Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01256

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text




1B Bulldogs ?.tlIl unbeaten
Informing more than .17C.00 readers daily in print and online







JU LR-IDAN


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POSSIBLE FIRE STATION


ANGIE COOK/FLORIDAN
Jackson County Administrator Ted Lakey has been authorized to talk with the realtor in charge of selling this building on Commercial Park
Drive, to determine whether the price is firm and whether it might be easily converted to serve as a fire station.


Building catches count


Fire service


assessment

considered

BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Jackson County Commis-
sioners have agreed let County
Administrator Ted Lakey talk
to a real estate agent about
a building that's up for sale
on Commercial Park Drive in
Marianna, to see if the price
is firm and to determine if it
could be easily converted to
serve ,as a fire station or some
other use by the county.
The asking price for the 6,900
square-foot metal structure is
$199,900. Lakey said someone
called and told him the build-
ing was up for sale and that he


wanted to pursue talks once he
followed up on that call.
The county is in the midst of
looking at a study the board
commissioned last year in
hopes of identifying ways the
county fire service could be
improved. One point made in
the study is that the county, in
order to improve its fire rating,
needs to establish a station
within five miles of the Indian
Springs subdivision and the
Interstate 10 exchange. This
building falls within the range.
The fire rating for homes
and other structures in that
area could improve as much
as three points, Lakey said, if
a station were that close and if
other circumstances were also
right. A better rating on that
scale could mean significantly
lower insurance premiums for
home and business owners in
the area, a goal commissioners


have voiced in the .past.
Lakey said the building at
2515 Commercial Park Drive
is worth looking at as a new
station candidate because of
its potential to accomplish
that and provide a closer fire-
fighting resource in one of the
busiest business areas of the
county.
The building has served as
a music store and studio, and
later as headquarters for a
business featuring inflatable
play/party structures.
Whether the building proves
to be affordable and appro-
priate as a station, the county
continues to work through its
fire study looking for ways to
improve service, Lakey said.
In December, the board
adopted a resolution which
leaves the door open for a
potential fire assessment that
property owners would pay to


ty's eye
augment the county's fire ser-
vice budget.
Lakey said that each mu-
nicipality in the county can
opt into or out of such an as-
sessment, if the county does
go forward with it. Each town
is supposed to decide that is-
sue by March 1. Marianna has
already indicated it may enact
its own separate fire assess-
ment, Lakey said.
If none of the cities opt into
the county's assessment, and
if it is enacted in the unicorpo-
rated areas alone, it would gen-
erate approximately $700,000,
Lakey said, adding that the
average household would pay
$59 annually in the assess-
ment. Businesses would be
assessed an amount based on
square footage, at an estimated
rate of 3 cents per square foot.

See BUILDING, Page 7A


Theater shooter
appears in court7A

Vol.91No.11

Alabama

resident dies

in car crash
From staff reports
According to a Florida Highway
Patrol report, Geneva resident
Raegan Everett Kelly, 22, was west-
bound on State Road 2 in a 1996
Nissan Pathfinder around 11:25
p.m. when the vehicle ran off the
road to the right and entered the
westbound shoulder. The Path-
finder continued traveling in the
shoulder of the road until it crossed
a driveway and became airborne.
It then overturned and Kelly was
ejected. The vehicle came to rest
on its roof, facing north.
Kelly was pronounced dead on
the scene and was taken to the
Medical Examiner's Office.


Lane closures

scheduled

for S.R. 71
Special to the Floridan

Drivers traveling State Road 71
in Marianna can expect tempo-
rary lane closures between Big
Bone Lane and Malloy Plaza Road
through Sunday.
The Florida Department of
Transportation reports that lane
closures will remain in effect from
7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
Workers are constructing the up-
coming detour that will take place
when the intersection at S.R. 71 and
Whitetail Drive is reconstructed.
This work is part of the ongoing
$8.5 million project to resurface
S.R, 71 from the Calhoun County
line to Magnolia Road.
Major work includes concrete re-
construction between Malloy Pla-
za and the TA Truck Stop that will
occur on one side of the roadway
at a time.
There will be no detours on S.R.
71. However, when the east side
intersection of S.R. 71 and White-
tail Drive is reconstructed, traffic
accessing Whitetail Drive will be-
detoured to Malloy Plaza Road and
Trailer Park Drive.
Construction is slated for com-
pletion in the fall.


County kicks in $1,500 for study aimed at auto builders


BY DEBORAH' BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Jackson County Commission-
ers on Tuesday agreed to con-
tribute $1,500 to a pool of mon-
ey that will pay for a study that
could help this corner of North-
west Florida get the attention of
vehicle manufacturers looking
for another place to set up shop.
Various other entities, are being
asked to donate money as well,
including the city of Marianna


and several power companies.
The study is a project being
pursued by Op-
portunity Florida.
#1 Chipola College
and Troy State
University will be.
L.A ^HBparticipating in
the study in some
Massey way, officials said.
The study would
identify the assets that might
make the county attractive to
auto builders, such as its ready


1-10 access, its U.S. 231 corridor
and the proximity of rail and
shipping routes. It would also
include information about the
work force, educational oppor-
tunities and other information
such as housing and medical
care facilities.
The study would also identify
barriers to attracting the manu-
facturers, so that the community
could focus on creating possible
remedies to the problem issues.
'The overall goal of the final


paper to result from the study is
to sell the area to manufacturers
as a better alternative to other
places like South Florida or other
areas of the country.
Opportunity Florida serves
Calhoun, Franklin, Gulf, Holmes,
Jackson, Liberty and Washington
counties and is described as an
entity dedicated to economic
development and well-being in
the region.
Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce CEO/President Jeff


Massey said he was excited about
the county's decision to kick in.
"I applaud the county com-
mission for having the presence
of mind to do things like this to
attract business," Massey said.
"From the Chamber perspective,
I will lend my support in anyway
possible, because this is what
we need to be doing to produce
jobs in the future. It takes a lot
groundwork and due diligence,
and this kind of study could be
crucial in the process."


Gov. Scott chooses Hispanic former legislator for running mate


The Associated Press

MIAMI Florida Gov. Rick
Scott, already in a potentially
tough fight for re-election, on
Tuesday made history when he
appointed the first Hispanic
to the position of lieutenant
governor.
Ending a guessing game
that stretched on for nearly 10
months, Scott named Miami-
Dade Property Appraiser Carlos


)CLASSIFIEDS...5B


Lopez-Cantera to the post. Lo-
pez-Cantera will also be Scott's
running mate in the November
elections.
Lopez-Cantera, a Republican
and an ally of U.S. Sen. Marco
Rubio, called the appointment
an "honor."
"It's just an opportunity that
could not be ignored or denied
because I'll be representing the
entire state," Lopez-Cantera
said.


a ENTERTAINMENT...4B


) LOCAL...3A


The job of lieutenant governor
is largely ceremonial, but Scott
said he plans to use the 40-year-
old former legislator to help push
through his legislative agenda
during the session that starts in
March.
But more importantly, the se-
lection of Lopez-Cantera brings
both ethnic and geographical
diversity to the Republican ticket

See SCOTT, Page 7A
a OBITUARIES...7A


Miami-Dade Property
Appraiser Carlos
Lopez-Cantera speaks
at a news conference
on Tuesday in Miami
after Gov. Rick Scott
(left) named him
lieutenant governor
and his running mate.


)) STATE...6A


S SPORTS...1B


)OPINION...4A


This Newspaper F i o us
Is Printed On Follow us
Recycled Newsprint




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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


Saturday
Sunny, Breezy & Cold.


High-590
Low 370


Sunday
Partly Cloudy & Cold.


2-4 hours, 1.10 N Year it ddae 1. 10- 'am
Monih to date 1I.I0" Normal 'TD '.I -
Normal MTD 2.38" Normal for year 59.20-


TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


6:34 AM
10:12 AM
6:39 AM
7:50 AM
8:28 AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
53.83 ft.
14.13 ft.
9.71 ft.
10.25 ft.


-8:28PM
1:48 AM
* 9:01 PM
-9:34PM
* 10:07 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
06 1 2 3:10 ll+


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:39 AM
Sunset 5:02 PM
Moonrise 4:55 PM
Moonset 6:38 AM


I


Jan. Jan. Jan.
7 15 23


~iidi~ixr i ~ her-Team*.is the d- L.7T

~flnrientire pa-hand- -


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher,- Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32448
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6a.m. and noon, Tuesday tb
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage-paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyondthe
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTOGETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


WEDNESDAY, JAN 15
New deadline to report 2014 small grains and
permanent grasses Permanent grasses such
as Bahia and Bermuda along with fall seeded small
must be reported by this date. This is a change for
the reporting deadline in prior years of Nov. 15.
) AARP tax aide training session 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Jackson County Agricultural Building, Penn
Ave., Marianna in the conference room. Learn
hands-on training for electronic preparation and
filing of tax returns free. If interested in volunteering
call 718-7919.
) Jackson County Tourist Development Council
meeting -10 a.m. at the Russ House, 4318 Lafay-
ette Street, Marianna.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
Tickets on sale for Chipola Artist Series event
Harpist Anna Maria Mendieta 2-5 p.m. at
Chipola Box Office or online tickets at www.chipola.
edu. Tickets are $14 adults $10 age 18 and under.
The music and dance program is complete with
Latin instruments and Flamenco dancers.

THURSDAY, JAN. 16
New Student Orientation The Baptist College
of Florida in Graceville.
) International Chat'n' Sip 8:30-10 a.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library; 2929 Green St. in
Marianna. Learning Center staff and their inter-
national English learners invite the public for the
exchange of language, culture and ideas in a relaxed
environment. Light refreshments served. No charge.
Call 482-9124.
) St. Anne Thrift Store 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. St.
Anne's Catholic Church, 3009 5th St:, Marianna.
Call 482-3734
D Literacy Fair-10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Jackson Alter-
native School. Parents and school board officials
invited. Call 482-9666 ext.243 for more info.
) Caregiver Support Group Meeting -11 a.m. to
noon in the First Presbyterian Church Social Hall,
4437 Clinton St., Marianna. Open to all family care-
givers providing care to loved ones or friends. Con-
fidential group, facilitated by a professional group
counselor. Coffee, water, light snacks provided.
) Chipola Civic Club Meeting Noon at The Oaks
Restaurant, U.S. 90 in Marianna. The CCC's focus
is the local community, "Community, Children &
Character." Call 526-3142.
D Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St., Marianna.
Call 482-2290.
) Jackson County Friends of the Library Board
Meeting-1 p.m. at the Jackson County Public
Library 2929 Green St., Marianna. All members and


Community Calenda
those interested in joining are invited.
D Employability Workshop 2:30 p.m. Marianna
One Stop Career Center. "Developing, Effective Self
Marketing Tools" is the workshop. It is free and open
to the public. The workshop is facilitated by a Certi-
fied Motivational Career Coach. Visit employflorida.
com to register for these informative workshops.
) Jackson County School Board Workshop 4
p.m. School Board meeting room, 2903 Jefferson
St. Marianna. Agenda on district website www.jcsb.
org. Open to public. Call 482-1200.
) Jackson County NAACP Meeting 5:30 p.m.
in the St. James A.M.E. Church basement, 2891
Orange St., Marianna. Call 569-1294.
Marianna High School Project Graduation
meeting rescheduled 5:15 at Jackson County
Early Childhood Center 4283 Kelson Ave., Marianna
has been changed tb Jan. 21. All parents please plan
to attend.
VFW & Ladies Auxiliary Meeting 6 p.m. at
2830 Wynn St., Marianna, with a covered-dish sup-
per. Call 372-2500.
) Chipola Artist Series event harpist Anna
Maria Mendieta 7 p.m. at Chipola Center for the
Arts. The music.'and dance program is complete
with Latin instruments and Flamenco dancers. Box
office sales from 6-7 p.rm. or online at www.chipola.
edu Tickets are $14 for adults and $10 for ages 18
and younger.. Call 718-2420.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, JAN.17
New Student Orientation The Baptist College
of Florida in Graceville.
Last day to register for Martin Luther King Jr.
Day Parade Parade will be Jan. 20 at 10 a.m. with
line-up at 9:30. Contact Ronald Mizer at 407-385-
9235 or 526-2008.
) Hooks and Needles -10 a.m. at the Jackson
County Public Library, Marianna. Branch. New and
experienced handcrafters welcome to create, share,
learn or teach favorite projects. Call 482-9631.
) City of Marianna to Observe Arbor Day -10
a.m. at Madison Street Park by planting a live oak
tree. Everyone invited to attend.
) Chess Club 6-8 p.m. First United Methodist
Church on Clinton St. in Marianna. Sponsored by
Marianna Optimist Club for students for students
8-18 years of age in Jackson County. All students
and their parents are welcome. Players of all skill
levels including beginners are welcome. Call 693-
0473.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult


and teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-upso" Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, JAN. 18
Blacksmithing Class 8 a.m. Panhandle
Pioneer Settlement, 17869 NW Pioneer Settlement
Rd., Blountstown. Come enjoy the art of shaping
heated iron and steel with hand tools. All-day event
so pack your lunch. Required items: gloves and
safety glasses. Cost: $45 with $25 deposit required.
For more info call 674-2777 or email ppsmuseum@
yahoo.com.
D Jackson County Community Helpers Club
-10 a.m. 4571 Dickson Rd, Greenwood.
Hog Butchering Class 8 a.m. Panhandle
Pioneer Settlement, 17869 NW Pioneer Settle-
ment Rd., Blountstown. This class will teach killing,
butchering, and preservation techniques. Cost $25
with $10 deposit required. Call 674-2777 or email.
ppsmuseum@yahoo.com.
D New Year's Resolution River Run 5K 9 a.m.at
Three Rivers State Park, Sneads. Registration 8 a.m.
Hosted by Country Bumpkins 4-H. Entry fees: 18
and younger $10 pre-registered, $15 day of registra-
tion; 19 and older $20 pre-registration, $25 day of
registration.Awards for each age group and team.
For more info call 272-3728.
) Arbor Day Tree Planting Ceremony Noon
at the Florida Caverns State Park in Marianna. Join
CSO member Bill Kleinhans to plant a tree in honor
of Florida's Arbor Day.
) Fourth Annual Oyster Cook-Off Noon to
5 p.m. at the Riverfront Park in downtown Apala-
chicola. Judging and bands starts at 2 p.m. All forms
of oysters will be available for tasting. For more info
call (850) 653-9419.
) Ellis Insurance Grand Opening/Ribbon Cut-
ting Noon to 2 p.m. Ellis Insurance Agency 2118
SR 71 Suite B, Marianna.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
Chili Dinner 6 p.m. Heavens Way Biker Church,
Cottondale. $5 donation per person. 7 p.m. Bridge
takes the stage.

SUNDAY, JAN. 19
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. in AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in
the board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, in Graceville.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Jan. 13, the latest
available report: Four acci-
dents-two with injury, one sus-
picious people, one escort, one
verbal disturbance, one burglar
alarm, two traffic stops, one
criminal mischief complaint,
one civil dispute, one juvenile
complaint, one property dam-
age complaint and seven home
security checks.


JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
___ reported the
following
____ incidents for
,f'm~jicJan. 13, the
C BI-M E latest available
report: One
accident, one
missing adult, one stolen tag,
three abandoned vehicles, one
reckless driver, three suspicious
people, one clothing escort,
four funeral escorts, one vehicle
fire, 17 medical calls, two traffic


crashes-one with entrapment,
three burglar alarms, one panic
alarm, nine traffic stops, three
larceny complaints, three
criminal mischief complaints,
one civil dispute, one trespass
complaint, one assault, one
animal complaint, one fraud
complaint, 13 property checks,
four assists of motorists or
pedestrians, one retail theft,
one public service call and one
Baker Act transport.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following people were


booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Christopher Robinson, 39,
3046 Zion St., Cottondale, driv-
ing while license suspended or
revoked.
) Dylan Smith, 31,10120 Ca-
bana St., Springhill, violation of
county probation.

Jail Population: 182

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.
To report a wildlife Violation, call 1-888-
404-FWCC (3922).


VEJD 4204 LAFAYETTE ST.
RfIUIA MIJMARIAN NA, FL
CHEVROLET BUICK CADILLAC GMC NISSAN

SALES TEAM es3

(850) 482-3051M


LISTEN -^ E I
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HOURLY lj!r|-v
WERTHERfW WNHUE
UPDRTES WJAQ 100.S"m


-12A WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 15, 2014


1


WAICE-up ClUIRL





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Marianna FFA places fourth


Special to the Floridan 19

Marianna FFA recently e
competed in state quali-
fications for Dairy Judg-
ing. The top 67 teams
from across the state
were vying for 20 spots to
see who would advance to
the state finals in Tampa at
the State Fair.
Marianna was recog-
nized as the fourth high-
est qualifying team in the
state and will advance to
the state finals.
The National FFA Dairy
Cattle Evaluation and
Management CDE is a
competitive event that
tests the student's ability to
select and manage quality
dairy cattle.
Event components in- Dairy Judging ti
clude six classes of dairy Hannah Blount a
cattle, herd record evalua-
tion, linear evaluation and
dairy management team The dairy
activity, team members


SUBMITTED PHOTO
eam members were Maddie Schrenker, Madalyn Daniels, Megan Schrenker,
and Kaitlyn Renegar.


judging
3 were Mad-


die Schrenker, Madalyn Hanna Blount and Kaitlyn
Daniels, Megan Schrenker, Renegar.


14th annual Florida Bull Test conducted


Special to the Floridan


The 14th annual Florida
Bull Test was conducted
at the University of Florida
North Florida Research
and Education center near
Marianna. There were 126
bulls consigned from 40
ranches located in Florida,
Alabama, Georgia, Missis-
sippi and North Carolina.
There were 67 An-
gus, 7 Charolais, 2 Her-
eford, 3 Red Angus, 33
SimAngus and 14 Sim-
mental bulls entered, that
were born between August
and December of 2012.
Bulls were delivered in
late July and initiated their
112-day test on August
20, 2013. The last day of
test was December 11,
2013.
In addition, individual
feed intake was assessed
for each bull to establish


UFAFASResearch Bull Test ID 1094
HI IFAS Extension 2013 Florida Bull Test
SUBMITTED PHOTO
L& L Cattle Company, Marianna, consigned the top performing
bull in the 2013 Florida Bull Test. Their Simmental bull, LLCC
Big Jake Z211, gained 5.31 pounds per day on the 112 day test.


feed efficiency, a hallmark
of the Florida Bull Test. At
completion of the test, the
entire group of bulls aver-
aged 3.45 pounds of gain
per day, but ranged from
1.81 to 5.31 pounds per


MHS VARSITY CHEERLEADERS

TO COMPETE IN JACKSONVILLE











SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Marianna High School Varsity Cheerleaders will travel to
Jacksonville this weekend to. compete in the Region 1 FHSAA
cheerleading finals. The state finals are in Kissimmee the last
weekend of the month. Team members are: (front row) Amy
Gearhart, Sheridan Dryden, Keionna Mitchell, Allie Hinson,
Cianna Harris, Melissa Garcia, Cailee Heinemann (middle row)
Gracelyn Howard, Hannah Jackson, Kayleigh Temples, Kendall
Lowery, Shelbie Johnson, Kristin Cumbie, Anastasia Mitchell,
(back row) Zannah Glisson, Bri Godwin, Kylee Barnes, Sydney
Holland and Morgan Bryan.


Arbor Day
Tree Planting
Please join the Friends
of Florida Caverns State
Park for the Arbor Day
Tree Planting Ceremony to
take place Saturday, Jan.
18, at the Blue Hole swim-
ming area in the Florida
Caverns State Park.
Lynne Lowenthal from
the Jackson County
Library will be reading
children's stories from
10 a.m. until noon. The
tree planting will begin
at noon to be conducted
by Friends' members Bill
Kleinhans and Mark Hebb
and children will be en-
couraged to participate.


A bird walk will follow
at 1 p.m. to be led by vol-
unteers Elliott and Lesley
Smith that will last about
an hour. Let's teach our
children to be stewards of
the forest and remember
that any day you can plant
a tree is a good day!
Park admission is $5 a
vehicle for up to 8 people
and admission includes
the Arbor Day activities
as well as the typical day
activities that include 5
miles of trails, museum/
theater, playground, geo-
caching, and fishing. Bring
a picnic and binoculars
and enjoy the beauty of
this 1,300 -acre gem in
your own backyard!


Activities of the Florida
Bull Test will conclude
with a sale on Saturday,
Jan. 18, at 12:30 p.m.
CST at the NFREC Beef
Unit near Marianna. Only
bulls meeting specific
benchmarks are eligible


for the sale.
In addition to perfor-
mance evaluation, bulls
are inspected for struc-
tural soundness and dis-
position, and must pass
a breeding soundness
exam to qualify for the
sale. Additional informa-
tion, such as actual per-
formance data, expected
progeny differences
(EPDs), and carcass ultra-
sound data, is available for
buyers to aid their selec-
tion of excellent quality
bulls to purchase.
For more information
on the Florida Bull Test,
including performance
data and pictures of all
bulls, or directions to
the NFREC Beef Re-
search Unit, visit the
Florida Bull Testweb page:
http: / /Infrec.ifas.ufl.
edu/flbull test/, or call
850-394-9124.


Marriages, Divorce Report


Marriages
) Angela Mihele Mor-
ris to Allen Manning
Williams.
))Hugh Mitchell Mc-
Millan to Kimberly B.
Mozley.
))David Adam Majors to
Sheila Joy Skelton.
))Howard E. Emery to
Roberta Leeann Mapel.
Divorces


))Little Willie Williams
vs. Stacy Yvette Williams.
))Dale Alan Brown vs.
Delayna J. Brown.
)Jody Burch vs. Rebecca
E. Neff.
))Donald James
Davis vs. Heather Ann
Davis.
)John C. J. Patrick vs.
Lanita Duree Patrick.
))Monica Hathcock
Fitzsimmons vs. Rollan
Talmadge Fitzsimmons.


Florida Lottery


Mon (E)


113 5-6-9 5.0-2.0 24-8-10-25
4-2.9 92-68


1114 3.0-4 4.3-3-4
0.7-2 5-7-1.5


Wed. Mi
Thurl )E)
Thurs (MI
Fri E)
Fri iM)
Sat i E)
*, al i .'i
Sun iE)
Sun (M)


Not Available


1 1-0 3 6-5-7-3 5-8-101934
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16.8 7.4-1-8


1.12 0-9-0 7.7-00
3-9 1 9-1-4-6


314-16-1934


E = Evening drawing M = Midday drawing


Saturday I/11
Wednesday 1:5


10 15-33-48-56
10-23-39-4758


PB34
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I I


Saturday 1/11
Wednesday 1/8


7-13-15-17-5153
324-30-35-43-51


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SUBMIT LTUEHOUlO
Artist Keith Martin Johns

Graceville artist's work

on display at Chipola


Special to the Floridan

Graceville artist Keith
Martin Johns will display
original works highlight-
ing the natural beauty and
culture of Florida in an
exhibition in the Chipola
College Center for the
Arts from Jan. 16 through
Feb. 14.
For more than 30 years,
Johns has painted exqui-
site and timeless land-
scapes filled with wildlife
and birds through the
backwaters of rivers and
creeks to wetlands and
coastal beaches. His Flor-
ida Collection of more
than 350 images has been
a lifetime endeavor to
capture the worth, value
and expression of the fa-
miliar Florida background
in which this fourth-gen-
eration native grew up.
Johns' work also repre-
sents the pioneer spirit
of people who forged
out agriculture in the
citrus, fishing, cracker
cattle and horse industry.
He operates a gallery in
Graceville. More infor-
mation and photos are


available at www.
keithmartinjohns.com
The exhibit opening
coincides with the Jan.
16 Chipola Artist Series
event, Harpist Anna Maria
Mendieta. Viewing also is
available by appointment,
by calling 718-2277.


'OPhilip








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Est. 1971 4!)
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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2014 3AF


LOCJU.











Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Our Opinion


Doctors in the house


and on the plane
W e were pleased to report a story this week in-
volving two Marianna physicians, Dr. Robert
Hoff and Dr. Nikorn Arunakul, who have been
friends and colleagues for 38 years.
The men were on a trip to Thailand to attend the
wedding of Dr. Arunakuls niece when, in midffight, a
call came over the intercom asking for a doctor. The
Marianna physicians responded.
Unfortunately, the passenger experiencing the
emergency did not survive, and likely was already dead
before the doctors got to her seat. However, we're proud
to have two such dedicated physicians to call Marianna
home.
Our society has become so litigious that people are
often reluctant to get involved in any sort of incident
that could possibly give them legal exposure. That's
something our society should be ashamed of, as it
impedes a persons natural inclination to help his fellow
man in jeopardy.
Physicians are particularly well-versed in liability, as
medical practice has become fertile ground for liability
cases. ,
It's refreshing that Drs. Arunakul and Hoff didn't
hesitate to rush to the aid of the stricken passenger.
The Hippocratic Oath eclipsed other concerns, and our
hometown healers responded voluntarily.
That should be a great comfort to the people of Jack-
son County.


Decatur (Ma.) Daily


Supply and demand

-1ecently we learned that efforts to curtail the
M{availabilify of methamphetamine nationwide
ave not been particularly successful.
A Drug Enforcement Administration study found
while efforts to curb local meth labs have had some
success, the supply of meth has increased as Mexican
cartels have moved in to fill the void.
As long as there is demand, there will be supply.
Now, a group of researchers at the University of Louis-
ville may have discovered one factor that influences the
demand for meth: the availability of alcohol.
Their research, presented a week ago at the annual
meeting of the American Economic Association in
Philadelphia, looks only at Kentucky. But Kentucky has
local-option laws similar to Alabama's. That means it
has "dry" counties where alcohol sales are prohibited,
"wet" counties where they are not and "moist" counties,
which are dry but contain wet cities.
The researchers found that Kentuqky could reduce
its number of meth lab seizures by 17 to 30 percent per
year if all its counties were wet.
Citing previous studies on the impact of various alco-
hol and drug prohibitions and regulations, they further
suggest that the decreased number of meth lab seizures
results from diminished demand.
So, to summarize, wet counties have fewer meth lab
seizures than dry counties because they have fewer
meth labs. They have fewer meth labs not because of
pressure on supply but because of a lower demand for
meth. And they have a lower demand for meth because
alcohol, a substitute good, is easier and less expensive
to obtain.
Of the counties that border the Tennessee River in
Alabama, only two are wet: Madison and Colbert. But
only two counties statewide, Clay and Blount, are com-
pletely dry.
Most north Alabama counties are moist, a relatively
recent development coming from a slew of recent lo-
cal-option votes everywhere from Moulton to Cullman
to Scottsboro. With the Great Recession lingering like
a nasty hangover, the prospects of liquor tax revenue
have trumped other concerns.
According to the University of Louisville researchers,
moist counties already have fewer meth lab busts than
dry counties. But they could have fewer still by going
wet.
What is the point of a county remaining dry when it
contains wet cities, anyway? It's mostly just for show,
although it does still result in the occasional arrest for
"illegal possession of prohibited liquor."
All the moist counties, including Morgan, Limestone
and Lawrence, should go wet. You have nothing. to lose
but your meth labs.

Lettesi to the Editor
.Submit letters by either mailing to Editor. P.O. Box 520,
Marianna FL, 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editoriql~jcfloridan.com. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
Include your full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call 850-526-3614.



/I NEED VA G~OOD PLAYLIT Td 0
( ISTEN TO WHILETIA//KEA1 PLAYLITi
\ ANY SUGOE5TIOINS'? 7


Whatever else happens, the issue is still jobs


There was a lot to talk about
when House Speaker John
Boehner appeared before
reporters recently for the first time
since the holiday break. There are
continuing fights over Obamacare.
Immigration reform. Appropria-
tions bills. The debt ceiling. The
Democratic push for the presi-
dent's "inequality agenda."
Given all that, what did Boehner
say in his brief remarks? "Our focus
will continue to be on jobs."
'All during the break, I kept hear-
ing from people that they wanted
us to focus on the economy,''
Boehner explained. "The American
people are still asking the question:
Where are the jobs?"
Indeed they are; there are a zillion
polls that prove it. And for Repub-
licans, who aim to keep the House
and win control of the Senate, the
biggest 2014 challenge will be to
keep their own focus on jobs amid
all the other distractions of a hotly
contested election year.
The House GOP leadership met
at a retreat on Maryland's Eastern
Shore recently as it turns out,
right after another dismal jobs
report was released. Boehner and
other top GOP officials are working
on a jobs agenda for the coming
year, which they will present to the
232 members of the House Repub-
lican conference at another retreat
later this month.
It's customary for the leaders to
look at poll data on what issues
Americans think are most impor-
tant in deciding how they will vote
for Congress. In a just-completed
survey that will be part of this
weekend's discussion, the top issue
is no surprise -jobs and the
economy, named by 42 percent of


ByronYork

respondents. Other issues are far
behind health care, at 10 per-
cent; education, at 9 percent; and
federal spending and the deficit,
also at 9 percent. The public's pri-
orities are pretty clear.
In his news conference, Boehner
pointed to "dozens" of jobs-related
bills the House has passed that
have been bottled up by the Sen-
ate's Democratic leaders. Indeed,
there have been many.
The largest group of bills, 13 in
all, deal with energy: The Northern
Route Approval Act (about the Key-
stone XL Pipeline). The Offshore
Energy and Jobs Act. The Protecting
States' Rights to Promote American
Energy Security Act. The Natural
Gas Pipeline Permitting Reform
Act. And more.
On other issues, there is the In-
novation Act. The Small Business
Capital Access and Job Preservation
Act. The Working Families Flex-
ibility Act. The Water Resources
Reform and Development Act. And
still more.
All have gone nowhere in divided
Washington. But now, Hill Repub-
licans believe they have a new
opportunity to make progress. The
disastrous rollout of Obamacare,
they say, has not only reduced the
public's faith in Obama's ability to
handle health care issues. It has
also reduced the public's faith in


the president overall, and has in
addition made voters increasingly
likely to view Obama more as a
cause of the country's problems
than a solution.
"This is a broad reassessment,"
said a plugged-in Republican strat-
egist. "Now the electorate is really
open to hearing alternatives. And
that puts Republicans in a remark-
ably enviable position for a political
party, which is the country wants to
hear what they have to say."
And what House Republicans will
have to say will be about jobs. That
doesn't mean they won't talk about
Obamacare the system's already
serious problems, should they
become acute in coming months,
could demand action, in addition
to being a winning issue for the
GOP It also doesn't mean they can't
talk about spending, a perennial
concern of the party's base. But it
means the main focus will continue
to be jobs.
So many things happen every day
that can distract the attention of
lawmakers. At the Boehner press
conference last Thursday, one re-
porter asked the speaker's thoughts
on the Chris Christie bridge matter.
Another asked about growing
troubles in Iraq. Yet another asked
about immigration.
They're all interesting topics, and
some are even in the purview of
the speaker of the House. But when
it comes to the public's concerns,
Boehner appears determined to
remember that the big question in
2014 is the same as it was in 2009,
2010, 2011,2012 and 2013: Where
are the jobs?

Byron York is chief political correspondent for
The Washington Examiner.


Diminishing the innovation deficit


By Cokie Roberts and Steven V. Roberts

Much has been written
about the national budget
deficit, and for good rea-
son. But America is facing another
shortfall that's just as serious: an
innovation deficit.
As Congress returns to work and
negotiates spending levels for the
next two years, one priority should
be at the top of their list: increased
funding for biomedical research.
This is something Washington
does really well. Ninety percent
of the money supporting basic
research in this country funnels
through the National Institutes of
Health, and many Americans live
longer and stronger lives because of
its work.
The impact is practical as well
as moral. Federal grants boost the
economy, create new jobs and
products and reduce time lost to
debilitating illness.
"The argument that biomedical
research pays a generous return on
investment is well-grounded," says
the Washington Post. "The research
(that) NIH funds is precisely what
we should demand from govern-
ment." As conservative columnist
George Will wrote recently, NIH is
"the federal government at its best."
And yet in a profoundly misguid-
ed policy, NIH funding has stayed
flat for a decade; factor in inflation,
and purchasing power has actually
declined. Moreover, the automatic
spending cuts known as a "seques-
ter" sliced another 5 percent from
the budget last year.
As a result, only about 15 percent
of all grant applications are now
being approved, which is half the
rate of a decade ago. Labs are clos-
ing, layoffs are mounting, graduate


stipends and equipment purchases
are declining. NIH director Francis
Collins tells us that he lives in fear
of turning away a scientist who
might win the Nobel Prize someday.
Meanwhile, foreign competitors
like China and Japan are boosting
their outlays. According to a recent
report in the New England Journal
of Medicine, America's share of
global spending for biomedical
research and development dropped
to 45 percent in 2012, down from 51
percent in 2007.
The research community got
good news in December when Con-
gress shelved the sequester and in-
creased annual federal spending by
$45 billion. But as lawmakers divide
that slightly larger pie, competition
for every dollar will still be fierce,
and biomedical research needs all
the friends it can get.
Hunter Rawlings, the president
of the Association of American
Universities, says it well: 'As we cut,
and then cut some more, and as our
competitors overseas increase their
investments in research and educa-
tion, we create an innovation deficit
that threatens America's global
leadership. This foolish policy must
end."
Yes it must. For one thing, scien-
tific experiments take a long time
and require a high tolerance for
failure. There are not many tasks
that government does better than
private enterprise, but funding
basic research is one of them. Even
Will, an apostle of free markets,
agrees that "in the private sector,
where investors expect a quick
turnaround, it is difficult to find
dollars for a 10-year program."
The widening "innovation deficit"
also discourages young scientists
who wonder whether they will


have the resources in the future to
build a career. We admit to a bias
- we have relatives whose research
depends heavily on NIH funding
- but that also gives us a personal
insight into the crisis.
We know Collins is correct when
he says, "Many young scientists are
on the verge of giving up, taking
with them the talent needed to
make tomorrow's medical break-
throughs". He cites a poll showing
one of five American research-
ers is now considering a move to
another country and adds, "That's
frightening."
The problem is compounded by
another stupid government policy:
strict limits on visas for foreign-
born researchers who studied at
American universities but cannot
get permission to stay and work
here. Countries like Canada and
Germany are wooing them ardently,
deepening our "innovation deficit."
"The biomedical community
is living a paradox," Collins as-
serts. Just as funding is drying up,
medical breakthroughs are more
promising than ever. New vac-
cines to treat AIDS and influenza
are "poised for rapid progress," he
wrote recently in the Post. Brain
research "could mean enormous
advances" in therapies for Alzheim-
er's, Parkinson's and other neuro-
logical disorders.
All this progress could be endan-
gered by the fiscal shortsightedness
that seems to have infected much
of Congress. Not all government
spending is equal. Yes, a sizeable
chunk of it is wasteful and careless.
But some of it is absolutely essen-
tial to America's national interest.

Steve and Cokie Roberts can be contacted by
email at stevecokie@gmail.com.


E
8
E
1 J1 /1 5
1 2014 Jeff Stahier/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS







BCF graduate now has invention on Walmart shelves


Special to the Floridan


When a Baptist College of
Florida graduate entered
the "Get on the Shelf" con-
test she had no idea her
invention would be on the
shelves at Walmart and
on line at www.eastsport.
com.
It was just a sixth-grade
science project for 11-
year-old Christen Wooley
Bell, who attended Suwan-
nee Middle School. The
assignment was to find a
problem and create a so-
lution by inventing some-
thing. For Christen, it was
a simple assignment. But
little did she know that
sixth-grade project would
one day be sold in Walmart
stores across the nation.
"I was asked to come up
with a problem and solve it
by inventing something,"
Christen recalled. "The
problem that I chose was
heavy backpacks, so my
solution was a backpack
that distributed the weight
around the body. This is
how the concept of Vest-
pakz came about."
Vestpakz can be de-
scribed as a vest-like pack
that performs the same
tasks as a backpack, but
distributes the weight
better on the shoulders.
"Actually, I thought it was
pretty neat," Cheryl said.
"We made the first one
from scratch. We cut out


"It's been a longjourney to get it from a science
project to being sold nationwide. I invented the
Vestpqak when I was 11 years old, and now Iam
26, so it definitely wasn't an easy process to go
through."
Christen Wooley Bell,
Inventor of Vestpakz


pieces of fabric and sewed
them together. I said, 'Hey,
this is pretty neat.' It was
different and it actually
worked."
Vestpakz began to take
off when her invention
took first place at Hough-
ton-Mifflin's National In-
vention Convention in
Boston, Mass.
"They flew us back up
to Boston and presented
Christen with an award
and recognition of her
invention," Cheryl said.
"When that happened,
my husband (Michael)
saw the potential, got the
patent process done and
sought a manufacturing
company. We did all we
could to market it."
Vestpakz, LLC is a family-
owned company. Christen
serves as the president,
Cheryl is the chief execu-
tive officer, Bell's brother
Casey Wooley is the execu-
tive vice president and Mi-
chael Wooley is the chief
financial officer.
In 2003, Christen ap-
peared on the Oprah Win-
frey Show's "Million Dollar


Idea Challenge." Christen
has also appeared at the
National Science Teach-
ers Convention and the
Inventors Hall of Fame.
'At age 12, she stood be-
fore a room full of famous
inventors and spoke about
the process of inventing,"
Cheryl said.
Christen's unique story
was published in a school
textbook, "Exploring En-
trepreneurship and Eco-
nomics," designed for
middle and junior high
students.
Arthur Grayer, senior
vice president of backpack
company Eastport, was in-
troduced to the invention
through Walmart. Grayer
said Christen's creativity
to combine a vest and a
backpack and the family's
efforts to promote the in-
vention "hooked" him.
"I was first introduced to
it (Vestpakz) by Walmart,
and I loved the concept,"
Grayer said. "I'm 100 per-
cent handling this product
because I believe in it so
much."
Eastport is Walmart's No.


1 vendor in backpacks.
The family associated with
Eastport last year, and as a
result of the partnership,
Vestpakz will be distrib-
uted in over 100 Walmart
stores nationwide next
week.
"I think the Wooleys are a
marketing machine," Grav-
er said, laughing. "I don't
know if we could market it
was well as they have."
Grayer said the back-
packs will be distributed
to key stores nationwide
to "get a feel for the whole
demographics." Tampa's
Walmart stores are cur-
rently the closest stores
that will carry Vestpakz.
The next step will be to
distribute the product to
1,500-2,000 stores and
then eventually to all 3,500
existing Walmart stores.
Grayer said there is also
some interest in the prod-
uct overseas.
"Nobody has pushed
this product as far as they
have. They believe in it so
strongly. It's great to see
that energy. That hooked
me," Grayer said. "They're
good people. I've worked
very closely with them.
This is a product that's very
close to my heart."
Eastport's headquar-
ters is located in New York
City across from Madison
Square Garden. Due to
the distance and his trav-
eling schedule, Grayer


Ways to save money on a gym membership


From Consumer Reports(R)
Joining a gym is an in-
vestment in your health,
but that doesn't mean you
can't find ways to trim the
cost, says Consumer Re-
ports Money Adviser. Our
annual New Year's resolve
to get in shape means that
clubs sign up more mem-
bers around January than
at any other time of the
year, and they're all com-
peting~for your business.
But there's no reason to
rush. "You can often get
the biggest discount if you
sign up late in the month,
because health clubs have
monthly sales quotas," says
Andrea Metcalf, a certified
trainer and health coach
in Chicago. Consumer
Reports Money Adviser
suggests that you take the
time to research your op-
tions and ways to save:
) Do a trial run. Call health
clubs near your home and
office to ask for a no-com-
mitment trial. Visit at the
times you'll be most likely
to work out. Ask members
what they like and don't
like about the facility,
and get a copy of the fee
schedule.
) Keep an eye on social
media. While you're decid-
ing where to join, look for
additional deals on gym
websites, Facebook and
Twitter, as well as offers on
saving sites like Groupon,
Living Social and Gilt City.
If a gym has a mailing list,
sign up.
) Negotiate your best
deal. When you decide on
a club to join, speak with a
manager, who is more like-
ly to have the clout to ne:-
gotiate. Ask what the cost
would be if you paid for a
year (or more) in full in-


stead of paying month by
month. Also see if you can
get some things you would
usually be willing to pay
for free. If the membership
includes things you won't
use, like child care, classes
or a pool, ask for a reduced
rate that excludes them.
) Be flexible. For instance,
see if a club offers different
levels of membership or
discounts if you agree to
go at non-peak hours or on
non-peak~days.
) Go with a group. Con-
sumer Reports Money
Adviser notes that many
fitness facilities will lower
,their, monthly rates for
large groups. One of the
easiest ways to take ad-


vantage of this benefit is
through your employer.
The Sporting Club in Phil-
adelphia, for example, of-
fers discounts of up to 20
percent to Temple Univer-
sity's full-time employees.
Ask your human resources
department if your em-
ployer has deals with local
clubs.
) Check your insurance.
Some health plans pro-
vide discounts on gyrm
membership. For example,
some United Healthcare
plans reimburse members
up to $240 a year if they
belong to a participating
fitness center.
) Read the contract. One
of the most expensive


charges you might en-
counter is a club's cancel-
lation fee. Although you
might not be able to get
it removed, you should
be aware of the stipula-
tions so you don't get
stuck paying a penalty
for a membership you
can no longer use. You
might have to let the club
know you want to cancel
two months in advance,
for example, or send it a
notarized letter to end the
contract.


said he stays in contact
with the family through
email and other means,
and has worked with them
each step of the way to
achieve the final product.
Christen, now 26, is reap-
ingthe benefits ofhersixth-
grade science project. She
resides in North Carolina
with her husband, Daniel
Bell, who is the minister
of music at Pines Baptist
Church in Knightdale,
North Carolina. Christen
is attending Southeastern
Seminary and working on
a master's in women's
studies.
"It's been a long journey
to get it from a science proj-
ect to being sold nation-
wide. I invented the Vest-
pakz when I was 11 years
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-16A WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2014


STATE


3 vie for GOP nomination in congressional seat


The Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG Re-
publican voters in a large
swath of Pinellas County
will pick one of three can-
didates Tuesday to run in
the general election to fill
the congressional seat of
U.S. Rep. C.W, Bill Young,
who died in October.
The congressional dis-
trict encompasses almost
all of densely populated
Pinellas County, on Flori-
da's Gulf Coast.
Polls were open from 7
am. to 7 p.m. More than
31,000 have already voted
by mail, according to the
Pinellas County Supervi-
sor of Elections website.
Whoever wins the pri-
mary will face Democrat
Alex Sink and Libertar-
ian Lucas Overby in the
March 11. general elec-
tion. That contest is
expected to garner na-
tional attention from both
major political parties -
the race could be a referen-
dum of sorts for President
Barack Obama's health-
care law, or a bellwether
for the 2014 midterm
elections.
The district is con-


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4482 Laf


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This photo taken Nov. 23, shows Florida Republican Congres-
sional candidate David Jolly, (center) talking with supporters
during a campaign rally in Indian Rocks Beach, Fla. Once a sol-
idly Republican bastion of Northern snowbirds and conserva-
tive retirees, this stretch of coastal beach towns and sprawling
subdivisions has moved toward the political middle.


sidered a tossup: it's
backed former President
George W. Bush in 2004
and narrowly supported
Obama twice. The seat has
been held by Republicans
since 1970, when Young
was first elected. He an-
nounced his retirement in
October, shortly before his
death.
One of the candidates in
the race David Jolly -
worked for Young as a con-

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Young's death-bed en-
dorsement, as well as the
backing of Young's widow.
Jolly, who is 41, has a law
degree and has worked as
a lobbyist.
Another candidate, 52-
year-old Kathleen Peters,
was a city commissioner
and mayor in South Pasa-
dena. She is currently a
state representative.
The third candidate, 60-


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Officials: Dad threw toddler over balcony


KISSIMMEE- Authori-
ties say a father threw his
2-year-old son off a sec-
ond-floor, hotel balcony
in central Florida before
jumping himself.
Kissimmee police
responded to the Bud-
get Inn around 2 a.m.
Tuesday. A Department
of Children and Families
news release says Juan
Pablo Maradiaga will face
an attempted murder
charge.
DCF says the toddler


suffered multiple injuries
including several frac-
tures, but is expected to
recover.
The department says
the 41-year-old Maradia-
ga was also hospitalized,
but his condition was not
known.
DCF is in the early
stages of its investigation
and has not made any
changes in the child's
custody.
From wire reports


year-old Mark Bircher, is a
retired brigadier general in
the Marine Corps Reserve.
He is an attorney and com-
mercial airline pilot.
During the campaign,
both Jolly and Peters have
tied Sink to the "Obam-
acare" health care law,
saying that the law needs
major changes. Peters
and Jolly have also criti-
cized each other, with Pe-
ters raising Jolly's past as
a lobbyist as a potential
negative. Jolly, who runs
a consulting firm, said his
Washington experience
makes him the only candi-
date ready to serve without
a learning curve.
Jolly has chided Pe-
ters for not being critical
enough of Obama's health
care reforms in past state-
ments, although she
says the 'law should be
repealed.
There are slightly more
Democrats than Repub-
licans in Pinellas County;
224,422 registered Demo-
crats and 219,106 Repub-
licans. The Supervisor of
Elections office reports
that 169,096 people are
not registered with either
party.


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Obituaries


James and Sikes
Funeral Home
Pinecrest Memorial Gardens
Marianna, Florida

Charlene Reed
Garrawav


Charlene Reed Garraway
passed away on January 2,
2014, after a brief battle
with cancer.
Charlene was the daugh-
ter of the late Charles Reed
and Julia McCaskill
Garraway and the grand-
daughter of J.J. and Evelyn
"Eva" McCaskill, all of Ma-
rianna, FL.
She is survived by sisters:
Julia Elizabeth "Beth"
Garraway, Annapolis, MD,
Mary Evalyn "Meg" Brown,
West Palm Beach FL, and
Catherine McCaskill Cross-
ley (Thomas), Roswell, GA;
Niece, Jennifer Poindexter
(Bradley -- Caroline, Wil-
liam, Tanner),, of Rich-
mond, VA; Nephews: Rob-
ert Brown (Mavis --
Kaitlyn, Amanda and Elyse)
Lake Worth, FL, and Reed
Higgins of Washington,
DC; Aunt, Mary Emily
Feduccia, Niceville, FL;
First Cousins: Macky
McCaskill Gortemoller,
Marianna, FL, -- Michelle
Gortemoller, Ashley Briggs
(Andy), Dexter Gortemoller
(Leslie); Alan Feduccia
(Olivia), Durham, NC, and
Gary Feduccia (Jan),
Niceville;
Charlene was a graduate
of Marianna High School
and was Miss Marianna,
1963.
A graduate of The Florida
State University in Con-
structive Design, and an
avid FSU fan, she loved to
entertain friends with her
special blue crabs during
all FSU games.
Charlene would light up
any room and captivate
others with her smile,
charm, and laughter. She
enjoyed 'family gatherings
and international travel
with her colleagues and sis-
ters. She encouraged her
nieces and nephews in cre-
ative endeavors and cele-
brated all their accom-
plishments. Charlene cele-
brated life to the fullest and
taught others to live in the
moment. Her passion was
art, theater, and dance.
She touched many peo-
ple with her warmth and
kindness, and loved all
creatures, especially her
beloved golden retriever,
IJJVI
She entered the hospitali-
ty industry with the open-
ing of Walt Disney World.
She held positions as direc-
tor of sales, events, con-
vention and catering man-
agement at various hotels,
including the Sheraton
Twin Towers and Marriott
in Orlando. She was execu-


tive vfce president and
owner of Bayway Travel, St
Petersburg.
She was founder and
past president, Orlando
Area Meeting Professionals
International (MPI), past
president and one of the
founders of the Tampa Bay
Area MPI, and on the Inter-
national Board of Direc-
tors. She received numer-
ous citations and awards
for outstanding service and
was included in Who's
Who of Young American
Women.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily prefers donations to a
scholarship fund establish-
ed in Charlene's name or a
charity of your choice.
Donations may be sent to:
Tampa Chapter MPI, 352
NE 3rd Avenue, Delray
Beach,FL,33444.
A memorial service will
be held at the First Presby-
terian Church in Marianna,
FL, on Saturday, January 18
at 2:00 PM (CST), with Rev.
Ted Land officiating. Buri-
al will follow at Pinecrest
Memorial Gardens. The
family will greet friends at
the church at 1:00,PM.
James and Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850-482-2332

Mary Lois
Poole

Mary Lois Poole, 82, of
Dellwood died Sunday,
January 12, 2014.
Mrs. Poole was born in
Blakely GA, on September
16, 1931 to Silas Powell and
Flossie Robinson Powell.
She retired from Florida
State Hospital and was a
member of Welcome As-
sembly of God Church.
She was preceded in
death by her parents; her
husband Everett Poole; two
brothers, Chester and Ho-
well. Powell; one sister
Evelyn Burch.
She is survived by one
son, Wayne Poole and wife,
Wanda; one brother, Lonzo
Powell; three sisters, Lillie
Cloud, Hazeline Mercer all
of Dellwood and Doris
Toole of Graceville; four
grandchildren, Shannon
Lollie, Michelle Powell, Joy
Martin and Everett Wayne
Poole, Jr.; five great grand-
children, Ashleigh Lollie,
Mindy Johnson, Shellsey
Hefner, Dalton Martin and
Austin Martin; two great
great grandchildren, Mil-
ton Johnson and Autumn
Hewett, and a very special
friend Sean Branch.
Funeral service were
held at 2 p.m. Tuesday,
January 14, 2014 at Wel-
come Assembly of God
Church..


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OPTIMISTS MAKE DONATION
SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Marianna
Optimist
Club recently
made a donation
to Cottondale High
School's Project
Graduation efforfs.
Club President
George Gay (left)
presents a check to
O&. ~Cottondale High
School Senior
Wendy Singleton
(center) along with
her mother Tammy
Singleton.



Movie theater shooter appears in court


The Associated Press

WESLEY CHAPEL
- Chad Oulson was de-
scribed by friends as a
man who loved dirt bikes
and his baby daughter.
Curtis Reeves was a re-
tired Tampa police offi-
cer with commendations
who liked riding his mo-
torcycle with his wife.
The men's lives collided
in a movie theater alterca-
tion that left Oulson dead
and Reeves in jail. Oulson
was texting his daughter's
daycare, friends said,
and Reeves got mad. Au-
thorities said Reeves shot
and killed Oulson with a


handgun after the men
exchanged words.
"He must have just
snapped," neighbor Joe
D'Andrea said of Reeves,
describing him as friend-
ly, "stand-up" guy. "I'm
trying to put all of this
together."
Reeves' personnel files
from the police depart-
ment show he led other
agencies in gun safety
training and received
numerous letters of
commendation for his
leadership.
Still, Pasco County Sher-
iff Chris Nocco said Tues-
day: "It didn't matter what
he had done previously


in his life. You don't shoot
someone over a texting
incident."
During Reeves' first
court appearance TMes-
day, Judge Lynn Tepper
ordered the 71-year-old
held without bond on a
second-degree murder
charge pending a bond
hearing.
Pasco County Sheriff's
officials say. Reeves ini-
tially asked Oulson to stop
texting at the theater in
Wesley Chapel, a suburb
about a half-hour north
of downtown Tampa.
Sheriff's Detective Allen
Proctor wrote that Reeves
spoke to 'Oulson dur-


ing the movie previews,
then got up and informed
management.
When Reeves returned
to his seat "additional
words were exchanged"
and Oulson threw a bag
of popcorn at Reeves, the
report said.
After officers read him
his rights, Reeves told
the detective that Oulson
struck him in the face with
an unknown object, and
that's when he removed a
.380 caliber gun from his
pants pocket. The report
said Reeves fired the gun
and struck Oulson once in
the chest and that he "was
in fear of being attacked."


State Briefs


$1,000 US Treasury note
auctioned for $3 million
ORLANDO -A $1,000 U.S.
Treasury note from 1890 has sold
for $3.29 million at a Florida rare
currency auction.
Dallas-based Heritage Auctions
says the note, known as the "Grand
Watermelon note" because of its
large-zero design's resemblance to
the fruit, became the most valu-
able piece of currency in existence
when it was sold last week at the
Florida United Numismatics con-


Building
From Page 1A

Lakey said the potential
assessment can be looked
at two ways. "Just think-
ing about the $59; you can
look at that as a tremen-
dous amount, or you can
divided it out across 365
days; it comes to 16 cents
a day that you're pool-
ing with other people to
get some more paid fire-
fighters on duty, get some
more equipment and stra-
tegically placed stations.
The cities, really, carry the
fire burden for us now to
a large degree and'they're
very important to us. We're


vention auction in Orlando,
A private collection purchased
the note and wished to remain
anonymous.

Man guilty in crash that
killed six people
YULEE A northeast Florida
man has been convicted of caus-
ing a crash that left a Jacksonville
grandmother and five members of
her family dead.
A Nassau County jury found 42-
year-old Pedro Juan Ocasio-Alca-


more a medical unit, I'll
acknowledge that, so we
really need to think more
about the fire side of our
fire rescue service. The as-
sessment could do a lot of
good across the county."
That estimated collec-
tion might be enough to
do some of the things the
county wants to achieve,
Lakey said. Better fire ser-
vice might mean hiring
more paid fire fighters and
stationing them at key lo-
cations across the county,
buying more equipment
and improving or resitu-
ating some of the county's
fire stations. Cities opting
in might be able to access
some of those dollars to
help their volunteer sta-


zar guilty Tuesday of six counts of
vehicular homicide. He faces life in
prison At his Feb. 13 sentencing.
Authorities say Ocasio-Alcazar
was driving recklessly down a rural
stretch of U.S. 1 in April 2010 when
he sideswiped Brenda Mitchell
Edwards' car. The Florida Times-
Union reports that the vehicle was
forced into the median and hit
by a pickup truck towing a trailer.
Edwards, her daughter and four of
her grandchildren were killed.

From wire reports


tions thrive, Lakey said,
but that if they opt out
would not likely get more
help than they already re-
ceive in the county's an-
nual allocation to those
stations.
The county has talked
about the possibility of
moving its existing main
station out of the Marian-
na Industrial Park, since
the city limits have ex-
panded to surround that
area, making fire coverage
more the responsibility of
the city. Lakey said that
is not necessarily what
would happen, though, if
the county obtained the
building on Commercial
Drive. Instead, he said,
the county might leave


an ambulance at the in-
dustrial park location
and put the fire trucks
at Commercial Drive.
Lakey stressed that none
of these scenarios are set
in stone, however, saying
that a lot more work and
planning have to be done
before the county's plan
of attack is ready in the
quest for improved fire
services.
Once the cities let the
county know whether
they're opting into the
assessment, the county
can then go forward with
drafting an enacting or-
dinance, a public hearing
on the ordinance, and po-
tential adoption of the as-
sessment by late June.


Scott
From Page 1A

in November. Lopez-Can-
tera was bom in Madrid,
Spain, but was raised in
Miami.
"He checks all the boxes
for the governor," said Al
Cardenas, former head
of the Florida Republican
Party and chairman of the
American Conservative
Union. "He's a young, His-
panic, talented office hold-
er with a beautiful family,
and a great record."
Scott brushed aside
any talk that his selection
would aid him politically
in a race where polls have
shown him trailing Demo-
crat and former Gov. Char-
lie Crist.
"I picked someone who is
going to help get our state
back to work," Scott said.
Lopez-Cantera down-
played his heritage, say-
ing he didn't want to be
defined by that, but joked
that "there will be a little


more Cuban coffee in the
governor's office."
The new lieutenant gov-
ernor said Scott never men-
tioned needing his help in
reaching the crucial Miami
Hispanic demographic in
the upcoming election.
"We talked about policy is-
sues;" Lopez-Cantera said.
Top Republicans, includ-
ing former Gov. Jeb Bush
and Rubio, praised the
choice.
"Carlos is a great friend
and a phenomenal choice
to be Florida's lieuten-
ant governor," said Ru-
bio, whose wife attended
the announcement. "I've.
known Carlos for three de-
cades and have cherished
his friendship and wise
counsel."
Democrats, however,
portrayed the selection of
Lopez-Cantera as a cynical
move to try to take away
attention from Scott's sup-
port for policies such as his
initial support for an Arizo-
na-styled immigration law
or last year's veto of a bill
that would have allowed


"He's a young, Hispanic, talented office holder with
a beautifidfamily, and a great record."
Al Cardenas,
former head of the Florida Republican Party


some young immigrants
living in the U.S. illegally to
apply for a temporary driv-
er's license. The bill was
passed overwhelmingly by
the Republican-controlled
Legislature.
"This is exactly the kind
of pandering choice that
has made Rick Scott one of
the most unpopular gov-
ernors in America," said
Florida Democratic Party
political director Christian
Ulvert.
Lopez-Cantera will be
sworn into his new job
on Feb. 3. He takes the
place of Jennifer Carroll
who abruptly resigned
in March 2012 after she
was interviewed by law-
enforcement authorities
about work she once did
for a charity that prosecu-
tors have said was a front
for a widespread gambling


ring. She has not been ac-
cused of any wrongdo-
ing and later said she was
forced to resign by the
Scott administration.
Scott is filling the spot
of lieutenant governor a
week after he was sued by
a Tallahassee lobbyist and
political activist for leaving
the position vacant for so
long. Barbara DeVane, who
filed the suit with the Flor-
ida Supreme Court, con-
tended Scott was breaking
a state law that requires
him to appoint a lieuten-
ant governor.
The attorney for DeVane
said Tuesday that the law-
suit will now be withdrawn.
Don Hinkle said that the
"inability" of Scott's law-
yers to defend the vacancy
"played a role in getting the
governor to do his job.
Florida went nearly 100


years without the post of
lieutenant governor un-
til it was revived in 1968.
The job, which pays near-
ly $125,000, has no real
defined responsibilities
besides replacing the gov-
ernor if he leaves office or
dies.
Over the last several
months several names
had emerged as possible
contenders for the job,
but Lopez-Cantera said
the Scott administration
did not reach out to him
about the position until
mid-December.
Financial disclosures
show that Lopez-Cantera
is worth more than $4 mil-
lion and his assets include
a $745,000 home in Miami
as well as a townhome in
Tallahassee and shares in
family businesses.
Lopez-Cantera served
eight years in the Florida
Legislature, rising to the
position of House Majority
Leader from 2010 to 2012.
He was elected property
appraiser in 2012. During
his time in the Legislature


he pushed bills that dealt
with property taxes and
property assessments.
But Lopez-Cantera has
also disagreed with Scott.
When Scott criticized the
level of education funding
in the state budget in 2011,
Lopez-Cantera called the
governor's comments a
"mischaracterization." He
pointed out that legislators
set aside more money for
schools than Scott himself
had recommended.
ButLopez-Canteradown-
played any past disagree-
ments with Scott and said
he shares the governor's
position on items such as
tax cuts and education.
"No two people are go-
ing to be exactly the same
on everything," Lopez-
Cantera said. "We have
the same vision in terms
of where this state needs
to go."
Scott credited what he
called Lopez-Cantera's ex-
perience in cutting taxes
and government regula-
tions as some of the rea-
sons he chose him.


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--- -------


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15,2014 7AF


FROM THE FRONT & STATE




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Chipola Mens Basketball



Chipola men top new NJCAA poll


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent ~jcflondan.com
The Chipola Indians are
the new No. 1 team in the
nation, manning the top
spot in the newest NJCAA
men's basketball poll re-
leased Tuesday.


Chipola (16-1) moved up
from No. 4 in last week's
poll thanks to a pair of
Panhandle Conference
wins and a loss by previ-
ous No. 1 team Northwest
Florida State.
The Raiders fell to No. 7


in the latest poll after los-
ing to Pensacola State on
Saturday to fall to 1-1 in
league play.
The Indians have won
both of their conference
games, knocking off Pen-
sacola State 77-76 on Jan. 4


and winning another close
contest 69-65 over Gulf
O ^ Coast on Jan.

Chipola was
scheduled to
take on Talla-
hassee Community College


on Tuesday night before
playing host to Northwest
Florida State on Saturday.
South Plains College (16-
1) came in at No. 2 in the
NJCAA poll, followed by
North Platte Community
College (14-0), Odessa (15-


1), Indian Hills (14-1), and
Vincennes (18-1) at No.6.
Rounding out the top 10
is Kilgore College (14-1) at
No. 8, Iowa Western (18-
2) at No. 9, and College of
Southern Idaho (17-2) at
No. 10.


MHS BOYS BASKETBAJLL


Marianna's Shaquarious Baker (3) drives into the lane during a game against Blountstown on Monday night in Marianna.


Bulldogs still unbeaten after topping Tigers


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Bulldogs ex-
tended their unbeaten streak
to start the season to 17 games
Monday night with an easy
48-37 victory over the visiting
Blountstown Tigers.
Jamel Johnson and Anta-
vious Leonard scored eight
points apiece to lead the Bull-
dogs in the unusually low-


scoring victory, with Blount-
stown using a stall game plan
to try to limit possessions in
the first half.
The Bulldogs led 8-5 after
one quarter but started to
get some separation from the
Tigers in the second quarter
thanks to forcing a bevy of
turnovers.
After a tip-in by Brian Pender
to start the period, Marianna
picked up three consecutive


steals, the first of which led to
a dunk by Trey Clemmons.
The last two came from MHS
point guard Shaquarious Bak-
er, who found Johnson and
Tommy White for layups to
put Marianna up by 11.
A driving three-point play
by Baker to end the half gave
the Bulldogs a 19-5 halftime
edge.
Blountstown had just two
made field goals in the first 16.


minutes of action and didn't
get a third until 4:47 of the
third period to end a 12-min-
ute drought.
By that time, the Bulldogs
were well in control of the
game, as baskets by Leonard,
Johnson, and a pull-up jump-
er by Herman Williams helped
key a 7-0 run to start the half.

See STRAIGHT, Page 8B


IYJHS Girls Basketball


Bulldogs



drop 4th



straight

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Lady Bulldogs
dropped their fourth straight game
Monday night
in Lynn Ha-
ven, falling
to the Mosley
Lady Dolphins
58-23.
MHS was
coming into the game off of losses to
Sneads, Rutherford, and West Florida,
and in Mosley the Lady Bulldogs faced
a bigger, stronger foe for whom they
couldn't get a handle on.
Mosley jumped out to a 15-8 first
quarter lead and kept the margin at 13
through halftime before blowing the
game open in the second half.
The Lady Dolphins outscored the
Lady Bulldogs 19-7 in the third period
and 30-8 for the second half to im-
prove to 12-8 on the season.
With the loss, Marianna fell to 4-13.
"We started out very flat, and hon-
estly, we were majorly out-manned by
Mosley's size," Lady Bulldogs coach
Chucky Brown said. "They came out
quick on us putting up major points.
We contained what we were supposed
to do early on in the beginning of the
first quarter, but then (Mosley) started
pounding it inside."
The MHS girls weren't helped by the
loss of starting point guard Danielle
Holden.to a knee injury early in the
third quarter, which came after key re-
serve Jaquanna Hughes Went down in
the second period.,
Shaniah Spellman had seven points
to lead Marianna, with Shakira Hands-
ford adding six.
J'niyah Daniels scored 15 points for
Mosley, while Niyah Grady had 14.
Marianna's Friday district loss to
West Florida was far more competi-
tive, with the Lady Jaguars taking a 34-
30 victory.


See BULLDOGS, Page 8B


Chipola Baseball

Alumni weekend set for Feb. 7-8


SPECIALTY FLORIDAN

Chipola baseball alumni,
their families, and fans are
invited to participate in the
20Q14 Chipola College Base-
ball Alumni Weekend set
for Feb. 7-8.
The weekend begins
with two Chipola baseball
games on Feb. 7: Chipola
plays Shelton State at 10
a.m. and Walters State at 1
p.m.
A golf tournament featur-
ing a four-person scramble
format tees off Feb. 7 at
12:30 p.m. at Indian Springs
Golf Club.
All golfers are invited to
tee it up with current and
former Major League Base-
ball alumni, sponsors and
guests.
A casual Alumni Social is
set for later that evening at
7p.m.
The Feb. 8 events kick off
with Chipola vs. Walters
State at 10 a.m., followed
by the annual Alumni
Home Run Derby, Jersey
Retirement Ceremony for
2013 MLB All-Star Patrick
Corbin, a silent auction
during the derb,y and


Chipola baseball alumni, their families, and fans are invited to
participate in the 2014 Chipola College Baseball Alumni Week-
end set for Feb. 7- 8. Pictured from left, are: Honorary Chipola
alumnus Jeff Mathis of the Miami Marlins, Jose Bautista of the
Toronto Blue Jays and Chipola coach Jeff Johnson.


MLB/MiLB autograph ses-
sion to follow.
The annual Alumni Din-
ner will begin at 7 p.m.
with special guest speakers
and entertainment to be
announced.
Chipola coach Jeff John-
son and members of the
Alumni Committee Na-
than Marks (00'), Andrew
Gay (07'), and Jason Bar-
ber (06') invite all former
players and Chipola alum-
ni to join them in support-


ing and participating in the
weekend's events.
"We want to stay in touch
with as many of our alumni
and fans of our program
as possible," Johnson said.
"We invite everyone to
participate in our Alumni
Weekend to have a great
time and support our
Chipola Indians."
For information, vis-
it www.chipola.edu or
phone coach Johnson at
850-718-2237.


MHS CHEERLEADING SQUAD


The Marianna High School Varsity Cheerleaders will travel to
Jacksonville this weekend to compete in the Region 1 FHSAA
cherrleading finals. The state finals are in Kissimmee the last
weekend of the month. Team members are, front row, from left:
Amy Gearhart, Sheridan Dryden, Keionna Mitchell, Allie Hinson,
Cianna Harris, Melissa Garqia, and Cailee Heinemann. Middle row:
Gracelyn Howard, Hannah Jackson, Kayleigh Temples, Kendall Low-
ery, Shelbie Johnson, Kristin Cumbie, and Anastasia Mitchell. Back
row: Zannah Glisson, Bri Godwin, Kylee Barnes, Sydney Holland,
and Morgan Bryan.





-12B WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2014


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


College Football


Muschamp gives Florida's


I coaching staff a new look


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Seen here in a BCS National Championship press conference as FSU's defensive coordinator,
Jeremy Pruitt took the same position with the Georgia Bulldogs. Pruitt has coached on three
straight championship teams, two with Alabama, and most recently with FSU.


Georgia hires FSU's



Pruitt to head defense


The Associated Press

ATHENS, Ga. Georgia
coach Mark Richt moved
quickly to name a new de-
fensive coordinator, hiring
Jeremy Pruitt from Florida
State on Tuesday, only
two days after losing Todd
Grantham to Louisville.
Richt said he is "ecstatic"
to add Pruitt to the Georgia
staff. Pruitt has coached
on three straight national
championship teams at Al-
abama and Florida State.
Under Pruitt, undefeat-
ed Florida State led the
nation in scoring defense,
allowing 12.1 points per


game, and ranked third
in total defense while
winning the national
championship.
.Pruitt also was Florida
State's defensive backs
coach, and the Seminoles
ranked second in the na-
tion in passing efficiency
defense.
Pruitt, who was in Ath-
ens on Tuesday, said the
move to Georgia "is an out-
standing professional and
personal opportunity."
"I'm looking forward to
meeting the current play-
ers and getting on the
road to visit with recruits,"
Pruitt said.


Georgia expects to return
10 starters on defense.
Pruitt already has a close
relationship with at least
one Georgia assistant
coach.
Pruitt began his playing
career at Middle Tennessee
State before transferring
to Alabama, where he was
roommates with Georgia
offensive line coach Will
Friend.
Georgia did not release
terms of Pruitt's contract.
Grantham was earning
$850,000. Pruitt, 39, earned
$500,000 in 2013 and was
expected to receive a raise
at Florida State.


The Associated Press

GAINESVILLE- Florida
coach Will Muschamp is
in a considerably better
mood these days.
Maybe it's his new assis-
tants. Maybe it's his new
offensive scheme. Maybe
it's just a new year.
After the program's
worst season since 1979,
Muschamp made signifi-
cant changes and not
just to his staff.
Muschamp introduced
three new coaches Mon-
day offensive coordina-
tor Kurt Roper, offensive
line coach Mike Summers
and special teams coor-
dinator Coleman Hutzler
- and announced plans
to install a hurry-up of-
fensive scheme that will
include spread elements.
"We needed more tem-
po, we needed to create
more snaps, we needed
to create more space
plays," said Muschamp,
who grew increasingly
frustrated with every loss
last season. "I felt like be-
ing in the gun would help
some of our personnel,
and that's where .we're
headed."
The Gators lost their fi-
nal seven games in 2013,
finished 4-8 and missed
a bowl game for the first
time since 1990. The of-


CHS Girls Basketball


CHS girls fall to Bethlehem


BYDUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Bethlehem Lady
Wildcats dealt the Cot-
tondale Lady Hornets
their 17th loss of the sea-
son Monday night in.
Cottondale, winning
55-43.
Bethlehem jumped out
to a 23-9 lead to start the
game, but Cottondale set-
tled down and rallied back
to cut the deficit to nine at
halftime.
The Lady Hornets trailed
by just nine early in the


fourth quarter, but an easy
basket for Bethlehem out
of a timeout followed by a
pair of point-blank misses
for Cottondale allowed the
Lady Wildcats to pull away
for good.
Arionna Johnson scored
17 points to lead the Lady
Hornets, while Brooklyne
Brown added 10,
"We started out slow,
but once we started to get
into a rhythm we started
making some shots and
got back in it," Cottondale
coach Shan Pittman said.
"But it was too late.


"That first quarter hole
put us too far behind. We
made a little bit of a run,
but we made a couple of
mental mistakes that cost
us."
The Lady Hornets were
coming off 'their fourth
win of the season last week
against district and county
rival Graceville, and the
coach said that despite
Monday's loss, she believes
the past two games are
evidence that her team is
making progress amid all
of the season's struggles.
"I feel like these past two


games we played the best
we've played all season,"
Pittman said. "I think
they're finally figuring it
out offensively and defen-
sively and starting to get a
little better understanding
of the game.
"Fundamentally, it's
starting to make more
sense to them."
Cottondale was sched-
uled. to play Wewahitchka
on the road Tuesday night
,before finishing the week
with another road dis-
trict game Friday against
Sneads at 4 p.mn.


Sports Briefs


High School Boys Basketball
Thursday- Graceville at Blountstown, 6 p.m. and 7:30
p.m.
Friday- Cottondale at Sneads, 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.;
Walton at Marianna, 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Saturday- Marianna at Rutherford, 5:30 p.m. and 7
p.m.; Sneads at North Florida Christian, 4 p.m. and
5:30 p.m.
*The Marianna vs. Graceville boys basketball game
previously scheduled for Jan. 7 will be played instead
on Tuesday, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, at 6:30 p.m.
preceded by the junior varsity game at 5 p.m.

High School Girls Basketball
Thursday- Graceville at Blountstown, 4:30 p.m.; Mari-
anna at Walton, 5:30 p.m.
Friday- Cottondale at Sneads, 4 p.m.
Saturday- Sneads at North Florida Christian, 2:30
p.m.

Chipola Basketball
Chipola men's and women's basketball teams will end
the week at home Saturday against Northwest Florida
State, with the women's game tipping at 5:30 p.m. fol-
lowed by the men at 7:30 p.m.

Southern Elite Softball
Tryouts for the girls' Southern Elite softball travel
team will be held at the Alford recreation park on Jan.
19 at 2 p.m. for ages IOU, 12U and 14U. For more infor-
mation, call 850-272-2109.


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Jackson County Travel Baseball
Jackson County Baseball will have tryouts for 9U
travel baseball Jan. 18 from noon to 3 p.m. at Jennings
Field in Marianna.
Those attending will need baseball pants, cleats, and
a glove, and players from Jackson County and sur-
rounding counties are all invited. Those who attend
will also be entered into a drawing for a chance to win
a $30 gift card from Hibbett Sports.
For any further information, call 209-5834 or
557-0419.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to editorial@jcfloridan.com, or
fax them to 850-482-4478. The mailing address for the
paper is Jackson County Floridan PO. Box 520 Mari-
anna, FL 32447.
















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fense was the primary
problem, finishing 113th
in the nation in -total
yards.
Muschamp responded
by firing offensive coor-
dinator Brent Pease and
offensive line coach Tim
Davis less than 24 hours
after the season ended.
Special teams coordina-
tor Jeff Choate resigned in
December to take a similar
position at Washington.
Their replacements
are tasked with helping
Florida get back on track
- and in a hurry.
It's unlikely that Mus-
champ, who is 21-16 in
three seasons at Florida,
will get more than a sea-
son to turn things around.
So the Gators have to find
some quick fixes to the of-
fense, and going with an
up-tempo scheme can be
an equalizer.
"If you can play the game
with some tempo and
speed and you can play


if in space, you can cre-
ate as many .1-on-1 tackle
opportunities as you can,"
said Roper, who left Duke
to join Muschamp.
"If you can create a
bunch of 1-on-1 tackle op-
portunities, then you have
a chance to have positive
yards, and positive yards
keep you on the field. Our
whole philosophy on of-
fense is points per game.
It's not yards. It's not going
up and down the field. It's
how many points we can
get.
"Playing the game in
space creates more oppor-
tunities to score points."
Florida hasn't been the.
same offensively since
2007 HeismanTrophywin-
ner Tim Tebow left school.
The Gators ranked 82nd
in total offense in 2010,
105th in 2011 and 103rd
in 2012. Some believe it's
a talent issue; others insist
it's a talent-development
issue.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


lions hire ex-Colts



coach Jim Caldwell


The Associated Press

ALLEN PARK, Mich. -
The Detroit Lions wanted
to replace Jim Schwartz
with someone with experi-
ence as a head coach.
The Lions landed one,
though he appears to be
Plan B.
The team said Tuesday
that Jim Caldwell has been
hired as the new coach
and will be introduced at a
news conference Wednes-
day. San Diego Chargers
assistant and former Ari-
zona Cardinals coach Ken
Whisenhunt was seeming-
ly Detroit's top choice, but
he chose to take the head
coaching job' at Tennessee
on Monday night.
The Lions are giving
Caldwell another chance
to be an NFL head coach.
He helped the Indianapo-
lis Colts reach the Super
Bowl after his debut season
in 2009, but was fired two
years later after a 2-14 sea-
son while Peyton Manning
was injured, dropping his
three-year mark to 26-22.
"We believe Jim is the
right man to lead our team
and deliver a champion-
ship to our fans," Lions
owner William Clay Ford
said in a statement.
Caldwell was hired by
Baltimore two years ago
to be their quarterbacks
coach and was promoted
to offensive coordinator
late in the 2012 season. The
Ravens went on to win the
last Super Bowl.
"I'm excited because he


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jim Caldwell led Indianapolis to the Super Bowl in his first season
as head coach. He went 26-22 in three seasons with the Colts.


has worked with some
good coaches and he did
a good job with the Colts,"
Lions offensive guard Rob
Sims said in a telephone
interview. "Players seem
to like him, so I'm looking
forward to being a part of
the next chapter of Detroit
Lions football with him
leading us."
The Ravens, though,
struggled on offense in
2013 and might've re-
placed Caldwell if he didn't
get another job. Baltimore
ranked 29th on offense
overall 30th rushing and
18th passing last season


with Super Bowl-winning
quarterback Joe Flacco and
running back Ray Rice.
Caldwell's body of work
was enough to also make
him a candidate to lead the
Washington Redskins and
Titans. Former Tennessee
coach Mike Munchak and
ex-'Houston Texans coach
Gary Kubiak were also con-
sidered by the Lions.
Caldwell won his first 14
games with the Colts in
2009 before losing the final
two games of the regular
season while resting Man-
ning and most of the other
starters.


Brees says he'll be flexible


The Associated Press,

METAIRIE, La. Af-
ter leading the Saints to a
fourth playoff appearance
in five seasons, Drew Brees
expressed confidence in
the direction of his team
and, perhaps more impor-
tantly, showed a willing-
ness to listen to contract
proposals if the team needs
his help getting under the
NFL's salary cap.
"Listen, I get compen-
sated very well. I don't take
that for granted for one
second," Brees said Mon-
day, referring to the five-
year, $100 million deal he
signed in 2012.
"But I play this game be-
cause I love this game, I
love this locker room and I
love the opportunity to win
a championship.
"If they want to come to
me and extend me even
further, that'd be great,"
Brees said. "Whatever helps
this team win and puts the
best team on the field."
With Sean Payton re-
turning from his bounty
suspension, the Saints im-
proved their regular-sea-
son record from 7-9 to 11-
5, then won the franchise's
first road playoff game in
six tries, beating the Eagles
in Philadelphia in the wild
card round before falling at
top-seeded Seattle, 23-15
on Saturday.
Brees eclipsed 5,000
yards passing for a third
straight season to go with
39 touchdowns.
Meanwhile, New Orleans'
defense went from worst
in the league a year ago to
fourth in total defense un-
der first-year coordinator
Rob Ryan. And that im-
provement came despite a
rash of injuries.
All in all, it looks as if the
Saints aren't far off from
Super Bowl contention
- if they can find the sal-
ary cap space to keep some
top free agents such as
tight end Jimmy Graham,
who led New Orleans with
1,215 yards receiving and
16 touchdowns.
Brees' contract calls for.
him to have a base salary
of $10.75 million next sea-
son, which along with his
pro-rated $37 million sign-
ing bonus will put his 2014


Drew Brees is willing to do whatever it takes to benefit himself
and the Saints, even if it means taking a cut in salary.
salary cap figure above $18 another year by placing the
million.- franchise tag on the four-
Graham has said his year veteran; but players
preference would be' to and teams generally pre-
remain with Brees in New fer to avoid that route and
Orleans. The Saints can seek long-term extensions
secure Graham for at least instead.


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NFL


Judge: $765M might not


cover concussion claims


The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA A
federal judge is slowing
down the proposed $765
million settlement of NFL
concussion claims, ques-
tioning if there's enough
money to cover 20,000 re-
tired players.
U.S. District Judge Anita
B. Brody denied prelimi-
nary approval of the plan
Tuesdaybecause she'swor-
ried the money could run
out sooner than expected.
She also raised concerns
that anyone who gets con-
cussion damages from the
NFL would be barred from
suing the NCAA or other
amateur football leagues.
"I am primarily con-,
cerned that not all retired
NFL football players who
ultimately receive a quali-
fying diagnosis or their
(families) ... will be paid,"
Brody wrote in a 12-page
opinion issued Tuesday.
The proposed settle-
ment, negotiated over
several months, is de-
signed to last at least 65
years.
The awards would vary
based on an ex-player's
age and diagnosis. A
younger retiree with Lou
Gehrig's disease would
get $5 million, those with
serious dementia cases
would get $3 million
and an 80-year-old with
early dementia would get
$25,000. Retirees with-
out symptoms would get
baseline screening, and
follow-up care if needed.
"Even if only 10 percent
of retired NFL football
players eventually receive
a qualifying diagnosis, it
is difficult to see how the
Monetary Award Fund
would have the funds
available over its lifespan,
to pay all claimants at i
these significant award
levels," Brody wrote.
She asked for more
raw financial data be-
fore scheduling a fairness
hearing later this year,
when objectors can ques-
tion or opt out of the plan.
Some critics believe the
NFL, with more than $9
billionin annual revenues,


Judge Anita Brody denied
preliminary approval of a $765
million settlement, stating
that it may not be enough for
the retired players.
was getting away lightly.
But the players' lawyers
said they will face huge
challenges just to get the
case to trial. They would
have to prove the injuries
were linked to the players'
NFL service and should
not be handled through
league arbitration.
Sol Weiss, a lead law-


yer for the ex-players,
remained confident the
class-actionsettlementwill
ultimately be approved.
"I am very confident that
the (actuarial) people we
used are right, and that
there will be enough mon-
ey to cover these claims for
65 years," Weiss said.
Greg Aiello, an NFL
spokesman, said the
league was "confident
that the settlement is fair
and adequate, and look
forward to demonstrating
that to the court."
More than 4,500 former
players have filed suit,
some accusing the league
of fraud for its handling of
concussions. They include
former Dallas Cowboys
running back Tony Dorsett
and Super Bowl-winning
quarterback Jim McMa-
hon, who suffers from
dementia.


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MORE ABOUT YOUR YOU GREW UP?
EARLY A GREAT
LIFEP TO ARTI ST'.






SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI


WANTED5...TO...BE-.
GREAT...ARTIST.
GOT IT.

I---- ,


AND WHEN EXACTLY
DID THAT DREAM
WITHER. AD DIE?
\ ANY -jBk
MtlINUTE -
NOW.


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


ARLO &JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON
i ~I F


1> Ny AoeeAoce, anoxc -y
\->

HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


HERMAN*
l.]5 C L.,q..nbarOQl Dil SC t~~l.J UOc toLfrS 514

"Now, don't forget what the judge said
about getting violent if you lose."


ACROSS
1 Rain icy
pellets
5 Youth
8 Mr.
Stravinsky
12 Coax
13MPG
monitor
14Tidy
15Cattail
16 Relax
18 Debated
20 Golf
scores
21 Vane dir.
22Sinbad's
transport
23 Excalibur
26 Proof of
purchase
(2 wds.)
29"- &
Clark"
30 Actress
Tyne -
31 Milne
marsupial
33Cen.
fractions
34Nota -
35 Put together
36 Vandalize
38 Farm
machine
39 Wood for
floors
40 Hold close


41 Garden
green
43 Scarcely
46 Rocks
48 Can't do
without
50 Roman
historian
51 Drain, as
energy
52 Cheerio!
(hyph.)
53 Sufficient,
in verse
54 LP
successors
55Similar

DOWN
1 "Ben- -"
2 General
vicinity
3 Disney CEO
Bob -
4 Books that
get cooked
5 River em-
bankment
6 Imitated
7 Mr. Ham-
marskjold
8 Whole
9 Equipment
10 Dobbin's
dinner
11 Country
addr.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

T O'Y T;AlPS PIOU:F
EVWA EVE R ELS E
RAANCERS SER
BEE TRI

P1 UI 11 R ii
EALLo I NRDE VAL
A NiA FR A A E
TA R HEAD HD
BAL SCIl
NY LJON EKN
LAMOIR WIANDIERER
ICON KIAY E I C E
L A K E SH|E|D sKY
17Type 37Tailor
glue shadow
19Sturm 38Chestnut
Drang hull
22 Audition. 40 Briefcase
goal closer
23 Sneaky 41 Zen riddle
24Writer's 42Graph
unit starter
25 Belgian 43 Headless
river nail
44 Faucet
26 Nuisance problem
27 Kind of 45Sasquatch
tradition cousin
28Jab 46Pre-A.D.
30 Knock flat 47 PC key
32 Above, to 49 Karate
Tennyson level
34 Bleated
35 Fuchsia


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


1-15 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each better In the cipher stands tor another.

"FMSKSXD SJ NX YHYMOSJY SX

JOCWLKCMY, OTSLLSXD NFNA NK KTY

MBOU CXKSW ABC ESXZ KTY XBJY."

- XBGYWSJK JKNXWYA YWUSX


Previous Solution: "Do not judge me by my successes, judge me by how many
times I fell down and got back up again." Nelson Mandela
TODAY'S CLUE: Pjsienb03
2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-15


Horoscope

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Keep everything out
in the open so you can deal
with issues as they arise.
You must clear up any
misunderstandings.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Don't waste the day.
There is too much to do,
and too little time. Secrets
are apparent, and they
must be considered.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Take a chance and
try something unique.
Look for ways to utilize
what you have to offer in
more diverse ways.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -Avoid altercations.
Partnership problems
will escalate if you aren't
willing to compromise. A
common-sense approach
will pay off.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -Take a chance, and
present what you have to,
offer. Showing your skills
will be more effective than
talking about them.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-You'll be tempted by an
offer that is based on hear-
say rather than facts.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Relationships and
mingling with people
who share your inter-
ests will bring exciting
opportunities.
LEO (July-23-Aug. 22)
-Watch your back today,
especially when dealing
with financial, legal or
medical issues. Confabu-
late with allies before tak-
ing a chance.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-Your suggestions will
be well-received. Don't
let anyone take you for
granted. People from your
past will reappear.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
Stay calm and rely on
your ability to deliver in-
formation with intelligence
and passion. Don't allow
anger to come between
you and your goals.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Enjoy the moment,
take part in unique activi-
ties and developxelation-
ships that will be of use to
you in the future. -
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -Keep an eye on
your personal papers and
concerns. Be prepared to
make a move toward your
goals.


Axunie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: I'm a divorcedwoman
who was married to a self-centered man
for 30 years. He often told me that if I
thought there was something better out
there to not let the door hit me on the
way out. I finally took him up on it.
For the past three years, I've been dat-
ing "Ted," also divorced. He is smart and
successful, and we are perfect together in
every way. Here is the problem: Ted is not
ready to marry. He told me his marriage
ended because there was no passion. He
fears if we live together, the physical at-
traction we feel for each other will die.
Ted and I spend weekends together
and travel often. I don't want to live alone
for the rest of my life. But if Ted isn't
ready after three years, I doubt he ever
will be. Is it time for me to walk?
-THOUGHT I'D FOUND THE ONE
Dear Thought: Ted may be skittish
about commitment, but that is his issue,
and he is making it yours. Some women
are content with a no-strings relation-
ship with someone they find compat-
ible. But if you are looking for marriage,
you will have to set Ted free and look
elsewhere. We realize you have put a lot
of effort, energy and emotion into this
relationship, but if the end result makes
you unhappy and anxious, Ted is not the


right person for you.

Dear Annie: I must reply to all the
mothers-in-law who write to you and
can't understand why they are treated
so unfairly by their daughters-in-law.
My mother-in-law has been incredibly
mean to me from the first time I met
her. She deliberately does not include
me in many of the family functions. She
promises my children outings and never
follows through. She and her daughter
have been the nightmares of my life.
My husband feels I should "be the
better person" and just ignore their
behavior.
THE OTHER SIDE OF THE STORY
Dear Other Side: Has-your husband
stood up for you with his family? Does
he say, "My wife must be invited to these
family functions, or I will not attend"?
Does he tell his mother that the children
no longer believe her promises and it
hurts her relationship with them? If he
thinks sweeping Mom's behavior under
the rug will make things better, he is
mistaken. It is cowardly Mom will learn
to respect you as a member of-her fam-
ily if her son makes it clear to her that
this is not optional and there are clear
consequences.


Bridge


When an average golfer gets a birdie
(one under par), it is anticipated that he
will make a mess of the next hole. But not
a pro. However, what do you think is the
worst score by a pro immediately after
making a hole in one?
In golf, you try to place your ball well
for your next shot. This also applies in
bridge. Are your cards meshing well or
badly with partner's hand?
Look only at the North hand. South
opens one heart, North raises to two
hearts, and South rebids two spades.
What should North do now?
Before you answer that question, what
does South's two-spade rebid show?
It indicates a hand too strong to pass
out two hearts, but too weak to jump to
four hearts. He is showing four spades
and a hand with six losers (here, one
spade, one heart, three diamonds and
one club). South is asking North to look


North 01-15-14
* Q 7 4
10 8 7 3
* J 6 5
t6 A 4 2


West
4! 10 8 5
V 6 5 2
iA Q 9
*J 8 7 3


East
9 6 2
T Q
K 10 7 4
K 10 9 6 5
South
* A K J 3
V A K J 9 4
*8 3 2
*Q


in particular
at his hold-
ings in the
majors.
North has a
useful spade
queen, four
trumps (a
nine-card fit
is much bet-


Dealer: South ter than an
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East eight-carder)
iV Pass 2 V Pass and an ace.
24 Pass 7??Yes, he has
Opening lead: + 3 only seven
high-card points and 4-3-3-3 distribu-
tion, but since his hand has those three
pluses, he should jump to four hearts.
Agreed, on a bad day, declarer will lose
three diamonds and one heart, but the
odds make this game worth bidding, and
it succeeds here.





CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, January 15, 2014-53 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors In advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

For d 0eadiesclltllfS eo vst w jfoidan0 S com6


(9) ANNOUNCEMENTS



Storewide Sale Starting at
/ 20% off Furniture
/ 30% off Accessories
/*40% off Glassware
if50% off Pictures
107 S. heroke


($)


FINANCIAL


BUSIN E SSOPPORTUNI
Consignment Shop in Dothan FOR SALE
specializing in clothing & acc. for women.
Well established with over 400 consignors
& a growing customer base, sates of
100K + yr. Unlimited potential for increase
sales & expansion. Store fixtures, eqiup,
& database included, Will train new owner.
Leave message at 334-677-5113

Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
4 504-915-1474 4

(?) MERCHANDISE
FURNITUREl= HOUSEHOLDITEMS
AMF Playmaster Pool Table- Red felt 4x8. Very
good condition. All accessories included. Buy-
er responsible for moving. Located in Enter-
prise. $1750.00 OBO. Call or text 334-806-6004.


DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
NEEDED I BUY SEALED!
UNEXPIRED BOXES
CALL BOB (334) 219-4697
OR (850) 710-0189

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
MISCELA O FR
RN Program Textbooks Six books have never
been used and those that were factory shrink
plastic wrapped still are. At Chipola College
bookstore these 6 are sold in a bundle for $317
+ tax. 1. All-in-One Care Planning Resource
(3rd Ed.; 2. Comp. Review for NCLEX Exam (5th
Ed.) ; 3. Mosby's Nursing Drug Guide (10th Ed.)
; 4. Mosby's Med. Dictionary of Nursing (9th
Ed:)5. Mosby's Diagnostic Test Ref (11 Ed.) ; 6.
Custom eBook Library for all the above.
(Pageburst) Textbooks above are 2nd bundle
for RN prog. @ Chipola. Also have 1st bundle
some never used all in excellent cond. (pd.
$734) other items required for program.
Would consider breaking bundle IF I could sell
2 or more to individual. Call 850-274-8776.

Dinette set, oval w/ leaf, maple $100. Book
shelves 2 white 71h 25w $20. ea 592-3261
French Provencial Dresser/Desk and
Lingerie Chest. $25. each. 850-592-3261.
Gun Ruger Model P85 Mark II automatic
9 mm $400.850-643-5887
Lift Chair by Tranquil, blue with heat and
massage, new condition. 850-526-1230
Pistol. Kahr PM 40 concealed carry pistol.
Stainless. Comfort grip. 2 mags. 2 concealed
carry holsters. Less than 50 rounds shot. Like
new. $500. 334-701-7149.
Proform Elliptical Exercise $125. 45" glass top
table w/ 4 chairs $200. both like new 526-2952
Refrigerator Mayag, white, like new $250. 850-
693-4277 Call 9am 7pm


Clean Your Closet...


...Collect Some Cash


(*) PETS


& ANIMALS


1 -r Free Rescued Dogs Black Labs, Beautiful
Pitts, Lab Mixes, Small Mixed Breeds,
2 f & m Beagles 6 mo. old mix 2-sm. Terriers
Springer Spaniel All Shots Call 334-791-7312
Adorable 5 mo. old female Peek-a-poo puppy
with papers, all shots for 1st yr. house trained,
must sell, loves kids $240. 334-805-4f80
AKC Reg. Dachshund mini (7) Ready Jan 24.
Vet checked/shots, some Dapple
$250. 850-263-0357
All left over Christmas Babies are on sale!!
Yorkies, Shorkie, Yorkies Mixes and
Japanese Chin Mixes 334-718-4886
Boston Terrier Puppies vet checked, w/ health
certificate guarantee, Parents on site.
$350. $275. 850-547-9351 or 850-849-0176
For Sale AKC German Shepherd Puppies -
Black/Tan. 3 Males $350. Parents on site.
Call 334-393-7284 OR 334-806-5851.
Looking For The Best Family Pet? This is the
Best I Have Ever Had the Pleasure to Share my
Home With!!!Mother is 1/2 Great Dane, 1/2
Standard Poodle Hybrid; Father is AKC Stand-
ard Poodle. All AKC Linage provided. Pups are
3/4 Standard Poodle and 1/4 Great Dane. Coats
range from smooth to wire hair with solid col-
ors of Apricots, Creams and Blacks. (One Black
with a touch of white!) Born Dec 7th,13. Availa-
ble Feb 7th. Health cert. all shots/worming up
to date. Tails docked for your convenience!
Best in Breed traits! No genetic defects! Not a
breeder or puppy mill! A onetime opportunity!
No more litters available through our Great
Danoodle! Please contact 334-565-3067
Days/334-685-0144 Nites/wkends Rochelle
Miniature Dachshund Puppies CKC registered.
Available Feb. 14. F bik/tan, M choc, M Dapple,
M piebald/dapple. $500. 334-403-8376
Yorkles, 2 females, $200 & $400. Pomeranians,
1 tan female, $350. 1 black and white male,
$300. 1 solid black male $250. 1 male Border
Collie, $350. All are purebred and registered,
up to date on shots and worming, ready to go.
334-796-5267 or 334-790-5077
(6) FARMER'S MARKET


GREEN FROZEN
PEANUTS
*We also have
shelled peanuts
850-352-4423
850-209-3322 or 850-573-6594
^ 4128 Hwy 231


BULK WHEAT
for Sale
$9.00 per bussell
#229-246-1340 4a

MADDOX FARMS I
|I|R>Q Beautiful Bermuda Coastal Hay
*l Round Rolls $50 4 Square $5
I ~-~Call 334-791-0023

Top Quality Coastal Bermuda
Hay- Large Rolls
Fertilized & Weed Control
850-209-9145


MADDOX FARMST
t'^'i *Horse Boarding
*Vf. (barn or pastures)
Beautiful Trails
LExcellent Care
Call 334-791-0023 or 334-791-7312


Buying Pihe/Hardwood in
your area.
NotracttoosmaBll / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
I 334-389-2003


(01)


EMPLOYMENT


5- VJackson
0 w Hospital

PAYROLL/AP CLERK

Jackson Hospital, a 100 bed fully
accredited acute care facility located in
Marianna, Florida, has an immediate
opening for a full-time Payroll/AP Clerk.
Experience with Microsoft Excel is
required. Knowledge of state/federal
payroll filing requirements and
sales/rental tax reporting is preferred.
* Minimum of 5 years payroll experience
required. Hours are 7:OOA-3:30P
Monday through Friday.

Jackson Hospital offers a competitive
salary with previous experience
compensation and full-time benefits
including medical, dental, life, long and
short term disability and retirement
Interested applicants should
send resume to:

HUMAN RESOURCES
JACKSON HOSPITAL
P.O. BOX 1608
4250 Hospital Drive
Marianna, FL 32447
(850) 718-2626
EOE


r....................................................................1
Press Operator
Dothan Eagle has an immediate opening for a press operator. Responsibilities include setup,
operation, repair and maintenance of Press/Plate Making Equipment, meeting company
guidelines to produce high quality products within strict deadlines. Successful candidate
must be capable of maintaining a clean work environment while following company safety
guidelines and adhere to production print schedules and employee work schedules to coincide
with production schedules. Must fully comply with all company policies and procedures and
at all times when representing the company, operate in a thorough professional manner
including communication, attendance, punctuality, and dress.
This position requires a minimum two years production line experience, strong mechanical
background, or printing experience. High school graduate or equivalent preferred.
Company benefits including medical, dental, vision, paid vacation, and 401K.
Pre-employment drug and background screen required. EOE/M/F/D/V.
You may apply on line at: www.bhmginc.com
or you may send your resume to:
Charlie Gibson, Dothan Eagle, 227 North Oates Street, Dothan, AL 36303.
L .................................................................


Sudoku


---_ -_ ---


7 9


9.751 8 41
__- -_ --9-




61 8 14 111

81 1273.5*9



4 9

6 7
-_ 1_ -_ _-


2014 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.


Level: U F2_
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9.. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to Tuesday's puzzle


9 1724.38 85 6

564,879,512312





56452 8_A 67 1
4-A 5-A 2 39 67
1_9__3, _5__6 74 ^2_ 8


1/15/14


Fast, easy, no pressure
S\ \ ,Pace an A d 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

'I\\\ www.jcfloridan.com


0 EE3


JUST BROWE





6B Wednesday. January 15, 2014 Jackson County Floridan


25 Drivers

Trainees

NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for
Werner Enterprises
Earn $800 per week!
No experience needed!
Local CDL Training
job ready in 15 days!

1-888-368-2198


Now Hiring
CREW CHIEF and INSTRUMENT PERSON
4 850-526-3991 4


CLASSIFIED


GENERALEMPLOYMENT GENERAL EMPLOYMENT


FAMILYT)._I17
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA
Now Hiring Full Time
1st shift Class B Trailer Technician
Requirements: Minimum of 3 years
experience in heavy-duty trailer
maintenance or 2 years experience in
heavy-duty trailer maintenance with a
Diesel/Auto technical School Degree.
Hydraulics experience preferred. Current
brake certification and proper certification
to perform FHWA inspections preferred.
Competitive Pay and
Benefits Pakckage!
Please apply in person at,
Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway.
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must be 18 Years Old
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace


Seeking Dynamic and Innovative
Managing Editor
The Dothan Eagle, a 26,000 daily newspaper located in Dothan, Al, is seeking a superstar
Managing Editor. We are a BH Media company located in Southeast Al just 80 miles from
the sugar white beaches on the Gulf of Mexico. We have sister weekly and dairy publications
in Marianna Florida, Enterprise Al, Eufaula Al, and Opelika, Al. The paper seeks a deadline-
oriented all-purpose editor with a strong passion for local content. The position requires
competency and experience in all areas including staff supervision, reporting, editing,
page design, social media, photography and online news presentation.
QUALIFICATIONS:
* Candidates must have a proven track record of successfully managing day to day
operations of an active newsroom.
* This position requires brilliant news judgment, strong leadership and coaching skills,
solid community relations and a passion for both digital and print journalism.
* You must demonstrate extremely innovative thinking all while maintaining a good
sense of humor and positive attitude.
* The ideal candidate will have at least TEN years experience in journalism with a
minimum of five years of experience as an assigning and supervising editor.
* Daily newspaper newsroom and digital media experience is a must.
* Strong ability to meet deadlines consistently and perform under pressure.
* Journalism degree from a reputable college or university.

The paper offers an outstanding benefits package that
includes vacation, quality health insurance and a 401K plan.
EOE/M/F/D/V.
Pre-employment drug and background screen required.

You may apply online at www.bhmginc.com


I


I)
'V -


C R.ijN WORm & 0OAI NGS
6Jones Concrete, LLC
Travis Jones
Free Estimates/Reasonable Rates
House Slabs Sidewalks
Driveways & Pole Barns
850-693-5812 30+ Years Experience










Dozer and Excavation Work
Ponds Road Building Demolition
Pine Tree Planting Herbicide Spraying
Fire Line Plowing Burning
SA850-762-9402
C1yVeIUUa Cell 850-832-5055
clayslandclearing@gmail.com


NEW&USEDTIRES
NEW TINES BELOW RETAIL PRICEKI
TRIPLE



wfe W4 -'71,Uffe94

850.526.1700
Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
2978 Pierce Street (behind Tim s Florist)


Library Director Pos#122
Master's degree in Library Science and 3 to 5
years of progressively responsible experience
in a public library setting, including adminis-
trative supervisory duties; or any equivalent
combination of training and experience
which provides the required knowledge, skills
and abilities. Fqr Library information visit
their website at www.jcplfl.org.
Starting Salary: $48,676.00/yr.

Administrative Support II
Pay Grade 13 Road Dept Pos#211
High school graduate or its equivalent, and
2-3 years of experience in secretarial or
administrative work. Must be able to handle
multiple phone lines and have working
knowledge of Personal Computer, exercise
the ability to use tact and courtesy in dealing
with the public. Word for Windows and
Internet experience required.
Possession of a valid Florida drivers license
prior to employment.
Starting Salary:$S17,236.0/yr.

Correctional Officer
Pay Grade 24 JCCF Pos#701
Must have a high school diploma or its
equivalent. Must be a State of Florida
certified Correctional Officer. Must be at
least 19 years of age, be a U.S. citizen and
have no record of a felony or misdemeanor
involving perjury or false statements.
Must be drug-free and pass a vigorous
background investigation. Possession of a
valid Florida drivers license is required prior
to employment.
Salary: $26,463.00/yr.

Equipment Operator I
Pay Grade 13 Road Dept Pos#567
High school diploma or equivalent with 1-2
or more years of experience in the safe
operation of a farm tractor and cutting
head with hydraulic/electrical switches and
driving truck with a loaded trailer attached;
able to supervise inmates.
Must have a valid Class "B" FL drivers license
prior to employment.
Starting Salary: S17.236.00/yr.
Submit Jackson County employment
application to the Human Resources Dept.,
2864 Madison Street Marianna, FL 32448.
PH 850-482-9633.
or www.acksoncountyfl.netL

Deadline to apply is
01/27/2014
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE/V.Pref/ADA/AA


Om0 to pro.0A -

BUSNES &^ YoL^rgu defogrQa




SERVICE DIRECTORY'


Call 526-3614 17a7


WSERVICS OFFERED

Clean Your Closet
I will buy your slightly used
undamaged clothing.
CoIl(850) 348-0588



Florida RentalJ


MODEL
#B30L, B42L In Stock
^ More Models Available
850-526-7368
2890 Noland St. Marianna



HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME



"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
Willini 11 LongIr'85)59-I0


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


TRE ERIC


* Tree Removal Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Insured Free Estimates -
593-4455


yI


ROOIN & *ELTE
BONDED -pTVID INSURED
pNVID LEWis
ROOFING CO.
265-6023
U\ LICENSE # RC0043637
davidlewisroofing@knology.net
|- 1406 Minnesota le. Lynn Haven, FL 32444


*ALL YOUR ROOFING NEEDS*
Metal Shingles Flat Roofs Insured
LCM. RC29027516
850-573-1880
Serving Jackson and Surrounding Counties



'North Florida Rental

DOLMAR ___

POWER PRODUCTS
MODEL #PS32, PS421, PS510 In Stock
More Models Available
850-526-7368
2890 Noland St. Marianna


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Job Announcement
North Florida Child Development is seeking
an Early Child Development
and Disability Specialist
Must have a Bachelor's degree or advance
degree in early childhood education; or a
Bachelor's or advanced degree and
coursework equivalent to a major relating to
earlychildhood education. Must have 3 years
of experience in child development, early
child development, and/or disabilities
services. Must have experience in the
following disciplines of developing and
supporting articulated training and technical
assistance for a diverse early care and
teachers; planning/implementing educational
component plans, and working with families
and children with disabilities. NFCD offers an
attractive benefit package (health, dental,
life, disability, sick leave, etc.)
For detailed information view careers at
www.floridachildren.org.
m Send resumes to:
smcgill@floridachildren.org,
fax (850) 639-6167. DFWP/M-F/7-5/EOE

lA?*=* POLLMR
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA
Now Hiring Full Time
Bulk Order Filler Position
1st 2nd. and 3rd Shifts
Competitive Pay and Benefits-Package!
Please apply in person at:
Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway,
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must be 18 Years Old.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace

NOW HIRING
CASHIERS
Handimart Stores
Competitive pay, paid vacation
& benefit package.
Sangaree Oil Co.,
850-482-5241 EOE.
Job Announcement
North Florida Child Development is seeking
Preschool and VPK teachers
for our Centers located in Blountstown,
Wewahitchka, and Port St. Joe.
have at least a FCCPC/CDA. NFCD offers an
attractive benefit package (health, dental,
life, disability, sick leave, etc
Send resumes to:
smcgill (floridachildren.org,
fax (850) 639-6167. DFWP/M-F/7-5/EOE
EDUCATION.
( & INSTRUCT1QN:-,
SCH S & INSTRUCTION
Look ahead to your
future! Start training
TIi for a new career in
FORW f Medical Assisting,
COLLEGE Medical Office Admin.,
Pharmacy Technology,
& HVAC!
Call Fortis College 855-445-3276
For consumer info: visit www.fortis.edu
C/^i,^ RES] PENMti JA
(f) REALESt *000-4-q&
APRTENSN. URI. SHED
2BR/1% BA Apartment For Rent In
Nice Neighborhood S600/Mo.
No Call 50-482-5134 4d
Cedar Creek Apartments 1BR/1BA $500
Appi, lawn care & pest control included.
Must be 62 or older or disabled. Call 850-352-
3878 or email cedarcreek'ainchouslng.net

1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
4 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4w
2/1 house Baker Ave. Marianna $575. mo
$650. dep No Pets 1 yr. lease
___ Call Joanne 850-693-0570 ___
1 ^ 2 &3BR Mobile Homes ||
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595 III
3 bedroom, 2 bath brick home on farm near
Graceville. References required $600 month,
No Pets. Call 334-445-2441. ______
Afford 3/2 Brick Home Engery Effiecent
2 car garage and covered porch $150 .Mo. '1*
Dep. Also Cottondale 3/1.5 Brick Co. Nm. on
1lac. $650. + dep. RENT OR OPTION TO BUY wI
Income & Credit approval
Call 850-579-4317 & 8301866-1965
Austin Tyler & Co **
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"


2/2 located in Sneads $350. mo.
4 850.573-0308 4" __
*Ar2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
'$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer Included.


http:// www.charloscountrylMng.com.
850-209-8847 W-
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Please call 850-258-1594 or
850-638-8570 Leave Message


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAiA
jcfloridan.com


-monsrero

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


r-


_jl now I


IS-






www.JCFLORIDAN.com


2BR / 1.5BA at Millpond $495 rent + deposit
Has utility shed, screened in front porch
850-209-3970 NO PETS
3/1 mbl. hm. apple. incl. located in Altha
$350. mo. + dep. 850-272-2972
Marianna area 2/2 Mbl. Hm. in park CH&A
water, sewage No Pets or Smoking Ref. Req.
1st. & last $500. mo. 850-482-8333
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park 1,2 & 3BR
MH's for Rent includes water, garbage,
lawn care, No Pets 850-592-1639

(Li) COMMERCIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Freezer Cooler Warehouse Combination 1600
sq. ft. Termapherm Freezer, 900 sq ft. cooler,
3000 sq. ft. Warehouse, Semi-loading dock
total 5500 sq. ft. $3950. mo. 850-718-6541.
Located in Marianna, Fl. 4w

y/"\\ RESIDENTIAL
(*) REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Beautiful Graceville FL home and farm -
4BR, 3 2 BA, custom built home on 239 acres.
Can divide. 175 acres tillable for corn, soy-
beans, cotton. Large free standing building.
3 wells. Joe Farris, Land and Stand Properties.
850-387-5517


Malone 3/3 2231sf. brick home CH/A florida rn.
fenced bk yd. 2 storage building,
I block from school, $160,000. OBO
334-300-7170 OR 850-591-4729

H^) RECREATION


Winnebago 1995 Vectra 33 ft. C/H&A, auto lev-
eling, Q-bed, new tires, batteries, frig. 7.5 Onan
generator, Ig. awning, lots of storage in & out-
side, micr-convection oven combo, gas stove,
hot water heater, 30 or 50 amp power, all
original paper work. $20,000. OBO 334-585-6689

[S) TRANSPORTATION


1965 Mustang Convertible Red with Parch-
ment Top and Pony Interior, very nice, new
tires, Great Car with A/C. 334-301-3574
ATS FR* AL
Ford 1994 F-150 XLT, single cab, auto, 302 V8,
dual tanks, PS, PB, PS, PDL, PW, complete
brake job, full tune up. Red/Silver, red cloth
seat. Looks, runs and drives good. Must see!
$4,595. Owner, Dothan, 334-671-3059.


CLASSIFIED


ATS FR* AL
Ford 2001 Taurus, 231K miles,
good condition. $1700. Send inquiries to:
lgriffin@dothaneagle.com
or Call 334-712-7962 from 9-5
--" Honda 2000 Odyssey
.J Family van- Runs perfect.
Clean inside & out Ice cold
air. Everything works. Has
been garage kept 152k mi.
$4.995. For more info. call 334-693-9360
Honda 2009 Accord, great gas mileage, certi-
fied warranty, nice car, well equipped. $250
down and $250 per month. Call Steve Hatcher
334-791-8243.
Lincoln 2004 Town Car
Signature, loaded, leath-
-er, like new clean, 94k
miles, owner, $7500.
334-790-7959.
Mazda 2008 Miata MX5 4cyl. Loaded. In great
condition. 31,000 miles. Silver with blacktop.
$14,500. 334-405-7402
Nissan 2013 Altima S, low miles, fully equipped,
must sell. $200 down, $279 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 334-714-0028.
RIDE TODAY!
M16 GOT BAD CREDIT?
'E 4 $0 Down/ist Payment,
& 4%~ Tax, Tag & Title Pass
I Repo pass bankruptcy
LOW CREDIT OK -SSI& VA OK
Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
"-l Toyota 2011 Camry LE.
4 door sedan, metallic
g green, 34,000 miles. Tan
cloth interior. Very clean.
$14,900. Will accept rea-
sonable offer. 334-402-1180 or 334-397-4301


2007 V STAR 1300 (Black) One Owner, Garage
Keep, Like New, 2000 Miles $5,500. Bought in
2009 from Wards' Yamaha. 334-707-8074


2007 GMC Yukon SLT -V8, Flex fuel, one owner,
navy with tan interior, leather, power seats and
windows, 6 cd changer, rear bucket seats, rear
air and radio, 3rd row seat, 66K miles, $18,995,
call 693-5454 leave message.
>Ford 1987 Bronco 4x4
RUNS GREAT!!Good tires.
New Sears battery, rear
window motor, fuel gauge.
Brakes recently overhauled. Less than 10k
miles on major tune-up (including distributor,
plugs, wires, oxygen sensor, etc.) Been used as
my hunting camp truck the last 7 years. Asking
$3,400. 334-750-5000
Honda 2009 CRV, low miles, underwarranty,
must sell. $200 down, $259 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 334-714-0028.
Nissan 2012 Rouge, Super Nice SUV, Good fami-
ly vehicle, plenty of room, loaded, bring this ad
in and get $500 discount, $250 down, $250 per
month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243.


Wheels Turning?


7 w


-t 1- -. -'
'~


t.


J- F
Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, January 15, 2014- I B


16' Flatbed Utility Trailer Like new. Purchased
in 2010. Asking $1,400 cash.334-685-4807


1997 FORD Econoline Club Wagon Van Seats 11
people, 273k, Runs great, great, needs some
sm. repairs. Accepting closed bids, closed bids
at (B34) 308-2480. Starting bid is $1500.
All proceeds will go to the DAV Chapter #9


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!

ALTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR RINK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


I ALSO SELL USED ARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664

Got a Clunker
f We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars:
and Farm Equip. at a
~' fair and honest price!
$250 & t Complete Cars
CALL 334-714-6285

** We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
- 334-794-9576 or 344-791-4714

WE WILL BUY YOUR CAR
OUTRIGHT!
Regardless of year, make, model, we have
millions of dollars on hand to pay you good
money for your current vehicle.
We Are On The Coast But Worth The Drive,
& reputable. & we can give you a fair price
appraisal In 15 minutes.
Call for appointment, dealer. 877-497-7975


(~)


LEGALS


LF160355
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY .
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 32-2010-CA-000918-CAAX-MX
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM T. LITTLE A/K/A WILLIAM LITTLE;
CYNTHIA R. LITTLE A/K/A CYNTHIA LITTLE; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN-SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PER-
SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS); COM-
PASS LAKE IN THE HILLS PROPERTY OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.; SUNTRUST BANK;
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in
the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
Jackson County, Florida, I will sell the property
situate in Jackson County, Florida, described
as:
LOTS 24 AND 25, BLOCK 123, OF COMPASS
LAKE HILLS UNIT FIVE, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A-4,
PAGES 130 THROUGH 140, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
for cash, At the North Door of the Jackson
County Courthouse at 11:00 a.m., on February
27,2014.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the
31 st day of December, 2013.
/s/Dale Rabon Guthrie
Clerk of Circuit Court


CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By /s/ Tammy 'Bailey
Deputy Clerk
THISC IMCTRIIMENMT REARD BV.


CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES


JAC*


-Ac-


I-


dw 0

A


- S -'


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VDae~
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Recording'a


Jackson County


History



5 Days a Week!


Clj~,of
es-,- 4- 7 "a

trash
wAS~f


a


Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Attorneys for Plaintiff
82191tfd
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact Court Administration at P.O.
Box 826, Marianna, Florida, 32447. Phone num-
ber 850-718-0026, Email: ADARequest@judl4.flc
ourts. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-
8771 at least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately upon receiv-
ing this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if
you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.

LF160300
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN AND
FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 12-333-CA
SPRINGLEAF HOME EQUITY, INC., formerly
AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
EDWARD L. BUTLER, et al,,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to an or-
der or a final judgment of foreclosure entered
in the above-captioned action, I will sell the
property situated in Jackson County, Florida,
described as:
Exhibit A
The land referred to in this exhibit is located in
the state of Florida in the county of Jackson in
Deed Book 164 Page 791 and more particular
described as follows:
A lot or parcel of land in Jackson County, Flori-
da and being more particularly described as
follows: Beginning at the accepted Northwest
corner of Section 14, T5N, RIOW and thence S2
degrees 30'E, 12 feet to the starting point on
the Westerly side of the old United States High-
way; thence S 15 degrees 30'E, along the west-
erly side of said highway, a chord distance of
277.85 feet; thence S 89 degrees 381W. 329.68
feet; thence N 43 degrees 26'E, 371.55 feet to
the starting point Said parcel being in the NW
1/4 of the NW 1/4 of section 14 and the NE 1/4
of the NE 1/4 of section 15, T5N, RIOW and con-
taining 1.00 acres, more or less.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder
for cash, in the front lobby of the Jackson
County Courthouse, 4445 Lafayette Street, Ma-
rianna, Florida 32447, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on
the 27th day of Febuary, 2014.'
That any person claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on.
DALE GUTHRIE
CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT
By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
Sidney E. Lewis, P.A.
Attorney for Plaintiff
300 W. Adams Street
Suite 300
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
(904)-355-9003
/IP
#47459 fc


GIVE US A RINGEDE


'Call today to place

your item in the

classified.


(850) 526-3614

(800) 779-2557


X __f
1 1'(9
r/ 2 0 _


I

**.





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NFL



Underdogs, rare for Patriots


The Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
- The Patriots' streak of
11 postseason games as a
favorite is over.
For the first time since
the AFC championship
game against Peyton Man-
ning and the Indianapolis
Colts in 2007, New Eng-
land is a playoff underdog
- against Manning and
the Denver Broncos in the
AFC championship game
on Sunday.
Tom Brady & Co. are will-
ing to use that as motiva-
tion for the game that will
send the winner to the Su-
per Bowl.
"We play with a chip on
our shoulder," wide receiv-
er Danny Amendola said.
"We like to play that way."
Count the Patriots out?
Go right ahead, fullback
James Develin said.
"I can't really speak for
everyone, but I person-
ally love the underdog
story," he said. "It just kind
of keeps a little bit of the
pressure off you and I just
like to prove the doubters


wrong."
Brady sounded the first
"woe is us" note during
his weekly appearance on
WEEI radio Monday.
"I know when we played
Baltimore nobody picked
us to win," Brady said. "I'm
sure no one's going to pick
us to win this week. We've
had our backs against the
wall for a while. Really, the
whole season we've lost
players, and, teams have
really counted us out.
"We've got a bunch of
underdogs on our team,
and we'll be an underdog
again."
The Ravens were favored
to extend their four-game
winning streak in the next
to last game of the regular
season. Baltimore was at
home, but the Patriots won
41-7.
Now New England (13-4)
is preparing to go on the
road again. And Brady's
teammates figure if play-
ing the underdog card
against Denver (14-3) is
good enough for him, it's
good enough for them.
"If Tom's going to em-


Tom Brady and the Patriots head into Sunday's AFC
*Championship game against Denver as underdogs.


brace it, I'm going to em-
brace it," New England
running back LeGarrette
Blount said with a smile.
"That's the leader of this
team, and if that's how he
feels, I'm sure that's how
most of the guys out here
feel."
In that loss to the Colts
seven years ago, the Patri-
ots held an 18-pbint lead
late in the first half but lost
38-34. Indianapolis went
on to win the Super Bowl.
That also was the Patri-


ots' most recent playoff
road game. Since then,
they're 7-2 at home and 0-
2 in Super Bowls at neutral
sites.
This season, they were
underdogs at home against
Denver on Nov. 24, but
won 34-31 in overtime af-
ter trailing 24-0 at halftime.
Broncos tight end Julius
Thomas missed that game
with a knee injury. Now
he's back, one of five Den-
ver receivers with at least
60 catches this season.


Titans hire Whisenhunt as new coach


The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
The Tennessee Titans have
wrapped up their coaching
search by hiring San Diego
offensive coordinator Ken
Whisenhunt as their new
head coach and 17th in
franchise history.
Titans president and
CEO Tommy Smith called
the hiring a big day in
announcing the hiring
Monday.
"Ken is a well-respected
coach in this league and I
am looking forward to see-
ing his vision become re-
ality for this team," Smith
said in a statement. "He
has a history of building
successful offenses and
took Arizona to a Super
Bowl as a head coach. We
all share a common goal
for this team and that
is to build a consistent
winner."
Whisenhunt, 51, will be
introduced at a news con-
ference Tuesday.
The Titans flew to San
Diego on Friday and inter-
viewed Whisenhunt, who
started his coaching career
in Nashville at Vanderbilt.
He was the fourth person
interviewed by the Titans,
who fired Mike Munchak
on Jan. 4.
But the Titans had com-
petition for Whisenhunt,
who also interviewed with


Detroit and Cleveland last
week. The Tennessean
reported the Titans in-
terviewed Cincinnati de-
fensive coordinator Mike
Zimmer for a second time
Monday in Houston before
hiring Whisenhunt.
Smith thanked general
manager Ruston Webster
for overseeing only the
second coaching search by
this franchise since mov-
ing to Tennessee in 1997.
Webster saidWhisenhunt's
intelligence, track record
with quality offenses and
success as a head coach
stand out to him most.
"I really enjoyed our
meeting on Friday night
in San Diego, and we share
similar philosophies about
the game," Webster said.
"Additionally, we have
several mutual colleagues
that have spoken highly
to me about Ken both as
a coach and as a person. I
am excited about Ken join-
ing us and the future of the
Titans."
Whisenhunt spent six
years coaching Arizona
and took the Cardinals to
their lone Super Bowl in
2009. He was fired Dec. 31,
2012, with a record of 45-
51 in the regular season
and 4-2 in the playoffs.
He interviewed with
Cleveland twice last year
before being hired as of-
fensive coordinator in San


Straight
From Page 1B

Baskets by Clemmons
and Johnson with just un-
der two minutes left in the
quarter gave the Bulldogs a
33-12 lead.
Blountstown was able
to trim the deficit to 37-23
with 5:51 remaining in the
game after an 11-4 run, but
a free throw by Williams
and consecutive buck-
ets by Baker and Pender


pushed the lead back out
to 19 with 3:50 to play.
Baker finished with sev-
en points, with Clemmons
and Williams each scoring
six, while the Tigers were
led by Dimitri Simmons'
14 points.
D'Anta Williams also had
six.
Marianna will return to
action Friday with a big
district home game against
the Walton Braves before
going to Panama City on
Saturday to take on the
Rutherford Rams.


I ]LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT

WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


WE TRAILER YOUR NEEDS"

Sales & Service


Truck Trailer & Rental



Behind Ruby Tuesday


Former Chargers offensive coordinator Ken Whisenhunt (right)
has been hired by Tennessee to become its new head coach.


Diego where he helped
Philip Rivers and the Char-
gers to the playoffs.
Chargers rookie head
coach Mike McCoy said
earlier Monday before the
Titans hired Whisenhunt
that he didn't want to lose
his coordinator but real-
ized he might lose him af-
ter only a year.
"Ken has done an out-
standing job here this
year," McCoy said. "He is
a big reason of why we got
as far as we did, not only
on the field, but behind
the scenes with things that
he did to help me."
Tight end Antonio Gates
said Whisenhunt did a
*phenomenal job imple-
menting a new offense in
San Diego that put them in
the best position possible.
"It was a privilege and


a pleasure to be around
a guy of that stature with
the experience and win-
ning Super Bowls, and
then helping me grow as a
player," Gates said.
Whisenhunt, a native of
Augusta, Ga., played tight
end at Georgia -Tech and
played 74 games in nine
NFL seasons with Atlanta,
Washington and the Jets.
He started coaching in
Nashville as an assistant
at Vanderbilt and also was
offensive coordinator for
Pittsburgh between 2004
and 2006. He also has
coached at Baltimore, the
Jets and Cleveland.
The Titans were the last
NFL team to fire a head
coach, and this hiring
leaves Minnesota, Detroit
and Cleveland still looking
for a head coach.


Bulldogs
From Page 1B
The Lady Bulldogs had
a chance to tie or take the
lead with 15 seconds left
down two, but a missed
shot led to a pair of West
Florida free throws to seal


the win.
Spellman scored nine
points in the loss for Mari-
anna, with Holden adding
seven.
The loss dropped MHS to
2-3 in District 1 competi-
tion, with another league
game coming Thursday on
the road against Walton.


1$8995


COOLING


SYSTEM FLUSH*:

I 'Expires 1/31/14, by appointment only,
must have coupon.
Up to 2 gallons of coolant.


L - -J .- ............


At


EALE.STW ATEIF

* MARIANNA 4209 Clay St., 4BR/2BA, 3115 SF, 3627 SF Total,
I Car Garage, Needs Work, Bank Asking $47,500
* SNEADS 1998 DWMH, 4BR/2BA, 1440 SF, Shady Lot, 50'xl150',
Bank Asking $30,500 /
* BLOU WN -1996, DWMH, 4BR/2BA, 1936 SF on .39 Acres,
Fenced, 2 Car Carport w/8'x20' Storage, Asking $45,000
* ALFORD -1982 SWMH, 2BR/1 BA, 744 SF on 10 Acres, Just off
HWY 167, MH in Good Condition Now $33,900
* CHIPLEY Comm. Bldg. @ HWY 90 & 77,1824 SF Was $60,000,
REDUCED to $39,000
* PANAMA CITY Lots and Acreage from $7,000 to $109,000
* CHIPLEY-.774 Little John Dr., DWMH 3BR/2BA, 1320 SF on 1.5 Acres. Asking $42,000
* FOUNTAIN 2511 Lake Lillian Ave, DWMH, 3BR/2BA, 1248 SF, 2002 on
5 Acres. Bank Asking $35,000
* CHIPLEY Hwy 77 S, 1 Acre with DWMH Needs lots ofwork. Asking $15,000
* MARIANNA 3BR/1 BA Block home with new roof and heat.
Needs some work, Great Rental. REDUCED. NOW $28.000
* MARIANNA Commercial Lot, 1 Ac. on Hwy 90 E/ 71,
Well and Septic Appraised $222,000. REDUCED. NOW $79,000
* MARIANNA -1 owner Home, 3BR/2BA, 1554 SF w/ 2862 total SF on comer
lot, 2 Car Att. Garage, lots of storage, updates, roof, windows, elec., 1g. deck,
Must See Asking $84,500
1000's of Homes Available
www.DavidMalloy.com
DAVID MALLOY, REALTOR
CELL: 850-2584947
email: dlinalloy@yahoo.com 19
H LLJORLO D IEvaRCe
SERVING N.W Fi-A FOR HOIES LAND INVESTMEN'TSi


*M_^ .-_ ____ .' 2fl


-Il


78B WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2014


SPORTS