Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01195

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text
- LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


Lady Pirates ready to
make postseason run


\ -K. JAKO'cOUT j

One dead, 2 injured in

FLO RiIDAmiddle school shooting
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Vol.90 No. 220


Mariaima


Mand chare, dwithkidnapeping



grnd theft', dmstic' batter


From Stati report


On Oct. 21, Robert L. Garrett, of 3053
Calhoun Road, Marianna, was arrested
and charged with kidnapping, grand
theft and domestic battery, which he al-
legedly committed against the mother of
his child, Desiree Marlyn Walker, on Oct.
16.
According to MPD, Walker alleges in her
complaint against Garrett that he took her
by force in the Grocery Outlet parking lot
after following her there.


She says he took her phone. deny-
ing her communications to call for help.,
struck her on the top and
side of her head, and bit
her on the arm and leg as
she struggled to get out
of the vehicle driven by a
friend who took them to a
residence on Camp Road.
Garrett An NIPD press release
goes on to say that when.
deputies arrived at the Camp, Road
residence, Walker did not tell the


deputies she had been taken against
her will because she was in shock from
the ordeal.
Walker came to the Marianna
Police Department later that night to file,
the complaint. On Oct. 18, an arrest war-
rant was obtained based on that com-
plaint and officers attempted to locate
Garrett over the weekend.
Garrett was arrested Oct. 21 when
he showed up at the Jackson County
Courthouse in reference to an unrelated
trespassing incident.


KINGDOMS CLASH AT
THE PANHANDLE SIURMISHES


P BOn R'. v tfM i 0 irl it n ftCPIOrAII
After a day of battling, fighters who wanted to keep going engaged in pick-up fights, often in hopes of learning from more experienced
members.



Warriorsgv on-



Compass Lake' n the Hills


BY MARK SKINNER
mciirinerE'icfiLoridan corn
- CONIPASS LAKE '-IN THE HILLS
- Close to 90 armored warriors from
the mighty kingdoms of Meridies
and Trimaris gathered at Compass Lake
in the Hills over the weekend. They


were there to do battle in the Panhandle
Skirmishes, an annual event pre-
sented by The Society for Creative
Anachronism Inc.
This was the second year the king-
doms- SCA's regional associations -
held the Skirmishes at Compass Lake.
While some SCA events feature arts and


sciences, the three-day Panhandle Skir-
mishes is purely a military-sryle event.
Saturday's schedule was, basically,
fight all day, then eat. That being said,
the event also featured a variety of
merchants selling their wares, archery
See WARRIORS. Page 7A


Brother of wanted mainfacing charge'ss ofhis own


From staff reports
On Oct. 19. at approximately
2:37 p.m., Officers with the
Marianna Police Department
responded to 2927A Albert-St.
in reference to a disturbance.
Once on scene, officers ob-
served inside the apartment a
black male they believed to be
a subject who had a felony war-
rant out of Jackson County.
According to court docu-
ments,, the officer addressed
the man, who was sitting on
the couch, as "Mr. Garrett," the


name of the man with the war-
rant, and asked hinm if he had
a'"trespass warning out here."
The man on the couch said he
did not.
The officers then detained
the subject, still on the couch,
and then stood him. up to at-
tempt to check for weapons,
as the man with the warrant
was said to possibly be armed.
That's when the subject alleg-
edly became irate and began
to resist officers.
The officer's affidavit says he
then pushed the subject back


down on the couch where the
officer, "could control his arms
and keep him from possibly
retrieving a weapon."
After the officer called for
assistance and advised police
dispatch that he had "Robert
Garrett" in custody, the man
he had detained told him he
was Joshua Garrett, not Rob-.
ert Garrett. The officer says he
then verified the man's iden-.
tdy as Joshua A. Garrett, 25, of
Marianna. He was identified
as the brother of Robert Gar-
rett, the man with' the active


warrant out foi. his arrest. MPD
then placed loshua Garrett un-
der arrest for resisting an offi-
cer without violence.
Outside the apartment, offi-
cers located marijuana, crack
cocaine and; powder cocaine
on Garrett's person.
MPD Officers then attempt-
ed to place Garrett in the back
of a patrol vehicle. Officials
say that's when Garrett kicked
and then spit on a law enforce-
ment officer. Garrett was then
See CHARGES, Page 7A


Makiannia


Discover the

'Spirit of the


Caverns' this

weekend


P.1 FI ItJIJI F f 1i : 0'' im I'Afj FI1-
Clyde Phillipp gives Johnathon and Valerie
Phillipp some help with their dart throwing
during the 2012 Spirit of the Caverhs.

Annual event has
new hours, location

.' '. Fr':m ';tjh repon f .
For some pre-Halloween fun,
bring your little ghouls and goblins
to Florida Caverns State Park in Mari-
anna for this weekend's "Spirit of the
Caverns."
The Department of Environmental
Protection's Florida Caverns State Park
and the Friends of the Florida Caverns
State Park Inc. invite everyone to join
them for two days of wildlife displays,
educational exhibits and interpreta-
tion of the "spirits and folklore" of
See CAVERNS, Page/A


Hfolmes Cooiaty


_3 men..


arrestedin


theft ring.

Investigation also
reveals meth lab

From staff report.,
The Holmes County Sheriff's Office
announces the arrest of three men af-
ter an investigation into
stolen utility trailers.
One of those suspects is
also facing drug-related
charges after deputies
found a meth lab at his
home.
Graham HCSO says the inves-
tigation began Sept. 24
when the agency was
notified of a utility trail-
er taken from a roofing
company that had been
working at the Hiclory
Hill Church in the Pros-
perity community.
Shideler Later on Sept. 26,
HCSO was notified of a
theft from a storage yard
westbof BonifayWhere a
utility trailer, -tool box
and several other items
were taken.
HCSO was able to
Morrill identify Jeffrey Shardon
Morrill, 31, as a suspect
in the first theft and Beauregard Lane
See THEFT, Page 7A


'>CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


)) ENTERTAINMENT...4B


.,)LOCAL.. 3A


'>NATlOFI...6A


) STATE...4A


), SPORTS. lB


,.WEATHER...2A


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7 65161 80050


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MOM W R]I-E


Follow us




Facebook Twitter


jz~S6DSi ,OUHIY


..........
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.c6m


Weather Outlook


.Sunny & Mild.-


,Mostly Sunny & Cooler.



High 740
Low 490'

Friday
Sunny.& Mild.


TIDES.
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destiro
Pensacola


,*RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Low 9:36,AM
Low 1:01 PM
Low 9:41 AM
Lo" 1 052 AM
Low 11:26 PM


High
High
High
High,
High


Reading
41.50ft.
3.66 ft.
7.26 ft.
4.86 ft.


- 11:22 PM
- 4:58 AM
-11:55 PM
- 11:49PM
112:22 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
S 19.0 ft.
120 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 Hie

0 1

'TILE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:48 AM
Sunset 6:02 PM
Ntoonrise '.8:52 PM
Moonsei 10:56 AM


Nov. Oct., Oct.
10 18 26


FLORIDA'S 311L

PANHANDLE

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9O

hLJISTENlFORllOURLYATHER UPDAiTE


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32448
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prides include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the 'publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for .non-inser-
tion of any advertise mlent beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable..

HOWTOGETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, de hand delivery.
Fees may apply fbr wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
'Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TUESDAY, OCT. 22,
Girls Art Day Camp 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at United
Methodist Church in Marianna. Agenda: painting.,
pottery, drawing and jewelry making. Cost: $30.
Deadline to register: Oct. 19. Call 386-2131.
)) St. Anne Thrift Store 9 a.m. 1 p.m. St. Anne's
Catholic Church. 3009 5th St., Marianna. Call 482-
3734- * .
Panhandle Youth Expo 9 a.m. Youth Exhibit
(norilivestocV.) Judging. 3 p.m. Swine Showmanship
,at Agricultural Center. U. S. 90, Marianna. Swine
Show will immediately follow Swine Showmanship.
) Careers in the Outdoors 10:30 a.m. at Sneads
High School in Sneads. Charlie and Ray of Fishing
University along with Michael Guy, of the Florida
Game and Fish Commission to discuss careers in
the outdoors. Public invited,
Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens. 2931 Optimist Drive~in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledorlia St. in Marianna.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901-Caledonia St. inMarianna,

WEDNESDAY; OCT. 23.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St, in Marianna.
Panhandle Youth Expo 91a.m. Farm Judging
and Poultry & Rabbit Judging. 1 p.m. Goat Show.
Agricultural Center. U.S 90. Marianna. Beef Show-
manship immediately following Goat Show. Goats
released immediately following Goat Show.
) Jackson County Library Board monthly
meeting -'3 p.m. Board of County Commissioners
meeting room. Public invited.

THURSDAY, OCT. 24
i)St. Anne Thrift Store 9a.m. -1 p.m. St.Anne's
,Catholic Church, 3009 5tn St., Marianna. Call 482-
3734
Panhandle Youth Expo 9:30 a.m. Beef Exhibi-
tor Meeting. 10 a.m. Breeding Beef Show. 1 p.m.
Steer Show. Agricultural Center, U.S. 90, Marianna.
Beef released immediately following show.
Chipola Civic Club Meeting Noon at The Oaks
Restaurant, U.S, 90 in Marianna. The CCC's focus,
is the local community, "Community. Children &
Character." Call 526-3142.
Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group


- 5:30 p.m. at Jackson Hospital Cafeteria Board.
Room. Free to attend. Curriculum developed by. ex-
smokers for thos6 who want to become ex-smokers
themselves Call 482-6500.
D Chattahoochee dain Street Project Scare
Haunted House 6 p.m.-9p.m. EST 35 Madison
St. in Chattahoochee. $2 under 12. $3 for 12 and up.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion.
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church. 2901
Caledonia St.. Ma'rianna. in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking:
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY; OCT. 25,
uSpirit of the Caverns 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday
and Saturday at Florida Caverns State Park
Hickory Pavilion. Marianna. Fun for the whole family:
Children's games. living historians. wildlife/educa-
tional displays, candy. prizes. Smokey the Bear and
more. Cost: $4 per carload (up to 8 people). Call
573-0390.
P Hooks and Needles -10 a.m. at the Jacksonr
County Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and
experienced hand crafters.welcome to create, share,
learn or teach favorite projects. Call 482-9631.
Chattahoochee MaIn Street Project Scare
Haunted House 6 p.m.-9p.m. EST.35 Madison
St. in Chattahoochee. $2 under 12. $3 for 12 and up.
S"Senior Singles" Meeting 6-8 p.m. in the
First United Methodist Church Youth Center, 4392
Clinton St.. Marianna. New location. Ample parking.
Singles age 50 and older.are invited for games,
food, prizes and speakers. No charge. Donations
accepted proceeds fund charitable endeavors of,.
Marianna's Gathering Place Foundation. Call 526-
4561 or 272-6611.
Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center. 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult.
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups:' Dinner: 6 p.mr. Child care available. Call,,
209-7856, 573-1131.
p Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church. 2901 Caledonia St. in, Marianna.

SATURDAY, OCT. 26
Spirit of the Caverns 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday
and Saturday at Florida Caverns State Park
Hickory Pavilion, Marianna.. Fun for the whole family:
Children's games, living historians, wildlife/educa-
tional displays, candy, prizes, Smokey the Bear and
more. Cost: $4 per carload (up to 8 people). Call
573-0390.
) Alford Community Health Clinic Hours .-10
a.m. until last patient is seen, at 17-70 Carolina St. in


Allord. The free clinic for income-eligible patients
without medical insurance treats short-term -ill'
nesses and chronic conditions. Appointments avail-
able (call 263-7106 or 209-55011: walk-ins welcome.
Sign in before noon.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church. 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.,
Chattahoochee Main Street Project Scare
Haunted House 6 p.fri.-9p.m. EST 35 Madison
St. in Chattahoochee. $2 under 12. $3 for 12 and up.
Sneads High School Project Graduation
Wright's Halloween haunt "13" 6.10 p.m. 2012
Wilson Ave., Grand Ridge. $3 per person. Ages 5 and
under free.
) Chipola College Show Choir Showcase 7
'p.m. Center for the Arts at Chipola College in Mari-
anna. Area middle and high school show choirs will
join Chipola Show Choir for an evening of song and
dance. Tickets: adults $5: under-18 $3.

SUNDAY, OCT. 27
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discus-
sion 6:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United
Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna
.Attendance limited to persons with'a desire to stop
drinking.
Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting -8 p.m. in
the board rocm of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital.
5429 College Drive. Graceville.

MONDAY, OCT. 28
Marianna Woman's Club and. Lowest Home Im-
provement" Fall Container Gardens" workshop
-10 a.m. in the Garden Center at Marinna Lowe's'
store. Free but registration suggested. Call 209-
9325 or 569-2227.
Parkinson's Support Group Meeting Noon
in the ground.floor classroom of Jackson Hospital.
Lunch provided. Those diagnosed within Parkinson's
and their caregivers are invited. No cost to partici-
pate. Call 718-2661.
)lMarianna Lions Club Meeting Noon at Jim's
Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St., Marianna. Call
482-2005.
Jackson County Quilters Guild Meeting
- 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 U.S. 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings
are fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects,
lessons, help, All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
Sneads High School Project Graduation
Wright's Halloween haunt "13" 6-9 p.m.'2012
Wilson Ave., Grand Ridge. $3 per person. Ages 5 and
under free.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community CalendarJackson County Floridan, P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcflQridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for Oct. 20, the
latest available report: Two abandoned
vehicles reported, two reckless drivers,
two physical disturbance complaints, one
verbal disturbance complaint, one panic
alarm, four traffic stops, one criminal mis-
chief report, one follow-up investigation,
one assault, 22 property/building checks,
one property damage report, one transport
call and two 911 hang-up calls.


Jackson County Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following
incidents for Oct. 20 the latest available
report: One report of a missing adult, two
abandoned vehicles.reported, one reckless
driver reported, eight suspicious vehicles
reported, two suspicious incidents re-
ported, one suspicious person complaint,
one report involving mental illness, one
burglary report, two physical disturbances,
five verbal disturbances, two pedestrian/
hitchhiker calls, one report of a prowler,
15 medical calls, four burglary alarms, one
panic alarm, one report of a shooting in
the area, three traffic stops, two larceny
reports, one criminal mischief call, one re-
port of trespassing, one found/abandoned


Police Roundup
property report, one littering/garbage
complaint, two assaults, two fights in prog-
chress, one noise disturbance,
^^-'27 property/building
'checks, four calls to assist
tA s a motorist/pedestrian, two
I ME calls to assist other agen-
Z; cies, one public service
call, one transport call,
one patrol request, one open door/window
report, two threat/harassment complaints,
and two 911 hang-up calls.


Jackson County
Conectional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
periods, Oct. 18-20:
) Charles Nelson, 25, 2935 Gardenview
Rd., Cottondale; domestic battery, posses-
sion of controlled substance with intent
to sell or deliver,, cultivation of marijuana,
possession of marijuana (more than 20
grams).
Sue Wilkes, 44, 6167 Pluto Trail, Mari-
anna; retail theft.
3 James Wilson, 55,2374'LongPine St.,
Campbellton; fugitive from justice (Hous-
ton County Ala.).
Elijah Turner, 39, 2135 Magnolia Dr.,
Cottondale; DUI.


Gregory Parham, 39,11943 Park Ave.,
Sneads; domestic battery by strangulation,
aggravated assault with a deadly weapon,
violation of state probation.
)) Joshua Garrett, 25,3124 Old U.S. Road,
Marianna; resisting arrest without violence,
possession of marijuana (less than 20
grams), possession of a controlled sub-
stance (cocaine), battery on a.law enforce-.
ment officer, criminal mischief, possession
of a controlled substance (crack cocaine).
) Tommy Stephens, 60,4904 Pope Chapel
Church Road, Marianna; failure to appear
(aggravated assault), failure to appear (ag-
gravated battery).
)) Christopher Powell, 18,2827 Booker St.,
Apt. B, Marianna; grand theft, grand theft.
of a firearm, burglary while armed.
) Jonathan Harrison, 24,4320 Dairy St.,
Apt. A, Marianna; hold for Liberty County.
Candra Pollock, 29, 2880 Eva Mae St.,
Marianna; aggravated battery.
) Derek Granberry, 38,2508 Sylvania
Plantation Road,,Greenwood; possession
of marijuana (more than 20 grams) with
intent to distribute within 1,000 feet of
worship center.
SLarry Finch, 49, 1057 Sixth Ave., Gracev-
ille; non-payment of child support.
Jail population: 209
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agency.To report a wildlife violation,
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


High-770
Low 480

Thursday
Sunny & Mild.


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


-12A TUESDAY, OCTOBER' 22,2013


WMKE-UP CALL




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NEW OPTIMIST CLUB OF JACKSON' COUNTY


BOARD MEMBERS, FOR THE. 2013-2014 YEAR INDUCTED









L zJackson Lt.
Governor, Sylvia
'Stephens JCOJC
President, Karen Wat-
son Board Member,
Karen Keesee Board
Member, Betty Dem-
mo n Board Member,
Kay Denn-is Board
Member, Shellie
-Hollis V-President,
___ Debbie Gochenaur
Sreay, And Mary
Pettis Board
Member.


__________ STEM Students Help Find'Solutions to

Algae Growth at Florida Caverns State Park


SUBMITTED PHOTO
aci Hart, 2, loving on her cat Suga'.
Wonderful daughter of Leatrice Hart.
-~~~~~~- ,^ '*';- .**'


Special to the Floridan

The FloridaLearns STEM Schol-
ars initiative was launched in July,
2011, with a vision to help Florida
address its urgent and important
STEM talent development chal-
lenge by focusing on some of
Florida's most underserved stu-
- dents, its gifted and talented high
school students in the rural regions
of the state. -
The Panhandle Area Educational
Consortium located, in Chipley, in
partnership with Heartland Educa-
tional Consortium and
North Florida Educational Consor-
tium, is collaborating'with STEM-
related higher edudatiof agencies,
military, businesses and industry,
student participants, parents and
community members to coordi-


SUBMITTED PHOTO
MHS student Morgan Willis is one of
the participants in the STEM talent
development experience at Florida
Caverns State Park.

nate FloridaLearns STEM Scholar
activities.


PAEC's Regional Advisory Com-
mittee for-the project met on Oct.
8, in Chipley. During the meeting,
Morgan Willis, a Marianna High
School student, presented infor-
mation regarding her week at the
University of Florida Immersion
into STEM Experience and also
provided details about her STEM
Talent Development Experience at
Florida Caverns State-Park.
Morgan and fellow Marianna
High School student, Evan
Barber, along with teacher, Kathy
McCrary, spent two weeks test-
ing solutions that might be used
to effectively remove algae from
the cave's limestone formations.
lights in the cave foster the ,growth
of algae and must be routinely
cleaned to protect the integrity of
the formations.


PAM FUQUA GUEST SPEAKER

ATITHE MkLkNNA

AMERICANILEGION.,

POST 10,o


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Pam Fuqua (center), Jackson County TDC Director, -was the
special guest speaker at the Marianna American Legion
Post 100 and Auxiliary Unit 100 monthly dinner meeting on
October 8. Ms. Fuqua provided information on current and
future projects of the TDCand showed photos of the many
great places to visit in Jackson County. Pictured are: Vice-
Commander & Program Chair Jesse Smallwood (left), Ms.
Fuqua (center), and Post Commander Tony Swearingen.


R' ida Lottery


Chipola Offering
Online Continuing Ed
and Career Training
Chipola College has a
program-that makes it
easy to take high-qual-
ity, affordable Online
Continuing Education
Courses and Career Train-
ing Programs.
Through a partnership
with ed2go|GES, anyone
can develop new skills
and knowledge needed -
to stand out in today's
competitive job market.
Courses are designed to
enhance personal and -
professional skills, launcW)
a new career or advance
in an existing one. Com-
prehensive six-week on-
line courses start monthly,
and students can work-.
anytime and anywhere
that is convenient.
Each high-quality
course includes compre-
hensive lessons, quizzes,


and a discussion area.
Dedicated instructors
facilitate every course;
pacing learners, answer-
ing questions, giving
feedback, and facilitating
discussions.
Online Career Training
Programs are available
to start anytime. They
range from three to six -
months, and many offer
an extension period if
necessary. Many pro-
grams include an indus-
- try certification exam.
Internship and externship
opportunities ar4 avail-
able for select programs.
The programs are entirely
Web-based, but expert
instructors provide office
hours and quick answers
to questions.
Alicia Hatcher, Continu-
ing Education Coordina-
tor at Chipola said, "We
are pleased to offer this
catalog of courses, which
provides the most con-
venient, affordable, and


accessible career train-
ing programs available
anywhere."
To learn more, call
Hatcher at 718-2405
or visit www.chipola.
edu/continuinged ,

WCU Choral and Jazz
Band at First Baptist
Church Marianna
The William Carey
University Chorale and
Jazz Band will be featured.
at First Baptist Church in
Marianna on Thursday
evening Oct. 24 at 7 p.m.
The 55 singers and 22
member orchestra Will
perform a variety of music
for worship. Under the di-
rection of Dr. Don Odom,
the Chorale has travelled
extensively throughout
the United States per-
forming at churches,
schools, and festivals.
Admission is free and
the public is invited.


LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT
WWW.JCFLORDAN.COM


The First Baptist Church
of Marianna is located
at 2897 Green Street.
For more information,
contact the church office
526-4200. -
From local reports


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Local Briefs


- Mon.
Mon
Tue.
Tue.
Wed
Wed.
Trurs.
Thurs
Fri
Fri
Sat.


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2013 4, 3AF


LOCRL


POWERBALL


For lottery iniormati on, call S50-4'S7-7?7-7 or 900 7-,'7.77-7




JACJKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.cohih


Sheldon seeks


to challenge Fla.


AG PamiBondi


The Associaled Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.
Former Department
of Children and Families
Secretary George Shel-
don criticized Attorney
General Pam Bondi as he
entered the race for herd
seat Monday.
Sheldon, a Democrat,
made his announcement
on Facebook, and while
he didn't call Bondi out by
name, he criticized her for
fighting President Obama's
health care overhaul and
for using the position for
political purpose.'
"Taking on predatory
lenders, human traffick-
ers and those who engage
in deceptive practices is
the job of the Attorney
General... not working full
time trying to deny health
insurance to children and
anyone with pre-exist-
ing conditions," Sheldon
wrote in his post.
Bondi, who lost a court
battle to have the Afford-
able Car Act deemed un-
constitutional, once told a
Republican group, "I can
sue the federal govern-
ment all day long."
Sheldon wrote: "This
race is about character.
Who has the experience
and character to use the
office of attorney general
for general good rather
than as a personal, politi-
cal, partisan platform."
Bondi's campaign
praised her work.
- "As Florida's Attorney
General, Pam Bondi has
fought hard to defend
and protect the people by
making Florida a zero tol-
erance state for pill mills,
taking on human traffick-
ing, and pursuing con-
sumer relief from both,
mortgage and Medicaid
fraud," Pablo Diaz, her
campaign manager, said
Sman email.
Sheldon recently re-
signed from his position
as acting assistant secre-
tary for the Administration
for Children and Families
at the U.S. Department .
of Health and Human


Services.
It's not the first time
Sheldon has sought the
post. He was a candidate
for the 2002 Democratic
Party nomination, losing
to current Orlando Mayor
Buddy Dyer. Republican
Charlie Crist eventu-
ally won the seat. When
then-Republican Crist
served as governor, he
picked Sheldon as DCF
secretary. Sheldon was
widely praised for leading
a department that is often
the target of criticism.
Sheldon, 66, was
deputy attorney general
under Bob'Butterworth.
The pair has worked
closely together over the
years. When Butterworth
was appointed DCF sec-
retary, he chose Sheldon
as his assistant secretary.
Crist tapped Sheldon to
take over for Butterworth
when he resigned in
Eoo8.
Crist, now a Democrat, is
expected to run for gover-
nor again.
Sheldon was his parry's
nominee for education
secretary in 2000, a race
he lost to Crist. He also
served as a state represen-
tative from 1975 to 1982.
He is the only viable
Democratic candidate
seeking any of the state's
three Cabinet positions on
the ballot next year.
"Pam Bondi and George
Sheldon have very differ-
ent credentials and points
of view, and we welcome
the opportunity to show
the voters in Florida that
they will have a clear
choice between two dis-
.tincdy different candi-
dates," Diaz said.
Bondi was recently
criticized for asking Gov.
Rick Scott to postpone an
execution so she could
host a fundraiser at her
home for her re-elec-
tion. Marshall Lee Gore,
a former escort service
owner who murdered two
women, was allowed to
live another three weeks at
Bondi's request. She later
apologized.


* 4


W-L
96-31
Mississippi State
Oregon State
Ohio State
Florida State
Auburn
Alabama
Georgia Tech
Miami
Texas A&M
Troy
North Carolina
Cottondale
Sneads
Trenton
Notre Dame
Akron


W-L
92-35
Mississippi State
Stanford
Ohio State
Florida State
Auburn
Alabama
Georgia Tech
Miami ,
Texas A & M
Western Kentucky
North Carolina
Cottondale
Sneads
Trenton
- Notre Dame
Ball State


a0 OR
W-L
90-37
Mississippi State
Stanford
Ohio State
Florida State
Auburn
Alabama
Georgia Tech
Miami
Texas A&M
Troy
North Carolina
Cottondale
Sneads
Marianna
Notre Dame
Ball State


W- L
89-38
Mississippi State
Stanford
Ohio State
Florida State
Auburn
Alabama
Georgia Tech
Miarrii
Texas A&M
Troy
North Carolina
Cottondale
Sneads
Marianna
Notre.Dame
Akron


W-L
83-44
Mississippi State
Stanford
Ohio State
Florida State
Auburn
Alabama
Georgia Tech
Miami
Texas A & M
Troy
North Carolina
Cottondale
Sneads
Marianna
Notre Dame
Ball State


4 -- L


79-48
Mississippi State
Oregon' State
Ohio State
Florida State
Auburn -
Alabarna-
Georgia.Tech *
Miami .
Texas A&M'K
Troy'
Florida A&M.
Jay,',
Sneads
Trenton- .'
Notre Dame
Ball State


6 -foot gator makes


appearance at


Apopka Wal-Mart


The Associated Press them.
Orlando television
APOPKA, Fla. (AP) A station WKMG reports
-foot alligator made an Apopka police officers
welcome appearance at tried to lure the gator away
he front door of the Apop- as customers gathered
aWal-Niart. to watch and snap pic-
The incident happened tures.
unday morning. The ga- The gator took off toward
or stopped in the entry- the nearby w6ods. Offi-
vay, causing the automat- cers scoured the area but
c doors to open and close couldn't find him.
until employees locked No one was injured,


",1

.1

11


6 cars damaged


byfireatlampa


Hard Rock casino
*'*'**' *; *'. R6 1 '


The Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. Officials
say six cars were damaged
by a fire at the Seminole
Hard Rock Casino & Hotel
.inTampa.
Hillsborough, County
Fire Rescue reports that
crews responded to a fire
inside the parking garage
Monday afternoon and
found a car fully engulfed
in flames.
It took firefighters'about
10 minutes to put out
the blaze, which had also
damaged surrounding ve-
hicles.
No injuries were reported


to civilians or firefighters.
Seminole police and fire
marshal will be conduct-
ing an investigation. Offi-
cials weren't immediately
reporting the cause of the
fire.


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4A # TUESDAY., OCTOBER 22,2013





'JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


L










p


e


Lillie Danzy, (front left) mother of escaped inmate Charles
Walker, with her husband Jeff Danzy, (second from left) listen
as Henry Pearson (far right) uncle of escaped inmate Joseph
Jenkins, makes a plea for his nephew to turn himself in to
authorities during a news conference at the Orange County
Sheriff's Office in Orlando, Fla., Saturday, Oct. 19. Joseph Jen-
kins and Charles Walker, two convicted killers freed by bogus
paperwork, were at large.

Police pledge more


arrests in escaped


t


HFUT^ d^^ ^^~^IA LW muri^^ws^ v^^f^^ v^W^rB ^B^


I Name


W-L
74,53
Missiisippi State
iStanford
'Penn State
Fl6rida State
Auburn
Alabama
Georgia Tech
Miami
Texas A & M
Troy
.Fdridci A & M
Cottondale
'Snbads
Marianna
Notre Dame
Akron


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Address


Phone Number-


City


Zip -


List Your Picks (All entries must be received no later than Friday at 5:00 p.m.)
1 -- 6 ----- ----- -11.



S3. 8. 13.___

4.____._: __ __9. 9._ _ ___ ___ 14. -__l __'
,' ,i i i ,' r it ,* ^' f ,i10 .ji
l^-.:~:^7^ ~^3^A


Football contest rules:
1. Pick the winners of the games hidden in the ads shown and list them on the official


2. Readers of the Jackson County Floridan may enter the football contest weekly.
All. entries must be on the official entry form (no facsimiles will be accepted].
View and print ballot online at icfloridan.com/sports
3. Entries must be in our hands by Friday at 5:00 pm following the publication.
Entries can be delivered to our office located at
4403 Constitution Lane Marjanna, Florida 32448.
4. In case of a tie, the tie breaked will determine'the winner.


Only 2 winners, per household during the contest period.
5. Employees of the Jackson County Floridan, a 6ddtheir families are not eligible for entry.
6. Winner must present proper 1.0. and complete a W-9 to receive the weekly $75 prize.
7. Decisions of the judges are final on all contest rules.


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inmate case


TheA ocilated Press

PANAMA CiTN' BEACH,
Fla. Investigators
worked to fulfill their
pledge to find and arrest
the people who helped
two Florida inmates es-.
cape from prison using
forged documents.
The two convicted killers
were back in custody and
being grilled by authorities
after they were captured
without incident over the
weekend at a motel in
Panama City. Meanwhile,
corrections officials were
planning to hold meetings
with court clerks to dis-
cuss how to prevent other
inmates from using fake
papers to escape.
The investigation of the
escape by Joseph Jenkins
and Charles Walker is now
focusing on who forged
the papers for them, who
helped the men elude po-
lice after the 'trickery was
discovered and who was
coming to pick them up at
the hotel in Panama City.
"I can tell you, there will
be more arrests," Florida
Department of Law En-
forcement Commissioner
Gerald Bailey said at a
news conference Sunday.
"We will be backtrack-
ing to those who helped
carry out this fraud and
along the way we will be
looking closely at anyone
who may have helped har-
bor these fugitives," Bailey
said.
Jenkins and Walker, both
34, were captured Satur-.
day night at the Coconut'
Grove Motor Inn in Pana-
ma City Beach, a touristy
area of putt-putt courses
and go-kart tracks.
The men, who had fled
the Orlando area after
word of their ruse be-
came public, did not know
law enforcement was on
the way to Panama Cirv.
They were waiting in the
motel for someone to ar-
rive from Atlanta to take
them out of state, Bailey
said, adding that authori-
ties don't yet know who
that person was or where
the convicts planned to go.
Florida investigators are
working with their coun-
terparts in Georgia.
"They had to have had
helpo- a lot of help,- 'to
get to where they were last
night," Bailey said. He said
the men were unarmed
and didn't have much
money.
Bailey's department is
pursuing a tip that some-
one was offering to forge
documents for prisoners
for $8,000. He said there
are at least two other re-
cent cases where prison-
ers were thwarted trying
to use fake documents to
escape.
"The documents them'
selves looked good, they
looked official," Bailey
said, although they con-
tained the signatures of
people who normally don't
deal with release docu-
ments, something that'
maybe should have raised
questions, he said.
Meanwhile, Corrections
Secretary Michael Crews
scheduled a meeting with
court clerks on Monday to
find ways to prevent future
escapes through 'bogus


documents. .
"It is embarrassing, but
my concentration at this
point is making sure that
we come up with a process
and a procedure that pro-
hibits this from happening
in the future," Crews told a
news conference.
Crews has already or-
dered his department to
begin verifying the le-
gitimacy of early-release
orders with a judge, not
just court clerks. He said'
his department receives a
few thousand such orders
each year, although he ac-
knowledged that reduced
sentences in murder cases
are~rare.
He also expressed relief
that the men were cap-
tured.
"I did a lot of praying for
the last five or six days," he
said. "To say we're thankful
I think is probably an un-
derstatement. These were
two hardened, convicted
felons and the thought of
them, being out there in
our state caused me great
concern."
The two prisoners had
not been traveling togeth-
er, but hooked up once
word of the forgeries be-
came public and traveled
from Orlando to Panama
City, said Frank Chiumen-
to (Sha NIENTO), chief of
the U.S. Marshals Service
(or Florida and the Carib-
bean.
Chiumento told The As-
sociated Press on Sunday'
that Jenkins and Walker
knew their time on the
run was limited once
their ruse had been. un-
covered. They were un-
der sun'eWance for about
two, and a half days, and
the men were surprised
when authorities finally
knocked on their motel
door. . I I
Jenkins.and Walker were
both serving life sentences'
at the Franklin Correctibn-
al Facility in the Panhan-
die before they walked free
without anyone realizing
the paperwork, complete
with case numbers and a
*judge's forged signature,
was bogus. The docu-
ments seemingly reduced
their life sentences to' 15
years.
Jenkins was released first
on Sept. 27 and registered
himself as a felon Sept. 30
in an Orlando jail. Walker
was released Oct. 8 and
also registered himself
with authorities three days
later.
Family members said
they thought 'the releas-
es were legitimate and
that the convicts even
spent time with their
relatives before they
disappeared. Hours be-
fore the capture, the in-
mates' families had held
a news conference in Or-
lando -1 350 miles away
urging them to surren-
der.
Jenldns had been locked
up since the 1998 kill-
ing and botched rob-
bery of Roscoe Pugh, an
Orlando man. It wasn't
until Thesday, when one
of Pugh's relatives con-
tacted the state attorney's
office to let them know
Jenkins' had been let out,
that authorities knew 'of
the escape.


lo o m 77 ...........


STATE'


0


TUESDAY, OCT08ER 22,2013 *5A




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Middle School Shooting



Police:Student killedstaffer at Nevada school


The Associated Press

SPARKS, Nev. A stu--
dent at a Nevada middle
school opened fire on
campus just before the
starting' bell Monday,
wounding two boys and
killing a staff member-who
was trying to protect other
children, Sparks police
said Monday.
TWenty to thirty students
were witnesses to the trag-
edy that also left the/lone
suspected gunman dead,
police said. It's unclear
whether the student com-
mitted suicide, but au-
thorities say no shots were
fired by law enforcement.
Police said between 150
and 200 officers, includ-
ing some from as far as 60
miles away, responded to
the shooting.
"In my estimation, he is a
hero ..:We do know he was
trying to intervene," Reno
Deputy Police Chief Tom
Robinson said about the
fallen staff member.
The motive isn't yet
known. Names of the sus-
pect and victims haven't
yet been released.
"As you can imagine, the


A Sparks Middle School student, back to camera, cries with family members after being
released from Agnes Risley. Elementary School Monday, in Sparks' Nev., after a shooting at
Sparks Middle School. A student at the Sparks Middle School opened fire on campus, killing a
staff member who was trying to protect other children, police said Monday.


best description is chaos,"
Robinson said. "It's too
early to say whether he
was targeting people or
going on an indiscriminate
shooting spree." '
Students from the middle
school and neighboring
elementary school. were
evacuated to the nearby
high school, and classes


were canceled. The middle can imagine how parents
school will remain closed are feeling. You don't know'
for the week. if your kid's OK."
At the evacuation center, One of the students in-
parents comforted their jured in the violence that
childrexi. ',. erupted around 7:15 a.m.
"We came flying down is out of surgery and the
here to get our kids," other is doingwell, accord-
said Mike Fiorica, whose ing to police.
nephewattendsthe school., The shooting happened
"... It's really chaotic. You on the school's campus


and ended outside the
school building itself, ac-
cording to police.
',"I was deeply .saddened
to learn of the horrific
shooting at Sparks Middle
School this morning," Ne-
vada Gov. Brian Sandoval
said in a statement ex-
tending his thoughts and
prayers to those affected;
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid, D- Nev'ada, of-
fered his condolences to
those who experienced "a
traumatic morning."
"No words of condolence
could possibly ease the
pain, but I hope it is some
small comfort that Nevada
'mourns, with them," Reid
said in a statement.
.,The school, located in a
working class neighbor-
hood, enrolls about 700
students in 7th and 8th
grades.
The violence 'erupted
nearly a year after a gun-
man horrified the nation
by opening fire in Sandy
Hook Elementary School
in Newtown, Conno, leav-
ing 26 dead. The Dec. 14
shooting ignited debate
over how best to protect
the nation's schools and'


whether armed teach-;
ers should be part of that
equation.
In a statement on the
website of Sandy Hook
Promise, a gun control,
advocacy group, Nicole;
Hockley, whose son Dylarn
was killed in the shooting
said, :"It's moments like
this that demand that we.
unite as parents to find,
.common sense solutions.
that keep our childrenall
children-safe, and prevent,
these tragedies from hap-
pening again anc, again."
Washoe County School
District held a session in.
-the spring in light of the
Connecticut tragedy to
educate parents on what
.safety measures the dis-
trict takes.
Sparks, a'city of .roughly
90,000 that sprung out of
the railway industry, lies
just east of Reno.
Mayor Geno Martini
spoke at a morning press.
conference to assure resi-
dents that the community
wa&safet'
"It's a tragic day'in the
city of Sparks," he said.
"This is just an isolated
incident."


Obama: 'No excuse for health care signup problems


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama on
Monday offered "no ex-
cuses" and little expla-
nation for the com-
puter bugs still frustrating
Americans who are-trying
to enroll online for insur-
ance plans at' the center
of his health care' law.
But software developers
tasked with building-, the
site said they saw signs a
year ago that the debut
could fail.
One source of the trou-
bles appears to be the test'
ing procedures employed
before the rollout three
weeks ago. Several devel-
opers of the HealthCare.
gov website told The As-
sociated Press they were
worried for months about
the system's readiness
and whether the software
meant to link key com-
puter systems was being
properly put through its
paces.
In addition, congres-
sional investigators raised
concerns before the roll-
out that the Centers for
Medicare and Medicaid
Services had taken'on the
job of testing the com-
puter systems for the new
markets during the final
weeks before the sign-ups


President Barack Obama walks from the Oval Office to the
Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Monday, with
Janice Baker, who runs a small business in Selbyville, Del.,
and was the first woman to enroll in the Delaware health care


exchange.
opened Oct. 1. That job is
often handled by special-
ized software companies.
Opama, who empha-
sized the website's sim-
plicity in the week's
leading up to the insur-
ance sign-ups, admitted
there could now be "no
sugarcoating" the prob-
lems even as, he talked
up the benefits of the law
at a Rose Garden' event
that had the feel of a pep
rally.
"The website that's sup-
posed to make it easy to
apply for and purchaseithe
insurance is not working
the way it should for every-


body," he said.
He insisted that the
problems would be fixed
and all Americans seeking
insurance would be able to
sign up. But it was not clear
how quickly that would
happen. The administra-
tion is beefing up call cen-
ters and encouraging more
people to enroll over the
phone while the website
problems persist.
The flood of computer
problems since the web-
site went online has been
deeply embarrassing for
the White House. The
glitches have called into
question 'whether the ad-


ministration is capable of
implementing the com-
plex policy and why se-
nior White House officials
- including the presi-
dent appear to have
been unaware of the scope
of the problems when the
health insurance mar-
kets, known as exchanges,
opened.
Obama stopped short,
of apologizing for the fail-
ures, saying. instead- that
"'nobody is more frustrated
than me."
Even as he spoke, more
problems came to light.
'The administration ac-
knowledged that a planned
upgrade to, the website
had been postponed in-
definitely and that online
Spanish-language signups.
would remain unavail-
able, despite a promise to
Hispanic groups that, the
capability would start this
week.
The White House says
additional technology ex-
perts from both inside and
outside the government
are being brought in to
work on' the failures.
Administration officials
initially blamed heavy
website traffic for the fro-
zen computer screens that
many people encountered
when they first logged


on. Since then, they have
also acknowledged short-
comings with software
and some elements of the
system's design, although
the administration has
yet to fully detail exactly
what went wrong with the
online system and who
was responsible for the
problems.
It appears the prob-
lems were well-khown to
some of those designing
the system. One developer
said that in the weeks lead-
ing up to the Oct. 1 launch,
he and his colleagues
huddled in conference.
rooms trying to patch de-
ficiencies in computer
code.
"It was an extremely tight
deadline," said the devel-,
oper, who spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because
he was told not to talk to
the news media about his
work.
Areviewof internal struc-
tural diagrams obtained
by AP' also, revealed the
complexity of the system.
The diagrams; show that
applicants must submit at
least 50 pieces of personal
information, including
income and immigration
status. That data is then
connected to at least eight
distinct federal computer


systems, including the So-
cial Security Administra-
tion and the Peace Corps.
The schematics from late
"2012 show how officials
preferred a "data services
hub" -a traffic cop of sorts
for managing informa-
tion instead of a setup
that would, have allowed
state exchanges to connect
directly to government,
servers when verifying an
applicant's information.
On 'Sunday, the Depart-
ment of Health and Hu-
man Services said fhe data
hub was working, but the
initial consumer experi-
ence had not lived up to
the public's expectations.
"We are committed to do-'.
ing better."
Administration officials-:
have so far refused to say
how many people have,
actually managed to en-
roll in insurance during
the three weeks since the
new marketplaces became
available. Without enroll-
ment numbers, it's im-
possible to know whether
the program is on track
to reach the projections
from the Congressional
Budget 'Office, which ,es-
timated 7 million people
would gain coverage
during the first year the ex-
changes were available.


Thieves pose as truckers


Thie Associated Press

WICHITA, Kan. T
steal huge shipments c
valuable cargo, thievee
are turning to a decep
lively simple tactic: The
pose as truckers, load thi
j freight onto their own trac
tor-trailers and drive awa
with it.
It's an increasingly coin
mon form of commercial
identity theft 'that has al
lowed con men to mak
off each year with million
of dollars in merchandisE
often food and beverage
And experts say the prac
tice is growing so rapid]
that it will soon become
the most common way t
steal freight.
I A generation ago, thieves
simply stole loaded truck
.out of parking lots. But thl
industry's widening us
of GPS devices, high-tec
locks and other advance
security measures hav
pushed criminals to adopt
new hoaxes.
Helping to drive th
scams, experts say, is th
Internet, which offer
thieves easy access to va;
amounts of information
about the trucking indus
try. Online databases a
low con men to assume
the identities of legitimal
freight haulers and to trar
ifor specific commoditfi


*they want to steal.
Besides hurting the na-
b tionis trucking industry
A which moves more than
,s 68 percent of all domestic
'shipments the thefts
y have. real-world conse-
e quences. for consumers,
including raising prices
y and potentially allowing
unsafe food and drugs to
i- reach. store shelves.
al News .reports from
I- across the country recount
:e just a few of the thefts:
is 80,000 pounds of walnuts
e, worth $300,000 in Cali-
s. fornia, $200,000 of Muen-
ster cheese in Wisconsin,
.y rib-eye steaks' valued at
le $82,000 in Texas, $25,000
o pounds of king crab worth
$400,000 in California.,
as The Hughson Nut Co.,
s fell victim twice last year,
.e losing two loads valued at
3e $189,000. Each time, the
h impostor truckers showed
d up at the Livingston, Calif.,
'e nut processor on a Friday
)t with all the proper paper-
work to pick up a load of
le almonds.
ie On the Monday follow-
rs ing the second theft, a
st customer called to com-
n plain that the almonds had
s- never arrived in Arizona.
1- The company's quality as-
le surance manager, Raquel
te Andrade, recalled getting
vA a sinking feeling: "Uh-oh. I
es think it happened again."


to steal huge cargo loads
The thefts ,are little- safety at' risk.
known and seldom dis- "In the end, the cnhsumn-
cussed outside the world er winds up paying the toll
of commercial trucking. on this," said Keith Lewis,
Companies that have been vice president of CargoNet,
victimized are often re- atheft-prevention network
luctant to talk about their that provides information
losses. But crime reports to the insurance industry.
and Associated Press in- The economic results go
terviews with law enforce- beyond.adding a few hick-
ment and industry leaders els or dimes to retail prices.
reveal an' alarming pat- The "consequential dam-
tern that hurts commerce, ages" from stolen cargo
pushes 'up consumer easily run into the millions
prices and potentially puts of dollars, far exceedingthe
Americans' health and value of the lost shipments.


I can show any listing ... not Just mine!

ED MCCOYTI.
850-573-6198 cell
emccoy02@yahoo.com 4N
I nt Century 21 Sunny
'M South Prnpeitles
,.Ai, mH.R r4TE 4630 Hwy 90 Marlanna, FL
www.emccbyrealtV.comfl


"1A*TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22,2013


i


NA~ION





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Warriors
From Page IA
contests using' period
bows and crossbows, fenc-
ing demonstrations and
other activities.
Thankfully, the ar-
rows flying through the
air on Saturday had no
sharp, pointy ends and,
instead of swords and
lances, warriors attacked.
each other with


weapons made out of flex-
ible rattan. I
"Dying" was on the honor
system and the safety rules
included, "don't be a jerk."
Farrell Rogers put it best
when he said, "We're really.
not killing each other."
SCA, according to the
group's website, is an in-
ternational organization
dedicated -to researching
and recreating the arts and
skills of pre-17th Century
Europe.


Holiday Hogg, (right)
gives Elizabeth
Snyder a few pointers
on how to shoot
her husband with
a medieval-style
crossbow during
Saturday's Panhandle
Skirmishes at
Compass Lake in
the Hills. The annual
event was organized
by members of the
Society of Creative
Anachronism Inc.'


Knight (and practice target) Quinton Snyder braces
himself as his wife fires a blunted crossbow bolt in his i' *jj
general direction. ______, __________________________



US carbon dioxide pollution down 3.8 percent


TheAssociatedPress

WASHINGTON The
United States cut its ener-
gy-related carbon dioxide
pollution by 3.8 percent
last year, the second big-
gest drop since 1990, the
Department of Energy
said Monday.
The only recent year
with a bigger percentage
drop was in 2009, when
America was in a large
recession. American cars
and factories spewed 5.83
billion tons of carbon di-
oxide in 2012, down from.
6.06 billion in 2011. It is
the lowest level for U.S.
emissions since 1994. Car-
bon dioxide is the chief
man-made global warm-
ing gas.
Energy Department
economist Perry Lind-
strom said carbon pol-
ludon reduction is due
to warm winter weather,
more efficient cars be-
cause of new mileage re-
quirements and an ongo-
ing shift from coal-power
to natural gas to produce
electricity.
The coal shift is a big
factor as is a sluggish eco-
nomic recovery, said Jay
Apt, director of the Carn-
egie Mellon Electricity
Industry Center. He said
in 1994 coal provided 52
percent of the U.S. power
and now it is down-to 37
percent. Burning coal pro-


A Norfolk Southern Railroad train pulls transport cars full of coal near Goodfield. Ill.. on
Oct. 9,2012. The United States cut its energy-related carbon dioxide pollution by 3.8 percent
in 2012, the second biggest drop since 1990, the Department of Energy said Monday, Oct.
21.


duces far more carbon di- bon pollution, by calculat-
oxide than burning natu- ing carbon dioxide emig-
ral gas.' sions per unit of GDP. And
Some past cuts in car- from 2011 to 2012, the
bon pollution were mostly United States carbon pol-
due to economic factors, lution per GDP dropped
such as the 7.1 percent by a record 6.5 percent,
drop in 2009, Lindstrom Lindstrom said.
said. But this drop hap-' That shovs this drop was
pened while the U.S. clearly not due to a reces-
economy was growing sion, Lindstrom said.
2.8 percent, as reflected In.2012, America spewed
by the gross domestic more than 368,000pounds
product, and its energy of carbon dioxide per
use was dropping by more second.
than 2 percent. "This latest drop in en-
Economists measure ergy-related carbon emis-
energy efficiency and how sions is reason for cau-.
real reductions are in car- tious optimism that we're


already starting to move mi
the right direction," said'
Pennsylvania State Uni-
versity climate scientist
Michael Mann. "But this
'alone will not lead us, to-
ward the dramatic carbon
reductions necessary to
avoid dangerous climate
change."
The world is heading in
the opposite direction. In
2011, the world carbon di-
oxide emissions jumped 3
percent, because of a large
increase by China, the No.
1 carbon polluting coun-
try. The U.S. is No. 2 in
carbon emissions.


NJ governor ends gay marriage fight as couples wed
The Associated Press,~ low, same7-sex.. couples


'TRENTON, N.J. Gov.
Chris Christie 'dropped
his fight against gay mar-
riage in New Jersey on
Monday, framing the deci-
sion in a pragmatic way:
/ No point in fighting a los-
ing battle.
Just hours after gay
couples began exchang-
ing vows with the blessing
of New Jersey's Supreme
Court, Christie announced
he was withdrawing his
appeal to the high court.
New Jersey is the 14th
state. to legalize gay
marriage.
Asrthe Republican gover-
nor seeks re-election two
weeks from now and pon-
ders a run for president in
2016, Christie's decision
holds both risks and ben-
efits for him.
It delighted gay rights
activists and could en-
hance Christie's appeal to
independents and moder-
ates of both parties. But it
angered members of the
GOP's conservative wing,


Beth Asaro (left) and Joanne Schailey (right) celebrate after
exchanging vows as Lambertville Mayor David DelVecchlo of-
ficiates in the first same-sex marriage in Lambertville history
at 12:61 a.m., Monday, Oct. 21, in Lambertville, N.J.
which already distrusts of the conservative Na-
Christie arid wields out- tional Organization for
sized influence in some Marriage, said he whs
state primaries, "extremely disappointed"
Bob McAfister, a veter- with Christie's decision,
an Republican strategist which he portrayed as "pf-
in South 'Carolina, said fectively throwing in the
Christie's latest move "is towel on marriage."
absolutely going to hurt Last year, the New Jer-
him." sey Legislature passed a
"Abandoning founda- bill to legalize gay mar-
*tional principles that go riage, but Christie ve-
beyond politics is not the toed it. The issue ended,
way to get positive atten- up before Christie
tion in South Carolina," he again after a trial-level
said. judge ruled last month
Brian Brown, president that the state must al-


towed.,.
Christie appealed 'that
ruling to the state Su-
preme Court. The court
agreed to' take up the case
but unanimously refused
on Friday to delay the
start of gay weddings in
the meantime, saying the
state had little chance of
prevailing in its appeal.
Same-sex couples began
exchanging vows Monday
just after midnight.
Advisers to the governor
said that in dropping the
appeal, Christiehad staved
true to his principles.
"Although the governor
strongly disagrees with
.the court substituting its
judgment for the consti-
tutional process of" the
elected branches or a vote
of the people, the court
has now spoken clearly
as to their view of the
New Jersey' Constitution
and, therefore, same-
sex marriage is the law,"
Christie spokesman Mi-
chael Drewniak said in a
statement.


Caverns
From Page 1A
ancestors who used the
land now called Florida
Caverns State Park.
The annual event fea-
tures children's games, face
painting, candy and prizes,
educational and wildlife
displays, plus a visit from
Smokey the Bear and oth-
er special guests. And the
whole family can enjoy
living history displays that
bring to life the ways of the
past and educate about
Native American life, bee-
keeping, and more. And if
you get a bit peckish, food
vendors will be on site sell-
ing refreshments.
Park Services Spe-
cialist Billy Bailey says
"Spirit of the Caverns"I is
making a. few changes as
it transitions back to a fall
festival with a living-his-
tory focus. This year marks
the return *of daytime
hours for the event and a
location shift to the Hick-
ory Pavilion (instead
of near the park Visitors
Center).
Bailey said the daytime



Theft
From Page 1A
Shideler, 32, as a suspect in
the second theft.
When deputies went to
interview Morrill at his
residence, they observed
a "shake-and-bake" meth
lab containing a substan-
tial quantity of meth oil.
Wherfdeputiesinterviewed
Shideler, he admitted to his
involvement in theft.
The investigation also
revealed that both Mor-
rill and Shideler had taken
the stolen trailers to the
residence of Albert Danley
Graham Jr., 36, in the New
Hope community. Graham
*later-admitted to receiving
the trailers from Moriill
and Shideler and trading
them to an individual in
Geneva, Ala.


hours will allow the park
to entertain school groups
on Friday and the general
public on Saturday, though
he wants to ensure the
public they are welcome
on either day.
He also mentioned that
the park encourages the
public to attend both the
Caverns event and Satur-
day's Sunland Fall Festival.
There' will be fun for all
ages at "Spirit of the Cav-
erns," 9 a.m. 'to 3 p.m. Fri-
day and Saturday at Florida
Caverns State Park, three
miles north of Marianna
on State Road 166. '
Park entrance fees will
be waived for participants,
but a suggested donation
of $4 per carload (up to 8)
will go to Friends of the
Caverns, to help support
future park events.
For more informa-
tion about "Spirit of the
Caverns" or the park,
call 573-0390 or visit
www~floridastateparks.
org/floridacaverns.
For more about Friends
of the Florida Caverns
State Park, visit the group's
website: FriendsoftheFlori-
daCaverns.com.


Deputies were able to re-
cover the trailers and most
of the stolen property, ac-
cording to an HCSO press
release.
Shideler was charged
with grand theft, Morrill
with grand theft and traf-
fic.king in methamphet-
amine and Graham Jr. with
dealing in stolen property.
All three subjects remain in
the Holmes' County Jail.
In the press release,
Sheriff Tim Brown is
quoted as saying, "We
will not tolerate these
individuals depriving hard-
working citizens of their
property." .
Sheriff Brewn. asks that
anyone with any informa-
tion of illegal activity in
Holmes County call 850-
547-4421 or. email repor-
tacrimre@holmescosherirf.
org.


Greenwood man


facing drug charge


From staff reports


A Greenwood man is fac-
ing a drug charge following
a Sunday afternoon traffic
stop in Marianna.
On Oct. 20, at approxi-
mately 1:49
p.m., offi-
cers with the
^gl1^Marian na
Police. '.*De-

conducted a
:,'***y traffic stop
-Granberry on Stephens
Lane, on a
maroon-colored Ford pas-
senger vehicle.
Upon conducting the
stop for the' traffic infrac-
tion of violation of a traffic
control device, contact was
made with the driver, who
gave the officer consent to
search the vehicle.


Charges
From Page 1A

placed in the back of a
patrol car, where he re-
peatedly kicked the door
on the car, causing dam-
age to the vehicle.
Joshua A. Garrett, 25, of
Marianna, was charged
with battery on .a law
enforcementofficer, re-
sisting an officer without
violence, criminal mis-
chief and three counts
of possession of a con-
trolled substance. He was
transported to the Jack-
son County Correctional
Facility to await his first
appearance in court.


Officers then made con-
tact with the passenger of
the vehicle, Derek Gran-
berry, 38, of Greenwood,
who admitted to law en-
forcement that he was in
possession of marijuana.
Officers were able to locate
what MPD describes as
"a substantial amount" of
marijuana, some of which
was packaged for sale. A
digital scale was also locat-
ed on the suspect's person.
Granberry was arrested,
charged with possession of
marijuana (more than 20
grams) with intent to sell
within 1,000 feet of a'wor-
ship center, transported to
the Marianna Police De-
partment for processing
and later taken to the Jack-
son County Correctional
Facility to await his first
appearance in court.


Obituaries


Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc'
Your Local Florist and Gifts
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


There were no
obituaries or
death notices
submitted to the
Eloridan as of the
deadline at 4 p.m.
yesterday.


LOOP JiG FOP MORE I JEWS9 VISIT


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4womikh, "VI;-&N, 0




-18A TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22,2013


WORLD


Suicide bomber strikes Russian bus, 6 dead


The Associated Press

MOSCOW A female
suicide bomber blew her-
self up on a city bus in
southern Russia on Mon-
day, killing six people and
injuring about 30, officials
said. The attack in Vol-
gograd added to security
fears ahead of the Winter
Olympics in Sochi.
The suspected bomber
was from the North Cau-
casus, a region in southern
Russia where an Islamic
insurgency has been sim-
mering for more than a
decade following two sep-
aratist wars in Chechnya.
A local official said the sus-
pected attacker was mar-
ried to an Islamic militant.
Volgograd lies 400 miles-
to the northeast of the
North Caucasus, while So-
chi sits to the west along
the Black Sea.
No one immediately
claimed responsibility for
Monday's suicide bomb-
ing, but it was the first
outside the North Cauca-
sus since Chechen rebel
leader Doku Umarov
three months ago
called for a resumption of
attacks on civilians and
urged militantstotargetthe
Sochi Games, which


This image made available by Rossia 1 TV channel and taken
'from an amateur video from a car driving, behind the bus,
shows a bus exploding while moving on the road in Volgograd,
Monday, Oct. 21. A female suicide bomber blew herself up on a
city bus in southern Russia on Monday, killing six people.


are to be held in February.
Russia in past years has
seen a series of terror at-
tacks ;on buses, airplanes
and other forms of trans-
portation, 'some of them
carried out by suicide
bombers. The last suicide
attack on "a bus was in
2008.
Twin bombings on the
Moscow subway in March
2010 carried out by female
suicide bombers killed
40 people and wounded
more than 120,. In Janu-
ary 2011, a male suicide
bomber struck Moscow's
Domodedovo Airport,
killing 37 people and injur-


ing more than 180.,
Umarov, who had
claimed responsibil-
ity for the 2010 and 2011'
bombings, ordered a halt
to, attacks on civilian tar-
gets because of the mass
street protests against
President Vladimir Putin
in the, winter of 2011-12.
He reversed that order in
July,:
The suspected bomber
was from Dagestan, one of
the predominantly Mus-
lim republics in the North
Caucasus, said Vladimir
Markiri, the spokesman for
the Investigative Commit-
tee, Russia's main investi-


gative agency.
In a statement, he iden-
tified the suspect as 30-
year-old Naida Asiyalova.
Russian state television
showed pictures of Asiya-
lova's passport.
In Dagestan, the center
of the insurgency, bomb-
ings and shootings occur
almost daily. Most of them
target, law enforcement
officers, not civilians. The
Tsarnaev brothers, ac-
cused of earning out the
Boston INlaiathon' bomb-
ings, have roots in Dages-
tan and Chechnya.
Rasul Temirbekov, a
spokesman for the Investi-
gative Committee's branch
in Dagestan, said the sus-
pected bomber was mar-
ried to an ethnic Russian,
Dmitry Sokolov, whom
she had met while both
were university students in
Moscow.
She encouraged him to
become a rebel, and he
quickly gained a reputa-
tion as an expert in explo-
sives, Temirbekov said.
Sokolov, whose nom de
guerre is Abdul Jabbar, has
been on the run.
Temirbekov said that
the suspected suicide
bomber had a fatal bone
illness.'


Israel awards Bloomberg $1 million 'Jewish Nobel


The Associated Press

JERUSALEM Israel
on Monday recognized
New York Mayor Michael'
Bloomberg as the first re-
cipient of the $1 million
Genesis Prize; an award
popularly dubbed the
"Jewish Nobel Prize."
The Genesis Prize Foun-
dation said. Bloomberg
was honored for his long
record of public service
and philanthropy.
* Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu will
present the prize to Bloom-
berg early next year in Is-
rael; Bloomberg, a billion-
aire, will then announce to
which philanthropic cause
he will donate the money.
Bloomberg, whose third
and final term as New York
mayor is drawing to an
end, said he was honored


%writh the money, though he
said he bounced around
some ideas with the Israeli
leader. "1 want to useit: to
do something that will fos-
ter relationships in'ta very
difficult part of the world,"
he said.
Bloomberg beat isout '200
other nominees for the
prize, which the founda-
tion said was established
"to recognize exception-
al human beings who,
through their outstand-
i HE A' CCIAIECI PR' , FIJLE ing achievement, come to
In this 2007 photo. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg at- represent a fundamental.
tends at a cornerstone ceremony for the Magen David Adom's value of the Jewish people
William H. Bloomberg Jerusalem Station, named after his late-'' a com and ent to the
father in Jerusalem. Israel has recognized New York Mayor Mi laerterment'of mankind."
chael Bloomberg as the first ever recipient of an award dubbed The prize is adminis-
'the "Jew 'ish N 'obel Prize:' tered by a partnership that
to be chosen. can be in Israel to accept includes the office of the
"I got 'a call from Ne-, it," Bloomberg told a news Israeli prime minister, the
tanyabu this mo rning to conference in New York. semid-governmental Jewish
congratulate me, and we'll Bloomberg said he has Agency and the Genesis
work out a date when I not yet decided what to do Philanthropy Group.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com



EU lawmakers OK


beefing up data


protection laws


The Associated Press

t BRUSSELS A Euro-
pean Parliament commit-
tee on Monday approved
sweeping new data pro-
tection rules that would
strengthen 6nline pri-
vacy and outlaw the kind
of data transfers that the
United States used for its
secret spying program.
The draft regulation was
beefed up after Edward
Snowden's leaksabout al-
legedly widespread U.S.
online snooping to in-
clude even more stringent
privacy protection and
stiff fines for violations.
The legislation will have.
significant implications
for U.S. Internet compa-
' nies, too.
After 18 months of
wrangling and fierce
industry lobbying, the'
legislation easily passed
late Monday with a 49-31'
committee vote, with
one abstention. Parlia-
ment still needs to, hold
'a. plenary vote and seek
agreement with the
EU's 28 member states
though-whichislikelyto
result in some changes.
The rules would for the
first time create a. strong
data protection law for
Europe's 500 million citi-
zens, replacing an outdat-
ed patchwork of national
rules that' only allow
for tiny fines in cases of
violation.
"Tonight's vote also
sends a clear signal: as
of today, data protection
is made In Europe," said
EU Justice Commissioner
Viviane Reding..
Supporters have hailed
the legislation as a mile-
stone toward establishing
genuine online privacy


rights, while opponents
have warned of creating
a hugely bureaucratic
regulation that will over-
whelm businesses and
consumers.
"In-the future, only EU
law will be applicable
when citizens' data in
the EU will be used, in-
dependently of where
the company using the
data is based, be it in
Germany, Ireland or the
U.SA.," said lawmaker
Jan Philipp Albrecht, who
led the negotiations on
the legislation.
The legislation, among
other things, aims at en-
abling users to ask com-.
panies to fully erase their
personal data, handing
them a so-called right
to be forgotten. It would
also limit user profiling,
require companies to
explain their use of per-
sonal data in detail to
customers, and mandate
that companies seek pri-
or consent. In addition,
most businesses would
have, to designate or hire
data protection officers to
ensure the regulation is
properly applied.
Grave compliance fail-
ures could be subject to
a fine worth up to 5 per-
cent of a company's an-
nual turnover which
could be hundreds of mil-
lions of dollars, or even
a few billion dollars for
Internet giants such as
Google.
"Those companies are
making billions from Eu-
ropean citizens' data. So
if you want them to com-
ply, you have to give them
the right incentives," said
Giacomo Luchetta of the
Center for European Pol-
icy Studies.


Greek police release photos of abduction suspects


Tne Aiociated Prec

ATHENS, Greece -
Greek police on Monday
released photographs of a
couple charged with ab-
ducting a girl and judicial
authorities put the pair in
pre-trial custody, as an in-
ternational search for the
child's biological parents
intensified. Authorities
also scrambled to uncover
fraudulent birth declara-
tions related to possible
welfare benefit scams in-
volving the couple and
others.
Investigators trying to es-
tablish how die girl known
only as "Maria" came to be
with the detained Gypsy
couple are considering a
range of potential scenari-
os, from child trafficking to
even simple charity.
The suspects were also
identified as 39-year-old
Christos Salis and a 40-
year-old woman who used
the names Eleftheria Di-
mopoulou and Selini Sali.
They were arrested last
week, after police found
the girl when they raided a
Gypsy, or Roma, encamp-
ment near the central
Greek town of Farsala. Her
DNA shows she is not the
couple's child. -
Authorities allege Dimo-
poulou claimed to have
given birth to six children
in less than 10 months, and
10 of the 14 children the
couple had registered as
their own are unaccounted
for. It is not clear whether
the 10 children are real or
were made up to cheat the-
Greek welfare system.
Police say the two sus-
pects received about 2,500
euros ($3,420) a month in
subsidies from three dif-
ferent cities. In Athens,
municipal authorities sus-
ipended the director of the


In this police handout photo taken on Thursday Oct. 17,
Christos Salis, 39, (right) and his companion Eleftheria
Dimopoulou, 40, or Selini Sali as the woman has two sep-
arate sets of identity papers pose with the little girl only
known as "Maria" in the Larisa police headquarters, Greece.


capital's records office as
well as two senior officials
pending the conclusion of
a fraud investigation.
.The couple has given
conflicting accounts of
how they came to have
the girl, according to po-
lice. A defense lawyer has
said they were motivated
by charity, after being ap-
proached by an intermedi-
ary for a destitute foreign.
mother who reportedly
could not afford to raise
the child.
Photographs released of
"Maria" have triggered a
global outpouring of sym-
pathy and possible tips to
police butno breakthrough
yet in identifying her or her
parents.
The "Smile of the 'Child"
charity, which is caring for
the girl, said it had received
more than .8,000 calls
and thousands of emails
- some with details and
photographs of missing
children from people
in the United States, Scan-
dinavia, other parts of Eu-
rope, Australia and South
Africa.
"The case has touched a
chord with lots of people
from many countries,"


Panayiotis Pardalis, a
spokesman for the charity,
told The Associated Press.
"This case is riow giving
hope to parents of missing
children."
,He said the charity had
forwarded all tips to the
police but that most peo-
ple were just conveying
their concern.


A dental' examination
showed the child is older
than previously thought,
5 or 6 years old instead of
four, the charity said.
"We had been seeking
details for a girl aged 4. So
the fact that she is older
changes the nature of the
search," charity director
Costas Yannopoulos said.
"One thing that has im-
pressed us is that the little
girl is not asking for anyone
... She is relaying the kind-
ness she has been shown
for the last three days to
her dolls."
In Britain, tabloid news-
papers drew parallels with
missing girl Madeleine
McCann, who disappeared
at age 3 from a Portuguese
resort six years ago. The
mother of Ben Needham,
a British boy missing in
Greece since 1991, said she
was thrilled by the news
of the girl's recovery. Her
toddler was 21 months old
when he vanished.


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Snorts
Brriefs

High School Football L ai
Friday- Jay vs. Cottondale,
7 p.m.; Trenton at Marianna,
7 p.m.; Sneads at North Bay dke
Haven, 7 p.m.; Graceville is
off this week. The Sn
one final
High School Volleyball non-leag
The District 2-lA tourna- Arnold c
ment continues today with High Sdh
the semifinals at Sneads High ing to bo
School. S Sneads
Tuesday's schedule: Sneads clubs tw
vs. Vernon winner, 5 p.m.; and lost,
Altha/Wewahitchka winner tory in a
vs. Blountstown/Graceville Maclay c
winner, 7 p.m. Saturday
The championship game the last
will be Thursday at 7 p.m. for the L
start the
Middle School Football ment to'
spite the
Thursday- Marianna at Port Roberts
St. Joe, 6p.m. with wha

Marianna Golf
The Marianna High School
golf team will compete
Tuesday in the Region 1-l A
tournament at AC Read Golf
Course in Pensacola.

Recreation Football
Marianna Recreation De-
partment will offer two tackle
football leagues and one
boys' flag foqtball league this
year. Registration for youth'.
ages 61to 13 will be held Oct.
1 through N6v. 1 from 8 a.m.,
td 4 p.m. at The Marianna
Educational and Recreational
.Expo (MERE) located at 3625.
.Caverns Road'in Marianna.
The registration fee for flag
*fOotball is $30 for all par-
ticipant5. The fee for tackle
* 'leagues will be $45 for all
'participants. The fee must be
:paid with 'a check or money
d order; no cash will be accept-
'ed. Special registrationwilll
be held at .the NI ERE from 4-7
'p.m. Oct. 14,21. No one will
be 'allowed to register after
Nov. L.

4 ? copy .of thei 'birth 'certifi- 9B
Scate:'Yofrmay also visit our
w'siteaiwyvw.leaguel-'
inpup.com/inrd and go to the
fo'tbal'-pAge and download
.*a form.Theageof all partici-
pants on Nov. 1 of the current
".year will be te player's age
'for the enure'season. .
Anyone4that may be in-
ferested. in coaching'a team
or officiating youth football
'please contact the Marianna
Recriation Department at
$48-.6-8'or. come by during


Men's Flag Football
Marianna Recreation De-
partment wAil offer a Men's
7-on-7 Flag Football League.
Teams may sign up at The-
,TMariamna Educational and
Recrea nal.,Expo (MERE)
located 23 25 'Caverns Road
ii Marianna. The registration
fee of $400 is due before first |
contest.Il
The league will play a
iO-game schedule with 'play-;fw
starting Nov. 4.'There will be ^
a mangers/organizational ,
meeting on Oct. 21 at 6 p.m.
at the MERE Coitiplex. ,,i
For more information;: '
'please contact IheM EREat *^ |
850-482-6228 iOicyisit out web:'
page at www.leaguelineup. I|
c~om/mrd and click on the
Adult Football page. _____

Grand Ridge Old Timer's
Game B
,Grand Ridge School will Lad,
host an Old Timer's Basket- Jd
ball Ga~me for former Indians |
on Nov. 9at 6p.mn. take


'All former administrators,
players, coaches. cheer- Tallk
leaders, and cheerleader
sponsors are encouraged to
attend. dk
Admission to the game is The C
$2. Concessions will be avail-
able and a cake auction will
be held at halftime.
Proceeds from the event
will be used to fund the res- '0.
toration of the class compos-
ite pictures, the Grand Ridge
School yearbook, and other
student events. victorie
Former students wishing Chipc
to play or cheer can contact games
* Wanda Lewis at 482-9835. knock
ext. 221 or wanda.lewis@jcsb. Georgia
org in order to pre-register Petersb
* and reserve your own souve-
nir t-shirt.


SHS Vofeybal


dy Pirates ready to make postseason run


-BY DUSTIN KENT
entiaicfliondan corn

heads Lady Pirates took
a stab at knocking off
gue rivals Maclay and
)n Saturday at Sneads
hool but fell shown, fall-
Dth teams in three sets.
s(18-8) had played both
ice before this season
coming closest to vic-
five-set defeat against
in Oct. 8 in Tallahassee.
ay's matches marked
regular season action
ady Pirates before they
District 2-1A tourna-
day at home, and de-
i losses, coach Sheila
said she was satisfied
at her team took from


the day.
-We were a bit flat. We weren't
bad, just not as crisp as we had
been, but they were high-en-
ergy, fast-paced matches and
that was important," she said.
"I was going to look for some
wveaknesses with our team and I
found a couple of those that we
really focused on (IMonday) and
that wa's the reason to schedule
those teams.
"It was a pretty good day over-
all. I think we could've done a
little better, but I'm not going to
complain too much. They were
excelent matches to play going
into district. They were fast-
paced with a lot of digging and
a lot of defense."

See PIRATES, Page SB


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Sneads'Ashlyn Roberts stops the ball during a game against Cottondale
earlier in the season.


MARKlSIINNER/ LURIDAN
I ebecca Mullins and Sue Ellen Mosier save the ball for CottondaleHigh School during a district
tournament game against Vernon Monday afternoon. The Lady Hornets were eliminated from the
District 2 tournament at Sneads High School on Monday afternoon, falling to Vernon in five sets.


Chipola
asketbaUl

y Indians

e3 more in

ahassee
BY DUSTIN KENT
ilerik'j|c llrdjri 'urn
Chipola Lady Indians
headed to Talla-
hassee on Sat-
J? urday tor an-
other series
of preseason
*i scrimmages
and came awa
with three more
s.
ila took all three
by double figures,
ig off Hillsborough,
i Highlands, and St.
urg.


1IMHS Golf

MAE MHS golf team takes' aim at state


i i r iroak IL^ If.- -11
Steve Spence putts for Marian-


na during a match earlier in the
See INDIANS. Page 8B season.
nj-**' .- -*;. -.:\ .^ 1 '..^ .^ ^ .


BYDUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Bulldogs golf
team will look tp continue its
dream season today in Pensaco-
la, as it gets set to compete in the
Region 1 Tournament at AC Read
Golf Course.
Marianna has not lost a match
this season and punched its ticket
to the regional tournament with
a 15-stroke district tournament
victoryy over Chipley last week at
Dogwood Lakes Golf Course in
Bonifay.
All five MHS boys will get to
compete at regionals today
thanks to the team victory in dis-
trict, while the Bulldogs also had
both of its girls golfers (Caitlyn
Carpenter and Caroline Rogers)
qualify as individuals, though a
previous engagement will keep
V) *


Rogers from competing today.
It's a return trip to the regional
tourney after making it last year
on the same course, which Mari-
anna coach Tyier Wilson said
he hopes is a big benefit for his
players.
"They played it last year, so
they have an idea of the layout
of the course. That definitely
should help," he said. "Some-
times you can go out there and
play a course you've, never seen
better than one you've seen and
played on, but I definitely think it
should give us an advantage."
The Bulldogs played a practice
round on the course Monday to
reacquaint themselves with the
surroundings, and Wilson said he
believed it was a course on which
his players could do very well.

See MHS, Page 8BL.


CHS LADY HORNETS ELIMINATED




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


- -. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alabama running back TJ. Yeldon (4) gets around Arkansas
linebacker Braylon Mitchell (34) and picks up a first down
,during the first half of Saturday's game in TuscaloosaAla.

Alabama and Florida State

top 1st BCS standings

The Associated Press

Alabama and Florida State hold the top two spots
in the first BCS standings of the season. Oregon was a
close third behind second-place Florida State.
The Seminoles (.9348 BCS average) are coming off
their biggest win of the season, a 51-14 victory at pre-
* viously unbeaten Clemson.
The Ducks (.9320) have only played one team that
was ranked at the time, but could get a boost in the
next two weeks with games against. UCLA and at
Stanford.
Ohio State is a more distant fourth, followed by Mis-
souri in the standings released Sunday night.
The top two teams. in the final standings after the
end of the regular season play in the Rose Bowl for the
national title in January.
Alabama is a comfortable 'No. 1 on the strength of
being top-ranked by a wide margin in both the USA
Today coaches' poll and Harris poll. The two-time de-
fending champion Crimson Tide is second in-the com-
puter ratings.
If the Tide can stay unbeaten, it should reach the BCS
championship game for the third straight year and for
the fourth time in five seasons.
The polls count for two-thirds of a BCS grade.
Florida State is No. 1 in the computer ratings and
third in each poll. Oregon is second in the polls and
fourth in the computers.
The race between- the Ducks and Florida State is
shaping up to be a close one iftboth keep winning.
The Seminoles still must play. unbeaten Miami, ri-
val Florida and potentially in the ACC championship
game, which could be a rematch with Miami or maybe
a game against Virginia Tech (6-1).
In addition to Oregon's next two tough games, the
Ducks play Oregon State and potentially the Pac-12
title game against perhaps UCLA or Arizona State.
Ohio State is probably relegated to hoping for the
teams in front of it to fall. The Big Ten is not affording
the Buckeyes many opportunities for resume-boost-
ing victories.' -
Stanford was. sixth. and -Miami seventh. Unbeaten
Baylor starts the BCS race eighth. - -
Only twice -since the- BCS started in 1998 have the
top two teams in the first standings played in the title.-
game.
The BCS is in its final season. It will be replaced by a
four-team playoff next season.


College Football


NCAA to rule on Miami case


The Associated Press

CORAL .GABLES Decision day
has finally arrived for Miami.
The NCAA will unveil the find-
irigs of its long investigation into
Miami athletics and release any
proposed sanctions on Tuesday,
about 2Y2 years after the probe be-
gan and more than eight months
after saying .the Hurricanes did not
S"'exercise institutional control" over
former booster, and convicted felon
Nevin Shapiro's interactions with
-the football and men's basketball
programs.
The report will be released at 10
a.m. EDT, the NCAA said. If the case
follows typical protocols, the Hurri-
canes will not receive their copy of
the decision until Tuesday morning,
shortly before the public release.
"We don't really concern ourselves
with things that we can't control,
such as the investigation and what
people are saying," Miami running
back Duke Johnson said Monday.
Miami is off to a 6-0 start, and the
school's No. 7 ranking matches its
highest since 2005. The school met
with the infractions committee in
June, leaving those two days in In-
dianapolis hoping a decision would
come within eight weeks.
It wound up taking more than 18
weeks. 'The decision will answer
whether the football program, ,by
sitting out two bowl games, last
season's Atlantic Coast Conference
titlegame and making reductions in
recruiting, has already paid enough
of a price for the wrongdoing.
"Hopefully they just take a few,
scholarships off," said Miami Dol-
phins defensive end OlivierVernon,,
who sat out six games of the 2011
season for his involvement with
Shapiro as a member of the Hur-
ricanes. "The school has done so
much already to avoid a harsh pen-
alty by punishing themselves, so
hopefully it's not too bad."
Shapiro '"alleged that he spent
millions between, 2002 and 2010
on football, and, men's basketball
recruits, athletes and coaches. A
study of -the- allegations by The As-
sociated Press found the NCAA was
able to identify about $173,330 in
extra benefits -"more than half
of that, investigators said, going
to former Hurricane players Vince
Wilfork and Antrel Rolle.
Still, the institutional control
* charge is considered the worst that
the NCAA can bring against a mem-
ber school.
The report will end another chap-
ter' in the saga, though if more
sanctions against Miami are rec-
omnmended, the process almost
certainly doesn't end Tuesday. The


Miami running back Duke Johnson talks with the news media during a football media
.day in Coral Gables on Aug. 9. .


Hurricanes have said they will
not stand for major penalties be-
yond ones they have already self-
imposed, and have the right to
appeal.
*As part of this process, accord-
ing to documents reviewed by AP,
the NCAA asked the Hurricanes to
provide things including how many
scholarships they are using in foot-
ball and men's basketball this aca-
demic year, how many they plan
to issue in those sports next year,
details of Ul postseason play in the
last four years, and a review of all-
games that the school expects to
play on television in the next three
years.
"We believe strongly in the prin-
ciples and values of fairness and
due process," university President
Donna Shalala said Feb. 18, one day
before the school received its al-
legations. "However, we have been
wronged, in this investigation, and
we believe that this process must
come to a swift resolution, which
includes no additional punitive
measures beyond those already
self-imposed."
The saga has had countless twists,
even NCAA wrongdoing.
Shapiro's allegations first start-
ed coming to light in 2010, about
four months after he was charged
by federal authorities with 'bilk-
ing investors of nearly $1 billion.
The NCAA's investigation of Miami
started in 2011. Some of the NCAAs
would-be accusations Were erased
-eafly this year, when it was found
that investigators improperly coop-
erated with Shapiro's attorney and
gleaned some of their information
wrongly from her.
NWAA President Mark Emmert
acknowledged that investigators
made a jnajor mistake there, calling
the moves "missteps." And when


Miami Dolphins defensive end Olivier
Vernon watches during the final seconds
of Sunday's game in Miami Gardens.
Vernon sat out six games in 2011 for his
involvement with Nevin Shapiro.

the NCAA's alliance with Shapiro *
attorney Maria Elena Perez a Mi-
ami graduate became public, the
Hurricanes went on the offensive,
with Shalala saying. it proved the
school was not treated fairly.
Tuesday's decision should also in-
clude what penalties several former
Miami coaches, including current
Missouri basketball coach Frank
Haith, may face for alleged rule-
breaking during their interactions
with' Shapiro, who is serving a 20-
year sentence in federal prison for
masterminding the Ponzi scheme.
Shapiro has said he went public
with the accusations against Miami
because he felt that members of the
athletic department did not offer
him enough support when his legal
woes began.


Florida State secondary excels against Clemson


The Associated Press Lamarcus Joyner'led the way, ery and broke up a pass. budding star at strong safety.
playing the Jameis Winston role Joyner, who is often used He made six tackles, against
CLEMSON, S.C. -.In the pre- for the Seminoles'defense, lead-. on- slot receivers, and Brooks Clemson, and is backed up by
vious two meetings between ing a dominant effort in a 51-14 have been joined by a bevy of another promising freshman,
Florida State and Clemson be- Aictory that helped Florida State underclassmen to make up a Nate Andrews.
fore Saturday night, the Semi- move up to No. 3 in the latest AP deep secondary that can handle Against Clemson, the second-
noles' pass defense-was burned Top 25. The versatile senior cor- three- and four-receiver sets ary rarely allowed easy throws
for. six touchdown passes by nerback had a sack that forced--better than most teams. down'the field for Boyd, the se-
Tajh -Boyd, three of at least 50 a fumble by Boyd, a fumble that *- Sophomore P.J.Williams might inior who had one of the worst
yards. was returned for a sc.re by Ma- be the Seminoles best cover cor- games of his career, going 17
On Saturday night in Death rioEdwards. Joyner also had an- ner. Fellow sophomore Ronald,,for 37- for 156 yards. Boyd had
Valley, Florida State's second- interception and eight tackles. Darby, who, played extensively passed for -591 yards the past
ary smothered Boyd's receivers, Fellow senior Terrerice Brooks, as a freshman, had an intercep- two seasons against Florida
caused game-changing turn- the'-free, safety who had prob- -tion in the second half against State.
overs and didn't allow a pass'of. lems against Clemson last year, Clemson. Star receiver Sammy Watkins
more than 18 yards. had five tackles, a fumble reoov- Freshmen Jalen Ramsey is a caught eight passes, but for only


68 yards. He never got free deep,
and Clemson's lack of another
consistent receiving threat al-
lowed Florida State to further
clamp down onWatkins.
On the season, Florida State
ranks second in the country in
passing yards allowed per game
(158) and second in yards al-
lowed per pass (5.45), despite
having big leads in most games.
The growth of the Seminoles'
secondary is part of the ma-
turity of a team that looks like
Jimbo Fisher's best in his four
seasons as coach.


Saban: Alabama S Simseri out for season


fThe Associated Press

TUSCALOOSA, Ala.
Alabama safety Vinnie
Sunseri is out for the sea-
son with a knee injury.
Coach Nick Saban said
Monday that Sunseri will
have surgery on his left
knee Tuesday. He de-
clined to give specifics of
the injury except that he
had ligament damage.
"Vinnie's done a great
job for us," Saban said.
"He's an outstanding
player and really good
person, good leader. Can't
say enough about the job
he's done throughout this
year and -his career. Al-
ways hate it when guys
get injuries. It's a tough
part of the, game.
"But it's going to provide
an opportunity for some
other guys to step up and
play well. We'll probably
play with Landon Collins
in that position."
Collins filled in at free
Safety during Ha Ha Clin-
1


IHLEASSOUUCIALEPRESS
Alabama defensive back Vinnie Sunserl (3) holds his knee af-
ter being injured on a kickoff during the first half of a game
against Arkansas in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on Oct. 19. Sunseri is out
for the season with a knee injury.


ton-Dix's two-game sus-
pension that ended be-
fore the Arkansas game,
but strong safety is his
normal position. Jarrick
Williams is expected to


back him up.
"Landon's been a very
good player for us in
whatever role that we've
asked him to play," Saban
said. "He's played money.


He's played some free
safety. He's played strong
safety. Strong safety is his
natural position."
Alabama plays Tennes- L
see on Saturday.
Sunseri is the only de-
fensive back to start each
of the first seven games
for the top-ranked Crim-
son Tide. He was injured
'while covering a kickoff
in the first quarter against
Arkansas.
Sunseri has 20 tackles
and returned two inter-
ceptions for touchdowns.
The junior has played
in 34 games and started
15 in his career.
Collins said this tran-
sition won't be as hard
since he's had more prac-
tice time at strong safety.
"For me, it's much easier
because that's where I've
been playing the whole
season," he said. "I went
:back to strong this past
game and just felt much
more comfortable and I
think played better."
j


[ KELSON DISCOUNT 1
*KEE INs DRUGS I




3008 Jefferson St. Marianna, FL


-12B TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22,2013


SPORTS




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


College Football


.T Bulldogs try to regroup,


heal up during open week


Grambling State University football player Naquan Smith speaks at a "State of Emergency"
-gathering organized by student Kimberly Monroe in Grambling, La., on Thursday. Smith said
the team had concerns about the football coaching staff and facilities. After two days of
,,players skipping practice, Grambling spokesman Will Sutton announced Dustin "Dirt" Win-
4ston as the new interim football coach shortly following the student demonstration.


Grambling player: No



regrets about boycott


The Associated Press

' GRAMBLING, La. Naquan 'Smith
4and his Grambling football teammates,
have no regrets about a nearly week-
4ong boycott that forced the university
-to forfeit its game against Jackson State
on Saturday.
P Grambling players stood behind
'Smith Monday.during a press confer-
ence outside of the Eddie Robinson
Museum on caihpus. Smith said the
,entire team. was present and that the
'vote to return to the field was "100
.percent."
* "The football team took a stance on
what we thought was right," Smith
said. "We did not quit on our univer-
"'sity. There are many problems that ex-
ist and if no one says anything, noth-
,ing will become of our institution. We
:hope coach Eddie Robinson and his
"legendary players appreciate we'took a
stand and thought we were right."
- Grambling's players staged the boy-
-cott because of many issues with uni-
versity leaders, including the school's
'rundown facilities, long 'bus trips to
'road games and personnel decisions.
Grambling President Frank Pogue
said'Monday night 'that'players would
not face any repercussions for Ithe
boycott, and that the. national atten-
tion would' help publicize the funding
"plight for historically black colleges
'and 'universities like Grambling.
Pogue said work is already scheduled
.to be done to improve conditions in
the football team's weight room.
"We will continue to support our
football team our players," Pogue
said. "We will pay attention,, obviously,
as much as we can financially to en-
hance all the athletic facilities includ-
ing those in football. My concern now
is we move forward together. The stu-
'dents have expressed themselves, their
'opinions."
Smith said players decided end the
boycott after reaching out to sev-
eral Grambling greats, including for-
*mer coach Doug Williams, who ad-
vised them to, "Go out there and play
football."
Williams also put them in contact
:with Baton Rouge businessman' Jim
Bernhard.
Smith said Bernhard told players he
"has their "best intentions at heart and
that he would ensure we had updated
facilities, but we had to agree to being
back practicing Monday ... and finish
the remainder of our season."
Smith said although the team will
play, "We have not forgotten the situa-
,tion and how we've gotten here."
Players refused to travel to Saturday's
game at Jackson State, a forfeit, because


of issues with university leaders.
Grambling players returned to
the practice field on Monday, going
through a light workout that was al-
most 'completely conditioning. The Ti-
gers host Texas Southern on Saturday.
Grambling athletic director Aaron
James said that the school could face
a $20,000 fine, according to the South-
western Athletic Conference bylaws.
But he said a fine had not been issued
as of Monday night and he wasn't sure
if the SWAC would penalize the school
at all.
'Smith said the players were eager to
return to the field.
"Everyone on 'the team wanted to
play, but to get what. we feel is right, we
had to take a stand and make sure our
voice was heard," Smith said.
Smith said he had no comment when
asked if there had been any pushback
from university officials because of the
boycott. No athletic administration
officials were present at the players'
press conference.
It's been a tough season for Grambling,
(0-8), which is on its third coach this
season and has lost 18 straight football
games to NCAA opponents. Williams
was fired affer just two games this sea-
son and replaced by George Ragsdale,
who was reassigned within the athletic
department on Thursday and replaced
by Dennis "Dirt" Winston.
The players have been not participat-
ed in practices or games since Tuesday,
when they walked out of contentious
meeting with school administration.
Emmett Gill, the national director
for the Student Athlete Human Rights
Project, said he was on campus to help
ensure that players do not face retalf-
ation from school' administration for
their protest.
University spokesman Will Sut-
ton said Grambling has endured a 57
percent cut in state funding over sev-
eral years that has affected .the entire.
campus.
The athletic department was asked
to cut $335,000 this year from its over-
all department budget of $6.8 million.
Sutton said football was cut by $75,000
to about $2 million.
ESPN reported Saturday. that it had
obtained a letter detailing player com,
plaints, which included mold in the
locker room and improperly cleaned
uniforms contributing to an increased
likelihood of staph infections.
Sutton said that local health depart-
ment inspectors, acting on an anony-
mous tip, recently visited Grambling
athletic, facilities and recommended
changes tb improve conditions, but
did not deem those facilities a health
hazard.


The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tpnn. -
First, the injuries started
mounting up for the Geor-
gia Bulldogs. Nowthe loss-
es are, too along with
any hopes of getting back
to Atlanta for a second
straight season.
At least the Bulldogs have
a break in the schedule to
rest up before the annual
showdown against Florida.
"This is a much needed
open date,". quarterback
Aaron Murray said. "We've
got to figure this out. Do
some soul searching and
really figure out what we
need to do individually
and as a team to get better.
There are still a lot of great
games left, a big game
versus Florida in a couple
weeks. We got to put this
one behind us, get back to
work, find a way and ... just
keep getting better."
The Bulldogs overcame
their injuries in pulling
out an overtime win at
Tennessee. I
Then theylostto Missouri
and had two more injuries
Saturday in a 31-27 loss at
Vanderbilt that knocked
Georgia out of the Top 25
for the first time in two
years. The injuries contin-
ued as receiver Chris Con-
ley hurt an ankle on the
final play. Safety Josh Har-
vey-Clemons hurt his right
foot in the second quarter,
and he didn't return.
Coach Mark Richt said
,on Sunday that it appears
Harvey-demons has a
better chance than Conley


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray (U) calls a play at the line'
of scrimmage against Vanderbilt in the first quarter of Satur-
day's game In Nashville, Tenn.


of playing against the Ga-
tors on Nov. 2.
Richt hopes that tailback
Toddf 'Gurley and receiver
Michael Bennett will be
ready for the Florida game,
but he wants both players
to get in. at least a week
of practice before they
return.
"It's tough, but we got to
just keep grinding," Murray
said. "Like I said, our lead-
ers really have to step up
and 'make sure everyone
stays focused, stays hun-
gry and keeps working."
Georgia was up 27-14 in
the third quarter and didn't
lose the lead until Jerron
Seymour's 13-yard touch-
down run with 2:53 left.
The Bulldogs helped Van-
derbilt's comeback with
poor play on special teams
leading to a muffed fair
catch on a punt, and then a
snap went over Collin Bar-
ber's head. that the punter


was lucky to recover.
"'It's definitely one that's
going to hit us deep," said
linebacker Jordan Jenkins,
who had two sacks.
Richt has plenty to study
on tape.
Vanderbilt held the
ball more than 35 min-
utes, outgained Georgia
337-221 in total offense.
Murray became the SEC's
all-time'leader in total of-
fense, passing Tim Tebow.
Yet the senior quarter-
back in his 48th start had
just 114 yards passing, the.
third-lowest passing per--
formance of his career.
lGeorgia was outgained'
94-4 in total offense in the
fourth quarter.
"They did a good job
of hitting our receivers
as the ball was coming,"
Richt said. -"We didn't
give up a sack but they
put some pressure on
us."


Spurner: QB Shaw probably out for Mizzou


The Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C.' -
South Carolina coach
Steve Spurrier says quar-
terback Connor Shaw
won't need surgery for his
sprained left knee.
But Shaw is unlikely to
playwhen the 20th-ranked
Gamecocks travel to No. 5
Missouri this weekend.
Spurrier says Sunday
that Shaw had on a knee
brace and was walking
some a day after injuring
the knee in a 23-21 loss at
Tennessee. However, Spur-
rier adds Shaw wouldn't
practice for two to three


dais. Should Shaw make
it back in time, it wouldn't
be' the first time the senior
overcame injuries to play.
Three' weeks ago, Spur-
rier was told Shaw would,
miss up to three games


because of a shoulder
injury against UCF on
Sept. 28. However, Shaw
was back at practice two
days later and played
the next week *against
Kentucky.


Washington announces plans to honor James


The Associated'Press


SEATTLE Steve Sarki-
sian took a moment Mon-
;day to"think back on his
,favorite moment with
former*Washington coach
.Don James.
It wasn't one of the prac-
tices or team meetings
'i James would attend some-
times. It was a casual pic-
ture of James and Sarkisian
'! shaking hands on the field
-before the 2010 Holiday
Bowl in San Diego.
"It's something I look at,
quite honestly, every sin-
gle day before I leave my
office," Sarkisian said. "It
*,wasn't a planned photo. It
mwas one that was caught
'spontaneously, and some-
', thing I cherish today and
'will cherish forever."


The school continued
mourning the passing of
James, who died on Sun-
day at the age of 80 due to
pancreatic cancer.
James coached at Wash--
ington from 1975-92 and
led the school to a share of
the 1991 national cham-
pionship. He arrived at
the school as an unknown
from Kent State and turned
Washington into a power
program, helping bring at-
tention to the West Coast
beyond what was happen-
ing in Los Angeles with
USC and UCLA.
The school announced a
series of tributes to James
that will take place this
wyeek. A public memorial
service for the coach will be
held on Sunday afternoon
at Alaska Airlines Arena,


.with details for the service
still being finalized.
A day before the memo-
rial, the Huskies will host
California in an 8 p.m.
kickoff. James will be hon-
ored throughout the game.
Players and coaches will
wear decals with the ini-
tials "DI" and members of
his family will serve as the
honorary captains for the
pre-game coin toss.
The Washington band
will also perform a tribute
to James during halftime
that will include a memo-
rial video.
"I think it is fitting that
this week is homecoming
and we have an amazing
opportunity to celebrate
coach James in a very
tasteful manner," Sarkisian


AFdtjc, Lewis

1$m CUT"&RMfm
BLOW PIPE

Makid"g ConnetfMU |
WALLACE F
COMMUNITY r
COLLEGE BEVERAGES m
Since 1937


Smith Supply Co.





FaTBaCKWs

ver TUST 8 SKINNY PIG.


Radiology Associates of Dothan


.E2B0T

Idoiithangle~gBIoffTHzfo


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22,2013 3BF


SPORTS




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BORN LOSER BYART AND CHIP SANSOM
FTIAE N EW COST-CUTrltnc7`q JM DOWl W EA'OCTOP ^'I-A D0CTOPFI? A MUR5$-S
I^'EASUgE.$ AXMWE.PO5PlTM | -_ DO OlOR'(OU? | H5t'>E.t' ?E. AsPR.E.$CR.lPTl0ts
(otME. W. TOO Fl! ,. g >FOp-M AnPPt6A, MX
1--t ~ >- --A i'~ I-I r ____-l1


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER



















10-22 e LahedtroOgokr IrsnedOeel Inc. D01t by UnlrsalW UCO lor UFS, 2013

"How do you expect me to average 55
miles an hour If I don't speed?" '


ACROSS
1 Gleeful
shout
4 Look after
8 Hay bundle
12 Countdown
start
13 Sandwich
cookie
14Fibbecd
15 Sea cows
17 Encourage
1,8 Paid but
19 FIery crime
20 Ended a
bout early
22PD
dispatch
23 Ruminate
26 Drubbing
28Tarzan
companion
31 Sheriff
,Taylor's
kid *
32 ChIcago
Loop trains
33 Police
officer
34 LP
successors
35 Harden
36 Nautical
position
37Soak (up)
38 Latin I verb
39 Emit
smoke


40 Cunning
41 Yellow-
knife's terr.
43Oneness
46 Eagle's
nest
50 Points of
conver-
gence
51 Cobbles
together
54 Finished
55 Pack -
(quit)
56 Allow
57Lip,
slangily
58 Lose color
59 Memorable
decade

DOWN
1 I0N takers
2 Jalopy
3 Diarist
Frank
4 Slogan
5 Umbrage
6 Born as
7 John -
Passos
8 Book
jacket ad a
9 Broadcast
10Toy block
brand
11 Blissful
spot


Answer to Previous Puzzle


16 Leg part
19NYC
dwelling
21 Elegant
22"Emma'
novelist'\
23 Beaded
shoes
24 Fancy coif
25 Speech
impediment
27Flamenco
shouts
28 Rights org.
29 Haiku
30 Pentathlon
event
36 Following
38 England's
Isle of -
40 Mixes


42 "True Grit"
lead
43 Alien craft
44 Exploding
star
45 Chills the
wine
47Tick off
48 Disney
CEO Bob
49This, in
Barcelona\
51 Skippy
rival
52 Ms. Hagen
53 Eliminate


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulliDriverBooks.com


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Horoscope
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Discuss money matters
with someone close to you
to find a way to meet your
financial demands.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) For maximum
inspiration, you should
visit destinations that are
educational or that spark
your imagination. Don't be
afraid to speak up.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21)-,Observe a
situation until you feel you
have enough information
to make a good judg-
ment call. Don't let anger
lead you in the wrong
direction.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan
19) Use your clout,
know-how and confi-
dence to help you gain
favors and support from
influential people. Stick to
conservative plans.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -Assess your situa-
tion and make decisions
based on what will make
your life easier. Physical
activity will ease stress.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Don't judge others.
Creative endeavors will
bring the best return on
your effort.
ARIES (March-21-April
19) Calm down and
consider what you can
accomplish. Making a
decision without giving
enough thought to the
outcome will end up cost-
ingyou.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Push for what you
want today. Put more into.
your relationships, both at
work and at home.
GEMINI (May 21-June, 20)
- Love is in, the stars, and:
romance will end your day
on an up note. A personal.
problem must be dealt
with honestly.-
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Socializing will lead;
to new ideas. Younger
and older people in your
life will inspire'you to do
something special.
LEOp(July 23-Aug. 22)
- Listen to any com-
plaints being made and
do your best to rectify a
problem before it gets out
of hand.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-What you do and say
will make a difference to
the outcome of a business-
situation or endeavor.


Anmie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: My husband and I are in
our mid-30s and happily married. We
have sex almost every night. Here's the
problem: I found out this past summer
that my husband is kinky. I saw him
smelling my1worn lingerie, as well as our
teenage daughter's and my mother's.
What makes a man want to do this with
women's clothing? I've never heard of
women smelling men's shorts. Is this
normal?
A DUMBFOUNDED WIFE

Dear Dumbfounded: Your husband is
turned on by the scent of worn women's
underwear. This is not an uncommon
fetish. As long' as everything else in
your marriage and sex life is good, we
wouldn't worry too much about this,
although you should insist he limit his
fetish to your undergarments and leave
his daughter's and your mother's alone.
It's creepy.

Dear Annie: "Awaiting Your Help" is up-
set that a friend is bringing her husband


G.C. Lichtenberg, an
18th-century German
physicist and philoso-
pher, wrote, "The great-
est events occur without
intention playing any
part in them; chance
makes good mistakes and
undoes the most carefully
planned undertaking. The
world's greatest events .
are not produced they
happen."
That assertion would
not meet with universal
agreement. However, at
the bridge table, missing a
chance to make a contract
can be a bad mistake. Let's
see if you can produce the
winning line in today's
deal.
South is in three no-
trump. West leads the
spade queen. How should
declarer play?
South's two-no-trump
response showed a


to the monthly girls' night out. I wish my
friends had welcomed my husband to
these evenings. While I was sharing good
times with my girlfriends, my husband
was out meeting women from the
Internet in seedy motels.,
He gave me two sexually transmitted
diseases before I found out; He appears
to be a great guy on the surface, but
underneath, he's a slimeball who has
lied and cheated for years. I no longer
go to girls' night out.'My friends hate my
husband and will not come to my house.
I've joined a support group, but I miss
my friends. My social life consists of a
weekly trip to the grocery. I am sad and
miserable.
Please let your friend bring her
husband to your nights out. Other-
wise, he might find another form of
entertainment.
-NOT LIVING THE DREAM

Dear Not Living: Why are you still with
this lying, cheating slimeball? Get coun-
seling, and if nothing changes, get out.


Bridge
North 10-22-13
4 10 e
V KJ 3
AQJ984
A K
West East
4-Q J 9 8 5 4 K 7 3 2
S8 7 5 4 2 V9 6
7 *K3
Q6 *98752


South
+ A 4
T A Q 10
* 10 6 5 2
* J 10 4 3


Dealer: North
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1 Pass
2NT Pass 3 NT All pass
Opening lead: Q4
balanced 10-12 points
with no four-card major.
(South might have made
a limit raise in diamonds,
especially if via a two-dia-
mond inverted minor-suit
raise, but we much prefer
no-trump to a minor. Yes,
I have noticed that five
diamonds is laydown.)
First, a defensive point.
East must either signal
encouragement with his
seven or, even better,


throw the king onto the
table. West would not have
led the queen without the
jack and nine.
South starts with seven
top tricks: one spade, three
hearts, one diamond and
two clubs. But given that
his spade ace will have
evaporated by tricd'two, he
cannot afford to lose the
lead until he is home.
The natural instinct is to
take the diamond finesse.
But there is a second, ad-
mittedly unlikely, chance.
Before gambling on the
diamonds, cash dummy's
club ace and king. Here
the queen drops and
declarer has nine win-
ners via one spade, three
hearts, one diamond and
four clubs. If the club
queen does not appear,
South crosses to his hand
with a heart and runs the
diamond 10.


'I


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.

SETGLTU N ,Fu T GIO I UUTDN
FGSDICFIGL FG KFPFGS, FL'U T JTN
YE KYYAFGS TL KFEI LVDYXSV LVI
JDYGS [GO' YE T LIKIUOYWI."
- C D uIX U U

Previous Solution: "Don't underestimate your kids. Don't be condescending,
because they're children but they're not stupid."'- Steve Carell*
TODAY'S CLUE: A sienbOd
0 22013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-22


7l4B +*TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22,2013


I- -. $




CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan -


Tuesday, October 22, 2013- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED



IARKETrPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publicanon Policv 'Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad,the first day. This .uOAIC,.1 Shal.o 1 l MEo t.a ltbie TIla to pubCI an a4 n e ix3r 3 qpraphic aro, or anors in ublicaion except to tIhe eteni or &.6 Cost cf the ad for Iris first days
niernion A.j|uitnenT for error, Is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the ermir r.ccuire.1 The aaven.iser agr.a lIthti publi-htr shill rol Oar luble 1r damages ariElng out ot ferror in advertisement barnd the amount paid lfor the apace
actually occupied by lhat portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. whether such error 3 due to nrrqlnrae oftld In r tihiser'i employees or olhirwise and there shall tae no ia3lilvy 101 ron-in~artion of anj advenisamerti beoird tIea arrouni paid for
Such adverrtrerrdnt Diaislay Ads are not uararneed poaiiion All ad6rlsring is, sur.ect 10 apoproval Rigir1 isisawenr-t lo ei irejisd cancel or ciac .ity all ads urndn Inte approprilE ciaz-arrcauori

--re-


ANNOUNCEMENTS
Y & AR D & A SALES
4 DOWN SIZING DUE TO AGE & HEALTH!
Antiques & collectibles Marked "BC"
FURNITURE 30 % OFF
MISCELLANEOUS 40% OFF "Except Firms"
GREAT IDEAS FOR CHRISTMAS!!
Backyard Treasure 2331 Ross Clark Cr.

NEED TO PLACE AN AD?
It's simple, call one of our friendly
Classified representatives
and they will be glad to assist you.


/*FiNNCIAL;^


Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com


ENTERPRISE ESTATE SALE 8 INDIGO PLACE
Thur-10/24, Fri-10/25, Sat-10/26, 9AM-6PM, Sun-10/27, 12N-4PM
This Is One Our Best Sales Of The Year. Million Dollar Alabama Executive Home Filled With The
Finest Quality Designer Furniture. The Owners Have Spent Over $475,000.00 Furnishing This
Exquisite Home. This Furniture Can Be Owned For A Fraction Of Its Original Cost. 100s Of
Decorator Collectibles, Furniture By Baker, Stickley, Henredon, Many Maitland Smith,
Theodore Alexander, Century, Thomasville. Bombe Chests, LaBarge Gilt Mirrors, French
Porcelain Lamps, French Tapestries, Indian And Persian Rugs, Vintage Outdoor Urns, Many
Decorator tables, A Beautiful Maitland Smith Coffee Table One Of A Kind, Century Fringed
Sofas, Vintage Marble Top Bombe Chests, Baker Consoles, Baker Banded Mahogany Round
Dining Table Table; Stickley Dining Chairs, Antique English Sideboard, Bar Stools, Leather
Recliners, Leather Theater Seating, Fine Silk Custom Draperies, French Chairs, Venetian Mirror,
Custom Office Desk, Many Different Occasional Chairs, China, Crystal, Glass, Floor Lamps,
Banded Serpentine Chests, An Impressive Maitland Smith King Bedroom Suite With Marble Top
Side Chest, Dressers, Maitland Smith Boudoir Desk With Chair, Many Pieces Of Art, Oil
Paintings, Botanicals Framed With The Finest Italian Custom Framing, Patio.Firniture, Leather
Sofa, Crystal Chandeliers, Lenox Holiday China, Lenox Eternal China, Limoge Hamilton China,
University of Alabama Collectibles,61 in Panasonic TV, Marble Top Bar, 100's of Decorator
items, Viking Refrigerator, trundle Bed, Christmas Items. This Is One Sale Not To Miss. You Can
Acquire The Finest Made Furniture At A Fraction Of Thie Cost. Everything Must Go!
VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.ALPHAESTATELIQUIDATORS.COM FOR PICTURES!
CALL 678-525-6148 FOR QUESTION AND MORE INFORMATION.


($)


IINANCIAL


Ill 11111111111111111111111111111E IU
Perfect Oppirtunity To Own ,
Your Own Business! -
DOTHAN ICE CREAM SHOPPE:
j For Info Call (334)-618-7;30j



Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
MICLANEU FRS ALE
Tires and Wheels
from 2014 Jeep JK.
1P255/75R17 Goodyear
E ar. ^Wrangler SRA. Only 1K
miles. Set of five (5) stock
17" aluminum wheels. Call
334-790-8530, day or night.



Free Kittens (7) to a good home, 6 weeks old,
litter trained, male & female.850-272-4908

7 lioPapWow (F) SOO.Yborlkes; ,
&mClhUahua 334-71 6 A.0
Boston Terrier Puppies health certificate, vet
checked, guaranteed & parents on site
$250. 850-547-9351 or 850-849-0176


Level:II2} 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Friday's puzzle
9 41 67 318- .821 T 15

8131'2,9516174
6115 32 7 94 8
3171.8 459162.



1. 6. 7 241589


Cc 2013 The Mepham Group Distriuted by Trioune Conment Agency. All rights reserved 10/22/13


JACKSOI| WUNTYf


^WFr M~LO^v I iB^' MBfc"^B1^^^^^^^^'^^Wl)4 NB'B^^^w^


Recorctng

Jackson County

History


5 Days a Week!


I$)


* 0'


-- - -
~


1~
A'
I, t


L
it


LOST: Male, black Chihuahua & female Pug
LOST in Marianna area. Call 209-8004 with info.
Miniature Schnauzers.White, CKC. Will be
ready the first week of Nov.Tails docked and
dew claws removed. Worming at 2,4, and 6
weeks and first shots.Call 334-714-0289.
r~*}j:ARMR'SUMPPIE

Y2 ac, of SUGAR CANE for sale.
0 Golden 27 Cane Mill
4 Doctors Buggy with horse and harness
4 20 ft. Goose Neck Cattle Trailer.
229-220-6711


APLIN FARMS
S*Tomatoes
U Peas 0 Squash
n Eggplants
Peppers
Sunflowers n Pumpkins
*mCucumbers
Open Mon-Sat (7am-6pm)
1 334-792-6362. '

Fresh Green

*We also have
*^ shelled peanuts
850-352-2199
850-209-3322 or 850-573-6594
4128Hw 231

Hewett Farms
Fall peas Ready
shelled or unshelled,
several variety's
Off hwy 90 between
Cypress & Grand Ridge
on Mayo Rd.
Bobby Hewett: 850-592-4156
or 850-899-8709
GIVE US A RING..
{ Call today to place
your item in the
classified.
(850) 516-3614
(800) 779-2557
jilk (;n' 1Tsn]nsD


Sudoku


__^__-J-- --


_7_ 91 _-L
9 9 .53,.1.

74 9.


_-- -- ---- --
_r78

2_ 25 3.7



8 4

__ 14 6_ 7_7_

3 7 5


5i. jiai





6B Tuesday, October 22,.2013 9 Jackson County Floridan


HOME GROWN. FRESH




220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
*334-793-6690*


Young Sim-Angus Bulls *
Top Blood Lines. Priced to Sell.
Call 334-898-1626 or 334-360-5035


'TREES TREES
12 TREES
12Wftall 30gal.
containers
$49.95 ea. 10 or
more $39.95
Live Oaks, Crape Myrtle,
Cherry Laurel & Magnolias
By appointment
*334-692-3695
WAN TED FARM &GARDEN


Northwest Florida Community Hospital,
Chipley, FL is seeking qualified
candidates for the following position:

COOK
FT, full menu, healthcare experience
preferred
*0Dietary Aide
FT, healthcare experience preferred

Applications available online at,
www.NFCH.6rg and/or application to:
Email dblount@nfch.org
(850) 415-8106 or Fax (850) 638-0622
Smoke and Drug Free Campus. EOE


Care Taker for Residential Subdivision
in Marianna 20 hours more or' less per week
$12.50 per hour. Must have exp. with
tractor/bush hogging, small implements and
equipment maintenance and repair,
reliable transportation required.
Call Ed Thomas 352-771-5902.


4S 4 0

^^ Look ahead to your
44 future! Start training
C' Tie for a new career in
FORf IIS Medical Assisting,
COLLEGE Medical Office Admin.,
Pharmacy Technology,
Electrical Trades & HVAC!
Call Fortis College. 855-445-3276
For consumer info: visit www.fortis.edu



APARTMENTSUNFlUR!ISHE
1 & 2BR Apartments In Marianna
2 & 3BR Mqbile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4m
Cedar Creek Apartments 1BR/1BA $500
Appliances, lawn care & pest control included.
Must be 62 or older or disabled. Call 850-352-
3878 or email cedarcreek@nchouslng.net
^^.l).t^4.!7f


CLASSIFIED


SAWYERgS PRODUCE
HAS FRESH HOME GROWN PRODUCE


FRSHPODC GNRA MPOMETAP*ARTMNTUFUNIHE


POSITION AVAILABLE
PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR

The City of Blountstown, Florida
Is seeking applicants to fill the newly created
position of Public Works Director in the City
of Blountstown. Persons interested in
applying for the position must fill out a City
of Blountstown Application for
Employment form and should send a detailed
resume, with professional references and
other information to City of Blountstown,
Re: Public Works Director Search, 20591
Central Avenue West, Blountstown, Florida
32424. Salary range $35,000 $45,000 DOQ.
Applicant must be able to pass a criminal
background check.
To obtain application form and complete
job description contact:
parrishe~)blountstown.org.

Minimum Training and Experience:
High School Diploma or GED
Five years experience being in responsible
charge of utility management and or
construction Computer literate, able to type
letters and generate spreadsheets.
Valid State of Florida drivers license.
Prefer College or University graduate with
major course work in electrical, sanitary, civil
engineering, building construction or public
administration. Considerable (10 years)
experience being in responsible charge of
utility management and or construction.
Florida experience and experience In Electric
system management.
Underground Contractors License
All Applications are due by
Friday, November 8,2013 at close of
Business, 4:00 PM Central Time.
A candidate selected for interview will be',
required to visit the City of Blountstown at
his/her own expense upon a date selected by
the City Council. Only those applicants short
listed will be called for interviews.
The City of Blountstown is an EOE and is a
Drug Free Workplace.


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CHIPOLA APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND 1 BEDROOM
APTS. FOR ELDERLY. SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE-ON ALL UNITS. FOR RENTAL
INFORMATION CALL (850) 526-4407
TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


IJAL IO~t 'ItCI

*3BRiBA duplex in on Alabama Ave. $425.
mo. $400. Dep. 3/1 HOUSE $550. mo. $500.
dep. incl. water, sewage & garbage
Both in Grandridge 850-592-5571.
Brick 2/1 Duplex 3196 Diana Lane $575. and
with carport & Storage $600.
4 Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 .

3BR/1BA 2636 Church St Cottondale
Stove & Refrigerator No Pets.
$550 Mo. + $300 Dep. Call 850-352-4222
3BR/1BA BRICK HOUSE CH&A,
$650. MO. + $650 pep. NO PETS.
HWY 73 & MAGNOLIA RD.
CALL 850-573-6307 or 850-482-5449
Austin Tyler & Co *
Quality Homes & Apartments
a# 850- 526-3355 or austintylercq.com
"Property Management IsOur ONLY business"


Lease/Option To Buy 3/2 hardwood floors,
CH&A 2940 Dogwood St
dose to Riverside school.
$875. mo. 4 850-718-6541

2/2 country setting, Sneads-Grand Ridge area,
water, sewage, lawn & garbage include.
No Pets $400. mo + dep. 850-593-6457
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes In Cottondale.
$500,and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http//*www.charioscountrylivfng.com.
850-209-8847-40


RECREATION- ,


BOAT MOTOR 2003 Mercury Outboard 15hp,
electric start & stick steering, exc. cond.
$1700. OBP 334-677-1147.

2009 Tritoin 171 Tourna-
Ament Sports. S0hp Mercu-
ry,, 3 batteries & 3 battery
charger installed, GPS fish
M l^^Bfinder in cockpit, fish find-
er up front w/recessed trolling motor control
pedal w/71 lb thrust. 24V trolling motor. Excel-
lent cond, housed inside. $9,000. 334-673-0135
Stratos Bass Boat, 201 Pro XL w/Trailer, 2003
Evinrude 225 h.p. (low hours), Trolling motor,
GPS, 2 Depth finders, extra. SS Prop., Built in
Battery Charger. Lots of Extras, Excellent con-
dition, garage kept. Must see! $7.995 229-334-
0224


k upyour copy today!

i1 .


T OCTOBER SW,"


OF n V,,l REAL


B-- ~ ~ A ",- *- ~


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!'
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
85-8283 Cel 850272662


LAN CEARNGANDOEBST ERIESS
Dozer and Excavation Work
Ponds Road Building Demolition
Pine Tree Planting Herbicide Spraying
Fire Line Plowing Burning
850-762-9402
ClayO'Neal Cell 850-832-5655
clayslandclearing~gmail.com n _
-ATMOIES ERIE

NEW&USEDTIRE$
NEW TIRBfInBOW MATW VRICE1i1i'




'We. d&y V-(e4tV'

850.526.1700
Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
2978 Pierce Street (behind Tim's Florist)


1942 Hwy. 231 *-Afford, FL oust north ofAlfftor
Depressiwn Glass, Blue Ridge Potte"y, Costume Jewelry, Bue awl White,
Milk Glass, Vaseline Glass, FolkArt and much more Stuffll
Opean Thur day- Saturday: 10:01am 5:00pm
: 850-579-2393




"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured







[For Alou ome hyrovement Needls
PNew Homes & Room Additions Flooring
Painting Siding Kitchen & Bathroom Upgrades
Custom Ceramic Shower Specialist* Porches
Pole Barns Concrete Driveways Sidewalks & Slabs
Llc# HR 2822811487 INSURED
850-573-1880


This oenth's Special

$2,39500
35 Years in Business
2 Wi Mon Pomait Baess .J


North Florida-Rental

5 Day Buy Back
<^ Year Warranty
MODEL
#B30L, B42L In Stock
N1 ore Models Available
850-526-7368
2890 Noland St. Marianna


- ------------
'North Florida Rental

DOLMAR _

POWER PRODUCTS
MODEL #PS32, PS421, PS51 OIn Stock
More Models Available
850-526-7368
2890 Noland St. Marianna


- :' 7- .1 d.,. :-J
bwsdoy's :'~ 6oj^F~o


IT'SASEASYASi -.2-3

1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


MO:Ls HMS FORsRENT
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Please call 850-258-1594 or
850-636-8570 Leave Message

2 &3BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna &Sneads (850)209-8595 1

3/2 DW in Malone, CH/A, No pets,
security negotable Section 8 ok.
850-594-9991 or 850-557-7719
Marianna area 2/2 Mbl. Hm. in park CH&A
water, sewage No Pets or Smoking Ref. Reg.
1st. & last $500. mo. 850-482-8333

(/^ RESIDENTIAL
G00 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
HMS WIH -CRAG
Beautiful Graceville FL home and farm
4 bedrooms, 3 /2 baths custom built home on
239 acres. Cap divide. 175 acres plowable for
corn, soybeans, cotton. Large free standing
building. 3 wells. Joe Farris, Land and Stand
Properties. 850-387-5517


M_.





www- W FLO T? r A N nm


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan e


Tuesday, October 22, 2013-7 B


Welicraft 18.7ft fiberglass tri hull boat, 115 HP
Mercury, good cond., Tandem 4 wheel trailer,
will trade for small travel trailer. 850-209-1064


2006 Forest River Wlldwood LE Model #31QBSS
31' Dry wt. 10280 lbs., 1 slide, 4 bunk beds,
Booth dinette, Center kitchen & LR, Jackknife
sofa, Front Q bed, Side aisle bath w/ shower &
roof vent, Dbl. door Frig., Gas/Elec. water heat-
er, microwave, Gas stove top/oven & furnace,
Duct A/C /Heat, AM/FM Stereo, Front & rear
stabilizer jacks, $9,000.00 334-790-4612
MOTO*HOMS & V

1998 40 Ft. Gulfstream Tour Master RV- Diesel,
RV Top of the Line, 1 Slide Out, Outside Enter-
tainment Center & Freezer. S/S Refrigerator,
Washer/Dryer, Separate Ice Make, 95,000
Miles, Good Tires, $45,000. Includes 2002 PT
Cruiser Tow Car. 850-557-3455
2002 Whnnabago 34' 2 slides, 5500 ONAN Gen,
lots of upgrades, excellent condition, 29000
miles $32,000. Honda 2006 CRV: 44600 miles,
ready to tow w/blue ox tow bar
system, excellent condition $13,000. Both
Vehicles for $43,000. Call 334-692-3337 or 334-
796-5421





Buick 2002 Regal LS, road-
ed, 2nd owner, looks and
runs great, everything
works, 135,000 miles.
$3995. 334-596-9564.
Chevy 1955 Belair 2-door, 350 engine, auto-
trans, runs great, daily driver $12,500. Firm
334-695-6368.
Chrysler 2004 PT Cruiser,
automatic, 4 cylinder,
cold air, loaded, 76,000
miles, excellent condi-
tion. $5200. Call 790-7959


= Ford 1999 Explorer: Eddie
sun roof and everything
,works great!!! Good AC &
heat, 6 disc CD changer.
Only 110,000 miles. KBB value is $4,435. Asking
only $3,100 obo. Looking to sell fast so all rea-
sonable offers will be considered. 850-693-1581.'


Ford Mustang Fast Pack V-6,5-;peed, Exc.
cond. metalic green in color, 229-861-2949.


GOT BAD CREDIT?
0 SO Down/Ist Payment,
Tax, Tag & Title Pass
H Repo pass bankruptcy
SLOW CREDIT OK
Ask About $1000. off at time of purchase.
4 Call Steve Pope 334-03-9550
Honda 2000 Odyssey: Runs perfect 3 year/3600
'mile warranty on transmission. $6,500.
Call 334-693-9360,
Hyundai 2006 Elantra GT,
loaded, leather, sunroof,
4 cylinder, automatic, 5
door hatchback, 69,000
miles, $7500. 790-7959
Jeep 2004 Wrangler: yellow, soft top, 135k
miles, over $3000 in upgrades, 5 speed manual,
great shape $10,900. Call 334-618-4430
Jeep 2005 Liberty XL: Excellent Condition, 138k,
miles, gold with tan leather interior, sunroof,
completely loaded. $6,000.334-237-1039
Mercury 2001 Grand Mar-
quis IS, loaded, leather,
cold air, 89,000 miles,
like new. $5995. Call 334-
790-7959.
Nissan 2012 AlHina, low miles, must sell, $200
down, $269 per month. Call Ron Ellis 334-714-
0028.
:Nssan 2012 Versa, GAS SAVER, well equipped,
still under factory warranty, $250 down, $250
,per month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243.
Toyota 2011 Camry, Great family car, great gas
'mileage, pwr windows, door lock, Am/FM, CD,
,$300 down, $300 per month. Call Steve Hatcher
334-791-8243.
Toyota 2011 Corolla, 4 door, like new, under
warranty, $200 down, $279 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 334-714-0028.


'2007 Poloris Victory Jackpot, 40K miles, 1634cc,
100 cu. in., 106 stroker kit, many extras, custom
pegs, mirrors & windshield. 2 seater & 1 solo
seat, lost job need to sell $8500. 334-432-3249.,


Honda '07 Ruckus 670 miles. $1450.
:334-798-0931


2012 Nissan Pathfinder one owner, excellent
'condition, low mileage, super clean, $19,950,
Phone 334-796-5036
Lexus 2010 RX350: Loaded car in excellent
condition. White with tan leather interior.
,Just completed 50,000 mile service. $29,900.
Cell 334-701-2642.


Dodge Ram 1500 2007 SLT quad cab 4x2 HEMI
:SJ V8 engine, anti theft, tilt steering, 26K
miles, very clean, power drivers seat, rear slid-
ing window, bed liner, towing pack. Loaded.
$17.000.334-475-6309.
FORKLIFT-TOYOTA 2000 Model, 3300 Ib, lift
;cap., excellent condition, $4,700 205-902-4212



1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!


AUTO BODY '& RECYCLING
PAYiNGOTOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


_______ CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES

I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING. 334-792-8664



fGot a Clunker
We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$250 &I Cormplete Cars
CALL 334-714-6285........j


Looking for VW Van
sold in Enterprise, AL
in 1983. If you have
seen this vehicle please
contact me @'
swtcraftL@hotmail.com

a* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not !
-334-T94-9576 or 344-191-4714

WE WILL BUY YOUR CAR OUTRIGHT!
Regardless of year, make; model, we have
millions of dollars on hand to pay you good
money for your current vehicle.
We Are On The Coast But Worth The Drive,
& reputable, & we can give you a fair price
appraIsal'in 15 minutes.
Call for appointment, dealer. 877497-7975


(ifl 4.EGALS


LF160271 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

PROJECT NAMES: Intersection of Hummingbird
Road and Basswood Road Subsurface
Remediation by Grout Injection and Chemical
Injection

Sealed bids, submitted in triplicate, will be
received by the Board of County Commission-
ers of Jackson County, Florida, (Owner), until
2:00 p.m. (Central Time) NovemberL72013 at
the CountyvEpgineer's Office (County Engineer,
Larry Alvarez), 2828 Owens Street, Marianna,
FL 32446 for the construction of the following
described Projects:

A. Subsurface compaction cement grouting
through injection'pipes at 10 locations to
an average depth of 35 feet to mitigate the
suspected sinkhole activity adjacent to and
beneath the roadway.
Compaction grouting shall be performed
generally as depicted on the plans, outlined
in these specifications:
The following specifications are for remedia-
tion of subsurface sinkhole conditions.
The work consists of furnishing all labor,
equipment, and materials required to inject
cementitious grout to an estimated average
depth of 35 feet. Do not drill beyond 50Afeet
unless prior permission is obtained from the
Engineer. In these specifications, "Engineer"
refers to the Geohazards, Inc. geotechnical or
structural engineer (or his- representative).

B. Additionally, chemical grouting shall be
performed at 9 chemical grout points to 8 foot
maximum depth, approximately 4 feet on
center to stabilize and increase the cohesive
strength and density of the shallow subsurface
bearing soils in the area of the depressions.
Chemical grouting should begin no sooner
than 45 days after the completion of the grout
compaction program. This work shall consist
of soil densification and void filling to improve
the bearing capacity of near-surface soils by
injecting a polyurethane material into the soil
beneath and supporting the roadway surface.
As used in these specifications, "Engineer"
refers to the Geohazards, Inc. geotechnical or
structural engineer (or his representative).

A Non-Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held
on 'October 24.2013 at 9:00 AM central time in
the Jackson County Road Department.
Potential bidders are encouraged to attend.
The deadline for receipt of questions will be
October 30.2013 at 2:00 PM Central Time
Questions must be submitted in writing
to the County Engineer (email lalvarez@jackso
ncountyfl.com: fax (850) 482-9063) with a copy
to the Jeannie Bean (email jbean@jacksoncoun
'tyfl.com).

Bids will be opened! and recorded at 2:10 PM
(or immediately thereafter) on November 7.
2013 at the Jackson County Board of County
Commissioners Board Room at 2864 Madison
Street. In addition to the above, Bids may also
be submitted to the County Engineer at the
Board Room from 1:50 PM until 2:10 PM Central
Time.

Specifications and bid documents will be
available after noon on October 16,.2013 at
the County Engineers office at Road and Bridge
Building at 2828 Owens Street. Electronic cop-
ies of the bid documents can be obtained by
mailing Larry Alvarez at lalvarez@iacksoncou
ntyfl.com or Jeannie Bean at ibean(iacksonco
untvfl.com.

County Engineer
Attn: Larry Alvarez
2828 Owens Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 482-9677

upon payment of $ No Charge per set which
amount constitutes the cost of. reproduction
and handling. This payment'will not be refund-
ed.
The Owner reserves the right to waive any
informality or to reject any.or all bids. Each
Bidder must deposit with his/her bid, security.
in the amount, form and subject to the condi-
tions provided in the Information for Bidders.
Sureties used for obtaining bonds 'must appear
as acceptable according to the Department of
Treasury Circ~ular 570.

No bid may be withdrawn for a period of
sixty days after the scheduled closing time
for receipt of bids.

To the extent applicable to this project,
attention 'of Bidders is particularly called to
the requirements of the Special Provisions
(Local Agency Program/Federal-Aid Contract
Requirements), conditions of employment to
be observed and minimum wage rates to be
paid under the Contract, Section 3, Segregated"
Facilities, Section 1019 Executive Order 11246,
and all applicable laws and regulations of the
Federal government and State of Florida, and
bonding and insurance requirements.
.IN PARTICULAR, BIDDERS SHOULD NOTE THE
REQUIRED ATTACHMENTS AND CERTIFICA-
TIONS TO BE EXECUTED AND SUBMITTED WITH
T-1I FAPM OF Rin DOPAiPn

DATE: _____________

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE/FAIR HOUSING
JURISDICTION

LF160272

INVITATION TO BID

Bids will be received by the Jackson County
School Board, Marianna, Florida, until 2:00 p.m.
Central Time, Thursday, November 7, 2012 in
the Administration Building Conference Room,
at which time and place all bids received will
be publicly opened and read aloud for furnish-
ing all labor and materials for the construction
of:

REROOFING PROJECT
RIVERSIDE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
FOR THE JACKSON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
MARIANNA, FLORIDA

All work shall be done according to plans and
specifications prepared by Paul A. Donofro'and
Associates, Architects, 2910 Caledonia Street,
Marianna, Florida 32446. Plans are on file and
open to inspection in the office of the Archi-
tect, 2910 Caledonia Street, Marianna, Florida.

Drawings and specifications may be obtained
from the office of the Architect at Post Office
Box 861, 2910 Caledonia Street, Marianna, Flor-
ida 32446. General Contractors may obtain one
(1) set of documents upon $100.00 deposit,
which will be refunded only to those submit-
ting a bona fide bid and returning said docu-
ments prepaid, in goqd condition, within ten
(10) days after receipt of bids. General Con-
tractors requiring more than one set,
subcontractors, suppliers, or others may pur-
chase a full set of documents for $50.00 per
st, non refundable.

Partial sets will not be sold to major
subcontractors, (mechanical, plumbing and
electrical). Suppliers and other subcontractors
may purchase drawings and specifications at
the rate of $2.00/sheet of drawings and
20e/page of specifications.
Bidding documents will be sent UPS, collect,
unless otherwise specified.

Each bid must be accompanied by a bid bond,
or a cashier's check, made payable to the Jack-
son County School Board, Marianna, Florida in
the sum of 5% of the base bid as a guarantee
and with an agreement that the bidder will not
revoke or cancel his bid or withdraw from the
competition for a period of thirty (30) days af-
ter the.opening of bids, and that in the event
the contract is awarded to the bidder, he will
within ten (10)consecutive days after it is sub-'
mitted, enter into written contract with the
Jackson County School Board in accordance
with the accepted bid. The cost of the bond
will be included as part of the bidders base-bid
proposal.

NOTE: There will be a Mandatory Pre-Bid Con-
ference Wednesday, October 30,2012 at 9:00
a.m. CT. at Riverside Elementary School, 2958
Cherokee Street Marianna, Florida and attend-
ance will be mandatory for all General Contrac-
tors (Roofing Contractors) who plan'to submit
a bid for this project, see Section B, "Instruc-
tions to Bidders", Paragraph B-16.

The Owner reserves the right to waive
informalities in any bid, and to reject any or all
bids, or to accept any bid and any combination
of alternates or separate bid prices that, in
their judgment, will be to the best Interest of
Jackson County School Board.

JACKSON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
BY: /s/ Steve R. Benton, Superintendent
Jackson County School Board
Marianna, Florida



rf '


LF160275

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 32-2012-CA-000022

SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,

v.

NEHEMIA MORGAN; SYLVIA L. MORGAN; UN-
KNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE
NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS,
DEVISEES; GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; SUNTRUST BANK
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the
Summary FinalJudgment of Foreclosure en-
tered on September 16; 2013, in this cause, in
the Circuit Court of Jackson County, Florida,
the clerk shall sell the property situated in
Jackson County, Florida, described as:

COMMENCE AT A NAIL AND DISC (RLS 3214)
MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SEC-
TION 28, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST,
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S.
8834'17"E., ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
SECTION, A DISTANCE OF 859.29 FEET TO A
NAIL AND DISC (RLS 2142), SAID NAIL AND DISC
BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
CONTINUE S.8834'17"E. ALONG SAID LINE, A
DISTANCE OF 200.02 FEET TO A NAIL AND DISC
(PSM 2142); THENCE S.0218'29"W., A DIS-
TANCE OF 441.84 FEET TO A 1/2" IRON ROD
AND CAP (PSM 2142); THENCE N.8741'31"W.,
A DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET TO A 1/2" IRON
ROD AND CAP (PSM 2142); THENCE
N.0218'29"E., A DISTANCE OF 438.77 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

a/k/a 4223 THOMPSON ROAD, MARIANNA, FL
32448-7625

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
for cash, at the North door of the Jackson
County Courthouse, 4445 Lafayette Street, Ma-
rianna, FL 32446, on December 5, 2013 at 11:00
am.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.

Dated at St. Petersburg, Florida, this 1st day of
October, 2013.

Dale Rabon Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tammy Bailey,

DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.
12425 28th Street North, Suite 200
St. Petersburg, FL 33716
PHONE 727-536-4911 / FAX 727-519-1094

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO EXTRA COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT JANE CHAFIN, COURT MANAGER, P.O.
BOX 510, MARIANNA, FL 32447,850-482-9552,
WITHIN WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF
THIS SUMMONS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771 OR
1-40-955-8770 (1) VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERV-
ICE.


CIseyou"COOLSTUFF"byvistnS


Dresser Blonde, 6 Drawers (no mirrow) $45.
850-592-2881

Patio table: Glass top/rattan look. 48" diame-
ter. Perfect condition. $60. 850-718-8084

Rocker/recliner: beige cloth swivel, one year
old. like new. $750BO. 850-718-8084


-Treated Wood Posts: (20) 6" to 8" wide by 8'
long $7 Ea. Call 850-594-5200.
Wood Heater $60., 1978 CHIJUCO annual $20.
850-592-2881.


WWW V U Y .JUVRIA~~,sLPAN9.tC




-18B TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22,2013


spoirrs


College Football



LSU falls to No. 13 after




Mettenberger's off night


The Associated Press

OXFORD, Miss. LSU's Zach
Mettenberger has been so good. for
so long that it was shocking to see
his passes miss open receivers.
Even worse: Mississippi's defense
was catching those balls instead.
The end result was Mettenberg-
er's worst game of the season and a
stunning 27-24 loss to Ole Miss on
Saturday that seriously damaged
any hope the Tigers (6-2, 3-2 South-
eastern Conference) had of winning
a league championship.
The 6-foot-5, 235-pound senior
completed 19 of 33 passes for 274.
yards and a touchdown, but he also
threw three interceptions, including
two in the end zone that killed po-
tential scoring drives.
All three were thrown into tight Ole
Miss coverage.
"Just bad plays," Mettenberger said
after Saturday's game. "They made
good plays on balls and just bad
plays by me. I've got to be smarter."
Mettenberger, had. thrown o only
two interceptions through six games
before the Ole Miss debacle. The
struggles were particularly perplex-
ing considering the Rebels' banged-
up defense was missing five regular
starters.
LSV coach Les Miles tried to take
some of the blame off Mettenberger
and put it on himself. He said the of-\
fense forced too many deep pass at-
tempts early in the game and should
have been -content to make shorter
passes or run the ball.
"I can tell you that I did a poor


iHt. Al' Al< l"'Ai :
LSU quarterback Zach Mettenberger (8) throws an 'incomplete pass as LSU full-
back Connor Neighbors (43) blocks against Mississippi in the first half of Satur,
day's game in Oxford, Miss.


job on preparing this football team
for playing this game," Miles said.
"There is a way I could prepare this
team to put them in a better position
emotionally and prepare them to
play in the kind of stadium that they
played in tonight. We gave them too
many turnovers..' Our football team
will get better. This one is on me. I
take it." I
LSU dropped seven spots in the
latest ranlings to No. 13 and the
Tigers are now two games behind
Alabama in the loss column in the
Western Division. They play Furman
- a Football Championship Subdi-
vision foe -- on Saturday in Baton
Rouge before a showdown with'the
Tide on Nov. 9 in Thscaloosa, Ala.
Mettenberger's problems in the


passing game were surprising, but
LSU's shaky defense was also partly
to blame.
LSU clawed all the way back' from
a 17-0 deficit to tie the game 24 on
Mettenberger's 4-yard pass to Jar-
vis Landry with 3:19 remaining. All
three of Mettenberger's inter6ep-
tions came in the first half and he
played much better after the break.
But the defense couldn't hold.
The Tigers gave up 525 total yards
to the Rebels. Ole Miss quarterback
Bo Wallace completed 30 of 39 pass-
es for 346 yards and continually con-
nected with receivers on third down
to keep drives alive. Jaylen Walton,
a 5-foot-8, 166-pound sophomore,
rushed for a career-high 105 yards
and two touchdowns.


No. 14 A&M looks to move on from upset to Auburn


The Associated Press

COLLEGE STATION,
Texas Texas A&M
'is .searching for a- way
to move on after. this
weekend's upset loss to
Auburn.
The 45-41 defeat
dropped the Aggies from
seventh to 14th in the
poll.
Now Texas A&M has to
see if Johnny Manziel's
right shoulder is OK .and
figure out how to improve
its porous defense before


0
Pirates
From Page 1a
The day wrapped up an-
other successful regular
season for the Lady Pi-
rates, who again went un-
defeated in district com-.
petition and was 'perfect
against IA teams.
They will try to extend
that unblemished mark
today when they open up
in the district tournament
semifinals at SHS against
Vernon at 5 p.m.
The other semifinal will


Indians
From Page 1B
The Lady Indians were coming off
of another 3-0 showing at Darton
(Ga.) College last week in which they
beat Darton, Georgia Perimeter, and
Central Georgia Tech by margins of
18,20, and 32 points.
Saturday's latest road, trip was just
as successful, though not without
any bumps in the road, according
to second-year Chipola coach Greg
Franklin.
"It was up and down. We had
some good moments, but our free
throw.shooting was an Achilles
Heel again," he said. "We would've
won all three by big numbers if we
were making free throws, but we're
not making them right now. I blame
myself for that for not getting our
players to the line more frequently
in practice. I'll definitely make sure
we're approaching the line more at


hosting Vanderbilt on sure pain. He didn't say
Saturday. anything to me; he just
Manziel missed a se- ..said that -he was ready to


ries in the fourth quarter
against the Tigers with
the 'shoulder injury -be-
fore returning in the loss.
Coach Kevin Sumlin
didn't provide an update
on the severity of his in-
jury after the game Sat-
urday night, but didn't
,think it was a factor in the
defeat.
"He came back in and
played," Sumlin said. "I.
don't know how to mea-


be between the winner
of Monday's Altha/We-
wahitchka and, Gracev-
Mle/Blountstown matches
at 7 p.m., with the league
championship match set
for Thursday-at 7p.m.
Sneads hasn't dropped a
set in a district match this
season and comes in as
the overwhelming favor-
ite to take home another
league crown.
However, Roberts said
the message to her play-
ers has been that, starting
today, they can't assume
victory against anyone if,


go. We were able to move
the ball; I don't think that
was the case. We had a
breakdown in protection
a couple of times' in the
second half, which that's
not his fault."
He was injured when
he bulled into three de-
fenders and was drilled
hard into. the. ground on
his right side late in the
third quarter. He looked
uncomfortable when he


they're going to make a
deep 'run towards what
the Lady Pirates hope
is the school's first state
championship.
"We're very excited. I'm
trying to make the girls
understand what they're.
about to embark on here
and what the potential is.
They have to look at every
team they face from here
on out as trying to stand
in between them and the
championship they' want
to win," the coach said.
"After we lost to Arnold
(Saturday), we came to-


practice from here on out."
The Lady Indians also struggled a
bit with staying out of foul trouble,
having difficulty adjusting to a new
emphasis throughout college bas-
ketball on eliminating contact on
the perimeter and calling hand-
check fouls more frequently.
It's a particularly'challenging ad-
justment for a Chipola team that
prides itself on aggressive pressure
defense on the perimeter, illus-
trated Saturday with one game that
featured 29 fouls with a 40-minute
running clock-
"The refs are hypersensitive over
the hand-check stuff. It's kind of
a mess right now," Franklin said.
"We had seven fouls 'called on us on
one possession of a game, all seven
hand-check fouls. Hopefully we can
get all that stuff straightened out."
Fortunately for Franklin, he's
much better-equipped to deal with
foul problems this year compared
to last thanks to a much deeper ros-


returned and was con-
stantly moving and roll-
ing his right arm. Though
Sumlin wouldn't specu-
late on how he was feel-
ing, receiver Malcome
Kennedy said they knew
he was in pain.
Manziel threw for 454
yards and four touch-
downs, but also had two
interceptions Saturday. He
ran for a touchdown after
the injury, but was sacked
for a 22-yard loss on fourth
down on the last drive to
give Auburn the victory.


gether right before every-
body left and I said, 'that's
the last match we're going
to lose.' I'm always trying
to win the last, match of
the season and I've never
done it.
"But right now, we're
just focused on getting
through district and tak-
ing it one game at a time
and not taldng anyone for
granted. It's time to play
our ,best ball. We're ex-
.cited. I'm glad it's finally
here." '


ter than last year's group that went
just seven-deep.
But the coach said that while he's
very happy with the numbers over-
all, he's still looking to develop more
reliable depth before the start of the
season.
"I've got nine kids right now that
can play at a high level and I know I
can trust. Nine who know the game
and know where they need to be at,"
he paid. "I'm still trying to find two
more. If I can find that last two to
make it 10-11 (rotation players) that
I can feel comfortable going into the
game knowing that they're going to
lift us up, I'll be happy."
The Chipola women will next go to
Oxford, Miss. on Monday to play a
scrimmage against Ole Miss before
playing another exhibition against
East Carolina on Nov. 2.
The Lady Indians open the regular
season with the Girls Basketball Re-
port Classic on Nov. 7-9 at the Mil-
ton H. Johnson Health Center.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alabama running back Kenyan'Drake (17) cuts between Arkan-
sas safety Eric Bennett (14) and Arkansas linebacker Jarrett
Lake (39) for a first down run during the first half of Saturday's
game in Tuscaloosa, Ala.

Yeldon, Drake latest tough

Alabama tailback duo

The Associated Press struggles and ran for-352
yards against Arkansas,.
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -Al- ",1 think those two guys
abama'sstringof formidable have played well," Tide
tailback tandems continues'"coach Nick Saban said.
unabated, "Both tailbacks 'comple-
INow, it's sophomores T.J. ment each other in terms
Yeldon and Kenyan Drake of their style. One guy's a'
pounding at, or running little bit faster (Drake). The'
away from, opposing de; other guy's more of an in-
fenses. The top-ranked side, make you miss, hard
Crimson Tide's Tailback 1 to tackle."
and lAhave been piling up "Ithinkthe change ofpace
yards. and touchdowns at that the two guys comple-
a clip that would make the ment each other with is re-'
Trent Richardson/Mark In- ally something that's good.
gram and Richardson/Ed- forourteam.Ithinkit'sgood
die Lacy combos proud. for both of them as well."
It's business as usual in 'This is starting to look like.
the Alabama backfield. One Sabai's typical Alabama
goes in, one comes out, and backfield. The Tides tail-
the Tide keeps r6lling. back duos during the three
."It's not really competing national championship
because coach 'sees us as seasons under Saban have
two people that can come averaged 2,423 yards and
in at any given time," Drake '27 touchdowns. The only
said. "Whether he's in or "down" year in the past four
I'm' in, we're both excited seasons was 2010 when In-
for each other. He scores a gram and Richardson com-
touchdown, I score a touch- bined for 1,575 yards and 19
down. He gets a big run, touchdowns and the team
I get a big run. Or any of went 10-3.
our'backs. We're just happy Those two were both first-
for each other because round picks Ingram won
we're helping the team win the 2009 Heisman Trophy
regardless." and Richardson was a final-
They've been powering ist in 2011-while Lacywas
the way lately for an offense a second-round pick of the
whose biggest star is quar- *Green Bay Packers this-year.
terback AJ McCarron and Lacy and Yeldon both
deepest position is wide topped 1,000 yards last
receivers season.
Yeldon'!has run for 333 Yeldon and Drake have'
yards and four touchdowns some ground to make up
in the last three SEC games to match' those numbers.
going into Saturday's visit Yeldon is sixth in the league
from Tennessee. Drake's with 686 yards while Drake's
production has been simi- 402 ranks 13th. Both have
lar with 309 yards and five run for seven touchdowns.
touchdowns, and both have But their recent tear has
been effective catching still been impressive. Plus,
passes too. Yeldon also has 11 catches
'"They're similar in terms for 104' yards and Drake
of stature, and they play eight for 101 yards.
with a high level of physi- "They are both great run-
cality," Tennesssee coach ning backs and I have con-
Butch Jones said Monday, fidence in anybody we have
"Both have great speed. I really as a running back
think the one thing you can when they step in, they'll do
say about their program the job needed," McCarron
it's what we're building said. "Both of those guys
here at Tennessee it's have been playing great for
based on competition; It's us. The things that I'm hap-
a competitive environment piest about is they do a re-
every day you walk in there. ally good job in protection
That's what we're building and get out when they are
* here, kind of the next-guy- supposed to and give me
in mindset." a check-down option, be-
The next guy in has been cause a lot of teams know
Drake, who has shed a slow we have a lot of vertical
start and squasl',ed any threats, so they drop a, lot
speculation about. wheth- .of people back in the zone
er a member of the latest now."


*group of hotshot running
backrecruits could overtake
him on the depth chart.
Drake had 53 yards
through three games and
was held out of the opener
against Virginia Tech for un-
specified reasons. Now, he
has seven touchdown runs
and is averaging 8.2 yards
a carry, the highest among
the SEC's Top 15 rushers.
Since those three games,
Alabama's running game
has climbed from last in the
Southeastern Conference in
rushing to fifth.
The Tide is pounding
away at a clip 8f 271.5 yards
per game and 7.2 yards
a carry since those early


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MUS
From Page 1B
"It's a pretty nice course;
a nice layout. It's got a
couple of holes you can
score pretty good on,"
he said. "We've probably
played harder courses.
There are some short
1par fours there and some


reachable par fives for
some of our guys. Hope-
fully we'll come out play-
ing good and see how it
plays."
The top two teams and
individuals from the re-
gional tournament will
'advance to the state tour-
ney held Oct. 29-30 at
Deer Island Golf and Lake
Club' in Tavares.


To make it that far, Wil-
son said his team would
likely need to shoot at or
around even par on the
par-72 course.
It will be difficult, but
the coach said he does
believe his players have it
in them to make a run at
a qualifying score.
"If we shoot a 316 like
we did at Dogwood Lakes


(Oct. 10 in the final regu-
lar season match), that
could be close," Wilson
said. "Everybody prob-
ably has to shoot in the
70s. There are a bunch of
good teams here. I don't
think 'anybody (at Mari-
anna) has ever gone to
state before as a team or
individually, so it would
be great if we could."


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TUSDAS & I'3p
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85.56.46