Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01178

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text
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VoL 90 No.203


Bullet pierces mobile home, hits dining man in foot


Shooting said
to be accidental
From staff report
Authorities have identified two
people who were shooting tar-
gets with rifles in a yard off Bevis
Road Wednesday night when an
18-year-oldman was shot in the
foot.
As of early Thursday morning,
victim Kelley Harlow was still in
an area hospital awaiting the re-
moval of the bullet that pierced


the wall of his single-wide mo-
bile home and travelled through
a bookcase before lodging in his
right foot.
The county's 911 dispatcher
sent officers to the Harlow home
at 4964 Bevis Road, Greenwood,
around 6:30 p.m. Family mem-
bers told officers that Harlow
was sitting at the dining table
having supper when the bullet
hit him, and several neighbors
told authorities that they'd heard
a number of gunshots around
the time of the incident.
The shooting was believed to


have been accidental, and the
Jackson County Sheriff's Depart-
ment is still trying to determine
whether anyone else in the area
may have also been firing guns
at the time.
The names of the two people
identified as potentially respon-
sible were not immediately
released.
Investigators returned to the
scene Thursday to determine
whether any more bullets struck
the home or any other areas out-
side the pile of dirt that the men
were using as a firing berm.


Determining that may help of-
ficials decide if one of the iden-
tified men is ultimately held re-
sponsible, whether a charge of
criminal negligence is appropri-
ate in the case or whether a lone
bullet ricocheted out of the dirt
pile in a fluke circumstance that
might not warrant a charge.
The bullet itself, once removed
from the victim, may ultimately
help officials determine wheth-
er one of the identified men or
someone else is responsible.
The men who were identified
had been shooting in an area


roughly 500 to 600 yards from
the Harlow home.
This is not the first time that a
stray bullet has injured someone
in Jackson County. Some time
back, a man was struck by a bul-
let while he sat in a funeral pro-
cession. Authorities determined
that someone who was squirrel
hunting fired the shot which un-
intentionally struck the victim in
that case.
Law enforcement officials
urge people to use extreme cau-
tion when using firearms in
recreational pursuits.


.VIUAIR-NNA FIRE D-PA1T1' IENT


Hot news from fire crews
-, :


william nail puts a fire alarm back
into place at the Marianna Fire Station
,,.-, Wednesday. ;, ., .-

Free smoke detectors,
Fire Safety Fun Day,'
new fire mascot are
ail or) the horizon

From staff report
The Marianna Fire Department
has 200 smoke detectors to give
away and install free of-charge on
a firSt-come, first-served basis to
elderly or low-income Marianna
residents. City dwellers who wish
to receive, one should stop by
the fire department between the
hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., any
day of the week, to fill out a short
form related to need and to make
arrangements for free installation
of the device.
The department also has 100
smoke detector batteries on hand
for people who alreadyhave smoke


F'H(,iTi e I 1i.1 Ai .R t itJIl FL'i If!tl fI LF
Elexis Collins gets a big hug' from Sparky the Fire Dog as the Marianna Fire
Department wrapped up its 2012 Fire Prevention Week Fun Day. ,


detectors but need a fresh battery.
Firefighters will install those. Resi-
dents who already have their own
fresh batteries but need them in-
stalled can also have a firefighter
install those at no charge for the
service.
A grant fromWal-Mart paid for
the detectors and batteries. .,
The supply of these devices
comes at an important time on the
fire service calendar, just ahead of
the Fire Prevention Week Oct. 7-
11. Firefighters will be purring on


safety programs at local elemen-
tary schools that week.
To kick things off forFire Preven-
tion Week, firefighters from both
the Marianna Fire Department and.
Jackson County Fire Rescue will be
participating in Marianhas' Fire
Safety FunDay on Oct. 5. The an-
nual event is usually held just out-
side Marianna Fire Station, but this
year will be held in Madison Street
Park from 8"a.m. until noon in
See FIRE, Page 7A


CURIOUS CRITTER


4


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


",'-,.:q

he cries of
unhappypigs
nearby draw
a small tree frog out
of its hidingplace on
a cattle trailer Tues-
day at the Jackson
County Agriculture
Center in Marianna.
The fussy pigs were
getting checked out
in anticipation of the
Oct. 22-24 Panhandle
Youth Expo.


FDOC: Malone,

prison stabbing

under investigation


Staff report
An inmate at Jackson
Correctional Institution
was injured by a fel-
low prisoner Thursday
morning. The inmate's
medical condition was
unknown as of late that
afternoon.
Misty Cash, deputy


communications direc-
tor with the Florida De-
partment of Corrections,
said by phone Thursday
that since there was an
open investigation into
what happened, her abil-
ity .to comment on the
incident was limited.
See STABBING, Page 7A


Seeldng mark


of distinction


-- r ..... r M K I I MI E/tFLuN IUDAr
The Marianna Airport and Industrial Park is one of the
sites being considered for industrial certification in
Jackson County. :

Third site moves ahead
toward industrial certification


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
A Gulf Power employee
was missing a key piece
of information when she
sent out a press release
Wednesday announcing
that, through a regional
economic development
initiative 'led by the
company, two of three
Jackson County sites
submitted for industrial
certification had made it
throughthe first phase of
the process and that one
had been rejected.
Around the same time
that press release was
sent, the certifying con-
sultant was notifying
Jackson County project
managers that the third
site had actually made
it through as well. After
initially being rejected,
the review area had been
pared down and resub-
mitted for review by the
consultant managing the


process. Some wetland
areas were culled out in
the amended submis-
sion, reducing the review
area from roughly 1,285
acres to just 235 acres,
and it passed muster
this week. But that news
didn't reach all the Gulf
Power folks in time for
them to put that fresh
information in the press
release or to. update it
later that day. ,
As a result, arelatedsto-
ry in the Jackson County
Floridan's Thursday edi-
tion erroneously report-
ed that the third site was
out of the running.
The matter has now
been sorted out and lo-
cal officials .confirmed
Thursday that the 235-
acre Spanish. Trail/Mal-
loy-Oakdale site near fin-
terstate 10 in Marianna
was moving forward to-
ward certification, along
SSee SITES, Page 7A


))CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B )) ENTERTAINMENT...4B


.. LOCAL;..3A


) OBITUARIES...7A


S)) RELIGION...4A


. SPORTS...1B


SWEATHER:..2A


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint


UR VOICE BEMEARD .,
Readers' Choice Ballot in this Sunday

FLORIDAN c


* 'f


F "?'.


.- I, -,, I I, .. I. ... ,- I -I LI v, L,, ,,1 I I I I I ILl
___ .... CDC says keep it up 7A ,

Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online 'n / :


JACKSON COUNTY




r..LORIDAN t


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


Today
A


9


Mostly Sunny & Warm

Justin Kiefer / WMBB


High 85
Low 60


SHigh 84
Low 600


Saturday
Sunny & Cooler.


High -;830
% Low"-650


Monday
Partly Cloudy. Possible
Shower.


FLORIDA'S
PANHANDLE
MEDIA PARTNERS


J.t mHigh 83
'' Sk^ Low 66


Sunday
Mostly Sunny & Mild.


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MITD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Low 2:27 PMf
Low 5:39PM
Low 2:32 PM
Low 3:43 PMJ
Low 4:17PM


High -
High -
High -
High -
,High-


2:47 AM
8:41 PM
3:20 AM
3:53 AM
4:26 AM


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
012 2 3>B I


iiLISTENjFORiHOURLY WEATHERiiUDAE


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
SPublisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com
Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
dQberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32448
S Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m.'and noon, Tuesday t9
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday.The '
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna. FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $1123 per month: $32 83
for three months: $62.05 for siy months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable stale and local la\es: Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance Mail '
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three month;
$92.24 for six months, and $184.47.lor one
year.- ,

ADVERTISING
., The advertiser agrees that the publisher .
shall not be liable for damages arising
, out of errors ancd advertisement beyond ,
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion el the advertise.
* ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shali be riot liability for noninser. ,
tion of any advertisement beyond the
-amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material ol any hnd Adverti;-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not'acceptable.

HOWTOGETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your newsor Community Calendar,
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan.orfices
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
. The Jackson Couhty Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


FRIDAY, SEPT. 27
) Hooks and Needles -10 a.m. at the-Jackson
County Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and
experienced hand crafters welcome to create, share,
learn or teach favorite projects. Call 482-9631.
) "Senior Singles" Meeting- 68 p.m. in the
First United Methodist Church southh Center, 4392
Clinton St., Marianna. New location. Ample parking.
Singles age 50 and older are invited for games.
food, prizes and speakers. rio charge. Donations
accepted; proceeds fund charitable endeavors ol
Marianna's Gathering Place Foundation. Call 526-.
4561 or 272-6611.
2013 Graceville Harvest Festival Beauty
Pageant 6:30 p.m. Sept. 27-28 at the Graceville
Civic Center. Friday, contestants will vie for the titles
of Tiny Baby Miss (0-9 months), Baby Miss (10-12
months), Toddler, Miss (13-23 months), Tiny Miss (2-
3), Future Little Miss (4-5) and Little Miss Graceville
Harvest Festival (6-7). Door admission: $5 per adult
* or $3 for children (3 and younger). Call 263-4744.
))Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. atEvangel Worship
,Center, 2645 Pebble Hill, Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcorrme hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856. 573-1131
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting- 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist .
Church. 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

:: SATURDAY, SEPT.28
) Union Grove Community Center Yard Sale
Fundraiser 7a.m. to 2 p.m. at 4517 Basswood
Road. Greenwood. Household items, furniture, and
food for sale. Vendor space available (call 594-4160,
594-6181). Fish sandwiches: $5. Proceeds benefit
renovation of old Union Grove High School.
)) Building Strong Families 5K run/walk and 10K
run 8 a.m: atthe Citizens Lodge Park, Caverns
Road, Marianna. Early registration: $25'forthe 5K,
.$30forthe 10K: Free 1-mrile fun run for ,ids 12 and
Younger. Sponsors: Tri-County Home Builders As
sociation. Big Bend Community Based Care, Quality
Parenting Initiative and Heart Gallery of North
Florida. For registration information call 209-0397
or 557-8139. ,
JCARC Fall Plant Sale Fundraiser 8 a.m. to
1 p.m JCARC. 2973 Pennsylvania Ave., Marianna.
Shrubs, trees, grasses, ground covers, house plants
and more. Call 526-7333. ,
Marianna Day -10 a.m. St. Luke's.Episcopal
Church, 4362 Lafayette St., Marianna. Blue Springs
Society. C A .R. will show St. Luke's Bible and offer


guided tours of the graves until noon.
Hobbs's FamilyReunion 10 a.m. in Sneads
Park. Sneads: last shelter byayground I
Alford Community Health Clinic Hours -10
a.m. until last patient is seen. at 1770 Carolina St. in
.Alford. The free clinic for income-eligible patients
without medical insurance treats short-ternm ill.
dresses and chronic conditions. Appointments avail-
able .call 263-7106 or 209-5501): walk-ins welcome.
Sign in before noon.
1 Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m.,in the'AA eoom of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna. .
9 2013 Graceville Harvest Festival Beauty
Pageant 6:30 p.m. Sept. 27-28 at the Graceville
Civic Center. On Saturday, contestants will vie for
the titles of Petite Miss (8-9). Miss Preteen.(10-11),
Young Junior Miss (12-13). Junior Miss (14-15),Teen
Miss (16-17) and Miss Graceville Harvest Festival .4
(18-21). Door admission: $5 per adult or $3 for
children (3-and younger). Call 263-4744.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 29
Kent Family Reunion 12:30 p.m. Kent
cemetery pavilion, three miles south west of Alford:
-Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion 6:30
p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna (in
one-story building behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking. '
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in
the board room of Carnpbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive. Graceville. '

MONDAY, SEPT. 30
Jackson County School at Sunland School
.Advisory Council 7:30 a.m. in.the Student Com-
mons room 6f the Habile Center, 3700 Connally, *
Marianna.Discussion: school improvement plan for
2013-2014. Call 482-9139.-,
j) Parkinson's Support Group Meeting Noon
in the ground-floor classrooms of Jackson Hbspital.
Lunch provided. Thoseldiagnosed with Parkinson's
and their caregivers are invited. No cost to partici-
pate. Call 718-2661. .'
))Jackson County Quilters Guild Meeting 5:30-
7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church. 3975 U.S.
90 West. \Marianna. Business rmeetirngs are fourth'
Monday: other Mondays are tor projects, lessons.
help. All quilters welcome..Ca1l 209-7638.
, Auditions 6 p.m. Sept: 30 and Oct. 1, Chipola
Theatre auditions for fall production, "The 1940's'


Radio Hour." Contact Theatre Director Charles
Sirmon: 718-2227orsirnionc'@chipoia.edu.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in theAA room of First Unirted Methodist
Church; 2901 Caledonia St.. Marianna.

TUESDAY, OCT. 1 '
)) Orientation Noon to 3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
STraining Center. 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for tree services. Call 526-0139.
D Optimist Club of Jackson County Meeting,
Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill. 4329 Lafayette St..
Marianna. ...:.
) Sewing Circle 1 p m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Manrianna. Call
482-5028. .
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in thrie AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
B Auditions 6 p.m. Chipola Theatre auditions for
fall production; "The 1940's Radio Hour." Contact
STheatre Director Charles Sirmon: 718-2227.
Marianna City Commission Meeting- 6
p.m. in City Hall, 2898 Green St., Marianna. Public
welcome. Call 718-1001.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist '
Crhurc:h, 2901 Caledonia St.in Marianna.. .

WEDNESDAY, OCT.2
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
SChurch, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna&

THURSDAY, OCT. 3
Chipola Civic Club Meeting Noon at The
Oaks Restaurant, U.S. 90 in Marianna. The CCC's
Focus is the local community, "Community, Children
& Character." Call 526-3142.
) Job Club 12-3 p.m: at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn job
seeking/retention skills; get job search assistance.
Call 526-0139,
Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St:, Marianna.
Call 482-2290. . .
i Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group
5:30 p.m. at Jackson Hospital Cafeteria Board
Room. Free to attend. Curriculum developed by ex-
smokers for those who want to become ex-smokers
themselves. Call 482-6500.


:" The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL32447,
S' email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


,. .......Police Roiundup


Marianna Police Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for Sept. 25, the
latest available report: One drunk pedes-
trian, one accident, two reckless drivers,
three suspicious vehicles, four suspicious
persons, one escort, one physical dis-
turbance, one traffic stop, one criminal
mischief complaint, two trespass com--
plaints, two follow-up investigations, three
juvenile complaints, one assault, two
animal complaints, one property check,
one assist of a motorist or pedestrian, one
assist of another agency, two public service
calls, one welfare check, one open door or
window discovered on patrol, and 13 home
security checks.

Jackson County Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriffs Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following


incidents for Sept. 25, the latest available
report: One accident wilh enfitrapment,
S. .'"one stolen vehicle,; one
reckless driver, five suspi-
1- u- cious vehicles, two escorts,
iCME-. one' highway obstruction,
'Ir J'VII two.structure burglaries, *
Sone burglary of a vehicle,
one physical disturbance,
two verbal disturbances, one pedestrian
complaint, two structure fire calls (one
residential, one with police response), one
vehicle fire, 16 medical calls, one brush fire,
two burglar alarms, one panic alarm, 19
traffic stops, one report of a shooting, one
civil dispute, two follow-up investigations,
one suicide attempt, one animal com-
plaint, 19 property checks, one assist of a
motorist or pedestrian, two retail thefts,
three assists of other agencies, one public
service call, two criminal registrations, one
welfare check, two threat/harassment com-


plaints and one 911 hang-up.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
periods:
)i Larry Brown, 41, 5962 Alliance Road,
Altha, felon in possession of firearms, viola-
tion of county probation.
SIssac Willis, 25; 3034 Jefferson St., Mari-
annha, failure to appear.
) Rhonda Castleberry, 46,23311 NW Black
Bottom Road, Altha, driving under the
influence, driving while license suspended
or revoked.

Jail Population: 202
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agencyTo report a wildlife violation,.
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


BAUA~BIEHUB4204 LAFAYETTE ST.
IUIRMARIAN NA. FL
CHEVROLET BUICK CADILLAC- GMC- NISSAN

SALES TEAM

(850) 482-3051


4 V


-72A ** FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27,2013


WACE-uP CALL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Sunday Afternoon with the Arts



Historian Cox to be featured guest writer


Special to the Floridan

Jackson County's own Dale Cox
will be the featured guest writer
at this year's Sunday Afternoon
with the Arts. He is a writer and
historian who is the author of 13
books on U.S. history. He lives
near the quaint community of
Two Egg.
A former journalist and me-
dia manager, he has written ex-
tensively about Florida history,
from the era of Spanish explo-
ration to the troubled times of
the 1930s. His books have
achieved critical acclaim and
rank among the best-selling
nonfiction books on history.
His books on the Battle of Mar-
ianna and the Battle of Natural
Bridge, Civil War battles that
took place in Florida during the
final year of that conflict, were
praised by critics as ground-


breaking works on Civil War en-
gagements. Civil
War Books & Au-
thors praised "The
Battle of Natural
Bridge, Florida" as
"informative and
well researched"
COX and Cox as "a skill-
ful constructor of
battle narrative."
Cox also maintains several
tourism and heritage related
websites:
)) www.exploresouthernhis-
tory.com;
)) www.battleofmarianna.com;
and
) www.twoeggfla.com.
Active in historic preservation
efforts and a popular speaker
and storyteller, Cox resides in
rural Jackson County near Two
Egg, about which he has writ-
ten extensively. He is ,the father


of two grown sons, William and
Alan.
He was named the Jackson
County Chamber of Commerce's
"Citizen of the Year" for 2012
and was inducted into the pres-
tigious Bonnie Blue Society for
Southern writers in 2013.
The ninth annual Sunday Af-
ternoon with the Arts exhibit
and reception will be hosted by
The Artists Guild of Northwest
Florida, Chipola College and
the Chipola Regional Arts Asso-
ciation on Nov. 3 at the Chipola
College Cultural Center, 3056
College St., Marianna, from 1 to
4p.m.
The nonjuried art exhibition
is open to all exhibitors of both
visual and literary art forms free
of charge. Exhibitors will have
the opportunity to share in cash
awards of almost $1,000, the
largest of which is the Kathy J.


Wycoff Memorial Award of
$500. The winner of this award
is voted on by exhibiting artists.
Other awards include a People's
Choice Grand Prize award and
two People's Choice runners-up
awards, a People's Choice Stu-
dent Grand Prize, and two run-
ners-up in this category.
Exhibitors and visitors will
have the opportunity to meet
and chat with regionally known
professional artist Keith Mar-
tin Johns and Cox, who are this,
year's special guest artist and
writer, respectively, -
It is a, free, family-friendly
event, open to everyone. In ad-
dition to hundreds of pieces
of beautiful art, visitors will be
treated to great music and tasty
food, and door prizes will be giv-
en away periodically throughout
the afternoon.
, Entry forms are available on


the Artists Guild Web page at
tagnwfl.org, from Sam Carnley
at samcarnley@gmail.com, or
by mail at The Artists Guild of
Northwest Florida, P.O. Box 1605,
Marianna, FL 32447. The entry
deadline is Oct. 1.
For more information, con-
tact Sam Carnley at samcarn-
ley@gmail.com, Larry Conley
at mattiepond@yahoo.com,
or Michele Tabor Kimbrough at
mtk4art@embarqmail.com.
This event would not be pos-
sible without the support of our
sponsors. They include Florida
Public Utilities, the Jackson
County Floridan, First Com-
merce Credit Union, the Jackson
County Tourist Development
Council, The UPS Store Marian-
na, John Brewer Studio, Tabor Art
Studio, Chipola College, Chipola
Regional Arts Association, and
Oglesby Nursery.


Officer suspended for
bra-shaking search
LAKELAND,- A Lake-
land Police Department
officer has been suspend-
ed in connection with an
incident in which he asked
a woman pulled over for
a traffic stop to shake out
her bra to see if she was
hiding drugs.
The Lakeland Ledger
reports Officer Dustin Fetz
was suspended for a day
without pay for misusing
recording equipment. In-
vestigators found the au-
dio on his recorder was off


r

S,!2 Jackson County announces nominees


S for principal, assistant principalawards
~O


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Simone Jeanty, from Haiti, sits in front of a photo of her
daughter Judith Valentin during a news conference Thursday
in Miami, asking for an investigation into her daughter's
drowning death.


Mother of drowned

Haitian migrant


searches for answers


The Associated Press

MIAMI The mother
of 'a. young woman who
drowned ,while being
smuggled by boat to Flor-
ida wants answers to- her
daughter's death.
Simone Jeanty said
Thursday she wants jus-
tice for her daughter and
is asking federal officials
to investigate. Judith Val-
entin was one of 10 people
who paid to be smuggled
from Haiti,' through the
Bahamas, to Flo;ida on
Aug. 28. She was hoping to
be reunited with her fian-
ce, her mother. said: Nine
people made it to shore
in Palm Beach and were
immediately detained by
federal authorities. Valen-
tin's body washed ashore
around the same time.
Jeanty arrived in South
Florida Monday on a hu-
manitarian visa to attend
her daughter's funeral. She
said the family has heard
some of the migrants say
Valentin was raped and
thrown overboard.
"My beautiful baby died.
No one can tell me what
happened to her. She was
a human being... a human
being," she told reporters


through tears.
U.S. Immigration and
Customs Enforcement
spokesman NestorYglesias
said the investigation into
the smuggling is ongo-
ing but that ICE could not
immediately say whether
the other individuals on
the boat remain in cus-
tody or are even still in the
country.
Ygiesias said ICE was not
aware of the allegations of
rape and/or murder until
Thursday, but that they
would fall under local au-
thorities' jurisdiction in
Sany case.
Palm Beach police
spokesman' Fred Hess
said his department also
learned of the allegations
Thursday. He said the in-
vestigation remains open
as the department awaits
toxicology reports from
the Palm Beach. County
medical examiner. Ini-
tial reports put accidental
drowning as the cause of
death.
Hess said he did not
know whether police of-
ficers ever interviewed the
other nine migrants re-
garding the. circumstances
surrounding Valentin's
death.


*Special to theFloridan -

On behalf of Superintendent Ben-
ton, please join him in congratu-
lating Carolyn Pllcher; principal
of Sneads Elementary School, as
the Jackson County School District
nominee for the 2013-14 Outstand-
ing Principal Achievement Award,
and Connie Brisolara, assistant
principal of Marianna High School,
as the Jackson County School
District nominee for the 2013-14,
Outstanding Assistant Principal
Achievement Award.
The Principal Achievement Award
for Outstanding Leadership was


established in 1988 to recognize
exemplary principals for their con-
tributions to 'their
schools and commu-
nities. The program
honors principals
who have spearhead-
ed initiatives to in-
crease student perfor-
Pl-cher mance and promote
safe learning envi-
ronments, often through partner-
ships with parents and community
members.
The Assistant Principal Achieve-
ment Award recognizes exem-
plary assistant principals for their


contributions to their schools and
communities. The program honors
assistant principals
who have utilized
teamwork and leader-
ship skills, to increase
student performance
and-promote safe
learning environ-
Brisolara ments, often through
partnerships with
parents and community members.
Jackson County has an education
system that is second to none, and
it shows.
Building a better community, one
student at a time. Congratulations.


Local & State Briefs


Stacy Goodson
speaks to Marianna
Kiwanis Club
Recently, Stacy Goodson
spoke to the Marianna
Kiwanis Club about the
details of his duties in the
Jackson County Court ses-
sions, as he is the Jackson
County probation officer.
SHe was introduced by
Jerry Glass.

Accordionist to
perform at Fine Arts
Series on Oct. 12
On Sunday, Oct. 12,
accordionist Beatrice will
be performing at the Fine
Arts.Series being held
at St. Luke's Episcopal
Church,'4362 Lafayette
St., Marianna. There will
be a reception follow-
ing the recital so you can
meet the artist. Donations
will be accepted for the
Fine Arts Series.

Appeal denied for
death row killer Gore
SMIAMI-A Miami fed-
eral judge has denied the
latest appeal by convicted
killer Marshall Lee Gore,
whose execution by lethal
injection is set for next
week.
U.S. District Judge Don-
ald Graham ruled Thurs-
day against Gore, who has
had three previous execu-
tion dates delayed this


year. Graham agreed the
Florida Supreme Court
was reasonable in find-
ing that Gore's claims of
insanity are unfounded.
Gore was sentenced to
death for the 1988 killing
of exotic dancer Robyn
Novick, whose body was
found in rural Miami-
Dade County. He was also
sentenced to death for the
separate slaying earlier
in 1988 of Susan Roark
in north Florida andwas
convicted of attempting
to kill a third woman.
Barring a last-minute
stay, the 49-year-old
Gore's execution is sched-
uled for 6 p.m, Tuesday.

Woman claiming
psychic powers
guilty of fraud
WEST PALM BEACH-
A South Florida woman
who claimed to have'
psychic powers has been
convicted by a jury of
multiple fraud charges in
what prosecutors called a
long-running, $40 million
scam.
Jurors in West Palm
Beach federal court found
62-year-old Rose Marks
Guilty of all 14 counts.
The Palm Beach Post
reports that Marks faces a
maximum 20-year.prison
sentence. Several other
family members previ-
ously pleaded guilty
Marks and other family


members operated out
of storefronts in Fort
Lauderdale and NewYork
City. Testimony showed
she convinced people that
money was the source of
evil and that they should
give her cash and valu-
ables to be cleansed and
returned. Most was not.
One victim was ro-
mance novelist Jude
Deveraux, who testified
she gave Marks about $18
million over several years.

Lead Gatorade
inventor honored
GAINESVILLE Gov.
Rick Scott has honored
the late Dr. Robert Cade
with the state's Great
Floridian Award.
The Gainesville Sun
reports Scott visited
the Cafe Museum for
Creativity and Inven-
tion and presented the
award to Cade's family on
Thursday.
Cade was the lead
inventor of Gatorade. He
was also a professor of re-
nal medicine at University
of Florida and described
himselfas a "physician,

rf "^


scientist, musician and
inventor."
. Cade is the 82nd recipi-
ent of the Great Floridian
Award. Previous honorees
,include sports figures, for-
mer civil rights activists
and military heroes.

Frop.local, wirre reports .


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BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
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4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT,


while taping the incident
because Fetz didn't Use the
microphone provided.
LPD spokesman Sgt.
Gary Gross said Fetz was
notified of his suspension
Wednesday.
Videotape of the bra-
shaking incident ignited
public outrage. Lakeland
Police Chief Lisa Womack
said in August department
policy required a same-sex
officer to do strip searches.
But the department's re-
view found the search did
not violate police policy or
the law.
From wire reports


State Brief


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27,2013 3AF


,. I . .


I


LOCAL & STATE






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BCF Announces


Missions Conference


Special to the Floridan

The Baptist College of
Florida in Graceville will
be hosting its annual Mis-
sions Conference Oct. 21-
23. The conference will
begin on Monday with
worship at 10 a.m. in the
R. G. Lee Chapel and will
conclude on Wednesday.
Special chapel speaker for
the Missions Conference
will be missionary 'and
pilot Michael Stroh.
Michael Stroh currently
serves as executive direc-
tor for the International
Association of Missions
Aviation and Director of
Aviation Safety with New
Tribes Mission Aviation.
Out of the 14 years of
working. with New Tribes
Mission Aviation, Stroh
spent nine years as chief
pilot and missionary in
Indonesia on the island
of Borneo. He studied
aerospace engineering
at San Diego State Uni-
versity in San Diego, Ca-
'lif., and has also taken
courses at Embry Riddle
Aeronautical University in
Daytopha. Stroh brings an
inspirational outlook on
missions to the Missions
Conference in support of
BCF's Missions Aviation
program.


S' / 4 "' SUBMITTEDPHOTO
Missionary and Executive Director of the International
Association of Missions Aviation Michael,Stroh (above) will
speak during BCF's Missions Conference.
In addition to the spe- their programs, share
cial time of worship and their vision of missions,
missions emphasis dur- and recruit for upcoming
ing chapel, there will be mission projects.
an exhibit area located For more information
in the student center about the Missions Con-
where representatives ference, please call at
from, mission agencies 800-328-2660 ext. 478 or
will be available to pro- visit www.baptistcollege.
vide information about edu.


Religion Briefs


Salem Free Will Tennessee.
Baptist Church Life Chain 2013 set
welcomes new Pastor for Oct. 6


Salem Free Will Baptist
Church would like to
announce the arrival to
its new pastor, Rev. James
Watters and his wife Jamie
along with their three
children Caleb, Thomas
and Abigail.'The Watters
family are coming from
Kentucky and are origi-
nally natives of


Life Chain 2013 will take
place Oct. 6 from 2 p.m. to
3 p.m. This is an interna-
tional hour of prayer for
our nation and a peaceful,
prayerfuil public witness
on behalf of the unborn
at risk of abortion. Life
Chain participant will
'stand and pray on side-
walks of major roadways


in cities across the nation
and Canada, holding
professionally printed
signs. Life Chain Marian-
na will form along U.S. 90
in front of the courthouse.
Life chain is looking for
people to be contact per-
sons for their church or.
organization and to make
phone calls. For informa-
tion or to volunteer, call-
Cap Pooser at 482-7674
or 372-3263.
From local reports


God, sex, worship and babies


ollsters have been
asking Americans
questions about
God, sex and babies for a
long time and the an-
swers used to be pretty
predictable.
Early in the 20th cen-
tury, it was easy to predict
which flocks of believ-
ers would produce the
most children with
Mormons reporting the
highest numbers, fol-
lowed by Catholics, then
Protestants and so forth
as fertility rates declined.
But things changed as
the century rolled on and
America became more
pluralistic and, in elite zip
codes, secular.
After Woodstock and
the Sexual Revolution,
it was clear "what re-
ally mattered wasn't what
religion you claimed to be
practicing, but the degree
to which you actually
practiced it especially
whether or not you were
in a pew week after week,"
said journalist Jonathan
A. Last, author of "What
to Expect When No One's
Expecting."
These days, people who
attend worship services
once a week or more have
a sharply different fertility
rate from those who avoid
religious sanctuaries. "It
really doesn't matter what
kind of services we're
talking about Catho-
lic, evangelical, Jewish,
Mormon, whatever. What
matters is whether you
show up," said Last.
The bottom line: An
activity that encourages
people to get married
sooner, staymarried lon-i
ger and have a higher rate
of happiness while mar-
ried will almost certainly
produce more babies.
"When id comes to peo-
ple having what people to-
day consider large families
three or more children
there are two Americas
put there,"'he said. The
division is between those


who actively practice

a faith,
especially a
traditional
form of
faith, and
those who
Terry do not.
Mattingly This is
crucial
informa-
tion in an era in.which
declining birth rates affect
debates about a wide array
of hot-button cultural is-
sues: from Social Security
to national health care,
and from immigration
reform to the future of
major religious groups.
The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
recently reported that
U.S. births appear to be '
leveling off, although
the numbers continue
to showsome decline.
While birth rates edged up
for women in their early
40s and throughout their
30s, rates kept falling for
women in their 20s and
among Latinas.
A key factor, Last ex-
.plained, is aspirationall
fertility," or the number
of children that parents
say they want to have. In
the early 20th century, a
clear majority of Ameri-
cans favored having three
or more children. Now,
66 percent of those who
seldom or neverattend
worship services'say zero,
one or two kids is ideal,
while 41 percent of those
worshipping weekly desire
, three or more children. If a
woman frequently attends
worship services, it is
much more likely she will'
have a larger family, if that
is her goal.
It's hard to pin political
or cultural labels on some
of the behaviors that
are inspiring so many
people to avoid marriage,
to marrylater, to have
fewer children or to have
children later in life. At
one end of the cultural
spectrum is the 30-some-


thing male whose solo life
remains focused on his
Xbox. At the other end is
the professional woman
working 70-hour weeks
while striving to rise in a
major law firm, even as
her biological clock ticks
loudly.
Of course, it also
matters that children are'
expensive. In his book,
Last examines a variety
of expenses and career re-
alities and concludes that
it costs about $1.1 million
to raise a single child,
with home costs and col-
lege expenses higher in
prime locations. When
living in New York City,
San Francisco orWash-
' inrigton, D.C., having two
children is "having a lot
6f children," he said.
"What's countercultural
in one city is normal in
another."
The bottom line is
that Americans who
choose to have large
families are almost cer-
tainly making "some
kind of theological state-
rhent," he.said. "They are
making countercultural
decisions and people just
don't keep taking specific
countercultural actions
without having some
kind of purpose, a larger
reason for what they are
doing....
"Think of it this way. At -
some point, you have to
ask: Am I the most impor-
tant or even the only
character that matters,
in the movie of my life?'
... Parents just can't think
that way, and the more
children you have, the less
you can afford to think of
yourself as the center of
everything that happens.
in the world.'... That's a
very important lesson to
learn about life."

Terry Mattingly is the diredtor'of the
SWashington Journalism Center at
'the Council for Christian Colleges
and Universities and leads the
GetReligion.org project tostudy
religion and the news.,


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^ ^- / *

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Alford First Assembly of God
1782 Tennessee St P.O. Box 226
Alford, FL 32420
Bascom Assembly of God
5516 Hummingbird Rdl
Bascom, FL 32423 272-7775
Shugroad@embargmall.com
SCypress Grove Assembly of God
3250 Cypress Grove Rd
Grand Ridge,-FL 32442 592-4451
cppressgrovechurch.org
Cords Of.Love Assembly Of God
2060 Bethelehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 272-0254
Eastslde Assembly of God Church
4723 Hatton St Marianna, FL
lop4664@yahoo.com 526-2422
El Bethel Assembly of God
2503 El Bethel Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 593-6044
First Assembly of God
5565 Brown St
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3351
First Assembly of God Church
4186 Lafayette St
Marianna FL 32446
482-2800 www.mariannafirst.org
First Assembly of God Church
of Cottondale
2636 Milton St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4626
Faith Haven Assembly of God
7135 Hwy 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-8205
Pilgrim Rest Assembly of God
3347 Pilgrim.Rest Church Road
Marianna, FL 32448 579-2300
WelcomeAssembly of God
6784 Messer Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5077
Welcomehometom@yahoo.com
BAPTIST
Alford Baptist Church
1764 Carolina St P.O. Box 6
Alford, FL 32420 579-2192
Bethel Missionary Baptist Church
2137 McLeod St
Cypress, FL 592-4108
Bethel Star Missionary Baptist Chu
4134 Lincoln Ave.
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4866
Bethlehem Baptist Church
2300 Bethlehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-9940
Circle Hill Baptist Church
7170 Circle Hill Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 592-2327


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West Florida Electric
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(800) 342-7400 CPA'S
74243 W. Lafayette St.
www.westflorida.coop Marianna, FL.
Graceville Sneads1 Bonifay 526-3910

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store Office Outfitter
4422 LAFAYETTE Sr. l 4423 Constitution Lane, Marianna
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526-3456
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JAMES & SIKES
Funeral Homern, Maddox Chapel
482-2332 '
Serving Jackson County Families
Since 1931


our Guide To Local Houses Of Worship
Collins Chapel Baptist Church Friendship Baptist Church of Malone New Galilee Missionary Baptist Church Trinity Baptist Church
5005 3rd Ave (5499 Collins Chapel Rd) 5507 Friendship Church Rd 2155 Highway 73 South P.O. Box 234 3023 Penn. Ave
SMalone, FL 32445 569-5644 Malone, FL 32445 569-2379 Marianna, FL 32447 482-5499 Marianna, FL 482-3705
.- .. .. .. ....... www.TrinitvMarianoa.com


Crossroads Baptist Church
Southern Baptist
3276 Main St PRO. Box 386
Cottondale Fl 32431 352-2636
Damacus Freewill Baptist
3700 Kynesville Rd..
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5878
Dellwood Baptist Church
5512 Blue Springs Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443; 592-6954
Eastsilde Baptist Church
4785 Highway 90
Marianna, FL; 526-2004
wwweastsidebaptistchurch.com
Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church
3360 Gardenview Rd .
SCottondale, FL 32431 579-4223
Everlena Missionary Baptist
5309 Ellaville Rd .
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3900
First Baptist Church.
3172 Main St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4586
First Baptist Church
5366 Ninth St P.O.' Box 98
Malone, FL 32445 569-2426
Faith Baptist Church
2494 Hwy 71 South
Marianna, FL 482-2869
First Baptist Church
8010 Pope St P.O. Box 246
Sneads, FL 32460.
First Baptist Church of Bascom
4951 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 97
Bascom, FL 32423 569-2699
First Baptist Church of Campbellton
2405 Hwy 2
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3183
First Baptist Church Southern Baptist
987 8th Ave P.O. Box 565
Graceville FL 32440 263-3323
fbcgraceville @ bellsouth.net
www.fbcgraceville.orgi
First Baptist Marianna
2897. Green St Marianna, FL 32446
rch 526-4200 www.fbcmarianna.org
First Freewill Baptist Church of Malone
5440 10th Street (Hwy 71 N.)
P.O. Box 385
Malone FL 32445 850-569-2786
First Freewill Baptist Church
7970 Davis St
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5400


Grand Ridge Baptist Church
2093 Porter Ave P.O. Box 380
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4846
grandridgebc@embarqmail.com
Greater Buckhorn Missionary
Baptist Church
4691 Hwy 162
Marianna, FL 32446 594-5761
Greenwood Baptist Church
4156 Bryan St P.O. Box 249
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3883
Hasty'Pond Baptist Church
4895 Hasty Pond Rd, Marianna, FL
Heaven's Way Biker Church
A Ministry of Alford Baptist Church
3924 Woodrest Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 334-806-4258
Holly Grove Free Will Baptist Church
2699 Highway 73S
Mariann, FL 32448 482-3489
Inwood Baptist Church
2012 Inwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 *.593-5328
Liberty Hill Missionary Baptist Church
5239 Liberty Hill Road
Bascom, FL 32426 569-5949
Little Zion Missionary Baptist Church
3181 Little Zion Rd P.O. Box 190
Sneads, FL 32460 592-1614
Lovedale Baptist Church
6595 Lovedale Rd Bascom, FL 32423
592-5415 or 592-2134 .
Marvin Chapel Free Will Baptist Church
2041 Hope School Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5375
www.marvinchapelfwb.com
Midway Freewill Baptist Church
1600 Church St
6158 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 592-8999
Mount Olive Baptist
6045 Hwy 2
Bascom FL 32423 569-5080
Mt.Tabor Missionary Baptist Church
S3695 Popular Springs Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 594-4161
Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church
5382 Old US Road
Malone, FL 32445 569-2049
New Easter Missionary Baptist Church
977 Hope Ave
Graceville, FL 32440 658-8344


New 'IosKle aptist unurcn h .
4252 Alien St Union Hill '
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-7243 3115 Union Hill Rd
Mw Inn ma wI R ntlt Marianna, FL 32446 526-5711
Nowu Hope Freewll Baptist I


Sweet Pond Rd
Dellwood, FL 592-1234
New Hope Missionary Baptist
3996,Wintergreen Rd
Greeiwood, FL 32443 592-8802
New Mount Olive Missionary Baptist
2870 Barnes St P.O.Box 312
Marianna, FL 32447 482-7595
New Salem Baptist Church
3478 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 579-4343
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
6687 Brushy Pond Rd
'Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5696
Pine Ridge Baptist Church
3064 Pine Ridge Church Rd
Alford, FL 32420 '
Piney Grove Baptist Church
2136 Piney.Grove Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3800
Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church
5481 Pleasant Ridge Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 263-8007
Poplar Springs Missionary Baptist Church
2662 Poplar Springs Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-3176
Providence Baptist Church
6940 Providence Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5481
pbch@embarqmail.com
Rocky Creek Baptist Church
5458 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-7508
Salem Free Will Baptist
2555 Kynesville Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4194
www.salemfreewillbaptist.com
Shady Grove Baptist Church
7304 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge FL 32442 592-6952
St. Luke Missionary Baptist Church
2871 Orange Street
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2591
St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church
1935 Jacob Road
Cottondale, FL 32431 263-4097
St. Peter Missionary Baptist
7889 McKeown Mill Rd
P.O. Box 326 593-3363


Victory Baptist Church
2271 River Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6699
www.victorybaptistfl.com
White Pond Baptist Church
P.O. Box 458 Mill Pond Rd
Alford, FL 32420 352-4715


CATHOLIC
St. Anne Catholic Church
3009 5th St P.O. Box 1547
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3734
www.stanne@stannemar.ptdiocese.prg
www.stannemarianna.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Caverns Rd. Church of Christ
4448 River Rd
Marianna, FL 482-2605

CHURCH OF GOD
Grand Ridge Church of God
2232 Porter Ave Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5301 or 592-2814
Marianna Church of God
(All services interpreted for the
hearing impaired.)
2791 Jefferson St, Marianna, FL 32446
482-6264 mariannacog.com

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST
Glorious Gospel
SChurch of God in Christ
4255 Clay St Marianna, FL 32448
594-1096 or 557-4019
Miracle Restoration Center
2997 Hall Street
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2335
Refuge Tabernacle
Church of God in Christ
2820 Chipola Street
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2607
The New Zion Temple
Church of God In Christ
1022 Washington Ave
Graceville, FL 32440
Victory Tabernacle
Church of God In Christ
6752 Highway 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 209-7711


-4A FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27,2013


RELIGION






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN 'vww.jcfloridan.com


Religion

Calendar

TODAY
Youth Activity Night 6
p.m. at Marianna Church of
God. Ages: 12-19. Call 482-
6264.
)) Revival 6 p.m. nightly
Sept. 23-27 at Friendship
Missionary Baptist Church.
Minister Stephen Andrews will
preach.
Once was Broken Now
Healed Conference Sept.
26-28 at the Jackson County
Agriculture Office Complex,
2471 Pennsylvania Ave.,
Marianna. Presented byTonya
Hill Ministries. Friday: Apostle
Nora L. Jackson, 7 p.m. Call
320-0582.
Celebrate Recovery Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome
hurts, habits and hang-ups in
a safe environment," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center with
praise and live worship music,
testimonies and fellowship. Din-
ner: 6 p.m. Child care available.
Call 209-7856,573-1131.
)) Pulse -.7-10 p.m. at Cypress
Grove Assembly of God Church
in Grand Ridge. Youth outreach
program open to all teens in
grades 6-12; shoot pool, play
Xbox and other games, listen to
music, more. Activities are free;
low-cost snacks for sale. Trans-
portation available (limited
area); call 381-2549.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 28
Car Wash Fundraiser
-8 a.m. to 1p.m. at Auto
Zone, 4606 Hwy 90, Marianna.
Sponsor: Rocky Creek Baptist
Church. Raising money to
keep church vans running. Call
693-4912.
)) Clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.
Once was Broken Now
Healed Conference Sept..
26-28 at the Jackson County
Agriculture Office Complex,
2471 Pennsylvania Ave., Marl-
anna. Presented byTonya Hill
Ministries. Saturday: Apostle
Jeffery J. Wooden, 10 a.m. Call
320-0582.
S))Annual Fish Fry and Skeet
Shoot 4 p.m. at Piney Grove
SBaptist Church in Cottondale.
The skeet shoot starts at 4 p.m.
The fish frywill follow. For more
information, cal1 352-3800.
Fall Festival 4 p.m. at,


PRAYER CONFERENCE FOCUSES ON SURRENDERED LIVES


Rick
Shep-
herd,
team strate-
gist of the
Prayer and
Spiritual
Awakening
Team at the
Florida Bap-
tist Conven-
tion, speaks
at the Annual
Prayer Con-
ference held
at The Baptist
College.of
Florida.


,, ,, SUBMITTED PHOTOS,
W ayne Barber, senior pastor of Woodland Park
Baptist Church in Chattanooga, Tenn., speaks f
W at the Annual Prayer Conference.


SLighthouse Community Church,'
Marianna. Featured singers:
Heaven Bound, Navarre. Call:
526-3452 or 482-8981.
)) Invitation to sing on musi-
cal program 6 p.m. Magnolia
AME Church, Marianna. All
choirs, groups and soloists
are invited. Call 594-4019 or
557-1259.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 29
Old-Fashioned Day
Bethlehem Baptist Church
in Cottondale celebrates with
Sunday school at 10 a.m. and
an 11 a.m. church service. Wear
your "old-fashioned attire." Din-
ner follows.
Fifth Sunday Sing -10:30
a.m. dt Marvin Chapel Freewill
Baptist Church, Marianna.
Featuring: Sheila Smith Trio.
Spiritual Emphasis Days
Sept. 29-0ct.2 at West Flor-
ida District Assemblies of God,
Marianna. Sept. 29 at 6 p.m.;
Sept. 30 and Oct. 1,9:30 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m.; Oct. 2,9:30 a.m.
Nursery for ages 4-12 and camp
meeting ages 4-12 for 6:30 p.m.


services. Guest ministers: Rev.
Rick Dubose, Rev .Thomas Trask
and Rev. Charles Crabtree. Call
482-2986.
)) Gospel Sing 6 p.m. at
Circle Hill Baptist Church,
Sneads. Featured group: Bryan
Brothers. Call 569-2215.
Fifth Sunday Night Sing
- 6 p.m. at Welcome Assembly
of God, Grand Ridge. In concert:
Mike and Dana Hammontree.
I '
) Revival Sept. 29-Oct. 2
at United Believers'Worship
Center, Sneads. Sunday at 6
p.m. Monday-Wednesday at
6:30 p.m. Guest speaker: Rev.
.James Lamb.

TUESDAY, OCT. 1
)) Dare to Live Healed Heal-
ing School Class 7 p.m. in
the BascomrTown Hall', 4969
SBasswood Road. Free classes
taught by Jacquelyn McGriff.
Call 276-6024.

THURSDAY, OCT. 3
Clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'


Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.

FRIDAY, OCT. 4
Youth Activity Night 6
p.m. at Marianna Church of .
God. Ages: 12-19. Call 482-
6264.
)) Revival 7 p.m. at Light-
house Community Church,
Marianna. Services Oct.'4-6.
'Sunday 10 a.m. Guest'speaker:
Evangelist Pastor Mark Her-
ridge Sr. Call 526-3452 or
482-8981.
Celebrate Recovery Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome
hurts, habits and hang-ups in
a safe environment," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center with
praise and live worship music,
testimonies and fellowship. Din-
ner: 6 p.mn. Child care available.
Call 209-7856,573-1131.
)) Pulse 7-10 p.m. at Cypress
Grove Assembly of God Church
in Grand Ridge. Youth' outreach
program open to.all teens in
grades 6-12; shoot pool, play
Xbox and other games, listen to
music, more. Activities are free;


low-cost snacks for sale. Trans-
portation available (limited
area); call 381-2549. .

SATURDAY, OCT. 5
Clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.
D Men's Fellowship Lunch 4
p.m. in the Lighthouse Cornm- .
munity Church Fellowship Hall,
Marianna. Call 482-8981.

SUNDAY, OCT. 6
)) Homecoming Celebration
-10 a.m. at Pine Ridge Baptist
Church; Alford. Music: Gospel-
tones. 11 a.m. morning worship:
Pastor Ronnie Wright. 11:45
a.m. Lunch (bring a covered
dish, meat will be provided).
)) 52nd annual Homecom-
ing 10:30-a.m. at Oak Grove
Church in the Parramore com-
munity. Singing: Sheila Smith
Trio. Dinner on the grounds.
) Revival -10:45 a.m. and 6
p.m. at Shady Grove Pente-
costal Holiness Church, Grand


Ridge. Guest evangelist and
singer: John Lanier."Call 592-
6203.
Life Chain 2-3 p.m. in
front of the Jackson County
Courthouse,.U.S. 90, Marianna.
This is international hour of
prayer. Call 482-7674 or 372-
3263.
) Reunion Concert- 3 p.m.
at St. Luke Missionary Baptist
Church, Marianna. United'
Voices for Christ Mass Choir
of Jackson County reunion
concert to benefit NAACP Youth
Council, Wanda B. Hender-
son Scholarship Foundation,
Habitat for Humanity, Jackson
county Community Helper's
Club, Covenant Hospice, the
Wright Foundation and Scholar-
ship in the Name of Unite
Voices for Christ. Call 594-3778
or 482-8752.

Special event announcements
for Jackson County churches are
Published free of'charge'each
Friday in the Floridan's "Religion
Calendar." Submission deadline:
noon Tuesday. Email items-to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,-subject
line: Religion Calendar.


IEHiDIRETR SMD OSBEB HS BUINSSS HOENOUAG AL F0s oATTED WRSIP0RVIES


a Vann Funeral Home
S 4265 Saint Andrews Street
yste , Marianna, FL 32446
ood stores 3 Phone:,(850) 482-3300
.. Fax: (850) 482-5363,
(850) 526-4700 Concern for the living,
Dak Station Shopping Center reverence for the dead.
Open Daily from 8amrn 8pm. ''.'..,.'... ,'.,: "


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3008 Jefferson Street
Marianna Florida
'526-2839


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.YOURGUIDE TO LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Marianna Church of the Nazarene
2987 N Madison St
Marianna,,FL 32446 526-3962 '.

EPISCOPAL
St. Luke's Episcopal Church
4362 Lafayette St I
Marianna, FL *482-2431
parishoffice@stlukesmarianna.org
www.stlukesmarianna.org

FULL GOSPEL
Christian Center Church
4791 Sheffield Dr P.O; Box 450
Marianna, FL 32447
526-4476 or 526-4475
jack@cccmaripnna.org
Country Gospel Community Church
Compass Lake in the Hills
650 Apalachicola Ave
Alford, FL 32420 (850) 579-4172
Resurrection Life Christian '
Fellowship International
2933 Madison Street .
Marianna, FL 526-2617 .
New Beginnings Worship Center
1165 Highway 69
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5791 www.nbworship.com'
New Beginning Outreach Ministries, Inc.
2254 Magnolia Dr..'
Cottondale,. FL 32431 (850) 352-4733
Evangel Worship Center
2645 Pebble Hill Rd
, Marianna, FL 32448 526-2232
New Life Family Church
4208 Lafayette St .-
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2132 :
The Bridge Church
2515 Commercial Park Dr
Marianne, FL 32448 209-2733

HOLINESS
Emmanuel Holiness Church
2505 Sandridge Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5167
Hickory Level Community Church
1221 Dipper Rd
Marianna, FL 32448
482-4696 or 482-2885
Oak Ridge Freewill Holiness Church
2958 Milton Ave
Marianna, FL 573-7684
Sneads Community Church
1948 Desoto Ave.- P.O. Box 1349
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5650

LATTER-DAY SAINTS
.Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints
3141 College St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-8159


LUTHERAN
Ascension Lutheran Church
3975 W. Hwy 90
Marianna; FL 482-4691


METHODIST
Bascom United Methodist Church
4942 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 67
Bascom, FL 32423 594-5755
Cypress United Methodist Church
6267 Cemetery Ave ..
Cypress, FL 32432 263-4220
First United Methodist Church
1111 8" Ave
Graceville, FL 263-3342
First United Methodist Church
2901 Caledonia St
Marianna, FL 482-4502
Grace United Methodist
4203 W. Kelson Ave
Marianna, FL.- 482-4753
Grand Ridge United Methodist Church
6911 l6wa Street ' '
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
Greenwood Chapel AME
5426 Fort Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-1112 '
Greenwood United Methodist
4220 Bryan St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-5755
Henshaw Chapel AME Church '
2370.Glastel St, P.O. Box 535
Cottondale, FL 32431 875-2610
Jerusalem AME Church
2055 Hwy 73
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5085
Kynesville United Methodist
2875 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4672
McChapel,AME Church
4963 Old U.S. Rd
Marianna, FL 569-2184
Mt. Shiloh AME Church
6702 Biscayne Road
Bascom, FL 32423 569-1044
New Bethel-Christian Methodist
Episcopal Church
2487 Highway 1
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-4647
Pope Chapel African Methodist
Episcopal Church
4898 Blue Springs Rd, P.O. Box 6000
Marianna, FL 32447 482-2900
Shady Grove United
Methodist Church
7305 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge, IFL 32442 592-9277
Sneads First United Methodist Church
8042 Church St, P.O. Box 642
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6481
fumc@embarqmail.com


Friendship Christian Methodist
Episcopal (CME) Church
5411 Avery Rd, P.O.Box 302
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-1111
1st United Methodist Church
of Cottondale
P.O. Box 458
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4426
Salem AME Church
5729 Browntown Rd, P.O. Box 354
Graceville, FL 32440 263-334.4
Springfield AME Church
4194 Union Rd
SMarianna, FL 32446 352-4252
St. James AME Church.
S2891 Orange St, P.O. Box 806
,Marianna, FL 32447 526-3440
St. Paul AME Church
5180 Hwy 273, P.O. Box 40
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-0333
Snow Hill AME Church
S5395 Snow Hill Rd,'P.O. Box 174
; 'Malone, FL 32445 '* 569-5315
Mt. Olive AME Church '
. .2135 Fairvlew Rd : .
Marianna, FL 32448 482-7917
Bethlehem AME Church
3100 Lovewood Rd, P.O. Box 752
Cottondale, FL 32431
352-2111 or 352-4721
Greater St. Luke AME Church
5255 11th Ave, PRO. Box 176'
.Malone, FL 32445 669-5188


NON-DENOMINATIONAL
2nd Chance Ministries
*2840 McPherson St .
Marianna, FL 32446 557-9885
Believers Outreach Ministry
3471 Hwy 90 W.
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4926
Cypress Creek Community Church
1772 Macedonia Road, PO Box 496
Alford, FL 32420 638-0360
Ever Increasing Word of Faith
Ministries
3749 Skyview Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-4704
Heaven's Garden Worship Center
3115 Main Street
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 579-9936 www.aidaspina.org
Faith Cornerstone Church Ministries
5460 Collins Chapel Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-5600
Foundation Temple Apostolic
Faith Church
3341 Tendell Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3884


,Glass Community Church
4005 Veteran's Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 272-7205 (850) 263-6715
Haven of Rest Church of Restoration .
Worship Center
2261 Haven of Rest Road.
Cottondale, FL 32431
Love and Restoration Ministries
2990 Heritage Rd
SMarianna, FL 32448 526-2730
Mill Springs Christian Chapel
1345 Mill Springs Rd, P.O. Box 83
Grand Ridge,' FL 32442 526-2519
Rivertewn Community Church
S(Meets at the new Marianna High School)
3546 Caverns Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 482-2477
Rocky Creek Tabernacle .
1890 Delta Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 272-0917
St Andrews (FC) Church Ministries
978 Hwy 71 S
Marianna, FL 32448 .569-5600
Sunrise Worship Center
.2957 Hall St, Marianna, FL 482-8158
PENTECOSTAL
Apostolic Life Church
4070 Old Cottondale Rd
Marianna, FL 482-8720
pastorbiggs @ embarqmail.com
' Apostolic Revival Center
of Marianna
3001 Hwy 71 N, P.O. Box 634
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3162
Christian Covenant Life Center
2011 Finley Ave.
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 592-4737
,Shady Grove Pentecostal Holiness
7541 Shady Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-6203


Sneads Pentecostal Holiness Church
2036 Gloster Ave
Sneads, FL 32460
593-4487 or 593-6949
Praise Life Ministries
7360 Hwy 90,. FPO. Box 177
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4166
Prayer Temple Church Of Prayer
For All People*
3341 Plantation Circle
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3343
United Pentecostal Deliverance
5255 10th Ave
Malone, FL 32445 569-5989
PRESBYTERIAN
First Presbyterian Church
Presbyterian Church (USA)
2898 Jefferson St
Marianna, FL 32446 .
526-2430 www.firstpresmarianna.org
fpcmarianna@embarqmail.com or
firstpresmarianna@earthlink.net
RESTORATIONIST
Church of Jesus Christ of Marlanna
4060 Thomasville Lane "
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2282
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
Emmanuel SDA Church
4531 Basswood Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3200
Marianna Seventh Day Adventist
4878 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2487
WESLEYAN
Salem Wesleyan Church
2764 Salem Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 (850) 593-6679
irquomai @ gmail.com


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 5AF


RELIGION





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


USDA to test new trap to catch Everglades pythons


The Associated Press

MIAMI Federal wild-
life officials alarmed by
an infestation of Burmese
pythons in the Florida Ev-
erglades have tried radio
tracking devices, a mas-
sive public hunt and even
snake-sniffing dogs to con-
trol the invasive species.
Now there's talk of snaring
the elusive pythons in spe-
cially designed traps.
The U.S. Department
of Agriculture received a
patent in August for a trap
that resembles a long, thin
cage with a net at one end
for the live capture of large,.
heavy snakes.
Researchers say Bur-
mese pythons regard the
Everglades as an all-you-
can-eat buffet, where na-
tive mammals are easy
prey and the snakes have
no natural predators. The
population of Burmese
pythons, which are native
to India and other parts
of Asia, likely developed
from pets released into
the wild, either intention-
ally or in the aftermath of
Hurricane Andrew in
1992.
Wildlife officials are rac-
ing to control the python
population before it under-
mines ongoing efforts to
restore natural water flow
through the Everglades.
According to a study re-
leased last year, mammal
sightings in the Everglades
are down sharply in areas
where pythons are known


THEASSOCIA ItC fI.' .
In this photo taken from a video on November 18, and made
available by the USDA Wildlife Services shows a python en-
tering a test trap. The trap patented by the USDA will test if
pythons can be lured into traps. Pythons are invasive species
that researchers believe are decimating populationsof native
mammals, especially in the Florida Everglades.


to live.
The Gainesville field sta-
tion for the National Wild-
life Research Center, which
falls under the USDA, is
preparing to test the trap
in a natural enclosure that
contains five pythons.
Over the coming
months, the researchers
will try baiting the traps
with the scent of small
mammals such as rats,
and they will try camou-
flaging them as pipes or
other small, covered spac-
es where pythons like to
hide, said John Humphrey,
a biologist at the research
center. Future tests may
use python pheromones
as bait.
"There's still more to be
learned, there's still more
to be tested," Humphrey
said. "This is just one of
your tools that you have
to put together with other
things to get the problem
solved.""


The trap was developed
to catch exotic snakes
without ensnaring small-
er, lighter native species,
Humphrey said.
The 5-foot-long trap is
made from galvanized
steel wire with a tightly
woven net secured to one
end. Two separate triggers
heed to be tripped simul-
taneously for it to close,
which should keep it from
snapping shut on such na-
tive snakes as the eastern
diamondback rattlesnake
or the water moccasin.
"The largest native
snakes are generally some-
what smaller than the
youngest of the pythons,"
Humphrey said. "That
was the impetus of the
design."
ThI longest python ever
caught in Florida was an
18-foot-8-inch specimen
found in May beside a ru-
ral Miami-Dade County
road.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This photo taken from a video on June 8 and made available by
the USDA Wildlife Services shows a python curled up in a test
trap at their research facility in Gainesville, Fla.


Humphrey developed
the trap in collaboration
with Wisconsin-based
Tomahawk Live Trap,
which is working on a li-
censing agreement to sell
the traps along'with other
snake-handling equip-
ment such as tongs, hooks
and secure bags.
"We don't expect to sell
a lot of them; it's not an
everybody thing, not like
a chipmunk or a squirrel
trap," said co-owner Jenny


Smith. But she said it has
potential for wildlife re-.
moval companies when
they get calls about "a big
snake."
It's not clear where ex-
actly the traps would be
deployed, or whether they
would be effective in an
area as vast as Florida's
Everglades.
Everglades National Park
alone encompasses 1.5
million acres, and all but
roughly a hundred thou-


sand acres of that is largely
inaccessible swampland
and sawgrass, vital breed-
ing grounds for a variety of
protected species.
It might not make sense,
or even be possible, to
place and monitor traps
in hard-to-reach swamp-
lands, said park spokes-
woman Linda Friar.
Traps have been used in
the park to collect pythons
for research but not for
population control, Friar
said.
Most of the state and
federal efforts aimed at
pythons have focused on
learning how the elusive
snakes have adapted so
well in the wild, and that
learning process contin-
ues, she said.
"They're so difficult to
track and find," Friar said.
"What we do know is
they've adapted. We don't
know how many there
are."
One of thie challenges
facing wildlife officials
is that the tan, splotchy
snakes are incredibly dif-
ficult to spot in the wild,,
even for seasoned hunt-
ers. Researchers say they'll
fail to see a python they're
tracking with a radio track-
ing device until they're
practically standing on it.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission allows hunt-
ers with special permits to
remove pythons and other
exotic reptiles from some
state lands.


Hillsborough Co.


affected by flood


insurance hikes


The Associated Press

TAMPA Hillsborough
County doesn't have a
single house on the Gulf
of Mexico and only about
2,000 that directly front a
bay.
Nonetheless, there are
thousands of other single-
family homes modest
bungalows as well as mil-
lion-dollar mansions -
that could be hit with soar-
ing flood insurance rates
under a new federal law
that takes effect Tuesday.
The Tampa Bay Times
reports the Hillsborough
County Property Apprais-
er's Office released a map
showing approximately
41,800 older homes that
until now have qualified
for lower, subsidized flood
insurance premiums:
Across the bay, the Pi-
nellas property appraiser
released its own map last
week showing that as
many as 33,114 single-
family homes in the county
more than one in seven
could face soaring pre-
miums as their subsidized
rates' are phased out. Con-
trary to a popular percep-
tion, most of the affected
-Pinellas properties are not
gulf-front McMansions but
more modest homes, some
of them well inland.
"I think we all tend to
associate flood areas with
the coastline, but the vast
majority are not out on the
coastline," said PatAlesan-
drini, director of valuation


for the property appraiser.,
Only about 2,000 of
the homes are consid-
ered "coastal" defined
as those areas subject to
flooding from waves on
Tampa Bay, 'Hillsborough
,Bay or Old Tampa Bay. The
rest are on or near lakes,
rivers, and even retention
ponds.
"They're absolutely ev-
erywhere," Alesandrini
said, noting that thou-
sands sit inland in areas
like Riverview, FishHawk
Ranch, Plant City, Bran-.
don, Seffner, Carrollwood
and Lutz.
"They just kind of sprawl
all over," he said.
All of them could see their
discounted rates phased
out as a result of the Big-
gert-Waters Act, passed
by Congress in an effort to
return the National Flood
Insurance Program to
solvency.
The Hillsborough map
does not show condos or
businesses, but they too
could be charged much
higher rates.
Real estate agents say the
law takes effect at a partic-
ularly inopportune time.
Travis Bell, an agent with
Keller Williams, notes that
prospective buyers used to
order home and termite in-
spections before thinking
about insurance. But now,
more and more are paying
up to $200 for a flood el-
evation certificate, so they
can get an insurance quote
before proceeding. ,


Lakeland police officer

arrested on 3 charges


The Associated Press

LAKELAND A Lake-
land Police Department
officer was charged Thurs-
day with armed sexual bat-
tery by a law enforcement
officer and armed aggra-
vated stalking.
Julio Pagan, 31, turned
himself in Thursday morn-
ing at the Polk County
Sheriff's Office.
Lakeland police Chief
LisaWomack said at a news
conference that Pagan met
a resident while respond-
ing to a call in July. Police
Records show Pagan then


returned to her home in
August when the woman
called regarding a problem
with her daughter.
According to the po-
lice report, Pagan pres-
sured the woman for sex,
and "she felt somewhat
intimidated because he
was in uniform," LPD
detective Paula Tolbert
wrote in her three-page
report.
S"There are simply no
words to express my shock,
my outrage and my dis-
gust," ,Womack said. "I'm
angry' for every member of
our community."


Woman who fired gun at husband gets new trial


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, A
Florida woman serving 20
years in prison for firing a
shot at her estranged hus-
band during an argument
will get a new trial, though
she will not.be able to in-
voke a"standyour ground"
defense, an appeals court
ruled Thursday.
The case of Marissa Al-
exander, a Jacksonville
mother of three, has been *
used by critics of Florida's
"stand your ground" law
and mandatory minimum
sentences to argue that
the state's justice system
is skewed against defen-
dants who are black.
The 1st District Court of
Appeal ruled that Alexan-
der deserves a new trial
because the trial judge
handling her case did not
properly instruct the jury
regarding what is needed
to prove self-defense.
The ruling, written by
Judge Robert Benton, said
the instructions consti-
tuted a "fundamental er-
ror" and required Alexan-
der to prove self-defense
"beyond a reasonable
doubt."
But the court also made
it clear in its ruling that
the judge was right to
block Alexander from us-
ing the state's "stand your


ground" law as ,a way to
defend her actions. That
law generally removes
people's duty to retreat in
the face of possible dan-
ger and allows them to
use deadly force if they
believe their lives are in
danger.
Faith Gay, one of the at-
torneys representing the
33-year-old Alexander,
said she was grateful for
the "thorough consider-
ation" provided by the ap-
peals court.
"We are looking forward
to taking the case back to
trial," Gay said.
Alexander had never
been arrested before she'
fired a bullet at a wall one
dayin2010 to scare off her
husband when she felt
he was threatening her.
Nobody was hurt, but the
judge in the case said he
was bound by state law to
sentence her to 20 years
in prison after she was
convicted of aggravated
assault with a deadly
weapon. Alexander has
maintained that the shot
fired was a warning shot.
The sentencing sparked
criticism from the local
NAACP chapter and the
district's African-Ameri-
can congresswoman, who
said blacks more often
are incarcerated for long
periods because of over-


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Email your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorialjcfloridan.
corn. mail them to PRO. Box 520.Marianna.'FL 32447 or
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zealous prosecutors, and
judges bound by manda-
tory minimum sentences.
State Attorney Angela
Corey, who oversaw the
prosecution of George
Zimmerman in the shoot-
ing death of Trayvon Mar-
tin, has stood by the han-
dling of Alexander's case.
Corey said she believes
that Alexander aimed the
gun at the man and his
two sons, and that the
bullet she fired could have
ricocheted and hit any of
them.
Jackelyn Barnard; a
spokeswoman for Corey,
said that the conviction
was reversed on a legal
technicality and that the
office was gratified that
the "stand your ground"
ruling was upheld.
Benjamin Jealous,
president and CEO of the


NAACP, called the ruling a
"welcome development in
a case that represents the
double standards in our
justice system."1
"Fror the streets to the
courthouse, race con-
tinues to influence the
judicial process, and it
certainly seemed to have
played a role here," Jeal-
ous said in a statement
issued by the civil rights
organization.
The state's "10-20-life"
law was implemented in
1999 and credited with
helping to lower the vio-
lent crime rate. Anyone
who shows a gun in the
commission of certain
felonies gets an automatic
10 years in prison. Fire
the gun, and it's an auto-
matic 20 years. Shoot and
wound someone, and it's
25 years to life.


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More kids protected from flu; CDC says keep it up


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON More
children than ever got vac-
cinated against the flu last
year, and health officials
urged families Thursday
to do even better this time
around.
Far too many young and
middle-aged adults still
forego the yearly protec-
tion, the Centers for Dis-
ease Control and Preven-
tion warned.
And this year, Americans
have an unprecedented
number of vaccine options
to choose from: The regu-
lar shot; the nasal. spray;
an egg-free shot for those
allergic to eggs; a high-
dose shot just for those
65 and older; and a tiny-
needle shot for the squea-
mish. The. bigger change:
A small number of the
Regular flu shots, and all of
the FluMist nasal vaccine,
will protect against four
strains of influenza rather
than the traditional three.
"There's something for
everyone this year," said
CDC's Dr. Anne Schuchat.
A severe flu strain swept
the country last' winter,
sparking: a scramble, for
last-minute vaccinations.
There's no way to predict if
this year will be as bad. But
it takes about two weeks
for the vaccine to take ef-
fect, so 'health officials


S". THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
This 2012 photo shows a flu shot administered in.,Jackson, Miss. More children than ever got
vaccinated against the flu last year, and health officials are urging families to do even better
this time around. A severe flu strain swept the country last winter, sparking a scramble for
last-minute vaccinations. There's no way to predict if this year will be as bad.


say early fall before flu
begins spreading widely
- is the best time to start
immunizations.
"Now is the time to get
vaccinated," said Dr. Paul
Biddinger of Massachu-
setts General Hospital in
Boston. "Don't wait until
it's in your community." .
'Boston declared a public
health emergency last Jan-
uiary when hospitals were
filled with flu patients,
and Biddinger said he
treated many who openly
regretted not having been
vaccinated. '


January and February
typically are the peak flu
months in the U.S. But
small numbers of flu cases
circulate for much of the
year, and Biddinger said
a couple of people have
been hospitalized already.
"That first cough or fe-
ver is not the time to think
about influenza vaccine,"
Schuchat said.
Flu vaccine is recom-
mended for nearly every-
one ages six months and
older. Yet just 45 percent
of the population followed
that advice last year. Flu is


particularly risky for se-
niors, children, pregnant
women and people of any
age with asthma, heart
disease and other chronic
diseases.
Two-thirds of adults 65
andolder were vaccinated
last year. So were nearly
57 percent of children, an
increase of 13 percentage
points over the past two
years. The number is even
higher among babies and
toddlers 77 percent -
and Schuchat said pedia-
tricians get the credit for
pushing flu vaccination in


recent years.
About half of pregnant
women are vaccinated, a
number also on the rise
since the 2009 flu pan-
demic illustrated that
population's vulnerability.
But only 42 percent
of adults younger than
65 were vaccinated,
Schuchat said, with rates
even lower among 18- to
49-year-olds.
It's not clear why. But
"there are no good rea-
sons to skip the influenza
vaccine,",' said Dr. Wil-
liam Schaffner of Vander-
bilt University and past
president of the National
Foundation for Infectious
Diseases.
The flu shot cannot give
anyone.the flu, tie stressed.
But while it's estimated to
cut by about 60 percent
the chances of getting the
flu, Schaffner said it's "a
good vaccine, but it's not a
perfect vaccine."'
How to choose among
the vaccine options, in-
cluding the new four-
strain version? The CDC
doesn't recommend' one
type of flu vaccine over an-
other. All flu vaccine pro-
tects against two strains"
of Type A flu, typically the
most severe kind, and one
strain of Type B., The new
so-called quadrivalent
versions protect against
two Type B strains.


Health law online sign-up delayed for small firms


'The Associated Press


WASHINGTON Days
before the. debut* of new
online insurance markets,
a couple of last-minute
technical glitches with
President Barack Obama's
health care law are making
supporters anxious and
giving opponents a new
line of attack.
The administration said
Thursday that small busi-
ness owners who want
,to use insurance markets This Al
designed especially for federal
them will have to wait un- ting cov
til' sometime in. Novem- law mij
ber before they can finish making
their sign-ups, They can eligible
still start shopping right 4 milli
away on Oct. 1. And even Spanis]
with the' delay, they can "It's
get coverage for their erm- ,years s
ployees byJan. 1, when the that L
law takes full effect. mary
In- a' potentially more ment
significant delay affecting fordab]
the law's larger insurance -would
market for individuals, the adn
the administration quietly have
told Hispanic groups on on Da
Wednesday that the Span- fer Ng
ish-language version of policy
the healthcare.govwebsite tional
will not be ready to handle That si
online enrollments for a her gre
few weeks. An estimated takes a
10 million Latinos are get thin


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
april 30, photo shows the short form for the new
Affordable Care Act application in Washington, Get-
vered through President Barack Obama's health care
ght feel like a combination of doing your taxes and
a big purchase that requires some research.
for coverage,' and Meanwhile, a politically
on of them speak powerful small business
h primarily, lobby that unsuccess-
been at least two fully sued to overturn
since we've known "Obamacare'. said the
atinos are a pri- enrollment delay for' em-
target for enroll- players strengthens the
through, the Af- case -for hitting pause on
le Care Act, so we the entire law, one of the
have hoped that strategies now being pur-
ministration would sued by congressional
the rollout -ready Republicans.
1y L," said Jenni- "Everystep in the imple-
'andu, health care mentation process has
director for the Na- seen delays and setbacks,"
Council of La Raza. Kevin Kuhlman, a top of-
aid, she added that ficial of the National Fed-
up won't object if it eration of Independent
Sfew more weeks to Business, said in a state-
ngs right, meant. "This is starting to


seem like a parody; un-
fortunately, it is extremely
serious."
New state insurance
markets for individuals
who don't have coverage
on the job, and separate
ones for small businesses
with up to 100 workers,
are a key part of Obama's
health care overhaul.
, Scheduled to open Oct.
1 next Tuesday the
markets are supposed to
offer a cohsumer-friendly
way to buy health insur-
ance while forcing insurers
to compete for business.
Consumers can apply on-
line, through a call center,
in person, or through the
mail.
The markets for individ-
ual consumers called
exchanges' in some states
- will offer tax credits to
make premiums more af-
fordable. Tax credits are
also available for some
businesses, generally
smaller firms employing
low-wage workers.
Largely because of Re-
publican opposition to the
law, the federal govern-
ment had to take the lead
in setting up markets in 36
states a development
unforeseen when the law
was passed. The delays


announced this week af-
fect the federal markets,
and some states running
their own' may have full
small business enrollment
and Spanish-language
capabilities.
Gary Cohen, the 'Health
and Human Services' de-
partnient official oversee-
ing the rollout, said small
business owners in states
with federally-run, mar-
kets will still be able to go
online Oct. 1 and compare
their health insurance
options.
They can get the process
going by filling out a form
that will have to be trans-
mitted separately by mail,
fax, or as an email attach-
ment. HHS will upload the
information into the gov-
ernment's computer sys-
tems. The businesses will
have to wait until some-
time in November to final-
ize their applications.
"We wanted to make
sure this was goingto work
properly .and be .effective
for small businesses," Co-
hen said in an interview.
"We, just felt like taking
the additional time to
make sure everything was
functioning the way we
wanted was the right thing
to do."


Feds direct $100M in grants to help broke Detroit


TheAsociatediPre.. '. administration scrounged
: .. through the federal bud-
DETROIT The U.S.. get an4 found untapped
government directed more money thai "either had not
than $100 million in grants. flowed or had not gotten
Thursday to help bank- out or not directed to the
rupt Detroit tear down top priorities for. Detroit."
vacant buildings and spur But considering the Mo-
job growth, but the help, tor City is at least $18 bil-
falls far short of the wider lion ii debt, 'it will take a
bailout, some city leaders far larger infusion of cash
had sought. or historic deals with bond
Gene Sperling, chief eco- holders, insurance com-
nomic adviser to President panies and other creditors.
Barack Obama, said'. the to correct the problem',


Si tes anna/Jackson Counry
Sis Distribution Park and
r- .. : Construction Services':
From Page lA Park, and the 1,600-acre
with the two other lo- Marianna Airport Com-
cal sites already known merce Park. Local officials
to be in-the group of 12 have one year to achieve
Northwest Florida sites certain benchmarks to
still in play for possible complete the certification
certification through process for official des-
an initiative led by Gulf ignation as an industry-
Power. ready site.
The ,Other two Jackson" Having such distinction
County sites are a 500- could make the differ-
acre parcel in the Mari- ence as industries look for


Sperling will join on
Friday in Detroit three
other top Obama aides
- U.S. Attorney General
Eric Holder, Transporta-
tion Secretary Anthony
Foxx and. HUD Secretary
Shauh Donovan. The
closed meeting also will
include city and state lead-
ers, .and the emergency
manager leading Detroit
through the largest mu-
nicipal bankruptcy in U.S.


'history. ',


The Obama administra-
tion has repeatedly sig-
naled it won't offer a mas-
sive federal bailout like the
one credited with helping
rescue Chrysler and Gen-
eral Motors.
"There is not going to
be a bailout," Democratic
U.S. Sen. Carl Levin told
The Associated Press on
Wednesday. "We have
enough problems with the
federal deficit. We need to
be creative and look at ex-


places to set up shop. tion to purchase the en-
Only one other county tire 1,285-acre Spanish
has more sites still in the' Trail/Malloy-Oakdale site
running Santa Rosa andthat it, will, on its own,
County has four, Bay 'pursue certification of the
County, has two, and the remaining area at a later
counties of Escambia, date. Stanton said that,
Walton and Okaloosa have. because of- the wetlands
one each. Walton may see issues, the consultant
a second site join that list didn't think that mitiga-
in October. tion could occur in time
Jackson County Devel- to meet the deadline for
opment Council Director certification of the full par-
Bill Stanton said Thurs- cel under the Gulf Power
day that JCDC has an op- initiative.


listing programs. There are
still some funds there."
The funding announced
by Sperling will include
$65 million in Com-
munity. Development
Block Grants for blight
eradication, $25 million
in a public-private col-
laboration for commer-
cial building demolition
and nearly $11 million in
funds to ensure working
families can live in safe
neighborhoods.


But Stanton said that,
with more time to work,
he feels that certification
is independently achiev-
able through the same
consultant being used
by Gulf Power, the inter-
nationally recognized
firm of McCallum Swee-
ny. In its option. to pur-
chase the property, JCDC
has 30 months to get the
property certified in or-
der to satisfy the contract
terms.


Stabbing
From Page 1A
"There was an incident
this morning at. JCI, she
,.said.
"It appears that there was
a stabbing of some sort."
Cash went on to confirm
that it was an inmate at
the facility who had been
injured, but could not de-
scribe that person's current
medical condition or the
severity of the injuries. She
also said another inmate
had inflicted the wound or
wounds, but did not indi-
cate, if any other' prisoners
had been involved inh the
incident.
The investigation will be
handled by FDOC.
JCI Warden John Barfield
confirmed via email Thurs-
day evening that the in-
mate who was stabbed is
expected to recover from
the injuries.'


Fire
From Page 1A
conjunction with Pump-
kins in the Park, a pre-Hal-
loween event for children
which is put on by the Jack-
son County Growers Asso-
ciation. Kids get to select
their own pumpkin to dec-
orate and take home. There
will be a bounce house, an
inflatable slide and other
fun and games for the kids.
All events are free.
A Jackson County Fire
Rescue crew-: will also be
there with their new fire
safety education trailer,
allowing children to walk
through and experience
some of the smoke and fire
safety scenarios that can be
created in the state-of-the-
art educational lab. A car
cutaway will be on display
to illustrate the concepts
involved in extrication.
Smokey Bear will: make
an appearance at the
event, along with Sparky
the Fire Dog and McGruff
the Crime Dog.
The'Marianna Fire De-
partment is'also conduct-
ing a "name our mascot",
and coloring contest at
Golson Elementary School,
with all final entries being
turned in today. .The fire
department has in the past
borrowed the Sparky mas-
cot costume, from JCFR
for certain special city fire
education but has now
purchased its'.own mascot.
Kids who participated in
the mascot coloring con-
test also wrote a suggested
name for the mascot on
their coloring sheets. The
MFD will name and recog-
nize the winner of the col-
oring contest and the win-.
ner of the naming contest
Sat the November meeting
of the Marianna City Com-
mission. The winners get
a $25 gift certificate to the
Milk and Honey yogurt
shop.


Obituaries

There were no
obituaries or
death notices
submitted to the
Floridan as of the
deadline at4 p.m.
yesterday.



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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN *. www.jcfloridan.com


S, .. THEASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo provided by the Janes family, shows West-
fleld-Brocton high school football player Damon Janes.A west-
ern New.York school district has canceled the remainder of its
varsity football season in the aftermath of Janes' death. Janes
took what hospital officials would later describe as a "helmet-
to-helmet" hit in their Sept. 13 game against Portville. He died
three days later at Women & Childrens Hospital in Buffalo.


NY school team


calls itquits after


football death


The Associated Press

S BROCTON, N.Y. -It was
a question with no right
Answer that tugged heav-
ily at the hearts of Damon
Janes' teammates when
the 16-year-old died after a
Shit in high school football
Game: Should the season
goon?
Should the players rally
and play every game for
their star running back,
whose motto was, "Giving
up is simply not an op-
tion"? Or should the teen-
agers forget about football
and take time to ,mourn
their friend?
SThe Westfield-Brocton
Wolverines' varsity players
took a paper-ballot vote
and decided that the pain
was too great, that their
season would end after
just two games.
"I wanted to play, I love
the game," said teammate
StevieWisecarver III, a 16-
year-old quarterback who
has played football since
third grade. "But it just
wouldn't feel right without
him. The team just didn't
Feel right."
Added 17-year-old senior
coinerbackJoeyVillafrank:
"It feels like there's more to
life.: Before, football used
to be life for me; it was.the
only sport I played. But
Snow I realize that there's
more than just playing the
game." '
It's a grief that's spread
through the clog'-knit vil-
lages of Brocton and West-
field, tucked' amid grape
farms about an hour's drive
south of Buffalo, where the
once-rival high schools
were forced to combine
their teams three seasons
ago because of budget
cuts.
STownspeople have held
vigils, lighted candies and
released balloons. They've
stayed- up nights mak-
ing ribbons and cook-
ies as fundraisers for the
Janes family. The Green
Arch Restaurant is con-
tributing apple pies. Hair
salons are dyeing streaks
of blue and green, reflect-
ing Westfield's';school col-
ors of blue and white and
Brocton's of green. Memo-
rial T-shirts with Damon's
motto are being printed.
And a spaghetti dinner
benefit at the Nickel Plate
Depot planned for Sun-
day is expected to draw
hundreds.
"It's.just a tragic thing
that happened," 71-year-
old Harold Montague said
as he finished his coffee at
the Green Arch, recalling
a' procession for Damon's
funeral that stretched for
more than a mile and a
half. 'A lot's been done that
,I've never seen before."


Damon took what' hos-
pital officials would later
describe as a "helmet-to-
helmet" hit during the
third quarter of Westfield-
Brocton's Sept. 13 game
against Portville, a 32-6
loss. He was able to get on
his feet but lost conscious-
ness on the sidelines. He
died three days later at
Women"'& Children's Hos-
pital in Buffalo. An exact
cause of death has not
been released.
In his obiu.a..ryhisjam-
ily wrote' that Damon liked
fishing, fiuh'tin'anicT just
about every. lind of sport
- soccer, basketball, ice
skating, motocross and
snowboarding. "He pur HO
percent into everything he
did," it said. "His motto
was. 'Giving up is simply
not an option.'" .
For some parents, 'the
dangers were obvious even
before Damon's death:'
As their sadness began to
mix with anger, they com-
plained.that poor officiat-
ing, with no penalty calls
on late hits, made it only a
matter of time before ball
carriers like Damon got
hurt.
"That whole game was
plagued with late hits and
people using their helmets
to 'spear' other people,"
said Sam Villafrank, Joey's
father. "It was like anything
goes." .
SSchool officials did not
return calls seeking com-
ment on the accusation.
Concern about increas-
ingly hard hits among thej
million boys who play high
school football has brought
renewed attention to con-
cussion management and
a national initiative to
teach the "Heads Up" tack,
ling technique. An average
of 12 high school and col-
lege players die annually,
according to a recent study
in the American Journal of
Sports Medicine.
Damon's was at least the
fifth high school football
death this season, but his
was the only team to can-
cel the season because of
it.
As iridescent ribbons
sparkle from light poles in
Brocton, the players say
they are moving on with-
out football after making
a decision that's drawn
both support and criticism
from those who believe
Damon would have want-
ed the season to go on.
"Honestly, none of
us can really say what
Damon would have
wanted," Villafrank said.
"The only person': who
could have -said that
was Damon. And unfor-
tunately, he's not here
anymore."


In Wake of the Massacre


Navy Yard employees get counseling


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Andy
Wood is accustomed to re-
sponding to a hazardous
materials spill or ferocious
natural disaster from his
post at the Washington
Navy Yard's emergency
operations center.
SA panicked call of shots
fired that reached his radio
on the morning of Sept. 16
presented a chilling new
challenge.
"It was terrifying," Wood,
a 35-year-old Navy elec-
tronics technician who
runs the center, recalled
in an interview Thursday
about the slaying of 12
people inside Building
197. *
Ten days later, Wood
remains haunted by that
morning.
When a base-wide an-
nouncement system was
tested in the days after
the shooting the same
system he had used to
declare the base on lock-
down he said he "got a
little freaked out." When
he leaves work at the end
of his shift, or when he
goes to pick up his chilk
dren, he panics that a


TiHC i lAT i:1D Pf:f
Police work the scene on M Street Southeast in Washington,
where a gunman was reported in a military building at the
Washington Navy Yard Monday, Sept. 16. Employees are re-
ceiving group and one-on-one counseling to cope with the
aftermath of the massacre.


similar disaster will strike
the base and he won't be
there or maybe no one
will to respond.
"I worry about not being
there to receive, the call
when it happens, he said.
Wood has received
both group and one-on-
one counseling since the
,shooting, and he's hardly
alone. Navy officials say
counselors have so far in-
teracted with more than
6,000 employees at the
Navy Yard, many of whom
were inside Building 197


whenformer Navy reserv-
ist Aaron Alexis who
worked there as an IT con-
tractor-- opened fire with
shotgun. Hewas killed by
a police officer more than
an hour after the shooting
began.
A specialized team that
responds to industrial
accidents, death on bas-
es and other traumatic
events deployed from
Virginia to Washington,
with counselors check-
ing in with workers at the
water cooler or on smoke


break. Some employees
have attended large group
counseling sessions or
scheduled one-on-one
appointments.-.
"We're hearing the wide
range of normal. People
are scared, they're angry,
they're sad. Some have
lost co-workers. Everyone
on the base has been im-
pacted one way or anoth-
er," said Navy Cmdr. Ingrid
Pauli, a leaderoftheSpecial
Psychiatric Rapid Inter-
vention Team, or SPRINT.
in Portsmouth, Va., add-
ing, "We try to get out and.
touch as many people as
we can."
The counselors stress to
workers that they're expe-
'riencing normal reactions
to an abnormal event, a
message Wood said he..
especially appreciates
as he revisits memories.
of the "shocked" faces of
the first responders and
the laundry list of respon- .
sibilities he performed
'that day from alerting
his chain of command,
processing messages from
Building 197 and spread-
ing word that the base was
on lockdown.
"Every duty day, every


Justice Department spent nearly $5M on drones


The A..: cx atedPrd'..

WASHINGTON The
FBI has been using drones
to support its law enforce-
ment operations since
2006 and has spent more
than $3 million on the un-
manned aircraft, the Jus-
tice Department's internal
watchdog said Thursday.
The disclosure came
in a new report by the
Justice Department's in-
spector general, Michael
Horowitz, who revealed
that the department also
has awarded $1.26 mil-
lion to at least seven local
police departments and
nonprofit organization for
drones.
In addition, the IG said
another Justice Depart-
ment component, the Bu-
reau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives,
plans to use drones to
support future operations.
To date, the ATF has spent


almost $600,000, the IG re-
port stated.
From 2004 to May 2013,
the Justice "Department
spent almost $5 million on
the unmanned aircraft.
In June, then-FBI Di-
rector Robert ,Mueller
told Congress that the
FBI :occasionally uses
the unmanned aerial ve-
hicles but was developing
guidelines in anticipation
of issues that will arise
"as they become more
omnipresent." In one in-
stance earlier this year,
the FBI used drones at
night during a six-day
hostage standoff in
Alabama.
In a letter in July to
Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky, the
FBI revealed it had used
drones 10 times since 2006
for 'surveillance in kidnap-
pings, search'and-rescue
missions, and drug and
fugitive investigations.
Among them was last


winter's standoff between
authorities and limmy
Lee Dykes, who was shot
to death after holding a 5-
year-old boy hostage in an
underground bunker in
Alabama, the letter said.
The IG's report cited
the Alabama case, but no
others, saying only that
a review of available re-
cords showed that the FBI
appeared to be operating
drones only after obtain-
ing required. approvals
from the Federal Aviation


Administration.
Civil liberties groups
critical, of domestic drone
use say such operations
could invade people's
privacy. ,

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High School Footbalm


Tigers try to turn the tables on Freeport


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Graceville's Jared Padgett tries to rid himself of a troublesome
Holmes County defender earlier in the season.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Freeport has made life pretty mis-
erable foi Graceville in the last two
seasons, but the Tigers will get a
chance to return the favor tonight
when the winless Bulldogs come to
town to take on a highly motivated
GHS squad.
The Bulldogs have won four games
over the Tigers over the last two
yearS, taking a 34-6 regular-season
victory in 2011 before knockingoff
Graceville three times in 2012 -
once in the spring, again in the regu-
lar season and then onefinal time in
the 1A regional semifinals.
So despite facing a team that has
lost all four games it has played by an
average of 27.8 points per game, the
Tigers shouldn't lack for inspiration.
"I think right now with our team
and our matchup with Freeport,


there's no question that our players
would really like to be able to kind of
reverse the trend a little bit," Gracev-
ille coach TyWise said Thursday. "We
didn't beat them last season and a
number of these players are return-
ing from last year's team, so I think
the level of mental focus we've had
this week with our players I can defi-
nitely attribute to last year and the
fact that they really want to be able
to say that they got the job done and
were able to defeat Freeport.
"They beat us in the spring, in the
regular Season and in the playoffs.
That's three bad memories, and it
has helped us this week. It's a game
we've had our eye on for a while, and
I think every player on our football
team has looked forward to the op-
portunity to play Freeport again."
The Tigers are coming off perhaps
their most complete and dominat-
ing performance of the season thus


far in the form of a 48-0 shellacking
of the Wewahitchka Gators in the
team's District 2 debut.
Graceville rolled up 506 yards of
total offense in the game, with Pres-
ton Nichols, Jarrett Brogdon and
Jared Padgett combining for 325 of
the team's 365 rushing yards, and
Nichols adding 141 yards and two
touchdowns through the air..
The Tigers are scoring 32.5 points
per game on the season despite get-
ting shut out by Blountstown two
weeks ago and are averaging 342
yards of offense.
They should have the opportunity
to add to those totals against a Bull-
Sdogs defense that has surrendered
52, 54, 56 and 48 points in its-four
losses.
Freeport has fallen on hard times,
though Wise said he always respects

S See TIGERS, Page 8B


HIGH SCHOOL GOLF


College Footbali


LSU-Georgia highlights


week to reshape rankldngs


S JV Fbotbafl



--,e ,"-.


r' heAsciatea Press

Finally, a college football
weekend with real poten-
tial to reshape the rankings
and shake up the national
championship race.
The fifth Saturday of
the season features four
games matching ranked
teams, highlighted by No.
6 LSU at No. 9 Georgia.
Eight more ranked teams
play road games of varying
degrees of difficulty.
Last weekend's schedule
produced mostly blow-
outs, and when. it was
over, it was as-if it never
happened. The top ,14
teams in the AP Top 25
held their spots from the
week before, and no team
moved up more than one
place.
This Saturday could
end with -a. couple of
teams saying goodbye to
their national champion-
ship hopes, and maybe
a few new teams being
taken more seriously as
contenders. .
Georgia wraps up the
toughest September
schedule in the country
with its third game against
a top-10 opponent.
The Bulldogs (2-1) split
with Clemson and South


Georgia running back Todd Gurley gets away from North Texas
defensive back James Jones as he runs for a touchdown during
Saturday's game in Athens, Ga. ,


Carolina to start the-sea-
son and now face an LSU
team that is yet again look-
ing like a Southeastern
Conference heavyweight,
though the Tigers are get-
ting it done a little differ-
ently this season. .
For the first time in a few
years, LSU's passing game
is a strength instead of a
question mark.
Zach Mettenberger has
the" sixth-best passer rat-
ing in the country.
"There's a big ceiling on
him," Bulldogs coach Mark
Richt said of Mettenberger,
who originally attended


Georgia but was dismissed
from the team when, as a
redshirt freshman, he got
into legal trouble over his
treatment of a woman at a
bar.
LSU receivers Odell Beck-
ham and Jarvis Landry are
making a case for being
the top tandem not just in
the SEC but in the nation.
That should lead to an-
other increasingly com-
mon occurrence: high-
scoring SEC games.
Georgia, with quarter-
back Aaron Murray and

See RANKINGS, Page 8B


Quatre Couch takes the ball for the Marianna JV squad during a game against Chipley on
Thursday night.


Bulldogs' rally falls short


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Bull-
dogs junior varsity nearly
erased all of a 16-point
fourth quarter deficit but
fell just short in a 28-26
home loss to the Chipley
Tigers on Thursday night
at Bulldog Stadium.
Chipley led 22-6 in the
third period after scor-
ing on its first drive of
the second half, with
Trey Thurman hitting
Adrian Sims on a 56-yard
completion on a third-
and-16 play to set up his
own 2-yard TD run on a


quarterback sneak.
But the Bulldogs an-
swered with a scoring
drive of their own, with a
six-play, 58-yard march
capped off by an 11-yard
TD run by Quatre Couch
to make it 22-12.
Thurman and Sims con-
nected again on the next
Chipley series, this time
for 67 yards and a touch-
down to put the Tigers up
28-12 with 5:31 left in'the
game.
Marianna got the score
back quickly, however,
with an 81-yard kickoff re-
turn by Tyler White setting
up Couch's second touch-


down run of the night, this
time from 15 yards out.
But the Bulldogs again
failed to convert the two-
point play and it remained
a two-possession game
with 4:31 to play.
. Things really got in-
teresting on the ensuing
series for Chipley when
Sims took a carry off the
left side and got stripped
of the football, which
fell right into the arms of
Jaden Harley, who took it
back 42 yards for a score.
White converted the
two-point play to bring the

See BULLDOGS, Page 8BL


Oil


MAR, SrINIr' FLORIDAN






-2B FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27,2013


SPORTS


College Football


SEC defenses knocked on their heels


The Associated Press
COLUMBIA, S.C. The
powerful defenses in the
Southeastern Conference
are being knocked on their
heels.
The SEC has built its
reputation on fast, talent-
ed defenses and rode that
tradition to seven straight
BCS national titles. This
year, defenses are being
shredded yard by yard.
Nine Of 14 SEC teams are
Surrendering more yards
than a year ago at this time.
Among them are some of p
the conference's defensive
leaders the past few sea-,
sons: Alabama, LSU and
South Carolina. q
Whatever the reason
spread offenses, an exodus
of defensive talent to the
NFL or attack-minded new
coaches pushing the offen-
sive tempo it's apparent
early. on that SEC defenses
are backpedaling.
Alabama coach Nick
Saban said the defen-
sive slide could simply be
about talent. .
"!'There's.alotof explosive .
players 0on offense,"' Saban Alabama
said, "and fiaybe there's *amma
notas many dominant de- .ide.S g7i
fensiveplayers." Millinei
Saban's top-ranked and leader:
tvo-time defending cham- was am
pion Crimson Tide outlast- Tide de
ed Texas A&Mi 49-42 two elected i
weeks ago in a shootout spring.
that was nothing like., the LSU h
9-6, overtime' defensive players
slugfest against LSU in drafted.
2011. starters
Then again, it's hard to theyard
stop anybody, when the gers allc
league's best defenders bled fro
Shave moved on. was giv
S Former Georgia ,line- and 101
Backer Jarvis Jones led the games i
SEC with 14 sacks, 241. 310 yari
tackles for loss and seven this sea;
forced fumbles Q year ago Tigers
and is now causing havoc said it
for the Pittsburgh Steelers. lack of
Alabama cornerback Dee experiei



No. 8 Florida State safety
Hunter out with neck injury
TALLAHASSEE Florida State
starting safety TIyler Hunter will be
held out of Saturday's Atlantic Coast
SConference game against Boston
College with a neck injury.
The junior was injured in the
first half against Bethune-Cookman


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
a defensive back Lahdon Collins (right) reacts with
te C.J.Mosley after making a stop for a loss during the
ine against Colorado State in Tuscaloosa, Ala.
x,the' 2012 league 'Our. players are as tal-
n passes defended, ented as we've ever had,
long four Crimson and I think there's a.matu-
fensive starters se- rity that needs to:take place
n the NFL draft last so they can play with their
cleats headed north and
ad seven defensive south, and ready to make a
off last year's team tackle," Miles said.
SWith just three But even veteran players
'back on' defense, are struggling to make an
is andpointsthe Ti- impact.
Iw have nearly dou- South CarolinaAll-Amer-
Dm a year:ago. LSU ican defensive end Jade-
ing up 149 yards veon Clowney, 'the reign-
oints through four ing SEC defensive player of
n 2012; it is yielding the year, was expected to
ds and 19.5 points dominate after notching 13
son. sacls a year ago and send-
coach Les Miles ing the helmet of Michigan
's not about a runner Vincent Smith fly-
talent; it's about ing in the Outback Bowl on
rice. New Year's Day.


College Football Brief
last week and did not return.
Coach limbo Fisher said Thursday
that freshman Jalen Ramseywill
move to safety after starting the
first three games at cornerback.
Hunter has eight tackles and an
interception.
Defensive end Mario Edwards Jr.
is listed as probable with a hand in-
jury after he was held out last week.


College Football

No. 12 South Carolina trying

to overcome defensive injuries


The Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. -With
all of the foot injuries that
have hit No. 12 South Car-
olina, it has been hard at
times for defensive coordi-
nator Lorenzo Ward to pre-
pare for undefeated UCE
All-American defensive
Send Jadevegn Clowney, is
playing with bone spurs
in, his.right foot, an injury
he's had since high school.
The .Gamecocks' other de-
fensive end,'; Chaz Sutton,
has a mid-foot sprain that
routinely flares up.
"We've had a lot of foot
,injuries this year; that's
more than normal," Ward
said..
And (that's meant bal-
ancing practice with rest,
something Ward and his
.staff will likely have to do'
with both linemen the re-
mainder of the season. The
two spent much of South
Carolina's bye week getting
treatment and not irritat-
ing their injuries so they'll
be at full speed when the
12th-ranked Gamecocks
(2-1) take on the Knights
(3-0) on Saturday in Or-
lando, Fla.
"You always want to de-
velop continuity with the
same 11 guys who are start-
ers practicing," Ward said.
"It's just something we're,
going to have to deal with."
And it's just not South
Carolina's defensive ends.
Tackle Kelcy Quarles has
missed practice last week
with neck sprain and has
Been in and out of games
Jdue to several bumps and


Vanderblt running back Wesley Tate crosses the goal line for a
touchdown in front of South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon
Clowney (right) in Columbia, S.C.


bruises. Starting lineback-
er Cedrick Cooper is ex-
pected back from shoulder
problems suffered in train-
, 'g camp, while fellow
starter Kadetrix- Marcus
didn't play against Georgia
two games back because of
a shoulder injury. Starting
cornerback Victor Hamp-
ton has been bothered by
foot problems, too.
Steve Spurrier expects
everyone to play.
"All of our other minor
injuries will be all right. It's
going to take everybody
playing their best if we're
going to have a chance to
beat Central Florida," he
said.
South Carolina defensive
line coach Deke Adams
said Clowney and Sutton
have worked out well this
week. He thought Quarles
was also moving strongly


and expected a,solid show-
ing from his line.
That hasn't always been
the case 'this"- year. The
Gamecocks- gave up 536
yards and 41 points in a
loss at Georgia on Sept. 7.
A week later, Vanderbilt
managed 25 points on the
defense after South Caro-
lina led 28-0.
Things were so bad in
Athens that Adams and
linebackers coach Kirk
Botkin got in a face-to-face
shouting match on the
sidelines as the Gamecocks
struggled. Spurrier said the
assistants settled their is-
sues and understand a re-
peat can't happen.
Adams believes things
improved against Vander-
bilt and the unit is regaining
its swagger from a year ago,
when it was ranked Ilth
best overall nationally.


The Gamecocks lost five
senior linebackers off last
year's .team, and Clowney's
seen offenses run away
from his.side. The Game-
cocks, llth in the coun-
try defensively a year ago,
have- allowed 76 points,
nearly three times the 29
they gave up through three
games in 2012. *
Clowney has 10 tackles
and two sacks this year.
Gamecocks 'coach Steve
Spurrier even joked. that
Clowney had better get in
shape this week because
it'll be a hot day in Orlandoq
when No. 12 South Caroli-
na faces UCF on Saturday.
Clowney picked things
up in his last outing, forc-
ing a second-half fumble
in the Gamecocks' 35-25
win overVanderbilt.
"It's hard, man," said
Chaz Sutton, the Game-
pocks' other starting de-
fensive end. SEC teams
"have a lot of great guys' at
the skill positions that can
fly and tear the top off a
defense." .
Things could get worse
for SEC defenses.
The league's leading de-
fensive unit in Florida -
the Gators have permitted
fewer than .15 points and
213 yards a game so far this
year could be without
star lineman Dominique
Easley, who injured his
knee in practice and indi-
cated on Twitter that he's
out for the season.
And it doesn't look like
SEC offenses will show
down anytime soon.
Tennessee safety Brian
Randolph, a sophomore, is
among three underclass-
men that grows to four if
they're in a nickel package
- starting in the Vols' sec-
ondary. He said hurry-up
offenses have changed the.
game, allowing teams to
get more snaps as defenses
try to adjust.


The sophomore had seven tackles
and a tackle for loss in the first two
games. DeMarcus Walker started for
Edwards Jr."
Offensive lineman IraJDenson
also is out with a shoulder in-
jury. The freshmanhas played as a'
backup in all three games.

The Ass6ciated Press
r-, n -P% ""_


IMTT-V. 11 ff& oOM


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com

College Football

OSUs Miller to start,

but Guiton on deck


The Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio A
lot of top college teams
have trouble finding one
quality quarterback.
No. 4 Ohio ,State has
two..
The problem for Ohio
State coach Urban Meyer.
is that he can only play
one at a time, and both
have played well enough
to start.
:Braxton Miller, back
from an injured knee;,
will "get the starting nod
against No. 23 Wisconsin'
Son Saturday night, Meyer .,
said after Wednesday's
:practice. ..,
"I think Braxton .will
probably .start. He had
a good day. today and it
looks like he's pretty close
to 100 percent," Meyer
said. "I just wanted to
make sure running the
ball he's good, too. And he
was. And Kenny's good."
SThen he voiced the
problem that is clearly
bothering him.
"We're still working
Through exactly how
we're going to use them,
to manage the game," he
said. "But they both look
good."-
Even if Miller, starts,
who plays the most?And
who finishes?
Kenny Guiton is coming
off three terrific games
and back-to-back Big
Ten offensive player of
'the week honors. But he,
is still behind Miller, re-
covering from a sprained
knee ligament..
It's a luxury, but at the


t HEASSOCIATED PRESS
Ohio State quarterback
Kenny Guitonlooks for a
receiver against Florida w..
A&M on Saturday in
Columbus, Ohio.
same time it's something
else to worry about.
Meyer hasn't figured
out how, when or how
much or even if- he'll
use Guiton.
"That's tough. That's
tough. I've had experi-
ence playing two in 2006,
and it's hard," he said,
referring' to his national
championship season
at Florida when he had
Chris Leak and Tim
Tebow at' quarterback.
"When a guy gets a hot'
hand, or if he doesn't get
thehot hand, then when
does he go back in? That's
a decision I 'can only
make by myself. So we'll
see.". ,
On the Buckeyes'
most recent two-deep
chart .they're listed as
co-starters.


Printed on September 17, 2013r

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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27,2013 *. 3BF


College Football

ACC rolling up the yards, points, wins this season


The Associated Press

BOSTON Pittsburgh allowed an
average of 56 points per game last
season. So last week's 58-55 victory
over Duke wouldn't stand out much
to a fan scanning the scores.
Except that the team with the stin-
Sgy defense was Pitt basketball.
The victory over the Blue Devils on
Saturday was the Panthers' football
team one, but hardly the only, ex-
ample of the record-setting Atlantic
Coast Conference offenses that are
scoring an average of 33.53 points
per game.
"Nothing really surprises you any-
more about college football," Geor-
gia Tech defensive coordinator Ted
Roof said. "With the way the rules
have changed and the evolution
of the spread offense and all those
things, not too much shocks me.
I pretty much can roll with it. ... As
long as we win, I'm good."
One year after averaging a record
29,55 points per game, ACC offenses
are scoring almost four points more.
A league-record five schools scored
50 or more, points on a single day-
Saturday including Pittsburgh's
game against Duke, in which both
teams broke the milestone.
"It's hard to play defense," Duke
coach David Cutcliffe said. "You just
can't give up explosive plays. You've
got to let them self-destruct. They'll'


Miami
running
back Duke
Johnson
runs in
for a
touchdown
during the
first half of
Saturday's
game
against
Savannah
State in
Miami
Gardens.


drop a ball, they'll overthrow a pass,
they'll have a penalty, you'll get bad
down and distance.... You've got to
be opportunistic around timely de-
fense, I guess, (is) what it's starting
to look like."
And it's not just Duke.
Virginia scored 49 points to beat
Virginia Military Institute, Mary-
land had 37 against West Virginia
and Syracuse scored 52 against
Tulane. And' in Miami's 77-7 vic-
tory over Savannah State, the Hurri-
canes set a school record for points
even though. the coaches agreed
to shorten the fourth quarter to 12
minutes.
Many of the games were set up


to be mismatches, like the one that
had No. 15 Miami as a 60-point fa-
vorite over Savannah State of the
Football Championship Subdivision
orVirginia againstVMI, another FCS
team. Syracuse also scored more
than 50 points a week earlier against
Wagner, also an FCS school. ,
.But that doesn't explain the ACC
game between Pitt and Duke, in
which the teams, combined for 113
points. Florida State hasn't been held
to fewer than 41 points this season,
including in its game against the
Panthers, and Georgia Tech has av-
eraged almost seven touchdowns a
game, including victories over Duke
and North Carolina.


College Football

Malzahn: Auburn WR

Denson out for season


The Associated Press

MONTGOMERY, Ala. -
Auburn coach Gus. Mal-
zalmn said starting wide
receiver Jaylon Denson is
out for the season.
Denson is the latest ca-
sualty in a string of early-
season injuries for the
Tigers, who have an open
date before playing No.
21 Mississippi.
"That was a pretty
tough injury, and that's a
big blow for our offense,"
Malzahn saidWednesday.
"He was our most consis-
tent guy. It's going to have
to be by committee from
here on out..
"It's good' that we have
an off week that we can
start working some guys.
Right now we're rotat-
ing a whole bunch of
guys."
Denson has posted on
Twitter that he suffered a
torn patellar tendon and
had surgery Tuesday.


He has started all four
games and had three
catches for 45 yards, but
also was one of the Tigers'
top downfield blockers.
Malzahn said the big-
gest benefit of the open
date is time to get injured
players healthy.
Seven players have
missed a total of 15
games, including five who
were'"listed as potential
starters on the preseason
depth' chart. Defen-
sive tackle Jeff Whitaker
hasn't played this season
with an unspecified leg
injury.
"I don't think I've been
around a team that had
that many this early,"
Malzahn said, "and to
main impact players.
Especially "defensively,
we've been playing with-
out a lot of impact play-
ers. Even when we get
them back, they're not
quite 100 percent yet, but
they're getting there."


Sports Briefs


High School Football
)) Friday--West Gadsden
at Sneads, 7 p.m.; Bron-
son at Cottondale, 7 p.m.;
Marianna at Chiles, 6 p.m.;
Freeport at Graceville, 7
p.m.

SHS Foundation
Silent Auction
The Sneads High School
Foundation will hold a
silent auction during the
week of Homecoming to
support an educational
trip for this .year's junior
class at SHS. The sched-
uled spring trip will in-
dclude visits to the National
Mall, Arlington National
Cemetery, National Gal-
lery, Smithsonian, Nation-
al Museum of American
SHistory, and more.
The silent auction will
be held in the lobby at
Sneads High School and
will begin Monday and
end at the Alumni Ban-
quet on Saturday.
For more information,
contact Tony Beauchamp
Sat 850-593-6576.
t.
S5K Run/Walk
S and 1OK Run
SThe Building Strong
Families 5K run/walk
and 10K run will be held
Saturday at Citizens
Lodge Park in Marianna
at 8 a.m. Early registration
for the 5K is $25 and for'
the 10K is $30. For kids 12
years old and under there
wiM be a free, 1-mile fun
run.
All proceeds from this
Seventh go toward provid-
ing a safe, healthy and
positive environment for
Children and families in
our communities.
For registration informa-
Stion, call Tammy Dean
at 850-209-0397 or Kathy
Donofro, 850-557-8139.
You can print a registra-
tion form by going to
SFacebook and searching
Sfor Building Strong Fami-
lies Event. You can also
find the details of
this event at www.Active.
com.

Recreation Football
Marianna Recreation
Department will offer two
tackle-football leagues
and one boys' flag-football
league this year. Registra-
tion for youths ages 6 to 13
will be held Oct. 1 through
Nov. 1 from 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. at the Marianna Edu-
cational and Recreational
Expo at 3625 Caverns
Road in Marianna.
The registration fee for
flag football is $30 for all
participants. The fee for
tackle leagues will be $45
for all participants. The fee
must be paid With a check
or money order; no cash
will be accepted. Special
registration will be held at
the MERE from 4-7 p.m.
Oct. 14 and 21. No one will


be allowed to register after
Nov. 1.
All participants must
bring a copy of their
birth certificate. You can
also visit our website
at www.leaguelineup.
com/mrd, go to the foot-
ball page and download
a form. The age of all
participants on'Nov. 1 of
the current year will be the
player's age for the entire
season.
Anyone who may be
interested in coaching
a team or officiating
youth football can
contact the Marianna
Recreation Department


WHIRLPOOL DRYER
5 Cycles With 3 Temperatures.
Commercial Design.
Was $278. ,


at 482-6228 or come by
during registration.

Men's Flag Football
Marianna Recreation
Department will offer a
men's 7-on-7 flag football
league.
. Teams can sign up at
the Marianna Educational
and Recreational Expo
at 3625 Caverns Road in
Marianna. The registration
fee of $400 is due before
first contest.
The league will play a
10-game schedule, with
play starting Nov. 4. There
will be a managers/orga-


INOW "
19 8


NEWAMANA
ELECTRIC RANGE
30 in., plug-in, plug-out burners,
lift-off oven door, lift-off top.
Was $438.
SALE$299
Other ranges as low as $238


nizational meeting Oct..
21 at 6 p.m. at the MERE
complex.
SFor more information,
contact the MERE at
850-482-6228 or visit our
Web page at www.league
lineup.com/mrd and
click on the Adult Football
page.

Sports items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan, P.O. Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447..


KING'S FURNITURE & APPLIANCES
HURRY FOR THE 2821 Ross Clark Circle, S.W.. Dothan 793-3045 Your Famtly Owned '
HURRYOperated Stoe'" F T&Oa S
BET SN Hdvert For Over 46 Years." .
,BEST SELECTION! Hundreds of Unadvrtised Bargains Priced Too Low To Advertise! our ea rings Store!"


*j^^K O1petH_

-I 2 09e'1 '
re"T'odall

All ik Get:
Livin 6 o4
Room sate N
Suites caos !
SALE.
priced!
2 pieces sofa,
loveseat,
choice of "
patterns and styles. P' Pricesa
Was $1,198. Starting at

WOOD BUNK BEDS
REG. $168
Sale 98 EACH

GE SUPER CAPACITY
5 Load Sizes. 4-Spin Speeds,
4 Temps. Was $498
SALE 229

ALL REFRIGERATORS ON SALE!!!
Side-By-Side and Across Top
Frigidaire Refrigerator Freezer
18.0 cubic ft., no frost,
new in carton across top freezer. Was $528.
SALE$395
GLASS
DINETTE TABLE
With 4 chairs. Was $249.
Now$9995


Nothing Held Back!
They've gotta go at some
kind of price! All brands:
Symbol, Therapedic, King,
'Queen & Twin/Full.
Prices startilng.at

$49 95.,each piece


RECLINERS
lChoice of styles
and patterns.
Priced For
Quick Sale

Frigidaire Front Load Washer
li 1 Was$899. Sale 345 -
i Frigidaire Front Load Dryer .
Was $849. Sale $288 ...


KING'S FURNITURE & APPLIANCES

2821 Ross Clark Circle, S.W. (Across From Eye Center South)
LARGEST SELECTION OF APPLIANCES & FURNITURE IN THE WIREGRASS!
Your Family Owned & Operated Store For Over 46 Years Same Day Delivery Free Nationwide Service
Limited Quantities Floor Models Scratch & Dent Demos & Repos Some One and Two of a Kind Pictures Similar to Illustration


Bring us the best price you can find, for any
merchandise we carry if we don't beat it,
we'll give you the item FREE!
Open Mon.-Fri. 9a.m. 6p.m. Saturday 9a.m. 6p.m.
Closed Sunday


793-3045


SDONT MISS THESE
ONE OF A KIND SPECIALS
FRIGIDAIRE FRIGIDAIRE
CHEST FREEZER REFRIGERATOR & FREEZER
SCu. Ft. Was $399 No Fros, Door Aross Top;:
21 Cu. Ft. With ice Maker. Was $699
SAL329 SALMI9
FRIGIDAIRE UPRIGHT ROPER-
FREEER WASHER
FREEZER Extra Large Capacity Plus 4 Load Slze.
14 Cu. Ft. No Frost Was $499 CapaTm i, 6 Cyle. Was $498.
SAL$3I9 4 L'$238
S FRIGIDAIRE OR Starting at
WHIRLPOOL $")'I
DISHWASHERS $228


FAice 7


U-






-l4B FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27,2013


ENTER rflZIMENT


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BECAUSE BOYS
DON'T USE THE
WORD 'A1DORA/LE,"
OLD SPOP.T.





'.7 fe^


T14EY ALSO DON'T
PR.ES5 LIKE SHERLOCK
HOLMES ANDI SMOKE
BUBBLE PIPES.
i-CHUCKLE. r.
TOUC.HEE
ItHA-!NOW
THAT'S
S ADOIi5RLE!
IP14 0 L Mfft


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
'ii'| A'^-9-^ 27 T-T a (SNFIDCNc &eWci5e. 1:n~v FLea OF '
I TS Yoou WRIl tbOR F ear$ I oRIT(NG CH-K.
BoIoa3P p r yt4p few WCstAOLtC-
C.9Ye~s 14M


'9)-



1)i


THI5 MAY b6.THfE.EASlbT
THIM& IV' OVnR DOe..!


%'9


KIT 'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


9.27 t LaughingStock Irternational Inc. Dist. by Univel UCIIc lot UFS, 2013

"She changed her mind."


ACROSS
1 Cousteau
invention
6 pie
11 Indifferent
gestures
13 With
caution
14- del
Fuego
15 Prophet
16 Chocolate-
colored
dog
17TV knob
18Hypo units
21 Force back
23 Lipstick
color
26Racetrack
circuit
27Persia,
today
28Creeping
plant
29Alongside
31 Pageant
crown
32 Synthetic
fabric
33 Earth
circler
35 Leg joint
36 Disagree-
able task
37Completely
38 Hearing
aid?


39 Makes
mention of
40 Cunning
41 Vigor's
partner
42Yale
student
44Slumbering
47 Blockhead
51 Long,
narrow
ditch
52 Dirty looks
53 Dull
surface
54 Euclid or
Plato

DOWN
1 Retired
flier
2 T'ai -
ch'uan
3 Suffix for
forfeit
4 Knot on a
tree
5 Rural
6 Christmas
song
7 Europe-
Asia range
8 -tac-toe
,9 Chicago's
st.
10 Potato bud
12Cavalry
weapons


Answer to Previous Puzzle


G Y|M R|EI
ROD EVI
ARSENA
DjEEDEDl
AWIE
KARMA

E RIII
V I SAN
OM I TS
AGAR E
L UGE P
FEED T
13 Made on a
loom
18 Author
Arthur
19 Poolside
Shelter
20 More agile
22Shiny
leather
23 Lassos-
24 Register
25 Very much
28 Travel
word
30 Want ad
letters
31 Rough-
housing
34 Chess
pieces
36 Pizzazz


B3A NDOrVIt
I L ATEI
L S SHE,
OAT ER
SS FI RIS

C R EAF
RL~S|TRr
E E LAN!I

EJ ESTEF
L ECTR I C
ACT ARN
O-TS PEI
39 Dorothy,
to Em
41 Blow off
steam
43Livy's
route
44PIN
prompter
45Tijuana
"Mrs."
46 Permit
48 Itty-bitty
49 Vexation
50 My, my!


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QullDriverBooks.com


9-27 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
"G'JL VSTRLY GM D EDKXSTP ... G
VSTRLY GM D ZSWX S'E GKL ... G
OGRL XS XFGMR XFDX G'l AHWX D
T LNHODT NHP." '
YLMULO VDWFGM.NXSM

Previous Solution: "What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as
what you become by achieving your goals." Ashley Benson
.TODAY'S CLUE: OslanbGy I
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 9-27


Horoscope
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Make decisions for the
right reason. You'll get the
most out of your day and
avoid complaints if you try
to do the best job possible.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -You'll have a clear
picture of what you want
to see unfold today. Rely
on your intuition and your
keen eye to guide you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Cast your fate
to-the,wind. Pursue an ad-
venture that will take your
mind off your worries.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Decide what needs
to be done and do it. It's
the time for action, not
talking. An important
relationship will require
careful nurturing.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -You'll see the need
to bring~about change, ,
but it'may not be easy.
Additional responsibilities
will become apparent and
must be dealt with first.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Plan a celebration.
Delve into a creative inter-
est or spend time with
children or loved ones.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Do what you can
on your own in a work in-
volvement. Avoid depend-
ing on others, and you'll
be free of disappointment.
Strive for perfection.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) It's a good day to
spend time with friends
or people who inspire and
motivate you. An interest-
ing proposalwill come
from an unusual source.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Revisit old ideas and
peers. With abit of fine-
tuning, you can get your
place in good shape and
host an event.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Take some time
out; pampering will do
you good and giveyou a
chance to let some infor-
mation sink in.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Stay on top of what's
Happening at home and
at work. Your reputation
must be protected, and
your decisions made on
accurate information.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Play the game strategi-
cally. Whether you are
involved in personal or
professional' situation.


lAnnie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: My wife of 25 years feels
that mailing and texting male friends is
nothing to be concerned about. By ac-
cident, I discovered she had visited one
of these men when she was supposed to
be at her girlfriend's for the weekend. She
swears nothing happened. But I checked
her laptop and found photographs of the
two of them.
When I asked about the pictures, she
claimed she was planning to send them
to me but never got around to it. We
went for counseling after the weekend
frip, and things calmed down for a while.
She ceased communication with that
guy, as far as I can tell. But I recently
found email evidence that she is still
communicating with the other guy
she knew from high school. They close
their emalls with "love you bunches" or
"xxxoooxxx," and I found one that said,
"Good night, Sexy."
My wife has no idea how much this


Bridge
Anne Tyler said, "People always call it luck
when you've acted more sensibly than they
have."
That is often true, but there can still be matters,
out of your control.Take today's deal, for example.
Look at only the North-South hands. In which
contract would you choose to play?
When the deal was originally played, the bid-
ding went as shown. North-South were using
two-over-one game-forcing. On the third round,
South broke a golden rule of Blackwood by using
the convention with two fast losers in both unbid
suits, with no guarantee that partner had a first-
or second-round control in those suits. South
should have bid four spades. Then, North prob-
ably would have passed, although with controls
in both hearts and clubs, there would have been a
good case for his using Blackwood.
Six diamonds and six spades are both excellent
contracts, apparently losing only one club trick.
However, at the table, against six diamonds, West
led the club jack. East won with her king and
realized that, unless West had a slow trump trick
like jack-fourth, there was only one way to defeat
the slam shift to a spade. West happily ruffed
and South unhappily wrote minus 100 on her
scoresheet.
Then North pointed out that six spades was
making. Against that slam, East's best lead is a low
club! If North carelessly plays low from the board,
West wins and gives his partner a diamond ruff.


drives me crazy. She sees nothing wrong
with this communication. Could you
expound on this type of affair and the
potential harm it can cause?What should
we do?
EMOTIONALLY DRAINED

Dear Drained: An emotional affair is
one of emotional, rather than physical,
intimacy. There is no sex. However, there
is deception, betrayal, intimate commu-
nication (texts, emails, phone calls) and
an emotional connection to the other*
person at the expense of the marriage.
Often, the person involved denies that
it is any kind of affair, claiming it's "only
friendship." Buthealthy friendships do
not involve secrecy and lies and do not
threaten the marriage. Please. go back to
counseling. Your wife needs to. under-
stand how her actions undermine your
trust, and you both must work on ways
to put your marriage back together.


MONTYBYJIM MEDDICK


North 09-27-13
A AQJ 10 9 8 5
YA3
4 1073
43
West East
-- 7 4 3 2
SK 8 5 2 J 9.764
* 6 5 4 2 -
*J10984 AI 72
South
4 K6
VQ10
+AKQJ98
4 Q65

Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
14 Pass
24 Pass 24 Pass
34 Pass 44 Pass
4 NT Pass 5W Pass
64 Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: 4 J






www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan e


Friday, September 27, 2013-5B
Friday, September 27, 2013 ) B


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: W4REGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
RP.O. BOX 520MARIANNA,FL 32447
IN PERSON:- 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publicaior. c, r,* ire -*ie. :i' :r L ih- o i.l ire ad i..'r he 'fril dav'.
Insertion. Adjustment for errors Is limited to the cost of'that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall'not be liable for damages arising out ofei. i,- ad.-i .rim,.,-.] e-,i .r'.:l ir.- iTi,amou.'r .i (I.1' I rhe ;pace
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement In which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publishers employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for -.-.r ,r,,.oio,.n ol Cr, v. 'rii;ii, rni ,r in- .,rrc,'jui pi, 1 ,
such advertisement DisplayAds are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval Right is reserved to edit, rl.:i :, .:.r ,:i6,l.;, ,1 a 1. ,n u.r 11,..- aCr,3'cp ," lra i,.-.r, .

Fordedlne clltol-re orviitww0jflrianco


ANNOUNCEMENTS


Cemetery Plots: (2) side by side
Memory Hill Hwy 52 "Garden of Devotion"
Section B, lot# 382 Plots 3 & 4
$2,200 OBO Call 334-792-0042


2 DO Mt~hoan Oo0S2to mrm 0 PN" LMMMo 0
New Special!!
S10 x 20 Only $50
3 Month Contract
201 Zenith Rd."
SCall 334-677-0808


OUR STOREWIDE SALE CONTINUES
THROUGH SATURDAY WITH
DISCOUNTS FROM 10-75% OFF DEPT.
STORE RETAILPRICES.
AMOUNT OF DISCOUNTS ON EACH ITEM
WILL BE POSTED IN STORE.
NOTHING HELDBACK.
AIR CONDITIONERS, FANS, CAMPING,
TENTS, MICROWAVES AND MUCH MORE.
Open M-S 9-6 PM
LOCATED AT 231 S. & RCC, DOTHAN NEXT
TO SOUTHSIDE KMART.. 334-714-9658

Man's Yard Sale 2136 Morris Road.
Kynesville. Sat.S'ept, 28th (7am-until)
Multi Family Yard Sale 1787 Tennessee Street.
Alford. Sat. Sept. 28th (7am-?) Boys clothes,
,furniture, H/H items and more.
Williams & Pelt Yard Sale Saturday, September
28, at 4926 Jasmine Drive 2 miles north of CVS
on Hwy. 71. Deer Stands, Hunting Supplies &.
Clothes, Tools, Furniture & Lots More

*m'1~ ~ NG 1 111111'I II I^


-7

Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY
(14) Town Homes for Sale
1 block off circle,
great income & fully occupied.
Owner Finance
with good down payment
386-312-6363 4

Janitorial Business for sale
'Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
4 504-915-1474 4-


Prerect Opportunity To Own
Your Own Business!
SDOTHAN ICE CREAM SHOPPE
For Info Call (334) 618-7030,

If You Have It and Don't Need It...
Sell It in the CIASSIFIEDS


CKC Shih-tzu Puppies: 4 sweet baby girls. First
shots, wormed & vet checked. Come and pick
out your puff ball today! $400. Call or text Ann
334-587-2632. Email dasheeses@yahoo.com
(6l) FARMER'S MARKET


Fresh Green
Peanuts
We also have
S shelled peanuts
850-352-2199
850-209-3322 or 850-573-6594
4128 Hwy 231











HOME GROWN. FRESH


AIBll Fam Fesh
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
334-793-6690


Top Qqality Coastal Bernuda Hay
for Horses and Cattle- Large Rolls
Fertiized & Weed Control
850-209-9145 4-


TREES TREES
.' TREES
12ft.tall 30 gal.
containers
S $49.95ea.10 or
more $39.95
Live Oaks, Crape Myrtle,
Cherry Laurel & Magnolias
By appointment
334-692-3695


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
.your area.
No tract tosmall / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
334-389-2003 -


(LI) MERCHANDISE

Now with Two Locations in Dothan 479-0491 or
479-8277 Mon thru Fri 8 to 6 Sat 8 to 2
Car Stereo Sales/Installation
(Pioneer, Memphis, Kenwood)
Lifetime Warranty
Window Tint $89 front two windows
Cars & Trucks $189
SUVs $250 SUVs Ceramic Tint,
Tint Removal, Car Wash/Details
Rock Bottom Audio and Tint


*,- GUN SHOW *
September 28th & 29th
National Peanut Festival Building *
Hwy 231 S. Dothan, Alabama
Over 275 Tables *
Sat. 9-5 9 Sun. 10-4
Call 334-279-9895


DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
NEEDED I BUY SEALED/
UNEXPIRED BOXES
CALL BOB (334) 219-4697
OR 850) 710-0189

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Baby Things Store
"Like Us" On Facebook Buy & Sell
Swings, Cribs, Fomula, Toys & Clothes
1330 Hartford Hwy Ste 1, Dothan 334-794-6692
( ) PETS & ANIMALS

7 mo. Papillon (F) $200. Yorkies,
& Chihuahua -, 334-718-4886 4
Adorable AKC Sheltie puppies available for
their new forever homes. We have 1 tri female,
1 sable male, 2 tri males. Pictures on Facebook,
at Tinker's Shelties. (334) 718-6840.
AKC Reg. Boxer Puppies
wormed & shots
fawn W/ black mask & fealed brindle.
6-Male/! I-F emale $600. ea, 334-494-4620
Also pictures upon request
ThAT'IS ChASsifiEd


Bikes (2) 1-girl & 1 boy 26" Huffy, multi-speed
$50.:ea Like New 850-849-3198.
English Sadie $150; Sadie bags exc. cond.
$60. 850-482-4455 .
Mandolin 8 string $250. 850-272-2572:
Old Wooden Door- 36x80 w/Glass Panel $150;
Utility Trailer- 4x8 $350. 850-209-0593


Refrigerator: Frigidaire $150; Freezer: upright,
Kenmoore $50; Microwave $10 850-482-3365
Silver Tea Set 4-piece, over 100 yrs. old. great
condition $400. 850-272-2575.
Sofa Sleeper: brand new $250; Daybed: $50 Call
239-272-8236


Sudoku
i'~ ~~~ ~ i '.-_


4 9 8 7
1_ 2


6 173

4. 8

9 4 6 8
.1 9
215 6_


5 6 9
3 6 9 4
----__ -_- -_


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.


Level: U 2 [3]
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit
www.sudoku.org. uk.
Solution to Thursday's puzzle
95287346
726943851
483165972
149TT 678523

632519784
578432619

897324165
2157362 3 8
2- 1 5 7 9 614 3 8


9/27/13


~'k


I


ace a A d Fast, easy, no press
P lace an 24 hours a day, 7 d<
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


ire
ays a week!


1; I W; i0


-7


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




A K'F F PLAC


Corn shelled or ear for cattle or deer feed 1-
S__ o850-592-9726 or 850-592-2350 __ ''-



Adets*or"CO TF"b viitn wwwjfoidncm Se sit foetis







rL E--:A-4. ^-*-, .--k^- 1"7 177 2 IA tL-%nn nC unmrt- PFl -iridqn


CTASSIFIEDS


B11 0rd% elm e 7 I aJcsnLon ir a A


EMP,..VMETr /Austin Tyler& Co *
TRANS *POR TTI'Nl &LOISIQuality Homes & Apartments
"* 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"


C clean 3br/lba home in town, nic
W A NTED hood $750. mo. + $750. dep. 1 yr
NO PETS. Ref/Req 850-482

Paper Carrier MOILHE1
2/1 MH in Afford $360. mo. $
N Mature 850-579-8882/850-209-1664/85
I Reliable 2/2 country setting, Sneads-Gran
water, sewage, lawn & garbal
Business Minded No Pets $400. mo + dep. 850-
SProof of Insurance 2/2 MH South of Cottondale Cen
nDependable Transportn4ation $500. + dep. & 2/1 MH H/A $450.
Dependable Trnsp o lawn care is furnished, 850-352-43
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in
EAR $ |$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewi
http://www.charloscountryliv
EARN,, $ 850-209-8847 4.
5 n00 8 0n 2BR 1BA at Millpond $495 + de
$Jv$5 0m$ U0 water/sewer/lawn maintenance
Per month AFTER expenses access to pond. No pets 85
Per month AFTER expenses 3/2 Nice in country 16iX80 neat
carport, storage bldg. edge of tow
$650. mo. $700. dep. water & sew,
Bid for Contract at the Front & Back porch Call 850-i
Countyrliora For Rent: Greenwood Mobile Hom
Jackson County Flordan, br. 2 ba. home with water and gar
4403 Constitution Lane, ed. No pets, no smoking. Lease $4
M$495 deposit. John 615-428-1518
^ _~Marianna, FL'fr f^ ;CME
( ";I ,COMMER
__ _ __ _MEN__ __ 1 'REAL ESTATE F


River Valley Rehabilitation 1000sq.ft officespace available
Center I, now hiring: ( / ) : RESIDER# T,
Center Is now hiring: $700/mo including utilities. 850-52
* Weekend House Supervisor. RN 6 ) E--S-- E -
Part Time 7a-7p : F M L A ,I!E
Coffee County, AL 80 acres-
House Supervisor. RN 5 miles Northwest of Elba. Go
Full Time 7p-7a investment/hunting property with
and hardwood/creek. View other
Coffee, Henry, Barbour, Pike &
RN's / LPN's afmlandsales.com or call Chucl
PRN, 7a-7p and 7p-7a 850-258-1605 Lic. Real Estate
d :[;ATERi-i j
Food Service Aide Beautiful Waterfront Home Fo
Full Time on 1/2 ac. attached mother-in-
141 Sunflower Ct. Georgetown, (
Great Pay and Benefits seller Will be pay $2500. closi
Health, Vision & Dental See Pictures on:
For Sale By Owner Listing 2
Please Apply at Contact Donna Morgan 334-6i
n. .. ..-^ missdmoraqan@yahoo.c
River Valley Rehabilitation Center miss moran ahooc
17884 NE Crozier Street (infll LEQAI
Blountstown, Fl. 32424 .
Ph: (850) 674-5464 S, -W[,
Fax: 674-9384 LF160249
Emfail: rvhrc@southernltc.com
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE F
Drug Free Workplace- Safe Minimal Lifting JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
Environment An EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION DIVISION
G E LM O CASE NO.: 32-2009-CA-0
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
GOODY'S Plaintiff,
NOW HIRING In Marianna; FL vs.
Store Manager SHANE E.JOHNSON etal,
Defendant(s).
(Full Time)
GO~d'S OfS NOTICEE OF FORECLOSURE
Goody's offers competitive wages. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
and'great benefits. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuar
enrs ueto: Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosur
Send resumes to. tember 04, 2013 arid entered in Ca
Howard Wright, District Manager 2009-CA-000985 of the Circuit Cou
n' noa nr a, tore c"' s ire IFOURTEENTH.Judicial Circuit in an
hWnght@StageStOrS.COI SON County, Florida wherein JPMI
~ CHASE BANK. NATIONAL ASSOCI/A


SCO L NS. ISRCO


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


I


l ICI.'W


SLook ahead to your B SEJn lI U '
future! Start training I"'II
FORTI$ ~~for a new career in i i i
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....J I I.1 111IU I .
AA.E-UIS
Apartments 0f orRentn Geeo4
2BRS451BR$ -400
Call 850-326-4289. "i
Cedar Creek Apartments 1BR/1BA $500
Appliances, lawn care &.pest control included.
Must be 62 or older or disabled. Call 850-352-
3878 or email cedarcreek@nchousing.net
CHIPOLA APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND 1 BEDROOM
APTS. FOR ELDERLY. SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE ON ALL UNITS. FOR RENTAL
INFORMATION CALL (850) 526-4407
TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
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1 & 2BR Apartments In Marianna
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Lot rent included. For details
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I .2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595 I
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JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDANR

jcfloridan.com



-nonsrero

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


CESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE
LLC1, is the Plaintiff and SHANE E JOHNSON;
AUNDREA C JOHNSON; are the Defendants,
The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at
NORTH DOOR JACKSON COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, MARIANNA, FLORIDA
at 11:00AM, on the 14th day of November,
2013, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment:
COMMENCE AT A 1 INCH IRON PIPE MARKING
THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF
SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 12
WEST; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 01 MI-
NUTES 38 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTER-
LY LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHEAST QUARTER FOR 685.52 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID POINT ALSO BEING
IN THE CENTERLINE OF A COUNTY GRADED
ROAD (FAMILY COURT); THENCE NORTH 29 DE-
GREES 06 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST, ALONG
SAID CENTERLINE FOR 669.50 FEET TO THE PC
OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST
AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 138.48 FEET;
THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE
FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.10 FEET, SAID
ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING NORTH 54 DE-
GREES 46 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST, AND A
CHORD DISTANCE OF 119.98 FEET TO THE IN-
TERSECTION OF SAID' CURVE AND THE NORTH-
ERLY LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
THE NORTHEAST QUARTER; THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 07 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID NORTHERLY LINE FOR 435.53 FEET
TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID NORTH-
WEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER;
THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 38
SECONDS WEST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY LINE
OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTH-
EAST QUARTER 605.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL BEING ALL THAT
PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
NORTHEAST QUARTER LYING NORTH AND EAST
OF SAID COUNTY GRADED ROAD IN SECTION
34, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST,
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
A/K/A 2142 FAMILY COURT, COTTONDALE, FL
32431
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any; other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on September 11,2013.
/s/ Dtale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk.
Publish in Jackson County Floridian
Invoice To: Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09106066 CHASEDIRECT-CONV-R-jzephir-
Team 3 F09106066
Copies Furnish to: eserVice@wolfelawfl.com
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.
LF160228
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT INAND FOR JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No. 13-729 CA
CITY OF MARIANNA,
a Florida municipal corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
J. M. WISE. R. W. WHITEHURST, N. H. LEATH, G.


GRATPET


C. BELL, CHARLEY LONG, J. G. MYRICK, and
DAVE DICKENS, as Trustees of John M. Wise
Lodge No. 316, Free and accepted Masons, and
their successors in Office, and working under
Protection of the Most Worshipful Union Grand
Lodge Inc., Florida jurisdiction, IF ALIVE, AND, "
IF DEAD, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS, AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL UNKNOWN
NATURAL PERSONS, IF ALIVE, AND IF DEAD OR
NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, THEIR SEV-
ERAL AND RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, AND CREDITORS,
OR OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PER-
SONS; AND THE SEVERAL AND RESPECTIVE UN-
KNOWN ASSIGNS, SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST,
TRUSTEES, OR ANY OTHER PERSON CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER OR AGAINST ANY
CORPORATION OR OTHER LEGAL ENTITY
NAMED AS A DEFENDANT; AND ALL CLAIM-
ANTS, PERSONS OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR
CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS
IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE
ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS
OR PARTIES OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
OWNED BY THEM,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: J. M. WISE, R. W. WHITEHURST, N. H.
LEATH, G. C. BELL, CHARLEY LONG, J. G.
MYRICK, and DAVE DICKENS, as Trustees of
John M. Wise Lodge No. 316, Free and accepted
Masons, and their successors in Office, and
working under Protection of the Most Worship-
ful Union Grand Lodge Inc., Florida jurisdiction,
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED.that a Complaint seeking to
foreclose an Assessment Lien with respect to
the following described property, to-wit:
Lot Number Four (4) in Block Two (2) in subdi-
vision of the South of the N.W. 1A of the S.W.
14 of Section 4, Township 4 North, Range 10
West, known as Merritt Ad. To Marianna, Fla.
[Parcel Identification No: 04-4N-10-0289-0020-
0040]
Street Address of Property: 2858 Eva Mae
Street Marianna, Florida 32448
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defenses
to it, if any, on Plaintiff's Attorney, Frank E.,
Bondurant, whose address is Post Office Box
1508, Marianna, Florida 32447, on or before the
4th day of October, 2013. You must file the
original of your written defenses with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court, Jackson County Court-
house, 4445 Lafayette Street (Post Office Draw-
er 510), Marianna, Florida 32447, either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
after service; Otherwise, a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint-
DATED this the 3rd day of September, 2013.
/s/ DALE RABON GUTHRIE, CLERK
Jackson County, Florida
By:Rachel Laramore
As Deputy Clerk


LFSTORAGE


_jl


I


q







Jackson County Floridan *


Friday, September 27, 2013 7 B


*I


As.5 V As n I


only


you can advertise your automobile in the

classified section of the Jackson County Floridan for 10 days!

Call the Wiregrass Classified Marketplace

and ask for our September Auto Special.


CALL 1800-79i27 A A ISA

nm -1 I S S ] 5 *- w -a. "q =


[ATV ] [GO CARTS, GOLF ARTS.: ;

HUNTER's SPECIAL
2012 BAD BOY BUGGY Michael Waddell Bone
collector series. #403 of 500
for sale, exc. cond $11,500. FIRM
334-687-8937 Leave Message


S2009 Triton 17' Tourna-
Mment Sports. 50hp Mercu-
ry. 3 batteries & 3 battery
charger installed, GPS fish
finder in cockpit; fish find-
er up front w/recessed trolling motor control
lpedal w/71 Ib thrust. 24Vtrolling motor. Excel-
lent cond, housed inside. $9,000. 334-673-0135
21' Runabout, Cuddy Cabin 5.0 liter V8, 2005.
Very low hours and clean, new custom cover.
Full factory enclosure. $15,995. 334-714-5433
Bass Tracker 1982 16 ft. 40 hp Mercury motor,
2 elec. anchors, 2 fish locators, new trollin
motor, just been tuned up, new water pump
w/ many extras. $2800. 334-618-1983.
Chaparral 15ft Walk Thru Windshield Boat bot-
tom re-fiberglass, with 80HP Mercury, needs :
water pump, good trailer $1,250. Call 334-790-
5370
Pontoon Boat 2008 20ft: G3 fish & Cruise, pur-
chased new July 2009, 30 gallon gas tank, fish
finder, 90HP, 4-stroke, Yamaha engine. Exc. gas
mileage. Asking $13,500.334-897-6929.


Forest River 2012, 28ft. Salem Cruise Lite, one
slide-out, queen bed plus two bunk beds, like
new, parked in Eufaula at Waterfront Fishing
Campgrounds selling below wholesale, $12,000
765-661-3795

L~7 TJ~POFTION


JEEP 1994 WRANGLER, 4 cylinder, 5 speed, 4
wheerdiive. 86K miles$4,750 Call (334)695-
2945 l


GMC 1979 Caballero Diablo in 2010 NEW GM
350 target engine, radiator, battery,, gas tank,'
water pump, 4 Indy 500 tires. Bench seat
recovered, red interior, silver paint ,
$4,995. 850-209-0526'
AUTS FRSALE


Chevrolet 2008 Corvette:
Black, 6 speed, new brakes
and tires, 46.000 miles. In
excellent condition.
$27.900. Call 334-714-0770'


Chevrolet 2009 Cobalt 2-door, 5-speed, silver in
color, less than 8000 miles, $8965. 334-792-3903
or 334-435-5823.
|Chevy 1992 Corvette Con-
vertible: Red with white
top, gray interior, power
windows, power door
locks and power seats, fully loaded, 71k miles,
asking $U,000. Call 334-441-6042
Ford 2002 Explorer: 8 passenger, green with tan
leather interior,.bluetooth stereo, recent tune
up and oil change, 212k miles $3,800 OBO
Call for questions or to make offer 334-585-
5288 or 334-618-0857
Ford 2006 Ranger XLT Super Cab. 4 door model,
V6/4.0 liter engine, power steering, tilt wheel,
cruise control, power windows, power door
locks, power o/s mirrors, AC,'AM/FM with CD
player, bed liner, tow package, new tires, new
battery, 34000 original miles, white with grey
cloth interior, floor mats. Excellent condition,
$13,950. 334-585-3891. leave message.


GMC 2012 Sierra Z71: Quicksilver metallic
color, ebony leather interior, SLT trim, 5.3
Vortec, Bose, heated/cooled seats, off road
package, rear vision camera. Excellent
condition. $35,200. Call 334-714-0770


GOT BAD CREDIT?
#* $0 Down/Ist Payment,
I e. Tax, Tag & ritle Pass
Ai Repo pass bankruptcy
SIi SLOW CREDIT OK
Ask About $1000. off at time of purchase.
S .* Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
-Honda 2008 Odyssey EX-L.
78,800 miles. 3.5L V6, Auto,
fully loaded, Aluminum
gray ext. Tan leather int.
Entertainment/DVD, in-
dash navigation. Fold flat 3rd row seats. Rear
power sliding doors. Power windows, doors &
sunroof.'Gopd Michelin tires, fresh full synthet-
ic oil change. Clean title, clean CARFAX. No ac-
cidents or damage. Superb condition. Southern
vphilep nnn-smoker. 61 6875. 334-803-5508


Jeep 2004 Wrangler: yellow, soft top, 135k
miles, over $3000 in upgrades, 5 speed manual,
creat shape $10,900. Call 334-618-4430 -


Jeep 2005 Liberty XL: Excellent Condition, 138k
miles, gold with tan leather interior, sunroof,
completely loaded. $6,000. 334-237-1039
S Mercury 2003
lMountaineer: Very well
Maintained SUV. All wheel
drive. Fully equipped with
all options. $6,500. Call 334-790-1233

Nissan 2012 Versa. Gas'Prices Going Up, Get
Great Fuel Mileage, $250 down, $250 per
month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243


Pontiac 2006 Vibe, low miles. Super Sharp!
$200 down, 1889 per month. Call Ron Ellis 334-
714-0028.
Toyota 2011 Camry, Super Sharp! Low miles,
must sell, $200 down, $249 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 334-714-0028.
i Volvo 2008 C30 T5 (turbo)
61,000 mi. Leather seats,
power seats & windows,
heated seats, Sunroof.
Bluetooth, navigation,
AM/FM radio, CD player, keyless entry. Great
cond. $17,500. 334-477-6831 or 334-477-6839


K-2002 Harley-Davidson
Sportster XL1200C Cus-
tom. Excellent condition.
Screamin' Eagle II exhaust.
Saddlebags & cover includ-
ed. Beautiful bike. $5,000.
Contact 440-213-7702 for more information.
2003 Anniversary Edition 1200 Sportster
6,700 miles, like new 1-owner, garage kept,
matching helmet, exc. cond. $8000.
334-726-1671.
Harley Davidson 2004 Soft Tail Standard, black
9,300 miles, 1 owner, garage kept, mint condi-
tion, $6000. in chrome accessories bought.
$10,000. 334-726-1671.
Honda 2006 VTX 130ORS:
black, like new, water
cooled, shaft drive, only
7200 original miles,$5,000.
Call 334-648-6166

SPOR[] T UTLITY~i&'
GMC 2007 Yukon SLT 2WD
B Located at Lemon Lot on
Westgate Pkwy. Original
owner. Brown/tan leather
seats. Loaded. 95,300 mi.
Z 7 i 4 brand new tires. Priced
below blue book. Excellent
condition. $19,800. Call Todd 334-596-2925.
JEEP 2000 Grand Cherokee 4x4, blown engine,
rest in excellent condition $1,000 334-232-4751


SDodge'1998 Dakota SLT,
Club Cab, loaded, cold
air, excellent, 120,000
miles, automatic, V-6.
Price $4995. 790-7959.
S Ford 2000 Taurus SE,
wagon, loaded, like niew,
one owner, automatic,
3.0 liter V-6, only 35,000
miles, $4495. 790,7959.:


GMC 1997 Sierra 2500
128K miles on new
engine, exc. cond. black &
silver in color. NEW tires,
cold air, long wheel base, runs great & very
clean $4500. 334-701-2596 located in Ozark


Nissan 1998 Quest Van: new tires and battery,
oil phapged and tune up, great sound system,
sunroof, luggage rack, whistle clean, great me-
chanical condition, AC needs work $1,200.
Call 850-209-1204

S(II IT! YELL IT! FMfI 0 IT!


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!


SALUTO BODY & RECYCL (NO
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR Fi K CARS
ContactJason Harger at 334-791-2624


CALL FOR TOP PRICE
[ FOR JUNK VEHICLES
I ALSO SELL USEDPARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664

-M&WlO Got a Clunker :
SWe'll be your Junker! :
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
0 fair and honest price!
S $25D&f Complete Cars
L CALL 334-714-628& 2
WANTED Dogde Ram Charger 1990 or 1991
4-wheel drive, 1-owner, low mileage,
well maintained I!1 not wrecked, no rust
334-447-1747; -
r ------------------------------- -
a* We buy Wrecked Vehi e


334u7t4.957o a 3447914714> ^

WE WILL BYYOUR CAR OUTRIGHT :
Regardless of year, make, modef.rWe have .,
mnillonsofdoilarswonfandto _ayyog'Sood.,
.'Money f youfcureht yehijcle.,
We Aie.On The Coast But.WrtWhThe Drive,
& reputable, we can give you a fair prilc
Appraisal in I5ninutes.; .;
Cd tppO~tiTnb de*r. 877d97-74 :


Ci


FIEDS


Nissan 2013'Sentra, Great gas mileage, all pow-
er equipment, AM/FM/CD, AT. $300 down, $300
per month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243


VC11161c, livil-alilvaVI-p- ul-






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


National Football League


Despite 3-0 start, tackling a problem for Dolphins


TheAssociated Press .' "'. '


DAVIE The Miami Dolphins
know they won't keep winning if
their tacklers keep whiffing.
Missed tackles by Miami have
resulted in mediocre defense
against the run, which was ex-
pected to be the team's strength
this season. Instead, the Dolphins
are giving up rushing yardage at a
disturbing rate, which makes their
3-0 record even more surprising.
"We have to tackle better," coach
Joe Philbin said. "We are not go-
ing to invent a whole lot of new
defenses. We've just got to execute
our techniques and fundamentals
better, and our No. 1 fundamen-
tal that we work on every single
day is tackling. We've got to do it
better."
Wrapping up will be especially
important when the Dolphins
play high-powered New Orleans
on Monday night. The Saints claim
they haven't noticed the Dolphins
being poor tacklers..
"Hopefully, they are and it works
out to my advantage," said Pierre
Thomas, a hard-churning runner


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Dolphins cornerback Nolan Carroll tackles Atlanta Falcons wide receiver
Julio Jones during the second half of Sunday's game in Miami Gardens.


who can be tough to bring down.
"I kind of do have that unique tal-
ent of breaking tackles, and I'm
going to use that to the best of my
ability."
In defense of Miami's defense, it
has been depleted by injuries, with
four starters missing most or all of
last week's win over Atlanta. The
status of two-time Pro Bowl end
Cameron Wake, tackle Paul Soliai


and cornerback Dimitri Patterson
for the Saints game is uncertain.
Reserves played well enough to
limit the Falcons to three points
over the final 27 minutes in a
come-from-behind, 27-23 victory.
The Dolphins have allowed only
-one touchdown in the second half
this year.
The defense ranks among the
league leaders in the red zone, on


third down and in interceptions.
Miami made late stands to pre-
serve leads against both the Fal-
cons and Colts.
"In.the past we gave up a play to
lose at the end ofthe'game," tackle
Randy Starks said. "Two weeks in a
row, we haven't done that."
Despite a succession of late
lapses, defense has been the Dol-
phins' strength in recent seasons,
and that was expected to be the
case again this year. Newcomers
Wheeler, linebacker Dannell Eller-
be and cornerback Brent Grimes
have made Miami faster and more
athletic, and takeaways are up.
But the Dolphins rank in the low-
er half of the league in both rush-
ing defense and pass defense. And.
now they must deal with Thomas,
Drew Brees, Darren Sproles, Jim-
my Graham, Marques Colston
and perhaps Mark Ingram, who
has been nursing a toe injury.
"We want to be one of the most
feared defenses in the league, and
we know you can't just'say that,"
Ellerbe said. "You've got to go out
and prove it, and you've got to get,
after people."


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE It
would be understandable
if the Jacksonville Jaguars
made at least a few, maybe
even wholesale, changes.
They're winless through
three games, losing each
by double digits, and have
scored a league-low 28
points.
They've been outscored
55-5 in the first half, have
no running game to speak
of, have allowed 15 sacks
and been gouged on the
ground.
Coach Gus Bradley cer-
tainly could justify just
about any move. Instead,
he's "looking for little
tweaks that could make a
big difference heading into
Sunday's game against In-
dianapolis (2-1).
"I don't think 'you'll see
any drastic changes, but I
think.you might see some
subtle changes," Bradley
said Wednesday. "We want
to be careful what message
we send them, so it's not
like were going to come
back and now we're going


STHE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jacksonville quarterback Blaine Gabbert looks for a receiver
against the Kansas City Chiefs in Jacksonville on Sept. 8.


to run quarterback up on
the center, huddle every
play, two-back throw, etc.
It's not going to be like
that. I think within our
scheme, what can. we do
to increase that productiv-
ity and increase the flow of
our offense?"
The Jaguars are counting


on the return of two key
players.
Quarterback Blaine
Gabbert (hand) returns
after missing the last two
games, and tight end Mar-
cedes Lewis (calf) expects
to make his season debut.
Any other .potential
changes will have to wait.


The Jaguars are sticking
with left guard Will Rack-
ley, who has taken the
brunt of the criticism for
the team's offensive strug-
gles. Rackley said Wednes-
day he's dealing with bone
and muscle bruises in his
left knee.
"It's getting better: It just
takes time," Rackley said.
"Every player deals with
something. You just have
to go with. Obviously, you
want to be at 100 percent,
but you can't complain
about it."
Jacksonville ranks 30th
in the league in rushing,
averaging 52 yards a game.
It's nowhere close to where
the Jaguars expected to be
with Maurice Jones-Drew
recovered from a foot in-
jury that kept him out the
final 10 games last season
and most of the offseason.
The Jaguars also have four
of the same five offensive
linemen who helped paved
the way for Jones-Drew to
lead the league in rushing
in 2011. The new addition
is right tackle Luke Joeckel,
the second overall pick in


April's NFL draft.
"We've just got to be
more efficient on run
downs," Jones-Drew said.
"We can't come out and go
negative rush yards in the
beginning.' We've just got
to continue to work on it
and figure it out.... We just
haven't been-getting posi-
tive gains on first- down
so we' want to work to do
that and continue that
going."


Tigers
From Page 1B
the potential of a team
led by veteran Bulldogs
coach Jim Anderson.
"Jim Anderson does
a great job and in my
opinion is one of the
best coaches in this
state. If there's a guy that
can get them ready for
Friday night, it's him,"
he said. "Freeport is the
type of team that if you
have a weakness they're
going to try to exploit
it and attack you where
you're not sound. Coach
Anderson does a great
job of identifying those
things and attacking
you where you're not
sound, so we've got to be
at the top of our game.
We've got to go out and
-play the way we've been
taught to play, and if we
do that, then we can get a
win."
Often when teams
struggle as much as the
Bulldogs have to start
the season, players will
lose motivation and
things can begin to un-
ravel even more, though
Wise said the last thing
he expects to see tonight
is a Freeport team that
isn't willing to fight.
"That team won't lose
heart. Jim Anderson
won't allow that to hap-
pen," the coach said. "I
thinkhe does a phenom-
enal job of inspiring his
players and preparing
them to play above and
beyond their level of
talent. There's no ques-
tion when they come to
Graceville that they'll be
ready to play."
The game kicks off at 7
p.m.


Bulldogs
From Page 1B
Bulldogs to within two at
28-26 with 4:16 remaining.
The Marianna defense
then came up big with a
stop thanks to a sack of
Thurman at the Chipley
33-yard line with just" un-
der three minutes to play.
The Tigers punted the
ball away, but Marianna's
Anton Wiflliams muffed' the
kick and Chipley recovered
with 2:33 to play at the
MHS 30.



Rankings
From Page 1B
tailback Todd.Gurley lead-
ing the way, is seventh in
the nation in yards pbr
play at 7.83. LSU is ninth
at 7.53.
The other big game in the
SEC takes place in Tuscalo-
osa, where No. 1 Alabama
faces No. 21 Mississippi.
The Rebels spread it out
and play fast like Texas
A&M, but Ole Miss presents
very different challenges.
"Even though the of-
fenses may be similar, the
philosophies are not the
same," Tide coach Nick Sa-
ban said.
No. 4 Ohio State faces its
first stiff test of the season
when No. 24 Wisconsin
comes, to Ohio Stadium on
Saturday night.
No. 22 Notre Dame is an
underdog for the second
straight season to Oklaho-
ma. Of course, that didn't
stop the Fighting Irish
from beating the Sooners
in Norman last year. Any
hope the Irish have of get-
ting back to the BCS title
game would be dashed
With a second loss.


Thurman kept the ball
for three straight runs,
converting a backbreaking
first down on the second,
and then took twvo knees to
run out the clock.
The Chipley QB finished
with three ;total touch-
downs on the night, rush-
' ing for two and passing for
another while complet-
ing 3-of-3 passes for 143
yards,.
DJ Curry led the Tigers
in rushing with 79 yards
on 15 'carries, with'Sims
accounting for 179 total
yards rushing and receiv-


ing and scoring two TDs.
Couch ended up with 111
yards and two scores on 16
attempts to lead Marianna,
while Olajuwon Brown ran
for 39 yards on five carries,
and Williams also had a
touchdown run. '
Chipley scored on its first
.two series of the game, go-
ing 67 yards on 10 plays
on the first drive and scor-
ing on a l'-yard TD run by
Sims, and then taking it 53
yards on eight plays with
Thurman scoring from 2
yards out to make it 14-0.
Williams' 1-yard TD run


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',
in the closing seconds of
the second quarter gave
the Bulldogs their only
score of the'first half.


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-18B FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013


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