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The Jacksonville free press ( June 19, 2008 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Jacksonville free press
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - AKN0341
oclc - 19095970
alephbibnum - 002042477
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00173

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Jacksonville free press
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough
Rita Luffborough Perry
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - AKN0341
oclc - 19095970
alephbibnum - 002042477
lccn - sn 95007355
issn - 1081-3349
System ID:
UF00028305:00173

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

Full Text




Tuskeegee
Airmen to be
Tackled by Mega
Movie Producer
Georga Lucas of
Star Wars Fame
Page 1


1


Community
Advocate Helen
,Jackson Works
Tirelessly to Educate
and Improve
Our Health
Page 8


Nascar Female
Employee
Launches $225
Million Dollar
Discrimination,
Sexism Lawsuit
Page 2


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Volume 22 No. 8 Jacksonville, Florida June 19-25, 2008

Does America Still Need Affirmative Action ?
by J. Farley for past discrimination. There is no inated), African Americans, far more likely than the rest of
Few issues have been as contro- need to fall back on PAST discrim- Hispanic Americans, and American Americans to grow up in neighbor-
versial in the workplace and on col- nation to justify affirmative action, Indians face grossly unequal oppor- hoods where many or most people
lege campuses as affirmative action and it may have been a major tacti- tunity in American society. are poor because nearly all the
-- in large part because so many cal error for its supporters to rely so Consider the following facts. good-paying jobs have fled the
blacks and whites have been per- much on past discrimination as a If you are born as a member of any neighborhood or been automated
sonally affected in ways both good justification of affirmative action. of these groups, you will be two to out of existence in the past few
and bad. In fact, there is plenty of justifica- three times as likely to be bom into decades. (Or, if you are American
Today, affirmative action is under tion to be found in the present. Two poverty, and up to twice as likely to Indian, on a reservation on land the
unprecedented attack. Its opponents decades of study and research in die before reaching the age of one whites didn't want in the first place,
cry, "Unfair reverse discrimina- race and ethnic relations reveal year, as you would if you were born and where the good-paying jobs
tion!", while its supporters seek to even with affirmative action (and white. If you are lucky enough to never existed.)
justify it as a way of compensating much more so if it were to be elim- survive that first year, you will be Continued on page 9


Shown above are newly inducted Links Felicia Cruse, Rometa Porter
and Phillis Varnado holding the organization's symbolic white rose
following their induction into the Bold City Chapter.


The Bold City Chapter of
Links.Inc inducted three new
members into their chain of friend-
ship and service at a private cere-
mony, held at the Hyatt Hotel.
Members of the social and com-
munity service organization were
ceremoniously dressed in white to
witness the sacred occasion of wel-
coming new sisters among their
ranks officiated by Southern Area
Financial Secretary Katherine
Wilson.The event also culminated
their work year marking their fif-


teenth anniversary of service to the
community. Their upcoming work
year includes hosting a 1,000+
attendee conference for Links
throughout the Southern Area,
establishing a career wear closet
for students at Edward Waters
College and continuing their pro-
gram to assist over age middle
school males in addition to new
programs to combat the increasing
epidemic of youth obesity. The
chapter is under the leadership of
Ruth Waters, President.


Mobley Mosley Nuptials
The former Renarda T. Mobley and Reginald C. Mosley were wed in
Holy Matrimony last weekend at Mount Olive Baptist Church in a double
ring wedding ceremony. Officiating the occasion was the Bride's parents
Dr. Barbara Mims and Pastor Rudolph Mims.Renarda Mobley is employed
by St. Lukes Hospital, the groom is an audit manager for Howard Johnson
Hotels. Following a honeymoon in Orlando, the couple will reside in
Jacksonville. R. Silver Photo.


Grand Lodge Among Flag Day Celebrants


Lawrence Sims P.M.W.GM., Richard Mack, City Councilwoman Glorious Johnson, Dr. Johnny McCray P.M.W.G.M., Grand Master Michael
Moore, Henry Simmons, P.M.W.G.M. and Henry Williams. FMP Photo
Although the upcoming 4th of July Holiday is the day we celebrate America's birthday, this past June 14th marked the annual celebration of Flag Day.
Flag Day is a day commemorating the adoption of the Stars and Stripes as the official flag of the United States. Betsy Ross sewed the first American
flag in 1776 and it has since become a symbol of freedom and democracy. This year, the annual celebration in Jacksonville included a parade and rally
in downtown Jacksonville. Shown above participating and proudly showing the colors are members of the Most Worshipful Union Grand Lodge
F.E.A.M.P.H.A of Florida. Also joining there were members of the ILA, Solomon's Lodge, Boilermakers Local 199 and the Morocco Temple.


PIRST STD
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June 19-25, 2008


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NASCAR Hit With Racism, Sexism Claims.



NASCAR Hit With Racism, Sexism Claims


by J. Fryar
As an aspiring racing official,
Mauricia Grant had grown used
to working in a man's world.
When she finally made it into
NASCAR, Grant was appalled at
the way she says she was treated
beginning from her first day on
the job until her firing last
October.
Now she's suing NASCAR for
$225 million, alleging racial and
sexual discrimination, sexual
harassment and wrongful termi-
nation.
"I loved it. It was a great, excit-
ing, adrenaline-filled job where I
worked with fast cars and the best
drivers in the world," Grant told
The Associated Press. "But there
was an ongoing daily pattern (of
harassment). It was the nature of


the people I worked with, the peo-
ple who ran it, it trickled down
from the top.
"It's just the way things are in
the garage."
The 32-year-old Grant, who is
black, worked as a technical
inspector responsible for certify-
ing cars in NASCAR's second-
tier Nationwide Series from


When packing up a
Motor Speedway an


January 2005 until her termina-
tion. In the lawsuit, she alleged
she was referred to as "Nappy
Headed Mo" and "Queen Sheba,"
by co-workers, was often told she


NASCAR official Tim Knox, right, takes measurements on the
car of driver Stephen Leicht before practice for the Busch Series
Food City 250 auto race at Bristol Motor Speedway in Bristol,
Tenn. Knox and official Bud Moore have been placed on indefi-
nite administrative paid leave. NASCAR will not reveal the identi-
ties of the officials sent home Friday from Kentucky Speedway.
The person requested anonymity because NASCAR's investigation
is ongoing. NASCAR did not give a reason for the men's suspen-
sion, and chairman Brian France cautioned against assuming the
officials are being punished for allegations made in a lawsuit by
Mauricia Grant.


Save N

By Jason Alderman
Between skyrocketing prescrip-
tion drug prices, rising insur-
ance copayments and an aging
population, it's not surprising
more and more people are hav-
ing difficulty paying for their
medications.
If that sounds like you or
someone you know, here are a
few money-saving tips:
Go generic. Unlike generic
cereal or soup, where quality
varies, generic drugs by law
must conform to strict Food and
Drug Administration guidelines
for quality, strength, purity and
stability. Generics usually cost a
fraction of brand-name counter-
parts, and many insurance plans
assign them significantly lower
copayments. Ask your doctor or
pharmacist if generic equiva-
lents exist for your medications.
Bulk up. Many insurers
encourage ordering routinely
taken drugs in larger quantities
from mail-order pharmacies.
For example, a 90-day supply of
blood-pressure medication
might have the same copayment
as a 30- or 60-day supply.
Multiply that by several drugs
over a year and savings could
really add up.
Shop around. Because prices
often vary widely, call or check
Websites of several pharmacies,


worked on "colored people time,"
and was frightened by one official
who routinely made references to
the Ku Klux Klan.
In addition, Grant said she was
subjected to sexual advances
from male co-workers, two of
whom allegedly exposed them-
selves to her, and graphic and
lewd jokes.


dark garage at Texas
official told Grant:


The lawsuit, filed last week in
the U.S. District Court for the
Southern District of New York,
lists 23 specific incidents of
alleged sexual harassment and 34
specific incidents of alleged racial
and gender discrimination begin-
ning when she was hired in
January 2005 through her
October 2007 firing.
NASCAR spokesman Ramsey
Poston said the organization had
not yet reviewed the suit.
"As an equal opportunity
employer, NASCAR is fully com-
mitted to the spirit and letter of
affirmative action law," Poston
said, adding NASCAR has a zero
tolerance policy for harassment.
In the lawsuit, Grant said she
complained numerous times to
her supervisors about how she
was treated, to no avail. On one
occasion, Grant said Nationwide
Series director Joe Balash, her
immediate supervisor, was dis-
missive of her complaints,
explaining her co-workers were
"former military guys" with a
rough sense of humor. "You just
have to deal with it," she says
Balash told her.
On another occasion, she
alleged Balash participated in the
harassment.
"Does your workout include an


urban obstacle course with a flat-
screen TV on your back?" she
claimed Balash asked her during
the week of July 28, 2007 while
working in Indianapolis.
Grant said her two younger sis-
ters witnessed racial discrimina-
tion against the official while vis-
iting her at Daytona International
Speedway in 2006 and encour-
aged her to document every inci-
dent going forward.
The lawsuit details a series of
those alleged incidents:
Grant was forced to work out-
side more often than the white
male officials because her super-
visors believed she couldn't sun-
burn because she was black.
-While riding in the backseat of
her car pool at Talladega
Superspeedway, co-workers told
her to duck as they passed race
fans. "I don't want to start a riot
when these fans see a black
woman in my car," she claims one
official said.
When packing up a dark garage
at Texas Motor Speedway an offi-
cial told Grant: "Keep smiling
and pop your eyes out 'cause we
can't see you."
When she ignored advances
from co-workers, Grant was
accused of being gay. She also
claimed co-workers questioned
the sexual orientation of two
other female officials.
After her termination, Grant
said she went over her notes and
recognized "a pattern of retalia-
tion and discrimination."
"It didn't diminish my love for
the sport of auto racing, but the
job wasn't always the easiest
thing to go to every day," she
said.
Grant said she routinely com-
plained to her supervisors. Two
weeks after her final complaint,
Grant said she was warned dur-
ing the week of August 18, 2007
at Michigan International


loney on Prescriptions


including
online-only
chains, to
find the best
deal. Two
cautions: In
addition to
your doctor,
make sure at
least one
pharmacist is
aware of all
medications
you take
(including
over-the-
counter) to


prevent acci-
dental drug interactions; and use
only online pharmacies certified
by the National Association of
Boards of Pharmacy .
Pill splitting. Many drugs
come in double-dosage tablets
that cost close to or the same as
a lower dosage. By splitting the
larger dosage in half, you essen-
tially get two doses for the price
of one. Caution: Many pills
should never be split, including
time-release and coated medica-
tions, so always ask your doctor
or pharmacist first.
Drug assistance programs.
Most pharmaceutical companies
offer patient assistance pro-
grams (PAPs) that provide unin-
sured and low-income people


access to prescrip-
f tion drugs they
couldn't otherwise
afford. There's lots
of paperwork, but
you can save hun-
dreds or thousands
J of dollars if you
meet their eligibil-
ity requirements.
Ask your doctor,
pharmacist or
health clinic how
to proceed, or visit
Partnership for
Prescription
Assistance
~- -~ (www.pparx.org),
which has enrollment informa-
tion on over 475 public and pri-
vate PAPs, including links to
Medicaid programs. Also help-
ful are RxAssist (www.rxas-
sist.org), NeedyMeds
(www.needymeds.com) and
Consumer Reports, which
explains how PAPs work (at
www.crbestbuydrugs.org, click
on "Prescription Drug
Assistance Programs").
Medicare. Medicare benefici-
aries can sign up for Medicare
Part D, which provides prescrip-
tion drug coverage through
dozens of plans offered by pri-
vate insurers. Monthly premi-
ums, copayment amounts, out-
of-pocket limits and drugs cov-


ered under the plans vary con-
siderably, so you'll need to be
very careful when choosing the
best plan for your situation.
Another good resource is
AARP's comprehensive guide
to Medicare at
www.aarp.org/health/medicare.
Note that extra assistance with
premium payments is available
to low-income people. And,
unless you turn 65 or otherwise
become eligible for Medicare
during the year (for example,
through a qualifying disability),
you'll need to wait for next
year's open enrollment period in
mid-November to join.
Tax advantages. If your
employer offers a health care
flexible spending account
(FSA), sign up. You can use pre-
tax dollars to pay for prescrip-
tion and over-the-counter med-
ications, as well as other health-
care-related expenses, reducing
your taxable income and there-
by lowering your taxes substan-
tially. To learn how FSAs work,
visit Visa's free personal finan-
cial management site, Practical
Money Skills for Life
(www.practicalmoneyskills.co
m/benefits.)
Bottom line: Don't let your
health suffer because of high
medication costs.


Government Says Get Used to $4 Gas


Motorists can expect gasoline
prices around $4 a gallon
through next year, with oil prices
staying well above $100 a barrel.
Crude oil prices are likely to
average $126 a barrel in 2009, $4
higher than this year, as oil sup-
plies and demand are expected to
remain tight, Guy Caruso, head
of the department's Energy
Information Administration, told
a House hearing.
Gasoline prices are likely to
peak at $4.15 a gallon in August
and won't go down much after
that, the agency projected in a
report. Gasoline was forecast to
average $3.92 a gallon through
2009.
The agency said that the high


price of gasoline has reduced
expected summer demand but
not enough to dampen prices.
Caruso told House members
that new auto fuel economy
requirements and the increased
use of ethanol and other alterna-
tive fuels are expected to pro-
duce "a substantial reduction" in
oil use and oil imports over the
next two decades.
Predicting future oil and gaso-
line prices is highly uncertain
with the volatile global oil mar-
kets, Caruso acknowledged. The
agency projects oil prices declin-
ing to $86 a barrel in 2010 and
then increasing to $107 by 2015.
Overall U.S. oil consumption is
expected decline over the next


two decades because of the pro-
duction of more fuel-efficient
cars and the growing use of
ethanol as a motor fuel, Caruso
said. Both were required by
Congress last December.
Crude prices, meanwhile,
soared Wednesday well above
Caruso's projections as his
agency announced that U.S. oil
inventories fell more than
expected last week. Light, sweet
crude for July delivery jumped
$4.50 to nearly $136 a barrel on
the New York Mercantile
Exchange.
Oil inventories fell by 4.6 mil-
lion barrels last week, a much
larger amount than had been pre-
dicted by analysts.


- Comparison shop. Be a
proactive consumer. Don't just
pay the high prices at the clos-
est station. Shop around to find
the most competitive price in
town. Visit www.
gasprices.mapquest.com to
compare prices in your area.
Slow It Down Gas mileage
decreases rapidly at speeds
above 60 mph, costing an addi-
tional 10 cents per gallon.
Aggressive driving can lower
gas mileage by as much as 33%
on the highway and 5% on city
streets, resulting in 7 cents to
49 cents per gallon. Next time
you get in your car stay calm,
cool, and collected put your car
on cruise control.


Former NASCAR techni-
cal inspector Mauricia
Grant is shown in the pits
at Daytona International
Speedway in Daytona
Beach, Fla. Grant worked
as a technical inspector
for NASCAR's second-tier
Nationwide Series from
January 2005 until she
was fired last October and
is suing NASCAR for $225
million, alleging racial and
sexual discrimination,
sexual harassment and
wrongful termination.

Speedway that she had engaged
in "conduct unbecoming of a
NASCAR representative" and
would be fired unless she
changed her behavior. She said
the warning stemmed from a con-
frontation with a track official
who stopped her as she passed
through a gate to use the rest-
room.
Roughly two months later, Grant
was fired, and NASCAR cited a
poor work performance in ending
her employment. The lawsuit
claims other than a previous
warning for using "street" lan-
guage, Grant had never been dis-
ciplined for job performance and
routinely received positive
reviews.
"It is time for NASCAR to real-
ize that not everybody is going to
be bought off and not file a com-
plaint," said Grant's attorney,
Benedict P. Morelli of Morelli
Ratner PC. "Not everybody is
going to be intimidated and not
file a complaint. Not everybody is
going to be blackballed and not
file a complaint."


In addition, the suit claims offi-
cial Heather Gambino was fired
in 2006 for complaining about a
sexually hostile work environ-
ment. The suit also claims former
official Dean Duckett, who is
black, was reprimanded and ulti-
mately fired last November for
using "aggressive language
toward a white co-worker."
Among those identified in
Grant's suit are Balash, assistant
series director Mike Dolan,
supervisors Alan Shephard and
Dennis Dillon, NASCAR's senior
manager for business relations,
the human resources director and
17 of Grant's fellow officials. All
of the defendants are white.
"My supervisors all praised me.
I was hanging in there with the
guys," she said. "I am an athletic
person. I went over the wall and
faced malicious crews and com-
petitive crew chiefs, and I was
right there and held it down and
was never lazy about it.
"And I knew that once I was ter-
minated, there wasn't going to be
an opportunity for me to find


MD Couple Indicted in


$35M Mortgage Scam


Above is the couple at their $800K wedding where Patti LaBelle sang
and 360 guests ate lobster and shrimp and drank Cristal champagne.


Federal authorities charged a
Prince George's County couple this
week with running a $35 million
foreclosure rescue operation that
duped lenders and homeowners
facing foreclosure.
Joy Jackson, 40, president of
Metropolitan Money Store of
Lanham,MD and her husband, Kurt
Fordham, 38, were arrested in
North Carolina. They are both
charged with charged with conspir-
acy to commit mail and wire fi-aud,
six counts of money laundering,
and 15 counts of mail fraud to
obtain money and property from
homeowners and lenders.
In a 25-count indictment, prose-
cutors allege that Jackson and
Fordham, and six other defendants
used money from the elaborate
scheme to pay for a lavish lifestyle
that included luxury cars, houses,
jewelry, fur coats and travel.
Prosecutors said Metropolitan
Money Store preyed on homeown-
ers facing foreclosure. The compa-
ny would allegedly use a "straw
buyer" to purchase a home and tell
the owners that they could continue
living there and then buy it back
after a year. But Metropolitan
would allegedly borrow as much as
possible against the value of the
home, siphoning off the equity and
making it impossible for the former
owners to buy it back.
The charges carry a maximum of
30 years in prison and a $1 million
fine for each of the mail fraud


counts.
According to the indictment, the
defendants, as part of the scheme,
told desperate homeowners that
Metropolitan Money Store and
companies headed by Fordham and
Clifford would help them repair
their damaged credit before giving
them back the titles to their homes.
The indictment also says the
defendants fraudulently bolstered
the credit of the straw buyers to
qualify for mortgages and paid
them $10,000 to participate in the
scheme. After obtaining inflated
loans on the properties, the defen-
dants stopped making mortgage
payments, which resulted in the
homes going into foreclosure, fed-
eral officials said.
"The alleged actions of those
indicted fed on people pursuing the
American Dream, turning those
dreams into an American
Nightmare," FBI Special Agent
Amy Lyons said.
I The Maryland labor and licensing
department, which is credited with
alerting federal officials to the
scheme, began investigating
Metropolitan in November 2006
after receiving complaints from
homeowners.
Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley
(D) applauded the investigation that
led to the indictments. The state
worked with the FBI, the U.S. attor-
ney's office, the Secret Service and
the Internal Revenue Service on the
case.


"Keep smiling and pop your eyes out 'cause
we can't see you. "


13-1111, 7 N4Q Fri-.i-. Prt-..Q.v












NFL Player Lito Shephard Sponsoring Fitness ,

Camp for Kids to Combat Youth Obesity


Philadelphia Eagle cornerback
Lito Sheppard is coming home to
Duval County and wants to help get
Jacksonville youth get in shape.
Lito is sponsoring a free fitness
camp for 500 youth in elementary
and middle school on Saturday,
June 21 at Eugene Butler Middle
School on Jacksonville's
Northwestside. The camp will be
held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
"I enjoy playing football but more
importantly I enjoy being able to
give back to the community, espe-
cially youth in Jacksonville. I hope
that this camp will inspire them to
live healthier lives and know that
you can have fun and be fit at the
same time".


Shephard attended Raines H.S.


Obesity among young children
and youth is at an all time high.
Lito has established this camp to
encourage kids to exercise and have
fun is the process. The camp will
be an exciting and lively event with
music, games and professional ath-
letes to assist with the activities.
Lito wants to encourage the
Jacksonville community to get
involved and enjoy this introduc-
tion to a healthier life.
To sign up for the free camp or get
more information visit
www.lito26sheppard.com or con-
tact Sharon Turner at 260-580-
0373.
The camp is free of charge.


Student Imari Bratcher Wins Congressional Art Contest


tion, each winner has the opportuni-
ty to qualify for an art scholarship.
Imari competed against 10 other
Jacksonville high school students.
During the competition Imari had
the chance to meet with
Congresswoman Corrine Brown.
Imari's winning piece will go on
display next week and will stay on
display for one year.


Shown above are Verdell Griffin, Patricia Singleton, Mayme Clark, Dollie Mathieu, honoree Gail Shipp,
Nathaniel Foley and Carol Davis at the party. She is holding a pictirial display of her teaching career pre-
sented to her. KFP Photo.
Friends and Family Throw Surprise Retirement Party

for Educator Gail Shipp Recognizing 39 Years of Service
Duval County teacher Gail Shipp was feted with a surprise retirement party at the Boobie Clark Community
Center by family and friends. Ms. Shipp taught at Northwestern for 31 years with her remaining 8 years at A.
Phillip Randolph Academy. In addition to music and great food, the celebration was highlighted with a tribute
from her Northwestern colleagues, Frances Mitchell and Alice Nixon. After working to serve students for so many
years, Ms. Shipp says she now plans to play tennis, learn fencing and to take voice lessons.


Federal Courts Reduce Sentences in Crack Cocaine Cases


Douglas Anerson School of the
Arts student Imari Bratcher (15),
recently won first place in District
Three's 2008 Congressional Art
Contest. Sponsored by the
Congressional Art Caucus, the art
contest allows student across the
country to participate in their local
congressional district contests for a
chance to have their own piece of


art work in the U.S. Capitol
Building for one year.
The official art competition is
sponsored annually by the
Congressional Art Caucus. Winners
from all districts receive round trip
airline tickets for them and two
guests to Washington, D.C. to see
their piece in the U.S. Capitol
Building's Cannon Tunnel. In addi-


Since 1986, Congress has man-
dated that the federal courts impose
significantly longer sentences when
defendants are convicted of traf-
ficking in crack cocaine as com-
pared to powder cocaine. If a defen-
dant is convicted of distributing 50
grams of crack cocaine, he or she
will automatically be sentenced to
10 years in federal prison. In con-
trast, if a defendant is convicted of
distributing the same amount of
powder cocaine, he or she will only
be sentenced to between one and
two years. It takes 5,000 grams of
powder cocaine before a defendant
faces an automatic 10-year sen-
tence. In other words, it requires
possession of 100 times more pow-
der cocaine to receive the same sen-
tence for the same crime committed


with crack cocaine.
These sentencing laws have been
under enormous criticism over the
last 20 years because they have
resulted in undeniable racial dis-
crimination. According to the
American Bar Association, 82 per-
cent of those sentenced under feder-
al crack cocaine laws have been
African-American despite the fact
that 66percent of those who use
crack cocaine are Caucasian or
Hispanic. Consequently, African-
Americans have spent substantially
more time in federal prison for drug
offenses than their Caucasian coun-
terparts. In addition, since crack
cocaine is made from powder
cocaine, the crack/powder disparity
ends up penalizing low-level crack
dealers with greater severity than


big time powder suppliers.
In an attempt to address this long-
standing inequity, Congress direct-
ed the Sentencing Commission to
conduct scientific studies on the
overall impact of the crack/powder
cocaine disparity. Since 1995, the
Sentencing Commission has sub-
mitted four reports to Congress all
of which acknowledge that the
100:1 crack/powder cocaine dispar-
ity, resulting in highly dispropor-
tionate sentences, is unwarranted.
The first report, authored by the
Commission in May of 1995, rec-
ommended that Congress give
equal treatment to crack and pow-
der cocaine. However, Congress
rejected this recommendation.
The United States Supreme Court
has recently chastised Congress for


creating this distinction between
crack and powder cocaine, expos-
ing the fact that Congress based its
two-tiered system on assumptions
rather than quantitative science.
In Kimbrough v. United States, 128
S. Ct. 558, 568-69 (2007), the High
Court acknowledged that empirical
data indicates that crack and pow-
der cocaine are two forms of the
same drug; that the active ingredi-
ent in powder and crack cocaine is
the same; and that the two forms of
the drug also have the same physio-
logical and psychotropic effects.
Consequently, the Court in
Kimbrough concluded that federal
district courts could ignore guide-
line ranges which fix crack cocaine
sentences significantly higher than
powder cocaine sentences.


Shown above is Imari Butcher with Cong. Corrine Brown


COUNCILWOMAN MIA JONES


invites you to a


Community Meeting


DISCUSSION TOPIC:

Stormwater Fee Exemption; Do you Qualify?


COJ Representatives will be available to address any questions you may
have concerning the exemption criteria and assist in completing the form.


Tuesday, June 17th, 2008

6:00 p.m.

Edward H. White High School Auditorium

1700 Old Middleburg Rd

Jacksonville, FL 32210
(Principal: Jim Clark)
(904) 693-7620


Monday, June 23rd, 2008
Time: 6:00 p.m.

William M. Raines High School Auditorium
3663 Raines Ave
Jacksonville, FL 32209
(Principal: Nongongoma Majova-Seane)
(904) 924-3049


Call 630-1684 to confirm your attendance and or with questions.

Bring a neighbor with you!


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 3


June 19-25, 2008









June 19-25, 2008


Pnot A Ms Prms ree res


rageybrItvAI


CDCs are Slowly Changing Neighborhoods


All you have to do is drive down
Chase or Norwood Avenues and
take a look around. Initially you
will see some pretty average homes
or even some blighted residences,
but you will also see a transforma-
tion taking place.
Old grown up lots that were once
dumping grounds and eyesores
have been replaced by quality
affordable housing. Houses that
were falling apart and havens for
illegal activity have been torn
down and replaced with two-story
stucco and brick homes.
No, the city hasn't come in and
bought up houses, nor are private
developers building these quality
homes. If you go into the North
Riverside area or 29th and Chase
community or even North
Brookside (north of Gateway Mall)
you will see the work of several
not-for-profit community develop-
ment corporations or CDCs.
Although the CDC phenomenon
has been around for a while now
many of our local organizations are
still not very well known through-
out the city. Most people have
heard of Habijax or Habitat for
Humanity, and most CDCs operate
like them, but the product and
financing is different.
Not to take anything away from
Habijax, but most of our neighbor-
hood-based CDCs are building
high quality energy efficient homes
that are comparable or better than
many private builders.
According to Wikipedia, the
online encyclopedia, "A
Community Development
Corporation (CDC) is a broad term
referring to not-for-profit organiza-
tions incorporated to provide pro-
grams, offer services and engage in
other activities that promote and
support a community."
The online encyclopedia also
says, "CDCs usually serve a geo-


graphic location such as a neigh-
borhood or a town. They often
focus on serving lower-income res-
idents or struggling neighbor-
hoods."
Jacksonville's CDCs have
become a critical lifeline to some
of our most challenged communi-
ties. And this infusion of new
homes and other community devel-
opment projects is stabilizing com-
munities and providing quality
housing for everyone from low-
income families to young profes-
sionals as well.
As Florida continues to grow, the
need for quality affordable housing
will also grow. According to
Florida TaxWatch, a not for profit
organization, Florida is the only
state where the rate of increase in
housing has accelerated every year
since 2000.
The American Dream is to own a
nice house in a nice neighborhood,
but that dream often is not easily
accomplished. One of the reasons
CDCs are able to do so well is
because there been a move by
many new homeowners to move
back into core city communities.
Many city governments are now
providing the resources that devel-
opers and not-for-profits need to
provide quality infill affordable
housing. But even with this resur-
gence of infill housing and devel-
opment this city and many others
still suffer from a lack of opportu-
nities for families in need.
When new subdivisions are built,
new infrastructure is built. And
building standards have changed so
much. For example, the state now
requires retention ponds for all new
development. So if you are build-
ing a new neighborhood, church,
convenient store, etc. you have to
be able to hold and treat your water
run-off. That was not the case when
most of the inner-city communities


were built.
One of the biggest problems with
retrofitting or constructing infra-
structure projects in urban areas is
that you have to use today's stan-
dards, which increase project costs.
Normally it is much more expen-
sive to tear up an existing road and
repipe it for water and sewer than it
is to build a new infrastructure sys-
tem under and new road. So CDCs
face challenges that many for prof-
it developers do not.
But that's why governments and
local public officials have to
encourage and support CDCs. They
are doing work that for profit
developers will not do because
there is in many cases no or very
little profit in these infill housing
developments.
Even as we weather this foreclo-
sure storm in Jacksonville and
nationwide, community develop-
ment corporations are still able to
help individuals and families get
into homes.
Many of these not-for-profits use
the Head Start to HOME
Ownership (H2H) Program, which
provides financial aid in the form
of down payment and closing cost
assistance to eligible families and
individuals interested in buying a
home.
Programs like H2H have been
critical to the infill housing market
in Jacksonville. CDCs are able to
get folks into homes below the
appraised value of the property,
which means homeowner are walk-
ing into the door with equity built
up.
It takes more than a vision and
neighborhood in need to make a
CDC work. Local Initiatives
Support Corporation (LISC) plays
a pivotal role in the success of our
local CDCs.
In 1999, Joni Foster opened the
Jacksonville LISC office. LISC


Jacksonville started with a simple
goal of building a strong and effec-
tive nonprofit community develop-
ment industry in Duval County.
Back then I had just been elected
to City Council and didn't quite
understand what LISC was and cer-
tainly didn't know what CDCs
were.
Because of Foster's passion for
community redevelopment and her
ability not to take no for answer she
was able to lay the foundations of
what we have today a successful
CDC network.
From Springfield and the
Eastside to North Main and North
Riverside, LISC and its CDC part-
ners are leaving a positive mark on
Jacksonville's housing industry.
And I can't stress enough the fact
that the housing that CDCs are pro-
viding is not simply for low-
income families. You might be sur-
prised when you look at the hous-
ing stock and the individuals pur-
chasing homes.
It's not the working poor that are
building new homes, but many
young professionals are taking
advantage of H2H and other hous-
ing initiatives.
We are talking about teachers,
firemen, journalist, and a slew of
other young professionals and fam-
ilies. That's why the terms
"Workforce Housing" is being used
more often than affordable housing
these days.
So if you know of someone who
is interested in owning a home for
the first time there are quality
affordable options available to him
or her. Just give your friendly
neighborhood CDC a call North
Jax CDC, Metro North CDC,
Grace and Truth CDC, RADO,
Operation New Hope and several
others.
Signing off from Grace and Truth
CDC, Reggie Fullwood


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Go Get a Job

by William Reed
els of social organizatLike legendafrican ARoman Fddlers, Afrmcan Americans
,stood starry-eyed in June when the numbers showed



Senatsequence of the lack of work that blarack Obama would because Demof institutionalrty's
presidential nominee. In unison wi t the race-neutral
Obama campaign African Americans too have turned
a blind eye to the fact that black joblessness is twice that provide more jobs foAmericans.
The devastating effects of crime, family dissolution, welfare, and low lev-
els of social organization among African Americans are fundamentally a con-
sequence of the lack of work that blacks endure because of institutional
racism and a lack of attention to public policies on this issue. Too many
blacks can't get a job and any candidate wanting African American votes
should be made to outline economic plans that provide more jobs for us and
all Americans.
While Obamamania was sweeping the national political scene in May the
unemployment rate jumped to 5.5 percent. It was the biggest monthly rise
since 1986. With employers worried about a sharp slowdown and their own
prospects, they clamped down on hiring and unemployment soared from 5
percent in April. That was the biggest one-month jump in the rate in 22 years.
The increase left the jobless rate at its highest since October 2004. The
African American jobless rate rose from 8.6 percent in April to 9.7 percent in
May.
The latest business conditions show reason why African Americans should
make their vote work for them. We are in a deeply troubled economy, and
again, blacks are the last and least of workers. The number of unemployed
people grew by 861,000 in May rising to 8.5 million. The over-the-month
jump in unemployment reflects more workers losing jobs and an increase in
those coming into the job market especially younger people to look for
work.
When Obama stared his "Impossible Dream," the number of unemployed
stood at 6.9 million and the jobless rate was 4.5 percent. Since then, a trio of
crises housing, credit and financial have rocked the economy. That's
caused economic growth to slow to a crawl and businesses and consumers to
tighten their belts. The country's economic problems are a top concern for
candidates vying to win the White House; but they, and most of the country,
are mute on more black youth getting jobs. Overall teenage unemployment
increased to 18.7 percent, while black teens' unemployment remains over six
times the national rate 32.3 percent.
While African American voters are knee-deep with Obama in "putting race
behind us," black youngsters face racial discrimination in hiring facts of life
in that will only get worse. Both the nearly 260,000 African American
teenagers actively seeking employment in May 2008 and didn't find any; and
the 4 million black kids just "out of work" are fodder for America's criminal
justice system and prison-industrial complex.
The "change" Barack Obama's wrought has been good. In a world in which
many young black men have been duped into believing that life is either a
choice between crime or stardom via sports or rap, Obama shows a third way.
And while that third way doesn't mean that every black boy will grow up to
be a presidential nominee, it does show that education is a better fit than
prison; and that being a good speaker garners as many fans as being a good
rapper.
With the evidence of inequity so stark, Black Americans should make bet-
ter use of their ballots. Concurrent with the special interests of getting ear-
marks, tax cuts, etc., shouldn't we be getting domestic policies that help us?
All political levels of Black Americans have to take a stand in regards to the
forces and policies that have produced the nation's obscene social and eco-
nomic inequality. The "dreams" of Black Americans should practical. We
need to make job creation the No. 1 election issue to spark the creation of
decent jobs on a scale that would bring the U.S. to full employment status,
whether Obama gets into the White House, or not. Jobs, and processes for us
getting them, aren't happening; and won't unless and until there's a movement
that demands it.


The Separate But

Equal News Network


by Mychal Massie
There's a conservative joke poking
fun at liberal media that predicts
coverage of an impending apoca-
lypse would have the headline
"World to End: Poor and Minorities
Hardest Hit."
Despite his tenure as a Republican
congressman, it seems J.C. Watts
W aa never heard that joke. Then again,
maybe he did and just didn't under-
- stand why it's funny.
rs Watts recently announced his inten-
|rs tion to start the Black News
Television Channel a news network
targeted at blacks. An agreement has
already been made with Comcast to
broadcast the channel in cities such
as Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago,
Detroit and Washington (but not
New York City) as early as next year.
In an interview with the New York
Post, Watts explained: "Our commu-
m nity features millions of people with
all kinds of backgrounds. There's a
S* much broader segment of the popu-
no lation than what we see in main-


stream news."
Watts says he wants to get beyond
the coverage that he implies too
often links black faces to negative
things such as crime. While break-
ing the media of its "if it bleeds it
leads" mentality would be a merito-
rious if not Sisyphean effort,
Watts faces obvious stumbling
blocks such as cost and content.
Industry sources suggest it might
cost at least $100 million to get such
a network off the ground and then
cost an additional $7 million per
hour of original programming.
There is also the problem of finding
quality talent not already locked into
a contract elsewhere.
Currently, black cable channels
such as TV One and BET are largely
devoid of news programming. BET
had a nightly newscast that was can-
celled years ago. BET President and
CEO Debra Lee said at the time:
"With 24-hour news networks and
everyone getting news off the -
Continued on page 5


MAILING ADDRESS
P.O. Box 43580
Jacksonville, FL 32203


Rita Perry

PUBLISHER

y CONTR
Reginald
Jacksonville Dyrinda
Chnber o f Commerie: Guyton.


PHYSICAL ADDRESS
903 W. Edgewood Ave.
Jacksonville, FL 32208
Email: JfreePress@aol.com


TELEPHONE
(904) 634-1993
Fax (904) 765-3803


Sylvia Perry

Managing Editor


IBUTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson,
I Fullwood, E.O.Huthcinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell,
Sapp, Marsha Oliver, Marretta Latimer, Phyllis Mack, Carlottra
Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver,Vickie Brown, Rahman Johnson,


DISCLAIMER
The United State provides oppor-
tunities for free expression of ideas.
The Jacksonville Free Press has its
view, but others may differ.
Therefore, the Free Press ownership
reserves the right to publish views
and opinions by syndicated and
local columnist, professional writers
and other writers' which are solely
their own. Those views do not neces-
sarily reflect the policies and posi-
tions of the staff and management of
the Jacksonville Free Press.
Readers, are encouraged to write
letters to the editor commenting on
current events as well as what they
wouldlike to see included in the
paper. All letters must be type writ-
ten and signed and include a tele-
phone number and address. Please
address letters to the Editor, c/o
JFP, P.O. Box 43580 Jacksonville,
FL 32203. (No CALLS PLEASE)


A A I


ft Gp- 4 ----go


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Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 5


U~~l "P*I JOWL., dVt


-


Shown above (L-R) Top:Rootman Overstreet. Adrian Rhodes and Roosevelt Watson III. (Bottom)
Laurence Walden with his portrayal of Barack Obama and renowned quilter Billie McCray. KFP Photo

Arual Tnro4gh Our e Exti Opens at t [7tz


The very best in local artistic tal-
ent is currently on display at the
annual Ritz Theater and Lavilla
Museum"Through Our Eyes 2008"
exhibit.
The cultural institution recently
held a reception honoring the
African American artists who have
shaped the foundation of the art
world on the First Coast. This
year's theme is "Everything Must
Change". Each artist presented a


unique form of art capturing the
essence of the Black Diaspora
through a variety of mediums.
The diverse contributions on dis-
play include: Artist Larry Walden's
rendition of Barrack and Michelle
Obama in the White House; painter
Lynn Wynn offered one of a kind
cards with paintings comparable to
Picasso; Traci Mims-Jones view of
women was captured in a large dis-
play and Billie McCray's wall


hanging is in honor of the dance
custom of the Nigerian Yoruba
Tribe among others.
Museum Director and curator
Lydia Stewart was proud and
offered her thanks to the many
artists present saying, "tonight is a
night of a true statement of artists in
Jacksonville." For more informa-
tion about the exhibit, or to take a
tour, call 632-5555.


URBANIZED AREA:
ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT:
RECIPIENT:


Jacksonville, Florida
$373,246
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) is providing an opportunity for a
public hearing to consider its FY 2005/2006 and FY 2006/2007 Program of Projects from which federal funds
are being requested from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Funding is generally available on an
80/20 matching basis between federal and local sources for Capital projects and on a 50/50 matching basis
between federal and local sources for Operating projects. The public is encouraged to comment on any and
all projects listed below.

Agency: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Project Description: Administrative Costs (up to 10%)
Agency Type: Local or Regional Transit Authority
Funding Amount: $37,324 (Federal)
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Coordinate Seamless Transportation
across Jurisdictional Boundaries and/or Between Services

Agency: ARC
Project Description: Purchase four small cutaways for clients living outside the % mile boundary of public
transportation and are not eligible for ADA services
Agency Type: Not For Profit
Funding Amount: $177,683 (Federal) + $44,421 (Local) = $222,104
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Provide additional transportation services with new routes
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Funding Amount: $107,503 (Federal) + $107,503 (Local) = $215,006
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Nassau County Council on Aging
Project Description: Establish route along US 17 between Nassau and Duval counties
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Funding Amount: $50,736 (Federal) + $50,736 (Local) = $101,472
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility


Total Projects:


$ 575,906


Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing before 5:00 p.m. on July 19, 2008.
If a request is received by the stated time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the public notified. Mail
requests to:
Notice of Public Hearing, Section 5317 Grant
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Post Office Drawer "0"
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

These projects have been coordinated through the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) and Unified
Planning Work Program (UPWP) of the First Coast Metropolitan Planning Organization (FCMPO) for the
Jacksonville Urbanized Area. No business displacements are expected to occur as a result of project imple-
mentation. These projects will have no substantial harmful effects on the environment, nor will they
adversely affect service levels to the elderly or disabled.

Details of the Program of Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue through July
19, 2008 during normal business hours. Persons with disabilities who need accommodations to attend the
meeting should contact the JTA Connexion office at 904-265-6001, CTC TDD 636-7402. This notice will
constitute the final publication unless the Program of Projects is amended.
Kenneth R. Holton
kholton@jtafla.com
Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


"Copyrighted Material -



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


-.--
- w -40
w.- d


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY

RE: FY 2006 and FY 2007 Section 5316 Formula Grant


URBANIZED AREA:
ESTIMATED APPORTIONMENT:
RECIPIENT:


Jacksonville, Florida
$766,452
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


Notice is hereby given that the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) is providing an opportunity for a
public hearing to consider its FY 2005/2006 and FY 2006/2007 Program of Projects from which federal funds
are being requested from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Funding is generally available on an
80/20 matching basis between federal and local sources for Capital projects and on a 50/50 matching basis
between federal and local sources for Operating projects. The public is encouraged to comment on any and
all projects listed below.


Agency: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Project Description: Administrative Costs (up to 10%)
Agency Type: Local or Regional Transit Authority
Funding Amount: $68,980 (Federal) = $68,980
Type of Project in'Coordinated Plan: Coordinate Seamless Transportation
across Jurisdictional Boundaries and/or Between Services


'0


Agency: St. Johns County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continue current service from St. Augustine to Jacksonville
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Funding Amount: $216,950 (Federal) + $216,950 (Local) = $433,900
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Project Description: Extend regular fixed route service to the growing Flagler Business Center
Agency Type: Local or Regional Transit Authority
Funding Amount: $139,314 (Federal) + $139,314 (Local) = $278,268
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: St. Johns County Council on Aging
Project Description: Purchase one 31' medium duty low floor cutaway
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Funding Amount: $116,834 (Federal) + $29,208 (Local) = $146,042
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Project Description: Establish Westside Industrial Park service
Agency Type: Local or Regional Transit Authority
Funding Amount: $56,112 (Federal) + $56,113 (Local) = $112,225
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Nassau County Council on Aging
Project Description: Purchase one vehicle for trips to low income workers
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Funding Amount: $59,200 (Federal) + $14,800 (Local) = $74,000
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility

Agency: Clay County Council on Aging
Project Description: Continue current routes and expand service in business districts of O.P.
Agency Type: Not For Profit (Community Transportation Coordinator)
Funding Amount: $101,577 (Federal) + $101,577 (Local) = $203,154
Type of Project in Coordinated Plan: Enhance Transportation Service Availability and Accessibility


Total Projects:


$ 1,324,234


Persons wishing to testify on this subject must notify the JTA in writing before 5:00 p.m. on July 19, 2008.
If a request is received by the stated time, a public hearing will be scheduled and the public notified. Mail
requests to:

Notice of Public Hearing, Section 5316 Grant
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Post Office Drawer "0"
Jacksonville, Florida 32203

These projects have been coordinated through the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) and Unified
Planning Work Program (UPWP) of the First Coast Metropolitan Planning Organization (FCMPO) for the
Jacksonville Urbanized Area. No business displacements are expected to occur as a result of project imple-
mentation. These projects will have no substantial harmful effects on the environment, nor will they
adversely affect service levels to the elderly or disabled.

Details of the Program of Projects are posted in the JTA Lobby at 100 North Myrtle Avenue through July
19, 2008 during normal business hours. Persons with disabilities who need accommodations to attend the
meeting should contact the JTA Connexion office at 904-265-6001, CTC TDD 636-7402. This notice will
constitute the final publication unless the Program of Projects is amended.
Kenneth R. Holton
kholton@jtafla.com
Manager of Capital Programming and Grants
Jacksonville Transportation Authority


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


JACKSONVILLE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY


.RE: FY 2006 and FY 200z OSetion 5 07,Frmula Grant


1m,, MI.. Ao 1 200 9


I









June 19-25, 2008


Pa-6 1M.P.-Pp -rvq ree Press


Historic Franklintown UMC to Greater Macedonia Baptist to host
-19 0


Celebrate 120th Anniversary
The Franklintown United Methodist Church on Historic American
Beach, will celebrate the Church's 120th Anniversary, at 11 a.m., Sunday,
June 22, 2008. The Reverend William 0. Holmes, President of the Nassau
County Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), will be the
guest speaker. Lunch will be served following the service. All members of
neighboring communities are invited.

Wayman Chapel Missionary Society
to host Fellowship Tea, June 28th
The Women's Missionary Society of Wayman Chapel AME Church,
8855 Sanchez Road, will present their 2nd Annual Fellowship Tea at 10
a.m. on Saturday, June 28, 2008. "Everyday, Growing Stronger in Mind,
Body, Spirit" is the theme. The event includes seminars on health & beau-
ty, massages, and a fashion show. FREE health screenings will be available.
Dr. Helen Johnson of the Duval County Health Department will be the
guest speaker for the luncheon. Information: www.wayman.org.

Disciples of Christ "Quench the
Violence" Fun Day for All
Pastor R. LeCount and the membership and officers of the Disciples of
Christ Christian Fellowship, 2061 West Edgewood Ave., invites the com-
munity to come out and enjoy FREE food, clothes, games, shoes, and much
more when they sponsor "Community Fun Day" with the theme: "Quench
The Violence" from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Health Screenings, Music and much
more, FREE! For directions, please call (904) 765-5683.
Rev. Gilbert Pickett St., will be the guest preacher, along with the Eternal
Praise Ministry of Mount Horeb Baptist Church, Corona Queens, New
York; will be the speaker for Morning Service at 10 a.m. on Sunday, June
29th. The community is invited.

Donna Richardson Joyner to address
Shiloh Health Fair June 28
Ladies attend the "Women's Wellness & Health Fair, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at
Shiloh Metropolitan Baptist Church, Saturday, June 18, 2008. Receive a
gift bag as you enter. Over 30 booths with samples, information, and more
will be available. Workshops on Stroke Prevention, "Becoming A First
Time Mom, Healthy Dieting and Heart Health," will be available.
Donna Richardson Joyner (Mrs. Tom), the fitness guru will discuss "9
Fruits of Good Health" at 11:30 a.m.
Exhibitors include: Bernard's Beauty Supply, Curves, Mona Vie, Mayo
Clinic, Brooks ReHab, and many more. This fair promises to focus on the
"total woman." Information, call (904) 354-1214.


Homeownership Preservation Clinic
Greater Macedonia Baptist Church, 1880 West Edgewood Ave., where
Dr. Landon Williams is Pastor; will host a "Homeowners Preservation
Clinic" from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Saturday, June 21st, from 8:30 a.m.
until 1:30 p.m. The Clinic will cover: "Understanding Your Options",
"Keys to Preserving Homeownership," "The Last Mitigation Process," and
more. This important workshop is FREE to everyone. Counselors, Lenders
and Service Providers will be on hand to provide information, and more.
This free workshop is not just for those who are about to loose their home,
or have lost their home. It will provide you with the tools to help you pre-
vent losing your home during difficult times.
Emanuel Missionary Baptist to
Dedicate Fellowship Hall June 22nd
Pastor Herb Anderson and the Members of Emanuel Missionary Baptist
Church, 2407 Division Street (off New Kings Rd.); invite the community to
join them at 11 a.m., Sunday, June 22, 2008; as they dedicate their new
15,000 square feet Fellowship Hall following the 11 a.m. Worship Service.
You are invited to worship and participate in this glorious celebration.
Founders Day Women's
Conference to Open at Prime Osborn
Dr. Barbara Mims, Pastor, New St. James Holy Family Church, will be
the speaker at 7:30 p.m., Friday, June 20th at the Prime F. Osborn III
Convention Center, 1000 Water Street (Headquarters) for the opening of
Believers in Christ Christian Center's Founder's Day Celebration June 20,
21 & 22, 2008..
The Women's Conference will begin at 9 a.m., Saturday. Deborah A.
Bernard, Host Pastor; and Elder Myra Henry, of Zoe International; will be
the speakers for the morning session.
Pastor Ronald Walker, of Anointed Outreach Ministries, Vineland, New
Jersey, will be the speaker at the 7 p.m. service; Host Pastor, Dr. Don
Edward Bernard, will deliver the message at the 11 a.m. Sunday Morning
and Apostle I. L. Carter, Prophetic Anointed International Minis-tries, San
Antonio, Texas; will deliver the closing sermon at 6 p.m. at the Prime
Osborn Convention Center.
Gospel Night Competition June 28th
The 1st Annual Expanding Minds Competition will give you an oppor-
tunity to show off your talents at "Gospel Night Out" beginning at 4 p.m.,
Saturday June 28, 2008. The Joint Heirs Christian Center is located at 2100
Dunn Avenue.
Directed by Michael White, there are three categories of performers:
Solo & Group Singers, Dance & Step Groups, and Spoken Word & Rap.
For more information, please call (904) 887-3309.


5863 Moncrief Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32209 (904) 768-8800 FAX 764-3800


Pastor Ernie Murray
Welcomes you!


Join Us for One of Our Services
SUNDAY
Early Worship 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
Ist Sunday 3:45 p.m.

Lord's Supper & Baptism
3rd Sunday 7:00 p.m.
*** ****
TUESDAY
Bible Study 7:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY
Noon Day Worship

THURSDAY
Youth Church 7:00 p.m.


ThCurhhaRacespt









Seeking the lost for Christ
Matthew 28:19 20 .__-

8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship
Uf9:30 a.m. Sunday School


Pastor Landon Williams


Th or fMaeoi r awy pntoyuadyurfml.I w a eo ayassac


All are invited to Family Day at
True House Deliverance Temple
Pastor Earl Thomas and Sister Shannon Thomas, invite all families to a
special Family Day dedicated to "Taking Our City from Crime". There will
be Free Food and Drinks, Free Prizes, and good, clean fun for the whole
family beginning at 12:30 p.m., Saturday, June 22, 2008.
This day of fellowship will bring the Word of God to help us turn this
city around through faith and prayer. If you need directions, more infor-
mation, or a ride, please call (904) 766-1666.

Cousins AME Celebrating Anniversary
The Philip R. Cousin AME Church, 2601 Orange Pickers Road, Pastor
Eugene E. Moseley Jr.; will celebrate their Choir Anniversary at 4 p.m. on
Sunday, June 22, 2008. The community is invited.
Historic Franklintown UMC to Celebrate 120th Anniversary, Sunday, June
22nd
The Franklintown United Methodist Church on Historic American Beach,
will celebrate the Church's 120th Anniversary, at 11 a.m., Sunday, June 22,
2008. The Reverend William 0. Holmes, President of the Nassau County
Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), will be the guest
speaker. Lunch will be served following the service. All members of
neighboring communities are invited.

New St. James AME to Present
"Women of The Gospel" June 22nd
New Saint James AME Church, 2128 Forest Street, will present Sis.
Marva Salary of True Way Church, in a mini concert at 4 p.m. on Sunday,
June 22, 2008. Bro. Marvin Green and the Steward Board will present the
"Women of Gospel" Doris Mack Bess, Bessie Brown and Ruth Grant,
who will sing songs from their latest CD. Dan Gibbs and Elouise Sanders
will serve as Master and Mistress of Ceremonies.
Several outstanding members of the community will be honored fol-
lowing the concert, they are: Juanita Wyatt, Padrica Mendez, Eula
Thornton, Natasha S. McCoy, Myrtle Barton, Rev. Eugene Flagg, Rev. S.
L. Badger, Mary Raunelll, Nettie Flagg, Councilwoman E. Denise Lee,
Lula McBride, Elizabeth Hunter, Albert Harris, Verna W. Ford, and Janie
Jenkins. The community is invited to share this occasion.

NOTICE: Church news is published free of charge.
Information must be received in the Free Press offices no
later than Monday, at 5 p.m. of the week you want it to run.
Information received prior to the event date will be print-
ed on a space available basis until the date. Fax e-mail to
765-3803 or e-mail to JFreePress@aol.com.


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church
215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464


Pastor Rudolph
McKissick, Sr.
Senior Pastor


Weekly Services


Midweek Services
Wednesday Noon Service
"Miracle at Midday"
12 noon-1 p.m.

Dinner and Bible Study
at 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m.


Come share In Ioly Communio n on st Sunday at -50 p.m.


Pastor Rudolph
McKissick, Jr.
Senior Pastor


Radio Ministry
WCGL 1360 AM Thursday 8:15 -8:45 a.m.
AM 1400 Thursday 7:00 8:00 p.m.
TV Ministry
WTLV Channel 12 Sunday's at 6:30 a.m.


Grace and Peace


* *A Full Gospel Baptist Church *


Sunday School
9 a.m.
Morning Worship
10 a.m.
Lord's Supper
Second Sunday
3:00 p.m.
Evening Worship
Every 3rd & 4th
Sunday
4:00 p.m.


A church

that's on the

move in

worship with

prayer, praise

and power!


Pastor Robert Lecount, Jr


School of Ministry Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.

Thursday High Praise Worship 7:00 p.m.

2061 Edgewood Avenue West, Jacksonville, Florida 32208
(904) 765-5683 Email:dccfmbc@yahoo.com


~. w


Sunday Morning Worship
7:40 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.
Church school
9:30 a.m.
The Word from the Sons
and Daughters of Bethel
3rd Sunday 3:30 p.m.


11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Tuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM
Sunday 2 PM 3 PM
**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M.


rage o iv-ts. rurry N -r i t;t; ju i u-in


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J.ne.1.-25. 208M.PrysFrePes-Pg


Shown above Dewitt Hughes III, Joni Hughes, Dewitt Hughes IV, Anthony Hughes, Annette Hughes, Anita Walton, Dewitt Hughes, II, Bert
Brooks, Ashlee Hughes, Randall Webb, William Perry, Charlie Perry and Donald Riley. FMP Photo
Hughes Family Pampers Dads for Fathers Day Family and Friends joined matriarch Annette Hughes for their annual Fathers
Day Feast held in honor of all fathers in the family. The popular proprietor of Hughes Southern Cooking & Catering put her skills to work in the spir-
it of fatherhood at her own dinner table for the event which featured all of her culinary favorites.


Rep. Terry Fields Provides Graduates Words of Wisdom for a Lifetime


Shown above are: (Back L-R) : Brandon Holmes, Kelli Belvin, Delores Thomas, Maria Ervin and Cary
Holmes. (Middle): Betty White, Jacqueline Reed, Yvonne Kyles and Eric Skow. (Front): Ethel Bryant,
Evelyn Hart, Class President Jasmine Clark, Historian William Buie, Secretary David Hart and
Valedictorian Ericka Jenkins, Superintendent Dr. Jeannette C. Holmes-Vann and Kendria Holmes.


Rep. Terry Fields
EDC is located on a 51-acre thor-
oughfare surrounded by Hope
Chapel Ministries' Sanctuary, a
two-story multi-purpose sports
complex, music and theatre storage
building as well as a day care facil-
ity.
For more information about EDC,
contact Betty White at 924-2000.


Ed Gordon Kicks off Daddy's

Promise to Strengthen Bond

Between Fathers and Daughters


Ed Gordon, Award-winning television journalist and founder of
Daddy's Promise with his daughter Taylor. Daddy's Promise: A
Lifetime of Love, is a new nationwide initiative celebrating the bond
between fathers and daughters. www.daddyspromise.com.


Daddy's Promise: A Lifetime of
Love, a new nationwide initiative
celebrating the bonds between
African American fathers and
daughters, kicked off a national
outreach campaign last weekend
during 100 Black Men of America's
Annual Conference in Orlando.
The brainchild of award-winning
television journalist Ed Gordon,
Daddy's Promise is inspired by
Gordon's own relationship with his
14 year old daughter Taylor. The
initiative's mission is to create a
national dialogue within and
between Black families about the
responsibility and rewards of the
father-daughter bond. It will pro-
vide guidance and encouragement
for fathers to help their daughters
grow into independent and accom-
plished young women.
"The overwhelming response to
an article I wrote for Essence mag-
azine about my relationship with
Taylor made it clear there was a real
need for information and support
for fathering in our community. "
said Gordon.. "Everything we do
with Daddy's Promise will be
designed to help Dads foster
stronger, more positive relation-
ships with their daughters."


Daddy's Promise is rolling out a
yearlong initiative that includes a
full schedule of community pro-
grams held with local chapters of
100 Black Men, churches and fam-
ily organizations nationwide, host-
ing high profile, celebrity-driven
events, and creating and distribut-
ing educational materials. The first
year will culminate on Father's
Day, June 2009 with a celebrated
Father-Daughter dance.
An interactive website, www.dad-
dyspromise.com, was launched
Father's Day to provide download-
able copies of the Daddy's Promise
pledge, a symbolic declaration by
fathers to be actively involved in
their daughters' lives. Users will
also be able to get guidelines and
tips for raising extraordinary young
women as well as view a national
photo album where they'll be able
to upload their favorite photo of
dad and his girl. In addition, mes-
sage boards will allow visitors to
participate in open discussions
about fatherhood and there will be
an events calendar.
Gordon will also contribute a blog
on to the site featuring his thoughts
and interviews with national fig-
ures. ...


"Choosing something that you
believe in (my community), having
a plan and wanting to help better
the lives of all people, working with
people who are committed, and
always understanding that 'one bad
apple' can not ruin a whole commu-
nity." is the philosophy of State
Representative Terry L. Fields who
spoke recently at the June 10th
graduation for Esprit de Corps
Center for Learning (EDC).
Fields, who attended the historic,
inaugural baccalaureate for EDC in
2007, was very impressed with the
ceremonies and the five young
African-American male graduates
who made up the school's first grad-
uating class. Returning this year as
the school's keynote commence-


ment speaker, he spoke before a
crowd of proud parents, students,
faculty and friends who made up
EDC's second annual commence-
ment ceremonies. "You are a victo-
ry waiting to happen," said Fields.
"Your personal beliefs can push you
forward or hold you back."
"I was also impressed with the
way he spoke. His charge was pow-
erful and confident." said
Valedictorian Ericka Jenkins. "I
have to have a vision and dream
and must entrust that dream to God,
who will be my help as I pursue it.
I also heard him say, "It not impor-
tant where you were born; what's
important is what you choose to do
afterwards."
Ericka will be joining the ranks of


the other three young graduates as
they pursue their plans for college
in the fall. Her fellow classmates
include Jasmine Clarke, William
Buie and David Hart.
"My experience here at EDC has
been incredible", says Jenkins. "I
was able to maintain dual enroll-
ment status with FCCJ, play an
active role in school activities,
including basketball and acquire
both biblical and academic training
during my high school years."
A subsidiary of Hope Chapel
Ministries, Inc., Esprit de Corps
Center for Learning initially opened
its doors with 47 students in grades
Kindergarten through seventh.
Today, the school serves 125 stu-
dents in grades K4 through 12.


The Jacksonville Free Press

would love to share your

event with our readers.


We do have a few guidelines

that need to be followed
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information.
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==I


Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 7


June 19-25, 2008










Pai~e 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press June 19-25, 2008


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Blacks Under The I

The number of African Ameri
plastic surgery patients is on th


The number of ethnic minorities
going under the knife for cosmetic
procedures continues to climb, with
African American plastic surgery
patients increasing nearly 10% last
year, according to recent statistics
compiled by the American Society
of Plastic Surgeons About 847;00"0
African Americants underwent plas-
tic surgery procedures in 2007, up
8% from 2006, compared with
1,011,000 Hispanics and 767,800
Asians, whose numbers increased
by 8% and 26%, respectively, the
study reports.
Nose reshaping, liposuction, and
breast reduction were among the
top cosmetic procedures African
American patients requested.
Hispanic patients requested breast
augmentation, nose reshaping, and
liposuction, and Asians requested
nose reshaping, breast augmenta-
tion, and eyelid surgery.
"Rhinoplasty and most plastic sur-
gery is no longer a taboo for most
ethnic groups," says Brian N.
Evans, a Beverly Hills plastic sur-
geon who is featured on reality
show Dr. 90210. "There are a lot of
minority patients who undergo
plastic surgery-probably higher
than what's reported." Evans runs
his practice with his wife, Dr. Susan
Evans, a Beverly Hills skin-care
specialist who also is featured on
the show.
More African Americans opting
for plastic surgery has to do with
greater awareness of this form of


operation, Evans beli
want to look as good
he says. Although Eva
vision shows are
behind the increase
undergo cosmetic o
dismisses the idea tha
of people choosing
gery do so to do aw
ethnicities. That's n
objective anyway, he
were a black person b
gery you are going
person after the surge
In fact, Evans sa'
trend among his patie
preserve their ethnic
tain who they are. C
plastic surgeon Julius
curs. "What I find wi
of color is that they
to find a balance in th
not trying to look moi
he says. Few, who is
Few Institute for Ae
Surgery, specializes ii
He sees more than 1
annually, with Africa
comprising 30% to
practice.
In general, 91% of a
women, with the av
those receiving invas
invasive procedures
Over the past three ye
noticed African Ame
are getting young
across the board tho
for facial cosmetic sui
than their Caucasian c


Community Advocate Helen Jackson


Working to Make Jacksonville Healthier


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er, although
)se coming in
rgery are older
counterparts.


For most people working a full time job and volunteer-
ing some in the community keeps them busy enough.
But not for Jackson, who also founded and serves as
president of her own nonprofit organization, Thes
Women of Color Cultural Foundation Inc. 5


By Samantha Minton
Helen D. Jackson is not a native of
the First Coast, but you would
never guess that because she cer-
tainly does not lack enthusiasm and
* passion for making Jacksonville a
better community.
Jackson along with her husband
- Joseph moved from Detroit to
-Jacksonville in 1990.
S-- "Jacksonville is a city that grows
on you," Jackson said. She said we
live in a unique city where bridges
connect us. She said you can be at
the beach one minute, Downtown
the next and go from rural to urban
very quickly.
Since moving here, Jackson has
worked at the Duval County Health
Department. She serves as the
Director of the Division of
w Community Nutrition Services. She
heads the Women, Infants and
-* Children (WIC) program, which
S-- provides special supplemental food
and nutrition education programs
for women, infants and children.
S Before moving here, she worked for
* the Health Department in Detroit
U for about 15 years.
"Helping young women receive
.* higher levels of education, econom-
ic development and live healthier
"* lifestyles," is the reason she said
she has always wanted to work to
* help improve the lives of women
m -- and children.
For most people working a full
--- time job and volunteering some in
the community keeps them busy
enough. But not for Jackson, who
ile also founded and serves presi-
fll e dent of her own nonprofit organiza-
tion, The Women of Color Cultural
fcan Foundation Inc.
e rise The Foundation, established in
February 2000, addresses the needs
ieves. "People of people of color to eliminate dis-
as they feel," parities in health, education, eco-
ans admits tel- nomic development and other areas
a big factor that affect the equality and common
ed desire to good of society, Jackson said.
operations he The Women of Color Cultural
at the majority Foundation provides scholarships
cosmetic sur- for high school students seeking
ray with their college degrees and women who
ot a realistic wish to return to college, particular-
says. "If you ly those who have interrupted their
beforee the sur- education to raise families or han-
to be a black die other major responsibilities. The
;ry," he adds. program, which is named
ys the current "Universal Teen Scholarship
nts is trying to Program" were awarded on June 1
ity and main- at the Ritz Theatre and LaVilla
Chicago-based Museum. Nearly $110,000 was
3 W. Few con- awarded in scholarship funds this
th my patients year. Those applying for the schol-
are just trying arship must participant in several
eir life and are workshops, which include learning
re Caucasian," interviewing skills, financial man-
director of the agement, etiquette training, essay
sthetic Plastic writing and public speaking. WJCT
na the eye area. opened it studio to the students
1,000 patients where they practiced their public
an Americans speaking in front of a camera.
35% of his The largest event, the Women of
Color Foundation hosts is the 9th
all patients are Annual Health Symposium for
average age of People of All Nations. The event
sive and non- will take place Saturday, July 26
around 42. from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the
ars, Few's has Prime Osborn Convention Center.
*rlarn ncitients


"We believe all people
must have access to high
quality healthcare and
education and the ability
to become economicallM
self-sufficient."
Jackson
said.
Jackson
served as


The event includes free health and
wellness education, screenings and
referrals on asthma, blood pressure,
nutrition, skin care, vision, stress,
bone density and many more.
Last year nearly 2,000 people
attended the event. The event is free
and open to all. For more informa-
tion, visit www.woccf.org.
Jackson said the reason for the
event is to "empower the communi-
ty to take control of their wellness ,
and health."
Another event, the (r
Foundation hosts is
"Universal Sisters Bey
Strong Be Healthy Be in
Charge," a one day event(
with national keynote
speakers, free health screen--"
ings and lunch. This year the
event was held at the Hyatt
Regency on May 3.
Throughout the year,
Women of Color also pro-
vides support for confer-
ences, lectures and work-
shops, educational mentor-
ing and family life enhancements.
Funds are raised by board members,
through corporate donations and
grant writing endeavors. One of the
major fund raising events for the
Foundation is the Ebony and Ivory
Gala, which will be held in
September.
"There was a definite need,"
Jackson said about the programs
and events The Women of Color
Foundation holds. She said over the
years, the Foundation "evolves" and
programs continue to grow.


both a study participant and
resource speaker for the
Jacksonville Community Council
Inc. (JCCI) recent study on Infant
Mortality. The study examined why
so many babies born in Jacksonville
were dying before they reached
their first birthday. In 2006, 130
babies died before they reached
their first birthday. The infant mor-
tality rate in Jacksonville is much
higher than other cities around the
state.
"This is not something we want to


be known for," Jackson said.
Jackson currently serves as the
President of the Board of Directors
for the Jacksonville Community
Council Inc., which is a nonprofit
organization that seeks to improve
the quality of life in Northeast
Florida. Since 1975, JCCI has con-
vened diverse groups of citizens
each year to identify significant
community issues for in-depth
study. Its goal is to increase public
awareness and promote positive
action, which is something Jackson
is also very passionate about.


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305 East Union Street

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For All Your Dental Needs


358-3827


Monday Friday
8:30 AM 5 PM
Saturday Appointments Available *

Dental Insurance and Medicaid Accepted


June 19-25, 2008


Page 8 Ms. Perry's Free Press


-


-


AUA ry ,-


Mrs. Helen Jackson









Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 9


Cultural Double Standards Undercut



Chronic HIV/Aids Fight Worldwide


The United Nations says religion
and culture continue to have a sig-
nificant impact -- both good and
bad -- on the spread and prevention
of HIV/AIDS worldwide.
The practice of male circumcision,
prevalent in some cultures, has
decreased the risk of HIV transmis-
sion in men, while male sexual
promiscuity in some societies has
put married women at high risk of
contracting the deadly disease.
But the jury is still out on
polygamy -- where men demand
their right to have multiple wives --
long considered a key factor in the
spread of HIV infections in Africa.
A 248-page study by the U.N.
Commission on HIV/AIDS and
Governance in Africa (CHGA),
released last week, says the evi-
dence on polygamy is inconsistent.
"Polygamous behaviour has been
considered one of the major factors
promoting the spread of HIV in
Africa, where higher rates of HIV
infection often are found in areas
with high rates of polygamy," it
noted.
Still, in Ghana, where 44 percent
of marriages in the north are polyg-
amous, the prevalence of HIV
infection was the lowest.
As of December 2007, there was
an estimated 33.2 million people
worldwide living with HIV, accord-
ing to the United Nations. But the
annual number of AIDS deaths has
declined, from 3.9 million in 2001
to 2.1 million in 2007.
The cultural double standards on
the sexual behaviour of men and
women are also a key factor in the
spread of HIV/AIDS.
At a CGHA interactive session in
Africa, one participant is quoted as
saying: "In our societies, men have
a 'cultural license' to demand sex,
unprotected, at any time, and the
woman cannot say no, even if she
knows he is infected. This has to
change."
"In our polygamous society,"
another participant complained, "it
is accepted that men have multiple
partners, while women have to be
faithful to one."
The role of religion, on the other
hand, has often been a positive fac-
tor in the fight against HIV/AIDS.
Conscious of the importance of reli-
gion in most societies, the United
Nations is deploying religious lead-
ers and faith-based organizations to


raise awareness on AIDS.
Under its HIV/AIDS regional pro-
gramme in the Arab states, the U.N.
Development Programme (UNDP)
held its first-ever training pro-
gramme on AIDS awareness for
135 Sunni and Shiite religious lead-
ers in Bahrain last year.
In Somalia, some 130 religious
leaders attended seminars, while
500 women attended lectures on
HIV/AIDS. And in Djibouti, 24
imams have received voluntary
counseling and testing for HIV,
thereby reducing the social stigma
attached to the disease.
The United Nations also says that
HIV/AIDS education kits, with ref-
erences from the Quran or the
Bible, are increasingly popular


(UNIFEM), Ines Alberdi, said
because HIV is most often transmit-
ted sexually, unequal relationships
between men and women, together
with gender stereotypes, fuel its
spread.
"We need to empower young
women to know and exercise their
rights -- to education, health servic-
es, economic opportunities, and
freedom from violence," she said.
Secondly, she said, "We need to
find ways to engage men and boys
in combating gender-based stereo-
types and behaviour that fuel this
(AIDS) pandemic, starting in the
home."
"Action is needed to promote
male behaviour that is based on
respect for women's rights, respon-


Earvin 'Magic' Johnson, Cookie Johnson and Spike Lee at the film-
ing of Abbott and the Magic Johnson Foundation's 'I Stand With
Magic Campaign to End Black HIV/AIDS public service announce-
ment campaign, a program aimed at helping prevent HIV infection in
the minority communities.
advocacy tools for religious leaders sibility, and that is non-violence and
worldwide. The government of non-abusive," she declared.
Morocco is using these kits for HIV She also quoted Elizabeth
education to all 31,000 imams in Mataka, the U.N. special envoy on
that country. HIV/AIDS in Africa, who said that
Sr. Maura 0' Donohue of Caritas in addition to more money, "We
International says that governments need to use those funds to be bold,
give a very rosy picture of what is and challenge the cultures and
happening in their countries. norms that generate behaviours like
"But they very rarely acknowledge violence against women and perpet-
that NGOs, faith-based organisa- uate the spread of this deadly pan-.
tions, and other grassroots organisa- demic."
tions are providing at least 30 per- Thoraya Ahmed Obaid, executive
cent of the services for five percent director of the U.N. Population
of the money," she added. Fund (UNFPA), said: "We need to
Addressing a panel discussion on pay more attention to women and
the margins of a high-level General young people, especially those who
Assembly meeting on AIDS, the are living with HIV, and engage
executive director of the U.N. them as experts in the response."
Development Fund for Women "Young people have called for


greater engagement in plans, poli-
cies and programmes and a dramat-
ic expansion ofAIDS education and
youth-friendly services. Let us
work with them to scale up the serv-
ices they need," she told IPS.
Obaid also said: "We need to inte-
grate interventions for AIDS and for
sexual and reproductive health so
that they are mutually reinforcing."
The overwhelming majority of HIV
infections, she pointed out, are sex-
ually transmitted or associated with
pregnancy, childbirth and breast-
feeding. Thus, integrated services
are essential to meet the needs of
women and couples.
To be effective, we must redouble
efforts to address gender inequities,
she added.
At the conclusion of the high-level
meeting, Jun. 10-12, the president
of the General Assembly, Srgjan
Kerim, said that an effective
response to the pandemic must have
human rights and gender equality at
its core.
Besides several heads of state and
health ministers, the participants at
the meeting also included more than
500 representatives from civil soci-
ety organizations.
Linda Hartke, of the Ecumenical
Advocacy Alliance, was more
blunt. "We have heard millions of
words and hundreds of speakers in
these three days and all of them
agree that the response to HIV is
urgent, and shamefully that we are
falling behind."
"All governments must do more
and do better, turning the words into
actions. And each and every citizen
is called to hold their government
accountable," she added.
Meanwhile about 60 non-govern-
mental organizations signed a state-
ment urging national governments
and the U.N. system to keep their
promises to men and girls who con-
tinue to be at an alarming risk of
HIV infection and of receiving
inadequate prevention, treatment,
care and support.
These shortcomings, the statement
said, was the result of persisting
social, cultural and economic sub-
ordination, structural inequalities,
as well as pervasive violence in
homes, communities, schools,
workplaces, streets, markets, police
stations, hospitals, and situations of
institutional confinement.


Watts Channel Is Affirmative-Action Really Still Needed in America?


Continued from page 4
Internet, our audience doesn't want
to wait until 11:00 pm to find out
what the news is."
The question begging an answer
is what exactly constitutes "black
news."
There are things that happen to
black people in black communities
that don't really have an impact on
the rest of America, but that doesn't
mean they should be provincial to
black America. News happening in
America is American news, and it
should be everyone's concern.
When Hurricane Katrina destroyed
the overwhelmingly-black Lower
Ninth Ward in New Orleans, it was
reported as an American story and
not just for blacks. Likewise, the
recent tornadoes in predominantly-
white Iowa are not just a concern
for white America.
There is quite simply no purely
black news just like there is not a
purely black sun, moon and stars.
There are certainly aspects of sto-
ries that may be of more interest to
people of a certain race, but it does
not justify setting up separate but
equal news networks by race in
order to discuss it.
Division among the races is a
favorite topic of the major media.
How are we going to overcome
divisions if blacks are supposed to
have their own channel for news
and the current news channels are
to be regarded as only expressing
the views of the white majority?
If J.C. Watts wants to see more
positive reporting about blacks, he
should use his considerable cache
to get the heads of Fox News,
CNN, MSNBC and the major net-
works on the phone. Perhaps one
or more of them will give him a
show.
Luring black America to a segre-
gated source of news, however, is
not the answer.


Continued from front
In these areas where no decent
jobs are available, families suffer
because few if any men are able to
find the kinds of jobs that enable
them to provide economic support
for families. Consequently, mar-
riage rates have plummeted and
divorce and separation rates soared.
Mothers struggle to support their
children with fast-food jobs or wel-
fare checks that, in real inflation-
adjusted dollars, have shrunk
steadily in the face of efforts to
reduce the ballooning federal
deficit.
When children reach school age,
they attend schools where expecta-
tions are low, belief in their ability
to succeed is often non-existent,
and, in many cases, poor funding or
financial mismanagement means
crumbling buildings, outdated
books, no computers, and outmod-
ed labs. Health problems abound,
because the ghettos, barrios, and
Indian reservations have become
dumping grounds for hazardous
materials and industries that pollute
but do not employ. They abound,
too, because African Americans,
Hispanic Americans, and American
Indians are two to three times as
likely to lack any medical insur-
ance, and those who do have insur-
ance are often on Medicaid, which
is again under the federal budget
ax.
Can anyone seriously believe that
people in racial and ethnic groups
who grow up in such conditions
have the same opportunities in life
as the average white American?
Affirmative action has been a
means to partially and only par-
tially offset the continuing reality
of unequal opportunity in American
society. It has had real benefits the
most obvious being the growth of
the black and Hispanic middle
classes over the past few decades.
But these benefits have not been


enough to offset the continuing, and
in some ways worsening, economic
abandonment, environmental
destruction, and educational neglect
of the areas where most African
Americans, Hispanic Americans,
and American Indians live. To now
take away the one thing that was


partially offsetting these forces
would be to guarantee increased
racial inequality in the future.
Abolishing affirmative action
might be the politically popular
thing to do, but in no way is it the
right, or the fair thing to do.


Octogenerians Make Marriage Legal
Del Martin, 87, bottom left, and Phyllis Lyon, 84 standing next to
her, are sworn in as a married couple by San Francisco county clerk
Edwin Lee, right, as Mayor Gavin Newsom, second from right, looks
on in a special ceremony at City Hall in San Francisco, Monday, June
16, 2008. Lyon and Martin became the first officially married same
sex couple after California's Supreme Court declared gay marriage
legal.


Are Blacks with Diabetes a Hopeless Cause? Even
when they are cared for by the same doctor, Black Americans who suffer
from diabetes are less likely than their white counterparts to bring the ill-
ness under control, a newly released study showed.


Middle Class South Africans Finding Peace in Confusion
South Africans hang out in Johannesburg's black township of Soweto
near a new BMW car, earlier this month. The former ghetto of Soweto,
long synonymous of misery and violence, is becoming the hip outing for
"black diamonds," the black middle class bore by the mutiracial democra-
cy that emerged in 1994


Celtics Take NBA Title Boston Celtics' Kevin
Garnett, left, Ray Allen, center, and Paul Pierce celebrate in the lock-
er room after winning the NBA basketball championship with a 131-
92 win over the Los Angeles Lakers on Tuesday, June 17, 2008, in
Boston.


Embracing the Changing Role of Parents: PTA


Names First-Ever Male, African-American CEO


Byron Garrett
In a strategic move that symbol-
izes the vision of the national
organization and the changing role


of parents, PTA will name its first-
ever male, Black chief executive
officer next week in San Diego.
Representing a long line of
visionary leaders since 1897 for an
organization once known as the
National Congress of Mothers,
Byron V. Garrett will be introduced
to attendees at the 112th Annual
PTA National Convention &
Exhibition (June 20-23rd). He will
continue the organization's rich
legacy of engaging parents,
schools, legislators, and community
leaders in improving children's
health, safety, and educational suc-
cess.
"I am thrilled to have the opportuni-
ty to introduce new, cutting edge
methods of connecting families and


schools in underrepresented com-
munities to better the lives and
futures of our nations' children,"
said Garrett. "This position offers
me a new avenue to work on behalf
of the issues that lie closest to my
heart-families, children, education,
and youth development."
Garrett will work in concert with
the PTA National Board of
Directors to continue long-term
strategies and priorities that benefit
families nationwide. Applying his
experience in youth development
and education, as well as managing
a diverse and multi-tiered work
force, Garrett will integrate PTA's
core values with the association's
strategic plan to speak for every
child with one voice.


The announcement comes on the
heels of a PTA national poll that
shows more men are getting
involved in their child's education
than ever before. Garrett will join
a long list of notable men that have
called attention to the importance of
PTA, including PTA's first-ever
male president-elect, Chuck
Saylors, installed last year; U.S.
presidents Theodore Roosevelt,
Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush,
and Bill Clinton; California
Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger;
television personality and child
advocate Fred Rogers of Mr.
Roger's Neighborhood; actor Bill
Cosby; basketball player Earvin
"Magic" Johnson, Jr.; and race car
driver Carl Edwards.


Michelle Obama, Attack Target? GOP Expected
to Aggressively Assail Potential First Lady
Stepping up attacks for the rough-and-tumble presidential campaign,
Republicans have set their sights on a new Democratic target: Michelle
Obama.
In a preview of what's to come, the media is already questioning
whether Michelle Obama will be featured in negative ads by the GOP in
an effort to discredit Michelle and her husband, Barack Obama, the pre-
sumptive Democratic nominee, who is challenging Republican Sen. John
McCain for the White House.
Fox News has dubbed Michelle as Barack's "baby mama" and some
black political analysts say the disrespect for Michelle is just beginning
and the attack ads about her are perhaps not far behind.
But a gallant Barack Obama defended his wife and told reporters he's
not having it.


J 19-25 2008









rage IVi- IMA3P A v'l Fri3, A, IJune;19-25%,200


7B


What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports


TO


activities to self enrichment and the civic scene


Amateur Night
Semi-Finals
Join the Ritz Theater for their
Apollo style Amateur Night semi-
finals on Friday, June 20th at 7:30
p.m. The showcase of the best of
area talent features a variety of cul-
tural genres. For more information
call 632-5555.

Gilbert Class of 1968
The Matthew William Gilbert
High School Class of 1968 is hav-
ing their 40th reunion June 20-22,
2008. The banquet will be held June
21st at 7pm at Jacksonville
Marriott Hotel 4760 Salisbury Rd.
For more information, contact
James Wright at 303 9897 or Lydia
Jackson at 904 765 9224.

Caribbean Boat Ride
On Saturday, June 21st, there will
be a Caribbean "Carmeritage" Boat
Ride aboard the Lady St. John
departing from 1501 Riverplace
Blvd. It will board at 10:30, depart-
ing at 11 p.m. For more information
call 465-1989.

Genealogical Society
The monthly meeting of the
Jacksonville Genealogical Society
will be held June 21, 2008, at 1:30
p.m. in the Webb-Wesconnett
Library, Jacksonville, Fl. Our
speaker will be Ann Staley,
Certified Genealogist, with a new
program dealing with "Heritage
Quest Online-The Ins and Outs."
Ann will help you in your explo-
ration of Heritage Quest. For fur-
ther information contact, Mary
Chauncey, at (904) 7682-9300.

Dangerous Curves
Fashion Show
Dangerous Curves of Jacksonville
will present their Total Woman Plus
Size Fashion Show on Saturday,
June 21, 2008, at the Ritz Theatre
& Lavilla Museum. The show, host-
ed by Karen Washington will begin
at 7 p.m. For more information on
the event, visit dangerouscurves-
jacksonville.com or call 904-554-
9930.
Soul Food
Music Festival
Area radio stations will present a
Soul Food Music Festival on
Saturday, June 21st at
Metropolitan Park. Classic artists
including the Whispers, Peabo
Bryson, Loose Ends, Dru-Hill and
Howard Hewett will be performing.
Gates open at 4 p.m. and showtime
is at 6 p.m. For tickets or more
information call 1-888-512-SHOW.


Learn All About
Mentoring at United
Way Day ofAction
The United Way of Northeast
Florida will have a "Day of Action"
to recruit and register much needed
mentors for First Coast students.
The rally will be held on Saturday,
June 21st from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
Hemming Plaza in Downtown
Jacksonville. The agenda for the
day includes a rally, mentor orienta-
tion and training in addition to live
entertainment, activities and give-a-
ways for the entire family. For more
information call 451-7604.

"Portraits of Music"
Musical at the Beach
The Jacksonville Beach
Elementary Preservation Fund, Inc
will sponsor their annual musical
"Portraits of Music" featuring the
church ladies cast members from
Broadway's "The Color Purple".
On Sunday June 22nd at 5:30pm
at the Historical RITZ Theatre
Tickets are $30. For more informa-
tion call Ms. Sullivan at 305-8654.

Canning Workshop
The City of Jacksonville Canning
Center in cooperation with the
Duval County Extension Service
will host a workshop on Monday,
June 23 from 1 PM to 3 PM.
Celebrate the harvest season by
learning how to make Blueberry-
Lemon Preserves. The cost
includes all materials and you will
take home two half-pints of pre-
serves. Space is limited. Call 387-
8850 to register. Deadline is June
18th.

Health Symposium
The Women of Color Foundation
Inc. will present the Ninth Annual
Health Symposium at the Prime
Osborn Convention Center on
Thursday, June 26th from 8:30
a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will
include free health and wellness
education screenings and referrals
on health issues such as asthma,
diabetes, immunizations, HIV and
AIDS, etc. Register online at
www.woccf.org.

Free Trash into
Treasure Class
Staffers from the Duval County
Extension Office will present take-
home ideas for recycling for your
garden and how and what to com-
post. The will also teach about the
basic mulches and where to use
them. The "Trash into Treasure"
class will be held on Thursday,
June 26th at the Webb Wesconnet


Appeal For Your Excess Clothes
The Millions More Movement Jacksonville Local
Organizing Committee Inc., a non-profit organization is
now in the process of gathering clothes for it's next
'Clothes Give-A-Way.
Due to the extended cold winter weather Jacksonville is
experiencing if you have extra jackets, gloves, caps,
sweaters, coats, blankets please bring them to 916
N.Myrtle Avenue from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday
through Saturday. JLOC will also come pick up your
donation.
For more information, vist their website at :
www.jaxloc.com or call 904-240-9133.




Do You Hae anEven


6br Arouid Towm?

The Jacksonville Free Press is please to print your pub-
lic service announcements and coming events free of
charge. news deadline is Monday at 6 p.m. by the week
you would like your information to be printed.
Information can be sent via email, fax, brought into our
office or mailed in. Please be sure to include the 5W's -
who, what, when, where, why and you must include a
contact number.
Email JFreePress@aol.com Fax (904) 765-3803
Mail: Coming Events Jacksonville Free Press
903 W. Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32203


Regional Library, 6887 103rd Street
from 2 4 p.m. This is a free class
but registration is requested. Call
Becky 387-8850 to pre-register.

Lawyers Show Their
Talent in Variety Show
Former Jacksonville Mayor and
UNF President John Delaney will
host "There Ought to be a Law"
variety show presented by the
Jacksonville Bar Association. The
concert's theme is "Legends" and
you'll witness the first-ever all
lawyer performance as Jacksonville
celebrates the legal profession's
contribution to the arts. They'll be
singing, dancing and acting, from
"Chicago" and "Annie Get Your
Gun" show tunes to the soulful
sounds of Al Green, Nat King Cole
and Billie Holiday.
It will be held on Friday, June
27th at 7:30 p.m. at the Times
Union Center of Performing Arts.
For more information call 399-
4486.

CATS the Musical
The show that revolutionized
musical theatre is coming to the
Times Union Center's Moran
Theater in Jacksonville for 5 per-
formances June 27 -29th, 2008.
Direct from Broadway, "Cats" is


the longest continuously touring
show in American theatre history.
For tickets or more information,
call (904) 632-3373.

Summer White Party
Uptown Saturday Night will fea-
ture a Summer White party on
Saturday, June 28, 2008 from 8
p.m. 2 a.m. at the Mill Copve Golf
Club, 1700 Monument Road. The
event will include free food, live
jazz, spoken word and a DJ. Fo
more information call 742-1203.

To Philly With Love
Concert at UNF
The Jacksonville Mass Choir will
present a "To Philly With Love"
concert on Saturday, June 28th at
7:30 p.m. inside the UNF Lazzara
Performance Hall. This event will
feature praise & worship at its best
as well as the sounds that made
Philly famous such as the O'Jays,
Teddy Pendergrass, Patti Labelle,
Barry White and more. For tickets
or more information, call 504-2763.

Spoken Word
at the Ritz
On Thursday July 1st, the Ritz
Theater will present a free evening
of spoken word. You are welcome


to participate or listen. For more
information call 632-555.

Atlantic Beach
Women's Connection
The Atlantic Beach Women's
Connection will have their next
meeting on Wednesday July 2nd
from 9:30-11:00a.m. It will meet at
the Selva Marina Country Club,
1600 Selva Marina Dr. in Atlantic
Beach. The speaking topic will be
"In America, is Everybody
Insane?". There will also be a trib-
ute to teachers. For more informa-
tion, contact Kate at 534-6784.

July PRIDE
Book Club Meeting
The July meeting of PRIDE Book
Club will be held on Friday, July
llth and the book for discussion
will be EVERY WOMAN NEEDS
A WIFE by Naleighna Kai. For
more information call Romona
Baker at 384-3939 or 703-3428.

Southern Women's Show
Satisfy your cravings at the
Southern Women's Show! Don't
miss savvy shopping, creative
cooking ideas, healthy lifestyle tips,
trendy fashion shows, great celebri-
ty guests, and fabulous prizes. The


show will be held October 16-19,
2008. For information call (800)
849-0248 or visit
www.SouthemWomensShow.com.

Preseason NBA
Basketball in Jax
Local residents will be able to
check out professional basketball
right in our own backyard with an
NBA pre-season basketball game
between the Orlando Magic vs. the
Miami Heat. Tickets go on sale
June 9th for the game that will be
held at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday,
October 18, 2008 at the
Jacksonville Veterans Memorial
Arena. For tickets or more informa-
tion, call (904) 353-3309, or online
at www.ticketmaster.com.

World Golf Village
Home Tour
The Neighborhoods of World Golf
Village presents its eighth annual
Nutcracker Tour of Homes on
Friday, Nov. 28 through Sunday,
Dec. 7, 2008. The free holiday
home tour will feature model
homes elegantly decorated in
themes inspired by The Nutcracker
ballet. During the tour, the homes
will be open daily from 12-4 p.m.
For information, call (904) 940-
soon


Rates starting at $36 a year


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June 19-25, 2008


Page 10 Ms. Perrvls Free Press


L-XVRAx %10013







Ms. Perry's Free Press Page 11


PBS Documentary Explores Slavery's
Legacy On One Family June 24


The PBS P.O.V. series will
begin its 21st year on PBS on
Tuesday, June 24, 2008 at 10 p.m.
with Traces of the Trade: A Story
From the Deep North by Katrina
Browne kicks off the season.
First-time filmmaker Katrina
Browne makes a troubling discov-
ery-her New England ancestors
were the largest slave-trading fam-
ily in U.S. history. She and nine
fellow descendants set off to
retrace the Triangle Trade: from
their old hometown in Rhode
Island to slave forts in Ghana to
sugar plantation ruins in Cuba.
Step by step, they uncover the vast
extent of Northern complicity in
slavery while also stumbling
through the minefield of contem-
porary race relations. In this bicen-
tennial year of the U.S. abolition
of the slave trade, Traces of the
Trade offers powerful new per-
spectives on the black/white
divide.
The DeWolfs, whose name
adorns the stained glass windows


they donated to Bristol's St.
Michael's Episcopal Church,
brought over 10,000 African
slaves to the Americas. Up to half
a million of these Africans'
descendants are alive today.
Moreover, the DeWolfs conducted
the trade over three generations,
beginning in 1769, and well after it
had been banned in the United
States in 1808.
Thomas Norman DeWolf has
written a book about his experi-
ences during the family's journey,
Inheriting the Trade: A Northern
Family Confronts Its Legacy as
the Largest Slave-Trading Dynasty
in U.S. History, published in
January 2008 on the occasion of
the Bicentennial of the abolition of
the U.S. slave trade. DeWolf was
born and raised in Pomona, Calif.,
and graduated with degrees from
Northwest Christian College and
the University of Oregon. He
served on the Oregon Arts
Commission for nine years and as
a local elected official for 11. His


Bravo's popular reality series
"The Real Housewives of Orange
County" and its recently-wrapped
New York City spinoff will finally
have a version featuring women of
color.


In August, the network will pre-
miere "The Real Housewives of
Atlanta," featuring an African
American cast of socialites, accord-
ing to blog site YBF (Young Black
& Fabulous).


Cast members include NFL wives
Lisa Hartwell and Sheree Whitfield,
as well as Deshawn Snow, wife of
Cleveland Cavaliers guard Eric
Snow. A wrap party for the first sea-
son, which just finished taping, was


Deshawn Snow, wife of NBA
player Eric Snow who plays for
the Cleveland Cavaliers
held at the Atlanta restaurant
Straits, owned by Ludacris.
The show's Atlanta run is Bravo's
first featuring any African
American among the main cast
members.


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Page 12 Ms. Perry's Free Press June 19-25, 2008


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Page 12 Ms. Perry's Free Press


June 19-25,2008


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