Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01181

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text

Nominee for energy
regulatory post withdraws 1OA

Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


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Local man recovering well after wreck


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Delmer Tillman's wife considers it a mi-;
nor miracle that she will be able to take her
husband home from the hospital in a few
days. When he wrTecked his 2009 Mercury
Marquis'late Sunday afternoon, it landed
upside down and lay crumpled into a mis-
shapen mass. with him behind the wheel.
From some angles, the car looked like it
had folded into a ball.
The 77-year-old Jackson County man was
See WRECK, Page 9A


Delmer Tillman is recovering
well after his severe single-
vehicle wreck Sunday near the
intersection of State Road 71.
and Blue Springs Highway.


PAIF : lj f I f 'Lt'M LAIl


against Tigers

IB

Vol. 90 No. 206


Tropical

depression

could affect

Panhandle
From staff report
A tropical depression in the
Bay of Campeche near Mexico
has local officials worried that
the low system could enter the
Gulf of Mexico later this week,
whip itself into a tropical storm
or worse, and head into the Flor-
ida panhandle.
Jackson County Emergency
Management Director Rod-
ney Andreasen said Tuesday
that while cooling water tem-
peratures, and persistent wind
shear lessen the chance that the
SSee WEATHER, Page 9A



Peanuts


inperil


iir. I iFCC, fHl" !,11.1
The epic rainfall that hit the area
in July and August 'has led to an
epidemic of leaf spot fungus in the
Panhandle's peanut crop.
Farmers dealing with
spurt of leaf spot disease
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbljC rah3Ier,'.cIhlaordar cornL

This year's growing season
brought much-needed rain to
local peanut fields, but there
was a downside to the overabun-
dance. The extreme moisture en-
couraged the spread of leaf spot
disease, a problem that peanut
farmers must contend with in
any given year but wh ich .has
multiplied this year because of
the extra rain..
The disease causes swift de-
foliation of the peanut plant,
and when this becomes severe,
it causes the plant to die. When
farmers start digging to harvest
their peanuts from those plants,
many peanuts will fall off their
pegs onto the ground, rather
than traveling with the plant into
the harvester. Not much can be
SeePEANUTS, Page 9A


Florida asks U.S. Supreme Court to stop Ga. water use


The Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Flori-
da charged ahead Tuesday
with a lawsuit against the
state of Georgia that accus-
es its northern neighbor of
consuming too much fresh
water from* a -river system
that serves three South-
eastern states.
The legal action filed
*directly with the U.S.
Supreme Court is an es-
calation in a legal dis-
pute lasting more than


"Georgia has refused to fairly share, the waters that
flow between our two states, so to stop Georgials
unmitigated consumption of water we have
brought the matter before the US. Supreme Court."
Rick Scott,
-Florida overrior


two decades. :
The lawsuit is not a sur-
prise since Gov. Rick Scott
announced in August that
the state was preparing
,one.
But the legal measure


asks the high court to take
some dramatic steps, in-
cluding capping Georgia's
overall water use at levels
existing in 1992. Florida
also wants a special mas-
ter to enter a decree that


would "equitably" divide
the waters in the basin of
the Apalachicola, Chatta-
hoochee and Flint rivers.
"The situation is dire
and the need for relief im-
mediate," states Florida's
lawsuit, which maintains
Georgia is on pace to dou-
ble its current consump-
tion levels by 2040.
Scott decided to push
ahead with the lawsuit fol-
lowing the near-collapse
of the oyster industry in
Apalachicola Bay and after


federal officials. declared
a fishery disaster for oys-
termen on the Gulf Coast.
Oysters need a mix of fresh
and salt water in order to
thrive.
"Georgia has refused
to fairly share the waters
that flow between our two
states, so to stop Georgia's
unmitigated consumption
of water we have brought
the matter before the U.S.
Supreme Court," Scott said
in a statement.
"Generations of Florida


families have relied upon
these waters'for their live-
lihood, but now risk losing
their way of life if Georgia's
actions are not stopped,"
Scott added.
Brian Robinson, a
spokesman for Georgia
Gov. Nathan Deal, blast-
ed the lawsuit as "politi-
cal theatre and nothing
more."
"The only 'unmitigated
consumption' going on
See OYSTERS, Page 9A


)'CLASSIFIEDS...7-9B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




Sl65.1 61800Il50 9


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SLOCAL...3A


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RAHAL-MILLER
CHEVROLET BUICK CADILLAC GMC NISSAN -..
SERVICE TEAM BST
(85O 482-6317


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READY OR NOT, IT'S HERE
.',jft,-EADY ,O R N OT ...I T": HE-RE


Find all the facts, figures, pros and cons

to the Affordable Care Act on page 5A




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


Today


Mostly Sunny & Warm.

Justin Kiefer / VWMBB

High 87
Low- 67'


, / _I High 87
7 ~Low -67'


Thursday
Mostly Sunny & Warm.




Low 680
^" High- 85



Saturday
Possible Storms.


-.A ./ High 85'
Low -70


Friday
Possible Storms


High- 83
Low 64


Sunday
Showers Likely.


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MID
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola.


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Low 3:50 PM
Low -) 9:12 PM
Low -,3:55PM
Low 5:06 PM
Low 5:40 PM


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
SCaryville


Reading
42.62'ft.
Missing ft.
. 8.43ft.
7.50 ft.


High 9:01 AM
High 2:59 AM
High 9:34 AM
High 10:07 AM
High- 10:40 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft. .


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme


o i 2 3 :f


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:35 AM
Sunset 6:26 PM
Moonrise 3:20 AM
Moonseti 4:19 PM


Oct. Oct. Sept, Sept.
5 11 19 27


FLORIDA'S Mia

PANHANDLE jcDNTRY
MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9 Fm
LmjjISTE FRiOULY EA'EiUiA.TES


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com
Circulation Manager-Dena Oberski
doberski@jctloridari com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
.. .. Street Address: .
S 4403 Constitution Lane
.. Marianna, FL32448
Office Hours:
SWeekdays. 8 a m to 5 p.m

MISS YOUR PAPER?
SYou should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tionbetween 6a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL. '

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months; .
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxe &; Mail
subscriptionss must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
,year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher,
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors, and advertisements beyond
the amount paidfor the space actually ,
, occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTOGETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan willpublish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY .
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

THURSDAY, OCT. 3
SInternational Chat'n' Sip 8:30-10 a.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library, 2929 Green St. in
Marianna. Learning Center staff and their inter-
national English learners invite the public for the
exchange of language, culture and ideas in a relaxed
environment. Light refreshments served. No charge.
Call 482-9124.
)) Chipola Civic Club Meeting Noon at The'
Oaks Restaurant, U.S. 90 in Marianna. The CCC's
focus is the local community,' "Community, Children
&,Character." Call 526-3142.
) Job Club Noon-3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S 90, Manrianna Learn job .
seeking/retention skills; get job search assistance:.
Call 526-0139.
Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St., Mariapna.
Call 482-2290. ..
D Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group
-5:30 p.m. at Jackson Hospital Cafeteria Board
Room. Freeqtbattend. Curriculum developed by ex-
smokers for those who want to become ex-smokers
themselves. Call 482-6500.
VFW & Ladies Auxiliary Meeting- 6 p.m. at
2830 Wynn St., Marianna. Covered-dish supper fol-.
lowed by a 7 p.m. business meeting. Call 372-2500.
William Dunaway Chapter, Florida Society,
Sons of the American Revolution 6:30 p.m.
Jim's Buffet and Grill. Speaker: Mrs. Charlotte Gard-
ner, Jackson County School Board Member, District
5. Dutch treat. Call 594-6664.
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.
69th Annual Northwest Florida Championship
Rodeo Oct. 3-5 at Memorial.Field in Bonifay. Visit
www.bonifaykiwanisrodeo.com.

FRIDAY, OCT. 4
First Friday Power Breakfast 7 a.m.-9 a.m.
at Agricultural Center, Penn Ave., Marianna. Special
guest: Representative Matt Gaetz giving updates on
the Common Core curriculum. Call 482-8060.
))Hooks and Needles -10 a.m. at the Jackson
County Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and
experienced hand crafters welcome to create, share,
learn or teach favorite projects. Call 482-9631.


))Celebrate Recovery- 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship Marianna. Public welcome. Agenda posted at JCSB.
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult, org. Call 482-1200.
teen meetings to"overcome hurts, habits and )) Jackson County QuiltersGuild Meeting-
hang-ups; Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran.Church;
2Q9-785r, ,573..-]]31. 3975 U.S. 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9 are fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects,
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist lessons, help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
Church, 2901 Caledonia.St. in Marianna. Jacob City Council Meeting 6 p.m. Jacob City
)) 69th Annual Northwest Florida Championship Hall. Public welcome.
Rodeo Oct. 3-5 at Memorial Field in Bonifay. Visit Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
www.bonifaykiwanisrodeo.com. p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.
SATIR IPAY CT 5 '


) Woman's Club yard sale 7 a.m. at Marianna,
Woman's Club House, corner of Clinton.and Caledo-
nia streets, Marianna. Oct. 5. Proceeds to continue
outreach programs in community. Call 209-9325.
)). Marianna Pumpkin Day-9 a.m. Madison
Street Park in Marianna. Kids select, decorate, and
Stake home their pumpkin. Activities for kids. Free.
)) Pet Appreciation Day Adoption Event 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. at Walmart, 2255 S.R.71, Marianna. Adopt
,a perfmnroi Partners for. Pets. Call 482-4570.
Robinson Family Reunion Noon at Bascom
Town Hall in Bascom. Decedents of Will and Gertie
Robinson and Charlie and Lizzie Robinson. Plates,
cups, napkins and utensils furnished. Call 573-1438.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room.of First United Methodist
Church, 2901,Caledonia St. ii Marianna.
69th Annual Northwest Florida Championship
Rodeo Oct. 3-5 at MemorialField in Bonifay. Visit
www.booifaykiwanisrodeo.com.
Altrusa International of Marianna yard sale
- U S. 90 in the old Mitchell TV Building between
Century 21 and Click on Clean.

S SUNDAY, OCT. 6. :
Deadline to enter Cotton Pageant 6 p.m.
Graceville Civic Center in Graceville. Ages 3- 21. All
proceeds after expenses benefit Special Olympics
of Florida/Jackson County. Call: 663-4529 or 557-
2725.. .. :
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion -
6:30 p.m. in the AA room of FirstUnited Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting -8 p.m. in
the board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, OCT. 7
))Jackson C county School Board Special
Meeting -10:45 a.m. at 2903 Jefferson St.,


TUESDAY, OCT. 8.
i Republican Club of West Florida Meeting
- Noon at Jim'g Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St..
Marianna. Call 352-4984.
Optimist Club of Jackson County Board Meet-
ing- Noon at 4476 Broad St., Marianna.
) Orientation Nloon to 3 p.m. at Coodwill Career
Training Center,-4742 U:S. 90. Marianna. Learn
about and register for free service es. Call 526-0139.
)), Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028. ,
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.,
)'Autism Support Group Meeting 6 p.m. in the
First Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall. Marianna
(Clinton Street entrance). Family members, caregiv-
ers and service providers welcome Call 526-2430. ,
Veterans Post 100 Dinner 6 p.m. American
Legion Hall Post 100, U.S. 90; Marnanrna. Guest
speaker: Pam Fuqua, Executive Director of the
Jackson County Tourist Development Council. Call
321-698-8697.
S))Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United'Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9
Alcoholics AnonymousOpen Meeting- Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

THURSDAY, OCT. 10
Chipola College Registration for Fall C Term
- 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Chipola College, Marianna. Visit
www.chipola.edu or call 718-2211.
Chipola Civic Club Meeting Noon at The
Oaks Restaurant, U.S. 90 in Marianna.The CCC's
focus is the local community, "Community, Children
& Character." Call 526-3142. *


The submission deadline for this'calendar is two ,Jay; elr, public ,liOn Submit to: Community C alendar, Ja,: .o:n ; County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


S Police Roimdup


Marianna Police Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for Sept. 30, the
latest available report. One accident, two
reckless drivers, one suspicious incident,
one suspicious person, one burglary, One
verbal disturbance, five traffic stops, three
criminal mischief complaints, one tres-
pass complaint, one animal complaint,
one welfare check, two threat/harassment
complaints, and one 91i hang-up.

Jackson County Sheriff's Offices
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following
incidents for Sept. 30, the latest available
report: One accident, one stolen tag, three
abandoned vehicles, two reckless drivers,
three suspicious vehicles, one suspicious


person, one highway obstruction, one
report of mental illness, one verbal dis-
.. turbance, 11 medical calls,
-_^.o ~three traffic crashes, one
-. j T burglar alarm, one report of
'CR'IME shooting in the area, 18 traf-
S....- fic stops, four civil disputes,
two trespass complaints,
two juvenile complaints, one sex offense,
13 property checks, two assists of motorists
or pedestrians, one child abuse complaint,
twowelfare checks, two threat/harassment
complaints and three 911 hang-ups.


Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting


periods:
SMatthew Kent, 22,1723 Jarous Road,
Cottondale, sentenced to 90 days.
)) Roy Jones Jr., 59, 4085 Edgewood Drive,
Marianna, battery (domestic).
)) Heather McClellan, 27,4085 Edgewood
Drive, Marianna, battery (domestic).
)) William Branning, 53, 2526Woodsview
Drive, Marianna, driving under the influ-
ence, possession of paraphernalia, fugitive
from justice (Houston Co., Ala).
Denise Buffalo, 53, 6145 Paradise Club,
Road, Greenwood, driving under the influ-'
ence-with damage to property, reckless
driving with damage to person or property.
Jail Population: 201
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agency.To report a wildlife violation,
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


RAIIIAHlE I 4204 LAFAYElTE ST.
RA ALAl FLMARIANNA, F'L
CHEVROLET BUICK CADILLAC GMC NISSAN

SALES TEAM wam(&-

(850) 482-3051 .B* **.* I.


I


12ZA WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2,2013


WKE-UP CALL




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


CHIPOLA SCIENCE

CLUB PLANTS TREES


SUBMIT IUIMPUIUI

Members of the Chipola College
Science Club recently planted two
trees in front of the Johnson Health
Center. Science Club members pictured (from
left) are: J.T. Steverson (president); Nick
Hussey (lieutenant); Dwayne Bentley (lieu-
tenant); Chris Swindle (lieutenant); Dr. Jeff R.
Bodart (Club sponsor); Michael King (secre-
tary); and Mattea Harbour (treasurer).


MILTON IS TOP

CHIPOLA EMPLOYEE


J..IP.i I I. LU HI.,
" Tldi Milton has been selected as the
\ /Chipola College Faculty/Administra-
Vtor/Other Professional Award recipient
of the month for October. Milton has served
as the director of E-Learning and has worked
at the college since 1993. Pictured from left,
are Dr. Sarah Clemmons, Chipola senior vice
president; Vikki Milton; and Dr. Jason Hurst,
executive vice president.

Marriage & Divorce Report


Special to the Floridan
Marriages
1 Brandon Scott Ed-
wards and Cami Elizabeth
Ouimet.
)) Angel Genene Collins
and John Henry Mason Jr.
)) Ellen Bamburg Shaw
and Richard Wayne Shaw.


)) Minnie Bell Adams and
Maurice Weems.
S))Kiley Marie Reh-
berg and John Steven
Summerhill.

Divorces
) Howard Michael
Rivera vs. Jodi Rivera.


' Florida Lottery


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9/26 7-2-2
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9/27 5.4;5
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5,16-2.-29-34
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Evening drawirj. M = Midday drawing


Saturday. '9/28
Wednesday 9/25


14-47-52-53-54
2-7-17-49-53


SPP23


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Saturday- 9/28 9-26:34-40-4249 xra4
SWednesday 9/25 1-2-25-43'48-53- extra 4
For lottery information., call-850-,487-7777 or 900-737-7777 .


LOCAL


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2,2013 3AF


MARIANNA MIDDLE SCHOOL


SEPTEMBER STUDENTS OF THE MONTH




rom left to
right: Chesney
'-FMiller; Jahmir
-Wooten; Natalee
Williams; Mr. Ellis
(Principal); Teresa
Long; Cydney Gran--
berry; Shemar Kelly;.
Jonathan Abbott; and
ir -Jayden Sorey.


SUDMII T.,IUn U



BSU WINS AT CHIPOLA FALL FEST


The Chipola Black Student
Union was the winning learn
in the Chipola Fall Festival'
Relay. Pictured (from left)
are: (front) Quintavious Home
and Elizabeth Jones; (back)
Deondre Davis, Demetric
Claiborne, Winter Caldwell,
Porsha Morgan, Tiara Sorey
and Qron Mullins.


SUBMITTED PHIOTO


DALLAS IS NAACP SCHOLAR .--


. .2CH ,


MI CuP HLOTO rnu
Jamles Dallas is the recipient of the Jackson County NAACP Scholarship to Chipola College.
Dallas is a 2013 graduate of Malone High School. Pictured (from left) are: Eulice Bryant,
NAACP scholarship chair; Rev. Ronald Mizer, NAACP president; James Dallas; and Leroy
Boone. Not pictured is Richard Patterson, NAACP past president.'

CUTE KIDS

A piggyback ride for little brother Cayden
Matthews Bryant, age 2, by "Bro-bro"
Cameron James Bryant. They are the
proud sons of Paul and Nancy Bryant of
Orlando. Maternal grandparents are Ms.
Theresa
Richter
late
Edward
'Richter of
Palm City. N
Paternal
grand-
parents
are Elmore
and Eplice
Bryant of
Marianna.


IN STORE:
Ring Sizing, Watch
Repair, Custom Design,
Pearl Re-stringing,
Rest ration
Free Jewelry Cleaning
Layaway
Est. 1971 (
fatsoin
GKMMQOGO STS .
850.482.4037
watsonjewelers.com


Chipola College&Artist Series presents


Friday, October 4 7p.m.
Chipola Center for theArts
From Lee Univeisty, theVoicesof Lee continuetothrifl audiences
worldwide with heart-felt, inspirational, a capella music.
$14 Adults $10 Children Under 18

Box Office Hours: Mon. Thur. 9 a.m. 4 p.m. and
Friday, 9 a.m. Noon. Call: 850-526-2761.


ingrown nails warts nail fungus calluses
corns orthotics arch disorders heel pain
hammertoes bunions -bone spurs
We Carry Blue Cross Blue Shield &
Medicare Approved Diabetic Shoes

FEITZ BOB-
' \ FOOT
CLINIC


BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
\PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East* Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


I OWE:r..AL1LI I


Mon:; ::.(E) 9/30 7-;'8-r:
Modn.; 4 *( )' ' : 46- 5


I










Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Our View

Sunland's talent



shines through
T here's a great deal of truthto the old chestnut that
First impressions are the' most important, When
visitors arrive in Marianna, the towering hard-
woods and Spanish moss signals that they've arrived in
a picturesque spot, but they're often in the middle of
town before they fully realize, the depth of the beauty
and Old Florida charm our city has to offer.
However, an emerging partnership will help make yet
another part of our community shine. The city of Mari-
anna has teamed with Sunland Center on a thre-epart
landscaping project to beautify three entrances to the
Marianna Airport and Commerce Park area.,
Sunland, learning community for its developmen-
tally disabledresidents, will use the skills of participants
in its horticulture program to replace existing hedges
with roses, ornamental grasses and colorful shrubs,
in what will be the center's'most expansive municipal
partnership yet.
We applaud the vision of city leaders, Sunland admin-
istrators and the talented'and inventive participants
in Sunland's horticulture program. This endeavor will
benefit all.


Another View
91 : 0

$51 billion in Medicaid

. TampaTribune
ne million of Florida's poorest residents are eli-
gible for health insurance under the expanded
Medicaid income guidelines associated with the
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.
SBut many of them will be relegated to the sidelines
as enrollment begins Oct. 1 in the health-care mar-
ketplaces being formed under the new law, known as
Obamacare.
That's because the state House, under the leader-
ship of SpeakerWill Weatherford, refuses to budge on a
decision last spring to reject $51 billion from the federal
Government to expand Medicaid in Florida over the
next 10 years.
We call onWeatherford, and Gov. Rick Scott, to re-
evaluate that decision now that the state's business
leaders and major health-care providers are pleading
with them to reverse course and take the money.
S'State Rep. Matt Hudoon, a Republican from Naples
who testified last week before a congressional commit-
tee investigating the effects of Obamacare on the states,
says the expansion won't lessen the number of unin-
sured,will strain an already lean health care workforce,
and will, add to the borrowing the federal government
must undertake to pay its bills....
A University of Florida study estimates the Medicaid
expansionwould create 120,000 jobs in Florida over
the next i0 years, with about 7,400 of thoseinHillsbor-
oughi County. In June, two health insurance coalitions
representing some of the nation's largest corporations,
-including Disney, Target and Wal-Mart joined with
industryassociations and hospital operators in warn-
ing the state that rejecting themoney could cost jobs
and ultimately result in rising premiums for employees
across Florida.
A reasonable compromise was floated during the last
legislative session, a state Senate plan that would have
used the federal Medicaid money to enable the poor to
obtain private insurance with modest monthly premi-
ums and co-pays.
It was a compromise that satisfied the governor and
the Senate but was rejected by the House, which offered
a plan to spend state tax dollars to insure only a portion
of the 1 million poor who might get insurance:under
the Medicaid expansion.
At the press conference in Tampa, that Senate plan
was invoked by local leaders who think it offers a viable
alternative. We agree and urge House leaders to recon-
sider that plan, or fashion a reasonable compromise
that covers the poor and delivers the $51 billion.


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O a nas sea in revi




Obama's year in review
S...* 1 :.'


eptember is over, and even
though we have most of fall
and a small part of winter to
go, for some, the end of the year is -
nigh: For baseball and its fans, for
instance, the year ends in October.
And for my-Jewish friends, the old
year ended about three weeks ago
and the new year is already here.
I began thinking about year's
.end when I reflected on President
Barack Obama's year so far year
one after re-election, year five of his
.presidency.
Some of you may remember the
1960s live album "That Was the
Year ThatWas" by Tom Lehrer, one
of our finest political satirists. (If
only Jon Stewart or Stephen Colbert
would sing more ...) It was a send-
up of the crises, real or concocted,
of the day. Thinking about the
president's year, one might agree
with the opening line of the titlde
song, "That was the year that was,
it's over let it go."
With three months left in 2013,
President Obama may already feel
it's time to say, "Let the year go."
There was the trifecta of fake
scandals what I call the "mock
shock," since there wa$ no there,
there. The economy's remained
an issue- modestly growing, but
struggling. The countdown on'
- immigration reform started, then
stalled. Gun safety is an issue that
just won't gdaway because people
keep getting massacred and Con-
gress keeps'dithering. -
Speaking of Congress, at this
point, is it anything more than a
bad reality TV show? How else can'
- Sen. Ted Cruz's performance be
described? Voted off the island by
his fellow Republicans. I don'tthink
any president has had to deal with
, a more do-nothing (only about'
22 bills passed), hold-my-breath- .
till-my-face-turns-blue group of
S"representatives."


Climate change? Wait till next
year. The war on women? Intensify-
j s ing -- see Texas State
SSen. Wendy Davis.
Voter suppression?
"That Was the Week
| That Was," a British
Donn satire, aired on NBC
Donna from 1964-to 1965, at
Brazile the height of the civil
rights movement.
Talk about a time
warp.
Foreign policy brought its own
special headaches. And that's on
a good day. Bashar Assad's use of,
chemical weapons meant getting
serious about Syria, and automati-
callyfacing more "mock shock"
from the right.
If you liked "The Phony Debt
Ceiling Crisis, Part I," you'll love
"Part II: Push America Off the Fiscal
Cliff," coming to a Congress near
you this October. And competing
for theater time is "The Sequestra-
tiofn" which should frighten even
Stephen King:
Opening this week was "Let's
Slash Food Stamps," or the "Starve
the Working Poor and Struggling
Middle Class Bill." As Republican
Rep. Tim Huelskamp of Kansas
said, "You can no longer sit on your
couch...-and expect the federal
taxpayer to feed you.'" This from a
man who will work 126 days (how
long the House will be in session)
and do nothing or at least, not
do the people's business for 239
days, while being fed on $172,000
of taxpayer money.
Finally, there's Obamacare and .
the House Republicans' vote to
defund it. Again. And again. And
'again. And again. And again. It's like
a game show: 'America's Got Talent,
Congress Doesn't."
SIf this all seems a bit sardonic;
well, it's been that kind of year, too.
SBut President Obama is an


Why should Congress get exemption

It T 'm going to get a vote," says dent Obama to simply create an
|Republican Sen. DavidVit- Obamacare exception for Capitol
J ter of Louisiana. "I can't tell ,ill.
you how, or when, but I'm going to W Not long after -


get a vote."
- Vitter is determined to force
his fellow senators to do some-
thing many don't want to do: Vote
on whether the law, specifically
Obamacare, applies to members of
Congress and their staff.
, Back in 2009, when Democrats
were writing the massive new ..
national health care scheme, Iowa
Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley
offered an amendment. Obam-
acare created exchanges through
which millions of Americans
would purchase "affordable" health
coverage. Grassley's amendment
sifnply required lawmakers, staff,
and'some in the executive branch
to get their insurance through the
exchanges, too.
To every Republican's amaze-
ment, Democrats accepted the
amendment. It's never been fully
clear why; the best theory is they
intended to take the provision
out in conference committee,
but couldn't do so because they
lost their filibuster-proof 60-vote,
majority. In any event, Obamacare
- the law of the land, as support-
ers like to say now requires Con-
gress to buy its health care coverage
through the exchanges.
That has caused Democratic
panic as the formal arrival of
Obamacare nears. Right now, all
lawmakers and staff are entitled
to enjoy generously-subsidized
coverage under the Federal
Employees Health Benefits plan.
Why give up that subsidy and go
on the exchanges like any average
American?
But that's the law. It could be
amended, but Democrats, who
voted unanimously for Obamacare,
couldn't very well expect much
help from Republicans, who voted
unanimously against it. So over the
summer Democrats asked Presi-'


...presto! the Office
of Personnel Man-
agement unveiled
a proposed rule to
allowmembers of
Byron Congress, their staff,
xYork' and some executive
branch employees
to continue receiv-
ing their generous federal subsidy
even as they purchase coverage
onthe exchanges. No ordinary
American would be allowed such
an advantage.
Vitter watched the maneuvering
that led to the OPM decision. He
began work on what became the
Vitter Amendment, which'he likes
tb call "No Washington Exemp- '
tion from Obamacare," that would
reverse the OPM ruling. It specifies
that members of Congress, staff,
the president, vice president and
all the administration's political
appointees buy health coverage
through Obamacare exchanges.
If any of them earn incomes low
enough to qualify for regular
Obamacare subsidies, they will
receive them -- just like any other
American. But those with higher
incomes will have to pay for their
coverage on the exchanges just
like everybody else.
Vitter hasn't exactly thrilled his
colleagues. "There has been a lot
of pushback behind the scenes,
including from many Republi-
cans," he says. Political types have
complained that the requirement
will cause "brain drain" on the Hill
as staffers escape the burden of
paying for their own coverage. "My
response is, first of all, it's the law,"
says Vitter. "Look, this is a disrup-
tion. It's exactly what's happening
across America, to people who,
are going to the exchanges against
their will. To me, that's the point."
Ron Johnson, the Republican


. optimist. And despite the setbacks,
when we look back, there will be
moments we can point to and the
president can say, because of that,
"It was a very good year."'
Presidents are like quarterbacks
getting harassed and hit are part
of the job description.
A quarterback has four quarters
to manage and win a game. A
president has four years in a term
to define his vision, then manage
and guide his agenda into law and
policy.
As any quarterback will tell you,
all quarters are equally important,
but the fourth quarter is the most
important. That's.when the field
general and the time manager
excel.
Sometimes, a quarterbackhas to
make things happen in the fourth
quarter- when the game is close,
, but especially when the team's
behind, ,
But sometimes the best thing
a quarterback can do is just bide
his time let his defense work,
run some running plays, kill clock.
When you've got a lead, the smart
play is to keep the pressure on and
run the high-percentage plays.
SWe're not into the final quarter of
Obama's term yet. That starts after
the mid-term elections, in 2014. But
in the last quarter of this year, he
may already be in control-the-clock
mode because he can still play
and find bipartisan solutions to our
problems.
The modern presidency has
moyed from an "imperial presi-
dency" to a "quarterbacking
presidency." And if that's the case,
we've got another quarter togo this
year. We'll soon learn for Obama,
Congress and the country--if the
year that was, was a very good year.
Donna Brazile is a contributor to CNN and ABC .
News, and a contributing columnist to Ms.
Magazine and 0, the Oprah Magazine.


n on Obamacare?
senator from Wisconsin, is one '
colleague delighted byVitter's
move. The idea of equal Obam-'
acare treatment forWashington is
enormously popular around the
country, Johnson points out,
which means even lawmakers who
don't like it will be afraid to -oppose
it.
"I think most members don't
want to vote to reject the OPM
ruling," Johnson says. "But I think
most members would vote to do '
that, if they were'forced to, because
it is so politically unpopular to have
special treatment for members of
Congress and their staff."
For that reason, Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid, aided by some
Republicans, has done everything
hecan to make sure there will be
no vote. When Vitter tried to attach
his amendment to an energy bill,
Reid at first resisted and finally
,.pulled the legislation rather than
allow a vote. Vitter also tried to
add the amendment to continuing
resolutions to fund the govern-
ment. The response: No way, no
how. Democrats have also circu-
lated drafts of legislation to actually
punish Vitter for his temerity.
But things may be changing.
Recently Minority Leader Mitch
McConnell came out strongly for
the amendment, telling radio host
Bill Bennett that Congress "should
not get any carve-outs from Obam-
acare." And the Vitter Amendment
could play a role in the resolution
of the current funding battle on
Capitol Hill.
Or it might not. But in the long
Srun, Vitter is likely to succeed. If
there's anything that drives vot-
ers crazy, it is Congress exempting
itself from the miseries it imposes
on the American public. Someday,.
as Obamacare becomes a difficult
reality in everyday life;Vitter will
get his vote.

Byron York is chief political correspondent for
The Washington Examiner.




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN $ www.jcfloridan.com WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2,2013 5Ar


AFFORDABLE CARE ACT

PATCHWORK OF NEW HEALTH CARE MARKETPLACES
3 ^ ~ States have their choice whether to operate their own insurance enrollment,
systems known as exchanges. let the federal ,
: l -, t ?y'S. 'is'-.K .. government do it or enter into e a
S state-federal partnership. i


.HOW MUCH IS SPENT
EACH YEAR ON HEALTH CARE
Average per-person health spending since 2007:


$10 000
2011: $8,680

8000


6 000


4 000


2.000


0111
2007 2005 2009 2010
Average per-person spending
by insurance source in 2011:


APPLYING FOR COVERAGE: NAVIGATING
THE NEW HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETPLACES
Beginning Jan. 1, most Americans will be required to carry some form of health
insurance. Getting that coverage under the Affordable Care Act might feel a little
like filing your tayes and researching a big purchase at the same time. Here are
a few things to help get you started:


ONLINE
Go to www.healthcare.gov and click
"Get Insurance." then choose your
state of residence to
* be connected to
Ia marketplace
y (more than half of
if states have left
it to the federal government to run
their marketplaces). You will create
an account with a user name. pass-
word and security questions.

PICKING A PLAN
All plans are required to offer the
same basic benefits. Consumers can
pay more up front in premiums and
lace lower out-of-pocket expenses.
or pay a cheaper premium but shell
out more in medical costs. Levels to
consider:
SBronze: Covers 60 percent of
medical costs on average (lowest
premium)


BY MAIL/IN PERSON
Call 1-800-318-2596 for a list of
locations near you where
Applications are available
or for help filling out the
form. In-person assis-
tance is available in many
areas from helpers known
as navigators. Call the
number above or get a list
of community-based organiza-
tions from localhelp.healthcare.gov.

SSilver: Covers 70 percent of
medical costs
) Gold: Covers 80 percent of medical
costs
) Platinum: Covers 90 percent
of medical costs (highest
premium)
a Low-priced "catastrophic"
plans are available to people
under 30. but ta.,' credits cannot be
applied


WHERE AMERICANS GETTHEIR HEALTH INSURANCE
.. Employer 'Medicaid *Medicare Other*. Uninsured
0 20 40 .60 80' 100%
U.S. average 100 u- Inr
Alabama
Florida ..

Georgia ,
Mississippi __n=
North Carolina INIMMI'l ISBN I ______II
South Carolina -
Tennessee "
N Virgsr, in nc estrplc ua p re
NOTE: Numlter may not equal 100 due to roundaing "Inc~ludes other publiC insurar, e programs and the selt-insurekd


HEALTH PREMIUM ESTIMATES VARY
Average monthly premiums for a benchmark health care policy
- known as a 'silver" plan under the Affordable Care Act for an
individual, based on a federal analysis of data submitted by insurers.
Mississippi M
North Carolina 369
South Carolina 339
Virginia 335
Florida 328
U.S. average 328
Alabama "" 318
Georgia 317
Tennessee 245


THINGS TO REMEMBER
)) Make sure your doctors and hospitals are
in the plan you pick to avoid' out-of-network"
costs. You may have to check the plan's website
or call your medical provider.
)) While the tax credit amount is geared toward
a benchmark silver plan, you can apply it to
any level, including cheaper "bronze plans for
further premium savings.
)) Provide an accurate estimate of your 2014
income It the number is too low. you might see a
smaller tax. refund next year. f itt is too hign. you
won t gel as big a ta:x credit now.


HOW HEALTH CARE COVERAGE WILL CHANGE UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CAREACT
The wide-ranging overhaul of the U.S. health care system known as the Affordable Care Act is expectedto touch the lives of most Americans in some fashion. Here are examples of health care
,consumers who could see benefits and drawbacks under the law:


L Single man, Single woman,.
28, employed 34, with a
S ' full lime i pre-existing
.. i ,., medical .
N' condition !
..." " i........................... ... ..... ..... ....... ............. ....................... ..................... ... ... ..................... ........ ... ............ ........ ..... ....... :.. ...........
mie Information technology Freelance graphic
workerfor small startup designer


Single man,
.40, employed
part time


Handymar


$


Family of four; Family of three;
mother, 44, father, 51,
employed full owns a small
time with health business
benefits '
..........[ ............. ..................................... ...... ... .............. ...... :., ...... ... .. .................. ........ ... .... .


S Human resources officer
for large firm


Currently insured?


Eligible for subsidized
coverage based on income?


Other benefits under
the health overhaul law


Drawbacks under the
health overhaul law


Earns $30,000 a year,
more than twice the
federal poverty level
(FPL) for a 1 -person "
household ....... ......., ........
100% of federal -
:.' .. poverty level L:I

DYES MNO
Employer does not offer
insurance; he is mulling
whether to purchase it. He
Shas not seen a doctor since
.aging out of his parents'
policy at age 26.


tYES


DNO


,.,iHe could opt to.buy a
low-cost, high-deductible
catastrophic policy: available
to those under 30 but would
not get a premium subsidy
for such a policy.


a He will be fined for not
carrying health insurance:
beginning in 2014,1 percent
of his income, eventually
growing to 2.5 percent of
income or $695, whichever is
greater.

SAs a young, healthy
person, he may wind up
paying relatively more for a
premium, since he will be
helping defray costs for older
and sicker consumers who
cannot be charged more
based on health status.


Earns $48,000 a
year, more than four
times the FPL for a
M1-person household




EYES JKNO


Denied insurance due to
pre-existing bipolar disorder
requiring medications. She
pays cash for medical care
and drugs.


EYES JKNO


' She' cannot be denied
coverage or.charged a
higher premium based on
her condition or her gender.
She will also have a cap on
out-of-pocket expenses and
no lifetime coverage limit.

S'Mental health care and
prescription drugs are
included in the core benefits
of marketplace-based plans.

SShe makes more than 4
times the federal poverty
level for an individual, which
means she is not eligible for
a government subsidy to
lower premium prices.
SShe is required to carry
health insurance or pay a
penalty, but she would be
exempted if the lowest cost
coverage available to her'
exceeded 8 percent of her
income, $3,840 a year.


* Earns $13,000 a year, Earns $85,000 a Earns $90,000 a
Just over the FPL for a year, 3.6 times the year, more than four
S1-person household'.. -........ FPL for a 4-person times the FPL for a
Household ......... 3-person household ........ ..
I. I I


SYES MNO
Employer does not provide
health benefits to part-time
workers. He forgoes preven-
tive care and visits a local
emergency room when
necessary.


YES


SNO


a He is eligible for
Medicaid, which has'
expanded in many states
for individuals making up to
$15,400.

SMedicaid for new
enrollees will offer core ,
coverage including free
preventive care.


a If his state doesn't expand
Medicaid, he may not be
able to afford private
insurance through a new
marketplace, which, given
his income, should not
exceed 2 percent of his
annual income, $240 a year.

a If his income drops below
$11,490 -the federal
poverty level for an
individual -- he will not be
eligible for a premium ,
subsidy, due to a quirk in
the law.


tYES


F NO


Has a generous coverage plan
through employer with low
deductibles and out-of-pocket
'costs. The family has a wide
range of doctors and specialists
from which to choose for care.


#YES


[] NO


a Can keep existing health
plan, provided her employer
continues to offer it.
a The plan must offer free
preventive services, allow
children under 26 to remain on
the plan and cap out-of-pocket
costs.


i Considered a "Cadillac Plan"
under the law (a plan valued at
more than $10,200 for an
individual or $27,500 for a
family), a tax of 40% will be
levied on the value of the plan
exceeding those amounts,
payable by the insurer. This
could lead the insurer to
modify the plan, drop it or pass
the tax on to the worker
through higher premiums,
deductibles or copays. The tax
will be assessed beginning in
2018.


tS ES


R NO


Covers family through
individual policy; doesn't'
provide coverage to
workers. The family visits
doctors in the plan's network
for care.

DYES NO0


a Because he has fewer than
25 full-time employees, he is
eligible for a tax credit of up'
to 50 percent of his contribu-
tion toward workers' health
insurance premiums if he
covers at least 50 percent of
.the total premium cost when
buying through an exchange.

SHis child could stay on his
coverage until age 26.

a Even with the tax credit,
the cost of providing health-
' insurance may be more than
he can afford.

, If he expands his business
to employ more than 50 .
full-time employees, he will
be required to provide health
insurance or face a fine of up
to $2,000 for each employee
after the first 30. He could
also be fined if he chooses a,
plan that is not considered
comprehensive or affordable.
Businesses will not have to
comply with this provision of
the law until 2015.


SOURCES: DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES; KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION: URBAN INSTITUTE


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS


( \ \ LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT


2,6". WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM
.4ZALL ~L t.


"1


2011


Person


Job and incor


, Restaurateur with 24
full-time employees


- -- .......... I ............ ... .. ...... -- . ......... :




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


16A WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2,2013


Sept. U.S. sales falter, but automakers see rebound


k
The Associated Press

DETROIT Automak-
ers expect little impact
from the federal govern-
ment shutdown, and they
predict a fburth-quarter
rebound after a rare sales
decline in September.
Auto sales dropped 4 per-
cent from a year ago to just
over 1.1 million, mainly
due to a calendar quirk that
pulled Labor Day weekend
transactions into August's
numbers. The drop ended
a 27-month streak of gains
for the industry.
General Motors, Honda
and Volkswagen reported
double-digit declines for
last month. Toyota, Nis-,.
san and Hyundai posted
smaller decreases. Only
Ford and Chrysler report-
ed gains among the bigger
automakers. ,
GM's II percent, drop
was its first since July of
last year. It allowed Ford to
get within 2,049 vehicles of
unseating GM as the top
U.S. autbmaker for the first
time since May of 2011.
Most industry officials
viewed September' as an
anomaly. They also down-
played the impact of the
government shutdown, as-
suming it's a short one.
Kurt McNeil, GM's U.S.
sales chief, said the fun-
damentals are still in place
for GM and the industry
to rebound in the coming
months. Jobless claims are
falling, home prices con-


U.S. auto sales for September dropped, ending 27 months of gains for the industry.


tinue to recover, gas pric-
es are down, household
wealth is rising and the
Federal Reserve has post-
poned the end of a bond-
buying program that kept
interest rates low, he said.
"As long as the underly-
ing economic factors are
supporting the business,
which we believe they will
through the end of this
year. and into 2014, we'll
get, through this turbu-
lence," said Ken Czubay,
Ford's U.S. sales manager.
Jim Lentz, Toyota's North
. Amerfican CEO, told The
Associated Press in an in-
terview that people have
grown used to dysfunction
inWashington. ;
Earlier this year, when the


government failed to avoid
automatic spending cuts
known as sequestration,
there were predictions that
the economy would melt
down, Lentz said. i
"Basically they were told
that when you wake-up to-
morrow, the Earth is going
to stop spinning," Lentz
said. "For the most part
the Earth didn't stop. And I
think that's how they view
this again."
The shutdown .will only
affect sales if it causes
credit markets to tighten,
Lentz said. That will be
a problem, he said, be-
cause low interest rates
and abundant credit have
helped fuel the auto sales
recovery.


There was concern
among executives and
analysts that a long shut-
down and a looming
confrontation over rais-
ing the government's debt
ceiling could eventually
cause sales to fall. McNeil
said anything over two
weeks could cut into con-
sumer confidence.
"Consumers don't like
to make big-ticket item
purchases when there's a
lot of uncertainty in the
economy," said Jesse To-
prak, senior analyst for the
TrueCar.com auto pricing
site.
One reason GM's sales
fell last month was a re-
versal in pickup trucks,
which have been hot-sell-


Investing in bank shares can be hit or miss


Dear Bruce: Do you think it's wise
for someone to buy bank shares in
this hurting economy?
-L.S.,VIA EMAIL
Dear LS.: If you are very knowl-
edgeable, it may be that there are
some goodbank shares worth con-
sidering. We are talking about many
banks. Let's take them one at a time.
The big ones and the large re-
gional banks oftentimes are decent
buys. Banking rules very much favor


BruceWMfliarns
Smart Money
them, and they can manipulate the
rules in ways that small banks can


only dream of. Small neighborhood
banks (there are around 8,000 in
the country) are not places where I
would choose to invest. In most, but
not all cases, the shares are depreci-
ated, and I don't see any immediate
recovery in their future.

Send your questions to: Smart Money, P.O.
Box 2095, Elfers, FL 34680. E-mail to: bruce@
brucewilliams.com. Questions of general interest
will be answered in future columns.


ers. Sales of GM's full-sized
pickups, the Chevrolet Sil-
verado and GMC Sierra,
fell 8 percent even though
the company is selling re-
designed trucks.
Some versions of the
trucks were slow to reach
showrooms. At the same
time, Ford's F-Series pick-
up, the top-selling vehicle
in the nation, posted near-
ly a 10 percent increase,
and sales of Chrysler's Ram
truck rose 8 percent.
Ford and Chrysler offered
more than $4,000 in dis-
counts as they sold down
2013 models, according
to the Edmunds.com auto
site. But GM reduced its
incentive spending almost
30 percent compared with
last year to about $3,900.
While touting its incen-
tive discipline in Septem-
ber, GM announced in-
creased discounts starting
Tuesday, including $1,000
cash on a 2014 Silverado
and up to $4,500 on a 2013
model.
Pickup trucks are tra-
ditionally the top-selling
vehicles in the U.S., and
they're key to automakers'
profits. Companies make
around $10,000 per truck.
McNeil said GM's sales


should return to normal
levels for the rest of the
year. Through September,
the company's sales are up
almost 8 percent from a
year ago.
At Honda, sales dropped
10 ,percent as two of its
most popular models, the
Accord midsize car and
the. CR-V small crossover
SUV, posted declines.
Sales of the Accord, which
have been hot all year, fell
nearly 14 percent, while
CR-V sales were off almost
4 percent.
Other ,automakers' re-
porting sales included:
)) Ford Motor Co. bucked
the industry trend with a
6 percent sales increase.
It was led by sales of the
Fusion midsize sedan,
which jumped 62 percent
over last September. The
subcompact Fiesta posted
nearly a 29 percent gain.
But sales ofthe Escape SUV
one of Ford's best sellers
dropped 2 percent, and
Explorer SUV sales were
up just 1.5 percent.
)) Chrysler Group LLC,
with a 1 percent increase
aided by the Ram and the
ever-popular Jeep Grand
Cherokee with sales up 19
percent.


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FROM CONSUMER REPORTS

Need to find a good
plumber, hairdresser or
auto mechanic? If you're
like a lot of people, you're
happy to turn to online
ratings services to, get a
recommendation.
' Sure, it can be conve-
nient to find out what oth-
ers think of a handyman's
skills before you hire him.
But how trustworthy are
the opinions? Here's what
you should- know about
the companies Consumer
Reports money adviser
recently examined, listed
in alphabetical order.
Angie*s List
Cost for consumers:
Varies; $46 a year in San
Francisco.
How it works: Compa-
nies set up free online
profiles or involuntarily
get one when a member
rates them. When they get
two reviews and a B aver-
age or better, and there are
no alerts about them, they
.can pay to advertise and
must offer discount cou-
pons that "position your
business to rotate on page
1 of search results," Angle's
List says. ,
Caveats: Consumer
Reports money adviser
thinks that the ability of A-
and B-rated companies to


buy their way to the top of
the default search results
skews the results. Angie's
List misleads consumers
by prominently promis-
ing that "businesses don't
pay" and that it's a con-
sumer-driven service
supported by member-
ship fees. But almost 70
percent of the company's
revenues come from ad-
vertising purchased by the
service providers being
rated.
Consumers' Check-
book Center for the
Study of Services,
Cost for consumers: $34
for two years
How it works: Local
companies are involun-
tarily rated by the Center
for the Study of Services,
based ,on surveys of Con-
sumers' Checkbook's own
subscribers, Consumer
Reports subscribers
and CSS' own research.
(Consumer Reports gave
CSS $25,000 in matching
funds to get started in the
Smid-1970s andhas allowed
Checkbook to survey
its subscribers in the seven
metro areas it covers.)
Caveats: Consumer Re-
ports money adviser found
little to fault here, except
that in some cases a busi-
ness rating may be based
on as few as 10 users.


But Checkbook provides Yelp
complete transparency
and guidance about how Costfor consumers: Free
to assess those ratings How It works: Anyone can
compared with companies look up a company onYelp
with more users, to see its overall rating and
individual reviewers' rat-
Google+ Local ings and comments. To
Cost for consumers: Free write a review, you need
How It works: Anyone only set up a username
can search Googie+ Local and provide your email
by city, state and business address and ZIP code. That
type to find reviews, which creates a profile where
are simple one- to five-star your reviews are gathered.
ratings and commentary. The more prolific you are,
Google is mum about how the more "known" you be-
an overall rating is calcu- come in Yelp circles.
lated beyond saying that Companies appear on
it's based on user ratings Yelp involuntarily, but they
- no details on how users can claim their page and
are verified "and a vari- gain access to tools that
ety of other signals to en- let them contact review-
sure that the overall score ers publicly or privately
best reflects the quality of -through the site to work
the establishment," ac- out problems.
cording to the Google+ Lo- Caveats: A company's
calwebsite. ability to make amends
To write a review, you with a negative reviewer
must create your own per- while good from a cus-
sonal Google+ profile, typi- tomer's perspective un-
cally using your real name, dercuts the integrity and
which provides something accuracy of the ratings,
of a reality check, because placated gripers
Caveats: Google encour- can change their review at
ages businesses to re- any time. And, Consumer
ward their fans with cou- Reports money adviser
pons and to try to resolve points out, rated service
customer service prob- providers can buy spon-
lems. But this can skew scored search results and
the ratings positively, be- put them at the top of the
cause assuaged customers list for someone searching
can always delete theirpre- for, say, a restaurant in Los
viouslynegative reviews. Angeles.


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Sooner or later someone in your family may need general surgery, and when they do, you can trust
the General Surgery services at Jackson Hospital. We're proud of our General Surgeons and our surgery
team for the care they are providing. From colon problems, gallbladders, breast cancer, and more, they
ensure quality surgical care right here in Jackson County. Nationally certified by the American Board of
Surgery, they share more than 60 years of combined surgical experience. They also ensure outstanding
surgical care during emergencies and are available day and night to Jackson Hospital emergency room
patients if needed.


For a general surgeon referral or more information about our
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BUSINESS


IF*




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


$.90
Family Pack lb
Ground Beef


Regular or
Bun Sized
BallPark .
Franks


~1


57
16 oz.


Fresh Whole
Fryers


I.


Carolina $ I1
Pride l
4x6
Cooked Ham


0 oz.


Farmland Sliced
Center Cut -$2 24
Boneless b"
Pork Loins


Bar'S'
Corn


$37031bbox
Dogs


'.1-,1. : 1^:. -, S 0O6
Jamestown b
Spiral Sliced
Half
Hams


Johnsonville
Brats or
Italian
Sausage


Armour $138'
Fun Kits ,3.oz
Turkey, Ham or Pizza
Conecuh
Smoked
Sausage
Farmland $1 49
Skineless 12 oz
Sausage-
Links
Kelley's $293
Smoked 41 z
Sausage Biscuits


0 ~CE CAL


$464 oz.


saw' 1


Original & Honey
Sweet Baby, Ray's
BBQ Sauce

$1258oz.
I 1 '\8 oz. -


Golden Flake, 22 pk., 22 o. I Hungry Jack, 15.3 oz. 16 Maxwell House,30 "oz. A69 Mueller, 16 oZ. 7
Potato Chips ................." Mashed Potatoes ............. I Original Coffee.......O......... Regular or Thin Spaghetti........... 7

$4 9 RaLu Del Monte
:$A69 ^i :,,- :,I + S,-a-,hetti + l, Ketchup ..'j A
Spagh~tfi-



+~~~~~2 oz. ry od 20o
PperTwl
lackburn, 32 oz. 24, + IFurlani, 8.6 o. IL Vlasic,46oz. L 81 liberty Gold, 20 oz S 7
Apple or Grape Jelly.............. Garlic Texas Toast ...... Kosher Dills...... .. ................. I Pineapple ....................


ASorted Flavors4.7-7.5 oz.' $ Wesoon48 oz .g Kraft, 30 oz. VIvet,4rt 4ll Tise.
Hamburg~er Helper..u................ 1 '-I"Io,,........ I....... I .........:............... ..2..I.Mayonnaise............................306IBafthroom Tussue................701


Red I7
Delicious $374
Apples 5 b. bag


Florida
Navel
Oranges


$333
4 lb bag


v $ 46
Russet lb bag
Baking Potatoes


$348
19oz


Powerade

; 52
*32 oz,.


Blue Bell
Ice Cream


Country
Crock
$282
45 oz.


Captain Crunch
Cereal

$2,11
' -14 oz.


"t4 .


Fresh
Yellow
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55c
l b.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2013 7A F


105
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-l8A WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2,2013


STATE


'^ .4 181 i.iL[.u a a 1' O :
1 i1"_ 1.I ,'i'
S. '. '. SUBMITTED PHOTO
Florida consumers who logged onto www.healthcare.gov Tuesday were met with delays and glitches as the government's online
health insurance marketplace went live.

Bumpy start for insurance exchange


The Associated Press

FORT LAUDERDALE, -
After 'months of build-up,
Florida residents were met
with technology glitches
Tuesday as they tried shop-
ping for health insurance
for the first time on gov-
ernment-run online mar-
ketplaces, a key compo-
nent of the Affordable Care
Act. Many were unable to
enroll, but health officials
stressed the program was
off to-a good start.
Consumers logging onto
healthcare.gov received an
apology message, for de-
lays due to high traffic. The
wait times at the call cen-
ter and for an online chat
operator were also lon-
ger than, expected. More
than 2.8 million people
visited the site in the past
day; and there were seven
times more users on the
website Tuesday morn-
ing than had ever been on
the Medicare website. The


online speed is gradually Her organization enrolled
improving and the prob- a steady stream of ap-
lems are being fixed, said plicants with scheduled
Marilyn Tavenner, an ad- appointments.
ministrator for the Centers Community health cen-
for Medicare and Medicaid ters around the state were
Services. also busy, with roughly 100
"This is day one of a pro- eager consumers in just
cess. We're in a marathon, a few hours at one Miami
not a sprint," she said. health center. Counselors
One organization said helped enroll consumers
their navigators weren't early in the morning be-
able to access the website fore 'the website crashed,
at all. The Epilepsy Foun- said Andy Behrman, presi-
dation of Florida also re- dent and CEO of Florida
ported very light foot traf- Association of Community
fic around the state, but Health Centers.
said phone inquiries were It will likely take weeks or
high. Their counselors sat months to gauge the law's
alone in a Pensacola office success. Federal health of-
with no visitors Tuesday. ficials were unable to pro-
. But other organizations vide data Tuesday on how
were not deterred by the, many people enrolled in
technology delays and re- Florida and ,other states.
lied on back-ups, includ- Coverage doesn't begin
ing paper applications. until January; and the en-
S"We were prepared," said rollment period ends in
Jodi Ray, of University of March.
South Florida, which re- Gepsie Metellus, execu-
ceived the state's largest tive director.of the Sant La
federal navigator grant, community center in Mi-


ami's Little Haiti neighbor-
hood, called Haitian Creole
radio programs Tuesday to
tell people they have plenty
of time to enroll and warn
people against anyone
who charges them a fee fo.r
information about the fed-
eral health law referred to
by many as "Obamacare."
The liberal advocacy
group Fanmilies USA esti-
mates that roughly half of
Florida's 3.5 million unin-
sured residents will. be eli-
gible for federal subsidies
to help them purchase in-
surance. But the amount
will vary widely depending
on income; location, the
plan, family size, age, and
even tobacco use. Florida''
residents can choose from
102 plans,, the second-
highest of any state. Fed-
eral health officials were
supposed to reveal how
much plans would cost
in Florida's marketplace
Tuesday, but that was also
delayed.


State executes convicted killer of exotic dancer


The Associated Press

STARKE A former es-
cort service owner who
spent 23 years on Florida's
death row for the killings
of two women was execut-'
ed Tuesday for the slaying
of one of those women, an
exotic dancer.
Marshall Lee Gore, 49,
was pronounced dead at
6:12 p.m. Tuesday follow-
ing an injection at Florida
State Prison, authorities
said. Gore had no last
words before the death
sentence was carried out.
He was sentenced to
death for the March, 19889
murder, of 30-year-old
Robyn Novick, whose nude
bodywas found dumped in
rural Miami-Dade County.
Gore also was convicted
of killing another woman,
Susan Roark, and of the at-
tempted murder of a third
woman.
In 'addition to the two
death sentences, Gore was
given seven life sentences
plus another 110 years in
a case involving the at-
tempted murder.
The U.S.'Supreme Court
denied Gore's last appeals
late Tuesday afternoon.
Earlier, Corrections De-
partment. spokeswoman
Jessica Cary said Gore re-
quested a last meal. of a
sausage and pepperoni
pizza, but he didn't eat it.
Gore met with both his;
spiritual adviser and one
of his attorneys during the
day.
This was the fourth time
Gore's execution has been
scheduled this year. Twice,
courts put the execution
on hold due to insanity
claims. Attorney General
Pam Bondi's staff also once
asked that it be postponed
because it conflicted with
her political fundraiser,
for which Bondi later
apologized.
Gore had claimed he
suffered from delusions
related to a conspiracy
theory in which the pur-
pose of his execution is so
that the elite and wealthy
people can harvest his or-
gans. Gore also had said
he is being targeted by
satanic worshippers for
human sacrifice, that he
hears voices telling him
Ito hang himself and that


i "' '' '',. *, ..


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com



Senator: Flood


insurance bill.


blocked by politics


The Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG,- A
bipartisan proposal to
delay federal flood insur-
ance rate hikes that take
effect. Tuesday is .being
stymied by a bitter con-
gressional dispute over
President BarackObama's
signature health care law,
Sen. Bill Nelson said.
Nelson, D-Fla., along
with U.S. Sens. Robert
Menendez, D-N.J.;. Da-
vid Vitter, R-La.; Mary
Landrieu, D-La.; Eliza-
beth Warren, D-Mass.;
and Brian Schatz, D-Ha-
waii, sponsored legisla-
tion last week to delay
implementation of the
Biggert-Waters Flood In-
Ssurance Reform Act until'
next year.. '
The rate hikes were
passed in 2012 to keep
the National Flood Insur- -
ance Program solvent af-
ter an onslaught of claims
from Hurricane Katrina
in 2005. Essentially, what
it does is remove federal
subsidies from properties,
in flood zones.,
"My legislation to fix
this is beingblocked right
now by partisan politics
and those who continue
to oppose the existing
health care law," Nelson
wrote in an email to The
Associated Press. "So
what we're trying to do is
to get bipartisan support
to join us to pass a clean
bill as soon as we can
delay those rate
increases."
Florida has among the
highest rates of people
covered by subsidized
flood insurance,. and Pi-
nellas County, which in-
cludes St. Petersburg, has
more subsidized policies
than any other county in
the nation.
Everyone from Florida
Gov. Rick Scott to real es-


tate agents and insurance
agents say 'the, rate in- ,
creases have the potential
to destabilize a real estate
market that was just be-
ginning to recover fol-
lowing the recession. On
Tuesday, Scott was sched-
uled to meet with real
estate agents and other
businesspeople to hold a
news conference regard-
ing the increases;
The Tampa Bay Times.
reported Tuesday that
flood insurance, rate in-
creases taking effect
Tuesday will have the big-
gest impact, on owners
of modest single-family
.homes notion theater.
The median value of the
33,000 affected homes
in Pinellas County is
$132,245, and the typical
size is about 1,430 square
fe6t. Roughly two-thirds
of the homes don't have
water frontage or a water
view, according to newly
released county property
appraiser figures.
Florida Republican Sen.
Marco Rubio said that the
current flood insurance
program "is not sustain-
able" but such massive
increases will be "highly
disruptive to our real
estate market and they,
are highly disruptive to'
the lives of everyday
people." '
And Florida isn't the
only state concerned
about how this will af-
fect property owners and
home values.
The Mississippi Depart-
ment of Insurance filed a
lawsuit Thursday against
the federal govern-.
ment to try to block rate
increases. '
SThe lawsuit is against
the U.S. Department of
Homeland Security and
one of its divisions, the
Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency.


w2884 Jefferson St.
Downtown Marianna,


850.482.6855


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS'
Protesters to the death penalty demonstrate across the highway from the Florida State
Correctional facility near Starke on Tuesday.


he was somehow injected
with the virus that causes
tuberculosis.'
The appeals judges sided
with a panel of state-ap-
pointed mental health
experts who concluded
Gore's "insanity" was all
an act "designed to mis-
lead the panel and avoid
responsibility for his past
actions."
Gore was arrested after
attacking a third woman,
who survived, and later
testified at his trial in
connection with Novick's
death. The survivor said
Gore beat her with a rock,
choked, raped and stabbed
her, leaving her near where
Novick's body was found.
The FBI tracked the

Follow us on
Facebook


woman's stolen car to Pa-
ducah, Ky., and arrested
Gore. When he was found,
he had the woman's bank
and credit cards in his
jacket pocket, according
to court documents.
Upon questioning about
all three crimes and shown
pictures of Novick's body,


police said his eyes filled
with tears and he said, "If
r did this, I deserve the
death penalty."
Gore initially denied
knowinganyofthewomen,
according to police. But he
later testified that all'three
women worked for him at
an escort service..


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STHE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Normally filled with visitors and tourists, the empty Rotunda at the U.S. Capitol is seen in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 1, after
officials suspended all organized tours of the Capitol and the Capitol Visitors Center as part of the government shutdown. A
statue of President Gerald R. Ford at center is illuminated amid large paintings illustrating the history of the United States.


Your fault! No shutdown end;



Dems, GOP trade blame


The AssociatedPress,

WASHINGTON First
slowed, then stalled by
political gridlock, the vast
machinery, of govern-
ment clanged into par-
tial shutdown mode on
Tuesday and President
Barack Obama warned the
longer it goes "the more
families will be hurt." Re-
publicans said it was his
fault, not theirs.
Ominously, there were
suggestions from lead-
Sers in both parties that
the shutdown, heading
for its second day, could
last for weeks and grow
to encompass a'possible
default'by the Treasury if
Congress. fails to raise the
nation's debt ceiling.' The
two :issues are "now all
together," said Sen. Dick


Durbin, D-Ill.
Spe'iiking at the White
House, the president ac-
cused Republicans of
causing the first partial
closure in 17 years as part
of a nonstop "ideological
crusade" to wipe out his.
signature health care law.
House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, gave
as good as he got. "The
president isn't telling the
whole story,' he said in an
opinion article posted on
the USA Today website.
"The fact is that Wash-
ingto.n Democrats have
slammed the door
on reopening the gov-
ernment by refusing
to engage in bipartisan
talks."
Both houses of Con-
gress met in a Capitol
.closed to regular public


YARD SALE


,pEMt1iriLL, Iw
SItrisa International ofMariarma
invites the community to come to
Jts annual Yard Sale fundraiser this
Saturday, Oct. 5. Proceeds for the sale go to
the club's Coats for Kids project as well as
othercommunity needs. The sale is located
onHwy 90 East in the old MitchellTV
Building between Century 21 and Click on
Clean.


Oysters
F-om Page 14A
around here is Florida's
wvase of our tax dollars
on a frivolous lawsuit,"
Robinson said. "Flori-
da 'is receiving histori-
cally high water flows at
the state line this year, but
it needs a bogeyman to'
blame for its poor man-
agement of Apalachicola
Bay."
Robinson' said Georgia
would defend its water
rights "vigorously" before
the court.
Robinson also repeated
Deal's assertion that Geor-
gia offered a framework
to end the dispute more
than a year ago. Citing
a previous court order,


Florida, officials have
refused to release any
details from negotiations
between the states,
.The long-running dis-
pute hinges over wxith-
drawals from Lake Lanier,
a federal reservoir on ihe
Chattahoochee River that
provides water to metro
Atlanta.
The Chattahoochee
and Flint rivers merge to
form the Apalachicola
River, which flows to the
Gulf of Mexico: In 2009, a
federal judge ruled that
metro Atlanta had little
right to take water from
Lake Lanier. He then or-
dered that metro Atlanta's
water withdrawals would
be drastically restricted
unless the three states
reached a settlement.


tours, part of the impact
of a partial shutdown
that sent ripples of dis-
ruption outward from
museums and memorials
in Washington to Yellow-
stone and other national
parks and to tax audi-
tors and federal offices
serving Americans coast
to coast.
Officials said roughly
800,000 federal employ-.
ees would be affected
by the shutdown after a
half-day on the job Tues-
day to fill out time cards,
put new messages on
their voice mail and simi-
lar chores.
Among those work-
ers were some at the Na-'
,tional Institute of Health's
famed hospital of last re-
sort, where officials said
no new patients would be


admitted for the dura-
tion of the shutdown. Dr.
Francis Collins, agency
.director, estimated that
each week the 'shut-
down lasts will. force
the facility to turn away
about 200 patients, 30 of
them children, who want
to enroll in ,studies of ex-
perimental ,treatments.
Patients already at the
hospital are permitted to
stay.
Late, Tuesday, ,House
Republicans sought
swift passage of legisla-
tion aimed at reopening
small slices of the federal
establishment. The bills
covered the Department,
of Veterans Affairs, the
Park Service and a por-
tion of the Washington,
D.C., government funded
with local tax revenue.


00A2 OLA.>
TO OIAC' CLUB
TO CHIPOLA(C.V,.


L SUBMITTED PHOTO
Margo Lamb, Manager of Volunteer Services with Emerald
Coast Hospice, spoke to the club on the overall mission of
the organization and thejr role in the community. She was,
introduced by local attorney Russell Roberts. Pictured are
Tiffany Crayton, CNA with Emerald Coast; Cecily Smith,
Community Liaison with Emerald Coast; Mr. Roberts; and
Mrs.Lamb.


A three-judge panel
from the Ilth U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals over-
turned that.ruling in 2011,
finding that metro Atlanta
could use the reservoir for
water with restrictions.
The U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers is currently
.studying how much wa-
ter the north Georgia re-
'gion can take froin the
system. But corps officials
have already acknowl-
edged that it will be
years before that study is
complete.
Water officials in Atlanta
have disputed that the
metro area's consumption
is harming the oyster fish-,
ery and say recent prob-
lems have more to do with
drought.
But in its court filing,


Florida contends that
long-term climate data
have not shown signifi2-
cant decreases in precipi-
tation and that a lack of
rain cannot be blamed for
the decreases of fresh wa-
,ter in the river system.
Florida points out in
its court filing that the
U.S. Supreme Court has
been asked to weigh in
on previous ,interstate
disputes, including battles
over water use between
states.
"This court's precedent
makes clear Georgia may
not store and consume
*the waters of the Chat-
tahoochee and Flint riv-
ers in unlimited quantity
heedless of the impact on
the Apalachicola region,"
the lawsuit says.


Wreck
From Page 1A

taken by medical helicop-
ter to Southeast Alabama
Medical Center with seri-
ous injuries.
But his spouse of 56
years, Ruth Tillman, said
Tuesday that he is im-
proving and will be out of
the hospital in a few more
days if all continues to go
well.
Doctors had to stitch up
his forehead, he has a con-
cussion and three fractures
to bones in the area of his
neck, but the hip replace-
ment he had five weeks
ago appears to have been
undamaged in the crash.
The fractures to his neck
area can heal with the use
of a collar, his wife said.
"He was lucky to have his
life, from what they said,"
Mrs. Tillman commented.
"He doesn't remember
what happened, as far as
the crash, and that's what


Weather
From Page 1A
system could I organize
and become a hurricane,
he nevertheless cautioned
local residents to keep an
eye on the depression and
its behavior over the next
several days.
Most forecasters, he said
predict that. the depres-
sion could develop into a
tropical storm, rather than
a hurricane, and that it
could still dump buckets of
rain on the already-soaked
panhandle- or another
coastal area of the U.S.


Peanuts
From Page 1A
done to combat that prob-
lem once it has reached the
critical stage.
Regional Agronomy
Agent Josh Thompson said
leaf spot has "come on
strong" in the last couple
of weeks in Jackson Coun-
ty. Most early-planted pea-
nuts escaped the worst of
it, because they were har-
vested before the disease
had a chance to take good
hold.
But later-planted nuts
are likely going to be more
susceptible since theywere
still in the ground when
the disease started spread-
ing more quickly across the
county.
Thompson said' some
farmers will likely have to
harvest earlier than they'd
wanted. In doing so, they'll
be picking their peanuts
when the nuts are more
immature and therefore
weigh less. That can result
in a lower quality grade for
their crops, a. difference
that could affect the prices
they get for their product.
, But Thompson said some
farmers might not have a
choice; to save their overall
crop, they'll have to sac-
rifice some quality-grade
points. He said the pro-
ducers will' have to care-
fully time their harvest
and, until then, maintain
a smart fungicide applica-


everybody wants to know.
But he has a concussion
and I told him not to worry
about trying to reconstruct
it in his mind. He's here,
and he's going to be all
right, and that's all that re-
ally matters to me."
According to a Florida
Highway Patrol report is-
sued late Monday after-
noon, Tillman was north-
bound on State Road 71
when he lost control of the
car on a curved section
of the road. The left-side
wheels crossed the center-
line and Tillman steered
right in an attempted cor-
rective action. But the car
began to gradually rotate
toward the shoulder. It slid
onto the east shoulder and
struck a utility pole. After
impact, the car continued
moving in a northerly di-
rection and overturned on
the same shoulder of the,
road. It came to rest upside
down, partly on the shoul-
der and partly in the north-
bound traffic lane.


'All the models don't
agree, but if it comes to-
ward us, it's probably go-.
ing to be on top of us or
we'll be on the bad side
of it," Andreasen said.
"It's off the Yucatan Pen-
insula, where Hurricane
Camille -started in 1969;
that one started as a
tropical. wave and be-
came a Category 5
hurricane very quickly."
Andreasen said that he
will ask Jackson County
Commissioners for an
emergency declaration if
the storm develops and
moves this way over the
next few'days.


tion schedule in order to
keep the disease at bay as
much as possible as the
clock ticks toward their
harvest time.
Thompson said the air-
borne disease, spread by
wind and rain, appears to
be fairly widespread across
the county, with no sector
especially more hard-hit
than others.
There are roughly 23,000
acres planted in peanuts
this year, down from last
year's estimated 32,000.
Most of that change re-
flects more farmers' deci-
sion to plant additional
cotton or corn on some of
their land because of mar-
ket trends. This year, about
48,000 acres are planted in
cotton, compared to last
year's estimated 43,000.
Higher prices drove that
decision for many, Thomp-
son said. A bit more corn is
being grown here, as well,
injresponse to drought, in
the Midwest Corn Belt that
led to more selling oppor-
tunities for local farmers.
The extra rain has nega-
tively affected some cot-
ton fields, Thompson said,
particularly in the western
part .of the county where
heavier soils held the water
longer. Some fields were
too soggy to bring tractors
in for the application of
fertilizer at times, he said,
leaving the plants to suf-
fer from lack of more nu-
trients to help them grow
and produce.


Obituaries


Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
Your Local Florist and Gifts
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


There were no
obituaries or
death notices
submitted to the
Floridan as of the
deadline at 4 p.m.
yesterday.


Do you have 'Cute Kids'?
SEmail your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcflori-
dan.com, mail them to P.O. Box 520. Marianna, FL
32447 or bring them by our offices at 4403 Consti-
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Include child's full name, parents'name(s) and city of
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LOCAL & NATION




SJACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN e www.jcfloridan.cor


World
Briefs
Netdayahc srae vmw t
ietkanget nucle ams
UNITED NATIONS
Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu
played the spoiler Tues-
day to any easing of Iran's
relations with the West,
telling world leaders his
country will do whatever
it takes to prevent Tehran
from developing nuclear
weapons, even if it has to
stand alone.
Speaking at the U.N.
General Assembly, Netan-
yahu asserted that Iranian
President Hassan Rouhani
must have known about a
terror attack on a Buenos
Aires Jewish community
center in 1994, as well
Sas the 1996 bombing in
SSaudi Arabia that killed
S19 Americans, because
he was national security
adviser at the time.
Last week, President
Barack Obama and the Ira-
nian leader spoke on the
phorne, the highest level
contacts between their .
countries in 34 years.
Netanyahu said&Israel's
future is threatened by
a "nuclear-armed" Irah
seeking its destruction
and urged the interna-
tional community to
keep up pressure through
sanctions.

Zimbabwe: Poachers
poison 91 elephants
HWANGE, Zimbabwe
The stench of rotting
elephant carcasses hangs
in the air in western
SZimbabwe, where wildlife
officials say at least 91
elephants were poisoned
with cyanide by poachers
who hack off the tusks for
the lucrative illegal ivory
market.
Massive bones, some al-
ready bleached by the blis-
tering sun in the Hwange
National Park, litter the
landscape around one re-
mote watering hole where
18 carcasses were found.
Officials say cyanide used
in gold mining was spread
by poachers over flat "salt
pans," also known as natu-
ral, mineral-rich salt licks.
"The magnitude of what
we are witnessing today
is much higher than what
has occurred previously,"
environment minister
Saviour Kasukuwere told
reporters on a trip to the
park Monday.

NKorea spurns
SKorea nuke deal
UNITED NATIONS
North Korea on Tuesday
spurned South Korea's of-
fer of development aid in
exchange for giving up its
nuclear weapons, saying
"this can never, ever, be a
political bargaining chip."
North Korean coun-
selor Sang Beom Lim was
speaking in the "right of
reply" session at the end
of the annual General
Assembly speeches, when
countries unleash their
most outspoken diplomats
to counter arguments
made by other countries in
their high-level speeches.
He spoke a few hours
after North Korea's vice
foreign minister, Pak Kil
Yon, blamed the "hostile
policy" of the United
States for continuing ten-
sion on the divided Korean
Peninsula.


Deputy: Dad likely saved girl in deadly rock slide


The Associated Press

BUENA VISTA, Colo.
- A 13-year-old girl said
her father shielded her as
boulders crashed down on
them on a Colorado hik-
ing trail an action that
authorities say probably
saved her life even as her
father and four other fam-
ily members were killed.
Rescuers dug Gracie
Johnson out of the rubble
after Monday's slide, and
she was airlifted to a Den-
ver-area hospital with a
broken leg, the Chaffee
County Sheriff's Depart-
ment said Tuesday.
"She told me at the last
second when the boulders
were coming down on top
of them that he covered
her up and protected her,
which I believe it saved
her life," said Deputy Nick
Tolsma.
Gracie's parents and
sister from nearby Buena
Vista were killed, as were
two of her cousins from
Missouri.
The sheriff's depart-
ment identified the dead
as Dwayne Johnson, 46,
and DawnaJohnson, 45,
Gracie's parents; and her
18-year-old sister, Kiowa-
SRain Johnson.


S THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Flight for Life Helicopter rises above backed up traffic
Monday, Sept. 30, in south-central Colorado. Roads were
closed as emergency personnel work to aid hikers trapped
after a rock slide on the trail to Agnes Vaille Falls.
The other victims were well known in the town
identified as BaigenWalk- and very active in com-
er, 10, and Paris Walkup, munity events, the sher-
22, both of Birch Tree, iff's department said.
Mo. They were nephews Family friend Mike
of Dwayne. and Dawna Carr of Buena Vista said
Johnson. Dwayne Johnson was
All five bodies were re- quick to help others.
covered Tuesday after- "Probably his only regret
noon and identified by a is that he didn't jump in
family member, Sheriff front of his Whole family.
Pete Palmer said. Palm- He's just that type of guy,"
er said the coroner will Carr said. "He probably
make the final, formal did that without one bit
identification. of hesitation."
Dwayne and Dawna.-. Monday's slide sent 100-
Johnson were coaches in ton boulders onto a popu-
Buena Vista schools, were lar viewing area that over-


Obama's nominee for energy


regulatory post withdraws


The Associated Press.

WASHINGTON --Presi-
dent Barack Obama's
,nominee to be the nation's
top energyregulator with-
drew Tuesday, conceding
he did not have enough
support for confirmation.
Ron Binz, a former Colo-
rado energy regulator who
strongly backs renewable
energy, was opposed by at
least half of the 22-mem-
ber Senate' Energy Com-
mittee, including all 10
Republicans and at least
one Democrat.
Opponents said they
considered Binz's views
to be outside the main-
stream and were troubled
by his comment that nat-
ural gas may be a "dead
end" fuel.
,Republicans said they
were concerned that Binz
was not truthful when he
assured them that he was
not part of a coordinated
effort 'by a green-energy
group and a Washington,
lobbying firm to boost his
nomination to head the
Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission.
Binz said in a statement
that he plans to remain in
Colorado. No replacement


was announced. Colette
Honorable, chairwoman
of the Ar-
kansas.Pub-
lic Service
A Commis-
sion, and
FERC com-
missioner
Binz C h e r y I
LaFleur are
among those mentioned
as possible successors to
outgoing FERC Chairman
JonWellinghoff.-
A White House spokes-
man said Tuesday that
Obama was grateful for
Binz's willingness to serve
and regrets that "quali-
fied public servants con-
tinue to get obstructed by
the Senate confirmation
process."
Binz, who served on
Colorado's public utilities
commission from 2007
to 2011, has championed
renewable energy such
as wind and solar power
and helped former Colo-
rado Gov. Bill Ritter push
through a law that led to
closures of older, coal-
fired plants in the state.
Binz, 64, said in an inter-
viewTuesday that he was
caught up in an ideologi-
cal battle, that had little


to do with him or with
FERC's job of regulating
interstate transmission of
electricity, oil and natural
gas. The panel does not
regulate coal.
"That was the greatest
disappointment, that the
person considered for this
jbb was a caricature of
me... spun up by my op-
ponents," he said. "The
committee announced its
votes on someone I didn't
even recognize.
Binz called the battle
over his nomination a
"blood sport" and said
advocacy groups funded
by the fossil fuel indus-
try waged an organized
and effective campaign
against him.
"It was a coordinated
attack," he said, call-
ing the dispute a proxy
battle against the Obama
administration's clean en-
ergy policies.
A former advocate for.
energy consumers, Binz
now works as a, consul-
tant and is affiliated with
a renewable energy in-
stitute headed, by Ritter.
Bl3inz said Tuesday he will
focus on "how to move
forward on a clean energy
agenda."


looks Agnes Vaille Falls
below 14,197-foot Mount
Princeton in south-central
Colorado.
The massive slide left a
gash the size of a football
field in the mountainside,
Undersheriff John Spezze
said.
What triggered it wasn't
immediately known,
though Spezze said the
area had heavy summer
rain and a recent snowfall.
Rain or melting snow can
make slides more likely by
weakening a'steep slope
and making the rocks and
soil heavier, said Jerry Hig-
gins, an associate profes-
sor of geological engineer-.
ing at the Colorado School
of Mines in Golden.
With enough data, geol-
ogists can identify slopes
that are susceptible to
slides, Higgins said, but
finding all of them would
be a massive undertaking.
"In Colorado, there's a
lot of steep slopes, and I
don't think anybody's got
the money to pay for the
studies for all the steep
slopes," he said. ,..
Witnesses said some of
the boulders were the size
, of cars. A hiker who heard
the slide in Chalk Creek
Canyon ran down the trail




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and called for help, Spezze
said.
Tolsma said he was one
of the first at the scene
and heard screaming
from beneath the rubble.
He saw Gracie Johnson's
hand sticking up through
the rocks.
"I started digging her,
out until I had more help
come and we got her all
the way out," he said.
The rock slide was too
unstable for crews to re-
trieve the bodies Monday,
so they waited till Tuesday,
authorities said.
The U.S. Forest Service
maintains the busy trail
near St. Elmo ghost, town.
Spezze said officials have
asked the Forest Service to
close it permanently..
The trail is one of the
first hikes recommended
to people new to the area
and is popular with tour-
ists, said Margaret Dean,
a regular hiker who has
walked the trail with her
7-year-old grandson.
Dean, a copy assistant
at The Mountain Mail
newspaper ,in Salida,
said the trail provides
a xiew of the falls and
the Chalk Creek Valley
in the.towering Collegiate
Peaks. : '





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Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710 L'ANC'J


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Good Neighbor Since 1986


Colo. teen pleads guilty in killing of schoolgirl


The Associated Press

GOLDEN, Colo. A
Colorado teen charged
with kidnapping and
killing a 10-year-old girl
pleaded guilty Tuesday to
all 22 charges against him,
against the advice of his
attorneys.
Austin Sigg, 18, could be
sent to prison for the rest
of his life for the October
2012 slaying of Jessica
Ridgeway in Westmin-
ster. Jessica was.abducted
while walking to school,


.and her dis-
appearance
panicked
Thousands of
residents' in
"V"" Denver'swest-
Sigg ern suburbs.
SSigg also
pleaded guilty Tuesday to
a May 2012 attack on a 22-
year-old jogger at a lake in
Jessica's neighborhood.
Prosecutors said Sigg
entered the pleas be-


cause of overwhelming
evidence against him. His
trial would have started
Thursday.
"The writing was on the
wall," Jefferson County
District Attorney Pe-
ter Weir said after the
hearing.
Sigg faces a minimum
sentence of 40 years in
prison with the possibility
of parole when he is sen-
tenced Nov. 8.


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Middle School Football


Blue Devils roll by Indians


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

GRAND RIDGE The Grand Ridge Indians
were unable to close out their 2013 season
with a victory Tuesday night in Sneads, fall-
ing to the Bonifay Middle School Blue Devils
36-16.
The loss ended the Indians' season with a re-
cord of 1-4, with the lone win coming against
Vernon 6-0 in the regular season opener Sept.
5. .
On Tuesday it was all Blue Devils from the
opening kickoff, as they took advantage of the
first of two Grand Ridge turnovers to get on
the board first with a 1-yard touchdown fun


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

In 2003, Sneads High School capped off
a nine-win season with a playoff victory
over Hawthorne before getting elimi-
nated the following week by Port St. Joe
in the 1A Regional Semifinals.'
The Pirates have not been back to the
postseason since then and if they have
any hope of breaking the string of con-
secutive seasons without a playoff ap-
pearance, they'll need to win Friday
night when the Graceville Tigers come to
town.


by Kevin Martinez with 2:43 left in the first
period.
After recovering an onside kick, the Blue
Devils scored again with a 3-yard TD run by
Blake Gardner on the last play of the quarter,
with Martinez's two-pointer putting Bonifay
up 14-0.
It was 20-0 after Bonifay quarterback Caleb
Cooley hit Javon Graham with a short pass
and Graham juked a pair of ridians defend-
ers and raced down the right sideline for a,74-
yard touchdown with 1:36 to halftime.
Grand Ridge finally found some offense
in the second half and started the third
See BLUE DEVILS, Page 10B


"Our kids are well aware that if we
want to stay in the playoff hunt, this is
a must-win game for. us," Sneads coach
Bill Thomas said Tuesday. "Of course they
want to stay in it. We want to be able to
control our own fate. We win this week
and we can still make the playoffs. No-
body wants to be where you have to de-
pend on other teams to beat teams that
you didn't beat. We don't want to be in
that position."
Sneads (1-3) comes into the garnte
standing-at 0-1 in District 2 competition
after a 30-20 loss to Cottondale on Sept.
20, while Graceville (2-2) is 1-0 in league


play after routing Wewahitchka 48-0 on
the same night.
While the Tigers can still afford a loss
Friday with games still to come against
Vernon and.the 2-0 Hornets, the Pirates
would need a lot of things to go right to
be able to compete for the runner-up
playoff spot in the district.
"I think we need this win a lot more
than they need it. That's the way I look
at it," Thomas said. "If we win this game,
we still control our fate. If they lose this
game, they still control their fate. They
See PIRATES, Page 10B


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Grand Ridge's Josh Baxley looks for a hole in the Bonifay defense Tuesday night during
a middle school game in Sneads.


Middle School
IFootball


Bulipups


go for4


in a row


atCHS
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Marianna Middle School
Bullpups will look to make it four
wins in a row Thursday night
when they go on the road to take
on the Cottondale Hornets at 6
p.m.
MMS (3-1) is coming off of
wins over FAMU, Florida High,
and Walton following an open-
ing-week loss to Taylor County,
and Bullpups coach Brad Cross
said that he believes his team is
playing its best football at the
moment.
"Yeah, I think we're definitely
gelling right now," he said. "Of-
fensively and defensively, every-
one knows what they're doing
now. We're not having missed as-
signments, not having the fum-
bles we had in the beginning.
With winning comes confidence
and with confidence comes a
better team and I think that's
what we are, a better team.
"We've still got room for im-
provement and can get better.
We've got some tougher games
coming up, so we've got to get
better. We're progressing and by
the end of the year I think we'll
be a very good team."
In the Hornets, the Bullpups
will be facing a team that Cross
said he knows very little about,
but based on his knowledge of
the varsity Hornets, he has an
- idea of what to expect.
"I know they get in that power
(formation) like they do (with
the varsity) with a three-back set
and try to get their biggest and
best guy and run it right down
the middle," he said. "That's one
thing our defense has been sus-
ceptible to this year, but we've
See BULLPUPS, Page 10B


Soccer


Cheetahs, Extreme


get wns atMERE


BYSHELIAMADER
Floridan Correspondent

Soccer action was in high gear
at Optimist Park on Monday eve-
ning with teams competing for
what they hope to be a winning
season. ;
In Midget League action, it was
the Extreme coming away with a
2-0 victory in a defensive battle
with the Tornados.
Scoring both goals for the Ex-
treme was Ryan Melzer, with tal-
ented goalkeeper Hayden Gause
preserving the lead.


over the Mystics.
Clark Hatcher put the Cheetahs
on the scoreboard first with a
goal from the right side and past
the Mystics goalkeeper, while it
was Cason Williams who in the
second half who got the game-
winning goal past keeper.
For the Mystics, it was Cole
Reagan who notched their lone
goal.
SThe, Cheetahs were without
their :starting goalkeeper for
most of the game when Cason
Hatcher went out with an injury
and was not able to return to the


Following the game, Coach game. .--
Mason Brocksaid he was pleased Coach Homer Rooks praised .
with his team's effort. his team's effort in stepping up
"They played well.. ,Brady in his absence.
(Brock) and Trent (DeFelix) and "James Isabella came in for
my goalie Haden (Gause) all Cason (Hatcher) and did a great
played well," he said. job at stopping some scores," he
The Extreme will return to ac- said.
tion Thursday at Optimist Park. Action will continue in the
In a second game, it was Midget League on Thursday 4
again a fine defensive Showing night with games at 5:30 p.m.
for the Cheetahs in a 2-1 win and 6:30 p.m.
? 'SS :""' s-" '"P:-t.,'' t_"- L .. ..'. ..r'-. -,,-,.., ." -t"' t .r_: e J i:: *..% ": 2 '- ".2t'......."F,.,.: 7",,'jy" ^ ^ : -.:.;.. .. ;;:'- : -"-, "': ..--^?


LF TEES OFF AGAINST HOLMES COUNTY





A













-'"" "Marianna's
Caroline
.... Rogers
... ; ., "gets her
r.. ball back
on the
green
during
a match
against
Holmes,
-- .. County..


.- . .. .... .. .. -a "' !" l
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN l
_ .- .. . -' ,- -' ," ,'- -,,,'A .,


HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL,




Back against the wall


Sneads'Antwan Durn gets dragged down by the Panthers last week.


Pirates face must-win against Tigers




--12B + WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2,2013


SPORTS


College Football


FSU kicker on pace to set school mark


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Flor-
ida State football .coach
Jimbo Fisher has no prob-
lem talking about his un-
defeated football team.
The record is perfect for
the No. 8-ranked team in
FBS, but there's room for
improvement. ,
The topic of redshirt
kicker Roberto Aguayo,
however, is another story.
"Dadgumit, don't jinx, it,"
Fisher said with a chuckle.
Aguayo is 26-for-26 on
extra points and 7-for-7
on field goals in his first
four collegiate games. His
47 points are 'on pace to
surpass Dustin Hopkins'
Florida State single-season
scoring record of 140 set
in 2012. Hopkins accom-
plished the feat as a senior
who also set the Atlantic
Coast Conference career
scoring mark. He also set
the NCAA career scoring
record by a kicker at 466
points.
"Everybody kept talking
about Dustin and all that,
he's just doing a great job
of being Roberto," Fisher
said, "which is a guy that's
extremely talented, has
good leg strength and
practices with great inten-
sity andgreat consistency.
S"Being able to watch
Dustin perform and pre-
Spare has really helped him.
He's got a great head on his
shoulders and hasjustbeen
very consistent for us."
Life seems fairly simple
for Aguayo the football
part, at least. The Semi-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State's Roberto Aguayo (right) kicks a field goal against
Nevada on Sept. 14 in Tallahassee.


Snoles have yet to trail in the
second half and Aguayo's
long of 45-yards came in
the first quarter of a 54-6
rout ofBethune-Cookman.
There haven't been any
pressure-packed kicks.
Such is life as the kicker
on the No. 4 scoring of-
fense in FBS that averages
51.3 points per game; His
33 consecutive kicks made
to start a career is a school
record.
He might get his shot Sat-
urday when Florida State
plays No. 25 Maryland.
"My position is more of a
(mental one) -90 percent
mental, 10 percent physi-
cal," Aguayo said. "Once
you get into your head,
once you're nervous'and
stuff, you're done. That's
what I feel I control much


better coming into the
season.
"Like Jimbo once said,
it's like preparing for a test.
If you don't prepare right,
you're obviously going to
be nervous. But asyou pre-
pare right during the week,
during the offseason, dur-
ing the summer, when you
come in you feel confident.
You don't feel that burden
of pressure. I prepared
good. That's why, the feel-
ing of pressure and ner-
vousness is not there. All
these games I haven't been
as nervous as I thought I
was going to be. It is what
it is. I do this for a living."
Hopkins (2009-12) isn't
the only shadow that
Aguayo resides in. Florida
State is a program known
to produce pro-caliber


kickers. Hopkins is on the
Buffalo Bills roster. Gra-
ham Gano .(2005-2008).
plays for the Carolina Pan-
thers. Sebastian Janikowski
(199.7-99) is in his 14th NFL
season after being a first-
round pick by the Oakland
Raiders in 2000.
"He knows that people
have kicked .here before,"
Fisher said. "I think he
feels a responsibility to
try to perform well. At the
same time, I tell him don't
worry bout that. You can't
be Sebastian Janikowski,
or Graham Gano or Dustin
Hopkins.
"You just have to be your-
,self and do what Roberto
does, which'is plenty good
enough and that's why we
recruited you here."
Aguayo is on pace for
a single-season record
141 points during the 12-
game regular season. That
doesn't include a possible
ACC. title. game or bowl
game. His current rate
puts him on track to break
Hopkins's career record
during Aguayo's senior
year.
"I surprised myself.' ...
Take it week by week and
eventually that legacy.
starts growing," Aguayo
said. "It's exciting. I think
about it, wow, 35 points.
... So, I've just got to do my
job and by the end of the
season it'll be there.
"But all the stats and all
that type of stuff, I'm not
really worried about. It's
just doing what I have to
do for my team and getting
the points for them."


College .ootbal


Texas AD Dodds says that he's ready to retire


The Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas DeLoss Dodds,
the Texas. athletic director who built
the program into a Goliath of college
sports in terms of wealth, power and
prestige, said Tuesday he is ready to
retire and leave the Longhorns -
and some potentially tough coach-
ing decisions-- in someone else's
hands after' three decades at the
helm.
Dodds, 76, has led the Texas pro-
gram since 1981 when he took job
that oversaw an athletic department
budget of about $4 million., He will
leave it Aug. 31, 2014, with an an-
nual budget of nearly $170 million,
upgraded and expanded "facilities,
and its own television network.
"This is a big day for me. I've
thought a lot about it," Dodds
said' at a .campus news confer-
erce with university President
Bill Powers. "In 62 years, it will be
the first time I haven't had a job...
That's long enough to work... We've


had a great run."
Dodds will move into a paid con-
sulting role after he steps down as
AD. Powers said a search for Dodds'
replacement will begin immediately
and the new boss could step into the
job as soon as they are hired, with
Dodds helping with the transition. ,
"We do not need somebody in
a week," Powers said. "We can be
thoughtful."
Instead of just a long goodbye for
an administrator who wielded influ-
ence over not just Texas but over en-
tire conferences, Dodds' departure
intensifies speculation over football
coach Mack Brown's future with the
Longh6rns.
Dodds and Powers have been
Brown's strongest allies against a
restless fans base frustrated by three
sub-par seasons, and a 2-2 start
in 2013. Brown, who has been at
Texas since 1997 and won the 2005
national championship, has often
noted their support and Tuesday's
announcement means a key piece


of that foundation is leaving.
Brown is under contract until
2020 and has said he wants to keep
coaching. He will be paid about $5.4
million this year with annual raises
in his contract. Brown was at prac-
tice Tuesday and did not attend the
news conference.
Dodds deflected questions about
potential coaching changes, saying
his replacement should be involved
in such decisions.,
. Dodds is under contract at Texas
through 2015 at $700,000 per year
with a $1 million annuity if he's em-
ployed at the end of August 2014.
Dodds came to Texas from Kansas
State in 1981 and presided over an
expanding Texas empire, at a time
the business side of college sports
was rapidly expanding. During his
tenure, the Texas men's program has
won 14 national championships and
108 conference titles, most notably
the football national championship,
the school's first outright football
title since 1969.


Sports Briefs


High School
Football
Friday -Graceville at
Sneads, 7 p.m.; Marianna
at East Gadsden,.6p.m.;
Cottondale atVemrnon, 7
p.m.

Junior Varsity
Football
)) Thursday -Vernon at
Sneads, 6 p.m.

Middle School
Football
SThursday Marianna
at Cottondale (V),
6 p.m.; Rocky Bayou
Christian at Graceville,
6p.m.

High School
Volleyball
Thursday -'Graceville
at Cottondale, 1 p.m.; Wal-
ton at Marianna, 5 p.m.
and 6 p.m.

Panhandle
Cross-Country
Championship
The annual Panhandle
Cross-Country Champi-
onship is coming back
to Marianna on Saturday,
'with the day beginning
with the varsity boys
race at 8 a.m., followed by
the girls at 8:30 a.m.
There will also be a
middle school open race
lat 10 a.m.


Recreation Football
Marianna Recreation
Department will offer two
tackle football leagues
and one boys' flag football
league this year. Regis-
tration for youth ages 6
to 13 will be held Oct. 1
through Nov. 1 from 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at The Marianna
Educational and Rec-
Sreational Expo (MERE)
located at 3625 Caverns
Road in Marianna.
The registration fee for
flag football is $30 for all
participants. The fee for
tackle leagues will be $45
for all participants. The fee
must be paid with a check
or money order; no cash
will be accepted. Special
registration will be held at
the MERE from 4-7 p.m.
Oct. 14, 21. No one will be
allowed to register after
Nov. 1.
SAll participants must
bring a copy of their birth
certificate. You may also
visit ourwebsite at www.
leaguelineup.com/mrd
and go to the football page
and download a form. The
age of all participants on
Nov. 1 of the current year
will be the player's age for
the entire season.
Anyone that may be
interested in coaching a
team or officiating youth
football please contact
the Marianna Recreation
Department at 482-
6228 or come by during
registration.


Men's Flag Football
Marianna Recreation
Department will offer a
Men's 7-on-7 Flag Football
League.
Teams may sign up at
The Marianna Education-
al and Recreational Expo
(MERE) located at 3625
SCaverns Road in Mari-
anna, The registration fee
of $400 is due before the
first contest.
The league will play a
10-game schedule with
play starting Nov. 4.
There will be a mangers/
organizational meeting
on Oct. 21 at 6 p.m. at the


MERE Complex.
For more information
please contact the
MERE at 850-482-6228
or visit the Web page
at www.leaguelineup.
com/mrd and click
on the Adult Football
page.

Sports Items
'Send all sports items to
,editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan, P.O.
Box 520 Marianna, FL
32447.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


College Fbotball


I il A DP RESS I ItUILu 3
Alabama head coach Nick Saban (right) talks with Mississippi
head coach Hugh Freeze before the start of Saturday's game
in Tuscaloosa, Ala.

Saban, Freeze


downplay ex-Ole


Miss staffer's role


The Associated Press

TUSCALOOSA, Ala,
- Alabama coach Nick
Saban says any concerns
about the role of staffer
Tyler "Siskey during the
Mississippi game is much
ado about nothing.
Television cameras
showed Siskey in the
, coaches box watching
through binoculars. That
prompted some Reb-
els fans to complain on
message boards and so-
cial media that he was
spying.
Siskey is the associate
director for player per-
sonnel and worked un-
der coach Hugh Freeze
at Mississippi last season
and before that at Arkan-
sas State.'
"He didn't really assist
in the game plan, and
he wasn't on a headset,"
Saban said Monday. "He
didn't talk to anybody
during the game. I don't
know if there's any rule
that says he can't go into
the press box and watch
the games. And he wasn't
in any different position
than he's ever been in a
game.
"The benefit that we
have was in the offsea-
.son when we do studies
of offseason opponents
and how we Would try to
defend what they do, was
to have somebody on our
staff here that understood
what the' other team was
doing."


The top-ranked Crim-
son Tide won the game
25-0 and -24th-ranked
Ole Miss's normally high-
powered offense was shut
out for the first time since
1998.
Freeze seems to agree
with Saban. He didn't
accuse Alabama of any
wrongdoing and twice
said he wanted to talk
about Saturday's game
with Auburn.
"Nick and (Alabama de-
fensive coordinator Kirby
Smart) are two of the best
in the business," he said.
"It's not like they need
a lot of help. in prepar-
ing for a game plan, but
I'm sure Siskey.helped in
some way Tyler Siskey is
a good man. I hate that
it's been quite the drama.
"Did I feel like they
had an excellent plan for
whatever reason? I did.
I'm sure Nick prepares
just like any of us would.
I'm ready to move on to
Auburn."
Freeze said he's not sure
if Siskey played a role
during the game, but was
confident he didn't break
any rules.
S"I don't think for one
minute that Nick would
have put himself or his
program at risk by do-
ing, something," he said.
"I don't want to be in-
'volved in something like
that. They beat us, they
lined up and beat us and
. I'm ready to move .ori to
Auburn." '


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College Football


IHL ASOUUAI LU) RKEl
Arkansas quarterback Brandon Allen prepares to pass against Texas A&M in Fayetteville, Ark.,
on Saturday.


Arkansas looks to avoid


3-game losing streak


The Associated Press

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark.
- Arkansas coach Bret
Bielema had a tough time
falling asleep following a
45-33 loss to Texas A&M
last week.
The loss was the second
straight for the Razorbacks,
the fifth time Bielema has
lost at least two games in
a row during his eight sea-
sons as a head coach.
Bielema has lost more
than two games in a row
just once in his career, a
four-game stretch while
at Wisconsin in 2008 a
mark he hopes to avoid
matching when Arkan-
sas (3-2, 0-1 Southeastern
Conference) travels to No.
18 Florida (3-1, 2-0) on
Saturday.
Despite the.loss to the Ag-
gies, Bielema's insomnia af-
terward had less to do with
how poorly the Razorbacks
played and more to do with
what he called the "'positive
things" about the game and
direction of the program.
There are things to do.
Arkansaswas 4-8 last sea-
son under interim coach
John L. Smith, and it was
picked to finish last in the
SEC West this season.
Bielema, meanwhile,
never had a losing season


while leading the Badgers
to three Rose Bowl appear-
ances in seven years there.
His worst season was a 7-6
mark in 2008, duringwhich
Wisconsin lost four in a
row and five of six games
after opening 3-0.
"It's a totally different per-
spective for me," Bielema
said. "I mean, I knew com-
ing in and taking this job
that,.there were some things
we were going to have to go
through. ... I told our guys
after the game, I said, 'We're
not there yet, but this climb
up the mountain has been
a lot of fun, and when we
get to the top it's going to
be really fun to know what
you did.'"
Arkansas never led
against Texas A&M, but it
looked much crisper on
offense than it had a week
earlier during a loss at Rut-
gers. The Razorbacks led
by 17 points in the second
half of that game before
falling 28-24 in a game
they played without quar-
terback Brandon Allen.
Alien returned fronf a
shoulder injury against
the Aggies and threw for a
career-high 282 yards and
three touchdowns.
The sophomore also
threw a pair of intercep-
tions in the loss, but his


return sparked Arkansas to
483 yards of total offense
- leaving the Razorbacks
feeling much better about
their performance than
during the loss to the Scar-
let Knights.
More than anything, it
was Allen's demeanor that
Made the biggest impres-
sion on his first-year head
coach.
"I've only known him
through the games that
we've played, but I saw a
feisty, aggressive, angry,
competitive young man
Saturday night that can
win alot of football games,"
Bielema said.
Bielema might have felt
better about the overall
direction of the program
following the Texas A&M
loss, but he wasn't happy
with several mistakes he
saw during the game and
off-the-field issues leading
up to it.
He said the Razorbacks
spent too much time on
defense celebrating be-
tween plays and not focus-
ing on pre-snap alignment
a factor that helped the
Aggies gain 523 yards of to-
tai offense.
Arkansas is 1-8 against
Florida, and hasn't defeat-
ed the Gators since joining
the SEC in 1992.


College FootbaUl


Spurrier: Gamecocks QB


Shaw practicing, could play


The Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. In-
jured South Carolina
quarterback Connor Shaw
could play when the 13th-
ranked Gamecocks go
Against Kentucky on Satur-
day night. -'
At least coach Steve, Spur-
rier believes he could.
Shaw, who injured his
shoulder Saturday against
UCF, was expected to be
out .Upto three weeks. But
Shaw practiced Monday
night and Spurrier said
he watched the QB throw
the, ball about 60 yards.
If his progress continues,
Shaw could start when
the Gamecocks (3-1, 1-1,
Southeastern Conference)
host the Wildcats (1-3,;
0-1).
Spurrier had no explana-
tion for Shaw's quickreturn
other than maybe the QB's
injurywas not as serious as,-
initially believed.
"Our trainer had him
out two to three weeks,"
SSpurrier said. "You'll have
to ask our trainers how he
made such a miraculous
' recovery."
Shaw left the UCF game
early, was taken to the
locker room and returned
with his right, throwing
arm in a sling and ice on
what looked like a badly
damaged shoulder. But
like. several other times in
the senior's college career,
it appears that Shaw will
shake off any pain and get
back to work.
He had sustained an in-
jury to the same shoulder
in the 2012 season opener
at Vanderbilt, yet returned
late in the game to lead a
go-ahead touchdown drive
in South Carolina's 17-13
victory.


.. "THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
South'Carolina quarterback
Connor Shaw walks the
sidelines after he was injured.
on a play against Central
Florida in Orlando, Fla., on
Saturday.
. "I' think we all know that
he's the toughest guy a lot
of us have seen," said Dylan
Thompson, Shaw's backup
who was expected to start


the next two games.
Thompson came in and
led a second-half rally as
South Carolina went from
trailing 10-0 to grabbing
a 28-10 lead. UCF almost
pulled off a comeback of
its own, drawing within a
field goal with two fourth-
quarter touchdowns.
Still, the Gamecocks
missed Shaw. He is fourth
in SEC pass efficiency and
has thrown six touchdowns
without an interception.
Spurrier said he wouldn't
decide on. a starting quar-
terback until later in the
week after Shaw's had
more time to work out.
Shaw is 20-4 during his
career as the Gamecocks'
starter and is only one of
two South Carolina quar-
terbacks (1970s-era quar-
terback JeffGrantz is the
other) to throw for 3,000
yards and rush for 1,000
yards in a career.


OPE) SUNDAYSI ~4V%

llmmp


College Football


Miles: No. 10 LSU will be


ready to rebound at MSU


The Associated Press

BATON ROUGE, La. -
Les Miles generally likes
to enforce what he calls a
"24-hour rule," referring
to the time he gives his
players to reflect on their
last game before 'moving
on to the next one.
This week, Miles said he
gave his players 48-hours
to digest their' dramatic
44-41 loss to Georgia last
weekend, hoping it'll help
them bounce back at Mis-
sissippi State this Satur-
day night.
"This is a program, like
most college programs,
where the players really
need to have victory when
they get to the end of the
week," Miles said Monday.
"This will not be a difficult
week for us to get our eyes
open to how quality the
opponent is."
After falling in the rank-
ings from No. 6 to No. 10,
the Tigers take on a team
against which they've had
a lot of success, winning
20 of the last 21 games, in-
cluding 13 in a row.
And Miles isn't letting
his players forget how
much is still at stake.
Even though LSU
dropped its first game of
the season to a Southeast-
ern Conference opponent,
it can still win the Western
Division without any help.
"I'll make reference to
the big picture," Miles
said. "More than any-
thing, it's the short term.
The most important need
is to get us squared away
and looking forward to
this next team.
"On a Saturday like we
just had, everybody will
recognize that all the
things we want to do are
still in front of us," Miles
continued. "There's no
reason at this point in
time to approach things
any differently."
LSU has won two na-
tional championships
and four SEC titles in the
BCS era. Only the 2011
Tigers team didn't lose
a game in the regular
season. That LSU squad
then was defeated by a
one-loss Alabama team
in the national champi-.
onship game.
The Tigers won the na-
tional title under coach
Nick Saban in 2003. That
LSU team lost to Florida


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LSU head coach Les Miles watches play against Georgia
during the first half of the game Saturday in Athens, Ga.


during the regular sea-
son. Miles' 2007 national
championship squad
dropped two regular-
season games both in
overtifihe --against Ken-
tucky and Arkansas..
The players are well
aware of recent history
in which one-loss teams
won both the SEC and na-
tional titles. Alabama won
both crowns a year ago af-
ter falling to Texas A&M.
"The mindset after the
Georgia game was-that
game didn't make or break
our season," said senior
wide receiver Kadron
Boone, who caught two
touchdown passes last
Saturday. "We just have
to be ready to go back to
work. If weplay our cards
right, we may see (Geor-


gia) again this season."
The Tigers will have to
fix problems on defense
to remain in the SEC West
race. Georgia gained 494
yards with Aaron Murray
passing for 298 yards and
'four touchdowns. On a
few occasions, there were
missed assignments in
the secondary.
S"We certainly can't have
blown coverages," Miles
said. "The fastest way
to get you beat is play
against a quality team and
not cover a segment of the
defense.
S"We have to make the
point to the remainder of
the defense to just do the
things we ask them to do.
If we do that, we'll not be
just a good defense, but a
great defense."


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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2,2013 3Br





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SPORTS


College Football


USC's slide to mediocrity costs Lane Kiffin


The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Less than two
years after Southern California fin-
ished a 10-2 season with a 50-point
win over UCLA, coach Lane Kiffin is
unemployed.
Thirteen months after the Trojans
were the nation's top-ranked team,
they've lost seven of their past 11
games. They haven't looked good in
many of their victories, either.
An elite football program has de-
scended into mediocrity, and the
slide culminated in Kiffin's firing
by athletic director Pat Haden. on
Sunday.
Haden believes the right coach
can put USC (3-2, 0-2 Pac-12) right
back among the nation's best, and
he wanted to start the hunt while
interim coach Ed Orgeron and the
Trojans finish this season.
'All our coaches are in the winning
business," Haden said. "When you're
a coach at a place like USC, we have
winning championships in our DNA
around here. You have to do the other
things as well. You have to play by the
rules. You have to care about players.
You have to graduate your kids. (But)
at the end of the day, we're all in the
winning business at USC."
SUnder the weight of NCAA sanc-
tions and enormous expectations,
Kiffin never lived up to the USC
standard set by Pete Carroll, who
won national championships and
captivated LA. before abruptly leav-
ing for the Seattle Seahawks nearly
four years ago.
Carroll is still mightily fond of USC,
and he'll be watching the develop-
ments closely.
"It's been a hard time for the Tro-
jan family," Carroll said Monday: "It's
been a hard couple of years. This is
difficult, too. Transitions like this,
they are huge. ... I've known Lane
since he was a little kid.. I feel for
him in this situation. They've made
a decisive move, and they're going
to move forward, and they'll make a
good choice and get the thing going
the way they want to go. But it's very
difficult."
It's mostly difficult for Kiffin, who


Former Southern California coach Lane Kiffin watches as the Trojans warm up for a
game against Washington State in Los Angeles on Sept. 7.


went 28-15 into his fourth season
at USC. The mark is either a solid
achievement given the Trojans'
scholarship restrictions and depth
problems, or it's an embarrassment
to a school laden with NFL-caliber
talent that accepts nothing but an-
nual title contention.
It isn't tough to see what Haden
thinks, and most USC alumni seem
to agree.
In Kiffin's successor, Haden must
find a coach who can handle USC's
expectations while maximizing the
school's many strengths. Kiffin brief-
ly appeared to be that coach, but for-
mer athletic director Mike Garrett's
choice for the job never got there.
Kiffin was on top of the game in
late 2011, when the Trojans finished
atop the Pac-12 South withwins over
Oregon and UCLA.
Quarterback Matt Barkley then an-
nounced he would return for his se-
nior season, passing up NFL millions
for a year to stick with his beloved
school, which got that preseason No.
1 ranking.
Numerically, the Trojans' current
slide began after a 6-1 start to that
season. But even Kiffin acknowl-
edged USC hasn't looked consis-
tently good for two seasons, playing
some of the worst defensive games
in USC history while failing to score
enough points to make up for it.


Oregon and Stanford surpassed
USC atop the Pac-12, while UCLA,
Washington and even Arizona State
appear poised to move in front this
season. Combined with the Trojans'
uninspiring performances even in
victory, it's more than Haden could
take.
"We just weren't making the prog-
ress I felt we needed to make," Haden
said.
Haden will keep his coaching
search private, but that didn't stop
anybody from speculating Monday.
Washington's Steve Sarkisian im-
mediately heard questions about
his interest in the school where he
worked alongside Kiffin as Carroll's
co-offensive coordinators.
Sarkisian, a Los Angeles-area na-
tive, welcomed the chance to "get
the giant elephant out of the room,"
saying he was very happy with the
Huskies.
The USC elephant roamed through-
out football on Monday, and won't
stop until Hadenpicks a coach.
Vanderbilt coach James Franklin
and Denver Broncos defensive co-
ordinator Jack Del Rio were asked
about their interest in the job, while
Boise State's Chris Petersen, North-
western coach Pat Fitzgerald and
San Francisco 49ers offensive coor-
dinator Greg Roman are among the
popular choices of pundits and fans.


College Football

Freshmen playing big roles for Ole Miss, Auburn


The Associated Press

AUBURN, Ala. Those
prized recruits at Auburn
and Mississippi are already
key figures in the pro-
grams' efforts to climb the
SEC West ladder in their
first season.
The 24th-ranked Rebels
have started five freshmen
heading into Saturday
night's game with the Ti-
gers, led by defensive line-
man Robert Nkemdiche,
wide receiver Laquon
Treadwell and safety Tony
Conner.
Auburn is relying heav-
ily on defensive linemen
Montravius Adams and
Elijah Daniel and wide
receiver Marcus Davis
among others.
Auburn coach Gus Mal-
zahn and his Ole Miss
counterpart, Hugh Freeze,
haven't been bashful about
throwing the youngsters
into the Southeastern Con-
ference fire as they rebuild
their programs.
"I think it says that myself
and Hugh, we're not scared
to play freshmen right off
the bat, especially if they're
talented enough," Malzahn
said on Tuesday. "You'll see
quite a few on both sides."
Some of it's 'out of neces-
sity with deficiencies in
depth or talent. Other play-
ers like Nkemdiche and
Adams might be just too
good to keep off the field.
Nkemdiche has started
every game on the defen-
sive line, moving from end
to tackle at least temporar-
ily for the Alabama game.
He and Georgia's Leon-
ard Floyd are tied for sec-
ond among SEC freshmen
with 4.0. tackles for loss
behind .only Vanderbilt's
Adam Butler (4.5). Adams
is a backup defensive tack-
le but leads the Tigers with
five quarterback hurries
and has a sack.
Those two are among
five freshmen collectively
who were ranked among
the top 21 players in the
247Sports composite rank-
ings of the major recruit-
ing sites. Nkemdiche was
the nation's top recruit
and started at a new posi-
Ition against the nation's


I THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Mississippi wide receiver
Laquon Treadwell is taken
down after a catch during
the first half of Saturday's
game against Alabama in
Tuscaloosa, Ala.
top-ranked team.
"He's a very strong, tough
guyto mpve around," Freeze
said. "He played really solid
for a game of that magni-
tude. To be a true freshman;
he did really well."
The "for a true fresh-
man" sentiment is likely
to be a familiar refrain for
both teams, but Auburn
defensive coordinator Ellis
Johnson said Nkemdiche
stands out.
"He's a big man. He's al-
ready physically ready to
play at this level and you
can see, he's making plays,"
Johnson said.
Treadwell was 14th on
that composite list of pros-
pects and was' also an im-


mediate starter, leading
the Rebels with 20 catches.
He ranks second among
SEC freshmen in receiving
yards per game and Ole
Miss freshman tight end
Evan Engram is third.
Auburn's Davis wasn't
as highly recruited as
Treadwell but his 10 recep-
tions are third on a team
that was in desperate need
of quick help at the posi-
tion and even more so with
the season-ending injury
to starting receiver Jaylon
Denson.
He had catches on three
consecutive plays during
Auburn's game-winning
drive against Mississippi
State.
"Marcus Davis has had
a fantastic attitude," Ti-
gers offensive coordinator
Rhett Lashlee said. "From
the third practice of fall
camp you knew he was
going to help us. I didn't
know if he'd start, but you
knew he was going to help
us because of his attitude,
the way he attacks prac-
tice, the way he listens. If
you correct him on some-
thing he doesn't make the
same mistake twice.
"Young guys are like that.
They are really coachable
because they don't know,
any better."
Fellow freshman Tony
Stevens had his first two


850.482So4442
2163 Post Oak Lane, Marianna
Behind Ruby Tuesday


career catches against No.
10 LSU.
For Ole Miss, Conner's 21
tackles are second among
.SEC freshmen. He had an
interception on his first
collegiate snap against
Vanderbilt and has started
all three games since.
Laremy Tunsil started
at left tackle in the Texas
game.
Auburn's other top de-
fensive line signees, ends
Carl Lawson and Daniel,
have both played in every
game.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com

College Football Briefs


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Navy players celebrate after a touchdown during the second
half of last season's game against Army in Philadelphia.


Federal shutdown
scraps games at
service academies
WASHINGTON -The
Defense Department
says it has temporar'-
ily suspended all sports
competitions at the
service academies as a
result of the partial gov-
ernment shutdown.
The decision jeopardiz-
es this weekend's football
games. Air Force at
Navy and Army at Boston
College.
A Pentagon spokes-
man, Army Col. Steve
Warren, says the suspen-
sion is being reviewed.
by Pentagon lawyers to
determine whether funds
used for these activities
are congressionally ap-
propriated funds.
SThe U.S. Naval Acad-
emy said in a statement
that a decision will
be made Thursday on
whether the Midship-
men will play Saturday.
The Navy-Howard soc-
cer match scheduled for
Tuesday night was called
off and it's not known if
the game will be made
up.

Brown disappointed
Campbell calling
for his ouster
SAUSTIN, Texas-Tex-
as coach Mack Brown
Says he's disappointed
former Longhorns run-
ning back and Heisman
Trophy winner Earl -
Campbell says Brown


HOME

OF THE

WEEK


should be replaced.
Brown has faced
intense scrutinyand
public speculation about
his job after a,2-2 start
this season. Campbell
told Houston television
station KRIV on Sunday
that Brown should be
replaced and applauded
Southern California for
firing Lane Kiffin early in
the season.
Campbell won the
Heisman in 1977 and
remains one of the most
popular players in school
history. The university
placed a statue of Camp-
bell at Royal-Memorial
Stadium in 2006.
Brown on Monday
declined to criticize
Campbell's comments
and said Campbell would
always be welcome at the
school. He says Campbell
is entitled to his opinion.

From wire reports


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Major League Baseball
New York
Yankees
manager
Joe Girardi
watches the
scoreboard
from the
dugout
during
Sunday's
game against
the Houston
Astros in
Houston.


Cashman: Yankees


want Girardi back


The Associated Press

NEWYORK The Yan-
kees want Joe Girardi to
return as manager next
season.
Girardi was hired after
the 2007 season, and his
contract expires at the
end of October. Crippled
by injuries, New York had
its poorest record since
1992 and finished tied
for third in the AL East at
85-77.
"He knows we'd like to
have him stay and contin-
ue as manager of the New
York Yankees as we move
forward," general man-
ager Brian Cashman said
Tuesday. "I feel we hired
,a good one. He's been a
world champion player
for us. He's been a coach,
a broadcaster and obvi-
ously a world champion
manager. So we've ben-
efited from having him
and we'd like to do that
going forward, but we'll
have to speak with him
and see how it plays out
Cashman met Girardi
for coffee on Monday, a
day after New York's sea-
son ended, and plans to
have lunch Wednesday
in New York with'Girardi's
agent, Steve Mandell.
,Girardi replaced Joe
Torre after the 2007 sea-
son and was given a $7.8
million, three-year con-
tract. He is completing
a $9 million, 'three-year


deal. Cashman wouldn't
saywhether he would give
the Chicago Cubs permis-
sion to speak with Girardi
about their manager's job,
which opened when Dale
Sveum was fired Monday.
"I think he likes it here,"
Cashman said. "We're go-
ing to give him a real good
reason to stay, and he's
earned that through his
six years with us so far."
Heading into the off-
season, the Yankees face
numerous questions,
especially ,about their
pitching staff and infield.
Mariano Rivera and Andy
Pettitte are retiring; and
second baseman Robin-
son Cano is a free agent,
as are pitcher Hiroki Ku-
roda and outfielder Curtis
Granderson.
Shortstop Derek Jeter
missed virtually the en-
tire season after break-
ing an ankle last Octo-
ber and third baseman
Alex Rodriguez, having
returned from hip sur-
gery, may have to serve
a drug suspension for a
large portion or all of next
season.
Cano, a five-time All-
Star second baseman
who turns 31 on Oct, 22,
can become a free agent
after the World Series.
Cashman will meet with
-the Yankees professional
scouts starting Monday
to formulate his offsea-
son plan.


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2,2013 5B F


Major League Baseball


Rays to playoffs again after win over Rangers


The Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas
The first person David
Price looked for after pitch-
ing the Tampa Bay Rays
into the playoffs was third
baseman Evan Longoria.
Price yelled after the
two locked eyes, and they
embraced to start the
celebration.
"He just told me that
he had a dream about it,"
Longoria said. "It was awe-
some to feel that emotion
from him. That's what an
ace does, that's what a
leader of a staff does. It was
awesome to watch."
Price, Longoria and the
Tampa Bay Rays are going
to playoffs again, getting
there with a victory in their
final regular-season game
for the second time, in
three years. They needed
an extra game this time.
Price pitched his fourth
complete game this year,
Longoria hit a two-run
homer and the Rays beat
the Texas Rangers 5-2 in
the AL wild-card tiebreak-
er game Monday night,
the 163rd game for both
teams.
When Price woke up
Monday, all he could think
about was throwing a com-
plete game, then getting
that last out and turning
straight to Longoria.
"You're probably sup-
posed to go to your catch-
er first, but for what he's
done for us and what he's
done for me personally,"
Price said. "I think about
that type of stuff before I
pitch all the time, but for
it to happen today. I didn't
want to text him when I
thought about it. I didn't
want to jinx it."
Luckily for manager Joe
Maddon and the Rays,
they weren't done in by an-
other blown call in Texas
- though this one did cost
them at least one run.
The Rays face anoth-
er must-win situation


STHE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tampa Bay Rays' David Price (left) and Jose Molina celebrate
after defeating the Texas Rangers 5-2 in theirAmerican League
wild-card tiebreaker game Monday in Arlington, Texas.


Wednesday night at Cleve-
land in the AL wild-card
game, Tampa's third game
in three cities in a four-day
stretch. The winner faces
Boston in the division
series.
Price (10-8), the reigning
AL CyYoung winner, had a
10.26 ERA in four previous
starts at Rangers Ballpark.
He was superb in this one,
striking out four and walk-
ihg one. He picked off two
runners while allowing
seven hits and throwing 81
of 118 pitches for strikes.
"If I don't get those two
outs on the pickoff moves,
I have to get the next guys
out," Price said. "It forces
me to throw at least 10
more pitches."
Longoria had three hits,
,continuing his stellar play
in the last game of regular
seasons. He is hitting .579


(11 for 19) in those finales
with seven homers and 10
RBIs, according to STATS.
"I wish I could explain it,"
he said. "I wish I could bot-
tle it up and take it through
161 games and not have it
be on the last day."
Texas had won seven in
a row, needing every one
just to force the majors'
first wild-card tiebreaker
since 2007.


Even with the return of
All-Star slugger Nelson
Cruz from his 50-game
drug suspension, the
Rangers missed a chance
to get to the playoffs for
the fourth year in a row.
"I'm disappointed. We
didn't get it done," Rangers
manager Ron Washington
said. "I've got no excuse
for that."
Cruz, who had 27 homers
and 76 RBIs in 108 games
before his suspension,
was 0 for 4 with a strike-
out while hitting sixth as
the designated hitter. His
groundout to shortstop
ended the game.
The Rays had runners at
first and second with two
outs in the seventh when
Delmon Young, who put
the Rays ahead to stay with.
a sacrifice fly in the first,
hit a soft flyball.
Center fielder Leonys
Martin made a running,
diving attempt for a catch.
Replays showed clearly
that the ball bounced into
Martin's glove; left field
umpire Bruce Dreckman,
looking at the play from
the side, ruled it an inning-
ending catch.
Young rounded first base
with his arms spread out
signaling safe. Maddon"
went out to talk to Dreck-
man, though the conversa-
tion didn't appear heated.
"Thankfully, it didn't
come back to bite us,"
Longoria said.
MLB intends to use ex-
panded video review next
year.


p~o'


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-16B WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2,2013


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


IT LOOKS LIKE
MADELINE'S TiHE
MYSTERY GIRL WHO
THIiNKS I'M
ADORABLE !
r1UT MADELINE
I GOES OUT: WITH
JOE TARBOX!


SHE'S NOT THE
FIRST TO 6E
TEMPTED BY THE
FRUIT OF THE .
"NATE TREE."
~ ACTUALLY,,
YES, SHE IS.
^^v------


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR
i-wffmm A VAwX W MAMWEp,


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
HEdteWseo. I DIDIN,'T
uWAthSO0 AR Awxv!W!
d FROM THE LEDGEI 0

r7/.


-APE 3.Er

' -^ BeTVTh%-R. IX'


ifK et1 -^


"I ran out of newspapers. Whaddya
want to know?" ,


ACROSS
1 Muscular
5 Masked
hero
10 Sliver or
gold
12 Go over
again
13 Signal fire
14 Egg on
15 Late tennis
Great
16Soyuz
destination
18Wheel buy
(2 wds.)
19 Missive
2Military
hats
25 Wiped out
29Hang -
(turn)
30Antitoxin
32 Last inning,
usually
33Granny's
brooch
34 Say yes
37 Fine violin
38 Hardly ever
40Tax pro
43 Extended
family
44 Foot part.
48 Character
flaw
50Ambitious
52 Staggered


53 Four-door
models
54 Peru's
mountains
55 Lugosi of
horror
flicks

DOWN
1 Hive
dwellers
2 Bryce
Canyon
state
3 Cosmetic
procedures
4 Sitcom
waitress
5 Buddhist
sect
6 Killer
whale
7 Bridle part
8 Pro (in
proportion)
9 Byron
work
10Exec's
degree
11 Agitated
state
12Stalr part
17Sault -
Marie
2001d
Testament
book


Answer to Previous Puzzle


21 "Our
Gang" kid
22 Nebr.
neighbor
23Charles
Lamb
24 Writes
26 Underbelly
(2 wds.)
27"Cope
Book" aunt
28Song
for two
31 Me, to
Miss Piggy
35 In one's
birthday
suit
36Successor
of "bi-"


course
40"Fargo'
director,
41 Dappled
42Well-
qualified
45Track
shape
46Jazzy
Home
47Coast
Guard off.
48 Monastic
title
49 Brown of
Srenown
51 Vicksburg
fighter


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at Qu.llDrlverBooks.com


10-2 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptogramrs are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.

"DTS E B Z'R CHU 0 B J OIAOER XBD

YHRWTSR XTHZM .PTVORWHZM ATI
PTVOTZO YWT YHCC ZOUOI LO BLCO
RT IOJBD DTS." KTWZ YTTXOZ

Previous Solution: "Don't tell me what I'm not doing when I'm doing what you
don't think I'm doing!" Gary Busey
TODAY'S CLUE: A siwfnn-
2013'by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universai Uclick 10-2 \


Horoscope
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
23) Past lessons will
be a guide to a difficult
situation that you're now
facing. You'll need to act
judiciously to keep the
peace.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Don't complain if
someone asks you to do
something. The fuss it will
cause won't be worth the
aggravation.
SAGITrARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -Fixup
your space. An emotional
matter will escalate if you
haven't been completely
honest about the way you
feel.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -Avoid dealing with
unpredictable people.
Team up with those willing
and able to contribute
consistently.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Use your energy'
wisely and protect yourself
against injury. Think mat-
ters through before you
make a decision:. f
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -Take note of what
everyone around you
is doing, and use what
you learn to reduce your
overhead and home in on
exactly'what's required to
achieve success. -,
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Share your thoughts
and ideas and indulge in
activities that allow you to
show off your skills.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Be efficient. Form-
ing an alliance with some-
qne who has discipline-
and a work ethic-similar to
yours will lead to freedom.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Collect your thoughts
and find away to deal with
a challengebefore matters
become costly. More effort
toward improving your
family life will be required.
CANCER (June 21-July,
22) Avoid melodrama.
You don't want to miss an
opportunity due to-a last-
minute change.
LEO (July23-Aug. 22),
-Appease whoever is
standing between you and
your goal. Make an effort
to keep the peace.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Jump on the
bandwagon and enjoy
whatever is being offered'
up by friends, relatives or
neighbors.


Dear Annie: I recently became engaged
to my boyfriend of four years. Immedi-
ately after he proposed, I phoned my ,
parents, who always gave the impression
that they liked my boyfriend and enjoyed
spending time with himjI thought they'd
be happy for us. I was very wrong.
My mom was really angry and said that
I am "way too young" to be getting mar-
ried. Annie, I'm in graduate, school. My
dad said that my boyfriend "isn't good
enough" and that I should "seriously
reconsider this guy." (This guy! Like he
doesn't have a name.)
I am still in school, so perhaps this is
their way of expressing their worry that if
I get married I won't finish my graduate
program, but regardless, I'm really hurt
by their reaction. I've tried reassuring
them, but they keep brushing me aside,
:insisting I'm marrying too youngand to
the wrong man.
I cannot figure out their problem. We
are inour late 20s, which doesn't strike
me as "too young." And if they truly
believe my fiance isn't the right person,
why didn't they say so in the intervening


Winston Churchill
said, "Men occasionally
stumble over the truth, but
most pick themselves up
and hurry off as if nothing
had happened.'
When a declarer
stumbles, making a
mistake, it is the job of the
defenders to make sure
that he falls, unable to pick
himself up and still make
his contract.
In today's deal, which,'
yes, bears a remarkable
resemblance to yester-
day's, South ended in four
spades. And when it was
originally played, two
errors were made, which
balanced each other out.
West led the diamond king
(under which East accu-
rately dropped the jack to
show the 10 as well). South
ducked, took the next dia-
mond with his ace, drew


four years? Why won't they give me any
concrete reasons for their objections? '
Sometimes I think what they're really
objecting to is the presence of another
person in our small, close-knit family. ;
But it seems selfish of them to place the.
current family dynamic over my future ,
marriage and happiness. Kids grow up.
They get married.
I never in my wildest nightmares
thought my engagement would be such a
source of anger. What do you think about
this?
-SAD BRIDE-TO-BE

Dear Sad: It does seem as though your
parents suddenly realized that you are
leaving the nest and they are panic
stricken. Since they refuse to discuss
their reasons with you, please ask a
trusted family member to-intercede on .
your behalf and try to ascertain whether
their objections have any justification.
But ultimately, the decision of marriage
belongs to you. We hope your parents
will welcome ybur groom into the family
instead of pushing you both away.


Bridge
North 10-02-13
,Q 10 8 2
V K7653
8 3
.4 54
West ,. East
474 49
V Q2 vJ98
* K Q 9 4 J10 6 5 2
46AQJ102 9763
South
A K J 6 5 3
V A 10 4
A7
K 8
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
I" 224 33 Pass
4 Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead: + K
two rounds of trumps end-
ing on the board, played
a heart to his ace, and
led a second heart. When
West played the queen,
declarer ducked in the
dummy. NowWest cashed
the club ace to stop an
overtrick. What were the
two mistakes?
In the modern style,


North responded three
spades, showing a weak
hand with four-card
spade support. With a
game-invitational hand,
North would have cue-
bid three clubs. This style
allows responder to bid
either constructively or
obstructively.
Now to the errors. First,
as we sawyesterday, when
South led a low heart from
the board at trick five, he
should have put in his 10.
East would have been kept
off the lead.
Second, when South
won with his heart ace,
West should have realized
that he needed to get his
partner on play for a club
lead through South. West
should have sacrificed his
heart queen under South's
ace. Then South would
have fallen on his face.


Annie's Mailbox


EUNTEBMNIVIENT




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Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, October 2, 2013- 7 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED



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Publicllon Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ed the first day. This pub o.n iinil -:.-il o. i.,ble i':. il-: urq oi pi-, ad o, r fr a typ r ryp., rsphic erri 0" errors in Dutblclor, d> i.p1l 10 Ie- 'leni ol-i- ccl iie.C cif Ie -d fior Ihe fr day'
insertion AAjuistmen for eni-ors Is limited to the ost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occu.re.s Til ..sAli:ee' ,0rE- lhal e iJ. I pu.,r.er r,-il rnol tO IebIa ,.-I da1-Y e-.3 a3vsrig .:ui oi ,norr in ad.ae,-l:ie-,s trjecn.l irhe arm.-juri pa3l 1IN the aSiCr
actually occupied by Ihal portion of Ire adene3 errnien, in whicn tIhe err oc.:urFe, ..hairer such error is u6 Io,:, r.rwIgerA I Inc U cuihr,['i, ,Tplo S ,j" lih-rwie and ier traI1 t, nro iianili for nor tn al any adverierner.ri oend ine '3rrounli paid Itr
such adveriserneni Disolay Adsa are rnot guaranteed pcirion ,1L) adNert,,erig is -u|-,C[l I0 aDpiOa31 Rigni r.kEr-d 1 c. eril rj--.i.,l:ancr i or ciaii ail ais under [Ine. appropriate ciaSificalt or

For_________ dseadlies alltol-fre orvist S -flo Sd.-- S


fk ANNOUNCEMENTS
CM E LOTS RELATED


Cemetery Plots: (2) side by side
Memory Hill Hwy 52 "Garden of Devotion"
Section B, lot# 382- Plots 3 & 4
$2,200 OBO Call 334-792-0042


Family Plots of 4 in Memory Hill Cemetery
"Garden of Chimes" $800. Each
Call 334-899-8564


Dothan Stor 'N Lok
S New Special!
S10 x 20 Only $s50
3 Month Contract
201 Zenith Rd.
SCall 334-677-0808
illlll.I.....iIII.. II.I.......Il...II


OUR STOREWIDE SALE CONTINUES
THROUGH SATURDAY WITH
DISCOUNTS FROM 10-75% OFF DEPT.
STORE RETAILPRICES.
AMOUNT OF DISCOUNTS ON EACH ITEM
WILL BE POSTED IN STORE.
NOTHING HELD BACK.
AIR CONDITIONERS, FANS, CAMPING,
TENTS, MICROWAVES AND MUCH MORE.
Opn M-S 9-6 PM
LOCATED AT 231 S. & RCC, DOTHAN NEXT
TO SOUTHSIDE KMART. 334-714-9658
/

4633 The Oaks Dr. Oaks Sub. Fri. 4th & Sat 5th.
6-? furniture, clothes, H/H, toys and more !!l
. DOWN SIZING DUE TO AGE & HEALTH!
Antiques & collectibles Marked "BC"
FURNITURE 30 % OFF
MISCELLANEOUS 40% OFF Except Firms"
GREAT IDEAS FOR t&HRISTMAS!!
Backyard Treasure 2331 Ross Clark Cr.

( ) FINANCIAL '


Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
S annual gross $19,500
4 504-915-1474 4


I.


J--p r*""' --7


Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com


l i iiiiiiInn iiinmnllllin immIlI
SPerfect Opportunity To Own .
S Your Own Business!
SDOTHAN ICE CREAM SHOPPE :
For Info Call (334) 618-7030 j
*IIi ;, IIIIII", IIIII',III."


Now with Two Locations in Dothan 479-0491 or
479-8277 Mon thru Fri Sto 6 Sat 8 to 2
Car Stereo Sales/Installation
(Pioneer, Memphis, Kenwood)
Lifetime Warranty
Window Tint $89 front two windows
Cars & Trucks $189
SUVs $250 SUVs*Ceramic Tint,
Tint Removal, Car Wash/Details
Rock Bottom Audioand Tint


OCTOBER.SUU^

OFRELESTATE
I F RI
ag-B B ; "tl T?.7 ... .. .lt l


Sudoku


DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
NEEDED I BUY SEALED/
UNEXPIRED BOXES
CALL BOB (334) 219-4697
OR (850) 710-0189

( A) ?ETS & ANIMALS

CFA Registered Persian Himalayan 4
born 6-21, litter trained and ready for their new
homes $150.-$250. 334-774-2700 After loam

7 mo. Papillon (F) $200. VYorides,
& Chihuahua ,334-8-4886 4
AKC Reg. Boxer Puppies
wormed & shots
fawn W/black mask & fealed brindle.
6-Male / 1-F emale $600. ea. 334-494-4620
Also pictures upon request
SCKC Maltese Puppies M & F, 11
wks old, S/W, Ready Now!
$500-$750 4 334-774-9595 4
CKC Shih-tzu Puppies: 4 sweet baby girls. First
shots, wormed & vet checked. Come and pick
out yopr puff ball today! $400. Call or text Ann
334-587-2632. Email dasheeses@yahoo.com
FREE: Lab mix puppies 2/M & 2/F. 850-209-7047
Pure Breed Boston Terrier Puppies 2-M, shots,
7 wks old, great markings, parents on site
$250. Call 334-461-9332 or 334-243-5916


RETIREES
HOUSEWIVES
STUDENTS
We have contracts available -
Are you?
If you are, '
Then you can earn
EXTRA CA$H
Ask about our sign on bonus
JA(ZKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32448
850-526-3614


10/2/13
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Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) containsevery digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.


Solution to Tuesday's puzzle,
57218396.4
391642857

864975132
2 5 9 8137.1- .6j 4 11.

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W3E.-3E


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Pic upyor.oyody


*


4 '




8 B- Wednesday. October 2. 2013 Jackson County Floridan


I*) FARMER'S MARKET


APLIN FARMS
Tomatoes
U Peas *mSquash
i Eggplants
Peppers
Sunflowers Pumpkins

Open Mon-Sat (7am-6pm)
4 334-792-6362. 4


Fresh Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-352-2199
850-209-3322 or 850-573-6594
n. 4128 Hwy 231












HOME GROWN, FRESH




220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
334-793-6690 |


STop Quality Coastal Bernuda Hay
for Horses and Cattle- Large Rolls
Fertilzed & Weed Control
,o 850-209-9145 4-


S Young Sim-Angus Bulls
Top Blood Lines. Priced to Sell.
Call 334-898-1626 or 334-360-5035


CLASSIFIES


wuii TCFLORTDAN.com


I S & TG EPNI 0: O


TREES TREES
.^c ~TREES
.; 12 ft.tall 30 gal.
: ccontainers
f $49.95 ea. 10 or
more $39.95
Live Oaks, Crape Myrtle,
Cherry Laurel & Magnolias
By appointment
334-692-3695


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area,
No tract to small / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
334-389-2003


1 'f lI 'i' ^ .. ..~ "'... .
~ '"7''gi:' 1-1 U L ) te

(') EMPLOYMENT


City of Marianna has a
Administrative Assistant
position available for the Municipal
Development Director also:
Natural Gas Utility Tech
& Street Maintenance Worker
Call 718-0326 for details.
EOE/Drug Free Workplace Employer



Class A CDL

DRIVERS
Needed Immediately
Wiregrass Local Wiregrass Hauling
3 years min. driving history
with Dump Trailer Experience
Home nights
4 Appjy ONLY online at:
www.perdidotruckingcom
Perdido Trucking
Service, LLC
251-470-0355

GENE AL EMLOYM E 1


JANITORIAL
MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST
This is an entry level janitorial and facility
maintenance position.
VISIT FLORIDA, the official tourism
marketing corporation for the State of
Florida, has an opening for an energetic and
career-minded MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST
at the US231 Official Florida Welcome
Center in Campbellton, FL. This janitorial
position is responsible for facility upkeep to
include hands on facility cleaning, proper
use and care of the center's equipment,
handling incoming deliveries including stack-
ing and unloading of incoming boxes, minor
repairs, taking part in brochure inventory
process and other related functions.
Team-player ability required. We offer a
competitive salary and benefits package..
Deadline for application is October 18, 2013.


Qualified candidates will need to apply for
the position through VISIT FLORIDA's web
page www.VISITFLORIDA.org/jobs.
VISIT FLORIDA EOE M/F/D/V


Hooters is conducting interviews for
Restaurant Managers
in Dothan and Panama City market areas.
Position requires the oversight of operations
in high volume restaurant, including
employee training and development.
Candidatesmust have a strong focus on cost
controls and guest services. Benefits include
insurance and paid vacations.
Email resume to info
@hrgi.biz or fax to (850) 654-7043. EOE
T/^ RESIDENTIAL
^-L1j._ REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

Cedar Creek Apartments 1BR/1BA $500
Appliances, lawn care & pest control included.
Must be 62 or older or disabled. Call 850-352-
3878 or email cedarcreek@nchousing.net
CHIPOLA'APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND 1 BEDROOM
APTS. FOR ELDERLY. SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE ON ALL UNITS. FOR RENTAL
INFORMATION CALL (850) 526-4407
TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

h ti. HauwO t.of13
'UI


2/1 MH in Alford $360. mo. $360. dep.
850-579-8882/850L209-1664/850-573-1851
2/2 country&setting, Sneads-Grand Ridge area,
water, sewage, lawn & garbage include.
No Pets $400. moD+ dep, 850-593-6457
2/2 MH South of Cottondale Central Heat/Air,
$500. + dep. & 2/1 MH H/A $450. + dep. water&
lawn care is furnished, 850-352-4393/209-4516
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
,_ 850-209-8847 4w
2BR 1BA at Millpond $495 + dep. very nice,
water/sewer/lawn maintenance included,
o ,,access topond, Noppets 850-209-3970 '
For Rent: Greenwood Mobile Home Park, nice 3
br. 2 ba. home with water and garbage includ-
ed. No pets, no smoking. Lease $495 per month
$495 deposit. John 615-428-1518
SNEADS area N. of 90 3/2 remodeled inside on
'/z2 acre $500. mo. 1st-last sec. NO PETS
850-272-1351 or 850-482-2272
rt'^' COMMERCIAL
i -J REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

1000 sq. ft office space available in Marianna.
$700/mb including utilities. 850-526-3668
/"\' RESIDENTIAL
llj REALESTATE FOR SALE,.

Coffee County, AL 80 acres $150,000.
5 miles Northwest of Elba. Good timber
investment/hunting property with planted pine
and hardwood/creek. View other properties in
Coffee, Henry, Barbour, Pike & Monroe @
afmlandsales.com or call Chuck Mathisat
850-258-1605 Lic. Real Estate Broker

Beautiful Waterfront Home For Sale 4/2
on 1/2 ac. attached mother-in-law suite.
141 Sunflower Ct. Georgetown, GA $125,000.
seller will be pay $2500. closing cost.
See Pictures on:
For Sale By Owner Listing 23321125
Contact Donna Morgan 334-674-1157 or
missdmorgan@vahoo.com


RECREATION


ATVS, O CARTSi, GOL [_ F CARTS'
HUNTER's SPECIAL
S2012 BAD BOY BUGGY Michael Waddell Bone
collector series. #403 of 500
for sale, exc. cond $11,5A0. FIRM
334-687-8937 Leave Message


BOAT MOTOR 2003 Mercury. Outboard 15hp,
electric start & stick steering, exc. cond.
$1700. OBO 334-677-1147.

-,1 ~2009 Triton 7lr Tourna-
,'S^^ '' ment Sports. 50hp Mercu-
-'i' i ry. 3 batteries & 3 battery
S -j charger installed, GPS fish
L' S finder in cockpit, fish find-
er up front w/recessed trolling motor control
pedal w/71 Ib thrust. 24V trolling motor. Excel-
lent cond, housed inside. $9,000. 334-673-0135
21' Runabout, Cuddy Cabin 5.0 liter V8,2005.
Very low hours and clean, new custom cover.
Full factory enclosure. $15,995. 334-714-5433
Bass Tracker 1982 16 ft. 40 hp Mercury motor,
2 elec. anchors, 2 fish ,locators, new trollin
motor, just been tuned up, new water pump
w/ many extras. $2800. 334-618-1983.
Pontoon Boat 2008 20ft. G3 fish & Cruise, pur-
chased new July 2009, 3b gallon gas tank, fish
finder, 90HP, 4-stroke,,Yamaha engine. Exc. gas
mileage. Asking $13,500. 334-897-6929.
Stratos Bass Boat, 201 Pro XL w/Trailer, 2003
Evinrude 225 h.p.. (low hours), Trolling motor,
GPS, 2 Depth finders, extra. SS Prop., Built in
Battery Charger. Lots of Extras, Excellent con-
dition, garage kept. Must see! $7,995 229-334-
0224"



Wellcraft 18.7ft fiberglass tri hull boat, 115 HP
Mercury, good cond., Tandem 4 wheel trailer,
will trade for small travel trailer. 850-209-1064


CP &R : T[RAILERSi~ll A -
Forest River 2012, 28ft. Salem Cruise Lite, one
Er slide-out, queen bed plus two bunk beds, like
U5 G u e o Vnew, parked in Eufaula at Waterfront Fishing
O Campground, selling below wholesale, $12,000
765-661-3795


J__ACKS






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Jackson County

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CLASSIFIED


www 11F .fLORIAN.nom


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, October 2, 2013- 9 B


(to4 TRANSPORTATION
4'WHEELDRIV'
JEEP 1994 WRANGLER, 4 cylinder, 5 speed, 4
wheel drive. 86K miles $4,750 Call (334)695-
2945
ANTIQUE & CLSSIC VEHICLE
GMC 1979 Caballero Diablo in 2010 NEW GM
350 target engine, radiator, battery, gas tank,
water pump, 4 Indy 500 tires. Bench seat
recovered, red interior, silver paint
$4,995. 850-209-0526

S' iT Chewvrolet 2008 Corvette:
S Black, 6 speed, new brakes
and tires, 46.000 miles. In
excellent condition.
$27,900. Call 334-714-0770
Chevrolet 2009 Cobalt 2-door, 5-speed, silver in
color, less than 8000 miles. $8965. 334-792-3903
or 334-435-5823.
Chevy 1955 Belair 2-door, 350 engine, auto-
trans, runs great, daily driver $12,500. Firm
334-695-6368.
i Chevy 1992 Corvette Con-
vertible: Red with white
top, gray interior, power
windows, power door
locks and power seats, fully loaded, 71k miles,
asking $13,000. Call 334-441-6042
Ford 1999 Explorer: Eddie
Bauer Edition. All leather,
sun roof and everything
-& 4 works great!!! Good AC &
.. .. heat, 6 disc CD changer.
Only 110,000 miles..KBB value is $4,435. Asking
only $3,100 obo. Looking to sell fast so all rea-
sonable offers will be considered. 850-693-1581.
Ford 2002 Explorer: 8 passenger, green with tan
leather interior, bluefooth stereo, recent tune,
up and oil change, 212k miles $3,800 OBO
Call for questions'or to make offer 334-585-
5288 or 334-618-0857
Ford 2006 Ranger XLT Super Cab. 4 door model
V6/4.0 liter engine, power steering, tilt wheel,
cruise control, power windows, power dopr
locks, power o/s mirrors, AC, AM/FM with CD
player, bed liner, tpw package, new tires, new
battery, 34000 original miles, white with grey
cloth interior, floor mats. Excellent condition,
$13,950. 334-585-3891, leave message.
Ford Mustang Fast Pack V-6, 5-speed, Exc.
cond. metalic green in color, 229-861-2949.
GMC 2012 Sierra Z71: Quicksilver metallic
color, ebony leather interior, SLT trim, 5.3
Vortec, Bose, heated/cooled seats, offroad
package, rear vision camera. Excellent
condition. $35,200. Call 334-714-0770
~Honda 2008 Odyssey EX-L.
78.800 miles. 3.5L V6, Auto,
fully loaded, Aluminum
gray ext. Tan leather int.
Ent6rtainment/DVD, in-
dash navigation. Fold flat.3rd row seats. Rear
powersliding doors. Power windows,,doors &
sunroof. Good Michelin tires, fresh full synthet-
ic oil change. Clean title, clean CARFAX. No ac-
cidents or damage. Superb condition. Southern
vehicle, non-smoker. $16,875. .334-803-5508
Jeep 2004 Wrangler: yellow, soft top, 135k
miles, over $3000 in upgrades, 5 speed manual,
great shape $10,900. Call 334-618-4430
Jeep 2005 Liberty XL: Excellent Condition, 138k
miles,'gold with tan leather interior, sunroof,
completely loaded. $6,000. 334-237-1039
Nissan 2012 Versa. Gas Prices Going Up, Get
Great Fuel Mileage, $250 down, $250 per
Month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243
Nissan 2013 Sentra, Great gas mileage, all pow-
er equipment, AM/FM/CD, AT. $300 down, $300
per month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243


Pontiac 2006 Vibe, Low miles, Super Sharp!
$200 down, 1889 per month. Call Ron Ellis 334-
714-0028; .


Bikes (2) 1-girl & 1 boy 26" Huffy,'multi-speed
$50. ea Like New 850-849-3198.
English Sadie $150; Sadie bags exc.cond.
$60.850-482-4455
Mandolin 8 string $250. 850-272-2572.


Old Wooden Door- 36x80 w/Glass Panel $150;
Utility Trailer- 4x8 $350. 850-209-0593


Toyota 2011 Camry, Super Sharp! Low miles, .. ..... l
must sell, $200 down, $249 per month. Call Ron We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Ellis 334-714-0028. Running or not !
L mt CC - 334 794-9576 or 344-791-.4714
2003 Anniversary Edition 1200 Sportster
6,700 miles, like new 1-owner, garage kept, WE WILL BUY YOUR CAR OUTRIGHT!
matching helmet, exc. cond. $8000. Regardless of year, make, model, we have
334-726-1671. millions of dollars on hand to pay you good
Harley Davidson 2004 Soft Tail Standard, black money for your current vehicle.
9,300 miles, 1 owner, garage kept, mint condi- We Are On The Coast But Worth The Drive,
tion, $6000. in chrome accessories bought. & reputable, & we can give you a fair price
$10,000. 334-726-1671. appraisal in 15 minutes.
Honda 2006 VTX 1300RS: Call for appointment, dealer. 877497-7975
black,'like new,'water
cooled, shaft drive, only "0 L G,
7200 original miles $5,000. LEGALS "'
Call 334-648-6166

0 3 ,LF160249
Honda '07 Ruckus 670 miles. $1450. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTIH
3344798-0931 JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
SPORT UTILITY -COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION DIVISION:
JEEP 2000 Grand Cherokee 4x4, blown engine, CASE NO.: 32-2009-CA-000985
rest in excellent condition $1,000 334-232-4751 HN
S. ... CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
TRUKSBUSSRACORS f TRLERS plaintiff
i Dodge 1998 Dakota SLT, vs.
,Club Cab, loaded, cold
Sair, excellent, 120,000 SHANE E.JOHNSON ,et al,
miles, automatic, V-6. Defendant(s).
Price $4995. 790-7959.
"Ford 2000 Taurus SE, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
wagon, loaded, like new, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
.l one owner, automatic, Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated Sep-
3.0 liter V-6, only 35,000 tember 04, 2013 and entered in Case No. 32- '
miles, $4495. 790-7959. 2009-CA-000985 of the Circuit Court of the
GMC 1997 Sierra 2500 FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for JACK-
128K miles on new SON County, Florida wherein JPMORGAN
engine, exc. cord. black & CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUC-
silver in color. NEW tires, CESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE
cold air long wheel base, runs great & very 'LLC1, is the Plaintiff and SHANE E-JOHNSON;
clean $4500. 334-701-2596 located in Ozark AUNDREA C JOHNSON; are the Defendants,
a $ The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest
and'best bidder for cash at
NORTH DOORJACKSON COUNTY COURT- '
Nissan 1998 Quest Van : new tires and battery, -HOUSE, MARIANNA, FLORIDA
oil changed and tune up, great sound system, at 11:00AM, on the 14th day of November,
sunroof, luggage rack, whistle clean, great'me- 2013, the following described property as set
chanical condition, AC needs work $1,200. forth in said Final Judgment:
Call 850-209-1204 COMMENCE AT A 1 INCH IRON PIPE MARKING
THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST
WA D, DAUO QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF
____________ _ __ _SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 12
WEST; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 01 Mi-
1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF NUTES 38 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTER-
YOUR TOWING NEEDS! LY LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
q fl T2ai. ^ NORTHEAST QUARTER FOR 685.52 FEET TO THE
Gtw w tf POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID POINT ALSO BEING
AUTO BODY& RECYCLING IN THE CENTERLINE OF A COUNTY GRADED
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS ROAD (FAMILY COURT); THENCE NORTH 29 DE-
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624 GREES 06 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST, ALONG
ConacJso______a_34_91264_ SAID CENTERLINE FOR 669.50 FEET TO THE PC
-OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST
n CALL FOR TOP PRICE AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 138.48 FEET;
THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE
O JUN K VEICLES FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.10 FEET, SAID
FOR JUNK VEHICLES ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING NORTH 54 DE-
IALSO SELL USED PARTS AGREES 46 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST, AND A
IT CHORD DISTANCE OF 119.98 FEET TO THE IN-
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664 TERSECTION OF SAID CURVE AND THE NORTH-
ERLY LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
''..*ee.G..4ota a CI nker ; e THE NORTHEAST QUARTER; THENCE SOUTH 89
T DEGREES 07 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST H.
We'll be your Junker ALONG SAID NORTHERLY LINE FOR 435.53 FEET
TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAIDNORTH-
SWe buy wrecked cars WEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER;
pand Farm Equip. at a THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES.01 MINUTES. 38
fair and honest price! SECONDS WEST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY LINE
$250 & t Complete Cars : OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTH-
CLL 3347146285EAST QUARTER 605.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF
CALL334"-714-285 BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL BEING ALL THAT
.................. PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
WANTED Dogde Ram Charger 1990 or 1991 NORTHEAST QUARTER LYING NORTH AND EAST
4-wheel drive, 1-owner, low mileage, OF SAID COUNTY GRADED ROAD IN SECTION
well maintained !! not wrecked, no rust 34, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST, .
334-447-1747... .JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA .
Clean Your Closet Collect Some Cash A/K/A 2142 FAMILY COURT, COTTONDALE, FL
1 1 ,32431 .

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
From the sale, if any, other than the property
owner asof the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
yon September 11, 2013.
/s/ Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
.g wwwj loridanom See sitefor detai-ls.J By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
Refrigerator: Frigidaire $150; Freezer: upright,
Kenmoore $50; Microwave $10 850-482-3365 Publish in Jackson County Floridian
Invoice To: Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.
; P0.O Box 256 18
Silver Tea Set 4-piece, over 100 yrs. old. great Tampa, Florida 33622-508
condition $400 85-27-2572.-i Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
condition $400. 850-272-2572. F09106066 CHASEDIRECT-CONV-R-jzephir-
_,-.. -, .,. Team 3 F09106066
TV: 50" Samsung Plasma. Excellent condition. Tea3 .-F09106066
$450. Contact Reggie at 334-333-5187. Copies Furnish to: eservice@wolfelawfl.com


._ r .,


.Your guide, to gre gaoto

SINESS&
^^Jim^^^^^ Kjlbusinesses & set~c^:^

VICE DIRECTORY

Call 526-364 to plac y :. O._
~ .: Call 526-36] 4 to ,lae'y~oir~i


Affordable Lawn Care
Low Overhead=Low Prices
850-263-3813 850-849-1175





Dozer and Excavation Work
Ponds Road Building Demolition
Pine Tree Planting Herbicide Spraying
Fire Line Plowing Burning
f MAfl~l 850-762-9402
Clay ,ea l C'.1 850-112-5055
clayslandclearinggmail.com
AUOMTIES ERVCE

NEW& USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELOW RETAIL PRICES

TRIPLE






850.526.1700
Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 5 Sat 7-1
2978 Pierce Street (behind Tim's Florist)


ForA Your Home l0povement Needs
,New Homes & Room Additions Flooring ..
Painting Siding Kitchen & Bathroom Upgrades
Custom Ceramic Shower Specialist ePorches
* Pole Barns e Concrete Driveways Sidewalks & Slabs
Lic# RR 2822811487 INSURED

850-573-1880








"Beautification of Your Home".



- Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
"aBeautification of Your Home"
- Carpentry/Painting Installations
7Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured7
I Wilia iH. ongJr.(850569290


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**See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
'before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.
LF160252
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE JACKSON
COUNTY.PLANNING COMMISSION OF ITS IN-
TENT TO CONDUCT A PUBLIC HEARING TO RE-
VIEW THE FOLLOWING AND OTHER BUSINESS:
The Jackson County Planning Commission will
consider:
1. Hwy. 73 Mobile Home Park (MH13-00065) -
Proposal for'a 9-lot mobile home park to be lo-
cated approximately 1 miles south of the Ma-
rianna City Limits at 2388 Hwy 73 S'in unincor-
porated Jackson County. Owner, Troy E.
McCoy.
2. Proposed Land Use Change from Agriculture
2 (Ag 2) to Mixed Use Urban Transitional
(MUUT) 1.603 (+/-) acres located approximate-
ly one (1) miles east of the Marianna City Lim-
its on the east side of Panhandle Road in unin-
corporated Jackson County. Owner, Troy E.
McCoy,
3. A Request for a 300' guy-wire Wireless
Telecommunications Tower located approxi-
mately 2 miles west of the Grand Ridge city
limits at 5890 Hwy 90 in unincorporated Jack-
son County, Highwood Towers.
4. A Proposed Land Use Change from Agricul-
ture 2 (AG2) to Industrial on a 0.64-acre site lo-
cated at 5263 Dove Nest Lane in unincorporat-
ed Jackson County, Florida (Section 29, Town-
ship 6N, Range 9W). Owner, Joyce Henry.
The public hearing will be held in the Jackson
County Commission Board Room of the Admin-
istration Building located at 2864 Madison
Street, Marianna, Florida, on Monday, the 7th
of October, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Anyone desiring information may contact the
Community Development Department between
7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
at 4487 Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida or/
contact by phone at (850) 482-9637. .
In accordance with the Americans with Disabil-
ities Act, persons needing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this meeting should
contact the Planning Secretary at Jackson
County Community Development no later than
5 days prior to the meeting. The Planning Sec-
retary may be contactedat 4487Lafayette
Street, Marianna, FL, 32448, (850) 482-9637, or.
(800) 955-8771 (TDD).
LF160255
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
WATER USE PERMIT
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chap-
ter373, Florida Statutes, the following applica-
tion for a water use permit has been received
by the Northwest Florida Water Management
District?
Application number 1 07418 filed 09/20/2013
James W. Westbrook, P.O. Box 135, Bascom, FL
32423 .
Requesting an annual average daily withdrawal
..of 9,400 gallons per day from the Floridan Aqui-
fer '
System for Livestock use by existing and pro-"
'losed facilities
,General withdrawal locations) in Jackson
: County:. T06N, R08W, Sec. 16
Application number 107421 filed 09/25/2013
S K Enterprises of Northwest Florida, Attn: Will
Suber-John Suber, P.O. Box 245, Quincy, FL-
32333
Requesting an annual average daily withdrawal
of 513,000 gallons per day from the Floridan
Aquifer System for Agricultural Irrigation use
by an existing facility.
General withdrawal locations) in Jackson
County: T03N, R09W, Sec. 10B
Interested persons may submit written.
comments/objection or submit a written re-
quest for the notice of proposed agency action
(NOPAA) regarding the application by writing
to:'Division of Resource Regulation, Northwest
Florida Water Management District, attn: Terri
Peterson, 152 Water Management Drive, Hava-
na, Florida 32333. A NOPAA will be mailed only
to persons who have filed such requests. A
NOPAA must be requested in order to be ad-
vised of further proceedings and any public
hearing date. Written comments/objectionor
NOPAA'requests must be received by 5:00 p.m.
eastern time on October 18,2013.
No further public notice will be provided re- '
garding this application. Publication of this no-
tice constitutes constructive notice of the per-
mit application to all substantially affected
persons.
LF160251
TRI COUNTY COMMUNITY COUNCIL, INC
302 North Oklahoma Street; P.O. Box 1210
Bonifay, Florida 32425
NOTICE
Tri,-County Coummunity County, Inc., Board of
Directors will meet on Thursday, Oct 10, 2013
at 5:00 p.m., with Finance Committee Commit-
tee meeting at 4:15 p.m. Board Development &
Personnel Committee meeting at 4:30 p.m. at
McLains Restaurant located on 331 South in
DeFuniak Springs.

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"11OB WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2,2013


SPORTS


National Football League


Buccaneers QB Freeman says he has ADHD


The Associated Press

TAMPA Benched
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
quarterback Josh Freeman
said he has Attention Defi-
cit Hyperactivity Disorder
and voluntarily entered
the NFL substance abuse
program more than a year
ago after mistakenly tak-
ing a medication to treat
the condition..
Freeman said Monday
night in a statement re-
leased by his agent that he
has passed all 46 drug tests
he's taken for the league
since once using Ritalin
instead of Adderall to treat
ADHD.
The fifth-year pro was
benched last Wednesday
after leading the Bucs to
an 0-3 start that included
apair of losses on last-sec-
ond field goals.
Freeman said he has
been "prescribed and per-
mitted to take medication"
to treat ADHD for the en-
tirety of his NFL career.
"Let me be very clear.
I have never tested posi-
tive for any illegal drugs
or related substances,"'


S. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Josh Freeman drops
back to pass against the New England Patriots on Sept. 22 in
Foxborough, Mass.


the 2009 first-round draft
pick said in the statement
released by agent Erik
Burkhardt.'
The testing has been
conducted at the Bucca-
neers training facility, and
Freeman believes some-
one there leaked informa-
tion about it.
"Since the confidential-
ity of my medical status
has been publicly violated,
I am choosing to address
this matter so that grossly


Blue Devils
From PagelB '
quarter with an eight-play, 58-yard
scoring drive capped by an 8-yard
TD run by Josh Baxley.
SThe two-point conversion by Matt
Thomas cut the lead to 20-8 with
3:12 left inthe period.
The Blue Devils had a chance to
answer with a first-and-goal from
the GRMS 3-yard line, but a fumbled
snap was recovered by the Indians.
However, Grand Ridge gave it right


Bullpups
From Page 1B -
got some new guys coming
in to play on the defensive
line and we'll see what we
can do to stop that from
coming at us."
The coach said that Jaco-
rian and Tamerique Jones
will get an opportunity to
get more reps on the de-
fensive line, as will Der-
rick Gaint in an effort to
create a sturdier defensive
front.
"I want to try to get
some bigger guys to fill
up some space and get
some big tackles in. the
middle," Cross said. "We
just want some bigger
bodies in there. I think we
need a little beef in this
game."
Another player who
will get an opportunity to
shine will be backup run-
ning back Curtis Screen,
who steps into the void left
by the absence of injured
wing-back Werlean Pol-


Pirates
From Page 1B
can still win out their dis-
trict games and be in the
playoffs (with a loss). It's
not do-or-die for them. It
is do-or-die for us. If we
lose this game then we're
just playing for pride the
rest of the year.
"Unfortunately that's
where we'reat. We lost one
we feel like we shouldn't
have, but we lost and put
our own selves in this
position."
The Pirates will have
their work cut out for them
Friday against a GraceVille
team consecutive wins
over Wewahitchka and
Freeport by a combined
score of 96-14.
The Tigers are averag-
ing 35.6 points per game
this season and have been
pretty dynamic offensively
with sophomore dual-
threat quarterback Preston
Nichols surrounded by tal-
ented skill players like Jar-
ed Padgett, Eddie Myrick,
and Jarrett Brogdon.
"They're really fast.
They've got a lot of great
athletes, and (Nichols) is
as good of a quarterback
.as I've seen all year long,"
Thomas said of the Tigers.
"The only game they didn't
Really score a lot of points


erroneous assumptions
about me do not persist,"
the quarterback said.
"Like millions of Ameri-
cans, I have ADHD and I
have been prescribed and
permitted to take medica-
tion to treat this condition
for the entirety of my NFL
career. Well over a year ago,
I took a different medica-
tion for the same condi-
tion (Ritalin rather than
Adderall), and to assure
everyone that the error


back with a fumble on the very next
play and Ray Powell punched it in
two plays later from 5 yards out,, with
the two-pointers extending the lead
Sto 28-8 with 5:15 left in the game.
The Indians answered with a 10-
yard TD run by Bhxley, with the two-
point play by Jaylin Kenner making
it 28-16, but the spread went right
back to 20 when Powell returned
the ensuing kickoff 80 yards for a
touchdown with an incredible run-
back, weaving his way through a
plethora of Grand Ridge players and
reversing field twice before reaching


was a one-time mistake,
I agreed to be voluntarily
tested.'"
The statement said that
since entering the league
program Freeman has
passed every testhe's been
given, adding they screen
for "every drug and banned
substance imaginable."
The quarterback agreed
to testing at the Bucs com-
plex "because I spend all
of my time there and I
have nothing whatsoever
to hide or be embarrassed
about.".
Freeman, who became
the first 4,000-yard passer
in Bucs history last season,
was benched in favor of
rookie Mike Glennon, who
made his first pro start
during Sunday's 13-10 loss
to Arizona.
Freeman was declared
inactive for the game by
coach Greg Schiano and
watched from a suite at
Raymond James Stadium.
In a television interview
with ESPN last week, the,
25-year-old said a trade
might be the best so-
lution for him and the
team.


the end zone.
The two-point play Martinez ac-
counted for the final margin with
2:23 to play
Hall finished with 34 yards rushing
and a touchdown, while Graham led
the Blue Devils with 78 yards on nine
carries, and Cooley completed 3-of-
5 passes for 113 yards and a TD.
, Baxley led the Indians with 13 car-
ries for 68 yards and two scores, with
Kenner going for 48 yards on nine
rushes.
. Thomas completed 3-of-10 passes
for 38 yards for the Indians.


1.1"H', .Ulrlllfl: H( lHI~:lrl)M
Nicholas English tries to shake off a Seminole defender during a recent Marianna Middle
School game.


lock after spending much
of his team so far filling in
'for starting fullback Nicho-
las English;
But Cross expressed con-
fidence that Screen was
fully up to the task.


was against Blountstown
and not many people are
going to 'score on Blount-
stown. I think Blountstown
is probably the ,best team
in the state."
Sneads is averaging 25.8
points through four games
and has topped 20 points
in each game.
Thomas said he expects
that both offenses will
present major challenges
to the defenses.
"If you look on paper, I
think it could be a shoot-
out," the coach said. "I
think we match up with
them in a lot of places '
in the game very close.
They've been putting a lot
of points on the board and
we've put a lot of points
on the board. It's going to
come down to who gives
up more big plays, who
makes the other team drive
the ball and who is going
to allow the other team to
make big plays."
Despite the 1-3 record,
the coach said he believes
his team is close to break-
ing through and seeing
results in the win column,
but only if it can start cut-
ting down on the critical
mistakes in crucial mo-
ments that have cost the
Pirates dearly in defeat.
"We've just got to learn
how to win. We can't just
go out there and blow ev-


"I think he'll be able to
step and do a great job.
He's done well for us this
year," the coach said. "I
told him before the sea-
son that I need him to be
my every back. He knows


erybody out. We've got
to win some games that
were wars," Thomas said.
"There are just some little
things that we've got to
learn how to do. We have to
learn how to finish drives


every position and, he's
taken that role and come
in whenever we've needed
him to fill a role and done.
a great job. I expect him
to continue to do that and
have a great game."',


and learn how to win. You
%%in by playing perfect and
you play perfect by prac-
ticing perfect.' That's been
our focus this week, really
working on what we do
and making it perfect.":


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com

National Football League

Brunell to be inducted

into Pride of Jaguars


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars are
going to induct retired
quarterback Mark Brunell
into the Pride of the Jag-
uars, the franchise's hall
of fame. -
Team president Mark
Lamping made the an-
nouncement Tuesday,
saying Brunell will be
honored at halftime of
Jacksonville's Dec. 15
game against Buffalo.
Brunell will become
the fifth member of the
Pride, joining offensive
tackle Tony Boselli (2006),


former team owners
Wayne and Delores Weav-
er (2011) and running
back Fred Taylor (2012).
Brunell spent nine years
with the Jaguars (1995-
2003), leading the team
to four playoff berths and
two AFC championship
games. .
He says, "The passing
records, they get broken
eventually. The other
individual awards, Pro
Bowls and those things,
big games sometimes get
forgotten. But the oppor-
tunity to be on the Pride,
that goes on, that lives
on."


National Fbotball League

Miami
Dolphins
quarterback
~Ryan
.i~iTannehill
lies on
the turf
after being
sacked
Monday
in New
Orleans.


First loss leaves lots

of issues for Dolphins


The Associated Press

DAVIE The Miami
Dolphins' first loss of the
season makes their defi-
ciencies look a lot more
glaring.
Pass protection is poor.
Turnovers are a prob-
lem for Ryan Tannehill,
He's struggling to mesh
with $60 million receiver
Mike Wallace. The ground
game tends to disappear.
The defense turns soft on
third down. And the sec-


ondaryis shaky, especially
when it comes to covering
tight ends.
Those issues 'were evi-
dent mi earlier games, and
theybecame insurmount-
able Monday night, when
the IDolphins lost at New
Orleans, 38-17. The defeat
dropped them one game
behind unbeaten New,
England in the AFC East
standings, and Miami (3-
1) must regroup quickly
to play Baltimore (2-2) on
Sunday.


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1~~~~* ^o r& ilor

1-F P"a F'To' cts...

Marianna(850)482-5513


,Join Us for the Tenth Annual

Breast Cancer Awareness Symposium
Thursday, October 17, 2013


Teresa
oodpaster, MD
P.1 _-" ,: .1.: ,


Kirby I.
Bland, MD
lJ. I-,:n, ': -


Assembly of God District Activity Center
4792 Highway 90 Marianna, Florida

Resen-dauori Required Call (850) 718-2884 c' Cst cot Atend!








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