Jackson County Floridan

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Title:
Jackson County Floridan
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Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co. ( Marianna Fla )
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oclc - 33284558
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Full Text




Martin's mother speaks


7 dead in hostage shooting 6A


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online

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SCHOOL GRADES

Some schools lose ground in FCAT


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Marianna Middle and
Grand Ridge Middle
Schools, along with all but
two of Jackson County el-.
ementary schools slipped
one letter grade this year
in a state assessment
based largely on their stu-


.INSIDE
i Annual grades fall
.sharply for Florida..
schools IOA .

dents' FCAT performance,
school officials learned
on Friday. High School
scores will not be released
until later this year.


Sneads Elementary re-
tained its A and Cotton-
dale Elementary retained
its B, but Grand Ridge,
Graceville and Riverside
dropped from an A to a
B, as did Marianna Mid-
die School. Riverside's B
was also assigned to its
feeder school, Golson
Elementary, because


Golson's younger K-2 stu-
dents are not tested on
FCAT.
Things could have been
worse for two of those
schools if not for the safe-
ty net that was strung by
the state about two weeks
ago. State Commissioner
See FCAT, Page 11A


DEBORAHAULTERl/nO4RfD
J.C. Lovett Jr., In foreground, right and his brother Eddie talk with customer Harvey Williams, foreground, ft and
Shirley Gray at the Marianna City Farimners Market.



Brothers share their


burdens and


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Brothers Eddie and J.C. Lovett Jr.
both live on.the home place where
they and their five sisters were
raised, and they share the burdens
and benefits that come with run-
ning their family farm and busi-
ness, Lovett Enterprise.
J.C. is retired at age 61, so he can
)man their booth at the Marianna
City Farmers Market on Tuesdays
and Thursdays, as well as Satur-
days. He has the gift of gab, and
often lingers past the market hours
to chat with a regular who some-
times drops by to sit a spell. Ed-


die, 53, still works with the Jackson
County School Board's food ser-
vice department on weekdays, but
takes vendor duty on Saturdays at
Sadie's Flea Market near Dothan.
Together, they grow collards,
kale, okra, several varieties of peas,
watermelon, tomatoes, squash and
cucumbers, with about 15 acres
of their 40-acre spread devoted
to growing market produce. They
learned how. to farm from their fa-
ther, J.C. Sr., and learned from their
mother, Mary, how to preserve food
for their pantry. Having respon-
sibilities on the farm as children
not only taught them skills, it also
provided them some cherished


county

memories of their parents, both
now deceased. For instance, they
recall with tenderness the many
days they sat shelling peas and
butterbeans with their mother.
Each man has a role in every as-
pect of the farm, and sometimes
those overlap. Both enjoy meeting
their customers and like the social
opportunity that market days give
them.
J.C. does most of the planting,
while Eddie keeps a close eye on
things during the growing season,
performing maintenance when
there's a need. Both gather their
See BROTHERS, Page 10A


No school tax increase for Jackson


From staff' reports
Unlilk property owners
in several other Florida
school districts, Jackson
County taxpayers will
not face an increase in
the "required local effort"
element of this year's
school board millage. The
required local effort is the
weightiest of six elements
that make up the millage
rate, with its mandatory
total set by the state.
Last year, Jackson


,p~ri FAf s olrbPjyI
S- e is.a .', se for.

County's required local
effort was set at 5.40, that
element costing taxpay-
ers $5.40 cents for each
$1,000 of their property's
taxable value. This year,
it has gone down to 5.24,
a 16-cent dip for taxpa-
pers, to $5.24. It made up
the bulk of last year's to-


,tal school board millage,
which totaled 6.40 mills,
or $6.40 per $1,000 of tax-
able value.
This year, the Jackson
County School Board is
proposing a slightly lower
overall millage of 6.36, a
figure that includes the
required local effort. The
proposal will be the sub-
ject ol a public hearing on
July 30 at 5:01 p.m. in the
school board's meeting
room at 2903 Jefferson St.
in Marianna.


Other elements that
make up the millage in-
clude optional line items,
like a basic discretionary
assessment to help with
the school system's oper-
ating expenses. Jackson
County School Board
is proposing tq set this
at .748, with rounding
pushing it toward .75, or
nearly 75 cents for every
$1,000 of taxable value.
The school board is not
See SCHOOLS, Page 11A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
. Shirts like those allowed in Jackson County's. new school
dress code are displayed outside Michael's Toggery, Friday In
downtown Marianna. Apparel is one category of goods exempt
from the state's sales tax holiday Aug. 2-4.
Shoppers, stores


prep for Aug. 2-4


sales tax holiday


BYANGIE COOK
acook@gmail.com

Whether your wallet
needs a break on back-
to-school buys or you just
have a yen for some retail
therapy, count your pen-
nies now and make plans to
take advantage of Florida's
sales tax holiday weekend:
Aug. 2-4.
From lig-box outlets to
small, independent stores,
retailers across the state
won't be collecting sales
tax (7.5 percent in Jackson
County) during that time,
on a number of items -
clothing, school supplies,
computers and more.
Florida Retail Federation
CEO Rick McAllister, on a
Thursday conference call,
answered questions about
the upcoming tax holiday,
when many popular back-


to-school items can be pur-
chased without having to
pay sales tax.
"Clearly it is a stimulus
to Florida's economy, and
we're excited about it."
Not everything is tax-ex-
empt, but the broad cat-
egories cover most needs
of students headed back to
class this fall. That's good
news for many Jackson
County parents who are
shoppingforitems required
by the school board's new
dress code policy. On cloth-
ing and accessories, up to
$75 per item, they'll pay no
sales tax. The same holds
true for pens, pencils, cal-
culators and a host of other
school supplies, up to $15
per item.
The big change this
year is the addition of
See HOLIDAY, Page 11A


Thx-fe tech

Computers, tables,

readers new to holiday
S2 1ru o accessories' without tthe
S added cost of sales, tax
If you've been eyeing a (7.5% in Jacksdon (*mn-
new gadget, Aug. 2-4 ty). But, gamers, -don't
Florida's sales tax holiday get excited about finally
weekead- .mightbethe getting your mitts., on
time to pounce.. that screaming water-
This. year's sales tax cooled, pre-built rig, and
holiday," .wihe, savvy entrepreneurs, this isn't
shopper, cah save on a green-light to outfit
back-t0-cthool and'ooier' your start-up staff wlth
purcihases, has a shiny tricked-out business
new addition to its list of gear. To qualify for tax-
tax-exempt items: Tech. exempt status during the
In addition to the usdal three-day holiday, each
suspects -' apparel and tech item must cost-less
school supplies con- than $750 and:, must be.
sumers can now pick purchased for'personal,
up,"personal comput-
ers and certain related See TECH. Page UA


MARK SKINNER/fLORIDAN
Tablets and e-readers, like these offered Friday In the Marianna
Walmart, are among the new tech Items Included In Florida's
Sales Tax Holiday this year.


) CLASSIFIEDS...8B


) ENTERTAINMENT...5B


)) JC LIFE...3A


)) OBITUARIES,...11A


)) OPINION...4A


:r T . r , ." .' o ,. ,


This Newspaper A"
Is Printed On (
Recycled Newsprint




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Vol.90 No.159


SSPORTS...1B


SLOCAL.,.5A






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com .


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RIVER READINGS
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Reading
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THE SUN AND MOON
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Aug. Aug. July July
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JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com
Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email- editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520. Marianna. FL 32447
Stret Addmss
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hour
Weekdays, 8 am. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL


SUBSCIPTON RATES
Home delivery. $11.23.per month: $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid ih advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months:
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

S ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shfiall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments In which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of anj advertisement beyond the
amount paid forsuch advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTOGETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements,
Forms are available at the Floridan offices..,
Photographsmust be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


, JCFLORIOAN.COM


Community Calendar


SUNDAY, JULY 28
18th White, Purdee and Spires Biennial
Reunion July 26-28 at Citizen Lodge in Marianna.
Sunday: Rev. Brian Hankerson brings the message
to family and friends, 8 a.m.
SAlcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to people with a desire to stop
drinking.
SA:lcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in
the boardroom of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital.
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, JULY 29
SChIldren'i Summer Feeding Progam Morn-
ing snack at 9 a.m. and lunch at noon at St. James
A.M.E. Church. 2891 Orange St. in Marianna. Free
program is available Monday-Friday for children
through the age of 18. Morning snacks such as milk.
juice, cereal and lunch items such as sandwiches '
and wraps will be served. This is an open walk-in site,
no pre-registration is required. Call 850-615-2934.
* Parkinson's Support Group Noon in the
ground-floor classroom of Jackson Hospital. 4250
Hospital Drive. Marianna. Lunch provided. Those
diagnosed with Parkinson's and their caregivers are
invited. Parkinson's DVD series continues with this
month's topic: "Exercise." No cost to participate. Call
718-2661.
a Employability Workshop "Understading
the Workforce" 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One
Stop Career Center. 4636 U.S. 90 in Marianna. Visit
EmployFlorida.com to register or call 718-0326.
a Jackson County Quitters GuNd Meeting
- 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 U.S. 90 W., Marianna. Business meetings are
fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects, les-
sons. help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
SAlcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, JULY30
a Marianna City Farmers Market 7 a.m. to noon
at Madison St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh
fruits and vegetables grown by local farmers.
* PPLCS Work Group Meeting 9 a.m. at the
Panhandle Public ULibrary Cooperative System of-
fices, 2862 Madison St., Marianna. Call 482-9296 or
visit www.pplcs.lib.fl.us.
* Spring/Summer Clothing Sale 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. at St. Anne Thrift Store, St. Anne Catholic
Church in Marianna. Call 482-3734.
* Orientation Noon to 3 p.m. at Goodvill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn about
and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
* Sewing Circle -1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call 482-
5028.
3 Employability Workshop "Employabllity Skills"
- 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career Cen-
ter, 4636 U.S. 90 in Marianna. Visit EmployFlorida.
corn to register or call 718-0326.
a School Board Public Hearing/Meeting 5:01
p.m. in the JCSB board room, 2903 Jefferson St.,
Marianna. Purpose: To adopt tentative budget and
mileage rates for 2013-2014. Call 482-1200.
)) Extension class: "Meals on the Grill In 30


Minutes" 6-8 p.m. at Jackson County Extension,
Room B. 2741 Pennsylvania Ave.. Marianna. Learn
how to grill entrees, side dishes and desserts. Cost:
$7. R.S.V.P. by July 23. Call 482-9620 or email aman-
dangriffin@ufl.edu.
SAlcohocs 'Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m, in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church. 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 31
3Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in theAA room of First United Methodist
Church. 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
SDeadlne for the School Choice Open Enrol-
mnt To attend the school of their choice:
students must complete and sign JC-296 from the
school of their choice and a signed performance
contract with that school. Make contact with the
school of choice to attain the required forms.

THURSDAY, AUG.1
a Appication deadline for Chipola College Fall
2013 Semester. The schedule of classes is available
online at www.chipola.edu. Call 718-2211.
* Marlanna City Famers Market 7 a.m. to noon
at Madison St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh
fruits and vegetables grown by local farmers.'
3 Chipola Civic Club Meeting Noon at The Oaks
Restaurant, U.S. 90 in Marianna. The CCC's focus
is the local community. "Community. Children &
Character", Call 526-3142.
* Marianna Khwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2290.
a Job Club Noon to 3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center. 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn job
seeking/retention skills: get job search assistance.
Call 526-0139.
SQuit Smoking Now Class/Support Group
- 5:30 p.m. at Jackson Hospital Cafeteria Board
Room. Free to attend. Curriculum developed by ex-
smokers for those who want to become ex-smokers
themselves. Call 482-6500.
a Extension class. "Meals on the Grill In 30
Minutes" 6-8 p.m. at Holmes County Ag Center,
1169 East U.S. 90, Bonifay. Learn how to grill entrees,
side dishes and desserts. Cost: $7. R.S.V.P. by July
25. Call 850-547-1108 or 850-638-6265, or email
jlcorbus@ufl.edu.
* VFW & Ladies Auxiliary Meeting 6 p.m. at
2830 Wynn St. in Marianna. Covered-dish supper
followed by a 7 p.m. business meeting. Call 372-
2500.
* 6th Annual Summer Concert Series featuring
SChester's Curve 7-9 p.m. at Citizens Lodge in
Marianna. This free event is presented by Jackson
County Parks and Recreation and Main Street
Marianna.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8-9
p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia
St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance limited to
people with a desire to stop drinking; papers will not
be signed.

FRIDAY, AUG. 2
3 Knitters Nook-10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters ate welcomed. Call 482-9631.
3 Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,


teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
3 Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY. AUG.. 3
3 44th Annual Wausau Possum Fun Day
Events throughout the day beginning with a pan-
cake breakfast at 6a.m. Activities will include food
and craft vendors, a dunking booth and waterslide,
inflatables. music groups, various contests and
much more. To finish out the day of activities', there
will be a dance from 7-10 p.m. featuring Straight
Shooters.'$5 admission fee.
Maruimna City Fanners Market -7 a.m. to noon
at Madison St Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh
fruits and vegetables grown by local farmers.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meetbig 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in theAA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SUNDAY, AUG. 4
SAlcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to people with a desire to stop
drinking.
Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting-8 p.m. in
the board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital.
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY. AUG. 5
SPatmor/Hale Book Signing 1-3 p.m. at
Chipola River Bobk & Tea. 4401 Lafayette St.
in downtown Marianna. Local author Mary Lou
Patmore, whose pen name is"Wahletta Hale:' will
sign copies of her book, "My Brother's Finder-My
Brother's Keeper." a mystery about her brother's
death.
3 Jackson County Quilters Guild Meeting
5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 U.S. 90 W., Marianna. Business meetings are
fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects, les-
sons, help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
3 Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, AUG. 6
3 Marianna City Fannmers Market 7 a.m. to noon
at Madison St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh
fruits and vegetables grown by local farmers.
3 Optimist Club of Jackson County Meeting
Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna.
3 Orientation Noon to 3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90 ,'Marianna. Learn about
and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
)) Sewing Circle -1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call 482-
5028.
Jackson Coqnty's National Night Out 2013
4-7 p.m. at Madison Park in Marianna, Sponsors
are CrimeStoppers of Jackson County, Marianna
Fire Department, Chipola College, Marianna Police
Department and other agencies. Free hot dogs,
chips and drinks. There will be activities for the
entire family. Call 718-1030.


The submission deadline for this calendar Is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P.O 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorlal@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for July 25, the latest
available report: one suspi-
cious vehicle, one suspicious
incident, three suspicious
people, one structure burglary,
one vehicle burglary, one verbal
disturbance, one burglar alarm,
three traffc stops, two follow-
up investigations, three juvenile
complaints, two animal com-
plaints, one fraud complaint,
one retail theft, one public
service call, one patrol request,
one threat and four home


security check

JACKS
SHERIFF




4 r"*

following incli
one accident,(
three abandon
one reckless d
cious vehicles
people, one es
way obstruct1
four verbal dis


Police Roqndup'
(s. woodland fire, 13 medical calls,
three burglar alarms, one panic
)N COUNTY alarm, 13 traffic stops, two lar-.
F'S OFFICE ceny complaints, one criminal
The Jack- mischief complaint, two tres-
son County pass complaints, two assaults,
Sheriff's OffiCe one suicide attempt, three ani-
and county mal complaints, two assists of
fir/cuety motorist or pedestrians, three
reported the assists of other agencies, two
ents for Jly 25: public service calls, one welfare
one dead person, July 25 check, two transports and one
ondd phlero, report of counterfeit money.


l^tU VVJMAVWOf
river, two suspi-
, six suspicious
escort, one high-
pn, one burglary,
sturbances, one


JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following people were
booked into the county jail dur-


ing the latest reporting periods:
D James Bellamy, 55, 7373
Highway 231, Cottondale,
failure to appear (trespass after
warning).
a Ray Williams, 30,109 NE
38th Ave., Birmingham, Ala.,
failure to appear (driving while
license suspended or revoked).
Shaverick Cooper, 38, 2776
Panhandle Road, Marianna,
retail theft.

Jail Population: 201
To report a ci ime, call Ci imeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


-"2A SUNDAY, JULY 28,2013


WAlE-UP CALL








JAKONCUTYFOIDANI'I!J'III

ackson1 Cou.1I I Ph hIf e _PAGE__3_A
b- SNDYJUY 8,01


On Saturday afternoon,
from 2-4 p.m., the Rev.
Jack Hollis and his wife,
Shellie, celebrated their
50th wedding anniver-
sary with friends and
well-wishers.
The Christian Center
Church, which they have
pastored for more than
43 of those years, hosted
the celebration at the'
church, which is located
directly behind the new
Marianna High School.
CCC had it's beginning
in the Hollis' living room
as a prayer meeting
and swiftly grew into a
church.
Jack and Shellie are pas-
tors to several other full-
time pastors from Atlanta
to Panama City, and from
Tallahassee to Crestview.
Shellie is known for her
patience and endurance,
having lived with Jack
since July 27, 1963 while
maintaining her sanity
and sweetness.
Shellie was born in
Donaldsonville, Ga, and
moved to Marianna in
the second grade and is
a graduate of Marianna
High School. Jack was
born at-home on Market
Street in. Marianna in
1939. He dropped out of
high school in the ninth
grade, but with Shellie's
encouragement he re-
ceived his GED, then his-


bachelor's and master's in
theology
They have one son,
Quinton, who is a ser-
geant with the Jackson
County Sheriff's Depart-
ment, a daughter-in-
law, Brandy who is a
paramedic/firefighter in
Walton County They also
have an adopted daugh-
ter, Rene, who is a fifth-
grade teacher, and three
grandchildren, Nick,
Aiden and Karissa.
During these years in
the ministry they have
helped thousands of
people come to a knowl-
edge of, and relationship
with the lord. They have
performed over 450
weddings and then set
an example of longev-
ity through many trials,.
mistakes, and blessings
for those they married.
They also pioneered
total Christian radio in
Marianna, WJNF-FM,
which continued for over
25 years before being sold
toWAY-FM.


Birthday


Walk Chlthm Watw,
daughter of Will and
PattyWester, celebrated
her ninth birthday on
April 12 and 13, with a
"Birthday Beach Bash" at
Vehtute Out in Panama
City Beach.
Four girlfriends spent
the night with Willa at'
the beach, and enjoyed
tacos for supper, followed
by several fun activities:
putt-putt golf, shuffle-
board and free time on
the playground.
The next morning, the
girls enjoyed swimming
in the heated pool by the
Grand Lagoon. Other
family and friends joined
the birthday girl for a cel-
ebration cookout. Grilled
hamburgers, hot dogs,


baked beans, potato
salad, chips and dip were
served.
Willa's chocolate-chip
cookie cake was deco-
rated with large flip-flops
made of icing and nine
candies.


MARK SKIMlNNiR/-LURIUDAN
Monkey Is a 3-to-4-year-old neutered male peke-a-poo. He
was originally found running loose at the Marianna Airport
and was adopted a year ago. He came back to the shelter
because of his owners encountered a housing change. He is
friendly and housebroken, but needs a fenced yard. If you are
interested In adopting him, the Partners for Pets shelter Is
at 4011 Maintenance Drive In Mqrianna. Its hours are 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. The
shelter's phone number Is 482-4570; the webslte Is wwly.
partnersforpets.petflnder.com.
Jay Is a 10-week-old
orange male tabby.
This kitten was found
trapped in a privacy
fence and was rescued
by firefighters. If you are
Interested In adopting
him, the Partners for
Pets shelter Is at 4011
Maintenance Drive In
Marianna. Its hours are
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday-
Friday and 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. Saturday. The
shelter's phone number
is 482-4570; the website
Iswww.partnersforpets.
petflnder.com.. MARK SKINNI R/OIl OIRAN


Ja'lynn Kay Thomas
was born at 9:22 p.m. on
July 13, 2013 at Jackson
Hospital in Marianna.
She weighed 6 pounds, 6
ounces and was 19 inches
long at birth. Her parents
are Amanda Sangster and
Jon Thomas.


Maxwell Shawn Smith
was born at 9:15 a.m. on
July 15, 2013 at Jackson
Hospital in Marianna.
He weighed 8 pounds
and was 21 inches long
at birth. His parents are
Kayla and Shawn Smith.


50th Anniversary


Remember to thank those who helped you


here are many peo-
plein the world that
have studied and
worked hard to become
successful in life. Whether
that success comes in the
medical field, professional
sports, the field of enter-
tainment, as a mechanic,
the field of cosmetology,
as a teacher, preacher, or
any other occupation that
can lead to a comfortable
lifestyle, an individual
should be thankful for
their accomplishments
A wise, successful per-
son will realize they didn't
get to be successful by
themselves. What is hard
to understand, is how
or why so many people
who are successful, seem
to get amnesia when it
comes to remembering


and respecting those that
have been pivotal in help-
W ing them
succeed.
After thank-
ing God for
His many
blessings, it
would mean
Thomas a lot for
Vincent the parents
MUrPhY who had to
make many
sacrifices in order for their
children to succeed, to be
reminded by those chil-
dren, from time to time,
how much they were and
are appreciated.
In some cases, siblings
unselfishly help one an-
other by sacrificing some
of the things they would
enjoy doing, so another
family member can move


forward. A short tele-
phone call of appreciation
to parents or a sibling
from time to time can do
wonders for them.
When many students
graduate from elementary
school, high school, col-
lege or graduate school,
they don't take the time
to thank some of the car-
ing, sincere teachers who
helped them consistently
move toward their goals in
life; by taking a personal
interest in a student to
help them reach the finish
line. It's great when an
individual comes to a time
in their life when they
take time to look back and
think of those who have
been very important in
their lives.
Some of the most


encouraging people in
life haven't been able to
reach their personal goals,
because of mopey or for
one reason or another;
yet they were there to
boost a friend or acquain-
tance when that friend or
acquaintance needed it
most. Some of our sincere
preachers of "The Word"
should be commended for
the work they do to help
people spiritually and by
guiding them in the right
direction.
To all those who have
been unselfish and uplift-
ing toward others in life,
keep those special char-
acteristics; blessings will
Surely come your way!

SEmail Thomas Vincent Murphy at
tvamj@yahoo.com.


Chipola Artist Series season tickets on sale Monday
Special to the Floridan


Chipola Artist Series sea-
son tickets go on sale to the
public Monday, at 7 a.m.
Online tickets may be
printed at home or with an
order confirmation. Will-
call tickets will be avail-
able at the box office the
night of the show.
Director of Fine and Per-
forming Arts, Evelyn Ward,
said, "Season ticket sales
are expected to go quickly
once they are offered to
the general public, so don't
miss out."
Tickets will be available
in the Center for the Arts
box office July 29-Aug. 28,
Monday through Wednes-
day from 2-5 p.m.
This year's lineup in-
cludes Sweet Potato Pie,
sharing a classy blend of
Americana, Bluegrass,
Country and Gospel mu-
sic, on Aug. 29.
Voices of Lee, a 16-mem-
ber a cappella vocal en-
semble from Lee Universi-
ty in Cleveland, Tenn., will
perform Oct. 4.
On Jan. 16, 2014, concert
harpist Anna Maria Me-
dieta will present the pas-
sionate and sensuous mu-
sic of the Argentine tango
and Spanish flamenco
complete with Latin in-


The Chlpola Artist Series 2013-2014 lineup, (from left), Inludes Sweet Potato Pie. Voices of
Lee, harpist Anna Maria Medleta and the Golden Dragon Acrobats.


struments and flamenco
dancers.
Recognized throughout
the U.S. and abroad as
the premier Chinese ac-
robatic touring group, the
Golden Dragon Acrobats
will amaze audiences with
their breathtaking skill
and spellbinding beauty
on April 1, 2014.

See TICKETS, Page 5A


In Loving Memnory of
Glenda Lynn Stokes-Tennysonm
07/27/83-05/29/12

God Bless Youl \
We Will Always
MISS YOUI
Love,,
Tyler, Scren & Aunit Marti


Births

Ryder Chase Sikes was [ {
born at 6:31 p.m. on July 15, '
2013 at Jackson Hospital in '
Marianna. He weighed 8 "
pounds, 4.6 ounces and was
21/4 inches long at birth. '
S His parents are Christina
Olivia Wilkinson and Justin .
S Sikes. Grandparents are Bt Q
Patrick Wilkinson and Reta
Aaron from Grand Ridge,
S and Stephanie Sikes and
Paul Sikes from Bristol.
Great-grandparents are Dessie Franklin and Danrny
Wilkinson from Grand Ridge.
Triton Wayne Howell .
was born at 8:55 a.m. on
July 18, 2013 at Jackson
Hospital in Marianna.
He weighed 7 pounds, 15
ounces and was 20 inches
long at birth. His parents
are Candace and Colt
Howell. Grandparents are
Myrtle and Terry Green,
Shannon Howell and Stan
Howell from Grand Ridge.













Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


The Tampa Tribune


GOP should pull


ad with teacher's


comments
ost of us were taught to be polite when we're
invited into someone's home. So it's no sur-
Sprise that finalists in the annual Teacher of
the Year competition said nice things about Gov. Rick
Scott at a recent gathering in the governor's mansion in
Tallahassee,
; They didn't know those interviews would be hijacked
by the Republican Party and used in an advertisement
for the governor's re-election campaign.
At least one of the those teachers isn't happy about it.
"I don't think it's appropriate for me to be in any politi-
cal ad, Democrat or Republican," middle school teacher
Apryl Shackelford told the Tribune's William March.
Despite those public comments, the state's GOP con-
tinues to stand behind the ad, saying the videos taken
during the gathering are public records available for
anyone's use....
Scott's record on education is evolving. After cutting
education funding his first year in office, he restored
some of that funding the next year and successfully
pushed lawmakers to include funding for teacher raises
this year. That's what inspired the positive comments
from Shackelford.
But she would rather those comments not become
politicized.
She drew support last week from state Rep. Karen
SCastor Dentel, a Democrat from Maitland who is a
schoolteacher. Castor Dentel wrote to Scott objecting
to the use of the teacher interviews in a political ad,
noting they were conducted by public employees and
occurred during a public event paid for by tax dollars.
Sure, the lawmaker may have some political motives
herself here, but she is correct that the teacher inter-
views were misused.
Scott may not have had anything to do with the cre-
ation or distribution of the ad, but he should push the
state GOP to quit running the ad. At the least, Shackel-
ford's image and comment should be removed.
After all, most of us were also taught to treat our
guests with respect.


The (Daytona Beach)
News-Journal


Twinkies defy our


fiafree trends
T, ostess Brands and their stock of snacks, includ-
Sing the beloved Twinkile, are back, defying a
l .major trend against sugary food.
The political culture has become increasingly hostile
to sugary snacks and drinks. But Hostess Brands' re-
birth proves that in America, you cannot easily dismiss
a tasty, high-calorie snack.
; Since November, U.S. consumers have been de-
prived of such Hostess Brands snacks as Twinkies and
CupCaks.
' Hostess Brands disappeared after bankruptcy pro-
ceedings brought on by feuding with iunioniworkers.
The owners threw their hands up and decided to let-
someone else worry about delivering the snacks daily to
consumers around the nation. The company was sold
to new investors.
* That also ended production, albeit temporarily Last
fall, as news of the Twinkle apocalypse spread, sales of
Hostess snacks jumped 31,000 percent that's 31,000
- according to the Dallas Morning News.
SPeople didn't miss what they had until it was about to
disappear. They flocked to the stores and snatched up
the last remaining Twinkles and Ding Dongs.
Then came a period of fasting....
It appears that Twinkles will remain on America's
21st-century menu, despite the temporary financial
disruption.
SHostess Brands' bottom line and maybe America's
too will get fatter even with all the nagging about
obesity.
So no matter what New York Mayor Michael Bloom-
berg decrees about snacks, obesity and fatty foods,
Americans will continue to hanker for snacks of ques-
tionable nutritional value.
. But it should be noted that the Twinkies are report-
pdly a little smaller this time around. That could be
considered a concession to the health crusaders as
long as Americans don't eat more Twinkles to make up
the difference.


2013 Jeff Staler/Dit. by Universal UCc for UFS
2013 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by UnIversal UCl~ck for UFS


Health care reform drives GOP mad


If insanity is defined as do-
ing the same thing over and
over and expecting a different
result, it's tempting to observe
that congressional Republicans
have gone stark, raving mad. My
own GOP congressman, Rep. Tim
Griffin, recently delivered himself
of an opinion column boasting
about having "voted more than
30 times to repeal all or parts of
Obamacare."
Only in politics does somebody
expect praise for sheer futility.
Characteristically, Griffin's
column began by misrepresenting
Sen. Max Baucus. No, the retir-
ing Montana Democrat didn't call
Obamacare a "train wreck." In
context, Baucus was complain-
ing about Congress' refusal to
adequately fund programs helping
people understand the law. With so
much disinformation out there, he
feared that public ignorance would
lead to citizens initially missing out
on its benefits.
But then fostering public igno-
rance is the whole GOP game plan
at this point. Having been defeated
in the House and Senate, failing to
have Obamacare declared uncon-
stitutional by the Supreme CourL,
and being rejected by voters in the
2012 presidential election, disinfor-
mation and sabotage are all they've
got left.
In that spirit, Griffin quoted the
Washington Examiner, one of
those tycoon-funded right-wing
propaganda publications reporting
that "cost estimates from 17 of the
nation's largest insurance compa-
nies indicate that health insurance
premiums will grow an average of
100 percent under Obamacare, and
that some will soar more than 400
percent."
Yeah, well the results are start-
ing to come in. In California and
New York, the nation's two most
populous states, which have set
up health care exchanges, premi-
ums have dropped sharply below
Congressional Budget Office
projections.


GeneLyons


According to The New York Times.
"State Insurance regulators say they
have approved rates for 2014 that
are at least 50 percent lower on av-
erage than those currently available.
in New York. Beginning in October,
individuals in New York City who
now pay $1,000 a month or more
for coverage will be able to shop for
health insurance for as little as $308
monthly. With federal subsidies, the
cost will be even lower."
Similar savings have been
achieved in California. They can be
expected anywhere that large num-
bers of Americans can be persuad-
ed to buy into the program and quit
playing health care roulette.
But then that's how insurance
works auto insurance, life insur-
ance, homeowners' insurance, ALL
insurance. By spreading the risk,
you lower the cost to individual
customers.
That's the basic insight that led
Benjamin Franklin to found the
Philadelphia Contribution for
Insurance Against Loss by Fire back
in 1752. The more people purchase
private health insurance through
Obamacare, the lower their pre-
miums and the lower the eventual
cost to taxpayers.
Not to mention the enormous
gain in personal freedom to
individuals who can no longer be
denied coverage due to "pre-exist-
ing conditions," bankrupted by
unexpected medical conditions,
or forced to keep a job they dislike
for fear of losing health insurance.
Under Obamacare they can take it
with them.
A certain kind of Republican,
however, still doesn't get it. Here's


GOP patriarch Ronald Reagan in
1961 inveighing against the dangers
of "socialized medicine." Unless
Americans rejected it, he predicted,
"one of these days you and I are go-
ing to spend our sunset years tell-
ing our children and our children's
children what it once was like in
America when men were free."
And what was Reagan talking
about? Medicare. Should it be
enacted, he warned, the plan to
provide for Grandma's medical bills
would lead to government seizure
of all doctors' offices and hospitals.
An all-powerful state would dictate
where Americans would live and
what their jobs would be. .
Of course, the Gipper was only an
actor, reading a tycoon-approved
script. After he became president,
he vowed to protect Medicare, al-
ready one of the most popular and
successful government programs
in U.S. history- along With Social
Security, another threat to freedom
as the scripted Reagan saw it.
It's true that with red-state
politicians dragging their feet, and
Republican congressmen whose
offices routinely assist constituents
to work out Medicare and Social
Security problems telling reporters
they'll refuse to help with Obama-
care, the short-term rollout could
be bumpy.
Partisan passions aside, people
want and need reliable health
insurance. Doctors, hospitals and
pharmaceutical companies need it
as well.'
This too: Never mind the politi-
cians. Health insurance companies
are going to market Obamacare
big-time. Since the law mandates
that 80 percent of premiums must
be spent on benefits, the only way
the insurance industry can en-
hance profits is by finding more
customers.
It's the American way.
Arkansas Times columnist Gene Lyons is a
National Magazine Award winner and co-author
of "The Hunting of the President" (St. Martin's
Press, 2000). You can email Lyons at eugenely-
ons2@yahoo.com.


Obama returns to 'Message: I care


In 1992, when a beleaguered
President George H.W. Bush
blurted out "Message: I care"
at a campaign stop in New Hamp-
shire, he accomplished the exact
opposite of what he intended.
Voters believed that Bush was
even more out of touch with the
economic problems of everyday
people than they'd thought.
We're about to see whether Presi-
dent Barack Obama's appeal for "a
better bargain for the middle class"
works better than the elder Bush's
awkward "I care."
Washington insider Bush lost his
re-election bid against outsider Bill
"j feel your pain" Clinton in large
part because the Arkansas gover-
nor could credibly argue that he'd
change Washington.
In 2008, Obama used his fresh
face as a Washington neophyte
to his advantage. Today, though,
Obama is undeniably an Insider,
having been elected president
twice. And yet he's fighting for his
agenda and his place in history by
distancing himself from the capital.
"Too often Washington has
made things worse," Obama said
Wednesday at Knox College in Il-
linois. He repeated the thought in
later speeches.
Obama is blaming Republicans
for thwarting his vision, and, yes,
he has faced a wall of partisan op-


MarshaMercer


position since Day One. But the
fact is, Obama can't even count
on his Democratic friends in the
Senate for support. Plus, he is the
chief executive, and as the sign in
Truman's Oval Office read, "The
buck stops here."
-When Obama dismisses troubling
revelations in his executive branch
bias at the IRS, cover-ups in the
State Department and widespread
snooping at the National Security
Agency as phonyy scandals," he
falls to Instill confidence that he
will do whatever it takes to clean up
the mess.
Reactions to Obama's new
Campaign tb prove he cares about
the middle class were predictably
political.
"It's a hollow shell; it's an Easter
egg with no candy in it," opined
House Speaker John Boehner,
R-Ohio, as if House Republicans'
voting about 40 times to repeal the
health care law knowni as


Obamacare was a solid-chocolate
bunny.
Obama is largely recycling his
proposals that have stalled in
gridlocked Washington. He appar-
ently thinks he can mobilize his
grass-roots base over the next eight
weeks to pressure the GOP to come
his way. But Obama is not in a
position of strength.
His job-approval rating is down
to 45 percent in the latest Wall
Street Journal-NBC News poll. The
only bright spot for Obama is that
people hold Congress in even lower
regard than they do him.
Only 12 percent of Americans ap-
prove of the job Congress is doing,
and just 32 percent say their own
member of Congress deserves to
keep the job. More than half say
it's "time to give a new person a
chance," the poll found. That's the
weakest support for Congress in
nearly 20 years.
In September, Republicans
threaten to play high-stakes rou-
lette with a government shutdown.
Dozens of conservative Republi-
cans are demanding that money to
implement and enforce the health
law be struck or they'll refuse to
keep the government open.
That won't help Americans sour
mood. Only 29 percent think the
country is on the right track a
19-month low.


NOW SHOWIft-lGIm





JACKSON COUN1 Y I I ORIDAN wwwictlotidan.comu


Welcoming neighbors for the Feast of Flowers


ach year, Orlando is mov-
ing to Florida.
Let's quickly clarify. A
recent story on National PuMlic
Radio states that 250,000 new
residents, or a number the size
of the population of the city of
Orlando, are moving to Florida
annually. For comparison,
imagine the state of Wisconsin
absorbing annually into its
economy as many new resi-
dents as currently reside in its
capital of Madison.
The U.S. Census Bureau
ranked Orlando (238,300) as
Florida's fifth-largest city in
2010. The latest official census
does not include newer resi-
dents. So the population within
Orlando's city limits is actually


closer now to 250,000. And obvi-
ously, there is a much greater
*population in the
Orlando metro-
plex than resides
within its city
limits.
The report also
Margaret states that the
lMcDowell vast majority of
-- new arrivals will
consist of baby
boomers and retirees. In some
cases these two groups are syn-
onymous; in others, not. Either
way, newcomers will add wear
and tear to state-maintained
highways, avail themselves of
public education opportunities,
and stress our state services in a
variety of fashions. Municipali-


ties will require larger police,
fire and public safety forces
to accommodate this growth.
What's the big deal? According
to Danielle Kurtzleben of U.S.
News and World Report, Florida
was tied for ninth with Oregon
in 2012 for the largest budget
shortfall among U.S. states.
Florida is a regional economic
prototype of the financial chal-
lenges that face the U.S. as our
population ages. In a nutshell,
this means more retirees who
contribute less significantly to
GDP, but who rely on govern-
ment programs and services.
Protecting tourism is para-
Smount for Florida's economy,
unique among American states.
With an estimated 90 million


visitors a year, Florida is the
largest tourist destination in the
world (official state website).
The industry has a $67 billion
impact annually here, a number
that is about twice the total GDP
of Vermont. Oil spills here carry
grave economic consequences.
In 2012, Florida's economy
grew at its fastest pace in the
last six years. Floridians, finan-
cially crushed by the decline in
home values, are now seeing
those values slowly escalate
again. Our ability to manage
this economic rebound with
sound fiscal planning is vital to
Florida's future.
We hope our new neighbors
will grow to love and care for it
as we have, and to contribute


to its GDP while utilizing its
services. For us, it is home.
As the late John D. McDonald
wrote of Florida in 1986, "Tacky
though it might be, its fate un-
certain, too much of its destiny
in the hands of men whose sole
thought was grab the money
and run... it was still my place
in the world. It is where I am
and where I will stay...."

Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a
syndicated economic columnist, Chartered
Financial Consultant and Accredited Invest-
ment Fiduciary, is the founder of Arbor
Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121,
www.arborwealth.net), a" Fee-Only "Reg-
istered Investment Advisory Firm located'
near Destin, FL. Arbor Wealth specializes
in portfolio management for clients with
$250,000 or more of investable assets.


MASTER MASON HONORED


he Rev. Dean

Gatch holds
the certificate
of appreciation he re-
cently received from
Harmony Masonic
Lodge No. 3 F&AM of
Marianna. The lodge
-e -." :honored past Wor-
shipful Master Gatch
for his 45years of
continuous member-
ship and fraternity.
His wife, Juanita, Is a
long-standing mem-
ber of the Order of the
Eastern Star.


%WUTTED PWOTO



Agency assessing plans


for plugging Gulf gas well


The Associated Press

NEWORLEANS-Aslight
sheen was visible again but
quickly dissipating Friday
near a damaged gas drill-
ing rig that blew wild and
burned earlier this week off
Louisiana's coast, a federal
agency said.
The rig blew wild Tues-
day morning and the
spewing gas ignited that
night, burning and heavily
damaging the rig owned by
Hercules Offshore Inc.
Authorities believe that
sand and sediment clogged
the well late Wednesday,
shutting off the gas flow
in what is referred to as a
"bridge over." Forty-four
workers safely evacuated
soon after the blowout
and. hours before the gas
ignited.
The clog was holding
Friday and BSEE, working
with well operator Walter
Gas & Oil, said assessments
on how to permanently
seal the well including
the possible use of anoth-
er rig to drill a relief well


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A fire Is seen on the Hercules 265 drilling rig In the Gulf of
Mexico off the coast of Louisiana on Wednesday.


- continued.
Once the well bridged
over, industry experts have
said, it became more likely
that well-control workers
will be able to seal or cap
the well itself. However, the
time-consuming process
of drilling of a relief well to
intercept the original one
and secure it with mud


and concrete remained a
contingency.
BSEE said Walter has
contracted to bring anoth-
er rig in "to potentially drill
a relief well."
The fire was out Thursday
morning, making it easier
for authorities to begin as-
sessing options for perma-
nently sealing it.


Military

Blount graduates basic training,


Special to the Floridan
Army Reserve Pvt. An-
thony "A.J." Blount gradu-
ated from basic military
training at Fort Jackson,
S.C., on June 7.
The intensive, eight-
week program Blount
completed included
training in military dis-
cipline and studies, U.S.
Army core values, physi-


cal fitness and basic war-
fare principles and skills.
SapBlount




Ioearning
Blount a promo-
tion in
rank. He is work-


ing through advanced
training at Fort Lee, Va.
Upon completion of his
military training, Blount
plans to finish his college
studies at Florida A & M
University in Tallahassee.
Blount, a Marianna
High School graduate,
is the son of Andrell and
Tammie Blount of
Marianna.


Spectra, NextEra team up


on $3B natural gas pipeline


The Associated Press

JUNO BEACH A joint
venture of Spectra Energy
Corp. and NextEra Energy
Inc. will spend $3 billion
to build a 465-mile pipe-
line that will bring natu-
ral gas from Alabama to
Georgia and Florida.
The companies said Fri-
day that they are building
*the Sabal Trail project for
SFlorida Power & Light Co.,
a subsidiary of electricity
supplier NextEra. Spec-
tra operates natural gas
pipelines.
The new pipeline will
end in Orlando, Fla., con-
necting there with two ex-
isting pipelines.
Florida Southeast Con-


Belaont loi wnth
Cjpalo protee

TALLAHASSEE
- Famed singer and en-
tertainer Harry Belafonte
is calling on Florida Gov.
Rick Scott to listen to
protesters who have been
at the Capitol for nearly
two weeks.
Protesters upset with
the verdict in the trial of
George Zimmerman
want Scott to call a spe-
cial session so legisla-
tors can alter the state's
self-defense laws. Scott
has refused.
Belafonte said Friday
that Scott still has a
chance to act before the
protests intensify and
thp situation becomes
"ungovernable."
Belafonte, who has
never visited Tallahas-


nection, also a subsidiary
of NextEra, will separately
invest roughly $550 mil-
lion to build a separate
pipeline connecting the
Sabal line with FPL facili-
ties in Indiantown, HFla.
Constructionis expected
to start in 2016. The pipe-
line is expected to become
operational in May 2017,
and should eventually be
able to ferry more than 1
billion cubic feet of natu-
ral gas per day, said FPL
FPL is Florida's largest
electric utility and natu;
ral gas user, with roughly
4.6 million customer ac-
counts. As such, it will be
the main customer for
the pipelines, the cornm-
pany said.


see before, was part of a
large contingent that was
chanting and singing in
the hallway outside the
governor's office.
Reports showed that 86
people spent the night
in the Capitol as part of
the protest. Protesters
say they are prepared to
continue their standoff
for weeks.


Shares of Spectra,
which is based in Hous-
ton, closed up 39 cents at
$36.75 Friday.
NextEra's shares slipped
29 cents to $83.66 in af-
ter-hours trading. The
Juno Beach, Fla., compa-
ny ended regular trading
down 13 cents at $83.95.


| P Philip


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Tickets
From Page 3A

Season tickets are $48.
Chipola says that's a
bargain price when com-
pared to sister institutions,
where prices are double or
triple this amount.
. Season-ticket holders
also are invited toVIP Meet
the Artist receptions and
early renewal privileges
for the next season.
Meet the Artist reception
hosts this year include:
First Commerce Credit
Union, First Federal Bank
:of Florida, Regions Bank
and Wells Fargo.
Some events are ex-
pected to sell out quickly.
Season ticket purchases
are the best way to be sure
to get the best seat in the
house.
For those who want to
brave single ticket sales,
prices are $14 for adults,
$10 for children under 18,


with special pricing for
Chipola students and em-
ployees. Individual tickets
for the first event .o on


sale Aug. 26.
Call 718-2277 or visit
www.chipola.edu/flne-
and-performing-arts.


*....................

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LOCAL, STATE & REGION


SUNDAY, JULY 28. 2013 5AF






,JAC('KSONCUL)UN'I Y I I.fll.AN p. 11-.1.'. l ,..rt


Gunman among 7 dead after apartment shootout

Ir,A,)o-:i..i(,lpress 1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


HIAILEAH A man set
fire to his South Florida
apartment, killed six peo-
ple, and held another two
hos.ige at gtilpoini before
a S\WVA I team stormed the
complex and fatally shot
him Saturday, accord-
ing to police and witness
accounts.
The ordeal lasted eight
hours, with Pedro Vargas
running through the build-
ing, firing at random and
eluding officers for part of
it, police said.
Vargas, 43, set a com-
bustible liquid on fire on
Friday evening to start the
blaze, police spokesman
Carl Zogby said.
The building 'manager
and his wife noticed smoke
and ran to the apartment.
' Vergas came out and shot
several times, killing both
of them, according to the
police account:
Vargas then went to his
fourth-story balcony and
fired 10 to 20 shots in the
street, killing a man who
was parking a car outside,
Zogby said.
Then, Vargas went down
to the third floor, kicked
the door in on another
apartment and killed a
man, his wife and their
teen daughter.
Zogby said Vargas then
ran through the building,


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS
City of Hialeah police block off the area of an apartment building at the scene of a fatal shooting
in Hialeah on Saturday.


firing "at random, in a very
irrational fashion."
"He kept running from
,us as he fired at us, and we
fired at him," Zogby said.
He forced his way into
an apartment and took
two people hostage at
gunpoint.
Ester Lazcano lives two
doors down from where
the shooting began and
said she was in the shower
when she heard the first
shots, then there were at
least a dozen more.
"I felt the shots," she
said.
Miriam Valdes, 70, lives
on the building's top floor
- one floor above where
the shooting began. She
said she heard gunfire and


later saw smoke and what
smelled like burned plastic
entering her apartment,
and ran in fear to the unit
across the hall.
A crisis team was able to
briefly establish commu-
nication with Vargas. Sgt.
Eddie Rodriguez said ne-
gotiators and a SWAT team
tried talking with him from
the other side of the door
of the unit where he held
the hostages.
Valdes said she heard
about eight officers talk-
ing with him as she stayed
holed up at the neighbor-
ing apartment. She said of-
ficers told him to "let these
people out."
"We're going to help you,"
she said they told him.


She said the gunman first
asked for his girlfriend and
then his mother but re-
fused to cooperate.
Rodriguez said thle talks
eventually "just fell apart."
Officers stormed the build-
ing, fatally shooting the
gunman in an exchange of
gunfire.
"They made the deci-
sion to go in there and save
and rescue the hostages,"
Rodriguez said. Both hos-
tages survived.
Neighbors said the
shooter lived in the build-
ing with his mother. Po-
lice don't believe she was
home at the time of the
shootings.
"He was a good son,"
Lazcano said. "He'd take


Miami-Dade morgue workers place objects in a oag outside
an apartment building at the scene of a fatal shooting in
Hialeah.


her in the morning to run
errands" and took her to
doctor appointments.
But Valdes said he was
known as a difficult per-
son who sometimes got
into fights and yelled at his
mother.
"Hle waits a very abusive
person," she said. "He
didn't have any friends
there."
Zogby called Vargas'
background "unremark-
able." He said police are
investigating any possible


disputes between Vargas
and the building manager
but don't yet have any in-
formation on a possible
motive. "Nobody seems
to know why he acted the
way he acted," Zogby said.
In Hialeah a suburb of
about 230,000 residents,
about three-quarters of
whom are Cuban or Cu-
ban-American--'the street
in the quiet, apartment-
building-lined neighbor-
hood was still blocked by
tape Saturday afternoon.


Halliburton has incentive to cut another deal


The Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Halliburton
has resolved a justice Department
criminal probe of its role in the Gulf
oil spill by agreeing to pay a $200,000
fine and admitting it destroyed evi-
dence, but the company still has a
powerful incentive to cut another
deal with businesses and residents.
The plea agreement doesn't shield
Halliburton from a high-stakes deci-
sion by a federal judge, who is con-
sidering how much the companies
involved in the 2010 well blowout
should pay for damage from the
nation's worst offshore oil spill. How
much each pays would be deter-
mined by how much fault the judge
assigns them for the disaster that led
to millions of gallons of oil spewing
into the Gulf.
Houston-based Halliburton, which
was BP's concrete contractor on the
Deepwater Horizon oil rig that ex-
ploded, can take its chances on get-
tingafavorable rulingby U.S. District
Judge Carl Barbier. Or it can elimi-
nate much of the risk and potential
liability by settling with a team of at-
torneys for tens of thousands of Gulf
Coast businesses and residents who
claim the spill cost them money.'
The guilty plea could apply more
pressure on Halliburton to get a deal
done before Barbier rules, although
one legal expert downplayed the pos-
sible effect of the criminal case on


s'1 *0> M'l, l'jhtVI''l
The Deepwater Horizon oil rig burns In the Gulf of Mexico In April 2010. Halliburton
Energy Services has agreed to plead guilty to destroyIng evidence In connection
with the oil spill.


the outcome of the civil litigation.
"It's not directly related to their
responsibility for the oil spill, so I
wouldn't think it would have much
influence at all," said Ed Sherman, a
Tulane University law professor.
In a regulatory filing Friday, Hal-
liburton said it is participating in
court-facilitated settlement discus-
sions to resolve a "substantial por-
tion" of the private claims pending
before Barbier. But the pace of those
talks has recently slowed while BP
challenges a portion of its own mul-
tibillion-dollar settlement with the
team of plaintiffs' lawyers, the filing
says.
"Reaching a settlement of the type


contemplated by our current discus-
sions involves a complex process,
and there can be no assurance as to
whether or when we may complete
a settlement," it added.
Halliburton won't face any other
criminal charges in connection with
the case, though individual employ-
ees could still be charged.
When BP reached its criminal
settlement with, the Justice Depart-
ment, the oil giant agreed to pay a
record $4 billion and plead guilty to
manslaughter charges for the deaths
of the rig workers. Rig owner Trans-
ocean Ltd., pleaded guilty to a mis-
demeanor charge and agreed to pay
$400 million in criminal penalties.


economy has led some
people In our area to
make bad decisions.
Let's be clear: If you witness
* taking an extra paper or newspaper theft,
coupon package is a crime, please contact
* we will prosecute, your local law
* the people most hurt enforcement.
by this theft are the
small businessmen and
women who buy and sell AS CO
newspapers. FLORIDAN


II'^^^^^^I-I-^



CALL NOWi! This Special Ends August 31,2013

.Mull prenil nei ,pqper Ad No' dlid n llh ypr io i,,i ,l!ds.'ini i mork ]I ,, 111 vaoy
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$200 Slue, Can not be combined wilh Insurauc D[lounts taken util il nd customary
ftC. Dicounts range from $5 to $1000. Oral urgry and endodlutlc sertcs tedcld, TIt3
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TO REFUSE PAYMENT, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMDUIRSED FOR PAYMENT FOR
ANY OTHER SERVICE EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED) AS A
RESULT OF AND WITfIN 72 HOURS Of RESPONIDIN(;TO THIIE ADVERTISEMENT (
FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR
TREATMENT '2751 PEM CROWN. ALL, FEES LISTED) ARE MINIMAL FEES ONLY OR
FARRUGIAA N4033.


DERMATOLOGY ASSOCIA [: S
.^K I'N k', C A\ i F Rv C- i IN"


~


-6A ;UrNO-:, JULY 28, 2013


STATE & REGION





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN wwwjcfloridancom SUNDAY, JULY 28,2013 7A r

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__8A SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013

State
Briefs
Man guilty
In fatal robbery
GREEN COVE SPRINGS,
-A Jacksonville man has
been convicted Qf two
deaths related to a rob-
bery he participated in.
A Clay County jury
found 20-year-old Derrell
Paul Emery Jr. guilty Fri-
day of first-degree murder,
second-degree murder
and armed robbery. He
faces a life sentence in
September. Because he
was 17 at the time of the
2010 robbery, the sen-
tence wasn't automatic.
Authorities say Emery
and 24-year-old Todd
Allen Bradshaw showed
up at a home 33-year-old
Leroy McDonald Jr. was
housesitting in with a plan
to rob him. The Florida
Times-Union reports that
McDonald was killed in
the garage following a
fight, and Bradshaw was
shot by an arriving deputy
as he attempted to flee the
scene.
Emery testified in
court that he didn't know
Bradshaw was going to the
home to rob McDonald.

Cab driver charged
with giving teen pot
KISSIMMEE Authori-
ties arrested a taxi driver
they say asked a teenage
passenger to fix him up
with a girl in exchange for
pot and alcohol.'
The 15-year-old passen-
ger told Osceola County
deputies that driver Aaron
Clements picked him
up in central Florida on
Thursday and dropped
him off at a party. After
the party, authorities said
Clements convinced the
teen to find a female for
himkn to hang out with. The
teen said he contacted
a 15-year-old friend on
Facebook and they drove
to pick her up. Authorities
said Clements gave the
teens cigarettes, alcohol
and pot.
Authorities said they
also found drug parapher-
nalia and pornographic
videos in the car.
Clements was charged
on Friday with drug pos-
session and contributing
to he delinquency of a
minor.
Drug charges against the
teens are penidinig. "' .


frwm warehouse
TAMARAC Authori-
ties say hundreds of cases
of cigars worth $250,000
have been stolen from a
South Florida warehouse.
According to the
Broward Sheriff's Of-
fice, surveillance video
showed multiple suspects
breaking into the Florida
Distributors Inc. ware-
house inTamnarac early.
Friday. The video shows
the suspects getting into
the warehouse through
the roof.
The Sheriff's Office says
that over the course of two
hours,.the suspects made
off with roughly 700 cases
of cigars in three vehicles.

'Dolphin Tale' sequel
to begin filming.
CLEARWATER "Dol-
phin Tale 2" is set tp begin
filming this fall at Clear-,
water Marine Aquarium.
Gov. Rick Scott an-
nounced the production's
return to the Tampa Bay
area Friday.
The first "Dolphin Tale"
movie had more than 55


production days in 2010
and added $17 million in
revenue to the state. After
the film's release, atten-
dance at the Clearwater -
Marine Aquarium qua-
drupled to about 750,000
annual visitors last year.
"Dolphin Tale" was
inspired by the real-life
rescue and rehabilitation
of Winter the dolphin.
Winter drew international
attention several years ago
when she was fitted with a
prosthetic tail. The sequel
will focus on another
dolphin calf named Hope
that was rescued in 2010.

_. From wire reports


JACK.;ON (OUN I Y I LO[IdAN www.jcfloridan.com


Martin's mother: 'Use my broken heart'


The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA The
mother of slain teenager
Trayvon Martin told a
National Urban League
gathering in Philadel-
phia on Friday to use her
tragedy to stop the same
thing from happening
to another child and she
blamed Florida's "stand
your ground" law for
allowing her son's killer to
go free.
Sybrina. Fulton issued
a call to action against
"stand your ground" self-
defense laws and told
the audience that she
believes -God is using her
and her family to make a
difference.
She said she was heart-
ened that her message is
getting through when, on
the way to the civil rights
organization's annual
conference, she handed
a card bearing her son's


Castro


pleads



guilty

The Associated Press

CLEVELAND A man
accused of kidnapping
three women, keeping
them captive in his Cleve-
land home for a decade
and raping them repeat-
edly is waiting to be sen-
tenced after pleading
guilty in a deal to avoid
the death penalty.
Ariel Castro, 53, a former
school bus driver, pleaded
guilty Friday to 937 counts
in the deal, which sends
him to prison for life with-,
out parole, plus 1,000
years.
Wearing an orange pris-
on jumpsuit, eyeglasses
and a bushy beard, Cas-
tro was far more engaged
than in previous court ap-
pearances when he most-
ly kept his head down and
eyes closed. He answered
the judge's questions in a
clear voice, saying he un-
derstood that he would
never be released from
prison and adding that he
expected he was "going
to get the book thrown at
me."
He told the judge he was
addicted to pornography,
had a "sexual problem"
and was himself the vic-
tim .of sexual abuse long
ago.
"My addiction to por-
nography and my sexual
problem has really taken a
toll on my mind," he said.
The judge accepted Cas-


photograph to a driver
and he told her, "That's
mly son, too."
"So my message is com-
ing across, and it's coming
across the right way," Ful-
ton told attendees.
The message, she said,
is. to use her son's story
to prevent other children
from dying the same way.
"My message to you is
please use mystery, please
use my tragedy, please use
my broken heart to say to
yourself, 'We cannot let
this happen to anybody
else's child,'" she told the
audience.
Fulton supports an in-
vestigation into whether
her son's killer could be
charged under federal
civil rights laws and she
attacked Florida's "stand
your ground" has having
"prevented the person
who shot and killed my
son to be held account-
able and to pay for his


awfidul crime."
A jury acquitted George
Zimmernman of all crimnli-
nal counts in the slay-
ing of the unarmed 17-
year-old. Martin was
shot and killed during a
confrontation with Zim-
merman that has spawned
a national debate about
"stand your ground"
laws in Florida and other
states. ,
Earlier Friday, a juror
told ABC's "Good Morn-
ing America" that she feels
like she let down Martin's
parents. Juror B29 said in
the taped interview that
the panel couldn't find
enough evidence under
Florida law to convict the
neighborhood watch vol-
unteer in Martin's death
last year.
The National Urban
League's conference ran
through Saturday at the
Pennsylvania Convention
Center.


TH kSSOCIATLD PRESS
Casrtro carterr) and defense attorneys Cratg Weintraub
and Jaye Schddachdet, stand hi the courtroom Friday in
Cleveland.


troy's plea, declared him
guilty, and set his sentenc-
ing for Thursday.
The women, who did not
attend the court proceed-
ing, said in a statement
they were relieved by the
conviction.
"They are satisfied by
this resolution to the case,
and are looking forward
to having these legal pro-
ceedings draw to a final
closee" said the statement
released on their behalf.
Castro's uncle, Julio Cas-
tro, who has run a nearby
comer store for 44 years,
said the ordeal will be
with the family the rest of
their lives.
"He's getting what he
deserves," Castro, 77, said.
"Nobody has the right
to incarcerate you for 10
years."
The three women disap-
pearedseparatelybetween
2002 and 2004, when they
were in their teens or early
20s. Each said she had ac-
cepted a ride from Castro,
who had remained friends


with the family of one of
the women and attended
vigils over the years mark-
ing her disappearance.
The women escaped
fromhishomeMay6when
one of them kicked out
part of a door and called
to neighbors for help. Cas-
tro was arrested and jailed
shortly afterward.
He had been scheduled
for trial in August on a 977-
count indictment, but 40
counts were dropped as
part of the plea deal.
Castro was accused of
restraining the women,
sometimes chaining them
to a pole in a basement,
to a bedroom heater or
inside a van. The indict-
ment included two counts
of aggravated murder re-
lated to accusations that
he punched and starved
one of the women until
she miscarried.
Gina Dejesus, Aman-
da Berry and Michelle
Knight disappeared when
they were 14, 16 and 20
years old..


Cases of intestinal illness reported


The Assocloted Press

TALLAHASSEE-Florida
health officials say they're
investigating 23 cases of a
stomach bug that has in-
,fected more than 320 peo-
ple In 14 states and New
York City.
The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
says most of the cyclospora
infections occurred from
mid-June to early July.
It's not clear whether the
cases are all linked.
Cyclospora causes di-
arrhea and other flu-like
symptoms. The illness
spreads when people
ingest foods or water
contaminated with fe-
ces. Previous outbreaks
of cyclospora infections
have been linked to vari-
ous types of fresh vegeta-
'bles and berries, Florida
health officials said.
None of the patients
in Florida have been
hospitalized. The state's
Department of Health
said Friday that none of
the Florida cases have a
restaurant, food or social
gathering in common.
"Epidemiologists
across Florida, in coordi-
nation with the Centers


for Disease Control and
Prevention, are Working
to identify the source of
these cyclospora cases,"
said Dr. Carina Blackmore,
Florida's interim state
epidemiologist. "Staff are
re-interviewing those af-
fected to carefully examine
food items and the ingre-
dients those patients were
exposed to."


According to the CDC,
138 infections have been
reported in Iowa, 70 have
been reported in Nebras-
ka and 71 have been re-
ported in Texas. Infections
also have been reported
in Minnesota, Wisconsin,
Illinois, Kansas, Missouri,
Arkansas, Georgia, Ohio,
New Jersey, Connecticut
and NewYork City.


(ff_/OLA
COLLEGE
Application Deadline Augj 1
Fall Registration Aug 14-16
Classes Begin Aug 19
Late Registration Aug 19-20
www ichiipola. edu


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, holds up a card
with a photo of her son as she speaks at the National Urban
League's annual conference.


Judge deliberates in


GI's WikiLeaks trial


The Associated Press

FORT MEADE, Md. -A
military judge is deliber-
ating the fate of an Army
private accused of aiding
the enemy by engineering
a high-volume leak of U.S.
secrets to WikiLeaks.
Prosecutors argue that
Pfc. Bradley Manning is a
glory-seeking traitor. His
lawyers say Manning is a
naive whistleblower who
was horrified by war-
time atrocities but didn't
know that the material he
leaked would end up in
the hands of al-Qalda and
Osama bin Laden.
Army Col. Denise Lind
began deliberating Fri-
day after two months of
conflicting evidence and
arguments about the
25-year-'old intelligence
analyst.
Lind said she will give a
day's public notice before
reconvening the court-
martial to announce her
findings. The most seri-
ous charge is aiding the
enemy, which carries a
potential life sentence in
prison.
Manning's support-
ers say that a conviction
would have a chilling ef-
fect on government ac-
countability by deterring
people from disclosing


official secrets to journal-
ists. WikiLeaks founder
Julian Assange said in a
telephone press confer-
ence Friday that if Man-
ning is convicted of aiding
the enemy, it will be "the
end of national security
journalism in the United
States."
He accused the Obama
administration of a "war
on whistleblowers" and a
"war on journalism."
Prosecutors contend
Manning knew the mate-
rial would be seen across
the globe, including
by bin Laden, when he
started the leaks in late
2009. Manning said he
didn't' start leaking until
February 2010.
"Worldwide distribu-
tion, that was his goal,"
said the military's lead
prosecutQr, Maj. Ashden
Fein. "Pfc. Manning knew
the entire world includ-
ed the enemy, from his
training. He knew he was
giving it to the enemy,
specifically al-Qaida."
During closing argu-
ments, defense attorney
David Coombs said Man-
ning was negligent in re-
leasing classified material
but lacked "evil intent"
that prosecutors must
prove to convict him of
aiding the enemy.


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Some Medicare providers banned in crackdown


The Associated Pi oss
MIAMI For the first
time in history, federal
health officials said Friday
they will ban certain types
of Medicare and Medicaid
providers in three high-
fraud cities from enrolling
in the taxpayer-funded
programs for the poor as
part of an effort to prevent
scams.
The strict moratoriums,
which start Tuesday, give


federal health officials
unprecedented power to
choose any region and
industry with high fraud
activity and ban new
Medicare and Medicaid
providers from joining the
programs for six months.
They wouldn't ban existing
providers.
The administrator of the
Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services said the
agency is targeting provid-
ers of home health care in


eiglit counties in thle Mi-
ami and Chicago areas.
All amllulance providers
would be banned in eight
counties in the Houston
area.
"We fully support the
action taken," said Val I.
Halamandaris, president,
National Association for
Home Care & Hospice.
"NAHC has long sup-
ported program integrity
measures such as this and
strongly recommended


that Congress give CMS
the authority to issue a
moratorium as part of the
Affordable Care Act. We
look forward to continue
working with CMS as it
considers other areas of
the country where a mora-
torium may be needed,"
Halamandaris said.
The moratorium, which
was first reported by The
Associated Press, will
also extend to Children's
Health Insurance Program


providers in the same ar-
eas, agency administrator
Marilyn Tavenner said in a
statement.
It's unclear how many
providers will be shut out
of the programs.
There were 662 home
health agencies in Miami-
Dade in 2012 and the ratio
of home health agencies to
Medicare beneficiaries was
1,960 percent greater in
Miami Dade County than
other counties, accord-


ing to figures from federal
health officials.
South Florida, long
known as ground-zero for
Medicare fraud, has also
had several high profile
prosecutions involving
that industry.
In February, the own-
ers and operators of two
Miami home health agen-
cies were sentenced for
their participation in a $48
million Medicare fraud
scheme.


..K1 ~ 4. -~ -, ~ ~ i


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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rescue workers on a boat search the Hudson River south of the Tappan Zee Bridge on Saturday for two people who are believed
to have fallen Into the water during a boat crash In Pleruont, N.Y.


Body found in river after crash


The Associated Pess
PIERMONT, N.Y. A fe-
male bodywas pulled from
the Hudson River on Sat-
urday near where a bride-
to-be and her fiance's best
man went missing after
thefr boat crashed into a
construction barge near
the Tappan Zee Bridge.
Officials stopped short
of saying whether they
had recovered the body of
30-year-old Lindsey Stew-
art, who plunged into the
river after the accident late
Friday.
The crash happened
shortly after the 21-foot
Stingray left the village of
Piermont for a short trip


across the river to Tarry-
town, about a half-hour's
drive north of New York
City, authorities said.
Stewart's mother, Carol,
said earlier Saturday that
she was praying for a mira-
cle. Lindsey Stewart was to
be married Aug. 10.
Four other people, in-
cluding the groom-to-be,
Brian Bond, 35, were hos-
pitalized after beingpulled
from the damaged boat.
Bond was knocked uncon-
scious in the crash but later
woke and was able to call
911, Carol Stewart said.
Lindsey Stewart's stepfa-
ther, Walter Kosik, said the'
couple have known each
other since they were 10


years old and used to go to
church together.
"They have been friends
the whole time, and they
fell in love about 3 years
ago," Kosik said.
They were to be mar-
ried at the Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church in Pearl
River, with a reception at
a Hudson Valley winery, he
said.
Rockland County Sher-
iff's Department Chief
William Barbera declined
to Identify the victims.
He said the barge, one of
several loaded with con-
struction material for an
upcoming replacement of.
the bridge, was equipped
with lights, but It was still


FDA proposes new rules


for safer imported foods
th Ascae Pres .. -,


WASHINGTON -
Chances are that about
15 percent of the food
you eat more if your
diet includes lots of fruits,
vegetables and cheese -
comes from abroad, and
the .government is taking
steps now to make it safer.
New rules proposed Fri-
day by the Food and Drug
Administration would
make U.S. food importers
responsible for ensuring
that their foreign suppliers
are handling and process-
ing food safely.
Imported fruit and
cheese has been respon-
sible for many recent
outbreaks, including 153
recent Hepatitis A ill-
nesses linked to a frozen
berry mix sold at Costco
last month as well as four
deaths last year that were
linked to listeria in Italian
cheese. Imported fruits or
vegetables are also the top
suspect in an ongoing out-
break of cyclosporiasis, a
gastrointestinal infection
that has so far sickened
321 people in 13 states.
Other illnesses in the last
several years have been
linked to imported papa-
yas, mangoes and nuts and
spices used as ingredients.
An estimated 3,000 people
die from food-related ill-
nesses every year.
The proposed rules, re-
quired by a sweeping food
safety law passed by Con-
gress in 2010, are meant
to establish better checks
on what long has been a
scattershot effort to guard
against unsafe food Im-
, ported from more than 150


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The FDA proposed new steps Friday to ensure that fresh
produce, cheeses and other foods Imported Into the United
States are safe.
countries. Only around 2 complexity of the food
percent of imported food supply"
is inspected by the govern- Investigators had to
ment at ports and borders, look at berries from sev-
The guidelines would re- eral different countries
quire U.S. food importers before they zeroed in on
to verify that the foreign the seeds as the probable
companies they are im- source of the illnesses,
porting from are achiev- she said.
ing the same levels of food Like rules for domestic
safety required in this farmers and food compa-
country. The government nies released earlier this
estimates that the rules, year, the idea is to make
which would also improve businesses more respon-
audits of food facilities sible for the safety of the
abroad, could eventually food they are selling or
cost the food industry up importing by proving
to $472 million annually they are using good food
FDA Commissioner safety practices. They
Margaret Hamburg used might do that by docu-
the frozen berry illnesses, meeting basic informa-
linked to pomegranate tion about their suppliers'
seeds from Turkey, as an cleanliness, testing foods
example of an outbreak or acquiring food safety
that could have been pre- audits. If they fail to verify
vented if the new rules the food is safe, the FDA
were in place. She said it could stop. shipments of
illustrates the "growing their food.


difficult to see on the water
so late at night.
The cause of the accident
is under Investigation.
The New York State
Thruway Authority, which
is overseeing the bridge
project, said it was review-
ing safety procedures.
"Our thoughts and
prayers are with the vic-
tims and their families
during this difficult time,"
the authority said. It add-
ed that the lighting on
the barges appeared to be
functioning normally.


Paint splattered on

Lincoln Memorial


The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Some-
one splattered green paint
on the Lincoln Memorial
Friday, but the statue of
the 16th president was
reopened by nightfall af-
ter the paint was washed
away.
The apparent vandalism
was discovered around
1:30 a.m. Friday on the
statue, the pedestal and
the floor, U.S. Park Police
said. No words, letters or
symbols were visible in
the paint.
The marble Lincoln
statute had green paint
on its shin, coattail, chair
and base, as well as paint
on the floor of the memo-
rial building.
Capt. Steven Booker said
the paint spill "appears
intentional based off of
the splatter." Police were
reviewing security camera
footage to try to identify
possible suspects.


No suspects had been
identified by Friday after-
noon. Police officials said
'they would not release
the security footage be-
cause the investigation is
ongoing.
The memorial chamber
was closed all day to allow
a National Park Service
crew to finish cleaning up
the paint. Workers spent
hours using pressurized
hoses and a chemical
paint remover to try to
wash away the paint
National Park Service
spokeswoman Carol
Johnson said the memo-
rial will be returned to the
condition it was in before
the vandalism.
"It is not -permanent
damage," she said. "Our
historic preservation crew
knows exactly what they
need to do."
The memorial has
served as a symbol of
equality and reunification
after the Civil War.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.corm


Annual grades fall sharply for Florida schools


The Associated Pi ess

TALIAHIlASSliE The
number of top-rated
schools in Florida fell
sharply again this year as
the states students struggle
to adjust to a wave of new
standards.
And the bottom line
could have been much
worse if state education
officials had not adopted
a last-minute "safety net"
provision that softened the
final grades.
The new A to F grades re-
leased Friday for elemen-
tary and middle schools
show that the number of A-
rated schools fell nearly 39


percent this year, while the
number of F-rated schools
more than doubled. Grades
for high schools won't be
released until late this year.
Last year, more than
1,200 schools received the
A grade that is used by
parents and businesses to
identify top-rated schools.
This year, the preliminary
grades resulted in a drop
to just 760 schools with 'A
grades.
Top education officials in-
sisted that the changes that
kicked in this year in-
cluding a raise in required
writing test scores -led to
the dramatic decline. Oth-
er recent changes include


incorporating results from
new end-of-course exams.
"This year's school grades
are indicative of the fact
that Florida has continued
to raise standards," said
Education Commissioner
Tony Bennett.
Each year, the statb hands
out A-to-F grades that are
used to reward top schools
and sanction those that get
failing marks. The system
has been in place for more
than a decade and was the
centerpiece of changes first
put in place under then-
Gov. Jeb Bush.
Some school superin-
tendents have complained
that the current school


grades do not reflect Irue
academic performance be-
cause of the impact of all
the recent changes.
Miami-Dade schools su-
perintendent Alberto Car-
valho on Friday tweeted
out the drop in grades was
"artificial" and that "unrea-
sonable" changes to the
formula have undermined
the grading system.
That point of view was
echoed by the head of the
state's teachers union.
Andy Ford, president of
the Florida Education As-
sociation, argued that the
flurry of changes had ren-
dered the grades "mean-
ingless as a comparison of


school progress."
"Lower school grades
don't reflect a drop in
achievement by students,"
said Ford. "They are the re-
sult of numerous changes
in the grading system
Bennett has defended the
need to include the tougher
standards because Florida
is transitioning in 2014 to a
new set of "common core"
standards that could piove
even tougher than those in
place now.
Bennett, however, said
that those schools that
received "F" grades are
showing that they are need
of help.
Still, the number of F-rat-


ed schools could have been
higher.
Earlier 'this month, the
State Board of Education
voted 4-3 to tweak the for-
mula that allowed as many
as 150 schools to avoid get-
ting an F grade. The board
adopted a provision rec-
ommended by Bennett
that prevented any school
from dropping more than
one letter grade at time. v
The decision to change
the grading standards was
done over the protest of
some officials who said
the move would confuse
parents and mask the true
performance of many
schools.


More school money means tax increase for some


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida
Gov. Rick Scott and state
legislators' have traveled
the state this year boast-
ing about the extra mon-
ey they steered toward
schools and teachers.
But for some hom-
eowners, more money
for schools comes with a
price: A tax increase this
fall.
The complicated formula
used by the state to match
local property tax dollars
with state money has re,
quired a tax increase for
nearly 20 out of the state's
67 school districts. The list
includes the home coun-
ties of Scott and the two
leaders of the Legislature.
Homeowners are start-
ing to learn about the in-
creases as school boards
prepare to adopt budgets
for the new school year.
For most districts, it's
a small increase likely to
add $20 to $30 more to
the tax bill of the owner



Brothers
From Page 1A
crop from the field and
both sell. J.C. makes sure
he has a recipe at his booth
for everything he grows. It's
a proven marketing strati
egy, he says. If a customer
unfamiliar with a certain
vegetable, is thinking of
buying to experiment with
cooking it, having a recipe
to see then and there usu-
ally makes them confident
enough to go ahead and
buy.
He's already harvesting a
crop of collards and is get-
ting ready to put several
thousand more of those
plants in the ground for a
second round, calculat-
ing that, plant by plant, his
potential yield will be well
worth that effort. Grow-
ing collards, he said, is his
gift, a knack he says was
God-given and constantly
inspired by a higher power.
He'll plant the new set of
collards "between show-
ers," he said, referring to
the recent run of rainy
days. But he's got. no beef
with the downpours. "One
year at my house, It didn't
rain for two months," he
said. "You think I'm gonna
complain? Oh, no. Not
me."
He's getting ready to
plant a u-pick pea field
with Cream d and 12 va-
rieties, where customers
can harvest the vegetable


of a $225,000 home with a
homestead exemption.
But Rita Scallan, the fi-
nance director for Oka-
loosa County schools,
says people are "likely to
become alarmed" when
they see the notice of a tax
increase.
"What happens is the lo-
cal board is the one that
will-take the heat," Scallan
said. "But we will tell them.
that the local school board
had no authority to adjust
it."
Republican legislators in
charge of school spend-
ing are aware of the loom-
ing increases but say they
aren't intentional. It wasn't
recommended by Gov.
Rick Scott either.
Instead they're the result
of the state formula, which
attempts to give each
county roughly the same
amount of money for
each student regardless of
where someone lives. The
formula has been In place
since the '70s.
"This is not a pure or


themselves to save a little
money. He said he might
sit in a chair at the end of
rows and enjoy the fact that
they're saving him some
labor. He'll feel like he's on
vacation and be making
money at the same time,
he said.
His retirement years can
hardly be called that be-
cause they're so busy, but
he's used to working hard.
For many years, he
lived far from his child-
hood home and worked
as a delivery man in New
York City, driving crates of
Italian wine into the five
boroughs of that sprawl-
ing metropolis. He moved
back here in the 1970s and
took- a job at the Jackson
County Courthouse. He'd
work there for the next 35
years, ramping up his farm
operation once he got out
of the public workforce.
For a time when he on
the courthouse mainte-
nance crew, he also held a
part-time job at a local fast
food restaurant; he put in
that extra duty'for a dozen
years, saving the additional
.income with an eye on this
stage of his life. He invest-
ed and saved, a mantra he
preaches to his son and
any young person who will
listen.
He thought once about
getting out of the farming
business, during a season
when he couldn't seem to
get anything to grow. But
a preacher friend changed


exact science," said Sen.
Bill Galvano, R-Braden-
ton and chairman of the
Senate education budget
committee.
Galvano said some coun-
ties have to raise their
property tax rates because
they were below the state
average.
Still, Senate President
Don Gaetz, former school
superintendent for Oka-
loosa County, said Fri-
day that he is bothered
by the increases for some
counties.
"As a school board mem-
ber and superintendent, I
was frustrated that the Leg-
islature often off-loaded
mandatory increases onto
local school districts," the
Niceville Republican said
in a statement.
Gaetz said the Senate
is reviewing how it might
recalibrate the formula to
"provide some property
tax relief and better shar-
ing of the education tax
burden."
Each year Florida law-


his mind. "He said, 'Your
daddy left you a legacy,
don't let it die,'" he re-
called. "Well, he was right,
and I was hearing that still
small voice, too, saying,
'You can't quit.' I can have
a good conversation with
myself. Plus, 'can't' is a cuss
word. It can cause you to
give up on yourself."
He said he's glad he
didn't quit. "I enjoy peo-
ple, and my daddy did,
too, so I've always had a lot
' of fun getting out to mar-
ket. I'm cutting deals with
my customers all the time
but I tell 'emr my deals are
sweet, not silly. We have a
good time together."
His hard work in the field
has rewards other than
money. Being able to work
together with his brother
toward a common goal, he
said, is meaningful beyond
the dollar. "We're a close-
knit family," he explained.
"Me and my brother, and
my sisters, we don't want
to ever become separated.
We help each other, enjoy
each other, and try to live
happy lives. There's more
to life than money; first
of all, you can never have
enough of that there's
no such thing and you
have to accept that and
also that we're not, any of
us, going to be here forev-
er. You have to draw some
lines, because you can get
your life out of balance just
trying to accumulate more
and more. We've found


MARK SKINNrR/rI ORIDAN
j J.C. Lovett Jr. talks with Veola Hearns at the Marlanna City Farmers Market on Thursday.


makers craft a state budget
that relies on a mix of state
and local money to pay for
public schools. This year,
that main pot is in excess
of $18 billion.
To receive their share
of state money, local dis-
tricts must raise a certain
amount through local
property taxes.
But some districts with
higher property values -
all of them along the coast
- raise most of their
money from local prop-
erty taxes. If the state then
increases overall school
spending, it can trigger
a tax increase in those
"property-rich" counties.
"That's something we
don't have a control over,"
Sarasota County School
Board Chairwoman Jane
Goodwin said.
This year, state legis-
lators passed a .budget
that boosted money for
schools by more than $1
billion. That increase in-
cluded $480 million for
teacher pay raises that


something we enjoy doing
together, and it's good to
make the money, but it's
worth a lot more than that
to me."


was advocated by Scott.
New estimates released
this month by the Depart-
ment of Education show
that 17 school districts
will have to raise what is
known as the "required
local effort" property tax.
Many of the state's 67 dis-
tricts will see a slight de-
crease in the rate.
There could be a mul-
titude of reasons for an


increase, including that
state legislators were given
Property tax estimates for
some counties that didn't
materialize. When that
happens, the school dis-
trict must raise its tax rate.
Rep. Erik Fresen, R-Mi-
.ami and chairman of the
House budget committee,
said-school districts have
known for decades that
the formula is not perfect


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STATE






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN # www.jcfloridan.coinl


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
P 0 Box 328
4278 Lafayette Street
Marlanna, Florida 312446
850.482.2332

Imogene
Burkett
Bontrager

Imogene Burkett Bont-
rager, 55, of Marianna,
Florida, passed away at her
home surrounded by her
loving family on Friday, Ju-
ly 26, 2013.
Imogene was born Octo-
ber 21, 1957, and raised in
Blountstown, Florida, by
her parents Grady and
Lovie Burkett. She gradu-
ated from Blountstown
High School in 1975. In
1976 she married her high
school sweetheart, Daniel
Bontrager. She was a lov-
ing wife and mother who
was devoted to her chil-
dren and a large extended
family. She enjoyed spend-
ing time outdoors, travel-
ing, and raising deer on the
family farm.
Imogene was preceded
in death by her father, Gra-
dy Burkett. She is survived
by her husband of 36 years,
Daniel; her daughter,
Mandy Bontrager Brewer
and husband, John Brewer;
a son, Travis Bontrager; her
mother, Lovie Burkett; and
her siblings, Gregory
Burkett, Volena Barfield,
Delores MvicDougald, and
Lawana McDonald.
Funeral services will be
held at 10:00 AM Monday,
July 29, 2013, at Evangel
Worship Center in Marian-
na, Florida, with Pastor
LaVon Pettis officiating.
Burial will follow at Nettle
Ridge Cemetery in Blount-
stown, Florida, with James
& Sikes Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel directing.
The family will receive
family and friends from
4:00 6:00 PM on Sunday,
July 28, 2013, at Evangel
Worship Center, 2645 Peb-
ble Hill Road, Marianna,
Florida
32448.
Flowers are welcome as


well as donations to Cove-
nant Iloslpice, 4215 Kelson
Ave. Stil e l, Mariannali, I
32'446
Impressions otf symnipathy
may be made online at
littp://www.jijaulesaiiidsikes
funeralhonies.conm/
lames & Sikes
Funeral Honme
Maddox
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850.482.2332

Adetha Mae
Atdkins Kern

Adetha Mae (Atkins)
Kern of Grand Ridge, FL
has gone to meet Jesus and
has no more pain after her
battle with cancer. She was
born in Lee,, FL 5 June,
1929. Adetha graduated
from Madison High School
in 1947. She served as a
Registered Nurse for many,
many years and at several
hospitals and medical fa-
cilities in northern Florida,
but spent the past severed
years retired and enjoying
her children, grandchil-
dren, great grandchildren,
and great great grandchil-
dren.
Adetha was preceded in
death by: her parents, TJ
and .Fairie Atkins; her hus-
band Harry Jacob Kern;'
brother, Calvin (Dorothy)
Simmons; son, Harry Dale
Kern II; and son less Allen
Kern.
She is survived by: broth-
er Hermon (Betty) Atkins of
Thorndale, TX; daughter,
Kay (Dan) Crow of
Beaverdam, OH; daughter,
Theada (Jimmy) Tolbert of
Dahlonega, Georgia; daug-
hter, Helen (Joe) Coleman
of Fostoria, OH; daughter
Karen (Paul) Simick of
Wellington, FL; daughter
Carol (Donnie) Larson of
Virginia Beach, VA; son,
Doug (Sherrie) Tatro of
Adairsville, GA; son Tom
Kern of Smyrna, GA; son
Russ (Patti) Kern of Parrott,
GA; son, lim (Lynn) Kern of
Grand Ridge, FL; and son,
Jud Kern of Grand Ridge,
FL Adetha is also survived
by many, many, many
grandchildren, great gran-


children, and great great
grandchildren.
Funeral Services will be
conducted al 10:00( am
Monday, Iuly 291tii it lames
and Sikes Fuiineral Ihlome,
Marianna, lI', The burial
will follow al Shady Grove
Cemetery.
'Thle family will recleve
friends from 4:00 pm 6:00
pmill on Siunday, July 28th at
James & Sikes Funeral
Home, Marianna, FL.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
http://www.jamesandsikes
funeralhomes.com/

Reed's Chapel
Funeral Home
302 West Church St.
Lexington, TN. 38351
731-968-3643

Michael
Newsom
Stripling

Dr. Michael Newsom
Stripling, age 55, of Ma-
riannla, Florida, passed
away July 24, 2013.
lie was preceded in
death by his mother, Sue
Newsom Stripling. He is
survived by his loving wife,
Janet; his father, Dr. Jack
Stripling and wife Carolyn
of Lexington, Tennessee;
his sons, Jacob Stripling
and wife Jennifer of
Hlernando, Mississippi;
Dustin Hahey and wife
Kristen of Franklin, Ken-
tucky; Seth Stripling and
fiancee Faith of Lynchburg,
Virginia; and Zach Stripling
of Syracuse, New York;
daughters Dana Miller and
husband Ray of Annapolis,
Maryland; Alexandria Waf-
son of Marianna, Florida;
brother Dr. Mark Stripling
and wife Peggy of
Jonesboro, Arkansas; sis-
ters Rena Lewis and hus-
band David of Lexington.
Tennessee; and Stacye
Fisher and husband James
of Martin, Tennessee;
grandchildren Makayla and
Addalyn Stripling, Jasper
Miller, Noah Stripling. Brit-
tany Lear, and Cheyenne
and Megan Haney.
A Celebration of Life will
be held at First United


Methodist Church of Ma-
rlanna, Florida, at 2:00 p.m.
Onil Sunday, July 28. A fam-
ily funeral service and buri-
al will be held the following
week in lexington, Tennes-
see. Arrangements are be-
ing made by Reeds Chapel
Funeral Home of Lexing-
ton, Tennessee. Condolen-
ces can be expressed at
reedschapel.com.

Wilfred W.
Tyre
Mr. Wilfred W. Tyre, 80,
passed away Thursday, July
25, 2013 at his residence.
He was the son of the late
Lemuel W. and Essie Anna
Crews Tyre. He is preceded
in death by his wife of fifty-
two years Hazel M. Tyre,
two soils Steve and Don
Tyre, seven brothers and
seven sisters. He was of the
Baptist faith and enjoyed
gardening. He had made
Marianna his home since
1967. He retired from the
International Paper Com-
pany with thirty-five plus
years.
He is survived by one son
Doug Tyre (Tammy) Ma-
rianna, FL; two daughter -
in-laws Karen Tyre of Tal-
lahassee, FL and Donna
Tyre of Wiggins MS. Eleven
grandchildren, fourteen
great grandchildren ahd a
host of nieces and nephews
also survive.
Funeral services will be
conducted Monday, July
29, 20J13 at 2:00 P.M. at the
Dees-Parrish Family Fu-
neral Home. Visitation with
the family will be held one
hour prior to service. With
Reverend Jerry Tyre offi-
ciating. Interment will be
held at Dekle cemetery in
Lake Butler, FL.
Dees-Parrish Family Fu-
neral Home is in charge
of all arrangements, 458
South Marion Avenue,
Lake City, FL 32025.
Please sign guess book at
www.pafWiluaWyfunemlhon.com.


I Ftorists]
Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


SHS CHEERLEADERS


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
A ggie Schack buys a ticket from a group of Sneads High School cheerleaders outside of
/... the Marianna Wal- Mart on Friday. The cheerleaders were selling tickets for a split-the-
.I JXpot raffle as part of a fundraiser for uniforms and cheer-camp trips. Other members of
the squad were bagging groceries at McDaniel's Grocery in Sneads, and the squad was also
having a yard sale Saturday from 7 a.m. to noon next door to Forget Me Not Antiques in Sneads.
The cheerleaders are (from left) Chelsey Brown, Sierra Kelley, Monica Hobbs, Crystal Bush,


Bianca Hernandez and Taylor Green.


Obituaries


Tech
From Page 1A

noncommercial use.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Revenue's list
of tax-exempt items in-
cludes desktop, laptop
and tablet computers,
electronic book readers,
and many related ac-
cessories (cables, disk
drives, headphones,
printers and more). To
answer some of the in-
evitable questions and
clear up some shop-
pers' confusion, the list
,lso shows which items
Ire still taxable and not
eligible for the sales-
tax break (sorry, no cell
phones or video game
consoles).
The qualifications still.
leave a lot of potential
savings on the table for
many would-be buy-
ers: Parents of students
heading back to class in
the fall, crafty consum-
ers ready to pick the
low-hanging fruit off
their Christmas gift lists,
or anyone who's just
flat had it with that oqe
family member who, for
the last seven months,
has only stopped their.
incessant tapping long


Schools
From Page 1A

proposing to assess any
taxes in the optional
"critical need" element
or in the "additional"
element of the millage,
but has tentatively set
the final element, "capi-
tal outlay," at .37, or 37
cents on each $1,000 of
taxable value.
About 20 counties in
the state will see an in-
crease in'the required lo-
cal effort element.
School board mem-
bers, in a budget session


Coast Guard returns
23 refugees to Cuba
MIAMI Coast Guard
crews have returned
roughly two dozen
Cuban migrants to their
island homeland.
Coast Guard officials
say 23 migrants were
returned Wednesday to
Bahia de Cabanas, Cuba.
The migrants were
picked up in two


Holiday
From Page 1A
computers and related
accessories. Desktop
computers, laptops, tab-
lets and electronic book.
readers under $750 are
tax-exempt.
McAllister said that new
category has some retail-
ers anticipating big sales
from this year's event. Es-
timating that the sales tax
holiday could yield a $400
million increase over
what would normally be
spent during this period,
he called it good news for
Florida's economy, and a
help to families.
The three-day period
will mean millions in tax
revenue will go uncol-
lected by the state, but
McAllister says these tax-
free days typically gener-
ate such a high volume of
traffic that FRF members


enough to tilt their head
skyward and ask, "How
did I manage before I
got my 'Tablet of Awe-
some'?" How, indeed.
Looking at two popular
tablet computers the
Apple iPad mini ($329
for a 16GB, Wi-Fi model)
and the Samsung Galaxy
Note 8 ($399 for a 16 GB
model).- shows buyers
could save enough dur-
ing the sales tax holiday
(roughly $25 and $30
respectively) that they
could afford to pick up
a (taxable) case or cover
for their new gadget.
And that's what makes
the event good for retail-
ers consumers come
out for the tax break,
have a bit leftover in their
pockets, and use that ex-
tra spending power on
the same trip.
As Rick McAllister,
president and CEO of
the Florida Retail Fed-
eration, put it last week
during a conference call
with reporters, "It's one
of the few times brick-
and-mortar stores can
compete with online
retailers."
Download a copy of
the DOR Sales Tax Holi-
day list of' taxable and
tax-exempt items by vis-
Siting JCFloridan.com.


a few days ago, rejected
the millage rate proposed
by Superintendent Steve
Benton. Citing increases
in the age and disrepair
of several school build-
ings, Benton wanted to
set the capital outlay at
1.50 for a total millage
of 7.49. Board mem-
bers, instead, said they
would rather dip into a
reserve fund to pay for
capital improvements.
Their proposed budget
-reflects plans for a
roughly $2.4 million
withdrawal from the re-
serve to leave a balance
of $636,612 in that pock-
et of money.


separate interdictions
between July 19 and July
22. Officials say Customs
and Border Protection
patrols spotted rustic
vessels healing north
across the Florida
Straits. Coast Guard
crews responded to
those reports and trans-
ferred all the migrants to
a cutler.

From wire reports


FCAT
From Page 1A

of Education Tony Ben-
nett recommended that
no school drop any more
than one letter grade as
the result of the current
FCAT scores, and the Flor-
ida Board of Education,
which governs such mat-
ters, ultimately approved
the measure. The safety
net was put in place in part


because, while teachers
are moving to a manda-
tory "common core" cur-
riculum, their students are
still being tested on the
old FCAT standards in this
transitional period.
Common Core standards
require students to delve
more deeply into con-
cepts, a process that takes
more time and sometimes
leaves students and teach-
ers covering fewer con-
cepts in a given timejrame
as students are immersed


more fully in each. Some
school officials theorize
that the lower test scores
reflect that FCAT may
have tested them on con-
cepts they haven't yet ap-
proached under the new
in-depth Common Core
philosophy.
In addition to the transi-
tion from FCAT to Com-
mon Core standards, the
state had raised the score
that students must reach
to pass and excel on their
FCAT, exams. That played


a role in the lower school
scores, as well, some edu-
cation officials say, and.
was another reason for the
safety net.
Deputy Superintendent
of Schools Cheryl McDan-
iel, who took on that new
position at the first of July,
confirmed that the state's
notification about the
grades included a state-
ment that Marianna Mid-
(Ile and'Grand Ridge Mid-
dle Schools benefited from
the safety net provision, a


notation that implies they
would have dropped to at
least a C without the net,
while the other schools
scored within the range for
the grades they received.
However, she added the
scores showing for Mari-
anna Middle and Grand
Ridge Middle are posted as
falling just within those for
a legitimate B-each school
showed the exact num-
ber of points defining the
low end of B. She said she
could not immediately de-


termine whether that score
was artificially posted to
reflect a B score because
that's the lowest grade the
safety net would allow, or
whether they actually did
score the number of points
posted.
Despite the drops from
A to B, McDaniel said the
school system sees positive
things. "We've very pleased
that, even with the changes
in rigor, we feel like we still
made the hopor roll with
all As and Bs."


MADDOX CHAPEL SNEADS CHAPEL

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Quality Se'rvic at Affimhalk Prices'
Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90
S850-482-5041Ii L


report' increased sales
of non-exempt items,
enough to offset the loss.
Asked if online retail-
ers were part of the event,
McAllister said yes, if
they operate a brick-and-
mortar store in the state,
their online counterpart
will charge or not
charge the proper tax
amount.
And for those who have
a large back-to-school
shopping list, but needed
a little extra time to pay,
McAllister said stores with
layaway plans will lay-
away eligible items tax-
free during the weekend.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Revenue's list
of tax-exempt items
- school supplies, cloth-
ing, computers and more
- is available online.
, Plan your sales tax
holiday shopping trip by
downloading a copy 'at
DOR.MyFlorida.


SUNDAY, JULY 28. 2013 uAF


FROM THE FRONT





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


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Research Shows Importance ofEarly Detection


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- 12A4* SUNDAY, JULY 28,2013






..x'. *,~
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JI.,


Outdoors


-JL--I-
BobKornegay
Outdoors Columnist


A discreet


retreat
ne climbs a mountain
"because it's there."
The chicken crosses the
road to "get to the other side."
Trout anglers leave well-stocked
streams to venture up totally
unfamiliar creeks because...
Hmm. Lack of sense? Total
stupidity? Looking back, either
seems appropriate.
Yet that's just what we did,
my buddy Barnes and I. Being
adventuresome, we cut short a
fishing trip on easy-access Wild-
cat Creek in the North Georgia
mountains in favor of a journey
up nearby Dick's Creek, whose
every variable was a complete
unknown.
Admirable, you say? We
thought so, too, even as the
one-lane rutted road became
progressively narrower as my
little truck struggled up the
mountain. We still thought so
upon finding ourselves in a mini
"canyon" with walls so sheer a
spider couldn't scale them. Like-
wise, our intrepid spirits did not
ebb when Dick's Creek yielded
no fish save two creek chubs
and one four-inch rainbow.
No matter, we thought. Let
others take the well-traveled
path. True adventurers bravely
choose the "road not taken."
Turning precariously around,
we started back down the
mountain trail, smugly full of
ourselves. We had scaled cliffs,
risked drowning and narrowly
missed driving off the road and
plummeting headlong into the
cove forest below. What stories
we could tell bur friends back
home.
Then the dump truck showed
Up. A great big dump truck with
a great big driver. Descend-
ing, we rounded a bend and
discovered it chugging upward,
straight toward us at breakneck
speed.
The road was so narrow my
truck was already scratched
beyond recognition by hem-
lock boughs on the "shoulder."
* Imagine, then, a huge hunk of
Strolling iron, twice as wide and
three times as tall, bee-lining to-
ward my teeny vehicle, ripping
off limbs the size of Rockefeller *
Center Christmas trees and dis-
lodging boulders the size of golf
carts. Notpretty.
"Turn around!" Barnes
screamed.
Yeah, right. Move the wheel
left andwe're in the creek 100
feet below. Move it right and
we're tumbling down the moun-
tainside. I slammed on brakes
and frantically hunted "reverse"
with the shift-lever. The trans-
mission screamed like a ground-
hog caught in a wood chipper,
not unlike Barnes' high-pitched
wailing from the passenger seat.
The dump truck driver (Did I
mention he was a big old boy?)
skidded to a stop nose-to-nose
with me, obviously perturbed at
having to start over in low gear
on such a steep incline. He low-
ered his window and expertly
spat a stream of tobacco juice
outward and downward. It trav-
eled 20 feet in a graceful arc be-
fore raining down on the side of
the steep roadside escarpment.
Then he turned and glowered at
me through the windshield. A
challenge.
In answer I chawed down
upon my own quid of Red Man,
pursed my lips and expectorated
in reply. What didn't dribble
down my shirt ran down the
See KORNEGAY, Page 2B


NEW GENERATION AT CAMP


*'r ,. Kt .M VED,, -


SIAMII wPHOTOS

ore than 40 youngsters participated in the recent annual Chipola kid's basketball camp. Lane
Johnson, grandson of the late Milton H. Johnson, participated in the camp along with J.D. Taylor
son of former Chipola assistant coach Scott Taylor. Pictured (from left) are: Scott Taylor, J.D.
Taylor, Patrick Blake, Lane Iohnson and David Johnson.



BASKETBALL CAMP ATCHIPOLA


M ore than 40 youngsters participated in the recent annual kid's basketball camp hosted by
Chipola men's basketball coach Patrick Blake. Coach Blake said, "This was our best turnoutit in
years. Our coaches and players enjoyed working with the great kids and families. Campers
performed the same drills as the college players do every day."
*B

NML


Bucs' McCoy assuming greater leadership role


The Associated Press
TAMPA Tampa Bay's Ger-
ald McCoy is coming off his first
Pro Bowl season and embrac-
ing a new role as the leader of a
defense that lost Ronde Barber
to retirement this spring.
SThe Buccaneers have com-
mitted more than $100 million
to upgrade a leaky secondary,
however McCoy feels it's up
to him and the rest of a young
defensive line to give offsea-
son acquisitions Darrelle Revis
and Dashon Goldson the best
chance to have a huge impact.
McCoy reported to training
camp 10 pounrids lighter than
the Bucs requested. He's eager
to. build on last year, when he
remained healthy for an entire
season for the first time in his
career and began to show why
he was the third overall pick in
the 2010 draft.
Now, the Bucs are counting
on him to emerge as the leader
of a unit missing Barber, the
final link to Tampa Bay's, only
Super Bowl championship.


"I'm not really doing anything
differently, just kind of taking
on more of the role I've been
given. I always had somewhat
of a leadership role, otherwise
your peers won't vote you as a
captain," McCoy said.
"But THE leader that spot
was left open when (Barber)
left, so I'm just kind of filling
in, not doing anything differ-
ent. Just taking the leadership
that I already had to a different
level," McCoy added. "That's
pretty much it."
The Bucs were last in the
NFL in pass defense in 2012,
nearly setting a league record
for yards allowed en route to a
7-9 record..
A porous secondary was part
of the problem, but an anemic
pass rush also contributed to
the team missing the playoffs
for the fifth straight year.
McCoy had a career-best
five sacks, more than the first
two seasons of his career com-
bined. Tampa Bay's 27 sacks
See McCOY, Page 2B


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Tampa Bay Buccaneers defensive tackle Gerald McCoy smiles as he takes a
break during an optional NFL football workout In Tampa on May 29.


II"--


ER IC WALDON KE (VIN NELN JOHN MU
M I KUAN~ ialUlACfI S4U, I SUB4 T
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JACKSON COUNT-Y FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-12B SUNDAY, JULY 28,2013


NFL

Gillislee hopes to follow Ricky Williams' path


The Associated Press

DAVIE As a kid grow-
ing up in Central Florida,
Mike Gillislee idolized one
of his Miami Dolphins pre-
aecessors at running back.
"Ricky Williams," Gil-
lislee said Saturday. "His
vision, the way he ran the
ball. he was a very tough
running back. And I liked
that he was humble, he
didn't say very much.
Gillislee now follows in
Williams' cleat marks as
a soft-spoken Dolphins
rusher. In his only year as
a Florida starter, Gillislee
last season ran for 1,152,
yards (4.7 avg.) to become
the Gators' first 1,000-yard
rusher since Ciatrick Fason
in 2004.
iGillislee hasn't gone un-
noticed even though veter-
ans Lamar Miller and Dan-
iel Thomas began training
camp higher on the Dol-
phins depth chart.
"He hasn't been tenta-
tive," Miami coach Joe
Philbin said. "That's the
one thing, when you get
a young back, you're a
little concerned a new
scheme, getting used to
pro football, maybe a lit-
' tie dance and shuffle. We
haven't seen a lot of that.
We've seen some get to the
point of attack, make a de-
cision and go."
Gillislee returned to
Gainesville after June's
minicamp to condition,


,,,..,
,, ',.'
.. ,. "


1*


' r ,

~. A;, .. .


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Miami Dolphins running back Mike Gllislee catches a pass during a practice July 21 at the
Dolphins Tlraining Facility In Davle.


lift weights and work on
his techniques. He said
the toughest part, so far, of
going from college to pro
has been in the passing
game.
"Knowing where you
have to be and knowing
who you have to pick up in
the blocking schemes," he
said.
The 5-11,213-pound Gil-
lislee figures see time on
special teams besides bat-
tling Jonas Gray and Mar-
cus Thigpen for spot duty
running the ball.


"Anything that the coach-
es want me to do," Gillislee
said. "I'm going to work,
I'm going to learn and I'm
going to try and be thebest
at whatever the role is."
Gillislee was one of three
Florida Gators receiver
Jelani Jenkins and kicker
Caleb Sturgis selected
by Miami in April's draft.
Add center Mike Pouncey,
who's entering his fourth
season, and there's a
strong Gators presence at
Dolphins camp. But that
doesn't mean the Florida


alums are spending all
their time together.
From Deland, in central
Florida, Gillisliee already
appears to be helping to
stimulate the Dolphins'
fan base.
"When I went home after
the (organized team ac-
tivities), everybody had on
Miami Dolphins stuff," Gil-
lislee said. "Pretty much all
the guys that I saw came up
to me telling me how long
they've been Miami Dol-
phins fans and they're glad
I got theopportunity."


MLB


Cashman




challenges




Rodriguez


The Associated Press

NEW YORK Brian
Cashman's expression
said it all.
Every time Alex Rodri-
guez's name was men-
tioned Friday, the New
York Yankees general
manager appeared as if
he might get sick.
The subject was the
third baseman's claim
that his left quadriceps
really isn't injured, but
it could have been any
one several topics: Ro-
driguez's alleged perfor-
mance-enhancing drug
use, his pesky Twitter
and radio appearances
or his knack for creating
tabloid headlines.
Cashman challenged A-
Rod to have his leg exam-
ined by an outside doc-
tor or perhaps even file
a grievance, defending
the team's medical and
training staff and saying
he wouldn't comment on
"extra noise.".


The third baseman
detailed his frustration
during a radio interview
Thursday, just hours af-
ter team management
said he wouldn't be ready
to resume minor league
rehab games until Aug. 1.
Rodriguez wouldn't an-
swer when asked whether
he trusted the Yankees.
Seemingly days away
from rejoining the Yan-
kees, Rodriguez com-
plained of leg pain last
weekend, and the Yan-
kees said an MRI on Sun-
day showed a quadriceps
strain. An outside physi-
cian,' Michael Gross, said
Wednesday he looked
at an MRI at Rodriguez's
request it's not clear
when 'the MRI was taken
- and could not detect
an injury. Gross is not
on baseball's list of doc-
tors recommended for
second opinions, and
he admitted he never
personally examined
Rodriguez.


Kornegay
From Page 1B
inside of the front door
and pooled on the
floormat.
"You best back up,"
Barnes said.
a think?" I replied.
Now, friends, I'm not
Sthe world's greatest driver
going forward on level
asphalt. Going backward
up h mountain I'm a lot
like those clumsy dogs you
see riding unicycles at the
circus. Topping it off, the


sadistic tobacco chewer in
the truck steadily acceler-
ated, keeping his grille
about three inches from
my own and forcing me
to back up ever faster.
The curves were the worst.
part: Barnes' screams
almost made me miss two
of them.
A half mile later, we
passed the driveway for
which our tormentor was
destined. He expertly
steered his vehicle at high
speed into the narrow
opening, grinned through
the open window and gave


EIoL~fllPr

w L
LPInfBusters 19 13
2.TeDivos 18 14
3.Steve&Ed 18 14
4.HotStuff 17 IS
5.T&J 15 17
6. Shenanigans 14 18
7. Team Pope 13 19
High Team Hdcp. Game: Pin Busters 485
High Team Hdcp. Series: Steve & Ed 1385
High Game Hdcp: Bruce Lheureux 258. Ed Pittman 249
High Series Hdcp: Steve Cartwright 700, Terry Holladay
665

M 3JUrY3
W L
L BlIrpie Dozards 17 3
2. All In the Family 13.56.5
3. Dynamic Duo 11.5 8.5
4.BestFriends 10 10
5. Just Kidding 8 12
High Team Hdcp. Game: Just Kidding 573
High Team Hdcp. Series: Just Kidding 1471
'High Game: Paula Kindelspire 263, Janzen KindelsplIre 252'
High Series: LuAno: 745. Jeff KIndelspire 854

JUILY23


1. Jay's Group
2. Waffle House
3.TASBAD
4. Strike Force,


us one of those little open-
fingered wiggling waves
goodbye as he roared up
the gravel drive toward 4
the mountain house in the
distance. I quickly shifted
from reverse to first and
resumed my getaway "
without further incident.
'TWo important life
lessons: (1) The road not
taken is often best left
thatway. (2) Keep your
mustache well-trimmed.
One never knows when
he might have to an-
swer a tobacco-spitting
challenge.


* K-Men M5 MS
SSharpshooters 15. 215
7.Cr|tastic 15 24
&3Men&ALady 12 28
High Team Hdcp. Gam SheMpshooters IM
High Team Hdcp. Series harpshooter 225
High Game Hdcp: Jay Roberts 27 JaM Mier 267
High Series Hdcp: David ChamlMs 750 Jana MWr 748


W L
1.XXX 26 14
2.Porkchop&Grits 25 15
'3. Bend Eml Pin Eml 24 16
4. El Rio 21 19
5.BlgLots 17 23
6. Three Amigos 17 23
7. Team No.1 16 24
8.TeamNo.8 14 26
High Team Hdcp. Game: Three Amigos 690
High Team Hdcp. XXX 1978
High Game: Zac Davis 243, LuAnn 194
High Series: Jason KindeLsplre 314 LuAnn 560

XYt25 _
W L
1. Dominators 22 6
2.3"P"sanda"W 17 11
3. The Wesley Crusher's 13 15
4. Bat Filends 12.5 15.5
5. Whiskey Throttle 10.5 17.5
6. Cassandra's Crew 9 19
High Team Hdcp. Game: Dominators 1044
High TeamN Hdcp. Series Donlmators 2932
High Game: Wes Jones 301 & Kelley Kindelspire 278
High Series: Jay Roberts 794


McCoy
From Page 1B
overall were the third
fewest in the league.
Entering his fourth sea-
son, McCoy is determined
to change that. And he's
intent driving ends Adri-
an Claybomrn and Da'Quan
Bowers, as well as rookie
tackle Akeem Spence, to
help him.
Before practice each
day, the 25-year-old gath-
ers all of the team's first-
year defensive linemen
and accompanies them
onto the -field to work on
fundamentals.
"What I'm doing with
them, I never got I had
.nobody to help me, had
nobody to coach me, no-
body to take me under
their wing. I had to learn
on the go," McCoy said.
"I don't want these
rookies to go through the
same thing. I want to be
that guy, where they don't
have to say: 'Nobody
helped me, they didn't
teach me.' ... because the
better they are, the better
we'll all be."
McCoy was the second
defensive player selected
in the 2010 draft behind
Detroit tackle Ndamu-
kong Suh. He struggled as
a rookie, failing to notch a
sack until his ninth game.
He missed the final
three weeks of that sea-


son with a tomrn left biceps,
finishing with three sacks.
He had one sack there fol-
lowing year, when he sat
out 10 games and parts
of two others because of
injuries.
Despite the limited pro-
duction and being unable
to stay healthy those two
seasons, McCoy said he
never lost confidence in
his ability.
The 25-year-old re-
turned in 2012, bought
into the system installed
by new coach Greg Schi-
ano, and progressively
played better.
Hewasrewardedwithhis
first trip to the Pro Bowl,
not that he felt he neces-
sarily need that to validate
his improvement.
"I ..never doubted my
ability. I never doubted
myself because I knew
once I started to figure
it out, I would start to be
successful," McCoy said.
"You never have it figured
out ever. The worst
three words anybody can
say is 'I got it.' You've never
got it figured out. But once
I started to pick it up, I
knew it was going to roll."
The Bucs, who lost Bar-
ber to retirement in May,
have invested heavily in
upgrading the defense
this offseason.
They traded for Revis
before giving him a six-
year, $96 million con-
tract; Goldson signed a


Fishing Report


LakeSeminole
Bass fishing is good
for some anglers using
topwater baits early in the
morning and late in the
afternoon. Buzzbaits can'
be especially effective over
submerged vegetation.
Largemouths may also be
taken on Texas-rig worms
near wood structure.
Fish slowly and deliber-
ately, especially during the
middle of the day. Overall,
the stained water and
increased current have
contributed to an increase
.in bass activity.
A few crappies are being
taken in specific spots,
but the crappie fishing is
sporadic overall. Anglers
who know how to target
the crappies this time of
year can still catch them.
There is, however, little
consistency.
Bream may continue to
bite in the shallow, sandy-
bottom areas. Target areas
containing the clearest
water possible right now.
Catfish have been biting
well early in the morning.
_J


over hard bottoms. Live
worms and prepared baits
argood.


LakeAndrews/
Chattahoochee River
The river Is muddy and
creeks flowing into the
river are quite high. At
present, fishing for most
species is extremely slow
and virtually nonproduc-
tive. Water must stabilize
and clear before fish activ-
ity positively resumes.

Lake Eufaula
Bass may be caught
early and late in the day
on points where current is
moving. For these areas,
use Texas-rig worms and
crankbaits. Small Caro-
lina-rigs may also be used
to catch smaller bass in
deeper water with wood
structure. Early and late in
the day are the best fishing
times overall, but chan-
nel bass may be caught at
virtually all hours under
the right conditions.


Crappies are locked into
their summertime pattern.
Fishing for them can be
fair to good on moderately
deep flats just off the river
channel. Look for flats
areas with transient brush
piles and fish jigging


spoons vertically, directly
in the brush. Crappies
have slowed somewhat in
the stained water.
Bream are slow at
present.
Catfish will bite late in
the day on flats as they


move into shallower water
to feed.
Generation schedules, pool levels,
and other such information for
area waterways may be obtained
by calling toll-free 1-888-771-4601.
Follow the recorded instructions
and access the touch-tone for the
Apalachicola River System,


five-year, $41.5 million
deal in free agency after
helping San Francisco
reach the Super Bowl last
season, and two olher po-
tential starters corner-
back Johnthan Banks and
Spence were added in
the draft.
In addition, Clayborn
is returning after missing
most of last season with
a knee injury and Bowers
is healthy after missing
the early portion of 2012
while recovering from a
torn Achilles tendon.
"Claybomrn's back, Bow-
ers is healthy, I'm healthy.
... We're going to see what
happens," McCoy said. .
The fourth-year pro
feels he's put in the work
necessary to give himself
a chance to do his part
He was determined to re-
port to camp lighter than
the Bucs felt he should
and met his goal, though
he won't say exactly what
he weighs.
"I trust my coaches, and
I trust the system. I love
the program, and I trust
whale we do here. How-
ever, I have to step across
the white lines and I have
to play," McCoy said. "I
know my body better than
anybody. So I know what I
feel good at, and where I'll
be most confident. That
why I came in lighter than
what they wanted me at."





iSi'




Thank You for All
Your lartd Work!


NEW LOCATION!
5y 3051 Sixth Street
Marianne, FL 32446
(850) 526-7474


Starting July 2013, we will be seeing patients in
our new location, shared with TOC.
We appreciate you choosing Dermatology
Associates and look forward to serving you.
For questions, please call our
Tallahassee office: (850) 877-4134
Visit us online at www.DATFL.com


SPORTS







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jctlordurn.com


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JULY 28,2013 3BF


NFL



Jaguars open camp with healthy MJD


Thl Associated Pi oss

JACKSONVILLE Mau-
rice lones-Drew's first
carry in more than nine
months barely got beyond
the line of scrimmage.
It was a huge gain for
the Jacksonville Jaguars.
though.
Jones-Drew completed
his first workout with the
team since a season-end-
ing foot injury in October.
He competed without set-
backs, without pain and
without apprehension
- all positive signs for the
three-time Pro Bowler and
for the rebuilding Jaguars.
'JIt just feels comfortable
making those cuts and
knowing there's no pain in
the foot, ankle, whatever,"
Jones-Drew said. "Not run-
ning for eight months, it's
like, 'Can I still do it?' But
I've been playing football
for 20 years and it's just
natural."
The bigger test will be
seeing how his left foot
feels after a couple days,
maybe even a few weeks.
"The main thing for me is
just getting back to where I
can carry the ball 20 or 25
times a game," he added.
"Obviously, "right now, I
feel like I can do it. But it's
different when you're get-
ting the ball play after play
after play."
Jones-Drew got about a
dozen repetitions with the
first-team offense Friday.
His best play was his last,
when he caught a pass and
reached full stride before
getting touched down.
"I feel like I had a little
burst," he said. "I feel like
I did some old stuff. I just
want to continue that and


1HE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jacksonville Jaguars running back Maurice Jones-Drew (32) runs past linebacker Russell Allen during a drill at training camp
Friday in Jacksonville.
continue on that track." camp. But team doctors bring him along. It was Gabbert for the starting
Jones-Drew injured his gave him the green light great to see him back out job, also had an intercep-
foot on the first play of a earlier this week, and he there. I know he had a lot- tion returned for score.
26-23 loss at Oakland on was in the backfield for the of excitement. He's been "One thing that I was im-
Oct. 21. It turned out to be first snap Friday. waiting for this day for a pressed with was just how
a Lisfranc injury, a disloca- "We have a plan for long time." they did handle a punch,"
tion or fracture of bones in Maurice, to see him make Aside from Jones-Drew's Bradley said. "Some of the
his left midfoot. He tried some cuts and see him go return, the practice was interceptions; I think, were
rehabbing with rest, but through the line and catch one to forget for Jackson- missed assignments by
doctors eventually decided some balls and things like ville's offense. receivers,' but then there
he needed surgery, that in .practice," coach Blaine Gabbert threw were times where we have
He had surgery in De- Gus Bradley said. "Hie's* two interceptions in 11- to make good decisions.
cember, missed all of right where we thought he on-11 drills, including one The decisions weren't ac-
offseason drills and was would be. We're going to that was returned for a ceptable in our standards.
unsure whether he would continue to work him and touchdown. Chad Henne, Blaine and Chad both un-
be cleared for the start of monitor his reps, but we'll who is competing with derstand that.


"We've got to tighten
those things up, and I know
some of those things are
going to happen. We're go-
ing to coach them up and
try to eliminate them."
The Jaguars opened
camp without five players.
Receiver Justin Blackmon
(groin), receiver Taylor
Price (foot) and center Ste-
phane Milhim (foot) are
on the physically unable to
perform list, while offen-
sive lineman Mark Asper
(knee) and safety Johna-
than Cyprien (hamstring)
are on the non-football
injury list.
Several others joined
them on the sideline Fri-
day, most of them because
of minor cramping. Re-
ceiver Jeremy Ebert was
the lone injury, banging
his head while colliding
with a defender near the
goal line.
Defensive end Jason
Babin, who had groin sur-
gery in early June, was on
the field in a limited role.
So was defensive tackle
Roy Miller, who missed
much of offseason drills
because of knee tendinitis.
But all eyes were on
Jones-Drew, who has to-
taled 4,735 yards rushing
and 29 touchdowns as the
centerpiece of the offense
the last four years.
"Maurice is a pro," guard
Uche Nwaneri said. "He's
been doing this for a while
and he knows how to get
ready for a football sea-
son. We know he's going
to play to the best of his
ability and he's got to be
smart at the same time.
But it's always good to see
32 on the field always
good."


.B ,


GM says Braves 'willing to pay' for pitching help


The Associated Press

ATLANTA Braves gen-
eral manager Frank Wren
said Friday the "tightest
market I've ever seen"
could make it difficult for
the team to trade for a
starting pitcher to replace
Tim Hudson.
Wren said the Braves
have sufficient depth to
withstand the loss of Hud-
son without a trade, but he
also says he's willing to pay.
for a pitcher who could
help them win the World
Series.
Hudson's wife, Kim, said
on her Twitter account
that her husband's season-
ending surgery on his bro-
ken right ankle went well
Friday. The surgery was
performed by Braves phy-
sician Dr. Marvin Royster.
Hudson was injured
Wednesday night when
the Mets' Eric Young Jr. in-
advertently stepped on the
back of the pitcher's lower
right leg at first base.
Asked how Hudson's in-
jury affects his search for
help before Wednesday's
trade deadline, Wren said "I
don't know if it will change
anything."
Manager Fredi Gonzalez
said Brandon Beachy, re-
covering from right elbow
ligament-replacement
surgery in June 2012, will
take HudsOn's rotation
spot Monday night against
Colorado.
Paul Maholm, who left
his start at the White Sox
on July 20 with a bruised
,left wrist, may miss only
one more start.
"We'll get him back and
things will start to normal-
Jze a little bit," said Wren
fof Maholm. "Then we'll
see over the next five days
what's available in the
trade market and does it re-
ally improve us and is that
the direction we should go,
whether starting pitching
or bullpen help."
Wren confirmed that-
Braves special assistant
to the general manager
Jim Fregosi was in Chi-
cago when Jake Peavy,
often mentioned in trade
speculation, started for the


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Atlanta Braves starting pitcher Tim Hudson (second from right) Is relieved by manager Fredl
Gonzalez (33) in a game against the Arizona Diamondbacks as Brian McCann (left) and Chris
Johnson (right) look on June 29 In Atlanta.


White Sox on Thursday.
Wren said Fregosi's scout-
ing trip "had been planned
for weeks and weeks."
"He was going to be see-
ing that White Sox series
because they had pitchers
available that fit what we're
looking for," Wren said. "So
you can't read too much
into where our scouts are."
The Braves also have
been linked with Houston's
Bud Norris and Kansas
City's Ervin Santana. Wren
said the trade options are
slim.
"I think it's the tightest
'market I've ever seen,"
Wren said. "I've been at
the major league level do-
ing this since 1991, and in
22 years I've never seen a
trade market as tight and
as thin in the number of
available players.
"I think a big part of that
is with the addition of
the wild card there are so
many teams that are still
close enough that they're
not ready to give up.
They're. not ready to start
trading. There's a lot more
of us that are in it than are
out of it and it's a real sell-
er's market. We're working
through that."
Wren said he normally
0


has two legal pages filled
with potential trade sce-
narios. This year he said
the names of players and
potential trade partners fill


only half of a page.
Wren said adding payroll
is not an issue.
"It's going to be the tal-
ent we have to give up and


LOCAL NEWS, YOUR WAY.'''
WEEKNIGHTS AT 6:00, 6:00, & 10:00


it's also understanding
how much of an upgrade
a particular player is for
us," he said. "In the mar-
ket are there pitchers out
there who would make us
better? Yes. The number of
them is pretty low."
The NL East-leading
Braves began Friday's
schedule eight games
ahead of Washington and
Philadelphia. Wren said
his focus is on the final
two months of the regu-
lar season, but added that
he's looking for a pitcher
who could improve a
postseason rotation.
"I think you're looking
at big picture as far as we
want to win the World Se-
ries,"Wren said. "So is there
a guy that really makes that
kind of difference? If there
is, I think you're willing to


pay for it. If there's not a
guy you see as a key con-
tributor to a playoff team
if you get there, probably
you're less likely to give up
a lot."
Gonzalez and Wren said
they are confident. Hud-
son, 38, will return next
season.
"I have no doubt in my
mind the way he goes
about his business," Gon-
zalez said.
Gonzalez said Hud-
son can help on the
bench in the final two
months.
"All the guys know he's
a beloved teammate and
friend," Gonzalez said. "I
think we'll rally behind
Huddy and We'll be fine. I
told him I want him here
and in uniform as soon as
possible."


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FLORIDAN







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Bail for Aaron Hernandez


associate set at $500,000


The Associated Press
ATTrLEBORO, Mass. A
Sudge set bail Friday at
$500,000 cash for a man
prosecutors say was with
Aaron Hernandez on the
night the former New Eng-
land Patriots player's friend
was shot to death.
SErnest Wallace appeared
in Attleboro District Court
bn a charge of being an
accessory after the fact to
murder in connection with
Odin .Lloyd's killing. De-
fense attorneyDavid Meler
had sought bail of $10,000,
arguing Wallace wasn't
k, flight risk and wanted
to return to his family in
Florida.
But prosecutors asked
for $1 million bail, saying
Wallace was at risk of flee-
Ing and had a long crimi-
pal history that included
drug convictions.
, Meierwouldnt comment
after court, includingabout
Whetherhis client expected
to make bail. Wallace, who
had previously pleaded
not guilty, was taken back
into custody following the
hearing.
SGregg Miliote, a spokes-
man for Bristol County
District Attorney Samuel
Suitter, said afterthe hear-
Ing that prosecut6on were
pleased with the bail.
. Hemrnandez has pleaded
not guilty to murder in
."he death of Lloyd, a 27-
yer-old Boston semi-pro-
fsslonal football player
Whose body was found
June 17 in an industrial
'uk about a mile from
Hemandez's home. The
two men were friends, and
Uoyd was. dating the sister
ofernandez' girlfriend.
! Friday's hearing followed
the release of court docu-
pnents a day earlier that
included, photos of Her-
pandez in his home, hold-
ng what authorities have
said was a gun. both before


in-..'N
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ernest Wallace arrives for a hearing Friday in District Court In
Attleboro, Mass. Ajudge set his ball at $500.000.


and minutes after Lloyd's
homicide. The photos
came from, Hernandez's
home video surveillance
system and are among
evidence authorities have
obtained with search
warrants.
Four pictures show Her-
nandez near the entrance
to his basement holding a
gun shortly after Lloyd was
killed, according to a court
affidavit. Two other photos


show what authorities say
is Hernandez in his living
room, a few hours before
Lloyd's killing, also holding
what they say is a gun.
Authorities believe Lloyd
was killed with a .45-cali-
ber Glock, which they have
said hasn't been recovered.
Prosecutors have said that
a gun Hernandez is seen
holding in the home sur-
veillance appears to be a
Glock.


NOTICE OF TAX FOR SCHOOL
CAPITAL OUTLAY

The Jackson County School Board will soon
consider a measure to impose a 0.370 mill property
tax for the capital outlay projects listed herein.

This tax is in addition to the school board's
proposed tax of 5.990 mills for operating expenses
and is proposed solely at the discretion of the
School Board.


THE P
BOARD
OPERATIC
OUTLAY
NOTICE.


PROPOSED COMBINED SCHOOL
TAX INCREASE FOR BOTH
4IG EXPENSES AND CAPITAL
IS SHOWN IN THE ADJACENT


The capital outlay tax will generate approximately
$563,860 to be used for the following projects:

MAINTENANCE, RENOVATION
AND REPAIR
Reimbursement of the maintenance, renovation
and repairs paid through the General Fund as
permitted by Florida Statue.

MOTOR VEHICLE PURCHASES
Purchase up to 5 school buses


PAYMENT OF PREMIUMS
FOR PROPERTY AND CASUALTY
INSURANCE NECESSARY TO INSURE THE
EDUCATIONAL AND ANCILLARY PLANTS
OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT
Insurance premiums on district facilities

All concerned citizens are invited to a public
hearing to be held on July 30, 2013, at 5:01 p.m.
at the Jackson County School Board, Board
Room, 2903 Jefferson Street, Marianna, Florida.

A DECISION on the proposed CAPITAL
OUTLAY TAXES will be made at this hearing.


BUDGET SUMMARY SCHOOL BOARD OF JACKSON COUNTY
FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014
PROPOSED MILLAGE LEVIES SUBJECT TO 10-MIL CAP
Required Local Effort 5.242 Additional 0.000
' Basic Discretionary Operating 0.748 Capital Outlay 0.370
Discretionary Critical Needs Operating 0.000 TOTAL MILLAGE 6.360

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS
GENERAL FOOD DEBT CAPITAL
ESTIMATED REVENUES OPERATING SERVICE .OTHER SERVICE PROJECTS TOTAL
Federal Sources 275,000 2,889,000 5,799,824 28,252 8,992,076
State Revenues 38,072,109 58,450 362,000 55,000 38,547,559
Local Sources 10,163,443 846,000 2,563,860 13,573,303
TOTAL REVENUE 48,510,552 3,793,450 5,799,824 362,000 2,647,112 61,112,938
Transfers In 1,413,860 1,020,719 2,434,579
Fund Balance- July 1, 2013 11,298,281 0.00 0.00 559,774 1,819,079 13,677,134
TOTAL REVENUE, FINANCING
SOURCES, AND FUND BALANCES 61,222,693 3,793,450 5,799,824 1,942,493 4,466,191 77,224,651

EXPENDITURES
Instructional 27,908,677 4,202,918 32,111,595
Pupil Personnel Services 2,853,805 230,702 3,084,507
Instructional Media Services 727,657 727,657
Instructional and Curriculum Services 895,404 710,630 1,606,034
Instructional Staff Training 72,816 174,644 246,460
Instruction Related Technology 245,000 63,000 308,000
Board of Education 557,800 557,800
General Administration 306,251 216,522 522,773
School Administration 3,344,500 83,300 3,427,800
Facilities Acquisition and Construction 557,272 1,395,000 1,952,272
Fiscal Services 342,579 342,579
Food Services- 3,793,450 18,500 3,811,950
Central Services 725,133 10,350 735,483
Pupil Transportation Services 3,554,079 13,574 3,567,653
Operation of Plant 5,221,059 75,674 5,296,733
Maintenance of Plant 1,964,137 10 1,964,147
Administrative Technology Services 637,541 637,541
Community Services 4,410 4,410
Debt Service 7,292 -1,381,168 1,388,460
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 49,924,412 3,793,450 5,799,824 1,381,168 1,395,000 62,293,854
Transfers Out 2,434,579 2,434,579
Fund Balance June 30, 2014 11,298,281 561,325 636,612 12,496,218
TOTAL EXPENDITURES, TRANSFERS &
BALANCES 61,222,693 3,793,450 5,799,824 1,942,493 4,466,191 77,224,651

j THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS PUBLIC RECORD
I 1 --------1------_---------- ----- ------ -


-148 SUNDAY, JULY28,2013


SPORTS






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Annie's

Dear Annie: Would you please give me
your opinion on the "man up" issue when
raising boys?
When my 2-year-old grandson falls
down, he is told to tough it out, that he is
OK, and to "man up." There is no hugging
or wiping of tears, because that's consid-
ered babying. I consider it compassion.
1 didn't raise my kids like this. Why do
parents want their boys to be tough and
hide their emotions? Isn't it OK to cry if
you are hurt, especially If you are 2 years
old? Should I continue to comfort them
anyway? How do I handle this?
-SAD GRANDMA
Dear Grandma: It's perfectly OK for boys
of any age to cry when hurt (physically or
emotionally). And while our society has
been conditioned to react negatively to-
ward men who weep at the drop of a hat,
it is generally considered sensitive and
attractive for them to shed a tear when
the occasion calls for it.
Thought minor hurts should not be
turned into major crises, a toddler should
be able to cry without worrying that he
is angering or disappointing his parents.
When he is with you, feel free to treat him
as you would any child who needs some
TLC. The world certainly does not need
more men who are emotionally closed off
because their parents taught them that
expressing themselves was somehow not
masculine.

, Dear Annie: My husband and I have dis-
hgreed about this since the day we mar-
ried. I was divorced, and he was divorced
twice. Let's call him "Joe Smith," and I'll
be "Jane Doe." After my divorce, I went
back to using my maiden name. I didn't
Want to be the third "Mrs. Smith."
a Here's the problem: Mail, holiday cards
and invitations all come addressed to
"Mr. and Mrs. Joe Smith." I feel it should
be "Mr. Smith and Ms. Doe." It Irks me


Mailbox

to no end that people cannot grasp this
*simple concept. I am right, aren't I?
-WHO AM I?
Dear Who: Basic etiquette says a mar-
ried couple is address as "Mr. and Mrs.
Whatever" unless Informed otherwise.
Even if people are aware that you use your
maiden name, they may think it is only
for business purposes and not for social
invitations. This is not an unreasonable
assumption, so you need to clarify your
preference. You should let your friends
and family know that you use your
maiden name for all forms of address
and would appreciate it if they would
respect that. Some folks may need to be
reminded more than once, so please be
patient.

Dear Annie: Your advice to "Grandpar-
ents" was right on the money. Our son and
daughter-in-law also have three children,
the eldest from a previous relationship.
It was obvious that "Johnny" was not
treated as well as his younger siblings. We
were heartsick at the way he was singled
out for unkind treatment. He was berated
for every little thing. Yet he was a good
boy with excellent grades who graduated
from school with top honors.
SWe took "Johnny" whenever possible,
sometimes for a week at a time, and
stayed closely in touch until, not surpris-
ingly, it reached the crisis stage and he
threatened suicide. They disregarded it,
and he ran off. We found him and took
him to live with us. His parents were an-
gry, and there was a yearlong estrange-
ment, but we stuck to it, knowing it was
the righfit thing to do. Today, "Johnny"
Is a successful student at college and
reunited with his parents and siblings.
It won't be easy, but I know if "Grand-
parents" continue to support and love
"Hayden," they will not regret it.
GRANDPARENTS, TOO


Bridge


C.J. Cherryh, a science fiction and fan-
tasy author who has an asteroid named-
after her, said, "Trade isn't about goods.
Trade is about information. Goods sit in
the warehouse until information moves
them."
For the last two weeks, we have been
using the acronym "trade" to help find
the right plays. We track the tricks, read
the lead, audition the auction, deduce the
danger, and eye the entries.
Here is one more example. How should
South play in four spades after West
guesses well to lead a fourth-highest club
five?
When North raises three spades o four,.
%he knows that there could be four top los-
ers, but it might make or be a good sacri-
fice against a making four-heart contract
for East-West.
This deal is East's problem. He should,
realize that if the defenders are going to
win four tricks, they will be either three
dubs (West started with queen-fourth)
and the heart ace, or two clubs (West
started with five clubs) and two hearts.
So, East takes the first trick with his dclub
king and cashes the club ace, noting that
West plays the two, indicating that West
started with five clubs. Now East must
shift to a low heart. If West has the king,
cashing the ace first works fine; but not
here. The question is: Will South guess
correctly?


North 07-27-13
4 A96
V J 108
AKQJ
*J93
West East
43 472
VQ9542 VA63
*74 108653
Q 10 7 5 2 *4 A K 4
South
4 KQJ10854
V K7
92
486
Dealer. South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
34 Pass 44 All pass

Opening lead: 4 5


Finally, if West wins the third trick with
the heart queen, how does he know to re-
turn a heart, not give East a club ruff?
Because if East had begun with the
ace-king-doubleton of dubs, he would
have won the first trick with the ace, then
cashed the king.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"PFLWL HWL NJELC NFJ EHUL PFBCDR

FHAALC, NFJ EHUL H TBOOLWLCIL. B

NHCP PJ VL J C L JO PFJRL NJELC."

- SLWH OHWEBDH



Previous Solution: "A noble heart cannot suspect in others the pettiness and
malice that it has never felt." Jean Racine
TODAY'S CLUE: Q slenbe.L
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 7-27



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.


" E WJ E


LJVVDFH


EZIFEWFV HJR
/


GZMYNFT GJK NDXF


J P E FV


HJR DT J


LDVJGNF EWJE EWF XJEDGJK WJT

ZXFVNZZCFH." -- ADNN GZTAR



Previous Solution: "There are women who make things happen, who make a
difference. I want to be one of those women." Vera Farmiga

TODAY'S CLUE: d slenbeA
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 7-29


Horoscopes

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- You might find some-
one with whom you've
rarely seen eye-to-eye to
be good company.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Don't allow yourself to
be overwhelmed by de-
tails. You'll fare better if
you make yourself look at
the big picture instead of
a few brush strokes.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Don't appear too ea-
ger if someone is trying
to interest you in a busi- A(
ness proposition. It would 1 s
weaken your position if su
you look to be too easy. 8
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 12S
42) -In an arrangement 13P
where your mate opts for 14c
15AI
the lead, it's OK to relegate 161n
yourself to a supporting a
role. 18C
20SI
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23- 21 M
Dec. 21) Do yourself 22
a favor by pushing away 2=A
from your desk and get- 28f
ting some exercise. A r
stimulating activity will 29G
be just what the doctor 33 P
ordered. b
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22- 3S
Jan. 19) Associating 36
with some friends whose 37 F
exuberance is infectious h
will make this a fun day. 38 M
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20- 39L
Feb. 19) Although 41S
you'll have a reservoir of 42H
strength to draw upon 45p
that will serve you well in n
tedious endeavors, you'll
need to pace yourself.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March [
20) When dealing with -
others one-on-one, your _
manner will put them at 12
ease. If your interlocu- i1-
tors sense your sincer- _-
ity; they'll feel impelled to 18
treat you similarly.
ARIES (March 21-April |
19) You should have
some stabilizing influenc-
es starting to manifest in -
areas that have been dis-
ruptive lately. Relax and 38
let these calming trends
bring you peace. 4B
TAURUS (April 20-May ,
20) Don't hesitate to &3
disengage yourself from -
others if you need to at-
tend to an important 6o
matter that requires your
attention. 7-27
EMINI(May21-June20) A
- Because you require 1p
solitude to perform at 4c
your best, try to slip away BE
from others to a place that fl
Is totally free from outside fil
interference. 12C
CANCER (June 21-July *
13"
22)-Relaxed social activ- 14H
ties with old friends will 16C
prove to be the most plea- c
surable part of your day. 17


World
Almanac
Today is the 209th day of
2013 and the 38th day of
summer.
TODAY'S HISTORY:. in
1868, the 14th Amend-
ment to the Constitution
was ratified, guarantee-
ing full citizenship rights
to African-Americans and
due process of law to all
citizens.
In 1914, World War I be-
gan when Austria-Hunga-
ry declared war on Serbia.
In 1932, the Bonus Army
-unemployed World War
I veterans demanding
their bonus payments in
full was evicted from
government property in
Washington, D.C.
In 2005, the Irish Re-
publican Army renounced
violence as a political tac-
tic and ordered Its units to
disarm and cease all ter-
rorist activities.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS: Be-
atrix Potter (1866-1943),
children's author/illustra-
tor; Jacqueline Kennedy
Onassis (1929-1994), first
lady; Bill Bradley (1943-
), basketball player/U.S.
senator; Jim Davis (1945-),
cartoonist; Sally Struthers
(1948-), actress.


I'
18E
201m
21 J
ft
22C
25 k
290
30 1
31 L
32V
S
33S
34A(
g
35 F
38 R
n
8
at
390
s


Entertainment Brief


Man accused of
tweet-stalking
AshantI In NYC
NEWYORK (AP) -An
Illinois man who served
jail time for stalking
R&B singer Ashanti has
been indicted in New
York for again stalk-
ing and harassing the
Grammy Award-winner.
Prosecutors sayDevar
Hurd was indicted


CROSS
alad bowl
rood
Infold, In
poetry
lain point
3k shade
ale
'on
greene with
nJured an
nkle
ontalners
hrlll bark
lessy
lace
lone
autumn Vo.
reeway
imp
iumbo-
sggle
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Ireek
column
type
Recluse
Finance
ub
loose kin
lettuce
nit
Speak
Highway
OP k
op
lunging
neckline


48 Rainbow
shape
49 Urbane
53 Lunar
events
56 Mr.
Sikorsky
57Woody's
son
58 U.K.
country
59 Invalid
60Where pol
Is served
61 TV receiver
62Fence -
opening
DOWN
1 Recipe
amt.
2 Mr. Kazan
3 BMW rival
4 Boat
bottoms
5 Startled
cries
6 Ancient
scrolls
7 Captivated
8 Moo goo
pan
9 Room
offerers
10Dele
canceler
11 Orderly
17Mimlc


Friday in state Supreme
Court in Manhattan. ;
Prosecutors say he vio*-
lated an order of protec-
tion when he sent more
than 100 tweets to the
singer's Twitter account
between September
2012 and last weekend.
His bail was set at
$750,000. He is expected
to be arraigned some-
time next month.
From wire reports
Answer to Previous Puzzle






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61 Ko-l- --. _cu- et10
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through sharply
23 Give the 44 Regretting
p ink slip 45 Tender
24 Koh-l- cutlets
25 Eye 46 Brownish
Impolitely tint
26 Not too 47 Rainesor
friendly Fitzgerald
27 Aquarium 50 OWater, In
30 Mr. Kris- Tijuana
tofferson 51 Electrical
31 Costa unit
32 Sore 52- Stanley
34 Kind of Gardner
pilot 54 Cash
35 Guys substitute
37 Ray gun 55Mil. officer
blast
39 Equines
40lOTime of the
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Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBookscom .


020


CROSS
Previously
hises flim
nally
future
power
Comic
trip queen
Bal -"
lIt hard
Cobra
cousin
Applied
eint
larbarians
Inquire
an.
Uollower
Discounts
magazine
4iece
Gunk
nature
emon -
/orld
series ma.
Spoiled
adjust a
ultar
playhouse
Rumor-
monger's
tart '
lorse code
signal


40Caesar's 16
41 Remote
button
44Patricla
Hearst, e.g.
48"Whuler-
49 Resolved a

5 ~rulty
drink
52Taboos
(hyph.)
53Gun lobby
org.
54Owns
0SSObserved
6SCongeal
DOWN
1 Basics
2 Big swallow
3 Skunk's
defense
4 Streamlined
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6 Brunched
7 Gizmo
8 At the drop
of---
9 Wlde belt
lOHula
swivelers
12Yawning
gulf


013 UFS. Dist. by Unkmsa Ucifck w UFS
Answer to Pevlous Puzze


EAC;L! I I"PiSiE.SILGJ__R
19IL-0N tIL'Ll
LAR 'O llllG NTuiL:LI
.LU:A' iUsEif iA TTEl
s15Madelike 30AIdln
sheep crime
19 Teahouse 34White
attire ribbon
21 Dancer 36 Billboards
Astaire 37 Connecdtions
22 Glasgow (hyph.)
resident 38Wall
23 St. Louis climbers
landmark 40 Inert gas,
24 Minstrel's 41 Nile god
Instrument 42Verdi opera
25 Culture 43Functlons
medium 44Sharpea
26 Fingerprint, 45Billions of
e.g. years
27 Actress 46Certaj-
Tumer 47 Sports fig.
28 Washstand SOSturgeon
Item product


Went more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at OulllDrilverBooks.com


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
tm VERY EA R O' 'r ST. OF coURSCU wEu. HAVE
YOU TO e ON YOUR TO ARRANE PAYMENFi RT HE TWI PJ ,-
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, t CAN YOU START? r T YOU TO WORK OUT VHWSt D91ALSI J S


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2013 # 5BF


ENTENI-





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN # www.jcfloridan.com


NFIL



Rodgers says he was lied to by Braun


The Associated Press
GREEN BAY, Wis. -
Green Bay Packers quar-
terback Aaron Rodgers
said Friday that he was
shocked and disappointed
after his friend Ryan Braun
admitted to'Violating base-
ball's rules against using
performance- enhancing
substances.
The Milwaukee Brewers
slugger "looked at me in
the eye on multiple occa-
sions and repeatedly de-
nied the allegations, said
they weren't true," Rodgers
recalled before a throng of
reporters at his 16ocker.after
the first practice of train-
ing camp. Braun accepted
a season-ending, 65-game
suspension earlier this
week.
He and Rodgers are
friends, and a Milwaukee
restaurant is named after
the Wisconsin stars. Rodg-
ers even defended Braun
on Twitter last year, saying
he would bet his substan-
tial salary that his friend
was clean.
Rodgers said he was sim-
ply "backing up a friend"
then, and that they've


spoken since Braun's
admission.
"Obviously, in hindsight,
a more measured approach
next time would obviously
be a better course of ac-
tion. People make mis-
takes. I definitely believe
in forgiveness and moving
forward," Rodgers said.
"Obviously, he has a tough
task in front of him moving
forward with his career, on
and off the field."
Asked about the busi-
ness relationship and the
licensing agreement for
the 8-twelve MVP Bar and
Grill in Milwaukee, Rodg-
ers said that was yet to be
determined.
"As far as the business
goes, right now I'm fo-
cused on football, and I
have people who can help
me work with those types
of issues," he said.
But the off-the-field
questions weren't done for
Rodgers, even if it was the
first preseason practice of
the year.
Earlier this week, for-
mer Packers receiver Greg
Jennings now the with
archrival Minnesota Vi-
kings delivered his


strongest criticism yet of
his ex-quarterback. In an
interview with the Star
Tribune, he questioned
Rodgers' leadership and
implied the quarterback
had become bigger than
the team.
"Don't get me wrong, '12'
is a great person," Jennings
was quoted as saying, refer-
ring to Rodgers. "But when
you hear all positives, all
positives, all positives all
the time, it's hard for you
to sit down when one of
your teammates says,
'Man, come on, you've got
to hold yourself account-
able for this.' It's hard for
someone to see that now
because all they've heard is
I'm doing it the right way,
I'm perfect. In actuality, we
all have flaws."
Rodgers said he wasn't
spending energy on Jen-
nings' comments.
"To me, I'm concerned
with the opinions of the
guys in this locker room
and the guys we have
here," Rodgers said. "It's
exciting to be able to be
one of the leaders of this
football team, and I'm very
confident in my style."


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Green Bay Packers
NFL football
quarterback
Aaron Rodgers
(left) and
Milwaukee
Brewers outfielder
Ryan Braun speak
during batting
practice before
a game between
the Brewers and
the New York Mets
in Milwaukee on
June 9,2011.


Sw an ~ p aor awt




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: You don't like your children's friends? :

SForbidding your children from seeing new friends Iecause you don't like them Is :
not an effective or realistic way to manage a social problem that you may perceive.
SThese friends probably go to the same school as your children or live In the same *
Neighborhood and so are a part of your child's life In some way, for better or worse.
SInstead of punishing your children by "taking away" the friends, try to discover what 0
Attracts them to these particular people.
Invite the new friends to your home. You don't like the way they dress? Avoid any hasty
judgments, as appearances can often be deceiving. And don't forget that trends come
and go-punk music Is in one year, techno music the next!
SInstead, pay more attention to their behavior. Are they rude to you or your child? Do they
Seem delinquent? If you're not reassured by this meeting, explain to your children the
reasons fqr your concern and talk about any behavior you feel is unacceptable. Don't
hesitate to share your concerns with a teacher or with another parent, as this could help
Syou to understand the situation more clearly.
Af It is possible that you are worried for nothing
*and that these new friends will turn out to be
Snice. It is also possible that the friendships will
0% be fleeting and that your children will drop them
R when they realize that the others are not really
their type. All the same, stay attentive to certain
signs that could Indicate your children are
r feeling troubled or under the negative influence
of a friend. Be alert for a drop in grades, anye
... .,, .^ personality change, or weight loss; such things
could Indicate that It's time for professional help.
Before judging your child's new friends, invite
^ Them over and try to get to know them a little
bit.


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SPORTS


-16B SUNDAY,.JULY 28,2013






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NASCAR



Earnhardt still looking for sponsor


The Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS For
sale by owner: Major spon-
sorship for NASCAR's most
popular driver. ,
Act fast, time is running
out.
-Dale Earnhardt Jr. is not
only looking for his first
win of the season, he's still
hunting for a big-bucks
sponsor for 12 Sprint Cup
races this season.
Earnhardt said he's not
worried, a sign that per-
haps Hendrick Motors-
ports has a deal on the
horizon.
"It is important to try to
fill out what we have this
season arid we will," Earn-
hardt said Friday at India-
napolis Motor Speedway. "I
don't have any doubt at all
that we will get that done.
I think we almost have to
look forward beyond that
to try to find out who is go-
ing to be the partner that
we can put a long term
deal together that matches
up with what we want to
do in.the future."!'
That's part of the prob-
lem. Hendrick and Earn-
harcft would love to find
a primary sponsor that
would fund what's left on,
this season's slate as well
as 2014, and possibly be-
yond. With 16 races left,
putting together a multi-
year deal with a committed
corporate backer seems
almost impossible to pull.
off.
"It's just all -the dollars
and cents are accounted
for at this point in theyear,"
Earnhardt said. "That
doesn't mean we can't put
some things together and
do some creative stuff with
some people and some
partners that we already
have."
Earnhardt's sponsorship
woes started when Pepsi,
through Diet Mountain


Sprint Cup Series driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. heads Into the first turn during practice for the
Brickyard 400 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis on Friday.


Dew and Amp, sliced its
sponsorship from 20 races
to five in 2013. The Na-
tional Guard did bolster
its support of the No. 88,
going from 16 to 20 races.
Earnhardt, who's made the
Chase for the Sprint Cup
championship each of the
last two seasons, is some-
what hindered in finding
the right fit because of
conflicts with committed
corporate sponsors. For
example, his Pepsi deal
is the reason he ditched
Budweiser when he signed
with Hendrick for the 2008
season.
It's not like. he doesn't
have options. Earnhardt is
one of the superstar faces
of NASCAR. Even as the
wins have dried'up, he was
still voted NASCAR's most
popular driver for each of
the last 10 years. Owner
Rick Hendrick isn't inter-
ested in sponsors looking
to work their way in for
a race or two, or the kind
of companies that would
conflict with his corporate
image.
Earnhardt was set to
drive an unsponsored
race at Daytona until Hen-
drick put the National
Guard on the No. 88. He'll
0


use the National Guard
again for Sunday's race at
Indy.
Another reason he can
be picky: The sponsorship
he does have on the 88 is


so lucrative that he has one
of the highest-funded cars
in the garage even with
available inventory.
He's also kept an eye on
sponsorship for his Na-


tionwide Series program
competing under the JR
Motorsports banner. Great
Clips signed on as primary
sponsor for 28 races this
season. Great Clips and
Hendrick on Friday an-
nounced a three-year ex-
tension through 2016 that
bumped its primary spon-
sorship from three Cup
races a season to 10 for
Kasey Kahne's No. 5 Chev-
rolet. Great Clips also will
serve as a major associate
sponsor.
Great Clips will be on
Kahne's car this weekend
in Indianapolis and again
for the Sept. 22 race in New
.Hampshire.
"They continue to see
a great return on invest-
ment, and we're focused
on continuing that trend
by performing at a high
level on the racetrack while


delivering business wins,"
Hendrick said.
Earnhardt, though, said
he didn't know how Great
Clips' increase would af-
fect its future relationship
with his Nationwide pro-
gram. He seems just as
confident that he'll find
the right sponsors.
"We have some potential
to have some really inter-
esting things announced
down the road with that,"
he said. "Due to how well
we've run this year and
how we've been able to
turn that program around,
we definitely caught the
eyes of a few sponsors
and potential partners. So,
we're looking a lot better
on that front, too. I think
everything is going to be
fine. I don't believe any-
body needs to be too con-
cerned at this point."


I iink i ON
|:., r ,'.,.,: ,,.,.:. ... ,., '"-,-:., ..... :,.. ,.Re ,.


College" Fbotbal


Florida gives


Muschamp a


$250,000 raise


I lMlAMWWUaSUSU lW bsituoUhffMOPll UstW6tlr&MOIlUMM4 UNMl rJ-EL By-i /l Iini1


The Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Florida
has given coach Will Mus-
champ a raise after an 11-
win season.
School president Ber-
nie Machen and athletic
director Jeremy Foley
upped Muschamp's sal-
ary $250,000 annually,
making" him the sev-
enth-highest-paid coach
in the Southeastern
Conference.
Muschamp will now
make $2.928 million an-
nually through the 2017
season, ranking behind
Alabama's Nick Saban


($5.47 million), LSU's Les
Miles ($3.8 million), South
Carolina's Steve Spurrier
($3.3 million), Georgia's
Mark Richt ($3.2 million),
Arkansas' Bret Bielema
($3.2 million) and Texas
A&M's Kevin Sumlin ($3.1
million).
Foley says in a statement:
"Dr. Machen and I believe
very strongly in Coach
Muschamp and his leader-
ship, arid we felt it was ap-
propriate to adjust his sal-
ary to be more in line with
his market value."
The Gators are 18-
8 in two years under
Muschamp.


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8 B Sunday, July 28,2013 Jackson County Floridan


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na FL located hi Devotion section, Lot 12, SP
3DothanIig So N as k -=O 120Z. nt Rd-18



. . . . a I


BUSINESSOPPORTUN..ITIE


Be your own boss and partner with the
worlds largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K,
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264


Jantor Business for sale
SEquipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,50
5-915-1474


.f *' S 1 '
.,so% le sl
Iong's Clock's & Antiques
101S Headland Ave. Dothan
,,,,Open Tues. FrI. 10-4
4 Cmii 334-792-3964

Maytag Appinc new In boxes: Oven,
Dlshwasher,Mlcrowave'fn combo for over
cooktop, and ceramic cooktop $2,000 All.
Call 850-557-0840

Want to save time on your
shopping experience? ,
Ever wish you could have clothes picked
out for you as soon as your walk In your
favorite store? Have you ever wanted help
finding that unique vintage dress or antique
piece of furniture? I CAN HELP.When people
have asked about passion the first and only
thing that'would come to mind Is shopping.
I can do what I love & help others in the
Process. Rates are $15/hr for a personal
shopper and $25 finder's fee for vintage
clothing and furniture. After a short get to
know you session, I can assist in making
your shopping experience not only a
memorable one but a painless one. Email
be lezs o 47 ahoo.co for more Info.


Sofa Bed: browh cloth queen size sleeper sofa,
never slept in. $300.850-718-8084



NEEDED I BUY SEALED/
UNEXPIRED BOXES
CALL BOB (334) 219-4697
OR (850 71HI089

Wanted: Old Cos, Goldl =
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
MISCE L =NOUS FOR SeAE*
FountahLn: porch waterfall fountain/pond.
pump and light. $50.850-718-8084
*t A1., _1 111 a Iln i la I"21! hil

Restaurant Equipment
Ref unit with 3ft prep cooler.
3ft. convection oven on stand 220 volt
4 burner grill for cooking steaks
Seven 4-seater tables
30 black stack chairs
S4 boxes of plastic dishes; glass plates,
plastic cups & silverware.
14ft 4 well steam table with ref unit and
display case.
3ft metal roll around storage box.
$1,;000. ALL CaNl 334-791-2800


Cmo: Radlsson 12 ft canoe, unsinkable,
extremely lgaht & stable. $SO. 850-718-084
Kayal 2 person sit-on kayak, very stable. o10 ft.
$400.850-718-8084


I FKree Kim (4) to a good home, 7 weeks old.
otter trained, mae & female. 850-2M-4908


Large gray bob-tailed cat
has gone missing In Laver
H ills. He is approximately
14 Ibs. and answers to the
Same Brutus. Extremely
affectionate and friendly.
S H He did have a break-away
collar on when he disap- .
peared on 12 July 13. If any-
dne has seen him or knows
where he Is please call
334-449-1422 or 334-446-1005. ** A REWARD
WILL. BE GIVEN FOR HIS SAFE RETURN.


Happy Jack DD33: Kills fleas quicker, last
longer on dogs & cats. Citrus odor.
Blodegradeable. ALTHA FARMERS COOP
(482-2416) www.happylacklnc.com




f Fresh Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-352-2199
85-209-3322 or 850-573-6594
__ 4128 Hwy 231

F".- btv".IANWei MH cdus
^A^^.aS>.W..inh. pu
yAaiean amiot JeSo,.



SNELL FARMS SKIPPERVILLE AL
* Shelled Pea's 0 Butter Beans 0 Okra
Tomatoes Watermelons
Green Peanuts
so Retail or Wholesale 4a
Call 334-733-6489 or 334-733-6490


Dresser with mirror, good condition. $100.850-
445-6834
FoMg Poker Table 48" oak for 8 w/green felt
surface and hardtop cover. $280 no trades, .
cash only. 850-933-8547.
Movie Camera, Panasonic OMMI PV500 VHS
$40 Pet Mate (3) 42x30x28 $40 Ea. 850-592-2881
Teachers Desk with glass top, oak, large
has 8 drawers $125.850-526-1120.


HOME GROWN, FRESH



Other Fresh Vegetables'!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvem
334-793-6690

SFeed Oaks for Hoses & Catle 4
$1Si. per iNl Ibs.
bring your owm bag please 34-7,-Ml

MADDOX FARMS
Beautiful Bermuda Coastal Hay
SRound Rolls $50 Square $5
Cal 334-7914023

Sim.Anpgus Rp=lacement Heffers */
Top Blood Lines. Priced to SeL.
Call 334-894-1626 or 334-360-5035
IT'S AS EASY
ASI -2-3
1.CALL 2.P EYoUam 3.6rmETs


Rocker antique $25. Signed Gospil tapes $5.
2009 Gator National football $50. Floor Lamp
.$20. Gospel Book James Blackwood signed & JD
Sumner signed $35. ea. 850-263-1039
Treadmill Vitamaster with electric incline $100.
850-592-3304
Whirlpool Washing Machine: white $125;
Kenmoore Washer white $125 850-482-3267


Sudoku


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Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains eery 'digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to last Sunday's puzzle
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3 1 8,15 46,9T2 7


7/28/13


'ac an A d Fast, easy, no press
?lace an A d 24 hours a day, 7 da
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


re
ays a week!


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www.JCFLORIDAN.coIi VCLASSIFIEDS


.Jackson County Floridan e


-Sunday, July 28, 2013-B
Sunday, July 28, 2013- 9l B


.: TREES TREES
4. 5 ,, TREES
S containers
$69.95 buy 2
.. get one FREE
Live Oaks, Crape Myrtle,
Cherry Laurel & Magnolias
By appointment
334-692-3695


l~toitH One/ Hardwood ip INN
..- . *our.r .
I 4.-A". ^- -. ._ .-^ *
., RIver Timber
S3-3892003,4.




Part-time News Clerk
The Jackson County Florldan newspaper
has an Immediate opening for a part-time
news clerk to handle various community
listings columns, assist people in the
newsroom and answer telephone calls and
questions from the public. The successful
applicant should possess excellent written
and verbal communication skills and be
knowledgeable with computer. Must type
accurately and quickly and able to Juggle
different tasks at once.
Drug screen & background check required.
EOE/M/F/D/V
Send resmeto:
vroberts)jcfloddaitcom
or mailto:
4403 Consuto Lane
Maanaa, FL 32448
TECNOOG


MT^H
Nwowu FWrtds
I ormihTY aneq*ril
Northwest Florida Community Hospital,
Chipley, FL is seeking qualified
candidates for the following position:
HVAC/Mechanical
Maintenance
Full Time, hospital experience preferred.
Applications available online at
www.NFClorg and/or application to:
Email dbloutPnfcl.org
(850) 415-8106 or Fax (850) 6384622
Smoke and Drug Free Campus. EOE
TRASPRTTIN &LOISIC


rAMBMY DOLLAR
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA
Now Hiring Full Time
Forklift Operator Positions
Experience Required
Competitive Pay and Benefits Package!
Please apply In person at:
Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway,
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must be 18 Years Old.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace


f9A"
TRAN4~f~j.INC.
SAFETY AND DRIVER
DEVELOPMENT POSITION
Are you looking for a Leadership role with
a focus on safety and driver
development? If you are then this is the
role for you. Paper Transport, Inc, a
leader in growth and innovation is looking
for you to join our Safety Team in Cedar
Springs, GA.
Qualified applicants should possess:
* 2-3 years of transportation experience
* Proficiency in HOS and DOT Regulations
and on-board communication devices
e Full understanding of CSA
Responsibilities Include:
* Interview and evaluation of prospective
driver applicants including road tests
Conduct and facilitate driver
orientations and accident investigation
CDL Is preferred but not required
*25% Travel
PTI offers a competitive
compensation package & a family
friendly work environment
Please visit to apply:
https//diim.dindexinc.com/]ob/9bc3eb


'TRIm mSS^ II


DRIVERS
Paper Transport, Inc has IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS for CLASS A DRIVERS for
Our dedicated accounts.
HOME WEEKLY
99% No Touch Freight
Competitive Pay
$.38 Cents + Bonus Per Mile
18 Months Experience Required.
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS!
Qualified Driver could be hired
within a Week!
Cal usat -85-PIOS (94S67


Dozer and Excavation Work
Ponds Road Building Demolition
Pine Tree Planting Herbicide Spraying
Fire Line Plowing Burning
Clay O'Nel 6.vSSS=,4
clayslandclearlngOgmall.com


STmlling Motor Repair
SAffordable Servicel Fast Repairl
Most Cases 1 Week Turnaround.
S Servicing Minn Kota & Motorguide.


II -850-272-5305
AUOMTIESERIE

RINEW&USED TIRE

TRIPLE .




850.526.1700
Hours: Mon-Frl 7-5 Sat 7-1
2978 Pierce Street (behind Tim's Florist)

APPLIACE REAIRa~
A( 4.^. 8 -693-6686
cmon 4@gmail.com
|4eAll jSPr Appliances
I^B^Same Dayjgext Day Service


-AJ=SPOR.TA= .IN&o OISTICS


WANTED:


Paper Carrier
* Mature
*Reliable
* Business Minded
*Proof of Insurance
* Dependable Transportation



EARN $$$

$500-$800
Per month AFTER expenses


Bid for Contract at
the Jackson County
Floridan, 4403
Constitution Lane,
* Marianna, FL

ff You Hove It and Don't Need It...
Sell It in the CLASSIFIED


Class A CDL
DRIVERS
Needed Immediately
W = Local Whegamss Haung
3 years min. driving history
with Dump Trailer Experience
Home nights
Apply ONLY online at:
www.perdidotru kingcom
Perdido Trucking
Service, LLC
251-470-0355

DRIVERS: Guaranteed
Home EVERY Weekend!
COMPANY: All Miles
PAID (Loaded & Empty)!
LEASE: To Own-No
Money Down, No Credit
Check! Call 888-880-5911


LAWNSERVICE
Affordable Lawn Care
Low Overhead=Low Prices
850-263-3813 850-849-1175



S o


850.557.2924
1850.209.9373

Lighthouse Electrical
SUnlimited, LLC
Ifhhe Residential Electrical
Remodels Service Work
#OER13014408 Insured
0 Rick)y Mosher
(850)272-2918 Owner.



c --




oc /^ Own r/opaa(3lo
COMMERCIAL 4854 Dowood or,
CLEANING &rOS ", EEPING
Clen1ing es Our obellOi (81 0) 728C 832
I oodomntrilalclMnlngOyalhooaomn
r ww.ow d comna rll-ol nlnr.iom a cao


1 Campbellton-Graceville Hospital located
in Graceville, Florida Is seeking qualified
persons for the following positions:


FULLTIME REGISTERED NURSES
This is a night shift charge nurse
position; must have a current Florida
Nursing License and a minimum of
2 years experience.
Apply or inquire to Campbellton-
Graceville Hospital www.c-ghospital.com
or call (850) 263-4431 ext. 2012. Resume
may be faxed to (850) 263-3312,
Attn: Personnel Director or email to
jaustlnrpanhandle.rr.com
Drug Free workplace, EOE.

-EEAL MLOMN


HEALTHCAR


I GEERALEMP OYMET =


ADRM ii RlSH!
You'll also get career arainig and money for
college. If you're ready for the excitement, join
thdie Army National Guard today.
SSG Ambrocio Bias
850-294-7349G
NATrONALGUARD.com* .1,-800-GO-GUARD


I SELF S.ORAGI


*/7i ) Trvums o.DJ Nm.
T U4 ow C'le0-brM
0 (SM 0U|86)M53MC |O|5094441


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'lU. BEAT ANY PIgi
Big OrSmall Jobs WELCOME
85 8283 C:ell.: 85 -27-62


"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
illmn11.1 ligJr (80)69-90


Find jobs


fast and


easy!,


FLORIDAN%
jcflorldan.com


"monsterI
FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOS


m


i I


I-


I !


1.









1 B Sunday, Jul 2, 2013 Jackson County F lorldan L -
fGENERALEMPLOYMENT 11 CAMPERS&TRAVELTAILERS


ATOD PREVENTION PROGRAM

Full time opportunity to provide substance
abuse prevention services to children and
adolescents In Calhoun and Liberty
Counties. Must he able to work and
communicate effectively with children and
adolescents, be well organized and at team
player. BA in Social Sciences or Education.
Experience working with children
preferred. Some travel.
Salary range $26,893 $29,265 D.O.E. +
Travel Per Diem + Full Benefits Package.
Send resume to CARE, 4000 E. 3rd Street,
Panama City, Ra. 32404,
Attn.: Delbert Horton.
EEO/DFWP/Drug & Background screening.

The Davey Tree Expert Company I hiungP a
geeilif F9n1FIRM wlo a
CDL for tMarlianna are Cal: 52-27M^2W


"*, '


s Look ahead to your
future! Start training
F R TI for a new career In
Fru ri I Medical Assisting,
COLLEGE Medical Office Admin.,
Pharmacy Technology,
Electrical Trades & HVAC!
Call Fortis College 888-202-4813


HOLLY HILLAPARTMENTS
1,.2 and 3 Bedroom Apartments
Monthly rent from $582 + utilities
Rental Assistance for Qualified Applicants
For Rental Info & Appllcations
CalH: 850-483-7150
Holly Hi Apartments
Located at: 4414 HolNy HM Drive, Madranna
Mon-IFi, 940 AM-S.OPM
(TOD #1-800-955-8771)
Equal Housing'Opportunity Provider & Employer







One bedroom apartment for rent
2941 Green St, Marianna.
$490 month 1 yr. lease $400 dep.
Call JoanNe 80-693-57


1 & 2BR Apartmet In Mar ia una
2 & 3BR MobN Homues Rent to Own
Lot rent Included. For detas
85N-5567-3432 or 56-814-6515 4a
2925RussSt,Marham. -2B-/2 Ba, LMsqft
home, central heat/air, carpet & hardwood
floors, vinyl in bathrooms & kitchen.
Concrete driveway, In town. $675, 850-264-615
3BR/1BA House hi Cpress,
water furnished, attached carport & nice lawn.
$400 Month. Call 850-762-3666
Ausin Tyer& Co *
SQuality Homes & Apartments
850-526-3355 or austintylero.cog.
"ProDertyv Management Is-Oar ONLY Business"
CeIy 1 bo en '1 bath, eat-4n-kltchen,
living rm, quiet area $475 mo. plus utilities.
850-566-9902
MOBILE HOM S.FR EN


3BR21A, Mobile Home nice total elec. on pave
road near Blue Springs water & yard main. fur-
Iished NoPets $550. mo + dep. 850-638-7822


Quiet, well maintained Park, Water/sewer/
garbage/lawn Included. -3/2 $575.
also 2/1 Brick Duplex $600. w/carport
SJoyCe Riley RE-850-209-789L





Mobile Home on S Acres: 2BR/1BA well, septice
tank, fixer upper on paved road near Marianna.
S25000.Call 84582-4V 333 0or_0-20 4936


2BR/1.5BA Townhome on Mewrtt'Wa MlI Pond,.
Marrianna. New roof, carpet and dock. Beauti-
ful view of Waterl1 $115,900 Call 850-693-9540





2003 Triton V 176 Magnum: alum hull, with
115H Mercury motor, trolling motor, excellent
condition. $9,500. Call 254-394-6703
Astro 1989 18ft Boat: Aluminum hull, with
trailer, 1998 Mercury engine, 115HP, 2 electric
anchors, front and rear, new fish/depth finder,
2 new batteries, plenty of storage, live well,
new trolling motor. Excellent fishing boat!
$3,500 Call 334-445-1616
Bluve Fin Bass
1998 EIlmator All
Aluminum Bass
Boat, 50 HP force

engine, galivan-
ized trailer-new
tires, all In very
good condition, 2
live well boxes, 4
new seats, new Humminbird fish finder $3,995
OBO 828-837-1314 or 828-421-0998
Javelin 1994 17ft., Fish/Ski, 150 Fast Strike
Johnson, 12/24 Trolling Motor w/on Board
'Charger, Hummlnblrd Depth/Fish Finder,
CD/Radio, Garage Kept, $6,200 OBO 334-695-
J360


2005 Camper- Cavalier 8 x 32ft. sleeps 8,-AC,
tub & shower, stove & oven, microwave, frig,
dbl. sink, 2 Ig. gas bottles $3250. 334-983-4941.


.Crossroads 2001 Travel Trail-
er 30ft, one slide out, new re-
frigerator, new awning and
TV Included. A/C, tub &
shower, stove, microwave,
dbl sink, tow gas bottles. Couch makes Into
extra bed, good condition $5,500 Call Mike
334-677-5701 or Cell 334-648-6166
RV for Sale 1998 Fleetwood Discovery.
34' length. 5.9 liter Cummins Diesel Pusher
Engine 275 hp w/ Allison 6 sp transmission, on
Freightllner chassis. 54,741 miles. Very good
condition, very well-maintained. Major mainte-
nance work Includes new rubber roof, new
awning, new Michelin tires, and new Interstate
batteries. Many upgrades including flat screen
TVs, new mattress, rock guard, and more.
$37,000. In Blakely, GA. Call 229-723-4360.
Vangaurd 1988 25 ft. RV Ford 350 Econollne
Chassis, old but in great condition, looks great
easy to drive $3000. OBO 334-479-0399



ATS FRSAL

,.f ,~lWli 12010 Chevrolet Camaro 2
SS Coupe V8, RS package
U Dual exhaust polished
stainless steel tips, rear
spoiler, high Intensity halo-
gen headlamps, running lamps, ultrasonic rear
parking assist, am/fm stereo, satellite radio,
Boston premium acoustic sound system, leath-
er sport bucket seats, elite alum. wheels. Only
13.000 mi. Exc. condition. $28,900. 334-797-0987
2012 Smart Car Convertible -11000 miles, like
new, factory warranty, A/C, A/T, heated seats
and much more. Asking only $14,995.00
Call 334 701-5129
Audi 2011 A4, sun roof, leather, low miles. Call
Matt 334-587-2957.
SBukick 1997 LeSabre,
Custom, loaded, cold air,
newtlres. 79,000 miles,
like new condition,
$3874. Call 334-790-7959.
Chevrolet 2012 Impala LT, factory warranty,
like new, $200 down, $279 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 334-714-0028.
fir-"ft Dodge 2002 Grand Caravan
W Sport, Taupe. Power driver
seat, power windows,
y locks. A/C. Heater works
> great front and rear,
AM/FM/tape/CD. towing pkg, roof rack, front
cloth bucket seats 2 rows bench seats. Runs
& rides well. High highway mileage 266K, good
gas mileage. $2,200.334-696-4767
I. DO YOU NIED A VEHICLE?
GOT BAo CRE iT?
n ~Pass Repo pass bankruptcy
slow credit ok
SDown/lst Payment,
Tax. TagT & Tle
SA*k"-bMt $.oortS F AS
GIVEAWAY
Cal Stve Pope 33-4 506
Ford 2M1 Flion, low miles, leather, priced to
sell Call Bon 205-572-1279.
Honda 2W Cvkc SIl: 5 speed, Red, 2 door, sun-
roof, 124k miles, 2nd owner, excellent condi-
tion, very clean in and out. cold AC, needs dis-
tributor cap. $3,000. Call 334-798-2302
Lknceln 26 Towcar Slgatae Seh-s pearl
white, 76k miles, biege leather interior, fully
loaded, well maintained, Michelin tires $9,500
OBO. Call 334-70141526
Nlsa 210 Frentor, X cab. low miles, must
sell! $200 down, $269 per month. Call Ron Ellis
334-n4-0028.


Nan 212 MaxIma, low miles, sun roof,
priced to sell. Call Tavaris 3344-618-7989.


Nlsou 2312 Seatmba, still under factory Warran-
ty. Great gas mileage, real nice car. $300 down,
$300 per month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-
8243,
Toyota 2312 Corollae Save Fuell Great fuel mile-
age, under factory warranty, all power, AC,
PW, PDL, AT, CD. $300 down, $300 per month.
Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243.


iCustom But Sloft Tal'
built in 2010,750 mi.
S&S motor 6 speed, trans
custom everything.
Have all receipts.
Clear title $8000. FIRM
22-26.93 or .65 -5739.
Harley Davkdson 20o,
100 Anniversary Edition,
Heritage Softall Classic,
black w/lots of chrome,
straight pipes, many
X-tras, 57K miles, $8,500
Firm 2M 21-9624
Harley Davidson 2M4 Sportso 1M0 Radster
20k miles $6,000 OBO. Call 334-588-3677
Honda 2006 Goldwing: 1800CC, black, one own-
er, many extra, and matching trailer available.
$13,500 Call 334-796-4125
Yamaha 1999 V-Star 1100CC, 33k miles, runs
and looks great and very clean. Asking $2,500.
Call 334-596-5032


Eddie Bauer 2010 Explorer, 21K miles, all leath-
er Inside, like showroom condition, can be seen
at 518 E Barbour St. between 10AM-4PM week-
days, $23.500 334-616-7272
SmzuM 2006 Grand Vltara 125K miles, good
cond. great little compact SUV $6000.
334-791-8977.
ITRUC BUS TIASA ILR

Dodge 1998 Ram 1500: Quad cab, loaded, heavy
duty towing package, camper shell Included,
low miles, less than 100k miles $4,500 OBO.
Call 334-793-1946 or 334-618-0583
Ford '03 Ford Pacer Bus: for sale to the highest
bidder. The bus may be seen at Dothan Adult ,
Care Center, 795 Ross Clark Circle, Dothan, Ala-
bama. Sealed bids must be sent to WIregrass
Rehabilitation Center, 795 Ross Clark Circle,
Dothan, Alabama, by August 30, 2013, by 4:00
p.m. If you have questions, contact Mona
Meadows (334) 792-0022, Ext. 283.
HFord 1995 F-150 XLT
Supercab, loaded, V-8,
Automatic, new tires,
wheels, bed liner, 75,000
miles, like new condition,
$6400. Call 334-790-7959.
Ford 2006 F350: power stroke, 6.0 Turbo deisel,
very short wheel base, 48k miles, 7,800 hours
on engine, very good truck for pulling peanut &
corn wagons. $8,000. Call 334-393-3746
-Ford 2006 Ranger XL, Eco-
nomical 2.3 4 cylinder, au-
tomatic, 68,000 miles,
-clean, $7380. Call 334-
790-7959,


311' IJ n"U3


THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation In order to participate In
this proceeding, you are enttlted, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mall at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850)
747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance, or Immediately
upon receiving this notification If the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance Is less than sev-
en (7) days. If you are hearing Impaired, call
711.
/s/Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Jackson County, Florida
/s/Tammy Bailey
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT


00i


Ford '97 Ford Pacer Bus: for sale to the highest
bidder. The bus may be seen at Enterprise
Adult Care Center, 106 Douglas Brown Circle,
Enterprise, Alabama. Sealed bids must be sent
to Wiregrass Rehabilitation Center, 795 Ross
Clark Circle, Dothan, Alabama, by August 30,
2013, by 4:00 p.m. If you have questions, con-
tact Mona Meadows (334) 792-0022, Ext. 283.
Tractor 1977 79 Ford 1600 series very good
condition, comes with 12 ft. long dual axle
trailer steel frame & box blade, approx 3 yrs.
old. $3999. 334-703-3611.
YanmarFarm Tractor: small, good condition,
4ft bush hog and 4ft tiller, 2 cylinder deisel
$3,500. Call 334-677-3795


Dodge 2013 Journey, 7 passenger, low miles,
great family vehicle. Call Chuck 334-333-8558.
VS,,* SSm For sale by Owner.
S2006 Pontiac Montana SV6,
88K miles, 7 passenger
sliding power door, rail
guards, back-up assist,
front/rear CD/MP3, DVD w/remote, fabric w/4
captain seats. Mainrtainred w/most service
records. 60-75% tread $5,900 334-790-6621



1 A1 CALL FOR TOP PRICE
*MR FOR JUNK VEHICLES

I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 1 334-792-664

SGot a Clunker
:Well be your Junkerd
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
S $250&t Complete Cars
r CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714M285
......... .m..... .....ama .........

[i* We bvWredked Velides
.: am!and




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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case n# 29-CA-40M6
JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association as
successor by merger to Chase Home Finance,
LLC
vs.
Dino L Parramore and Tammy D. Parramore,
Husband and Wife;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
dated July 9, 2013 entered in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-000986 of the Circuit Court of the 14th
Judicial Circuit In and for Jackson County, Flori-
da., wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank. National
Association as successor by merger to Chase "
Home Finance, LLC, Plaintiff and Dino L
Parramore and Tammy D. Parramore, Husband
and Wife are defendantss, I, Clerk of Court.
Dale Rabon Guthrie, will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF
THE JACKSON COUNTY COURTHOUSE, AT 11:00
A.M. CENTRAL STANDARD TIME on September
5,2013 the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING IRON ROD (LB NO.
1355) MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 4
NORTH, RANGE 9 WEST, OF JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE RUN N. 89 50' 57" W.,
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NE 1/4, A DIS-
TANCE OF 2674.12 FEET TO AN EXISTING 3/4"
IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 15 AND CALL
THIS' THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE S. 88
54' 12" W., ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID
NW 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 889.94 FEET; THENCE
N. 01* 03' 42" W., 776.92 FEET TO AN IRON ROD
(PSM NO. 6111); THENCE S. 89 31 07" E.,
285.09 FEET TO AN IRON ROD (PSM NO. 6111);
THENCE S. 00 15' 08" W., 409.98 FEET TO AN
IRON ROD (PSM NO. 6111); THENCE N. 89 02'
58" E., 617.85 FEET TO AN IRON ROD (PSM NO.
6111); THENCE S. 00 30' 06" E., 357.65 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO THE
SOUTH 30 FEET THEREOF FOR THE PURPOSES
OF INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT.
TOGETHER WITH A 30 FOOT INGRESS AND
EGRESS EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING IRON ROD (LB.
NO. 1355) MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 4
NORTH RANGE 9 WEST, OF JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE RUN N. 89 50' 57" W.,
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NE 1/4, A DIS-
TANCE OF 2674.12 FEET TO AN EXISTING 3/4"
IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 15; THENCE
S. 88 54' 12" W., ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID NW 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 889.94 FEET AND
CALL THIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
CONTINUE S. 88 54' 12" W., ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE, 439.74 FEET TO A POINT ON THE
WESTERLY'RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF DOUGLAS
POND ROAD (COUNTY MAINTAINED DIRT
ROAD); THENCE N. 01 05' 45" W., ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 30.0 FEET; THENCE DE- .
PARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE ON A BEAR-
ING OF N. 88 54' 23" E., 439.76 FEET; THENCE S.
01 03' 42" E., 30.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER


- -, A --


in_ -


Remedial Project Manager
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
61 Forsyth St.
11th Floor
Atlanta, GA 30303
and,
John Sykes III
Project.Manager
Florida Department of Environmental Protec-
tion
2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 4520
Tallahassee, FL 32399-2400


www.JCFLORID)AN.com


LF16017 MARIANNA HOUSING AUTHORITY
2912 ALBERT STREET
MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32448
will receive bids for furnishing all labor, materi-
als, equipment, and services required for:
SECTION 504 RENOVATIONS AT TWO
DWELLING UNITS DEVELOPMENT FL29P031-001
CAPITAL FUND PROGRAMS 501-11 AND 501-12
MARIANNA, FLORIDA
Sealed bids shall be received until 2:00 p.m. Le-
gally Prevailing Time, on 20 August 2013 at the
offices of the Owner. At that time all bids
received with be publicly opened and read
about. Proposals submitted by mail should be
addressed to the Owner at the address set out
above and plainly marked as indicatedin the
"Instructions to Bidders." All proposals submit-
ted by mail will be collected at the above men-
tioned mailing address at 1:00 PM Legally Pre-
vailing Time, on the day mentioned above and
taken to the offices of the Owner. There they
will be opened.
A pre-bid conference will not be conducted. All
bidders are strongly encouraged to visit the
site to review the work. Prospective bidders
must contact the Owner to coordinate visita-
tion and access to the subject dwelling units.
Information on this project may be obtained
from the Architect's web site at www.brr-archi
tects.com. The work for the above referenced
project consists of, but Is not limited to, the
work herein described as follows:
1. Developments FL29P031-1 (2 dwelling units);
Marlanna, Florida
a. Modify two dwelling units for handicap ac-
cessibility at locations indicated. Include site
modifications indicated for parking and dwell-
ing unit access and egress. Renovation also in-
cludes abatement of asbestos-containing ma-
terials and lead based paint.
Proposed forms of Bidding Documents, includ-
ing Drawings and Specifications, are oh file at
the above office of the Owner and the office of
the Architect as follows:
Bradfleld, Richards, Rhodes & Associates,
Architects, Inc.
1040 Crown Polnte Parkway; Suite 500
Atlanta, Georgia 30338
Phone: (678) 990-5656 Fax: (678) 990-5858
Copies of the documents may be obtained by
prime contractors, subcontractors, or material
suppliers, from the Architect Sets of docu-
ments may be obtained for a NON-
REFUNDABLE CHARGE of $50.00 per set The
document charge shall be submitted in the
form of a Company Check, Certified Check,
Cashier's Check or Money Order made payable
to the Architect Checks shall be drawn on a -
financial institution insured by the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). No
documents will be issued by the Architect until
the document charge has been received and no
partial sets will be issued. To allow for repro-
duction and delivery, anyone desiring to pick
up a set of bid documents from the Architect's
office must call Architect's office a minimum of
24 hours in advance to place the order.
Requests for documents shall be accompanied
bya, street address, telephone number and
shall identify the purchaser as aprime contrac-
tor, subcontractor, or material supplier. AIso,
provide the current E-mail address where
addenda may be forwarded.
For construction and equipment contracts
exceeding $25,000 a bid guarantee equal to not
less than 5% of the bid amount, and complying
with the requirements of Clause 9 of form HUD-
5389, "Instructions to Bidders for Contracts -
Public and Indian Housing Programs" as modi-
fled by the "Supplementary Instructions to Bid-
ders" (both of which are contained in the Proj-
ect Manual),.shall be submitted with eachKbid.
Bid Bonds must be executed on the form in-
cluded in the Project Manual. The successful
bidder will be required to furnish and pay for
satisfactory assurance of contract completion
in accordance with Clause 10 of the above
referenced from HUD-5369 as modified.
Attention is called to the fact that Not less than
the minimum salaries and wages as set fbrth in
the "General Conditions of the Contract for
Construction Public and Indian Housing"
(form HUD-5370), "Supplementary Conditions,"
and Section "Wage Determination" (all con-
tained within the Project Manual), must be
paid on this Project All contractors shall
provide Equal Opportunity Employment
The Owner reserves the right to reject any or
all bids and to waive any Informalities in the
bidding.
MARIANA HOUSING AUTHORITY
/s/Bonnie Home, Executive Director
17 July 2013
LF160185
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION
NOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCY ACTION
UNITED METALS INC. SUPERFUND SITE
Pursuant to subsection 62-780.680(8), F.A.C.,
(and similar provisions in 62-770, 62-782 and
62-785), the Department of Environmental Pro-
tection gives notice that it proposes to approve
institutional controls selected by the United
States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
as part of the remedial action at the United
Metals, Inc. Superfund Site (Site), Site ID#
04TH, located In Marianna, Jackson County,
Florida and intends to restrict exposure to con-
tamination In the following manner:
The United States Environmental Protection
Agency Is seeldng this approval In reference to:
1. Landi use restrictions Including an exclusion
of digging, excavation, grading, construction,
drilling, mining, or tunneling Into or below the
containment cell located on the Site; and,
2. Ground Water restrictions including a re-
striction on groundwater use and drilling for
water into or below the former operations area
located on the Site.
Complete copies of the Site's Record of Deci-
sion, Final Remedial Action Report and the
draft restrictive covenant are available for pub-
lic Inspection during normal business hours
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday,
except legal holidays at Jackson County Public
Library, 2928 Green Street, Marianna, FL 32446.
Local governments with jurisdiction over the
property subject to the Institutional control, re-
al property owners) of any property subject to
the Institutional control, and residents of any
property subject to the Institutional control
have 30 days from publication of this notice to
provide comments to the Department. Such
comments must be sent to:
Joseph Alfano


































PRICED FOR QUICK SALE. 15 acres has unfinished,
old 2 BR house and barn on property. Barn has
attached 20x40 shed and two 12x12 horse
stalls. Approx. 10 acre hay field. Some fencing.
Underground storm shelter, well and septic tank.
Being sold "AS IS." $75,000 MLS #248497


2 BR/2 BA Mobile home. on 2 fenced acres.
Paved roads, 3 metal storage buildings, one
converted into living quarters. Generator for
Mobile home. Animals welcome. Possible owner
financing 20% down, 6% interest for 5 years
w/ctedit report. S$49,900 MLS #248500


Maorinna- On o quiet deodend street is this 3 BR/2BA
home, plus an unheated bonus room. Cen H&A 7
months old. Oak floorssome covered with carpet. One
car garage. 2 metal storage buildings. Large shady lot
is fenced in back. Great for children or pets. $75,000


Well-maintained.cll!.
2 BR/2 BA mobile
home in a country
setting. The master bedroom has a walk-in
closet. All appliances included. Most of property
is chain-link fenced, .7 ac lot is cross fenced wih
large garden space. Open shed 18x15, storage
bldg. 12x8. Front and back porch. Reduced to
$25,900. Bring Offers! MIS #247915


Marianna Approximately acre lot with
149' on north Jefferson zoned mixed used.
Could be residential, apartments/duplex or
business. City utilities. 2 BR, old house being
sold "AS IS". MLS #247182
.. . . .. . . .. . I I.. .. .. . . .. . . .


Blountstown Business opportunity on
Highway 20, road to the beach. Metal building
has approx. 3,100 sq ft. H/C and 7,500 sq
ft under roof. Roll-up door 10x12, 3 offices,
three baths, 8 hold rooms, and workshop/
mechanics room. Fenced back lot on corner of
two paved streets. $375,000. MLS #247989


Indian Springs

REAL ESTATE


I GREAT WOODED
S LOTS IN DOGWOOD
.. ... 7 RHEIGHTSI Several
S....lots to choose fro.
/ Located on Donna
.... Drive are 2, 1.20
... ._ Acre lots for $17,000
EACH Located on
Paulk Road is a 3.45 acre lot that can be purchased as a whole for
$35.000 or Can be purchased in 3 1.05+./- lots Each for $15,000. Located
to close Marianna High School and in an established neighborhood!
ENTER YOUR DRE WAMHOME 1
snog lon 4 kn aW inth rp(a
Snna' PeIrian tn. rrorq
.111 Orar 51 0,1 Sq n 2Nas$
kll~hen lh .11) t'.11 a1
llolnh nl tOch SW tOk
roe Theirra hi I rll h iris a ei4l
ndti $1to tIoa2s n1 iSQ tth oui.0TM
_t^fila^ bI io b uoik niSn set oOiO



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ r^ harmwoo flooit' ihe\m
e .ar ,n also h0.05sI
INa iner Steloo m a Ui
hltnhra l wno C oeir TaO o,4 l ,11 hm i 00004 000 aaor to O la n easlArly c o oldPt 0 5 WQ '60 $
roraa thartl! 0 14 lethal t i rIoVN.a nac 1 .'! 1010 the 05dl INc r 0 11 On 1n SP tn lthe0
kla i id h l ih e to rldod ihnntlat ,c ins tl 00 aiaf' n L 0 124%l ln n MI 10i
amRFECT HOME FOR
YOUR LARGE FAMILY?
loeal 4 BeotlOh 011 a
Barn hoor lirs aileWth oto
1,;o sq it cord e Ailr
Larlge LaIVUra i) 0n1 1
havoWO0 t floor$' ITh





^^^^^^^ HH^^^^^ ^Ihas Aitreatoao orogova4r
Masten bedeoomr also has






^^^B ^B^ ^^^^ ^^^ HardaaHw orS saoe
han.woot noons and the
othe r D3netorlsha ,lv
ha1lutodUnv unt he arClpet Fdlnlly[r o ill hn ICallbe ar 3 Coiy clrertestotJo arroJl,0
Dedwmoo oediiltloGd great SIiouOs I HO ltl NI MLS Z04281
LOCATED IN
GRACEVILLE ON
A CORNER. Co:y
I~ ~ ~~~~ Wlm ..-,' 3 oon, 2 Bath
horrsd "ith aipnooX
t 1300 sq It under ai,'
~Vinyl Siding With
no Maintenance
rnee netel Homre ha
ar nea root, a21t6
Back Porch and a 2700t Front porch to rteax onn Wood Floors inr$d =
honqe! Thri won't last long so call toa v SOLD AS IS
ALL THE ISELLS LAND
WHSILLESI slob 4
StrnllAerl 3 3arn4hrI

hi n ,ftr i aerm o
lll e ~l L iill lo io il il ~ln illrl ern,' O tlWn i eoe se nn
LUOS A. .Jisf a Gm90,Xd
Ohoo..maen Isnnon
c,,an.P .1m C.l05
tIN Fja* .ePoann 11m
4.10,14-.1 1ft a ireikem I NiiueV Na nnt..nen OoaOA J-
Gierr comneine;o A a a-nWn,law .t ran km n q Oa8n' ROOTt a. car aw
loncril mef n C orn.ar I mdsnt anaalatmAft f tePananpen, INAna


SUNNY SOUTH PROPERTIES
4630 Hwy. 90 Marlanna, FL 32446
(6850) 526.2891
I.oh Office I Inde.pndently Owned and Operlatd
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER


Ed McCoy, Realtor'
Cell.(850) 573-6198
www.emccoyrealty.com
emccoy02@yahoo.com

- GRAND RIDGE Great
plao retire, 2 Bedtoom/2
aoihhome with spacious rooms,
w/w carpet, plenty of cabinets,
and a detached carport.
Located on a paved toad.
MLS 248382 9 $69,900.
MARIANNA- 3 Bedroom
home in excellent shape, now
AC uritf, lots of cabirtnos, mntol
root, detached corport, metal
yoid building oand very nice
loids(opsng, ovein reedy.
MIS 248524 $109,900.
GRAND RIDGE -wet



MLS 248677 $249,000
lmobb lt !i e 0onaiWmeho o ns tool it,
hoeid fns, ei foot, I m.3 St~oes.

pRieatl to died eMoid toi o
00wetrn Paoimal aioo d40 san

slts tooo(ld. t sy
ofII mIilo m do 0(is(l( o,,
WS51361901suidisfs&
MLS 248677 a $249,000
REDUCED GRAND RIDGE WIN

mon l 30 do l hornopoen Rordo





^^^^^^A 110d DO 1 #Wi Abl to ENoy l2X16
pwM f ood, S is a MUSTS1I
MLS 2418591 $9,S00.
Debble Roney Snmith,
Realtor
850.209-8039
debbleroneyslarnth@
embarqmail.com
Lak esidhLaesk LwIsaeic3
Bedirn/2oant 21 BuhW2WOr-w
3000 To |B Sq Ft Snaw Porch
So E,,., oke Vesnloefthx
Wd tal0To En Eoy Lle 2403
RV Gwi P6 Maoe Mew6dg
MLS 248259 $ $239,000.
ll~~at p N It almi Now i
Nlehh Iv tle.l Iul h
BolliW I. hior W-I

R cn fbn ton P0 bre W iAM
Adil C 9A OIL 17 C I A C A


Sunday, ly 2, 2013-
Sutidiy, .lely 28, 2013 1B


IWell maintained
3BR/2BA home just
inside Marianna city
limits Convenient
location to 1-10,
Family Dollar and
Panama City! This home- has carpet and tile throughout.
Tastefully painted and decorated, this home shows beautifully.
Home has a living room and a great room! Nice rear deck and
fenced-in backyard. A great deal at $119,000 MLS# 248496

N r e and clean 3BR/2BA
tIersD, located in
Meadoowview Subdivision.
Ceramic tile throughout
home except for carpet
in bedrooms Has a large
den. livieg/dining combo. Kitclirir ias new courrtertops, beautiful
cabinets, and is a chef's delrght Large laundry room, workshop, newer
pole barn, Ig. fenced backyard. Seller will allow up lo $7000 for a new
.t.o Th. ,. ia Ull cr t nlv. 1 tla9.IOnn uii0M l'24803n


Thls beaulul tCoslorn buCil. 5
farcpttwnono cnafsmeoasoip ot
b&ooshelers OR e/cinwm moldr
hoailh faitepace ?2 sets of In
fioos tIhe eat-in kitchen is a
a leO mitse nina fttnar


I .cjnn nsnan *r~ i nS af< .,f rrf n Ml .nnCn su n f car na 01 l *B ew aw sx in& L X OIl- I *3UW. | "*- * -*
a hia iran in obran.n rvM' ", ar- no^rn t.,.nwnr n Ona alJ S j Oveesowena d tra 2 vanities a,
, N, G tn t, J .1 Kr..n 1.i ,.*t -n60Now Mt HOW Vw iL or oan WI 1st ,oor is a gUot,
11S 1411 1 "11 -ip AkS' $35 AW ,,e 10 hdCroaeComaa Secild 2nd Nolalo atnr 2 awesome
SCOMPLETELY IM >., hW S w fq "5 E, W 2 d C1 WOO= woksop irrnatiron system frt
REMODELLNED 1 -m111 RI G&1 n1 11 IrS,, $C A. i ,x $3 000 k t an apponmlalr ivat sl
2 EDROOM 1I 54J$ t:t-~ eiI~$0O~rr epmmn!atae
BATH HOMEI The I boPAo c C -," 'V to+a Ng PW A'W" Lo AoaM J-.lAek
Kitchen is open 31 ? 1i4f *: Fumki&S L.a ic na"Y GodC.1teoCa&C o) Co ursS5,500
to the lrivinO area SW 5Acrl.is.) O12ir T ?"23l 13 oad d 30vnImr o ioCaley
and has aines T h Nit wIw iI Wumtlt Propety
steel appliances.
flat top stove. new handmade counteftops and cabinets wMi IDi i'r a 0 1* I l^^,o.,,,, iid
.Oflginal hardwood Floors throughout wth No catrtling! S1K5l DnsToatiWlcslo ks byflo n e Sb
Remodeled Bathroom' Large H Aacr lot has a huge *SIRNSMU Cri;taloWi iPoow iSar 0 MosIL)ynet Iandanicedeckaenthererf
backyard! Central Heat and air with an new duct work! aNs2Im .. 5lhoLdemodiddC DadDgOuedWi p6*"wlad n, and a Ox2Oyard slhed. Th
ILS #24e35 BS?. ,,ItsUN k It fnmvO nt9 10 MleCHohk. Wo d screen TVs! This is a must
WARFONT r. M '5" La
oar bon MofltsLid ULeaThnso
PO ,Cary 2 ReioonomNonmifRedor
it+- I: i
I a s rtooruno0
IL Q loante bur
Low'oLarge yAd RMlO
,in o< W l (,elf 111504U5..-I72} g 3000' of living sp
bat have ,-diH same Beautifully landsca
and Master Ibedroom vn elltt Be watiel Foeplacrin W"ot, an M ni!Fiita i, I fin A4 bl- This is a great buy i
driveway to iaen. Cal todayto yoor personal shown" IRS 04SM Will .4 flelS

;Alfileand-MOREan?25swoo
HHM^B^^ Flo o. X&*' m W mS 247924 $129,900.
bodetntseTIM a oed3eto
hill, *,AdbeMemooch4bon.111e0
~ bomm'! lld* 94.$K I
am s nol IN uwaWell .0Poo*, clahlor A a"so" L"M W and c 'm !+ + wl
CWWOWpf~b~in fr N I J30d Q1,0 l- UM-I1AS 27940$30,000.
KWLSTM tom DyINVEST IN VACANT LA ND
^EBwJt nH.dianad baidal^lo an-MM~ri n^I ^R c. nuaA ann^nn'nnrn Oat .oa-1oann opetyVifW
^^Bla~~s.'fjI OFuujIH~ MArLMc itan -cr = -n LAI^H^^^^^ Kiwiy bd pvigim. w^^S^^

11 r Bta f n Is am RICE BlttOK,,.o" S v. o71 SI K
b M ,. ,iolV . o I .-t ,Y dS,44: $V-500 spacious laundry, nicely parl
WoVIeni to. i 1, fa m tIt6bni .L ar S ,od inAo ,m etfi etertaining.Lgeyardw/ouit.
.0 ugo .u >,,, e r S 24777M 4 S7,SO. $2000 toward buyers closin
Tri Thi s I .. Coil .1 ,ly., Termite Bond. Make nI a
WW at FHA and USD AS109-252 11
101104! Tr ,lt. nt for y-r afl yonr -a1 l o..d. I
tat so Cold us realWanm bne ol rA io U
KiALOW CRM L0O you t o t i

6 ,o1 w'l.dly, w, dw, k arndgas firepa
The Hrpslitv"i l rv 521i6yw vipord ,ig. enclosled woftsho with 1(
2Mastee be n omw MLS 241415 $159,900. beautiful azaleas. Home at
Srenened Pencn aad Jac.tsonCty, app oi.-20 mnt
Laund ry oom s aing
on 5 y tlob and ns ai Pat Fu1r
eutili backyall d wih a 24n 2x24 OulbuildlnoShoOO' T home nls tcome TLC Realtor
Out l Ma id a llnIl winn A pumlni Sol AS IS MLS 0e4018 R or
^m-_m= H85wf 0.209.8071

c1RW9C iinnllen aFH wor sl rolid annd
f ibeloneI 7


NoLargo BerdsoWi MISo2434 w S239,00.
i n b I bt hreM on withaelk
over m I L,-- '--------:
Fea on h ag >.iL,', ,t: subdivsionnamedHidd
a LinT' ^^ .o cA.0
Fr noaantP poh whii, gorgeous Ciwaterh
Hugea n ry N me .' to the easement and is
Hug pany Newer can be a private homes
central a/c & heating unlt! Some windows have been replaced Hnmroe 1 ro in. n*ayn .dwinannnyrC,on I
with double one windows L SOLD AS 18. MIS 1247B50 i i'rnoen--
HOCM SON 24 ACRES t MIS249 $118,500.
IN^^ ^ GHREEN WOOD ON FORT SjjJmi jP901 E^RJCD^ 5an^ 1 Car.------
ROAD. Large 4 Bdroonm 3 ,oaBI,-nI nr t in
IohBath fck ome and a 3 le ,,i, ana r ,., oIS24 a3n ,,,n n .
car n garagt Over O sq l ,,.i. r ,, ioon. .i n ,. pan wdcinoldiv ha o wi ast
ot wiltl a l wrg living hOOn, i nini. ., cuirnly i usnn ed as n mni
updatld kitchnl cabinets, ,, non. o^ "a n , an nat"l On ot. ,rl lo ie drshwasnhr Hardwood 1 yw e
Ilo0ns Ihru oUt living anas and bedloomst Sunken living loon has a Beaullllll wood M IS248434 jay, 9w.n mannu0dm.
hsrnnrg~~~~~~ prcirrpac rBik trg o ivfn OO a teS onIS. ngdtITrana
Large Kitchenc width4 sdeg toI te aemnondisa





7la)NED MIX USF o~t~,l~dstltanosBt, L aote
Hgd oars enee I rA d n hocansb breakfast Toomrn
cnr a/&hannom wrdooi ldhlv rd 2 mybeecsr HoCoenereeds
MOCAT48N 25 ,0. displaysmn2yo8d1s$yle7Soth0
toBahnh abo ncre atown


I.
BRI 5BA. sloew bose an 50 acrsi a reaIbifd!"
displayed evrywheie' Il basa I trbraiy whialls of
inIs lige great mroom w/ncesstd Ilghtnn. stone raised
ich doors to a stone patio., all with beautiful hardwood
a 0oumets diean with a walk-n l pantry Includes
Farea T master bath mcl a sauna. Jacui tub,
longI with 2 closets Theare 4 other ln bedrooms;
t/mi-taw suite wit tail bath and 3 bdrmns on the
re storage tooms'r Home features a 3-car garage w/
ruit Irse, & a rose garden Too muaci to his'II Make
showing today f rceird at $699.OM MLSe 241572


eai tiul
executive home
in Spring Chase!
3BR/3BA with
ace. Too many extras to list!
ped and has a private backyard.
t nnlv tlQQ nn MI m 9dBnfR0


MI h adOowed V birat oies INs
southern home has relv nlic
leshurps, 3BRII.SBA tnlnal
LR, toi v mO11 eatitifl step-
doln g a roimom wspuitt-in
nus room, hardwood floors throeuhout under crnier
some ildating btl has great potential. PTIp"t
ern Oalttrees that are betiful Includes 3 pcels
All this for only $95,000 MLSI 248624


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CLASSIFIES


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4909 Hwy. 90 E. Marianna, Florida


850-526-3456


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