 or (904)
353-5737 or email me at
SCDAANFC@comcast.net.


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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 9


Tiger Woods is on course to
become the first billionaire athlete
with the popular U.S. golfer prov-
ing a marketing dream, according
to Forbes Magazine.
Woods, who won the U.S. Open
last month despite a bad knee, is on
track to exceed $1 billion in career
earnings by 2010 after earning
$115 million in 2007, said the
American magazine which pub-
lishes an annual list of the world's
richest people.
It would take 32-year-old Woods
a bit longer to actually pocket that
amount as taxes and management
fees eat into his prize and endorse-
ment money.
The calculation was based on
Woods' estimated earnings in the
annual rich list dating back to
1996, when he turned pro, and also
credited the world number one
golfer with annualized investment
returns of 8 percent.
The magazine said there are plen-
ty of billionaires who have
excelled at sports, like
Switzerland's richest man and


Jax native Daniel Breaker
stars in the Broadway play
Spike Lee will film "Passing
Strange," Stew's rock musical jour-
ney of self-discovery, during
upcoming performances at
Broadway's Belasco Theatre.
The movie, budgeted at about $2
million, was shot July 19 at both the
matinee and evening performances.
The stage production will also be


champion sailor Ernesto Bertarelli,
but no billionaires who have accu-
mulated their fortune by playing
sports.
Woods has been a sports market-
ing phenomenon.
A golf prodigy as a child, his
recent U.S. Open victory was his
14th major championship and he
has won 50 tournaments on the
PGA Tour faster than any player.
But prize money only accounts
for about a tenth of his earnings
with the rest coming from lucrative
endorsement deals signed by the
exceptionally popular player with
companies that include Nike,
Buick and Gillette.
Sports drink maker Gatorade
recently launched a new line of
drinks called Gatorade Tiger.
The magazine said Woods would
earn about $90 million in endorse-
ment contracts this year. Over the
course of his career, he has earned
more than $750 million from deals.
Woods is not playing again this
season after undergoing knee sur-
gery a few weeks ago.


filmed at two other times in the the-
ater without audiences present.
"Musicians are the greatest artists
on this Earth," said Lee, a big fan of
the musical since seeing it at the
Public Theater last year. "What we
are really doing is really a hybrid.
We are filming the play."
Lee, director of such films as "Do
the Right Thing," "Malcolm X" and
"She's Gotta Have It," said there
would be surprises in the film but
declined to amplify. "Then it
wouldn't be a surprise," he said.
The show, which opened on
Broadway in February to enthusias-
tic reviews, tells the show of a
young musician, played by Daniel
Breaker (a Jacksonville native),
who travels to Europe in search of
sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll. Stew
wrote the show's book, which won
a Tony Award in June, as well as the
lyrics.
Stew was born Mark Stewart, but
uses just the name Stew.


Reynolds Says He Is Still Very Much in Love With Star


Tiger Woods on Tap to

be First Billionaire Athlete


to get her show off the ground. We
were also trying to deal with all the
negative stuff after we allowed the
media into our marriage."
Reynolds, who now divides his
time between New York and
Miami, said he's not gay, and the
Internet and tabloid speculation
about his sexuality several blog-
gers refer to him as "Big Gay Al" -
has damaged his professional repu-
tation. The 37-year-old former
banker said he has not dated anyone
since the end of his relationship
with Jones, nor has he spoken to the
former prosecutor.
"I feel like I've still got a little bit
of healing to do," said Reynolds.
"I'm not sure I could open that emo-
tional side of myself up to anyone
else right now. After the divorce is
final, I'll probably be a little bit
more interested in that. Right now,
I'm focusing on teaching and finish-
ing my doctorate degree."
Jones and Reynolds tied the knot
in an over-the-top ceremony in
November 2004. Jones was criti-
cized for endlessly discussing the


Al Reynolds continues to have a
soft spot for Star Jones, despite
their impending divorce. "I still
very much love her," Reynolds told
said in a interview. "I do. I can't lie
to you."
Jones' soon-to-be ex-husband is
opening up about his relationship
with the former co-host of ABC's
"The View" in an interview being
posted Tuesday on YouTube.
"I was approached by a number of
media outlets to do interviews, and
most of them wanted me to trash
my wife," Reynolds spoke during a
telephone interview. "I wasn't inter-
ested in participating in the sensa-
tionalism."
Instead, the interview was filmed
last month at the home of Reynolds'
publicist, Howard Bragman. Jones
filed for divorce from Reynolds in
March after three years of marriage.
Reynolds said his marriage to
Jones began to unravel last year
when Jones was launching her
truTV talk show and Reynolds
began teaching at Florida Memorial
University in Miami. He said the
pair separated in February, and he
was served divorce papers in
March. Reynolds was surprised
when Jones issued a public state-
ment about the dissolution of their
marriage in April.
"I don't know if I can point to a
specific thing that happened," said


Reynolds. "I felt like we started to
grow apart. I took a position down
in Florida. I started working aggres-
sively on my book. She was trying


Mayweather Jr. Accuses


HBO Announcers of Racism


Recently retired boxer Floyd
Mayweather Jr. accused HBO's
announcers of bias against him and
other black fighters.
Mayweather, a 31-year-old former
Olympic bronze medalist from
Grand Rapids, told The Grand
Rapids Press in an interview Friday
that the network "is great," but crit-
icized its boxing announcers.
"They talk about Kelly Pavlik, a
white fighter, like he's the second
coming. Or they go crazy over
Manny Pacquiao. But I'm a black
fighter," Mayweather said. "Is it
racial? Absolutely. They praise
white fighters, they praise Hispanic
fighters, whatever. But black fight-
ers, they never praise.
"I've noticed it for a long time but
I couldn't say anything because I
had to do business with them. I'll
still do business with them, but I'm
done holding my tongue."
HBO Sports president Ross
Greenburg said in a statement that


Mayweather
the network, which has carried
many of Mayweather's fights, was
disappointed to hear of the boxer's
remarks and denied his claims.
"Floyd is a tremendous athlete
who gave his all to the'sporf"We"
have nothing but admiration for
what he accomplished in the ring,"
Greenburg said. "His remarks
regarding HBO broadcasters and
executives are unfortunate and we


could not disagree more."
Mayweather gave the interview on
the first day of a three-day retire-
ment celebration in downtown
Grand Rapids. Boxing's pound-for-
pound king abruptly retired last
month at the peak of his athletic
skill and earning power.
"I'm happy. I feel clear. I feel free
as a bird," he said. "I feel good that
I can finally speak out, and say the
things I want to say."
Mayweather called it quits at the
close of a remarkable 18-month
stretch in which he beat Oscar De
La Hoya and Ricky Hatton, made
more than $50 million in the ring
and became a bankable celebrity
outside it.
In the past year alone, Mayweather
has appeared on "Dancing With the
Stars,"' worked on his record label.
served as the lionoriran starter at the
Indianapolis 500 and entered the
wrestling ring for a choreographed
tussle.


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wedding and plugging its sponsors
on "The View." The negative reac-
tion to the affair, which was attend-
ed by guests ranging from Hillary
Rodham Clinton to Spike Lee, was
cited by Barbara Walters as a reason
why Jones' contract wasn't renewed
in 2006.
Reynolds who is originally
from Horse Pasture, Va. now
agrees the wedding spun out of con-
trol but claims he thought such
behavior was customary for celebri-
ty nuptials. Reynolds is currently
working on a financial help book
aimed at the middle-to-low class,
and tentatively titled "Bank On It."
He says he's not interested in using
the divorce as opportunity to fade
out of the spotlight.
"I'm not a fade-away type of guy,"
said Reynolds. "I'm a guy who pro-
gresses and moves forward. I was
successful before I met Star, and I
plan to be successful after Star. I'm
in the public eye now. That's the
truth. It comes with responsibilities.
I'm using it as an opportunity to
educate and motivate people."


Al and Star Reynolds in happier times


Spike Lee to Film Award

Winning Passing Strange


Julyl7-23, 2008


FEELING LUCKY?


T 1 -A4 131 J^ I lanort<










Pai~e 10 Ms. Perry's Free Press July 17-26, 2008


799

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July 17-26, 2008


Page 10 Ms. Perry's Free Press


w









J.L. King Has
Fessed up to
Being a Down Low
man But Says
Ostracizing is
SWorst Than Ever
Page 11


-A

P


Marsha Oliver's
look Who's
Talking Chats
It Up with
Selena Bass
Page 5


Woodlawn
Presbyterian
Celebrates 19th
Anniversary of
Pastor and First
Lady Rigsby
Page 9


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Ain't No Half Steppin 'for Senior Dancers When Joe Simmons started Joe and the Rockettes 20 years ago, he had no idea that his
dancing troupe of seniors would blossom into a popular commanding performance revue. Now numbering over eighty in members, you never know where
the Rockettes may show up. Shown above at the recent Summer Dance at the Mary Singleton Center are Theresa Mackey Barnes, Algerine Jones, Gladys
Davis, Lucille Bess, founder Joe Simmon, Myra Bailey, Emma Wright and Elfie Sims. For more photo highlights from the dance, see page 9. FMPPhoto.

Surprise Birthday Celebration Held for Free Press Publisher


%06 OW mW& 01 46W'*


Friends and family secretly gath-
ered last Thursday night for the sur-
prise birthday celebration of Free
Press publisher Rita Perry. Dubbed
a "Diamond Evening", the party
coordinated by a host of excited
party planners was attended by
more than a hundred guests all
dressed in the requested white attire
at the Friday Musicale in Riverside.
The honoree entered escorted by
her God-son Rahman Johnson and
walked down the carpet to her seat
with tears in her eyes as the loud
"surprise" and recognition of faces
from near and far brought tears to
her eyes. Immediately upon seating,
Mistress of Ceremonies Carol
Alexander began the festivities with
a celebratory applause that was
throughout the evening.
A variety of vignettes invited dif-
ferent relationships from Ms.
Perry's life to give their personal
tribute. Among those delivering
personal messages were: "Mentor
and Friend" Carlottra Guyton,
Ju'Coby Pittman-Peele and Lynette
Jones; "Children from Another


Shown above is Rita Perry following her champagne toast.


Mother" Reggie Fullwood,
Rahman Johnson and Maretta
Latimer; "Radio Days" Willie
'Captain Groovy' Martin and
"Friendship Through the Ages" by
Helen Christopher.
The evening was not without a
light note as a celebration in song
was delivered by the honoree's
God-daughter Angel Jackson. The
central Florida vocalist delighted
the audience with a jazzy version of
the classic "God Bless the Child",
dedicated to her Godmother. There
was also a very special medley per-
formed by "The Temptations" who
included Charles Griggs, Kevin
Love, Dwayne Sweet, Bruce
Burwell and Reggie Fullwood.
Mr. Bobby Henry, President of the
Florida Black Publishers
Association brought professional
and personal greetings reflecting on
"the life of a publisher". In his
vignette he saluted Rita Perry's
tenacity to succeed against the odds
in a field traditionally dominated by
men. Also speaking were the hon-
Continued on page 6


A &


WEkKLY Cents
50 Cents


Infant Mortality
Rate Deserves
Just as Much
Attention as
Chronic Murder
Epidemic
Page 4


PIRST STD
U.S. Postage
PAID
Jacksonville, FL
jr
-,,-,Frmlt No. 662











n -- -M.- -D- 9 1L,---P 0


Ms. rerry's rre ress -


Extreme Makeover Home Facing Foreclosure


LAKE CITY, Ga. More than
1,800 people showed up to help
ABC's "Extreme Makeover"
team demolish a family's
decrepit home and replace it
with a sparkling, four-bedroom
mini-mansion in 2005.
Three years later, the reality TV
show's most ambitious project at
the time has become the latest
victim of the foreclosure crisis.
After the Harper family used
the two-story home as collateral
for a $450,000 loan, it's set to go
to auction on the steps of the
Clayton County Courthouse
Aug. 5. The couple received the
loan for a construction business
that failed.
The house was built in January
2005, after Atlanta-based Beazer
Homes USA and ABC's
"Extreme Makeover" demol-
ished their old home and its
faulty septic system. Within six
days, construction crews and
hoards of volunteers had com-
pleted work on the largest home


America I AM
America I AM Across
America," a traveling exhibition
preview leading to the "America
I AM: The African American
Imprint" museum exhibition,
will visit Jacksonville, Florida
on its nationwide tour of 40
cities.
The exhibit will open in
November celebrating 400 years


How Long to


. Your First Million?

If you know that Hollywood's top stars can earn $20 million dollars per
film and that the average time to shoot a movie is six months, you won't
be surprised to see that their paychecks make the average person's
income look minuscule in comparison. In fact, if these celebrities worked
standard 8-hour workdays, it would take them less than seven days to
earn $1 million.
In all likelihood, you and I aren't making that kind of money. In fact, it
will take some people their entire careers to cross the million-dollar mark
even once.
With that in mind, we looked at a variety of jobs to see just how long it
would take to earn $1 million working in each position. We used the
median annual salary of each profession, as reported by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, and broke down the earnings based on a 40-hour work-
:ot a $450K week.
e for a con- Here are 30 jobs with earnings anywhere from below minimum wage to
I and reno- six-figure salaries and how long it would take to earn $1 million in terms
of hours, eight-hour workdays and years.


Clayton County neighborhood.
The home's door opened into a
lobby that featured four fire-
places, a solarium, a music room
and a plush new office.
Materials and labor were donat-
ed for the home, which would


have cost about
$450,000 to build. Beazer
Homes' employees and company
partners also raised $250,000 in
contributions for the family,
including scholarships for the
couple's three children and a
home maintenance fund.


Traveling Exhibit at the Ritz


of African American contribu-
tions to the nation through arti-
facts, documents, multimedia,
photos and music. In a cus-
tomized mobile recording
booth, visitors can leave their
own "imprints" as recorded
video messages that will
become part of the exhibition.
As the exhibit travels to cities


across the country, this living
imprint will grow to become the
largest oral history project
recorded in U.S. history.
It will be at the Ritz one day
only, Wednesday, August 6th
from 1:00 7:00 PM.
The museum is located at 829
N. Davis Street. For more infor-
mation, call 632-5555.


ABC said in a statement that it
advises each family to consult a
financial planner after they get
their new home. "Ultimately,
financial matters are personal,
and we work to respect the pri-
vacy of the families," the net-
work said.
Some of the volunteers who
helped build the home were less
than thrilled about the family's
financial decisions.
"It's aggravating. It just makes
you mad. You do that much
work, and they just squander it,"
Lake City Mayor Willie Oswalt,
who helped vault a massive
beam into place in the Harper's
living room, told The Atlanta
Journal-Constitution.


Don't Get Caught in the Credit Crunch


By Jason Alderman it score in
As the economy continues to falter, many Late or
people find themselves trapped in financial cards, loar
limbo: unable to cover their bills (such as Too man)
adjustable rate mortgages) and not qualified opening u
for more favorable interest rates that could Maintai
help because of lenders' tightening credit ances and
standards. Compare that to a few years ago, fers.
when just about anyone could secure a Closil
mortgage or car loan. unused ac
Maintaining a strong credit score has available
become more important than ever, since increasing
anything less could greatly increase interest the portico
rates you pay or even prevent you from you're act
obtaining credit in the first place.
It could even impact your ability
to rent an apartment or secure a
job.
Here are a few tips for strengthening your __
credit score:
Understand how credit scores 'ork. The
three major credit bureaus iEqulfa\,
Experian and TransUnion) track \our cred-
it history and activity and use that informa-
tion to create a three-digit credit score -
commonly referred to as a F ICO
score, after Fair Isaac Corporation
(FICO), which developed the
proprietary software.
Your FICO score is deter-
mined by such factors as
your on-time payment
record, overall debt amount,
credit history duration, ratio of debt to ally using
available credit, number of accounts and active (pa
types of credit used (credit cards, auto course).
loans, mortgages, etc.) Creditors use your Unpaid fi
score to determine the level of risk involved cule, unpa
in lending money to you and set credit lim- other civic
its and interest rates accordingly. credit rep(
Warning flags that might lower your cred- Here are


clude:
insufficient payments for credit
as, utilities and other bills.
y accounts. Think twice before
needed new accounts.
ning high individual account bal-
d making frequent balance trans-

ng old accounts. Closing older,
counts can backfire because your
credit amount is lowered, thereby
g your "credit utilization ratio" -
n of your available credit limit
ually using.


I

ga
ayi

ne
aid
c
or


or improve your credit:
Always pay on time at least the mini-
mum due on all bills. Consider signing up
for automatic payments if this is a recurring
problem.
Although using lower interest-rate
accounts makes sense, don't overburden
any particular card or use more than 30 per-
cent of the available credit.
Open a secured credit card, which is backed
by a deposit account you open with the
issuing financial institution. Often, you can
convert a secured card to an unsecured
(regular) card after you've made several


on-time payments.
T 8Carefully review your credit reports.
C R U D EY You can order one free credit report a
year from each of the three bureaus at
www.annualcreditreport.com.
Look for errors, omissions and
fraudulent activities that could
lower your score.
Consult a financial professional
to help resolve your particular
;R-t4 situation.

credit scores from each of the
three credit bureaus for about
$15 each at their websites
(www.equifax.com, www.exper-
Not using existing ian.corn and www.transunion.com).
accounts Manm financial Or. ift. you'd rather just estimate your score,
experts recommend occasion- use the free FICO Score Estimator at
all open accounts to keep them What's My Score, a financial literacy pro-
ing off balances right away, of gram run by Visa Inc.
(www.whatsmyscore.org/estimator.) The
-s or penalties. However minis- site also features tips on repairing damaged
J library fines, traffic tickets and or unestablished credit scores.
penalties could show up on your Don't let a poor credit score ruin your
t. chances for future financial security.


several actions that can establish


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47 years
Librarians, local government:
$44,960
46,254 hours
5,783 days
22 years
Middle school teachers, except
special and vocational education:
$46,300
44,924 hours
5,615 days
22 years
Network systems and data com-
munications analysts: $64,600
32,154 hours
4,032 days
15 years
Personal financial
advisers: $66,120
26,896 hours
3,932 days
15 years
Photographers: $26,170
79,491 hours
9,935 days
38 years
Pharmacists: $94,520
22,007 hours
2,751 days
11 years
Physical therapists: $66,200
31,417 hours
3,927 days
15 years
Police and sheriffs
patrol officers: $47,460
43,821 hours
5,479 days
21 years
Post-secondary teachers: $56,120
37,064 hours
4,633 days
18 years
Retail salespersons, department
stores: $19,610
106,045 hours
13,259 days


*Salary data based on median annual salary data as reported by
the BLS. **Hours, days and years figures are rounded to the near-
est whole number.


-fhm*a a --- AI o


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July 31 August 6, 2008







Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


JUly u -.n UgUst ugus U O


Knights of Peter Claver's 93rd Convention Brings


Close to 2,000 Black Catholics to the First Coast


Council 335 of Jacksonville (L-R): Philip Stiell National Treasurer, Athanase (Tony) Jones Silver Medal
Merit, Gene A Phillips, Sr Most Worthy Supreme Knight, Paul Jones Deputy Supreme Knight and
Leonard Stiell Gulf Coast District Deputy.


Shown (L-R) Sitting: Earl Flournoy, Mary George, Grand Lady of Msgr Walter J Darcy Ct #335 and
Father James R. Bodie, Jr, Pastor of St. Catherine's of Orange Park. Standing: Ruby Myers (Crucifixion
Church), Stephanie Fisher (St. Pius V Church) and Maurice C. Grant from Crucifixion Church.


The event also gave to local charities. Shown above is Geralyn C. Shelvin Supreme Lady, JuCoby
Pittman-Peele, CEO of the Clara White Mission and Gene A Phillips, Sr. Most Worthy Supreme Knight
with a check presentation tothe Mission. FMP Photo
I


Apology
continued from page 1
of their names and heritage" and
that black Americans today contin-
ue to suffer from the consequences
of slavery and Jim Crow laws that
fostered discrimination and segre-
gation.
The House "apologizes to
African-Americans on behalf of
the people of the United States, for
the wrongs committed against
them and their ancestors who suf-
fered under slavery and Jim
Crow."
"Slavery and Jim Crow are stains
upon what is the greatest nation on
the face of the earth," Cohen said.
Part of forming a more perfect
union, he said, "is such a resolution
as we have before us today where


we face up to our mistakes and
apologize as anyone should apolo-
gize for things that were done in
the past that were wrong."
Cohen became the first white to
represent the 60 percent black dis-
trict in Memphis in more than
three decades when he captured a
2006 primary where a dozen black
candidates split the vote. He has
sought to reach out to his black
constituents, and early in his term
showed interest in joining the
Congressional Black Caucus until
learning that was against caucus
rules.
Another of his first acts as a fresh-
man congressman in early 2007
was to introduce the slavery apolo-
gy resolution. His office said that
the House resolution was brought


to the floor only after learning that
the Senate would be unable to join
in a joint resolution.
More than a dozen of the 42
Congressional Black Caucus
members in the House were origi-
nal co-sponsors of the measure.
The caucus has not endorsed either
Cohen or his chief rival, attorney
Nikki Tinker, in the Memphis pri-
mary, although Cohen is backed by
several senior members, including
Judiciary Committee Chairman
John Conyers, D-Mich., and Ways
and Means Committee Chairman
Charles Rangel, D-N.Y. Tinker is
the former campaign manager of
Harold Ford, Jr., who held Cohen's
seat until he stepped down in an
unsuccessful run for the Senate in
2006.


The Knights of Peter Claver and
its Ladies' Auxiliary held its 93rd
National Convention in
Jacksonville, Florida at the Hyatt
Hotel. The much anticipated event,
held in Jacksonville for the first
time, brought Catholics from all
over the country including several
noted priests and bishops to
Florida's First Coast. Several relat-
ed events, including a golf tourna-
ment to support Jacksonville's
Guardian Catholic Schools and
even a day of volunteerism took


place.
The Knights of Peter Claver, Inc.
is the nation's largest African-
American Catholic lay organiza-
tion. The Order was founded on
Nov. 7, 1909 in Mobile, AL for
Black men who were barred from
other organizations in the Catholic
Church. The organization's mem-
bership has since expanded to
include the entire Catholic Church
including Bishops and Cardinals
from around the country.
The Order is named after St. Peter


Black U.S. AIDS rates rival some


The AIDS epidemic among
African-Americans in some parts of
the United States is as severe as in
parts of Africa, according to a
recently released report.
"Left Behind Black America: A
Neglected Priority in the Global
AIDS" is intended to raise aware-
ness and remind the public that the
"AIDS epidemic is not over in
America, especially not in Black
America," says the report, pub-
lished by the Black AIDS Institute,
an HIV/AIDS think tank focused
exclusively on African-Americans.
"AIDS in America today is a
black disease," says Phill Wilson,
founder and CEO of the institute
and himself HIV-positive for 20
years. "2006 CDC data tell us that


about half of the just over 1 million
Americans living with HIV or
AIDS are black."
Although black people represent
only about one in eight Americans,
one in every two people living with
HIV in the United States is black,
the report notes.
The report uses just-released data
from UNAIDS and existing CDC
and Census data to highlight grim
statistics:
* AIDS remains the leading cause
of death among black women
between ages 25 and 34. It's the
second-leading cause of death in
black men 35-44.
In Washington, more than 80
percent of HIV cases are among
black people, that's one in 20 resi-


Claver, a Jesuit priest from Spain
who ministered to African slaves in
Cartegena, Colombia in the 1600s.
Peter Claver is said to have con-
verted over 300,000 slaves to
Catholicism. The Knights of Peter
Claver is a faith based fraternal
order with units in nearly 400
Catholic parishes in the United
States and South America.
The Order also engages in a vari-
ety of church and community serv-
ice projects and supports charitable
appeals both nationally and locally.

African nations
dents.
"Five percent of the entire popu-
lation (in DC) is infected... that's
comparable to countries like
Uganda or South Africa," Dr.
Anthony Fauci, director of the
National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases, told CNN.
According to this report, if black
Americans made up their own
country, it would rank above
Ethiopia (420,000 to 1,300,000)
and below Ivory Coast (750,000) in
HIV population. Both Ethiopia and
the Ivory Coast are among the 15
nations receiving funds from the
President's Emergency Plan For
Aids Relief. The United States has
given about $15 billion to PEPFAR
nations in the past five years.


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OUR FINANCIAL ADVISORS ARE HERE
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July 31- August 6, 2008.


P 4 M P
'
F Press


age s. erry s ree


r


City Chrnile


Jacksonville's Infant Mortality Rates Deserve


the Attention that our Murder Rate Receives


Sometimes your view on a sub-
ject is enhanced or drastically
changed based upon your own per-
sonal life. An issue as serious as
infant mortality in Jacksonville
being amongst the highest in the
city and nation should get every-
one's attention right?
Unfortantely, there hasn't been a
major community-wide outcry.
Sure various news outlets have run
stories and the Jacksonville
Community Council, Inc. (JCCI)
has done some studying of Duval
County's unusually high infant
death rate, but you really don't see
the acknowledgement of the issue
on a grand scale.
Jacksonville's murder rate seems
to be casting a shadow over every
other problem in our community.
But going back to perspectives for
a moment. I guess I am as guilty as
everyone else because until I
recently had two children, infant
mortality rates were important, but
not something that I paid a lot of
attention to.
Sadly, not enough civic and polit-
ical leaders are making infant mor-
tality rate issues apart of their regu-
lar platforms.
If you look at the numbers they
are pretty startling. In 2006, 130
babies died in Jacksonville alone.
Black infants are dying at a rate
twice that of white infants.
Let's look at it from a more phys-
ical perspective. If you go to your
child's school and assume that the
average class size is around 25 stu-
dents, well imagine the first five
classes that you walk by disappear-
ing.
Imagine if all of those young peo-
ple died within a one-year period.


That's how bad the infant mortality
rate has been in Jacksonville.
Our local JCCI study from 2006
suggested that by far, women's gen-
eral health and prenatal care is the
most important factor, accounting
for 70 percent of black infant
deaths and 58 percent of white
infant deaths.
Research showed that black
babies were twice as likely as
whites to be stillborn or die after
being born prematurely and very
small.
Low birth weight accounts for
about 80 percent of the racial dispa-
rity, the study found.
Now we get to the good part. Why
are these death tolls so high
amongst black folk? Well, let me
get my lawn mower and chain saw
and cut through the bush instead of
beating around it.
There have been numerous studies
done nationally and locally that
point the finger directly at race. No
surprise right?
A couple of weeks ago I had a
long conversation with a local
author and PHD who had done
some extensive research into this
issue.
He hammered home that fact that
it wasn't race that was the problem
it was the environmental stresses
associated with being black and in
many cases black and poor.
It's not a genetic make up issue,
but way community as person lives
and socio-economic conditions that
the young lady deals with on a
daily basis that affect her child's
health.
And while many ob/gyns and
health experts point to causes like
the timing of prenatal care or


unequal health insurance access,
others are actually getting down in
the weeds and researching how
race and racism are key factors.
Makes sense right? Well, some
experts argue that point.
Sometimes the obvious isn't so
obvious at all. In fact, a study com-
missioned by the Journal of the
American Medical Association in
2003 gave us he following data:
The two most significant determi-
nants of a young baby's health and
development are birth weight and
gestational age at birth.
Infants born at or before 37 weeks,
or under 2,500 grams (5 lbs., 8 oz.),
are at greater risk of medical prob-
lems, disability, and death before
their first birthday.
Now if you compare that data with
women from various ethnic groups
in the United States (Hawaiian,
American Indian, Puerto Rican,
Filipino, Mexican, Cuban,
Japanese, Chinese and non-
Hispanic white), black mothers
have the highest percentage of low
birth weight and preterm births.
Back in 2000, more than one in
ten black infants was born too
small and nearly one in five was
born before the ideal time.
As I said sometime the obvious
isn't that obvious. We talked about
socio-economic conditions affect-
ing infant mortality rates. But on
the surface it's still very hard to
come up with conclusive evidence
to truly identify the causes of this
problem.
The study states that middle-class
black mothers continue to experi-
ence the two to threefold higher
risk of having a small baby than
white moms.


Research has shown that college
and graduate school educated black
mothers still have a higher infant
mortality rate than white moms
who didn't finish high school
The study also shows that black
women who get prenatal care in the
first trimester have double the
infant mortality rate of white moth-
ers with first-trimester care
Getting back to the million dollar
question of why or how. What
experts will agree on is that chron-
ic emotional stress from many fac-
tors, including physically demand-
ing jobs and a lack of control in the
workplace, single parenthood, and
financial worries-all problems
experienced disproportionately by
women of color.
Discrimination is also a docu-
mented source of harmful stress.
Some studies have found that
women who gave birth to very low
birth weight babies were more like-
ly to have experienced racial dis-
crimination than women who had
normal weight babies.
So we know the issues and suspect
that we know the causes, but the
question I can't seem to get out of
my mind is how is it that we live in
a country with the most advanced
heatlhcare system and technology
in the world, yet black babies con-
tinue die at alarming rates?
Once again, I find myself asking
all of the questions and not provid-
ing solutions, but continuing to
raise awareness and fighting for
more funds to research the causes
of high infant death rates amongst
blacks is critical.
Signing off from the Magnolia
Project,
Reggie Fullwood


The Origins of Being Black in America


By Gary Flowers
As America viewed the broadcast,
"Black in America", on the Cable
News Network (CNN) last week, I
was beset with mixed emotions.
On one hand, Soledad O'Brien
should be commended for her
efforts to bring the perspectives
and experiences of African-
Americans to the nation and the
world. All too often, large media
companies are reluctant to devote
four hours of prime time to one
non-White ethnic group.
Yet, to fully understand the cur-
rent reality of being Black in
America absent an analysis of the
socio-economic factors affecting
African- Americans for the past
400 years is at least incomplete.
Race, civics, and economics have
particularly permeated the percep-
tion of Black America-internally
and externally. In 1619, when the
first Africans were reportedly
brought to the shores of North
America in what was to become
Jamestown, Va., the Virginia
Company of London, England
shipped them.
Immediately, dark-skinned
Africans were readily identifiable
by color, and by their origins of
West African nations, were well-
suited for the physical work in
humid conditions. Africans were
initially declared indentured ser-
vants, and then legally rendered


slaves for life by the Virginia
House of Burgesses (now the
Virginia General Assembly).
Targeted economic exploitation
based on race was written in blood
on the Charter of America,
Incorporated.
The false notion of cultural
supremacy (Anglo/White) shaped
the formation of the new nation's
economic order, paid by the divi-
dends of dehumanization. The
record reflects that the origin of the
United States of America is rooted
in economic exploitation of Black
people (and Red, Brown, and
Yellow people).
Likewise, the Colonial
Constitutional denial of citizenship
and the current attacks on voting
rights by federal and states courts
on Black people in America has
cast a cloud on how many
Americans view Black people.
Internally, the perception of being
Black in America has been shaped
into what Dr. W.E.B. Dubois
referred to as the ambivalent veil
of dual consciousness African
and American. Many Blacks,
despite their educational and mate-
rial success, never feel completely
comfortable as first-class citizens.
Therefore, to address Being Black
in America in 2008 without
reviewing the wretched record of
America on African Americans is
to suggest that Black people-


descendants of Nubian priests,
scholars, warriors, builders, and
business owners-are somehow
genetically destined for demo-
graphic devolution.
The Prison Industrial Complex
must share the shame of the 50
percent dropout rate for African-
American males. The legal separa-
tion of Black families in the Slave
Trade (and later by the federal wel-
fare system) must share the shame
of 70 percent out-of-wedlock
Black births. The absence of
employment opportunities for
qualified Black people must be
considered in the high crime rate in
Black America. While personal
responsibility is everyone's duty to
self, the group-levied, systemic
and structural obstacles placed on


S.

6


the back of Blacks by the public
and private sectors must too be
accountable.
In other words, a ghetto is not the
presence of Black people, but the
absence of jobs and capital. And
racial equality is does not result
from a Black man in the White
House, but from cross-cultural
respect, equal protection under the
law, and equal access to economic
opportunity.
Toward that end, Senator Barack
Obama's idea of a White House
Office on Urban Policy is a good
one for the American working
poor, disproportionately Black.
The origins and the outcomes must
be part of being Black in America.
We must know the whole story. We
must share the whole story.


S /

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III


FLORIDA'S FIRST COAST QUALITY BLACK


MAILING ADDRESS
P.O. Box 43580
Jacksonville, FL 32203


Rita Perry

PUBLISHER

CONTR
fmtReginald
Jacksonville Dyrinda
UlbhambeoCr of nommftec Guyton,


PHYSICAL ADDRESS
903 W. Edgewood Ave.
Jacksonville, FL 32208
Email: JfreePress@aol.com


TELEPHONE
(904) 634-1993
Fax (904) 765-3803


Sylvia Perry

Managing Editor


IBUTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson,
I Fullwood, E.O.Huthcinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell,
Sapp, Marsha Oliver, Marretta Latimer, Phyllis Mack, Carlottra
Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver,Vickie Brown, Rahman Johnson,


p 0


DISCLAIMER
The United State provides oppor-
tunities for free expression of ideas.
The Jacksonville Free Press has its
view, but others may differ.
Therefore, the Free Press ownership
reserves the right to publish views
and opinions by syndicated and
local columnist, professional writers
and other writers' which are solely
their own. Those views do not neces-
sarily reflect the policies and posi-
tions of the staff and management of
the Jacksonville Free Press.
Readers, are encouraged to write
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phone number and address. Please
address letters to the Editor, c/o
JFP, P.O. Box 43580 Jacksonville,
FL 32203. (No CALLS PLEASE)


SJesse Jackson


Inc. Rainmaker


or Charlatan?


Name 10 things Barack Obama has done toward helping African Americans
advance. Mainstream media trickery has pushed that question to the fore.
Whether or not "the gaffe" was a devious Fox technician catching Jackson
unaware that his microphone was on, or an intentional ploy by Jackson,
Jesse's aired complaint that presidential candidate Barack Obama seems "to
be talking down to black people" and should broaden his message has pitted
the political perspectives of Jesse Jackson and Barack Obama among African
Americans.
Few political figures in America today arouse as much passion as the Rev.
Jesse Jackson. A hero to some in the black community, Jackson is credited
with helping to break down barriers to political and economic access. But to
some, Jackson has become a symbol for all that's wrong with African
Americans.
Barack Obama is the first African American to secure the nomination of a
major political party. Black leaders and intellectuals that never thought that
would happen are now conflicted as to how to deal with "the race issue" of
the campaign. When it comes to race, Obama wants to transcend it. But Jesse
says, "Not so fast". Should blacks side with Obama distancing himself in
order to win white votes, or side with Jesse's contention that Obama takes
blacks for granted?
Sadly, Black Americans are jumping over each other to get establishment
media air time to decry Jesse Jackson or defend him. The debate breaks down
to pre-civil rights and post-civil rights perceptions. Even Jackson's own son,
Congressman Jesse Jackson, Jr, a co-chair of Obama's campaign, called his
dad "out of line". But, the senior Jackson is far from alone in thinking Obama
needs to put the struggles of Black America within a larger societal context.
Is he just conveniently black? Shouldn't African American voters name
what they expect from Obama beyond symbolism? Unapologetically black
and focused on bettering Blacks' circumstances, Jesse L. Jackson was deseg-
regating restaurants and theaters when Barack was a baby. Jackson joined
MLK's Southern Leadership Conference (SCLC) movement in 1965. In
1966, Dr. King appointed Jackson to run SCLC's Chicago Operation
Breadbasket economic programs for African Americans' advancement.
Obama was just 10 when Operation Breadbasket was renamed Operation
PUSH People United to Serve Humanity in 1971.
Thousands of Generation X and Y African Americans condemning Jackson
do it from desks at Coca Cola, Kentucky Fried Chicken, 7-Up, Heublein
Corp., Southland Corp. (7-Eleven) and scores of others because of Jackson
engineered business "covenants". Actually Jackson has been a rainmaker
among African American businesses and gotten multi-billion corporations to
put money into black banks and ads into black media.
When Barack was in high school Jackson's Rainbow PUSH Coalition was
organizing events to bring attention to economic advancement, workers
rights, labor conditions, voter registration, education, and racial profiling
problems facing Americans. Jackson created the Wall Street Project in 2003
to build economic opportunities and advancements of African Americans
among financial firms.
The mainstream media is manipulative and demeaned Jackson for the com-
ment that "Obama has given what amounts to lectures at African-American
churches". Obama panders to white and Jewish voters while simply speaking
down to blacks with "moral challenges." This approach allows Obama to
deny that the black community is faced with high levels of unemployment,
home foreclosures and violence that need high-level government attention.
Jackson is right, "We have some real serious issues not just moral issues".
Blacks should get a grip on what's important to them and their kind.
Jackson's angst is about Obama's limited focus on black fathers stepping up
and claiming responsibility for their families is worthwhile. But to get votes
from any segment of the population, a candidate has to say what he's going to
do for them.
Ninety percent of African Americans are happy with Barack Obama's can-
didacy and will vote for him come hell or high water. But, what has he said
about assisting African American advancements to: access to capital, quality
health care and education, decent housing at affordable prices and interest
rates, equal justice, and livable wages and job opportunities?




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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5


Sickle Cell Advocate


Selena Webster Bass


His family and friends were the
world to him; he showed love to
everyone.
He had a big smile, a genuine
kindness, and a wonderful sense of
humor.
He was born in Boston and was a
fan of the Patriots.
He loved life and Publix fried
chicken.
I never met Sean Anton Ely and
regretfully, I never will; He lost his
life-long battle with sickle cell ane-
mia on July 15.
While randomly reading the obitu-
aries in last week's daily, I stumbled
across Sean's and was struck that a
young man who lived too few years
could indeed teach us all a life-long
lesson "we should give meaning to
life, and not wait for life to give us
meaning."
Sean's biographical brief immedi-
ately reminded me of a person who
knows a great deal about both sick-
le cell anemia and living her life's
work.
Meet Selena Webster-Bass,
Director of the Be Sickle Smart
Program/Novartis
Pharmaceuticals/Director of
Multicultural Initiatives with the
Harrington Group.
A carrier of the sickle cell trait,
Selena and her husband Lester Bass
(also a trait carrier) lost their first
child, Richard, at age 2, to sickle
cell disease. Currently, the Basses
have three children Spencer (9),
Trinity (5), and Micah (2), and a life


of great meaning.
Q: Tell us about yourself.
A: I was born and raised in
Jacksonville by very dedicated par-
ents; my mom is a registered nurse
and my dad is Pastor of Peace
Missionary Baptist Church on the
city's northside. I graduated from
Ribault Senior High School in 1990
and earned a B.S. in Biology from
the University of North Florida, and
a Masters of Public Health at the
University of South Florida. I am
currently completing my disserta-
tion in Educational Leadership at
UNF, studying Sickle Cell
Disease/Sickle Cell Trait
Knowledge, Attitudes and Beliefs
of General Population in Northeast
Florida.
I enjoy playing the piano, travel-
ing, swimming, spending time with
my family, singing, and watching
CNN and HGTV.
Q: What exactly is sickle cell dis-
ease?
A: Sickle cell disease is a genetic
blood disorder that affects the red
blood cells. Normal red blood cells
are round and flexible and move
easily through the blood vessels. In
individuals with sickle cell disease,
their red blood cells are hard, rigid
and become crescent shaped under
conditions of deoxygenation.
Average life expectancy is about 50
years of age.
Q: How long have you been an
advocate for sickle cell aware-
ness? What prompted your inter-


My interest in sickle cell disease
began during my undergraduate
studies while researching butyrate
as a form of treatment for sickle cell
disease. Once I had a child with
sickle cell disease in 1997, my pas-
sion for sickle cell disease aware-
ness grew. And when my son
Richard passed in 1999, becoming
involved in sickle cell disease
awareness became a way of dealing
with the grief of his transitioning. I
have been an advocate for sickle
cell disease for over 13 years.
Q: Would you say that your per-
sonal experience with sickle cell
makes you a better advocate?
A: My experience of having a
child with sickle cell disease affords
me the opportunity to empathize
with the struggles of other care-
givers and patients; such as the pain
of watching a child experience a
pain crisis, parental guilt, frustra-
tions with the health care system,
and the dire need for a universal
cure.
Complete this sentence People
should know ...
A: People should know that sickle
cell disease greatly affects lives.
Thirty percent of children with
sickle cell disease may experience
stroke and even silent strokes that
may impact their academic per-
formances; People should know
that when adult patients encounter
the unpredictable pain crises associ-
ated with the disease, every area of


P i "I


Marh Olivrrnyoucoanpsa


their life is affected. These painful
life interruptions can affect their
ability to maintain employment and
even their sense of self-worth.
Sometimes patients feel isolated
and alone and need the uncondi-
tional support and love of friends
and family
Q: How can people help gener-
ate awareness about and support
for sickle cell disease?
A: There are numerous ways that
persons can help. They can help by
supporting the local Sickle Cell
Disease Foundation by giving
blood for patients that undergo
blood transfusions, contacting leg-
islators to request additional fund-
ing for sickle cell disease research,
and help mobilize the community to
rally around sickle cell disease like
other diseases such as HIV, cancer,
diabetes, etc.
Q: What did you aspire to
become when you were a child? If
different from current occupa-
tion, do you regret not pursuing
that route? Why or why not?
A: I wanted to be an
Obstetrician/Gynecologist and offer
holistic health care services to
women. I pursued medical school
and was an alternate twice. I believe
that I am living out my life's pur-
pose in my current position. I enjoy
my position immensely and my
responsibilities are a mesh of all my
interests community health educa-
tion, biology, community relations,
faith-based programs and most of
all sickle cell disease awareness.


V


Q: What is the
most valuable thing
you have learned
about life? How do
you teach that les-
son?
A: My greatest life
accomplishment is
living in the Spirit.
Living in the spirit for
me means to fully
align my life with
Christ's teaching so
that every area of my
life is blessed my
family, career, rela-
tionships, emotional-
ly and physically so
that God may be glo-
rified.
Q:Sixty years from
now, what do you want
people to say about Selena
Webster Bass?
I want people to say that I've
heightened the awareness of sickle
cell disease worldwide and that I
was a faithful wife, mother, daugh-
ter, sister, friend and believer.
As a mother to a ten-year old who
is a sickle cell trait carrier, I cele-
brate the life of passion and purpose
Selena Webster-Bass holds for sick-
le cell disease awareness. It has
been my privilege to know Selena
and the Webster-Bass family for
over a decade and can undoubted-
ly say that she has indeed been an
outstanding advocate, devoted fam-
ily member, devout Christian, and
caring friend. Her work, her love,


Dobf Ovw Black Per I


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Jul 31 Au ust 6 2008


f to Grow


To enroll, give us a
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Evening and weekend classes are available


ouy o .vgu ~ U, L


The Bass Family
and her life will continue to keep
the spirit and memory of Richard
Webster Bass, Sean Anton Ely and
so many patients and families who
have been affected by sickle cell
disease alive.
Free testing is offered
by the Sickle Cell
Foundation at (904)
353-5737.
Marsha G Oliver is executive officer
of 0. Communications, a Jacksonville-
based public relations and marketing
communications firm. For more infor-
mation about 0. Communications,
please visit www.knowyourimpres-
sion.com or contact Ms. Oliver at mar-
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u trpnryse


jon


Brenda Burwell


Helen Christopher


Camilla Thompson


Carol Alexander


Marsha Oliver, Joel Oliver and Vanessa Boyer


44
hb~ ~r~b


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1.


I,


Yvette Ridley, Helen Ridley, Rita Perry, Terry Fields and Denise Lee


Reese and Lee Marshall


Felice Franklin and Sheila Thomas


Angel Jackson, Derya Williams, Myra Van Moore and Reychelle Wynn


Gracie Chandler, Rita Perry and Tommy Chandler


Continued from front
honoree's sister Brenda Burwell
on "Sisters by Blood, Friends by
Choice" and daughter Sylvia Perry
with "Lessons I've Learned". Dr.
Robert Mitchell provided the spir-
itual thanksgivings with the bless-
ing of the food.
Among the evening's menu
selections were crab cakes, seared
scallops, bacon rotinis, fruit, exot-
ic cheese, Caribbean chicken, beef
stuffed bleu cheese kabobs, sea-
soned rice and a cook to order
pasta station. Dessert was a cus-


tom made four tier sour cr6me and
caramel cake with fresh raspber-
ries followed by a champagne
toast. While guests enjoyed their
food and music provided by a live
DJ, Ms. Perry tried to greet each
and every one of her well wishers.
In lieu of gifts, a traditional
'money pinning' dance was held to
the tune of Donny Hathaway's
"You've Got a Friend" and the
"Shoop Shoop Song" where thou-
sands of dollars were given to the
honoree. She also received a tick-
et to Las Vegas and a tennis


bracelet to commemorate the
occasion.
Rahman Johnson, who lead the
toast saluted Ms. Perry by saying,
"Today we are here to give you
your roses. We love you, we salute
you, we honor you."
Happy Birthday
Ms. Perry
and many more!
Photos by Rhonda Silver
and Frank Powell


Angela Spears and Jennifer Gunn Reuben Brigety Jerry and Wendy Hinton


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Lynette Jones


Rahman Johnson Marretta Latimer


Reggie Fullwood


Carlottra Guyton Sylvia Perry


The "Temptations" tribute stole the evening.


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Jacquelyne Haynes


Songstress Angel Jackson


Robert nd Deloris Mitchell


Gabrielle Burwell with Grandparents
Willie and Diana Perry


Willye and Leo Dennis
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Josephine Porter, Rita Perry, Robert Porter, Betty and Carl Davis


Kevin Love and Bruce Burwell


Marguerite Warren, Gloria Belton, Rita Perry, Ronnie Belton and Cynthia Baker


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Exekiel and Cristella Bryant


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Edith Rogers


Lorraine Spraggins and Rhonda Silver


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P- -I8- M.-ery--FeePrs Jly31Auus 6.20


Jax Gospel Announcers Guild to Hold
Conference & Award Celebration
The Radisson Hotel, 4700 Salisbury Road will be the headquarters for
the Jacksonville Gospel Announcers Guild Conference and Award
Celebration, Saturday, August 30th, so make your plans now to attend.
The VIP Gospel Industry Roundtable featuring Stellar Awards Board
Members, Top Gospel Labels, National Gospel Radio Announcers, man-.
agers, and producers; will be held at 12 noon, Saturday, August 30, 2008..
Make your reservations now by calling (904) 766-2266.
Headliners at the conference include Bishop Bruce Allen, Twinkie Clark,
CBS-47's Dawn Lopez, Pastor Merry Racheal, V. Michael McKay, NtoU
Magazine, Dr. Yvonne Capehart, VShawn Mitchell, Ken Amaro, Destiny
Praise Atlanta, and the UNF Gospel Choir.
National Worship Beyond Measure
Retreat Kicks Off in September
Lance Williams announces the True Worship Retreat 2008: "Worship
Beyond Measure: An Intimate Experience."
The retreat kicks off Thursday, September 11lth, with featured perform-
ances by Tye Tribbet, with multi-Stellar Award winning artist Dewayne
Woods & many others.
The retreat will be held at the Christian Pentecostal Church, 971 Clinton
Avenue in Irvington, NJ from Thursday September 11- Saturday,
September 13.
On Friday, September 12 "The Intimate Place" Concert will highlight
the ministries of Lance Williams & True Worship, Maurette Brown-Clark,
and JJ Hairston & Youthful Praise, along with other premier Gospel artists.
Each nightly event begins at 7:30 p.m. and general admission is free
(preferred seating has a fee). For preferred seating or to register for the sem-
inars/workshops logo onto www.TrueWorship.org.
"Women United in Prayer" at First
AME of Palm Coast Women's Day
The Women of First Coast AME Church, 91 Old Kings Road North, in
Palm Coast, FL will continue their women's celebration July 30, 31, and
August 1, 7 p.m., in a Women's Revival; Saturday, August 30, aHealth and
Beauty Pamper Party, accessorized by vendors from 10 a.m. 'to 2 p.m., and
the culmination of Women's Day on Sunday, September 14, at the 10:45
a.m. service.
The women are wearing shades of purple for the service. A wonderful
meal has been planned, and a Women's Day Choir is underway, directed by
Sophia Booker, for making adoration at the actual event of Women's Day.
Also on schedule is their Third Annual Music Workshop and Concert
conducted ,by ,Mui Direct Michael Booker. It will be held on Friday,
Saturday and Stinday, August 8-10, 2008.
The Reverend Dr. Gillard S. Glover, Senior Pastor; invites old and new
friends. For directions, please call (386) 437-5142.


Pastor Ernie Murray
Welcomes you!


Disciples of Christ to Celebrate
Pastor's Birthday with Banquet
The Disciples of Christ Christian Fellowship will celebrate their Pastor
Robert LeCount's 50th Birthday with a Banquet at 7 p.m. on Friday, August
1, 2008. The banquet will be held at the All People International Church's
Banquet Hall, 1993 West Edgewood Avenue. Tickets are available by call-
ing (904) 765-5683 or at the door. Churches, Pastors and the general pub-
lic are invited.
St. Thomas Missionary Baptist to
Celebrate Pastor's Anniversary
The St. Thomas Missionary Baptist Church will celebrate the 22nd
Anniversary of Pastor Ernie L. Murray Sr., beginning with a Banquet at 7
p.m. on Friday Evening, August 8, 2008 in the St. Thomas Missionary
Baptist Church Family Life Center, 2119 Rowe Ave.
Pastor Anthony Q. Robinson of Greater Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church, Palatka, FL will be the speaker. For banquet ticket information,
please call (904) 768-8800.
The Anniversary Celebration will culminate Sunday, August 10th, with
Worship Services at 8 a.m., 10: 45 a.m. and 4 p.m. Special guests will be
visiting churches from around the city, including Greater Macedonia
Baptist Church, Dr. Landon L. Williams, Sr., Pastor; New Jerusalem
Baptist Church, Pastor Brian Campbell; Pastor Torin Dailey of the First
Baptist Church of Oakland will deliver the Spoken Word.

Mt. Olive to Hold "Back to School"
Carnival with Supplies, Fun & Games
Mount Olive AME Church, 841 Franklin Street; will hold a "Back to
School Carnival" from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, August 9th. There will
be FREE school supplies, drinks, hotdogs, popcorn, with Clowns, Jumpers,
Safety Tips, and much more. For Directions or Information, please call
Youth Director Audrey Pridgen at (904) 354-6085.

Rev. John F. White II is Family &
Friends Day Speaker at New Bethel
New Bethel AME Church, 1231 Tyler Street. Rev. Elizabeth E. Yates,
M. Div., Pastor; will celebrate Family and Friends Day, Sunday, August 10,
2008. the theme is "United Champions For Christ" (1 Peter 2:9). Sunday
School begins at 9 a.m.
The speaker for Morning Service at 10:30 a.m. is Rev. John F. White II,
the son of the 130th Elected Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal
Church, John F. White Sr., who is also a former pastor of Ne\w Bethel
Rev. White II is a M. Div. graduate of the I.T.C. and is currently writing
his dissertation for the D. Min. d4gree. The community is invited.


Join Us for One of Our Services
SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
Ist Sunday 3:45 p.m.

S- a Lord's Supper & Baptism
3rd Sunday 7:00 p.m.
** * * *
TUESDAY
Bible Study 7:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY
Noon Day Worship

THURSDAY
Youth Church 7:00 p.m.


Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20. "

S:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship
,9:30 a.m. Sunday School


Pastor Landon Williams


Te1Idoors. of.5I Mac.edoJg~nia arealways op:,E.U~eI~en oyuandyour amily.If ~weA mlay beof anIEy assista.ce
to yuin orsprtalwl, lae*otctu t.6-25 rvi m i at. aea -. aol.e a


God's Treasure House of Prayer
Anointing Service set for August 16th
God's Treasure House of Prayer Ministry Inc., Apostle Ruth E. Young,
Founder; will hold an Anointing Service at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, August
16th, at the Gates of Southpoint, 7035 Phillips Highway, Suite 30 (near J
TB). You are invited to bring your bottle of oil to be blessed. Come and be
blessed.
American Idol's Ruben Studdard at
St. Paul's on Behalf of Sickle Cell
The Sickle Cell Disease Association of Northeast
Florida in collaboration with the Be Sickle Smart
Program are sponsoring a Sickle Cell Patient
Education Day 7 Bar-B-Que at St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church, 3738 Winton Drive, August 9, 2008,
9 am 3 pm. Ruben Studdard of American Idol will
be the featured celebrity guest. Call (904) 504-9772
or (904) 353-5737 for more information.

Submissions Requested
for American Beach Documentary
The American Beach Home Owners Association is requesting that you and
your family submit your photographs and accounts of your "Most
Memorable Experiences" or "Special Occasions" at American Beach to add
to the chronicles of the 1950s 1990s.in a Documentary of American
Beach, "Back In The Days." The documentary will focus on the weekends
that were filled with sunbathers, swimmers, parties, other occasions, and
fellowship. American Beach is a place that should not be forgotten, it is
Black History! For more information on how to tell your story on video
tape, contact Ms. Camilla E. Bush, (904) 356-1402.

35-Year Reunion for Palatka
High School Graduates
Palatka Central and Palatka South High Schools are planning a 35th Year
Reunion for High School Graduates. All who are interested in planning the
reunion are asked to meet at Jenkins Middle School, Saturday, August 9,
2008 at 11 a.m. For more information, call: Sharon Ruth Hunter (904) 766-
9306 or Linda Johns Oliver (904) 692-5904.

NOTICE: Church news is published free of charge. Information must
be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5 p.m. of
the week you want it to run. Information received prior to the event
date will be printed on a space available basis until the date. Fax e-mail
to 765-3803 or e-mail to JFreePress@aol.com.


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church
215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


Pastor Rudolph
McKissick, Sr.
Senior Pastor


Weekly Services


Midweek Services
Wednesday Noon Service
"Miracle at Midday"
12 noon-1 p.m.

Dinner and Bible Study
at 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m.


gCome share In Holy Communion on 1st Sunday at 4:50 ..m,


Pastor Rudolph
McKissick, Jr.
Senior Pastor


Radio Ministry
WCGL 1360 AM Thursday 8:15 -8:45 a.m.
AM 1400 Thursday 7:00 8:00 p.m.
TV Ministry
WTLV Channel 12 Sunday's at 6:30 a.m.


Grace and Peace


* * *A Full Gospel Baptist Church * *


Sunday School
9 a.m.
Morning Worship
10 a.m.
Lord's Supper
Second Sunday
3:00 p.m.
Evening Worship
Every 3rd & 4th
Sunday
4 :00 p.m.


A church

that's on the

move in

worship with

prayer, praise

and power!


Pastor Robert Lecount, Jr

School of Ministry Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.

Thursday High Praise Worship 7:00 p.m.

2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


5863 Moncrief Rd. Jacksonville, FL 3209 (904) 768-8800 FAX 764-3800
I5863 Moncrief Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32209 (904) 768-8800 FAX 764-3800


Sunday Morning Worship
7:40 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.
Church school
9:30 a.m.
The Word from the Sons
and Daughters of Bethel
3rd Sunday 3:30 p.m.


11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday 2 PM 3 PM
**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


July 31-August 6, 2008


Page 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press








'I ta v 31 A Ano 6 2lMPrrys reePres VPaeU


Woodlawn Presbyterian Church
(USA) celebrated the twenty years
of dedicated service of its Pastor,
The Rev. Dr. J. W. Rigsby and his
wife, Lorraine Sturgis Rigsb:,.
with a Celebratory Banquet held
at the Prime Osborn
Convention Center, Saturday,
July 26, 2008. Over four-
hundred family, including
son, Michael and his wife,
Nancy; their daughter, Betty
Williams (Marvin Sr.), and
grandchildren Casia, Dajon,
Marvin Jr., Shawndraugh
and Destiny; friends and
Woodlawn members gathered
to honor Rev. and Mrs. Rigsby.
The festivities included a musi-
cal tribute of his favorite country
songs, a roast and a historical and
youth video presentation.
The Sunday Sermon was deliv-
ered by Rev. Rigsby's colleague and
long time friend, The Rev. Dr.
Frank Colciough of New Harmony
Presbytery, Florence, SC.
A Mississippi, Rev. Rigsby grad-
uated from Stillman College in


Tuscaloosa,
AL, with a BA degree in Sociology
and a minor in philosophy. He
received his Master Divinity
Degree from Johnson C. Smith


Theological Seminary. His Doctor
of Ministry degree wqs earned at
Columbia Theological Seminary in
Atlanta, Georgia.
Rev. Rigsby was the first
African American to be
received and ordained by the
Presbytery of Mississippi
(1967), where he served as
an evangelist for five
years. He served as pastor
of the Washington Shores
Presbyterian Church in
Orlando for two years, but
returned to the Presbytery
of Mississippi totake the
lead in new church develop-
ment.
Woodlawn Presbyterian
Church (USA) welcomed Rev.
Rigsby as pastor on June 19,
1988. Under his leadership
Dr. and Mrs. Woodlawn has
W. Rigsby grown, the annual
budget has more
than doubled, a Family Life Center
erected, and church programs such
as outreach, feeding the homeless,
parenting, an "adopt a family pro-


gram", and the Prison Ministry
which has become the pride of the
membership. Summer Interns have
shared the pulpit gaining valuable
experience and tutelage for the past
five years.
A true shepherd, he spends end-
less hours devoted to visiting sick
and shut-in members. He used his
carpentry skills throughout the
church, as well as, sharing his vol-
leyball, basketball and bowling
skills with the church youth.
Rev. Rigsby has served the
Presbyterian Church (USA) on
the first General Assembly Council,
as commissioner to the General
Assemby, and moderated the
Presbytery three times. He also
served on the General Assembly
Council from 2000-2006, and
served as a delegate to the World
Council and visited the Mission
Fields in Japan. He also served on
the General Assembly Worship
Team.
The community is a better place
because of the presence of Rev. Dr.
J. W. Rigsby.


Woodlawn Celebrates 19th Anniversary


of Pastor and First Lady Rigsby


Sights and Scenes: Mary Singleton Senior Citizens Center


Summer Show and Dance Featured Classic Motown Revue


.. G n (L-R) Cynthia Anderson, Olivia Ellis, Evelyn Ford, Pat Antoniello, Cynthis Anderson, Olivia Ellis,
Veda Williams, Gerald Mackey and Theresa Mackey Cathy Mobley, Gwendolyn Mincey, Resla Jones and Joyce Pittman.


(L-R) Judy Wells, Emma Lovett, Rosa Geiger, Mary Cobb, Jackie Gibbs, Loretta Hagans, Myra Bailey, Mildrded Johnson, Joyce McCall,
Lucille Bess, Gladys Davis, Theresa Barnes, Donna Ailey, Unita Fowler, Gladys Davis and Effie Williams.


Willie Jennings as Stevie Wonder


Lucille Bess, Gladys Davil, Carl Jakson as Percy Sledge and Liz Jackson


Ask DyriUnld

'haLr avd sKvint tips for todays womv"t of ooLor

Hot to Care for Nails
Dyrinda, and crack. What's causing this?
My nails are Like body shape, skin tone, and
always breaking or I guess you hair texture, our nails' ability to
could even call it flaking. I've grow is largely hereditary there
tried acrylic nails but that just are things you can do to avoid
made them weak and even more much of the splitting:
brittle. Can you offer any tips that Protect your nails from water.
I can use to make them stronger? Keep your hands out of H20,
Jasmine- Downtown since water can actually dry out
Well first let me offer a little sci- nails, causing them to split. Be
ence so you can get a better under- sure to wear gloves when doing
standing of your nails. Nails are dishes or cleaning.
made of a hard protein called ker- Apply hand cream religiously.
atin. This protein is one of the Look for a rich formula, which
building blocks which make up will seal moisture into nails, mak-
the body. And your nails are there ing them stronger and more flexi-
for more than just beauty; they are ble.
designed to help protect the ends Limit use of nail polish remover
of your fingers from trauma. to weekly. It contains alcohol and
Everyone should take a good look other chemicals which make nails
at their nails; are they strong and brittle.
healthy-looking? Or do you see Buff instead of polish. Nail pol-
ridges, or areas of unusual color or ish can have a drying effect on
shape? The condition of your weak nails. To get a shiny, pol-
nails may offer clues to your gen- ished effect, try a buffer. The fric-
eral health. Many women are tiont it creates actually stimulates
plagued by fingernails that split nail growth.


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 9


July 31 August 6 2008


The Supremes: Carolyn, Anita, Myra and Betty




















What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene


Forum on Being "P.C."
The Jacksonville Diversity
Network will present a one evening
seminar on "Beyond PC".
Examining the role of political cor-
rectness in our society, nationally
recognized diversity advocate and
author Phillip Milano says, go
ahead. Ask! The free event will
take place on Thursday, July 31st
from 7 8:30 p.m. at the Karpeles
Manuscript Museum, 101 West 1st
Street. For more information call
630-8073.

PRIDE Book Club
August Meeting
P.R.I.D.E. Book Club, the city's
oldest African-American book club,
will have their next meeting on
Saturday, August 2nd from 4:00 -
6:30 PM at the home of Marsha
Phelts in American Beach, Fl. The
book for discussion will be My
Face is Black is True: Callie House
& The Struggle for Ex-Slave
Reparations by Mary Francis Berry.
For directions or more information,
call 904-261-0175.

Financial Workshop
The War on Poverty will be pro-
viding a free financial workshop
called Smart Edge Financial
Fitness. The interactive workshop
will talk about budgeting and cred-
it. It is perfect for those interested in
getting tips on balancing your
budget, maintaining or fixing your


credit and becoming financially fit.
It will be held on Saturday, August
2nd from 10:30 a.m. noon and
12:30 p.m. 2 p.m. at 5196-A
Norwood Avenue. For more infor-
mation, call 766-7275.

Satisfactions Saturdays
Jacksonville, get ready! Saturday,
August 2nd starts the first of many
sophisticated Saturday nights.
Come and enjoy hip hop and R&B
with the mature crowd at Arielles
on Arlington Expressway. Doors
open at 9, ladies free before 11p.m.,
Drink specials, and military dis-
count at the door. Advance tickets
on sale now call 272-7782 for more
information.

Lunch & Learn
with JCCI and JTA
Join JCCI on Tuesday, August 5
from Noon 1:00 for a lunchtime
conversation on: Shaping Our
Transportation Future with Mike
Miller of JTA and Denise
Bunnewith, First Coast MPO. Bring
your own lunch. Water and tea will
be providedat their headquarters on
Atlantic Avenue. Please RSVP to
Chandra at 904-396-3052.

Candidates Forum
The Perkins Bar Association and
the NAACP are sponsoring their
final Candidates Forum on
Saturday, August 5th featuring the
judicial races in July and the house


of representatives, city council and
school board in August. All will
occur at FCCJ downtown starting at
6:30 p.m. Email your questions to
info@dwperkinsbar.org.

Touring Black History
Exhibit at the Ritz
The "America I AM Across
America," traveling exhibition will
visit Jacksonville, Fl on its nation-
wide tour The traveling museum
celebrates African American contri-
butions to the nation through arti-
facts, documents, multimedia, pho-
tos and music. There is also a cus-
tomized mobile recording booth,
where visitors can leave their own
"imprints" as recorded video mes-
sages contributing to the largest oral
history project recorded in US his-
tory. It will be in Jacksonville on
Tuesday, August 5th at the Ritz
Theater from 1- 8 p.m. For more
information, call 632-5555.

First Wednesday
Art Walk Downtown
Art Walk is a free, self-guided tour
of Downtown galleries and muse-
ums, as well as cultural venues,
restaurants and businesses on the
first Wednesday of every month,
rain or shine. Choose your own
route, or begin at Headquarters at
100 N. Laura St. The next one will
be held on Wednesday, August 6th
from 5 9 p.m.


HobNob '08
The Annual Jacksonville Chamber
Hob Nob will be held Thursday,
August 7 from 4:30 7:30 at
Metropolitan Park Park. This year's
event will include the always antic-
ipated Presidential Straw Poll.The
free event is a non-partisan political
venue to meet the candidates run-
ning for office in our upcoming
elections. Food and beverages will
be provided. For more information
call 366-6646.

Aaron Bing in Concert
Jacksonville's own saxophonist
Aaron Bing will be in concert on
Friday, August 8th at 7:30 p.m.
and 10:30 p.m. at the Times Union
Center Terry Theater. For tickets
call 353-3309.

Raines Class of '72
Members of the William M.
Raines Class of 1972 are invited to
attend a reunion planning meeting
on Saturday, August 9 at 4:30pm at
the Bradham-Brooks Northwest
Library on Edgewood Avenue. For
more information, call Ms. Gaffney
at 393-9836.

Storytelling at
Mandarin library
There will be a free storytelling
event for children (ages six and up)
on Tuesday, August 12 at 2:30 p.m.
in the Mandarin Branch Library
(3330 Kori Road). The free event is


I look forward to receiving the Free
Press each and every week. I've even
given several gift subscriptions and
truly feel that it is a viable part of our
community. If you care about what's
going on in our community and our
world, I encourage you to join the Free
Press family!
Rometa Porter, Entrepreneur


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designed to entertain and educate
children about Northeast Florida in
the 1880s. During the program,
"Emma" will give children a look
back into the Golden Era (1880s)
on Amelia Island, and a typical day
in the life of a Victorian Lady.
Following the presentation, there
will be a craft opportunity for chil-
dren, as well as light refreshments.
Parents are encouraged to attend.
For more information on the story-
telling event call (904) 226-3548.

10th Annual Toast
to the Animals
Tickets are now available to the
Jacksonville Humane Society's
10th annual "Toast to the Animals."
The wine tasting event is Aug. 15 at
the Florida Theatre from 6- 9 p.m.
This year's event will feature
gourmet hors d'oeuvres, desserts
and more than 200 varieties of wine
in addition to a live and silent auc-
tion. Tickets are available at
www.jaxhumane.org or by calling
904-725-8766.

Ribault Class of 1978
The Ribault class of 1978 will
have it's 30th social social gathering
on Saturday, August 16, 2008 at the
Commonwealth Holiday Inn start-
ing at 6:30 p.m. Call 651-0567 for
more info or to stay connected.

How to Grow Your
Own Vegetables
Is your grocery bill out of control?
Want to learn some ways to reduce
that bill? Try growing your own
vegetables. The Duval County
Extension Office is offering a
hands-on workshop on how to start
your own vegetables from seeds.
The class will be held on Saturday,
August 16th, from 10 a.m. noon
at the Extension Office, 1010 N.
McDuff Ave. You will take home
your own planted seed try and light
refreshments will be served. Call
387-8850 to pre-register. .

Reggae Legend Beres
Hammond in Concert
Reggae legend Beres Hammond
will be in concert for one show only
at the Plush Nightclub. The show
will be on Thursday, August 21st.
For tickets or more information,
call 353-3309.

An Afternoon with
Charles Cobb, Jr.
The Jacksonville Public Library's
African American Collection
Author Series will feature author
Charles Cobb, Jr. on Saturday,
August 23rd at 2:00 PM Cobb is
the author of On the Road to
Freedom : A Guided Tour of the
Civil Rights Trail.
For more information, call 630-
2415

FCCJ Family Literacy
Fair at North Campus
The Sixth Annual FCCJ Family
Literacy Fair will be held on
Saturday August 23, 2008 from 10
a.m.-2 p.m. It is free and open to the
public. The annual event includes
live performances by celebrity
readers, storytelling, age-appropri-
ate reading activities and lists, free
books, face painting, prizes, sur-
prises and free lunch. For reserva-
tions (appreciated) or more infor-
mation call 904-766-6553.FCCJ's
North Campus is located at 4501
Capper Road.


Gospel Artists Sought
for Talent Showcase
The Jacksonville Gospel
Announcers Guild is looking for
soloists & groups to take part in
their upcoming Gospel Industry
Showcase, Aug. 30th in
Jacksonville. Showcase your talent
to industry professionals, record
company execs, national radio
announcers, Stellar Award board
members and more. For details,
call (904)766-2266 or log onto
www.jaxgag.com.
September PRIDE
Book Club Meeting
PRIDE Book Club will have their
September meeting on Friday,
September 5th at 7 p.m. hosted by
Ros Richardson. The fiction book
for discussion will be "On the
Eighth Day She Rested" by J. D.
Mason. For more information, con-
tact Felice Franklin at 389-8417 or
703-8264.

Sickle Cell
Walk-A-Thon
The time is now to get your teams
together to walk for sickle cell. The
Annual Sickle Cell Walk-A-thon
will be held on Saturday,
September 6, 2008 at Florida
Community College Jacksonville
(FCCJ) Downtown Campus loca-
tion. Registration begins at 8:00
am, the run begins at 9:00 am and
the walk will begin promptly at
9:15 am. If you have any questions,
please call (904) 244-4472 or (904)
353-5737 or email me at
SCDAANFC@comcast.net.

Historical
Documentary
on Consolidation
Viewing at the Library"
The Main Library will host a pro-
gram entitled: "Government by
Gaslight" on Thursday, Oct. 2,
2008. The event will include a
viewing of a documentary that first
aired on Channel 4 in 1966 and
encouraged support for the
Consolidation movement in
Jacksonville. After the viewing,
Harry Reagan and Norm Davis, for-
merly of WJXT-TV4, will discuss
the role of the media in creating
support for Consolidation. It will
begin at 5:45 p.m. in the Hicks
Auditorium Main Library, 303 N.
Laura Street. Call 630-BOOK for
more information.

Panel Discussion
on Consolidation
The Main Library will host a pro-
gram entitled: "A Bold New
Revolution: 40 years later" on
Saturday, Oct. 4, 2008. A modera-
tor and three distinguished scholars
will discuss how Jacksonville has
fared under Consolidated govern-
ment in the 40 years since it was
implemented. The forum will kick
off at 11 a.m. in the Main Library,
Hicks Auditorium, Conference
Level, 303 N. Laura Street. For
more information call 630-BOOK.

Annual Southern
Women's Show
Satisfy your cravings at the
Southern Women's Show! Don't
miss savvy shopping, creative
cooking ideas, healthy lifestyle tips,
trendy fashion shows, great celebri-
ty guests, and fabulous prizes. The
show will be held October 16-19,
2008. For information call (800)
849-0248.


Appeal For Your Excess Clothes
The Millions More Movement Jacksonville Local
Organizing Committee Inc., a non-profit organi-
zation is now in the process of gathering clothes
for it's next 'Clothes Give-A-Way.
Please bring them to 916 N.Myrtle Avenue from
9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday through Saturday.
JLOC will also come pick up your donation.
For more information, vist their website at :
www.jaxloc.com or call 904-240-9133.


m l


July 31 August 6, 2008


Pa e 10 Ms Perr
'
s Free s


I '












Down Low Author Out and About But Says


Black Community Still Stigmatizing Him


FOXY BROWN, LIL KIM SUED OVER
BOOK DEALS: Friends-turned-enemies Foxy
Brown and Lil' Kim found themselves in the same
headline last week as subjects of separate lawsuits from
book publisher Simon & Schuster Inc. The company
says the rappers were paid advances for books they
never delivered. The lawsuits seek return of the money.
Brown, born Inga Marchand, was reportedly paid
$75,000 in 2005 to
deliver an autobiography called "Broken Silence" by February 2006; while
Lil' Kim, real name Kimberly Denise Jones, was paid $40,000 in 2003 for
a novel that was due June 2004.
SAPP IN, SHARPTON OUT OF ABC'S 'DANCING'
Retired NFL star Warren Sapp is among the confirmed celebrities set to
appear on next season's "Dancing with the Stars," while Rev. Al Sharpton
has gone public with his rejection of ABC's offer to join the cast.
The civil rights veteran, who also turned down a request from Donald
Trump to join "Celebrity Apprentice" next season, says he'd rather spend
his time this fall focusing on voter edu-
cation.
KARDASHIAN MAKING
WEDDING PLANS
Kim Kardashian says she's already
making wedding plans in the event that
her boyfriend, NFL star Reggie Bush,
decides to propose. Speaking to Ryan
Seacrest Thursday, Kardashian, 27,
said she will be prepared so that
"whenever I get asked there won't be any drama."
HAIRSPRAY SEQUEL IN THE WORKS
New Line has signed an agreement with "Hairspray" creator John Waters
to write a treatment for a sequel to last year's hit musical film.
None of the original cast, which included Queen Latifah as Motormouth
Maybelle and Elijah Kelly as Seaweed, had sequel options in their original
contracts. But New Line is hoping to reunite the original cast in a film that
will be ready for release by Warner Bros. in mid-July 2010, reports Variety.


JL King became known as the
infamous "Mr. Down Low" after he
guested on "The Oprah Winfrey
Show" and shared the story of his
double life as a loving husband who
had homosexual affairs.
After writing two books on the
subject, King has written a new
novel called "Love on a Two Way
Street," due out tomorrow, that
expects to be just as intriguing.
But the author and speaker
explained that the road to the fic-
tional project (or is it fact?) has
been a bumpy, yet helpful ride.
"They say be careful what you ask
for because it can either be beauti-
ful or it can be hell. I've had expe-
rience in both," King said of "com-
ing out" about his life a few years
back. "Because I came forward and
pulled back a cover of a behavior
that's been going around since the
beginning of time, I then became
the poster boy of that type of behav-
ior, even though I came forward
and said I've changed."
King protested that even though
he's no longer on the down low, no
longer one of those "brothers that
lie to women," he still can't shake
the title and the ridicule.
"I am one who wants to let people
know that this type of behavior
exists and it looks like me," he said,
"but the African American commu-
nity did not let me change."


Uncle Luke Finally Takes a Bride


Luke Campbell, former frontman
of 2 Live Crew, heard wedding
bells instead of beatboxing and
picket lines as he and Kristin
Thompson tied the knot in Dallas,
Texas.
"I waited 47 years to find a special
woman and have found that in
Kristin," said Campbell. "I never
knew that I could feel love on
another level like this until I met
her, and I am now honored to call
her my wife."
The stars of the upcoming VHi
reality series: Luke's Parental
Advisory tied the knot in front of
300 guests at Saint Luke
Community Methodist Church, fol-
lowed by a reception at the Opus
Grand Ballroom at Hotel Palomar.
Thompson, 27, who serves as gen-


S^/





Mr. and Mrs. Luke Campbell
eral counsel for Campell's company
Luke Entertainment, wore a wed-
ding gown by Monique Lhuillier.


CASINO AND RESORT


Doug E. Fresh deejayed and per-
formed, keeping guests, including
Arizona Cardinal Edgerrin James,
on the dance floor until the early
morning. Soul singer Betty Wright
serenaded the happy couple. Their
first dance was to Brian McKnight's
"Back At One."
Campbell and Thompson met at
Jerry's Deli in Miami Beach two
years ago. He proposed to her on
Halloween last year. This is the first
marriage for both. Campbell has
two children from a previous rela-
tionship. .
Luke's Parental Advisory pre-
mieres Aug. 4 at 10:30 p.m. on
VH1. The wedding will be featured
on the season finale in September.
V Wilson photo


King said that his wife has forgiv-
en him, his children have forgiven
him, and even the church has for-
given him but the community as a
whole has not.
"That's not who I am anymore.
People just refuse to allow me to
change. For some reason, they got a
rush out of being near or knowing
Mr. Down Low," he said.
King has since become an
HIV/STD prevention activist, edu-
cator, and author and said that he
does go into his Mr. Down Low
personality as needed in those
cases.
"Sometimes I'm Mr. Down Low
because an organization or a health
department or a group wants to
see what it is to be around
a person who lies about
who he is," he
explained. "And/
then there are
people that let
me be this
changed indi-
vidual who had
become an
example of what
other men who live
on the double life
should live their life -
and be honest with their
women, and give their women
a choice."
One thing that has come out of his
revelation to the world has been
that he's become an answer key in
some cases too thousands of men
and women who have concerns
about the "down low" issue.
"About a month a go I probably
received my 150,000th question
from women asking me what are
the signs of being on the down low.
Wherever I go, whether I'm at a
restaurant, a bar, or at church,
women come up to me and say, 'I
want to know what are the signs.
How can I tell?' So I am in the stu-
dio right now putting together a
two-hour DVD called 'The Top 10
Down Low Signs and More.'"
'n-' King hope the DVD will help,
women in particular recognize the
signs of when their man is cheating,
whether it be with men or women.
"And I'm hoping that that will


ease the fear that a lot of our women
are dealing with everyday," he said
and continued that he's found that a
number of women have fallen into
an attitude of mistrust of black men,
thanks in part to his books.
"They say, 'Every black man is
on the down low; every black man
that came out of prison must be
gay; every black man that spends
time with his friends must be on the
down low. Everything thing that
brothers do, women are accusing
them of being on the down low."
Interestingly, King is also getting
requests from men, too. He said that
literal-


1 y
thousands of men plead with him to
let sisters know that not all black
men are on the down low.
"This has caused a lot of damage
between men and women. It has
caused a lot of unnecessary para-
noia in the black community
because of me coming forward and
sitting with Oprah talking about my
life," he said.
But the paranoia may not be that
unnecessary.
"At the same time, HIV is still
running rampant," King added.
"The CDC says that the number one
way is through heterosexual con-
tact. There is still a lot to feed that
fear." -
Still King assures his audiences
that there is no need to be afraid of
black men.
"This behavior impacts every eth-


nic group," he said. "You have to be
careful who you get to know. Don't
rush to go to bed with someone.
Know their HIV status. Get to know
them first. I tell a lot of young peo-
ple when I do my HBCU tours that
it's ok to abstain from sex. You
don't have to be sexually active and
you don't need a man in your life.
Learn to love yourself more and
you'll be ok."
With the questions and suspicions,
however, King said he doesn't
regret making his confession and
talking about it to the world.
"I truly believe that God chose
me to do this. There are thousands
of men who could have told their
S story about being on the
down low that
could've created
the same wave,
but I believe
that God
/\ chose me. I
Sf think that
he used me
and he
saved me
H from being
HIV positive
and hurting my
wife or anything
more destructive than
I did Showed me that I
could .stand forward and be that
poster boy and talk about my life,"
he said.
King said that it's important to
him that women see him as some-
one who doesn't "look" gay, but
rather looks like their husbands and
boyfriends. He believes that that
teaches women to be responsible
and not just "give up their bodies
because of a look, a job, a title, or
education."
"That's what I've been trying to
do. Trying to let people know that
that's who I used to be, that's not
who I am today, that there are good
brothers out there who are not lying
and more importantly, it's about
behavior and going into healthy
relationships." j . _
King's "Top 10 Signs of Down
Low Behavior" is available on July
29. Check his website at www.jlk-
ing.net.


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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 11


July 31-August 4, 2008













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