Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01260

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text

Chipola knocks off
NWF State 1B

Informing more than 17.000 readers daily in print and online
On 3 JobScq 45 PkaSCq 001





Fr LORIDAN





Fire damages Cottondale home


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
The rented home of a Cotton-
dale family was damaged Sun-
day night in fire that started in
the attic and burned through the
roof, according to Cottondale
Fire Chief AndyAnderson.
Fire officials say preliminary
findings indicate the fire was
electrical in nature. The male
occupant of the house wasn't
at home at the time it started.
The woman and child who lived
there, along with a baby sitter,
were at home when it began but
got out unharmed after discov-
ering the fire around 5:50 p.m.,
according to Anderson.
Owned by Matt Carey and rent-
ed by Cassandra Kent, according
to officials, the brick home is


located at 2569 Dogwood Drive.
Anderson said the family made
arrangements to stay with oth-
ers until their alternative perma-
nent housing is in place.
Most of the personal belong-
ings were saved, said Jackson
County Fire Rescue Chief Scott
Birge, because firefighters were
able to contain the blaze to a
large extent. Most of the interior
damage was related to fire and
smoke, he said, and no other
structures or properties were at
risk.
Cottondale, Alford and Gracev-
ille volunteer units responded to
the blaze, along with JCFR.
. Anderson estimated the
structural damage at $150,000
and damage to the contents at
$40,000.


UDBORUAH BUUKHALI TR/F-LUORIUAN
This brick house at 2569 Dogwood Drive in Cottondale was damaged by fire
on Sunday, Jan. 19. Three people were inside when the fire started, but all
escaped uninjured.


Scenes from the Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade, Monday, Jan. 20, 2014, in Marianna.
Pastor Freddie Roulhac waves to the crowd from the Poplar Springs Missionary Baptist
Church float.


WS W '7-' *-*gW ^ j
PHOTOS BY ANGIE COOK/FLORIDAN
Members of the Buffalo Soldiers, Ninth and 10th
(Horse) Cavalry Association, Marianna Area
Chapter, march in the Martin Luther King Jr. Day
parade, Monday, Jan. 20, in Marianna.


Parade celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day


BYANGIECOOK
acook@jcfloridan.com

MARIANNA -- Spectators were
met with clear skies and cool
temperatures as they lined Or-
ange Street Monday morning in
anticipation of this year's Martin
Luther King Jr. Day parade.
The decision to move this
year's parade from US 90 to
Orange Street appeared to
go over well with those in
attendance.
Leatha Blackshear, proprietor
of Mayes' Seafood & Oyster'Bar
on Jefferson Street, watched the
parade from outside St. Luke
Missionary Baptist Church. She


ONLINE
SFor more photos of
Monday's parade, visit us on the
web at www.jcfloridan.com.
said she thought the change was
a good one.
"It seemed like there were more
people here."
Churches, civic groups, politi-
cians, clubs and more joined to-
gether in honoring the memory
of the slain ciyil rights leader.
Several ,floats were adorned
with portraits of King and some
displayed quotes and others
played audio recordings of King's
famous speeches.


Congressional candidate Gwen Graham greets'Tra'vonta Harris
during the Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade, Monday, Jan. 20 in
Marianna.


Prayer breakfast, afternoon service

round out MLK Day celebration


From staff report '
'Martin Luther-King Day was celebrat-
ed in Jackson CountryMonday with a pa-
rade, a morning prayer breakfast a( St.
James AME' Church, and an afternoon


* :,, -'fc *' **.*>.,<'.,
,-~^,p
RSeepmore
tds df th}eMcrtr.'.
Lujther King,.Ji^V'.
SDay celebration: .
6A .' ..


service at New Mt.
Olive MB Church.
At the prayer
breakfast, the lo-
cal NAACP chapter
presented John-
nie Speights with
the organization's
Citizen of the Year


plaque. Longtime host of the Spiritual
Echoes gospel radio program, Speights
accepted the award from his godson,
the Rev. Adrian Abner.
Guest speaker for the morning service
was Daragh Reed-Gray, of Campbellton.
An 8th-grade Social Studies teacher at


Roulhac Middle School in Chipley, Da-
ragh holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in
See MLK, Page 6A


The Rev. Ron Mizer takes his at turn at the
podium as master of ceremonies at the
MLK Day Prayer Breakfast at St. James AME
Church, where he is pastor.


2 nabbed in credit
card fraud case

5A

Vol. 91 No. 15


Altha


teen dies


in crash
From staff reports
An Altha teenager died in a
State Road 71 crash just south
of Suncrest Road in Jackson
County early Friday morning.
Nolan Bailey Musgrove, 16,
was southbound behind the
wheel of a 1999 Chevrolet Sil-
verado around 4:15 a.m. when
the vehicle drifted left, crossed
the northbound traffic lanes
and entered the east shoulder
See CRASH, Page 6A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN FILE
In this Floridan photo, Angus
Gholson talks with Carmen Zaldi-
var Wednesday, May 23 at the
start of the newest trail to be add-
ed to Chattahoochee's nationally-
recognized nature trail park.

Famed


amateur


botanist


dies at 92

Angus Gholson was
world-class expert on
Panhandle plant life
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan
For the first time in decades,
the trout-lilies, trillium and In-
dian-paints in Chattahoochee
will bloom without a visit from
one of their most intimate
friends this spring.
World-renowned amateur
botanist Angus Gholson died
See GHOLSON, Page 6A


Marianna

police warn

of IRS scam
From staff reports
On Friday, an alert citizen
called the Marianna Police De-
partment to warn the public
about a scam attempt made
upon her that morning.
The Marianna resident re-
ceived a call in which the
caller identified himself as an
See SCAM, Page 5A


)) CLASSIFIEDS...4-5B ) ENTERTAINMENT...3B


)) LOCAL...3A


) OBITUARIES...5A


)) STATE...4A


a SPORTS...1B


))WEATHER...2A


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7 '65161 80050 9


Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com, mail them to P.O. Box ....
520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them by our offices at 4403 Constitution Lane ,,*
in Marianna.^ "-
*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include child's full name, parents
name(s) and city of residence. This is a free service. All entries subject to editing. '-4 .


PAYING TRIBUTE


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


Today


Clearing. Windy &
Colder.
Justin Kiefer / WMBB
High 58'
Low 27


High 47
Low 27


Wednesday
Sunny & Cold.



/ High-44
" X,^'" Low 27


Friday
Sunny & Cold.


0^ /


High 59
Low 28


Thursday
Mostly Sunny & Wannrmer.


4-k L,


High 52
Low 36


Saturday
Partly Cloudy & Cool.


TIDES ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low
Apalachicola Low
Port St. Joe Low
Destin Low
Pensacola Low

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


7:13 AM
12:29 PM
7:18AM
8:29 AM
9:03 AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
49.89 ft.
13.90 ft.
9.59 ft.
9.25 ft.


- 3:17 PM
- 6:25 AM
- 3:50 PM
- 12:06 PM
- 12:39 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 Q4-^ ^ H^

THE SUN AND MOON R
Sunrise 6:38 AM L
Sunset 5:07 PM
Moonrise 10:14 PM Feb. Feb. Jan. Ja
Moonset 10:05 AM 6 14 23 3(


LISTEN lS
FOR _.
HOURLY l
WEATHER W .-
UPDRTES WJAQ lOOS,


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher- Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32448
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tidn of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events Via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


TUESDAY, JAN. 21
St. Anne Thrift Store BOGO Sale-9 a.m. to 1
p.m. St. Ann Thrift Store, 4285 2nd Ave., Marianna.
)) Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida
Provider Rate AD HOC Committee Meeting-9
a.m. at the Coalition Region Three Family Success
center, 703 W. 15th St., Suite A, Panama City.
)) Chipola Regional Arts Association meet-
ing-11:30 a.m. Jim's Buffet. Guest speakers will be
members of Artists Guild of Northwest Florida, Inc.
Dutch treat luncheon. For more info contact Anita
Price at pricea@chipola.edu or 718-2277.
Optimist Club of Jackson County Meeting
- Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St.,
Marianna.
)) Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
)) Panhandle Public Library Cooplerative System
Board Meeting 4,p.m. at.2862 Madison St.,
Marianna.
)) Jackson County School Board Meeting-4
p.m. School Board meeting room, 2903 Jefferson
St. Marianna. Agenda on district website www.jcsb.
org. Open to public. Call 482-1200.
)) Marianna High School Project Graduation
meeting-5:15 at Jackson County Early Childhood
Center 4283 Kelson Ave, Marianna. All parents
please plan to attend.
Jackson County Relay for Life Team Meet-
ing-6 p.m. Jackson County Extension Agricultural
Center, 2741 Penn Ave., Marianna. Contact shannon.
rodriguez@cancer.org
)) Disabled American Veterans Meeting 7
p.m. at the DAV Chapter 22 house, 3083 DAV Lane,
Mariana. Call 209-4310.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna. Closed dis-
cussion with 12 & 12 study. Everyone with a desire
to stop drinking is welcome.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22
AARP tax aide training session-9 a.m. until
1 p.m. Jackson County Agricultural Building, Penn
Ave., Marianna in the conference room. Learn
hands-on training for electronic preparation and
filing of tax returns free. If interested in volunteering
call 718-7919.
))Jackson County Library Board Meeting-3 p.m.
Jackson County Board of County Commissioners
Administrative Building, 2864 Madison St., Mariana.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
))Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees monthly


Community Calenda
Finance Committee and Board meeting-5 p.m.
in the classroom at Jackson Hospital.

THURSDAY, JAN. 23
St. Anne Thrift Store 9 a.m. -1 p.m. St.'Anne's
Catholic Church, 3009 5th St., Marianna. Call 482-
3734.
))Deadline to nominate 2013 Citizen of the
Year-5 p.m. Jackson County Chamber of Com-
merce, 4318 Lafayette St., Marianna. Late entries
will not be accepted.
)) Chipola Civic Club Meeting Noon at The
Oaks Restaurant, U.S. 90 in Marianna. The CCC's
focus is the local community, "Community, Children
& Character." Call 526-3142.
)) Town of Grand Ridge Citizens' Advisory Task
Force-6 p.m. at Grand Ridge Town hall. Purpose
of meeting to discuss the town applying for a
grant under the Florida Department of Economic
Opportunity's Small Cities Community Develop-
ment Block Grant Program for the FFY 2013 funding
cycle. Public-invited. For more info call 592-4621.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, JAN. 24
))Bird Walk-lO a.m. Florida Caverns State Park,
Marianna. Walk begins at Blue Hole Swimming
area and will last about an hour. Bb sure to bring
binoculars. Walk led by Park Volunteers Elliott and
Lesley Smith.
)) Hooks and Needles 10 a.m. at the Jackson
County Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and
experienced hand crafters welcome to create,
share, learn or teach favorite projects.Call 482-
9631.
)) Chess Club -6 p.m. 8 p.m. First United
Methodist Church on Clinton St. in Marianna.
Sponsored by Marianna Optimist Club for students
for students 8- 18 years of age in Jackson County.
All students and their parents are welcome. Players
of all skill levels including beginners are welcome.
Call 693-0473.
)) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult
and teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
)) Chess Club -6 p.m. 8 p.m. First United
Methodist Church on Clinton St. in Marianna.
Sponsored by Marianna Optimist Club for students


for students 8-18 years of age in Jackson County.
All students and their parents are welcome. Players
of all skill levels including beginners are welcome.
Call 693-0473.
)) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult
and teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, JAN.25
Basket weaving class-9 a.m. Panhandle
Pioneer Settlement's Clubhouse, 17869 NW Pioneer
Settlement Rd., Blountstown. Basic basket weaving
techniques appropriate for beginners and inter-
mediate weavers. All basketry materials supplied.
Bring heavy shears and old bath towel. Fell $50 with
mandatory $25 deposit. Call 674-2777 or email at
ppsmuseum@yahoo.com to sign up.
The Boys to Men Choir of Jackson County,
Jackson County Youth Community Choir and
the Save Our Children Black Awareness Pro-
gram Practices-9 a.m. 11 a.m. at Pope Chapel
AME Church, 4898 Blue Springs Rd., Marianna. The
Boys to Men Choir of Jackson County is open to
anyone ages 3-26. If you would like to join or need
more info contact Carol Marks 693 9630 or Leon
Kelly 209-4310.
)) Alford Community Health Clinic Hours -10
a.m. until last patient is seen, at 1770 Carolina St. in
Alford. The free clinic for income-eligible patients
without medical insurance treats short-term
illnesses and chronic conditions. Appointments
available (call 263-7106 or 209-5501); walk-ins
welcome. Sign in before 11 a.m.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.


SUNDAY, JAN. 26
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. in AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna. At-
tendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in
the board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, in Graceville.

MONDAY, JAN. 27
Marianna Lions Club Meeting Noon at Jim's
Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St., Marianna. Call
482-2005.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County FRoridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


Marianna Police Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for Jan. 19, the lat-
est available report: One drunk pedestrian,
one hit and run vehicle, two suspicious
persons, one physical disturbance, two
verbal disturbances, one civil dispute, two
property checks, one retail theft and three
assists of other agencies.


Jackson County Sheriff's Offices
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following
incidents for Jan. 19, the latest available
report: Four abandoned vehicles, five
suspicious vehicles, one suspicious person,
one escort, one highway obstruction, one
burglary of a vehicle, two physical distur-
bances, one verbal disturbance, five fire
calls, 18 medical calls, two burglar alarms,
14 traffic stops, one civil dispute, one ob-
scene/threatening phone call, one follow-
up investigation, one juvenile complaint,
two assaults, one suicide attempt, three an-
imal complaints, 17 property checks, two
assists of other agencies, one child abuse
complaint, one 911 hang-up, one welfare
check and one patrol request.


Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
.__. -. periods:
:. -. _- )) Jessica Barnes, 28, 2883
Old U.S. Road, Marianna,
'r'- :- driving while license sus-
'CRIME
-- pended or revoked-with
knowledge, violation of
state probation.
Cornell Bynum, 40, 145 24th Ave., St.
Petersburg, hold for Pinellas Co.
) Travis Harvey, 29, 2883 Godfrey Lane,
Marianna, trespass after warning.
)) Calvin Spires, 61, 4311 Sunstone Court,
Marianna, leaving the scene of an accident
with property damage.
)) Myrtle Green, 45, 2353 Sand Ridge
Church Road, Grand Ridge, trespass after
warning.
)) Carlton Curry, 42, 3070 Carters Mill
Road, Marianna, battery on a law enforce-
ment officer, resisting arrest with violence,
possession of a controlled substance (crack
cocaine).
)) Eugene Travis, 29, 1121 Laura St.,
Quincy, hold for Gadsden County, hold for
court.
)) Roger Durbin, 65, 833 Mill Road, Alford,


violation of parole.
)) Shametria Crawford, 30, 3070 Carters
Mill Road, Marianna, public assistance
fraud.
)) Xzavier Foster, 19, 8106 Eugenia St.,
Sneads, grand theft, petit theft.
Christopher Moreno, 45, 5916 Concord
Road, Bascom, hold for Bay Co.
)) Pam Mayo, 45, 2104 Creek Road, Mari-
anna, hold for Calhoun Co.
)) Cailin Foran, 25, 4433 Orchard Pointe
Drive, Marianna, possession of drug
paraphernalia.
)) Coby Grice, 40, 8083 Eugenia St.,
Sneads, trespass after warning, battery, ag-
gravated assault with a deadly weapon.
)) Jeremy Barnes, Z7, 5799 Viola Trail,
Malone, driving while license suspended or
revoked, possession of marijuana-less than
20 grams.
)) Ryan Shores, 23, 1843 Church St., Mari-
anna, battery.
)) Joseph Atkinson, 22, 2995 Spring St.,
Marianna, criminal mischief, battery (do-
mestic violence).
)) Pamela Laster, 38, PRO. Box 752, Gracev-
ille, issuing worthless check.
Jail Population: 176
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agency.To report a wildlife violation,
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


353~Ej ..cc~r'v1


712A TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014


WAKE-UP CALL


ppPP14





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Chipola College recently hosted a luncheon meeting for members of the Workforce Development Advisory Council. More than
100 area professionals and business leaders serve on 10 advisory committees for each of the college's technical programs.
Members of the Business and Information Technology Advisory Committee, are pictured from left: (front) Jack Mason, Dr.
Cathryn Meegan, April Alday, (back) Nina Adams, Sara Applewhite, Larry Meese, Dr. Jim Froh, Dennis Everett and Marcus
Dabai.


Workforce advisory committees meet


Chipola College recently
hosted a luncheon meet-
ing for members of the
Workforce Development
Advisory Council.
More than 100 area pro-
fessionals and business
leaders serve on 10 advi-
sory committees for each
of the college's technical
programs.
Advisory committee
members advise Chipola
faculty on the develop-
ment, evaluation and
revision of educational
programs. Advisors help
ensure that curriculum
meets the needs of busi-
ness, industry and the
community and that pro-
gram graduates are ca-
pable of performing entry
level skills in the occu-
pation in which they are
trained.
Members also help re-
cruit students for career
and technical education
training programs and aid
students in locating occu-
pationally related jobs.
Dr. Jason Hurst, Chipola
Vice President of Bacca-
laureate and Workforce
Education, says, "We de-
pend on the expertise of
these professionals to
provide real-world advice
about the training we need
to provide to our students.
Their involvement in-
sures that our students are
well-prepared to enter the
workforce."
Chipola advisory com-
'mittees and members are:
Automotive Cynthia
Lapitt and Dustin Davis,
Advance Auto Parts; Neil
Glover, Glover's Automo-
tive; Ray Lawrence, Ray's
Garage; J.P. Picket and Me-
lissa Lombardo, Chipola
Ford; Jamie Cozart, Hop-
kins; Chuck Anderson and
Ricky Miller, Rahal Chev-


rolet; Mike Bowyer and
Odis Boykin, Washington
Holmes Technical Voca-
tional School; Ronnie Ste-
vens, Marianna Auto Parts;
John Pforte, Johnny Bar-
foot and Tim Poppell, Bob
Pforte Motors; Walmart;
Philip Deshazo, Deshazo
Automotive; Tony Tye, Car-
quest; John Merrifield and
Debbie Walters, Barnes
Tire; Tiffany Simmons,
Firestone; Dave Collings,
Cardinal Points Engineer-
ing; Dr. Jason Hurst and
John Gardner, Chipola
College.
Cosmetology Treva
Crevatt, Beauty Systems
Group; Brian Davis and
Catherine Davis, Super-
cuts; Alice Rabion, Perma-
nent Beauty byAlice; Paige.
Vanderwerf and Ada Scott,
Chipola College.
Culinary Management
- John Milton, Daf-
fin Food Service; Edwin
Blitch, Jackson Hospital;
April Jones, Sod'exo Food
Service; John Mayo, Ruby
Tuesday's; Scott Jackson,
U.S. Foods; Vickey Baker,
Sweet Stuff Bakery; Claire
Grigsby, Zaxby's.
Law Enforcement Lou
Roberts, Jackson County
Sheriff's Office; Glenn H.
Kimbrel, Calhoun Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office; Mark
Mallory, Blountstown Po-
lice Department; Hayes
Baggett, Marianna Police
Department; Elton Hor-
ton, Graceville Police De-
partment; William Wat-
ford, Cottondale Police
Department; Burt McAl-
pin, Sneads Police De-
partment; Jimmy Baggett,
Altha Police Department;
Glenn Hess, Office of State
Attorney; Dave Edmond-
son and Shad Redmon,
Office of State Attorney;
William L. Wright, Cir-


cuit Judge; Wade Mercer,
County Judge.
Corrections Laura
Bedard, Angela Geis-
inger-Kelly, and Meghan
Babcock, Graceville' Cor-
rectional Facility; Wayne
Lipford and Steven White,
Jackson County Correc-
tional Facitity; John A.
Barfield and Ricky Cloud,
Jackson Correctional In-
stitute; Mark Henry, Black-
water River Correctional
Facility; Lisa Hayes, One-
Stop Career Center; Ronald
Mathis and James Perdue,
Correctional and Proba-
tion; Felicia Nobles, A.C.I.
Correctional Institution;
Scott Payne, Calhoun Cor-
rectional Institution; Jacob
Sorey, Liberty Correctional
Institution; Gwen Brock,
Florida Department of
Corrections.
Firefighting Tony Wes-
ley and Will Arryo, Jack-
son County Fire Rescue;
Nakeya Lovett and Scott
Birge, Marianna Fire Res-
cue; Floyd Aycock, Chi-
pley Fire Rescue; Ben Hall,
Blountstown Fire Rescue;
Shay McCormick, Bonifay
Fire Department; Don Ma-
cLaren, President Jackson
County Fire ChiefsAssoci-
ation; Rodney Andreasen,
Jackson County Emergen-
cy Management; Martin
Fowler, Chipola College.
Business Kenny Grif-
fin, Chipola Regional
Workforce Board; Sara Ap-
plewhite, Carr, Riggs and
Ingram, ELC; Nina Adams,
Community South Credit
Union; Candace Croft,West
Florida Electric Coopera-
tive; Larry Meese, Jackson
Hospital; David Melvin,
Melvin Engineering; Wil-
liam Long, Jackson County
Health Department.
Information Technology
- Dennis Everett and By-


ron Ward, Chipola Col-
lege; Dave Grossnickle,
Bonifay Computers; Jamie
Hussey, Jackson Hospital;
Michael Pinnella, Holmes
County School District;
Kevin King, Department
of Transportation; April
Alday, Department of Rev-
enue; Jack Mason, Family
Dollar Distribution.
Nursing Gene
Grantham, Blountstown
Health and Rehab; Becky
Galloway, Bonifay Nurs-
ing and Rehab Center; Ann
Smith, Capital Regional
Medical Center; Joyce
Roland, Chipola Nursing
Pavilion; Merian Milton,
Covenant Hospice; Carla
Rockwell, Doctors Memo-
rial Hospital; Pam Lanier
and Kim Barnes, "Florida
State Hospital; Marilyn
McKissick, Flowers Hospi-
tal; Christy Bloechi, Genti-
va; Christianna Orvis, Gulf
Coast Medical Center; Di-
ane Tipps, Jackson County
Health Department; Rob-
bin Catt,- Jackson Hospi-
tal; Parm Moss, Marianna
Health and Rehab; Karla
Nichols, Rivervalley Rehab
Center; Diane Buntyn and
Gwen MacGilberry, South-
east Alabama Medical
Center; Darlene See and
Milo Jordan, Sunland; Bar-
bara Alford and Kathy Ma-
son, Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital.
EMT Tony Wesley and
Will Arroyo, Jackson Coun-
ty Fire Rescue; Phillip Hill,
Calhoun County EMS; Stan
Whittaker, Liberty County
EMS; Greg Barton, Holmes
County EMS; Randy Tru-
ette, Washington County
EMS; Larry Williams and
Sean Gibson, Dothan Fire
Department; James Mc-
Millan, North Walton Fire
Department; Dr. Murray
Baker, Jackson Hospital.


STACY GOODSON SPEAKS TO C "POLA CWVC CLUB
^ ... ictured are Richard Kunde,
president; Stacy Goodson,
7 Lt Jackson County probation
SMI T P officer and Jackson County School
Board District 3 member; and Tony

Swearingen, club member. Swear-
ingen introduced Goodson who
spoke to the Club on the Jackson
County Court System as well as
issues relating to the county school
system, such as the 1/2 cent sales
SUBMITTED PHOTO tax as well as the possibility of


CRAA meeting to feature

local artist guild as speakers


The Artists Guild of
Northwest Florida Inc. will
provide the featured guest
speakers at Tuesday meet-
ing of the Chipola Regional
Arts Association.
CRAA will ..meet at Jim's
Buffet, with a Dutch-treat
luncheon at 11:30 a.m.
and program beginning at
noon.
The Artists Guild of
Northwest Florida is a di-
verse group of individuals
with one thing 'in com-
mon: they really love art
in all its forms: Their goal
is to encourage all aspects
of creativity in the art
world through promotion,
exhibition, and placement
in local and regional facili-
ties, in Northwest Florida.


constructing a new K-8 school.


They offer opportunities to
local artists in what is now
an ever-shrinking artistic
environment, through im-
proved visibility and artistic
media, arts education ser-
vices, and communication
mediums involving visual
imagery. TAG meets on the
second Saturday of each
month except in April and
December. Membership is
open to all interested par-
ties Several artists will have
their works on display at
the Tuesday meeting.
For information about
CRAA, contact Anita Price
at pricea@chipola.edu or
718-2277. For more infor-
mation about TAG visit
their website at www.tag
nwfl.org.


Riverside Elementary

announces Cavanaugh

as Teacher of the Year


On behalf of the faculty
and staff of Riverside Ele-
mentary School, Principal
Chris Franklin is pleased
to announce the River-
side Teacher of the Year is
Paige Cavanaugh.
Cavanaugh has been
teaching for 24 years.
She began her career in
1989 teaching third grade
at Fort McCoy School in
Fort. McCoy, Fla. Jack-
son County has been her
home since 1995, and
Riverside has been her
"home away from home."
She has taught third,
fourth and fifth grade.
She has a Bachelor of
Science in elementary
education from Stetson
University and recently
earned her Master of
Education in educational
leadership from the Uni-
versity of West Florida.
She is involved in several
professional associations,
including National Board
for Professional Teach-
ing Standards, Delta
Kappa Gamma Society,
National Education Asso-
ciation, Jackson County
Education Association,
and Network for Public
Education.
She received the honor
of being named River-
side's Teacher of the Year
once before in 2002.While
Cavanaugh has taught all


subjects, reading is the
closest to her heart. She
has this to
say about
her favorite
subject:
Cavanag 1reainghaee
benefits of
leading are
Cavanaugh varied and
far-reach-
ing. The immediate rea-
sons that come to mind
include this old saying,
'The more you read, the
more you know.' I also
think of this quote by
Fredrick Douglas, 'Once
you learn to read, you will
be forever free.' Not only
is reading fundamental to
school success, I believe
it helps our children lead
well and ultimately, more
successful lives. I remem-
ber reading on one of the
many blogs I follow that
reading helps build em-
pathy in children. As Kate
Forsyth said, 'When you
read a book, you experi-
ence the story from inside
the hero's skin; you are
privy to their innermost
thoughts and feelings,
leading to a much deeper
emotional connection ...
even if that hero is a Hob-
bit with hairy feet.' Read-
ing allows our children to
experience and see life
through another person's
eyes."


Riverside Elementary

announces School-Related

Employee of the Year


On behalf of the faculty
and staff of Riverside Ele-
mentary School, Principal
Chris Franklin is pleased
to announce the School-
Related Employee of the
Year is George Barnes.
Barnes is in his 24th year
of service for the school
district, and all of his
years, have been working
as a custodian/mainte-
nance employee at River-
side Elementary School.
Franklin said, "During my
first few months as prin-
cipal of Riverside, I have
found Mr. Barnes to be
very congenial, polite and
dependable. He has an ef-
fective working relation-
ship with all fellow em-
ployees and is a positive
influence for the students
of our school." No task is
ever too big or too small
for Barnes to handle and
he keeps a smile on his
face all day long.
Riverside teacher Dave
Galloway said "Many peo-
ple don't realize the posi-
tive impact that a smile
or a few warm words
can have on a child. Mr.
Barnes does. He fully un-
derstands that he may be
the best part of a child's
day. He treats all our stu-
dents with kindness and


consideration, the same
as he does with his co-
-workers at
Riverside."
The facul-
ty and staff
Pof Riverside
Elementary
N School are
. Barnes very proud
to have
Paige Cavanaugh and
George Barnes as employ-
ees of the year.

SPhilip








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STATE


Jail inmates grow own food


The Associated Press

OCALA, Fla. Marion County
Jail inmates are served three meals
a day. In 2012 and 2013, the average
inmate population on any given day
was 1,546. That means roughly 4,638
food trays a day, or 1,692,870 meals
per year.
To help save taxpayers money -
and to keep inmates occupied and,
perhaps, learning new skills the
Marion County Sheriff's Office oper-
ates three inmate work farms.
The main farm is at Maricamp
Road and Baseline Road in Ocala,
where inmate workers grow a vari-
ety of crops and raise cows, pigs and
chickens.
Another site is a partnership at
the 1,100-acre University of Florida
Plant Science Research and Educa-
tion Unit in Citra. This farm also pro-
duces a number of plant and animal
foods, with a focus on creating new
varieties, such as plants that do not
require much water or fertilizer.
The third site is a county-owned
orange grove on Carney Island.
According to the Florida Depart-
ment of Corrections, the average
cost per tray to feed a state prisoner
is $1.54.
According to Lt. Richard Byrd, food
service unit coordinator at the jail, in
2013 the average foqd tray cost was
50 cents per tray, as determined by
the price of food the Sheriff's Office
had to purchase.
The cost to the Sheriff's Office var-
ies by season. For instance, in May,
June and July of 2013, the average
food tray cost was 44 cents per tray.
Prices were down due to a greater
variety of vegetables and fruits com-
ing in, Byrd said.
The most expensive months were
August, September and October,
where the cost was 56 cents per tray
because that was the end of the har-
vest and fewer vegetables were com-
ing in.
Byrd said one example of signifi-
cant savings through the main in-
mate farm in Ocala is in the produc-
tion of eggs.
If the sheriff had purchased eggs
at a store last year, the average price


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Marion County inmate Damion Sanders looks for eggs Jan. 6 in one of the chicken
houses at an inmate work farm Ocala, Fla. The inmate work farm and University
of Florida citrus groves supply the jail with fresh fruit, vegetables, eggs and some
meat.


would have been $31.47 a case, with
30 dozen eggs in a case. On average,
to prepare a meal at the jail that in-
cludes eggs, it takes 10 cases, which
would have meant paying $314.70
per meal.
The jail offers meals that include
eggs 208 days a year, which means
the total cost if they had to buy eggs
would have been $65,457.60.
"That would be a lot of money for
that one item for us, which is a large
savings for us," Byrd said.
The plant and animal foods pro-
duced at the three farms are trans-
ported to the jail two or three times
a week. Once the food arrives, it is
kept in a cooler until it is prepared
for consumption.
What is not to be used immediately
is frozen for later use. Byrd said most
of the meat products are purchased
by the agency, which solicits bids to
get the best prices.
All meals have to be certified by a
dietitian according to state jail stan-
dards before they are served.
"You'have to follow the guidelines.
For example, I can substitute a des-
sert, like a cake, with a fruit. I can
replace a carbohydrate, such as rice,


macaroni or noodles, with potatoes
or sweet potatoes. All canned veg-
etables can be replaced with farm
vegetables," Byrd said.
While some inmates complain
about the food, at least one thinks
the meals are not all bad.
"The oranges and vegetables are
pretty nutritious," said Kyle Katona,
20, currently incarcerated on a viola-
tion of probation charge.
Master Sgt. David Hurst is in
charge of the inmate farm system.
He and Dr. Daniel Colvin, director
of research programs at UF, estimate
that between the Citra location and
the work farm in Ocala, the produc-
tion of food including eggs, meat and
plant crops is valued at more than $1
million a year, which is measured by
a comparison of what is grown and
harvested and what others are pay-
ing for those same products.
Colvin hailed the UF/MCSO part-
nership and said it not only provides
the research facility an abundance
of labor they "could never afford,"
but also provide inmates a chance to
learn new skills.
"It gives them access to agricultural
teaching and farming," Colvin said.


FAMU program to prep high students


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. EloridaA&M
University is hoping to help raise the
quality of applicants by working with
students in the several Leon County
high schools.
The program began Jan. 11 when
students and their mentors gathered
at the university for an initial session.
The goal is to make sure they don't
struggle once they start college.
The Tallahassee Democrat reports
that up to two dozen high school stu-
dents are participating in the FAMU's
Stellar Student Program. School offi-
cials hope to expand to other parts of
Florida.
The program was started by FAMU's
Interim President Larry Robinson,
who believes the university can't rely
solely on school districts to prepare
students for the rigors of college life.


During the fall semester, the pro-
gram's infrastructure was set in place,
with coaches and mentors identified
at each school.
"The interim president has made it
very clear to us that he wants FAMU
to be more active in cultivating tal-
ent for college," said Mark Howse,
faculty administrator for the project.
"We can no longer wait on students
to want to come to Florida A&M. Our
goal is to touch all of the districts in
our shadows;'
Robinson has said he would like
the program, which is starting in
Leon County, to move to Gadsden
and Jefferson counties before going
statewide.
"I think this is necessary for every-
one involved," Robinson said. "The
middle school and high school stu-
dents need it. Their parents need it, as
do the school districts. And, ultimate-


ly, Florida A&M University needs it."
Enrollment at the university has
been dropping and .officials say this
is one way to reverse the trend, said
Donal Palm, associate vice president
for academic affairs.
Though officials hope that partici-
pants will attend FAMU, the program
doesn't limit them to the school.
Students must have a 3.0 GPA and
a solid attendance record. Science,
technology, engineering and math
courses are emphasized, but the pro-
gram is not limited to those areas.
"We wanted to help students who
have already demonstrated poten-
tial, and needed support getting to
the next level," Howse said. "We also
focus on the whole student develop-
ment, including self-esteem and self-
confidence. We pride ourselves in
trying to support students from every
angle."


State Briefs


Ex-NY Rep. Otis Pike
dies at 92 in Florida
VERO BEACH, Fla.
Former NewYork
Democratic Rep. Otis
Pike, who led a mid-1970s
House investigation into
CIA activities, has died in
Florida, his daughter said.
Pike died Monday at a
Vero Beach hospice after
a long illness, said his
daughter, Lois Pike Eyre.
He was 92.
Pike served 18 years in
Congress before deciding
to retire in 1978.
In 1975 and 1976, he
chaired the House Select
Committee on Intelli-
gence, which investigated
questionable CIA activi-
ties. The agency consid-
ered the inquiries by the
Pike Committee and its
counterpart in the Senate
as a dramatic shift in Con-
gress and the first signifi-
cant House investigation
of the U.S. intelligence
community since the CIA's
creation in 1947.
Pike also served as a
member of the House
Armed Services Commit-
tee, the House Ways and
Means Committee and the
Budget Committee.
After he retired from
Congress, Pike wrote a
syndicated column for
jNewhouse Newspapers for


20 years.In his later years,
his split his time between
homes inVero Beach and
Virginia, his family said.
Pike was born Aug. 31,
1921, in Riverhead, N.Y.
He served in the Marines
as a pilot in the Pacific
during World War II, and
then worked as a lawyer in
his hometown.
He is survived by his sec-
ond wife and two children.
Plans for a funeral service
were pending.

Thief takes car with
two toddlers inside
ORLANDO, Fla. Au-
thorities are looking for a
thief who took a car with
two toddlers strapped
into their car seats from
outside an Orlando hotel
parking lot.
The children ages 1
and 3 -were found on
a sidewalk about a mile
away Sunday night still
buckled in their car seats.
The thief and the car were
gone.
Police say the children
were not harmed and have
been reunited with their
mother.
The car was taken from
a Ramada Inn off John
Young Parkway in Orlan-
do. No further details were
immediately available.
Orlando police are ask-


ing anyone with informa-
tion to call Crimeline at
1-800-423-TIPS.

Biologists monitor
pilot whales off coast
FORT MYERS BEACH,
Fla. Two pilot whales
have died and a third will
be euthanized after doz-
ens of whales swam into
shallow waters off south-
west Florida.
Kim Amendola of the
National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Adminis-
tration's Fisheries Service
says a handful of whales
were stranded Monday
near shore in Lee County.
More than a dozen other
whales were swimming


nearby, and an additional
12 whales had been spot-
ted farther offshore earlier
in the morning.
NOAA regional strand-
ing coordinator Blair
Mase says necropsies
will be performed on
three beached whales.
She says the remaining
whales appear listless and
emaciated.
Officials were monitor-
ing roughly two dozen
other pilot whales in the
waters off Collier County.
Those whales were the
same pod that swam into
shallow waters off Naples
on Sunday. Mase says they
also appear in poor shape.
From wire reports


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com



Florida man's


'too fat to kill'


appeal focuses


onwiretaplaw


The Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. The
"too fat to kill" defense
didn't work for a Florida
man convicted of mur-
dering his son-in-law
in 2006, so he is appeal-
ing his conviction on the
grounds that New Jer-
sey's wiretapping law is
unconstitutional.
New Jersey's Supreme
Court will hear arguments
in Edward Ates' case
Wednesday in Trenton.
The victim, Paul Dunc-
sak, was shot six times
at his home in Ramsey.
Prosecutors said the 40-
year-old pharmaceuti-
cal executive and Ates'
daughter, Stacey, were
involved in a bitter cus-
tody dispute after their
divorce.
Prosecutors contended
that Ates drove up from
Florida and broke into
Duncsak's house, then
shot him several times be-
fore driving back south.
At his 2009 trial, Ates'
defense centered around
a novel theory: In his
60s and at 5-feet-8 and
285 pounds with numer-
ous health problems, he
wasn't physically capable
of running up a flight of
stairs to shoot Duncsak,
then escape by driving
nearly 24 hours straight
to his mother's home in
Sibley, La., as investiga-
tors believed.
A jury didn't buy it and
convicted Ates of murder,
felony murder and other
counts. Ajudge sentenced
him to life in prison.
A key piece of evidence
in the trial was a wire-
tapped conversation be-
tween Ates and his sister
in Louisiana after Dunc-
sak was killed, in which
Ates repeatedly went
over the timing of his re-
turn to make sure stories
matched up. His sister
later testified that she
misled police about the
day Ates arrived in Loui-
siana because her brother
had asked her to lie.


While a warrant was
required in Florida to
search Ates' residence in
Fort Pierce, the phone
conversation with his
sister was recorded with-
out the need of a warrant
in Florida. Under New
Jersey's wiretap law, local
authorities are allowed to
intercept calls between
callers in other states if
the "listening post" the
location where the calls
were intercepted was
in New Jersey.
Ates claimed in his ap-
peal that even if New Jer-
sey authorities followed
the letter of the law, the
law itself is unconstitu-
tional because it exceeds
federal law and "eradi-
cates all jurisdictional
boundaries between the
states."
"We are arguing for a
higher standard," Ates' at-
torney, Walter Lesnevich,
said last week. "I'm say-
ing you have to do what's
right for New Jersey and
say the statute just has
too much power."
An appeals court dis-
agreed last year, denying
Ates' appeal and writing
that federal law permits
the same type of author-
ity. The court admitted,
however, that the issue
"has not been previously
addressed by our courts"
in New Jersey. Lesnevich
noted that recent revela-
tions about NSA surveil-
lance may have changed
the landscape for appeals
such as Ates'.
He also pointed to a case
decided last July in which
the state Supreme Court,
in a unanimous decision,
said that all law enforce-
ment officers must get a
search warrant based on
probable cause if they
want access to cellphone
locating data. Since 2010,
police had had to satisfy
a lower standard of dem-
onstrating there were
"reasonable grounds" t
believe the information
would be relevant to an
investigation.


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service. All entries subject to editing.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850-482-2332

Marilyn B.
Clark

Marilyn B. Clark, of
Grand Ridge died Saturday,
January 18, 2014 at The
Covenant Hospice Center
in Panama City. She was
67.
She was born in Blue
Earth, MN, moved to Jack-
son County at the age of
three where she has lived
the reminder of her life.
Marilyn was a homemaker
and attended Grace United
Methodist Church.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Herbert Clark; parents,
George Arthur Bennett and
Freda Donough Bennett;
brother, Roger Bennett.
She is survived by two
sons, Mark and Carl Clark
both of Grand Ridge; two
daughters, Jo-Jo Lawrence
of Grand Ridge, Vicki Clark
of Tallahassee; two sisters,
Wanda Ellis (Ed) of Ma-
rianna, Marlene Ellis (Earl)
of Altha; one brother, Ever-
ett Bennett (Barbara) of
Warner Robins, GA., three
granddaughters, D.J. Law-
rence, Amber Clark, and
Cassie Clark all of Grand
Ridge and a host of nieces
and nephews."
Funeral service will be at
10 a.m. Wednesday, Janu-
ary 22, 2014 at James &
Sikes Maddox Chapel. Bur-
ial will follow in the Cy-
press Cemetery with James
& Sikes Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel directing.
The family will receive
friends Tuesday, from 6-8
p.m. at James & Sikes Mad-
dox Chapel.
In Lieu of flowers, contri-
butions may be made to
Covenant Hospice or St.
Jude's Children's Hospital.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com.

Florists

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Scam
From Page 1A

employee of the United
States Internal Revenue
Service and said that she
owed back taxes, and then
wanted her personal in-
formation. Knowing this
to be a falsehood she told
the would-be scam artist
to have wonderful day and
hung up the phone. She
then made contact with
the IRS herself and con-
firmed that the man was
not with the IRS.
Police urge residents to
never give information
but over the phone, by
mail or Internet to solicita-
tion that they themselves
did not initiate. If they
contact you and ask for in-
formation, it is most likely
a scam.
The Marianna Police
Department and all law
enforcement have the
highest praise for alert
citizens who accept their
civic responsibility and
watch out for the well-be-
ing of their fellow man and
report such scams.
If you believe you have
been the target of a scam,
please do not hesitate to
give MPD a call so that the
agency can get the word
opt and make it possible to
prevent victimization.


Boy Scout Troop 3 learns about first aid


Special to the Flonrdan

Troop 3 Boy Scouts
conducted their weekly
meeting on Jan. 13, at
the Scout Hut at Wynn
Street Park. The topic
of study was "First Aid",
which was training and
information for the newer
Scouts and review time
for the more experienced
Scouts.
Noah McArthur led the
instruction and demon-
stration time, and Se-
nior Patrol Leader Daniel
Tillman provided help-
ful input and assistance
throughout the meeting.
The topics of discussion
included: simple cuts and
scrapes; blisters; nose-
bleeds; venomous snakes;
bites and stings of insects
and ticks; minor burns;
frostbite and sunburn;
and how to help a choking
victim.


Additional first aid
practices will be explored
and reviewed in the en-
suing weeks. Troop 3 also
continued planning and
preparing for their first an-
nual Scout Fest to be held
on February 15 at Madi-
son Street Park, located
at 2884 Madison Street in
Marianna.
This event will feature
numerous booths and
information centers that
will provide outreach and
recruitment of poten-
tial new members for the
Scouting program. More
information will be shared
soon about this exciting
event.
The Marianna Optimist
Club is the chartering
organization for Troop
3 Boy Scouts. For more
information about Boy
Scouts, please call Scout-
master Bill Kleinhans at
526-2897.


Daniel Tillman (R) demon-
strates with Noah McArthur
the maneuver to use to help a
choking victim.


SUBMITTED PHOTOS


CU 7II* ,-I.---.
-,;d :... -__J ,a.LA L .


ames Anthony
Hitchcock,
6-months-old,
son of Tiffany and
David Hitchcock,
grandson of Kelly
and Danny Tate, and
great-grandson of
Davine and David
Shores, all of Cot-
tondale, smiles while
playing.


2 nabbed at Texas border in credit card fraud case


The Associated Press

McALLEN, Texas Ac-
count information stolen
during the Target secu-
rity breach is now being
divided up and sold off
regionally, a South Texas
police chief said Monday
following the arrest of two
Mexican citizens who au-
thorities say arrived at the
border with 96 fraudulent
credit cards.
McAllen Police ChiefVic-
tor Rodriguez said Mary
Carmen Garcia, 27, and
Daniel Guardiola Domin-
guez, 28, both of Monter-
rey, Mexico, used cards
containing the account in-
formation of South Texas
residents. Rodriguez said
they were used to buy tens
of thousands of dollars'
worth of merchandise at
national retailers in the
area including Best Buy,
Wal-Mart and Toys R Us.
"They're obviously sell-
ing the data sets by re-
gion," Rodriguez said.
Garcia and Guardiola
were both beingheld Mon-
day on state fraud charges.
It was not immediately
known whether they had
retained lawyers.
Rodriguez said he did
not know whether they
were the first arrests re-
lated to the Target breach.
Target did not immedi-
ately return phone and
email messages left Mon-
day, which was Martin Lu-
ther King Jr. Day, a federal
holiday. The Minneapolis-
based company said last
week that it has stopped
more than a dozen opera-
tions that sought to scam
breach victims by way of


"IJ -


' -- -T


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
McAllen Police Chief Victor Rodriguez displays dozens of
fraudulent credit cards that were confiscated by McAllen
police after arresting a man and a woman on fraud charges
tied to the December Target credit card breach.


email, phone calls and
text messages.
McAllen police began
working with the U.S.
Secret Service after a
number of area retailers
were hit with fraudulent
purchases on Jan. 12. The
Secret Service confirmed
that the fraudulent ac-
counts traced back to
the original Target data
breach from late last year,
Rodriguez said.
Investigators fanned
out to McAllen-area mer-
chants and reviewed
"miles of video" looking
for the fraudsters, he said.
From that, they were able
to identify two people and
a car with Mexican license
plates.
A message left for the
Secret Service on Mon-
day was not immediately
returned.
With the help of U.S. Im-
migration and Customs
Enforcement, investiga-
tors confirmed the iden-
tities of their suspects


from immigration records
of when they had en-
tered Texas in the same
vehicle. Police prepared
arrest warrants last week
and waited for them to
return.
On Sunday morning,
federal officials alerted po-
lice that their two suspects
were at the Anzalduas In-
ternational Bridge trying
to re-enter the U.S. They
were carrying 96 fraudu-
lent cards, Rodriguez said.
Investigators believe
the two were involved in
both the acquisition of
the fraudulent account
data and the production
of the cards, but only part
of what must have been a
much broader conspiracy.
Rodriguez said investiga-
tors suspect Garcia and
Guardiola were singling
out Sundays for their
shopping sprees hoping
that the banks would hot
be as quick to detect the
fraud.
With the amount of elec-


tronics and other mer-
chandise purchased on
Jan. 12, Rodriguez said the
two would have needed an
"army" to move it all.
Rodriguez also alluded
to a link with Eastern Eu-
rope or Russia, but did not
provide additional details.
He said he expected Garcia
and Guardiola to eventu-
ally face federal charges.
South Texas authori-
ties have seen large-
scale fraudulent credit


card schemes before,
including one in which
they seized machines
used to upload informa-
tion to the cards' magnetic
strips.
The Target security
breach is believed to


have involved 40 million
credit and debit card ac-
counts and the personal
information of 70 million
customers.


Follow us on
Twitter
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jcfloridannews


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Members of the crowd listen to St. Luke MB Church pastor
and Second West Baptist Association Moderator Rev. Riley
Henderson during his presentation as guest speaker at the
MLK Day service at New Mt. Olive MB Church.


ABOVE: Pianist and MMS teacher Kenny Baker plays and sings with the Club Yu Marianna Middle School choir. LEFT: Hailey Yo
and Olivia Clemmons were among the many children who took part in MLK Day activities Monday.


MLK
From Page 1A
history and Afro-Ameri-
can studies and Master
of Education degrees
in Educational Leader-
ship and Curriculum and
Instruction.
The Rev. Ron Mizer was
master of ceremonies at
the MLK Day prayer break-
fast at St. James, where he
is pastor.
The Club YU Choir
from. Marianna Middle
School sang inspirational


selections at the service.
At the afternoon service,
the Rev. Riley Henderson
was guest speaker. He is
moderator at Second West
Baptist Association and
pastor of St. Luke Mission-
ary Baptist Church.
Other presentations were
given by Karen Edwards,
Walter Caldwell and Ada-
jaha Swilley.
The Anniversary Choir
of the Angelic Choir
Union and the Jackson
County United Voices
for Christ sang special
selections.


fzlsm- Attorney Jami Coleman (left) and attorney LaDray Gilbert
MLK Day Prayer Breakfast guest speaker Daragh Reed-Gray pose for a picture after Coleman presented Gilberta plaque in
gives her presentation, recognition of his being honored as grand marshal of the MLK
Day parade in Marianna.


The Rev. Riley Henderson speaks at the MLK Day service at
New Mt. Olive MB Church.


Members of the Heroines of Jericho social club were part of the
crowd at the MLK Day service at New Mt. Olive MB Church.


Gholson
From Page 1A

last week at the age of 92.
Otherwise, he would prob-
ably have walked at least a
piece of the trail that bears
his name, and where those
flowers grow. He might
have rested for a bit, too,
under the shelter of the pa-
vilion in a park that graces
the trailhead and which
bears his name.
The Angus Gholson
Nature Trail Park was
so named back in 2003.
Over the years, more land
around it was purchased
by the state and added to
the park, and new trails
were added to augment the
original one. It is so exten-
sive now that visitors can
walk through the park off
Morgan Avenue all the way
to the Apalachicola River.
A longtime Corps of En-
gineers employee, Ghol-
son in retirement took his
lifelong interest in native
plants to a new level. He
created his own herbarium
at home, turning a mod-
est old shed into a shelter
for one of the largest and
most diverse personal col-
lections of preserved plant


Crash
From Page 1A

of the road. The left side of
the truck collided with a
wooden utility pole. Impact
caused the truck to spin
clockwise. It overturned
and came to rest on the
east shoulder of the road.
Musgrove was pronounced
dead at the scene.
His passengers, 16-year-
old Emily Swell of Blount-
stown and 16-year-old Al-
tha resident Tryston Cole
Miller, received minor
injuries in the crash. Both
were takep to Jackson Hos-
_pital for treatment.


specimens in the world.
People traveled from other
countries to see the world-
class array, and Gholson
was consulted by many
experts over the years who
wanted to add his store-
house of knowledge to
theirs.
He was a wealth of infor-
mation, and was generous
with what he knew. Always
educating his visitors in a
friendly way on how to be
careful around the collec-
tion, he hosted school chil-
dren, professors, graduate
students and citizens of his
community many times.
His storytelling skills and
his sense of gentle humor
added to his legend. Born
a bit north in Recovery,
Ga., but raised in Chat-
tahoochee, the decorated
World War II bombardier
lived most of his adult life
in the same house in Chat-


tahoochee where he and
his wife Eloise raised their
children.
Gholson was recognized
numerous times over the
years for his knowledge
and sharing of botanical
*facts and for his discovery
of many species in and
around Chattahoochee.
Three of his discoveries
were named after him, in
fact.
A core of volunteers from
that community and other
places have taken on the
park as a project, clean-
ing it of debris on a regu-
lar basis and making sure
it is kept up as Gholson
felt it should be as a jewel
in nature's crown. It was a
commitment that Ghol-
son appreciated. He had
counted the naming of the
park in his honor as one
of the things he was most
proud of in his lifetime of


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-76A ir TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014


LOCAL









IEL


CC Women's Basketball



Lady Indians stay perfect in Panhandle


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcflondan.com
In a battle of the only 3-0
Panhandle Conference teams,
it was the No. 4 Chipola Lady
Indians who came out on top,
knocking off the No. 13 North-
west Florida State Lady Raid-
ers 55-45 Saturday night in
Marianna.
With the win, the Lady Indi-
ans took sole possession of first
place in the Panhandle Confer-
ence at 4-0 and won their ninth
straight game overall.


Northwest Florida State fell
to 3-1 in the league and 16-3
overall.
Chipola won despite com-
mitting 24 turnovers and going
just 7-of-19 from the free throw
line thanks largely to outscoring
the Lady Raiders' 24-0 from the
three-point line.
Brianna Wright led the way
for the Lady Indians with 15
points and 11 rebounds, while
Tiffany Lewis had 11 points and
made three of the team's eight
three-pointers.


Khadijah Ellison had just sev-
en points but played a critical
role defensively, matching up
with Northwest leading scorer
Simone Westbrook and help-
ing limit her to just nine points
on 3-of-10 shooting following
her 30-point outing against
Gulf Coast State earlier in the
week.
Carla Batchelor led Northwest
with 13 points, but offense was
tough to come by all night for

See PANHANDLE, Page 6B


CC MEN'S BASKETBALL


Short-handed Chipola

knocks off NWF State

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
Despite missing three of their top five
scorers, the No. 1 Chipola Indians scored
their most significant victory of the sea-
son Saturday night at home, knocking off
the No. 7 Northwest Florida State Raiders
86-78.
Chipola was without regulars Torian Gra-
ham, Cinmeon Bowers, and Jamaar McKay
after the trio was arrested Thursday night,
charged with tampering with evidence,
and suspended indefinitely by the school.
But the remaining Indians rallied Satur-
day and took a win that put them in sole
possession of first place in the Panhandle
Conference.
They did it behind huge efforts from Sam
Cassell, Jr., Demetrious Floyd, and Carlos
Morris, with three combining for 64 of the
team's 86 points and making all nine of the
team's three-point shots.
"We had some guys who rose to the occa-
sion and embraced the moment," Chipola
coach Patrick Blake said after the game. "I
was proud of the effort from start to finish.
We said going in that adversity shows your
character and we embraced that. With a
big game, we wanted to put our best foot
forward."
The Indians jumped out to a fast start,
taking an 18-9 lead midway through the
first half and going up 35-24 after a bank
shot by Morris and a reverse layup by Ty
Baker.
But the Raiders scored seven straight to
close the half and cut the margin to four at
the break.
Chipola answered with a 7-0 run of its
own to start the second half, with a triple
from Cassell, Jr. making'it 42-31.
A transition basket by Floyd and another
three-point for Floyd gave the Indians their
biggest lead of the night at 52-37 with 14:42
on the clock.

See TOP, Page 6B


DANIELWILLIAMS
Carlos Morris (11) goes in for a shot during a Chipola game against Northwest Florida State on
Saturday night.


Sport
Briefs

High School
Boys Basketball
Tuesday- Malone at
Marianna, 5:30 p.m. and
7 p.m.;Vernon at Cotton-
dale, 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.;
Blountstown at Sneads,
5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.; We-
wahitchka at Graceville,
5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Thursday- Wewahitchka
at Sneads, 1:30 p.m.; Cot-
tondale at Altha, 5:30 p.m.
and 7 p.m.
Friday- Vernon at
Graceville, 5:30 p.m. and
7 p.m.; West Florida at
Marianna, 6 p.m. and 7:30
p.m.; Malone at Laurel
Hill, 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Saturday- Rutherford at
Graceville, 5:30 p.m. and
7 p.m.

High School
Girls Basketball
Tuesday- Malone at
Marianna, 4 p.m.; Chipley
at Sneads, 4 p.m.; Gracev-
ille at Paxton, 6 p.m.
Thursday- Sneads at
Malone, 5 p.m.; Holmes
County at Cottondale,
6 p.m.; Bethlehem at
Graceville, 6 p.m.
Friday- Marianna at
Dothan High, 6 p.m.
Saturday- Cottondale at
Ponce de Leon, 6 p.m.

Chipola
Basketball
Chipola men's and
women's basketball teams
will play host to Pensacola
State tonight, before fin-
ishing the week in Panama
City on Saturday against
Gulf Coast State.
On both nights, the
women's game will tip at
5:30 p.m. followed by the
men at 7:30 p.m.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan P.O. Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447.


Wert's late


triple spurs


Sneads


pastNFC

BYDUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

JeremyWert made a three-pointer with
six seconds left to help lift the Sneads
Pirates to a 56-53 road victory over
the North Florida Christian Eagles on
Saturday.
Wert's game-winner capped off a
dominant fourth quarter for the Pi-
rates, who outscored the hosts 18-
6 to erase a nine-point deficit after
three.
Darius Williams led the way with 21
points and Wert finished with 16 to help
the Pirates take their third victory in the
last four games after starting the season
2-14.
:; Y .-- -. . -? ."" ,, ; :


JENNIFER BASFORD
Sneads' Darius Williams dunks the ball during
a game against North Florida Christian in
Tallahassee on Saturday.
"We were excited to get that win,"
Sneads coach Bruce Hubbs said. "It's the
biggest road win we've had. (The Eagles)
are a quality team and we were excited to
beat them."

See SNEADS, Page 6B


MHS Boys Basketball



Rams deal Bulldogs



1st loss of the season


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Marianna Bulldogs'
dreams of an undefeated
season were dashed Satur-
day night in
SPanama
by the
Ruth-
erford
Rams,
w h o
took a 70-63
victory to deal the 'Dawgs
their first defeat in 19 con-
tests this season.
Khaliel Spearman
scored 25 points to lead
the Rams, who improved
to 16-3 on the season,
while Josh Wade had 15
points, and Marquis Steele
and Keith Arts each had
nine.


Shaquarious Baker
scored 26 points in a los-
ing effort or the Bulldogs,
with Jamel Johnson add-
ing 17 points, and Herman
Williams 11.
The Rams won despite
being without a pair of
regulars in Destin Dun-
ton and Dorian Moore,
who were both out with
injury.
But Rutherford didn't
seem to miss a beat in
the early going, jumping
out to a 19-10 first quar-
ter lead before the Bull-
dogs rallied with a strong
second period to go up
by one at the halftime
break.
Rutherford reassumed
control in the third by out-
scoring Marianna 21-14
and then held off a fourth
*. ._


quarter' charge by the
visitors.
"We kind of played slow
early and were a little
sluggish," Bulldogs coach
Travis Blanton said of his
team. "We got back on
track before halftime, but
Rutherford did a nice job
of making open shots in
the second half."
Marianna was coming
off of a big district victory
over the Walton Braves on
Friday night, a win that
clinched the top seed in
the upcoming district
tournament.
That was the more sig-
nificant game of thd'week-
end for the Bulldogs, but
Saturday's proved the most
challenging.

See BULLDOGS, Page 6BL
", -. : j -


Chipola's
Khadijah
Ellison
(41)
shoots
over the
defense
during
a game
against
Northwest
Florida
State on
Saturday.


DANIELWILLIAMS


SHS Boys Basketball





-2B TUESDAY, JANUARY 21. 2014


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NFL



Seahawks rally, beat 49ers for NFC title


The Associated Press

SEATTLE Richard Sherman
did a CenturyLink Leap.
Golden Tate grabbed a 12th
Man flag and circled the field
with it.
Even team owner Paul Allen
made an appearance and gave a
victory speech.
The Seattle Seahawks are head-
ed to the Big Apple for the Super
SBowl.
"To see all our work that we put
in the mornings, the nights,
the weights, all your life, as a
young player and in the NFL,"
Malcolm Smith said after his end
zone interception with 22 sec-
onds remaining clinched the 23-
17 victory over the San Francisco


49ers on Sunday. "It's amazing."
Seattle's top-ranked defense
forced three fourth-quarter turn-
overs, and Russell Wilson threw
a 35-yard touchdown pass on
fourth down for the winning
points. Seattle will meet Denver
(15-3) for the NFL title in two
weeks in the New Jersey Mead-
owlands. It's the first trip to the
big game for the Seahawks (15-3)
since they lost to Pittsburgh after
the 2005 season.
The conference champs had
the best records in the league
this year, the second time the
top seeds have gotten to the Su-
per Bowl in 20 seasons. It also is
a classic confrontation of Den-,
ver's record-setting offense led
by Peyton Manning against the


NFL's stingiest defense. Den-
ver opened as a 1-point-favorite
over Seattle on the Glantz-Culver
Line.
"It will be a great matchup,"
coach Pete Carroll said. "I think
it's an extraordinary opportunity
to go against a guy that set all
the records in the history of the
game."
Moments after Sherman tipped
Colin Kaepernick's pass to Smith
for the interception, the All-Pro
cornerback jumped into the
stands behind the end zone, sa-
luting the Seahawks' raucous
fans. With 12th Man flags waving
everywhere,'and "NewYork, New
York" blaring over the loudspeak-
ers, CenturyLink Field rocked like
never before.


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Seattle Seahawks' Russell Wilson holds up George Halas Trophy after the
NFC Championship game against the San Francisco 49ers on Sunday.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning bobbles the ball
on a bad snap during the first half of the AFC Championship
game against the New England Patriots in Denver on Sunday.



Manning's



comeback



heads to NYC


The Associated Press

DENVER Only three
years ago, Peyton Manning
could barely grip a football,
let alone throw one.
A Super Bowl quarter-
back? Nobody had ever
overcome those kind of
odds.
On Sunday, he wrote
the next chapter in one of
football's most remarkable
comeback stories, outplay-
ing Tom Brady to lead the
Broncos to the Super Bowl
for the first time since John
Elway took the snaps in
Denver some 1.5 years ago.
Manning crafted yet an-
other impeccable mas-
terpiece, throwing for 400
yards in a 26-16 victory over
Brady and the New England
Patriots.
"Being in my 16th season,
going to my third Super
Bowl, I know how hard it is
to get there," Manning said.
He'll 'try to become the
first starting quarterback to
lead two different teams to
titles.
On his way out of Indy,
Manning's comeback at-
tempt began a while after
his fourth neck surgery,
when he tried to play catch
with an old college buddy,
Todd Helton, who then
played for the Colorado
Rockies.
The first pass left Man-
ning's hand and fluttered to
the ground. Helton thought
Manning was joking.
He wasn't.
Fast forward three years
and there he was, on a
splendid, 63-degree day in
Denver, winging it to the
receiving corps Elway put
together when he returned
to the Broncos as a front-of-
fice executive.
One of those receivers,
Demaryius Thomas, caught
seven passes for 134 yards
and a touchdown to cap
off one of Manning's two
7-minute-plus touchdown
drives.
"To keep Tom Brady on
the sideline is a good thing,"
Manning said. "That's
something you try to do
when you're playing the
Patriots."
Afte; kneeling down to
seal the victory, Manning
stuffed the ball into his
helmet, then ran to the 30-
yard line to shake hands
with Brady. A bit later in the
Locker room, he celebrated


with his father, Archie, and
brothers Cooper and Eli.
Asked what pregame ad-
vice he gave his younger
brother, Cooper said: "Go
ahead and pretend you're
a 10-year-old playing in the
front yard. That's what it
looked like" today.
Indeed,: Manning did
whatever he wanted. And
though he threw for 400
yards, it was more dink-
and-dunk than a fireworks
show in this, the 15th in-
stallment between the NFL's
two best quarterbacks of a
generation. (Manning is 5-
10, but now 2-1 inAFC title
games).
Manning set up four field
goals by Matt Prater and
put his stamp on this one
with the long, meticulous
touchdown drives.
He geared down the no-
huddle, hurry-up offense
that helped him set records
for touchdown passes and
yardage this season and
made the Broncos the high-
est-scoring team in history.
The result: 93- and 80-yard
touchdown drives that were
the two longest, time-wise,
of the season for the Bron-
cos (15-3).
The Broncos held the ball
for 35:44. They were 7 for 13
on third-down conversions.
Manning capped the
second long drive with a 3-
yard pass to Thomas, who
got inside the overmatched
Alfonzo Dennard and left
his feet to make the catch.
It gave Denver a 20-3 lead
midway through the third
quarter.
From there, it was catch-
up time for Brady and the
Pats (13-5), and they were
not built for that at least
nor this year.
"We got in a hole there,"
Brady said. "It was just too
much to dig our way out."
A team that averaged
more than 200 yards on the
ground the last three games
didn't have much quick-
strike capability. Brady, who
threw for most of his 277
yards in comeback mode,
actually led the Patriots
to a pair of fourth-quarter
touchdowns. But they were
a pair of time-consuming,
80-yard drives. The second
cut the deficit to 26-16 with
3:07 left, but the Broncos
stopped Shane Vereen on
the 2-point conversion and
the celebration was on in
Denver.


Belichick: Welker tried to 'take out' Talib


The Associated Press

FOXBOROU,GH, Mass. -The col-
lision that knocked Aqib Talib out of
the AFC championship game rever-
berated Mondaywhen Patriots coach
Bill Belichick saidWesWelker tried to
"take out" the star cornerback.
Belichick took the shot at his for-
mer wide receiver after viewing vid-
eo of the second-quarter play in the
Denver Broncos' 26-16 win on Sun-
day. Coming from opposite sides,
the players ran into each other. No
penalty was called.
It "was a'deliberate play by the re-
ceiver to take out Aqib, no attempt
to get open," Belichick said during
his opening statement at his season-
ending news conference.
"I'll let the league handle the disci-
pline on that play. It's not for me to
decide, but it's one of the worst plays
I've seen. That's all I'm going to say
about that."
NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said
Monday, "If there is any discipline
for plays in (Sunday's) games, it will
be determined by Merton Hanks
later in the week."
Hanks is the league's vice president
of player operations.
Welker, who had a cool relation-
ship with Belichick before leaving
New England as a free agent last off-
season, was not available for com-
ment Monday.
But after the game, he said, "it was
one of those plays where it's kind of a


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
New England Patriots cornerback Aqib Talib (31) and defensive back Logan Ryan
(26) run during a stretching session before practice on Jan. 7.
rub play and I was trying to get him not doing anything with intent."
to go over the top, and I think he was Asked why he would send the 5-
thinking the same thing and wanted foot-9 Welker, 4 inches shorter, at
to come underneath and wejust kind Talib after sustaining two recent
of collided.... It wasn't a deal where I, concussions, Fox said, "That's a good
was trying to hit him or anything like question. I don't have an answer to
that." it."
After Talib left with a knee injury, But he and several Patriots said
Broncos quarterback Peyton Man- pick plays in which one receiver
ning took advantage of having the brushes against or hits a defender to
much.shorter Alfonzo Dennard cov- free another receiver are becoming
ering receivers Talib normally would more prevalent.
handle. The previous season, a thigh "Teams do a lot of that just to give
injury ended Talib's. day in the first guys separation and to open up the
quarter of the AFC championship passing game," safety Devin Mc-
game, a 28-13 loss to Baltimore. Courty said.
Denver coach John Fox said he Steve Gregory, New England's oth-
hadn't seen Belichick's comments er starting safety, said he didn't think
but called Welker "a great player, Welker would deliberately try to hurt
high integrity. I can say that we were a player.


Seahawks' Sherman makes big play, talks bigger


The Associated Press

SEATTLE Richard
Sherman didn't go into
details about what hap-
pened, but somewhere
during the offseason he
felt slighted by San Fran-
cisco wide receiver Mi-
chael Crabtree.
It made his final play of
Sunday's NFC champion-
ship game that much more
special for Seattle's All-Pro
cornerback. It was one of
the few moments that San
Francisco quarterback
Colin Kaepernick decided
to challenge Sherman,
trying to find Crabtree on
a throw to the end zone in
the final minute.
And Sherman was up to
the challenge, deflecting
the pass into the air long
enough for teammate
Malcolm Smith to race
over and intercept the
pass to clinch Seattle's 23-
17 win and the second Su-
per Bowl trip in franchise
history.
"I think everybody in the


arm for. a handshake. In-
stead, Sherman got shoved
in the face before picking
up his personal foul as his
celebration continued.
Asked about the incident
afterward by. Fox reporter
Erin Andrews, Sherman
lit up Twitter with a rant
that began: "I'm the best
corner in the game. When
you try me with a sorry re-
ceiver like Crabtree, that's
the result you gonna get.
Don't you ever talk about
me!"
Sherman didn't back
down even after getting
some time to collect his
thoughts. He apologized
to Andrews, then pro-
ceeded to call Crabtree
"mediocre," making sure
to annunciate each syl-
lable of the word.
"I was making sure ev-
erybody knew Crabtree
was a mediocre receiver,"
Sherman said. "And when
you try the best corner
in the game with a me-
diocre receiver that's what
happens."


stadium was surprised,"
Sherman said. "You throw
that, that's just a mistake."
Sherman stole the spot-
light of the NFC title game
between his athletic de-
flection, his taunting of
Crabtree that followed
and his television rant on
the field after Russell Wil-
son took a knee to run off
the final seconds.
While Smith was cel-


ebrating the intercep-
tion, Sherman exchanged
words with Crabtree, got
shoved in the face as a re-
buttal then made a chok-
ing gesture toward the
San Francisco bench that
he said was intended for
Kaepernick.
Sherman ran over to
Crabtree and. gave him a
pat on the backside, then
appeared to extend his


Ann Jones Clarice Boyette Tim Sapp
Owner/Broker Realtor Broker Associate
(850)209-9077 (850) 573-1572 (850)209-3595
Come See Us For All Your Real Estate Needs!


Realtor Realtor Realtor
(850)573-6849 (321)663-2671 (561)891-4034
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Seattle Seahawks' Richard Sherman celebrates with fans.
after after the football NFC Championship game against the
San Francisco 49ers on Sunday.





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcflonridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
LAST qAQ IT ATtTLJENTY-
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C-)KINDPOF T HIS A75 6IBEP THEMWITH IT5 CL(0OE'
WT- 5 Ai 6REEW BRANCHES, AND i
THEN IT 5TOOP THERE
B| AND ATE THEM...





BORN LOSER BYARTAND CHIP SANSOM
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IS 6ETTEP. THAT. STAR, FOp, FANS.
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a
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RIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


HERMAN'
121L. kF 24

"Sounds like a power struggle between
the spaghetti and the pickled onions."


ACROSS
1 Make
dinner
5 Scribble
down
8 Neaten the
hedge
12Waikiki
setting
13 Dazzle
14 Late night
Jay
15 In the cards
17Absorbs
18CD prede-
cessors
19 Like
cloudless
nights
21 Test
versions
24 First 007
movie
(2 wds.)
25 Evergreen
26 Decorate,
as leather
30 Lamb's
alias
32 Charged
particle
33Sporty
vehicles
37 Fast planes
of yore
38 Set afire
39 Half quart
40 Dent
43 Size above


med.
44Go in
reverse
46 Apparent
48 Soup or
salad
50 Cave, often
51 Disentangle
52 Divides by
three
57 End-of-
week cry
58Youngest
Cratchit
59 Bludgeon
60Carbon
deposit
61 Ripen
62 "Fish
Magic"
artist

DOWN
1 Police
officer
2 Galley
slave's tool
3 Melodrama
shout
4 Khan
5 Elbows
6 Athena's
symbol
7 Golf pegs
8 Stops
raining
(2 wds.)


Answer to Previous Puzzle


AS1EA C
DO'LiL Ul
S P IlDEORi

I BIEJ
PA I NIS
C PA AI
SON11NII N
LJA I [
K I LITE
POSSUM
SAL ROC
A LE E DI
T AT EL
9 Find out
10 Opening
remarks
11 Nosegay
16 Cathedral
part
20 NFL events
21 Parting
words
22 Morays and
congers
23 Bother-
some sort
27 Factory
28 More than
simmer
29 Not fool&1
31 Bush's first
attorney
general
34 Linoleum
square


35 MIT grad
36 Dele
canceler
41 Signs off on
42 Misfortunes
44Small drum
45Seund
47 Sweater
style
(hyph.)
48 Skips class
49 Blues
singer
James
50OThin coin
5318-wheeler
54Mil. rank
55 Half a
dangerous
fly
56Yon
maiden


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


1-21 2014 UFS, Dist, by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"EPH EPCOZHY LCHT, VBE' PCT
EPJBDPET GYH VHMJOL EPH YHGAP JU
LHTEYBAECJO. WHO GYH WJYEGK, VBE
CLHGT GYH CWWJYEGK."
- YCAPGYL GLGWT

Previous Solution: "We were all touched by Dr. King because he made us like
each other and respect each other." Lena Home
TODAY'S CLUE: d senbs n
2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-21


TUESDAY, JANUARY 21,2014 3Br


Horoscope
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) If you stay informed
and talk your way through
complications, you'll be
able to find solutions to
whatever you face.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) If you are feeling
run-down, allow yourself
some time to rejuvenate.
Take care of yourself.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Don't be overcome
by fits of anget. Focus on
accomplishing reasonable
things that will lead to
personal satisfaction.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -You'll have momen-
tum and should be able
to complete your agenda.
Love is on the rise.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-You may need to walk
on eggshells, or you could
end up in an argument
with someone at home.
Hold off on talks until late
in the day.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- Heed the advice of oth-
ers and you will discover
all sorts of salient details.
A relationship can thrive if
you put in the hours.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Learn from experience,
especially when there is
money involved. You can
improve your financial
future if you take adirec-
tion that you've wanted to
pursue for some time.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- If you refuse to compro-
mise, you will jeopardize a
partnership. You may want
to take on fewer projects.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- If you act fast and avoid
procrastinating, you'll
find success. Investments
could shape the year
ahead for you.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Someone is likely
to enchant you today.
Relationships can become
magical, intense and
exciting.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Embellishing
the truth will get you into
trouble, so be honest. Lies
will come back to haunt
you. Do what you can to
dispel any clouds hanging
over your head.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Focus on what you
wish to accomplish, and
get things moving prompt-
ly. Disputes will escalate
later in the day.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: You have printed many
letters from older people who are upset
because they are estranged from their
grandchildren or because they are not
allowed to visit as often as they would
like. Here are a few questions these folks
might consider:
1. Do you-treat your adult children like
adults? Or do you mar visits with unso-
licited advice and criticism disguised as
concern? Typical topics that should be
off-limits include child discipline and
housekeeping.
2. Do you constantly make jokes at
your children's expense or revisit sensi-
tive issues from their youth and then,
when they object, claim they have no
sense of humor?
3. Do you expect to be treated like
royalty while visiting, rather than pitch-
ing in like family members should? This
is especially frustrating when babies and
young children are involved and parents
could use an extra hand. Bring a dish to
share or help prepare dinner and clean
up after. Change the kid's dirty diaper.
Get your duff off of the sofa.


4. Do you consistently undermine your
children's authority in front of their own
children?
5. Do you find yourself complaining to
peers about your children's'reluctance
to invite you over or to take your advice
about parenting? If so, trust me, it means
the time before, during and after your
visits is stressful to your child and his or
her partner. And the grandchildren will
eventually pick up on this. You are grand-
parents. That doesn't make you infallible.
Take responsibility for your end of things.
ROLLED UP THE WELCOME MAT

Dear Rolled: You make some good
points, although we remember a time
when grandparents received more
respect, when a parent's advice was cher-
ished and no one would dream of asking
Grandma to clean up the house. But on
the other extreme, we've heard from chil-
dren whose parents were physically and
emotionally abusive and still expect to
have full access to the grandchildren. The
healthiest relationships lie somewhere in
between.


Bridge


Jean Cocteau, a French
poet and novelist who died
in 1963, said, "The greatest
masterpiece of literature
is only a dictionary out of
order."
In most deals, the exact
order in which you play
the tricks does not matter
too much. Occasionally,
though, you have to follow
a specific sequence, or you
can be defeated by accu-
rate defense.
Which applies in today's
deal? South is in three no-
trump after East opened
one spade. West leads the
spade nine and East over-
takes with his 10. What
should declarer do?
Although East has only
11 high-card points, his
hand is worth opening. He
has length in the majors,
an easy two-heart rebid,
and if he finds a fit with his


West
A 9
V10 8 3 2
*8543
4 10 7 4 2


North 01-21-14
4 6532.
V QJ7
* K9
4 AQJ5
East
4 Q J 10 8 7
VA964
A 10
463
South
4 AK4
V K5
* Q J 762
4 K9 8


Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass
Opening lead: 9
partner, his hand has only
seven losers (two spades,
two hearts, one diamond
and two'clubs), which is
the normal number for
a minimum opening bid
with a five-card suit.
South starts with only
six top tricks: two spades


and four clubs. He might
be able to get three more
tricks from diamonds,
but if he has to lose two
diamond tricks, East will
establish and run his
spade suit to defeat the
contract.
Instead, South should
impale East on the tines of
Morton's Fork. Since East
is marked with the missing
aces, declarer should play
a club to dummy's jack,
then lead the diamond
nine.
If East wins with his ace,
South takes two spades,
four diamonds and four
clubs for an overtrick. Or
if East ducks his ace, de-
clarer wins with his queen
and leads the heart king
from his hand to collect
two spades, two hearts,
one diamond and four
clubs. 1





4 B Tuesday, January 21, 2014 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


IREGRASS CLASSIFIED


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
F-jfcarcn ,AJc/ Errors and Omissions. ,Adersersr shoua check te:r ad tr-e irs: d-y hs pubt 'aicn sha& r_, be abt for faiLure to publish an ad c, for a iypographc error or errors in pubcation except to the extent of the cost of he ad for the fst da/s
rsr-, Adjustment fo errors is Imited to the cost of that portion o' te sa .-rer-en tp error cccu'rr e admsrtser agrees ira ime publisher sh'! no i be labe or damages arising out of errors n advertisement beyond the amount paid for the space
actLa.y occ.ps by thrt pc6on of the aertfrnent in viich the error, occurred, re'tr such ec' s d- tr-o -regnc of rhe pubs es errpbyees or oter.se ard tire shat be no itabty for non-insertion of any advercement beyd the amnt paid for sh aarteent.C.Dspfay
Ads a'e no: guaranteed positron Al adrertsingj is subject to approve Right rhs eseru to edoe._,-_1, canel or cassfy ai ads urder the appropte csfca


For deadl1~inescal ht1I U 0 toll-free]or isLit www~Njcflor ida~n co


(.) ANNOUNCEMENTS



Storewide Sale Starting at
/ 20% off Furniture
/ 30% off Accessories
40% off Glassware
/ 50% off Pictures
107 CherokeeI
Wed-St 10:0 to4:0


($)


FINANCIAL


Consignment Shop in Dothan FOR SALE
specializing in clothing & acc. for women.
Well established with over 400 consignors
& a growing customer base, sales of
100K + yr. Unlimited potential for increase
sales & expansion. Store fixtures, eqiup,
& database included, Will train new owner.
Leave message at 334-677-5113

(5) MERCHANDISE

AMF Playmaster Pool Table- Red felt 4x8. Very
good condition. All accessories included. Buy-
er responsible for moving. Located in Enter-
prise. $1750.00 OBO. Call or text 334-806-6004.

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
MICLANOSITM ANTE
RECORDS WANTED paying $1. each for old
45's, 78's & LPs, Ig. collections only
803-215-9585.
MICLANEU FRS ALE
Tanning Bed Solor Storm 24 lamp 110 volt,
for residential, good condition.
$950.334-347-1954.
IT'S AS EASY
AS 1,-2-3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS

[ f3ETS & ANtMA t-S


1 I Fine Rescued Dogs Black Labs, Beautiful
Ptts, Lab Mixes, Small Mixed Breeds,
2 f & m Beagles 6 mo. old mix 2-sm. Terriers
Springer Spaniel All Shots Call 334-791-7312
ACK Reg. Labs black 2-males & 5-females
$500. Parents on site. Ready Jan. 30th. father is
a choc. pointing lab, mother is silver.
Dew Claws removed & shots & wormed
334-790-3582 or 334-618-7256.
AKC Shih-Tzu puppies 1-female, 2-males, both
parents onsite, Ready Jan.,30th.
Declaws removed, Shots & wormed. $600.
770-362-6044 Enterprise
All left over Christmas Babies are on sale II
Yorldes, Shoride, Yorkies Mixes and
Japanese Chin Mixes 334-718H46
Beautiful rare solid white CKC Reg. Miniature
Schnauzer puppies $350. Ready Jan. 25th.
taking deposits 334-464-0000
For Sale AKC German Shepherd Puppies -
Black/Tan. 3 Males $350. Parents on site.
Call 334-393-7284 OR 334-806-5851.
FREE puppies 7 wks old. mixed American Pitt
Bull & Australian Blue Heeler 850-579-4769
Looking For The Best Family Pet? This is the
Best I Have Ever Had the Pleasure to Share my
Home With!!!Mother is 1/2 Great Dane, 1/2
Standard Poodle Hybrid; Father is AKC Stand-
ard Poodle. All AKC Linage provided. Pups are
3/4 Standard Poodle and 1/4 Great Dane. Coats
range from smooth to wire hair with solid col-
ors of Apricots, Creams and Blacks. (One Black
with a touch of white!) Born Dec 7th,13. Availa-
ble Feb 7th. Health cert. all shots/worming up
to date. Tails docked for your convenience!
Best in Breed traits! No genetic defects! Not a
breeder or puppy mill! A onetime opportunity!
No more litters available through our Great
Danoodle! Please contact 334-565-3067
Days/334-685-0144 Nites/wkends Rochelle


BULK WHEAT
for Sale
$9.00 per bussell
4 229-246-1340 4m


S MADDOX FARMS
Beautiful Bermuda Coastal Hay
s Round Rolls $50 so Square $5
Call 334-791-0023


. MADDOX FARMS
Horse Boarding
(barn or pastures)
o Beautiful Trails
e Excellent Care
Call 334-791-0023 or 334-791-7312


|Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract too small / Custom Thihng
Call Pea River Timber
334-389-2003 4.


WANTED LOOKING FOR LONG TERM
Deer Lease/Hunting
rights on large private ac. 150-300 acres.
starting this season and for many more
years to follow. 603-566-4330.


C of EMar iPannahaSa OitMnavailableN T
Cityoaiannahasa o siion available for


JANITORIAL
MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST
This is an entry level janitorial and facility
maintenance position.
VISIT FLORIDA, the official tourism
marketing corporation for the State of
Florida, has an opening for an energetic and
career-minded MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST at
the US231 Official Florida Welcome Center in
Campbelton, FL This janitorial position is
responsible for facility upkeep to include
hands on facility cleaning, proper use and
care of the center's equipment, handling
incoming deliveries including stacking and
unloading of incoming boxes, minor repairs,
taking part jn brochure inventory process
and other related functions.
Team-player ability required.
We offer a competitive salary and benefits
package. Deadline for application is
February 7,2014.
Qualified candidates will need to apply for
the position through VISIT FLORIDA's web
page www.VISITFLORIDA.org/iobs.
VISIT FLORIDA
EOE M/F/D/V


FAMILY D'LIIUt
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MAR1ANNA, FLORIDA
Now Hiring Full Time
1st shift Class B Trailer Technician
Requirements: Minimum of 3 years
experience in heavy-duty trailer
maintenance or 2 years experience in
heavy-duty trailer maintenance with a
Diesel/Auto technical School Degree.
Hydraulics experience preferred. Current
brake certification and proper certification
to perform FHWA inspections preferred.
Competitive Pay and
Benefits Pakckage!
Please apply in person at:
Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway.
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must be 18 Years Old
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace


r .............................. ......................................I.
Press Operator
Dothan Eagle has an immediate opening for a press operator. Responsibilities include setup,
operation, repair and maintenance of Press/Plate Making Equipment, meeting company
guidelines to produce high quality products within strict deadlines. Successful candidate
must be capable of maintaining a clean work environment while following company safety
guidelines and adhere to production print schedules and employee work schedules to coincide
with production schedules. Must fully comply with all company policies and procedures and
at all times when representing the company, operate in a thorough professional manner
including communication, attendance, punctuality, and dress.
This position requires a minimum two years production line experience, strong mechanical
background, or printing experience. High school graduate or equivalent preferred.
Company benefits including medical, dental, vision, paid vacation, and 401K.
Pre-employment drug and background screen- required. EOE/M/F/D/V.
You may apply on line at: www.bhmginc.com
or you may send your resume to:
Charlie Gibson,_Dothan Eagle, 227 North Oates Street, Dothan, AL 36303.
L ...................... Y; ............ ... ..

Pilo ^*^


Firewood for Sale $75 Delivered. 850-557-9311
or 850-683-9689.
SGun Ruger Model P85 Mark II automatic
9 mm $400.850-643-5887


Call 718-1001 for details. Sewing machine cabinet oak $50. Por. vin. cov-
EOE/Drug Free Workplace Employer er & heater for golf cart $150. 850-482-3145.


Sudoku


2014 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency' All rights reserved.


Pistol. Kahr PM 40 concealed carry pistol.
Stainless. Comfort grip. 2 mags. 2 concealed
carry holsters. Less than 50 rounds shot Like
new. $500. 334-701-7149.
Tread Mill variable speeds, incline adjustment,
very good cond. $135, 850-482-3145.


Level: U P] I
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Friday's puzzle
587361429
31629-4578
42958.7613
731845962
258976134
694123857
872619,345
965432781
143758'296
5 87 36_2 1 4__ 219Q







8 7 2_ 6_ 1_9- 3_4_5
9 6 5_ 4_3_2 7 8 1^
1 4 _3171_51_81_2191_


1/21/14


SEYFast, easy, no pressure
\\Place an A 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
\ \\Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
\ -and make secure online payments.

____ www.jcfloridan.com


__8 _1

_5_ _6__ 6_2

7 6 3
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( AI;M']] ARK-ET
FR^t PRODUCE** *.- .'. **'..- *''





www.ICFI.ORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Tuesday, January 21, 2014- 5 B


EERLM LO


Library Director Pos#122
Master's degree in Library Science and 3 to 5
years of progressively responsible experience
in a public library setting, including adminis-
trative supervisory duties; or any equivalent
combination of training and experience
which provides the required knowledge, skills
and abilities. For Library information visit
their website at www.jcplfl.org.
StartingSalary: $48,676.00/yr,

Administrative Support II
Pay Grade 13 Road DepL Pos#211
High school graduate or its equivalent, and
2-3 years of experience in secretarial or
administrative work. Must be able to handle
multiple phone lines and have working
knowledge of Personal Computer, exercise
the ability to use tact and courtesy in dealing
with the public. Word for Windows and
Internet experience required.
Possession of a valid Florida drivers license
prior to employment.
Starting SalaryL:$17.236.00/yr.

Correctional Officer
Pay Grade 24 JCCF Pos#701
Must have a high school diploma or its
equivalent. Must be a State of Florida
certified Correctional Officer. Must be at
least 19 years of age, be a U.S. citizen and
have no record of a felony or misdemeanor
involving perjury or false statements.
Must be drug-free and pass a vigorous
background investigation. Possession of a
valid Florida drivers license is required prior
to employment.
Salary: $26.463.00/yr.

Equipment Operator I
Pay Grade 13 Road Dept. Pos#567
High school diploma or equivalent with 1-2
or more years of experience in the safe
operation of a farm tractor and cutting
head with hydraulic/electrical switches and
driving truck with a loaded trailer attached;
able to supervise inmates.
Must have a valid Class "B" FL drivers license
prior to employment.
Starting Salary: $17,236.00/yr.
Submit Jackson County employment
application to the Human Resources Dept.,
2864 Madison Street Marianna, FL 32448.
PH 850-482-9633.
or www.jacksoncountyfl.net/

Deadline to apply is
01/27/2014
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE/V.Pref/ADA/AA
(L.} EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION
sC O OS-&0ISTRUCTI ON
\ Look ahead to your
future! Start trai n i n g
FORTIm for a new career in
Fr TII Medical Assisting,
COLLEGE Medical Office Admin.,
Pharmacy Technology,
& HVAC!
Call Fortis College 855-445-3276
For consumer info: visit www.fortis.edu

C/^. .RESIDENTIAL
6A REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
A.PA..MNT llSlUN NISH 'ID
Apartments for Rent in Greenwood
2BR $450 1BR $400
m# Call 850-326-4289 4e
Cedar Creek Apartments 1BR/1BA $500
AppI, lawn care & pest control included.
Must be 62 or older or disabled. Call 850-352-
3878 or email cedarcreek@nchousing.net
HO S UeINRNJISH
1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
S850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4m
2/1 house Baker Ave. Marianna $575. mo
$650. dep No Pets 1 yr. lease
Call Joanne 850-693-0570
Afford 3/2 Brick Home Engery Effiecent
2 car garage and covered porch $850 Mo. +
Dep. Also Cottondale 3/1.5 Brick Co. Hm. on
1 c. $650. + dep. RENT OR OPTION TO BUY w/
Income & Credit approval
Can 850-579-4317 & 850-866-1965
Austin Tyler & Co *
Quality Homes & Apartments
P 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"


2/2 located in Sneads $350. mo.
*. 850-573-0308 ,4
* 2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
850-209-8847 4=
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Please call 850-258-1594 or
850-638-8570 Leave Message

-* 2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes |
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595 |


2BR / 1.5BA at Millpond $495 rent + deposit.
Has utility shed, screened in front porch
# 850-209-3970 NO PETS


Mc E HOME FORREN
3/1 mbl. hm. appl. incl. located in Aitha
$350. mo. + dep. 850-272-2972
3/2 Mobile Home on Ham Pond Rd in Sneads
CH/A, lawn care incl. $550+dep. 850-592-4625
Marianna area 2/2 Mbl. Hm. in park CH&A
water, sewage No Pets or Smoking Ref. Reg.
1st & last $500. mo. 850-482-8333
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park 1,2 & 3BR
MH's for Rent includes water, garbage,
lawn care, No Pets 850-592-1639
SNEADS area N. of 90 3/2 remodeled inside on
acre $500. mo. 1st-last sec. NO PETS
850-272-1351 or 850-482-2272
(Li]) COMMERCIAL
REAL ESTATEFOR RENT
COMUUJMERIA&INDSTIAL =lBUlILINGS
Freezer Cooler Warehouse Combination 1600
sq. ft. Termaphemi Freezer, 900 sq ft. cooler,
3000 sq. ft. Warehouse, Semi-loading dock
total 5500 sq. ft. $3950. mo. 850-718-6541.
L Located in Marianna, FL 4-

RESIDENTIAL
(CA) REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
I HI33SE1 S EEI S3SSRA
Beautiful Graceville FL home and farm
4BR, 3 /2 BA, custom built home on 239 acres.
Can divide. 175 acres tillable for corn, soy-
beans, cotton. Large free standing building.
3 wells. Joe Farris, Land arid Stand Properties.
850-387-5517

Malone 3/3 2231sf. brick home CH/A florida rm.
fenced bk yd. 2 storage building,
1 block from school, $160,000. OBO
334-300-7170 OR 850-591-4729
MOBI E HO ESOR SAL
2004 14x70 Southern Energy MH 3/1 energy
efficient, new floors & paint, skirting &
1 porch/deck $10,000 850-482-3524

6a RECREATION
MOSTO O5 53 S&3-VS-
Winnebago 1995 Vectra 33 ft. C/H&A, auto lev-
eling, Q-bed, new tires, batteries, frig. 7.5 Onan
generator, Ig. awning, lots of storage in & out-
side, micr-convection oven combod, gas stove,
hot water heater, 30 or 50 amp power, all
original paper work. $20,000. OBO 334-585-6689

6i( ) TRANSPORTATION


1965 Mustang Convertible Red with Parch-
ment Top and Pony Interior, very nice, new'
tires, Great Car with A/C. 334-301-3574
I Plymouth '65 Valiant
Convertible,
Automatic, A/C, 273
V8, Good Condition!
$6,000 B00850-263-4563


CADILLAC 1991 Brougham, under 15 thousand
miles, garage kept $5,500 OBO 334-687-9161











lb. .. l
S *^ ^- *

Jones Concrete, LLC
Travis Jones
Free Estimates/Reasonable Rates
House Slabs Sidewalks
Driveways & Pole Barns
093-5812 30+ Years Experience











Dozer and Excavation Work
Ponds Road Building'- Demolition
Pine Tree Planting Herbicide Spraying
Fire Line Plowing Burning
Clay O Neal Cell 850-832-5055
clayslandclearing @ gmail.com


NEW& USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELOWRETAIL PRICES!

TRIPLE


We do H Kf v'^
d^ 'e adeM ~ t .jfl
850.526.1700
Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
2978 Pierce Street (behind Tim's Florist)


I Chevrolet 2005 Impala LT 42,800 miles, family
owned, smoky gray color, exc. cond. $6900.
334-699-2830. No Terms
Ford 1994 F-150 XLT, single cab, auto, 302 V8,
Sdual tanks, PS, PB, PS, PDL, PW, complete
brake job, full tune up. Red/Silver, red cloth
seat. Looks, runs and drives good. Must see!
$4,595. Owner. Dothan, 334-671-3059.
] Ford 2001 Taurus, 231K miles,
good condition. $1700. Send inquiries to:
Igriffin@dothaneagle.com
or Call 334-712-7962 from 9-5
SGOT BAD CREDIT?
RIDE TODAY!_
S$0O Down/lst Payment,
4 Tax, Tag & Title Pass!
Repo pass bankruptcy
SLOW CREDIT OK -SSI&VAOK
Report to Credit Bureau
Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
Grand Marque 2008 leather seat, 1-owner
low mileage, black w/ gray int. new tires,
garage kept, looks like new, Real Clean!!
334-797-5151
-Honda 2000 Odyssey
Family van Runs perfect.
Clean inside & out. Ice cold
Sair. Everything works. Has
been garage kept. 152k mi.
$4,995. For more info call 334-693-9360
Honda 2009 Accord, great gas mileage, certi-
fied warranty, nice car, well equipped. $250
down and $250 per month. Call Steve Hatcher
334-791-8243.
Lincoln 2002 Town Car Exe. Series exc. cond.
beige in color, leather seats, only 114J( miles,
I michelin tires, garage kept. $4,800.
334-693-0288
S Lincoln 2004 Town Car
Signature, loaded, leath-
-er, like new, clean, 94k
miles, owner, $7500.
334-790-7959.
I Mazda 2008 Miata MX5 4cyl. Loaded. In great
Condition. 31,000 miles. Silver with black top.
$14,500. 334-405-7402
Nissan 2013 Altima S, low miles, fully equipped,
must sell. $200 down, $279 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 334-714-0028.
-' ^'Toyota 2011 Camry LE.
"' 4.1 door sedan, metallic
r green, 34,000 miles. Tan
cloth interior. Very clean.
$14,900. Will accept rea-
sonable offer. 334-402-1180 or 334-397-4301

2007 V STAR 1300 (Black) One Owner, Garage
Keep, Like New, 2000 Miles $5,500. Bought in
2009 from Wards' Yamaha. 334-707-8074

S2007 GMC Yukon SLT -V8, Flex fuel, one owner,
navy with tan interior, leather, power seats and
windows, 6 cd changer, rear bucket seats, rear
air and radio, 3rd row seat, 66K miles, $18,995,
call 334-791-1570 leave message.
S j.__ -- 2 Ford 1987 Bronco 4x4
RUNS GREAT!! Good tires.
New Sears battery, rear
I *window motor, fuel gauge.
Brakes recently overhauled. Less than 10k
miles on major tune-up (including distributor,
plugs, wires, oxygen sensor, etc.) Been used as
my hunting camp truck the last 7 years. Asking
S$3,400. 334-750-5000


Honda 2009 CRV, low miles, under warranty,
must sell. $200 down, $259 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 334-714-0028.


Clean Your Closet
SI will buy your slightly .used
undamaged clothing.
cli (850)348-0588



rNorth Florida Rental4


/ MODEL
,/ #B3OL, B42L In Stock
/ More Models Available
850-526-7368
2890 Noland St. -Marianna



HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
I:S,* : ': -EE.-
85 -48-81Cl: 8522-62
HOMEZ!3 ~fIMPOEMENTS
HOME REPAjjIRS By |.i.Li,[KS


Nissan 2012 Rouge, Super Nice SUV, Good fami-
ly vehicle, plenty of room, loaded, bring this ad
in and get $500 discount, $250 down, $250 per
month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243.

1997 FORD Econoline Club Wagon Van Seats 11
people, 273k, Runs great, great, needs some
sm. repairs. Accepting closed bids, closed bids
at (334) 308-2480. Starting bid is $1500.
All proceeds will go to the DAV Chapter #9


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
9wtar 4s24 eot 76w4
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING o 334-792-8664

Got a Clunker
naMIN L We'll be your Junker!
j Weabuy wrecked cars :
and Farm Equip. at a _
fair and honest price!
$250 & f Complete Cars
CALL 334-714-6285
L............... .. ........ ..... J
a We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
334-7 9576 or 344-791-4714

WE WILL BUY YOUR CAR
OUTRIGHT!
Regardless of year, make, model, we hive
millions of dollars on hand to pay you good
money for your current vehicle.
We Are On The Coast But Worth The Drive,
& reputable, & we can give you a fair price
appraisal in 15 minutes.
Call for appoinbtment, dealer. 877-497-7975







Sniff Out a reatlDeal

in the Classifieds.
Shoppers with a.nose for bargains head straight for the
Classifieds. In the Classifieds, you can track down deals
on everything from cars to canine companions. It's easy
to place an ad or find the items you want, and it's used
by hundreds of area shoppers every day.
Go wth your Instincts and use the Classifeds today.
JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN
(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


I I


"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured


.L J .(


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* Tree Removal Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
-Insured Free Estimates

593-4455


BONDED INSURED
-XVviD LEW.[S
ROOFING CO.
265-6023
LICENSE # RC0043637
davidlewisroofing@knology.net
1406 Minesota Ave. -Lynn Haven, FL 32444




*ALL YOUR ROOFING NEEDS*
Metal a Shingles Flat Roofs Insured
[C# RC2SO27516
850-573-1880
Serving Jackson and Surrounding Counties



'North Florida Rental

DOLMAR

POWER PRODUCTS
MODEL #PS32, PS421, PS51 0In Stock
More Models Available
850-526-7368
2890 Noland St. Marianna


Find jobs



fast and



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JACKSON COUNT Y


FLORIDAi-

jcfloridan.com



Tnonsrer

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NFL



Broncos-Seahawks Super




Bowl pits top '0,' top 'D'


The Associated Press

Peyton Manning's Denver Broncos
and Richard Sherman's Seattle Seahawks
were the NFL's best all season, so it's
fitting that they'll meet in the Super
Bowl.
Nobody scored as many points or
gained as many yards as the Broncos.
Nobody allowed as few points or gave
up as few yards as the Seahawks.
And nobody won as many games as
those clubs, either.
What a way to finish the season. When
the AFC champion Broncos (15-3) play
the NFC champion Seahawks (15-3) on
Feb. 2 at what could be a chilly MetLife
Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., it will
be the first Super Bowl since 1991 pit-
ting the league's highest-scoring team
in the regular season against the team
that was scored on the least, according
to STATS.


It's also only the second time in the
last 20 Super Bowls that the No. 1 seed
in each conference reached the NFL
championship game.
"It will be a great matchup," Seahawks
coach Pete Carroll said. "I think it's an
extraordinary opportunity to go against
a guy that set all the records, in the his-
tory of the game."
That, of course, would be Manning,
the 37-year-old quarterback who is the
only four-time NFL MVP and no one
would be surprised if No. 5 arrives the
night before the Super Bowl. He estab-
lished marks by throwing for 55 touch-
downs and 5,477 yards, helping Denver
lead the league with 37.9 points and
457.3 yards per game. Manning is an in-
escapable pitchman, too, seen Sunday
after Sunday during TV commercials.
Hey, there- he was selling cars during
breaks in the broadcast of the NFC title
game. Expect even more face time now.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard
Sherman (25) hits the ball away from San
Francisco 49ers wide receiver Michael
Crabtree (15) and is intercepted by Seattle
Seahawks outside linebacker Malcolm
Smith (53) during the NFC Championship
game on Sunday.


49ers hurt from serious injury to Bowman


The Associated Press

SANTA CLARA, Calif.
- NaVorro Bowman slowly
made his way inside 49ers
team headquarters on erutch-
es Monday for a short visit
before, departing, one day
after the All-Pro linebacker
sustained a serious left knee
injury in San Francisco's NFC
championship loss' at Seattle
that could put his 2014 season
in question.
Coach Jim Harbaugh said
after Sunday's 23-17 season-
ending loss to the Seahawks
that Bowman is believed to
have a torn anterior cruciate
ligament in his left knee.
There was no word Monday
on potential surgery, though
linebackers coach Jim Leavitt
expected to learn more later
Monday.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
San Francisco' 49ers' NaVorro Bowman is taken to the locker room
on a cart after injuring his leg during the second half of the NFC
Championship game against the Seattle Seahawks on Sunday.


Leavitt said he remains op-
timistic that Bowman will
be playing when the 49ers
open new Levi's Stadium next
season.


"He's a warrior. He's going
to push forward, there's no
question," Leavitt said. "He's
a special guy, tremendously
talented, but he's got such


a heart. He's been so good
with me it's unbelievable. He's
great young man. He'll be
fine. We're going into a new
stadium and he'll be ready to
go when we start."
In -addition, left guard
Mike lupati broke his left
ankle in the loss. He says he
doesn't know whether he will
need surgery, but is sched-
uled to be further evaluated
Tuesday.
"This is a bad-luck year,"
said lupati, who missed four
games with a left knee injury.
"I'll probably be in a cast for
a while. I'll be here rehabbing.
It's day by day and wish for
the best."
As the 49ers braced for Bow-
man's lengthy recovery, they
were still dealing with. the
sting of another season that
ended just short of the goal.


Colts QB Andrew Luck headed to Pro Bowl


The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS- Colts quarterback
Andrew Luck has been chosen to play
in the Pro Bowl this weekend, replacing
Seattle's Russell Wilson.
It is the second consecutive selec-
tion to the NFL's all-star game for


Panhandle
From Page 1B
the Lady Raiders, who shot
just 35 percent from the field
for the game and were 0-of-8
from beyond the three-point
arc.
Chipola led from start to fin-


Luck, who will join teammates Rob-
ert Mathis and Matt Overton in Sun-
day's game in Honolulu. Wilson will
be playing in the Super Bowl a week
later.
This season, Luck completed 343-of-
570 passes (60.2 percent) for 3,822 yards,
23 touchdowns and nine interceptions


ish, making five early three-
pointers, with the fifth from
Diamonisha Sophus giving
the Lady Indians a 24-11 lead
with 8:36 left in the first half.
The lead was 38-15 late in
the half, but the Lady Raiders
cut the margin to 19 at half-
time and got to within 13 early
in the second half after back


for an 87.0 passer rating..In two postsea-
son games, Luck threw for 774 yards, six
touchdowns and seven interceptions;
in the wild-card win over Kansas City,
he led the Colts to the second-largest
comeback in NFL postseason history
after trailing by 28 points in the second
half.


to back buckets by Batchelor
made it 42-29.
But Sophus answered with
another triple and the Lady
Indians soon had the lead
backup to 17 points.
Northwest never got closer
than 13 until the final two
minutes when Takisha Jor-
dan made a jumper to make


it 55-44, but the Lady Raiders
couldn't make up any more
ground despite Chipola miss-
ing five straight free throws
to end the game, including
three straight front ends of
one-and-one.
Chipola (20-1) will next play
host to Pensacola State today
at 5:30 p.m.


Top
From Page 1B
However, Northwest stormed back with
a 14-2 run to cut the deficit to three, as the
full-court pressure began to give the Indians
trouble and force a series of turnovers.
After threes from Ethan Telfair and Farad
Cobb trimmed the lead to six, the Raiders
forced another turnover and finished the
play with Shaquille Johnson throwing down
a two-handed dunk off of a lob in transition
from Telfair to make it 53-49.
Another bucket by Tevin Glass made it a
three-point game with just over 10 minutes
left to play, but the Raiders got no closer the
rest of the way.
A free throw by Fl1yd and a three-point-
er from Morris pushed the margin back to
seven and a pair of free throws by Cassell, Jr.
put Chipola back up double figures at 67-57
with 5:39 remaining.
The lead was still 10 at 3:36 before one last
charge by the Raiders, who got consecu-
tive triples from Cobb and Clide Geffrard to
make it 71-67, but Cassell, Jr. answered with
a nice floater in the lane to put the Indians
back up six.
After another three from Benji Bell cut it to
four with 1:01 to play, Cassell, Jr. made two
free throws to make it 79-73.
But free throws by Bell and Stephen Hurt
cut the margin back to three at 79-76 with
48.9 seconds left before the Raiders com-
mitted a needlessly quick foul on Dont'e
Reynolds, who calmly sank two free throws.
Reynolds made two more free throws with
26.7 seconds left to make it 83-77 and he put
an exclamation point on the win with a steal
and a dunk on the final play of the game.
Cassell, Jr. led Chipola with 25 points and
five assists while making 11-of-14 from the
foul line, with Floyd going for 23 points on
8-of-ll shooting and 5-of-7 from three-
point range, and Morris for 16 points.
Bell was the top scorer for Northwest with
20 points and Hurt had 12 points and seven
rebounds, as the Raiders fell to 17-3 overall
and 2-2 in the Panhandle Conference and
in a three-way tie for second with Pensacola
State and Gulf Coast State.
Chipola moved to 17-2 on the year, but
the biggest question going forward for the
Indians is when and if the three suspended
players will return to the team.
Before the game, Chipola Athletic Direc-
tor Steve Givens said that a decision wasn't
going to be made on the players' future un-
til the legal process plays out and the school
conducts its own internal investigation of
what happened.
After the game, Blake was more interested
in speaking about the players still with the
Indians.
"The great thing'about Chipola is we're
a family and we've got a great administra-
tion here and I'm sure they'll make the
best decision for the college and move for-
ward," he said. "But since I found out about
it Thursday night, my only focus has been
on the nine guys we have and getting them
prepared to play against a great opponent.
That's all I've been focused on."
If the players aren't brought back, their
absence leaves a big production void in the
Indians' lineup, with the three combining to
average 42.5 points and 16.6 rebounds per
game this season.
However, Blake said that he believes
Chipola still has' more than enough to com-
pete for a Panhandle championship and
beyond.
"I think we have a team full of great play-
ers and this is an opportunity for everyone
else," he said. "They embraced it tonight
and I'm looking forward to seeing those guys
embrace that opportunity going forward."
The Indians will be back in action tonight
when they play host to Pensacola State at
7:30 p.m.


Sneads
From Page 1B
Devonte Pettus also
added 11 for the Pirates,
who now, for the first team
all season, have a winning
streak after knocking off
district foe Cottondale on
Friday night.
Sneads lost its first sea-
son games of the season


Bulldogs
From Page 1B
"I thought we competed,"
Blanton said of his team's
Saturday performance.
"But at 'the same time, we
put all of our energy into
Walton and that's the game
we had to win. (On Satur-
day), that was a game that
we knew we were going
to really have to play ex-
ceptionally well in to win
and we were in a position
to maybe pull it out, but it
didn't work out that way.
"But we'll try to turn a
negative ifito a positive.
Maybe it will help us out
in the long run and maybe
get us grounded and force
us to think about doing
some of the little things
that made us successful
early. I hope this will end
up being a good learning
experience for us."
J Marianna was sched-


and then dropped seven
of its next eight after pick-
ing up its initial win of the
year over Wewahitchka on
Dec. 17. ,
But a near-upset of top-
ranked 1A team Malone
on Jan. 9 seemed to spark a
resurgence for the Pirates,
who are 3-1 since that loss
and appear to be playing
at a much higher level.
"I hope we've got some


uled to go back on the road
Monday night to take on
county foe Graceville be-
fore coming back tonight
to host archrival Malone
in what will be the Bull-
dogs' fourth game in five
nights.
As great of a test as Sat-
urday's trip to Rutherford
was, Blanton said Monday
he was just as eager to see
what his team puts togeth-
er in the final two contests
of this rigorous stretch.
"I want to see how we
respond to the adversity,"
he said. "The great teams,
no matter what the level
of competition, when
they come off a loss like
that they usually respond
the next game with a ven-
geance. I think (the play-
ers) were disappointed
(with -Saturday's loss),
but I hope they're mature
enough to know that if we
learn from it that it can be
a blessing in disguise.


traction now. We're on a
little bit of a roll," Hubbs
said. "It's just confidence.
We've been close in a lot
of games, but we haven't
found a way to win. No-
body stepped up and made
a big play. We've talked
about it, but talking about
making big plays and mak-
ing big plays are different
things. Jeremy stepped up
and made a big play.


"Hopefully the timing
happened at the right time
as far as getting us back


"I'm jut proud of them.
They found a way to win
this time and that has
eluded us in the past."
Sneads will next play host
to Blountstown tonight at
7p.m.

Lady Pirates cruise to
12th straight win
The Sneads Lady Pirates
had little.difficulty earning


grounded two weeks be-
fore the district and kind of
getting us refocused."'


their 12th consecutive win
Saturday in Tallahassee,
racing past the North Flor-
ida Christian Lady Eagles
66-27 to improve to 16-2
on the year.
Tasherica McMillon


scored 21 points to lead
Sneads, followed by Aali-
yah Williams with 16, Lo-
gan Neel with 12, and Cha-
sity McGriff with 10.
Sneads will next play host
to Chipley today at 4 p.m.


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716B TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014


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