Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01258

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text

The Senate passes a $1.1 trillion
spending package
Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online 0A


JobSeq 56 PkgScq 003


'LORIDAN


DEBORAH BUCKHALTER/FLORIDAN
Peggy Yon Mills helps Chipola Family Ministries volunteer Larry Jones
unload food and other items collected for charity at her 70th birthday
party, one she turned into a special "giving party."


Vol.91No.13


Woman celebrates 70th


by throwing 'giving party'

Instead of gifting the honoree, guests gave to her favorite causes


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalterOajcfloridan.com

When Peggy Yon Mills started
thinking about her 70th birth-
day, she realized something.
She has all she needs, really, but
she knew her family and friends
would want to give her some
gifts. She thought, then, about
all the people in Jackson County


who are in need.
A longtime teacher at Cotton-
dale High School and now re-
tired, Mills is the namesake of a
scholarship that was established
at the school in recent years. She
proudly supports the CHS Peggy
Yon Mills Scholarship Fund be-
cause she knows there are local
parents whose financial strug-
gles make it difficult to send their


kids to college.
She thought, too, about the
many less-fortunate families'
who need food, clothing and
household items. As a long-
time supporter of Chipola Fam-
ily Ministries, which distributes
those items to many, she knew
the need was great.
See GIVING, Page 7A


VISITOR FROM CUBA


SDEBORAH BUCKHALTER PHOTOS/FLORIDAN
Manicurist Alison Jackson leans in to work on the nails of Mirta Jimenez Villavicencio at A Wild Hair in Marianna. Villavicencio is visiting
from Cuba, having been allowed to travel outside the country for the first time, and was being treated to a makeover at the salon.




Crossing the Gulf


Woman traveling outside her homeland for the first time visits family in Marianna


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

When Angel Trejo was 10 years old, he
had to leave his native Cuba. His par-
ents sent him, his brother and his sister
to live with relatives in Florida as Cuba
came under the control of Fidel Castro.
Their father, a physician in great de-
mand within the government-con-
trolled medical system, had not been
given permission to go immediately,
and their mother did not want to leave
their father's side.
Not knowing, in the uncertainties of
a changing regime, whether she would
ever see her husband again if she left,
she opted to stay with him and put their
children in the care of their aunt, Rosela
Martin.
Martin and her husband had worked
for Fulgencio Batista, who was toppled
by Castro. They had long since fled Cuba
for their safety and were established in
Miami by the time Trejo's parents decid-
ed it was time to leave.
Trejo said his aunt Rosela became a
true mother figure. Calming, loving and
reassuring the children for the eight
frightening months that they were with-
out their parents, who did eventually get
out together, she embraced her nieces


Villavicencio chooses a hair color at A Wild Hair, a salon owned by her cousin's daughter,
Desiree Baggett (right). Her cousin, Angel Trejo, helps her look through the swatch of
possibilities. Villavicencio settled on light brown.


and nephews as her own.
Her loving support is not forgotten in
adulthood. Today, Trejo does what he
can to mirror her commitment as he
helps his family members who never
made it out of Cuba. His father had
moved the family to Marianna and


served as the medical services chief at
Sunland for several years.
As the child of a medical professional,
the importance of proper medical sup-
plies wasn't lost on Trejo. That's one of
See VISITOR, Page 7A


New Year's Fire


Picking



up the



pieces

Pete family presses
on after blaze that
claimed four lives
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
The children who suffered the
loss of four important adults in
a Marianna fire last month are
finding their way as the family
tries to heal itself with the help
of God and a loving community,
according to Rodell Pete, son
of the guiding matriarch who
perished in the fire.
By all accounts, Gertrude Pete
was the glue that held her family
together. Six young children and
several adult family members
lived with her. At the age of 68,
after having raised her own
children, she was raising twin
daughters of another family
member. She also was helping
daughter Martieka Speights,
who was living there with her
three children. Her daughter
Cynthia and Cynthia's son lived
with her, too, and she provided
her daughters with mothering
advice.
The lives under her roof at
4472 Jackson St. were shattered
on NewYear's Day. The fire call
came in just before 8 a.m. that
day. By the time firefighters got
there two minutes later, the
fire was already in an advanced
See FIRE, Page 7A


ANGIE COOK/FLORIDAN FILE
Rodell Pete's grief shows on his
face in this photo taken a few days
after his mother, Gertrude Pete, and
three other elders in his family died
in a fire that consumed her home on
Jackson Street in Marianna.


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Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your'Cute Kids*' photos to edit.rI -jiIori3n,:,rrj, mail them to P.O. Box ._ -' .
520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them by our offices at 4403 Cril:.iilutiri Lane a*, __
in Marianna.


*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include child's full name, parents'
name(s) and city of residence. This is a free service. All entries subject to edting.


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12A FRIDAY, JANUARY 17,2014


Weather Outlook


,, -/ High 67
SLow 46


Monday
Mostly Cloudy. Possible
Shower.


_-\ High-61
-v v-, Low 33


Tuesday
Mostly Cloudy. Possible
Shower.


VWAKE-UP CALL


". \ -" "
~% High: 58
'- Low: 28




--y""7High:-59-.
._ ..- k ^Low:.27
-' :r'57 -
.-Low:29

PRECIPITATION


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.00"
1.91"
2.72"


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Year to date
Normal YTD
Normal for year


7:14AM
11:03 AM
7:19AM
8:30 AM
9:04 AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
55.47 ft.
16.30 ft.
10.84 ft.
11.16 ft.


I .' I
59.20-


- 9:31 PM
- 3:16AM
- 10:04 PM
- 10:37 PM
- 11:10 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


5
3M


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


I ?A i vr. v


LISTEN lM
FOR ________
HOURLY .J Iuinv
WEATHER W IUMI
UPDATES WJAQ 100.SM


I .....


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com "

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32448
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTOGETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will.publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


FRIDAY, JAN.17
) New Student Orientation -The Baptist College
of Florida in Graceville.
Last day to register for Martin Luther King Jr.
Day Parade Parade will be Jan. 20 at 10 a.m. with
line-up at 9:30. Contact Ronald Mizer at 407-385-
9235 or 526-2008.
)) Hooks and Needles -10 a.m. at the Jackson
County PublicLibrary, Marianna Branch. New
and experienced handcrafters welcome to create,
share, learn or teach favorite projects. Call 482-
9631.
D City of Marianna to Observe Arbor Day 10
a.m. at Madison Street Park by planting a live oak
tree. Everyone invited to attend.
)) Chess Club- 6-8 p.m. First United Methodist
Church on Clinton St. in Marianna. Sponsored by
Marianna Optimist Club for students for students
8-18 years of age in Jackson County. All students
and their parents are welcome. Players of all skill
levelsincluding beginners are welcome. Call 693-
0473.
Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-pups."'Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1]31.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, JAN. 18
Blacksmithing Class 8 a.m. Panhandle
Pioneer Settlement, 17869 NW Pioneer Settlement
Rd., Blountstown. Come enjoy the art of shaping
heated iron and steel with hand tools. All-day event
so pack your lunch. Required items: gloves and
safety glasses. Cost: $45 with $25 deposit required.
For more info call 674-2777 or email ppsmuseum@
yahoo.com.
Jackson County Community Helpers Club
-10 a.m. 4571 Dickson Rd,.-Greenwood.
Hog Butchering Class 8 a.m. Panhandle
Pioneer Settlement, 17869 NW Pioneer Settle-
ment Rd., Blountstown. This class will teach killing,
butchering, and preservation techniques. Cost $25
with $10 deposit required. Call 674-2777 or email
,ppsmuseum@yahoo.com.
)) New Year's Resolution River Run 5K 9 a.m.
at Three Rivers State Park, Sneads. Registration
8 a.m. Hosted by Country Bumpkins 4-H. Entry
fees: 18 and under $10 pre-registered, $15 day of


registration; 19 and over $20 pre-registration, $25
day of registration. Awards for each age group and
team. For-more info call 272-3728.
)) Arbor Day Tree Planting Ceremony Noon at
the Florida Caverns State Park in Marianna. Join
CSO member Bill Kleinhans to plant atree.in honor
of Florida's Arbor Day.
Fourth Annual Oyster Cook-Off Noon to 5
p.m. at the Riverfront Park in Downtown Apala-
chicola. Judging and bands starts at 2 p.m. All forms
of oysters will be available for.tasting. For more info
call (850)'653-9419.
-)) Ellis Insurance Grand Opening/Ribbon Cut-
ting Noon to 2 p.m. Ellis Insurance Agency 2118
SR 71 Suite B, Marianna.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
)) Chili Dinner 6 p.m. Heavens Way Biker Church,
Cottondale. $5 donation per person. 7 p.m. Bridge
takes the stage.

SUNDAY, JAN. 19
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. in AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna. At-
tendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting- 8 p.m. in
the board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, in Graceville.

MONDAY, JAN. 20
Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade 10 a.m.
Line-up 9:30 a.m. Parade route begins at Hawk
St. and Orange St., turn right on St. Andrews St. to
Barnes St. Last day to register is Jan. 17. Contact
Ronald Mizer 407-385-9235 or 526-2008.
Senior Fellowship Association monthly lun-
cheon and meeting Noon in the Youth Center
of First United Methodist Church, Marianna. Fried
chicken will be furnished. Bring vegetable/salad,
dessert or drink. 1 p.m. will be live auction. Open to
public. Proceeds go towards activities for seniors
in community. If you have something to contribute,
someone will be there at 11 a.m. to receive your
items. Reserve prices will be held. If your items do
not sell you may receive it back. Call 481-4120 for
more info,
n Jackson County Quilters Guild Meeting
- 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 U.S. 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings


are fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects,
lessons, help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
)) Breast Cancer Support Group 5 p.m. in the
Education Classroom ground floor of Jackson Hos-
pital, 4250 Hospital Dr., Marianna. Open to anyone
who has or had breast health issues. No cost to
attend. For more info call 718-2661.
)) Alford Community Organization Meeting -6
p.m. in the Alford Community Center. New members
from Alford, surrounding communities invited to
join. Call 579-4482, 638-4900 or 579-5173.
The Capt. Luke Loft's Calhoun Guard, Camp
2212 Sons of Confederate Veterans-meeting
- 6 p.m. at the Altha Community Center in Altha.
Anyone interested in Southern and Confederate
heritage men, women arid children welcome.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, JAN. 21
n St. Anne Thrift Store BOGO Sale 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. St. Ann Thrift Store, 4285 2nd Ave., Marianna.
Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida
Provider Rate AD HOC Committee Meeting 9
a.m. at the Coalition Region Three Family Success
center, 703W. 15th St.,Suite A, Panama City.
Optimist Club of Jackson County Meeting
- Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St.,
Marianna.
)) Sewing Circle -i p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
)) Panhandle Public Library Cooperative System
Board Meeting 4 p.m. at 2862 Madison St.,
Marianna.
Jackson County School Board Meeting-4
p.m. School Board meeting room, 2903 Jefferson
St. Marianna. Agenda on district website www.jcsb.
org. Open to public. Call 482-1200.
)) Marianna High School Project Graduation
meeting 5:15 at Jackson County Early Childhood
Center 4283 Kelson Ave, Marianna. All parents
please plan to attend.
Jackson County Relay for Life Team Meeting
- 6 p.m. Jackson County Extension Agricultural
Center, 2741 Penn Ave., Marianna. Contact shannon.
rodriguez@cancer.org
)y Disabled American Veterans Meeting 7
p.m. at the DAV Chapter 22 house, 3083 DAV Lane,
Marianna. Call 209-4310.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


Marianna Police
Department
Marianna Police Department
listed the following incidents
for Jan. 15, the latest available
report: One suspicious ve-
hicle reported; one suspicious
person reported; three prowler
complaints; one burglary
.alarm; seven traffic stops; one
trespass complaint; two animal
complaints; two retail thefts;
two calls to assist other agen-
cies; one public service call;
one 911 hang-up call and seven
home security checks.

Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following incidents


for Jan. 15,, the latest available
report: One accident with no in-
jury; one abandoned vehicle re-
ported; two suspicious vehicles
reported; one information call;
two burglaries reported; one
verbal disturbance complaint;
one vehicle fire reported; one
drug offense; 12
-------- medical calls;
-'-. -'- one grass/brush
RME Efire reported;
T91ME two burglar
S z alarms; one
fire alarm;
eight traffic stops; one larceny
complaint; four civil disputes;
two trespass complaints; one
obscene/threatening call; one
follow-up investigation; one
juvenile complaint; one assault
complaint; one animal com-
plaint; two fraud complaints;
13 property/building checks;


one call to assist another
agency; one public service call;
one criminal registration; two
transports and one threat/ha-
rassment call.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
Margaret Robert, 44, 855 Earl
St., Chipley, DUI, possession
of controlled substance two
counts.
)) Logan Hoisted, 19, 8216 Gulf
Blvd., Navarre Beach, burglary
of a structure two counts,
grand theft-two counts.'
)) Joseph Redman, 18, 3063
Joyce Dr., Marianna, burglary of
a structure two counts, grand
theft-two counts.
)) Zachary Outler, 30, 4380
Singer Rd, Youngstown, viola-
tion of state probation.


)) Gina Prevatt, 28, 6934 Burke
St., Grand Ridge, driving with
license suspended or revoked.
)) Keli Pettis, 32, 5971 Gran-
berry Dr., Marianna, violation
of state probation, hold for
Calhoun County.
Bruce Martin, 46, 2915 Or-
ange St., Marianna, retail theft,
trespassing after warning, re-
sisting officer without violence.
)) Dexter Williams, 24, 6697
Reddick Rd., Grand Ridge, pos-
session of cocaine with intent
to sell, possession of marijuana
- less than 20 grams.

Jail Population: 185

To report a crime, call Crimestoppers at
526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call 1-888-
404-FWCC (3922).


SA UA I Rh IED4204 LAFAYETTE ST.
RAHAL-MILLERK MARIANNA.FL
CHEVROLET BUICK CADILLAC GMC NISSAN

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(850) 482-3051


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ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0123 4

THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:39 AM
Sunset 5:04 PM
Moonrise 6:40 PM Feb. Feb. Jan. Jan.
Moonset 7:51 AM 6 14 23 30





JACKSON'COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Chipola shines at state AFC convention


Special to the Floridan

Chipola College was one of the
most talked-about colleges at
the 2013 Association of Florida
Colleges Annual Convention in
Orlando.
Chipola garnered numerous
honors, including chapter rec-
ognition, membership awards,
and the coveted Leroy Collins
alumni award.
The Chipola Chapter was
named a Platinum Chapter, the
highest recognition a chapter
can receive, for chapter activi-
ties and leadership. Chipola also
won a membership award
for having one of the highest
percentages of full-time
employees at Chipola as AFC
members.
Chipola alumnus Robert
Trammell was honored by
the state with the Leroy Col-
lins Hometown Hero award.
As a state legislator, Tram-
mell took the lead in secur-
ing millions for new buildings
and renovations on campus. He


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Attendingthe conferencewere (from left) Chipola alumnus RobertTrammell,
Matt White, Alice Pendergrass, Dr. Gene Prough, Angie Tyler, Kim Collins,
Renee Hopkins, Evelyn WardCasey Bush, Stacey Hinson, Pat Barfield, Dr.
Jim Froh, Rachel West, Joyce Traynom, Chipola alumna Kay Trammell and
Chipola alumna Priscilla Prough.


has organized successful fund-
raising events to create schol-
arships and an athletic endow-
ment that exceeds $1 million.
Kim Collins, department as-
sociate for student affairs, was
awarded a Region I Unsung Hero


award for her contributions
behind the scenes.
Chipola's library was awarded
the Learning Resources Com-
mission's Exemplary Practice
Award. Librarian Renee Hopkins
and teacher education assistant


professor Casey Bush presented
the practice, "Why is Amelia
Bedelia in a College Library?"
Several Chipola employees
presented educational sessions:
Evelyn Ward, Chipola director
of fine and performing arts, of-
fered the session, "AFC Awards
& You." Ward has served as chair
of the AFC Awards Committee
for the past six years. She pre-
sented ways for members to
best represent themselves in the
awards process.
Matt White, Chipola director of
distributed systems, presented
three new trends in technol-
ogy sessions. In "mLearning:
You Mean I Can Learn on My
Phone?" he discussed the new-
est trends in mobile learning
or using mobile devices to con-
sume educational content. He
explored backup and storage
services available through the
CLOUD and concluded with
'Apple's iOS 7: It's Like getting a
New iPhone/iPad!" highlighting
the changes in Apple's newest
operating system.


Several Chipola employees
will serve in state leadership
roles next year. Alice Pender-
grass will serve as credentials
committee chair. Dr. Jim Froh
will serve as the chair of the
communications and market-
ing commission. Both will sit
on the state board of directors.
Matt White will serve as the
Region I director-elect. Ev-
elyn Ward will also serve as a
member of the Credentials
Committee. Also attending the
conference from Chipola were
Dr. Gene Prough, Stacey Hin-
son, Angie Tyler, Joyce Traynom,
Rachel West and Pat Barfield.
AFC is a statewide organi-
zation open to all employees,
retirees and trustees of the 28
colleges in the Florida College
System. AFC provides profes-
sional development opportuni-
ties for its members, and repre-
sents the interests of community
colleges before the Florida' Leg-
islature. The association has
nearly 9,000 individual employ-
ee and retiree members.


GO GREEN TEAM 3RD 9 WEEKS!


SUBMITTED PHOTO
olson Elementary Science teacher Mendy Bannerman proudly photographs the 3rd
9 weeks Go Green Team. The purpose is to teach the importance of taking care of
our Earth. In a collaborative effort with Waste Management, Sunland Recycling and
Waste Pro, the team collects plastics from its classrooms and campus. Front row (from left):
Terrell James, Jayla Cockerham, Alden Dickow, Destinee Willis, Akiyah McKellar, Jaydon Gray,
Denton Lord, Jaxon Ross Holley and Camden Bennett. Middle row (from left): Nicholas Tocci,
Halli Nobles, Dexter Adams, Alex Martin, Jakia Merriel, Tyrone Ramsey and Allison Noble.
Back row (from left): Zoe Sims, Mallory Speights, MJ RileyJatavia Merriel, Camden Bruner,
Caden Galloway, Emily Benton, Gabriella Ubias, Jesse May and Magdalena Clemente. Not
pictured: Amarii Spires, Sergio Wamble and Chayton Evans.



The Girl Scouts are now taking cookie orders


Special to the Floridan

The Girl Scout Cookie
Program, the largest girl-
led business in the world,
is now underway in com-
munities across the Florida
Panhandle.
Girl Scouts are taking
pre-orders now through
Jan. 27 for the delicious
cookies. The renowned
Girl Scouts cookie lineup
offers all eight favorites:
Trefoils, Samoas, Thin
Mints, Tagalongs, Dulce
de Leche, Thank U Berry
Munch, Savannah Smiles
and Do-Si-Dos.
"The Girl Scout Cookie
Program provides girls
with the opportunity to
learn while earning," said
Raslean M. Allen, Girl
Scout Council of the Flor-
ida Panhandle Inc. chief
executive officer. "Girls
who participate in the
Cookie Program develop
five financial literacy and
entrepreneurship skills
- goal-setting, decision-
making, .money manage-
ment, people skills and
business ethics."
Building on the 2013
theme, "What Can a Cook-
ie Do? A World of Good,"
the 2014 program encour-
ages girls to "show you

The latest news, all
the time! Check out
www.jcfloridan.com


HOW (Her Own Way)"
your purchase of a box
of cookies benefits them
and the community. In-
corporating the five es-
sential skills learned, girls
discover, connect and take
action to fund important
troop and community
projects.
Feb. 7-8 is National Girl
Scout Cookie Weekend,
designated to celebrate the
importance of Girl Scout
cookies and the positive
impact of the program
on girls and their com-
munities. Included in the
weekend celebration is




21
8GAIN

SHeLIa MaDer?

HaPPY BIrTHDaY!


4$.


the opportunity to obtain
Girl Scout cookies before
they officially arrive on
Feb. 15. The Girl Scout
Run for the Cookies 1 Mile
and 5 K Run will be held
in Pensacola and Talla-
hassee respectively, on
Saturday, Feb. 8. All 5 K
runners preregistering by
Jan. 31 will receive a box of
cookies.
If you miss the oppor-
tunity to pre-order your
cookies, cookie booth
sales will begin Feb. 15
through March 16 in part-
nership with local busi-
nesses. To locate a cookie


booth near you, log on to
the Girl Scouts of the Flor-
ida Panhandle's websitee at
www.gscfp.org and look
for the Cookie Locator.
You can also download.
the Official Girl Scout
Cookies App from the
website, or contact the Girl
Scout Council toll free at
1-800-876-9704 for more
information.
More information, in-
cluding a listing of the
specific cookie products
available and tips on how
to buy cookies, can be
viewed by visiting www.
gscfp.org.


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BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


Atkins donates


$2,500 to the


WHTC Foundation


Special to the Floridan

The Washington-Hol-
mes Technical Center
Foundation has re-
cently received a $2,500
Community Funding
Grant from the Atkins
Foundation.
The. Atkins Foundation
was established in 2006
to give back to the com-
munities in which their
employees live and work.
They based their model
for giving on the concept
of "community, itself."
The foundation primarily
supports community ini-
tiatives focused on edu-
cation and response to
natural disasters.
Special consideration
is given to programs that
promote science, tech-
nology, engineering and
mathematics (STEM).
They strongly encourage
support of local nonprofit
IRS Section, 501(c)(3) or-
ganizations target pro-
grams, especially those


that demonstrate a track
record for success.
The Washington-Hol-
me,s Technical Center
Foundation provides
scholarships and assis-
tance to students who
plan to attend or are pres-
ently attending Washing-
ton-Holmes Technical
Center. Founded in 1987,
the WHTC Foundation
certainly qualifies for this
grant based on its track
record of success over the
years.
In the last fiscal year,
the foundation provided
assistance to '66 students
in 18 different programs
at WHTC, and 50 stu-
dents the year before. The
most active WHTC pro-
grams with students
receiving grants were li-
censed practical nurse,
pharmacy tech, and
cosmetology.
The Atkins donations
intended to increase in-
terest in STEM programs
atWHTC.


Florida Lottery


Mon (iE '


Wed
Wed
Tliurs
Thurs
Fri
Fri
Sat
Sat
Sun
Sun


1.13 5.6.9 5 0.2.0 2 4.8-1025
42-9 926-8
1,14 3-0-4 4.3.3.4 8-14-32-33-34
0.7.2 5 7 1-5
1/15 3 9-5 T7.7-9 12-16 22-23.29
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15 3 .884-6
1/11 62 ? ?-0-75
168 7.4 18
1/12 0.90 7.7-0.0
3 .9-1 9.1-46


114- 25-27 33

3 14-16-1934


E = Evening uIaring. M = Midday drawing


Saturday 1/1'U
Wednesday 1/15


101533-48-56
7-8-9-24 29


PB 34
PB 25


I LOI I


Saturday
Wedrne day


1/11 7-13-15-17 51-53
1/15 13-18-20 23-42 53


xtra5
xtra4


ror letter inrtormatiron c.ll 3f8C,' 487?77 or 900-737-7777


I POWERBALL I


FRIDAY. JANUARY 17, 2014 4. 3AF


LOCRL





-14A FRIDAY, JANUARY 17.2014


RELIGION


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


FRIDAY, JAN. 17
> Youth Activity Night 6 p.m. at
Marianna Church of God. Ages: 12-19.
Call 482-6264.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen
meetings to "overcome hurts, habits
and hang-ups in a safe environment,"
7 p.m. at Evangel Worship Center with
praise and live worship music, testi-
monies and fellowship. Dinner: 6 p.m.
Child care available. Call 209-7856,
573-1131.
> Revival of Freedom 7 p.m. It's
All about Jesus Ministries, Malone.
Speakers will be Minister Katina Oliver,
evangelist Lillie Lane and pastor
Bobbie Donaldson. For more info call
718-7712.

SATURDAY, JAN. 18
Free clothing giveaway 9 a.m.
to noon at Mother Agnes' Closet, 2856
Orange St. in Marianna.
) Chili Dinner 6 p.m. Heavens Way
Biker Church, Cottondale. $5 donation
per person. 7 p.m. Bride takes the
stage.
) Revival of Freedom 7 p.m. It's
All about Jesus Ministries, Malone.
Speakers will be Minister Katina Oliver,
evangelist Lillie Lane and pastor
Bobbie Donaldson. For more info call
718-7712.

SUNDAY, JAN. 19
Blind Evangelist from Costa Rico
to perform -10:30 a.m. Rocky Creek
Tabernacle, Marianna. Special guest


will be brother Terry Sanders. Everyone
invited. For more info call 272-0187 or
272-4190.
) The Lighthouse Children's Home
Choir to Perform 10:30 a.m. at
Welcome Assembly of God Church,
Grand Ridge. They will be singing and
giving testimonies. For more info call
592-5077.
7 Annual Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. Program New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church, Greenwood during
morning worship service.
) 76th Church Anniversary 11 a.m.
Bethel Star M. B. Church, Marianna.
Guest speaker: Rev. Paul Daniels. The
second service will begin at 3 p.m. with
guest speaker pastor Robert Knight.
Dinner will follow the morning service.
7 Pastor's 13th Anniversary -11
a.m. Evergreen Missionary Baptist
Church honoring Rev. Wallace Godwin.
The morning service will be con-
ducted by pastor Thomas Forward. The
afternoon services will begin at 2:30
with pastor Nelson Wilson in charge.
Everyone invited.
) January Bible Study Kickoff Chili
Supper 5 p.m. Bethlehem Baptist
Church, Kynesville. Everyone is invited.
For more info call 579-9940.
7 Seminary Extension Courses
- 5:30 p.m. Eastside Baptist Church,
Marianna. Upcoming course is New
Testament Survey I and the cost is
$233 which includes the textbooks.
Registration forms dan be picked up
at the church office or downloaded
and printed from the church website:


Religion Calendar

eastsidebaptistchruch.com.
) Gospel Sing 6:30 p.m. Em-
manuel Holiness Church, Grand Ridge
featuring "The Shepherds."
) Revival of Freedom 7 p.m. It's
All about Jesus Ministries, Malone.
Speakers will be Minister Katina Oliver,
evangelist Lillie Lane and pastor
Bobbie Donaldson. For more info call
718-7712.

MONDAY, JAN. 20
> Bible Study 7-8:30 p.m. Beth-
lehem Baptist Church in Kynesville.
Classes for all ages including nursery
to adult. Light refreshments will be
provided. Everyone welcome. For more
info call 579-9940.

TUESDAY, JAN. 21
7 Dare to Live Healed Healing
School Class 7 p.m. in the Bascom
Town Hall at 4969 Basswood Road.
Free classes taught by Jacquelyn
McGriff. Call 276-6024.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22
Bible Study 7-8:30 p.m. Beth-
lehem Baptist Church in Kynesville.
Classes for all ages including nursery
to adult. Light refreshments will be
provided. Everyone welcome. For more
info call 579-9940.

THURSDAY, JAN. 23
7 Free clothing giveaway 9 a.m.
to noon at Mother Agnes' Closet, 2856
Orange St. in Marianna.


FRIDAY, JAN. 24
7 Youth Activity Night 6 p.m. at
Marianna Church of God. Ages: 12-19.
Call 482-6264.
)) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen
meetings to "overcome hurts, habits
and hang-ups in a safe environment,"
7 p.m. at Evangel Worship Center with
praise and live worship music, testi-
monies and fellowship. Dinner: 6 p.m.
Child care available. Call 209-7856,
573-1131.

SATURDAY, JAN. 25
D Free clothing giveaway 9 a.m.
to noon at Mother Agnes' Closet, 2856
Orange St. in Marianna.
) Fruit of the Spirit Program 6
p.m. at New Beginning Outreach Min-
istries, Inc. in Jacob City. The program
will be conducted by various ministers
from various churches. The Church
of God By Faith praise team will be in
charge-of praise and worship. Youth
department will be selling hot dog
and chili dog plates. For more info call
352-4733.

SUNDAY, JAN. 26
) Annual Lay Day 2:30 p.m. Mc-
Chapel AME Church, Marianna. Guest
speaker: Minister Stephen Andrews.
Guest choir will be Grant Tabernacle
AME Male Chorus. For more info call
594-3778.
) Sunday night sing 6:30 p.m.
Emmanuel Holiness Church in Grand
Ridge. Special guest will be "Perfect


Grace" from Valdosta, Ga.

TUESDAY, JAN. 28
Dare to Live Healed Healing
School Class 7 p.m. in the Bascom
Town Hall at 4969 Basswood Road.
Free classes taught by Jacquelyn
McGriff. Call 276-6024.

WEDNESDAY, JAN.29
Revival 6:30 p.m. Emmanuel Holi-
ness Church, Grand Ridge featuring
pastor Huber Neel.

THURSDAY, JAN.30
7 Free clothing giveaway 9 a.m.
to noon at Mother Agnes' Closet, 2856
Orange St. in Marianna.
) Revival 6:30 p.m. Emmanuel Ho-
liness Church, Grand Ridge featuring
pastor Huber Neel.

FRIDAY: JAN. 31
Youth Activity Night 6 p.m. at
Marianna Church of God. Ages: 12-19.
Call 482-6264.
) Revival 6:30 p.m. Emmanuel Holi-
ness Church, Grand Ridge featuring
pastor Huber Neel.
D Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen
meetings to "overcome hurts, habits
and hang-ups in a safe environment:'
7 p.m. at Evangel Worship Center with
praise and live worship music, testi-
monies and fellowship. Dinner: 6 p.m.
Child.care available. Call 209-7856,
573-1131.


BCF president to preach





the first week of chapel


SUBMITTED PHOTO
BCF President Thomas A. Kinchen will preach in the R. G. Lee
Chapel Jan. 20-22 at 10 a.m; CST.


Special to the Floridan

Faculty and students at The Baptist
College of Florida in Graceville excit-
edly await the first week of chapel
services for the spring semester, Jan.
20-22 at 10 a.m., featuring BCF Presi-
dent Thomas A. Kinchen.
The highly anticipated worship
service held in the R. G. Lee Chapel
always includes a message from the
president, a welcome to the new
students and words of encourage-
ment for returning students and the
Graceville community.
"Chapel services are at the very
heart of whowe are and what we do


at The Baptist College of Florida,"
stated Kinchen.. "We have been giv-
en a wonderful responsibility and
opportunity as our Lord commis-
sioned us to go into the world and
make disciples. In. chapel, we sing
the message, pray the message, and
preach the message. As we go' out
from chapel, we live the message
and proclaim the message."
Kinchen is in his 24th year as
president of The Baptist College of
Florida. Under his leadership, BCF
continues to expand programs, pre-
pare and equip leaders, while in-
corporating innovative and cutting-
edge delivery options for training


the next generation. Last year, BCF
added a second graduate degree
and experienced significant growth
in the bachelor's degree in missions
with a concentration in aviation.
The faculty and staff at BCF remain
committed to preparing men and
women for areas of ministry, service,
and leadership.
The presidential sermon will be
broadcast live on WFBU 94.7, BCF's
LP-FM radio station, accessible on
the website at www.wfbu.com.
For information on the spring
2014 chapel schedule, call 800-328-
2660, ext. 446 or download the
schedule at www.baptistcollege.edu.


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Your Guide To Local Houses Of Worship


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Alford First Assembly of God
1782 Tennessee St P.O. Box 228
Alford, FL 32420
Bascom Assembly of God
5516 Hummingbird Rd
Bascom, FL 32423 272-7775
Shugroad@embargmail.com
Cypress Grove Assembly of God
3250 Cypress Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4451
cppressgrovechurch.org
Cords Of Love Assembly Of God
2060 Bethelehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 a 272-0254
Eastside Assembly of God Church
4723 Hatton St Marianna, FL
lop4664@yahoo.com 526-2422
El Bethel Assembly of God
2503 El Bethel Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 593-6044
First Assembly of God
5565 Brown St
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3351
First Assembly of God Church
4186 Lafayette St
Marianna FL 32446
482-2800 www.mariannafirst.org
First Assembly of God Church of
Cottondale
2636 Milton St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4626
Faith Haven Assembly of God
7135 Hwy 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-8205
Pilgrim Rest Assembly of God
3347 Pilgrim Rest Church Road
Marianna, FL 32448 579-2300
Welcome Assembly of God
6784 Messer Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5077
Welcomehometom@yahoo.com


BAPTIST
Alford Baptist Church
1764 Carolina St P.O. Box 6
AlfIord, FL 32420 850-573-3249
Bethel Missionary Baptist Church
2137 McLeod St
Cypress, FL 592-4108
Bethel Star Missionary Baptist Church
4134 Lincoln Ave
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4866
Bethlehem Baptist Church
2300 Bethlehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-9940


Circle Hill Baptist Church
7170 Circle Hill Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 592-2327
Collins Chapel Baptist Church
5005 3rd Ave (5499 Collins Chapel Rd)
Malone, FL 32445 569-5644
Crossroads Baptist Church Southern
Baptist
3276 Main St P.O. Box 386
Cottondale Fl. 32431 352-2636
Damacus Freewill Baptist
3700 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5878
Dellwood Baptist Church
5512 Blue Springs Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-6954
Eastside Baptist Church
4785 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 526-2004
www.eastsidebaptistchurch.com
Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church
3360 Gardenview Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4223
Everlena Missionary Baptist
5309 Ellaville Rd
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3900
First Baptist Church
3172 Main St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4586
First Baptist Church
5366 Ninth St P.O. Box 98
Malone, FL 32445 569-2426
Faith Baptist Church
2494 Hwy 71 South
Marianna, FL 482-2869
First Baptist Church
8010 Pope St P.O. Box 246
Sneads, FL 32460
First Baptist Church of Bascom
4951 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 97
Bascom, FL 32423 569-2699
First Baptist Church of Campbellton
2405 Hwy 2
Campbellton, FL 32A26 263-3183
First Baptist Church Southern Baptist
987 8th Ave P.O. Box 565
Graceville FL 32440 263-3323
fbcgraceville @ bellsouth.net
www.fbcgraceville.org
First Baptist Marianna
2897 Green St Marianna, FL 32446
526-4200 www.fbcmarianna.org
First Freewill Baptist Church of Malone
5440 10th Street (Hwy 71 N.)
PO. Box 385
Malone FL 32445 850-569-2786
First Freewill Baptist Church
7970 Davis St
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5400


Friendship Baptist Church of Malone
5507 Friendship Church Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-2379
Grand Ridge Baptist Church
2093 Porter Ave P.O. Box 380
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4846
grandridgebc@embarqmail.com
Greater Buckhorn Missionary Baptist
Church
4691 Hwy 162
Marianna, FL 32446 594-5761
Greenwood Baptist Church
4156 Bryan St P.O. Box 249
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3883
Hasty Pond Baptist Church
4895 Hasty Pond Rd, Marianna, FL
Heaven's Way Biker Church
A Ministry of Alford Baptist Church
3924 Woodrest Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 334-806-4258
Holly Grove Free Will Baptist Church
2699 Highway 73S
Marianna, FL 32448 482-3489
Inwood Baptist Church
2012 Inwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 593-5328
Liberty Hill Missionary Baptist Church
5239 Liberty Hill Road
Bascom, FL 32426 569-5949
Little Zion M!ssionary Baptist Church
3181 Little Zion Rd P.O. Box 190
Sneads, FL 32460 592-1614
Lovedale Baptist Church
6595 Lovedale Rd Bascom, FL 32423
592-5415 or 592-2134
Marvin Chapel Free Will Baptist Church
2041 Hope School Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5375
www.marvinchapelfwb.com
Midway Freewill Baptist Church
1600 Church St
6158 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 592-8999
Mount Olive Baptist
6045 Hwy 2
Bascom FL 32423 569-5080
Mt.Tabor Missionary Baptist Church
3695 Popular Springs Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 594-4161
Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church
5382 Old US Road
Malone, FL 32445 569-2049
New Easter Missionary Baptist Church
977 Hope Ave
Graceville, FL 32440 658-8344
New Galilee Missionary Baptist Church
2155 Highway 73 South P.O. Box 234
Marianna, FL 32447 482-5499


New Hoskle Baptist Church
4252 Alien St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-7243
New Hope Freewill Baptist
Sweet Pond Rd
Dellwood, FL 592-1234
New Hope Missionary Baptist
3996 Wintergreen Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-8802
New Mount Olive Missionary Baptist
2870 Barnes St P.O. Box 312
Marianna, FL 32447 482-7595
New Salem Baptist Church
3478 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 579-4343
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
6687 Brushy Pond Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 718-8401
Pleasant Hill Missionary Baptist Church
6704 Reddoch Road
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-2273
Pine Ridge Baptist Church
3064 Pine Ridge Church Rd
Alford, FL 32420
Piney Grove Baptist Church
2136 Piney Grove Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3800
Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church
5481 Pleasant Ridge Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 263-8007
Poplar Springs Missionary Baptist
Church
2662 Poplar Springs Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-3176
Providence Baptist Church
6940 Providence Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5481
pbch@embarqmail.com
Rocky Creek Baptist Church
5458 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-7508
Salem Free Will Baptist
2555 Kynesville Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4194
www.salemfreewillbaptist.com
Shady Grove Baptist Church
7304 Birchwood Rd
Grand'Ridge FL 32442 592-6952
St. Luke Missionary Baptist Church
2871 Orange Street
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2591
St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church
1935 Jacob Road
Cottondale, FL 32431 263-4097
St. Peter Missionary Baptist
7889 McKeown Mill Rd
P.O. Box 326 593-3363


Trinity Baptist Church
3023 Penn. Ave
Marianna, FL 482-3705
www.TrinityMarianna.com
Union Hill
3115 Union Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-5711
Victory Baptist Church
2271 River Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6699
www.victorybaptistfl.com
White Pond Baptist Church
P.O. Box 458 Mill Pond Rd
Alford, FL 32420 352-4715
CATHOLIC
St. Anne Catholic Church
3009 5th St P.O. Box 1547
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3734
www.stanne@stannemar.ptdiocese.org
www.stannemarianna.org
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Caverns Rd. Church of Christ
4448 River Rd
Marianna, FL 482-2605
CHURCH OF GOD
Grand Ridge Church of God
2232 Porter Ave Grand Ridge, FL
32442
592-5301 or 592-2814
Marianna Church of God
(All services interpreted for the
hearing impaired.)
2791 Jefferson St, Marianna, FL 32446
482-6264 mariannacogcom
CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST
Glorious Gospel Church of God in
Christ
4255 Clay St Marianna, FL 32448
594-1096 or 557-4019
Miracle Restoration Center
2997 Hall Street
Marianna, FL 3?448 526-2335
Refuge Tabernacle Church of God In
Christ
2820 Chipola Street
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2607
The New Zion Temple Church of God
In Christ
1022 Washington Ave
Graceville, FL 32440
Victory Tabernacle Church of God In
Christ
6752 Highway 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 209-7711






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


RELIGION


FRIDAY, JANUARY 17,2014 5AF


Florida students, disaster relief



volunteers rebuild homes in NY


Special to the Floridan

Although not wrapped in festive
paper and bright ribbon, it was a
Christmas gift wrapped in God's love,
given by seven students from The
Baptist College of Florida to those in
desperate need in NewYork.
While many college students were
looking forward to a relaxing Christ-
mas break from their studies, seven
students from The Baptist College
of Florida volunteered as disaster
relief volunteers, traveling to Staten
Island, N.Y, to help rebuild homes
catastrophically damaged by Hurri-
cane Sandy more than a year ago.
Accompanied by David Coggins,
associate professor of leadership at
the college, along with eight other
adult disaster relief volunteers, the
group went into homes still deemed
unlivable because of the devastation
left in the wake of the deadliest and
most destructive storm of the 2012
Atlantic hurricane season.
There, one team of students erected
stud walls in a basement apartment
for an elderly woman who lives with
her daughter, while another team
installed insulation and flooring in
a home with no floors. All the while,
they built relationships with the
homeowners and shared their faith
as opportunities arose to do so.
"In providing help, we provide
spiritual hope," said Coggins, who
has led two other student groups to
minister through disaster relief in
NewYork.
Helping people rediscover hope in
the midst of disaster is an opportune
time to share the Gospel, according
to Marvin Corbin, Florida Baptist
field missionary/logistics.
"By providing help in the aftermath
of a disaster, we are showing God's
love. When is there a better time to
share God's word than when you
are showing God's love?" he said.
The student trip to New York was
a response to a two-year disaster re-
lief commitment made by the SBC
North American Mission Board to
help rebuild homes on Staten Island
and Long Island, explained Corbin.
The Florida Baptist Convention
partnered in the collegiate team ef-
fort by covering fuel costs to and
from Staten Island, helping en-
list the eight adult volunteers and


SUBMITTED PHOTO


BCF students volunteer with disaster relief during Christmas break.


providing necessary training, Corbin
said.
On each disaster relief trip he
has helped lead, Coggins has had a
front-row seat to seeing lives
changed, including the lives of stu-
dents as well as the lives of those to
whom they are ministering.
As the Gospel is shared numer-
ous times on each trip, those on the
receiving end of the disaster relief
efforts often make professions of
faith.
Sometimes opportunities to share
the Gospel arise even outside the
scope of the disaster relief efforts.
On the December trip to Staten Is-
land, as the group stopped at a fast-
food restaurant in Virginia en route,
one student shared the Gospel with
a young person eating by himself.
"Although he did not accept
Christ there, the Gospel was shared
and the seed was planted for may-
be somebody else to nurture it and
for him to make that life decision,"
said Gabriel Zavala, one of the stu-
dent disaster relief volunteers who
ministered in NewYork.
The Puerto Rico native, who has
been in the United States 'for four
years, acknowledged the positive
impact he experienced as a result of
his serving in NewYork.


"This experience definitely
changed my life, burning within me
a deeper and more mature passion
for helping people in need. This trip
fueled my heart for others," said the
ministry studies student.
Time and again, Coggins sees stu-
dents discover that they "can be in-
volved in disaster relief now, stand-
ing along with and working with
those who are serving now."
Many seasoned disaster relief
volunteers are re-energized when
working alongside students.
"My faith was renewed as I ob-
served the hard work and great at-
titude of these college students.
They were eager to work each day,
and they never complained. It was
refreshing to work alongside them,"
said Kaye Dickerson, a member of
Pensacola's Hillcrest Baptist Church
and one of the adult team members
to accompany the student group.
As the seven student volunteers
have returned to campus and their
collegiate routines, Coggins' hope
is that the New York experience
will be etched on their hearts and
minds. "I don't want students to see
disaster relief as a one-time or just
short-term experience, but a life-
style of responding when others are
in need."


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Charles Scicluna, former Vatican chief prosecutor of clerical
sexual abuse, waits Thursday in Geneva, Switzerland, for the
start of questioning over clerical sexual abuse of children.


Vatican comes under more

criticism over sexual abuse


The Associated Press.

GENEVA- It resembled
a courtroom cross-exami-
nation, except no ques-
tion was off-limits, dodg-
ing the answer wasn't an
option and the proceed-
ings were webcast live.
After decades of accu-
sations that its culture of
secrecy contributed to
priest sex abuse, the Vati-
can was forced for the first
time Thursday to defend
its record in public and at
length.
In a stuffy U.N. con-
ference room before an
obscure human rights
committee, the Holy See
was interrogated for eight
hours about the scale of
abuse and what it was do-
ing to prevent it.
The Vatican was com-
pelled to appear before
the committee as a signa-
tory to the U.N. Conven-
tion for the Rights of the
Child, which requires gov-
ernments to take all ade-
quate measures to protect
children from harm and
ensure their interests are
placed above all else.
. The Holy See was one.
of the first states to ratify
the treaty in 1990, eager
to contribute the church's
experience in caring
for children in Catholic
schools, hospitals, or-
phanages and refugee
centers. It submitted a
first implementation


report in 1994, but didn't
provide progress assess-
ments for nearly two de-
cades, until 2012.
By then, the clerical sex
abuse scandal had ex-
ploded around the world.
Thousands of priests
were accused of raping
and molesting thousands
of children over decades,
while their bishops
moved them from parish
to parish rather than re-
port them to police. Crit-
ics allege the Holy See,
the central government
of the 1.2-billion strong
Catholic Church, con-
tributed to the problem
by encouraging a culture
of secrecy to protect the
church's reputation at the
expense of victims.
"How can we address
this whole systematic
policy of silencing of
victims?" asked com-
mittee member Benyam
Mezmur, an Ethiopian
academic. "There are
two principles that I see
are being undermined in
a number of instances,
namely transparency and
accountability."
Monsignor Charles Sci-
cluna, the Vatican's .for-
mer sex crimes prosecu-
tor, replied: "I am with you
when you say that all of
these nice words will not
mean anything ... if there
is not more transparency
and accountability on the
local level."


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(850) 526-4700
Oak Station Shopping Center
Open Daily from 8am 8pm


Vann Funeral Home
4265 Saint Andrews Street
Marianna, FL 32446
Phone: (850) 482-3300
Fax: (850) 482-5363
Concern for the living,
reverence for the dead.
C. B.n L.F DIG C.V Jr,. LF.D.Adran D. Abnr, LF D
Lula C.Van.- LPaM.C./Dors LV Pnn LRN.C.


Tropic
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S"HETRAILER YROUR NTD
1-888-767-4275
482-3420
2163 Post Oak Ln Marianna
www.tropictrailer.com'


YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Marianna Church of the Nazarene
2987 N Madison St
Marianna, FL 32446 372-4605
EPISCOPAL
St. Luke's Episcopal Church
4362 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 482-2431
parishoffice@stlukesmarianna.org
www.stlukesmarianna.org
FULL GOSPEL
Christian Center Church
4791 Sheffield Dr P.O. Box 450
Marianna, FL 32447
526-4476 or 526-4475
jack @ cccmarianna.org
Country Gospel Community Church
Compass Lake in the Hills
650 Apalachicola Ave
Alford, FL 32420 (850) 579-4172
Resurrection Life Christian Fellowship
International,
2933 Madison Street
Marianna, FL 526-2617
New Beginnings Worship Center
1165 Highway 69
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5791 www.nbworship.com
New Beginning Outreach Ministries, Inc.
2254 Magnolia Dr.
Cottondale, FL 32431 (850) 352-4733
Evangel Worship Center
2645 Pebble Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2232
New Life Family Church
4208 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2132
The Bridge Church
2515 Commercial Park Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 209-2733
HOLINESS
Emmanuel Holiness Church
2505 Sandridge Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5167
Hickory Level Community Church
1221 Dipper Rd
Marianna, FL 32448
482-4696 or 482-2885
Oak Ridge Freewill Holiness Church
2958 Milton Ave
Marianna, FL 573-7684
Sneads Community Church
1948 Desoto Ave P.O. Box 1349
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5650
LATTER-DAY SAINTS
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day
Saints
3141 College St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-8159


LUTHERAN
Ascension Lutheran Church
3975 W. Hwy 90
Marianna, FL 482-4691
METHODIST
Bascom United Methodist Church
4942 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 67
Bascom, FL 32423 569-2231
Cypress United Methodist-Church
6267 Cemetery Ave
Cypress, FL 32432 263-4220
First United Methodist Church
1111 8th Ave
Graceville, FL 263-3342
First United Methodist Church
2901 Caledonia St
Marianna, FL 482-4502
Grace United Methodist
4203 W. Kelson Ave
Marianna, FL 482-4753
Grand Ridge United Methodist Church
6911 Iowa Street
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
Greenwood Chapel AME
5426 Fort Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-1112
Greenwood United Methodist
4220 Bryan St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-5755
Henshaw Chapel AME Church
2370 Glastel St, P.O. Box 535
Cottondale, FL 32431 875-2610
Jerusalem AME Church
2055 Hwy 73
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5085
McChapel AME Church
4963 Old U.S. Rd
Marianna, FL 569-2184
Mt. Shiloh AME Church
6702 Biscayne Road
Bascom, FL 32423 569-1044
New Bethel Christian Methodist
Episcopal Church
2487 Highway 1
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-4647
Pope Chapel African Methodist
Episcopal Church
4898 Blue Springs Rd, P.O. Box 6000
Marianna, FL 32447 482-2900
Shady Grove United Methodist Church
7305 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-9277
Sneads First United Methodist Church
8042 Church St, P.O. Box 642
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6481
fumc@embarqmail.com
Friendship Christian Methodist
Episcopal (CME) Church
5411 Avery Rd,'P.O.Box 302
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-1111


1st United Methodist Church of
Cottondale
P.O. Box 458
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4426
Salem AME Church
5729 Browntown Rd, P.O. Box 354
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3344
Springfield AME Church
4194 Union Rd "
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4252
St. James AME Church
2891 Orange St, P.O. Box 806
Marianna, FL,32447 526-3440
St. Paul AME Church
5180 Hwy 273, P.O. Box 40
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-0333
Snow Hill AME Church
5395 Snow Hill Rd, P.O. Box 174
Malone, FL 32445 569-5315
Mt. Olive AME Church
2135 Fairview Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-7917
Bethlehem AME Church
3100 Lovewood Rd, P.O. Box 752
Cottondale, FL 32431
352-2111 or 352-4721
Greater St. Luke AME'Church
5255 11th Ave, P.O. Box 176,
Malone, FL 32445 569-5188
NON-DENOMINATIONAL'
2nd Chance Ministries
2840 McPherson St
Marianna, FL 32446 557-9885
Believers Outreach Ministry
3471 Hwy 90 W
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4926
Cypress Creek Community Church
1772 Macedonia Rpad, PO Box 496
Altord, FL 32420 638-0360
Ever Increasing Word of Faith Ministries
3749 Skyview Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-4704
Heaven's Garden Worship Center
3115 Main Street
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 579-9936 www.aidaspina.org
Faith Cornerstone Church Ministries
5460 Collins Chapel Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-5600
Foundation Temple Apostolic Faith
Church
3341 Tendell Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3884
Glass Community Church
4005 Veteran's Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 272-7205 (850) 263-6715
Haven of Rest Church of Restoration
Worship Center
2261 Haven of Rest Road
Cottondale, FL 32431


Love and Restoration Ministries
2990 Heritage Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2730
Mill Springs Christian Chapel
1345 Mill Springs Rd, P.O. Box 83
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 526-2519
Rivertown Community Church
(Meets at the new Marianna High School)
3546 Caverns Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 482-2477
Rocky Creek Tabernacle
1890 Delta Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 272-0917
St. Andrews (FC) Church Ministries
978 Hwy 71 S
Marianna, FL 32448 569-5600
Sunrise Worship Center
2957 Hall St, Marianna, FL 482-8158
PENTECOSTAL
The Sanctuary
4070 Old Cottondale Rd
Marianna, FL 482-8720
www.sanctuarypom .com
Apostolic Revival Center of Marianna
3001 Hwy 71 N, P.O. Box 634
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3162
Christian Covenant Life Center
2011 Finley Ave.
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 592-4737
Shady Grove Pentecostal Holiness
7541 Shady Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-6203
Sneads Pentecostal Holiness Church
2036 Gloster Ave
Sneads, FL 32460
593-4487 or 593-6949


Praise Life Ministries
7360 Hwy 90, P.O. Box 177
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4166
Prayer Temple Church Of Prayer For All
People
3341 Plantation Circle
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3343
United Pentecostal Deliverance
5255 10th Ave
Malone, FL 32445 569-5989
PRESBYTERIAN
First Presbyterian Church
Presbyterian Church (USA)
2898 Jefferson St
Marianna, FL 32446
526-2430 www.firstpresmarianna.org
fpcmarianna@embarqmail.com or
firstpresmarianna@earthlink.net
RESTORATIONIST
Church of Jesus Christ of Marianna
4060 Thomasville Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2282
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
Emmanuel SDA Church
4531 Basswood Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3200
Marlanna Seventh Day Adventist
4878 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2487
WESLEYAN
Salem Wesleyan Church
2764 Salem Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 (850) 593-66Z9
irquomai@gmail.com


1




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIQAN o www.jcfloridan.com


--16A FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 2014


CUTE KIDS


SUBMITTED PHOTOS

OP: Timothy James Clark Jr., whose
parents are Jennifer Renee Coleman
of Bascom and Timothy J Clark Sr. of
Dothan, Ala. BOTTOM: JaNiyah Renee Clark,
whose parents are Jennifer Renee Coleman of
Bascom and Timothy J. Clark Sr. of Dothan,
Ala.


Insurance commissioner says rates are falling


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Homeowner
insurance rates are finally coming
down in Florida nearly a decade af-
ter the last hurricane hit, the state's
insurance commissioner says.
But the upbeat report by Insiur-
ance Commissioner Kevin McCarty
also shows that some of the state's
larger insurers have asked for and
received rate hikes. The report
also did not include the state-cre-
ated Citizens Property Insurance,
which has been steadily raising its
rates for several years.
The report was done at the urg-
ing of Chief Financial Officer Jeff
Atwater, who wanted to know why
homeowner rates have not come
down even though the largest ex-
pense for insurance companies
- reinsurance has been coming
down.
A national report released in De-
cember found that Floridians are
paying the highest homeowner
insurance rates in the nation. The
report from the National Associa-
tion of Insurance Commissioners


concluded that the average premi-
um for most Florida homeowners
is $1,933 a year, or nearly twice the
national average of $978.
McCarty's report said that the
overall trends show rates going
down and that the market is "more
robust and competitive" than it has
been previously. Florida's insurance
market has been volatile ever since
Hurricane Andrew tore into the
state in 1992 and rates skyrocketed
after eight hurricanes hit the state in
2004 and 2005.
"There is reason to be optimistic
that the Florida homeowners mar-
ket is steadily improving," McCarty
wrote.
The national report was based on
2011 rates, while McCarty's report
uses more recent information. But
McCarty's report is only partially
complete: Data was provided by
only half of 30 insurance companies
that represent 70 percent of the in-
surance market. However, among
the 15 insurers providing data, six
had filed for rate decreases ranging
from 2.4 percent to 9.2 percent.
However, two of the state's larger


insurers, State FarnA Florida and
Castle Key, have either asked for or
received approval for rate hikes.
The report also did not include
Citizens, which has more than 1I mil-
lion policyholders and represents
about 20 percent of the insurance
market. Citizens has been raising
rates because it covers homes, in-
cluding those along the coast, that
private insurers have been reluctant
to insure. State law caps how much
Citizens can raise its rates each
year.
The report also said many insur-
ers were seeing declines in their
own costs for reinsurance. Reinsur-
ance is the backup coverage an in-
surer purchases to make sure it can
pay claims in the event of a major
catastrophe like a hurricane. Rising
reinsurance costs has been blamed
for past price spikes.
McCarty noted that while reinsur-
ance is a "significant factor" in rates,
other types of losses could also im-
pact rates. He also stated that a "10
percent decrease ir reinsurance
costs does not translate into a 10
percent decrease in total rates."


Local & State Briefs


Relay for Life
meeting on Jan. 21
Save the date for Relay
for Life, May 2 and 3 at
Citizens Lodge.
Each year, more than
4 million people in over
20 countries raise much-
needed funds and aware-
ness to save lives from
cancer through the Relay
for Life movement.
Get involved and come
make a difference by
joining today. Everyone is
welcome.
The next team meet-
ing is going to be Tues-
day, Jan. 21, at 6 p.m. at
Jackson County Extension
Agriculture Center, 2741
Penn Ave., Marianna.
For more information,
contact shannon.rodri-
guez@cancer.org; mike.
ubias@fl.usda.gov; or
margolamb@gmail.com.

College grad rates
called unacceptable
FORT MYERS Gradu-
ation rates at some Flor-
ida universities are being
called unacceptable.
The new chairman of
the Florida Board of Gov-
ernors on Thursday criti-
cized the graduation rates
at both Florida A&M Uni-


versity in Tallahassee and
Florida Atlantic University
in Boca Raton. FAMU's
six-year graduation rate
is 39 percent, while FAU's
rate is 40 percent. The rate
is 86 percent at University
of Florida.
Mori Hosseini also
pointed that only 42 per-
cent of all students gradu-
ate within four years.
The Board of Governors
oversees the state univer-
sity system.
Hosseini, who gave
a "State of the System"
speech, wants university
trustees across the state
to do a "stress test" of
each university. Hos-
seini says each university
needs to review every
program and every degree
to see if students graduate
on time and get jobs.

Davidson named to
WCC dean's list
Douglas Paul Davidson
of Marianna was recently
named in the Wallace
Community College fall
2013 dean's list.

Russ House tour,
investigation Jan. 25
Emerald Coast Paranor-
mal and Jackson County


Chamber of Commerce
will host another tour and
paranormal investigation
at the Russ House on Sat-
urday, Jan. 25. There will
be two tours: 7-8:30 p.m.
and 8:30-10 p.m. There
is no-charge but dona-
tions are welcome. All
donations will go directly
toward repairs of the Russ
House. Reservations are
required. Call 482-8060
and ask for Tamarah Ras-
mussen for information
and reservations.
No one younger than 16
will be allowed to attend
the investigation portion
of the tour.

Bill approved to
increase speed limits
TALLAHASSEE --Flor-
ida drivers could soon be
allowed to push the pedal
to the metal a little bit
more.
The Senate Transporta-
tion Committee approved
a bill Thursday that would
allow the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation
to raise speed limits five
miles per hour.
The bill doesn't man-
date an increase, but only
gives the transportation
department the ability to
raise limits on a case-by-


case basis on a particular
roadway.
Current maximums
are 70 miles per hour on
limited-access highways,
65 on four-lane highways
outside urban areas and
60 on other roads the
department manages.
The bill also grants the
transportation depart-
ment the authority to set
minimum speed limits.

From local, wire reports

BEFORE

THE

BOTTOM

DROPS
OUT...
SELL YOUR

GOLD

AT



a J^.EWELEAS >
Paid on Site
4432 Lafayette Street
526-5488
www.smithandsmithonllne.com


LOCAL ICE CREAM MAKERS


ADDRESS OPTIMIST CLUB


SUBMITTED PHOTO
indy and Dale Eade, owners and operators of Cindale Dairy
Farms near Marianna, were recently welcomed as guest
speakers at the Marianna Optimist Club. The Eades milk
about 450 cows in their operation, producing about a half million
gallons of milk each year. However, in'February 2013, the Eades
launched a new venture with their daughter and son-in-law and
started Southern Craft Creamery. Southern Craft produces
hand-crafted ice cream in about 15 different flavors, using in their ice
cream many locally grown products including satsumas and pecans.
Southern Craft sells its product to a number of wholesalers and
privately owned retailers, primarily between Tallahassee and
Pensacola. However, the company has plans to open a retail location
here in the near future. For more information about its ice cream,
visit it on the web at www.southerncraftcreamery.com. The Eades are
seen here with Optimist Club President George Gay.


DOTHAN EAGLE


cordially invites you to the


The Wiregrass' Premiere Bridal Show!
Elite bridal professionals Couture Bridal Runway Lux Give-a-ways


January 26

1:00-4:30

Dothan Civic Center

sponsored by


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Like us on Facebook!


LOCAL & STATE





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Obit- afies

James and Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, F132446
850.482.2332
850.526.4143 FAX
http://www.jamesand
sikesfuneralhomes.com/

Dorothy Jean
Adams

A Memorial Service will
be held at Shady Grove
Pentecostal Holiness
Church, at 12 pm on Satur-
day, January 18, 2014 with
James and Sikes Funeral
Home directing.
James and Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332

Frances Inez
Crawford

Frances Inez Crawford
died Wednesday, January
15, 2014 at the Southeast
Alabama Medical Center in
Dothan, Alabama. She was
75.
Inez was born and raised
in Marianna, where she
earned her AA from
Chipola Junior College. She
worked at Beggs and Lane
Law Firm in Pensacola as a
legal secretary where she
retired. Inez loved God, her
family, reading, antiques,
and chocolate.
She was preceded in
death by her father, Henry
Shiver, and her mother Mi-
ami Linton Shiver.
She is survived by her
husband of 54 years, Calvin
Crawford of Marianna; one
daughter, Susan Crawford,
of Tallahassee; and two
grandchildren, Chloe Nel-
son and Jacob Nelson of
Tallahassee. Other survi-
vors include several broth-
ers and sisters-in-law, nie-
ces, nephews, and cousins.
Funeral services will be
Monday, January 20, 2014
at 11:00 AM at First United
Methodist Church of Ma-
rianna. Interment will fol-
low in Cypress Cemetery
with James and Sikes Fu-
neral Homes Maddox
Chapel directing. The fami-
ly will receive friends at the
church an hour prior to the
service at the church.
Please note that all times
are Central Standard Time.
The family requests that
flowers be omitted. If de-
sired, memorial contribu-
tions may be made to the
American" Cancer Society
or to First United Method-
ist Church, Marianna.
Ex4pressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomnes.com
McKinnie Funeral Home,
5304 Bowden Hill Road
Campbellton, FL 32426
(850) 263-3333

Para Lee
Daniels

Funeral Services for Para
Lee Daniels will be held 11
pm Saturday, January 18th
at New Bethel CME
Church. Visitation will be
5-7 pm Friday, January
17th at the Mckinnie Fu-
neral Home Chapel, with
Mckinnie Funeral Home of
Campbellton directing.
James and Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332
http://www.jamesand
sikesfuneralhomes.com/

Robert E.
Harrell

Robert E. Harrell, 76, Of
Cottondale died Thursday,
January 16, 2014 at his
home in Cottondale.
Arrangements will be an-
nounced by James and
Sikes Funeral Home Mad-
dox Chapel.


Florists

Artistic Designs Unimited Inc.
Your Local Florist and Gifts
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


Visitor
From Page 1A

the areas he focuses on as he as-
sists his family
He consistently sends medical
supplies, food and cash to his 68-
year-old cousin, Mirta Jimenez
Villavicencio, and her family, and
he gives over-the-counter medi-
cations and other supplies to
pharmacies in communities near
her. A package he sent recently
will keep his cousin and her fam-
ily well-supplied for about six
months.
And he was able to do some-
thing extra special for his cousin
when, under leadership changes,
the Cuban government started
allowing its citizens to leave the
country and visit other places
after decades with no significant
movement allowed.
Villavicencio and her hus-
band, Jose Manuel Bermudez de
la Nuez, applied for permission
from the United States to visit
here in 2013. At first, both were
denied entry, but Trejo didn't take
no for an answer. He went to a
U.S. senator, asking him to ap-
ply a little pressure in the right
places.
The next time they applied, Vil-
lavicenio was approved to visit.
Her husband, however, was not
allowed.
Based on what Trejo has learned
in the process of getting his aunt
here for a visit, Trejo said he be-
lieves the U.S. government is try-
ing to prevent an influx of Cuban
citizens who might come for a
visit and want to stay permanent-
ly once they get here. Fearing that
they will become a burden on the
resources of the nation as they
arrive without jobs and incomes,
Trejo said, the U.S. carefully
screens the requests to visit. Giv-
ing permission to one member
of a family and not the other, he
thinks, is a strategy the country
uses to prevent mass migration.
His cousin, he said, has no de-
sire to stay because most of her
family is still in Cuba. But the
stateside visit that started in mid-
December has been a good one
so far and one she's not likely to
forget when she returns home in
a few days.
With Trejo acting as her trans-
lator, Villavicenio said Thursday


Giving
From Page 1A
Thinking about all this,
Mills decided to throw
herself a "giving party,"
where all her guests would
give something to the two
causes instead of buying
her a gift.
Her children had been
secretly planning a sur-
prise party for her, and
when theylearned of those
plans they had to regroup,
get on board with her idea
and pitch in.
And so, on Saturday, that
party took place in a big
way, as 138 people showed
up with their arms full
of canned goods and dry
pantry items, clothes,
cleaning products and
other items for Chipola
Family Ministries. They
brought checks and cash
for the scholarship fund,
and some earmarked their
donations to a third cause:
the pantry that Mills keeps
stocked with supplies she
uses when she cooks for
the sick and shut-in resi-
dents of her community.
Together, her friends
donated $872 to the schol-
arship fund, gave $450
to stock her pantry, and


Fire
From Page 1A
stage. All six kids and three adults
who were inside managed to
escape.
But Gertrude Pete did not.
She, her daughter Cynthia, her
mother-in-law, Ruth Elise Pete,
and her mother Sarah Johnson,
all died in the fire.
Younger adults in the family
stepped up to help the children
pick up the pieces of their lives,
and the community stepped in
to help the grieving survivors
in a big way, Rodell Pete said
Thursday.


DEBORAH BUCKHALTER/FLORIDAN
Mirta Jimenez Villavicencio and her cousin, Rosela Martin (right), got a double dose of pampering at A Wild Hair in
Marianna, a salon owned by a family member, Desiree Baggett.


that she was grateful to her own
country for allowing her come
here. Because that permission
was granted, she's been able to
see her sister for the first time
in 20 years. With her sibling in
fragile health now, Villavicencio
was touched by the experience
of reconnecting with her at the
age of 64. She's also getting to
know some of the younger fam-
ily members. On Thursday, for
instance, Trejo's daughter Desiree
Baggett gave her a makeover at A
Wild Hair, the salon Baggett owns
in Marianna.
Pampered with a new hair-
cut and color, a manicure and a
pedicure, Villavicencio marveled
that a private citizen could own a
business. In Cuba, all commerce
is controlled by the government.
People who are entrepreneurs
here would simply be govern-
ment employees if they lived in
Cuba.
Villavicencio browsed the cloth-
ing and other goods she found at
A Wild Hair as she waited for her
makeover to begin. She giggled
with Rosela as they sat with foil
spikes in their hair. Good haircol-
or is hard to come by in Cuba, she
said. She plans to stock up while
she's here.
Villavicencio also is fascinated
by some of the technological ad-


vances that she's never seen in
her country. Things like modern
cars with automatic windows,
and refrigerators with icemak-
ers and in-door water dispensers
thrill her. She's amazed to see fully
loaded tractor trailer rigs traveling
the highways; delivering goods to
privately held businesses across
the nation.
According to Trejo, most cars
in Cuba are ancient, and even
those are rare sights on the Na-
tional Highway. The movement
of goods is strictly regulated in
Cuba, and all is ultimately under
the government's tight control as
the country does not have a free
market economy.
Workers in Cuba are paid by the
government at an average rate
of $10 a month, translated into
American currency, according to
Trejo.
Each individual in a household
is allotted a certain supply of food
every month by the government
but must pay for that out of the
wages they earn working for the
government. Villavicencio gets
six pounds of rice, one chicken
leg and thigh, a half-pound of
beans and five eggs.
Socialized medical care and ed-
ucation produces many medical
providers in the country; some
hotels have their own nurses. But


specialist care is hard to come by,
and things like aspirin are treated
like gold when Trejo. and others
bring it in with the consent and
encouragement of the govern-
ment there. The cash he brings
is welcomed by the government,
too, and all foreign money is ex-
changed for a. Cuba conversion
peso, valued at hot quite a dol-
lar for dollar rate, but at far more
than the worth of the common
Cuban peso. Translated, it's worth
about 25 cents on the dollar.
While she's here, Trejo is mak-
ing sure that Villavicencio gets
good meals, picks up some sup-
plies she can use at home and
sees the culture of the country
That's where Marianna comes in.
When she's with Rosela in Miami,
Trejo said, most of thepeople she
encounters are older expatriate
Cubans who still carry out many,
of the traditions and ways of their
homeland.
In Marianna, she's being ex-
posed. to a different sort of per-
son and a younger generation, he
said. He hopes that her husband
will be able to join her on a fu-
ture visit. That's one of the only
things she regrets about being
here; she's away from someone
she loves deeply. Looking back on
his childhood, Trejo can imagine
how she feels.


The family
of Peggy Yon
Mills gathered
for this group
photo recently.
They are (from
left, front row)
granddaughter
Avery Mills,
grandson-Gage
Mills, great-
granddaughter
Makayla
O'Rourke,
grandson CJ
Mills, (back
row) son Mark
Mills and his.
wife, Moon Mills,
Peggy Yon Mills,
granddaughter
Raven Tipton,
daughter Eliz
Tipton, daughter-
in-law Jennifer
Mills and son
Clay Mills.


SUBMITTED PHOTO


lugged in 700 pounds
of groceries. They came
from all over the area to
celebrate with her; some
guests drove in from Tam-
pa, Pensacola, Panama
City, and points in Ala-
bama and Georgia.
They were rewarded
with a big birthday lunch
that included smoked
roasts, fried chicken,


baked turkey, Brunswick
stew, veggies, desserts
and, of course, a big birth-
day cake. A cherry cheese-
cake in the shape of a red
hat trimmed out in the
Red Hat Society's custom-
ary purple band and bow.
Mills is Queen Mother
three Red Hat chapters.
The tables were deco-
rated with centerpieces


Individuals and area churches
donated enough money to help
them pay for the four funerals.
They donated enough to help
get the children back in clothes
and shoes. They offered up their
prayers and helped in many oth-
er ways, he said. The family still
has a way to go in its recovery,
but Pete said everyone wishes to
thank all those who have reached
out to make things a little easier.
There are a few days left to add
money to the special Pete Family
Fire Fund account at Region's
Bank before it closes on Jan. 24,
Pete said, but that's not why he
stopped by the Jackson Couhty
Floridan office on Thursday. He


illustrating interests that
get d share of Mills' con-
siderable energy.
After the big meal, 52
party plates were as-
sembled from what was
left over, and some of her
guests took those plates to
the sick and shut-in peo-
ple Mills sees about.
Mills and her friend and
fellow canasta enthusiast


came to deliver a letter to the
editor, which should publish in
this Sunday's paper. In it, he tried
to sum up what all the support
has meant to the family.
It helps the family go on, he
said, as they try to work out some
of the unfinished business that
they were faced with in the fire's
aftermath.
Cynthia's son and the twin girls
are going to live with Rodell's
sister Ruth, in Marianna. Like
her mother before her, Ruth is
taking on a new trio to nurture
after having raised children of
her own.
The other three are going to
live with their mother, Martieka


Retta Clough helped de-
liver the items bound for
CFM on Wednesday.
Mills said she hopes her
party will inspire other
elders to do something
similar. She figures she's
not the only one who has
lived long enough to have
all that's needed and who
wants to help others on
their birthdays.


Speights, who got out of the
burning house, but she and the
children are without a perma-
nent address. They're living with
one of her grown children right
now, but Rodell is trying to help
them find a home of their own
elsewhere. He's also trying to find
housing for another sister, Linda
Pete, who lived at the house with
their mother and has medical
problems that cause her to live
on a fixed income.
Rodell said the youngest of the
children still ask "Where is Mama
Gert?" and the rest of the family.
He tells them they're in heaven
with Jesus. It's something he
believes deeply.


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M^^HHQud/iht San'i, t ..WA&mle Prim
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FRIDAY. JANUARY 17,2014 7AF-


LOCAL & FROM THE FRONT





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Official: Egyptian voters have backed new charter


The Associated Press

CAIRO An overwhelming
majority of Egyptians who voted
on the country's new constitu-
tion backed the draft charter,
a senior Egyptian official said
Thursday, despite criticism from
an international monitoring
group of a clampdown on free
speech ahead of the election.
The election official told The
Associated Press that unofficial
results after most of the ballots
had been counted indicated
that more than 90 percent voted
"yes" on the constitution. He
declined to give an estimate on
the final turnout and spoke on
condition of anonymity because
he is not authorized to talk to
journalists.
The interim government is
looking not only for a strong
"yes" majority but also a large
turnout to win undisputed le-
gitirnacy and perhaps a popular


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Election workers empty a ballot box at the end of the second, final day of
a key referendum on a new constitution, inside a polling station in Cairo,
Egypt, on Wednesday.


mandate for the military chief,
Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, to run
for president later this year.
An incomplete estimate pub-
lished by the state news agency
MENA showed a turnout of
about 40 percent in Cairo and


Alexandria, both higher than in
the 2012 referendum on the Is-
lamist-backed constitution.
In the western border prov-
ince of Masra Matrouh, which
has a sizeable constituency of
Islamists, turnout was the low-


in Egypt's second largest city, est, with only 20 percent of


voters showing up, in compari-
son to 36.5 percent participation
in 2012.
In the southern province of As-
siut, considered a stronghold of
Islamists but with a large Chris-
tian population, participation
was slightly less than in 2012,
dropping from 28 percent to 25
percent.
The Election Commission said
results will be announced Satur-
day evening.
The vote held Tuesday and
Wednesday was a milestone for
Egypt's interim government, in-
stalled by the military after a July
coup toppled Islamist President
Mohammed Morsi following
mass protests demanding that
he step down.
Many considered the vote as
key to restoring stability and
supporting the current govern-
ment in the face of continued
opposition and protests from
Morsi supporters.


But on Thursday, students ral-
lied outside the campus of the
University of Cairo and fought
with security forces. Police fired
tear gas, pushing the students
back and later arrested 23, au-
thorities said.
An. Interior Ministry statement
said it later deployed forces to
clear clashes on campus be-
tween pro- and anti-Morsi stu-
dents, and that one student
was shot and killed. It was not
immediately clear who shot the
student.
The draft constitution is a
heavily amended version of a
charter .written by Morsi's Is-
lamist allies and ratified in
December 2012 with some 64
percent of the vote but with a na-
tionwide turnout of just over 30
percent. Morsi's Muslim Broth-
erhood group and other Islamist
groups boycotted the referen-
dum, calling it "illegitimate" and
vowing to keep up protests.


-- fOhio


't "L, ,L "- -' =o Ii Killer's execution takes 25 minutes


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
From left, Sen. John Boozman, R-Ark., Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-
Utah, Sen. Bob.Corker, R-Tenn., and Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., arrive at the Capitol in Washington
on Thursday.

Senate passes $1.1 trillion spending bill


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Congress sent Presi-
dent Barack Obama a $1.1 trillion govern-
ment-wide spending billThursday, easing
the harshest effects of last year's auto-
matic budget cuts after tea party critics
chastened by October's partial shutdown
mounted only a faint protest.
The Senate voted 72-26 for the mea-
sure, which cleared the House a little
more than 24 hours earlier on a similarly
lopsided vote. Obama's signature on the
bill was expected inr time to prevent any
interruption in government funding Sat-
urday at midnight.
The huge bill funds every agency of gov-
ernmnent, pairing increases for NASA and
Army Corps of Engineers construction
projects with cuts to the Internal Revenue
Service and foreign aid. It pays for imple-
mentation of Obama's health care law; a
fight over implementing "Obamacare"
sparked tea party Republicans to partially
shut the government down for 16 days
last October.
Also included is funding for tighter reg-
ulations on financial markets, but at lev-
els lower than the president wanted.
The compromise-laden legislation re-
flects the realities of divided power in
Washington and a desire by both Demo-
crats and Republicans for an election-
year respite after three years of budget
wars that had Congress and the White


House lurching from crisis to crisis. Both
parties looked upon the measure as a way
to ease automatic spending cuts that both
the Pentagon and domestic agencies had
to begin absorbing last year.
All 53 Democrats, two independents
and 17 Republicans voted for the bill.
The 26 votes against it were all cast by
Republicans.
Shortly before the final vote, Sen. Ted
Cruz, R-Texas, delivered a slashing at-
tack on Senate Democrats, accusing
them of ignoring the problems caused
by the health care law. "It is abundantly
clear that millions of Americans are being
harmed right now by this failed law," Cruz
said.
The 1582-page bill was really 12 bills
wrapped into one in negotiations head-
ed by Rep. Harold Rogers, R-Ky.,. and
Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., respec-
tive chairmen of the House and Senate
Appropriations committees, and their
subcommittee lieutenants. They spent
weeks hashing out line-by-line details.of
a broad two-year budget accord passed in
December, the first since 2009.
The bill, which cleared the House on
a vote of 359-67, increases spending by
about $26 billion over fiscal 2013, with
most of the increase going to domestic
programs. Almost $9 billion in unrequest-
ed money for overseas military and diplo-
matic operations helps ease shortfalls in
the Pentagon and foreign aid budgets.


Nation Briefs


Campfire embers spark wildfire
in hills near LA
GLENDORA, Calif. Campfire embers
fanned by gusty winds blew up Thursday
into a fast-moving wildfire that forced
nearly 2,000 people from their homes
in the dangerously dry foothills of the
San Gabriel Mountains and threatened
some densely populated suburbs of Los
Angeles.
The blaze draped smoke across the LA
basin all the way to the coast, and rained
ash on Glendora.
"We're underneath a giant cloud of
smoke," said Jonathan Lambert, general
manager of Classic Coffee. "It's throwing
quite the eerie shadow."
Three men in their 20s were arrested
on suspicion of recklessly starting the
blaze by tossing paper into a campfire in
the Angeles National Forest, just north
of Glendora. The forest was under "very
high" fire danger restrictions, which bar
campfires anywhere except in fire rings
in designated campgrounds.
There are no designated campgrounds
where the fire began, U.S. Forest Service
spokeswoman L'Tanga Watson said.
By late afternoon, the flames had
charred at least 2V2 square miles of dry
brush in a wilderness area and destroyed
two homes.
At least 10 renters were left home-
less when the fire destroyed two guest
units on the historic grounds of a retreat
that once was the summer estate of the
Singer sewing machine family. Statues of
Jesus and Mary stood unharmed near the
blackened ruins.
Whipped by Santa Ana winds, the
fire quickly spread into neighborhoods
where residents were awakened before
_Jdawn and ordered to leave.


Kerry urges opposition
to attend Syrian conference
WASHINGTON Secretary of State
John Kerry urged the Syrian opposition
on Thursday to attend next week's peace
conference in Switzerland and said any
individual chosen to lead a political tran-
sition in the war-torn country must be
acceptable to both the government and
opposing forces.
The opposition groups, which will
vote Friday whether to attend the peace
conference, say it should lead to a
transitional government that would see
Syrian President Bashar Assad step down
and end four decades of his family's rule
in Syria. The government rejects the
demand.
Speaking to reporters at the State
Department, Kerry also pushed back
against the Syrian government, which
has long said that the conference should
focus on fighting terrorism. Kerry said
the Syrian government is to blame for in-
stability in the country that had attracted
extremists from around the world.
"We too are deeply concerned about
the rise of extremism," Kerry said. "The
world needs no reminder that Syria has
become the magnet for jihadists and
extremists. It is the strongest magnet for
terror of any place today. So it defies logic
to imagine that those whose brutality
created this magnet, how they could ever
lead Syria away from extremism and to-
wards a better future is beyond any kind
of logic or common sense."
Kerry said the aim of the conference,
which begins Wednesday in Montreux,
is to establish a process needed to form
by mutual consent a transitional govern-
mental body with full executive powers.
From wire reports


The Associated Press

LUCASVILLE, Ohio
- A condemned man
appeared to gasp several
.times and took an un-
usually long time to die
- almost 25 minutes in
an execution carried out
Thursday with a combina-
tion of drugs never before
tried in the U.S.
Dennis McGuire's attor-
ney Allen Bohnert called
the convicted killer's
death "a failed, agonizing
experiment" and added:
"The people of the state of
Ohio should be appalled
at what was done here to-
day in their names."
An attorney for Mc-
Guire's family said it plans
to sue the state over what
happened. Dayton de-
fense lawyer Jon Paul Rion
said the family is deeply
disturbed by the execu-
tion, which it believes
violated his-constitutional
rights.
McGuire's lawyers had
attempted last week to
block his execution, argu-


ing that the untried meth-
od could lead to a medical
phenomenon known as
air hunger and cause him
to suffer "agony and ter-
ror" while struggling to
catch his breath.
McGuire, 53, made loud
snorting noises during
one of the longest execu-
tions since Ohio resumed
capital punishment in
1999. Nearly 25 minutes
passed between the time
the lethal drugs began
flowing and McGuire was
pronounced dead at 10:53
a.m.
Executions under the
old method were typically
much shorter and did not
cause the kind of sounds
McGuire made.
Prison officials gave in-
travenous doses of two
drugs, the sedative mid-
azolam and the painkiller
hydromorphone, to put
McGuire to death for the
1989 rape and fatal stab-
bing of a pregnant newly-
wed, Joy Stewart.
The method was ad-
opted after supplies of a


previouslyused drug dried
up because the manufac-
turer declared it off limits
for capital punishment.
The execution could
launch lawsuits over
the injection procedure.


4Philip








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NATION & WORLD








J


Chipola Men's Basketball



Indians host Raiders in heavyweight dash


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The first outing as the nation's
top-ranked JUCO team couldn't
have gone much worse for the
Chipola Indians.
They'll try to make a better go
of it Saturday night when they
host the No. 8 Northwest Flor-
ida State Raiders in a matchup
of the two top-ranked teams in
Florida.
Chipola (16-2 overall, 2-1 in
the Panhandle Conference)
was throttled by the Tallahassee
Eagles 80-59 on Tuesday the
same day the Indians asGended


to No. 1 in the NJCAA poll get-
ting ambushed from the jump by
a TCC team that came in 0-3 and
desperate for its first Panhandle
Conference win.
"It was a game where one team
was playing with a sense of ur-
gency and another team just
couldn't get out of their own
way," Indians coach Patrick Blake
said Thursday. "They did a great
job of taking control of the game
early, and I was disappointing
with our fight and our lack of re-
sponse for the entire game."
Chipola trailed by 20 at half-
time and never made a seri-
ous dent in the TCC lead in the


second half.
The Indians shot just 38 per-
cent for the game, including 4-
of-26 from the three-point line,
with Blake noting that his team's
poor shot selection has been an
ongoing issue all season.
"It's been the biggest focus in
practice for awhile. Unfortunate-
ly, maybe it takes a loss like that
to wake our guys up," the coach
said. "It was a bad loss. We didn't
play well at all. It's one of those
things we have to learn from, but
we've moved on quickly and our
focus now is on playing a really

See INDIANS, Page 8B


Mariainna Basketball


Bulldogs try


to win district
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Bulldogs wiV look to clinch the
top seed in the District 1 tournament tonight
when they play host to the Walton Braves at 7
p.m.
Marianna (17-0 overall, 4-0 in district) won
the first matchup with Walton 54-39 on Jan. 16
and the Braves have yet to win a district game
(0-3).
But Bulldogs coach Travis Blanton said that he
is taking nothing for granted in this series, espe-
cially after seeing Walton knock his team out of
the district tournament last year after Marianna
swept the regular season series.
"Last year, we beat them by seven and 12
(points) and they ended up beating us in dis-
trict, and you never feel good about facing
a team that. shoots it the way 'that they do,"
he said. "They're shooting the ball extremely
well and playing with an extra bit of energy
defensively and -with a little bounce in their
step and that concerns me. We'll have to play
well.
"I think they're much improved. They're a bet-
ter shooting team, a better ball handling team,
a better defensive and rebounding team. It's all
the important qualities that they've improved
in and that's concerning."
The Bulldogs .have also been an improved
team since the first meeting, with a one-point
road win over Pensacola Catholic on Dec. 13 the

See BULLDOGS, Page 8B


LORIE NABLE/FOR THE FLORIDAN
Marianna's Trey Clemmons goes up for a dunk against
Blountstown on Monday at Marianna High School.


CHIPOLa WOMEN'S STALL




Statement game?


DANIEL WILLIAMS/FOR THE FLORIDAN


Janisha Lindsey tries to shoot over a Gulf Coast defender during a Chipola game last week.


Chipola battles NWF for Panhandle supremacy


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The last two unbeaten teams in
the Panhandle Conference will face
off Saturday night when the No. 13
Northwest Florida State Lady Raid-
ers'come to Marianna to take on the
No. 4 Chipola Lady Indians at 5:30
p.m.
Chipola (19-1) and Northwest
Florida State (16-2) both come in
at 3-0 in Panhandle play, with the
Lady Raiders knocking off TCC, Pen-


sacola State, and Gulf Coast State by
an average margin of 17.7 points per
game, and the Lady Indians winning
over Pensacola State, Gulf Coast
State, and TCC by an average margin
of 11.3 points per game.
The Lady Indians have won eight
straight overall since suffering their
first loss of. the season against St.
Petersburg on Dec. 7 and have often
looked dominant in doing so.
But in Northwest Florida State,
Chipola faces a team that is also on
an eight-game win streak and also


has the look of a true national title
contender.
"This is a really good basketball
team," Lady Indians coach Greg
Franklin said of the Lady Raiders.
"They have a great guard in Simone
Westbrook who is scoring at a high
rate and we're definitely paying at-
tention to that, but they also have
some ready shooters and ready
scorers like (Carla) Batchelor and
(Ridiane) Eduardo and a couple of

See CHIPOLA, Page 8B


High School Girls Basketball


Sneads, Cottondale girls


get district victories


BYDUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Lady Pirates and Cotton-
dale Lady Hornets each picked up a
pair of district victories Tuesday night,
with Sneads knocking off Graceville
59-11 at SHS and Cottondale defeat-
ingWewahitchka 52-34 on the road.
The victory was the 10th in a row for
the Lady Pirates, who improved to 14-
2 on the season and 9-0 in District 2
competition.
Tasherica McMillon scored 13
points to lead Sneads, while Logan
Neel added 10 points, De'Aryll


Green nine, and Aaliyah Williams
seven.
fFor the Lady Hornets,
Tuesday's win was the
fifth of the season and
the second in the last
*three games, as Cotton-
dale went to 5-17 on the
year.
Brooklyne Brown led
the Lady Hornets with 19
points, followed by Arionna Johnson
with 14.
Sneads and Cottondale will face
off today at Sneads High School at
4p.m.


Malone Girls Basketball


Lady Tigers roll past


Arnold for easy 58-30 win


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Malone Lady Tigers took their third
straight victory Thursday afternoon in
Panama City knocking off the Arnold Lady
Marlins 58-30.
Curteeona Brelove scored 25 points to
lead the Lady Tigers, who improved to 12-7
on the year, while Angelica Livingston and
Alicia Jackson added eight points each, and
Brianna Dallas had seven.
Malone dominated from the outset, scor-
ing the-first nine points of the game and
taking a 23-11 lead into the halftime break.
The margin was extended to 22 in the


third quarter and the Lady Tigers coasted
in the fourth with coach Preston Roberts s
ubstituting freely.
"We got out to a good start and the girls
played pretty good," the coach said. "It was
a tough game because it was at 3 p.m. and
there was nobody really in the gym and
(Arnold) is struggling, so it's hard to get the
girls up for that but they came out with the
intensity they needed. I said we needed to
come out and play hard and we did that."
Malone will next play Blountstown on
Monday at home at 5 p.m. before going
on the road to face Marianna on Tuesday
and finishing the week Thursday at home
against Sneads. L


Chipola's
Cinmeon
Bowers
puts up
a shot in
the lane
during a
game last
week.


.,""f ^ .. -* . .





-92B + FRIDAY. JANUARY 17. 2014


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


College Football


Auburn's Malzahn

wins Bryant Award

wins Bryant Award


The Associated Press

HOUSTON Gus Mal-
zahn knows all about
Bear Bryant, so this award
meant a whole lot to the
Auburn coach.
Malzahn is the Paul
"Bear" Bryant College
Coach of the Year after
leading a remarkable turn-
around in his first season
in charge of the Tigers,
who went to the national
title game a year after they
went 3-9.
Malzahn, who like Bry-
ant is from Arkansas, said
Wednesday night he was
honored to be associated
with an award with the
name of the fabled former
Alabama coach.
"When you're growing
up he's the man," Malzahn
said. "The fact that I'm
from the state of Arkansas
and he's from Fordyce, Ar-
kansas and one of my best
friends is coaching high
school there makes it even
that much more special."
Auburn came up just
short in the national cham-
pionship, with Florida
State scoring a touchdown
with 13 seconds left to pick
up a 34-31 win.
"We're still hurting over
the fact that we were close
to winning the national
championship and got
beat," Malzahn said. "But
if you can remove yourself
from that it was a lot of fun,
our players came a long
way, they improved each


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Auburn coach Gus Malzahqj a finalist for the Paul "Bear"
Bryant college coach of the year award, poses with the trophy
on Wednesday in Houston. Malzahn was named the winner of
the award.


week and we were 13 sec-
onds away from being the
national champion."
Malzahn beat out Bay-
lor's Art Briles, David Bai-
liff of Rice, Michigan State's
Mark Dantonio and David
Shaw of Stanford for the
honor.
The Tigers, who were
winless in Southeastern
Conference play in 2012,
reeled off nine straight vic-
tories after a loss to LSU on


Sept. 21 to gain a spot in
the title game this season.
They were the talk of col-
lege football when they re-
turned a missed field goal
109 yards for a last-second
score to beat then-top-
ranked Alabama on Nov.
30.
Malzahn knew his team
was talented, but even he
was amazed at what Au-
burn was able to do this
season.


Spurrier gets




extension, raise


The Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. South Carolina's
Steve Spurrier has received a one-
year contract extension and a raise
that will pay the coach $4 million
annually.
The university board of trustees ap-
proved a $700,000 raise and the exten-
sion Thursday. The deal ties Spurrier to
the school through 2018. If the 68-year-
old coach decides to retire, the trustees
voted for a contract clause that krould
make Spurrier a special assistant to uni-
versity President Harris Pastides and
athletic director Ray Tanner.
With the raise, Spurrier becomes one
of the top 10 highest-paid college foot-
ball coaches in the country.
Spurrier's nine assistant coaches also
received raises that put their com-
bined compensation at $3.3 million,
up from the $2.7 the group earned this


past season.
All assistants were given new two-year
contract agreements except for defen-
sive coordinator Lorenzo Ward, who re-
ceived a three-year deal. Also earning a
raise was quarterbacks coach G.A. Man-
gus, whose salary was frozen for a year
after his arrest for urinating in public.
Mangus' salary increased $100,000 to
$275,000.
Ward will be the highest-paid assistant
at $750,000, a $100,000 raise. The big-
gest boost came for offensive line coach
Shawn Elliott, who saw his compensa-
tion rise from $305,000 to $430,000 next
fall.
Spurrier thanked Pastides, Tanner and
the board for the new contracts and
raises.
"We all hope to coach here many
more years and we still have some goals
that have not been accomplished yet,"
he said.


South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier watches from the sideline during the game against
Arkansas in Fayetteville, Ark., on Oct.12. Spurrier has received a one-year contract extension
and a raise that will pay the coach $4 million annually.


Pruitt says he waited 11 years for


The Associated Press

ATHENS, Ga. Jeremy
Pruitt said Wednesday he
didn't have to think twice
about leaving Florida State
after he found out Geor-
gia coach Mark Richt was
looking for a new defen-
sive coordinator;
Pruitt said he first met
Richt 11 years ago when as
a high school coach in Fort
Payne, Ala., he brought
recruits to Georgia. Pruitt,
who coached under his
father, Dale Pruitt, at Fort
Payne, said he was im-
pressed by the 2003 meet-
ing with Richt.
"It was the first time I
ever met him and.when I


walked out of that room
30 minutes later I was
wowed," Jeremy Pruitt said.
"My father looked at me
and said 'That's what col-
lege football is all about.' I
said right then and there if
I ever had an opportunity
to work for him, I wanted
to be a part of his staff."
The opportunity came
Sunday, when defen-
sive coordinator Todd
Grantham left Georgia
for a similar position at
Louisville. Only two days
later, Richt on Tuesday
hired Pruitt as Grantham's
successor.
In Pruitt's only season as
Florida State's defensive
coordinator, the Seminoles


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jeremy Pruitt (left) is introduced as Georgia's new defensive
coordinator by head coach Mark Richt during a news conference
Wednesday in Athens, Ga.


led the nation in scoring
defense and won the 2013
national championship.
He was a finalist for the


Broyles Award given to
the nation's top assistant
coach.
Richt said he was foggy


about th
2003 me
at a sumr
"We ha
the stadiL
had pizz
could say
moment,
moment
tell you th
Richt it
at a team
fensive pl
afternoon
ers appla
entered ti
"He to
'We're go
enough s
turn it loc
Richt sa
out in ap


Georgiajob

ie details of the ter Pruitt spoke.
eting with Pruitt "I've never seen that hap-
ner camp. pen in 30-something years
d the practice in of coaching," Richt said.
im and afterward Pruitt takes over a Geor-
;a and I wish I gia defense that struggled
I remember that last season. The Bulldogs
but I'm glad the ranked only eighth in the
happened, I can Southeastern Conference
hat," Richt said. in total defense and 78th
introduced Pruitt in the nation in scoring
a meeting for de- defense. Georgia gave up
layers on Tuesday 29 points per game to rank
a. Richt said play- 78th in the nation as the
uded when Pruitt Bulldogs finished 8-5.
he room. Pruitt said he'll run a 3-4
)ld the players base defense but will have
ing to be simple multiple variations to aId-
so you guys can just to weekly challenges.
)se,"' Richt said. Grantham also used a
aid players "broke three-man defensive front
)plause again" af- as his base scheme.


.THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Arkansas State defensive lineman Markel Owens looks to
make a tackle against Arkansas-Little Rock during the game
in Jonesboro, Ark., on Aug. 31.



Clemson DE Beasley


to stay in school


The Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. -
Clemson defensive end
Vic Beasley wants one
more season with the
Tigers.
The Atlantic Coast Con-
ference leaderwith 13 sacks
this season has decided to
postpone a shot at the NFL
and play his senior season
at Clemson. The school
announced Beasley's deci-
sion Wednesday.
When asked what Beas-
ley's choice meant for the
Tigers in 2014, coach Dabo
jSwinney texted back, "Lot


of sacks."
The announcement also
means one of the best de-
fensive lines in the country
stays together for one last
season. Th'e Tigers led the
Football Bowl Subdivision
in tackles for loss, and de-
fensive tackle Grady Jarrett
and defensive end Corey
Crawford also decided to
return.
But Beasley was the
group's dynamic star, and
he stretched out his deci-
sion to the final few hours
before the deadline for
eligible underclassmen to
declare for the NFL draft.


Arkansas State player killed in shooting


The Associated Press

An Arkansas State foot-
ball player and his step-
father were shot to death
during a home invasion
robbery in Jackson, Tenn.,
with the athlete apparently
trying to protect his par-
ents from their attackers,
police said Thursday.
Markel Owens, a 21-year-
old junior defensive line-
man for the Red Wolves,
was fatally shot along with
Johnny Shivers, 36, during
the robbery at a duplex on
Wednesday night. Shivers


died at the scene, while
Owens was pronounced
dead after being taken to
Jackson-Madison County
General Hospital.
A 37-year-old woman,
who was Shivers' wife and
Owens' mother, was also
shot. She was treated and
released from the hospi-
tal. Her name was not re-
leased, but Owens' mother
is listed as Chermaine Ow-
ens in the Arkansas State
media guide. '
"I think you can conclude
that he was protecting his
mother and stepfather,"


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Jackson police spokes-
man Tyreece Miller said of
Owens.
Jerry Scott, the school's
sports information direc-
tor, called it a sad day for
the Red Wolves.
"We're deeply saddened
and our utmost sympa-
thies go out to his fam-
ily, teammates and class-
mates," Arkansas State
athletic director Terry Mo-
hajir said in a statement.
"Please join me in prayer
for so many people who
are being impacted by the
loss of Markel."


Investigators say Shivers
was arriving home when he
was rushed by two masked
men and forced inside the
apartment, where Owens
and his mother were. The
suspects demanded money
and a struggle began, with
Owens attempting to help
Shivers by fighting one of
the men, police said.
Shivers "and Owens were
both shot during the strug-
gle and one of the gunmen
then shot the woman. The
suspects got away with
a large amount of cash,
police said.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcflonridan.com


SPORTS


FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 2014 & 3BF


... i ..'.. a seball


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Tampa Bay pitcher David Price delivers against the Boston Red Sox during Game 2 of the
American League Division Series in Boston on Oct. 5.


Price, Rays agree to $14


million, 1-year contract


The Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG-Now
that Tampa Bay's David
Price is slated to earn the
biggest single-season sal-
ary in Rays history, the
three-time All-Star hopes
he remains part of the
budget-minded franchise's
plans for 2014.
The team announced
Thursday that the 2012 AL
Cy Young Award winner
agreed to a $14 million,
one-year deal. However,
the agreement doesn't
eliminate the possibility of
a trade.
"I still have the mind-
set moving forward that I
want to be with the Rays,"
said Price, who at the end
of last season seemed re-
signed to the fact that he'd
probably be dealt during
the offseason.
The 28-year-old has been
the subject of trade specu-
lation after going 10-8 with
a 3.33 ERA last year while
earning $10,112,500. He
is eligible for free agency


after the 2015 season, and
the Rays likely won't be in a
position to pay the type of
money Price could earn on
the open market.
If he's traded, Price be-
lieves it wouldn't be before
Japanese pitcher Masahiro
Tanaka decides where to
sign. Teams have until Jan.
24 to reach an agreement
with Tanaka, a 25-year-
old right-hander who was
24-0 with a 1.27 ERA last
year for the Japan Series
champion Rakuten Golden
Eagles.
Price believes the Rays,
who've made the playoffs
four of the past six seasons,
could have one of the best
teams again in 2014.
"I want to be part of it. I
think we're going to have a
really good season," Price
stressed, adding a trade
after the start of spring
training likely would leave
a "bad taste" in the mouths
of teammates who'd also
like to see him remain with
the Rays.
Price's 2013 season was


interrupted by his first stint
on the disabled list, caused
by a strained triceps. He
went 9-4 with a 2.53 ERA,
102 strikeouts and just
13 walks in 18 starts after
coming off the DL on July
2, spurring the Rays' drive
for a playoff berth.
The No. 1 overall pick in
the 2007 amateur draft is
71-39 over parts of six sea-
sons and is Tampa Bay's
career leader in ERA (3.19)
and winning percentage
(.645).
Price became the fran-
chise's first 20-game win-
ner in 2012, when he edged
Detroit's Justin Verlander
in AL Cy Young balloting.
He was a 19-game winner
in 2010, his first full season
in the majors.
The left-hander's sal-
ary for 2014 will account
for a significant portion
of a projected payroll of
about $72 million. Carlos
Pena earned $10.25 mil-
lion in 2010, the previ-
ous season high for the
Rays.


Rodriguez says year-long


suspension could be benefit


The Associated Press

MEXICO CITY Alex Rodriguez says
his season-long suspension could be a
benefit, allowing him to rest and return
to the Yankees for the final three years of
his contract.
Speaking late Wednesday in Mexico's
capital during a promotional appear-
ance, Rodriguez declined to talk specifi-
cally about his suspension for violating
baseball's drug agreement and labor
contract.
Rodriguez, in his first public comments
since arbitrator Fredric Horowitz's deci-
sion Saturday, said he wanted to end his
career with NewYork. Yankees managing
general partner Hal Steinbrenner has
declined to talk about his possible return
but has called him a "great player."
"The 2014 season could be a big help
for me," Rodriguez said. "It might serve
as a break and close the chapter, and
begin in 2015 with my last three years
under contract with the Yankees."
Rodriguez, who will be 39 when the
2015 season opens, repeated several
times that this part of his life had not
been completed.
"I want to retire in New York, and
I think the rest will do me good," he
added. "For me, the book isn't finished.
There are still chapters to finish.... Right
now I haven't thought about retiring."


Rodriguez, fifth on the career list with
654 homers sued the Major League Base-
ball and the players' union on Monday
in an effort to overturn the decision by
Horowitz, who reduced what originally
was a 211-game suspension issued by
Selig in August.
"This process has been taxing both
mentally and physically throughout
the past eight months," Ron Berkowitz,
a spokesman for Rodriguez, said in a
statement Thursday. "Alex will abide by
the rulings of the federal judge.- what-
ever he decides and get ready for
2015 should the judge rule against him.
He will continue to move forward with
his complaint which will help all players
against this unfair system."
Also speaking Wednesday night, Yan-
kees captain Derek Jeter said he is sad-
dened by the situation.
"The whole situation is bad," Jeter said
at his Turn 2 Foundation golf classic in
Tampa,-Fla. "The whole thing has been
kind of messy."
Jeter has been in communication with
Rodriguez, but declined to say what was
discussed.
"I'm sure it's a rough situation," Jeter
said.
Hall of Famer Goose Gossage attend-
ed Jeter's event and called the Rodriguez
matter unfortunate for the game and
everyone involved.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
New York's Alex Rodriguez arrives at the offices of Major League Baseball in New York on
Oct. 1.


PARADISE VALLEY, Ariz.
- Major League Baseball
will greatly expand instant
replay to review close calls
starting this season.
MLB announced Thurs-
day that owners, players
and umpires have ap-
proved the new system.
Each manager will be al-
lowed to challenge at least
one call per game. If he's
right, he gets another chal-
lenge. After the seventh
inning, a crew chief can re-
quest a review on his own
if the manager has used his
challenges.
The so-called "neighbor-
hood play" at second base
on double plays cannot
be challenged. Many had
safety concerns for middle
infielders being wiped out
by hard-charging runners-
if the phantom force was
subject to review.
"I tell you the fans will love
it," baseball Commisioner
Bud Selig said after owners
met and voted their unani-
mous approval.
All reviews will be done
by current MLB umpires
at a replay center in MLB.
come's New York office. To
create a large enough staff,
MLB agreed to hire six new
big league umpires and
call up two minor league
umps for the entire season.
A seventh major league
umpire will be added to re-
place the late Wally Bell.
Joe Torre, MLB's execu-
tive vice president of base-
ball operations, said work
continues on a proposed
rule that would ban home-
plate collisions between
runners and the catcher.
The rule has not been writ-
ten and talks on its content
are ongoing between MLB
representatives and the
players union, he said.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
U KNOj I THINK YOU WOULD
J7HAT I HAVE MADE
(THINK ? A GOOD CAT!


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
60A OF EPLO'Ce S..9 I TRCIR INg&RATITU:E GAILLS A E, FTEP. LL, DON'T I NLWM 5
CO.\PLNKING TRA I I R k I k t t S'KEURK [ t>AUB TRI'G5
5UPE-iO '( TYCOAPLEM! D OWN TO P, LE.4e.LTREX(CMN


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE


HATE, YOU SEEM
TO THINK THAT
ART TEACHERS
AREN'T REAL-
ARTISTS.


WELL, JUST FOR THE
RECORD... TEACHING
AST DOESN'T MEAN
I CAN'T ALSO MAKE
APT OF MY OWN!
I AM AN ARTIST!


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT
kitncarlyle@comcast.net --- wwwGoComics.coi


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"Will you quit arguing and give
me my seven iron?"


ACROSS
1 "- the
raven..."
6 Basin
occupant
11 Trumpeted
13 Like
corduroy
14 Road
divider
15 Great works
16 Atlas abbr.
17 Poker
stake
18Maj. ocean
21 Buenos -
23 Nope
opposite
26 Cattle call
27 Grating
28Pepperoni
seller
29Sasquatch
31 Ball girl
32 Chicago
suburb
33 Coup
leader
35 Harness.
part
36 Lady's
honorific
37Goof it up
38 Mexican
Mrs.
39 Window
ledges
40 Recolor


41 Pay for
42 Sleeve
filler
44 Keepsake
holder
47Granola
kin
51 Badly
52 Gave out
53Riverboat
danger
54 Rounds of
applause

DOWN
1 NFL VIPs
2 Final: Abbr.
3 Boathouse
gear
4 Lace or
ribbons
5 Seven-
sided figure
6 Exclamation
of dismay
7 Meet edge
to edge
8 TV network
9 Half a
giggle
10 Six-
pointers
12 "Taxi
Driver"
actor
13Regally
attired
18 Fossil


Answer to Previous Puzzle


SAXCECAIN
IlCB iAll
U FloMoUL!
P A11Lb MbI I !
Illj~r
iT R O'u PIEN
TROUPE

URIL TIEl
GRUB AI'

ARI GJUJE
AGU
FADEND
R IGOR
R ID E AI
IT TE R C
MOSS KU
resins
19 Hard
worker
20 "Big" star
22 Ceremony
23 Squealed
24 Queen of
whodunits
25 South
Dakota
capital
28 Berlin
article
30 Fish's
rudder
31 Abrupt
dismissal
(2 wds.)
34 Cold cut
36 Like a julep
39 Bulge
41 Gumbo


M P Z IINIC
I0 E IN
NO SAWN

LTHE

TH E
S VI OL


TO b RYIE
E ONISIET
DODO
j C E|D AR|S

REE EC
URD NO
veggie
43 Grand
Canyon
sight
44 Music
collectibles
45 Aah's
companion
46 Sweet
murmur
48 Planet
warmer
49 Took in tow
50 Badges
and such


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


1-17 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"MKLH X MWN XH UZHXTP KXVK
NRKTTO, YKL YLWRKLPN ATYLC JL
YKL NYZCLHY JTNY OXILOF YT LHC ZE
XH YKL LOLRYPXR RKwXP."
NFOALNYLP NYWOOTHL

Previous Solution: "Be led. by your talent and not by your self-loathing ...
everything beautiful in the world is within you." Russell Brand
TODAY'S CLUE: r sienbe n
@2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-17


Horoscope

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Keep a close watch
on your situation today.
Not everyone will play by
the same rules.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Get whatever is
troubling you out in the
open. The more direct you
are, the surer you will be of
the path you have chosen.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -You will not see your
situation clearly. Don't be
fooled by someone trying
to ferret out personal
information.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -Accept the in-
evitable, but don't initiate
change. Listen for any
changes that might affect
your status.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Broach personal
subjects with caution.
Showing compassion will
help you ease into a situa-
tion that has the potential
to turn emotional.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) Deal with a fraught
situation while you have
the chance. Things will be
easier when you need a
favor or aid in return.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Get together with
someone you love. Sharing
stories will help you build
a closer bond.
LEO (July 2a-Aug. 22)
- Don't let added respon-
sibilities get you down.
The more quickly you get
your chores out of the way,
the sooner you will be able
to enjoy a change of pace.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Find out all you-can
about things that inter-
est you. Listening to what
others have to say will give
you a wide variety of op-
tions to consider.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Don't dilly-dally or you
will be criticized forbeing
indecisive. Take action
based on what works best
for you.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Stay out of emotion-
al talks that you cannot
win. Concentrate on learn-
ing about new people,
places and pastimes.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) Consider
making a personal invest-
ment or improvement
to your home and your
surroundings.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: My husband's family came
to town for a week over the holidays, We
made plans to be with them every eve-
ning except one. My parents were in the
final stages of a job relocation andwere
leaving town that same weekend. We
gave my family the one evening, Sunday,
that was not delegated to my in-laws.
My husband's parents asked us twice
to go out to dinner with them and their
friends on that same evening. We politely
declined both times, explaining that we
had plans.,That Sunday morning, we
found out that my in-lawshad made din-
ner reservations for us anyway. Some-
how, to my husband, this meant we had
to reconsider our options. I thought it
was extremely rude.
After several hours of arguing, my
husband and I compromised by saying
we would go to dinner with his parents,
eat quickly and then spend the rest of the
evening with my parents.
Well, dinner was a disaster. One couple
was an hour late, and my in-laws insisted
on waiting for them. Then, my husband
and I, along with his brother, were put
at.the "children's" table with three kids
under the age of 13. After we finally


In golf, there is usually
more than one way to hit a
shot to the green as-
suming, of course, you are
skillful enough to do that.
In bridge, many deals
give only one side a
chance to do something
meritorious: declarer or
the defense. But some-
times both sides will have
an opportunity, although
one side might require the
other to err. That applies
in this deal.
Would you prefer to
declare or defend in three
no-trump after West leads
a diamond to dummy's
bare ace?
If you like to declare,
look at only the North-
South hands and plan the
play.
Alternatively, cover the


managed to leave, we ran to my parents'
house only to find everyone else had
gone.
My husband considers this a success-
ful outcome, but I do not. My family was
deeply offended by my in-laws' usurping
our only evening together. Am I crazy
to think he should have honored the


original plans?


-STILLANGRY


Dear Still: Your husband is wrong to
think your plans should be changed
because someone else rearranged them
without your knowledge or permission.
He obviously wanted to spend time with
his family and not yours, which was un-
fair under the circumstances. When you
agreed to attend his family's dinner, you
also should have set a time to leave and
done so, regardless of where you were in
the meal.
A better compromise would have been
for him to have dinner with his folks
while you spent the time with yours.
While not ideal, it would have been
better than anger, resentment and an
argument. Now let it go. You'll do better
next time.


Bridge

West and South hands. At
trick two, declarer leads
the club king from the
board. How would you,
East, defend?
South starts with only six
top tricks: two spades, one
heart and three diamonds.
The other tricks must
come from clubs, but
dummy is short of entries.
South should be happy to
lose two club tricks and to
do it as quickly as possible.
So, at trick two, he leads a
low club from the board.
After that, everything
is under control. If the
defenders must get two
tricks in a suit you wish to
establish, make them take
those tricks as quickly as
possible.
If South makes the mis-
take of starting with a club


North 01-17-14
# A74
V 6 3 2
*A
K Q 8 6 5 2
West East
* J9 Q 10 8 2
VQ1095 K4
*J9863 10742
49 7 46AJ 10
South
K 6 5 3
V AJ 8 7
KQ5
4 43
Dealer: North
Vulnerable: North-South
South West North East
1 Pass
1 V Pass 2 4 Pass
3 NT Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead: 6

honor at trick two, East
can defeat the contract by
ducking, letting declarer
take the trick. Then South
lacks the dummy entries
to establish and run the
suit.


HERMAN'
tLjvia Iwr WI -c Otly(It4.iwn'!YdbS ofLS 201<


--14B FRIDAY,.JANUARY17,2014


1-117





www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


qJackson County Floridan a


FFriday, January 17, 2014-
Friday, January 17, 2014-5 B


m WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED



MARKETPLACE


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent-of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in'advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

Fo0dadinscal ol-fe o vsi w wjcloidn. o


fI}) ANNOUNCEMENTS



Storewide Sale -Starting at
/ 20% off Furniture
/ 30% off Accessories
/ 40% off Glassware
,/50% off Pictures
0 0* I I g^ II
107 S. heroke
Wed-Sat 10:30 to 4:00BB^


($)


FINANCIAL


Consignment Shop in Dothan FOR SALE
specializing in clothing & acc. for women.
Well established with over 400 consignors
& a growing customer base, sales of
100K + yr. Unlimited potential for increase
sales & expansion. Store fixtures, eqiup,
& database included, Will train new owner.
Leave message at 334-677-5113

Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
504-915-1474 4

(?) MERCHANDISE

AMF Playmaster Pool Table- Red felt 4x8. Very
good condition. All accessories included. Buy-
er responsible for moving. Located in Enter-
prise. $1750.00 OBO. Call or text 334-806-6004.


DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
NEEDED I BUY SEALED/
UNEXPIRED BOXES
CALL BOB (334) 219-4697
OR (850) 710-0189


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
M ISCELANOUS IAIT MSWA Ni,
RECORDS WANTED paying $1. each for old
45's, 78's & LP's, Ig. collections only
803-215-9856.

RN Program Textbooks Six books have never
been used and those that were factory shrink
plastic wrapped still are. At Chipola College
bookstore these 6 are sold in a bundle for $317
+ tax. 1. All-in-One Care Planning Resource
(3rd Ed.; 2. Comp. Review for NCLEX Exam (5th
Ed.) ; 3. Mosby's Nursing Drug Guide (10th Ed.)
; 4. Mosby's Med. Dictionary of Nursing (9th
Ed.)5. Mosby's Diagnostic Test Ref (11 Ed.) ; 6.
Custom eBook Library for all the above.
(Pageburst) Textbooks above are 2nd bundle
for RN prog. @ Chipola. Also have 1st bundle
some never used all in excellent cond. (pd.
$734) other items required for program.
Would consider breaking bundle IF I couldsell
2 or more to individual. Call 850-274-8776.
Tanning Bed Solor Storm 24 lamp 110 volt,
for residential, good condition.
$950.334-347-1954.

Firewood for Sale $75 Delivered. 850-557-9311
or 850-683-9689.
Gun Ruger Model P85 Mark II automatic
9 mm $400.850-643-5887
Pistol. Kahr PM 40 concealed carry pistol.
Stainless. Comfort grip. 2 mags. 2 concealed
carry holsters. Less than 50 rounds shot. Like
new. $500. 334-701-7149.
Proform Elliptical Exercise $100. 45" glass top
table w/ 4 chairs $150. both like new 526-2952
Refrigerator Mayag, white, like new $250. 850-
693-4277 Call 9am 7pm

IDISGOVERI.
CLASSIFIED
POTENTIAL


(gM10


PETS & ANIMALS


1 Free Rescued Dogs Black Labs, Beautiful
Pitts, Lab Mixes, Small Mixed Breeds,
2 f & m Beagles 6 mo. old mix 2-sm. Terriers
Springer Spaniel All Shots Call 334-791-7312
ACK Reg. Labs black 2-males & 5-females
$500. Parents on site. Ready Jan. 30th. father is
a choc. pointing lab, mother is silver.
Dew Claws removed & shots & wormed
334-790-3582 or 334-618-7256.
AKC Shih-Tzu puppies 1-female, 2-males, both
parents onsite, Ready Jan. 30th.
Declaws removed, Shots & wormed. $600.
770-362-6044 Enterprise
All left over Christmas Babies are on sale!!
Yorkies, Shorkie, Yorkles Mixes and
Japanese Chin Mixes 334-718-4886
Beautiful rare solid white CKC Reg. Miniature
Schnauzer puppies $350. Ready Jan. 25th.
taking deposits 334-464-0000
Boston Terrier Puppies vet checked, w/ health
certificate guarantee, Parents on site.
$350. $275. 850-547-9351 or 850-849-0176
For Sale AKC German Shepherd Puppies -
Black/Tan. 3 Males $350. Parents on site.
Call 334-393-7284 OR 334-806-5851.
FREE puppies 7 wks old. mixed American Pitt
Bull & Australian Blue Heeler 850-579-4769
Looking For The Best Family Pet? This is the
Best I Have Ever Had the Pleasure to Share my
Home With!!!Mother is 1/2 Great Dane, 1/2
Standard Poodle Hybrid; Father is AKC Stand-
ard Poodle. All AKC Linage provided. Pups are
3/4 Standard Poodle and 1/4 Great Dane. Coats
range from smooth to wire hair with solid col-
ors of Apricots, Creams and Blacks. (One Black
with a touch of white!) Born Dec 7th,13. Availa-
ble Feb 7th. Health cert. all shots/worming up
to date. Tails docked for your convenience!
Best in Breed traits! No genetic defects! Not a
breeder or puppy mill! A onetime opportunity!
No more litters available through our Great
Danoodle! Please contact 334-565-3067
Days/334-685-0144 Nites/wkends Rochelle
Miniature Dachshund Puppies CKC registered.
Available Feb. 14. F bik/tan, M choc, M Dapple,
M piebald/dapple. $500. 334-403-8376
Yorkies, 2 females, $200 & $400. Pomeranians,
1 tan female, $350. 1 black and white male,
$300. 1 solid black male $250. 1 male Border
Collie, $350. All are purebred and registered,
up to date on shots and.worming, ready to go.
334-796-5267 or 334-790-5077


(6)


FARMER'S MARKET


GREEN FROZEN
PEANUTS
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-352-4423
850-209-3322 or 850-573-6594
1 4128 Hwy 231


Sudoku


BULK WHEAT
for Sale
$9.00 per bussell
229-246-1340 ,
MADDOX FARMS
S Beautiful Bermuda Coastal Hay
SRound Rolls $50 v Square $5
-'_ __Call 334-791-0023

Top Quality Coastal Bermuda
Hay Large Rolls
Fertilized & Weed Control
0 850-209-9145
PATRE' SAL


A


MADDOX FARMS
Horse Boarding
(barn or pastures)
Beautiful Trails
Excellent Care


|LCall 334-791-0023 or 334-791-7312
A~l; I i 1 AlIf;1; : I ]:

Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract too small / CustomThinning
Call Pea River Timber
I 334-389-2003

If You Have It

and
Don't Need It...
Sell It
in the
CLASSIFIED


(W)


EMPLOYMENT
ERhL EMBPLOYEN


JANITORIAL
MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST
Tjis is an entry level janitorial and facility
maintenance position.
VISIT FLORIDA, the official tourism
marketing corporation for the State of
Florida, has An opening for an energetic and
career-minded MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST at
the US231 Official Florida Welcome Center in
Campbellton, FL. This janitorial position is
responsible for facility upkeep to include
hands on facility cleaning, proper use and
care of the center's equipment, handling
incoming deliveries including stacking and
unloading of incoming boxes, minor repairs,
taking part in brochure inventory process
and other related'functions.
Team-player ability required.
We offer a competitive salary and benefits
package. *- Deadline for application is
February 7,2014.
Qualified candidates will need to apply for
the position through VISIT FLORIDA's web
page www.VISITFLORIDA.org/iobs.
VISIT FLORIDA
EOE M/F/D/V


DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA
Now Hiring Full Time
Bulk Order Filler Position
1st 2nd, and 3rd Shifts
Competitive Pay and Benefits Package!
Please apply in person at:
Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway,
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must be 18 Years Old.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace.. .


r.....................................................................
o E s mPress Operator
.Dothan Eagle has an immediate opening for a press operator. Responsibilities include setup,
operation, repair and maintenance of Press/Plate Making Equipment, meeting company
guidelines to produce hIigh quality products within strict deadlines. Successful candidate
must.be capable of maintaining a clean work environment while following company safety
guidelines and adhere to production print schedules and employee work schedules to coincide
with production schedules. Must fully comply with all company policies and procedures and
at all times when representing the company, operate in a thorough professional manner
including communication, attendance, punctuality, and dress.
This position requires a minimum two years production line experience, strong mechanical
background, or printing experience. High school graduate or equivalent preferred.
Company benefits including medical, dental, vision, paid vacation, and 401K.
Pre-employment drug and background screen required. EOE/M/F/D/V.
You may apply on line at: www.bhmginc.com
S"or you may send your resume to:
L Charlie Gibson, Dothan Eagle, 227 North Oates Street, Dothan, AL 36303.


8 __2

3 _2 45 8

4 9 7 3

15 91


7
4 1


8 6 3 5

9 514 2 1

4 9
__-_--_____


2014 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.


Level: U 2] 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to Thursday's puzzle
685142397

73 1 5 98462
492376851
249815736

81 3769245
576423918
T27954683

364281579
958637124
9__^ 5_ 0 8 37'1 4


1/17/14


Pla e n A- |Fast, easy, no pressure

P lace A24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
; \ Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
1" l l LW and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan..comr
90W ir _' L e l________________________


mV I U-4[I!'-I I





6B Friday, January 17, 2014 e Jackson County Floridan


GENERL EMLOYMNT-GEERALEMPLYMEN


Library Director Pos#122
Master's degree in Library Science and 3 to 5
years of progressively responsible experience
in a public library setting, including adminis-
trative supervisory duties; or any equivalent
combination of training and experience
which provides the required knowledge, skills
and abilities. For Library information visit
their website at www.jcplfl.org.
Starting Salary: $48,76.001/yr.

Administrative Support II
Pay Grade 13 Road Dept Pos#211
High school graduate or its equivalent, and
2-3 years of experience in secretarial or
administrative work. Must be able to handle
multiple phone lines and have working
knowledge of Personal Computer, exercise
the ability to use tact and courtesy in dealing
with the public. Word for Windows and
Internet experience required.
Possession of a valid Florida drivers license
prior to employment.
Starting Salary: $17236.00/yr.

Correctional Officer
Pay Grade 24 JCCF Pos#701
Must have a high school diploma or its
equivalent. Must be a State of Florida
certified Correctional Officer. Must be at
least 19 years of age, be a U.S. citizen and
have no record of a felony or misdemeanor
involving perjury or false statements.
Must be drug-free and pass a vigorous
background investigation. Possession of a
valid Florida drivers license is required prior
to employment.
Salary: $26,463.00/yr.

Equipment Operator I
Pay Grade 13 Road DepL Pos#567
High school diploma or equivalent with 1-2
or more years of experience in the safe
operation of a farm tractor and cutting
head with hydraulic/electrical switches and
driving truck with a loaded trailer attached;
able to supervise inmates.
Must have a valid Class "B" FL drivers license
prior to employment.
Starting Salary: $17,236.00/yr.
Submit Jackson County employment
application to the Human Resources Dept.,
2864 Madison Street Marianna, FL 32448.
PH 850-482-9633.
or www.jacksoncountyfl.net/

Deadline to apply is
01/27/2014
Drug-Free Workplace/EOF/V.Pref/ADA/AA

Wftyrnl
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA

Now Hiring Full Time
1st shift Class B Trailer Technician
Requirements: Minimum of 3 years
experience in heavy-duty trailer
maintenance or 2 years experience in
heavy-duty trailer maintenance with a
SDiesel/Auto technical School Degree.
Hydraulics experience preferred. Current
brake certification and proper certification
to perform FHWA inspections preferred.
Competitive Pay and
Benefits Pakckage!
Please apply in person at:
Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway.
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must. be 18 Years Old
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace
Job Announcement
North Florida Child Development is seeking
an Early Child Development
and Disability Specialist
Must have a Bachelor's degree or advance
degree in early childhood education; or a
Bachelor's or advanced degree and
coursework equivalent to a major relating to
early childhood education. Must have 3 years
of experience in child development, early
child development, and/or disabilities
services. Must have experience in the
following disciplines of developing and
supporting articulated training and technical
assistance for a diverse early care and
teachers; planning/implementing educational
component plans, and working with families
and children with disabilities. NFCD offers an
attractive benefit package (health, dental,
life, disability, sick leave, etc.)
For detailed information view careers at
www.floridachildren.org.
4' Send resumes to:
smcgill (Ifloridachildren.org,
fax (850) 639-6167. DFWP/M-F/7-5/EOE



-'t_ /~~s /"L

'^^^^A


NOW HIRING
CASHIERS
Handimart Stores
Competitive pay, paid vacation
& benefit package.
Sangaree Oil Co.,
850-482-5241 EOE.

Job Announcement
North Florida Child Development is seeking
Preschool and VPK teachers
for our Centers located in Blountstown,
Wewahitchka, and Port St. Joe.
have at least a FCCPC/CDA. NFCD offers an
attractive benefit package (health, dental,
life, disability, sick leave, etc
s Send resumes to:
smcgillhfloridachildren.org,
fax (850) 639-6167. DFWP/M-F/7-5/EOE

(p ) EDUCATION
Ig'J & INSTRUCTION


Look ahead to your
future! Start'training
fOR TI for a new career in
R% TI Medical Assisting,
COLLEGE Medical Office Admin.,
Pharmacy Technology,
& HVAC!
Call Fortis College 855-445-3276
For consumer info: visit www.fortis.edu

} ~RESIDENTIAL
( REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

2 2BR/1% BA Apartment For Rent in
Nice Neighborhood $600/Mo.
Do Call 850-482-5134 -4
Apartments for Rent in Greenwood
2BR$450 1BR $400
p Call 850-326-4289 4
Cedar Creek Apartments 1BR/1BA $S500
AppI, lawn care & pest control included.
Must be 62 or older or disabled. Call 850-352
3878 or email cedarcreekinchousino.net


1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
,o 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4-
2/1 house Baker Ave. Marianna $575. mo
$650. dep No Pets 1 yr. lease
Call Joanne 850-693-0570


Afford 3/2 Brick Home Engery Efflecent
2 car garage and covered porch $850 Mo. +
Dep. Also Cottondale 3/1.5 Brick Co. Hm. on
1 ac. $650. + dep. RENT OR OPTION TO BUY w/
Income & Credit approval
Call 850-579-4317 & 850-866-1965
Austin Tyler & Co *
Quality Homes & Apartments
4 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Prooertv Management Is Our ONLY Business"


"i -. -ss

CONCETEWORK& CATIG-
[ o] [] .il =V o ^^;1[ : [_ !--']


JJones Concrete, LLC
Travis Jones
Free Estimates/Reasonable Rates
House Slabs Sidewalks
Driveways & Pole Barns
50-63-5812 30+ Years Experience










Bnffisaisf;E
Dozer and Excavation Work
SPonds Road Building Demolition
Pine Tree Planting Herbicide Spraying
Fire Line Plowing Burning
Insured and Refeence2Avalabl




clay 0'NeaI ceVl50 2 5
clayslandclearing@gmal.com



NEW TIRE1 BELOW RETAIL Pn- Emo !

TRIPLE .,
Pin Tre lntng-Hebcie payn
Fie Lin PlowU ing Burnin







850.526.1700
Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
2978 Pierce Street (behind Tim's Florist)


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


Clean Your Closet
SI will buy youth slightly used
S undamaged clothing.
Cal1 (850) 348-0588


LANDS CAP* -ADEN


MODEL
/ #B3OL, B42L In Stock
j More Models Available
C850-526-7368
2890 Noland St. Marianna



HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME

85-8283 e: 85-22-62

"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
WiliamH. oti, J. (50)69-90


www..iCFLORIDAN.com


M:OBILEHOM SoSFO RE

2/2 located in Sneads $350. mo.
4& 850-573-0308 4-
S2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charioscountryliving.com.
850.209-8847 4-
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $SS00/Month
Please call 850-258-1594 or
850-638-8570 Leave Message

2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595 I
2BR / LSBA at Millpond $495 rent + deposit.
Has utility shed, screened in front porch
850-209-3970 NO PETS
3/1 mbl. hm. appl. incl. located in Altha
$350. mo. + dep. 850-272-2972
Marianna area 2/2 Mbl. Hm. in park CH&A
water, sewage No Pets or Smoking Ref. Reg.
1st. & last $500. mo. 850-482-8333
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park -1,2 & 3BR
MH's for Rent includes water, garbage,
lawn care, No Pets 850-592-1639
SNEADS area N. of 90 3/2 remodeled inside on
acre $500. me. 1st-last sec. NO PETS
50-272-1351 or 850-482-2272
COMMERCIAL
4 REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
COMMERC:lIA&INDUSTR.i;A~lllDliNGl.!
Freezer Cooler Warehouse Combination 1600'
sq. ft, Termapherm Freezer, 900 sq ft. cooler,
3000 sq. ft. Warehouse, Semi-loading dock
total 5500 sq. ft. $3950. mo. 850-718-6541.
4 Located in Marianna, Fl. 4w

,,- RESIDENTIAL
(LU) REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
HMS WTHAREG
Beautiful Graceville FL home and farm -
4BR, 3 / BA, custom built home on 239 acres.
Can divide. 175 acres tillable for corn, soy-
beans, cotton. Large free standing building.
3 wells. Joe Farris, Land and Stand Properties.
850-387-5517

Malone 3/3 2231sf, brick home CH/A florida rm.
fenced bk yd. 2 storage building,
1 block from school, $160,000. OBO
334-300-7170 OR 850-591-4729






cIIsssarIs


C/CE =x
7 8 9 +
4 5 6 -
1 2 3
o0 E n ENTER


RECREATION


Winnebago 1995 Vectra 33 ft. C/H&A, auto lev-
eling, Q-bed, new tires, batteries, frig. 7.5 Onan
generator, Ig. awning, lots of storage in & out-
side, micr-convection oven combo, gas stove,
hot water heater, 30 or 50 amp power, all
original paper work. $20,000. OBO 334-585-6689

(r) TRANSPORTATION


1965 Mustang Convertible Red with Parch-
ment Top and Pony Interior, very nice, new
tires, Great Car with A/C. 334-301-3574
f Plymouth'65 Valiant
Convertible,
Automatic, A/C, 273
SV8, Good Condition!
$6,000 OBO 850-263-4563


CADILLAC 1991 Brougham, under 15 thousand
miles, garage kept $5,500 OBO 334-687-9161
Chevrolet 2005 Impala LT 42,800 miles, family
owned, smoky gray color, exc. cond. $6900.
334-699-2830. No Terms
Ford 1994 F-150 XLT, single cab, auto, 302 V8,
dual tanks, PS, PB, PS, PDL, PW, complete
brake job, full tune up. Red/Silver, red cloth
seat. Looks, runs and drives good. Must see!
$4,595. Owner, Dothan, 334-671-3059.
Ford 2001 Taurus, 231K miles,
good condition. $1700. Send inquiries to:
lgriffin@dothaneagle.com
or Call 334-712-7962 from 9-5


-" ."-- B Honda 2000 Odyssey
... e.= j Family van- Runs perfect.
iClean inside & out.- Ice-cold
j air. Everything works. Has
been garage kept. 152k mi.
$4,995. For more info call 334-693-9360


Call 526-3614 to place your ad.


* Tree Removal Tree Trimming .
9 Stump Grinding
Insured* Free Estimates

593-4455


BONLDED --EW INSURED
n^ pVID LEWIS
ROOFING CO.
:f i 265-6023
LICENSE #,RC0043637
davidlewisroofing@knology.net
I l m 1406 MinnesotaAve. Lynn Hven, fL 32444



'ALL YOUR ROOFING NEEDS*
Metal Shingles Flat Roofs Insured
LC, RC2902751G
850-573-1880
Serving Jackson and Surrounding Counties



,North Florida Rental

DOLMAR

=zsssBazelA Q 91
POWER PRODUCTS
MODEL #PS32, PS421, PS510 In Stock
More Models Available
850-526-7368
2890 Noland St. Marianna


JACKS 6N CO U N T Y


FLORIDAII

jcfloridan.com



monster

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


CLASSIFIED


REA ESATEAUCION

FOR SALE BY
AUCTION
"Everyone Welcome"
Auction Held At Property
Saturday, January 25 @ 12PM CST
Preview from 11:30 AM or Drive-By Anytime
80 Acres w Home Site
2 Deep Wells, Septic Tank
5748 Hartsfield Road
Greenwood, Florida
MATHEW EBERIUS (727) 488-2423
MEberius@AHAuctioneers.com







: 0
- --M OBLEHM ES FOR SALE-1
2004 14x70 Southern Energy MH 3/1 energy
efficient, new floors & paint, skirting &
1 porch/deck $10,000 850-482-3524


----------------


_ m


_jl


11


M.






--rry"'T lfrlTfll I--_


C ASSTFIEDS


www.JCF~rLORVIL)AIN.comI


Jackson County Floridan e


Friday, January 17, 2014- 7 B


SGOT BAD CREDIT?
RIDE TODAY!
*. SO Down/lst Payment,
STax, Tag & Title Pass!
9 ^ Repo pass bankruptcy
SLOW CREDIT OK -SSI&VAOK
Report to Credit Bureau
Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
Honda 2009 Accord, great gas mileage, certi-
fied warranty, nice car, well equipped. $250
down and $250 per month. Call Steve Hatcher
334-791-8243.
ULincoln 2004 Town Car
Signature, loaded, leath-
er, like new, clean, 94k
miles, owner, $7500.
334-790-7959.
Mazda 2008 Miata MX5 4cyl. Loaded. In great
condition. 31,000 miles. Silver with black top.
$14,500. 334-405-7402
Nissan 2013 Altima S, low miles, fully equipped,
must sell. $200 down, $279 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 334-714-0028.
i Toyota 2011 Camry LE.
4 door sedan, metallic
m green, 34,000 miles. Tan
cloth interior. Very clean.
$14,900. Will accept rea-
sonable offer. 334-402-1180 or 334-397-4301


2007 V STAR 1300 (Black) One Owner, Garage
Keep, Like New, 2000 Miles $5,500. Bought in
2009 from Wards' Yamaha. 334-707-8074


2007 GMC Yukon SLT -V8, Flex fuel, one owner,
navy with tan interior, leather, power seats and
windows, 6 cd changer, rear bucket'seats, rear
air and radio, 3rd row seat, 66K miles, $18,995,
call 693-5454 leave message.
HFord 1987 Bronco 4x4
RUNS GREAT Good tires.
New Sears battery, rear
window motor, fuel gauge.
Brakes recently overhauled. Less than 10k
miles on major tune-up (including distributor,
plugs, wires, oxygen sensor, etc.) Been used as
my hunting camp truck the last 7 years. Asking
$3,400. 334-750-5000
Honda 2009 CRV, low miles, under warranty,
must sell. $200 down, $259 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 334-714-0028.
Nissan 2012 Rouge, Super Nice SUV, Good fami-
ly vehicle, plenty of room, loaded, bring this ad
in and get $500 discount, $250 down, $250 per
month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243.


1997 FORD Econoline Club Wagon Van Seats 11
people, 273k, Runs great, great, needs some
sin. repairs. Accepting closed bids, closed bids
at (334) 308-2480. Starting bid is $1500.
All proceeds will go to the DAV Chapter #9
*1iI Ind 61I liI0-'

1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!

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LGL NTEGALS
ii 0


LF160358

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 13000374-CA

FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA, a Banking
corporation organized under the laws of the
United States of America, f/k/a FIRST FEDERAL
SAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
DANIEL D. BROWN, ET AL,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE is hereby given that DALE RABON GU-
THRIE, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Jackson
County, Florida, will on the 27th day of Febru-
ary, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. CST in the front lobby
of the Jackson County courthouse, 4445 Lafay-
ette Street, Marianna, FL 32446, offer for sale
and sell at public outcry to the highest and
best bidder for cash, the following described
property situated in Jackson County, Florida,
to-wit:

SEE EXHIBIT "A" ATTACHED HERETO AND
BY REFERENCE MADE A PART HEREOF.

Pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure
entered in a case pending in said Court, the
style of which is as set out above, and the
docket number of which is 13000374-CA. Any
person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said
Court, this 9th day of January, 2014.

/s/DALE RABON GUTHRIE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Jackson County, Florida

FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA
PAUL V. SMITH, ESQ.


P.O. BOX 2029

Tammy Bailey
By: Deputy Clerk
4705 U.S. HIGHWAY 90 WEST
LAKE CITY, FL 32056
EMAIL: smithj@ffsb.com

EXHIBIT "A"

PARCEL 1:

COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE
EAST LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF
THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 10,
TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST OF JACK-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THE SOUTH RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF DRY CREEK ROAD, THENCE
RUN WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY, 1267.00
FEET, THENCE CONTINUE WEST ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 218.07 FEET, THENCE DE-
PARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY ON A BEARING
OF SOUTH, 199.75 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH, 199.75
FEET, THENCE RUN EAST PARALLEL WITH THE
SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF DRY CREEK ROAD,
218.07 FEET, THENCE NORTH, 199.75 FEET,
THENCE WEST PARALLEL WITH THE SAID
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF DRY CREEK ROAD,
218.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

TOGETHER WITH AN INGRESS, EGRESS AND
UTILITIES OVER, ACROSS AND UPON THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY:

COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE
EAST LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF
THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 10,
TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST OF JACK-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THE SOUTH RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF DRY CREEK ROAD, THENCE
RUN WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY, 1267.00
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE
DEPARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY ON A BEARING
OF SOUTH, 259.75 FEET, THENCE RUN EAST
PARALLEL WITH THE SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE
OF DRY CREEK ROAD, 30.00 FEET, THENCE
NORTH, 259.75 FEET, THENCE WEST PARALLEL
WITH THE RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF DRY CREEK
ROAD, 30.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.

PARCEL 2:

COMMENCE AT A '" IRON ROD AND CAP (PSM
6525) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE
EAST LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST 14 OF NORTH-
WEST 14 OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH,
RANGE 10 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
WITH THE SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF DRY CREEK ROAD, THENCE S
01005'04" W, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, A DIS-
TANCE OF 399.50 FEET TO A 2" IRON ROD AND
CAP (PSM 6525), THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST
LINE, N8656'52" W, A DISTANCE OF 446.49
FEET TO A " IRON ROD AND CAP (LB 7476),
SAID IRON ROD BEING THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE S 01005'04" W, A DISTANCE OF
415.34 FEET TO A " IRON ROD AND CAP (LB.
7476), THENCE N 87027'23" W, A DISTANCE OF
1038.79 FEET TO A " IRON ROD AND CAP (LB
7476), THENCE N 0107'33" E, A DISTANCE OF
424.55 FEET TO A " IRON ROD AND CAP (PSM
6525), THENCE S 86058'52" E, A DISTANCE OF
1038.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

ALSO AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS
DESCRIBED AS:

BEGIN AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST
LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWN-
SHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST, AND THE
SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY OF DRY CREEK ROAD,
AND RUN SOUTH ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTH-
WEST QUARTER, 399.5 FEET, THENCE RUN
WEST 50.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 399.5
FEET, TO THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY OF DRY
CREEK ROAD, THENCE RUN EAST 50.00 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

EASEMENT:

A 30 FOOT INGRESS, EGRESS AND PUBLIC UTIL-
ITIES EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A VY" IRON ROD AND CAP (PSM
6525) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE
EAST LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST /4 OF NORTH-
WEST 14 OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH,
RANGE 10 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
WITH THE SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF DRY CREEK ROAD, THENCE S
01-05'04" W, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, A DIS-
TANCE OF 399.50 FEET TO A !" IRON ROD AND
CAP (PSM 6525), SAID IRON ROD BEING THE
POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE S
01005'04" W, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, A DIS-
TANCE OF414.05 FEET TO A " IRON RODAND
CAP (LB 7476), THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST
LINE, N 8902'19" W, A DISTANCE OF 30.00
FEET, THENCE N 01-05'04" E, A DISTANCE OF
30.00 FEET TO A " IRON ROD AND CAP (LB
7476), THENCE CONTINUE N 01-05'04" E, 385.14
FEET TO A /" IRON ROD AND CAP (LB 7476),
THENCE S 86056'52" E, A DISTANCE OF 30.02
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

EASEMENT 4:

A 30 FOOT INGRESS, EGRESS AND PUBLIC UTIL-
ITIES EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A i" IRON ROD AND CAP (PSM
6525) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE
EAST LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST ,4 OF NORTH-
WEST ,4 OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH,
RANGE 10 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
WITH THE SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT OF
WAY OF DRY CREEK ROAD, THENCE S 0105'04'
W, ALONG SAID EAST LINE, A DISTANCE OF
813.55 FEET TO A " IRON ROD AND CAP (PSM
6525), THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE, N
8902'19"' W, A DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE N
8902'19" W, A DISTANCE OF 416.23 FEET TO A
" IRON ROD AND CAP (LB 7476), THENCE N
01005'04' E, A DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET TO A /"
IRON ROD AND CAP (LB 7476), THENCE S.
8902'19"' E, A DISTANCE OF.416.23 FEET TO A
" IRON ROD AND CAP (LB 7476), THENCE S
0105'04"' W, A DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
LF160362

INVITATION TO BID
JACKSON COUNTY

NOTICE is hereby given to all interested per-
sons or firms that sealed bids will be accepted
at the Jackson County Purchasing Department


located at the Jackson County Administration
building, 2864 Madison Street, Marianna, Fl.
32448 NO LATER THAN 2:00 pm C.T. on
01/30/14 for the following projects:

BID NUMBER: 1314-08
BID NAME: one (1) ton 2W/D Extended cab
Pick-up truck

Complete bid specifications on our web page w
ww.jacksoncountyfl.net

BID OPENING:
Bids will be opened and recorded JACKSON
COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS Purchas-
ing Department located at 2864 MADISON
STREET, Marianna, Florida 32448 on 01/31/14
10:00AM C.T.

Specifications and General Conditions may be
obtained from the Purchasing Department be-
tween the hours of 8:00 A.M. C.T. and 4:00 P.M.
C.T. Monday through Friday. Information or In-
quiries may be made by contacting Stan
Hascher, Purchasing Agent, at 2864 Madison


Street, Marianna, Florida or voice phone 850-
718-0005, or Fax 850-482-9682. A complete copy
of the Bid Packet may be acquired through the
Jackson County Purchasing WEB site: www.jac
ksoncountyfl.us. Click on the Purchasing De-
partment site then click on current bids and
RFP's to obtain a copy.

Bids SHALL be submitted in a sealed envelope
marked:

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: DATE: 01/30/14
TIME: 2:00 pm CT

SEALED BIDS and identified by the NAME OF
THE FIRM, NAME AND NUMBER OF THE BID,
ALONG WITH THE DATE AND TIME OF OPEN-
ING.

List of bidders and awards (if any) shall be an-
nounced at a meeting of the Jackson County
Board of County Commissioners. Bid award
will be made to the best bidder, but the right is
reserved to reject any or all bids.

Board of County Commissioners
Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

By: Chuck Lockey
BOARD CHAIRMAN

EEO STATEMENT
Jackson County is committed to assuring equal
opportunity in the award of contracts and,
therefore, complies with all laws prohibiting
discrimination on the basis of race, color, reli-
gion, national origin, age and sex.

LF160360

INVITATION TO BID JACKSON COUNTY

NOTICE is hereby given to all interested per-
sons or firms that sealed bids will be accepted
at the Jackson County Purchasing Department
located at the Jackson County Administration
building, 2864 Madison Street, Marianna, Fl.
32448 NO LATER THAN 2:00 pm C.T. on
01/30/2014 for the following project:

BID NUMBER; 1314-03

BID NAME: Request for one (1) 33,000 GWVR
Cab &Chassis

BID OPENINGS: '01/31/2014 10:00AM C.T.
Bids will be opened and recorded by the JACK-
SON COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS Pur-
chasing Department located at 2864 MADISON
STREET, Marianna, Florida 3244.8

Specifications and General Conditions may be
obtained from the Purchasing Department be-
tween the hours of 8:00 A.M. C.T. and 4:00 P.M.
C.T. Monday through Friday. Information or In-
quiries may be made by contacting Stan
Hascher, Purchasing Agent, at 2864 Madison
Street, Marianna, Florida or voice phone 850-
718-0005, or Fax 850-482-9682. A complete copy
of the Bid Packet may be acquired through the
Jackson County Purchasing WEB site: www.jac
ksoncountyfl.us. Click on the Purchasing De-
partment site then click on current bids and
RFP's to obtain a copy:

IMPORTANT
Bids SHALL be submitted in a sealed envelope
marked on outside of envelope:

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: DATE: 01/30/2014
TIME: 2:00 pm CT

SEALED BIDS and identified by the NAME OF
THE FIRM, NAME AND NUMBER OF THE BID,
ALONG WITH THE DATE AND TIME OF OPEN-
ING.

List of bidders and awards (if any) shall be an-
nounced at this meeting of the Jackson County
Board of County Commissioners. Bid award
will be made to the best bidder, but the right is
reserved to reject any or all bids.

Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

Board of County Commissioners
By: Chuck Lockey
BOARD CHAIRMAN

EEO STATEMENT
Jackson County is committed to assuring equal
opportunity in the award of contracts and,
therefore, complies with all laws prohibiting
discrimination on the basis of race, color, reli-
gion, national origin, age and sex.


LF160361

INVITATION TO BID JACKSON COUNTY

NOTICE is hereby given to all interested per-
sons or firms that sealed bids will be accepted
at the Jackson County Purchasing Department
located at the Jackson County Administration
building, 2864 Madison Street, Marianna, Fl.
32448 NO LATER THAN 2:00pm C.T. on
01/30/2014 for the following projects:

BID NUMBER: 1314-04
PROJECT; Supply one (1) new Motor Grader

The Jackson County Board of County Commis-
sioners is seeking qualified vendors to respond
to these Requests for Bids.

BID OPENING:
Bids will be opened and recorded by the Pur-
chasing Department OF THE JACKSON COUN-
TY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS located at
.2864 MADISON STREET, Marianna, Florida
32448 on 01/31/14 10:00AM CT


Specifications and General Conditions may be
obtained from the Purchasing Department be-
tween the hours of 8:00 A.M. C.T. and 4:00 P.M.
C.T. Monday through Friday. Information or
Inquiries may be made by contacting Stan
Hascher, Purchasing Agent, at 2864 Madison
Street, Marianna, Florida or voice phone 850-
718-0005, or Fax 850-482-9682.

IMPORTANT

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: DATE: 01/30/14 No
later than TIME: 2:00pm C.T.

Bids SHALL be submitted in a sealed envelope
marked on the OUTSIDE packet:

SEALED BID and identified by the NAME OF THE
FIRM, NAME AND NUMBER OF THE BID, ALONG
WITH THE DATE AND TIME OF OPENING.

A complete copy of the bid packet may be ac-
quired through the Jackson County Purchasing
WEB site: www.jacksoncountyfl.us. Click on
the Purchasing Department site then Click on
"Current Bids and RFP's" to obtain a copy.

Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

Board of County Commissioners
By: Chuck Lockey
BOARD CHAIRMAN

EEO STATEMENT
Jackson County is committed to assuring equal
opportunity in the award of contracts and,
therefore, complies with all laws prohibiting
discrimination on the basis of race, color, reli-
gion, national origin, age and sex.

LF160345

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2013-302-PR
IN RE: ESTATE OF JACQUELINE P. BENNETT,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of Jacqueline
P. Bennett, deceased, whose date of death was
July 20, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Jackson County, Florida, Probate Division, File
Number 2013-302-PR, the street address of
which is 4445 Lafayette Street; Marianna, Flori-
da 32446, and the mailing address of which is
Post Office Drawer 510, Marianna, Florida
32447. The names and addresses of the person-
al representative and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publication of this Notice is
_____~___,2013.

Personal Representative:
/S/ Richard Dennis Bennett, Jr.
Post Office Box 266
Greenwood, Florida 32443
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/S/ Terrence T. Dariotis
Florida Bar Number 190057
1695 Metropolitan Circle, Suite 6
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
(850) 523-9300
tdariotis@nettally.com


LF160357

NORTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT
DISTRICT GOVERNING BOARD
MEETING SCHEDULE 2014
* All meetings are scheduled to begin at 1:00
p.m., ET, at District Headquarters, 81 Water
Management Drive, Havana, FL 32333, unless
otherwise indicated.
January 9, 2014
February 13, 2014
March 13, 2014
April 10, 2014
May 8,2014
June 12, 2014
July 10, 2014
August 14, 2014
*September 11, 2014
Governing Board 4:00 p.m., ET
Budget Public Hearing 5:05 p.m., ET
*September 25, 2014
Budget Public Hearing 5:05 p.m., ET
October 9, 2014
November 13, 2014
December 11, 2014


/


I


*j -^





-18B FRIDAY.JANUARY 17, 2014


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


E Sports Briefs

Harvin still not cleared for Seahawks chool
Harvi~n still not cleared for Seah boys basketball


Seattle wide
receiver Percy
Harvin (11) catches
a football during
warmups Jan. 2
before practice in
Renton, Wash., as
he stands with wide
receiver Ricardo
Lockette (83) and
practice squad
wide receiver Phil
Bates (13).


RENTON, Wash. Seattle
Seahawks wide receiver Percy
Harvin is still going through
concussion testing and has
not been cleared for Sunday's
NFC championship game.
Seattle coach Pete Carroll
said Harvin won't be partici-
pating in practice Thursday.
He said the only deadline for
Harvin is the one determined
by doctors who must clear


Harvin for him to be able to
play against San Francisco.
Harvin was injured late in
the first half of Saturday's
NFC divisional playoff win
over New Orleans. Harvin hit
his head hard on the turf after
jumping for a pass in the end
zone. It was the second big
hit Harvin took in the game.
Before being injured, Har-
vin had three receptions and
one carry in just his second
game of the season.


Police: Hernandez eyed as gunman in 2012 slayg
Police: Hernandez eyed as gunman m 2012 slaying


The Associated Press

BRISTOL, Conn. Bos-
ton police have been in-
vestigating whether jailed
former New England Pa-
triot Aaron Hernandez
may have been the gun-
man in a 2012 double slay-
ing, according to a search
warrant request released
Thursday.
Hernandez, who is await-
ing trial on murder charges
in a 2013 shooting near his
home, was seen on surveil-
lance footage in the same
nightclub as the victims the
night of the attack in Bos-


ton's South End, authorities
have said. But the newly re-
leased documents confirm
for the first time that police
suspect Hernandez could
have pulled the trigger.
A lawyer for Hernan-
dez did not immediately
respond to a request for
comment.
No charges have been
filed in the deaths of
Daniel Jorge Correia de
Abreu and Safiro Teixeira
Furtado, who were killed
on July 16, 2012, when
somebody inside an SUV
opened fire on their car.
A third person was shot


but survived.
In the affidavit and search
warrant application re-
leased by Superior Court in
Bristol, Conn., police write
that there is probable cause
to believe that Hemrnandez
was driving the vehicle used
in the shooting and "may
have been the shooter."
The affidavit was filed on
June 28 as police sought
to search an SUV they say
was involved in the shoot-
ing and was found that
month at Hernandez's
uncle's home in Bristol, his
hometown.
The SUV had been


given to Hernandez by a
Rhode Island company in
exchange for participat-
ing in promotional ac-
tivities, according to court
filings.
The SUV was covered
in dust and cobwebs and
had a dead battery, leading
police to believe it has re-
mained untouched in the
garage for close to a year,
according to the court
document.
It is not clear from the
affidavit why police be-
lieve Hernandez may
have pulled the trigger in
the 2012 shooting. The


section of the affidavit that
appears to explain that
reason is one of several
redacted from the public
copy of the document.
Survivor Aquilino Freire
told police an SUV pulled
up next to them while they
were stopped at a traffic
light, and he saw some-
one in the SUV's back seat
laughing, according to the
affidavit. Then, several
gunshots were fired from
the rear passenger seat
into the car, Freire told
police. Two other people
in the car ran away, Freire
said.


Eagles assistant Lazor hired as Miami coordinator


The Associated Press

MIAMI New Miami
Dolphins offensive coordi-
nator Bill Lazor says he can
help head coach Joe Phil-
bin win games and some
job security.
Lazor said he accepted
thejobWednesdaybecause
of Philbin, even though his


Bulldogs
From Page 1B
only, true close call
among the ensuing 10



Chipola
From Page 1B
freshmen who have come
in and done a great job.
They have multiple weap-
ons and anybody can lead
them on any given night."
Northwest is being led
by the 5-foot-8 freshman
Westbrook, who is averag-
ing 17.8 points per game,
including 20.3 points per
game in conference play.
While the Lady Raiders
have four players aver-
aging double figures, it's


Indians
From Page 1B
talented Northwest team
coming in and playing
well."
Northwest Florida State
(17-2, 2-1) is coming off
of a 100-76 blowout' vic-
tory over Gulf Coast State
on Tuesday, as the Raiders
shot a whopping 57 per-
cent from the floor while
making 8-of-12 three-
pointers and 34-of-40 free
throws.
It was the eighth win in
the last nine for the Raid-
ers, who have quite an im-
pression on the Indians'
coach.
"I'm really impressed,"
Blake said. "For as big as
they are, they really run
and play up-tempo. Their
guards are doing a greatjob
of finding open people and
moving the ball really well.
They can not only hurt you
from the inside, but they
have bigs who can also
step out and shoot it from
three, and their guards are
very good."
Northwest is averaging
87.7 points per game as
a team, with sophomore
guard Farad Cobb leading
the way with 14.1 points
per game, while freshman
guard Benji Bell and soph-
omore forward Darnell
Harris are each putting in
12.7 points per game, fol-
lowed by Tevin Glass with
11.5 points per game.
j Cobb, Bell, and freshman


new boss' status is shaky season as quarterbacks while Tannehill threw 24 the playoffs for the fifth
after two so-so seasons, coach with the Philadel- and 17. consecutive year. The Ea-


"Right now my future and
his future are together,"
Lazor said. "I'm in it with
him. I choose to compete
and make an impact and
to be a difference-maker,
and that's why I'm here."
Lazor was hired Wednes-
day by Philbin after one


Marianna wins.
MHS took lopsided vic-
tories over Godby and East
Hall (Ga.) over the holidays
and came back with solid
wins over district rivals


Westbrook that Franklin
said his team has to deal
with first and foremost.
"She shoots it from deep,
she penetrates and scores
it, and she can score in
many ways. She can take
it to the hoop, pull up and
shoot it, catch and shoot;
she's a very good basket-
ball player," the coach said.
"We'll run our best defend-
ers at her non-stop."
The best perimeter de-
fender that the Lady In-
dians have is sophomore
Khadijah Ellison, who at
5-foot-7 with elite athletic


Ethan Telfair have proven a
potent backcourt trio that
can do damage from the
perimeter Cobb is con-
verting 46.2 percent from
three, with Bell making
36.2 percent from deep,
and Telfair 37.5 percent
- while the 6-foot-8 Har-
ris is a versatile inside-out
presence who is convert-
ing 39 percent from long
range while also leading
the team in rebounding
with 6.2 per game.
The Raiders also pos-
sess a great deal of size and
bulk on the interior in the
6-foot-10 sophomore Mi-
chael Chandler and 7-foot
sophomore Stephen Hurt,
with the latter averag-
ing 9.2 points and 5.3 re-
bounds and drawing rave
reviews from the Ch'iipola
coach.
"Stephen Hurt is the
best center, if not the best
player, in the country,"
Blake said of the Kansas
State commit.'"He's an ex-
tremely skilled low post
player."
With such offensive bal-
ance as the Raiders pos-
sess, the Chipola coach
said that it's imperative
that his team plays with
a chemistry and continu-
ity defensively that has
often been elusive this
season.
"We have to start defend-
ing as a team. That's been
our biggest problem, too
much one-on-one de-
fense," he said. "Five guys
have to see the ball and play


phia Eagles, where he
helped develop second-
year pro Nick Foles into
the NFL's top-rated passer.
The Dolphins also had a
second-year quarterback
in Ryan Tannehill. Foles
threw 27 touchdown pass-
es and, two interceptions,


Pensacola Catholic and
West Florida.
Another convincing
win could be in order for
the Bulldogs tonight, but
Blanton said he'll be hap-


ability and quick hands
that produce nearly three
steals per game, would
appear ideally suited to
match up with Westbrook.
Franklin said that Ellison
will get plenty of opportu-
nities to contain the North-
west star, but he needs her
to avoid some cheap early
fouls.
"One thing I don't want
to happen is for her to get
in foul trouble early. She's a
little overaggressive some-
times reaching and going
for steals, butwe're going to
need her down the stretch


the ball. We have to have a
great team defensive effort
to be successful."
Despite the big loss Tues-
day and a pair of uneven
performances in close
wins over Pensacola State
and Gulf Coast, the Indi-
ans still sit atop the league
standings and can take
sole possession of first
with a win Saturday and a
Pensacola loss.
But while his team is
coming off of a loss and
facing a top 10 opponent
and archrival, Blake said
the Indians aren't treating


Lazor said he studied
Tannehill on video before
accepting the job.
"I'm really excited to
work with him," Lazor said.
"I see a lot of ability."
The Dolphins ranked
27th in the NFL in yards,
finished 8-8 and missed


gles ranked second in total
yards and offensive points,
went 10-6 and won the
NFC East.
"A lot of the things that
led to that are going to
have a great impact in
what I believe works going
forward," Lazor said.


py to get to 18-0 however you're the No. 1 team, then
possible, that's great. But (the Braves)
"I'll be happy with win- are playing extremely well,
ning by one," he said. "If so I don't know that we
you can win convincingly can do that. I hope we
to send the message that can."


big time," the coach said.
"In a game like this, I'm
sure she'll be really hyped
and ready to go."
She'll have that in com-
mon with every other
player and coach in atten-
dance Saturday for a game
that will be the biggest of
the Panhandle Conference
season thus far and one of
the biggest national games
as well.
But Franklin said his team
is ready for a game of great
magnitude after a tough
non-conference sched-
ule that included a trip to


the game like it's any more
special than the previous
three.
"You've got to approach
every game like it's a must-
win. We've just got to get
back to getting better each
and every day," he said.
"We're in great position,
win or lose in this game.
There's still eight more
that we've got to play, and
we don't need to add any
pressure. We shouldn't
have to use any extra mo-
tivation to get ready to
play Northwest Florida at
home.


Midland, Tex, for a loaded
Women's NIT that included
a matchup with No. 1 Trinity
Valley, who the Lady Indians
defeated 72-60 on Nov. 23.
"We went out and played
that tournament for this
very reason, to get accus-
tomed to big basketball
games," the coach said.
"It's not foreign to us. We're
fine 'with it. But I think
since this is the first time
we've played (Northwest),
I believe our kids want to
make a statement. We look
forward to it. It should,be a
fun night."


"The good. thing about
my guys is they have a
short memory. Sometimes
it's a good thing and some-
times a bad thing, but I
don't think they're too fo-
cused on the last game.
They know we'll have a
great crowd Saturday and
we're just excited to get out
there."
The game will tip at 7:30
p.m. following the women's
game at 5:30 p.m.


Friday Cotton-
dale at Sneads, 5:30
and 7 p.m.;Walton at
Marianna, 5:30 and
7p.m.
Saturday- Mari-
anna at Rutherford,
5:30 and 7 p.m.;
Sneads at North
Florida Christian, 4
and 5:30 p.m.
*The Marianna vs.
Gracevifle boys bas-
ketball game previ-
ously scheduled for
Jan. 7 will be played
instead on Tuesday,
Martin Luther King.
Jr. Day, at 6:30 p.m.
preceded by the
junior varsity game
at 5p.m. .

High school
girls basketball
Friday- Cotton-
dale at Sneads, 4
p.m.
Saturday Sneads
at North Florida '
Christian, 2:30 p.m.

Chipola
basketball
Chipola men's and
women's basketball
teams will end the
week at home Satur-
day against North-
west Florida State,
with the women's
game tipping at 5:30
p.m., followed by the
men at 7:30 p.m.

Southern Elite
softball
Tryouts for the
girls' Southern Elite
softball travel team
will be held at the
Alford recreation.
park on Jan. 19 at 2
p.m. for ages 10U,
12U and 14U. For
more information,
call 850-272-2109.

Jackson County
travel baseball
Jackson County
baseball will have
tryouts for 9U travel
baseball lan. 18 from
noon to 3 p.m. at
Jennings Field in
Marianna.
Those attending
will need baseball
pants, cleats, and a
glove, and players
from Jackson County
and surrounding
counties are all
invited. Those who
attend will also be
entered into a draw-
ing for a chance to
win a $30 gift card
from Hibbett Sports.
For any further in-
formation, call 209-
5834 or 557-0419.

Sports items
Send all sports
items to editorial@
jcfloridan.com, or
fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing
address for the paper
is Jackson County
Floridan RO. Box520
Marianna, FL 32447.


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