Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01254

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text






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Informing more than 17.000 readers daily in print and online







FLORIDAN


4 |5 w0|.


Vol. 91 No. 9


Arrest made in connection with car burglaries


From staff reports
On Friday at approximately
5:06' a.m., the Jackson County
Sheriff's Office responded to
a vehicle burglary on the east
side of the county. Shortly
thereafter several calls were
made to the Sheriff's Office


Brookins


reporting other
vehicle burglaries.
Eight vehicle
burglaries were
reported on the
east side of the
county. During
these burglaries,
guns, computers,


purses containing credit cards
and identification, along with
other items were taken.
Around 7 a.m., an attempt
to use one of the victims' debit
cards was made at a local store.
Along with this information
and further investigation, Travis
Duane Brookins, 27, was identi-


fled as the suspect.
Brookins was located at his
residence in the 4300 block of
Kelson Avenue in Marianna.
A search was conducted of
Brookins' residence and vehicle.
Nearly all of the stolen items
were found.
During the course of the in-


vestigation, Brookins made self-
incriminating statements as to
his involvement in the series of
burglaries.
Brookins was arrested and
transported to the Jackson
County Correctional Facility
to await his first appearance in
court.


CHflMBER POWER BIERLIUAST



Business expert in spotlight


PHOTOS BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER/FLORIDAN
From left, Scott O'Brien of Beef
O'Bradys restaurant, Small
Business Development Center
Regional Director Robert Goetz
and Jackson County Chamber
of Commerce board member/
Prudential Jim Roberts Realty
agent Robby Roberts chat
after a presentation by Goetz
at the Chamber's Friday Power
Breakfast.

Goetz promises

one-on-one aid
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

The Small Business Develop-
ment Center in Panama City
is ramping up its presence
in Jackson County, with' its
new regional director prom-
ising some one-on-one help
for those who want to start
a business, who are already
in business or who are still in
the dreaming stage of such an
enterprise.
Robert Goetz made that
commitment at Friday's Jack-
son County Chamber of Com-
merce Power Breakfast. On the
job for six months, Goetz said
his will be a familiar face here
as he spreads his reach across
a six-county coverage area.


Small Business Development Center Regional Director Robert Goetz talks about what the center can do for
Jackson County entrepreneurs.


He was guest speaker at the
event, and said he has a corps
of field representatives who
will come here and provide in-
dividualized,person-to-person
advice and on business-related
topics. He said he also plans to
put on some group workshops
for the general public.
The advice his team can give
in the one-one-one sessions is
free and confidential, he added.
The SBDG is a Gulf Coast State
College program funded by the
Small Business Administration.


It offers a variety of resources to
entrepreneurs and to the busi-
ness sector of communities at
large in Jackson and five other
surrounding counties.
In his presentation Friday,
Goetz emphasized the impor-
tance of being willing to learn
and change, and to recognize
and react when economic
opportunities present them-
selves. In order to have the
most success as a community,
he said, Jackson County must
"grow its own" businesses by'


supporting those who want to
take the leap.
Friday's breakfast was the
chamber's last public get-to-
gether before the organization's
big annual banquet, set for Jan.
30 at the former Chipola Col-
lege Fine Arts Center. The ban-
quet gets underway at 5:30 p.m.
that evening with a mixer/net-
working session. The program
begins at approximately 6:15.
Guest speaker for tmat event
See CHAMBER, Page 7A


O n a recent frosty
morning, Randy
McDaniel lay-
ered up under a heavy
coat and put on a hat
and gloves to trim the
stock in his 9-acre mus-
cadine vineyard off El
Bethel Church Road.
His father, Otis McDan-
iel, planted the "Sweet
Jenny" varieties in the'
1990s and the son keeps
it going strong.


DEBORAH BUCKHALTER/FLORIDAN


Floridan photographer Mark Skinner
dons his snowman hat in December
2011.

Skinner set

for marrow

transplant

Cancer count drops
dramatically
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Jackson County Floridan pho-
tographer Mark Skinner has re-
ceived some post-holiday good
news from his cancer doctors. A
recent test showed that his mul-
tiple myeloma has entered re-
mission, which will allow doctors
to embark upon his next stage of
treatment.
With several weeks of chemo-
therapy, radiation and steroid
treatment behind him and more
to come, Skinner will soon be
scheduled for a bone marrow
transplant at UAB Hospital. He
will spend an extended period
of time about a month, he es-
timates in Birmingham, Ala.,
and will then come home with
an eye toward recovery as quick-
ly as possible.
Skinner thanks everyone for
See SKINNER, Page 7A


Trustee found

with tobacco

faces charge

From staff reports
A Jackson County jail inmate
was charged with the introduc-
tion of contraband into the facili-
ty after he allegedly returned from
a work assignment with a stash of
tobacco hidden in
a sandwich.
Si According to the
&J r y complaint filed
C1k against5l-year-old
jail trustee Michael
Ervin Whittington,
Whittington correctional of-
ficers found the
tobacco while searching Whit-
tington Wednesday afternoon.
The matter was reported to the
Marianna Police Department
Thursday morning and Whitting-
ton was subsequently charged
with the offense.
See CONTRABAND, Page 7A


)CLASSIFIEDS...4B


) ENTERTAINMENT..3B


)JCLIFE...3A


))OBITUARIES...7A


OPINION...4A SPORTS...1A


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Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint


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RAHAL-M MILLER
CHEVROLET BUICK CADILLAC GMC NISSAN
NISSAN TEAM

4204 LAFAYETTE ST. ii !i"-uj .
MARIANNA FL f L *:fl


FROSTED GRAPES


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook

F~-u Ai Sunny As


TlIer Eliasen / WMBB

High 660
Low-430 j


\A44 High 69'
lllR~sLow -49' ^t


Monday
Scattered Showers &
Storms.


~ii~


High 560
Low 310


Wednesday
Sunny, Breezy & Cool.


Tuesday
Sunny


IA ~ High 570
SiiTLow 35'


Thursday
Sunny & Cool.


TIDES
Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


4:52 AM
8:17AM
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6:08 AM
6:42 AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
49.08 ft.
13.01 ft.
8.98 ft.
8.24 ft.


- 6:33 PM
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Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
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12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very
0 1 2 3.


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:39 AM
Sunset 4:59 PM
Moonrise 2:25 PM
Moonset 4:28 AM


E113
Jan. Jan. Jan.
7 15 23


LISTEN Eli
FOR _______
HOURLY in mpm
WLERTHER W W-T
UPORTES WJAQ 1oo.P*N


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32448
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83.
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


SUNDAY, JAN. 12
Jackson County Youth Council of the NAACP
-4 p.m. at the St. James AME Church in Marianna.
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. in AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna. At-
tendance limited to people with a desire to stop
drinking.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in the
board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, JAN 13
Marianna Lions Club Meeting Noon at Jim's
Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St., Marianna. Call
482-2005.
) Tickets on sale for Chipola Artist Series event
Harpist Anna Maria Mendieta 2-5 p.m. at
Chipola Box Office or online tickets at www.chipola.
edu. Tickets are $14 for adults,,$10 age 18 and
younger. The music and dance program is complete
with Latin instruments and Flamenco dancers.
) Employability Workshop 2:30 p.m. Marianna
One Stop Career Center. "Mock Interviewing" is
the workshop! It is free and open to the public. The
workshop is facilitated by a Certified Motivational
Career Coach. Visit employflorida.com to register
for these informative workshops.
) Sneads Elementary School Advisory Council
meeting 4 p.m. in the school library. Public
invited.
) Jackson County Quilters Guild Meeting -
5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church, 3975
U.S. 90 W., Marianna. Business meetings are fourth
Monday; other Mondays are for projects, lessons
and help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
) City of Jacob council Meeting 6 p.m. at the
Jacob City Hall. Public welcome.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, JAN. 14
Republican Club of West Florida Meeting
- Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St.,
Marianna. Call 352-4984.
n Optimist Club of Jackson County Board Meet-
ing Noon at 4476 Broad St., Marianna.
) Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
) Republican Club of West Florida Noon at
Jim's Buffet and Grill in Marianna. Keith William will
be speaking on the Affordable Care Act. Do not have
to be a member of Republican Club or a Republican
to attend. Call 352-4984.
) Tickets on sale for Chipola Artist Series event
Harpist Anna Maria Mendieta 2-5 p.m. at
Chipola Box Office or online tickets at www.chipola.
edu. Tickets are $14 for adults, $10 age 18 and
younger. The music and dance program is complete
with Latin instruments and Flamenco dancers.
) Employability Workshop 2:30 p.m. Marianna
One Stop Career Center. "12 Keys to Success" is
the workshop. It is free and open to the public. The
workshop is facilitated by a Certified Motivational
Career Coach. Visit employflorida.com to register
for these informative workshops.
) Jackson County Tobacco Free Partnership
meeting 4:30 p.m. at the Department of Health


in Jackson County Multi-purpose Room. Commu-
nity invited to participate.
) Special School Board Workshop Meeting 5
p.m. Jackson County School Board Office at 2903
Jefferson St., Marianna. Open to the public.
) Autism Support Group Meeting 6 p.m. in the
First Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall, Marianna
(Clinton Street entrance). Family members, caregiv-
ers and service providers welcome. Call 526-2430.
) American Legion Smith-Kelly Post 100 Veter-
ans dinner and meeting 6 p.m. at the American
Legion Hall, Smith-Kelly Post 100 located West of
Marianna on U.S. 90 next to the national Guard
Armory and Agricultural Center. Guest speaker is
Trey Young of Altha. He will be speaking on training
horses. For more info call 482-3744.
) Genealogy Club Meeting 6-7:30 p.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library, 2929 Green St.
Marianna. Paula Snellgrove, Family History Director
for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints
of Marianna, will speak to the Club about genealogy
resources. Call 482-9631.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room-of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna. Closed dis-
cussion with 12 & 12 study. Everyone with a desire
to stop drinking is welcome.
) St. Anne Thrift Store 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. St.
Anne's Catholic Church, 3009 5th St., Marianna.
Call 482-3734.

WEDNESDAY, JAN 15
New deadline to report 2014 small grains and
permanent grasses Permanent grasses such
as bahia and Bermuda along with fall seeded small
must be reported by this date. This is a change fro
the reporting deadline in prior years of Nov. 15.
) AARP tax aide training session 9 a.m. until
1 p.m. Jackson County Agricultural Building, Penn
Ave., Marianna in the conference room. Learn
hands-on training for electronic preparation and
filing of tax returns free. If interested in volunteering
call 718-7919.
a Malone Joy Club -10 a.m. Joy Club House, S.R.
2, Malone. Lunch served at noon. Games following
lunch. Come and join the fun.
) Jackson County Tourist Development Council
meeting 10 a.m. at the Russ House, 4318 Lafay-
ette Street, Marianna.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Tickets on sale for Chipola Artist Series event
Harpist Anna Maria Mendieta 2-5 p.m. at
Chipola Box Office or online tickets at www.chipola.
edu. Tickets are $14 for adults, $10 age 18 and
younger. The music and dance program is complete
with Latin instruments and Flamenco dancers.

THURSDAY, JAN. 16
a Hog Butchering Class 8 a.m. Panhandle
Pioneer Settlement, 17869 NW Pioneer Settle-
ment Rd.; Blountstown. This class will teach killing,
butchering, and preservation techniques. Cost $25
with $10 deposit required. Call 674-2777 or email
ppsmuseum@yahoo.com.
) International Chat 'n' Sip 8:30-10 a.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library, 2929 Green St. in
Marianna. Learning Center staff and their inter-
national English learners invite the public for the
exchange of language, culture and ideas in a relaxed


environment. Light refreshments served. No charge.
Call 482-9124.
) St. Anne Thrift Store 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. St.
Anne's Catholic Church, 3009 5th St., Marianna.
Call 482-3734
) Literacy Fair -10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Jackson Al-
ternative School. Parents and school board officials
invited. Call 482-9666 ext.243 for more info.
) Caregiver Support Group Meeting -11 a.m. to
noon in the First Presbyterian Church Social Hall,
4437 Clinton St., Marianna. Open to all family care-
givers providing care to loved ones or friends. Con-
fidential group, facilitated by a professional group
counselor. Coffee, water, light snacks provided.
) Chipola Civic Club Meeting Noon at The Oaks
Restaurant, U.S. 90 in Marianna. The CCC's focus
is the local community, "Community, Children &
Character." Call 526-3142.
) Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St., Marianna.
Call 482-2290.
) Jackson County Friends of the Library Board
Meeting -1 p.m. at the Jackson 'County Public
Library 2929 Green St., Marianna. All members and
those interested in joining are invited.
) Employability Workshop 2:30 p.m. Marianna
One Stop Career Center. "Developing Effective Self
Marketing Tools" is the workshop. It is free and open
to the public. The workshop is facilitated by a Certi-
fied Motivational Career Coach. Visit employflorida.
com to register for these informative workshops.
) Jackson County School Board Workshop 4
p.m. School Board meeting room, 2903 Jefferson.
St. Marianna. Agenda on district website www.jcsb.
org. Open to public. Call 482-1200.
) Jackson County NAACP Meeting 5:30 p.m.
in the St. James A.M.E. Church basement, 2891
Orange St., Marianna. Call 569-1294.
) VFW & Ladies Auxiliary Meeting 6 p.m. at
2830 Wynn St., Marianna, with a covered-dish sup-
'per. Call 372-2500.
) Chipola Artist Series event harpist Anna
Maria Mendieta 7 p.m. at Chipola Center for the
Arts. The music and dance program is complete
with Latin instruments and Flamenco dancers. Box
office sales from 6-7 p.m. or online at www.chipola.
edu Tickets are $14 adults and $10 age 18 and
under. Call 718-2420.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to people with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, JAN.17
a Last day to register for Martin Luther King Jr.
Day Parade Parade will be Jan. 20 at 10 a.m. with
line-up at 9:30. Contact Ronald Mizer at 407-385-
9235 or 526-2008.
) Hooks and Needles -10 a.m. at the Jackson
County Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and
experienced hand crafters welcome to create,
share, learn or teach favorite projects. Call 482-
9631.
) Chess Club 6-8 p.m. First United Methodist
Church on Clinton St. in Marianna. Sponsored by
Marianna Optimist Club for students for students
8-18 years of age in Jackson County. All students
and their parents are welcome. Players of all skill
levels including beginners are welcome. Call 693-
0473.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcflorid.an.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police
Department listed the follow-
ing incidents for Jan. 9, the
latest available report: One hit
and run vehicle, one
accident, one abandoned
vehicle, one suspicious inci-
dent, two highway obstruc-
tions, one drug offense, one
traffic stop, one obscene or
threatening phone call, two
follow-up investigations, one
animal complaint, one fraud
complaint, one retail theft, one
public service call, one welfare


check and 10 home security
checks.

JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sher-
iff's Office
72*% L= and county
m )-U--'= fire/rescue
reported the
r i]ME following
incidents for
Jan.9, the latest
available report: Three aban-
doned vehicles, one reckless
driver, two suspicious vehicles,
one suspicious person, one


escort, one structure burglary,
vehicle burglary; one verbal
disturbance, two fire calls
- one with police response,
12 medical calls, one traffic
crash, one burglary alarm, one
robbery alarm, one report of
shooting in the area, four traffic
stops, one larceny complaint,
one criminal mischief com-
plaint, two trespass complaints,
one follow-up investigation,
one juvenile complaint, one
assault, 13 property checks,
one retail theft, three assists of
other agencies, one child abuse
complaint, two public service
calls, one welfare check, one


transport and one threat/ha-
rassment complaint.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
Haven Clements, 20,1613
Lake Ave., Panama City, posses-
sion of a controlled substance-
methamphetamine, possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Jonathan Harrison, 24, 4320
Dairy St., Marianna, retail theft.

Jail Population: 182


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


.i JCFLORIDAN-COM


~2A SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014


WAKCE-UP CAxLL






LI COUNT iL IDAN

^-,PAGE 3A


We don't need a new year for a
W Audn't it be of a tight budget, our food in an unsettling world, our
great if we could supply will continue to daily routines will not dif-
wave a magic be the same fer much unless we decide
wand and erase all the with few to make personal changes
troubling, painful events variations, for our well being; and it
that have, taken place When we doesn't take a holiday or
in our past; and start all get into our New Year to determine
over with an exciting new vehicles, when we do so. How we
beginning? 6 it always view life is crucial to how
After the celebration of Thomcs seems we will live our lives. Since
the New Year's holiday has Vincent there's this life is what we must
ended and things began MUrphy not quite deal with, why not make
to settle down, reality enough it as enjoyable as possible.
comes roaring back. We gas; and we need to buy Seems we'll remain the
begin to realize that the some of that overpriced same, unless we decide to
same things we were gasoline in order to get change our mental out-
dpaline with last vear are arndn.L Same dilemma look and attitude toward


right there staring us in
the face once again. Many
of us will still be trying
to figure how to stretch
our paycheck if we're
getting one as far as
possible, as we try to
make ends meet. Because


as last year! If we have a
job, we regret having to
face a grumpy supervisor
who is never satisfied; and
we spend a large portion
of our day complaining.
Nothing has changed.
As human beings living


New officers (from left) are Sandra Durden,
Green, vice-president; Daisie Schoultheis,
Brenda Peacock, treasurer.

Jackson Hostf


a *1
secretary; Ellie
president and


ital


life.
Things can be different
if we re-adjust our vision.
There may not be steaks
in-our refrigerator, but
grits, or potatoes and eggs
can taste mighty good
when we're hungry and


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Kathryn Jordan, community staff educator was the guest
speaker.


Auxiliary holds


quarterly meeting


Special to the Floridan

The Jackson Hospital
Auxiliary held the first
quarterly meeting for 2014
on Jan. 3 in the hospital
education room. Former
president Elizabeth Ann
Ward called the meeting to
order and welcomed mem-
bers and guests. After a de-
licious meal prepared by
the hospital staff, Kathryn
Jordan, community staff


educator, conducted the
annual educational pro-
gram. Elizabeth Ann Ward
conducted the installation
of officers for 2014: Daisie
Schoultheis, president; El-
lie Green, vice president;
Sandra Durden, secretary;
Brenda Peacock, treasurer.
A president's pin was given
to the incoming president,
Daisie Schoultheis.
A short business meeting
was conducted by Ward.


Flower winners were (from.left) Marsha Kent, Nancy Branch,
Judy Kroft, Sue Hussey, Jeanette Woodham, Jeanette Land,
Elizabeth Saunders and Sharon Bannerman (not pictured).


After the meeting, names
were drawn for the flowers.
The winners were Marsha
Kent, Nancy Branch, Judy
Kroft, Sue Hussey, Jeanette


Woodham, Jeanette land,
Elizabeth Saunders and
Sharon Bannerman.
The meeting was
adjourned.


Pioneer Settlement holds hog butchering day


Special to the Floridan

On Saturday, Jan. 18, from 8 a.m. to
1 p.m. Panhandle Pioneer Settlement
at 17869 NW Pioneer Settlement Rd.
in Blountstown will hold its 10th an-
nual Hog Butchering event.


ON THE MENU
SCHOOL MENUS
FOR JAN. 13-17

MONDAY
Breakfast-Choice of One: Chicken
Biscuit, Assorted Cereal & Toast. Choice of
Fruit: Assorted Fresh Fruit, Craisin, 100%
Fruit Juice.
Lunch-Choice of One: Fish Nuggets
w/Hush Puppies, Ham & Cheese on Bun.
Choose Up to 3: Tater Tots, Baked Beans,
Fresh Assorted Fruit, Chilled Pineapple,
100% Fruit Juice.

TUESDAY
Breakfast-Choice of One: Cinnamon
Roll, Assorted Cereal & Toast. Choice of
Fruit: Assorted Fresh Fruit, Chilled Apple
sauce. 100% Fruit Juice.


Take a step back in time when the
butchering of farm animals was a
staple of life. Come to the Panhan-
dle Pioneer Settlement for a hands-
on demonstration of the art of hog
butchering. This event was a major
part of life during pioneer days dur-

Lunch-Choice of One: Turkey Soft Taco,
Cheese Quesadilla. Choose Up to 3: Sea-
soned Retried Beans. Steamed Corn. Fresh
Assorted Fruit, Chilled Peaches. 100%
Fruit Juice.

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast-Choice of One: Breakfast
Burrito. Assorted Cereal & Toast. Choice
of Fruit: Assorted Fresh Fruit. Chilled Pine-
apple Tidbits, 100% Fruit Juice.
Lunch-Breakfast for Lunch-Choice of
One: Scrambled Eggs & Toast, French
Toast & Sausage, Breaded Chicken
Sandwich. Choose Up to 3: Sweet Potato
Wedges, Breaded Green Beans. Fresh
Assorted Fruit. Chilled Pears. 100% Fruit
Juice.

THURSDAY
Breakfast-Choice of One: Sausage


BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


ing the late fall and early winter. You
will receive lessons in how to prop-
erly butcher the hog and preserva-
tion techniques.
For more information call 674-
2777 or email us at ppsmuseum@
yahoo.com.

Biscuit. Assorted Cereal & Toast. Choice of
Fruit: Assorteq Fresh Fruit, Chilled Pears,
100% Fruit Juice.
Lunch-Choice of One: Sloppy Joe, Deluxe
Mac & Cheese. Choose Up to 3 Romaine
Side Salad, Steamed Broccoli. Baked Po-
tato Wedges, Fresh Assorted Fruit, Chilled
Mixed Fruit, 100% Fruit Juice.

FRIDAY
Breakfast-Choice of One: Pancake on a
Stick. Assorted Cereal & Toast. Choice of
Fruit: Assorted Fresh Fruit, Chilled Mixed
Fruit. 100% Fruit Juice.
Lunch-Choice of One: Pepperoni Pizza,
Bean & Cheese Burrito, Turkey & Cheese
Sandwich. Choose Up to 3: Fresh Carrot
Sticks. Steamed Corn, Fresh Assorted
Fruit, Baked Apple Slices, 100% Fruit juice.
Information provided by the Jackson County
Schools Food Service Department Menu
subject to change


YOUNG HOUSE WITH MODERN FLAIR!
Finished in 2009, 3BR/2BA, first owners, quiet
neighborhood. Great room, spacious baths,
move-in ready, beautifully landscaped, well
insulated with electric bills to prove it. ADT system.


Engagements


new start
have a roof over our head.
While we're riding in our
vehicles on a cold day and
notice others bundled
up while walking to their
destinations, our vehicle's
value seems to rise, no
matter how old it is. In
our struggling economy,
if we have any type of job,
we should stop com-
plaining and understand
how fortunate we are. It
doesn't matter if it's at the
beginning of the year, or
any other time of the year,
things will remain the
same; but there can be a
major change in our lives,
if our mental outlook and
attitude becomes fresh
and brand new.
Why not make a person-
al decision to improve our
lives as we move forward?


Officer in Martinsburg, WV.
Adam received a Bachelor
of Science degree in
Agricultural Business in 2001
and a Master's Degree in
Safety Engineering in 2003
from the West Virginia
University in Morgantown,
WV. He is also employed
with the USDA-Farm Service
Agency as a Farm Loan
Officer in Petersburg, WV.
The couple is planning a
wedding on October 11, 2014,
in Kingwood, WV.


Birth


Niayomi Ellisabel Tull
was born at 1:47 a.m.
on Jan. 2 at Jackson
Hospital in Marianna.
She weighed 7 pounds
8 ounces and was 19
inches long at birth. Her
parents are Yajaira and
William Tull. Grandpar-
ents are Bhinda Morado,
Moises Morado, Pedro
Zayas II, Jeannette Tull
Rodriguez and William
Tull. She has 3 older
brothers, Nayo, Najel
and Noah Tull.


MLK parade

planned for

Jan.20
Special to the Floridan

The Martin Luther King
Jr. Parade will be held Jan.
20.at 10 a.m. Line-up will
begin at 9:30 a.m. All or-
ganization, clubs, bands,
youth groups, step teams
and churches are invited
to participate. This year's
parade route will begin at
Hawk and Orange streets
and turn right on St. An-
drews Street to Barnes
Street.
Friday is the last day for
registration.. Call Ronald
Dale Mizer at 407-385-
9235 or 526-2008.


4rOh

^Philip


I


Carat The FIVE C's
Color SW4.
Clarity JIM
Cut
CONFIDENCE

Marianna's Most
Trusted Jeweler
Est. 1971 QD

lliatson
GEMOLOGISTS
850.482.4037
atsonjewelers.com


^ ~Jeannie ^
January 131 will make two years since we lost you.
1I' We miss you very much.
O Here are just a few reasons why you meant so much to.me.
J-Jesus Faithful Servant
E-Eager to help anyone.
A-Always by my side through everything.
N-Never met a stranger.
N-Never letmne or myJamily down.
11-intended on doingyourvery
best at yourjob.
E-Enjoyed eating with you at yourfavorite
restaurant, the Fortune Cookie.
B-Brought out the best in me.
i; ^ R-Really dtid your best when helping || *
b \9 with mom, dad &my aunt.
W' \ 0-Overlooked everything that was said or '
did against you.
0-Only saw the best in everyone.
o -Knowing you loved your kids, grandkids
S &greatgrandkids.
S-Sweetest lady 1 have ever known.
These are just a few reasons why I still love & miss you.
There are too many other reasons to list them all.
I love & miss you very much.
James

..? \ Q '
\) ,r ^r '. [


Robert and Carol Alford of
Two Egg, FL are pleased to
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Casey Alford,
to Adam Hayes, son of
Kimble and Kathy Hayes, of
Kingwood, WV.
Casey received a Bachelor
of Science degree in Food and
Resource Economics in 2010
from the University -of Florida,
in Gainesville, FL. Upon
graduation she accepted a
position with the USDA-Farm
Service Agency where she
now works as Farm Loan





~1


Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Florida Views


The Gainesville Sun


on throwing bombs

If only U.S. Rep. Ted Yoho put as much energy into
writing bills with a realistic shot at becoming law as
he did crafting clever acronyms.
Yoho, R-Gainesville, last month introduced two mea-
sures related to the Affordable Care Act. Not surprising-
ly, they're more about firing up his tea-party base than
seriously addressing the country's challenges involving
health care coverage and costs.
The Nullifying the Unconstitutional Mandate By
Evaluating Results, or NUMBER, Act would repeal the
Affordable Care Act if the Obama administration fails
to meet its goal of 7 million people being enrolled in
health-care exchanges by March 31.
The Government Lacks Insight To Choose Health, or
GLITCH, Act would implement a 5 percent salary cut
for Department of Health and Human Services Secre-
tary Kathleen Sebelius for each month that the heath-
care. gov website isn't fully functional.
We're all for holding Sebelius or another administra-
tion official accountable for the disastrous rollout of
the website. In fact, Yoho had a strong case in joining
33 other House Republicans in calling for Sebelius'
resignation.
But cutting her pay is politics at its most petty.
Yoho's first bill is similarly silly. It's not as if he hopes
the measure will create pressure that leads to the en-
rollment goals being met. Instead, he's rooting for the
Affordable Care Act's failure without offering any alter-
native that covers millions of uninsured Americans.
While we don't expect Yoho to become a cheerleader
for the Affordable Care Act any time soon, he should lay
off legislation that lacks even a remote shot of becom-
ing law. Throwing bombs at the president's signature
achievement may please the tea party, but it does noth-
ing to improve the lives of Yoho's constituents.



The News-Journal,


Daytona Beach,


on state surplus

ith the state government's surplus fattening,
it's time for legislators to examine their priori-
ties for that extra cash.
There is plenty of talk.of a $400 million fee cut for mo-
torists, and that's a laudable goal. But discussion about
any surplus should also include how it might be used to
help the mentally disabled in the Sunshine State.
Last week, the Work Orientation Rehabilitation Center
Inc. (WORC) closed its doors in Bunnell due to a lack
of funding. With the closing, Flagler County lost a vital
service for the mentally disabled and their families.
The vehicle registration fee cut that Gov. Rick Scott
wants would give back $25 to each motorist. But aid
to the mentally disabled would have a much bigger
payoff. And the need is major.
That the Bunnell center is being forced to consolidate
with the Volusia County office just adds a degree of
difficulty to the families of citizens with developmental
disabilities in Flagler County. If people cannot find care
for their mentally disabled adult sons or daughters,
then a member of the household often has to drop
out of the workforce to care for that family member.
That has very real costs to both the household and the
community.
It is for this reason we taxpayers pay a portion of our
taxes to help pay for social programs that WORC and
similar agencies provide. These programs assist the
most vulnerable in our communities. The programs en-
able other members of households containing mentally
disabled adults to continue working themselves, so the
funding pays off in more than one way.
No doubt, the recession, followed by years of weak re-
covery, have been tough on all Floridians, and on state,
coffers as well. The state Legislature and former Gov.
Charlie Crist raised the auto registration fees in 2009 to
help balance the budget. Giving some of that increase
back to motorists is a worthy idea to consider.
But there are other vital areas of the budget, ones
involving social-service agencies, to consider as well.
It seems likely that 2014 will be a year in which Florida
sees solid growth in the private sector and, as a result
tax coffers should see a surplus. Some estimates have
pegged the surplus to be as much as $1.2 billion.
There's nothing wrong with Scott's goal to give some
of that surplus back to residents in the form of reduced
vehicle registration fees.
But part of the surplus should also be earmarked to
strengthen services for people in the state who have
developmental disabilities, mental illness or addiction
struggles.


BY THE LOOK OF ALL OF
THESE CANDLES, I'D BETTER
WISH FOR GETTIN6 MY
AFFAIRS IN ORDER.


D2014 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UCfick for UFS


Job satisfaction leads to better economy


To paraphrase Tolstoy, every
successful small business
shares the same traits. And
they all begin with high-quality em-
ployees. I'm thinking of three local
establishments where I've traded
for years: an auto repair garage, a
dentist's office, and a one-size-fits-
all country store where I buy cattle
and horse feed.
The aptly-named "Toad Suck
One-Stop" carries everything from
crickets and minnows to motor
oil, pain remedies, kitty litter and
homemade sandwiches. If you get
up early enough, they'll even fix
you breakfast while somebody else
loaids feed sacks into your truck.
(Toad Suck is a place name desig-
nating a long-ago ferryboat stop on
the Arkansas River.)
It's much the same at George Jett's
auto garage down in Little Rock;
also at my dentist's, whose name
is Lamar Lane. The first thing you
notice is familiar faces. People who
work at these places stay for years.
And they do so because they're
well-paid, earn decent benefits,
and are treated respectfully. So they
like their jobs, take pride in their
work, and are glad to see familiar
customers.
Now I'm not going to lie that I
love going to the dentist. But I do
like feeling among friends, even
if it means hearing Dr. Lane carry
on about his LSU Tigers. (Because
my wife was born in Baton Rouge,
where her daddy played ball, I get a
double dose.)
Something else: How a business
treats employees also tends to be a
reliable predictor of how they treat
customers. Dr. Lane does high-
quality work and stands by it. If a
crown breaks, he replaces it for free


GeneLyons

without asking if you were shelling
pecans with your teeth.
My man George Jett hires good
mechanics, values their skills, and
guarantees their work. If the rattle's
still there, he'll drive the vehicle
around the block and then put it
back on the lift to figure out why
- also at no additional charge.
Jason down at the One-Stop isn't
exactly a philanthropist at least
not where Bermuda grass hay
-and Canadian night-crawlers are
concerned. Keeping a business
with so many moving parts run-
ning requires constant attention
to detail. New hires that stand out
back smoking when shelves need
restocking tend not to last. Loyal
long-time employees won't cut
them much slack.
Gas is cheaper at the Wal-Mart
across the river in Faulkner County,
but the One-Stop's pumps stay
busy. It's the community's unofficial
'town hall. If you want to know who's
looking for a lost blue heeler or how
Holly's orphaned baby raccoons are
doing, it's got to be the One-Stop.
Ordinarily, such commonplaces
would hardly be worth recording.
So there are friendly folks at the
country store.
Who'd of thunk it?
Unless, that is, you live in the
United States of America, a large
proportion of whose tycoon class


Saving MLK Day from crass c
T he federal holiday honoring
the Rev. Martin Luther King
Jr. got off to a rocky start, to
put it mildly.
In 1986, its first year, only about
half the states observed the
holiday. In King's hometown of
Atlanta, boxing promoter Don King
celebrated the new holiday and the h yarshaM ercer
civil rights leader who dedicated
his life to nonviolence with, you King's statement that "Everybody
guessed it, a fight night. can be great because everybody
The seven-hour evening, sup- can serve" animates the day
posedly a tribute, was a "grotesque People young and old will clean up
farce," author Jack Newfield streams, deliver meals, sprucedup
wroterin "The Life and Crimes of schools and community centers,
Don King: The Same of Boxing in collect food and clothing and sign
America." up mentors, among other things.
Don King "put on seven fights But just as it took years to create
with out-of-shape heavyweights the holiday, it took years for the
who weighed an aggregate of 3,212 holiday officially to become a day
pounds. Every fight stank," New- of national service.
field wrote. In the main event be- Rep. John Conyers, a Michigan
tweenTim Witherspoon and Tony Democrat, firstgintroduced
Tubbs,Tubbs "acted like he was legislation establish a holiday
tryi erg to honor Dr. King by winning honoring King four days after he
the Nobel Peace Prize in the ring." was assassinated in Memphis in
After such an unpromising 1968. In 1983, Congress approved
start, it's remarkable that the King the holiday after ugly opposition
holiday has mostly risen above the in the Senate from Jesse Helms.
crass commercialism that plagues The North CarolinatRepublican
Presidents Day and our other filibustered, charging that King
holidays, was a Marxist who had Communist
Retailers seem far more willing connections. Helms distributed
to use Presidents Day originally 300 pages of documents, which
commemorating the February Democratic Sen. Daniel Patrick
birthdays of George Washington Moynihan of NewYork famously
and Abraham Lincoln to sell us threw to the Senate floor, stomped
cars, mattresses and TVs. In con- on and called "a packet of ifith."
trast, the King holiday summons us On Nov. 2,1983, President Ronald
to reflect and to give our time mak- Reagan signed the bill making the
ing our communities better. third Monday in January the
On Jan. 20, bells will toll, church- Martin Luther King Jr. federal
es will hold services and hundreds holiday, starting in 1986. Not until
of thousands of Americans will 1999, though, did all 50 states
spend at least part of the King holi- observe it.
day volunteering on community Even today, states observe the
service projects. holiday in different ways. For


appears determined to drag us back
to the Gilded Age.
If they gave a Scrooge McDuck
Award for the nation's greediest
knucklehead, the 2013 winner
would be Home Depot's billionaire
founder Kenneth Langone, a Catho-
lic who voiced public alarm at Pope
Francis' seeming enthusiasm for the
gospel of Matthew 19. That's where
Jesus observes that "it is easier for
a camel to go through the eye of a
needle than for someone who is
rich to enter the kingdom of God."
The Pope didn't cite that verse, nor
discuss politics as such. However,
his encyclical Evangelii Gaudium
did warn against "crude and naive
trust in the'... sacralized workings of
the prevailing economic system."
What, not worship money? Never
mind that this is elementary Chris-
tian doctrine. Langone warned that
American plutocrats don't want to
hear about it even in church.
But the good news is that, ac-
cording to Adam Davidson in The
New York Times, old-fashioned
business ethics may be making a
comeback.,According to Davidson,
the going thing in corporate circles
is "The Good Jobs, Strategy," a book
by Zeynep Ton, an MIT business
professor.
Ton argues that what some call
the "Costco strategy" of hiring bet-
ter-trained, better-paid employees
"will often yield happier custom-
ers, more engaged workers and
surprisingly larger corporate
profits."
As I was saying, who'd of thunk it?
Arkansas Times columnist Gene Lyons is a
National Magazine Award winner and co-author
of "The Hunting of the President" (St. Martin's
Press, 2000). You can email Lyons at
eugenelyons2@yahoo.com.


commercialism
years, Virginia celebrated King and
Confederate generals Robert E. Lee
and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson
on the same day. In 2000, the state
legislature separated the holidays,
and Virginia state offices now are
closed for Kingon the third
Monday in January and Lee and
Jackson on the preceding Friday.
Alabama celebrates Lee and King
together, then Confederate
Memorial Day in April and the
birthday of Jefferson Davis in June.
As for the day of service, a couple
of weeks after the first federal King
holiday in 1986, sociologist Marion
J. Levy Jr. of Princeton University
wrote a letter to The New York
Times.
"I propose we declare the holiday
a 'day on,' rather than a 'day off,"'
the professor wrote. His idea was
that everyone would work on the
holiday and those above the pov-
erty line would send their day's pay
to a special fund benefiting
housing, educationand other
projects.
Levy was rowing against the tide
when he suggested that people
give up not only their day off but
also their wages but his idea of
the holiday as a "' day on, rather
than a 'day off"' stuck. The phrase
appears frequently in connection
with the day of service.
In 1994, Congress passed the
King Holiday and Service Act,
creating the national day of service,
and President Bill Clinton signed it.
It's a day when we all can be great
because we can serve. And that's
a real tribute to the memory of
Martin Luther King Jr.

Marsha Mercer writes from Washington. You
may contact her at marsha.mercer@yahoo.
com. 0 2014 Marsha Mercer. All rights reserved.





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN o www.jcfloridan.com


Kolkata cellphones, Delhi autos and economic demographics

"I know you got your physical geographic area. nation outside the circle? Western counterparts ics mean that many are Margaret R. McDowell, ChFCl,All",
own-town... And much of the region The U.S., with a popula- whom they admire on downsizing and shedding Casriterd FinancianCionsltantand
I know you got your own circled was tion of 315 million. Not television and the inter-' possessions. Accredited Investment Fiduciary,
ways. I know you got your .P water. mentioned in the caption net. Companies that sell Car companies must is the founder of Arbor Wealth
own life... ..f The cap- is the fact that many of to emerging market na- have marketing strategies Management, LLC, (850-608-
I'm just sayin'... come on tion below these countries are 'also tions which that put drivers behind 6121-www.arborwealth.net), a
down to my place." the graph, some of the world's fastest are friendly to the West the wheel in Delhi and Advisory Firmelocated near Destin.
"In My City" by Priyanka though, was growing nations, and to Western culture en- cellphone manufactur- Arbor Wealth specializes in port-
Chopra Mcrga ret staggering. Companies that pro- joy another competitive, ers must create a buzz in folio management for clients with
McDowell It stated duce, market and sell economic advantage. Kolkata surrounding the $500.000 or more of investable
.t- -1- .- - .- - -assets.


A fascinating graph
/A came across my
.L Xdesk recently, one
that depicted a circle
surrounding about 25
countries between eastern
Russia and Japan. The
circle included China,
India, Indonesia, Pakistan,
Bangladesh, southeastern
Russia, Japan, the Philip-
pines, Vietnam and Thai-
land, among others.
The circle actually
encapsulated a very small
portion of the world's


that inside
this small


circle live more than half
of the world's 7 billion
people. In other words,
more people live inside
the circle than outside it.
Indonesia, with more
than 230 million people,
is the world's fourth-most
populous nation, behind
China, with 1.3 billion,
and India, with 1.2 billion.
All three of these coun-
tries were within the circle
on the graph. The largest


products globally must
consider distribution
centers not only in New
York and London, but in
cities like Delhi, Mumbai
and Kolkata, India; in
Dhaka, Bangladesh; and
in Karachi, Pakistan, all
of which are among the
world's 10 largest cities.
What do these folks, all
concentrated into this
region, really want?
Many want to dress,
drive, eat, communicate
and consume like their


When purcnasmng secu-
rities, American investors
should consider their time
horizon, their long range
financial goals, and their
risk tolerance, among
other things. But they
should also consider
whether the companies
they invest in are partici-
pants in the global mar-
ketplace. American manu-
facturers no longer enjoy
the luxury of marketing
only to U.S. consumers,
where aging demograph-


new apps on tneir devices.
A telecommunications
company that markets
only to Middle America,
or a company that makes
and distributes comput-
ers, but not in global
markets, is missing out on
the vast majority of the
world's potential con-
sumers. Look for those
companies that recognize
the vast purchasing power
that is becoming more
and more dictated by
demographics.


Follow us on
Facebook








Jackson County
Floridan


WELLS SPEAKS


TO ROTARY CLUB


SPECIAL TO THE FLORIDAN

Pictured are (from left) Rotary host Larry Meese, guest speaker
Clay Wells, and Rotary president Gene Strickland. At the recent
Rotary Club meeting hosted by Larry Meese the guest speaker
was Clay Wells with Parks and Recreation Department of the City of
Marianna. The program consists of information about the improve-
ments and expansion of the MERE Complex and other City Parks.
Wells estimated that 4,000 to 5,000 young people are involved annu-
ally in the city sports leagues which consists of football, baseball, soft-
ball, basketball and soccer.


Pate's Annual Deer Hunt held
Specialto theFloridanI


On Dec. 27 and 28, Clint Pate held his
annual deer hunt. Proceeds from the
event went toward Pate's campaign for
Jackson
A TEv N County
Com-
SP mission
District 2.a
The event
included
a Big Buck
and Big
SPECIAL TOs THE FLORIAN Doe Con-
Clint Pate rewards Brandon test, chili
Wilkes for killing the big buck supper, live
music and a
silent auction.
The event drew 90 entries and a good
crowd both nights for the weigh-ins and
other activities. Plans are already being
made for next year's event.
The winners of the contest were: first
place buck, Brandon Wilkes (Cotton-
dale); second place buck, Dustin Locke


Come let
Smith and
Smith
Jewelers
design the
jewelry of
your dreams
with our 3D
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You can be
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every step of
the way with
our 3Design
program to
make sure
it is exactly
as you
dreamed.


SPECIALTOTHE FLORIDAN
Brandon Wilkes took first place at Pate's
Annual Deer Hunt.
(Westville); first place doe, Daryl Foor
(Chipley); second place doe, Matt Strader
(Marianna).


Behind your
great jewelry
design is
a great
jeweler that


.^dj ^/ can li

^ .-.,. \..t
j .1W ^*.^

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uppen.


I..'.


We can help you select the perfect stones or use yours.
You can choose from any of the precious metals. It is
exciting and fun to watch it come to life in 3D.
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4432 Lafayette Street 526-5488
www.smithandsmithonline.com
Your Hometown Jeweler 91j carook


Chipola Artist Series

will feature harpist


Special to the Floridan

The Chipola Artist Series
will present harpist Anna
Maria Mendieta on Thurs-
'day at 7 p.m., in the Center
for the Arts.
Leading the audience
through the turns, dips,
and smoky cafes of Argen-
tina, harpist Anna Maria
Mendieta's Tango del Cie-
lo (Tango from Heaven)
is a fresh innovative pre-
sentation of the passion-
ate and sensuous music
of the Tango and Spanish
Flamenco. Complete with
Latin instruments and
Flamenco dancers, the
music and dance program
is a must see.
Tickets are available on-
line at www.chipola.edu
and at the Center for the
Arts box office. Monday

State Brief
Woman gored
in eye by deer
SPRING HILL Of-
ficials say a woman was
gored in the eye by a
deer at a Tampa Bay area
wildlife sanctuary.
The Pasco County
Sheriff's Office reports
that a woman called 911
Friday, saying that her
75-year-old sister had
been injured at the Sur-
vival Outreach Sanctu-
ary. An ambulance was
sent to the sanctuary,
but the woman's condi-
tion was not available.
Last week, a 150-
pound female lion
escaped its enclosure at
the sanctuary and had to
be tranquilized.
From wire reports


S iFiALIoT'aLWI
Harpist Anna Maria Mendieta
through Wednesday, from
2-5 p.m. and one hour be-
fore show time.
For information, call
718-2277.


d


BEFORE

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BOTTOM

DROPS

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4432 Lafayette Street
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN a www.jcfloridan.com


Therapy dogs help children talk about abuse


The Associated Press

SARASOTA The girl
was sweet, smart, just 9
years old. She had been
sexually abused by her
stepfather, and her mother
had abandoned her to live
with the man and his mon-
strously abhorrent secret.
No one seemed to want
Big Red either. A woman
found the Labrador mix
wandering up Proctor
Road one day, the scars on
his mangy side mysteri-
ous and sad, but there was
something wise and gentle
about him, too.
When it came time for
the girl to give a deposi-
tion in the case against her
stepfather two years ago,
she withdrew and grew
frightened and wouldn't
talk to anyone about it.
Prosecutor Dawn Buff
tried playing a fun game
with her. It didn't work.
They sat at a kid's table and
colored. Not a sound.
Over on the couch, next
to some pillows, watching
all of this, was Big Red.
He was a proud therapy
dog now among the ve-
hicles prosecutors use to
assuage the fears of abused
children but he was
scared, too, of elevators.
So scared, in fact, his
handler had to hold him
in her arms as they rode
up to the deposition room
that day.
Buff leaned over to the
girl and said softly, "I know
this is really scary and a lot
has gone on, but Red's re-
ally scared to be here, too.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Big Red, an 8-year-old rescue dog, lies with his owner, Rita Niro, at the Child Protection Center
in Sarasota. Big Red is a therapy dog used to calm the fears of abused children at the center.


"He's afraid of the eleva-
tor, but he came because
he knew you were going
to have to talk about this
today. He came to be by
you. He knew you needed
him."
The girl rose from her
chair, walked to .the couch,
put her arms around Big
Red and snuggled up to
the gentle brown therapy
dog with the scars on his
side.
"I almost started to cry,"
Buff said.
They all moved to the
floor and the girl started
talking, apprehensively at
first, and then saying just
enough to send her step-
father to prison for the rest
of his life.
Inside the lobby of the
Child Protection Center in


Sarasota is a large, twisting
glass cylinder two stories
tall.
Abused children drop
marbles down the cyl-
inder, and the little balls
slink their way to the bot-
tom, where they all remain
clustered like gumballs in
a 25-cent machine.
This is to signify to the
children that they are not
alone.
On the wall inside a
medical room at the center
is a painting of grass and
trees and summertime.
Hidden deep in the land-
scape are ladybugs and
grasshoppers.
Abused children are
asked to find the hidden
insects while lying on a
medical table.
This is to forget they are


being examined by a doc-
tor after enduring horrific
acts, violations often com-
mitted by someone they
love.
In one room is a closet
full of donated children's
clothes and television
monitors.
This is where law en-
forcement officers watch
the forensic interviews
taking place.
Inside another room is a
small kids' table with small
kids' chairs and a camera
high up in a corner.
This is where Danielle
Hughes works.
She is a 34-year-old fo-
rensic interviewer, and no
one draws squiggly lines
with a 5-year-old better
than her.
Hughes is called a child


protection team case co-
ordinator, one of four on
staff at the Child Protec-
tion Center.
She interviews children
ages 3-12 who might have
been abused.
If someone' places a call
to the Department of Chil-
dren and Families sus-
pecting abuse, Hughes is
among the people who will
be called upon to interview
the child.
Her interview tape will be
given to law enforcement,
and the case could be for-
warded to the state if the
police deem it credible.
Her job is to gather infor-
mation in a nonthreaten-
ing way.
"Can you imagine a 3-
year-old talking to a law
enforcement officer who
has a gun and a badge?"
Hughes said. "That's
frightening. They don't
want to talk about what
happened and they don't
want to get the perpetrator
in trouble."
Hughes has interviewed
more than 1,000 children
during the past 10 years.
She has to make them feel
comfortable, gain their
trust and attempt to obtain
crucial information within
a narrow timeframe.
As a rule of thumb, she
has three minutes to talk
to a child for every year of
the child's age. That's about
the length of a child's at-
tention span. For example,
she'll have 15 minutes for a
5-year-old.
Inside the interview
room, it's just her and


the child no parents or
family. Law enforcement
watches on the monitor
from another room.
She always points out
the camera and the mi-
crophone to the child. She
wants no surprises.
And she always sits at the
little table, at eye level with
the child. Buff, the assis-
tant state attorney, often
does the same when she
* conducts depositions.
"We want to eliminate all
power so I have no power
over that child," Hughes
said.
Buff was in Alabama a few
years ago for an Auburn-
Florida football game.
She was walking near the
famous Toomer's Corner
part of Auburn's campus
when she wandered into a
trinket shop.
She spotted a small me-
dallion inside the store that
bore the word "Courage."
When a young child takes
the stand in court, Buff will
sometimes have them hold
the small medallion.
Prior to a child testify-
ing in court, Buff brings
him or her in to sit in each
seat and become famil-
iar with the setting. Some
even swivel around in the
judge's chair.
She says she never coach-
es a child on how to act.
"They've got one job and
that's to tell the truth," Buff
said. "They worry, 'Am I
going to say it right?' And I
say: 'You don't worry about
anything else. It's my job
to worry about everything
else."'


Cremation becoming more popular


The Associated Press

FORT MYERS Fewer
Florida families are en-
tombing their loved ones'
bodies underground
opting instead to send
the remains into the Gulf
of Mexico, shoot them into
the sky or wear them in a
locket. %
The traditional burial,
once so important in the
grieving process, is becom-
ing a thing of the past.
More than half of Flo-
ridians who die are cre-
mated instead of buried.
The practice is even more
common in southwest
Florida, where financial,
practical, religious and
sentimental reasons are
causing more people to
choose cremationi.
"What's interesting is
cremation seems to be be-
coming the new tradition
for many families," said
Barbara Kemmis, execu-
tive director of the Crema-
tion Association of North
America.
Florida cremated 59 per-
cent of its dead in 2011
the second highest
percentage in the U.S., ac-
cording to the most recent
Cremation Association
statistics. Florida ranked
third for growth in cre-
mations that year, behind
California and Texas.
In 2012,74 percent of Lee
and 73 percent of Collier
county residents who died
were cremated, according
to the most recent Florida
Department of Health sta-
tistics. That's compared to
69 percent in Lee and 68
percent in Collier in 2008.
At Mullins Memorial
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion Service in Cape Coral,
about 85 percent of clients
choose cremation, ac-
cording to owner Shannon-
Mullins.
A major reason is cost. A
basic cremation costs an
average of about $2,250,
according to the Crema-
tion Association. That's
compared to about $8,350
for the average burial.
Another reason was
demonstrated last month,
when a southwest Florida
father exhumed his de-
ceased son's body and was
appalled at what he saw.
Jesse Watlington, 11, died
in October 2012 after he
was struck by lightning.
His family buried him at
Fort Myers Memorial Gar-
idens, but later moved to


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shannon Mullins, of Mullins Memorial Funeral Home & Cremation Services, prepares to perform
a cremation in Cape Coral.
Orlando and decided .to as Fort Myers Memorial the same way," Kemmis
re-bury Jesse close by. Gardens. said, "so I think this per-
When workers opened "Probably our most sonalization is just so
the grave, the burial vault beautiful area is our cre- important."
lid was cracked, and the mation area," General Bill Krumrey, 69, of Cape
casket inside was full of Manager Donnell Sullivan Coral, had his mother bur-
water. said. ied in August. It's what she
Certain caskets and buri- The cremation area has wanted to be next to her
al vaults can keep water been open four years, and husband in the family's
out, but only for so long, it's so popular Memorial Chicago cemetery, he said.
Mullins said. Especially Gardens is looking into an But Krumrey plans to be
after a rainy season in expansion, cremated.
southwest Florida, where Perhaps the most unusu- "(It) makes life simpler,"
the water level is so high., al way to lay a loved one to he said.
Cremation is also a prac- rest shoot the remains Members of Bob Bas-
tical option for south- up in a rocket over the Gulf tuba's family have always
west Florida's seasonal of Mexico. At 3,000 feet been buried, but the 68-
and transplant residents, a parachute deploys and year-old Fort Myers resi-
as cremated remains are floats the remains down to dernt thinks he will break
cheaper and easier to the water. tradition and choose cre-
transport, Mullins said. Mullins has conducted mation. His wife likes the
Cremation fits people's the rocket launch twice idea because it's cheaper.
modern lifestyles and in his career once was They're considering in-
gives families more op- for a deceased fireworks ternment in a veterans
tions, Kemmis said. There fanatic. cemetery in Michigan,
are a handful of cemeter- "No two people grieve where he's originally from.
ies in southwest Florida,
but unlimited ways to lay'
cremated remains to rest.
Mullins dedicates one
wall of his funeral home DO
showroom to casket op-Pemnt
tions, and three to urns. heelpin
There are urns that display prs
pictures, are disguised as
lamps, worn as lockets or
are biodegradable. Mul-
lins sells a Florida Gators
urn and a $695 urn hand- We Specialize in Quality Medical & Surgical
made by an artist from Care for All Types of Foot & Ankle Problems.
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STATE





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN v www.jcfloridan.com


James and Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332
http://www.jamesand
sikesfuneralhomes.com/

Ernest Milton
Bryant

Mr. Ernest Milton Bry-
ant, 99, of Grand Ridge
died Saturday, January 11,
2014 at his residence.
He was a carpenter by
trade, built many kitchen
cabinets and helped build
several buildings on the
campus of Florida State
University. Mr. Bryant
loved his cows and growing
vegetables. He was Pente-
costal Holiness by faith and
a member of the Grand
Ridge United Methodist
Church.
Preceded in death by his
wife, Julia Bamberg Bryant;
three brothers and one sis-
ter.
Mr. Bryant is survived by
one son, Charles K. Bryant;
two daughters, Hazel
Shaw, Carolyn Johnson
and husband, Wayne, all of
Grand Ridge; 11 grandchil-
dren, 23 great-grand-
children, 15 great-great-
grandchildren; and a host
of nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be
10 a.m. Monday, January
13, 2014 at Grand Ridge
United Methodist Church
with Rev. Raymond Owens,
Rev. Jerry Tanton, Rev. Ro-
land Bamberg and Trevor


Johnson officiating. Burial
will follow in Shady Grove
Cemetery with James and
Sikes Funeral Home Mad-
dox Chapel directing.
The family will receive
friends from 5 to 7 p.m.
Sunday, January 12, 2014 at
James and Sikes Maddox
Chapel.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
%xw vjan ci san dsike (if lora.i lhomef .com

James and Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332
http://www.jamesand
sikesfuneralhomes.com/

William E.
Burke

Funeral service will be 2
p.m. Monday, January 13,
2014 at James and Sikes
Funeral Home Maddox
Chapel. Burial will follow in
Cypress Cemetery. Visita-
tion will be held one hour
prior to services.




Florists

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Wounded vets swim with dolphins


The Associated PResS

MARATHON Doz-
ens of wounded mili-
tary veterans got some
dolphin therapy in the
Florida Keys this week
when they got to swim
with the mammals.
At the Dolphin Re-
search Center, retired
Army Sgt. 1st Class Rob-
ert Rivera held onto a
dolphin's dorsal fin and
was towed for a Friday.
Rivera sustained a spinal
injury in Iraq in 2010.
Rivera said he was most
excited to see the reac-


tions of his comrades,
many who lost limbs in
Iraq or Afghanistan or
are suffering from inju-
ries that are not visually
apparent.
The dolphin visit was
part of Soldier Ride, or-
ganized by the nonprofit
Wounded Warrior Proj-
ect. About 50 wounded
military veterans and
their supporters are par-
ticipating in the combi-
nation bus and bicycle
trip through the Florida
Keys.
Soldier Ride ends Sun-
day in Key West.


-- -.~~-'-.',- -.- -. .- -


THEASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS
AT LEFT, Retired soldier Bryan Taylor enjoys a dorsal tow at Dolphin Research Center in Marathon. ABOVE, U.S. Army Lt.
Nathan Rimpf (foreground) pedals across the Seven Mile Bridge in the Florida Keys.


Scott promises changes to school standards


The Associated Press

ORLANDO Florida
Gov. Rick Scott, acknowl-
edging the backlash
among some Republicans
against new state school
standards, said Saturday
that steps will be taken to
address the criticism that
has built up over the last
few months..
Scott, who was speak-
ing at the annual meeting
of the Republican Party
of Florida, said he under-
stood there was a "little
bit of passion" surround-
ing the standards that are
known officially as the
Common Core State Stan-
dards. His remarks came a
,day after a state party cau-
cus passed a resolution
opposing them.


Woman convicted for
caging boy in closet
TITUSVILLE A
woman has been con-
victed of seven felonies
after authorities say she
and her boyfriend kept
an emaciated 13-year-old
boy locked in a cage.
Glass was convicted
Friday of several charges
including child abuse. She
and Michael Marshal were
arrested in 2012 after
authorities say they locked
the boy in a closet as pun-
ishment and strapped him
to a bed for long periods
of time. Investigators said
the couple also starved
the boy. He weighed 40
pounds when he was
found.
Florida Today reports
Glass denied involvement
in the alleged abuse and
blamed Marshal. Her
attorney said she should
have intervened but didn't
participate in the abuse.
Marshall faces similar
charges, but a trial has not
been scheduled.

1-year-old boy
drowns in tub
PANAMA CITY BEACH,
- Police are investigating
after a 1-year-old child
was found unresponsive
in a bathtub in Panama
City Beach home.
Investigators said
Gaudalupa Ritchie Mar-
tinez was home with his
mother and two siblings
Friday and may have been


The governor said Edu-
cation Commissioner Pam
Stewart will unveil a list
next week of proposed
changes to the standards.
He also said that the Flor-
ida Legislature during its
spring session would pass
a "data security" bill to re-
spond to concerns about
what type of information
will be collected from stu-
dents that could be passed
on to others.
"These are Florida stan-
dards, they are not some
national standards," Scott
said. "This is our state.
We're not going to have
the federal government
telling us how to do our
education system."
Scott's response still falls
short of an outright repeal
of the standards that some


briefly unsupervised. He
was pronounced dead at
the hospital.
Panama City Beacih
Police Chief Drew Whit-
man said they don't
suspect foul play but are
investigating to determine
if the child was neglected.
The News Herald reports
authorities said they
are waiting on autopsy
results.

Sea turtles rescued
from cold waters
PANAMA CITY BEACH,
- Florida wildlife officials
say nearly 75 endangered
sea turtles have been res-
cued and taken to a rehab
after suffering a cold stun
from severe weather.
Florida Wildlife and
Conservation Commis-
sion officials say turtles
suffering from cold stun
typically stop moving
and end up just float-
ing in the water or even
washing ashore. Officials,
volunteers and research-
ers rescued the turtles this
week all along the Gulf
Coast. The majority were
discovered in St. Joseph
Bay near Panama City.
The Pensacola News
Journal reports the turtles
now are in intensive care
at the Gulf World Marine
Institute where they are
recovering in warm water.
The turtles likely will be
released back into the wild
within the next few weeks.

From wire reports


opponents want. Florida
also had no plans to give
detailed student data to
the federal government,
but State Board of Educa-
tion member John Colon
said passing a bill will en-
sure that there's no "wiggle
room."
The changes that Stew-
art plans to the standards
are relatively minor. She
told state legislators earlier
this week that one of them
would to be include the
teaching of cursive writing
in schools.
Scott initially backed
Common Core standards,
which set uniform bench-
marks for reading, writing
and math. But in the last
few months he refused
to take a firm position
on Florida's transition to


the new standards, which
have been adopted by 45
states and the District of
Columbia.
In September, Scott
called for public hearings
and set the groundwork
for the state to pull out
of a consortium develop-
ing a national test to see-if
school children are meet-
ing the new standards. The
hearings generated harsh
criticism of the standards
from some parents who
called them a plan by fed-
eral bureaucrats to assert
more control over schools.
Common Core State
Standards are a result of
an initiative sponsored by
the National Governors
Association and the Coun-
cil of Chief State School
Officers.


Opponents see them as
the nationalization of ed-
ucation policy and stan-
dards, something they say
should be left to the states.
The new standards are
backed by former Gov. Jeb
Bush, who helped create
the state's current A-to-F
grading system. Support-
ers contend that having a
shared set of standards will
allow for a more accurate
state-by-state comparison
of student performance.
Rep. Debbie Mayfield,
R-Vero Beach, is sponsor-
ing a bill that would halt
the state's implementation
of the standards for now.
Mayfield praised the gov-
ernor's actions, but said he
hoped he would eventual-
ly agree to opt out of Com-
mon Core completely.


Gun-rights group sues



university over gun ban


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A
gun-rights group is suing
the University of Florida
for banning guns in cam-
pus housing. The lawsuit
comes on the heels of a
similar suit against the
University of North Flori-
da's ban on guns in cars.
In early December, the
1st District Court of Ap-
peal sided with a UNF
student and gun rights
group Florida Carry that
challenged a rule ban-
ning students from stor-
ing guns in their cars.
The Daytona Beach
News-Journal reports UF
officials said in a writ-
ten statement they had
been in talks with Florida
Carry this week and were
stunned by the lawsuit.


UF got rid of its ban on
guns in cars to comply
with the, ruling, but had
left in place a strict ban
on firearms elsewhere
on campus. Campus
residents can store their
guns, unloaded, at the
university's police station
if they have permission.
Anyone bringing a gun
to the station is required
to follow a specific street
route to get there.
More than 75 people
have stores guns at the
station, according to me-
dia reports.
"They didn't object to
the steps we have taken
to comply with the court's
decision, and they never
raised the issue of guns in
the home, which was not
the subject of the court's
decision," UF spokes-


woman Janine Sikes said
in a statement.
After last month's rul-
ing Florida Carry sent a
notice to all Florida uni-
versities and colleges that
it will sue any school that
does not -repeal similar
rules by the start of the
spring semester.
"We take no joy in filing
lawsuits," founder Sean
Caranna said. "I wish it
was not a necessary part
of what our organization
does. But it is a stark real-
ity in the fight to protect
the right to bear arms."
After the ruling, UNF
President John Delaney
told students and faculty
the university would not
appeal the ruling; and
stated that, effective im-
mediately, students could
store guns in their cars.


Gov. vows GOP will win big this year
The Associated Press annual gathering of the my and jobs picture as a
Republican Party of Flor- key reason why they ex-
ORLANDO Head- ida were his first major pect to win in November.
ing into a crucial election campaign speech during "We have every right to
year, Florida Gov. Rick a year in which he will be win everyelectionbecause
Scott said Saturday that the main target for the we are doing the right
the state's Republicans state's Democrats. thing," Scott told roughly
will win big and keep their Scott and other top 200 party activists.
lock on state government Republicans gearing up Republicans have con-
and maintain their major- for this year's elections trolled- the Florida Leg-
ity among Florida's mem- sounded confident as islature and governor's
bers in Congress. I they repeatedly cited the mansion for much of the
Scott's remarks at the state's improving econo- last two decades.


Contraband
From Page 1A
A correctional officer re-
ported finding a balloon
inside a sandwich' from
Whittington's bag lunch
around 4 p.m. Wednesday
after Whittington returned
from the work detail. The
officer asked Whittington
what was inside it, but the
inmate said he didn't know
where it came from or what
it was. The officer and a su-
pervisor then opened the
balloon and found a tobac-
co pouch, according to the
complaint.



Chamber
From Page 1A
will be StanW, Connally Jr.,
president and CEO of Gulf
Power Co.
Other banquet high-
lights will include a
"passing of the gavel"
ceremony to mark the
departure, of outgoing.
chamber Chairman John
Alter and the arrival of the
new chair, Cindy Eade. The
2013 Citizen of the Year will
also be named at the ban-
quet, along with the winner
of the Wayne Mixson Eco-
nomic Leadership Award.


Skimner
From Page 1A

their support throughout
this medical crisis. Stu-
dents and faculty in lo-
cal schools, individuals
and various -organizations
have held fundraisers for
him over the course of his
illness, diagnosed in late
October, and have given
outright contributions to
the special fund set up for
him at First Federal Bank.
They've sent him holiday
and get-well cards and he
continues to receive those
messages of hope and
concern. Skinner said it all
means a great deal to him.
"I want to thank everyone
for all the support they've
given me," Skinner said in
a phone conversation Fri-
day. "When I get down, I
get out the Christmas cards
and the get-well cards and
look through them. And
I want to thank all those
who donated money; it will
help us during that time (at
UAB)."
Skinner said he has been
overwhelmed by the gen-
erosity and concern.


a-h


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Food trucks of all flavors are thriving in Miami


MIAMI John Jairo
Pelaez came to Miami in
October of 2004 with only
$1,000 in his pockets, after
the bankruptcy of his shoe
factory in the Colombian
city of Medellin.
Nine years later, the busi-
nessman has become the
owner of one of the most
popular of the dozens of
Hispanic fast-food trucks
that turn up mornings in
Kendall to serve clients
looking for something tast-
ier than traditional chain-
store fare.
"Rain, thunder or light-
ning, I am open here every
dawn," said Pelaez, owner
of Asados El Paisa. "I start-
ed this adventure with a
lot of love, like my mother
taught me, because rice
and eggs taste very good
if done with love. Our spe-
cialty is doing things with
love, and the results are
obvious. Thanks to God,
things are going very well
for us."
Parked in strip malls and
churches along busy 137th
Avenue and Southwest
88th Street, the trucks an-


nounce their specialties
with modern, lit-up digi-
tal panels and display na-
tional flags to indicate the
origin of their dishes.
Miami-Dade County
Commissioner Javier Sou-
to, who represents part of
Kendall, said that the area,
home to about 300,000
people, has become an
attractive spot for the
trucks because of the high
concentration of Hispan-
ics looking for the typical
tastes of their native coun-
tries at modest prices.
"In Miami-Dade, in the
'80s and '90s, these food
trucks went to the indus-
trial areas near the airport
to serve mostly truckers,"
Souto said. "Now these
trucks are following the
New York trend and search
for more residential areas
to sell their food in rhore
sophisticated, more mod-
ern vehicles, which has
turned into a success.!
For Carla Santos and Es-
tefanfa Lugaresi, going to
the trucks for some of the
popular "chimichurris" -
Dominican Republic ver-
sions of a hamburger is
a tradition that keeps their


roots alive.
Their favorite place is
Chimi-Kendall, owned
by Rubito Suarez, whose
trucks are parked at the
Plaza Taimar, on 137th Ave-
nue in front of the Tarmiami
airport.
"We always try to get
together to come and eat
here," Lugaresi said. "The
food is good, and they sell
it at good prices." His chi-
mis sell for $6, and a combo
that includes meat, cheese,
plantains and sausage goes
for $12.
Suarez bought his 1981
truck for $15,000 three
years ago, to start a new
business after selling a
small shop in northeast
Miami.
"Now my dream is to
have a bigger truck, so that
I can serve more people,"
Suarez said.
Working out of the same
parking lot are two other
trucks that serve Colom-
bian food Que Sabroso
Fast Food and Okay Ex-
treme Burger.
Positive word of Kendall's
food trucks has traveled
so far that R.J. Reyes, a
student who lives in Pem-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Owner John Jairo Pelaez (right), greets a customer at the Asados Paisa Colombian food truck,
in Kendall.


~.


broke Pines, stops by the
trucks on 88th Street every
time he visits his friend
Claudia Sdnchez.
'I live almost one hour
away, but when I come,
what I do is I look for the
food trucks in Kendall be-
cause they are very good,"
said Reyes, whose family is
Cuban.
But starting Monday, cli-
ents like Reyes will have
a new option in Broward
County
That's the start of the
Food Truck Collective, in a
five-acre park in the city of


Hollywood that will feature
several fast-food trucks as
well as live music shows.
The park, Negril on The
Green at 315 South 62nd'
Ave., will be open to the
public starting Monday at
6p.m..
The Broward market al-
ready has. caught the at-
tention of Pelaez, who has
one of his trucks rotating
through several areas of the
county for special events.
But his ambitions go be-
yond that. The Medellin
native is planning to buy
a third truck and park it


in Homestead to serve the
growing market of Mexican
clients.
Pelaez also rented a
shop in Little Havana four
months ago and plans
to open a restaurant that
will sell his hamburgers,
arepas and fried plantain
tostones.
He will be following in
the footsteps of Gerardo
Cardenas, a Peruvian who
owns Super Cholo and who
six months ago opened a
fixed restaurant after sev-
eral years of selling food
out of a truck.


Caverns Road Church of Christ


"The churches of Christ
greet you"
Romans 16:16
Elders:
Benny Carr
David Register
Raymond Chapman
Jim Swails
Deacons:
Michael McLean
James Pelham
Glenn Hoff
Donnie Hall
Henry Drouillard
Minister:
Tom Bowling
850-482-2605 office
850-372-4137 home
preachertombowling@gmall.com
4448 River Road
Marianna, FL 32446
Phone: 850-482-2605
Email:
cavemsroad@embarqmail.com
www.cavernsroadchurchofchrist.org

Service Times:
Sunday Morning:
9:30 a.m. Bible School
10:30 a.m. Worship
6:00 p.m. Worship
Wednesday:
6:00 p.m. Bible Study


'Gc-d'4 P,60p!, ukg.. i A FAithi tcN,8 Ntv lMouiiinau'

Have You Heard About The Church Of Christ?
(Acts 17:6)
Charges true and false have always been made about the Lord's
church (Acts 17:6; 18. Acts 16:20-21). This article examines
several of the charges comrionly made against Christ's church,
and gives the Biblical answers to them.
True or False?
1. The Church of Christ Doesn't Believe In All The Bible (False)
A. Of course we believe all the Bible to be the inspired word of God
(2 Timothy 3:16-17), however we do not believe that all the Bible
is binding as law upon us today.
(Romans 7:1-4; Ephesians 2:15; Colossians 2:14; Hebrews 9:15).
II. The Church of Christ Doesn't Believe In Music (False)
A. Of course we believe in music, but a certain type of music -
singing. (Colossians 3:17; Ephesians 5:19; Colossians 3:16;
Hebrews 2:12; James 5:13). We practice the only authorized type
of music in the New Testament.
Ill. The Church of Christ Only Preaches Baptism (False)
A. Yet, Preaching Christ includes preaching baptism
(Acts 2:37-38; Acts 8:5-12; 8:35-36; 1 Peter 3:21).
IV. The Church of Christ Doesn't Believe In Salvation
By The Blood (False)
A. (Ephesians 1:7; Romans 6:1-4, 17-18).
V. The Church of Christ Thinks They're Right And Everyone
Else Is Wrong (False)
A. The Bible is right, and whoever disagrees with it is wrong
(Matthew 24:35; John 12:48). Less time should be spent on the
.who' and more should be spent on 'what' is right.

Don't believe everything you hear. Gather the facts for yourself, read
the provided verses, and then come to your conclusions. Thats
what I would encourage all of us to do in regard to the Church of
Christ Weigh the evidence, and follow and obey the truth.
For a free, in-home Bible correspondence course
please contact the Caverns Road church office, or
contact: preachertombowling@gmail.com
My name is Tom Bowling, and I am the pulpit
minister for the church of Christ that meets at Caverns
Road here in Marianna. I would like to invite you
to offend our services, or to contact me anytime for
prayer or Bible study. God Bless You! 1j]


-~ 4


Sponsored by J C.


MCCOY'S an FLORIDAN



Big Buck Contestl
9 INCLUDES ARCHERY. GENERAL GUN AND MUZZLE LOADING SEASONS!

Beast Huntin Buddy Camo Golf Cart ..A- I


Contest W W (Retail VaIue $U,999")

Trophy Mount from Tanya iiith Outdoor IR

Addiction in Alford, FL (Retail Value $350)
2nd Place Prize Hoyt Carbon Element Compound Bow ($1.399"' Value) 3rd Place Prize Hoyt CRX 35 Compound Bow ($799"" Value)
4th Place Prize Maui Jim Sunglasses (up to 1.200 Value) 5th Place Prize $150 McCoys Gift Card


Prize drawings *from0allentr.ieM s Cra


Weekly entries %%ill run in the Jackson County Floridan or go to i~wvw.jcnoridan.com to see all entries
Each photo "ill be placed on our braggin' board located at McCoy's.
Enter at NvlcCoy's Outdoors 2823 Jefferson St. Marianna, FL 850-526


)-2921


ELLIL':TT HOLLOIr 8 P:IirJT


MIKE BISHOP 11 POINT


NICK CONRAD 10 POINT


SYDNEE GOODSON 8 POINT


I.


LTW.R. r.1cD.'.'LL 8 P.:.liT __ WILL LA. 10 POII


Contest Rules
* F rFer. ii. i h. HI \ iii.lil Leer DejdiilC( ,.r nirle2. im M-ir>h 'rd. 2"'14
* rni- IIi. 4..:, r iT i I,1 hr. -uh1 i. N-( -,. >1]Ujl, for ith e ..r i Ml FBR ...e licc[. n-i.l hei .uhniiid ir rt.. Mc i .: ., k .h ': 1i| 1
* The l.'i- :r. tf r .i. ill .Ji.kcrniri- [ihe %, inner .:. N rrr, ice requ-rcd
* LI.. F *;"ii i rr.. i--,1 1.1j :d .F l ti-.UIf .ic- i id 1c BK ..i.re r e.:i
Winners %ill be announced on NMarch 11. 2014 and be published in the Jackson County Floridan on March 16. 2014.


4


WEEKLY ENTRIES


t7-6 -I


STAfTE


TF.F F iLl FF.:. IC.- 6 F':'l l


Fl E 5p ,l'- H T : r I P :.[T
















Bulldogs take another



big district road win


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent jcflorndan.com

Another test, another pass-
ing grade for the Marianna
Bulldogs.
The undefeated Bulldogs made
their second trip to Pensacola
this season and again brought
a big district victory back with


Sports Briefs

High school
boys basketball
Monday Blountstown at
Marianna, 5:30 and 7 p.m.
Tuesday Graceville at
Sneads, 5:30 and 7 p.m.;
Malone at Ponce de Leon, 6
and 7:30 p.m.; Cottondale at
Wewahitchka, 4 and 7 p.m.
Thursday Graceville at
Blountstown, 6 and 7:30 p.m.
Friday Cottondale at
Sneads, 5:30 and 7 p.m.;
Walton at Marianna, 5:30 and
7 p.m.
Saturday Marianna at
Rutherford, 5:30 and 7 p.m.;
Sneads at North Florida
Christiap, 4 and 5:30 p.m.

High school
girls basketball
Monday Bethlehem at
Cottondale, 5 p.m. and 6 p.m.;
Marianna at Mosley, 6 p.m.
Tuesday Graceville at
Sneads, 4 p.m.; Rutherford at
Marianna, 6 p.m.; Cottondale
atWewahitchka, 3 p.m. and
5:30 p.m.
Thursday Graceville at
Blounmstown, 4:30 p.m.; Mari-
:anna at Walton, 6 p.m.
Friday Cottondale at
Sneads, 4 p.m.:
Saturday Sneads at North
Florida Christian, 2:30 p.m.

Chipola basketball
Chipola men's and women's
basketball teams will be
in Tallahassee on Tuesday
night to take on Tallahas'see
Community College, with [he
women's game tipping at 4:30
p.m. and the men at 6:30 p.m.
They'll end the week at
home Saturday against North-
west Florida State, with the
women's game tipping at 5:30
p.m. followed by the men at
7:30 p.m.

Southern Elite softball
Tryouts for the girls' South-
ern Elite softball travel team
will be held at the Alford
recreation park on Jan. 19 at
2 p.m. for ages lOU, 12U and
14U. For more information,
call 850-272-2109.

Jackson County
travel baseball
Jackson County baseball
will have tryouts for 9U travel
baseball Jan. 18 from noon
to 3 p.m. at Jennings Field in
Marianna.
Those attending will need
baseball pants, cleats, and a
glove, and players from Jack-
son County and surround-
ing counties are all invited.
Those who attend will also be
entered into a drawing for a
chance to win a $30 gift card
from Hibbett Sports.
For any further information,
call 209-5834 or 557-0419.

Sports items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com, or
fax them to 850-482-4478. The
mailing address for the paper
is Jackson County Floridan
P.O. Box 520 Marianna, FL
32447.


them Friday night after knock-
ing off the West Florida Jaguars
67-58.
The win improved Marianna
to 16-0 and moved the team
one win away from clinching
the top seed in the District 1
tournament.
"It's a big road win," Bulldogs,
coach Travis Blanton said after


the game. "Like we talked about
going into it, we were out of our
routine at school (Friday) and
didn't get to do our workout at
school, so that took us out of our
routine and then you're driving
two-and-a-half hours and you
never know how you're going to

See BULLDOGS, Page 2B


Marianna's
Jamel
Johnson goes
in for a layup
during a
game earlier
this season.


Hornets downed by Tigers in OT

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
COTTONDALE Down two with under minute left in
regulation, the Graceville Tigers faced the prospect of a
second heartbreaking district defeat in as many nights
after losing by one to Altha the previous night.
But thanks to a tying shot by Deangelo Bell in regula-
tion, and then a buzzer-beating three-pointer by Rashard
McKinhie in overtime, the Tigers avoided such a fate Fri-
day night and dealt their rivals a devastating defeat.
McKinnie's left corner triple as time expired in OT gave
Graceville a 50-47 victory and sent the Cottondale Hor-
nets to their fourth straight loss and third in a row in dis-
trict play.
"It was another classic Graceville-Cottondale battle,"
Tigers coach Matt Anderson said after the game.
Graceville had to do it at the end without its two lead-
ing scorers after DerrickWhite fouled out late in the fourth
quarter and Marquavious Johnson had to leave the game
early in overtime after suffering a serious cut over his eye
after taking an inadvertent elbow under the basket.
"To pull out a win like that is a testament to our depth
and how hard our kids fight," Anderson said. "But the Cot-
tondale kids fought just as hard as we did. Both teams
played hard defensively. We both struggled offensively, but
I thought both teams were outstanding defensively. We just
had the ball last."
The sophomore point guard Bell helped pick up the
slack for the Tigers in the absence of White and then
Johnson, making a tough banker in traffic with 12.8 sec-
onds left in regulation to tie the game, and then scoring
in transition following a Cottondale turnover to put GHS
up four early in OT.
It was also Bell who found McKinnie in the corner for
the game-winning shot, turning away a contested three
of his own as time wound down to give it to his open
teammate.
Once McKinnie one ofjust four seniors on the Tigers'
roster let it go, he said he knew the game was over.
"It felt good from the time it left my hand until it went
in," he said. "When I released it, it felt like magic."
The end was decidedly less magical for a Hornets
team that was coming off of a disappointing road loss to
Blountstown on Tuesday and was looking to get things
turned around with a big home win.

See BUZZER, Page 2B


Lady Hornets


top Graceville

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Cottondale Lady Hornets picked up a
rare victory Thursday night at home, defeat-
ing district and county rival Graceville for
the second time this season, 40-26.
Cheyanne Franklin scored 18 points to
lead the Lady Hornets, who improved to 4-
16 overall and 4-4 in District 2 competition
with the win.
Brooklyne Brown added 13 points for
Cottondale, while Madison McDaniel led
Graceville with 10.
Cottondale led by one after the first quarter
but stretched the lead out to 23-14 at half-
time before taking control in the third period
and going up by 15.
Lady Hornets coach Shan Pittman said af-
ter the game that she was very happy with
the energy and execution of her team.


See COTTONDALE, Page 2B


ESTALMATTOX/FOR THE FLORIDAN
Graceville's Derrick White goes up for a shot during a game against Cottondale
on Friday night.


Sneads Baskethall


Pirates bounce back from


loss with dominant win


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

One night after taking a tough loss in an
emotional game against the Malone Ti-
gers, the Sneads Pirates avoided a letdown
Friday with a dominant 72-44 win over the
Wewahitchka Gators.
It was just the third victory of the season
for the Pirates, who improved to 3-14 over-
all and 2-7 in District 2 competition, with
both wins coming over Wewahitchka.
The wi" came on the heels of a 71-57 loss
to Malone in which the Pirates led by two
with three minutes to go before the Tigers
closed the game on a 16-0 run to derail the
upset bid.
Sneads coach Bruce Hubbs said he was
concerned that his players might have ex-
pended too much energy Thursday night
to bring enough Friday, but that proved
not to be true.
"I was worried about last night.


Sometimes you use it all up at one time
and don't have anything left over," the
coach said after the game. "We started out

See PIRATES, Page 2B


BOB KORNEGAY
The Can and I. See
more on Page 2B.


y~~iF~f ~J
-~


'- *^l : ERIC WALDON
1'jc -,k L 1- NA~NCE MANAGER


JOHN ALLEN CRAIG BARD MICHAEL CASTLEBERRY
SALES TEAM SALES TEAM SALES TEAM .


IGH SCHOOL BICSKETBALL





BUZZER BEATE


t4





71 2B SUNDAY, JANUARY 12,2014


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


The Can and I


As a child, my
store-bought toys
were relatively few.
That's not to say I didn't
have plenty of play-
things. It's just that the
majority of my toys were
either made, found, or
pass-alongs.
My favorites among
things in the latter
category were my great
grandfather's empty
tobacco tins. Great things,
those old Prince Albert
cans; not a thing in the
world a little prepubescent
crumb snatcher couldn't
do with them. Or cram
into them.
Dirt, pebbles, marbles,
doodlebugs, you name it.
Everything sooner or later
found its way in. Later,
when I was older, the cans
were just as useful for
holding BBs and, still later,
.22 cartridges. They made
great BB gun and .22 rifle
targets as well.
It doesn't stop there.
Cans of one sort or an-
other have played pivotal
roles in my outdoor life.
Take coffee cans. Ah,
yes. There were few things
more useful or multi-
purpose than an empty
Maxwell House receptacle.
How many dug-up
earthworms have ridden
to their doom inside a
boy's Maxwell House cof-
fee can? How many trips
to the fishing hole? How
many scoldings motivated
by my leaving a can full
of red wigglers under the
bed to die and smell a day
or two later? How many
thumb gashes caused by
a jagged rim in those days
before plastic cans and
pull-tops? If contaminated


Bulldogs
From Page 1B
come out of the gate."
Marianna came out pret-
ty strong, taking a 33-24
halftime lead before ex-
tending it to 17 in the sec-
ond half.
But the Jaguars charged
back and cut the deficit to
three witlb two minutes to
play.
They got no closer, how-


BobKornegay
Outdoors Columnist
worm dirt and cuts from
rusted metal really were
infectious and potentially
deadly, I'd never have
made it past 12.
Some of us found coffee
cans made excellent creels
and livewells, too. It was
often said I was the only
young angler on earth who
could fit a limit of bluegills
inside one. Everything was
a keeper back then, size
notwithstanding.
Then there were the
coffee cans stowed aboard
those old wooden john-
boats rented at north
Florida fishing camps.
Every boat had one. Pity
the angler who left the dock
without it. There was never
an old wooden johnboat
that didn't leak. Without a
coffee can for bailing, one
was likely to find him-
self in rather than on the
water.
Fishermen aboard
old wooden johnboats
occasionally needed
to "leak" as well. Thus,
the cans saved us from
embarrassment and
the hazards involved in
standing precariously
in the bow attempting
to "go" over the side in a
brisk wind and a two-foot
chop. It's arguable, but
possible Maxwell House's
"Good to the Last Drop"
trademark stemmed
from this particular


ever, with MHS point
guard Shaquarious Baker
helping salt the game away
by making four straight
free throws in the final
minute.
Herman Williams fin-
ished with 14 points to
lead the Bulldogs, with
Jamel Johnson scoring 13,
and Roderick Copeland 12
before leaving the game in'
the third quarter with an
anlde sprain.
The junior forward Co-


coffee-can function.
And what of food cans?
Notably those containing
fisherman's' manna such
as potted meat, Vyeenees,
and sardines. As nostalgic
as I am for the good old
days, I must hedge a bit
and admit to a decided
preference for these de-
lightful morsels in their
more modem receptacles.
Anyone who ever used
those ridiculous little keys
to open a can of processed
"meat" parts or a tin of oily
little Norwegian fish will
agree with me. I refer you
back to "thumb gashes"
and "jagged rims" men-
tioned earlier.
The keys to the food
cans of my youth were
missing about half the
time. This forced us to
open the tins with our
knives, resulting in more
slashed digits and added
"seasoning" from gut-
coated knife blades, which
we seldom deemed it
necessary to clean. True,
there's little adventure in
opening today's snap-
and-peel food cans, but
there's much to be said for
dining on their contents
unaccompanied by bloody
fingers, bloodcurdling
screams and cuss words
that would peel the paint
off those old wooden
boats.
Yep. Cans, it seems, have
played a major role in my
outdoors career. Knowing
that, you'd think I wouldn't
have paddled out here
without one. And wouldn't
you just know I'd be in the
canoe today.
Ah, well. No recourse but
to stand.
Carefully!


peland did not return to
the game and Blanton said
he was questionable for
next week's games against
Blountstown on Monday,
Walton on Friday, and
Rutherford on Saturday.
"He has an energy that's
hard to replace," the
coach said of Copeland.
"It's a tough loss as far as
one of our leaders. Hope-
fully he'll be back soon.
We'll see what the doctor
says."


Buzzer
From Page 1B
It appeared that would be how it
would go late in regulation when Ka-
deem Webb's pull-up jumper put' the
Hornets up 41-39 with 1:06 to play, and
a Graceville turnover led to a transition
opportunity for Mike Gallon.
But Gallon was whistled for a charge
with 32.3 seconds left to give it back over
to GHS.
The Tigers couldn't convert on their
next possession and Cottondale again
had a chance to stretch the lead to four
with 21.2 seconds remaining, but Da-
kota Haddock missed the front end of a
one-and-one to open the door for Bell's
tying shot.
Gallon got another chance to be the
hero on the final play of regulation with
an open comer three of his own from
the right side, but the shot was long and
Haddock was unable to get up' a fol-
low shot in traffic after collecting the
rebound.
The Hornets had an opportuni-
ty to go up with another open cor-
ner three-pointer in overtime, this
time for Webb from the left side, but
for the second time the shot missed
everything.
Webb made amends moments later by
knocking in two free throws with 41 sec-
onds left to tie the game at 47-47.
Anderson called timeout with 10.8 sec-
onds left and drew up a play for Ladarius
Nix to isolate for a drive on the right side
of the court.


P.0
Pirates
From Page 1B
strong and then went through a run
where -we were doing more wrong
things than right, but we made a couple
of changes and rotated out a little better
and started making a run and it was all
uphill from there."
Sneads had lost four straight af-
ter picking up its second win of the
year over South Walton on Dec. 27 at
a Christmas classic at Graceville High
School.
But the performance in the loss to top-
ranked Malone could've been indicative
of an uptick in play for the Pirates, and
Friday's effort only strengthened that
idea.
"Although we weren't fabulous, we


Cottondale
From Page 1B
"It's probably the best I've seen them
play all season. It was a lot of team ball,"
she said. "They distributed the ball to each
other well, ran the break well, and tan the
offense. Defensively, we made some stops
and theywere talking. It was the first com-
plete game we've had all season."
The loss dropped the Lady Tigers to 4-


He couldn't convert, but the Tigers
picked up the offensive rebound to set
up the game-winner.
"It's a real big win for us," McKinnie
said. "It's a big rivalry game and we had
some players who stepped up."
For Cottondale, it was the latest in a
string of disappointing outcomes fol-
lowing the Christmas break, with the
close loss no consolation for a club
desperately searching for positive
momentum.
"In terms of intensity, it was more than
we had the last few games, but that's to
be expected in a rivalry game," Hornets
coach Chris Obert said. "But obviously it
was not enough to pull out a win. Defen-
sively we were better in spots, but we're
still not where we need to be. And at the
end, the kid just made a good shot. You.
have to give him credit."
McKinnie finished with 12 points,
with White leading the way for the Ti-
gers with 13.
Johnson also had nine, and Bell scored
eight.
Haddock led the Hornets with 14
points, with Tre Lee scoring 10, and
Webb and Gallon eight each.
With the win, the Tigers improved to
9-7 overall and 6-2 in District 2, while
the Hornets fell to 7-8 and 4-4 in league
play.
Cottondale will next go to Wewahitch-
ka on Tuesday night for another district
game before finishing the week out in
Sneads on Friday.
Graceville will be in Sneads on
Tuesday and will also be on the road
Thursday against Blountstown.


really played pretty well," Hubbs said.
"We've put some things together and
we've started having fun. It's not much
fun when you lose. We're taking some
baby steps and we've started putting it
together a little bit. We're playing with
a lot of intensity and starting to trust
each other, and some better things are
happening.
"I was pleased and (the players)
were happy too. It's a big district win.
I'm proud of them. We're looking for-
ward to next week and trying to win a
few more games and maybe challenge
some people when we get to the district
tournament."
*Sneads will next play host to a pair
of district rivals this week, taking on
Graceville on Tuesday and Cottondale
on Friday.
Both games tip at 7 p.m.


10 overall and 4-5 in District 2.
For Cottondale, the victory means that
with another win over Wewahitclika on
Tuesday it would lock up the No. 3 seed
in the district tournament.
But Pittman said she was content just
to see her team playing better.
"It's encouraging to see us play togeth-
er as a team. Hopefully we'll be able to
lock in on that third seed and see what
happens," she said. "We're going in the
right direction."


Fishing Report


Lake Seminole
Bass fishing is slow to
fair. The largest concentra-
tions of largemouths can
be found on creek points
and along creek bends.
Seek the clearest water
available up the creeks and
use Texas-rigged worms.
Near grass beds use jerk-
baits and floating stick-
baits for the best results.
Frog-type lures may pay
off in grass and around vis-
ible wood structure. When
using worms, go with the
lightest weight possible.
The lip-less crankbait bite
will improve as water tem-
perature stabilizes.
Crappies are fair on live
minnows for some anglers.
As a rule, they are still


deep, but have shown signs
recently of shallowing up a
bit. Target the shad schools
to locate the crappies.
Warm-water fishes such
as bream and catfish are
still showing few signs of
activity.
Lake Eufaula
Bass fishing is fair in
deep cover with jigs
and Carolina rigs. Fish
as closely as possible to
the cover. Deep-running
crankbaits. may work on
main-lake points and
spoons can pay off up the
creeks on ledges. Texas-
rigged lizards have worked
fairly well on points and
in rocky structure. Also try
Carolina-rigged worms


in dark colors and fish
them very slowly for the
best results. Slow-rolled
spinnerbaits are also
recommended.'
Crappies are slow to
bite right now. Most are
suspended deep and
reluctant to get active.
Minnows drop-fished in
deep brush may produce
some minimal catches. On
a positive note, individual
fish sizes are good.
All other species are
extremely slow.
Lake Andrews/
Chattahoochee River
Bass fishing is slow.
Continue to fish ledges
along channel bends in
spots where the chan-


nel curves near the bank.
Fish spoons or jig-and-pig
combos and work the baits
very slowly. Bass fishing up
the creeks has become less
productive as well. The
bite there is still sporadic
and the creeks are produc-
ing very few fish on worms
and crankbaits. Fishing is
slow near sandbars and


bankside structure.
Caftfishing can be fair up
and downriver. For larger
cats, go downstream and
fish bluff walls near river
bends. Tailwater catfishing
is slow to fair. Use frozen
shad, worms, or prepared
baits.
Crappies, though scat-
tered, will bite moderately


well when concentrations
of fish can be located.
Bream fishing'is very
slow.

Generation schedules, pool levels,
and other such information for
area waterways may be obtained
by calling toll-free 1-888-771-4601.
Follow the recorded instructions
and access the touch-tone for the
Apalachicola River System.


MONDAY NIGHT HI ROLLERS
TEAM STANDINGS
JAN. 6
W-L
1)-Marianna Office Supply 42-30
2) #1 0-32
3) Mary's Day Care 39.5-32.5
4) Adams Funeral Home 33-39
5) Trouble 1.5-40.5
6) Fly by Night 8-32
High Team Hdcp. Game: #1704
High Team Hdcp. Series: #12026
High Game: Bettie Grinsted 199; Don Still 225
High Series: Bettie Grinsted 507; Don Still 623
Special Pickups: Bettie Grinsted 5-10
TUESDAY MORNING COFFEE LEAGUE
TEAM STANDINGS
JAN. 7
W-L
1) Downhome Dental 51-25
2) Verizon 48.5-27.5
3) Gazebo 8-28
4) Kindel Awards 47.5-28.5
5) James & Sikes 40-36
6) Family Dentistry 36-40
7) Jim's Buffet & Grill 36-40
8) Pacers 4-42
9) Marianna Animal Hospital 30-46
High Game: LuAnn 187; Ray Pumphrey 238
High Series: LuAnn 540; Ray Pumphrey 698
High Team Game: Kindel Awards 991
High Team Series: Kindel Awards 2862
TUESDAY NIGHT MIXED
TEAM STANDINGS
JAN. 7


6) James Gang 35.5-36.5
7) Brantley's Bunch 34-38
8) Oak Creek Honey Bees 33-39
9) Deadwood 29.5-42.5
10) El Rio 3-49
High Team Hdcp. Game: We're Back 989
High Team Hdcp. Series: We're Back 2850
High Game Hdcp: Dale Reynolds 280, Steve Dailey 305
High Game Scratch: Dale Reynolds 223; Jason 266
High Series Hdcp: Kay Pittman 744; Steve Dailey 811
High Series Scratch: Dale Reynolds 570; Steve Dailey 688
WEDNESDAY NIGHT MIXED
TEAM STANDINGS
JAN. 8
W-L
1) Smith's Supermarket 49-19
2) Hump Day 0-28
3) P.C.B.D.T. 39-29
4) Big Lots 38-30
5) 2 Pair of Nutz 37-31
6) 4 Shades of Grey 35-33
7) Kindel Awards 34-34
8) Marianna Wash & Wax 33-35
9) Kindel Pro Shop 31-37
10) Whiskey Throttle 29-39
11) EJ Sound Machine 23-45
12) James Gang 20-48
High Team Hdcp. Game: Smith's Supermarket 979
High Team Hdcp. Series: Marianna Wash & Wax 2778
High Game Hdcp: Ashlee Walker 265; Mike Curry 280
High Series Hdcp: Ashlee Walker 740; David Shepard 737
High Game Scratch: Ashlee Walker 211; Aaron Walker 258
High Series Scratch: Ashlee Walker 578; Jay Roberts 632
CHIPOLA MEN'S LEAGUE
TEAM STANDINGS
JAN. 9


1) Southern Style Stucco
2) Craptastic
3) X-Men
4) Ricoh
5) Kindel Lanes Pro Shop
6) RTFB
7) The Cripples
8) Vengeance


Visit www.westflorida.coop for more energy-saving tips.


West Florida Electric

A Touchstone Energy' Cooperative 0)
The power of human connections


1) We're Back
2) Backwoods Bowlers
3) X-Men
4) Ba-Zin-Ga
5) Jason's Crew


W-L
46-26
43-29
0.5-31.5
38.5-33.5
37-35






.JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Anlrie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: I have been married for
three years. Two months after the wed-
ding, I discovered that my husband was
cheating with several women. Worse, he
confessed that he wasn't using condoms,
and by that time, I was four months preg-
nant. I was crushed to learn that he was
putting our unborn baby's life at risk.
After that horrible ordeal, we tried to
work on our marriage, but I never re-
gained trust in him, and the love I had felt
dissipated. Now I've discovered that he
is cheating again. I can't even stand to be
intimate with him. To kiss him is torture.
I no longer love him and am contem-
plating leaving. Can you give me some
guidance?
MYTRUSTWENT OUT THE
WINDOW
Dear Trust: First, if you are still sexually
intimate, please use protection, because
you cannot trust your husband to do
so. Then speak to a lawyer. You need to
protect yourself financially. You also need
to work out custody, support and visita-
tion arrangements that are in your child's
best interests. Then we hope you will seek
counseling to help you understand that
your husband's serial cheating and risky
sexual behavior are not your fault and
that you deserve better. A good counselor
will guide you to move forward with your
life without holding onto bitterness and
anger.

Dear Annie: My friend and I like to take
books out of the library and often carry
them to work in order to read at lunch.
The problem is, other co-workers start
talking to us even though they see us
reading. Sometimes they stare until we
look up and engage. We always close our
books and take part in the conversation,
but it eats up our entire lunch break. I
know it's rude to read at the table when
others are talking, but this is the only
time we have and the only place other
than the bathroom or our cars. And it's
not as if we don't speak to our co-workers
at other times.
These same people read the newspa-
per, do puzzles and spend time on their


phones with no interruption from me, so
why do they insist on interrupting people
with a book? Are we being rude, or are
they?
READING ON MY OWN TIME
Dear Reading: It is rude to read at the
table when others are already there and
attempting to engage you in conversa-
tion. But it is equally rude to crash a table
where someone is reading and interrupt
them, although these co-workers might
assume you read because you have no
one to talk to.
You could tell them, "I'd love to talk,
but I really must finish this book, and
this is the only free time I have." You and
your friend could post a little sign at your
lunch table that says, "Reading Room."
You could look for another place to read
within the building that is not occupied
by people you know. You could go out
for lunch to a nearby coffee shop. Or you
could read at home.

Dear Annie: This is a response to "BH,"
who was irked that her boyfriend's un-
pleasant ex-wife invites herself to family
events. Many years ago, a dear friend
taught me that we can achieve peace by
changing our own attitude when we find
ourselves dealing with an unpleasant
person.
I was bemoaning the latest outra-
geous behavior by an uncle I couldn't
avoid when "Lenora" interjected, "How
sad you must be for him! He must be a
deeply unhappy person and have many
struggles in life." Rather than be annoyed,
I should feel sorry for him. It completely
reoriented my outlook.
This mindset, which I call radical com-
passion, does not require that we like the
person, but it does enable us to maintain
our own calm politeness and avoid the
pitfalls of trying to force others to make
changes they resent.
-MORE AT PEACE

Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column.
Email questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


Bridge


It is bad enough to go down in a
partscore contract after the defenders
play well. But then to notice that you
could have made game in a different
strain really rubs salt into the wound.
In this deal, how can East-West defeat
two clubs? And which game can be
made?
South was a tad cautious when he rebid
two clubs, not three clubs. It is true that
three would have been a slight overbid,
but with such good clubs, it would have
been acceptable.
It was normal for North to pass over
two clubs. Over three clubs, though, he
would have continued with three hearts,
and South would have signed off in three
no-trump with his spade stopper. Note
that as the cards lie, three no-trump is
unbeatable. Even if West is psychic and
leads a diamond, declarer can win on the
board and play on hearts. (And, yes, on
another subject, some Wests would risk
a takeout double over one club, hoping
that if partner advances in diamonds, he
has good length there.)
The defense against two clubs is in-
structive. When West leads his heart ace,
East drops the seven, starting a high-low
(echo) with his doubleton. West cashes
the heart king, then leads the heart eight,


North 01-11-14
63
I Q 10 6 5
AK 7 4 2
I 8 5
West East
4 A 10 8 4 4 Q.J 9 5 2
VAK83 V 7 2
*J5 Q 10 9 8
4 10 6 3 4 J 4
South
4 K7
f J 9 4
6 3
4 A K Q 9 7 2
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
14 Pass 1* Pass
2 4 Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: V A

his higher remaining heart being a suit-
preference signal for spades. East ruffs
and shifts to the spade queen.
Let's assume South covers with his
king. West wins with his ace and carefully
cashes the spade 10. Now, with every
side-suit trick taken, West leads his last
heart. When East ruffs with his club jack,
it effects an uppercut. South overruffs,
but now West collects the sixth defensive
trick with his club 10.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.


"OV TNRSI TSDD HINT, GPS USOVNI

RSI OUS IN JNNM OG XDOLAIJ MYRK

AV RNVG NW GPS GARS TS'US ING

XDOLAIJ." DOUUL RADDSU



Previous Solution: "I love the noise ... I love the smell. 'I love crazy people. I love
every single thing about New York." Lea Michele
TODAY'S CLUE: .gsienbe )1

W2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-11


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.


"NXZCFWX, K JKBB TKII RZA UWXR

TAVF. FWHUWM FHI OHKMWS H MWJ


HMOWB. XWIC KM GWHVW."


- UK M


SKWIWB ZM GHAB JHBEWX'I SWHCF



Previous Solution: "As women well know, the reason men are no good at
playing dumb is most of the time we're not playing." Larry Miller
TODAY'S CLUE: M slenbe p

2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-13


Horoscopes

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19) Don't feel
obliged to do things
differently. Concentrate
on what you can do to
improve your life and
your future.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 19) Dealing with
authority figures, insti-
tutions or government
agencies will pose a prob-
lem, particularly if travel
is involved.Your reputa-
tion must be protected.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Take part in a cause
you believe in to impress
someone who has some-
thing to offer. You must
be honest where your
intentions and motiva-
tions are concerned.
ARIES (March 2 1-April
19) Consistency will be
a deciding factor when it
comes to your future re-
lationships with friends,
family and peers.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Relax and enjoy
the day. Take time to be
with the people whose
company you most enjoy.
Live fully and make love a
priority.
GEMINI (May 2 1-June
20) -Thoughts followed
by actions will bring
good results. High energy
intentions will prove
to be your ticket to the
winner's circle. Get ready
to celebrate.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) A makeover will
prepare you for future en-
deavors. Getting involved
in someone else's cause
won't satisfy your needs.
Do what makes you feel
good, not what someone
else wants you to do.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
-You won't get all the
facts, but you should
head in the direction that
beckons you. You can't
please everyone, so it's
best to please yourself.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Timing is every-
thing. Mixing business
with pleasure will allow
you to grab the support
needed to pursue future
endeavors. Don't donate
money just to impress
someone.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Don't be afraid to Voice
your opinion. You might
raise eyebrows, but you
will get your point across
and feel good about your
progress.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) An emotional
financial matter might
cloud your vision. An idea
of yours must be deemed
sound before you decide
to invest in it.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) Look at the
past and consider what
has brought you the big-
gest return. Establish how
to incorporate what you
do best into a marketable
service.


World
fflmanac

In 1519, Holy Roman
Emperor Maximilian I
died..
In 1773, the first public
museum in America was
organized in Charleston,
S.C.
In 1828, the United
States and Mexico signed
a treaty defining the
boundary between the
two countries to be the
same as the one estab-
lished in 1819 between
the U.S. and Spain.
In 1912, textile work-
ers at the Everett Mill in
Lawrence, Mass., walked
off the job to protest wage
cuts.
In 1915, the House of


Representatives rejected,
204-174, a constitu-
tional amendment giving
women the right to vote.


Entertainment Brief


Green: I want to
create a'Voice' star
PASADENA, Calif.
- "The Voice" is a rat-
ings success for NBC,
but judge Cee Lo Green
says it has one more
mountain to climb.
Green said Friday that
"The Voice" has yet to
mint a new music star
from its contestants,
and he'd like to be a part


ACROSS
1 Bad actors
5 1040 info
8 Key point
12 Right now!
13 Unseal
14Jai -
15 Gamblers'
mecca
16Wild
hyacinth
18Town
official
20 Flight stat
21 Sault
Marie
22 Pupils'
chores
25 Kernel
holder
28 Actress
Madeline -
29Gibson
and Torme
33 Waxed
theatrical
35 Mint drink
36 Queen's
truck
37 Suite
amenity
(2 wds.)
38 Emblem
39 "Et tu" time
41 "- Given
Sunday"
42 Female
feline


45 NNW
opposite
48 Status -
49 More than
willing
53 Ring-
necked -
56 Carnival
attraction
57 Puffin
cousins
58 Comstock
Lode st.
59 Gets older
60 Chicken
wire
61 Tooth-
puller's org.
62 Insinuate

DOWN
1 Evil
2 Out on
the briny
3 Quite a few
4 Reel
5 Kind of
story
6 Make
ripples
7 Nerve cell
8 Talk on
and on
9 Seine vistas
10 Margarita
rim


of changing that.
As a contrast, Fox's
"American Idol" has de-
veloped stars like Kelly
Clarkson and Carrie
Underwood.
Green has alternated
with Usher as a judge
on "The Voice." He says
he'd like to continue but
he has other ambitions
that might someday pull
him away.
The Associated Press

Answer to Previous Puzzle


*N|0|RER]
ACM
R ANI F
F A I NTE
ER R R~
K I DDO
ORRNDO
D PAIS L

A L I E N
M I L KCO
AVE|HHE
HEX SR'
11 Scrabble
piece
17 Sea eagle
19 Type in
again
23 Merry's
opposite
24 Chimney
deposit
25 Amoebas
have one
26 Melville
opus
27 Tennisace
Bjorn -
30 Island near
Corsica
31 Thin
32 Frisky
34 Pony's gait
35 Mr. Ventura
37 Itty-bitty


M I RMEJAILH
I GMIENITIS
D I N SE T
P IE RC E
RM ELAN
OSE URE
D GABLE

WS REND
A T INI T
TA NO0D
39 Large
lizard
40 Hummed
43 Mensa data
44-
Bernhardt
45 Junk email
46 Elisabeth
of
"Soapdish"
47 Cartoon
shrieks
50 Lresle
l Caron film
51 Idyllic spot
52 Crash, so
to speak
54 Bonfire
remains
55 Rural elec.
provider


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuiIIDrlverBooks.com


2014 UFS, Dict. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ACROSS
1 Carpet
4 Prison
room
8 Milk qty.
11 Famous
numero
12 Latin dance
music
13 Little pest
14 Carpet
16Zig
opposite
17 Urges
strongly
18 Old cattle
town
20"- -Pan"
21 Polish
22Freshen
25 Glacial
deposit
29 Aussie gem
30 Sailor
31 Football
coach Shula
32 Crooner
Damone
33 High times
34 Lawn
invader
35 Cream-filled
pastries
38 Fishing
gear
39 Veld grazer
40Jungle
crusher


41 Poison -
441n the
black
48 Timetable
info
49 Moustache
style
51 Sleep
phenom
52Ohio
natives
53 Town in
Oklahoma
54 NASA
counterpart
55 Ladies
56 Tasty tuber

DOWN
1 Ancient
letter
2 Windows
alternative
3 Vincent
van -
4 Desert
bloomers
5 Architects'
wings
6 Baton
Rouge sch.
7 Party in
Britain
8 Sphinx site
9 Rani's maid
10 Links org.
12 Scarecrow
stuffing


Answer to Previous Puzzle


HAMS S PU
ASAP 01
RENO B
MAYOR
L ES
COB KAI
EMOT ED
LOGO _II
T I G-I
SSE QU(
PHEASAI
AUKS N1
MESH A
15 Monopoly
buy
19CEO
degree
21 Breaks in
22 Wander
23 Hero's tale
24 Salt, to a
chemist
25 Swabs
26 fixe
27 Carol
28 They may
be split
30 Hindu
teacher
34 Intertwine
36Ottoman
title
37 Moved
slowly


S NEGI |SITI
P E A L A I
L UE BE L L
ARR S-TE
SONS
FIN MELS
J ULE P
DES ANY

-5EAGER
NT R I DE
EVAGES
DA H INT
38 Dice turns
40 Fortells
41 Parched
42 Sporty
trucks
43 Baby's cry
44 Small cut
45 Online
auction
46 Nothing, to
Pedro
47 Zoo
transport
50 "Exoous"
character


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulilDrlverBooks.com


2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
[7 WHAThei GO---- ---'-
4ON, OOOLA? I CAN
HEAR YOU, BUT I 7
ICAN't SEE YOU!


SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014 3BF





CLASSIFIED


www.TCFLORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKET PLAC


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. Alt advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

Fo 6dadins al0tllfre or visit wwjcloriEdancom


(I) ANNOUNCEMENTS


BK1AFFILIATED
rMXI ACTIONS(


Public Auction
Sunday Jan. 12, 2014 @ 11:30 am
2500 Apalachee Pkwy Tallahassee, Fl 32301
Fine art, coins, antiques, jewelry and
militaria inc luding uni forms, headgear,
edged weapons, medals and firearms as well
assporting firearms. "Original Plaque that
hung at Doak Campbell Stadium 1972 to
approx 1994 when they remodeled the press
box and removed it. COA signed by
Bobby Bowden, Ronald Rygiel, and John
Roberge. Your bids can be placed live in
person, over the phone, internet or via
absentee form found at
www.affiliatedauctions.com
Lic#AB2286 & AU3103



Storewide Sale Starting at
/ 20% off Furniture
/ 30% off Accessories
/40% off Glassware
/ 50% off Pictures
1.07 Chroke
WBed-St 1:30to :0


($)


FINANCIAL


Consignment Shop in Dothan FOR SALE
specializing in clothing & acc. for women.
Well established with over 400 consignors
& a growing customer base, sales of
100K + yr. Unlimited potential for increase
sales & expansion. Store fixtures, eqiup,
& database included, Will train new owner.
Leave message at 334-677-5113

Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
4 504-915-1474 4

c?) MERCHANDISE


Split Oak Firewood
Delivered in the Witegrass!
$75 For a Full Sized Pickup load.
$12'for 5 Gallon bucket of kindling wood.
4 334-393-9923

AMF Playmaster Pool Table- Red felt 4x8. Very
good condition. All accessories included. Buy-
er responsible for moving. Located in Enter-
prise. $1750.00 OBO. Call or text 334-806-6004.


DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
NEEDED I BUY SEALED/
UNEXPIRED BOXES
CALL BOB (334) 219-4697
OR (850) 710-0189

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.


MISC ELLANEOUSFORSA
RN Program Textbooks Six books have never
been used and those that were factory shrink
plastic wrapped still are. At Chipola College
bookstore these 6 are sold in a bundle for $317
+ tax. 1. All-in-One Care Planning Resource
(3rd Ed.; 2. Comp. Review for NCLEX Exam (5th
Ed.) ; 3. Mosby's Nursing Drug Guide (10th Ed.)
; 4. Mosby's Med. Dictionary of Nursing (9th
Ed.)5. Mosby's Diagnostic Test Ref (11 Ed.) ; 6.
Custom eBook Library for all the above.
(Pageburst) Textbooks above are 2nd bundle
for RN prog. @ Chipola. Also have 1st bundle
some never used all in excellent cond. (pd.
$734) other items required for program.
Would consider.breaking bundle IF I could sell
2 or more to individual. Call 850-274-8776.

Dinette set, oval w/ leaf, maple $100. Book
shelves 2 white 71h 25w $20. ea 592-3261
French Provencial Dresser with matching
lingerie chest. $25. each. 850-592-3261.
Proform Elliptical Exercise $125.45" glass top
table w/ 4 chairs $200. both like new 526-2952
Refrigerator Mayag, white, like new $250. 850-
693-4277 Call 9am 7pm
PETS & ANIMALS

Adorable 5 mo. old female Peek-a-poo puppy
with papers, all shots for 1st yr. house trained,
must sell, loves kids $240. 334-805-4180
AKC Reg. Dachshund mini (7) Ready Jan 24.
Vet checked/shots, some Dapple
$250. 850-263-0357
Looking For The Best Family Pet? This is the
Best I Have Ever Had the Pleasure to Share my
Home With!!!Mother is 1/2 Great Dane, 1/2
Standard Poodle Hybrid; Father is AKC Stand-
ard Poodle. All AKC Linage provided. Pups are
3/4 Standard Poodle and 1/4 Great Dane. Coats
range from smooth to wire hair with solid col-
ors of Apricots, Creams and Blacks. (One Black
with a touch of white!) Born Dec 7th,13. Availa-
ble Feb 7th. Health cert. all shots/worming up
to date. Tails docked for your convenience!
Best in Breed traits! No genetic defects! Not a
breeder or puppy mill! A onetime opportunity!
No more litters available through our Great
Danoodle! Please contact 334-565-3067
Days/334-685-0144 Nites/wkends Rochelle
Miniature Dachshund Puppies CKC registered.
Available Feb. 14. F blk/tan, M choc, M Dapple,
M piebald/dapple. $500. 334-403-8376
Yorkies, 2 females, $200 & $400. Pomeranians,
1 tan female, $350. 1 black and white male,
$300. 1 solid black male $250. 1 male Border
Collie, $350. All are purebred and registered,
up to date on shots and worming, ready to go.
334-796-5267 or 334-790-5077


( *) FARMER'S MARKET


GREEN FROZEN
^SK^ PEANUTS
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-352-4423
850-209-3322 or 850-573-6594
.0 4128 Hwy 231


BULK WHEAT
for Sale
$9.00 per bussell
0 229-246-1340 0


FI;~l


MADDOX FARMS
Beautiful Bermuda Coastal Hay
4 Round Rolls $50 m* Square $5
Call 334-791-0023


Top Quality Coastal Bermuda
Hay Large Rolls
Fertilized & Weed Control
4 850-209-9145 1


~ MADDOX FARMS
Horse Boarding
(barn or pastures)
Beautiful Trails
Excellent Care
6Call334-791-0023 or 334-791-7312


THE CLASSIFIED


Sudoku


-----__- --
6 __5_

5719 _7_

9 4

_14 3







---- -
_ __ __ 8521_

2 5


2014 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.


Complete the grid so each row, column arid
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how'to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to last Sunday's puzzle
1294 T 7 3459168




875196 24 1397
9T17 3 2 68 45
78 4 5 93152 6 9 3
5296831374_4 9_2 _7
917326845-LA
45_2_____81769_3_J
638549217A-


1/12/14


Place an Ad


Fast, easy, no pressure
24 hours a day, 7 days a week!


t\ \Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


4B- Sunda, January 12, 2014 Jackson County Floridan


PLACE AN AD-


I


.... ...






www.JCFLORIAN.com ^CLASSIFIEDS


Jackson County Floridan e


Sunday, January 12, 2014-5 B


( 9*) EMPLOYMENT


AGRI-AFC Now accepting applications for a
Secretarial Adninistration Position
Competitive Pay, we offer insurance,
401K and vacation.
*Please come in or call to setup
hiterview. 850-762-2150 from 7-5 Mon. FrL
CIty of Marianna has a position available for
Call 850-718-0326 for details.
EOE/Drug Free Workplace Employer




25 Drivers


Trainees

NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for
Werner Enterprises
Earn $800 per week!

No experience needed!
Local CDL Training
job ready in 15 days!

1-888-368-2198


Drivers: Home EVERY Weekend,
Dedicated Southern Lanes & OTR!
All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)!
Or Walk Away Lease: No Money Down,
No Credit Check. 1-888-880-5911



The Jackson County Floridan
is looking for a
Dock Worker
for newspaper distribution.
The dock worker provides security and
quality control for newspaper distribution
and archives. This position assists with
deliveries, route and rack maintenance and
is responsible'for the maintaining the
parking lot and mailroom.
This position works 10:30pm to 7:00am
Monday through Thursday and Saturday
with occasional overtime and some
holidays. The ideal candidate is dependable,
has reliable transportation, has experience
working nights, is security minded, has good
math skills, is able to lift and carry 50 Ibs,
has experience in customer service,
works well with others and is able to work
without supervision.
We offer a full benefit package that
includes, medical, dental, 401K and paid
vacation. EOE/M/F/D/V. Pre-employment
drug and background screen required.
You may apply online at
www.bhmginc.com


;&IPersonnel
'" sources
"Personnel Resources is currently hiring
Flux fore mig welders and Tig welders and
Electrical maintenance mechanics.
Welders must be able to pass a bend
test and work any shift.
* Email resumes to: hireme(Sprdothan.com.


I GENERAL EMPLOYMENT


Library Director Pos#122
Master's degree in Library Science and 3 to 5
years of progressively responsible experience
in a public library setting, including adminis-
trative supervisory duties; or any equivalent
combination of training and experience
which provides the required knowledge, skills
and abilities. For Library information visit
their website at www.jcplfl.org.
Starting Salary: $4&676.Wyr.

Administrative Support II
Pay Grade 13 Road Dept Pos#211
High school graduate or its equivalent, and
2-3 years of experience in secretarial or
administrative work. Must be able to handle
multiple phone lines and have working
knowledge of Personal Computer, exercise
the ability to use tact and courtesy in dealing
with the public. Word for Windows and
Internet experience required.
Possession of a valid Florida drivers license
prior to employment.
Starting Salary: $17.236.O0/yr.

Correctional Officer
Pay Grade 24 JCCF Pos#701
Must have a high school diploma or its
equivalent. Must be a State of Florida
certified Correctional Officer. Must be at
least 19 years of age, be a U.S. citizen and
have no record of a felony or misdemeanor
involving perjury or false statements.
Must be drug-free and pass a vigorous
background investigation. Possession of a
valid Florida drivers license is required prior
to employment
Salary: $26,463.00/yr.

Equipment Operator I
Pay Grade 13 Road Dept Pos#567
High school diploma or equivalent with 1-2
or more years of experience in the safe
operation of a farm tractor and cutting
head with hydraulic/electrical switches and
driving truck with a loaded trailer attached;
able to supervise inmates.
Must have a valid Class "B" FL drivers license
prior to employment.
Starting Salary: S17.236.00/vr.

Submit Jackson County employment
application to the Human Resources Dept.,
2864 Madison Street Marianna, FL 32448.
PH 850-482-9633.
or www.jacksoncountyfl.net/

Deadline to apply is
01/27/2014
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE/V.Pref/ADA/AA

Job Announcement
North Florida Child Development is seeking
Preschool and VPK teachers
for our Centers located in Blountstown,
Wewahitchka, and Port St. Joe.
have at least a FCCPC/CDA. NFCD offers an
attractive benefit package (health, dental,
life, disability, sick leave, etc
Send resumes to:
smcgillolfloridachildren.org,
fax (850) 639-6167. DFWP/M-F/7-5/EOE

Now Hiring
CREW CHIEF and INSTRUMENT PERSON
850-526-3991 w


. ...............................................................
Press Operator
Dothan Eagle has an immediate opening for a press operator. Responsibilities include setup,
operation, repair and maintenance of Press/Plate Making Equipment, meeting company
guidelines to produce high quality products within strict deadlines. Successful candidate
must be capable of maintaining a clean work environment while following company safety
guidelines and adhere to production print schedules and employee work schedules to coincide
with production schedules. Must fully comply with all company policies and procedures and
at all times when representing the company, operate in a thorough professional manner
including communication, attendance, punctuality, and dress.
This position requires a minimum two years production line experience, strong mechanical
background, or printing experience. High school graduate or equivalent preferred.
Company benefits including medical, dental, vision, paid vacation, and 401K.
Pre-employment drug and background screen required. EOE/M/F/D/V.

You may apply on line at: www.bhmginc.com
or you may send your resume to:
L Charlie Gibson, Dothan Eagle, 227 North Oates Street, DothanAL 36303.
L .......... ca.l.G.Lsn.D.O.t.... .. ............ ?15 ? *! "................



Seeking Dynamic and Innovative

Managing Editor

The Dothan Eagle, a 26,000 daily newspaper located in Dothan, Al, is seeking a superstar
Managing Editor. We are a BH Media company located in Southeast Al just 80 miles from
the sugar white beaches on the Gulf of Mexico. We have sister weekly and daily publications
in Marianna Florida, Enterprise Al, Eufaula Al, and Opelika, Al. The paper seeks a deadline-
oriented all-purpose editor with a strong passion for local content. The position requires
competency and experience in all areas including staff supervision, reporting, editing,
page design, social media, photography and online news presentation.
QUALIFICATIONS:
Candidates must have a proven track record of successfully managing day to day
operations of an active newsroom.
This position requires brilliant news judgment, strong leadership and coaching skills,
solid community relations and a passion for both digital and print journalism.
You must demonstrate extremely innovative thinking all while maintaining a good
sense of humor and positive attitude.
The ideal candidate will have at least TEN years experience in journalism with a
minimum of five years of experience as an assigning and supervising editor.
Daily newspaper newsroom and digital media experience is a must.
Strong ability to meet deadlines consistently and perform under pressure.

Journalism degree from a reputable college or university.


The paper offers an outstanding benefits package that
includes vacation, quality health insurance and a 401K plan.
EOE/M/F/D/V.
Pre-employment drug and background screen required.

You may apply online at www.bhmginc.com


FAMILT~DiLL
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA

Now Hiring Full lime
1st shift Class B Trailer Technician
Requirements: Minimum of 3 years
experience in heavy-duty trailer
maintenance or 2 years experience in
heavy-duty trailer maintenance with a
Diesel/Auto technical School Degree.
Hydraulics experience preferred. Current
brake certification and proper certification
to perform FHWA inspections preferred.
Competitive Pay and
Benefits Pakckage!

Please apply in person at:
Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway.
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must be 18 Years Old
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace
Job Announcement
North Florida Child Development is seeking
an Early Child Development
and Disability Specialist
Must have a Bachelor's degree or advance
degree in early childhood education; or a
Bachelor's or advanced degree and
coursework equivalent to a major relating to
early childhood education. Must have 3 years
of experience in child development, early
child development, and/or disabilities
services. Must have experience in the
following disciplines of developing and
supporting articulated training and technical
assistance for a diverse early care and
teachers; planning/implementing educational
component plans, and working with families
and children with disabilities. NFCD offers an
attractive benefit package (health, dental,
life, disability, sick leave, etc.)
For detailed information view careers at
www.floridachildren.org.
4 Send resumes to:
smcgillhfloridachildren.brg,
fax (850) 639-6167. DFWP/M-F/7-5/EOE



DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA

Now Hiring Full Time
Bulk Order Filler Position
1st. 2nd. and 3rd Shifts
Competitive Pay and Benefits Package!

Please apply in person at:
Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway,
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must be 18 Years Old.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace______

r^) EDUCATION
( & INSTRUCTION
iSCHOS&INTUTO


I


ftLook ahead to your
4S future! Start training
for a new career in
FORfl IS Medical Assisting,
COLLEGE Medical Office Admin.,
Pharmacy Technology,
& HVAC!
Call Fortis College 855-445-3276
For consumer info: visit www.fortis.edu


('T' RESIDENTIAL
(1I| REAL ESTATE 5OR RENT
APARTMENTS1UNFURNISHED
2BR/1% BA Apartment For Rent In
Nice Neighborhood $600/Mo.
0- Cal 850-482-5134 4
Cedar Creek Apartments 1BR/1BA $500
AppI, lawn care & pest control included.
Must be 62 or older or disabled. Call 850-352-
3878 or email cedarcreeki4anchousing.net


1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4w
2/1 house Baker Ave. Marianna $575. mo
$650. dep No Pets 1 yr. lease
Call Joanne 850-693-0570

2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595

3 bedroom, 2 bath brick home on farm near
Graceville. References required $600 month,
No Pets. Call 334-445-2441.
Afford 3/2 Brick Home Engery Effiecent
2 car garage and covered porch $850 Mo. +
Dep. Also Cottondale 3/L5 Brick Co. Hm. on-
1 ac. $650. + dep. RENT OR OPTION TO BUY w/
Income & Credit approval
Call 650-579-4317 & 850-866&1965
Austin Tyler & Co *
Quality Homes & Apartments
*s 850- 526-3355 or austintvlerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
LEASEWITHJ OPIONTOj|UY

Lease/Option To Buy 3/2 hardwood floors,
CH&A 2940 Dogwood St. close to
Riverside school. (MARIANNA) $875. mo.
850-718-6541 4m

MOBILSHOXSSSFSS3RENT

2/2 located in Sneads $350. mo.
850-573-0308 40
*2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer Included.
http:// www.charloscountrylihrng.cou.
.# 850-209-8847 4w
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Please call 850-258-1594 or
850-638-8570 Leave Message

3/1 mbl. hm. appl. incl. located in Altha
$350. mo. + dep. 850-272-2972


Marianna area 2/2 Mbl. Hm. in park CH&A
water, sewage No Pets or Smoking Ref. Reg.
1st. & last $500. mo. 850-482-8333
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park 1,2 & 3BR
MWs for Rent includes water, garbage,
lawn care, No PetS 850-592-1639


RECREATION.


Winnebago 1995 Vectra 33 ft. C/H&A, auto lev-
eling, Q-bed, new tires, batteries, frig. 7.5 Onan
generator, Ig. awning, lots of storage in & out-
side, micr-convection oven combo, gas stove,
hot water heater, 30 or 50 almnp power, all
original paper work. $20,000. OBO 334-585-6689


Cargo Trailer enclosed 12ft long, less than
4000 miles, rear and side doors. Bought in
September $2300. OBO 217-424-1033.

TRANSPORTATIOw


1965 Mustang Convertible Red with Parch-
ment Top and Pony Interior, very nice, new
tires, Great Car with A/C. 334-301-3574


Ford 1994 F-150 XLT, single cab, auto, 302 V8,
dual tanks, PS, PB, PS, PDL, PW, complete
brake job, full tune up. Red/Silver, red cloth
seat. Looks, runs and drives good. Must see!
$4,595. Owner, Dothan, 334-671-3059.
Ford 2001 Taurus, 231K miles,
good condition. $1700. Send inquiries to:
lgriffin@dothaneagle.com
or Call 334-712-7962 from 9-5
"-:7H Honda 2000 Odyssey
r 'Family van- Runs perfect.
l Clean inside & out. Ice cold
'A m p .l air. Everything works. Has
been garage kept. 152k mi.
$4,995. For more info call 334-693-9360
Lincoln 2004 Town Car
Signature, loaded, leath-
er, like new, clean, 94k
miles, owner, $7500.
334-790-7959.
Lincoln 2007 MKZ
(Metallic Red), Cream
Leather, all power, sun
roof, dial-in door, cooled
and heated seats, navigation, new tires, new
battery. Only 70000 miles. Is in immaculate
condition. $14,500. Call 334-693-2603
Mazda 2008 Miata MX5 4cyl. Loaded.'In great
condition. 31,000 miles. Silver with black top.
$14,500. 334-405-7402
RIDE TODAY!
GOT BAD CREDIT?
.9' $0 Down/ist Payment,
*21 Tax, Tag & Title Pass
Repo pass bankruptcy
LOW CREDIT OK -SSI & VA OK
Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550


2007 V STAR 1300 (Black) One Owner, Garage
Keep, Like New, 2000 Miles $5,500. Bought in
2009 from Wards' Yamaha. 334-707-8074


2007 GMC Yukon SLT -V8, Flex fuel, one owner,
navy with tan interior, leather, power seats and
windows, 6 cd changer, rear bucket seats, rear
air and radio, 3rd row seat, 66K miles, $18,995,
call 693-5454 leave message.
H Ford 1987 Bronco 4x4
RUNS GREAT! Good tires.
New Sears battery, rear,
window motor, fuel gauge.
Brakes recently overhauled. Less than 10k
miles on major tune-up (including distributor,
plugs, wires, oxygen sensor, etc.Y.Been used as
my hunting camp truck the last 7 years. Asking
$3,400. 334-750-5000
IJ=1:061 k:m J=! I a.I: :IIT
16' Flatbed Utility Trailer Like new. Purchased
in 2010. Asking $1,400 cash.334-685-4807


1997 FORD Econoline Club Wagon Van Seats 11
people, 273k, Runs great, great, needs some
sm. repairs. Accepting closed bids, closed bids
at (334) 308-2480. Starting bid is $1500.
All proceeds will go to the DAV Chapter #9


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!

q4*91 4 2'A gedn 7 AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664

-i Got a Clunker
We'll be your Junker!
'We buy wrecked cars:
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$250 & f Complete Cars
CALL 334-7146285

'a We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
334-7944576 or 34449 4714--


LIGALS^


L197468
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE JACKSON
COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD OF ITS
INTENT TO CONDUCT A PUBLIC MEETING TO
REVIEW POTENTIAL VIOLATIONS.
The public hearing will be held in the Jackson
County Building Department located at 4487
Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida
on the 16th day of January, 2014 at 9:00 a.m.
Comments are encouraged. Anyone desiring
information may contact the Jackson County
Code Enforcement Office located at 4487
Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida or contact
by phone at (850) 482-9087 during regular
business hours.


CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES


-j


M,





County Floridan-- CLASSIFIEDS


C .ONC:EJE.WO lKl&.COAINGS
SJones Concrete, LLC
o Travis Jones
Free Estimates/Reasonable Rates
House Slabs Sidewalks A11111
Driveways & Pole Barns .i
850-693-5812 30+ Years Experience


Do* r and Ho Work
m osOfc rCmmeca Cenn

Dozuer andRefeenesAvatilnaWor


Ponds Road Building Demolition
Pine Tree Planting Herbicide Spraying
Fire Line Plowing Burning
flMU A'anI O85-762-9402
Clay v O eal Cell 8S0-832-SOSS
clayslandclearing@gmail.com


'North Florida Rental
fDayBuyBad'lckr


'North Florida Rental

DOLMAR ____

POWER PRODUCTS
MODEL #PS32, PS421, PS51JIn Stock
More Models Available
850-526-7368
2890 Noland St. Marianna
SN

HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
b: .B^: -I:L i


"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
Il'llai H.Log~r:(85)59-90


I Tony's Roof and Debris
Removal. Remove small
debris off roof tops.
850-394-7075



Tree Removal Tree Trimming
9 Stump Grinding
Insured Free Estimates -f
593-4455


Clean Your Closet
I Will buy your slightly used
* undamaged clothing.
cal (850) 348-0588


BONDED INSURED
IINVID LEWIS
ROOFING CO.
265-6023
LICENSE # RC0043637
davidlewisroofing@knology.net
N J 1406 MfiIOesIta Ave. Lyon Hover, fL 32444


*ALL YOUR ROOFING NEEDS*
Metal o Shingles Flat Roofs Insured.
LC# PC20027516
850-573-1880
Serving Jackson and Surrounding Counties


4630 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446
(850) 526-2891
Eahh Office 1. 0-eedfn' Ow 0-Oorled
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER

Ed %ICo. Rralinr'
Cell-(850) 573.6198,
www.emcdoyreafty.com
emccoy02@yahoo.com

Home located on 4 acres that
needs some sineas'finished.
Great investment and handyman
Project. OWNER FINANCING
AVAIIABE TO QUALIFIED BUYER.
MLS# 248236* $45,600.
GRAND RIDGE-
P-1 )h,,r "ri, il iid
[Off-i.4iii jioitiikij T,


MLS# 241


786 $88,000.
.211111MARIANNA Brick
home with recent updatns
located in established area near
Memitts Mill Pond. Many special

712 *$114,900
GRAND RIDGE -
Well built home with plenty of
ling space and natural hernweod
floors. Puichase home and 40
acres or buy 0all80 ares.
77 $249,000.
Pat Furr
Realtor
850.209.8071
furrl9@msn.com


MIS# 249113 $172,000.
3 nelroo ma/2 im it home
dekfithi med orh of e f rresh dr wt dri
hioryal) intf fir hoAw, failed
FM nnl Open H N~ntIM The Sf i cf~i f erii n


A-D-V-I-R-I-1-S-I-N-G
ar iicle" that SELLS.


mft! DRH1111 ^i ARN$3,V
rdInI 5r55'e' ': *~ 1& Dvlj -
ed, C The JavacakiOnl5



CoSt :Floridan I

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O0 -County Floridan














en.I on oitlo, 6 As Nal
her dr~v'! Classifieds
L An Ld SL 15-0 0

Irw. And Place Your

Ad Today!





jdflridaPco tona C

shlillil8 *401k "')


tolmrare TO 55-0000W 10 vaity ~ oc eO '
to optit
UrswReq Exel.tad
-0 180-26314-0.


Find jobs




fast and




easy!


49,500 MLS# 249157
120 Aerw MOL with 16 of it in
Posiure. Plenty of room ftr your
horses. 3/2 spit bedroom Pox
plan Palm Harbor home. Spacious
kitchen, lar Ie rivg room and
separate dining area. Enjoy peoce
& quiet on bock screen
Includes 20ox20 Pole barn.
0MIS# 248617
iWhol a Boentyl 3/2 Custom Built
neer hoe on e e. Split
bedo 1m 1-oo d#n. Great rmi
-i wood bu0ni Nreploce,6i9h
ceilings & recess sighing, cutiomv
kiche,. Tile flooring khru out.
Proivte location and only 20
minute drive to shopping
)MU# 248516
Bevely Thomas
Realtor
Cell 850-209-5211


MARIANNA Two stmy
duplex each unit with 2 bedrooms,
I baoth, hardwood flooring
upstairs. and vinyl downstairs.
After updating will make great
nvestmentfnr rentals.
539,900
GRACEVILLE Updated
mine with metal [oof, 5
bedrooms, new glass energy
effident windows, newer kitchen
ipplionces and more. There is a
Home Warranty with this home.
30.000


ALTHA Custom built home that cost was not a problem.
There are so many special features in this home, stainless
steel Kitchen-Aide appliances, Jacuzzi tub, Whirlpool
washer and dryer and MORE! Call Bevely, 850-
209-5211 today and set appointment to see all of the
features. Home also is handicap accessible.
MIS# 248415 *$159,900


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORWDANi

jcfloridan.com


monster

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


IL-

















ovnIi w 11i1[ rnvr hin iiv
4630 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446
(850) 526-2891
Each Office Is Indkpeedalet Owned and Oparaled
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER


Ouida Morris
REALTOR
Broker/Owner
850-209-4705

IBLOUNTSTOWN
Newer home with 3
bedrooms in established
neighborhood convenient to
local amenities. PRICE
REDUCED!!
1* $59,900
ICOTTONDALE
B Brck howe on 3.95
ocras in the county with
plenty of room for garden
or animals. PRICE
REDUCED!!
$119,900
I MARIANNA -
Large spacious 4 bedroom
home with nice features
and is close to town.


$62.500


* $65,000.
IBONIFAY Cottage
style home located on 1.34
acres has 3 bedrooms and
a nice side porch to enjoy
the evenings. PRICE
REDUCEDII
I $69,900
IGRACEVILLE Brick
home has had renovations
and is elly attractive with
wood laminte flooring and
nice fireplace. PRICE
REDUCED'!
5 $58,900
I MARIANNA
Lovely brick home has
large living room with
fireplace, dining area and
kitchen with breakfast bar.
PRICE REDUCED!!
$107,900


'RDUE MARIANNA Brick
home in nice area has 3
bedrooms and in addition
there is on apartment or
11us8 it 0s a 4th bedroom.
PRICEE REDUCED!!
MLS# 248540* $109,900


Cecil Powell

Realtor

206-718-9049


MARIANNA
Beautiful 1 Acre Woterfiont
Lot in Spring Chose
Subdivision. Located on a Cul-
de-Soc and next to another
beautful waterfront home!
MLS# 249101 $94,500
ALFORD AND
ROUND LAKE
AREA tI.-,i,,l.-l,, I
w t M il nun il InI I If Il., d i
*JJB~i ^ M^ ^P^ Krntal AI 11101 II- I 0,111m) oiln
'^!M^*^8^a~aH^Miiiii~ffli1i1g8 10lt; AIIji-i nMl. 11IjII
MLS# 248634 $65,000
CAMPBELLTON
Thit is the 50 Acreas of the moot
amadinghunting and formland
you will ever sea, nseil comes with
ao400 SF Tree Posse canutructed
in a huge oak baa0 .
MLS# 248626 $150,000
'CHIPLEY AREA -
10 Acres of beautiful, secluded
woodlands with a (teek and emall
pond. Uplands orea coevred with
onk and pines. Just woiihrg fot
yaulao consthuct foot new home.
MLS# 248665* $30,000


- EoiaSfocslkat


Jackson County Floridan *


to lawn in Mariannea.SOity pu, m
Fenced back yard with charmiog A-hoame home has
a screened back parch 2BR/1-1/2BA and is in move-
lst the right size for in ready condition. Kitchen,
relaxing or entertaining. Home is located ona Meadowview Road. Full bat has a marble floor! With landscaping, this home feels tuawayd
close to schools, College, shopping end hospital. This updated Fl ahhsmrlfvr ihlnsaigtlhmfasukdwyo
home is lust the right size and reedy for you to move in! Call today private! Owners are motivated to sell and have applied for shot-sale. Make an
for an appointment to see this home. $129,OO0K MLS* 249224 appt. to see this love home! PRICEDAT$83,900 MLS#248399



ntl ah omlDnn omadBek ast Arua aice c sto nabinevi vaarii n jj 1.1i Tis 11-acre, fome
S acmeonthrsahnom S e has a 29 h ol e (Par 31 agolf
bsebi0d o in i d d a be a u t if A d l' T hi s 1 $ 1 1 6 ,9 fm e r
bii~,a d "nck a d p viy ard incoarse, comes with a
nmaiveia nu ,er nn~eshseruva bme that has 3215'
I'ii ialrfoorvpeithnLag edM and ste kredrandaahady Th ruee large B eincMaosiet under roof, hathonly 972' is being used. Has potential of 2-3BR/1-



yard baths Fral Diinworsop! an Breakat AreaKighbohencsom cabnet MaGrbeat bcyr!Cnein oFml olr aaa t n
Firepla n aceandBui r t- ino ok Seives Perfect choefruntertainingo manaybeauiifl 2BA, large outside deck. With the location, this property has
tingvs with ice breautifui hmieses$8,00an oss a d .ursoealOferaioes. ML Sn#24764 potential !!! Bring all efer!! Priced at $116,900 MLS #247834


Great Deal on th is 3R B n r
beautiful 2 Bedroom UlliB A rum5r
Home in Malone! nit l notitMuis rnri.a
It's already updated and ready for you! Large fenced LR, OR, carpet, nicely painted, great deck re/fenced in
yard with a workshop! A great neighborhood and a Great backyard! Convenient to Family Dollar, Panama City and
Hoe! tYoui ran afford this neo! MLS #247258 ,1v1n1n11nf) vser.; an A lne;mnn lullc(Zsasneane


C Character gives this
older home in Gracevilla
its charm! This well
maintained home has
a large yard and is very
convenient to the College and Businesses of Graceville. This 3/2 home is
ready for you to call it home. The roof was completely replaced in 2011!
Bedrooms are large with plenty of space. All of the appliances! Call today to
set an appointment to see this beautiful, and affordable home. MLSO 247421



ups. 4 acres on a paved
road a great place to
live! Located in North Jackson County close to the Alabama State Line,
this home is in a perfect spot for those who travel between Marianna
and Dothan. Call today and let us show you this beautiful home. Priced
to sell, owner says bring all offers. $79,900 MLS# 248922



College, Schools and
only $59,900.
Updates already done! Just move in! Great investment
with low payments! Hardwood Floors, newer metal roof
and central heat/air. Just too cute to pass up! Possible


large family room,
liig eand dining
Wtrooms. Seller is ready
tO lekatM llHfers
and help A bayer fulfil
their dream of owning a
towel Newer steve and refrigerator. Allowance for a new stave
- pickitt so~t yaursejlft Reaatital patio with a gardening shed far


This 3BR/2BA
southern home has a
formal LR, formal DR,
beautiful step-down
great room, breakfast
room, bonus room, nice hardwood floors throughout under
carpet and 2 fireplaces! Home needs updating. Many old-
style Southern Oak trees. Incl. 3 parcels totaling about 1
acre in Cottondale. PRICED AT $85,000 MLS #248624


This appealing
3BR/2BA home has
beautiful laminate
hardwood floors,
spacious great room, kit/din combo, Ig bdrms & baths, big utility
rm, new heat pump, 2-car garage, landscaped yard w/backyard
fenced. Close to high school, state park, airport, & so much more.
Make an appt. today! Priced at only $154,900 .MLS #247791

WHTABARGAIN!
This 1600 square foot
building on 2 acres
is located on busy
Hwy. 90 between Marianna and Cottondale. This structure
has a large open area with several office areas. Make an
ap ointment today! Priced right at $59,900 MLS #249124.

This prestiglious


Boniay.It hs 5bedromsOaks Subdivision shews
and 3 baths, 6 fireplaces well tram th6 time yea
and huge rooms. The enter the foyer! Sunken
ceilings are approx. 12 feet high. It also features a large detached 2 car LB. Ig kitchen with new s.s. refrig. & dishwasher, new stovetop,
garage (30040) but for your convenience there is an attached carport at plenty at cabinets and a breakfast area. Beautiful crown molding
the front porch. The seller iscery motivated and is open to all offers. Make throughout home. Upstairs bed/bath with large multi-purpose room.
enrd ant sat Too MLe#2491t w t ,, ,. Int*i F,-3 at $f, r""161AMLr K_14' 114
Small 2/1 home in 2 p o a P l nrfus ria. IMak
Blosnistown. Nice area [201)14 ."1 HC ,eiai ivirty
of town and convenient to 1. il, -idi,, ,,~,.~
eeyhn!This is a great ..- '
starter home. Fenced -
yard and carport. Too cute to pass op. Very affordable at $62,000 with ,,, ,, ...,... .e, a.,,,.
payments that will he lower than ientl Don't pass this up. MLS# 249218 property steup to 140+n acres. Property has numerous potential uses. Make
l an appointment today! Priced at $495,000 MLS # 247339

Short Sale Approved .1,111r i~ry ilMliht,14
for $75,600 on this ML I'IIo hr
3/2 in the heart &EvYvt 1"
of Marianna. This AKT11
won't last long. jr1
Great Investment. Large lot with nice back yard. 1t,01:si.ri.
Located on Lime Street at the dead end. Don't wait toabedrom, new carpet, boat dock, dock, 2 workshops, paeed drieeway, secluded
see this home and make an offer. MLS #G249221 frm main road.eFishingboating, dien ng, swimming, etc. Beatifl clearsp!ng
townanshopping.$89,9001 11M_ I 249169 I Selwater fed.morinvaoiloffers! All for 24T9,000 MI S #248162
Bedroom 2 Bathrtnhngasdfa 145 acre cattle farm
lot t carm It as enswith 2 homes, plus
nerowellmainaine Thea 2330' commercial
1, a dishwasher, and is the bldg needs new
highlight at this home, along with many ether features. The roof was replaced roof, fenced & cross-
in 2012 and'the Central Air and Heat unit is only about 3 his, old. Formal Dining fenced. Has 4 wells of which 2 are solar powered. Appo. 30
and Lining area, Office/Computer toss, and a great workshop garage that is acres in~clear pasture & balance in pine trees re/pasture.
2420 in sire. In a qalet and relaxing area at Greenwood. but not too far from Borders Wright Creek in Holmes County. Bring all offers!
townend shopping. $89,960 MLS 249t69 Seller motivated! PRICED AT $359,000 MlLS # 248137

Cnmpletely renoueted and ,, .v-'
K looks brand new inside! A 6 ~ .ti
Ntem appliances, heautiful
hardwood floors, unique $1 3i.i. '.. 'w
were popular it n te'~ nd this buildnr added insulated panels Is keep it f i
nconomical for heatinig end cooling. Falls area perfect for entertaining and family --f- I:- I. l' Im' 5,,5,,,,.),) .i -, liiu ,iv d,
a,,s..,,. a,,,,., ,,,, a.',,, ,,,,, i a~. directly being Wine Dixie Shopping Ctr. PRICED AT $149,000 MLS#248339

Ia.1it l H.,

71 rb
2000 square foot of retail space and two fuel islands a aeadyrfe. 1i4if 1 i g a
an enterprising operator. Property is in the county where alcohol sales t cb ea a
uolci ra ffice aFrameaHoistand aJib Hosot.Bldg.
are possible seven daysaweek. Ovar6000e vecesopathis location w ad w/246 Vet 3- e 600 Watt electrical. Too many extras ta list!
perydayireport by a e st at ONLY15,900 MLS #248836 Br n a baffes s PR ICED AT$ 137,00 MLS#248801
11111 3/ wellmaintaiend and
deted home conetoMain Location, ocation,
'tjjTcouple of mi*esSof'tce o ffiecopexhasl1530'
SChSemshnohe Lresndwhreafn lblaec
eandscped vac ar wia & iscaoseto thehospital
patsoand pria p ecetatheRenovatedwoaew metal
spatea i fonthe homes behind. R a ten ston ragehead. wofon osftsaa o3esw gaadeksn ee fc
aportwihseparaelaundry rom tao fAes lscened porhspans he a xmrs ahwiigaeceki ra xc fie
wholelnt ftefuto os.Ti ssoncmuthe r;m ndh a os f Csrrently leased onea month-to-month basis. Exc. income producer or use
poisor Itiy ls surely a mast seal ONLY $67,9 t MLS# 240028 for your own business! PRICED AT $137,500 MLS# 248189


*4 Separate Lots Available in Blue Springs Plantation Subdivision on
Blue Springs Highway
I1 Acre Lot on Old U S Hwy north of Hwy 162 $10,000
*10 Beautiful Acres on River Road near Lake Seminole $40,000
*10 Acre Tract off Blocker Road $35,000
*5 Acres off Sweat Pond Road $22,000
1 Acre Comer lot on paved road in Compass Lake $6,000


.4 lots Mashbum Rd., Marianna, FL$12,000/ea
3 acres Lake Seminole Rd. $50,000
*20 acres Church St., Cypress $50,000
*.5 acre-Chipola River- $25,000
121 acre cattle farm-$450,000


.Sr
Sunday, January 12, 2014 -7IB


I ifforida Sfivasc kcoky j


PERFECT FOR-
YOUR LARGE
FAMILY?? Great
,4/2 with almost
1700 sq ft ceder
Air! Beautiful
original hardwood
floors! The Family
room can be easily converted to a 5th bedroom if needed!
Great Spacious 1.80 acres! Brick home has a sewer 4 ton AC
unit! This home can be offered assa short sale! MIS #248281


Sunrsam with Windows from
Floor tot ceiing overlooking the
bsclyardt The FsmilyRooam Boasts
18 ft ceilings, built in entertainment center and a granite see thru fireplace to
the sunroom. The Main Kitchen is a dream. Granite countertops with a center
island with lots of upgraded cabinets There is a 2 car attached garage with
a bonus room which has central air and the detached garage is large enough
to store your toys! There is also another bedroom over the detached garage.
MOVE IN READY!
Great 3/2 with over
1900 sq ft! There is a
Mother in Law guest
house! Large 1 acre lot
with a Huge Workshop!
Completely remodeled
from floors to ceiling Beautiful sunroom
overlooking nice backyard! MLS #248896
LOCATED ON MERRITS.
MILL P01101 Cozy 2/1 with
1080 sq anerlasking lake
Large Backyard wdth deck
perfect tor relaxingi Kitchen
and baths hone had same
apdstest Lining rosra and
Master bedroom overlook
the water Fireplace in
lining resin! MLS #247509


LOCATED ON A CORNER Large
3 or 4 Bedroom 3 bath tame has
almost 1900 sq ft under air! The
3Huge lining roam, with 2 Master
__________________bedrooms. Screened Perch,
Laundry Rooce. Sitting an 5 city
lets and has a beautiful backyard
with a 24x24 Outbuilding/Shop!
Sold AS-IS. MLS #248168
SMALL FLOWING CREEK
with a 3/2 Home with
aprox 1960 sq ft. Open
Kitchen area to Family
room. Split Bedroom
Plan. Located on 1O acres.
New on market so call for
List Price.

a H [ifENJOY BEAUTIFUL
SUNSETS ON SUN LAKE.
2/2 With apron 1344
Sq Ft. Screened parch
overlooking water. Located
on 1.35 acres. San Lake is
an 00 acro Bass Lake. Pier
and dock tn fish on' New
an market so call today
for Prie


Every body's talking about what's in the classifieds.

A (/(/ ^U AAL


CLASSIFIED


MLS# 248831


Indian Springs


REAL ESTATE

5035 Hwy 90 Marianna, FL 32446

Cresh Harrison, Broker 850-482-1700
Stacy Borges, Realtor 850-573-1990
Julie-Miles, Realtor 850493M3435

BUILD YOUR
DREAM HOME
-- HEREI Several
Wooded Lots
in Marianna.
// Choose from 2,
/, /1.20 Acre lots for
$17,000 EACH.
OR a 3.45 acre
lot that can be
purchase as a whole for $35,000 or Can be purchased
in 3 1.05+/- lots Each for $15,000. Located close to
the High School and in an established neighborhood!




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN* www.jcfloridan.com


Jackson County's
New& Used
Truck Center


U IM"


NEW 2013
Transit Connect XLT


'.A ..ifi^


WAGON, REAR VIEW CAMERA
STOCK ID MSRP..................$26,260
#13368 CHIPOLA FORD DISCOUNT.............$765
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH........$2,500


NEW 2014
Mustang V6 Premium









AUTO TRANSMISSION, COMFORT PACKAGE, LEATHER
STOCK ID MSRP............................................$29,830
#14101 CHIPOLA FORD DISCOUNT.......$1,335
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH.......$4,000


NEW 2014
Escape SE ^, .


2.0 ECOBOOST ENGINE, TRAILER TOW
STOCK ID MSRP...........................................$29,740
#14107 CHIPOLA FORD DISCOUNT......$1,245
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH.......$2,000


NEW 2013
Edge SPORT


NEW 2013 4-f- NEW 2'013
F-150 Lariat I F-150 FX4 SuperCrew
SuperCrew 4X2,jft. 4X4 A*


LEATHER, NAVIGATION SYSTEM, V6, VISTA ROOF
STOCK ID MSRP..................$41,860
#13396 CHIPOLA FORD DISCOUNT.......$1,865
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH.......$2,500
FORD CREDIT BONUS CASH......$1,000
TRADE-IN ASSISTANCE...................$500


LEATHER, ECOBOOST, MOONROOF
STOCK ID MSRP..................$47,705
#13399 CHIPOLA FORD DjSCOUNT.......$3,710
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH.......$1,500
FORD CREDIT BONUS CASH..............$1,500
TRADE-IN ASSISTANCE.........,$1,750


FX LUXURY PACKAGE, NAVAGATION, LOADED!
STOCK ID MSRP..................$50,755
#13286 CHIPOLA FORD DISCOUNT.......$3,760
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH.......$1,500
FORD CREDIT BONUS CASH......$1,500
TRADE-IN ASSISTANCE-,...............$1,750

00S^S


* * PRE-OWNED CLEARANCE EVENT* *


09 MECURY
GRAND MARQUIS
LEATHER V8, LOADED,
71K MILES
STOCK ID#12354A
WAS $16,995
NOW $10,995


07 CHEVROLET
TRAILBLAZER IS
84K MILES
NICE!
STOCK ID#14127A
WAS $13,995
NOW $10,995


08 HYUNDAI
TIBURON
2 DOOR AUTOMATIC TRANS
ONLY 43K MILES
STOCK ID#P3469A


WAS
NOW


$13,995
$10,995


11 CHEVROLET
HHR LT
MOONROOF LEATHER
47K MILES
STOCK ID#13367B
WAS $17,995
NOW $13,995


09 FORD
ESCAPE XLT
63K MILES 4 CYLINDER
GREAT MILEAGE!
STOCKID#P3447
WAS $18,995
NOW $13,995


10 FORD 11 FORD 11 NISSAN- l CHEVROLET 11 FORD
EDGE LIMITED TAURUS SEL ALTIM A 2.5 S EQUINOX LT MUSTANG
LEATHER 1 OWNER V6 POWER PACKAGE LEATHER MOONROOF POWER PACKAGE CRUISE 34K MILES
96K MILES CRUISE 56K MILES ALLOW WHEELS! 46K MILES ALLOY WHEELS 45K MILES MANUAL TRANSMISSION
STOCK ID#13343A STOCKID#13282A STOCKID#13242A STOCKID#13209A STOCKID#13305B
WAS $19,995 WAS $20,995 WAS $20,495 WAS $20,995 WAS $21,995
NOW $15,495 NOW $16,495 NOW $17,495 NOW $17,995 NOW $17,995

12 FORD 09SUBARU 12 FORD E-350 11 FORD 13 FORD
FUSION SEL FORESTER 15 PASSENGER VAN EDGE SPORT EDOE SE
LEATHER LOADED LEATHER MOONROOF XLT 3.7 V-6 MOONROOF 3.5 V6 POWER PACKAGE
APPEARANCE PACKAGE LOADED! 37K MILES LEATHER CD
STOCKID#R3453 STOCK ID#13342A STOCK ID#P3466 STOCK ID#14198A STOCK ID#14148
WAS $22,995 WAS $24,995 WAS $25,995 WAS $26,995 WAS $26,995
NOW $19,495 NOW $20,495 NOW $22,995 NOW $23,995 NOW $24,995


13 TOYOTA
TACOMA PRERUNNER
DOUBLE CAB SRS
35K MILES *-LIKE NEW!
STOCK ID#31444A
WAS $29,995
NOW $26,995


10 FORD
FLEX LIMITED
LEATHER MOONROOF
LOADED! -27K MILES
STOCK ID#R3460
WAS $29,995
NOW $27,995


12 CHEVROLET
K1500 SILVERADO IT
4X4 CREW Z-71
40K MILES
STOCK ID#13423A
WAS $32,995
NOW $30,495


08 CHEVROLET
K2500 LT
DIESEL AUTOMATIC
4X4 *70K MILES
STOCK ID#13334A
WAS $33,995
NOW $31,995


10 FORD
EXPEDITION LMT.
4X4 LEATHER
CHROME WHEELS 44K MILES
STOCK ID#13211A
WAS $34,995
NOW $31,995


HWY 90 lo MARIA Nl N- A-, fB L Plenty More Great Deals On the Lot To Choe Ft Rmi
HWY 90 ?MARIANNA, '- Our Sales Team Is Here To Help Youl
(B50) 48-2 40643 1 (866) 587-3873 -6 7 3
wwwChipoiaFor'd.com [ mu.
Rick BarnesT Sales Manager [liii
ALL PRICES PLUS $299.50 P&H, TAX, TAG & TITLE. ALL INCENTIVES APPLIED.
INCENTIVES GOOD THRU 01/31/2014 A"t PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION PRUPOSES-ONLY. PRICES GOOD THRU 01/31/2014 3 El


I8B SUNDAY. JA U ARY 12, 2014


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