Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01198

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text

Obama calls for immigration
law by end of year 9A

Informing more than T7,000 readers daily in print and online


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Bulldogs
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USDA issues Conservation Reserve

Program rental, direct, ACRE payments


HA ,flRP rjIJLh I .f IIU Ii LL .FH.IUj
USDA has begun distributing Conservation Reserve Program annual rental payments, 2013 direct payments and 2012
Average Crop Revenue Election program payments to participants across the country. Payments were scheduled to be
issued earlier, but were delayed several weeks due to the lapse in federal funding.


Delay due to lapse in federal funding


Special to the Floridan '

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vil-
sack recently announced that
USDA has begun distributing
Conservation Reserve Program
(CRP) annual rental payments to
participants across the.counmry.
USDA also began distributing
2013 direct payments and 2012
Average Crop Revenue Election
(ACRE) program payments on
Oct. 24. Payments were originally
scheduled to be issued earlier in
the month, but were delayed by
several weeks due to the lapse in
federal funding.
"Farmers, ranchers and rural
landowners across the country
count on USDA programs and the
payment delays due to the shut-
down were an unnecessary bur-
den," Vilsack said. "USDA has pri-,
oritized making these scheduled
payments without any further
delay and Farm Seryice Agency
staff haye worked hard to get this
assistance out the door as quickly
as possible."
Producers will receive payments
on almost 700,000 CRP contracts
on 390,000 farms covering 26.8
million acres. In exchange for a
yearly rental payment provided
by USDA on contracts ranging
from 10 to 15 years, farmers and
ranchers enrolled in CRP agree to


I
"USDA has priorilixed making these scheduled payments
without any further dday and Farm ServiceAgency staffhave
worked hard to get this assistance out the door as quiddy as
possible."


remove environmentally sensitive
land from agricultural production
and plant grasses or trees that
will improve water quality and
improve waterfowl and. wildlife
habitat. CR' reduced runoff and
leaching of nitrogen and phos-
phorus into waterways by an es-
timated 605 million pounds and
121 million pounds, respectively,
in 2012, and soil erosion reduc-
tions totaling 308 million tons in
2012.
Direct payments .for 2013 for
the DCP and ACRE programs
are being made to the more than
1.7 million farms enrolled in the
Farm Service Agency's programs.
Producers with base acres of cer-
tain commodities are eligible for
DCP payments. ACRE payments
for 2012-crop barley, corn, grain
sorghum, lentils, oats, peanuts,
dry peas, soybeans, and wheat are
scheduled.to be released begin-
ning Oct. 24 and contingent upon
national average market prices


Tom Vilsack,
.Ag cjcuIt raI Secretar/

and yields in each state. ACRE
payments for large chickpeas,
small chickpeas, canola, crambe,
flaxseed, mustard seed, rapeseed,
safflower, sesame, and sunflowers
are scheduled to be made in early
December and for long grain rice
and medium ahd short grain rice
in early February 2014 when the
final 2012/13 market year average
price data becomes available.
The 2008 Farm Bill, extended
by the American Tax Payer Relief
Act of 2012, provides authority to
enroll land in DCP, ACRE and CRP
through Sept. 30, 2013, however,
no legislation has been enacted to
reauthorize or extend this author-
ity. Effective Oct. 1,2013, FSA does
not have legislative authority to
approve or process applications
for these programs..
For more information on
CRP, DCP and ACRE,' producers
should contact their local FSA
office or visit, FSA's website at
www.fsa.usda.gov.


Chipley


.. ,, iUbMli I r LJ N iU
Members of the recently formed Northwest Florida
Manufacturers Council are treated to a tour of Washington-
Holmes Technical Center in Chipley Wednesday.

Washington-Holmes

Technical enter hosts

Northwest Florida

Manufacturers Council


SSpecial to the Floridan
Members of the recently
formed No'rthwest Florida
Manufacturers Council
were treated to a tour of
Washington-Holmes Tech-
nical Center in Chipley on
Wednesday.
Several program instruc-
tors, including those for
the welding and electrical
programs,, spoke to the
group and explained how
WHTC has tooled up. to
afford regional businesses
the skilled workforce they
require.


* Jennifer Grove, workforce
development coordinator
for Gulf Power Company,
shared information with
the group, noting a con-
tinuing partnership with
area schools to develop a
skilled workforce for the
respective industries.
Grove pointed to the fact
that manufacturing cur-
rently generates 14,518
direct jobs,' with an addi-
tional 17,063 indirect jobs,
in the 12-county region of
Northwest Florida.
SeeWHTC,Page 9A


Fla, attorney general

challenges medical

marijuanameasure


N TheAssociated Press '
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -
Florida Attorney General
Pam Bondi is challenging
proposal to allow the use
of medical marijuana in
the state.
Bondi criticized the pro-
posed amendment in a fil-
ing she made Thursday to
the Florida Supreme Court.
Bylaw, the attorney gener-
al asks the court to review
proposed amendments.
The SupremeCourt could
throw out the amendment
if it agrees with Bondi.
The Republican attor-


ney general called the
amendment misleading.
Bondi told the court that
if passed by voters the
measure would allow
marijuana use in limitless
situations.,
Bondi also said the
amendment could con-
fuse voters that medical
marijuana use would be
allowed under federal law.
The group pushing the
amendment People
United for Medical Mari-
juana needs to gather
nearly 700,000 signatures
in order to make the 2014
ballot.


Northwest Fla. airports exhibit together at Las Vegas avia


Special to the Floridan

Under the .umbrella of
the region's economic de-
velopment organization,
Florida's Great Northwest
(FGNW),, the major air-
ports in Northwest Florida
are exhibiting under one
banner at the National
Business Aviation Associa-
tion Convention, (NBAA)
in LasVegas, Nev. NBAA is
the sixth largest tradesho,
in the U.S. and the world's
largest business aviation
event.
Pensacola International
Airport, Okaloosa ,Countyrv
Airports, Northwest Flor-
ida Beaches International


rI ; ..... "" Rti A'
Major airports in Northwest Florida exhibit under one banner
at the National Business Aviation Association Convention in
Las Vegas.
Airport and Tallahassee nership with the region's
Regional Airport, in part- economic development


) CLASSIFIEDS..7-9B ENTERTAINMENT...6B ') LOCAL...3A
? g :'^r :F*'_~- :,_. ,'i "-'. '-i-' .


professionals, are exhibit-
ing at the convention, a
first-time for the region's
airports. Participating in
this trade show is part of
FGNW's 18-month aero-
space recruitment strategy
launched last month.
"Exhibiting as a group al-
lows us to increase our ex-
posure and presence for
our airports as well as for
Northwest Florida," said
Mike Stenson, deputy di-
rector of Okaloosa County
Airports. "A larger exhibit
provides greater visibil-
ity; our booth will be four
times larger than we have
had in previous years and
create a better environ-


OBITUARlES...9A


) STATE...4


ment to collectively show-
case the aerospace capa-
bilities of the region."
"Pensacola International
Airport is excited to col-
laborate with Florida's
Great Northwest and the
other airports in the region
to market opportunities to
aviation businesses. NBAA
is the sixth largest' trade
show in the world and will
have 25,000 attendees,"
said Greg Donovan, direc-
tor of Pensacola Interna-
tional Airport. '"Anytime
that we can work together
to convey the brand, c6m-
municate attributes of our
region, and build relation-
ships with perspective
A '' )SPORTS...1B


dion event

businesses, it is a win for'
our future. Our team will
be showcasing the many
positives of doing business
in'Florida and will articu-
late to the worldwide avia-
tion industry why Florida
is the most conducive
business environment for
future growth."
S"Northwest Florida is
a destination for many
corporations, businesses,
families and individu-
als, and we are proud to
participate in NBAA with
our aviation and business
development partners,"
said Parker W McClellan,
See EXHIBIT, Page 9A
WEATHER...2A


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7 6III 16118010 9( 1


ii


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


Today



08


Sunny, Windy & Cool.

Justin Kliefer / WMBB


High 68
Low 38


_,, High- 70
i' Low -43


S Saturday
Cold Start. Sunny Cool
Day.


High 79'
Low 530


Monday
Warm & Sunny.


%,,Atj High 80
. Low 500


SSunday
Mostly Sunny. Warmer.



J~J^ High-81W
SLo~k 55':


Tuesday
Partly Cloudy. Warm &
Humid


TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX
Low -12:20 PM High 12:45 AM
Low 2:25 PM High 6:16 AM 0-2 Low, 3-5Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 114
Low- 12:25PM High- 1:18 AM [-2.o w ,- *.o w
Low 1:36 PM High 1:51AM, 0 1 2 *2
Low 2:10 PM High- 2:24AM _______-__:____S


Reading
41.21 ft.
3.24 ft.
7.1'1 ft.
4.77 ft.


Flood Stage
66,0 ft.'
15.0 ft.'
19.0 ft,
. 12.0 'ft.


TiE SUN AND MOON '
Sunrise 6:51 AM L a
Sunset 5:59 PM o. ti.,i
Moonrise 1-1:23 PM Nov. Nov. Oct. Oct.,
Moonset l:.13 PMN 3 10 18 26,


FLORIDA'S BREL
PANHANDLE CNY

MEDIA PARTNERSWJAQ 100.9F

IS FRLAT D,


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publihher valeria Robert
vrobertsijclflonridan corn

Circulation Manager Dena Obersih
doberski4Cifloridancom .

CONTACTS
. Telephone: 850-526-3614 .
S FAX:850-482-4478' ..
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Street Address:
S'4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna. FL 32448
S Office Hours:
S Weekdays,8 a.m.to'5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7a.m. to 11a.m. on Sunday. The
' Jackson County Floridan (USPS271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
,for three moriths;'$62.05 for six months;'
and $12345 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be pa3id in advance MatI
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$9224 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year. ,
t",
ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising :
out of errors and advertisemnernts beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
Sments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the.negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise,and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or,
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
Sing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


S TODAY
Spirit of the Caverns -'From 9,
a.m to 3 p.m at Florida Caverns State
Park Hickory Pavilion, Marianna. Fun *
for the whole family: children's games,
living historians, wildlife/educational
displays. candy. prizes.Smokey Bear
and more. Cost: $4 per carload (as
many as eight people). Call 573-0390.
v Hooks and Needles -10 a.m. at
the Jackson County Public Library,
Marianna Branch. New and expe-
rienced hand crafters welcome to
create, share, learn or teach favorite
projects. Call 482-9631.
Chattahoochee Main Street
Project Scare Haunted House 6-9
p.m. Eastern, at 35 Madison St. in
Chattahoochee. $2, younger than 12.
$3, 12 years and older.
) "Senior Singles" Meeting -'6-8
p.m. in the, First United Methodist
Church Youth Center, 4392 Clinton St.,
Marianna. New location. Ample park-
ing. Singles age 50 and 'older invited
for games, food, prizes and speakers.
'No charge. Dohatjons accepted; pro-
ceeds fund charitable endeavors of
Marianna's Gathering Place Founda-
tion. Call 526-4561 or 272-6611.
)) Bulldogs Go Pink for Breast Can-
cer Awareness 6:30 p.m. Bulldog
Stadium. Bulldogs would be honored
if breast cancer survivors would join
them in the end zone and walk with
them onto the field as "Unite and
Fight" against breast cancer. T-shirts
available $10 at MHS Co-sponsored
by Tommy's Glass, Harkins Properties,
A Wild Hair and Dr Steven Spence.,
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble
'Hill Road in Marianna. Adult and
teen meetings to ".overcome hurts,
habits'and hang-ups."Dinner: 6 p.m.
Child care available. Call 209-7856,
573-1131.
wAlcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p,m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, OCT. 26
)) Spirit of the Caverns 9 a.m.


Communit
to 3 p.m. Florida Caverns State Part
Hickory Pavilion. Marianna Fun lor the
whole family children s games. living
historians, wildlile/educatiornal dis-
Splays, candy, prizes. Smoley Bear and
more. Cost: $4per carload (as many
as eight people).Call 573-0390.
Alford Community Health Clinic
Hours 10 a.m. until last patient is
seen. t770 Carolina-St. in Alford. The
free clinic for income-eligible patients
without medical insurance treats
,short-term illnesses and chronic
conditions. Appointments available;
call 263-7106 or-209-5501. Walk-ins
,welcome. Sign in before noon.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 4:30-5:30 p.m.Jn the
AA room of First United Method-
ist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in
Marianna.
)i Chattahoochee Main Street
Project Scare Hauhted House 6
p.m.-5p.m. EST35 Madison St. in
Chattahoochee. $2 under 12. $3 for"
12 and up.
Sneads High School Project
Graduation Wright's Halloween
Haunt "13" 6-10 p.m. 2012 Wilson
Ave., Grand Ridge. $3 per person.
Ages 5 and younger admitted free;
Chipola College Show Choir
Showcase 7 p.m. Center for the
Arts at Chipola College in Marianna.
Area middle and high school show
choirs will join Chipola Show Choir for
an evening of song and dance. Tickets:
adults, $5; younger than 18, $3.

SUNDAY, OCT.27'
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed
Discussion 6:30 p.m. in the AA
room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Mari-
anna. Attendance limited to persons
with a desire to stop drinking.
Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting
-8 p.m. in the board room of Camp-
bellton-Graceville Hospital, 5429
College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, OCT. 28
Toys for Tots applications
Anchorage Children's Home, 4452


y Calendar '
. Clinton St., Marianqa.Applications
will be taken until noon Dec. 6 All toys
distributed Dec. 21. starting at'10 a.m.,
Marianna Woman's Club and
Lowes Home Improvement "Fall
Container Gardens" workshop -10
a.m. in the Garden Center at Marianna
Lowe's store. Free but registration
suggested. Call 209-9325 or 569-
2227.
)) Parkinson's Support Group
Meeting noon in the ground-floor
classroom of Jackson Hospital. Lunch
provided. Those diagnosed with-'
Parkinson's and their caregivers are
invited. No cost to participate. Call
718-2661.
Marianna Lions Club Meeting
noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329
Lafayette St., Marianna. Call 482-.
2005.
) Jackson County Tobacco Free
Partnership Meeting 4:30 p.m.:
Citizen's Lodge on Caverns Road in
Marianna. Helpingeducate on the
dangers of tobacco and secondhand
smoke. Offeringassistance to those
who struggle with nicotine addiction.
Call 526-2412, ext. 157.
)) Jackson County Quilters Guild
Meeting 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascen-
sion Lutheran Church, 3975 U.S. 90
West Marianna. Business meetings
are fourth Mondays; other Mondays
are for projects, lessons, help. All.
quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
Sneads High School Project
Graduation Wright's Halloween
Haunt "13".- 6-9 p.m. 2012 Wilson
Ave., Grand Ridge. $3 per person.
SAges 5 and younger.admitted free.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p:m. in the AA room of
'First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, OCT. 29
)) Toys for Tots applications
-Anchorage Children's Home,4452
Clinton St., Marianna. Applications
will be taken unt:l noon'Dec. 6. All toys
will bedistributed Dec. 21, starting at
10a.m.
)) St. Anne Thrift Store 9 a.m.-l


p.m. St Anne's Catholic Church. 3009
5th St.. Marianna. Call 482-3734
Pinochle Club Meeting 9:30
1:30 a.m. Ascension Lutheran
Church Fellowship'Hall, 3975 U.S.',
90, Marianna. Everyone invited. Call
.482-6132..
Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson
County Senior Citizens, 2931 Optimist
Drive in Marianna: Call 482-5028.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open.
Meeting noon to 1p.m.,in the
AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in
Marianna. !
) Magic Comedy Show -6-7 p.m.
at the Jackson County Public Library,
2929 Green St., Marianna: Free. Call
S482-9631. .
Artnight with Anna 6-8 p.m. in
the Heritage Room of the Blountstown
Public Library in Blo'untstown. Learn
the t,:chnique"scratchboard."Call
674-8773.
Sneads High School Project
Graduation Wrighfs Halloween..
Haunt "13" 6-9 p.m. 2012 Wilson
Ave., Grand Ridge. $3 per person.
Ages 5 and younger admitted free.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, OCT.30
Toys for Tots applications
Anchorage Children's Home, 4452
'Clinton St., Marianna. Applications :,
will be taken until noon Dec. 6. All toys
distributed Dec: 21, starting at 10 a.m.
Eldercare USDA Food Distribution
-8 a.m. Eldercare Services, 2979. ,
Daniels St., Marianna. Call 483-3220.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting Noon to 1 p.m. in the
AA room of.First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in
Marianna.
Jackson Hospital Board of
Trustees Finance Committee and
board meetings 5 p.m. in the
classroom at Jackson Hospital in
Marianna. Call 718-2629.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson CountyFloridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for Oct. 23, the lat-
est available report: Two accidents with no
injuries, two abandoned vehicles reported,
two suspicious persons reported, on
burglary reported, one verbal disturbance
complaint, one burglary alarm reported, 17
traffic stops, one larceny, one threatening/
obscene call reported, one illegally parked
vehicle reported, one 911 hang up call and
16 home security checks.


Jackson County Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the follow-
ing incidents for Oct. 23, the latest avail-
able report: one accident with unknown
injury, one hospice death, one abandoned
vehicle reported, four suspicious vehicles
reported, one suspicious incident reported,


Police Roudup
three suspicious persons reported, two
burglaries reported, one verbal disturbance
complaint:two pedestrian/.
^_i h, hitchhiker complaints, two
.. j ,- prowler complaints, one
titME ,woodland fire reported, 11
', 1 medical calls, six burglar
alarms reported, 26 traffic ,
stops, one civil dispute reported, one tres-
passing complaint, one follow-up inves-
tigadon, four animal complaints, one sex
offender, 15 building/checks, two assisting
other agencies, one threat/harassment
complaint and one 911 hang-up call.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility,
Kevin Houck, 26,1625 Frank Marshal
Road, Ozark, Ala.; driving while license sus-
pended/revoked, possession' of prescrip-
tion pills without prescription, violation of


state probation
) Shane Love, 21,2865 McPherson St.,
Apt. 3, Marianna; possession'of marijuana
less'than 10 grams
l Douglas Smeltzer, 65, transit; violation
of state probation
)) Clifton Bryant Sr., 47,4299 Sylvania
Plantation Road, Greenwood; violation of
county probation
Darren Lewis, 47, 7877 U.S. 90, Sneads;
violation of county probation
) George Konicott, 29, 5441 10th St,,
Malone; violation-of state probation
)) Michael Gardner, 28,7303 Bonnie Hill
Road, Chattahoochee; possession of mari-
juana less than 10 grams, possession of
drug paraphernalia
)) Ebony Kesner, 31,3121 U.S. 90, Mari-
anna; fugitive from justice
Jail population: 203
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppersat 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agencyTo report a wildlife violation,
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922). '


B4204 LAFAYETE ST.
MARIANNA, FL
CHEVROLET BUICK CADILLAC GMC NISSAN,, .




(850) 482-3051
SALE TEA


L


-12A FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25,2013


WAKE-UP CALL


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


OPTIMISTS RECOGNIZE SEPTEMBER

STUDENT OF THE MONTH


he Optimist Club of Jackson County recognized its September
Student of the Month, Noah McCoy, at its luncheon meeting
on Oct. 15. Noah is the son ofAmanda and Colin McCoy and he
was nominated by Kay Dennis. Noah is in the fourth grade at River-
side Elementary School, where hescored a Level 5 on his FCAT read-
ing test and is a straight-A student. Noah has played baseball for three
years, was in the 4-H for two years, and he helps tutor other students.
Pictured with Noah and his award (from left) are Optimist President
Sylvia Stevens; his grandmother Dianna Keel, and Kay Dennis.




JACKSON COUNTY FRIENDS OF

THE LIBRARY BOARD THANK MEMBERS


O ct. 20-26 is National Friends of Libraries Week, and mem-
bers of the Jackson County Friends of the Library board were
treated to refreshments and thanks by the Marianna Library
after its monthly meeting on Oct. 17. For more information on join-
ing the Friends stop by the Marianna Library, 2929 Green Street, and
pick up an application. Pictured are some of the 2013/2014 board and
committee chairmen (from left) Marilyn
Sweeney, Jean Wiggins, Edith Whidden, Claudia Smith, Dianne
Oswald, Barbara Grant, Jackie Faye Kelly, President Becky Trott and
SMary Pettis.


Covenant Hospice honor chaplains


Special to the Floridan',

Covenant Hospice will
honor the contributions
of its dedicated chaplains
during Pastoral Care Week,
Oct. 20-26. Each day pas-
tdral care givers are invited
into the life experiences of
women, men, children, and
organizations. Faith can be
tested and many questions
arise about the meaning
of suffering and pain near
the end-of-life. Pastoral
caregivers bring many gifts
to the process of healing
and wholeness. They are
trained to help individu-
als draw on their own faith
traditions and teachings
for comfort and guidance
as they walk through dark
valleys.
In 2012, Covenant Hos-
pice chaplains made more
than 13,000 calls andvisits
to patients facing life-lim-
iting illnesses and their
families, and were asked
to officiate at over 450 fu-
nerals. "Our chaplains are
often referred to as 'angels
among us' by the patients
and families we serve," said
Dale 0. Knee, Covenant
Hospice President & CEO.
"We are truly humbled by
the work they do as part of
our team and appreciate
the opportunity to honor
them each year."
Held first in 1984, Pasto-
ral Care Week is sponsored
by the Coalition on Minis-
try in Specialized Settings


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Covenant Hospice Chaplains are Jack Howell, Ronnie Wright,
and Bob Johnson.


Network (COMISS) a na-
tional organization of pas-
toral care providers, pasto-
ral care professionals, and
faith group endorsers. Now
in its 28th year, the week-
long observance promotes
spiritual values as a part
of the healing process and
invites us to celebrate the
work of caregivers in such
settings as hospitals, hos-
pices and nursing homes.
Celebrating its 30th An-
niversary, Covenant Hos-
pice is a not-for-profit
organization dedicated to
providing comprehensive,
compassionate services to
patients and loved ones


Jackson County Quilters Guild

announces contest winners


Special to the Floridan

E very year, the
Jackson County
Quilters Guild
has a challenge contest
where members are
asked to create a unique
wall hanging. This year's
theme was "My Favorite
Vacation."
First Place Winner:
"Sedona, Arizona" by
Leann Tan. Leann's
children sent her and
her husband on a trip
to Sedona, Ariz. Leann
captured the unique
scenery as well as the


Indian spiritual aspect of
the area.
Second Place Winner:
"Road to Oklahoma" by
Linda Edwards. Linda
features her many road
trips to her home state of
Oklahoma. She remem-
bers fondly the trips her
'family took. .
Honorable Mention:
"Rose Garden" by Char-
lotte Hunter. Charlotte
created roses to repre-
sent her vacation spent
with her daughter where
she shared her love of
gardening by helping her
daughter plant a rose


garden.
Honorable Mention:
"Color Tour by Lanell
Skalitzky. Lanell 'and her
husband took a tour of
New England to, observe
the colorful leaves and'
to visit light houses in
the area. Lanell's label
explains it all: "You only
live once."
The Jackson County
Quilters Guild meets
every Monday night at
the Ascension Lutheran
Church from 5:30 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m. New
members are always
welcome.


The Woman's Club of Chipley presents the

annual Kirby Holt Decorating Showcase


Special to the Floridan

The Woman's Club of
Chipley will hold its an-
nual Kirby Holt Decorat-
ing Showcase at the Wash-
ington County Agrioulture
Center, U.S. 90W, Chipley,
FL on Tuesday, Nov. 5 at 6
pOm. Admission is $10. Re-
freshments will be served
and door prizes will be
given.
Join them as loca4 re-
nowned decorator and
floral artist Kirby Holt
shares his designer tips,
techniques and secrets
for decorating your home
for the upcoming holiday
season. His entertaining
and motivating style will
prepare you for the most
beautiful and joyous sea-
son of the year in this two
hour stage show.
This year Kirby will be
doing wreaths, floral ar-
rangements, tablescapes,
etc. for many different
events along with some
Christmas trees and other
holiday decorations. He
will also be demonstrating
how to use the flowers and
greenery from your yard
to make beautiful and
decorative accents in your
home. Several of Kirby's
wreaths and fall arrange-
ments will be available for
sale at the show.
Kirby is the owner of
Blossoms in Chipley and a
member of the prestigious
American Institute of Flo-
ral Design. He has taught
design for multiple profes-
sional florist organizations
across the Southeast and
nationally. He has shared
his talents for many years


Kirby Holt decorator and designer.


on Dothan's WTVY Morn-
ing Show with Ann Var-
num. He has also created
designs, and decorated
events for many celebri-
ties, 'including President
Obama, the Beach Boys'
and JoDee Messina.
The annual Showcase is
a major fundraiser for the
Chipley Woman's Club.
Proceeds from the event
are used to support local
community organizations
and activities, including
Chipola College scholar-
ships, Project Gradua-
tions, etc.
For more information,


call 638-0053 or visit the
Club's new website: www.
womansclubchipley.com

Follow us on
Twitter


twitter.com/
jcfloridannews


SUBMITTED PHOTO

Jude, 5, enjoying water straight from the
source at Falling Waters. His bemused
parents are Patrick and Tabetha Hunt.


watson
G*A0LOOJST$
850.482.4037
wvatsonjewelers.com


.CUTE KIDS


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2013 3AF


LOCAL


pqiiro^ ifT




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Inmate backing


custody after


accidental release


The Associated Press

ORLANDO A Florida
prison inmate is back in
custody after being acci-
dentally released form the
Orange County Jail in May.
John Lanard Baker, 29,
was. picked up at his Or-
lando home on a warrant
Thursday, a day after the
problem was first discov-
ered, Orange County Cor-
rections reported.
Baker had .already been
serving a prison sentence
with the Florida Depart-
ment of Corrections :for
theft and burglary convic-
tions when he was trans-
ported to Orange County
in- April to face a grand theft
auto charge. According to
Orange County Correc-
tions, its employees failed
to place a detainer on him,
sofollowing, a bond hear-
ing the-next month, he was
released on $2,500p bail.
Baker returned to court
in September, when pros-
ecutors dropped the grand
theft auto charge. And he
was again allowed to leave.
Jail officials finally real-
ized the error Wednesday,
after the Florida 'Depart-
ment of Corrections con-
tacted Orange County Cor-
rections because Bakerwas
missing from the state's
system.
Orange County Correc-
tions Chief Comrnita Riley
acknowledged in a state-
ment Thursday that her
department was respon-
sible for the error.
"This was clearly an error
4n.the part of our depart-
ment and it is unaccept-
able," Riley said. "We are
currently conducting a
detailed inquiry as' to ex-
actly how this happened


and will make appropriate
changes. Appropriate cor-
rective action with be tak-
en for any staff found to be
responsible for this error."
Florida Department of
Corrections Secretary Mi-
chael Crews said his de-
partment is also looking
into the mistake release.
"DOC is continuing to
investigate the matter and
is working with officials to
take steps to ensure this
never happens again,"
Crew said.
According to Orange
County Corrections
spokesman Allen Moore,
Baker apparently had no
idea that he was doing
anything wrong. There was
no indication that Baker
would be facing escape
charges, though it was'un-
clear how his five months
of freedom would affect
his previously, scheduled
release date from prison.
SUnlike Baker's accidental
release, two convictedmur-
ders recently used forged
documents to escape from
a Florida prison.,
Charles Walker and Jo-
seph Jenkins 'were ,cap-
tured last weekend at a
Panama City motel. .Au-
thorities say they used
forged court orders to get
them released from the
Franklin Correctional In-
stitution in the Panhandle.
The forged orders culit their
prison sentences from life
to 15years.
The Florida Department
of Law Enforcement is
investigating who wrote
the phony court docu-
ments and how they got
into the judicial system.
Both men were convicted
of murders in the Orlando
area.


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The casket containing the body of deceased congressman C.W. Bill Young is carried into First Baptist Church of Indian Rocks
on Thursday, Oct, 24, in Largo, Fla. Young, died last Friday after 43 years in Congress, he was 82. Republican House Speaker
John Boehner, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos, former Deputy Secretary of Defense Gordon England and Rep.
Steny Hoyer, the No. 2 Democrat in the House, are among those scheduled to eulogize Young.

Around 1,500 attend funeral




for Fla. Congressman Young


The Associated Preis


LARGO During a two-
hour funeral, Rep. C.W Bill
Young was remembered
Thursday as a man who
loved his family, his coun-
try and those who served
in the military.
Young the 82-year-old
Pinellas County Repub-
lican who served in Con-
gress for 22 terms died
last week, surrounded by
'friends and family, at Wal-
ter Reed Medical Center in
Bethesda, Md.
Young had been involved
in Florida politics since
1957. He was considered
the elder statesman of
Florida's Republican Party
and in the U.S. House of


Representatives.
More than 1,500 people
attended the funeral at a
Baptist church in Young's
district. The memorial
service drew 34 members
of the House,' including
Speaker John Boehner, as
well as Gov. Rick Scott and
countless other local and
state officials.
Boehnerchokedupwhile
speaking about Young and
his legacy.
"What now? Who among
us will carry on this man's
work?" Boehner said. "No
one man or one woman
can fill his shoes. It will
take all of us."
Marine Corps Comman-
dant Gen. James E Amos
and former Deputy Sec-
retary of Defense Gordon


England, said Young and
his wife, Beverly, were un-
matched in their dedica-
tion to the military and
wounded veterans. The
pair would visit injured
veterans at Walter Reed
almost weekly- and even
accepted one into their
family.
Marine Lance' Cpl. Josh
Callihan stood with three
of Young's sons during
the funeral and said that
Young helped him re-
cover, both physically and
mentally. Young had been
paralyzed by a bullet to the
spinal cord. "
Callihan said that in the
last days of Young's life, he
recorded a video for Calla-
han's unborn daughter.
C.W Bill Young II, one


of Young's children, said
family was the most. im-
portant thing this father.
Yet after years of medical
problems Young suf-
fered lasting back injury
following a 1970 plane -
crash it was Young's
wife, Beverly, who inspired
the 'congressman 'to help
others.
"Nobody but Beverly and
God will know how much
she's done for me," Young
would tell his son.
Young was buried fol-
lowing the service at Bay
Pines' Cemetery, which is
located near the Bay Pines
VA Medical Center the
same facility that his law-
maker colleagues have
proposed to name after
Young.


Jury gets case of'Little Tony' in Boulis killing


"Big Tony' Moscatiello,
who witnesses testified


FORT LAUDERDALE was a captain in NewYork's
Anthony "Little Tony" Fer- Gambino crime family.
rari coldly plotted with a With Boulis trying to re-
mob-connected associate gain control, Assistant
to have a prominent South State Attorney Gregg Ross-
Florida businessman killed man, told jurors during
so money would keep closing arguments the two
flowing their way from ,a Tonys decided to have him
fleet of lucrative gambling eliminated.
ships, a prosecutor said "Mr. Moscatiello decided
Thursday. he wasn't leaving. This was
Konstantinos "Gus" his retirement," Rossman
Boulis had sold SunCruz said. "Theywanted control
Casinos and the new own-' of the company".
ers had lined up contracts Ferrari, 56, could get the
with',,Ferrari and Anthony. death penalty if convicted,


even though he did not
pull the trigger the night
of Feb. 6, 2001, when Bou-
lis was fatally shot in his
car on a Fort Lauderdale
street. Other witnesses tes-.
tifled the killer was mob
hit man John "J.J." Gurino,
who they said was brought
in by Moscatiello for the
job.
Moscatiello, 75, is also
charged with murder but
was granted a mistrial
earlier this month when
his attorney became ill.
Prosecutors intend to re-
try Moscatiello, and he too


could get the death pen- and connections his pur-
alty. He has pleaded not ported Ganmbino ties af-
guilty. forded. Ferrari had been


The jury, which has been
sequestered since testi-
mony began Sept. 30, be-
gan deliberating' Ferrari's
fate Thursday afternoon
but quit after less than two
hours. They will resume on
Friday.
Rossman said the evi-
dence showed that the
new operator of Sun-
Cruz, businessman .Adam
Kidan, brought Mosca-
tiello into the business
because of the protection


telling people he was the
main Gambino contact in
South Florida, according
to trial testimony.
Ultimately, Rossman
said, the' decision to. in-
volve Moscatiello, and by
extension Ferrari, Jled to
Boulis'death.
"Gus Boulis was killed
because Adam Kidan
reached out to Anthony
Moscatiello," Rossman
told jurors.
Kidan was not charged


Covenant Hospice offers free 'Coping with the, Holidays' workshop


'gSpecial to the Floridan


Covenant Hospice in-
vites community members
who have suffered the loss
of a loved one or would
like to learn how' to help
those that are grieving to
attend 'Coping with the
Holidays'. workshop. The
workshop will be held


from 10 a.m. to 1 p.mn.
Thursday, Nov. 7 at Cov-
enant Hospice, located at
4215 Kelson Avenue,'Suite
Ein Mariahna.
The workshop will in-
dclude many tips on, "how
to cope" during the holi-
days, understanding nor-
mal grief reactions, coping
strategies for the holidays,


ways to remember a loved
one, and supporting ehil-
;dren and adults through
the holidays. Those who
attend will also receive
free material and, litera-
ture on coping during the
holidays.
There is no charge to
attend this workshop,
however, registration is


required.. Lunch and re-
freshments will be served.
If you are interested in at-
tending this, very special
workshop, call Riley Hen-
derson, BSW at.482-8520
by Tuesday, November 5 to
make a reservation.
Celebrating its 30th An-
niversary, 'Covenant Hos-
pice is a not-for-profit


organization dedicated
to providing compre-
hensive, compassionate
services to patients and
loved ones during times of
life-limiting illnesses. For
more information about
Covenant' Hospice, call
482-8520 or 888-817-2191
or visit www.covenan-
thospice.org.


in the Boulis slaying, tes-
tifying he had nothing to
do with it and that the two
Tonys confessed to him
separately. Kidan and his
former SunCruz partner,
ex-Washington lobbyist
JackAbramoff, both served
federal prison time for
fraud in the $147.5 million
SunCruz purchase.
Boulis was 51 when
he died. He had risen to
prominence years earlier
by founding the success-
ful Miami Subs restaurant
chain before turning to the
SunCruz business.


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--14A FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25,2013


LOCAL & STATE


.J


. I




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Mother of bullied girl looking at legal options


The Associated Press

TAMPA The mother of
a 12-year-old Florida girl
who jumped to her death
after being bullied for
months is exploring her le-
gal options, her attorneys
said Thursday.
Attorneys for Rebecca
Sedwicles mother have
taken no legal -action yet,
but theyjhaven't ruled out
suing Polk County schools
or the parents of two
middle school girls
who were arrested in
connection with Sedwick's


death, they said.
"It's a difficult process,"
said David Henry, lead at-
torney for Tricia Norman.
"There are a number of
other children who 'also
participated."
Among the attorneys
representing' Norman
is former Gov. Charlie
Crist. '
"It's got to be stopped.
It's got to be rooted out,"
Crist said at a news confer-
ence. "It's not like some-
body getting shoved on a
playground."
. Two of Sedwick's


schoolmates, who depu-
ties say were primarily
responsible for the bul-
lying, were arrested last
week. The girls, ages 14
and 12, were charged with
stalking.
Norman's attorneys
said they have' set up' a
website to help her raise
$5,400 to pay for funeral
costs. Any additional funds
will be used for anti-bully-
ing causes.
"A little bit of me is an-
gry,". Norman said. "I'm
grateful for the chance to
save other kids."


Morgan &
Morgan
attorneys
David Henry,
(left) and
Matt Morgan,
and former
Florida
Governor
Charlie Crist,
(right) sur-
round Tricia
Norman as
she answers
a question,
during a
news confer-
ence in
Tampa. Fla.
[HfI'A SSUJlk Hfr


State
Florida Blue
dropping 300,000
policyholders
JACKSONVILLE Flor-
ida Blue is dropping
300,000 customers whose
policies the health insurer.
says aren't sufficiently
comprehensive under the
health care overhaul.
The Jacksonville-based
insurance company said
Thursday that the 300,000
policyholders have plans
that don't include all of the
10 categories of benefits
required under the Afford-
able Care Act.
Florida Blue says the
affected policyholders can
upgrade to a plan with
more comprehensive ben-
efits. Others may choose
to go with another insurer.
Florida Blue says those
policyholders should
contact the company to
review their options.
Gov. Rick Scott, though,
says Florida Blue's actions
show that not'everyone
is able to keep their plans
as promised by Presi-
dent Obama under the
overhaul.

GOP comes under
fire for polling
before funeral
ST. PETERSBURG- A
national Republican orga-
nization is coming under
fire for polling voters in
the district of U.S. Rep. Bill
Young.
Young died last week
after 43 years in Con-
gress, and his funeral was
Thursday.
The National Republican
Congressional Committee
started polling Pinellas
County voters a.day earlier
about potential matchups
in a special election for
Young's replacement.
Florida Gov., Rick Scott,
who attended Young's
funeral, blasted the group.
"It's typical Washington,"
said Scott, a Republi-
can. "There's no off on
the political switch. It's
disappointing."
Katie Prill, a spokes-
woman for the NRCC, said
that a few unscheduled
polling calls were "inad-
vertently" made in Young's
district. She-apologized for
the "unfortunate mistake."
It's up to Scott to decide
when to set the date for *
the special election.


Fantasy Fest expects
to draw 60,000
KEYWEST- KeyWest's
annual decadent costum-
ing festival continues with
some 60,000 revelers ex-
pected for Saturday night's
highlight parade.
Although most Fantasy
Fest events are adult-ori-
ented, several are ap-
propriate for youngsters,
including Wednesday
evening's Pet Masquerade,
where many dressed-up
animals subscribed to the
festival theme of "Su-
per Heroes, Villains... &
Beyond."
Standout entries in-
cluded a feline "vampire"
reclining in a fake coffin,
a superhero ensemble
featuring a husky dog ac-.
tually named Batman, and
six glamorously-garbed
People and pooches
spoofing the "Real House-
wives" television shows.
Two entries included
small dogs costumed as
Diana Nyad, who recently
swam from Cuba to Key


Briefs
West, "menaced" by hu-
mans dressed as jellyfish.
The real Nyad is to lead
Saturday's parade.
Fantasy Fest runs
through Sunday with
events including a mas-
querade march through
SKeyWest's historic district.

Woman gets 1 year in
'toxictush'case
MIAMI--A Florida .
woman accused of inject-
ing toxic substances into
women's buttocks as an
enhancement procedure
has been sentenced to a
year in prison.
As part of a deal with
Miami-Dade County
prosecutors, 32-year-old
Ron Oneal Morris pleaded
guilty Thursday to illegal
practice of healthcare. A
judge rejected a previous
plea agreement for 180
days, saying that sentence
was too liglt.
Morris was arrested in
November 2011. Pros-
ecutors say the botched
operations left two women
ill and disfigured.'
Police say Morris was
born a man and identifies
as a woman. Authorities
believe she may have
used some of the toxic
substances including
flat'-tire sealant and glue.
on herself.
The Miami Herald
reports that Morris faces
additional charges in Bro-
ward.County, including
manslaughter. Officials
say one victim died after
an operation.

Driver hits, injures 3
students entering bus
BOWLING GREEN--A
driver who didn't realize a
school bus had stopped to
pick up students swerved
onto the shoulder of State
Road 62 and hit three
children.
The Florida Highway
Patrol says one of the
children 9-year-old
Caylin Morgan Skipper
-was critically wounded
Thursday morning. Two
other children suffered
minor injuries.
Troopers say 69-year-old,
Louis Edward Stephen
told them he thought the'
red lights on the school
bus were the flashing
lights at a nearby intersec-
tion. By the time he real-
ized it was a school bus,
he wasn't able to stop. To
avoid a collision, Stephen
swerved right and hit the
children, who were getting
onto the bus.
The critically injured
child was flown to Tampa
General Hospital.
Stephen is charged with
failure to stop for a bus.

Train derails near
Sanford leaves 1 dead
SANFORD The
Florida Depariment.of
Transportation says a train
employee was killed after
a train derailment near
"Sanford.
Department of Trans-
portation spokesman
Steve Olson says the
employee was working as
a spotter Thursday on one
of the cars as a locomotive
pushed 10 cars backward
into a rail yard.
Four of the cars carry-
ing gravel tipped and the
worker became partially
trapped underneath one
of the cars and the
crushed rock.
From wire reports


Poll: Youth online abuse falling but prevalent


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON More
young people are reach-
ing out to family mem-
bers after being harassed
or taunted online, and it's
helping. At least a little.
A poll released Thursday
by The Associated Press-
NORC 'Center for Public
Affairs Research and MTV
found incidents of "digital
abuse" are still prevalent
but declining somewhat.
It found a growing aware-
ness among teenagers and
young adults about harm
from online meanness
and cyberbullying, as well
as a slight increase among'
those willing to tell a par-,
ent or sibling.
The findings come a
week after two 'Florida
Girls, ages 12 and 14, were
arrested on felony charg-
es for allegedly bullying
online a 12-year-old girl
who later killed herself.
by jumping off a tower at
an abandoned concrete
plant.
"I feel like we're making
progress. People should
be encouraged," said Sa-
meer Hinduja, co-direc-
tor of the Cyberbullying
Research Center and pro-
fessor at Florida Atlantic
University.
The AP-NORC/MTV poll
found that'.some 49 per-
cent of all teenagers and
young adults in the United
States say they have had
at least one brush with
some kind of electronic
harassment, down from
about 56 percent in 2011.
Of those who have en-
countered an incident, 34
percent went to' a parent
- compared to 27 percent
just two years :ago. And
some 18 percent up
from 12 percent in 2011
- asked a brother or sister
for help.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sarah Ball, a victim of cyber bullying during her high school
years, poses for a portrait at her home on Wednesday, Oct.
23, in Spring Hill, Fla. Ball, now a student at a nearby com-
munity college, maintains a Facebook site called "Hernando
Unbreakable", an anti-bullying page and mentors local kids
identified by the schools as victims of cyberbullying.


When. asked what
helped; 72 percent of
those encountering digital
abuse said changing their
email, screen name or cell
number, while 66 percent
said talking to a parent.
Less than a third of re-
spondents found retalia-
tion helpful, while just as
many said it had no effect
and 20 percent said getting
revenge actually made the
problem worse.
Girls were more likely
than boys to be the targets
of online meanness but
they also are more likely to
reach out for help.
Sarah Ball was a 15-year-
old high school sopho-
more at Hernando High
School in Brooksville, Fla.,
when a friend posted on
Facebook: "I hate Sarah
Ball, and I don't care who
knows."
Then there was the Face-
book site dubbed "Her-
nando Haters" asking to
rate her attractiveness, the
anonymous email calling
her a "waste of space" and
this text that arrived on
her 16th birthday: "Wow,
you're still alive? 'Impres-


sive. Well happy birthday
an a)"
anyway."
It wasn't until Ball's
mom, who had access
to her daughter's online
.passwords; saw the mes-
sages that Ball told her
everything. ,
"It was actually quite
embarrassing to be hon-
est," remembers Ball,
now an 18-year-old col-
lege freshman. But "really,
truly,, if it wasn't for my
parents, I don't think I'd be
where I'm at today. That's
for sure."
The poll also indicated
that young people are be-'
coming more aware of the
impact of cyberbullying.
Some 72 percent, up from
65 percent in 2011, saM
online abuse was a prob-
lem, that society should
address. Those who think
it should be accepted as a
part of life declined from
33 percent to 24 percent.
Hinduja credits, school
programs that are making
it "cool to care" about oth-
ers, and increased aware-
ness among adults who
canhelp teens.talkthrough
their options, such as de-


activating an account or
going to school adminis-
trators for'help in remov-
ing hurtful postings.
That was the case for
Ball, whose parents en-
couraged her to fight back
by speaking up. "They said
this is my ticket to helping
other people," Ball said.
With their help, Ball
sent copies of the abusive-
emails, texts and Face-
book pages to school au-
thorities, 'news outlets
and politicians and orga-
nized a local anti-bullying
rally. She still maintains a
Facebook site called "Her-
nando Unbreakable," and
mentors local kids identi-
fied by the schools as vic-
tims of cyberbullying.
Ball said she thinks if
other teens are reaching
out more for help, it's as
a last resort because so
many kids fear making the
situation worse. That was
one reason Jennifer Tins-
ley, 20, said she didn't tell
her parents in the eighth
grade when another stu-
dent used Facebook to
threaten to stab and beat
her.
"I didn't want them to
worry about me," Tinsley,
now a college student in
Fort Wayne, Ind., said of
her family. "There was a.
lot of stress at that time. ...
And, I just didn't want the
extra attention."
According to the Cyber-
bullying Research Center,
every state but Montana
has enacted anti-bullying
laws, many of which ad-
dress cyberbullying spe-
cifically. Most state laws
are focused on allowing
school districts to punish
offenders. In Florida, for
example, the state legis-
lature this year passed a
provision allowing schools
to discipline students ha-
rassing others off campus.


Miami officials consider Little Haiti boundaries


The Associated Press

MIAMI Miami's Little
Haiti neighborhood got its
unofficial name from the
Haitian immigrants who
moved here in the late
1970s and early 1980s. The
city commission now is
considering making that
official to differentiate Lit-
tle Haiti from the historic
neighborhoods it largely
absorbed over the years.
Commissioners are set
Thursday to contemplate
setting official boundar-
-ies for a cultural or neigh-
borhood conservation
district. Commissioner


Michelle Spence-Jones,
whose district. includes
Little, Haiti, has called
for a study to determine
whether the area should
be officially recognized. .
: Some Haitian activ-
ists want the official
recognition.
"Every day you hear of
a new group encroaching
into what we know as Little
Haiti," said Marleine Bas-
tien, executive director of
Haitian Women of Miami.
"These groups moved into
Little Haiti, so I don't un-
derstand why they don't
want it to be named Little
Haiti anymore."


Critics such as business-
man Peter Ehrlich tell
The Miami Herald that
.the designation would
endanger the character
of' the neighborhoods
now encompassed in the
area generally known
as Little Haiti, such as
Lemon City,, Little River
or Buena Vista, and could
make the area less attrac-
tive to investors.


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16A FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25,2013


RELIGION


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Victory Baptist celebrates pastor's 30th


Special to the Floridan

On Sunday, Victory Bap-
tist Church in Sneads will:
celebrate Pastor Appre-
ciation Sunday and pastor
David Pipping's 30th year
there.
Dr. Pipping has min-
istered in the area since
1970, when he accepted
a position as chaplain at
Apalachee Correctional
Institution and moved
with his wife, Myra, and
their three young chil-
dren to Chattahoochee.
In 1983, Victory Baptist
Church called Dr. Pip-
ping as pastor, and he has
faithfully shepherded his
flock for three decades.
His wife has served
in many capacities, in-
cluding women's Sun-
day school teacher; VBS
coordinator and church
pianist of 30 years. She is
a steadfast source of en-
couragement, strength
and help to her husband
and to the church family.
In addition to church
work, the Pippings min-
ister to the students and


uBMinFED O'k,
Dr. David Pipping and his wife, Myra Pipping, will be honored
Sunday in celebration of their 30 years at Victory Baptist
Church in Sneads.

staff at Victory Christian the school's administra-
Academy. Dr. Pelping is tor and his wife teaches


the younger students in
Wednesday chapels.
VCA was founded by
Dr. Pipping and his son,
Brian, in 1986 as a min-
istry of the church, and
the Pippings remain corn-
mintted to seeing young
people won over to Christ,
trained to serve him and
educated fully.
Although Dr. Pipping
retired from the Florida
prison system in 2000, he
continuestobeinvolvedin
prison ministries, 'travel-
ing ro institutions around
the country to minister at
prison crusades.
Closer to home, he
serves as chaplain at the,
Jackson County Jail, min-
istering weekly as coun-
Sselor and Bible study
teacher.
The celebration Sunday
will begin with the 10:50
a.m. service, with music
by the Bryan Brothers, and
will follow with dinner on
the grounds. Friends and
family are invited.
The church is located
at 2271 River Road in
Sneads.


Bethel Baptist Church,
1349 Highway 173, Poplar
Springs Community,
Graceville, will be hosting
aVeterans DayTribute
Celebration on Sunday,
Nov. 10, from 10 a.m. to
noon. Bethel takes pride
in recognizing and honor-
ing those veterans who
have, served and those
presently inactive duty in
our nation's military ser-
vices. Veterans and their
* families are invited.
The church choir will
present a special mu-


.Page


sic tribute and the Rev.
Ellis Christmas, one of
Bethel's own, aWorld
War II veteran and retired
chief warrant officer in
the Army, will be guest
speaker. Immediately fol-
lowing the service in the
sanctuary, a traditional
Southern Sunday din-
nerwith be served in the
Family Ministry Center.
The congregation will be
honored to have veterans
and their families join
them at this special meal.
Special to the Floridan


OnWednesday, Oct. 30, at 10 a.m.,
the president of the Southern Baptist
Convention Executive Committee Frank
S. Page will bring the chapel message in
the R. G. Lee Chapel at the Baptist Col-
lege of Florida in Graceville.

See PAGE, Page 7A


Religion Calendar


TODAY program open to all teens in
) Youth Activity Night 6 grades 6-12; shoot pool, play
p.m. at Marianna Church of Xbox and other games, listen
God. Ages: 12-19. Call 482- to music and more. Activities
6264 .- are free. Low-cost snacks for
sale. Transportation available
) Celebrate Recovery (limited area); call 381-2549.
Adult and teen meetings.,
to "overcome hurts, habits SATURDAY, OCT. 26
and hang-ups in a safe
environment' 7 p.m. at Evangel )) Women on Mission's 14th
Worship Center with praise and annual Arts and Crafts
live worship music, testimonies Festival 7 a.m. First Baptist
and fellowship: Dinner: 6 p.m. Church, Cottoridale. Breakfast
Child care available. Call 209- and lunch available. Support
7856 or 573-1131. mission projects and church
>>Pastor'sAppreciation building fund. Call 352-4902.
-7 p.m. God's DARE Free clothing giveaway -9
.International Worship Center a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
lnc. in Marianna. Guest speaker: Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
apostle Rosilyn Copeland- 'Marianna.
Walker. Call 209-1149. Family Day Fall Festival
> Pulse 7-10 p.m. at Cypress 5-8 p.m. Mount Olive Baptist
Grove Assembly of God Church Church, Bascom. Hot dogs and
in Grarid RidgeYouth outreach chili served. Many games and
fun stations. Call 569-5080.


)) Pastor's Appreciation
-7p.m. God's DARE
International Worship Center
Inc. in Marianna. Guest speaker:
apostle Jacqueline Porter. Call
209-1149.

SUNDAY, OCT.27
Homecoming Celebration
-10 a.m. Rocky Creek Baptist
Church in Marianna. Special
singing: Mercy Revealed. Guest
Speaker: Paul Cantrell. Dinner
following. Call 643-7711.
) Homecoming 10:30
a.m. Cypress Baptist Church,'
Cypress. Lunch will follow with
meat furnished. Side dishes
welcomed.
> Homecoming 10:30
*a.m. Marvin Chapel Freewill
Baptist Church in Marianna.
- Guest speaker: brother Charles.
Powell.


D Pastor's 30th Anniversary
-10:50 a.m. Victory Baptist
Churchin6 Sneads. Special
Music: Bryan Brothers. Dinner .
on the grounds.
Homecoming -11a.m.
Collins Chapel Baptist Church
in' Malone. Singing at 10 a.m.
with Sheila Sm'ith Trio. Guest
speaker: former pastor, Johnny
Hamilton. Lunch following
service.
))Harvest Day--11 a.m.
St. Matthew M.B. Church in
" Cottondale. Guest speaker: the
Rev. James Dickson. Dinner
served after worship. Call 352-
3385.
P Pastor's Appreciation
-11 a.m. God's DARE
International Worship Center
Inc. in Marianna. Guest speaker:
pastor Gloria McCrea; 5 p.m.
Service, Drs. David and Vernette
Rosier. Call 209-1149.


MONDAY, OCT.28
. Revival 5:30 p.m. Little
Zion M.B. Church in Sneads.
Oct. 28-Nov. 1 nightly.
Evangelist: pastor Kelvin
'Williams.

TUESDAY, OCT. 29 ,.
> Free clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna. i '
> Dare to Live Healed
Healing School Class 7
p.m. in the Bascom Town Hall
al 4969 Basswood Road. Free
classes taught by Jacquelyn
McGriff. Call 276-6024.

SUNDAY, NOV. 3
S114th Homecoming -10:30
.a.m. Lovedale Baptist'Church
in the Lovedale-Two Egg
community. Guest speaker:


the Rev. Bill Blakrick, former
music and youth director, The
Arthur Basford family will be'
honored during worship service.
Everyone invited. Call 592-5415
or 592-2134..
S) Revival 11 a:m. Damascus
Freewill Baptist Church in
Marianna. Sunday night service
5:30 p.m. Monday Wednesday
services 7 p.m. nightly. Guest
speaker: Pastor Frank Woods,
director of Free Wil Baptist
Family Ministries of Greenville,
Tenn.
> Harvest Day Celebration
-Noon. Prayer Temple Church
of Prayer for All People in
Marianna. Special'spepker:
' Elder Glenis D. Smith. 7heme:
Praying for the Harvest.
Celebratory repast following
the service: Call 526-4572 or
,569-5565.,


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Yo
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Aiford First Assembly of God
1782 Tennessee St P.O. Box 228
Alford, FL 32420
Bascom Assembly of God
5516 Hummingbird Rd
Bascom, FL 32423 272-7775
Shugroad@embargmail.com
Cypress Grove Assembly of God
3250 Cypress Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4451
cppressgrovechurch.org
Cords Of Love Assembly Of God
2060 Bethelehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 272-0254
Eastslde Assembly of God Church
4723 Hatton St Marianna, FL
lop4664@yahoo,com 526-2422
El Bethel Assembly of God
S2503 El Bethel Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 '593-6044
First Assembly of God
5565 Brown St
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3351
First Assembly of God Church
4186 Lafayette St
Marianna FL'32446
482-2800 www.mariannaflrst.org
First Assembly of God Church
of Cottondale'
2636 Milton St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4626
Faith Haven Assembly of God
7135 Hwy 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-8205
Pilgrim Rest Assembly of God
3347 Pilgrim Rest Church Road
Marianna, FL 32448 579-2300
Welcome Assembly of God
6784 Messer Rd -
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5077
Welcomehometom@yahoo.com
BAPTIST
Aiford Baptist Church
'1764 Carolina.St P.O. Box'6
Alferd, FL 32420 579-2192
Bethel Missionary Baptist Church
2137 McLeod St '
Cypress, FL 592-4108
Bethel Star Missionary Baptist Church
4134 Lincoln Ave
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4866
Bethlehem Baptist Church
2300 Bethlehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-9940
Circle Hill Baptist Church
7170 Circle Hill Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 592-2327


ur Guide To Local Houses Of Worship
Collins Chapel Baptist Church Friendship Baptistt'Church of Malone New Galllee Missionary Baptist Church Trinity Baptist Church
5005 3rd Ave (5499 Collins Chapel Rd) 5507 Friendship Church Rd 2155 Highway 73 South P.O. Box 234 3023 Penn. Ave
Malone, FL 32445 569-5644 Malone, FL 32445 569-2379 Marianne, FL 32447 482-5499 Marianna, FL 482-3705
.. wnww TrinitvMarianna conm


Crossroads Baptist Church'
Southern Baptist
3276 Main St P.O. Box 386
Cottondale Fl. 32431 352-2636
Damacus Freewill Baptist
3700 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5878
Dellwood Baptist Church
5512 Blue Springs Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-6954
Eastslde Baptist Church
4785 Highway 90
Marianne, FL *'526-2004
www.eastsidebaptlstchurch.com
Ebenezer.Missionary Baptist Church
3360 Gardenview Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4223
Everlena Missionary Baptist
5309 Ellaville Rd
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3900
First Baptist Church
3172 Main St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4586
First Baptist Church
5366 Ninth St P.O. Box 98
Malone, FL 32445 569-2426
Faith Baptist Church
2494 Hwy 71 South
Marianne, FL 482-2869
First Baptist Church
8010 Pope St P.RO. Box 246
Sneads, FL 32460
First Baptist Church of Bascom
4951 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 97
Basoom, FL 32423 569-2699
First Baptist Church of Campbellton
2405 Hwy 2
Campbelltbn, FL 32426 263-3183
First Baptist Church Southern Baptist
987 8th Ave P.O. Box 565
Graceville FL 32440 263-3323
fbcgracbville@bellsouth.net
www.fbcgraceville.org
First Baptist Marianna
2897 Green St Marianna, FL 32446
526-4200 www.fbcmarianna.org
First Freewill Baptist Church .of Malone
5440 10th Street (Hwy 71 N.)
P.O. Box 385
Malone FL 32445 850-569-2786
First Freewll Baptlst'Church
7970 Davis St
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5400


Grand Ridge Baptist Church
2093 Porter Ave P.O. Box 380
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4846
grandrldgebc@embarqmail.com
Greater Buckhorn Missionary
Baptist Church
4691 Hwy 162
Marianne, FL 32446 594-5761
Greenwood Baptist Church
4156 Bryan St P.O. Box 249
Greenwood, FL 32443- 594-3883
Hasty Pond Baptist Church
4895 Hasty Pond Rd, Marianne, FL
Heaven's Way Biker Church
A Ministryof Alford Baptist Church
3924 Woodrest Rd
Cottondale, FL' 32431 *334-806-4258
Holly Grove Free Will Baptist Church
2699 Highway 73S
Marianne, FL 32448 482-3489
Inwood Baptist Church
2012 Inwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 593-5328
Liberty Hill Missionary Baptist Church
5239 Liberty Hill Road,
Bascom, FL 32426 *'569-5949
Little Zion Missionary Bapltist ChUrch
3181 Little Zion Rd P.O. Box 190
Sneads, FL 32460 592-1614 .,
Lovedale Baptist Church
6595 Lovedale Rd Bascom, FL 32423
592-5415 or 592-2134
Marvin Chapel Free Will Baptist Church
2041 Hope School Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5375
www.marvinchapelfwb.com
Midway Freewill Baptist Church
1600 Church St
6158 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianne, FL 32448 592-8999
Mount Olive Baptist
6045 Hwy 2
Bascom FL 32423 569-5080
Mt. Tabor Missionary Baptist Church
3695 Popular Springs Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 594-4161
Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church
5382 Old US Road
Malone, FL 32445 569-2049
New Easter Missionary Baptist Church
977 Hope Ave
Graceville, FL 32440 658-8344


4252 Allen St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-7243
New Hope Freewill Baptist
SSweet Pond Rd
Dellwood, FL 592-1234
New Hope Missionary Baptist
3996 Wintergreen Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-8802
New Mount Olive Missionary Baptist
2870 BarnesSt P.O. Box 312
SMarianne, FL 32447 482-7595
New Salem Baptist Church
3478 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 579-4343
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
6687 Brushy Pond Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5696
Pine Ridge Baptist Church
3064 Pine Ridge Church Rd
Alford, FL 32420
SPiney Grove Baptist Church
2136 Piney Grove Rd,: '
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3800
Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church
5481 Pleasant Ridge Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 263-8007
Poplar Springs Missionary Baptist Church
2662 Poplar Springs Rd
Marianne, FL 32446 526-3176
Providence Baptist Church
6940 Providence Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5481
pbch@embarqmail.com
Rocky Creek Baptist Church
5458 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-7508
Salem Free Will Baptist
2555 Kynesvllle Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4194
www.salemfreewlllbaptist.com
Shady Grovp Baptist Church
7304 Blrchwood Rd
Grand Ridge FL 32442 592-6952
St. Luke Missionary Baptist Church
2871 Orange Street
Marianne, FL 32448 482-2591
St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church
1935 Jacob Road
Cottondale, FL 32431 263-4097
St. Peter Missionary Baptist
7889 McKeown Mill Rd
P.O. Box 326 593-3363


Union Hill
3115 Union Hill Rd
Marianne, FL 32446 526-5711
Victory Baptist Church
2271 River Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6699
www.victorybaptistfl.com
White Pond Baptist Church
P.O. Box 458 Mill Pond Rd
Alford, FL 32420 352-4715

CATHOLIC
St. Anne Catholic Church
3009 5th St P.O. Box 1547
Mariannea, FL 32446 482-3734
www.stanne@stannemar.ptdiocese.org
www.stannemarianna.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Caverns Rd. Church of Christ
.4448 River Rd
Marianne, FL 482-2605

CHURCH OF GOD
Grand Ridge Church of God
2232 Porter Ave Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5301 or 592-2814
Marianna Church of God
(All services interpreted for the
hearing Impaired.)
2791 Jefferson St, Marianne, FL 32446
482-6264 mariannacog.com

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST
Glorious Gospel
Church of God In Christ
4255 Clay St Marianne, FL 32448
594-1096 or 557-4019
Miracle Restoration Center
2997 Hall Street
Marianne, FL 32448 526-2335'
Refuge Tabernacle
Church of God In Christ
2820 Chipola Street
Marianne, FL 32448 482-2607
The New Zion Temple
Church of God In' Christ
1022 Washington Ave
Graceville, FL 32440
Victory Tabernacle
Church of God In Christ
6752 Highway 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 209-7711


Bethel Baptist to host

Veterans Day tribute


........ ..'....., .... ...... '... ........... :.... ...... .. ..........

SBC Executive Committee
president to speak atcollege


l


W-


I


MNew -, oklI a Dtlat Church ">" .... ...... ...*...............





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN *. www.jcfloridan.com


Military chaplains back on front lines


It was in 1775 that General
George Washington autho-
rized chaplains in the Conti-
nental Army.
* "Purity of Morals," he wrote,
three years later, provided the
"only sure foundation of public
happiness in any country" and
thus was "highly conducive to
order, subordination and suc-
cess in an Army."
"Purity of Morals" might
have provided unity during
the American Revolution, but
chaplains face more divisive
issues decades after the sexual
revolution. .
"No Catholic priest or deacon
maybe forced by any authority
to witness orbless the union of
couples of the same gender,"'
wrote Archbishop for the Mili-'
tary Services Timothy Broglio, in
guidelines released last month.
"No Catholic priest ordeacon
can be-obliged to 'assist at a
'Strong Bonds'or other'Mar-
riage Retreat,' if that gathering is
also' opento couples of the same
gender. A priest who is asked to
counsel non-Catholic parties in
a same-gendered relationship
will direct them to a chaplain
wh6 is able to assist."
The archbishop's missive


TerryMattingly
S On Religion


followed a remarkably similar
memorandum from Southern
Baptist Convention leaders,
including former Army Chief
of Chaplains Douglas Carver,
a retired two-star general. It
stressed that Southern Baptist
chaplains must teach that "all
forms of sexual immorality," in-
cluding adultery, homosexuality
and pornography, are "equally
destructive to healthy marital
-relations.," : ,
However, the document's
main purpose was to offer guid-
ance on issues emerging after
Pentagon decisions to embrace
same-sex marriage and to allow
Says and lesbians to openly
serve in the armed forces.
Southern Baptist chaplains
stressed the guidelines could
not "conduct or attend" same-
sex union rites or join in coun-


selling sessions or retreats that
"give the appearance of accept-
ing ... sexual wrongdoing."
The document also drew a
stark line between the work of
SBC chaplains andthose repre-
senting liberal traditions, saying
they should not lead worship
services with any clergy person
who "personally practices or
affirms a homosexual lifestyle or
such conduct."
While one Army manual says
chaplains are not obligated to
perform duties "contrary to
their faith traditions, tenets
and beliefs," other regulations
stress that all chaplains must
be willing to provide "religious
support" for all personnel in
their care.
The "Chaplain Activities in the
United States Army" volume
notes, for example, that while
chaplains "remain fully ac-
countable to the code of ethics,
and ecclesiasticalstandards
of their endorsing faith group"
this does not relieve them from
their duty to provide,"adequate
religious support to accomplish
the mission."
* Thus, it's significant that Army
materials promoting the chap-
lain-led "Strong Bonds" pro-


gram indicate that its mission
is to help all soldiers singles,
unmarried couples and families
-thrive in the "turbulence of
the military environment."
It will be impossible for doc-
Strinally conservative clergy to
avoid same-gender couples and
families in that context. Thus,
it's time for some chaplains to
quit, according to a manifesto
from the Military Associati6n
* of Atheists and Freethink-
ers, entitled "Didn't Southern
Baptists Just Resign as Military
Chaplains?"
"IThe SBC policy is encour-
aging because it is an honest
representation of the previous
unwritten anti-gay stance of the
SBC ... but is discouraging in
that it does not take full respon-
sibility and resign explicitly
from a military chaplaincy they
clearly do not wish to partake
in," said the MilitaryAtheists.org
analysis.
"The policy as written may po-
tentially be copied by other en-.
dorsing agencies who share the
same view of Scripture. If other:
agencies follow suit; potentially.
50 percent of military chaplains
may be affected."
Clearly, the nation's two largest


churches do play crucial roles in
the chaplaincy program. A mere
234 priests serve the 25 percent
of all military personnel who are
Catholics. The Southern Baptist
Convention has more than 1,500
approved chaplains, more than,
any other faith group.
America's military leaders will
have to decide if doctrinally
conservative chaplains will be
allowed to honor their religious
vows, said the Rev. Russell
Moore, leader of the SBC's Eth-
ics & Religious Liberty Commis-
sion, in a forum last week.
The current trend, he said, is
to view chaplains as "carriers of
the American civil religion, in a
way that seeks to counsel and to
do some religious duties but not
to actually be Roman Catholics.
or Evangelicals or Latter-day
Saints or Muslims or what have
you. I think that is troubling.
.. I believe in religious plural-
ism in the public square where
everyone comes as he or she is
into the public square for more
dialogue and not less.":
Terry Mattingly is the director of the
-Washington Journalism Center atthe
Council for Christian Colleges and1 .
Universities and leads the GetReligion.org
project to study religion and the news.


Chaplain moving closer to home


Special to the.Floridan

The Florida Department
of Corrections has made,
the decision to move the
Rev. Henry Earl Taylor,` ..
chaplain, closer to his -
hometown of Campbellton
Taylor has been travel-
ing from one institution-
,to the other since Decem-
ber 1999; working with,


FDOC for the past 13 1/2
years and serving five dif-
ferent in-
stitutiOns.
Hewillgbe
working'
t with jack-
,. -son Cor-
rectional
Tao Institute in
aylor Malone.
STaylor is replacing Chap-


lain Ronald Evans, who
retired in September. This
position means he will now
be in charge of the Jackson
Correctional Institution's
main unit work camp and
,the Graceville work camp.
He will have volunteer,
chaplains to help with the
work. ,,;
"It really is a blessing to
be minutes away from my


ShoIe," he said. "I count
it all joy to have been the
chosen one to carry on
this much-needed work of
turning lives around while
still incarcerated,
"I learned early in life
that there are three things
that are always needed
to make it in this world:
,preaching, praying and lov-
ing thy neighbors."


Lovedale Baptist celebrates 114th homecoming


Special to the Floridan

Lovedale Baptist Church will
celebrate its 114th homecoming on
Sunday, Nov. 3. The service begins at


10:30 a.m., with the Rev. Bill Black-
rick, former music and youth direc-
tor, speaking. The Arthur Basford
family, longtime members, will be
.honored. Lunch will follow the ser-


vice. Dr. Steve Canada is the pastor.
Everyone is invited. The churches at
6595 Lovedale Road in the Lovedale-
TWo Egg community. For more infor-
imation, call 592-5415 or 592-2134.


Tage
. From Page 6A

Page has served as president and chief
executive officer of the Southern Baptist
Convention Executive Committee for the past
three years and served from 2006 to 2008 as
president of the Southern Baptist Convention.
Page worked with the Nort"h American
MissionBoard as the vice president for the
Evangelization Group and has served as pastor
at churchfies'in North Carolina, South Carolina,
Georgia and Texas. Page received his Bachelor
of Science degree from Gardner-Webb Uni-"
Sversity in Boiling Springs, N.C., and his Master
S. of Divinity ,nd Ph.D. at Southwestern Baptist
Theological Seminary in FortWorth, Texas..,
Page and his wife, Dayle, reside in Nashville.
Chapel services are held at the Baptist Col-
lege of Florida Monday, Tuesday afndWednes-
day at 10 a.m. in the R.G. Lee Chapel and are
open to the public. For information about the
fall 2013 chapel speakers, call 800-328-2660,
ext. 446, or visit www.baptistcollege.edu.


THSDRCOYIS'MAD POSIBLB HEEUINES0 W O'NCU AGELLO sToATED ORHI ERICS


Linda Pfot Insurance Agency Inc S V
S 2919 Penn Avenue
SuRe B food stores
l 1Marianna, FL 32448-2716hl 'r "...
S850-482-3425 (850) 526-4700
Oak Station Shopping Center
linlapof.rte.bxrs@statefann.com .Open Daily from 8am 8pm


Vann Funeral Home
4265 Saint Andrews ,Street
Marianna,FL 32446''
Phone: (850) 482-3300
Fax: (850)482-5363
Concern for the living,
reverence for the dead..
CB. nrLRtCG- C..WnIjr. LRUfAddn aAbn-.LKR
LLutC.Aw LP.N.CJDo.LLAT nl LPJLC.


KELSON DISCOUNTJ TnIt
DRUG 4rLeilr
ew-r"UT MdEa FOURNW'BW
4t 7ifo t 1-88-767-4275
3008 Jefferson Street 482-3420
Marianha, Florida 2163 Post Oak Ln* Marianna I
26 S S9' I www.tro ictrier.con


YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP


CHURCHOF THE NAZARENE
Marianna Church of the Nazarene
2987 N Madison St
Marianna, FL 32446 1 526-3962

EPISCOPAL
St. Luke's Episcopal Church' "
4362 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 482-2431 .
parishoffice@stlukesmarianna.org.. '
"www.stlukesmarianna.org, 1

FULL GOSPEL
Christian Center Church
4791 Sheffield Dr P.O. Box 450
Marianna, FL 32447
526-4476 or 526-4475
jack@cccmarianna.org
Country Gospel Community Church
Compass Lake in the Hills
650 Apalachlc6la,Ave -
Alford, FL 32420. (850) 579-4172
Resurrection Life Christian ,
Fellowship International
.2933-Madison Street "
Marianna, FL 526-2617 .
New Beginnings Worship Center
1165 Highway 69
Grand Ridge,'FL 32442
592-5791 www.nbworship.coin
New Beginning Outreach Ministries, Inc.
2254 Magnolia Dr. I .
Cottondale, FL 32431 (850) 352-4733
Evangel Worship Center ,
2645 Pebble Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2232
New Life Family Church
4208 Lafayette 1t
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2132
The Bridge Church
2515 Comrriercial Park Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 209-2733

HOLINESS
Emmanuel Holiness Church
2505 Sandridge Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5167
Hickory Level Community Church
1221 Dipper Rd
Marianna, FL 32448
482-4696 or 482-2885
Oak Ridge Freewill Holiness Church
2958 Milton Ave
Marianna, FL 573-7684


Sneads Community Churc
1948 Desoto Ave P.O. Box 1
Sneads, FL 32460 593-565

LATTER-DAY SAINTS
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints
3141 College St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-81


LUTHERAN
Ascension Lutheran Church
3975 W. Hwy 90 '
Maranna FL 482-4691

METHODIST;.
Bascom United Methodist Church
4942 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 67
Bascom, FL 32423-. 569-2231
Cypress United Methodist Church
6267 Cemetery Ave
:' Cypress, FL 32432 263-4220
First United Methodist Church
1111 8' Ave.
Graceville, FL 263-3342
First United Methodist Church
2901 Caledonia :St
Marianna, FL 482-4502
Grace United Methodist
S4203 W. Kelson Ave
Marianna, FL -482-4753
Grand Ridge United Methodist.Chunr
6911 Iowa Street '
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
Greenwood Chapel AME
5426 Fort Rd
GreenWood, FL 32443 594-1112
Greenwood United Methodist
4220 Bryan St.
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-5755
Henshaw Chapei AME Church
'2370 GlagtelSt, P.O. Box 535
Cottondale, FL 32431 875-2610 .
Jerusalem AME Church
2055 Hwy 73
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5085
Kynesvilie United Methodist
2875 Kynesville Rd
Marianna; FL 32448 -482-4672
Mcdhape'PAME Church
4963 Old U.S. Rd
Marianna, F'L 569-2184
Mt. Shiloh AME Church
6702 Biscayne Road
Bascom, FL 32423 5669-1044
New Bethel Christian Methodist
Episcopal Church
2487 Highway 1
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-4647
Pope Chapel African Methodist
Episcopal Church
4898 Blue Springs Rd, P.O. Box 6000
vhArla.- erLdf q0A7. on


ivaanna, r F L324/ 4 748-290uu
1349' Shady Grove United
0 i. Methodist Church
7305 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge,. FL 32442 592-9277
-Sneads First United Methodist Chur
8042 Church St, P.O. Box 642
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6481
59 fumc@embarqmail.com


Friendship Christiah Methodist
Episcopal (CME) Church.
5411 Avery Rd, P.O.Box 302
SCampbellton, FL 32426 263-1111
1st United Methodist Church
of Cottondale
P.O. Box 458.
Cottondale, FL 32431' 352-4426
Salem AME Church
5729oBrowntown Rd, RP.O. Box 354
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3344
Springfield AME Church
4194.Union Rd .
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4252
St. James AME Church "
S2891 Orange St, P.O. Box 806
Marianna, FL 32447 526-3440
St. Paul AME Church
5180 Hwy 273, P.O. Box 40
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-0333
.oh Snow Hill AME'Church
5395 Snow Hill Rd, RP.O. Box 174
Malone,. FL 32445 *569-5315
Mt. OlIve'AME Church
2135 Fairview Rd
SMarianna, FL 32448 482-7917
Bethlehem AME Church /
3100 Lovewood Rd, P.O. Box 752
Cottondale, FL 32431
352-2111 or 352-4721
Greater St. Luke AME Church
5255 11th Ave, P.O. Box 176
Malone, FL 32445 569-5188

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
2nd Chance Ministries
2840 McPherson St
; Marianna, FL 32446 557-9885
Believers Outreach Ministry
3471 Hwy 90 W
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4926
Cypress Creek Community Church
1772 Macedonia Road, PQ Box 496
Alford, FL 32420 638-0360
Ever Increasing Word of Faith
Ministries
3749 Skyview. Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-4704'
Heaven's,Garden Worship Center
3115 Main Street
Cottondale, FL 32431
S (850) 579-9936 www.aldaspfna.org
Faith Cornerstone.Church Ministries
S 5460 Collins Chapel Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-5600
ch Foundation Temple Apostolic
Faith Church'
3341 Tendell Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3884


Glass Community Church
4005 Veteran's Road.'It
Cottondale, FL 32431:
(850) 272-7205 (850) 263-6715.,
~ 1 f : ., I* ,
Haven of Rest.Church of Restoratk
Worship Center '-
2261 Haven of RFest Road
Cottonidale, FL 32431
Love and Restoration Ministries
2990 Heritage Rd,.
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2730
Mill Springs Christian Chapel
1345 Mill Springs Rd, P.O. Box 83
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 526-2519
Rivertown Community Church
(Meets athe new Marianna High Schc
3546 Caverns Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 482-2477
Rocky Creek Tabernacle
1890 Delta Lane
SMarianna, FL 32448 272-0917
St Andrews (FC) Church Ministries
978 Hwy 71 S
Marianna, FL 32448 569-5600
Sunrise Worship Center
2957 Hall Stt Marianna, FL 482-8158
PENTECOSTAL .
Apostolic Life Church
4070 Old Cottondale Rd
Marianna, FL 482-8720
pastorbiggs@embarqmail.com
Apostolic Revival Center
of Marlanna
3001 Hwy 71 N, P.O. Box 634
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3162
Christian Covenant Life Center "
2011 Finley Ave.
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 592-4737


Sneads Pentecostal Holiness Church "
2036 Gloster Ave '
Sneads, FL 32460
593-4487 or 593-6949
on Praise Life Ministries
7360 Hwy 90, P.O. Box 177
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4166
Prayer Temple Church Of Prayer
For All People
3341 Plantation Circle
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3343
United Pentecostal Deliverance
5255 10th Ave
Malone, FL 32445 569-5989
PRESBYTERIAN
ol) "First Presbyterian Church
Presbyterian Church (USA)
2898 Jefferson St
S Marianna, FL 32446
526-2430 www.firstpresmarianna.org
fpcmarianna@embarqmail.com or
firstpresmarianna@earthlink.net
RESTORATIONIST
Church of Jesus Christ of Marianna
4060 Thomasville Lane ,
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2282
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
Emmanuel SDA Church
4531 Basswood Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594,3200
Marianna Seventh Day Adventist
4878 Highway 90
Marianna; FL 32446 526-2487
WESLEYAN
Salem Wesleyan Church
S2764 Salemr Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 (850) 593-6679
irquomai@gmail.com


Shady Grove Pentecostal Holiness
7541 Shady Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-6203


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25,2013 7AF-


. RE3EJGION




-18A FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25,2013


BUSINESS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Twitter sets $17 to $20 per share range for IPO


'The Associated Press

NEWYORK- Twitter has
set a price range of $17 to
$20 per share for its initial
public offering and says it
could raise as much as $1.6
billion in the process. The
pricing is relatively con-
servative considering fmhat
Twitter is poised tdpull off
the year's hottest IPO.
Twitter Inc. said in a
regulatory filing Thursday
that it will put forth 70
million shares in the of-
fering. If all the shares are
sold, the underwriters can
Sbuy another 10,5 million
shares.
: At the $20 share price,
.,Twitter's market value
would be around $12.5 bil-
lion, roughly one-tenth of
Facebook's current valu-
ation. Twitter's value is
based, on 625.2 million
outstanding shares ex-
I


-, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
This Oct. 18, photo shows a Twitter app on an iPhone screen
in New York. Twitter Inc. said in a regulatory. filing Thursday,
Oct. 24, that it is putting forth 70 million shares in the initial
public offering.
pected after the offering, change. The shares will
including restricted stock likely start trading in early
units and stock options. November. Twitter will be-
The San Francisco-based gin its IPO roadshoww" as
short-messaging service,. early 'as Friday, meeting,
plans to list its stock under with. prospective investors
the ticker symbol "TWTR" to pitch its stock.
on the New York Stock Ex- The company's valua-


tion is conservative. Some closer to the IPO, and thus
analysts had expected the fuel demand.
figure to be as high as $20 Facebook's IPO was
billion. Back in August marred by technical glitch-
Twitter priced some of its' es on the Nasdaq Stock
employee stock options Exchange in May of 2012.
at $20.62, based on an ap- As a result, the Securities
praisal by an investment and Exchange Commis-
firm. sion fined Nasdaq $10 mil-
Other publicly, traded lion, the largest ever levied
companies in the $12 bil- against an exchange. Those
lion range include tool problems likely led Twitter
maker Stanley Black & to the NYSE.
Decker and pharmaceu- Last week, Twitter dis-
tical company Forest closed that it lost $65 mil-
Laboratories. LinkedIn lion in the third quarter,
Corp., meanwhile, stands three times as much as in
around $27 billion based the same period a year ear-
on its closing stock price lier. It was the' company's
Thursday. 'biggest quarterly loss since
STwitter's caution suggests 2010. Founded in 2006;
that the company learned ..Twitter has never posted
from Facebook's rocky ini- a profit, but its revenue is
tialpublic offeringlastyear. growing. Revenue for the
Rather than set expecta- latest quarter more than:
tions too high, Twitter is doubled from the 'same
playing it safe and will very period last year, to nearly
likely raise its price range $169 million.


The IPO has been long
expected. The company
has been adding to its ar-
senal of advertising prod-
ucts and working to boost
ad revenue in prepare,.
tion. Still, it's ad revenue
is small compared with
Facebook. Twitter says it
has more than 230 million
monthly users, compared
with Facebook's roughly
1.2 billion.
A big part of Twitter's
appeal is in its' simplicity
and public nature. Users
can send short messages
that consist of up to 140
characters. Anyone can
"follow" anyone else,.but
the relationship doesn't -
have to be reciprocal,
which makes the service
especially attractive for
celebrities and companies
that use Twitter to com-
municate directly with
fans and customers.


" Higher profits from Ford, others drive stocksup


I HEASUUIAIE t PESF 'ILL
In this Feb. 19, photo, hydrocodone bitartrate and acetamino-
phen pills, also known as Vicodin, are arranged for a photo at
a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. The Food and Drug Administra-
tion on Thursday, Oct. 24, recommended new restrictions on
prescription medicines containing hydrocodone.

FDA wants new limits put on

most prescribed painkilers


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Food and Drug Adminis-
tration is recommending
new restrictions on pre-
scription medicines con-
'taining, hydrocodoine, the
highly addictive painkiller
that has grown 'into the
most widely prescribed
drugin the U.S. .
In a major policy shift,
'the agency said in an on-
line notice' Thursday that
hydrocodone-containing
drugs should be subject
to the same restrictions as
other narcotic drugs like
Soxycodone and morphine.
The move comes more
than a decade after the
Drug Enforcement Ad-'
ministration first asked
the FDA to reclassify hy-
drocodone so that it would
be subject to the same re-
strictions as other addic-
tive painkilling drugs. The
FDA did not issue a formal
announcement about its
decision, which has long
been sought by many
patient advocates, doc-
tors and state and federal
lawmakers.
For decades, hydroco-
done has been easier to
prescribe, in part because
it is only sold in combi-
nation pills and formulas
with other non-addictive.
ingredients like aspirin
and acetaminophen.
That ease of access has
made it many health care
professionals' top choice
for treating chronic pain,
everything from back pain
to arthritis to toothaches.
In 2011, U.S. doctors
wrote more than 131 mil-
-lion prescriptions for hy-
drocodone, making it the
most prescribed drug in the
country, according to gov-
ernment figures. The in-
gredient is found in block-
busters drugs like Vicodin
,as well as dozens of other.
generic formulations.
It also consistently ranks
as the first or second most-
abused medicine in the
U.S. each year, accord-


ing to the DEA; alongside
oxycordone. Both belong..
to family of drugs known
as opioids, which also in-
cludes heroin, codeine and
methadone.
Earlier this year the Cen-
ters for Disease Control
and Prevention reported
that prescription painkiller
overdose deaths among
women increased -about
fivefold between .1999 and
2010. Among men,- such
deaths rose about 3.5-fold.
The rise in both death rates
is closely tied to a boom
in the overall use of pre-
scribed painkillers.
The FDA has. long sup-
ported -the more "lax pre-
scribing classification for
hydrocodonewhichis also
backed by professional so-
cieties like the American
Medical Association. :
But the agency's top drug
regulator, Dr. Janet Wood-
cock, said in a statement
Thursday: "The' FDA has
become increasingly con-
cerned about the abuse
and misuse of opioid prod-
ucts, which have sadly
reached epidemic propor-
tions in certain parts of the
United States."
The FDA says it will for-
mally request in early De-
cember that hydrocodone
be rescheduled as a Sched-
ule II drug, limiting which
kinds of medical profes-
sionals can write a pre-
scription and how many
times it can be refilled.
The Controlled Sub-
stances Act, passed in
1970, put hydrocodone
drugs in the Schedule III
class, which is subject to
fewer controls. Under that
classification, a prescrip-
tion for Vicodin can be re-
filled five times before the
patient has to see a physi-
cian again. If the drug is
reclassified to Schedule II,
patients will only be 'able
to receive one 90-day pre-
scription, similar to drugs
like OxyContin. The drug
could also not be pre-
scribed by nurses and phy-
sician assistants.


The Associated Press

NEW YORK -- Another
dose of strong corporate
earnings, this time from
Ford, Southwest Airlines
and others, helped push
the stock market higher
.on Thursday.
It's one of the busiest
weeks on Wall Street for
companies posting their
quarterly results. Roughly
a third of the Standard &
Poor's 500 index will re-
port earnings, including
some of the world's best-
known companies.
For investors, this week
,has also been a welcome
return to businesses usu-
al. Wall Street has been fo-
cused for weeks on what's
going on in Washington,
with the government shut-
down, the near-breach
of the nation's borrowing
limit and questions about
what's next for the Federal
Reserve's, massive bond-
buying program.
So far, corporate- earn-
ings have come in pretty
much as most money
managers expected. Com-
painies are, reporting big-
ger 'profits, but most of
the growth has come from
cost-cutting, a trend that
hasn't changed.very much
since the financial crisis.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Specialists Michael O'Connor (left) and Matthew Diez,
(foreground left) work with traders, at the post that handles
US Steel, on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange
Thursday, Oct. 17.


pers]
a yea
61 c(
$17.
AT&
1.8p
teleci
,pariy
it hac
66 ce
ter,
lysts'
revere
ofwi
ITw
Micri
repo:
stoci
day.
expe


"We're in a slow-growth earned an adjusted profit rose
economy and companies of 45 cents per share a' soft j
need to do everything to record for the third'.quar- 'after
boost earnings," said Bri- ter-- as sales rose 12 per- 'Wa
an Reynolds, chief market cent to $36. billion. The some
strategist at Rosenblatt Dearborn, Mich.-based Chin
Securities, automaker sold 1.5 mil- fact
The Dow Jones indus- lion cars 'and trucks in seven
trial average rose 95.88 the period, up 16 percent. tobe]
points, or 0.6 percent, to Wall Street analysts had ued
15,509.21. The S&P 500 expected Ford to earn 37 reboi
index added 5.69 points, cents per share, accord- secol
or 0.3 percent, to 1,752.07, ing to. FactSet. Ford rose Wil
about two points, :below 24 cents, or L-5 percent, to ing
the record highdof l,754.67 $17.76. and
it reached on Tuesday. Southwest Airlines, the ing i
The Nasdaq composite nation's largest domes- "their
was up 21.89 points, or 0.6 tic air carrier, reported watch
percent, to 3,928.96. sharply. higher earnings, aren'
Among companies re- Southwest said it had an their
porting earnings, Ford adjusted profit of 34 cents here.


hare, up from 13 cents
r ago. Southwest rose
ents, or -4 percent, to
12.
&T- fell 65 cents, or
percent, to $34.63. The
bmmunicationscom-
* said late Wednesday
id an adjusted profit of
rnts in the third quar-
i penny above ana-
forecasts, however
mue fell, slightly short
hat analysts expected.
9 technology giants,
soft and Amazon,,
rted results after the
kmarketclosedThurs-
Both beat analysts'
stations. Amazon
5 percent and Micro-
umped 6.5 percent in
-market trading.
al Street also had
e positive news out of
a. A Chinese manu-
.ing index rose to a
i-month high in Oc-
r, suggesting contin-
momentum for the
und in the world's
ad-biggest economy.
th the S&P 500 trad-
near a record high
corporations find-
t difficult to increase
sales, several market
hers have said they
t sure how much fur-
stocks can go from


8 statesjoin forces to promote clean cars


The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO -
Eight 'states, including
California and New York,
pledged Thursday to work
together to dramatically
multiply the number of
zero-emission cars on the
nation's roads by speeding
the construction of charg-
ing stations and other
infrastructure.
.The goal is to put 3.3
million 'battery-powered
cars, plug-in hybrids
and other clean-burning
vehicles on the roads
in those states by 2025..,
That's more than 15 times
as many zero-emission
vehicles projected to be
in use in the entire U.S. by
2015.
Auto dealers say. net-
works of charging stations
and other conveniences


are crucial to winning
over drivers who are ac-
customed, to pulling up
to the gas'pump and fear
getting stranded by a dead
battery.
The other states in the
pact are Massachusetts,
Maryland, Oregon, Con-
necticut, Rhode Island and
Vermont. The eight states
.together represent about
23 percent of the U.S. auto
market.
The Associated Press
breaks down' why there
are not more, zero-emis-
sion cars already, the keys
to accomplishing the
goal and the formidable
challenges: ,
How does this agreement.
differ from .plans already
in Place in the states?
Each state has already
separately adopted rules
to require a percentage


of new vehicles sold to be
zero-emission by 2025.
For example, Califor-
nia's mandate of 15.4
percent calls for,a total
of 1.5 million zero-emis-'
sion vehicles to' be on
the state's roads by that
.time. Currently, "plug-in
,hybrids and electric ve-
hicles make up less than
2 percent of the state's
market.
The agreement signed
Thursday is aimed at co-
ordinating efforts among
the eight states so that in-
centives, zoning laws and
other ideas for promot-
ing zero-emission vehi-
'cles can ,be more quickly
implemented.
"The idea :is to make
it easier for custom-
ers to operate and use
zero-emission vehicles.
This in turn will help pave


the way for success of the
auto industry," said Mary
Nichols, chairman of the
California Air Resources
Board.
Deb, Markowitz, Ver-
mont's natural resources
secretary, sald her state
will probably form part-
nerships with companies
to help them build charg-
ing stations and other
necessary infrastructure.


SWaco
Gift Siop
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Sctob rd'

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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Danvers High School students prepare to launch sky lanterns during a candlelight vigil to mourn the death of Colleen Ritzer, a
24-year-old math teacher at the school, on Wednesday, Oct 23, in Danvers, Mass. Ritzer's body was found in the woods behind
the school, and Danvers High School student Philip Chism, 14, who was found walking along a state highway overnight, was
charged with killing her.



Classmate: Accused Mass.



teen stayed after school


The Associated Press ,

DANVERS, Mass. A teacher
Swho was allegedly killed by one of
her students had asked him to stay
after school the day she was killed,
a classmate said Thursday, as stu-,
dents met with grief counselors and
tried to come to grips with the slay-
ing of the popular teacher.
Philip Chism, 14, was charged with
murder Wednesday in the death of
Colleen Ritzer, a 24-year-old math
teacher at Danvers High School.
Rania Rhaddaoui sat two seats
away from Chism in Ritzer's Algebra
I class, the final class of the school
day. She said Chism was drawing in
a notebook rather than taking notes
Tuesday.
"She came over and said, 'I didn't
know you draw,' and he said, 'yes,'
then later on, she said, 'Can you stay
after with me?'" Rhaddaoui said.
"Obviously, he stayed after because
when I was leaving, he was still at
his desk."
She said Ritzer had scheduled a
test for Friday, but she was unsure
why exactly Ritzer asked Chism to
stay after school.
RiLtzer never returned home that
day. Blood in a second-floor bath-
room helped lead investigators to
her body, which was dumped in the
woods behind the school in a close-
knit community about 20 miles
north of Boston.
SChism was picked up by police in
the early morning hours Wednes-
day, walking 'along Route 1 in
neighboring Topsfield. His attorney
declined to comment outside
court Wednesday and did not im-
mediately return a call seeking


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Danvers High School students hold a
candlelight vigil to mourn the death
of Colleen Ritzer, a 24-year-old math
teacher at Danvers High School, on
Wednesday, Oct 23, in Danvers, Mass.

comment Thursday.
The high school remained closed
for classes Thursday, but grief coun-
selors were on hand to offer comfort
to students.
Kaitlyn Nash, 16, went to the,
school to be with her friends. She
said students who knew and loved
Ritzer were still trying to make
sense of what happened. She said
she found it particularly frightening
that she had theater rehearsal Tues-
day afternoon and was at the school
when authorities believe Ritzer was
killed. I*
S"It's just terrifying," she said. "I
know a lot of people don't want to go
back to school at this point. I know
we have to, and we just need to get
on with it."
Classes were expected to resume
Friday.


SAuthorities offered no clues Thurs-
day on Chism's alleged motive. They
also would not say how Ritzer was
killed.
Carrie Kimball-Monahan, a
'spokeswoman fobi Essex District At-
'torney Jonathan Blodgett, said the
case was still'being investigated.
Chism had moved to Massachu-
setts from" Tennessee before the
start of the school year and was a
top scorer on the school's junior
varsity soccer team.
Jean McCartin, a Danvers School
Committee member, said the school
has extensive programs to help ease
the transition for new students who
may have problems but there was
no information about Chism that
would have presented any red flags.
"He just presented himself to
us like any other student would,"
she said Thursday. "And that's
what I think is so hard for the ad-
ministration right now. You know,
their hearts are breaking because
they just didn't know he was in
need, if he was in need .... No one
knows why he would have behaved
in this way and done such a terrible
thing."
Ritzer's family released a state-
ment Thursday, asking the media to
respect their privacy as they make
arrangements "to celebrate Colleenrs
vibrant life."
Chism appeared briefly in court
Wednesday for arraignment on a
murder charge and was ordered
held without bail..
Ritzer was the second teacher al-
legedly killed by a student in the U.S.
this week. A Sparks, Nev., middle
school teacher was shot Monday, al-
legedly by a 12-year-old student.,


Obama calls for immigration law by end of year


The Associated Press. ; a il


WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama made
a plea for Republican qo-
operation on immigration
Thursday, seeking com-
mon ground by year's end
in the aftermath of the. di-
visive partial government,
shutdown. Yet prospects
for success this year re-
main a long shot even as
a handful of House GOP
lawmakers push for more
limited measures.
Obama's renewed fo-;
cus on immigration
comes amid mounting
criticism of the White
House over comput-
er problems that have
plagued insurance enroll-
ment under the 3-year
old health care law. It also
comes nearly four months
since a bipartisan major-
ity in the Senate passed
a comprehensive, immi-
gration bill that would
tighten border security
and provide a path to
citizenship for the 11 mil-
lion immigrants living
here illegally.
"Rather, than create
problems, let's prove to
the American people that


1 i!HE A j)CIMIEO hEiS
President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden (right)
greet supporters of immigration reform after Obama spoke
in the 'East Room of the White House in Washington.


Washington can actually
solve some problems,"
Obama said during an
event devoted to immigra-
tion at the White House.
SThe Senate measure
has stalled in the House,
where most Republicans
reject a- comprehensive
approachand many ques-
tion offering citizenship
to people who broke U.S.
immigration laws to: be in
this country.
Still, White House offi-
cials say they believe that,
the partial government
shutdown, rather than
poisoning the political at-'
mosphere, may have cre-
ated an opportunity for


collaboration with Repub-
licans seeking to repair
their image, which polls
show took a hit during.
the prolonged fight over
financing the government
and extending the nation's
borrowing limit. '
Moreover, Obama made
a point of underscor-
ing support for an im-
migration bffill from the
members of the business
community, traditional
Republican allies who
criticized GOP tactics that
led to the partial shut-
down and to brinkman-
ship over a potentially
economy-jarring default
on U.S. debt.


The White House took.
notice when Speaker John
.Boehnrier, R-Ohio, indicat-
ed on Wednesday that he
was hopeful that immigra-
tion legislation could be
done before year's end.
But Republican strate-
gists also say the most op-
portune time to act might
not come until after next
year's 2014 primary elec-
tions, when lawmakers
will be freer to vote with-
out fear of having to run
against a more conserva-
tive challenger.
Arid while Obama called
for the House to pass a
large bill that could then
be reconciled with the
Senate version, House
Republicans want to ap-
proach any changes in
piecemeal fashion, a pro-
cess that at best would
push any significant prog-
ress into next year.
Boehner spokesman
Brendan Buck said Thurs-
day that the House "will.
not consider any mas-
sive, .Obamacare-style
legislation that no one
understands." He said the
House is committed to a
deliberate, "step-by-step
approach."


Exhibit
From Page 1A
executive director of
Northwest Florida Beach-
es International Airport.
"This opportunity will
allow us to increase aware-
ness for the strong infra-
structure, site availability,
access, and resources ECP
has to offer."
"Our participation in
the NBAA conference will
allow us to market the
Tallahassee Regional Air-
port to the-larger," national
aviation community," said
Tllahassee City Commris-
sioner Scott Maddox and
liaison to the airport. "This
is a great opportunity to
help spur the growth of
our airport by sharing the
quality services it provides


WHTC
From Page 1A
Manufacturing and in-
dustrial companies in
Washington and Holmes
counties were invited to
attend the meeting and
make known their needs
and concerns for a skilled
workforce. WHTC Direc-
tor Martha Compton told
the group of private-sector
business owners and man-
agers that the school would
work with them to accom-
modate those needs.


Williams FuneralHome '
of Graceville
5283 Brown Street
Graceville, FL 32440
(850) 263-5116

Wflda.Faye
Scurlock

Mrs. Wilda Faye Scur-
1ock, age 83, of Graceville,
Florida, passed away
peacefully at her home,
surrounded by her loving
family, on Wednesday, Oc-
tober 23,2013.
She was born February 7,
1930. Mfs. Scurlock was
preceded in death by the
love of her life, her hus-
band, Artis Scurlock. At the
time of his passing, Mr. and
Mrs. Scurlock, who were
wed on October 26, 1946,
had been married for 64
years.
Mrs. Scurlock is survived
by five children, Sherry Ri-
chards (Joe), Garris
Scurlock (Diane), Gail
Daffin (Kenneth), Craig
Scurlock (Cheryl), and An-
gela Scurlock "Williams
(Melvin); seven grandchil-
dren and their families,
Timothy and Katherine Ri-
chards, Gentry and Jeremy
McClenny, Amanda and
Robert Burkett, Kerry and
Sharie Gilmore, Blair
Daffin, Brandy Scurlock,
and Kristin Scurlock;
twelve great-grandchild-
ren; 1 great-great-
grandchild; and one very
special caregiver, Linda
Boster.
God saw you getting
tired, and a cure was not to
be,So He put His arms
around you,o, and whis-
pered, "'Come to Me"; With
tearful eyes, we watched
you, and saw you pass
away. Although we loved
you dearly, we could not
make you stay. A golden
heart stopped beating,
hardworking hands at rest;
God broke our hearts to
prove to us, He only takes
the best.
The family will receive
friends on Friday morning,
October 25, 2013, at 10 AM,
at the Grace Assembly of
God Church in Chipley,
Florida. Funeral services
will follow at 11 AM, with
Pastor Dallas M. Pettis,
presiding. Interment will
follow at the Pilgrim's Rest
Cemetery in the Glass
Community, Cottondale,
Florida. Williams Funeral
Home of Graceville is in
charge of arrangements.


and by recruiting business
partners to Florida's capital
*city."
NBAA features all of the
major airframe manufac-
turers and their suppliers
along with exhibits show-
casing the most up-to-date
technology products and
servicesintheindustry.Last
year, 42 percent of the con-
vention's attendees were
company decision-mak-
ers and more than 25,000
people were in attendance.
This event brings together
business leaders, govern-
ment officials, manufac-
turers, corporate aviation
department personnel and
all manner of people in-
volved in nearly all aspects
of business aviation.:
For more informa-
tion, contact FGNW at
850-729-6848.


WHTC offers over 30
degree and certification
programs and reports a
high placement rate for
graduates from the vari-
ous skilled programs, in-
cluding welding, culinary,
cosmetology, IT, cyBer
security and networking,
nursing, drafting, electri-
cal, law enforcement and
public safety, digital me-
dia and continuing adult
education.
For more information
about Washington-Hol-
mes Technical Center, visit
www.WHTC.us. '


J. ames and Sikes.
SFuneral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850.482.2332

Joe SheffieldI

Joe Sheffield, 90,. of
Sneads died Thursday, Oc-
tober 24, 2013 at the Signa-
ture Health Care at the
Courtyard.
Born in Washington
County, Fl. Mr. Sheffield
had resided in Jackson
County for the past 58
years. He was a US Marine
veteran having served in
WWII and Korean. Joe was
a member of Sneads As-
sembly of God Church and
a retired Ward Supervisor
at Florida State Hospital.
He was preceded in
death by his wife, Deanie
Sheffield; two grandchil-
dren, Scotty and Edwin
Sheffield; his parents A. L
and Mary C. Morrell Shef-
field; three sisters, Dovie
Sheffield, Violet Riddick
and Goldie Reeves.
Survivors include his
four sons, Aubrey A. Shef-
field and wife Carolyn; Jo-
seph Sheffield all of
Sneads; Don Sheffield and
wife Patty of Graceville;
Delton Sheffield and wife
Carol of Sneads; 11 grand-
children and 14 great
grandchildren. -
SService of Remberance
will be at 6 pm Monday,
October 28, 2013 at Sneads
Assembly of God Church
with Rev. Juno Douglas
officating.
Memorization will be by
cremation with James and
Sikes Funeral Home Mad-
dox Chapel directing. Ex-
pressions of sympathy may
be, made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com


Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
Your Local Florist and Gifts
2911 Jefferson St. Mariarnna
850-372-4456'


JCFLORIDAN.COM


; .. .,


Email your 'Cdte Klds'4phbtk'od itobrial@jftloridan:eoitui[
mail them'o P.a.Box'QOr'rN~nF 32447 or Brng thie
by our offiees.at 4403 COngtifuRio Lane in i4arianna. ;:!
*12yfaK or dpder" ties. Include child s-
full name, paMeft1.'ntaffTi(ssar^dcyf. dS Th, .
service e. A Ieht. si ct .to ed g.. ; : : ..-
,,' .ll.:^ -..^; ^- *, ,. '. *t ^


J"ackson Cmi ait ...& U,
Qivaq S~y Se tAt4ffG~ldde 4e
Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 9
I850.462.5041


Obituaries


n3720ecCaverns Road t Maranna, L 32446-1806 (850)t4823964

3720 -Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 e (850) 482-13964


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25,2013 9AF


LOCAI, & NATION




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


WTC concourse opens in area shut since 9/11


The Associated Press

NEW YORK -The first
piece of a nearly $4 bil-
lion redevelopment of
the World Trade Center
transportation hub de-
buted Thursday with the
official opening of an un-
derground concourse that
passes through an area
that has been closed since
9/11.
The gleaming, marble-
paved expanse is expected
to smooth the way for tens
of thousands of commut-
ers and visitors. It ulti-
mately will feature retail
outlets, but it offers some-
thing. new right now: A
passageway thatlinks busi-
nesses and ferry service to
the west of the trade center
site to New Jersey-bound
PATH trains 'and the rest
of lower Manhattan to the
east.
Prior to Sept. 11, pe-
destrians used a bridge
over heavily traveled West
Street. Since the attacks de-
stroyed the bridge, they've


IHE,. :.l:ILI I:j. I-t ..
Visitors ride escalators up to the Brookfield Place West Street Pavilion, Thursday, Oct. 24, in
New York. A newly opened passageway that connects Brookfield Place with the World Trade
Center PATH station is part of a nearly $4 billion redevelopment of the World Trade Center site.


used a temporary bridge
or crossed the streets at
street level. The temporary
bridge is being dismantled
and is not .in use.
"The original World
Trade Center site eliminat-
ed the street grid because
that was the fashion of the


times," Port Authority of
New York and New Jersey
executive director Patrick
Foye said at Thursday's rib-
bon cutting. "This restores
that street grid and adds
an underground grid that
literally spans the length of
lower Manhattan."


- Foye noted that design-
ing the $3.9 billion trans-
portation hub, scheduled
to be completed in 2015,
provided the. opportunity
for a "do-over" of sorts that
focuses more on linking
multiple modes of trans-
portation than the original


World Trade Center site
did.
SThehub will connect the
PATH rail system, terry ser-
vice, New tbrk City subway
lines and the Fulton Street
Transit Center. Gone will
be the days, Foye said, of-
commuters having to cross
busy streets and trudge up
and down stairs to make
transit connections, Foye
said.
The approximately 600-
foot-long underground
concourse, which features
40,000 square feet of Ital-
ian marble, will house
stores and restaurants on
two levels, also by 2015.
The Port Authority is
partnering with Westfield
Group to develop and
lease the more than
350,000 square feet of re-
tail space. WVestfield had
signed a long-term retail
deal with the Port Author-
ity not long before Sept. 11
and signed a new deal for
the redeveloped site in
early 2008.
Other components of the


redeveloped Worlt Trade
Center site will be rolled
out over the next several
months.
the 72-story 4 World
Trade Center is scheduled
to open next month, and
One World Trade Center,
once known as the Free-
dom Tower, is expected to
have its official opening in
early 2014.
The first new. PATH rail
platform to replace the
temporary platforms that
have been used since Sept.
11 should open by the end
of this year or early in 2014,
Steven Plate, World Trade
Center construction, direc-
tor, said. ',
Yards from where hur-
rying commuters passed
through the temporary
PATH station Thursday,
workers continued the
construction of the mas-
sive, 800,000-square-foot
transportation hub, whose
dominant feature will be
an "oculus," two wing-like
sections of arches separat-
edhby a huge skylight.


S. PHOTOS BYTHEASSOCIATEP PRESS
Police and rescue workers gather at a candy factory after an
explosion in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 24. The
explosion happenedatthe Dlces Blueberryfactoryand caused
the floor to collapse, said factory worker Ismael Bouchet.


Dead, 40hurt


in Mexican candy


factory explosion


The Associated Press


CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mex-
ico An explosion inside
a candy factory in the bor
.,der city of Ciudad Juarez
on Thursday left one per-
son dead and at least 40
injured, Mexican authori-
des said. Several workers
remain missing.
The blast took place on
the second floor of the
Dulces Blueberry factory
and caused the floor to
collapse, injuring people
working downstairs, said
factor, worker lsmael
Bouchet.
"I was able to help five
people who walked out of
the building but as soon
as they were out they went
into shock and fainted," he
said.
Authorities said the cause
of the blast hadn't been de-
termined but Bouchet said
a steam boiler had been in-
stalled recendy in the area.
Ciudad Juarez Civil Pro-
tection Director Fernan-
do MNlota said firefighters
found a body inside and


Calif community questions shooting of 13-year-old


C
et
n
T
d
a
w;


9L
Sa




dc
lii

p:
flo



It
sc
sA
Al


that six of the at least 40 'si
injured are in serious con- bi
edition. Several workers ei
are missing and could be at
trapped inside the build-
ing, located on the Texas ifl
border, he added, b.
Bouchet said people
could smell acid in the
area where the explosion
occurred.
"Since the morning, sev-
eral co-workers said there
was a bad smell, that it
smelled of acid and be-
cause it was a new area we
thought it was normal,"
Bouchet said.
Photographs of workers
being helped by paramed-
ics showed people with
injuries that. resembled
chemical burns.
Dulces Blueberry, which
employs 300 people, pro-
duces gumruy bears, jelly
beans and hard candy,.
among other sweets. The
candy is sent to a distribu-
tor based in El Paso, Texas.
Ciudad Juarez is a
manufacturing hub and
the assembly plants
there employ many of its
residents.


The Associated Press

SANTA ROSA, Calif.
- Residents of a North-
rn California commu-
rity expressed skepticism.
thursday about a sheriff's
eputy's decision to shoot
popular 13-year-old boy
'ho was carrying a pellet
,un that looked like an as-
aulit rifle.
"Dozens of local resi-
ents and students vis-
ed the field where Andy
lpez was killed Tues-
ay 'afternoon. Some
t candles 'and placed
owers at a makeshift me-
norial that had printed
pictures of the victim,
uffed animals and a bal-
ion that read "RIP, Andy

"It's very tragic and sad.
just happened so quick,"
aid Noel Nunez, 15, ,a
)phomore at nearbyElsie
[len High School. Still, he
aid 'deputies should have
een able to tell the differ-
ice between a real gun
id a replica weapon.
A Sonoma County sher-
f's deputy twice told the
oy to drop the weapon,


but he instead raised it in
the deputy's direction, po-
lice said at a news confer-
enceWednesday.
"The deputy's mindset
was that he was fearful
that he was going to be
shot," said Santa Rosa po-
lice Lt. Paul Henry, whose
agency is investigating the
shooting in the suburban
town of roughly 170,0Q0
people. It's about 50 miles
northwest of San Frain-
cisco in California's wine
country.
The gun looked just like
an AK-47 assault rifle,
with a black body and am-
munition magazine, and a
browh butt and grip. Only
after the shooting did
deputies realize, it was a
plastic replica, authorities
said.
,"Nobody should die for
a misunderstanding, es-
pecially not a young boy
who hasn't even started
his life. It's just really sad
knowing that," said Vivi-
any Diaz Agirra Torres, 17.
Torres said she wanted to
know whether police gave
Andy time to put the gun
down before opening fire.


Hundreds of commu-
nity members marched
Wednesday night to re-
member the teen and pro-
test the; shooting, chant-
ing "We need justice," the
Press Democrat of Santa
Rosa reported.
. Police said two deputies
were .riding-in a marked
patrol vehicle and were
in uniforms when they
spotted Andy in a hood-
ed sweatshirt and shorts
around 3:15 p.m. Tues-
day. His back was turned
toward the deputies, and
they did not realize he was
aboy.
One of the deputies saw
what appeared to be an as-
sault rifle similar to an AK-
47 in the teen's left hand.
The deputies pulled over
and took cover behind
one of the vehicle's doors,
according to police.
A witness reported see-
ing the patrol car's over-
head' emergency lights
turn on and. hearing the
chirp of, a siren, police
said.
One of the deputies twice
ordered Andy to drop the
weapon, according to a


witness, police said.
The teen was about 20
or 30 feet away from the
deputies with his back
toward them when he
began turning around
with what' one deputy de-
scribed as the barrel of the
rifle rising up and turn-
ing in his direction, police
-said.
The deputy then fired
severalrounds, strildngthe
boy at least once, Henry
said. He was pronounced
dead at the scene.
, At Wednesday's news
conference, Santa Rosa
police displayed the pel-
let gun alongside a real
AK-47. The two appeared
strikingly similar.
Deputies also found a
plastic handgun in the
boy's waistband, police
said.

Theonly
curedor



4 fisyou.
10. ;


t'. .*^
NOVEMBER 2013




brandSAER
Trusted Brands to Improve Your Everyday ;


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Rescue workers help an injured, man after an explosion at a
candy factory in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico; Thursday, Oct. 24.
The explosion happened at the Dulces Blueberry factory
and caused the floor to collapse, said factory worker Ismael
Bouchet.



*


"1lOA FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25,2013


NATION & WORLD







Sr!


Sports Briefs

High school football
Friday Jay vs. Cotton-
dale, 7 p.m.; Trenton at
Marianna, 7 p.m.; Sneads
at North Bay Haven, 7
p.m.; Graceville is off this
week.

Chipola softball 5K
and Fun Run
Chipola softball will
host its second annual
5K and Fun Run on Nov.
16.
Registration begins
at 7 a.m. at the Chipola
Softball Complex. The 5K
race starts at 8 a.m. with
the one-mile Fun Run at
9.a.m.
For information, call
Kelly Brookins, Chipola
assistant softball coach,
at 850-718-2468.

Recreation football
Marianna Recreation
Department will of-
fer two tackle football
leagues and one boys'
flag football league this
year. Registration for
youths ages 6-13 will
be held through Nov. 1
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
The Marianna Educa-
tional and Recreational
Expo, (MERE) located
at 3625 Caverns Road in
Marianna.
The registration fee for
flag football is $30 for all
participants. The fee for
tackle leagues will be $45
for all participants. The
Sfee mustbe paid with a
check or money order;
no cash will be accepted.
No one will be allowed to
register after Nov. 1.
All participants must
bring a copy of their birth
certificate. Visit www.
* leaguelineup.com/mrd,
go to the football page
and download a form.
The age of all partici-
pants on Nov. 1 of the
current year will be the
player's age for the entire
* season.
SAnyone who" may be
initrested in'-coachizg
a team or ofciaihg"'
youth football can c-.ll
the Marianna Recreation
Department at 482-
6228 or come by during
registration.

Grand Ridge
Old Timers game
Grand Ridge School
vAl host anOld Tim-
ers basketball game for
former Indians on Nov. 9
at6 p.m. .
All former administra-
tors, players, coaches,
cheerleaders, and
cheerleader sponsors are
encouraged to attend.
Admission.to the game
is $2. Concessions will
S' be available, and a cake
auction will be held at
halftime.
Proceeds from the
event will be used to
Fund the restoration
of the class composite
pictures, the Grand Ridge
School yearbook, and
other student events.
Former students wish-
ing to play or cheer can
callWanda Lewis at 482-
9835, ext. 221 or wanda.
lewis@jcsb.org in order
to pre-register and re-
serve your own souvenir
T-shirt.
The class composite
pictures from 1941 to'
2006, with the exception
of 1942, 1943 and 1944,
have been restored and
will be unveiled before
to the game in the lobby.
A frame has been made
for the missing years and
anyone who has a copy
of the photos can contact
Beth Tyre at 482-9835,
ext. 224 or berh.tye@jcsb.


org.

Sports Items
Send all sports items
to editorial@jcfloridan.
corn, or fax them to 850-
482-4478. The mailing
address for the paper is
Jackson County Floridan
P.O. Box 520, Marianna,
FL 32447.
.. ,,y ../ *.;... .


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Cottondale's Shaundre McAroy tries to shake off a tackle by a Sneads
defender during a game earlier this season.


BYDUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Like fellow Jackson County
football teams Marianna and
Sneads, the Cottondale Hornets
have a game tonight that is no-
where near as significant as the
game theywill play next week.
The Hornets head to Graceville
next week to take on the archri-
val Tigers in a game that will
likely determine .their postsea-
son fate, though before they get
to that matchup, they will have
to deal with the Jay Royals in a
nonleague contest that will be
difficult to project.


Cottondale and Jay come into
the game on much different.
notes, with the Hornets still very
much in the mix for the play-
offs and the Royals eliminated
from contention with last week's
21-13 district loss to the Baker
Gators.
The Royals were very com-
petitive against the undefeated
Gators in a game that was very
much in doubt in the second
half, though they lost their previ-
ous two games to Graceville and
Northview by a combined score
of 70-14,
See HORNETS, Page 4B


MIWRMNNA FOOTUBLL



Trying to build off win



Bulldogs look to

keep momentum


Marianna's Tommy White runs the ball during a game earlierthis season.


Indians fighting

health issues as'

season nears
BYDUSTIN KENT
Sderit'-'.Idlloit n LCom .

The Chipola Indians men'sbasketball team
took on Talladega on Thursday night in the
final preseason scrimmage before the Indi-
ans open the regular season Nov. 1 against
East Georgia.
It has been a somewhat frustrating exhibi-
tion season for the Indians, who have gone
4-2 in six scrimmages but have yet to see
their full roster in action at the same time.
"It's been hard to get everybody on the
court,", second-year Chipola head coach
Patrick Blake said before Thursday's scrim-
mage. "We're a work in progress right now,
but we're excited about our potential."
As usual, the Indians brought in another
stellar recruiting class to go along with one
'of the best core groups of returning players
in the nation, featuring All Panhandle Con-
ference players Carlos Morris, Demetrious
Floyd, and Cinmeon Bowers.,
There have been preseason wins over Cen-
tral Florida, Hillsborough, Shelton State and
See INDIANS, Page 4B
_.. *;,', "* .. *. 3, .. . ....... . ,,::* -,, '* ^ '


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN


going against Trenton
BY DUSTIN KENT,
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Marianna Bulldogs picked up their big-
gest win of the season last week overWalton.
Next week, they'll head to Tallahassee to take
on Florida High in a game that will determine
their ppstseason fate.
But before then, the Bulldogs will play host
to 1A power Trenton tonight at 7 p.m., as the
reigning state runner-up Tigers (5-1) come in
looking to notch a big nonleague win against
a 4A opponent.
Marianna (2-5) rolled over Walton 43-19 last
week in a district win that kept the Bulldogs'
playoff hopes alive, with a win next week put-
ting the Bulldogs in a three-way tie at worst
and potentially earning them a playoff berth
outright should Walton beat East Gadsden.
The Trenton game has no tangible impact on
Marianna's postseason possibilities, though
Bulldogs coach Mark Beach said it's vitally
important that his team carry positive mo-
mentum into the Florida High game,.and that
won't happen with a loss tonight.
"From a confidence standpoint, this is a big
game," he said. "We're still 2-5, so we've got a
lot of work to do. It's a big game. Every game
the rest of the season is a big game for us. The
great thing is we've got something to play for
in Week 10 and not everybody can say that, so
every practice is important and every oppor-
tunity for us to play is important."
In the Tigers, Marianna will face a team with
a similar run-first approach to offense, with
Trenton averaging 254 yards per game on the
ground, led by Melvin Adams' 570 yards and
six touchdowns.
Kenny been has added 296 yards and four
TDs, while Jacquez Powell has 238 yards and a
team-high seven TDs, and senior quarterback
See BULLDOGS, Page 4B


Chipola basketball set to open season
Special to Floridan

-The Chipola Indians open the 2013-14 bas-
ketball season Nov. 1 in the Milton H. Johnson
Health Center when they host East Georgia at
8 p.m.
The Indians finished second in the Panhan-
dle Conference last season and made it to the
semifinals of the 2013 state tournament.
ONill R~tiThe Lady Indians open the season Nov. 7
when they host the three-day Girl's Basketball
Report Classic.
Chipola's women finished second in the
Florida/Region VIII Basketball Tournament
and went on to finish in the Elite 8 in the NJ-
CAA tournament.
The Girl's Basketball Report Classic games
begin Nov. 7 with games at 5 p.m., Gulf Coast
vs. Darton; and 8 p.m., Chipola vs. East Florida
State.
Nov. 8 games include: 10 a.m., Tallahassee vs.
Darton; noon, Santa Fe vs. Northwest Florida
State; 2 p.m., Georgia Perimeter vs. Broward; 4
p.m., Pensacola vs. Georgia Highlands; 6 p.m.,
Gulf Coast vs. East Florida State; and 8 p.m.,
Chipola vs. South Georgia Tech.
Nov. 9 games include: 10 a.m., Tallahassee vs.
Santa Fe; noon, Northwest Florida vs. Georgia
Perimeter; 2 p.m., East Florida State vs. Dar-
ton; 4 p.m., Pensacola vs. South Georgia Tech;
PHOTO COURTESY OF CHIPOLA 6 p.m., Gulf Coast vs. Georgia Highlands; and 8
Chipola's Rahni Bell goes in for a shot last p.m., Chipola vs. Broward.
season. For information, visit www.chipola.edu. L


,; --' .'- w;wia w


I.-


Cottondale Football


As Hornets host


Royals, team tries


not to look ahead


I




-12B FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25,2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


No. 21 UCF hoping confidence grows


The Associated Press
\
ORLANDO The UCF
coaching staff is hoping
the Knights continue to
play offense with the con-
fidence they displayed
during the upset of Louis-
ville last week.
SThe late-game 75-yard
touchdown drive against
the Cardinals, not only
wound up being the game-
winner, but was a huge
growth-spurt for a young
Offense in its on-going
maturation process.
For the 21st-ranked
Knights (5-1, 2-0 Ameri-
can Athletic Conference),
coach George O'Leary said
that will be particularly
beneficial for junior quar-
terback Blake Bortles the
remainder of the season.
UCF hosts winless Con-
necticut on Saturday.
"I think basicallyhe takes
things in stride," O'Leary
said. "He's not a kid that
ever gets too high or too
low. I think the South
Carolina game he started
feeling sorry for himself
in the second half. And
that's something I spoke
to him about. You go as
your quarterback goes. You
can'tbe having that broke-
jaw thing on the sideline. It
doesn't work.".


I HE ASSUUIAI TED PRESS -IL
Central Florida quarterback Blake Bortles passes against Louisville during the game in Louisville, Ky., on Oct. 18.

Bortles threw for a sea- last drive he took down Cardinals, they are that we can plug
son-high 358 yards against the field against a very Bortles said his pass se- any guy in there. They can
South Carolina, but had talented Louisville team election is Jless by design possibly get the ball on
two costly interceptions basically was a thing of and more attributable 'to any play and they know


that helped the Game-
cocks hang on for a 3-point
-win.
"'I think he's improved
since then," O'Leary said.
"He'll never be a captain,
Quarterbacks are cap-
tains. They're the leaders
of your team. I think that


beauty."
Where some young quar-
terbacks often become re-
liant on a favorite receiver
or two, Bortles continues
to spread the-ball around
to his receiving corps.
Seven different receivers
caught passes against the


their success in making the
most out of the Knights'
schemes.
"It just goes to show how
talented they are and how
versatile our offense can
be," Bortles said. "It's play-
specific, read-specific,
and it shows how good


that."
UCF offensive coordi-
nator Charlie Taaffe said
that's why the final drive
in the Louisville games
sticks out for him because
though Bottles was the
catalyst, the entire unit
contributed.


"The communication
was good, the guys execut-
ed extremelywell in crunch
time," Taaffe said. "Obvi-
ously your quarterback is
the leader. The quarter-
back's kind of the barom-
eter for the offense. If he's
panicking and freaking out
and there's no poise, then
the other guys are going to
pick up on that.
"His demeanor probably
Helps him in 4 situation
like that, because he's not
a real Type-A kind of guy
... His teammates believe
in him, he's earned their
respect and you would ex-
pect that in this stage of his
career and he stepped up
an delivered."
Taaffe said that all of
Bortles' cumulative expe-
riences good and bad
throughout this season
led up to him being able to
produce against Louisville.
He's also already seeing
that filter down to others
in the unit.
The Knights' offensive
line held Louisville with-
out a sack a week after
the Cardinals had a sea-
son-high eight at Rutgers.
And running back Storm
Johnson wreaked havoc
on Louisville's defense
with a season-high 188
all-purpose yards.


College Football Briefs


Vandy coach says
QB at practice early
NASHVILLE, Tennm.
-Vanderbilt coach James
Franklin says he hasn't
made a decision yet on
a starting quarterback
Saturday against No. 14
Texas A&M.
Franklin said Wednesday
, nightthat senior Austyn
Carta-Samuels was out
at practice early before
being sent in to have some
things handled. Patton
Robinette took the major-
ity of work in practice.
Carta-Samuels hurt
his left leg in the second,
quarter of last week's win
.over then-No. 15 Georgia
and watched the second
half using crutches,.
Franklin says they have
an experienced quarter-
back who's played a lot of
games atVanderbilt (4-3,
1-3 Southeastern Confer-
ence) wants to give him
every opportunity to play.
Franklin says he's not try-
ing to avoid questions but
just doesn't have informa-
tion at this point.


iME A':S,,,iatliME' L L
Vanderbilt quarterback Patton Robinette passes against Georgia in the game on Saturday in
Nashville, Tenn. Vanderbilt upset Georgia 31-27.
Florida's Poweil anterior cruciate ligament special teams.
SUffere knee injuo in his left knee Saturday Muschamp says "unfor-
s___ ,,fini__o Iat Misisuri and Mill havp inate for him. He-'s a -V


GAINESVILLE Florida
has lost yet another player
to a season-ending injury.
, CoachWill Muschamp
says backup linebacker
Jeremi Powell tore the .


season-ending surgery. He
injured it trying to block
a punt.
Powell, redshirt fresh-
man from Largo,'had
Been a key contributor on


who was really emerging
special teams-wise."
Powell is the eighth
Florida player out for the.
season,
The list includes four'


starters: Quarterback Jeff
Driskel (broken leg), de-
fensive tackle Dominique
Easley (knee), right tackle
Chaz Green (labrum) and
Running back Matt Jones
(knee). Receiver/kick
returned Andre Debose


(knee), freshman line-
backer Matt Rolin (knee)
and freshman defensive
back Nick Washington
(shoulder) also sus-
tained season-ending
injuries.
From wire reports


Winner from Game Piece
Printed on October 15, 2013

CONGRATULATIONS!



MARY .,

FRANCIS

COTTON


Former Oregon TE arrested


The Associated Press

EUGENE, Ore. For-
mer Oregon tight end
Colt Lyerla, who left the
second-ranked Ducks ear-
lier this month following
a one-game suspension
for violating team rules,
was in custody Thurs-
day after his arrest on
drug-related charges in
Eugene.
The sheriff's office said
'in a statement that Lyerla
was observed by a drug
investigation unit snort-
ing a white powdery sub-
stance while sitting in a
parked car Wednesday.
The 20-year-old Lyerla was
arrested on suspicion of
unlawful possession of co-
caine and interfering with
a police officer.
When he decided to
leave the Ducks, 'Lyerla
said it was to pursue an
NFL career. He had been
suspended for Oregon's
Oct. 5 game at Colorado
by coach Mark Helfrich for
an unspecified violation of
team rules.
At the time, Lyerla told
Oregon's athletics website,
GoDucks-.com, that his
withdrawal from school
had nothing to do with
that suspension.
"I love everyone at Or-
egon; everyone's on good
terms, I believe," Lyerla
said. "Just for my own ben-
efit, it was time to move
on."
I Along with missing Or-


egon's 57-16 victory over
the Buffaloes, he also
sat out Oregon's 59-14
win over. Tennessee ear-
lier this season because
of illness. Oregon does
not disclose injuries, so
after the game Helfrich
described his absence as
"circumstances."
Lyerla then complained
to The Oregonian' news-
paper that he felt the de-
scription could be unfairly
interpreted. He later apol-
ogized for airing his frus-
tration publicly and said.
he never meant to bed a dis-
traction. Both he and Hel-
frich said they'd discussed
the matter and moved
on. .
The former star from
Hillsboro High School,
west of Portland, caught
three passes for 26 yards as
a junior for the Ducks this
season. For his career, he
had 34 receptions for 565
yards and 11 touchdowns.
"If he felt this was best
for him, that's OK. We
talked about it and we
'moved on," Helfrich said
.a day after Lyerla left the
program. "We wished him
absolutely nothing but
the best, and he wished us
nothing but the best. There
was no 'smoking gun,' so
to speak."
Lyerla also landed in the
doghouse this summer af-
ter he tweeted support of
conspiracy theories about
the Sandy Hook Elemen-
tary School shooting. One


of his posts concerned
the parents of the young
victims.
' The school issued a
strongly worded statement
condemning the post.
"Twitter posts attributed
to student-athlete Colt Ly-
erla concerning the tragedy
at Sandy Hook are insens.i-
tive and offensive, espe-
cially those devastated by
the shootings, and we have
communicated as much to
Colt," the statement said.
, He also, missed the first
several days of fall.camp
his sophomore year for
personal reasons.
After. his arrest Wednes-
day, Oregon wide receiver
Josh Huff wrote on Twitter:
"God be with my' former
teammate!!!"
The Lane County Sher-
iff's office release said de-
tectives were working on
an unrelated case when
they observed Lyerla. .
"Lyerla was contacted
by police and admitted
to using and possessing,
cocaine," said the release,
prepared -by Sgt. Steve
French.
Detectives arranged to
meet Lyerla at his resi-
dence to continue the in-
vestigation, but once there
he ran from his car into a
nearby apartment, the re-
lease said. He was arrested
when he emerged a short
time later.
Lyerla was being held in
the Lane County Jail on
Thursday.


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Shaw: Targeting rule cutting down on flags


The Associated Press

MONTGOMERY The
Southeastern Conference's
coordinator of officials
Steve Shaw says allowing
replay officials to overturn
player ejections for tar-
geting and not penalties
should be re-examined.
The new rule is, however,
cutting down on the poten-
tially dangerous hits, Shaw
saidWednesday.
He said there have been
14 targeting, flags within,
the SEC this season, with
eight resulting in ejec-
tions and six where in-
stant replay officials al-
lowed the player to return
to the game. The rule is
designed to protect play-
ers by stopping defenders
from hitting defenseless
players above the shoul-
ders or leading with the
" crown of the helmet on a
tackle.
Shaw said officials have
thrown flags for targeting
52 times nationally this
season, and that the num-
bers are down both in the
SEC and overall from last
year.
"We've actually seen


Missouri wide receiver L'Damian Washington is hit by Florida's
Cody Riggs (right) after Washington caught a pass during
the game Saturday in Columbia, Mo. Riggs was penalized and
ejected on the play for targeting.


players' reactions change
on these type hits," he said
Wednesday in a confer-
ence call with reporters.
"Last year, a lot of times
we'd have a big hit and
.the player would be chest-


bumping and high-fiving
his teammates.
"Now, it's almost, 'Uh
oh,' hands on the helmet
or whatever. So I think the
players are getting it."
The SEC had' four


targeting penalties in
last weekend's games, a
high for the season. Three
resulted in ejections.
Replay officials can-
not wipe out the 15-
yard penalty but can
let players return to the
game.
"Two were just absolute
textbook targeting," said.
Shaw, who didn't specify
which plays he was refer-
ring to. "One was a gray
area but clearly by rule it
was a targeting foul. Then
we had one that was prop-
erly overturned. That's
where we get the most
concern.
"Even our commissioner
(Mike Slive) has serious
reservations about the
penaltyphilosophyaround
targeting fouls when calls
.are overturned. Together,
we're going to work with
the rules committee to re-
visit the penalty if the dis-
qualification is overturned
for targeting."
Florida safetyCody Riggs,
Georgia defensive end Ray
Drew and South Caro-
lina safety Kadetrix Mar-
cus were all ejected in the
first half of games because


of targeting.
Replays of the second-
quarter play that led to
Drew's ejection showed
he let up when approach-
ing Vanderbilt quarterback
Austyn Carta-Samuels, but
did shove' him above the
shoulders shortly after he
delivered a pass. Former
NFL head referee Mike
Pereira tweeted: "Ejection
of Georgia player has to be
reversed!!"
After the Vanderbilt
game, Georgia linebacker
Jordan Jenkins took issue
with not only the calls but
the rule as well.
"I think it ruins, the
game," Jenkins said. "I
think it's going to ruin the
game of football."
A targeting penalty on
fourth down also kept
alive a Vanderbilt touch-
down drive in the 31-27
victory. Ramik Wilson hit
Vandy receiver Jonathan
Krause with his shoulder
on an ,incompletion on
fourth-and-4. Review kept
Wilson in the game, but
the penalty stood for a first
down.
OnTuesday, Georgiatight
end Arthur Lynch said he


couldn't watch film of the
loss to Vanderbilt because
of the calls.
"We had the game. In my
opinion we had it won and
the calls were very ques-
tionable," Lynch said. "I
think it's safe to say it was
the wrong call because
they reversed it. I think
that because of the rule
they still get 15 yards really
doesn't make sense. It's like
committing a crime and
pleading guilty for it and
not having to go to jail. It
doesn't make sense."
South Carolina coach
Steve Spurrier said Marcus'
ejection against Tennessee
was the correct call in the
23-21 defeat.
"We didn't argue the call
at all. We need to do all
we can to make this game
safe," Spurrier said.
Sha*.said the emphasis
with SEC players has been
Son keeping their heads up
to see what they're hitting,
hitting lower and wrap-
ping up instead of launch-
ing into the air for a hit. .
Shaw said launching
wasn't as common in
games going back to the
early 1990s.


Miami continuing to work on compliance issues


The Associated Press

CORAL GABLES -This
long .NCAA investigation
of Miami did'not start with
Nevin Shapiro taking some
recruits for a ride on his
yacht orhanding out some
cash.
Instead, phone calls and
text messages were the
culprits.
Compliance issues a
lack of monitoring certain
areas well enough at times
- were part of Miami's
mess over the past few


years. Arid even .though
NCAA Case No. M362 is
now essentially over, with
a small number of scholar-
ship losses for football and
men's basketball as the
most significant penalties
left to address, the Hurri-
canes want to ensure this
saga never repeats itself.
. "The challenge for all of
us is to make sure the les-
sons learned in what we've
gone through are ,never
forgotten," Miami. ath-
letic director Blake James
said Wednesday, one day


after the NCAAs report on
the Hurricanes was finally
released.
Miami self-reported nu-
merous violations regard-
ing improper phone calls
and text messages in 2009
- things that on their
own would have seemed
like parking tickets. The
NCAA started looking
looked at the Hurricanes
then and amped-up the
probe a few months later
when the former booster
and mastermind of a $930
million Ponzi scheme


began sharing his story
with investigators..
"Staff members had a
poor understanding of
NCAA rules .or felt com-
fortable breakig them,"
the NCAA said Tuesday.
It would seem. unfair to
apply those words to ev-
eryone at Miami and
worth noting that fortnmer
Hurricane compliance-di-
rector David Reed once`
,confronted 'Shapiro at a
football game and warned
others at the school about'
him.


But if nothing else, it's a
reminder of the need for
vigilance.-
"It's building a 'culture
where people have rela-
tionships with compliance
Sand trust that compliance
is there to help them and
assist them," said Jennifer
Strawley, Miami's senior
associate athletics direc-
tor for administration. "It's
Creating an atmosphere
where it's OK that il a mis-
take happens, we deal with
it."' at. l i .'.
Most Miami athletic


administrators have been
hired since the Shapiro
scandal broke widely in
2011 or have assumed
new roles since. Compli-
ance officials have more
of a public persona now,
utilizing social media
and seminars to educate
boosters, Icoaches and
athletes about right and
wrong.
Miami is still ask-
ing donors for support
- but warning them that
it won't buy unfettered
access.


Kentucky,

Miss St.
lokingfor

first SEC win
TheAssociated Press

STARKVILLE, Miss. -
Mississippi State doesn't
have a very easy path to
'six victories and a fourth
straight season of bowl
eligibility.
'.Beating Kentucky would
be a good first step.
SThe 'Bulldogs (3-3, 0-2
Southeastern Conference)'
host Kentucky (1-5, 0-3)
on Thursday night in a
matchup of two teams vy-
ing for their first confer-
ence victory of the season.
Mississippi State has won
four straight against the
Wildcats, including last
season's 27-14 victory in
Lexington, Ky.
Mississippi State is com-
ing off an unimpressive
21-20 victory over Bowl-
ing Green on Oct. 12.
The Bulldogs. have sdme
promising young players
S like sophomore quar-
terback Dak Prescott and
sophomore linebacker Be-
nardrick McKinney but
have been inconsistent on
both sides of the ball.
"I think we have a lot of
guys that want to win, des-
perately want to win, and
are learning how to do it
within the team setting,"
Mississippi State coach
Dan Mullen said.
'Kentucky is facing many
of the same obstacles.
The Wildcats, who are
led by first-year coach
Mark Stoops, are com-
ing off a lopsided 48-7
loss to No. 1 Alabama on
Oct. 12, but before that
played. competitive games
against South Carolina and
Florida.
"You watch their team
and they're accomplish-
ing an awful lot," Mullen
said. "Their guys are play-
ing hard for four quarters,
buying into their system.
And you see a lot of growth
and development on a
team that looks like a very
young football team."


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridarr.com


NFL


Brady, Patriots look to improve


The Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
Wide receiver Julian
Edelman hasn't thought
much about the New Eng-
land Patriots' struggling
offense as they approach
the midway point of the'
season. ,
Quarterback Tom Brady,
on the other hand, can't
gethis-mind off it.
"We haven't done great
on offense this year, pe-
riod," Brady said. "So there
are probably a lot of places
we've struggled in the
third quarter and at the
end of games, and third
downs and red area and
short yardage.
"But you know, this a
new week, so we are going
to go out there and try toM
executed our best. If'we do
that, we're confident that
we are going to win.".
So, while Brady is leading
the first-place Patriots (5-
2) into a pivotal divisional
-matchup Sunday against
the Miami Dolphins (3-3),
he knows their offense is
hardly as feared or fluent
as it has been throughout
his career.
Third downs are ,becom-
ing a significant hurdle.


THI 1. .1'11 C( f
New York Jets linebacker Quinton Copies (98) knocks the ball
away from New England quarterback Tom Brady (12) during
the game Sunday in East Rutherford. N.J.


Third-quarter play: is
Declining. Red zone effi-
ciency ranks near the bot-:
tom of the league.
As far as excuses go,
though, Brady has none.
"We're 5-2; we're at a de-
cent place," he said. "We're
a long ways from the end
of the season. Based on
what we've done so far,
there's a lot of room for
improvement.
"Imagine if we make the
improvement. I think that
is the positive."
Brady certainly is not
used to this.
SNew England has ranked
in the top four in the league
in passing offense three


of the past four seasons,
and was first and second,
respectively, in overall of-
fense the last. two years,
averaging 428 yards per
game.
The Patriots, losers .of
two of their last three
games, now rank. 20th
with 225 yards passing a
game. They haven't scored
a touchdown in 'the third
quarter, getting outscored
44-9. They've found the
end zone just 45.8 percent
of the time while inside the
20-yard line compared to
67.5 percent last year. And
they rank 28th on third
down, converting just
33 percent (35-for-105),


including 1-for-12 perfor-
mances in losses to the
Cincinnati Bengals and
NewYork Jets.
"Some weeks you think
you have the solution, and
you go out and it works,
so you go, 'OK, I think we
figured it out.' Then you,
go out the next week and it
doesn't, and then you have
to re-evaluate where you're
at," Brady said. "So, you've
just got to try as a team
to improve, build confi-
dence in areas that you're
good at and, like I said,
try to stay levelheaded
about where you're at and
where you're heading and
what you believe in your
team.'
Part of the Patriots' prob-
lems stem from their shuf-
fling receiving corps.
Danny Amendola has
played'in just three games
,due to a' lingering groin
injury and a concussion
suffered two weeks ago.
All-Pro tight end Rob
Gronkowski finally made
his season debut Sunday in
a 30-27 overtime loss to the
Jets. And rookie receivers
Kenbrell Thompkins, Aar-
on Dobson and Josh Boyce
haven't exactly emerged as
trusted targets.


QB Ponder likely


to start for Vikings
The Associated Press played well in a victory
over Pittsburgh and poor-
EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. ly in a loss to Carolina two
The quarterback car- weeks ago, prompting
ousel hasn't stopped coach Leslie Frazier to
turning for the Vikings, turn to the newly'signed
and it seems to spin more Freeman against the New
wildly out of control each York Giants on Monday.
week. Freeman went 20-for-
After an awful debut 53 for 190 yards and one
Monday night, Josh Free- interception in the loss
man reported to team to the Giants, but Fra-,
headquarters ,this week zier said Tuesday that he
with concussion-like would stick with Free-
symptoms. The short man gping.forward as the
week will make it difficult starter.
for him to gain clearance Then Freeman was di-
to play Sunday night agnosed with the concus-
against Green Bay. sion symptoms, thrust-
Step right up. Christian ing Ponder back into the
Ponder. It's your turn to middle of the action. For
hop on for another ride a team that is looking to
when the Vikings (1-5) stabilize -itself during a'
host the Packers (4-2). massively 'disappointing
"It's, an opportunity to first six weeks, the ins
get back in the saddle and and outs at quarterback
be more vocal and take aren'thelping.
ahold of this position," "At the quarterback
Ponder said Wednesday position, you want to
after practice, "because know who is going to be
, I don't want to give it lining up week in and
back." week out," Frazier said.
Ponder started the "But that's the circum-
first three games of the stance where we are, and
season, was injured and Christian will do a good
then lost his job to back- job for us on Supday
up Matt Cassel.' Cassel night." .,


Dallas, Detroit, Miami to play NFL London in 2014


The Associated Press

LONDON The Dal-
las Cowboys, Detroit Li-
ons and Miami Dolphins
will travel to London next
year to take part in the
NFL International Series,
the league announced
Thursday.
The NFL will hold three
games at Wembley Stadi-
urn in 2014, with the Jack-
sonville Jaguars, Atlanta
Falcons and Oakland Raid-
ers as the designated home
teams.
The lineup: Cowboys vs.
Jaguars, Lions vs. Falcons,
and Dolphins vs. Raiders.
Dates are to be
determined.


Chase Baker of the Minnesota Vikings takes part in a coaching
clinic for London children near Wembley Stadium in London
onSept.24.


The Cowboys ha'ave played
preseason games abroad
before, but the prospect
',of playing in London was
absolutely appetizing to
coach Jason Garrett.


"It's a great opportunity
for our organization to go
over there and play,' and
were going to do what we
need to do logistically to
play our best," Garrett said.


"It's Wembley Stadium, for
crying out loud. It's one of
the .great stadiums in the
world." ...
Lions' All-Pro receiver
Calvin Johnson said it will
be "interesting" to make
his first trip to London, but
hopes the game isn'tsched-
uled before the team's
annual short week.
SThe Jaguars are playing
four games over four sea-
sons in London, starting
Sunday against .the San
Francisco 49ers.
Jacksonville is a kind of
'designated home team
for London, as it has given
up one of its eight regular-
season home games for
four seasons.


1.. ... .... "It's been 'tough to gauge
Jl i ans., -because we've got so many
From PagelB injuries,.' Blake said. "I love
our, talent and potential,
Gordon, and losses to but we're nowhere near
Daytona State and 'Chat- being on the same page as
tanooga State, but a series team, andwe'vestill-gota
of injuries has kept Blake longwayto go defensively.
and his staff from getting a (Chemistry) is luxury that
true measure of where the we're not going to have
team stacks up with just a early on. We're just going to
week' to go beforothe real have to go in shorthanded
season starts. and just find a way to win


and get better every day."
' Of the 13 players on the
roster, eight were available
for Thursday's scrimmage.
Despite the lingering
health issues, Blake said he
doesn't anticipate it being
a long-term problem.
"I'm not concerned right
now. That's stuff that's out
of our control, so we worry
about stuff we can con-
trol," he said. "We have


a 'lot of talent; we're just
maldking sure the guys who
are out there can execute
the game plan. It's just
about getting everyone on
the same page. Not hav-
ing everyone out there has
kind of hurt the chemistry.
We need to get guys out
there playing together and
exerting the type of effort
and energy we need on the
defensive end."


Bulldogs'
From Page 1B
Stephen. Smith has 243
yards and three, TDs on
the ground, with 440 yards
and six scores through the
air. '
Trenton has outscored
its( opponents 243-66 on
the season and, aside
from an 18-7 loss to Dixie
County and a 17-14 win
over Chiefland, have thor-
oughly dominated their
opponents in 2013.
.' "They've had a real good
year. They're well-coached.


(Trenton coach Andrew
Thomas) is a friend of
mine, and he does a great
job," Beach.said. "I've been
telling our guys about
them all week. They're a
very well-coached and
disciplined football team,
and they're coming here
to win, These guys were
in the state championship
game last year. They're not
slouches."
Marianna has sported
a dominant run game as
well this year, posting 252
yards per game on the
ground, led by the dynam-
ic duo of Teon Long and


Tommy White, with the
two combining for 1,533
yards and 10'touchdowns
this season. -
Long leads the team
with 831 yards and eight
TDs, with White going
for 702 yards and two
scores.
They totaled 323 yards
and three scores in the win
over Walton, but they also
got some help from the
passing ,game, with Her-
man Williams completing
7-of-13 passes with two
,touchdowns 'to help give
the Bulldogs the offensive
balance they've wanted all


.season.
"From a, running per-
spective, we've wanted to
have our identity there,
but also to have the pass-
ing game open up so we
could be good in both ar-
teas," Beach said. "We knew'
we could do it. We've been
close, but you're only as
good as your last game.
We were pretty good in our
last game; I just want us to
continue to build on that.
We're happy as a staff and
happy as a team, but we're
looking forward to'these
next two games to keep
getting better."


Hornets
From Page 1B
Jay has lost four games in.
a row overall, but has been
impressive at times with
the loss to Baker and a 13-0
win earlier this season over
Vernon.
CHS coach Mike Melvin
said given the highs and
lows of the Royals' season
and their being eliminated
from contention, it's hard
to know what to expect in
this game.
"They might come out
trying to prove a point af-'
ter the loss to Baker, or,
they could come out' flat,"
he said. "I think they'll
come out and use every-
thing they've got against
us. They brought out a
lot of stuff for Baker that I
think they could show for
Jius Po because they've


got nothing to lose at this
point. They're playing for
pride." *
Though-the game is out
of district, it could have
playoff implications for
the Hornets in the event of
a three-way tie for first or
second that would result
in a three-team shootout,
with the team with the
most wins overall getting
to host the shootout.
But the big game is still
a week away, and Melvin
said he wants his team
to wait until next week to
start worrying about the
Tigers.
" "This is a home game for
us and we've played pretty
well at home this year. We
want to play good in front
of our fans," he said. "It's
hard not to look ahead be-
cause it's a big one against
a very good football team.
I just hope that our guys


have their heads in the
right places. We'll talk
about that one on Monday.
Right now it's all about the
Jay Royals."
The Royals are led by ju-
nior quarterback Tate Up-
ton and sophomore run-
ning backs Braden Cross
and AJ Nash.
STailback Cross is the
more explosive back of the
two, with fullback Nash
providing much of the
inside running.
"They're both real solid
and they're both just soph-
omores," Melvin said of
Cross and Nash. "They're
also good upfront. They're
going to blockyoujustwith
the effort they give, and,
they're not going to make a
lot of mistakes. They don't
change a lot of stuff up;'
they'll just do what they
do, but they usually do it
pretty well. It's just a solid


football team. If they show
up to play, they're going to
be hard to handle. Coach
(Kent) Smith does a real
good job with them."
The game will kick off at
7p.m.


I


-14B FRIDAY.,OCTOBER 25,2013


SPORTS




JACKSON-COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


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I





--6B FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25,2013


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BORN LOSER BYARTAND CHIP SANSOM
qPjKVOCAULAK O MR>FOP .7 WILbE.-FOKCF, i 0A'( fmi9 STOOl' LIl4ETIE- FRIT
TOM' tS"5tOOP"--NO :YOU tA YKOW 5 R-OW TO CAL5 fS MPOP?
SPELL I

LA


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
VVE TARTED'- A WHY WOULD, ANYBODY'
BUSINESS SELLING PAY YOU ,FOR A
HOROSCOPES I-HOROSCOPE'
SWRITE FO- A BECAUSE UNLIKE'
SEjLF' DOLLAR? NEWSPAPER
HOROSCOPES.
MINE ARE
PERSONALIZED'.

HOROSCOPES -


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


"TODAY FORP LUNCH,
YOU WILL 'HAVE A
STUNA SANDWICH. -
BLUEBERMY YOGURT,
.CELERY AND A
PEANUT BUTTER COOKIE."


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK
I r a IS 0 1 W,


THAT'S WIH-T 1 E HD
FOR LUNCH EvErF
PA'Y SINCE SECOND
G GRADE. .
EXACTLY!' DOES '
A NEWSPAPER,
HAVE THAT
KIND OF -
KNOWLEDGE? .
ONE
r fcl)6LLAR,
_ T LEASEE,
",S,, '1


ACROSS 36Ghostly
1 Pottery sound
fragment 37Stretchy
6 Fingerprint bandage
part 38 Many mos.
11 Nanny 39Center
from 40Mal de -
abroad 41 Light metal
(2 wds.) 42 Many
13Reddish- millennia
brown 44Joln up
color 47Place
14 Long step 51 High
15 Brambles spirits
16Dit partner 52Escargots
17 Owns 53 Kind of cab
18 Mao 54 Brazilian
-tung dance
21-Wassallers'
tune DOWN
23 Rudder's 1 Airline to
place Stockholm
26Basketball 2 Lean-to
hoop 3 30-day mo.
27Aspen 4 Speakeasy
transport risk
(hyph.) I 5Preachy
28 Hideous 6 Bucolic
monster 7 Wading
29Opposite bird
of humility 8Expected
31 Type of 9 Watcdog's
bear 9Wtho'
32 Bit of warning
tomfoolery 10 Naval off.
33 Starts over 12 Fixes up
35Swarm 13Loathe
withm 18War ender


Answer to Previous Puzzle


19John,
Hancock,
notably
20 Overacts
22 Force
Through
23 Shining
brightly
24Tour de -
25 More to the
point
28Alley-
30 Youngest
Cratchit
31 Some'
boats
34 Canvas
supports
36 Like some
toothpaste
39Teary-eyed


41 Evens the
score
43 Rose Bowl
org.
44 Poached
item
45 Opposing
vote
46Gloss
target'
48Zero in on
49 Attorney's
deg.
50ONASA
counterpart


S Want more puzzles?.
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


10-25 @2013 UFS. DIst. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos.
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands tor another. ,

" SK'J K S I Y E B M I Y KB J T B F I A
NCZSYXOY KTNK 'ABC ZBX'K TNG'Y
KB PY LYMEYOK KB NOTSYGY ABCM
Z M Y N I J ." UNKA LYMMA

Previous Solution: "I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me In
magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet. Jack London
T. TDA6YSCLUE: Msenp / d 'M '
2013:by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-25


Horoscope
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Follow your heart
and make changes at
home that contribute to
your goals, success and
happiness.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Listen care-
fully, especially to talk
about financial matters.
Someone may try to take
advanlitage of your gener-
osity or gullibility.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -A suggestion may
appear to be a little un-
usual, hut when'you break
it down, you will discover
a sensible purpose.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -You may have to
alter the way you do things
or even take a different
route to get to the destina-
tion that you are deter-,
mined to reach.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March'
20) -Make a choice and
proceed without looking
back. A financial gain is
apparent, and it could
prove quite a windfall.
ARIES (March 21-April .'
19) Don't let restless-
ness be your downfall.
Embrace change but don't
initiate it.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Express your
concerns and youroplans.
Meet in person with a con-
cerned party if it will help
you make your point.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-Advancement comes
by using your skills to
impress people and make
a difference.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Focus on the unusual
today. Learn all you can
About a situation that can
benefit your environment
as well as bring in extra
cash.
SLEO,(July23-Aug.22)':
-You have to reach out
and ask specific ques-,
tions so you can base your
next move on what's real,
instead of assumptions.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.-
22) Put your time and
energy behind something
or.someone you.believe
in, and you will make your
way to a very comfortable
position.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
Expect to face someone
who is overreacting or
pushing boundaries. Don't
Sget bullied into something
that you don't want to do.


Annie's mailbox


Dear Annie: I am a 44-year-old woman
in aquandary. I have-been married for
21 years to a good man who is nine years.
my senior.' He is supportive and affec-
* tionate. Most women would be satisfied.
Slie plays the lottery more often than
.we can afford, but other than that,'he's
a kindman. He is also a terrific, loving
father to our two teenage boys.
Here's my problem: Six months ago,
I got in touch with my first young love
through Facebook. We became comfort-
able chattingand texting. We eventually
met face to face, and there was an instant
attraction. We how text daffily and talk on
the phone at least once a week. We also
get together once a month to go hiking.
,'We have hugged'and kissed, but havent
had sex. He feels that would be crossing
a line that could never be erased. But we
are both slowly givingin to our desire
for each other. Our marriages are at a
crossroads. Neither of us is intimate with
'our spouse, ..
My family is completely unaware that
I am in love with my childhood sweet-
heart. Do I follow my head and stay in a


This deal centers on the
black suits, one stronger
than the other. Would you
prefer tobe in four spades
or five clubs?
Let's assume that South .
Sis in four spades and West
leads a diamond. East
wins with his 10 and con-
tinues with the diamond
ace. How should South
continue after ruffing?
The auction is difficult.
South might rebid three
clubs, not two hearts,
because his hearts are
so weak -- but we love
majors. North's three
diamonds is a game-forc-
ing cue-bid. Then, when
South shows club support,
North might well bid game
in that suit.
Five clubs makes unless
East leads a trump, which
is feasible when South
shows a three-suited hand.


safe, stale marriage? I love my husband,'
but I am not in love with him and haven't
been for years. I Would, of course, wait
for my sons to go off to college before.
changing my life. Do you have any advice
for me?
IN LOVEWITH ANOTHER MAN

Dear In Love: Imagine your husband
reconnecting with an old flame and
deciding to leave you because you aren't
exciting anymore. Wouldn't you want the
opportunity to discuss it? To point out
how it would hurt the children? To help
him understand that 21 years together
should mean something?
We can assure you that six months
of playing kissy-face is not the same as
a day-to-day marriage. It's easy to put
effort and romance into a fling and be-
lieve it's going to belike that forever. We
understand that you are bored, but this is
disrespectful to your marriage and your
husband. Get counseling. See whether
you can fix what's maldking yo, unhappy
before you make a mess of several lives,
including your own.


Bridge
S North 10-25-13
4 87
AK4
652
4KQ1095
West East
4 Q 10 9 4 463
V J 8 5 Q 10 9
*8743 *AKQJ10
464 4872 .
South
4 AKJ52
V 7632


4 AJ3
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
SWest North East
Pass 24 24
Pass 34 Pass
Pass 44 All pass


'Opening lead: 3 ,
But if East starts with
the diamond ace before
shifting to a club, North
wins inhis hand, ruffs a


diamond in the dummy
(South), plays a heart to
his ace, ruffs another dia-
mond, leads a heart to the
king, draws trumps, tries
unsuccessfully to drop the
spade queen and claims,
conceding one heart.
In four spades, South
should plan on losing two
spades and one diamond.
He draws two rounds
of trumps and turns to
the clubs. West ruffs the
third round and leads a
diamond, but South ruffs,
plays a heart to the king
and discards a heart on
the next club. The contract
makes.
Did you notice that East
missed a nigh-impossible
defense? If he had shifted
to a heart-at trick two, it
would have removed a key
dummy entry. Try it and
see.


EN ERrAINMDNT




CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan e


Friday, October 25, 2013- 7 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED



AR KEI TPLAAC


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
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IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publcalion Policy Errors and Omsaions Advertiser- should check their ad the f.rl.t lay Thiv publicafio, shll rIot be liable for i ilure to publish an adr or for a typographic error or errors in publication except 10to the extend of the cost of Ithe ad for the first day's
Insertion Adjustment tfor errors Is limited to Ina e cost of trial poion of the ad where the errTr occurred Tne edvTrtier aLgree t.ail the putlil-sar shall rnoi D liable lot damages arnsingg out Oi erorE In advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of ete adverltsemenl in whic.n the error occurred, whether Such error is due to negligence of tin Publerrer's employees Gr othaneriise end mre shall be no laDlitly for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paia for
such advetiseirenLt. Display Ads are nol guaranteed position All advertiing Is subject lto approval. Rignl is reserved to edit reject cancel or cla .fy all adi under the appropriate classification
III
Fo ealne al ol-re r iitw w.cloia~~o
FRES PRDUC
wur A3AI~1: A FRESH PRODUC


YARD&STA TS
. DOWN SIZING DUE TO AGE & HEALTH!
Antiques & collectibles Marked "BC"
FURNITURE 30 % OFF -
MISCELLANEOUS 40% OFF "Except Firms"
GREAT IDEAS FOR CHRISTMAS!!
Backyard Treasure 2331 Ross Clark Cr.



BUSINSSil OPPRTNIIE



Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com
JAnitoriaI Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K;
annual gross $19,500
504-915-1474 4m


HEALTHP-R-ODUCT


IJ

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
COO ] ['] LI STUFF


Full iTze Bedroom set -"f0. 850-526-19iM.


Lazyboy Rocker Recliner blue leather$100.
Bike boys 20" $15. 334-482-6189.


Motorcycle Seat. OrginalSeat for 2013 Harley
Road Glide Ultra $150 850-209-7298 3pm-8pm
Motorcycle Seat. Ultimate seat w/backrest foi]
1800 Honda Goldwingi $500 Call 850-209-7298
Queen size bedroom set $450; 850-526-1916.
Treated Wood Posts: (20) 6" to 8" wide by 8'
long $7 Ea. Call 850-594-5200. .
Wood Heater $60., 1978 CHIJUCO annual $20.
850-592-2881.t
Yard Sale Friday, October 25 and Sat October
26,2013,7 am- noon; 5177 Fort Rd. Greenwood
block building behind the grocery store. A little
bit of something for everyone for more info call
850-718-6258



Free Kittens (7) to a good hbme, 6 weeks old,
litter trained, male & female. 850-272-4908
~I.

1 inmoPapilon (F) $2W0 Yorkdes,
& ChihWahua 334-718-4886 .
AKC GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES. SABLE AND
BLACK AND TAN. UP TO DATE ON SHOTS AND
WORMING. $350 CALL MARK AT 334-806-5851
OR 334-393-7284
Boston Terrier Puppies health certificate, vet
checked, guaranteed & parents on site
$250. 850-547-9351 or 850-849-0176
English Bulldog puppies: AKC registered. 5 mo
old, 3 females! 2 white/fawn & 1 brown/white ,
S/W. $1.200. Call 229-403-9957 after 5PM.


LOST: Male, black Chihuahua & female Pug
LOST in Marianna area Call 209-8004 with info.


Miniature Schnauzers .White, CKC. Will be
ready the firstweek of Nov.Tails docked and
dew claws removed. Worming.at 2,4, and 6
weeks and first shots.Call 334-714-0289.


cam Yoir oset & Collect Sobe Cash


LWIPk" M KI. I


0 V2 ac. of SUGAR CANE for sale.
4 Golden 27 Cane Mill
Doctors Buggy with horse'and harness
20 ft. Goose Neck Cattle Trailer.
229-220-6711


APLIN FARMS
j r-Tomatoes
U Peas Squash
i Eggplants
Peppers
Sunflowers Pumpkins
-Cucumbers
Open Mon-Sat (7am-6pm)
334-792-6362. -

1 Fresh Green
Peanuts
Wealsohave
shelled peanuts
850-352-2199
850-209-3322 or 850-573-6594
o 4128 Hwy231


uy/" B 9 i ,


SHewett Farms
SFall peas Ready
Shelled or unshelled,
several variety's
Off hwy 90 between
Cypress & Grand Ridge
on Mayo Rd.
Bobby Hewett: 850-592-4156
or 850-899-8709

Place your ad in our

Sales & Service

Directory,
and grow your business!!!


HOME GROWN. FRESH



220W. Hwy52Malvern
* 334-793-6690


ENTERPRISE ESTATE SALE 8 INDIGO PLACE
Thur-10/24, Fri-10/25, Sat-10/26, 9AM-6PM, Sun-10/27, 12N-4PM .
This Is One Our Best Sales Of The Year: Million Dollar Alabama Executive Home Filled With The
Finest Quality Designer Furniture. The Owners Have Spent Over $475,000.00 Furnishing This
Exquisite Home. This Furniture Can Be Owned For A. Fraction Of Its Original Cost. 100s Of
Decorator Collectibles, Furniture By Baker, Stickley, Henrddon, Many Maitland Smith,
Theodore Alexander, Century, Thomasville. Bombe Chests, LaBarge Gilt Mirrors, French
Porcelain Lamps, French Tapestries, Indian And Persian Rugs, Vintage Outdoor Urns, Many
Decorator Tables, A Beautiful Maitland Smith Coffee Table One Of A Kind, Century Fringed
Sofas, Vintage Marble Top Bombe Chests, Baker Consoles, Baker Banded Mahogany Round
Dining Table Table,'Stickley Dining.Chairs, Antique English Sideboard, Bar.Stools, Leather
Recliners, Leather Theater Seating, Fine Silk Custom Draperies, French Chairs, Venetian Mirror,
Custom Office Desk, Many Different Occasional'Chairs, China, Crystal, Glass, Floor Lamps,
Banded Serpentine Chests, An Impressive Maitland Smith King Bedroom Suite With Marble Top
Side Chest, Dressers, Maitland Smith Boudoir Desk With Chair, Many Pieces Of Art, Oil
Paintings, Botanicals Framed With The Finest Italian Custom Framing, Patio Furniture, Leather
Sofa, Crystal Chandeliers, Lenox Holiday China, Lenox Eternal China, Limoge Hamilton China,
University of Alabama Collectibles,61 in Panasonic TV, Marble Top Bar, 100's of Decorator
Items, Viking Refrigerator, Trundle Bed, Christmas Items. This Is One Sale Not To Miss. You Can
Acquire The Finest Made Furniture At A Fraction, Of The Cost. Everything Must Go!
VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.ALPHAESTATELIQUIDATORS.COM FOR PICTURES!
CALL 678-525-6148 FOR QUESTION AND MORE INFORMATION.


.,.lIOCTOBER SHOWIF


r 'R -1 A -*- '-




Sudoku. ,


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.


evel:e
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-s box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to Thursday's puzzle


10/25/13


Place an Ad


Fast, easy, no pressure
24 hours a day, 7 days a week!


,j Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
NEEDED I BUY SEALED/
UNEXPIRED BOXES:
CALL BOB (334) 219-4697
OR (850) 710-0189


JL- ----- -- -_
87 _1 25
5. 4

__ _941 4_ 5_
1 5 38 6

.9 56 8


6_ "_ 7

__9_ 7_6,_ 34


4 2 5 3 8 1 l 7619
8 6 1.9 4'7 5, 312
713. 2'5 6'.4.8

_2 _5 _3 7, 9.'8 61 1._J _

917 6413-2 58
64783'91 '25
5918725846
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rull am= 91111 % .Pjvv. --l- I .


U-1 I~l


I-wo I III Mal IQIIIIQ al -I --u- VVILII Illiv.


I.


i




8 B Frida. October 25. 2013 Jackson Counq Floridan


CLASSIFIED


FARMER'SMAR?4
(6 ) '1 -. ** *,-1


I*1.


Young Sim-AngAus Bul
Top Blood Lines. Priced to Sell.
Call 334-898-1626 or 334-360-5035


TREES TREES
S, .... TREES
:: .;.- 12 ft.tall 30 gal.
*containers
S$49.95 ea. 10 or
more $39.95
Live Oaks, Crape Myrtle,
Cherry Laurel & Magnolias
By appointment
< 334-692-3695
WANTD -FARM&,GRDE

Buying Pine / Hardwood In.
your area.
No tract to small /CustoinThinning
Call PeaRiver Timber
I 334-389-2003 ,

,'~I T)EMPLOYVME -



SJackson
Hospital
Information Systems Director
Jackson Hospital, is currently looking for
driven, dedicated Information Systems
Director. The hospital system consists of a
100 bed acute care hospital and 16 affiliated,
providers.' Qualified candidates must
possess a BS Degree with experience in
Healthcare IT preferred. Preferred
candidates should have implementation and
operational experience in clinical, financial
and network applications, file-server
technology and system 'updates &
implementations. Candidate must also
possess strong analytical, communication,
-and time management skills, project'
management and strong supervisory
experience. Exp. with CPSI and allscripts
Hospital Information System preferred.
Join our team by faxing your resume to:
Human Resources of Jackson
Hospital 4250 Hospital Drive,
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 718-2626 phone or
(850) 718-2679fax EOE
II A A.1 7:C*m- l



' NEIL 1,


Northwest.Florida Community Hospital,
Chipley, FL is seeking qualified
candidates for the following position:
HVAC/PLUMBING/ELECTRIC
In General Facilities Maintenancefor
hospital. FT with benefits.
Applications available online at
www.NFCH.org and/or application to:
Email dblount@nfch.org
(850) 415-8106 or Fax (850) 638-0622
Smoke and Drug Free Campus. EOE





TRANSPORT, INC.
DRIVERS
'Paper Transport, Inc has IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS for CLASS A REGIONAL
DRIVERS for Our DEDICATED ACCOUNTS.
HOME WEEKLY
No Touch Freight
$.38 Cents + Bonus Per Mile
18 Months Experience Required.
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS!
Qualified Driver could be hired within~a.Week!
Call us at 1-855-PTI JOBS (784-5627)


II
I


Class A CDL
DRIVERS
Needed Immediately
Wiregrass Local Wiregrass Hauling
3 years min. driving history
with Dump Trailer Experience
0 Home nights
Apply ONLY online at:
www.perdidotrucking.com
Perdido Trucking
Service, LLC
251-470-0355


r') ^ EDUCATION
1 CHL :& INSTRUCTION

S' ui Look ahead to your
'' ;future! Start training ,
C'^^dTIC for a new career in
r Tff I IS Medical Assisting,
COLLEGE Medical Office Adrmnin.,
Pharmacy Technology,
Electrical Trades & HVAC!,
Call Fortis College 855-445-3276
For consumer Info:*visit www.fortis.edu

4. -'RES'pENTIAL
I REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

S1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
S Lot rent included. For details
S 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4.
SCedar Creek Apartments 1BR/1BA $500
Appliances, lawn care & pest control included.
Must be 62 or older or disabled. Call 850-352-
3878 or email cedarcreek@nchousing.net

SOUTHSIDE APARTMENTS
Accepting Applications for 1 and 2 BR apts.
Must meet income requirements.
S850-526-4661 TDD 850-955-8771 4-
EAL HOSMOIVMTUNCTY '


*er


I


L

U


*


Log Truck Driver needed
Must have dean driving record,
Drug screen required
Call: 850-658- 46094

Meed a tMew mome.?
Chedc out the Classifiic


HOEIPOEET


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE"
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
: s ,::: : .
BULLOiZINGil'
LANDE33CLEARNBN OESTRY ERVICE


SDozer and Excavation vvork.
ponds Road Building Demolition
Pine Tree Planting Herbi6ide Spraying
Fire Line Plowing Burning
Clay N a.I 850-762-9402
6ly o N 1 .Cell 8EO-832-SOS!


AUTMTV SERIES

NEW&USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELOW RETAIL PRICES!


mB .T,,R...PLE ,..


W'e a! Wead4 Udt
850.526.170
S Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 S;
2978 Pierce Street (behind


CHIPOLA APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND 1 BEDROOM
APTS. FOR ELDERLY. SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE ON ALL UNITS. FOR RENTAL
INFORMATION CALL (850). 526-4407
TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


* 3BR 1BA duplex in on Alabama Ave. $425.
mo. $400. Dep. .* 3/1 HOUSE $550. mo. $500.
dep. incl. water, sewage & garbage
Both in Grandridge 850-592-5571.
Brick 2/1 Duplex 3196 Diana Lane $575. and
with carport & Storage $600.
SJLoyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4.

3BR/1BA 2636 Church St. Cottondale
Stove & Refrigerator No Pets.
$550 Mo. + $300 Dep. Call 850-352-4222
3BR/1BA BRICK HOUSE CH&A,
$650. MO. + $650 Dep. NO PETS.
HWY 73 & MAGNOLIA RO.
CALL 850-573-6307 or 850-482-5449
Austin Tyler & Co *
Quality Homes & Apartments
4 850- 526-3355 or austjntylerco.com
_"PropertyManagement Is Our ONLY Business"

Lease/Option To Buy 3/2 hardwood floors,
CH&A 2940 Dogwood SL
close to Riverside school.
$875. mo. 850-718-6541
0 : 0 0"
2/2 country setting, Sneads-Grand Ridge area,
water, sewage, lawn & garbage include.
No Pets $400. mo + dep. 850-593-6457
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliviig.com.
.*4 85O-209-8847 4-
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Please call 850-258-1594 or
850-638-8570 Leave Message


RECREATION


BOAT MOTOR 2003 Mercury Outboard 15hp,
dledtric start & stick steering, exc. cond.
$1700. OBO 334-677-1147..

Stratos Bass Boat, 201 Pro XL w/Trailer, 2003
Evinrude 225 h.p. (low hours), Trolling motor,
GPS, 2 Depth finders, extra. SS Prop., Built in,
Battery Charger. Lots of Extras, Excellent con-
dition, garage kept. Must see! $7,995 229-334-
0224
.07

Wellcraft 18.7ft fiberglass trihull boat 115 HP
Mercury, good cond., Tandem 4 wheel trailer,
will trade for small travel trailer. 850-209-1064

2006 Forest River Wildwood LE Model #31QBSS
31' Dry wt. 10280 Ibs., 1 slide, 4 bunk beds,
Booth dinette, Center kitchen & LR,Jackknife
sofa, Front Q bed, Side aisle bath'w/ shower &
roof vent, Dbl. door Frig., Gas/Elec. water heat-
er, microwave, Gas stove top/oven & furnace,
Duct A/C /Heat, AM/FM Stereo, Front & rear
stabilizer jacks, $9,000.00 334-790-4612

1998 40 Ft. Gulfstream Tour Master RV- Diesel,
RV Top of the Line, 1 Slide Out, Outside Enter-
tainment Center & Freezer. S/S Refrigerator,
Washer/Dryer, Separate Ice Make, 95,000
Miles, Good Tires, $45,000. Includes 2002 PT


Your0guk0e f great local

JSINESS & "-&
l^ ii r ^^ .*: businesses&Ssrle ..,.



RVICE DIRECTORYi

Call 526-3614 to p .ac o..i,_..
"" I R ,"EN.,TS SELF-STO "-G

1942 Hwy.231 Aliord, FL ust north iofAIorro [his Month's Special
Depression Glass, Blue Ridge Pottery, Costume Jewelry, Blue and White, o'x s 6'p B M B
MilkGlass,Vasellne Glass, FolkArtend much moreStuffll $ 1 O' x 16'
S Open Thursday-Saturday:10;o0aim 5:;OOp m 2 3 950
Le n Time nfti 'u d 850-579-2393 3: 5 Years in Business
.WE_ MaeP opS w.,EPOB,,,.

I, r I I- -,i1 g.![.]MW. i D--i, i /1--1


FGeneral Repairs Insurehind g b "
I *^ ;Ie wYea Wairantyv


rim's Florist)


: MODEL
#B30L, B42L In Stock
". More Models Available
2890 Noland St. Marianna

rNorth Florida Rental

DOLMAR

POWER PRODUCTS
MODEL #PS32, PS421, PS510 In Stock
More Models Available
850-526-7368
2890 Noland St. Marianna


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


J A CKSON C 0 U N T Y

FLORIDAi1
jcfloridan.com


monster
FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


I For~ ourHomeImproement Needs
*New Homes & Room Additions Flooring
e Painting Siding Kitchen & Bathroom Upgrades
Custom Ceramic Shower Specialist Porches
Pole Barns Concrete Driveways Sidewalks & Slabs
I Lic# RR 2822811487 INSURED
850-573-1880


_______________________u m CF LORI DAN.coni


3/2 DW in Malone, CH/A, No pets,
security negotable Section 8 ok.
850-594-9991 or 850-557-7719
Marianna area 2/2 Mbl. Hm. inpark CH&A
water, sewage No Pets or Smoking Ref. Req.
Ist. & last$5400., mo850-482-8333
(A\K RESIDENTIAL
IALLJ. REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Beautiful Graceville FL home and farm
4 bedrooms, 3 Vz1/2 baths custom built home on
239 acres. Can divide. 175 acres plowable for
corn, soybeans, cotton. Large free standing
building. 3 wells. Joe Farris, Land and Stand
Properties. 850-387-5517


TRANSPORTATION &^LOGISTICS APARTMENtS UNFURNISHED MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT


-Ji


I


0





CLASSIFIED


www.JCFIORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan *


Friday, October 25, 2013- 9 B


2002 Winnabago 34' 2 slides, 5500 ONAN Gen,
lots of upgrades, excellent condition, 29000
miles $32,000. Honda 2006 CRV: 44600 miles,
ready to tow w/blue ox tow bar
system, excellent condition $13,000. Bbth
SVehicles for $43,000. Call 334-692-3337 or 334-
796-5421 ,

(f) "T-ANSPORT TION

AUTS FRSALE
WBuick 2002 Regal IS, load.
ed, 2nd owner, looks and
runs great, everything
works, 135,000 miles.
r* -$3995. 334-596-9564.
Chevy 1955 Belair 2-door, 350 engine, auto-
trans, runs great, daily'driver $12,500. Firm
334-695-6368.
HChrysler 2004 PT Cruiser,
automatic, 4 cylinder,
cold air, loaded, 76,000
miles, excbilent condi-
tion. $5200. Call 790-7959
Ford 1999 Explorer: Eddie
Bauer Edition. All leather,
sun roof and everything
works great!!! Good AC &
heat, 6 disc CD changer.
Only 110,000 miles. KBB value is $4,435. Asking
only $3,100 obo. Looking to sell fastso all rea-
sonable offers will be considered. 850-693-1581.
Ford Mustang Fast Pack V-6, 5-speed, Exc.
cond. metalic green in color, 229-861-2949.
'-, 'GOT BAD CREDIT?
n $0 Down/lst Payment,
i Tax, Tag & Title Pass
Repo pass bankruptcy
SLOW CREDIT OK
Ask About $1000. off at time of purchase.
Q, Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
Honda 2000 Odyssey: Runs perfect 3 year/3600
mile warranty on transmission. $6,600.
Call 334-693-9360
Hyundai 2006 Elantra GT,
loaded, leather, sunroof,
.4 cylinder, automatic,.5
door hatchback, 69,000
miles, $7500. 790-7959
g B Mercury 2001 Grand Mar-
quis LS, loaded, leather,
cold air, 89,000 miles,
like new. $5995. Call 334-
.... 790-7959.
Nissan 2012 Atima, low miles, must sell, $200
down, $269 per month. Call Ron Ellis 334-714-
0028.
Nissan 2012 Versa, GAS SAVER, well equipped,
still under factory warranty, $250 down, $250
per month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243.
Toyota 2011 Camry, Great family car, great gas
mileage, pwr windows, door lock, Am/FM, CD,
$300 down, $300 per month. Call Steve Hatcher
334-791-8243.
Toyota 2011 Corolla, 4 door, like new, under
warranty, $200 down, $279 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 334-714-0028. .


2007 Poloris Victory Jackpot, 40K miles, 1634cc,
100 cu. in., 106 stroker kit, many extras, custom
pegs, mirrors & windshield. 2 seater & 1 solo
seat, lost job need to sell $8500.334-432-3249.
Harley Davidson 2009SporsterXL 1200C, red,
excellent condition 6300 miles, $7695.
334-671-8671 or 334-791-0984. Lots of Extras.


Honda '07 Ruckus 670 miles. $1450.
334-798-0931

"J.F' J i _'M '" ui"._.


2012 Nissan Pathfinder one owner, excellent
condition, low mileage, super clean, $19,950,
Phone 334-79&-5036
Lexus 2010 RX350: Loaded car in excellent
condition. White with tan leather interior.
Just completed 50,000 mile service. $29,900.
Cell 334-701-'2642.


Ford 2010 F150 FX4 4-door, completely loaded,
,excellent condition, 158K miles, $18,900
334-791-3081.
FORKLIFT-TOYOTA 2000 Model, 3300 Ib, lift
cap., excellent condition $4,700 205-902-4212
SGMC 1997 Sierra 2500
128K miles on new
engine. exc. cond. black
& silver in color. NEW
tires, cold air, long
wheel base, runs great
& very clean Reduced To $3500. OBO
Must Sale. 334-701-2596 located in Ozark


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
^ AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK'CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664

gT "I 'Got a Cl;unker,
I, We'll be your Junker!.
We buy wrecked cars:
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$250 & t Complete Cars
L i CALL334-714-6285
,. Looking for VW Van
sold in Enterprise, AL
in 1983. If you have
seen this vehicle please
contact me@
swtcraft@hotmail.com

WEWILLlUYYOUR AR O TITI
Regardless of year, make, mddel, w. ie '
millions of dollars on hand to pay you good.
money for your current vehicle.
We Are On The Coast But Worth The Drive,
& reputable, & we can give you a fairl price
Sappraisal in 15 minutes. ;; i
Call for ppointent, ee. 877-47-7]975





LF160272


INVITATION TO BID


Bids will be received by the Jackson County
School Board, Marianna, Florida, until 2:00 p.m.
Central Time, Thursday, November 7,2012 ,in
the Administration Building Conference Room,
at which time and place all bids received Will
be publicly opened and read aloud for furnish-
ing all labor and materials for the construction
of:
REROOFING PROJECT
RIVERSIDE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
FOR THE JACKSON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
S MARIANNA, FLORIDA
All work shall be done according to planr and
specifications prepared by Paul A. Donofro and


Marianna, Florida 32446. Plans are on file and
open to inspection in the office of the Archi-
tect, 2910 Caledonia Street, Marianna, Florida.
Drawings and specifications may be obtained
from the office of the Architect at Post Office
Box 861,2910 Caledonia Street, Marianna, Flor-
ida, 32446. General Contractors may obtain one
(1) set of documents upon $100.00 deposit,
which will be refunded only to those submit-
ting a bona fide bid and returning said docu-
ments prepaid, in good condition, within ten
(10) days after receipt of bids; General Con-
tractors requiring more than one set,
subcontractors, suppliers, or others may pur-
chase a full set of documents for $50.00 per
set, non refundable.
Partial sets will not be sold to major
subcontractors, (mechanical, plumbing and
electrical). Suppliers and other subcontractors
may purchase drawings and specifications at
the'rate of $2.00/sheet of drawings and
20t/page of specifications.
Bidding documents will be sent UPS, collect,
unless otherwise specified.
Each bid must be accompanied by a bid bond,
or a cashier's check, made.payable to the Jack-,
son County School Board, Marianna, Florida in
the sum of 5% of the base bid as a guarantee
and with an agreement that the bidder will not
revoke or cancel his bid or withdraw from the
competition for a period of thirty (30) days af-
ter the opening of bids, and that in the event
the contract is awarded to the bidder, he will
within ten (10)consecutive days after it is sub-
mitted, enter into written contract with the
Jackson County .School Board in accordance
with the accepted bid. The cost of the bond
will be included as part of the bidders base-bid
proposal.
NOTE: There will be a Mandatory Pre-BId Con-
ference Wednesday, October 30,2012 at 9:00
a.m. CT. at Riverside Elementary School, 2958
Cherokee Street Marianna, Florida and attend-
ance will be mandatory for all General Contrac-
tors (Roofing Contractors) who plan to submit
a bid for this project, see Section B, "Instruc-
tions to Bidders", Paragraph B-16.
The Owner reserves the right to waive ;
informalities in any bid, and to reject any or all
bids, or to accept any bid and any combination
of alternates or separate bid prices that, in
their judgment, will be to the best interest of
Jackson County School Board.
JACKSON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
BY: /s/ Steve R. Benton, Superintendent
Jackson County School Board
Marianna, Florida


LF160275
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY, STATE OF
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 13-535-CA
CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest
to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WESLEY C. MILES, a/k/a WESLEY C.
MILES, JR.; UNKNOWN TENANT #1
and UNKNOWN TENANT #2, the names
being fictitious to account for parties who
may be in possession,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: WESLEY C. MILES, a/k/a WESLEY C. MILES,
JR.
and if deceased,,their unknown heirs, devisees,.
grantees, creditors and all other parties claim-
ing by, through, under, or against them; and all
unknown natural persons if alive, and if dead
or not known to be dead or alive, their several
and respective unknown spouses,'heirs,
devisees, grantees, and creditors, or other par-
ties claiming by, through, or under those un-
)knnwnni iraokl -nrcnnr*- a -lnd ffS&Jpral a>nd re-


spective unknown assigns, successors in inter-
est, trustees, or any other person claiming by,
through, under or against any corporation or
other legal entity named as the defendants;
and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or
corporate, or whose exact legal status is un-
known, claiming under any of the above named
or described defendants or parties claiming to
have any right, title; or interest in or to the
lands hereinafter described,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following property:
COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING IRON ROD MARK-
ING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH-
EAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER
OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 12
WEST, JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDA; THENCE
S00020'00"W A DISTANCE OF 1364.08 FEET;
THENCE N8940'00W, 57.42 FEET TO A SET IRON
ROD PSM NO. 6111 MARKING A POINT ON THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE
ROAD NO. 2; THENCE ALONG SAID ROAD RIGHT
OF WAY ON A CURVE CONCAVE TOWARDS THE
SOUTH AND HAVING A DELTA ANGLE OF
348'05", A RADIUS DISTANCE OF 3769.83 FEET,
AND AN ARC LENGTH OF 250.12 FEET TO A SET
IRON ROD/CAP PSM NO; 6111 AND CALL THIS
THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE DEPARTING
SAID SOUTH LINE ON A BEARING OF
S1151',3"W, 150.80 FEET TO A SET IRON
ROD/CAP PSM NO. 6111; THENCE S7000'21"W
196.99 FEET TO A SET IRON ROD/CAP PSM NO.
6111 ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF A 20 FOOT
DRAINAGE EASEMENT; THENCE ALONG SAID
EASEMENT ON A BEARING OF N3205'01"W,
81.24 FEET TO A SET IRON ROD/CAP PSM NO.
6111; THENCE N3605'10"W ALONG SAID EASE-
MENT A DISTANCE OF 141.38 FEET TO A SET
IRON ROD/CAP PSM NO. 6111; THENCE
N0251'56"W ALONG SAID EASEMENT A DIS-
TANCE OF 98.19 FEETTO A SET IRON ROD/CAP
PSM NO. 6111 ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY OF AFORESAID STATE ROAD NO. 2;
THENCE ALONG SAID ROAD ON A BEARING OF
S8001'32"E, 161.21 FEET TO A 4 X 4 FDOT CON-
CRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE P.C. OF A
CURVE; THENCE EASTERLY ALONG A CURVE
CONCAVE TO THE SOUTH AND HAVING A DEL-
'TA ANGLE OF 255'35", A RADIUS DISTANCE OF
3769.83 FEET, AND AN-ARC LENGTH OF 192.55
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
Parcel Identification Number: 02-6N-12-0000-
0330-0010
has been filed against you, and you are re-
qiired to serve a copy.of your written defens-
,es, if any, to it on GarthD. Bonney, Esq., whose
address is Post Office Box 737, Panama City,
Florida 32402, horror before November 18,2013
and.file the original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint. '.
DATED this 9th day of October, 2013.
DALE RABON GUTHR1E-
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk


AQLMB


5 fora

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in the'

Classified.


'Ii


Jackson County




History



5 Days a Week!


- --




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Browns WR



Gordon tired


of trade talk


The Associated Press
BEREA, Ohio Already
dealing with cornerbacks,
double coverage and de-
fenses targeting him,
Browns wide receiver Josh
Gordon has spent the past
month trying to shake free
from trade rumors.
It's been exhausting.
"I'm tired of it," Gordon
said.
With Tuesday's NFL
trade deadline approach-
ing, Gordon remains the
subject of speculation that
won't go away. The talented
second-year receiver with
All-Pro potential has be-
come a coveted commod-
ity, and as he prepares for
Sunday's game at Kansas
City, Gordon doesn't know
if it will be his final one
with the Browns (3-4).
"I honestly wish if it was
going to happen, I wish
it would happen already
instead of dragging on,"
he said. "If a trade offer
came in and that's what
the Browns want to do, so
be it."
Browns. coach Rob
Chudzinski has insisted'.
the Browns won't trade


Gordon. CEO Joe Banner
recently said he would be
"completely shocked" if
the Browns traded the 22-
Syear-old, hut the team has
continued to receive offers
for Gordon, who has 27
catches for 450 yards and
two touchdowns in five
games.
Cleveland's trade of run-
ning back Trent Richard-
son last month to India-
napolis for a first-round
pick underscored the
team's willingness to build
for the future, and Gordon
understands he might not
be a part of it.
Gordon's off-field issues
could play a role in wheth-
erhe stays in Cleveland.
He was suspended for the
first two games this sea-
son for violating the NFL's
substance-abuse policy,
and it's his understand-
ing that another failed
drug test could result in
a one-year suspension.
Gordon's checkered past
could prompt the Browns
to move him before he
makes another mistake.
But his background may
make teams leery of taking
a chance on him.


NFL

Vick practices, moves closer to return


The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA Eagles coach
Chip Kelly won't admit it, but it's ap-
pearing more and more likely that
Michael Vick will start on Sunday,
when the Giants come to Lincoln
Financial Field.
Vick on Thursday practiced suc-
cessfully for a third straight day, and
is set to undergo his toughest phys-
ical challenge of the week Friday
when he'll test out his hamstring
for the first time since he injured it
on Oct. 6 against the Giants (1-6) in
NewYork.
"Gotta get out here and run," Vick
said Thursday. "Tomorrow's not a
walk-through day for me."
It'll be the first time' in almost
three weeks Vick will turn it
loose without holding anything
back. The test, he said, will be
straightforward.
"Run 100 yards as fast as I can," he
said.
Nick Foles has quarterbacked
the Eagles (3-4) in Vick's absence,


Philadelphia quarterback Michael Vick (left)throws as quarterback Matt Barkley
looks on during practice Tuesday in Philadelphia. :


but he suffered a concussion last
Sunday, when he threw for just 80
yards on .11 -for-29 passing in a 17-3
loss to Dallas.
Despite missing the past two and
a half games, Vick remains, second
on the Eagles in rushing yards (307)
and is second among all NFL quar-
terbacks to Seattle's Russell Wilson
(323), who has not missed a game


in seven weeks. ''
His mobility and scrambling ca-
pability is more important for him
than most passers, so his sprint test
could predict his ability to be effec-
tive. But Kelly said he and Vick have
yet to talk about it. ,,
S"We'll see where Mike is,"" Kel-
ly said., "Again it's how do you
respond?"


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THE A.ilA, CTE[C :'-i f If.
Cleveland Browns wide receiver Josh Gordon (12) breaks away
from Detroit Lions defensive back Darius Slay (30) during the'
game in Cleveland on Oct. 13.


.~0
Merweather's



suspension


down to 1 game


The Associated Press a mistake, they want to Sot' ?
protect the player, so if it's PR
NEW YORK Washing- anywhere close to being a
ton Redskins safety Bran- helmet-to-helmet, they are
don Meriweather's two- throwing a 15-yard flag,
game suspension from the and that's what they're be- | bos
NFL for multiple helmet- ing told to do. If you get
to-helmet hits was cut in anywhere around that
halfWednesday oh appeal, head, you've got a chance
Two days after Merin- to hurt your football team,"
weather was toldhe would Washington coach Mike
miss time for repeated Shanahan said Wednes-
violations of player safety day in Ashburn, Va. "We're
rules, hearing officer Ted constantly emphasizing it,
Cottrell reduced the pun- but it's tough in the heat of
ishment to one game. Cot- battle for these guys. You're
trell was jointly appointed very competitive. You want-
by'the league and the play- to get after them. Then all
ers' union. of a sudden, a guy might
Meriweather's suspen- duck at the last -second,
sion by NFL vice president and. all -of a sudden you
of football operations Mer- have helmet-to-helmet,
ton Hanks came for re- and they don't even look at
peated hits to the head and intent."
neck area of defenseless In Week 2, Meriweather
players, including two in was fined $42,000 for a
Washington's 45-41 victory helmet-first hit on Green
over the Chicago Bears on Bay running back Eddie
Sunday. Lacy, forcing Lacy out of
Meriweather was flagged the game with a concus-
for a helmet-to-helmet sion. Later that same day,
hit when tackling receiver another helmet-first hit
Alshon Jeffery on a 28-yard gave Meriweather himself
completion with about two a concussion, knocking
minutes left in the third him out of the game.
quarter. He also was pe- Meriweather will lose
nalized for a helmet-first about $70,000 in sal- 2 6
hit on Brandon Marshall ary when he sits out Sun-
in the end zone on an in- day's game at the Den-'
complete pass with a little ver Broncos. He is not
more than four minutes allowed to participate
remaining in the game. in any football activities l em
"All of these officials, with the team during the W
Jif theY're going io make suspension.


~YA ~ininmm.~u


10OB FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25,2013


E -1 V^^^^^f^
^^w^: ^^


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