Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01112

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text





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Vol.90 No.137


Fuqua family regrouping in wake of fire


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Matt and Pam Fuqua, their
daughter Emily and the fam-
ily dog Ollie stayed with fam-.
ily members Monday night af-
ter fire destroyed their home at
2878 Magnolia Blossom Lane in
the Indian Springs subdivision.
Believed to have resulted from
a lightning strike, the fire sped
through the 3,800-foot structure.
Mr. Fuqua and others estimated
that it was essentially lost within
30 minutes. Firefighters from
multiple departments respond-
ed to the blaze, which started
in the middle of a powerful
thunderstorm, but they could


only contain the damage.
Wesley estimated that, togeth-
er, the firefighters used between
60,000 and 80,000 gallons of wa-
ter on the fire. The first teams
were summoned there around
2:30 p.m. and the last of the crew
members left the scene at ap-
proximately 9 p.m.
"We think when it hit, it was the
air conditioner exploding, plus
there was a propane gas line that
erupted," he said. "This added to
the fire. The lightning had struck
a tree behind the home; parts of
the tree were found 150 feet away
from the main trunk. A pipe with
copper ground ruptured, allow-
ing the lightning to travel the line


to the water heater on the side of
the house. The fire had compro-
mised an exterior wall, which al-
lowed ignited gas to travel up the
wall and into the attic. There was
also a direct lightning hit on the
house."
He estimated the destruction
at $600,000 worth of damage to
the home and its contents.
Neighbors heard a boom and
immediately- sawflames, officials
said. Emily, an 18-year-old who
graduated as a salutatorian at
Marianna High School this year,
was at home with Ollie when the
fire started. She grabbed him
See FIRE, Page 9A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN /
Firefighters from throughout. Jackson County responded to the fire
that destroyed Matt and Pam Fuqua's home in Indian Springs Monday
afternoon.


IltAN-1LlNG'TAALL


MARK IINtKER/LtLURIUADN
A tussock moth caterpillar scales the rocky heights of a marble bench
outside the Jackson County Courthouse, Saturday, June 15, in
t downtown Marianna. The hairy critter was likely hoping for some
tasty tree leaves to eat or a safe spot to weave a silken cocqon.




Governor appoints 5 to


Chipola board of trustees

Special to the Floridan 41, of Marianna, is a commer- a term beginning June 24, 2013,
cial banker with Cadence Bank. and ending May 31, 2015.
On Monday, June 24, Gov. He received his bachelor's de- Nolan Baker, 48, of Ponce
Rick Scott announced three ap- gree in finance from Troy Uni- de Leon, is an engineer with
pointments and two reappoint- versity. Lassmann has served on CDG Engineers and Associates.
ments to the Chipola College the Jackson County Chamber Baker is a board member of the
District Board of Trustees. of Commerce. He succeeds Jeff
Thomas "Tommy" Lassmann, Crawford and is appointed for See BOARD, Page 9A


Fall at Marianna


bottling plant sends


employee to hospital


BY ANGIE COOK
acook@jcfloridan.com
An employee of a water bot-
tling plant in Marianna was
taken to an area trauma center
Tuesday after a workplace fall.
Shortly before noon, emer-


agency responders were dis-
patched to the Ice River Springs
facility on Russell Road, in the
Marianna Industrial Park. Re-
sponding were the Jackson
See FALL, Page 9A


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PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Dakota Hamil and Cole Reagan work on their cooperation skills during a
class for 6-and-7-year-olds taught by Sierra Hill.


From staff reports


,or the last week or so, the
Chipola College student
body has been a bit
smaller than normal. The new
additions didn't shrink in the
wash though; they were part of
the school's Kidz College
Program for 6-to-12-year-olds.
, The program, which was
split into two four-day sessions,
is being taught by members
of Chipola's Future Educators
Club and is covering topics
ranging from "wicked, wacky
weather" and "all about the
ocean" to Hannah Wilks'
"persuasive penmanship"
class.
How is the penmanship
persuasive? One activity in this
class involved the kids writing
about why their parents should
let them stay up later.
Cooking classes were being
used to teach the kids every-
thing from entomology to
mineralogy.
For example, after studying
the life cycle of butterflies the


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During one of the Chipola Kidz
College classes Tuesday, Lana
Barfield ponders her words carefully
as .she pens an essay explaining why
her bedtime should be later.
kids made caterpillars out of
marshmallows and butterflies
out of hot dogs and biscuits.
While studying mineralogy
the kids "mined" cookies for
chocolate.
Ninety youngsters attended
the Kidz College and Continu-
ing Education Coordinator
Alicia Hatcher said she hopes to
bring it back next year.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


'. High-95
f .Low-740

Thursday
Hot & Humid. Isolated
Storms.


L High- 910
Low 74


Saturday
Scattered Showers &
Storms.


"- '. High -92'
C Low 750

Friday
Scattered Showers &
Storms.


i" High -91
Low -73


Sunday
Scattered Showers &
Stonrms.


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.56"
4.55"
5.00"


Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryvillc


Weather Outlook


Year t. dJ.ic 2n 2 5
Norm. I YTD) 2" iIn"
Normal for year 59.2o


10:14 PM High
1:11AM High
10:19PM High
11:30'PM High
12:04 PM High


Reading
44.07 ft.
7.57 ft.
6.35'ft.
4.32 ft.


- 11:53AM
- 7:47 AM
- 12:26 PM
- 12:59 PM
- 1:32 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3 4

THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 5:40 AM L L JL JL J
Sunset 7:48 PM
Moonrise 10:29 PM July July June June
Moonset 10:20 AM 8 16 23 30


FLORIDA'S HAL

PANHANDLE CNR

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ oo09'

ISTE ORE EAH UPT


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JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (LISPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes -,r 'npt Ii, To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


TODAY
"5 Steps to Rapid Employment" Workshop
- 9 a.m.-noon at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
) Marianna Blood Center's Mobile Unit will be at
Blountstown Health and Rehab from 9 a.m.-12:30
p.m. and at River Valley Rehabilitation Center in
Blountstown from 1-4 p.m. The process takes 30-45
minutes. Save up to three lives with one donation..
Call 526-4403.
) "Dig Into Reading" with the Jackson County
Public Library's Summer Reading Program
- Graceville Civic Center. Preschool age from 10-11
a.m. and school age 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. For reser-
vations call 482-9631.
)) "Meet-N-Eat" 11 a.m. at Emerald Coast Hos-
pice Office, 4374 Lafayette St. in Marianna. Chaplain
Gino Mayo ..ill offer education and bereavement
support for individuals in the community suffering a
loss. This is open to the public. Call 526-3577.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
-1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
)) Internet/Email Basic Computer Class Part
2 Noon-3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career Training
Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Free class
teaches basic use of the internet, how to send and
receive emails and how to protect your computer.
Call 526-0139.
) "Dig Into Reading" with the Jackson County
Public Library's Summer Reading Program
- Campbellton at The Gallery. Preschool age from
2-3 p.m. and school age 3:15-4:15 p.m. For reserva-
tions call 482-9631.
) Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees Regular
Monthly Finance Committee and Board Meet-
ings 5 p.m. in the Hudnall EuJIdljig Community
Room. Call 718-2629.

THURSDAY, JUNE 27
Jackson County Growers Association/Mari-
anna City Farmer's Market 7 a:m.- noon at,
Madison St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh fruits
and vegetables grown by local farmers.
)) Marianna Blood Center's Mobile Unit will be at
the Department of Transportation in Chipley from
7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. The process takes 30-45 minutes.
Save up to three lives with one donation. Call 526-
4403.
Area Agency on Aging for North Florida Board
of Directors Meeting 10 a.m. EST at 2414
Mahan Drive in Tallahassee. Agendas are available
upon request. Call 850-488-0055.
)) First Federal Bank of Florida Customer Ap-


preciation Cookout -11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at 4701
Highway 90 in Marianna. Everyone is invited to have
lunchwhile catching up with familiar bankers and
meeting new ones.
Chipola Civic Club Meeting noon at The Oaks
Restaurant, Highway 90 in Marianna. The CCC's
focus is the local community, "Community, Children
& Character". Call 526-3142.
Job Club Noon -3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills; get job search
assistance. Call 526-0139.
)) Employability Workshop "Developing Effec-
tive Self-Marketing Tools" 2:30 p.m. at the
Marianna One Stop Career Center, 4636 Highway
90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group
- 5:30 p.m. at Jackson Hospital Cafeteria Board
Room. Free to attend. Curriculum developed by ex-
smokers for those who want to become ex-smokers
themselves. Call 482-6500."
)) Water Bath Canning Class -5:30-8 p.m. at the
Jackson County Extension Office, 2741 Pennsyl-
vania Avenue, Suite #8 in Marianna. Learn basic
water bath canning methods of food preservation to
ensure you have food in times of need. Cost is $10
which includes sample foods, materials and recipe
book. RSVP no later than T'-.r.I- i, .lir,,? 20. Call
482-9620.
) 6th Annual Summer Concert Series featur-
ing Sin of the Day 7-9 p.m. at Citizens Lodge in
Marianna. This free event is presented by Jackson
County Parks and Recreation and Main Street
Marianna.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
minitid i,: persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, JUNE 28
Jackson County Youth Council Fundraiser
-Winn Dixie in Marianna. Members of the group will
be collecting ci,:nr i.r-.n: jrid ,Iiling r iffie tickets to
raise money to fund a trip to the NAACP National
Convention in Orlando on July 12.,
)) Knitters Nook -10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
)) Marianna Blood Center's Mobile Unit will be at'
the Wal-Mart Supercenter in Chipley from 10 a.m.-4
p.m.The process takes 30-45 minutes. Save up to
three lives with one donation. Call 526-4403.
)) Partners for Pets 4th Annual Spaghetti Din-
ner 4-8 p.m. at Marianna First United Methodist


Church, 2901 Caledonia St. Cost is $5 per plate and
$2.50 for children under 6 years. There will be a
raffle and door prizes. Call 482-4570.
> 57th Annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival
- 5 p.m. at the Washington County Ag Center in
Chipley. Enjoy arts and crafts, food and children's
.a,.:ti it,-: Concert by country music singer Andy
Griggs at 6 p.m. followed by country music legend
and Grammy award winner Joe Diffie at 7:30 p.m.
Festival is free.
) Marianna's Gathering Place Foundation
Senior Singles Gathering 6 p.m. at the Gazebo
Coffee Shoppe & Deli, downtown Marianna. Single
seniors age,50 and older are encouraged to get
acquainted, form friendships. Games, food, prizes
and a guest speaker are planned. No charge; dona-
tions accepted (proceeds fund charitable endeav-
ors of Marianna's Gathering Place Foundation). Call
526-4561.
) Celebrate Recovery- 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and *
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
> Marianna High School Class of 1983 Reunion
-30 year class reunion Friday, June 28 through
Sunday, June 30. Activities have been planned for
Friday night, Saturday afternoon and Saturday
night. Cost is $50 for singles and $150 for families
for all activities for the entire weekend. Call 209-
2207 or 573-3261.

SATURDAY, JUNE 29
> Jackson County Growers Association/Mari-
anna City Farmer's Market 7 a.m.- noon at
Madison St. Park in Marianna. Purchasefresh fruits
and vegetables grown by local farmers.
> 57th Annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival
- Washington County Ag Center in Chipley. At 7
a.m. a 5,000 meter Hot Trot Run at the Washing-
ton/Holmes Technical Center and a pancake break-
fast at the Shrine Club. At 10 a.m. a parade on Hwy.
90. At 11 a.m. Crossroads in concert followed by the
introduction of Watermelon Queens at 11:45 a.m.
At 12 noon there will be the Watermelon Auction. At
1:30 p.m. Grammy award winning bluegrass group
Daily & Vincent perform. Enjoy arts and crafts, food
and children's activities.
) Washington County Arts Council's Annual
Summertime Magic Art Show and Sale at the
Panhandle Watermelon Festival in Chipley. Top prize
for Best of Show is $250. Call 693-0808 or contact
suzangage@yahoo.com.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for June 24, the
latest available report: One accident,
two suspicious vehicles, two suspicious
persons, one burglary of a vehicle, two
burglar alarms, 14 traffic stops, one larceny
complaint, three follow-up investigations,
one garbage complaint, two juvenile com-
plaints, one assault, three animal com-
plaints, one assist of another agency, five
public service calls and two open doors or
windows discovered,on patrol.


Jackson County Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following
incidents for June 24, the latest available
report: Two accidents, one stolen tag, one
stolen vehicle, three abandoned vehicle re-


ports, two reckless drivers, eight suspicious
vehicle reports, one suspicious incident,
two suspicious persons,
-- _--: ,- two highway obstructions,
,--_- two burglaries, one verbal
'.RIME disturbance, seven fire
C lM-'g' calls, 19 medical calls, two
traffic crashes, five burglar
alarms, two fire alarms,
four traffic stops, one larceny complaint,
three criminal mischief complaints, two
civil disputes, three trespass complaints,
two found/abandoned property reports,
one sex offense, one fraud complaint,
two assists of other agencies, three public
service calls, one transport, two threat/ha-
rassment complaints and one 911 hang-up.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into


the county jail during the latest reporting
periods:
)) Michael Burns, 34, 7740 Shady Grove
Road, Grand Ridge, hold for Washington
Co.
) John White, 38, 6223 Sand Ridge Church
Road, Grand Ridge, violation of state
probation.
I ) Donna Gabriel, 34,1468 NW 61s St., Mi-
ami, assault, felony battery-two counts.
) Oliver Robbins, 52, 22712 SW 113th
Place, Goulds, violation of county
probation.
> Kendra Worthington, 20, 4974 Be-
vis Road, Greenwood, violation of state
probation.
S))Joseph Alpin, 21,10914 Recovery Way,
Tallahassee, hold for Leon Co.
Jail Population: 221
To report a crime, call CnrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agency. To report a wildlife violation.
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


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I "-^ 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL .

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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN # www.jcfloridan.com


Jackson County native to lead HR division for Turner Broadcasting


Special to the Floridan

A ngela Santone,
/ formerly Angela
. Jiley, who grew
up in Jackson County,
more specifically Grand
Ridge, has been promoted
to senior vice president
and chief human re-
sources officer for Turner
Broadcasting in Atlanta,
GA and will lead the entire
HR division.
In her elevated role,
Santone will provide ex-
ecutive leadership for
all human resources
functions including
recruitment, total rewards,
training and development,
performance manage-
ment, inclusion strategy
and succession planning
supporting TBS, Inc. and
its networks and busi-
nesses. Additionally, she
will provide executive
oversight for Turner
Security. Santone is based
in Atlanta and reports
to Kelly Regal, executive
vice president of TBS,
Inc.


Jackson County native Angela Santone, formerly Angela
Riley, will lead the human resources division for Turner
Broadcasting.


'Angela is an inspira-
tional, employee-focused
leader with a deep and


broad understanding
of Turner's business," Re-
gal said. "This promotion


recognizes her long track
record of professional
achievement and the
clear vision she articulates
for success in the
future."'
During 12 years at
TBS, Inc., Santone has
held various roles within
the HR organization. Most
recently she was senior
vice president of human
resources, providing
executive HR leadership
for the company's corpo-
rate and sales, sports and
distribution divisions. Pre-
viously, she provided HR
support for Turner's enter-
tainment groups, includ-
ing finance and account-
ing, program acquisitions
and finance, research
and public relations. She
joined TBS, Inc. from S2
Systems, Inc., where she
served as education/doc-
umentation manager and
HR generalist.
Santone is an executive
mentor for the Turner"
Women'today mentoring
program, has served
as a peer-to-peer mentor


for the Southeast Chapter
of Women in Cable
Telecommunications
and has been a mentor
in WICT's Agnes Scott
mentoring program.
She is a board member
for the Emma L. Bowen
Foundation for Minority
Interests in Media and
Atlanta Jumpstart for
Young Children, and is
a member of Children's
Healthcare of Atlanta's
Hope's Circle group.
She is a graduate of the
Pathbuilders Achieva
class and is a Class XXII
fellow in WICT's Betsy
Magness Leadership
Institute.
Santone earned an
undergraduate degree
from Florida State Univer-
sity and a master's degree
in counseling from Troy
University. She is also a
certified facilitator for
the Benchmark 360 as-
sessment by the Center
for Creative Leadership
and is a qualified facilita-
tor for the Myers-Briggs
Type Indicator.


The following mar-
riages and divorces were
recorded in Jackson
County during the week
of June 17-21:
Marriages
)) William Jeremy
Grice and Karen Hinson
Pumphrey.
)) Thomas Edwin Wals-
ingham and Tara Nicole
Skipper.
)) Joshua Charles
Olive and Emily Nicole
Bridges.
)) Christopher Shawn
Coleman and Jennifer
Ann James.
)) Cornelius Jajuan
Clark and Atavius Key-
antay Smith.
)) Maynor Guillermo
Lopez Domingo and Me-
linda Sue Silberman.
)) Charles Alan Riley
and Amy Elizabeth
Davis.
Divorces
)) Larry Dean Long vs.
Elmira Bowers Long.
))Yvonne Still vs. Don
Still.


Farmers market coupons to be handed out July 1


Special to the Floridan

Abbie Burdeshaw, Direc-
tor of the Jackson County
Senior Citizens has an-
nounced that the 2013
Jackson County Farmers
Market coupons will be
handed out Monday, July
1 from 8-11 a.m. at the
Jackson County Commis-
sioners Office located on
Madison St. in Marianna.


Burdeshaw would like to
remind everyone to an-
ticipate a wait time at this
year's distribution. Indi-
viduals applying for cou-
pons must be at least 60
years of age, reside in Jack-
son County and provide
the following information:
Proof of income from all
sources (not bank state-
ments) for each house-
hold member; social secu-


rity card for each person
residing in the household
and Florida picture ID. In
addition, applicants must
provide a copy of each
document that will remain
with the Jackson County
Senior Citizens.
For additional informa-
tion regarding the coupon
distribution contact Abbie
Burdeshaw at 263-4650 or
263-2774.


May unemployment rates are released


Special to the Floridan

Florida's seasonally
adjusted unemployment
rate was 7.1 percent in
May, the lowest since Sep-
tember 2008 when it was
7.0 percent. The May rate
was down 0.1 percentage
points from the April rate
of 7.2 percent and was 1.7
percentage points lower
than the year ago rate of
8.8 percent. There were
671,000 jobless Floridian's
out of a labor force of
9,427,000. Florida's
seasonally adjusted total
non-agricultural employ-
ment was 7,511,200 in
May, a decrease of 6,200
jobs over the month. The
number of jobs in the
state was up 122,500 from


May unemployment rates


County
Cdalhoun
Holmes
Jackson
Liberty
Wa.shing-ton
(r hipola Pt-i,:in


May, 2013
64
57
'55


May a year ago.
The unemployment rate
for the ChipolaWorkforce
Region, which includes
Calhoun, Holmes, Jack-
s6n, Liberty and Wash-
ington Counties, was 6.1
percent, a slight increase
overall but the counties
had an increase in the
number employed and an
increase in the number
entering the workforce.


GAS WATCH
GJ;"'. pri,:^. ;i3rie ;:,nL; lip H:ri; jlr?
ga.I ir-n .1 .i: p. n it.r ,jr .,i i:lt
Tue'd.", ,~tIrrr,:,ori,
1. $3.34. McCoy's Food Mart.
2823 Jefferson St. Marianna
2. $3.35. Murphy Oil. 2255 Hwy
71S. Marianna
3. $3.35. Pilot. 2209 Hwy 71.
Marianna
4. $3.39. BascomGeneral. 2725
Basswood Road. Bascom
5. $3.39 Dar-Bee's Quick Stop.
6189 Hwy 90. Cypress
6. $3.39. Green's BP. 2846 Hwy
71. Marianna
7. $3.39. KMEE II. 5392 10th St.
Malone
8. $3.39. Loves Travel Center.
2510 Hwy 231. Cottondale
tI Ft j A ) '- ."

- -.I:'l~ f )l~ i ti3 F/'" i. i i',i-.i t, l; _, l' '


Apr, 2013
61
5.3
53
55
7


May, 2012
81
'0
71
71
9.3
h


This rate was 1.5 percent-
age points lower than the
regions year ago rate. Out
of a labor force of 49,602
there were 3,033 unem-
ployed region residents.
For further informa-
tion contact the Chipola
Regional Workforce Board
at 718-0456.


,. : -.-


Men iE)
Mon (M'
Tue (E)
Tue (Mr
Wed. (E)
Wed M)
Thurs iE)
Thurs (MI.
Fri I'E)
Fri 11 1
*;.,ar Eri
.at r'Ei
Sun i E )
Sun (Mi




Saturday
Wedri' ei.:a,


IFADS FFA RECEIVES.


', " ,.T


SUBMITTED PHOTO


SUBMITTED PHOTO
C omerford Vault and Memorial Services recently donated a
monument to the Sneads FFA Chapter. The monument is
C engraved with the words Sneads FFA Chapter below that
the FFA Emblem, with the FFA Motto engraved around the emblem,
The beginning of the FFA Creed is also engraved below the emblem,
"I believe in the future of agriculture..." The Sneads FFA is grateful
for the donation of the monument from Comerford Vault and
Memorial Services. It is a great addition to an outstanding program.
Pictured (from left): Cole Hamilton, Shelby Lawrence, Lindsey
Locke, Georgia Pevy, Sneads FFA Advisor Stan Scurlock, Taylor


Reed and Jordan Kite.



. ..i .''


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Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@ajcflonrdan
cor,, mail them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or
.bring them by our off ices at 4403 Constitution Lane in
Marianna.
*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. in.: hiude
Child's full name, parents'name(s) and city of residence.
This is a free service. All entries subject to editing.



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Carnival sees fewer bookings, replaces its CEO


The Associated Press

NEW YORK Pas-
sengers remain hesitant
to book cruises, despite
deep discounts. But that
didn't stop Carnival Corp.
from eking out a $41
million second-quarter
profit thanks to lower fuel
costs and the timing of
some administrative
expenses.
.The Miami-based com-
pany also announced
Tuesday.that Micky Ari-
son, who has been CEO
since 1979 and is the son
of Carnival co-founder Ted
Arison, is being replaced
by Arnold W Donald, who
has served on the compa-
ny's board for the past 12
years. Arison will continue
to serve as chairman of the
board.
The profit was nearly
triple the $14 million
the world's largest cruise
company earned during
same period last year, a


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In this 2007 photo, Carnival Corp. Chief Executive Micky Ari-
son speaks about the state of the cruise industry during an
interview from his office at company headquarters in Miami.


quarter which it suffered
from steep losses on fuel
prices bets known as
derivatives.
Earnings totaled of 5
cents per share this quar-
ter, up from 2 cents a share
last year at this time. Rev-
enue fell 1.7 percent to
$3.48 billion.
Excluding one-time


items, Carnival's earnings
were 9 cents per share.
Analysts polled by FactSet
had expected earnings of 6
cents per share on revenue
of $3.56 billion.
Shares of Carnival rose
$1.67, or 5 percent, to close
at $34.89 Tuesday.
Arison led the company
through an aggressive


expansion that included
the acquisition of sev-
eral brands, including
Holland America, Costa
Cruises, Cunard and Sea-
bourn. In 2003, he oversaw
a merger between Carnival
Corp. and P&O Princess
Cruises. Today, Carni-
val runs cruises under 10
brands.
However, Arison came
under fire during Carni-
val's bad publicity earlier
in the year when a string
of its cruise ships suf-
fered through mechani-
cal problems and fires.
The most dramatic of
them was the Carnival
Triumph where passen-
gers were stranded at sea
for five days as toilets
backed up and air condi-
tioners failed. There were
media reports of raw sew-
age seeping through walls
and carpets.
Arison, who also owns
the Miami Heat basket-
ball team, took some heat


of his own for attending a
game while the crisis was
ongoing.
Donald founded and
led Merisant, a company
whose products include
sweetener brands Equal
and Canderel. He also held
multiple senior manage-
ment roles at Monsanto
over the course of 20-plus
years, including president
of the company's consum-
er and nutrition sector and
president of its agricultural
sector.
The Triumph night-
mare was followed up
with, problems on three
other Carnival ships: The
Elation, Dream and Leg-
end all which made big
headlines.
None of that helped re-
store confidence in vaca-
tioners who are still wary,
after the January 2012
sinking of the Costa
Concordia, also owned by
Carnival.
In its earnings release


Tuesday, Carnival said that
advance bookings for the
rest of 2013 are running
behind last year's levels,
even at lower prices. Book-
ings on its namesake Car-
nival line are particularly
weak.
Arison said in a state-
ment that Carnival is
working to market the
"truly exceptional vaca-
tion values" that cruis-
es offer through travel
agents and other industry
partners.
"We believe these initia-
tives, combined with slow-
er supply growth, will lead
to increased yields," he
said. "In addition, we re-
main focused on reducing
our fuel dependence. By
year end, we will achieve a
23 percent cumulative re-
duction in fuel consump-
tion since 2005 and expect
our research and develop-
ment efforts in fuel saving
technologies to continue
to bear fruit."
I


Judge in Trayvon Martin case weighs police calls


The Associated Press

SANFORD Several
times in six months, neigh-
borhood watch captain
George Zimmerman called
police to report suspicious
characters in the gated
townhouse community
where he lived. Each time,
when asked, he reported
that the suspects were
black males.
On Tuesday, the judge at
Zimmerman's murder trial
in the killing of 17-year-old
Trayvon Martin listened
to those five calls and
weighed whether to let the
jury hear them, too.
Prosecutors want to use
them to bolster their ar-
gument that Zimmerman
was increasingly frustrated
with repeated burglaries
and had reached a break-
ing point the night he shot
the unarmed teenager.
The recordings show
Zimmerman's "ill will,"


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
George Zimmerman enters the courtroom for his trial in
Seminole County circuit court in Sanford, Fla. Tuesday, June
25.


prosecutor Richard Mantei
told Judge Debra Nelson.
"It shows the context
in which the defendant
sought out his encoun-
ter with Trayvon Martin,"
Mantei said.
Defense attorney Mark
O'Mara argued that the
calls were irrelevant and
that nothing matters but
the seven or eight minutes


before Zimmerman fired
the deadly shot into Mar-
tin's chest.
The prosecution is "go-
ing to ask the jury to make
a leap from a good, respon-
sible, citizen behavior to
seething behavior,"O'Mara
said.-
The judge did not imme-
diately rule on whether to
admit therecordings. ,


Prosecutors played the
calls with the jurors out
of the courtroom at the
beginning of a day in
which a former Zimmer-
man neighbor testified
about what she saw of the
confrontation.
Also, prosecutors pre-
sented graphic photos
of Martin's body, a police
officer described trying
to revive Martin as bub-
bling sounds came from
his chest, and a police
manager described how
she helped Zimmerman
set up the neighborhood
watch.
In the calls, Zimmer-
man identifies himself as
a neighborhood watch
volunteer and recounts
that his neighborhood
has had a rash of recent
break-ins. In one call, he
asks that officers respond
quickly since the sus-
pects "typically get away
quickly."


In another, he describes
suspicious black men
hanging around a garage
and mentions his neigh-
borhood had a recent ga-
rage break-in.
Zimmerman, 29, could
get life in prison if con-
victed of second-de-
gree murder for gun-
ning down Martin as the
young man walked from a
convenience store. Zim-
merman followed him in
his truck and called a po-
lice dispatch number be-
fore he and .the teen got
into a fight.
.Zimmerman has
claimed self-defense, say-
ing he opened fire after
the teenager jumped him
and began slamming his
head against the concrete
sidewalk.
Zimmerman, whose fa-
ther is white and whose
mother is Hispanic, has
denied the confrontation
with the black teenager


had anything to do with
race, as Martin's fam-
ily and its supporters have
charged.


Man pleads guilty in $13M Facebook share case


The Associated Press

NEW YORK A Flor-
ida investment adviser
pleaded guilty Tuesday in
a $13 million securities
fraud scheme that pros-
ecutors say capitalized on
enthusiasm for shares of
Facebook and other Inter-
net companies about to go
public.
Craig L. Berkman, 71, of
Odessa, Fla., entered the
plea to securities fraud


and wire fraud in U.S.
District Court in Manhat-
tan, agreeing to serve be-
tween eight and 10 years
in prison, according to the
terms of a written agree-
ment between Berkman
and prosecutors. Other-
wise, he would have faced
up to 40 years in prison.
Berkman, a one-time Or-
egon GOP gubernatorial
candidate, admitted that
he falsely claimed to inves-
tors in December 2010 that


he owned shares of Menlo
Park, Calif.-based Face-
book Inc., Chicago-based
Groupon Inc. and Moun-
tain View, Calif.-based
LinkedIn Inc., among oth-
er companies.
Prosecutors say he pock-
eted much of the .$13.2
million he received from
more than 120 investors
during the scheme, which.
stretched from 2010 un-
til his March 2013 arrest.
The government says he


transferred the investors'
money into his personal
account rather than us-
ing it to acquire shares of
Facebook.
They said he used about
$6 million to pay off
creditors in his personal
bankruptcy, another $4.8
million to pay off earlier
investors and spent an-
other $1.6 million on legal
fees, travel and other per-
sonal expenses, including
cash withdrawals.


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ensure quality surL jir cal:re igqht here in Jackson Couit,. r laTi,:,i-,i-l ^r-itt-,J ,, ;1" .-_1f-a: . -:h,( I, l r' .n ,..,f
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-16A WEDNESDAY. JUNE 26, 2013


STATE


a. ''LtCn





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


EO THU


Family Pack
Country Style Ribs.............................
Family Pack
Pork Steaks.........................


Bratwurst or
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Johnsonville
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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 7AF












Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Another View



Responsibility



now rests



with Afghans

he moment has arrived for the people of Afghani-
stan to step up. In a ceremony in Kabul this week,
NATO officially handed over responsibility to
Afghan leaders and security forces to take the lead in
all security operations.
Six years ago, Afghanistan's army and police forces
totaled around 40,000. Now the number has risen to
more than 350,000.
That's an impressive increase, but as more than a
decade of U.S. involvement has shown, it's an immense
challenge to bring security and stability to the Central
Asian country, which defied conquest by the British
empire in the 19th century and invasion by the Soviet
Union in the 20th.
The Associated Press reports that the transition
"comes at a time the violence is at levels matching the
worst in 12 years."
What are some of the needed ingredients for success?
Demonstrations by Afghan security forces that they
can carry the fight strongly to the Taliban even as NATO
forces.continue to advise and, in emergency situations,
provide airstrikes and medical evacuations. Progress
against corruption in the government and military.
Positive relations with neighboring Pakistan, where Tal-
iban forces find sanctuary. And effective negotiations
with the Taliban in peace talks that are about to begin
in the Persian Gulf nation of Qatar.
Over the past decade, American and allied military
personnel have fought courageously to bring Afghans
to this moment. More than-2,200 Americans, and more
than 1,100 allied troops, have given their lives. U.S.
spending is in the hundreds of billions of dollars.
American development teams including National
Guard teams from Nebraska as well as members of
Iowa's Army and Air National Guard have worked
hard to help the Afghan people pursue agricultural in-
novation and efficiency....
Foreign troops, totaling about 100,000 from 48 na-
tions today, are scheduled to leave the country by the
end of next year.
What a travesty it would be if the progress in moving
Afghanistan forward on women's opportunities and the
country's many other areas of need were to be short-
circuited now by military failures, government misman-
agement and political shortsightedness.
Afghanistan and its leaders must step up to the
challenge.

Omaha World-Herald


Contact your representatives

Florida Legislature


Coley


Coley


State Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 5
District Office:
Administration Building, Room 186
Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701
850-718-0047


Letter to Editor,


Mr. Jones, taxpayers

should not pay to dig

up Dozier graves

Mr. Roy Jones needs to talk to more people than those
who think like he does. I have spoken to many indi-
vidual citizens in Jackson County, both black and white,
and the vast majority agree with the "local newspaper,"
the "star columnist" and the "local historian" that our
tax dollars should not be spent to open graves that have
been there for years, graves that no one knows what
grave belongs to what individual.
It is true, Mr. Jones, that the majority voted for them.
However they voted for them to represent the inter-
est and concerns of the majority. Mr. Jones, if anyone
desires to have their family member dug up, let them
pay the bill. Do they know where this love one is
buried? It could require digging up several just to find
that one. Mr. Jones, why have all these various groups
gotten into this matter only after millions have been
brought up as to funding this project. As to "allegations
of brutality," all of those who were residents Dozier
School, violated state law or laws, one way or another.
Some not only violated the state law but God's law.
Genesis 9:6, they took another human's life. I was
raised in Jackson County. I had personal friends who
worked at Dozier. I never heard of any talk of brutality
except of those who were residents there. And that one
on another. All I knew of stated that every effort, by the
employees of the facility, was made to treat the resi-
dents as citizens, even if they had violated the state law.
Mr. Jones, and to all citizens, as a majority I speak to
say, let those who want their family member removed
pay the bill, not the taxpayers of the present and the
future.
They also agree that the area should be legally re-
moved from the rest of Dozier property and made an
honorable and respectful place of burial, as well as keep
it that way so the property can be sold or used!
REV. DR. BILLY BRUNER, TH. D
/ Cottondale


Arresting j ournalists-at-



work is a double-negative


government surveillance
of news media operations
ranging from The Associ-
ated Press to Fox News has made
national headlines for more than
month now.
But there's an ongoing govern-
ment-press conflict that also is im-
portant in its effect on journalists'
ability to gather news and report
to the rest of us, and to the proper
role of a free press under the First
Amendment.
Journalists reporters and
photographers are being ar-
rested while reporting on public
demonstrations or police activity
on matter'of public interest. In a
latest example, Charlotte Observer
religion reporter Tim Funk was
arrested June 10 at the General
Assembly building in Raleigh, N.C.,
while interviewing local clergy
involved in legislative protests.
As seen in a video Of the ar-
rest posted on Facebook, Funk, a
veteran reporter, was interview-
ing members of the protest group
while wearing a Charlotte Observer
identification card on a lanyard
around his neck. He continued to
do interviews with several protest-
ers after police ordered the group
to disperse. He is standing in front
of, not among, the group.
Funk first is grabbed by the arm.
and then handcuffed with a plastic
tie. Later, the reporter was escorted
away by three uniform officers.
An Observer news story said Funk
"was taken along with the arrested
protesters to the Wake County mag-
istrate's office to be arraigned on'


GenePolicinskld
Inside the First Amendment


misdemeanor charges of trespass-
ing and failure to disperse."
"We believe there was no reason
to detain him," said Cheryl Carpen-
ter, the newspaper's managing edi-
tor said in an Observer story about
Funk's arrest. "He wasn't there to
do anything but report the story, to
talk to Charlotte clergy. He was do-
ing his job in a public place."
Gathering news and in the
process, performing the Consti-
tutional duty as a "watchdog on
government" that the nation's
founders envisioned for a free press
- requires more getting a few facts
from official sources. It means
being at the scene, talking with
those involved, observing the news
first-hand.
If Funks arrest were a single in-
cident, it still would be of concern.
But, according to aWeb site set
up to track arrests of journalists in
recent years who were reporting
on the Occupy movement, in the
year ending in September 2012,
"more than 90 journalists have
been arrested in 12 cities around
the United States while covering "
Occupy protests and civil unrest."
Add in a.sizeable number of .


arrests in recent years of photog-
raphers for takingpictures at the
scene of police actions and traffic
'incidents, and also those swept
up in mass arrests of protesters at
national and international confer-
ences in the last decade, and there's
more reason to worry.
Mickey Osterreicher, general
counsel for the National Press Pho-
tographers Association (NPPA),
said he deals with such arrest
issues involving photojournalists
"every day, all across the nation."
He works with police departments
to educate officers on the rights of
journalists and the public to
take photos. He said catch and
release police actions have no legal
foundation, and that the increase
in arrests may stem from a "perfect
storm" of more cell phone cameras,
and easier distribution and more.
visibility because of the Web.
Certainly, there are times when
situations are chaotic and police
must act to protect public safety. In
such instances, it may be impos-
Ssible to sort out the protester from
the person reporting on the protest.
But in Funk's case, for example, .
there was no chaos and he visibly
- with ID on and notebook in
hand was working as a reporter.
The rights to assemble, peace-
ably petition the government for
change, and to raise one's voice in
doing so, are all protected free-
doms under the First Amendment
along with the right of a free
press to gather and report the news
without government sanction or
disruption.


Catholics must communicate better


I've been spending the better
part of the last week among
Catholics who communicate.
They're people of varied back-
grounds and politics who love
their church. We're at the annual
meeting of the Catholic Press As-
sociation, where I've been asked
to speak a few times. But what I've
been doing more of is listening.
What I've been hearing is an
acknowledgment that something's
gone terribly wrong. Not that
church teaching has to be over-
hauled, as is so often the assump-
tion in media, but that we need to
communicate better. We need to
be more consistent witnesses of an
alternative to the conventional.,
Frank Bruni, writing in his New
York Times column, recently excori-
ated the church for its continued
encouragement to nien and wom-
en with same-sex attractions to
live lives of chastity. Bruni focuses
on recent comments by NewYork's
Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the best-
known of any contemporary U.S.
bishop, teaching that sexual love
is "intended only for a man and
woman in marriage." This, Bruni
says, "assigns homosexuals a status
separate from, and unequal to, the
one accorded heterosexuals: You're
OK, but you're really not OK. Upon
you there is a special restriction,
and for you there is a fundamental
dimension of the human experi-
ence that is off-limits, a no-fly zone
of the heart."
But what's missing here is the
fact that there are many men and
women who do not have same-sex
attractions who are not married,
but want to be. I met some of them,
as I do just about everywhere,


KathrynLopez


in Denver this week. One young
woman talked about her desire for
marriage, her desire to know that's
her vocation, while acknowledging
that she is already serving God as
a single woman, at her job, in her
community and among friends.
She's not going to let what she
lacks, and really wants, impede her
gratitude.
It might, in fact, be a bit of an
indictment of Catholic commu-
nicators both preachers and
laypeople that Bruni can easily
write: "Let's leave aside the legions
of straight people, Catholic and
otherwise, who aren't tucking their
sex lives into a box that tidy, tiny
and fecundity-minded." I don't
know about the "otherwise," but
Cardinal Dolan's primary obligation
is to the Catholics, as a spiritual
shepherd. And regardless of your
sexual attractions, what Dolan said
holds for all: Sexual union is a glori-
ous one meant for marriage.
Which gets back to the discus-
sions here this week. We live in the
world. We know too many of us
aren't taking what we say we believe
seriously. A Catholic governor of
NewYork made increased abor-
tion access in his state a priority.
A Catholic former Speaker of the
House shut down a legitimate


question about brutal late-term
abortions, insisting the topic had
some kind of "sacred ground" pro-
tection. And how many weddings
have you attended in a Catholic
church after the couple had already
spent months, if not years, playing
house? Living as though married,
with only a party delayed, the
"sacrament" performed only for the
sake of nostalgia or pictures?
Mother Dolores Hart is at this
conference. Many know her as
the nun who kissed Elvis. Dolores
Hart had a successful acting career,
having starred in two movies with
Presley, among others, but found
herself called to a life of contem-
plative prayer. She now emanates
wisdom and peace, but recalls
crying herself to sleep for the first
seven years in the convent.
In her memoir, "The Ear of the
Heart," Mother Dolores writes: "To
enter the contemplative life truly,
you have to go through a narrow,
lonely place in your being, where
you face all your fears and self-
ish patterns, even when you don't
know what these are. I thought I
was very grown-up, very mature.
You don't realize what a child you
are until God tests your heart and
you go through that deep place all
of us have to go through."
A key question of the day: What
are we here for? We may just be
here for one another, but not in
the ways that culture assumes. The
* Catholic Church, throughout the
country and world, offers oppor-
tunities for spiritual growth and
temporal support for all.
That's the only successful com-
munications strategy for a church:
Be for real.


..... . ...... ..... . ....... ................ .... .. -






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN *, www.jcfloridan.com


_..;'a..- 'L '.: 4 . -.- --

Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
Marianna, Florida 32446
Phone 850-526-5059

Ruth
Elizabeth
Peters

Ms. Ruth Elizabeth Pe-
ters age 80 of Marianna
passed away on Saturday,
June 22, 2013 in Jackson
Hospital.
Services for Ms. Peters
will be held today at 1:00
P.M. in the Sunland Chapel
with Chaplain Ruth Moore
-officiating. Interment will
follow in the Riverside
Cemetery.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements. Expressions of
sympathy may be submit-
ted online at
www.mariananchapelfh.com.

Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


Fall

From Page 1A

County Sheriffs Office
and Jackson County Fire
Rescue.
According to a Fire Res-
cue spokesman, a female
worker at the plant fell
about 25 feet, landing on
concrete. The woman,
Swho had sustained serious
injuries, was transported
by helicopter to an area
hospital trauma center for
treatment.
Representatives of Ice
River Springs Marianna
confirmed the person who
fell is an employee and es-
timated the height of the
platform on which she was
working just prior to the
incident at 15 to 20 feet.



Board
From Page 1A

Walton County Economic
Development Alliance
and the Holmes County
Development Commis-
sion. He received his
bachelor's and master's de-
grees in civil engineering
from Auburn University.
He succeeds Robert "Bob"
Jones and is appointed for
a term beginning June 24,
2013, and ending May 31,
2015.
Hannah Causseaux, 28,
of -Bristol, is the former
Director of Appointments
in the Executive Office
of the governor. She re-
ceived her bachelor's de-
gree in political science
from Florida State Univer-
sity. She succeeds Mark
Plummer and is appointed
for a term beginning June
24, 2013, and ending May
31,2014.
Gary Clark, 45, of Chi-
pley, is the vice president
of West Florida Electric
Cooperative. He received
his bachelor's degree
in marketing from the
UniversityofPhoenix. Clark
served on the Washington
County school board for 12
years. He is reappointed for
a term beginning June 24,
2013, and ending May 31,
2015.
John Padgett, 82, of
Marianna, is retired.
He was a member of
the U.S. Army Medical
Corps. Padgett has previ-
ously served as a Jackson
County commissioner.
He is reappointed for a
term beginning June 24,
2013, and ending May 31,
2014.


The appointments are
subject to confirmation by
the Florida Senate.
Chipola's nine-mem-
ber board also includes
Gina Stuart of Jackson
County, Danny Ryals
of Calhoun County, Dr.
Leisa Bailey of Holmes
County and Jan Page of
Washington County.


Army to cut brigades at 10 U.S. bases


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Army will eliminate at
least 12 combat brigades,
relocate thousands of sol-
diers and cancel $400 mil-
lion in construction proj-
ects as the first wave of
federal budget cuts takes
aim at military communi-
ties around the country.
In a massive restructur-
ing, Army leaders said
Tuesday that they will
slash the number of active
duty combat brigades
from 45 to 33, as the ser-
vice moves forward with
a longtime plan to cut
the size of the service by
80,000. And they warned
that more cuts of as
many as 100,000 more ac-
tive duty, National Guard
and Reserve soldiers -
could be coming if Con-
gress allows billions of
dollars in automatic bud-
get cuts to continue next
year.
The sweeping changes
would eliminate brigades
- which number from
3,500 to 5,000 troops at
10 Army-bases in the U.S.
by 2017, including those
in Texas, Kentucky, Geor-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
This 2010 photo shows soldiers from the 10th Mountain
Division saluting during the national anthem during a
welcome home ceremony attended by Vice President Joe
Biden in Fort Drum, N.Y.


gia, Colorado, North Caro-
lina, NewYork, Kansas and
Washington. The Army
will also cut thousands of
other jobs across the ser-
vice, including soldiers
in units that support the
brigades, and two bri-
gades in Germany have al-
ready been scheduled for
elimination.
Gen. Ray Odierno, Army
chief of staff, said one ad-
ditional brigade will likely
be cut, but no final deci-
sions have been made.
"I know in the local


communities it will have
its impact," Odierno told
reporters Tuesday. "But
we've done our best to
reach out to them so they
understand what the im-
pacts are. We've tried to
make it as small an im-
pact as possible for as
many communities as we
could."
Members of Congress,
meanwhile, expressed
concerns about the pros-
pects for greater cuts down
the road.
Rep. Howard PR "Buck"


McKeon, R-Calif., chair-
man of the House Armed
Services Committee, said
his panel "will carefully
examine the implications
of this initial restructur-
ing, but we all must un-
derstand that this is only
the tip of the iceberg,
muci deeper cuts are still
to come."
The Army is being re-
duced in size from a high
of about 570,000 during
the peak of the Iraq war to
490,000 as part of efforts
to cut the budget and re-
flect the country's military
needs as the wars in Iraq
and Afghanistan end. Odi-
erno said that the poten-
tial 100,000 more would
be spread out across the
active duty, Guard and
Reserves, and that there
also could be reductions
in the Army's 13 aviation
brigades.
While the personnel cuts
may have less impact at
some of the Army's larger
bases such as Fort-Hood
in Texas and Fort Bragg in
North Carolina, they could
be more painful for com-
munities around some of
the smaller installations
such as Fort Knox, where


currently only one brigade
is based.
The other seven U.S. bas-
es that will lose a brigade
are: Fort Bliss inTexas, Fort
Campbell in Kentucky,
Fort Carson in Colorado,
Fort Drum in New York,
Fort Riley in Kansas, Fort
Stewart in Ge6rgia, and
Joint Base Lewis-McChord
in Washington. Soldiers in
the deactivated brigades
would be transferred to
other units.
Odiemo said the Army
tried to spread out the cuts
geographically. He said
Fort Knox scored the low-
est in military value, but
insisted the reduction was
not the first step toward
closing the base. He noted
that about 4,000 civilians
workers had been added
there, as well as the Army's
recruiting command.
The overall cut in size
has been known for more
than a year, and Army
leaders have been work-
ing on how to manage the
reduction, conducting lo-
cal community meetings
across the country and re-
leasing an extensive study
on the issue earlier this
year.


GOP divided on immigration; House uncertain


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Sen-
ate Republicans are split
over the immigration bill
steaming toward approval
at week's end, a divide that
renders the ultimate fate
of White House-backed
legislation unpredict-
able in the House and
complicates the party's
ability to broaden its ap-
peal among Hispanic
voters.
To some Republicans,
the strength of Senate
GOP support for the bill
is all but irrelevant to its
prospects in the House.
Conservatives there hold
a majority and generally
oppose a core provision
in the Senate measure,
a pathway to citizenship
for immigrants living
in the United States
illegally.
Any such impact is
"greatly overrated," said
Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt,
who previously served
as chief vote counter for
House Republicans.
But Rep. Paul Ryan, R-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 11, photo, Senate Minority Leader Mitch
McConnell of Ky., left, accompanied by Senate Minority Whip
John Cornyn of Texas speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Republicans are deeply split over the immigration bill.


Wis., offered a different
view. A Senate vote on
Monday to toughen bor-
der security with thou-
sands of new agents and
billions of dollars in tech-
nology "obviously makes
final legislation more like-
ly," the party's 2012 vice
presidential nominee said
on CBS.
* One prominent Demo-
crat, Sen. Chuck Schumer
of New York, also says
House sentiment can be
changed, particularly


through the addition of
strong border security
measures of the kind that
resulted from negotiations
with previously uncom-
mitted Republicans.
"I believe a large bipar-
tisan vote will wake up
our colleagues ... in the
House," Schumer said
shortly before the Sen-
ate inserted a require-
ment for 20,000 new
Border Patrol agents and
a total of 700 miles of
fencing along the border


with Mexico.
"Hopefully, as congress-
men look how their sena-
tors voted, they will be
influenced by it."
In the key Sefate show-
down so far, 15 Repub-
licans voted to advance
the legislation that tough-
ens border security at
the same time it creates a
chance at citizenship for
11 million immigrants liv-
ing in the United States
illegally. Another 27
voted to keep the bill
bottled up.
Republicans who voted
to block the legislation
generally did so after say-
ing it would not deliver on
its promise of operational
control of the border.
"When you look at it, it
doesn't, and they know it,"
Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala.,
said of the bill's backers,
who quickly disputed the
charge.
A political pattern
emerged, as well.
AmongRepublicanswho
are seeking a new term
next year and as a result
face the risk of a primary


challenge, only three vot-
ed with supporters of the
measure. Eight did not, a
group that includes the
party's two top leaders in
the Senate, Mitch McCon-
nell of Kentucky and John
Cornyn of Texas, as well
as Sessions, who has been
one of the bill's principal
opponents across three
weeks of debate.
While party leaders long
have looked to immigra-
tion legislation as a way
to broaden appeal among
Hispanic voters, indi-
vidual members of Con-
gress report a different
perspective.
"It's hard to argue with
the polling they've been
getting from the national
level," Texas Republican
Rep. Kenny Marchant
said recently, referring to
polls that show support
for border security along
with legalization. Yet
in his own district in the
suburbs west of Dal-
las, he said, proposals
along the lines of the
Senate bill are "very
unpopular."


Wife: Journalist Hastings wasn't reporting on Jill Kelley


The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Journal-
ist Michael Hastings was not
working on a story about Florida
socialite Jill Kelley when he died
in a fiery single-car wreck last
week, his wife said Tuesday on
Twitter.


Fire
From Page 1A

and ran outside, saving
herself and her pet from
any harm.
In addition to the home
being destroyed, Emily's
Nissan Altima burned up
in the fire. Crews tried to
save the car, but had to
abandon the task when
the roof above it began to
collapse as they were try-
ing to move it.
Mr. Fuqua said he is
grateful for the commu-
nity outreach his family
experienced, extended be-
fore the last hot embers
stopped sending trails of
smoke skyward.
"We've had offers of
places to stay from Rose-
mary Beach (on the coast
near Panama City) to
the Alabama line, and
every place in between,"
he said Tuesday. "Many
people have called, asking


Elise Jordan tweeted that she
wanted to correct the record
after seeing erroneous reports
about the work of her husband.
"Since I've seen it errone-
ously reported a few times: @
mmhastings was not working on
a story about Jill Kelley," Jordan
wrote. She declined a request for


'What can I bring?' They've
brought us clothes, tooth-
brushes, everything. I've
got friends who live ih big
cities. If this had happened
to them, I think they'd
just be out of luck. We've
had everything offered
to us, and we appreci-
ate everyone for all their
concern, for their thoughts
and prayers on our
behalf."
The Fuquas had the
house built in 1995. They
drew the plans, and had
worked a long time on the
design before committing
to its construction. The
three-bedroom, three-
bath home was a one-
story structure. Emily and
her older brother Harrison
grew up there. Harrison
came home from college
Monday night to be with
his family after being told
about the fire, his father
said.
Fuqua said he and his
wife are taking the next
few days and months to


further comment.
Kelley claimed in a federal
lawsuit filed earlier this month
that the government willfully
leaked false and defamatory in-
formation about her and her
husband, violating their pri-
vacy, in the scandal that led to
Gen. David Petraeus resigning


assess their losses and po-
tentially make some deci-
sions. They're not sure yet
whether they will rebuild
on-site, move into Mari-
anna or make other living
arrangements.
On Tuesday, they were
sifting through the ashes,
looking for any additional
treasures that may have
come through the fire in-
tact or nearly so. "It's kind
of funny, the things that
will survive," Mr. Fuqua
said. "We found little
pieces, like a teacup that
belonged to my wife's
stepfather's parents, sev-
eral pieces of our wedding
china, some silverware
from my mom. But the
big old antique furni-
ture you thought might
make it through, all but
one piece in one room is
gone."
Jackson County Fire
Rescue Chief Tony Wes-
ley said approximately 25
firefighters responded,
including those from his


as CIA director.
The 33-year-old Hastings
had won a 2010 George Polk
Award for his Rolling Stone
magazine article that led to
the resignation of U.S. Army
Gen. Stanley McChrystal as US.
commander of coalition forces in
Afghanistan.


agency as well as from collapsing from the heat
Marianna Fire Depart- when they came out of
ment, and volunteer units the house after a short
from Grand Ridge, Gracev- turn of duty inside. But
ille, Cottondale, Dellwood few came out empty-
and Compass Lake in the handed, she said. "They
Hills. Anderson-Columbia scooped up frames and
used some of its equip- mementos, bringing them
ment to bring in extra wa- out of the house, treating
ter as well, according to their stuff like it was brand
neighbor Sandy Hascher. new. They cupped it so
Hascher said the light- carefully in their gloves.
ning bolt and resulting They were exhausted,
explosion lit up her house heated to the bone, but
and popped every circuit it was just amazing to
breaker on the west side watch them work. They
of her home. Hascher, an recovered some jew-
American Red Cross vol- elry, some heirlooms;
unteer, suddenly found they were outstanding."
herself on duty for her She said the team col-
neighbor. lectively drank about
She happened to be on 10 cases of water that
call as the primary ARC day, with 24 bottles to the
Disaster Response Team case.
member. She made sure The Fuqua family de-
firefighters had water to clined ARC's offer of tem-
drink, using her person- porary housing or other
al funds to buy bottles, assistance, Hascher said,
money which will later with Mrs. Fuqua request-
be reimbursed by the ing that the funds be
ARC. She said some fire- reserved to help others
fighters were practically instead.


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a 850-482-5041 L


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26,2013 9AF


LOCAL & NATION


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Yongama, 9, observes bunches of flowers after leaving a get-well card at the entrance to the
Mediclinic Heart Hospital where former South African President Nelson Mandela is being
treated in Pretoria, South Africa on Monday.


Mandela family gathers together


The Associated Press

JOHANNESBURG Members of Nel-
son Mandela's family and tribal elders
gathered Tuesday at the former presi-
dent's rural hometown in eastern South
Africa, as concern grew for the leader who
spent a third ,day in critical condition in a
hospital, local media reported.
The office of President Jacob Zuma
said Mandela's condition remained un-
changed after reporting late Sunday that
his health had deteriorated to critical,
alarming many South Africans as well as
people around the world who regard the
former president as a symbol of sacrifice
and reconciliation.
Mandela's family members held a
meeting at his home in Qunu village in
the Eastern Cape province, 600 miles
south of Johannesburg, where the anti-
apartheid leader grew up. No details on
what was discussed in the meeting were
announced. Those at the gathering in-
cluded Mandela's grandsons Mandla and
Ndaba Mandela, according to press
reports.
The Mail & Guardian, a South African
newspaper, reported on its website that
some elders in the area were only told of
the meeting shortly before it started.
"Many of us in the village were not aware
and we were only told this morning, so a
number of Mandela elders still need to
be transported to Qunu for the meeting,"
the newspaper quoted Silumko Mandela,
a relative, as saying earlier in the day.
A military helicopter was also seen hov-
ering over the Mandela home, reported
the online edition of City Press, a South
African newspaper.
As on previous days, other family mem-
bers were seen visiting the hospital in Pre-
toria where the Nobel Peace Prize laure-
ate is being treated. South Africa's defense
minister and an Anglican archbishop also
visited the facility.
Dozens of doves were released Tuesday
outside the hospital, which has attracted
well-wishers who have gathered outside
to show support for Mandela.
"In terms of releasing these doves, we're
simply saying it symbolizes how he has
set free us as South Africans," said Kelvin


Hugo, who arrived with the birds. "He set
us free in the capacity not only of social
freedom or economic freedom but he's
given us an opportunity to have freedom
of speech, freedom of movement, free-
dom of association."
Mandela, who spent 27 years in prison
during white racist rule and became
South Africa's first black president in all-
race elections in 1994, was taken to the
hospital on June 8 to be treated for what
the government described as a recurring
lung infection; Zuma's office said doctors
were doing their best to ensure his recov-
ery and comfort.
"We must support him and support his
family," Zuma said in a statement. "We
must demonstrate our love and apprecia-
tion for his leadership during the struggle
for liberation and in our first few years of
freedom and democracy by living out his
legacy and promoting unity, non-racial-
ism, non-sexism and prosperity in our
country."
The president asked that the legacy of
Mandela, also known by his clan name
Madiba, be celebrated on July 18, his
95th birthday. In recent years, organizers
have sought to turn the day into an inter-
national event in which participants do
something to honor Mandela's values for
67 minutes, noting that he spent 67 years
as a human rights lawyer,'a prisoner, a
peacemaker and a democratically elected
president.
"We must all be planning what to do
next month in marking our 67 minutes of
doing good for humanity as called upon
by Madiba to do so, when he launched
the International Mandela Day cam-
paign," Zuma said. "Let us make it the
biggest Mandela Day ever on the 18th of
July, focusing on doing good all over the
country."
South Africa's foreign minister, Maite
Nkoana-Mashabane, said people should
honor Mandela but not dwell excessively
on his illness.
"We continue to wish the father of our
nation well," she said. "We are realistic
about his age. But I am sure he would be
very disappointed, if he hears that be-
cause he's very sick, life has stopped in
South Africa."


Putin says no to US request


to turn over Snowden


The'Associated Press

MOSCOW Russian
President Vladimir Putin
bluntly rejected U.S. pleas
to turn over National Se-
curity Agency leaker Ed-
ward Snowden on Tues-
day, saying he is free to
travel wherever he wants
and insisting that Russian
security agencies haven't
contacted him.
Snowden is in the tran-
sit zone of a Moscow air-
port and has not passed
through Russian immi-
gration, Putin said, mean-
ing he is not technically in
Russia.
After arriving Sunday on
a flight from Hong Kong,
Snowden registered for
a Havana-bound flight
from Moscow on Mon-
day en route to Venezuela
and then possible asylum
in Ecuador, but he didn't
board the plane.
Snowden's whereabouts
since then have been a
mystery, and Putin's com-
ments were the first time
Russia has made clear it
knows where he is.
Speculation has been
rife that Russian security
agencies might want to
keep Snowden in Russia
for a more thorough de-
briefing, but Putin denied
that.
"Our special services.
never worked with Mr.
Snowden and aren't
working with him today,"
Putin said at a news con-
ference during a visit to
Finland.
Putin said that because
there is no extradition
agreement with the U.S.,
it couldn't meet the U.S.
request.
"Mr. Snowden is a free
man, and the sooner he
chooses his final destina-
tion the better it is for us
and.for him," Putin said.
"I hope it will not affect
the business-like charac-
ter of our relations with
the U.S. and I hope that
our partners will under-
stand that."
U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry said Tuesday
that though the United
States does not have an
extradition treaty with
Russia, it wants Moscow
to comply with common
law practices between
countries where fugitives


are concerned.
Putin's staunch refusal
to consider deporting
Snowden shows the Rus-
sian president's readiness
to further challenge Wash-
ington at a time when
U.S.-Russian relations are
already strained over Syr-
ia and a Russian ban on
adoptions by Americans.
A Kremlin decision to
provide even temporary
shelter and safe transit
to Snowden would em-
barrass Washington. And
despite Putin's denial, se-
curity experts believe the
Russian special services
wouldn't miss the chance
to question a man who is
believed to hold reams of
classified U.S. documents
and can shed light on how
the U.S. intelligence agen-
cies collect information.
Igor Korotchenko, direc-
tor of the Center for Global
Arms Trade and editor of
National Defense Maga-
zine, said Snowden would
be of particular interest
because little is known
about digital espionage.
"The security services
would be happy to en-
ter into contact with Mr.
Snowden," Korotchenko
said.
Russia also relished


using Snowden's rev-
elations to try to turn the
tables on U.S. criticism of
Russia's rights record.
Putin compared
Snowden to WikiLeaks
founder, Julian Assange,
who has been provided
asylum in the Ecuadorean
Embassy in London, say-
ing that both men were
labeled criminals but con-
sider themselves rights ac-
tivists and champions of
freedom of information.
'Ask yourself a question:
should people like that be
extradited so that they put
them in prison or not?" he
said. "In any case, I would
prefer not to deal with
such issues. It's like shear-
ing a piglet: a lot of squeal-
ing and little wool."
In an apparent reference
to claims that Moscow
could have played a role
in Snowden's exit from
Hong Kong, he said that
his arrival was a "complete
surprise" and dismissed
accusations against Rus-
sia as "ravings and sheer
nonsense."
"He doesn't need a visa
or any other documents,
and as a transit passenger
he has the right to buy a
ticket and fly wherever he
wants," Putin said.


;ii ,s---- -,-o--- .

Downtown Marianna
88 Jef .fero -S


50o.482.o655


li4e)7k N I4PI'AY

a 3pz


Obama to tackle climate change


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama de-
clared the debate over cli-
mate change and its causes
obsolete Tuesday as he an-
nounced a wide-ranging
plan to tackle pollution
and prepare communities
for global warming.
In a major speech at
Georgetown University,
Obama warned Americans
of the deep and disastrous
effects of climate change,
urging them to take action
before it's too late.
"As. a president, as a fa-
ther and as an American,
I'm here to say we need to
act," Obama said.
Obama announced he
was directing his adminis-
tration to launch the first-
ever federal regulations on
heat-trapping gases emit-
ted by new and existing
power plants "to put an
end to the limitless dump-
ing of carbon pollution."
Other aspects of the plan
will boost renewable en-
ergy production on federal
lands, increase efficiency
standards and prepare
communities to deal with
higher temperatures.
Even before Obama un-
veiled his plan Tuesday,
Republican critics in Con-
gress were lambasting it
as a job-killer that would
threaten the economic
recovery. Obama dis-
missed those critics, not-
ing the same arguments
have been used in the past
when the U.S. has taken
other steps to protect the
environment.
"That's what they said
every time," Obama said.


. ,'.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama speaks about climate change Tuesday
at Georgetown University in Washington.


"And every time, they've
been wrong."
Obama touted Ameri-
ca's strengths research,
technology and innova-
tion as factors that
make the U.S. uniquely
poised to take on the chal-
lenges of global warming.
He mocked those who
deny that humans are con-
tributing to the warming
Of the planet, adding that
he "doesn't have much pa-
tience" for anybody who
refuses to acknowledge the
problem.
"We don't have time for
a meeting of the flat-earth
society," Obama said.
Obama also offered a
rare insight into his ad-
ministration's delibera-
tions on Keystone XL, an
oil pipeline whose poten-
tial approval has sparked
an intense fight between
environmental activists
and energy producers.
The White House has
insisted the State De-
partment is making the
decision independently,
but Obama said Tues-
day he's instructing the


department to approve it .
only if the project won't ,' \."
increase overall, net emis-
sions of greenhouse gases. ; ,
'Allowing the Keystone : r. -
pipeline to be built requires
a finding that doing so
would be in our nation's in-r
terests," Obama said. "Our
national interest would be
served only if this project
does not significantly ex-
acerbate the problem of
carbon pollution."
Obama's far-reaching U
plan marks Obama's most
prominent effort yet to
deliver on a major prior-
ity he laid qut in his first
presidential campaign and
recommitted to at the start
of his second term: to fight
climate change in the U.S.
and abroad.




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Pirates drop contests



to Cairo, Blountstown


BYDUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Sneads Pirates dropped a
pair of games Tuesday evening
at Marianna High School, falling
to Blountstown 54-40 and Cairo
(Ga.) 45-42.
Sneads first took on Blount-
stown and took an early lead
thanks to eight quick points
from Darius Williams, with a
driving basket by the rising se-
nior forward putting the Pirates
up 17-12.
But a 9-0 Blountstown run
turned a 19-15 deficit to a 24-19
Tiger lead with 5:25 to halftime
before a 3 byAntwan Durn broke
up the run and made it 24-22.
A pair of three-point plays by
the Tigers and a 3-pointer at
the halftime buzzer put Blount-
stown up 33-26 at the halftime
break, and the lead was pushed


out to 10 at 38-28 early in the
second half.
A .free throw by Williams and
an offensive put-back by Al-
phonso Brown got Sneads back
to within single digits at 43-34,
but Blountstown answered with
a 9-2 spurt to extend the lead to
16 with 2:50 remaining.
Williams finished with 12
points to lead the Pirates, with
Brown and Chris Green each
adding eight.
In the nightcap against Cairo,
it was nip and tuck throughout
the entire first half, with neither
team leading by more than four
points over the first 20 minutes
of action.
Sneads trailed 24-20 late in the
half before a driving basket and a
three byWilliams cut the margin
to one at the break, and Williams
added a three early in the second


half to put the Pirates up 30-28.
Back-to-back triples by Dustin
Pittman and Devonte Green gave
Sneads a 38-32 lead with 15:25 to
play, but Cairo answered back
with a 10-0 run to go up 42-38
with four minutes left.
A basket by Green trimmed the
margin to three with 55 seconds
remaining, but Cairo ran the
clock out on its final possession..
Williams finished the game
with 11 points to lead the Pi-
rates, with Devonte Green and
Chris Green each adding eight
points.
The last day of the Marianna
Summer League will be Thurs-
day with four games on tap.
Marianna opens with Bay High
at 4 p.m., followed by Malone vs.
Mosley at 5 p.m., Mosley vs. Bay
High at 6 p.m., and Malone vs.
Marianna at 7,p.m.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Sneads' Alphonso Brown goes up for two points during a Summer League
game against Blountstown on Tuesday afternoon in Marianna.


SNEADS TAKES TITLE


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
The Sneads Darlings All-Star Team won the District 2 championship on Sunday night with a 15-12 victory over Marianna.

All Stars rally to defeat Marianna for Darlings championship


BYDUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Sneads Darlings All
Stars rallied from an early def-
icit to take a 15-12 victory over
Marianna and win the District
2 championship on Sunday
night inWewahitchka.
Marianna jumped out to the
early lead with five runs in the
top of the first inning, as Am-
ari Brown, Mattie Rooks, Lexie
Spooner, Brianna Standiford,


and Jaysoni Fowler all picked
up hits and scored.
Sneads got four runs in its
half of the inning, with Tay-
lor-Reese Howell and Kaylee
Grammer getting hits and
scoring on a two-RBI hit by
Elizabeth Arnold, who also
scored on a ground ball by
Kennady Harrell.
Natalie Benton had an RBI
hit to score Aurlee Perkins
to round out the scoring for


Sneads Belles fall


to Franklin County


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Belles All Stars
fell just short ,of a trip to state
Sunday night, falling to Frank-
lin County 10-5 in the final
game of the District 2 tourna-
ment in Wewahitchka.
It was the third matchup
between Sneads and Franklin
County in the tournament,
with Sneads winning the first
meeting Saturday night 3-2
thanks to a pair of late runs to
erase a 2-1 deficit.
On Sunday, it was Franklin
County that answered with a
10-6 win over Sneads to force
an elimination game for the
championship and won that
one to take the title.
Sneads coach Ron Ranew
said that the Franklin County
offense simply overwhelmed
his team.
"Their offense was just kill-


"Their offense was just
killing the ball, and our
defense didn't play like
it did Saturday."
Ron Ranew,
Sneads coach
ing the ball, and our defense
didn't play like it did Saturday,"
Ranew said. "Their batting
was just stronger than ours
was. They were hitting a good
game. We had one of our play-
ers out sick and just had a bad
day I guess."
The Sneads All Stars finished
the tournament with a 2-2 re-
cord, earning a 15-0 win over
Port St. Joe in Saturday's open-
ing game.
Autumn Avriett started that
game in the circle for Sneads

See BELLES, Page 3B


Sneads in the inning and cut
the margin to 5-4.
Marianna answered in the
top of the second by send-
ing the maximum 10 batters
to the plate to score six more
runs, with Olivia Spooner,
Josie Granger, Hayden Gause,
Brown, Rooks, and Lexie
Spooner all getting hits and
scoring.
A two-RBI double by Howell
scored Shiley Coulliette and


Rea Green in the bottom of
the second for Sneads to cut
the lead to 11-6, and Sneads
went ahead for good with six
more runs in the third.
Sneads then tacked on three
more runs in the fourth when
Grammer and Arnold got hits
and scored, and Harrell had a
hit and was driven in by Ben-
ton to make it 15-11.

See DARLINGS, Page 3B


* ~A~L f~i-!~i-~ .~k~4'...AKJ


he Marianna Darlings were the runners up in
the District 2 Tournament in Wewa. They are
(front row) Jaysoni Fowler, Amiya Summer-
well, Josie Granger, Meghan Beebe, Olivia Spooner,
Jasmine Bess and Lexie Spooner. In the middle row
are, Amari Brown, Sara Castleberry, Mattie Rooks,
Emilyann Roulhac, Hayden Gause and Brianna
Standiford. In the back row are Howard Bess, Clay
Rooks, Rochelle Summerwell and Charlene Beebe.


Marianna
Summer League
Thursday- Marianna vs. Bay,
4 p.m.; Mosley vs. Graceville,
5 p.m.; Bay vs. Mosley, 6 p.m.;
Graceville vs. Marianna, 7 p.m.

Tiger Shootout
Graceville High School will
play host to the Tiger Shootout
on Saturday, with three Jackson
County boys basketball teams
competing in games starting at 8
a.m. and running all day.
The schedule is: Bozeman vs.
* Liberty County, 8 a.m.; Malone
vs. Walton, 8:50 a.m.; Graceville
vs. SouthWalton, 9:40 a.m.;
Blountstown vs. Mosley, 10:30
a.m.; Rickards vs. Marianna,
11:20 a.m.; Liberty County vs.
Malone, 12:10 p.m.; Bozeman vs.
Graceville, 1 pjm.; Blountstown
vs. South Walton, 1:50 p.m.;
Mosley vs. Walton, 2:40 p.m.;
Rickards vs. Malone, 3:30 p.m.;
Marianna vs. South Walton, .
4:20 p.m.; Graceville vs. Liberty
County, 5:10 p.m.; Blountstown
vs. Bozeman, 6 p.m.; Rickards vs.
Walton, 6:50 p.m., Marianna vs.
Mosley, 7:40 p.m.

Marianna Swim Team
The Marianna Swim Team is a
local, recreational swim team for
boys and girls ages 4-18. Prac-
tices are held from 5 p.m. to 6:30
p.m., Monday through Thursday
through August at Chipola Col-
lege Pool.
Meets are held on Saturdays
throughout the summer.
Registration is open. All we re-
quire is that the swimmer swim
one full pool length (25 yards)
and that children under 10 have
parental supervision during
practices.
The registration fee of $35
payable to MST helps cover cost
of life guards and relay events at
meets. Team T-shirts for mem-
bers will be an additional $5
and $15 for non-members. Pool
membership is also required by
Chipola College.
For additional information
please call Vicki Pelham at 482-
2435; Angie Bunting at 209-8918;
Julie Smith at 557-3292; Monica
Bolin at 209-2388; or email your
questions to MST2010@centu-
rylink.net.

Bulldog Wrestling Club
The Bulldog Wrestling Club is
starting practice for the summer
season.
Practice will be Tuesday and
Thursday nights from 5:30-7
p.m. at the old Marianna High
School wrestling room.
All Jackson County kids ages 5-
18 are welcome to join. For more
information, call MHS coach
Ron Thoreson at 272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to edito-
rial@jcfloridan.com, or fax them
to 850-482-4478. The mailing
address for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan PO. Box 520
Marianna, FL 32447. |






-72B WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26,2013


NFL


Rookie S osiu


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Buffalo and NewYork Jets rookies talk with youngsters after a Play 60 event as part of NFL football's rookie symposium Tuesday
at the Cleveland Browns practice facility in Berea, Ohio.



Rookies warned about



hard kiocks off the field


The Associated Press

BEREA, Ohio The
money can disappear,
the fame can vanish. This
week, NFL rookies are
being reminded that the
game's hardest knocks of-
ten happen off the field.
During the league's an-
nual Rookie Symposium,
first-year players are get-
ting a crash course into ev-
erything that goes into be-
ing a professional athlete
the good, and the bad.
The NFL wants its newest
members to be prepared
not only for what awaits
them this season, but for
Sthe years ahead, especially
those days when they're
no longer making big pay-
checks or big plays.
Through various educa-
tional seminars, candid,
sometimes heartbreaking
speeches and panel dis-
cussions, players are learn-
ing the X's and 0's of life.
"It's a great opportunity
forusto be outherelearning
from players who've been
here, been in our shoes and
who are where we want to
be," said San Diego Char-
gers linebacker Manti Te'o,
the former Notre Dame star
who this year was the target
of a hoax involving a fake
girlfriend. "As we get into
the next phase of our lives,
it's a new phase, something
we're not used to, so to
keep our circle small and
remember the people who
have always been there for
you."
The AFC's rookie class
arrived in Aurora, Ohio,
on Sunday to begin the
four-day session, which
the league has constructed
as a teaching and bonding
experience. The NFC rook-
ies arrive Wednesday and
stay through Sunday.
On Monday, players at-


"He's made a lot of mistakes in his career, but he's a
guy who is still standing strong and still working
hard. He's using his past trials and tribulations to
try and help us."
Geno Smith,
New York Jets QB on Adam "Pacman" Jones


tended a seminar titled:
"Are You Bigger Than The
Game?" that featured Cin-
cinnati cornerback Adam
"Pacman" Jones and for-
mer Ohio State star run-
ning back Maurice Clarett
as speakers.
Jones recently pleaded
not guilty to a misdemean-
or assault charge and has
had other off-the-field is-
sues that led to league sus-
pensions. He talked frank-
ly about his many errors
arid warned players about
them.
"He's always been a guy
who has preached don't
do the same mistakes he's
done," said New York Jets
rookie quarterback Geno
Smith, who knows Jones
because both played at
West Virginia. "He's made
a lot of mistakes in his ca-
reer, but he's a guy who is
still standing strong and
still working hard. He's us-
ing his past trials and tribu-
lations to try and help us."
Because Jones is still an
active player and Clarett's
story is well documented,
their messages resonated
with the young players.
"Growing up, those were
the role models of their
era," Steelers linebacker
Jarvis Jones said. "Great
players, tremendous play-
ers. Just to see where
they're at it in life now and
the things they've been
through, it opened bur
eyes because we're no dif-
ferent from nobody else.
"For me, I always try


to surround myself with
positive people. I don't do
nothing negative, man. I
can make the best deci-
sions for me and my family
and my team as well. What
stuck out to me was just
some of the decisions that
they, made, clearly it was
caused by them just not
thinking about it before"
they made it."
Clarett urged the players
to stay straight. His prom-
ising pro career was de-
railed by legal troubles not
long after he helped lead
the Buckeyes to their first
national title in 34 years.
Clarett wound up serving 3
1/2 years in prison.
"His story was really
deep," said Tennessee
guard Chance Warmack
while taking a break from
teaching area school kids
some football basics on
the Browns' practice fields.
"He and Pacman remind-
ed us there are obstacles
you have to deal with as a
professional and the stan-
dards you've got to hold
yourself to because we're
not like everybody else."
Chris Herren had a more
harrowing tale.-
The former NBA player
was invited by the league
to talk of how substance
abuse nearly cost him his
life. Now sober for five
years, Herren had his audi-
ence riveted with firsthand
accounts of his perilous
road before recovery.
"He was a guy that lost
a lot," Browns linebacker


Barkevious Mingo said.
"He nearly lost his fam-
ily for the choice that he
made, and he was sitting in
the same seat that we were
saying that it wasn't going
to be him. I looked around
and everybody was paying
attention to what he had to
say because it was real.
"This was a guy that said
this wasn't going to hap-
pen to him. He's not going
to get addicted to drugs,
he's not going to spend his
money on this, he's not go-
ing to do that, but he did.
Everybody listened to that
andit made them pay more
attention to the events and
' the speakers."
On Wednesday, the AFC
players will get a history
lesson with a tour of the
Pro Football Hall of Fame
in nearby Canton. One of
the reasons the league is
holding the symposium in
northeast Ohio is its prox-
imity to football's birth-
place. It's a chance for the
players to connect with
the game's immortals who
all began as wide-eyed
rookies.
Following a two-hour
tour of the shrine, the play-
ers will have a session with
Hall of Fame cornerback
Mike Haynes. Jim Brown
was scheduled to speak
but canceled. The 77-year-
old NFL great has traveled
extensively of late and said
in a statement he needs to
rest. Brown was recently
rehired as a special adviser
by the Browns following a
separation from the team.
Bills quarterback EJ Man-
uel was most looking for-
ward to seeing the bronze
bust of his godfather, Bills
end Bruce Smith.
"I've seen the replica
one he's got at his house,"
Manuel said. "I'm going to
take a lot of pictures."


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN t www.jcfloridan.com

.,/ -' -m .W ,'- 't 1



No charges


filed against



running back

The Associated Press security because he was
wearing a plain, bright


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
Maurice Jones-Drew will
not be charged in con-
nection with an alleged
bar fight last month.
The State Aftorney's Of-
fice filed an "announce-
ment of no information"
Tuesday, saying "based on
the facts and the law, the
state cannot establish the
charge beyond and to the
exclusion of all reason-
able doubt."
Jones-Drew had been
accused of punching a
bouncer at a restaurant/
bar in St. Augustine over
Memorial Day weekend.
"Naturally I am pleased
with this result and look
forward to focusing on
football," Jones-Drew
said in a statement. "My
rehab is going well, and
I'm anxious to join my
teammates at the start of
training camp."
Jones-Drew declined to
answer questions about
the incident earlier this
month. His agent, though,
insisted his client was not
involved in an altercation
with bouncer Kasim How-
ard at the Conch House
on May 26. The bouncer's
attorney, meanwhile,
called it an "unprovoked
attack."
Attorney Patrick Canan
said Tuesday he plans
to file a civil suit against
Jones-Drew. Canan has
said that videotape evi-,
dence supported his cli-
ent's claim.
But the state attorney
said those videos did not
clearly show who was in-
volved in the altercation.
It also was unclear that
Howard was working as


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jacksonville Jaguars running back Maurice Jones-Drew
leaves the field after minicamp June 12, in Jacksonville, Fla.


NFL Notes


Cowboys DE likely on der in March after Dallas
1-year deal again put the franchise tag on
him for the second year in
IRVING, Texas Dallas a row. Spencer made $8.8
defensive endAnthony million in 2012, when he
Spencer is likely to play led the Cowboys with a ca-
a second straight season reer-high 106 tackles and
under a one-year con- had his first double-digit
tract after talks with the sack season with 11.
Cowboys failed to produce Spencer is moving from
a long-term deal. linebacker to defensive
Spencer's agent, Jordan end with the Cowboys
Woy, said Tuesday that switching to the 4-3.
both sides are happy even
without a deal. Spencer Colts to hold 1 night
said earlier this month
he wasn't worried about practice during camp
his contract situation. He INDIANAPOLIS The
can't sign a multiyear deal Indianapolis Colts' tenta-
after July 15. tive training camp sched-
The 29-year-old Spencer ule includes only one
signed a $10.6 million ten- night practice at Anderson


Follow us .


online JCFLORDANCOM
| J --- -- -^ JCFLORIDANCOM


University this summer.
Players report July 27
and begin workouts with a
morning walkthrough the
next day. The first workout
open to the public is set
for July 28 at 1:50 p.m.
The team will typically
hold closed workouts in
the morning and after-
noon practices that will
be open to the public,
according to the schedule
released Tuesday morn-
ing. Indianapolis will wrap


up training camp follow-
ing an open practice from
10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on
Aug. 16.
The only scheduled
night practice is set for
Aug. 6 from 6:30 to 8:55
p.m. The night practices
usually draw the biggest
crowds.
This is the fourth
consecutive year the
Colts have held camp at
Anderson.
From wire reports


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green shirt while the rest
of the security staff was
wearing orange tops.
"It is not clear in the vid-
eo if K. Howard grabbed,
or struck from behind,
what appears to be an-
other black male," the
report said. "It appears
as though K. Howard was
struck and knocked down
a very short time after
grabbing this unknown
black male. It is not evi-
dent who struck K. How-
ard based on this video."
In one of two videos re-
leased Tuesday, Howard is
seen scuffling with sever-
al people. He removes his
shirt as security personnel
carry others away from
the crowded deck. A sec-
ond video shows Jones-
Drew and another man
exiting the bar, escorted
by employees wearing
orange shirts. Howard fol-
lows about a minute later.
The incident happened
days after Jones-Drew
decided to skip organized
team activities to work
out on his own in Miami.
Jones-DrewhadLisfranc
surgery on his left foot in
December, spent several
months in a walking boot
and. was unable to fully
run until recently.
He was admittedly out
of shape when the team's
offseason program began
in April, but looked to-be
in considerably better
shape when he returned
for a three-day minicamp
earlier this month.
Jones-Diew has 7,268
yards rushing, 2,559 yards
receiving and 76 total
touchdowns in seven
years with the team.







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Clippers finalize



Doe Rivers' move



away from Boston


The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES After weeks
of negotiations and intrigue,
Doc Rivets has officially left the
Boston Celtics for the Los Ange-
les Clippers.
Rivers will be introduced as
the Clippers' new coach and se-
nior vice president of basketball
operations at a news confer-
ence Wednesday at their Playa
Vista training complex, capping
a lengthy process by completing
a rare trade involving a champi-
onship-winning coach.
The Clippers and Celtics fi-
nalized the move Tuesday when
the NBA approved the deal.
Boston will get an unprotected
first-round pick in 2015 from
the Clippers for Rivers, who
went 416-305 and won the 2008
NBA title during nine seasons
with the Celtics.
Boston's front office mostly
had warm words for Rivers after
he took off for his exciting new
team on the West Coast, appar-
ently not eager to stick around
for the aging Celtics' rebuilding
process.
"We, don't have a champion7
ship without Doc Rivers coach-
ing," said Danny Ainge, the
Celtics' president of basketball
operations. "He did an unbe-
lievable job. He has a long his-
tory of great success with us in
the last nine years, and we wish
him the best in Los Angeles."
Rivers is likely to be the NBA's
highest-paid coach with the
deal, and he'll also have a prom-
inent role in the Clippers' front
office with his additional title.
Clippers owner Donald Ster-
ling will expect impressive re-
sults for such an investment,
but his long-suffering franchise
has never been in better shape
on the court providing Los
Angeles re-signs Chris Paul, who
is eligible for a five-year con-
tract worth nearly $108 million
in July. Paul is widely expected
to stick with the Clippers, and
,Rivers' arrival might clinch the
deal.



Belles
From Page 1B
and went three innings to get
the win, with Allie Leigh closing
it out with scoreless fourth and
fifth innings.
Avriett also got the start in
Saturday's game against Frank-
lin County and went all seven
innings to earn the victory, and
came back Sunday and went


With Boston likely to spend
the next few years revamping,
Rivers seized the chance to take
over one of the league's most
compellingyoung
teams. He was
eagerly pursued
by the Clippers,
who are com-
ing off the best
regular season in
Rivers franchise history
with a roster built
around Blake Griffin arid Paul..
"He felt like it was time for a
change," Ainge said. "He felt like
we all needed a change. That
was his rationalization or justifi-
cation for going to the Clippers,
that this was better for every-
body. I don't think there should
be any resentment. I know how
Boston fans are. This may be a
win-win for everybody."
The 51-year-old Rivers replac-
es Vinny Del Negro, who wasn't
re-signed after the Clippers won
a franchise-record 56 games
and their first Pacific Division
title last season.
Los Angeles' first-round play-
off loss to Memphis likely cost
Del Negro, who went 128-102
over three years and became
the only Clippers coach to post
consecutive winning seasons in
35 years.
Rivers' new deal is expected
to be similar to the three years
and $21 million that remained
on his contract with the Celt-
ics. Boston was knocked out of
the first round of the playoffs
by New York last month, and
Rivers gradually became more
interested in the Clippers' va-
cancy than the Celtics' rebuild-
ing process.
The negotiations for Riv-
ers proceeded deliberately
and abruptly over the past
two weeks, with several po-
tential moves discussed by the
franchises.
Ainge would have welcomed
Rivers back to the Boston
bench, but Rivers apparently
saw the Clippers as a golden
opportunity.


five innings in the loss.
In Sunday's final game, Leigh
started in the circle and went
the distance. Despite the loss,
Ranew said he was proud of the
run through the tournament
that his team made.
"I think they played the best
they played this whole season,"
the coach said. "They just came
together and played an awe-
some tournament. They were
really outstanding."


Inbee Park hopes to win



third straight major title


The toughest test in
women's golf would figure
to be a piece of cake for
the No. 1 player in the world.
She already had six wins,
and the LPGA Tour season was
barely at the halfway point. She
stamped her dominance by
winning the first two majors of
the year. The gap between her
and the next best player was
even larger than what Tiger
Woods enjoyed in men's golf.
Her swing was reliable. And she
had the experience as a past
U.S. Women's Open champion.
If she had a weakness,. it wasn't
apparent.
A third straight major almost
seemed inevitable.
But it didn't work out that way
in 2005 for Annika Sorenstam.
She tried to ignore a month of
hype only for jangled nerves
to join her on the first tee at
Cherry Hills. She was behind
from the opening round, and
the harder she tried, the farther
behind she fell.
"It was a lot of pressure,"
Sorenstam recalled last week
about her bid for the Grand
Slam. "I wanted to not neces-
sarily ignore it, but I was trying
to not let it get to me. I wanted
to just focus. It's another major.
It's the U.S. Open, and at the
time, I had won two before. And
I thought, 'I can do this.'"
She can appreciate better than
most what Inbee Park faces this
week.
The 24-year-old South Korean
didn't win the first two majors
as convincingly as Sorenstam
did in 2005, but she won them.
Park is coming off back-to-
back wins, including the LPGA
Championship in a playoff, to
widen her lead at No. 1 in the
world. She won the Women's
Open just five years ago at
Interlachen.
"I'm looking forward to see-
ing how Inbee handles this,"
Sorenstam said. "She has the
major experience and she's
the No. 1 player in the world,
so she's not necessarily brand
new in this role.... We'll see how
she handles Sebonack and the
conditions that await."
Sorenstam didn't make it
clear if she was talking about
external conditions such as
wind coming off Atlantic waters
on Long Island -- or whatever
emotions are roiling inside Park.
The U.S. Women's Open starts
Thursday at Sebonack Golf
Club, and Park is the latest to
challenge history.
Sorenstam was only the most
recent player who tried and
failed to win three straight
majors to start out the season.
Woods had a chance in 2002


until he was blown away by the
wind, cold and rain of Muirfield
on Saturday of the British Open.
Pat Bradley was going for three
straight in 1986,
but she shot 76 in
the first round of
the U.S. Women's
Open and never
caught up. Jack
Doug Nicklaus was
oerguson n the verge of
ergfUSOn winning three
straight majors
in 1972 until Lee Trevino beat
him at Muirfield. Arnold Palmer,
who created the modern ver-
sion of the Grand Slam in 1960,
lost out by a shot to Kel Nagle
that year at St.Andrews.
The last player to start the sea-
son by winning three straight
majors was Babe Zaharias in
1950, back when the LPGA Tour
only had three majors. Ben Ho-
gan won all three he could play
in 1953, when the PGA Cham-
pionship was held at the same
time as British Open qualifying.
It's different now.
Sorenstam said of Park, "I've
been in her shoes," but only as
it relates to her bid to win three
straight majors. Sorenstam
was going after the Grand Slam
in 2005. The LPGA Tour now
counts the Evian Masters, which
gives it five majors. Trouble
is, a grand slam only scores
four runs: Or as Jeff Sluman so
famously said in 2003, "When
you go to Denny's and order
the Grand Slam breakfast, they
don't give you five things, do
they? They give you four."
What do you call winning
five majors in one year? That's
a question Park would love to
have someone answer.
The next stop is Sebonack,
whether nothing figures to be
easy not the course, not the
competition, not the pressure.
"I think there is no way that
you won't feel the pressure,"
Park said Tuesday. "Because you
will always feel the pressure. But
it's just the more you experience
it, you just feel it a little less and
less over the time. Now when
I'm in the position where I am,
and when I'm in the winning
position and I've been there
a lot it's just knowing what I
have to do. I think that's been a
bighelp for me."
A bigger help is how she's
playing:
"This is the best I'm playing in
my career so far," Park said. "I'm
trying to keep this going."
Park is coming off a year in
which she won the money
title, and she is happy to see
her game get even better. She
replaced Stacy Lewis at No. 1 in
the world just over twp months


",lr ;-. _- *. ..

'. ..4

THEASSOCIATED PRESS
South Korean Inbee Park won the
first two majors of the year.

ago, and thereghas been nothing
to suggest she is ready to give it
back.
What might help her in this
case is her lack of experience
compared to the other players
going for three in a row.
Bradley was 35 and Sorens-
tam was 34 when she went to
the U.S. Women's Open try-
ing for three straight majors.
Sorenstam seemed to be fully
equipped for the moment. She
had played on the PGATour at
Colonial only two years earlier.
She stated her goal at the start
of the year was to win the Grand
Slam.
Park is still young enough to
see only. the next shot instead of
wondering where it might lead.
"I've watched her a lot on TV,
and she's very calm. She does
not get rattled," Bradley said.
"That's the key, to keep your
mind calm and just get out of
your own way. Youth might
serve her very well. Annika and
I knew the history of it, the
importance of it. We knew the
buzz that would be created.
This young lady, I'm not sure. It
might be to her benefit to take it
as a regular tournament. Don't
look at the signage that says,
'U.S. Open.' Just look at the
hole. Just do your thing."
Bradley believes it will hap-
pen. She sees a player dominat-
ing the game, at least in the first
part of the season. She sees a
simple, repeatable swing. She
sees a calm hand over the big
putts. She sees' no reason why
another LPGA major will end
on Sunday with someone other
than Park holding the trophy.
Then again, she has seen this
before.
"But I thought Annika was
going to do it a few years ago,"
Bradley said, "and that didn't
quite happen."


Darlings
From Page 1B
Marianna got a run back
in the top of the fifth on an
RBI hit by Jasmine Bess to
bring in Standiford, but
that was as close as Mari-
anna would get.
"We got off to a slow start
as usual, but we turned it
on halfway through the
game and were able to pull
it off," Sneads coach Travis
Howell said: "We were real
excited. We knew coming
into that last game that
Marianna had just beaten
Wewa to get them into
the championship game,
and they were on a roll.


We knew after the first and
second innings that we
had to hit the ball to keep
up with them.
"Fortunately, their
bats slowed down as the
game went on and ours
maintained."
The win means that
Sneads will get to move
on to the Darlings state
tournament in Brooksville
starting July 5.
Unfortunately for the
Marianna All Stars, the dis-
trict runner-up in youth
softball does not get to go
to state like in youth base-
ball, meaning their season
is over.
. "It's tough for us because
I think we have a very com-


"We got off to a slow
start as usual, but we
turned it on halfway
through the game."
Travis Howell,
Sneads coach

petitive team that could've
done well down there,"
Marianna coach Charlene
Beebe said of her team.
"But some days, little girls
have a hard time keeping it
all together and making the
plays. We made a bunch
(in Sunday's 7-1 win over
Wewahitchka to advance
to the title game), and we
unfortunately didn't make


as many as Sneads in the
second game.
"They just out-hit us by a
couple of hits. They made
some defensive plays
when it really counted
and stopped some of our
rallies. We. tip our caps to
them. It was a war of attri-
tion, and they won it."
Taylor-Reese Howell and
Benton each had three hits
to lead the Sneads team,
with Grammer, Arnold,
Howell, and Coulliette
scoring two runs each.
For Marianna, Brown,
Standiford, and Fowler
all had three hits, while
Brown, Rooks, Lexie
Spooner, and Standiford
scored two runs each.


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FALL 2013 REGISTRATION
NEW & RETURNING STUDENTS
JULY 9-11 and AUG 14-16
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SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 4 3Br







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Miami Heat


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami's LeBron James motions to the fans during a parade honoring the NBA champions as Juwan Howard (right) looks on
Monday in Miami.



James says he's not




thinking about 2014 yet


The Associated Press

MIAMI LeBron James
has this summer on his
mind, and is starting to
plan for next season.
The summer of 2014, that
can wait.
James said Tuesday that
he is not thinking about
the possibility of becoming
a free agent in 12 months,
though he did acknowl-
edge that the prospects of
competing with Dwyane
Wade, Chris Bosh, Erik
Spoelstra and Pat Riley
for several more champi-
onships with the Miami
Heat is more than a tiny bit
intriguing.
"That's the goal," James
said. "That's the ultimate
finish. And we all hope that
can happen, obviously."
James' final interview
session of this season re-
vealed plenty in 17 min-
utes, including that he's
already feeling an itch to
get back on the basket-
ball court after just a few
days off, that he'll stop at
nothing to give longtime


girlfriend Savannah Brin-
son anything she wants
on their wedding day in a
couple months, and that
he's making no secret of his
hope that the Heat bring
back at least the majority
of this year's champion-
ship roster.
The most interesting
news, however, was when
he spoke of his short- and
long-term plans. First, he's
vowing to come back bet-
ter next season, which is no
small promise from some-
one with four MVP awards,
two Finals MVP awards
and who carries the tag of
"best player in the world."
And then next summer, it
certainly sounds as if he's
going to give the prospects
of staying in Miami a good,,
long look.
"This is what we came
here for, so that would be
the ultimate," James said.
"Butyou can never... I don't
know, life changes, things
happen, and we have to be
prepared for that. But this
is what we all want to be
here for, that's to be able to


compete for a champion-
ship each and every year.
And if we can do.that, then
it'd be awesome."
James scored 37 points
in Game 7 of the NBA Fi-
nals against San Antonio,
carrying the Heat to their
second straight champion-
ship in a season where he
picked up his fourth MVP
award. He's gotten to the
championship series in all
three of his seasons with
Miami, falling,to Dallas in
2011, then beating Okla-
homa City last season and
the Spurs this year.
The team gathered for
physical and a quick
meeting on Tuesday, and
now begins the process of
scattering for vacation and
other business. James will
make his annual trip with
Nike to China next month,
not long after Wade does
some business there.
And already, James
sounds like he's missing
the group that he spent the
past nine months with.
"It's like, 'Damn, I wish
we could come back in the


locker room, have anoth-
er practice, take another
flight, have another bus
ride with those 15 guys,'"
James said. "That's what it's
all about. You miss the guys
throughout the summer. I
know my family probably
doesn't want to hear that,
but it's the truth."
It was not a Finals with-
out speed bump's for
James, who failed to score
20 points in any of the first
three games against the
Spurs. And after Miami lost
Game 5 in San Antonio,
James had to prepare with-
out one of his most faithful
sounding boards.
Maverick Carter, James'
longtime friend and per-
haps his most trusted con-
fidant, wouldn't talk with
him for days after Game
5, other than challenging
him by saying that great
players have to be great in
the biggest moments.
James responded with 32
points, 10 rebounds and 11
assists in Game 6, then the
37-point outburst in Game


NBA the pro sports leader in diversity


Shaw the new



head coach



in Denver


The Associated Press

DENVER The Denver
Nuggets officially intro-
duced Brian Shaw as their
head coach on Tuesday.
Shaw steps in for George
Karl, the NBA Coach of
the Year who was ousted
after the team won a fran-
chise-record 57 games,
only to be bounced from
the first round of the play-
offs for the fourth straight
season.
A longtime assistant,
Shaw finally gets his
chance to coach an NBA
team. He's been mentored
by the likes of Phil Jack-
son and was the associate
head coach for Indiana
during the season that
just ended, when the Pac-
ers made it to the Eastern
Conference finals before
being eliminated by LeB-
ron James and the Miami
Heat in seven games.
A first-round draft pick
by the Boston Celtics in
1988, Shaw played for
eight teams in his 14 NBA
seasons. He captured
three championships as a
player with the Los Ange-
les Lakers and two more
titles with L.A. as an assis-
tant under Jackson.
The 47-year-old Shaw
has been interviewed for
quite a few head coaching
vacancies over the years
only to be passed up -
until Monday. Shaw beat
out Lionel Hollins, the
former Memphis Grizzlies


coach.
This may have played a
part in the decision: With
the Pacers, Shaw played
an integral part in devel-
oping young players such
as Paul George. The Nug-
gets are youthful, boast-
ing the third-youngest
team in the league last
season.
It's been a tumultuous
offseason for the Nuggets
since a first-round loss
to the Golden State War-
riors. First, general man-
ager Masai Ujiri the
league's Executive of the
Year bolted from Den-
ver to become the GM of
the Toronto Raptors.
On the heels of that,
Denver severed ties with
Karl after he led the Nug-
gets to nine straight
playoff appearances and
a 423-257 mark in the
regular season. His big-
gest issue was the open-
ing round, with his teams
losing eight times in those
nine appearances.
Under Karl, the Nuggets
were an up-tempo team
that liked to wear out op-
ponents, especially in the
thin air of the Mile High
City, where they went an
NBA-best 38-3 at home in
2012-13.
Although Shaw has been
heavily influenced by the
teachings of Jackson and
his triangle offense, Shaw
has said he won't use that
type of system with the
Nuggets.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS'
The Denver Nuggetts introduced former Indiana Pacers
assistant Brian Shaw as their new coach Tuesday.

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The Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. The
NBA remains the industry
leader among men's pro-
fessional sports leagues for
racial and gender hiring
practices, according to a
study released Tuesday,
The University of Central
Florida's Institute for Di-
versity and Ethics in Sport
gave the NBA an A in a re-
port on its hiring practic-
es, with an A+- in the race
category.
The league slipped from
an A- to a B+ in gender hir-
ing practices, but scored
an overall mark of 90.7.
"There's no question
that the NBA has been for
almost 20 years now the
leader among men's sports
when it comes to racial
and gender hiring practic-


es," said Richard Lapchick,
the primary author of the
report.
Using data from the 2012-
13 season, TIDES found
that African-Americans
made up 43.3 percent of all
NBA head coaches, and set
a record last season with
45.6 percent of all assistant
coaches being of color.
According to the study,
35.7 percent of all profes-
sional employees in the
NBA are people of color
and 41.1 percent are wom-
en at the league office.
Lapchick said NBA Com-
missioner David Stern,
who will step down in 2014,
has embraced the moral
imperative for diversity.
"I think he's charted a
course from the time he
Took over," said the 67-
year-old Lapchick. "I'm


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old enough where I was
around at the point and
a lot of people were criti-
cizing the NBA for being
quote, unquote too black.
They were referring to the
players at the time. But
David Stern was right from
the start someone who.said
we're going to put the best
players on the court and
the best people in the front
offices. And I think the re-
sult is what the NBA is to-
day in terms of racial and
gender hiring practices.
"It will be interesting to
see if ufinder (Stern's future
replacement) Adam Sil-
ver that leadership level


continues. I fully expect it
will."
On the court, African-
Americans comprise 76.3
percent of all NBA players,
and that 81 percent were
people of color.
According to the study
are four African-Ameri-
can chief executive offi-
cers and presidents in the
NBA. There are no Latinos,
Asians, or those classified
as "others" in CEO/presi-
dent positions. Sacramen-
to's Matina Kolokotronis
was the NBAs only woman
president as of the be-
ginning'of the 2012-2013
season.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chicago's Jonathan Toews hoists the Stanley Cup after defeating the Boston Bruins 3-2 in Game 6 to win the Stanley Cup Finals
on Monday in Boston.


Blackhawks look toward




another Stanley Cup win


Stunning loss



sends Bruins


into offseason


The Associated Press

BOSTON Don't tell
David Krejci that adver-
sity makes you stronger.
Certainly not the shock-
ing kind that left the Bos-
ton Bruins wondering
how a night of hope be-
came, in a mere 17 sec-
onds, a long summer of
disappointment.
That's all the time the
Chicago Blackhawks
needed to score two goals
in the last 76 seconds and
win the Stanley Cup with
a 3-2 victory on Monday
night. For the Bruins,
Sunday's NHL draft, not
a seventh and deciding
game in Chicago, is, the
next big event.
"It's not even a point to
say that it's going to make
us stronger in the future,"
said Krejci, the top scorer
in this year's playoffs. "It's
going to hurt for a while."
What went wrong?
"I don't know what hap-
pened," the Bruins cen-
ter said. "It just did, you
know?"
Management, though,
must push on through the
pain.
The Bruins have no first-
round draft pick. They
sent that to the Dallas
Stars on April 2 for Jaromir
Jagr, who had no goals in


the playoffs. He did have
10 assists but was limited
in Game 6 by injury
They do have key play-
ers who could become
free agents goalie Tu-
ukka Rask, right wing Na-
than Horton, defenseman
Andrew Ference plus
Jagr and backup goalie
Anton Khudobin.
Rask emerged as one of
the NHL's top goalies with
a strong postseason. Hor-
ton had seven goals and
12 assists in the playoffs,
but no goals and two as-
sists against Chicago. Fe-
rence is a 13-year veteran
and could be supplanted
by Torey Krug or Matt
Bartkowski. Both showed
promise as rookies.
Rask is the most im-
portant member of that
group. He played 36 of
48 games in the lockout-
shortened season and all
22 playoff games. He was
a worthy successor to
Tim Thomas, the MVP of
the 2011 postseason who
took this season off rath-
er than try for a second
championship in three,
years.
Boston had 17 play-
ers from the team that
won the Cup in 2011.
There shouldn't be much
turnover this offseason,
either.


.The Associated Press

CHICAGO When
Rocky Wirtz' took over
the Chicago Blackhawks
six years ago, they were
among the worst teams in
the NHL.
Fast forward to Tuesday,
when the owner mingled
with fans and friends hours
after the Blackhawks flew
home with the Stanley Cup
for the second time in four
seasons. It's been quite the
turnaround, and the 60-
year-old Wirtz thinks there
is more to come.
"I think we're going to see
a lot of goodyears ahead of
us," he said.
It sure looks that way.
Unlike in 2010, when the
title-winning team un-
derwent changes because
of salary-cap issues, the
Blackhawks will be able to
bring back many of their
top players next season
when they try to become
the first repeat Stanley Cup
winner since the Detroit
Red Wings in 1998.
Forwards Jonathan
Toews, Patrick Kane, Mari-
an Hossa andPatrickSharp,


and defensemen Duncan
Keith and Brent Seabrook
are all under contract for
at least two more seasons.
Brandon Saad, one of the
finalists for the Calder Tro-
phy given to the NHL's top
rookie, is years away from
restricted free agency.
"I think there's something
about our core," said Kane,
who won the Conn Smythe
Trophy as MVP of the play-
offs. "Hopefully we can
stay together a long time,
because that's two Cups in
four years, and we seem to
only be getting better and
better as players as time
goes on here."
The Blackhawks lost in
the first round of the play-
offs in each of the previous
two seasons, but general
manager Stan. Bowman
decided to stay the course..
He kept Joel Quennev-
ille in place even though
the coach was hired by
his predecessor, Dale Tal-
lon. Corey Crawford was
given time to develop in
goal, and he rewarded the
organization's patience
with a terrific performance
in this year's playoffs. Kane


matured into one of the
NHL's top players.
AskWirtz and team pres-
ident John McDonough
about the Blackhawks'
turnaround, and their
response often includes
some variation of hire the
right people and then stay
out of the way. The steady
leadership in the front of-
fice is one of the reasons
Chicago is the first fran-
chise with two titles since
the NHL instituted a salary
cap in 2005.
"I think Stan Bowman
and Al MacIsaac and Norm
Maciver and everybody in
our hockey operations, they
do a meticulous job," Mc-
Donough said, "and they've
been planning for this off-
season as we did before for
months and months, so
we'll be ready for it.
"We're going to do ev-
erything we can and try to
keep as many of these guys
as we can and just keep
this rolling."
But with the salary cap
dropping to $64.3 million
next season, it's going to
be next to impossible for
the Blackhawks to bring


everyone back.
According to CapGeek.
com, forwards Bryan Bick-
ell, Michal Handzus, Viktor
Stalberg and Jamal Mayers,
defenseman Michal Roz-
sival and goalie Ray Emery
are eligible for unrestricted
free agency.
Bickell is likely headed
for abig pay daythatwould
put him out of Chicago's
reach unless it decides to
shed salary to make room
for the physical winger.
The 6-foot-4 Bickell had
nine goals and eight assists
in the playoffs, including
the tying score at the end
of the third period in the
Blackhawks' title-clinch-
ing 3-2 victory at Boston
on Monday night.
StalbergandEmeryprob-
ably won't be back, as well.
Stalberg was -in and out
of the lineup during the
playoffs after he had nine
goals and 14 assists in his
third season with Chicago.
With Crawford's emer-
gence, Emery didn't make
a postseason appearance,
and the Blackhawks also
signed Antti Raanta of Fin-
land in June.


Chicago fans celebrate another title


The Associated Press

CHICAGO The Chi-
cago Blackhawks brought
the Stanley Cup home
Tuesday and proceeded
to take it on a pub crawl,
with scores of ecstatic fans
flocking to taverns and
restaurants in hopes of
catching a glimpse of their
beloved players and the
sacred trophy awarded to
the NHL champion.
Many fans, bleary eyed
from staying up the night
before to watch Game
6, looked to the skies for
TV news helicopters that
would alert them they
were on the right track.
Others set themselves up
at bars, hoping the rumors
from friends or Twitter
might turn out to be true.
"We've been packed
since 7 this morning."
said Brad Tice, general
manager of The Pony on
Chicago's North Side. "In
2010 (the last time the
Blackhawks won the cup)
it came here, and players
hang out here and live in
the neighborhood, so ev-
eryone is hoping it will
show up."
In suburban Oak Brook,
fans descended on a res-
taurant said to be a fa-
vorite spot of Blackhawks
coach Joel Quenneville.


By midafternoon, the cup
hadn't shown up at either
spot.
The trophy that turns
into a drinking buddy
once it is awarded to the
National Hockey League
champions had already
put in a pretty full day.
Though it hadn't made it
to the runway of a strip
club or the bottom of a
swimming pool just two
of the many places 'that
players have taken it over
the years it did make
the rounds, stopping at


two restaurants and the
United Center, where the
Blackhawks play, and a
downtown steakhouse.
"I'm shaking, that was
so cool," said 21-year-old
Anne Fernandez after she
reached out and touched
the cup as Blackhawks
President and CEO John
McDonough pulled it out
of a black SUV in front 'of
Phil Stefani's restaurant
and held it aloft as so many
players had on the ice in
Boston the night before
after their series-clinching


SeAarch Did00 's of ho m alels]iin

77~ David Malloy


ur,:: r-850-258-4947
,LUDORLD IMPNF:RCT
:9 R e i Eo s a c e
Ei-,,iii dlmalloyJ/ahoo.com L a,


IIRSI BAPTIST


SUNDAY: WEDNESDAY:
Sunday School: 9:30 AM Fellowship Supper: 4:15 PM
Morning Worship: 10:45 AM Children's Choir. 4:45 PM
Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Bible Study: 6:00 PM
www.fbcmarianna.org


win over the Bruins.
Fernandez showed uip
after a rumor showed up
on Twitter, while others
got their tips from friends
- though nobody knew
where this intelligence
was coming from.
"I got an .email that said
if I wanted to see the cup
to be at 437 (the address
of the steakhouse) in 15
minutes," said Carrie Wil-
liams, a 28-year-old mag-
azine editor, who did not
know how the emailer got
that information.


JACKSON, COUNIvT-


flORIDAN


Recording

JadkStOfCottty

( 1 -History


S Days a Week

7 J Get Started Today!
f O :Call (850) 526-3614
www.jcfloridan.com


Alr0


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26,2013 v 5B F


STANLEY CUP FILS


I


fc








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


BORN LOSER BYARTAND CHIP SANSOM
RE-PROR.TYOU 5ue~lTTUi I ^' TM WN FULL OF 5UPE-.FLUOUS I EWPRESSIOI,'(OU O'TTKNOW SAEA 's FWUOUS, UT /
Il.FOPlON1 A- Tl TE AfNIN6OF VE E.TTEK!
I 5UPEP.9LU00 "' ,


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
'A :, ( He S mOe a Me a tc
We u.NT To VIf-( 1^1 m y L H E 6 Male HOMe-
OLDeR COUEIM iNveRMort M ape BUBBLe-.GOm,
4t-USr PAS-T kteeD. '
1,,>> ^^^.^^,^-^^ '1\., (t);/V J I *


L 6 J ,.' ,-, "

FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES

FHI4..O,.5oFHY
__PAfT/MvCT
L J PAYS WITHOuT A
LoGICAJ. FALL--ACY




GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR
T %Y'I TIZE 1 4 Mi6 To K j M1 fA f I[
\fk'4o'P AT -MtI AUPlTokUM ThIS M ?UMIA5 h-k -


ALLEY OOP BYJACK AND CAROLE BENDER


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


-16B WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


ACROSS
1 Dust bunny
5 Perfor-
mance
8 Urchin
12 Asian nanny
13- tai
14Half of A.D.
15 Hunter's
garb
16Train
18 Sound a
bell
20 Gold, in
Peru
21 Refrain
syllables
22 Examine
25 "Little
piggie"
28 Motown's
Diana -
29 Heavy
hydrogen
discoverer
33 Flat-
bottomed
boats
35Greek
marketplace
36 Wedges
37 Delegate
38 Purple
shade
39 Evening
wear
41 Record
42Snuggled


Answer to Previous Puzzle

HI AUE H
P|EEBLyUEiB|EL
A E S
HI Hw

Y WE
LE-AT DETE^CT
PEIG BR E B;A)
NN ELLECIEL
S Y. DNE AIRE0
OSU KANo

I SA1A PE_(R(
,D~~ AOEV E
O DEN]S E
PDBATVH
io~s~pE~tIA


45 Long time
48 Bolt mate
49 White-water
transport
53 More
stylish
56 Cyrus'
realm, today
57 Yield
58 Part of TNT
59 Singer
Hornme
60 Nylons
61 FICA
funds it
62 Safecracker

DOWN
1 Shortage
2 Somalian
supermodel
3 Identify
4 Oar pin
5 Rock band
need
6 Chocolate
substitutes
7 Diadems
8 Angkor -
9 Dye-
yielding
plant
10lCuzco
founder
11 Enemies
17 Mil. rank
19 Ancient
harps


40 Frisky
mammals
43 Finale
44 Diurnal
45 Write on
glass
46 Sandwich
cookie
47Jarrett and
Sparks
50 Without
charge
51 Zingy taste
52 Pitfall
54 Bridal
notice
word
55 Narrow
inlet


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzlc-s" books
at OulllDrlverBjook. r.Ijrri


6-26 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
"SBGZYMGYHV SKBBZXGE YKT HTZZTL

BN YJB TIXHZ XZ ZYXHH SKBBZXGE

TIXH." OTLLV EMLSXM


Previous Solution: "Here is a sovereign talisman against regret: never do that
which might engender it." David Mamet

TODAY'S CLUE: A slenbe Il
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 6-26 .


23 Aurora, to
Plato
24 Schleps
25 Cookbook
qty.
26 Maui
Neighbor
27 Ambler or
Clapton
30 Muddy the
waters
31 Proof word
32 Yin
complement
34 Feds (hyph.)
35 "Lou
Grant" lead
37 Cobbler's
tool
39 Astronauts'
wear (hyph,)


Arvde 's
W 1 S T.''O^? ..-.., i-'Si


Dear Annie: We live in a quiet family
neighborhood. Recently, a neighbor tried
to locate the owner of a rental home next
door in order to discuss a shared fence
issue. When our neighbor could find no
contact information through the city
department of housing, he searched the
Internet. He was shocked to discover that
for the past 10 years, the owners have
had a porn site registered at that rental
home address. None of us wants a porn
site associated with our neighborhood.
How should we handle this?
NO NAME OR LOCATION, PLEASE

Dear No Name: While we certainly
understand your moral objections, these
owners seem to be running a legal opera-
tion. Most web-based or home-based
businesses are fine unless there are
customers or employees coming to the
house. There may be a requirement to
have a business license, but that's about
it. You can contact a lawyer in your city
to find out whether there are other pos-
sibilities, but we suspect there is nothing
you can do, legally, about this. Sorry.


Bridge players usually know the goal of a -
deal. For each side, it is to win a certain num-
ber of tricks. How should East try to defeat
three no-trump after West leads a fourth-high-
est diamond two?
Many players are under the influence of
"return partner's suit." They would win the W
first trick with the diamond ace and lead back A
the diamond eight. Even if West were psychic,
taking South's queen with his king and shifting
to a club, declarer would have nine tricks via
three spades, four hearts, one diamond and .
one club. A more thoughtful East would do
some analysis. What does West's diamond-two
lead signify?
That he has exactly four diamonds. So how
many does South have? Five and it is rarely
right for the defenders to attack declarer's
longest suit.
Here,,East should win with his ace, then
switch to the club king. With this layout, the
contract should now fail. South will take the
second club and lead a sneaky diamond jack,
but West can grab that trick and lead his last
club, giving the defenders two diamonds and
three clubs.
Play by thought, not by rote.


Dear Annie: I share a small workspace
with someone who constantly coughs,
sneezes, clears her throat, blows her nose
and grunts. Worse, she never covers her
mouth, so I am surrounded by airborne
germs all day. It's extremely annoying
and interferes with my ability to concen-
trate on my work.
I have offered cough drops and antihis-
tamines, which she has refused. I suffer
from allergies, as well, but try to keep my
symptoms to myself. I have talked to my
boss, but she won't deal with it. Other
co-workers are unwilling to switch desks
with me. What do you suggest?
HAD IT WITH THE HACKING

Dear Had It: First, be more direct with
this co-worker, explaining your discom-
fort and asking her to please cover her
nose and mouth. If that doesn't help, can
you complain to the human resources
department or a higher-up? Is it possible
to move your desk? Would you be willing
to wear a surgical mask or filter? Aller-
gies can't always be helped, but people
should be considerate of one another.


CANCER (June 21-July
22) -You can make this
remarkable day by doing
everything in accor-
dance with your highest
standards.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Even though you might
do your utmost to conceal
your tender inclinations,
you won't be able to help
being wonderfully chari-
table toward your friends.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Someone who
holds you in high esteem
might work on your behalf
without your knowledge
to make something easier
for you. Be sure to pay it
forward.'
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Something that appears
to be difficult, even mys-
terious, will be a piece of
cake to you. Don't hesitate
to show your stuff.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -A person you've re-
cently met is very afixious
to get to know you better.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -An associate
who has been extremely
helpful to you in the past
can be of assistance.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -*A If you are lucky
enough to get involved
with someone whose
objectives closely parallel
yours, both you and this
person will have an easier
time achieving your goals.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -When something
important has to be nego-
tiated, keep in mind that
the other party is just as
eager to reach an under-
standing as you are.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -Your associates will
sense your strength. Real-
ize that you don't have to
be aggressive to get your
way.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -Thoughtful things
you do for your mate or
special someone will not
go unnoticed or unappre-
ciated. Try your hardest to
help others.
'TAURUS (April 20-May
20) If at all possible,
entertain at your place,
where friends feel wel-
come and relaxed.'
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -A gentle reminder
should do the trick to get
something that you loaned
to another returned.


North 06-26-13
A Q65
K KQ98
S43
6 6532
est East
832 4 10974
643 V 7 5 2
K10 7 2 -- A8
874 KKQJ9
South
# AKJ
V A J 10
Q J 9 6 5
A 10

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
2 NT Pass 3 Pass
34 Pass 3NT All pass

Opening lead: 2


6-26 C LaughngStcck Itemratoal nc. Osw by Un versal UCIck for UFS, 2013


ENTERTAINVIENT






CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, June 26, 2013- 7 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN' PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors Is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors In advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error Is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. Ahl advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

I r IaI tvc


ANNOUNCEMENTS


SDOWN SIZING! antiques & collectibles
Marked "BC" 30 % discount of furntiure,
40% discount on misc. See at Backyard
Treasure 2331 Ross Clark Circle.


[$)


FINANCIAL


I BUSINESSOPPORUN


Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com

Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
504-915-1474

|) MERCHANDISE


DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
NEEDED I BUY SEALED/
UNEXPIRED BOXES
CALL BOB (334) 219-4697
OR (850) 710-0189

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Generator: Tahoe Diesel Generator
TPI7000LXH. New, never Used. Remote start,
single cylinder vertical four stroke air cooled
direct injection. $2,000. Call 251-254-0093
GENERALS PECIA a OTES6


RETIREES
HOUSEWIVES
STUDENTS
We have contracts available -
Are you?
If you are,
then you can earn
EXTRA CA$H
Ask about our sign on bonus
JACK'r';i rnVlr'TY

FLORIDAN
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32448
850-526-3614


LAWN&lGARE NJEQUI 1 MEN
Riding Lawn Mower, Troy-Bilt Pony 17.5 HP
Manual 42-in cutting deck with Briggs Stratton
Engine, 7-speed Shift-on-the-Go, automatic,
rear baggers. $695 cash, sorry no checks.
937-554-8035

4-Wheeler: 110cc fun for all. $900 new, will -
take $500 OBO. Must sell. 5 yrs. old, hardly
used. Call Steve @ 334.796.1724
r ........................... "
ANNE'S DAYLILIES *i
827 S. APPLETREE ST
Dothan, Daylilies ($1- up)
334-792-0653 or 334-797-9657
Free Perennial with purchase! -'
L .....................
STOP GNAT, FLY, & MOSQUITO BITES!
Buy Swamp Gator Natural
Insect Repellent.
Family and Pet Safe
Available at The Home Depot

Alto Saxophone: Nearly new. Barely used.
$900 new. $500 OBO. Grab it before band
camp!!! Has a scratch, plays great.
Call Steve @ 334.796.1724
Baby Grand Piano: Sohmer & Company "1959"
Model 57 in mint condition, purchased in
2003 after minor restorations and very little
play, but has been continuously tuned. Ma-
hogany wood with maple finish. Matching
wood bench included. $12,000 334-589-3422

PETS & ANIMALS

AKC English Bulldog: Beautiful 1V yr old male,
rj-ed brindle color, current shots and wormed,
very sweet & healthy, house trained. $2,000.
Firm. Call 334-735-2957 ..
Bulldog Puppies- English, Male and female for
adoption. Contact me if you are willing to have
them at g.w120@yahoo.com


( FARMER'S MARKET
FAR & D.IR


/ BLUEBERRIES
""e, U-Pick $7.00 per gallon
We-Pick $20.00 per gallons
Co. Rd. 33 in Columbia
4 334-796-8165 4-

. Julian Aplin
SU-pick Peas

and
Tomatoes
*334-792-4775




Peanuts
o,*Frozen Green

A. We also have
'- shelled peanuts
850-352-2199
850-209-3322 or 850-573-6594
M 4128 Hwy 231


1st Ed. AA Big Book $500. 850-263-1039.


2-nd Ed. AA big book $450. 850-263-1039.


Border Collie Mix- FREE, Spayed, 1 yr. old, obe-
dient & loving; 850-557-6384 or 850-557-9823


Free black mixed Lab pups to good home.
850-594-3099
PEKINGESE PUPPIES, 6 males, 1 female (2 are
mini's), 1st shots, available now, $175-$225,
334-695-8633
Super Puppies Sale
Shih-Tzu Mix $100, Small Chihuahua
Female $400 Papillions $250 Adult Small Dogs
$50 $200 -o 334-718-4886 4-


Broom Mop antique -$25. 850-263-1039
Bumper Trailer Hitch $29. like new 482-7665
Camera Lens 75-300/1.7mm $40 ea. 482-7665
Camera Olympus 600UZ, $149, 850-482-7665
Canoe-12 ft. Radisson. $500. 850-718-8084
Chair- $20. 850-263-1039
Chair $30. 850-263-1039
Complete Office set cherry wood, includes,
desk, swivel chair, 2-book shelves,
printer cabinet $500. 850-557-0131
Desk-Antique, $25. 850-263-1039
Dialogue Paintings- Signed, $50. 850-263-1039
Dining tbl. w/4 chairs & hutch $500. 557-0131
Evolution Abs Roller -w/DVD $10. 850-557-6384
Ext. Door-6 pane, 36x80 RH, $150 (850)482-2636
Floor Lamp $30. 850-263-1039
Free Kittens- 12 wks. old, Black & White, Calico,
& Orange Tabby. 850-693-4420


Aplin
" Farms
1AlTomatoes,
sweet corn,
cucumbers,
Sqaush, okra, peppers,
cabbage, & Zucchini
Open Mon-Sat (7-6)
4 334-792-6362. 4

CreekWater Blueberry Farms
U-Pick $8. or We-Pick $15. gallon
334-406-4405 or 334-588-2708
Hartford 2 mi. from 4-way stop
3354 E. Co. Rd. 16 Follow Signs





Naturally Grown Blueberries 4
U-Pick or I-Pick or We-Pick
334-714-4703 Located 52 W
33 mi. from circle turn (R) Look for signs.
All you can eat while picking in the field


Fry Pan antique w/ legs $25. 850-263-1039
Insullators.antiques 3-alass $10. 850-263-1039.


Jelly Bean Container- $5. 850-263-1039


Lamps (3) $20. each 850-263-1039.
Life Vest-4x Large Adult $20. 850-557-6384
Living Room Furnitufe: green sofa w/matching
(3) cherry wood end tables & matching sofa
table also includes oak curio cabinet $500
Call 850-557-0131,
Lost: reddish brown lab mix, male, last seen
Old Spanish Trail. Call 850-592-6628
Michelin Tire- 225 70R 19.5, $100. 850-482-6022
Scooter handicap $200. 850-263-1039.


Table: 6 Barrel Back chairs. $350. 850-272-6412


Tire 23565R17- $35. 850-483-6022


Tire P265/R18 $15. 850-482-6022
Tires-2/23560R16 $60. 850-482-6022
Tires: P235/70R/16 $40 850-482-6022
Trollinn Motor- Minn kota. $125. 850-718-8084


Waterbed Frame Q-sz. $75. 850-482-6022.


Window-EF, 29x30, Dbl. $100 (850)482-2636


Sudoku
#


_9 2
8 975

47 53


3 126 8



5 983 2

2 53

185 6

2 7


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Level: h 2- -3
.Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to Tuesday's puzzle
349521867
851 746392

76298351.4
916374 2 85
234658971
587192436

625_81 9 7 43
493267158
178435629


6/26/13


f-: Fast, easy, no pressure
\ *, I 1ace an Ad 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
\ Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
,, \ .\ \ and make secure online payments.

___ www.jcfloridan.com
W--J.


P.


I0IBS-USSI


I


Advert y r OT UFF" forFREE, ;by iiin w .lloridan -.om -ese -


Col.






8 B Wednesday. June 26. 2013 Jackson County Floridan


FRESH SWEET CORN
May 29th July 7th
GREEN CIRCLES FARM
233 Cooler Rd, Bainbridge
229-246-1724
Yellow, White and Bi-Color
Varieties Available Market Price


Hewett Farms
Peas, Corn, Squash,
cucumbers, pickles,


okra & snap beans
Off hwy 90 between Cypress
& Grand Ridge on Mayo Rd.
Bobby Hewett
850-592-4156
or 850-899-8709

MooneyHam
Farms
U-PICK PEAS 6 miles N of Grand Ridge,
or 2.1 miles S of Dellwood on Hwy 69.
$7. /per 5 gal, bucket
Field opens at 6:30- 6:30
7 days/wk. .
Dark & White Peas & Butterbeans
Ready to Pick
S4 850-718-7750 4

No OeJcso.ars, Gan idgF
U-ikTmtesadPpes


; G.M. Properties of PC
.... Beach 800-239-2059
_. Fully Furnished Condos
S- & Townhouses
near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $250 nt.
Portside Resort starting @ $125.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @$70 nt.
ww.nmdnronnrties.com


HOME GROWN, FRESH



Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
334-793-6690 0

0 U/We-Pick4 ,
Tomatoes
James Bedsole
334-886-2291
or 334-726-5895
CLOSED ON SUNDAY

VEITCH'S BLUEBERRY FARM
7772 Howell Rd. Sneads, FL 32460
YOU PICK BLUEBERRIES
Opening June 1 Tues- Sun 9a.m. 6p.m.


, PANAMA CITY BEACH CONDO
2/1.5, Pool, Tennis, Club House
Fully Furnished On Front Beach Road
S125/Night S750/Week, $80 Cleaning Fee
334-300-6979 or 334-393-3559




IN THE CLASSIFIED


SBALLARD DAYLILILIES
252 N. Co. Rd. 9 (3 miles N. Slocomb)
$1.00 & up. FREE Amaryllis wI/ purchase.
334-886-2273 or 1-866-745-1243

TREES TREES
,''; TREES
SJ 1 12 ft.tall 30 gal.
S;:: containers
$69.95 buy2
Sget one FREE
Live Oaks, Crape Myrtle,
Cherry Laurel & Magnolias
By appointment
334-692-3695


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
34d-RQ-2N0 -


( EMPLOYMENT





PAPER
TANSPORT, INC,
DRIVERS
Paper Transport, Inc has IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS for CLASS A DRIVERS for
Our dedicated accounts.
HOME WEEKLY
99% No Touch Freight
Competitive. Pay
$38 Cents + Bonus Per Mile
18 Months Experience Required.
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS!
Qualified Driver could be hired
within a Wppkl!


Callus at 1-855-PTI JOBS (784*5627)


rj Your guide to great local

3S u Si businesses & services


FIRVICE DIRECTORY


Affordable Lawn Care
Low Overhead=Low Prices
850-263-3813 850-849-1175
: I i' i' 1\ ,. . ' 't '



LoMl Buller
Soc'0 Owner/operator
COMMERCIAL 4854 Dogwood Dr.
CLEANING Mariann, FL 32446
Cleaning Is Our Obsession (850) 728-3832
M ocdcommerclalcleanlng@yahoo.comr
0 www.ocd-cemmerclal-cleanlng.com BON2) &ISUREJ
BULDZIoG


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc.
ALTHA, FL
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055


WE OFFER COMPETE

samE4,SBOEm.


P Trolling Motor Repair
Affordable Service! Fast Repair!
Most Cases 1 Week Turnaround.
I1Servicing Minn Kota & Motorguide.
850-272-5305


NEW& USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELIW RETAIL PRICES
TRIPLE E va


W~e &to -,71"& V94
850.526.1700
Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
2978 Pierce Street (behind Tim's Florist)


Call 526-3614 to place your ad.


Chad 0's Lawn F/X
SCommercial & Residential a
SSpring Clean-up & .i .. *-
Monthly Maintenance ". l .
Full Lawn Care Service'
S Free Estimates
Family Owned & Operated
Chad Oliver I 850-573-7279 _55


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
85-42881Cel:80-7-62

"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured


G&K

HANlHMANl
PRESSURE WASuNG SERVICE
PrrNMG DECKS
GENERAL CARPETRY AND MORE
850.557.2924
850.209.9373

Lighthouse Eletrical
Unlimited, LLC
SResidential Electrical
Remodels Service Work
I V #ER13014408 Insured
S /(850)272-2918 RickyMosher
gj l (OJL)h/2-hyl 0 ___ owner


We Link


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


MAIANNA CITY 2844 MacfdIson St.
:FARMERS Ts,-rua
MARKET --
:MARKET'7am-noon
...., ..... ..


This Month's Special
lii) I',
$239500
35 Years in Businessi
Wr MovE Piimkblaw Bli'iilik..2L

a.a

,W Safe Roof Cleaning Available
/j) ) Tavares (T.D.) Horne
L, LL' Owner/Operator
10: (866) 992-5333 C: (850) 509-8441

SHIVER PRESSURE WASHING
.Homes, Barns, Sidewalks, etc.
S Work, Guaranteed-
I 8650-260-9348


CLASSIFIED


Lot rent included. For details
*m 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4-


1BR/1BA Completely Remodeled, 5 minutes
from Wal-mart, engery efficient, tankless
water heater, all apple No Smoking or Pets!
$450 Mo. + $400 Dep. Call 850-573-6198


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN'%
jcfloridan.com


nonsrer
FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


FRSHPODCESED &PANT


I


I


11


I TREE SERVICE I


www.JCFLORIDAN.com

Log Truck Driver needed
Must have clean driving record,
Drug screen required
at Call: 850-658- 4609 4m
0* *' 01;roi0 IL1t:51




McLANE
Distribution Center
Supervisor
McLane Company, one of the largest
grocery wholesale companies in the nation,
is looking for a Distribution Center
Supervisor to join our Dothan, AL Division.
This position reports directly to the
Distribution Center Manager and is
responsible for the day to day operations
of a fast paced department staffed with
approximately 25+ employees.
Responsibilities include meeting daily
production standards, employee relations,
staffing, meeting order quality standards,
daily housekeeping and misc. reporting.
The ideal candidate will possess a
bachelor's degree and preferably two to
four years hands on experience in the
functional areas listed above. Must also
possess excellent communication and
computer skills. Experience in the
distribution industry is preferred, but not
required.
McLane Company offers an excellent salary,
annual bonus plan and benefits that include
medical, dental, vision, life, STD, LTD, and
401k. Ifyou are interested in applying for
this position, you may stop by our main
lobby Monday through Friday between the
hours of 8am and 4pm or forward your
resume and salary history to:
McLane Southeast Dothan
Attn: Human Resources
100 McLane Parkway
Cottonwood, AL 36320
Phone: (334) 678-2707
Fax: (334) 678-2754
E-mail: ronald.paulk@mclaneco.com
(Take Highway 231 south to the Florida
state line. Turn left onto State Line Road.
McLane is 1 mile down on right.)
E.O.E.

Need someone with mechanical knowledge to
help work on a 1962 Cadillac Eldorado
n Call 334-727-4911 <4

Immediate opening for Parts Manager
Excellent pay and benefits,
Send resume to P.O. Box 916 Iariann, Fl


Southern Forestry Realty




Interested in Rural land sales with a
steady flow of leads? Southern Forestry
Realty is looking for a Full Time Alabama
licensed real estate agent to selNand in
Alabama. Be part of a regional team of
professional real estate agents.
Must be a self starter.
If qualified and interested,
please call Bud Holleman
at 229-246-5785.
EDUCATION
SO & INSTRUCTION
l O S

s Look ahead to your
future! Start training
FORTIS for a new career in
SIIS Medical Assisting,
COLLEGE Medical Office
Administration,
Pharmacy Technology, Electrical Trades &
HVAC! Call Fortis College
888-202-4813 For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu
( 1 ...RESIDENTIAL
mTJ REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

1BR/1BA, nice clean apt. in town
screened porch, large yard $450. mo.
No pets. 850-557-2000 for more info.



Beach Cottage for Rent: 3BR 1.SBA,
Large screened porch, Beacon Hill
(Near Mexico Beach) $500/wk
850-482-2539 or 201-888-2388

1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own


r








www.JCFLORIDAN.com


2BR 1BA House for rent,
Safe neighborhood, $500/mo + dep.
850-482-8196 OR 850-209-1301
2BR/2BA Duplex 2152 Lovers Ln. $450. mo.
$450. dep. Grand Ridge Call 850-592-5571
3BR/1.5BA Brick Home in Malone Storage
shed, fenced backyard, No Pets!
$600 Mo. + $600 Dep. Call 850-569-2697
3BR/1BA, 2643 Faney St. Cottondale.
CH&A No Pets, $600 Mo. + $400 Dep.
2BR/1BA 2656 Railroad St $450 Mo. + $400. Dep
No Pets (850) 352-4222 or 850-557-4513
Afford 4/2 Lg. Home w/ CH&A 2 car garage
fenced back yd. $850 mo. + dep.
850-579-4317 & 850-866-1965 Avail. Now
Austin Tyler & Co *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
House for Rent: 3BR/2BA Hwy 71 South in
Marianna, FL No Pets. $650. Mo. + $650. Dep.
Call 850-482-4400


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountryliving.com.
.* 850-209-8847 _4-
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

-* 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595

4 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maint.incl.
,* 850-593-4700 4m
Quiet, well maintained.Park, Water/sewer/
garbage/lawn included. Available Now
3/2 DW $625. & 3/2 $575. & 3/2 $500.
SJoyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 _4-
I. RESIDENTIAL
1 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
FARMS, LAND IIMBE





| RECREATION


1985 Gambler 17ft Bass Boat with a year 2002
Evinrude 115HP Motor- Includes Depth Finder
and Trolling Motor. Equipped with CD
player/Radio, 2 live wells, and life-vests. Re-
cently had new carpet installed and professio-
nally painted. Storage Cover Included. Trailer is
in great condition! $3400 OBO. Contact 334-
372-1019 or 334-482-1172 for more info.
,- t -< '- Fisher Freedom Deluxe
fcC "-2" 2006 22' pontoon: 90hp
-.W Mercury, 4 stroke, less
M than 50hrs, pristine condi-
tion, custom trailer
w/guides, trolling mtr, battery charger, front &
rear electric anchor, extra fishing chair & cus-
tom cover. $14,500. 334-493-6496; 334-504-2555


-1986 Bayliner Contessa
2850 with Volvo 260hp I/0
engine. Excellent condition
with low engine hours.
There have only been two
owners. No trailer but have a friend with one
who will negotiate transport separately if
needed. "U" shaped dinette, stand up head,
hanging lockers & plenty of storage, private
cabin w/queen size bed, Bomar hatches & lots
of beautiful teak wood. $9,000. 334-687-8507
Blue Fin Bass 1998 Elimator All Aluminum Bass
Boat, 50 HP force engine, galvanized trailer-
new tires, all in very good condition, 2 live well
boxes, 4 new seats, new Humminbird fish find-
er $3,995 OBO 828-837-1314 or 828-421-0998
Cobra 1996, 16ft, 55HP Johnson, power trim,
anchor, trolling motor, depth finder on a Cobra
trailer, $4,500 334-232-4610
Stratos 1996 Bass Boat, 201 Pro XL w/Trailer,
2003 Evinrude 225 h.p. (low hours), Trolling mo-
tor, GPS, 2 Depth finders, extra. SS Prop., Built
in Battery Charger. Lots of Extras, Excellent
condition, garage kept. Must see. $10,500 229-
334-0224


Keystone 2007 30' Travel Trailer 30-RLS
Outback Sidney Edition. Weight 7700# Q-bed,
rear living w/picture window, 2 swivel chairs.
Sleeper sofa, Living & dining rm. slide out
w/awning. 2-entrances, new tires, outside sink
w/2 burner propane stove. Kept under shelter.
$14,000. 334-897-6929 or 334-475-6309.


1999 35ft Pace Arrow: Ford V10, new front-in
with michilin tires, very clean, lots of storage,
private bedroom, dual AC with generator, mi-
crowave. $13,900. Call 334-793-3494 or 334-333-
1291

f~jTRANSPORTATION


Ford 1968 Mustang: emerald green, only 131k
miles, 289 4 barrel automatic, rebuilt motor
and transmission, good condition. Asking
$6,000 OBO Call 334-733-0106


B %N qCadillac 1989 Seville
I- 41 K (Classic Car)
onlyI a few ever made,
runs great, looks great,
too much to mention. Must See !
$2400. OBO 334-648-3171.
CHEVY 1995 CAPRICE-Clean, runs great, cold
air, fully loaded $3,300 OBO 334-740-0229
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
GOT BAD CREDIT?
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy
slow credit ok
1 4~ $0 Down/lst Payment,
Tax, Tag & Title
-1 Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
Honda 2008 Accord EX-L: Burgundy, 4 Door,
Automatic, leather, sun roof, heated seats,
all the extras. $14.900. 334-300-4418
.. -_ Honda 2012 Accord Coupe
S- EXL: Automatic transmis-
sion with paddle shift,
navigation. sunroof, heat-
ed leather seats, 6 disc CD player. Has around
9,500 miles. Asking $24,900. Call 334-268-3900.
Mustang 2002 GT convertible, good shape,
gray in color with black top, 4- new tires,
runs great 334-792-1070 or 334-435-2151


Get it fast


Jackson County Floridan v


ATSF u *ORoSALE=


Jeep 2010 Wrangler Unlimited right hand drive
vehicle, 4 door, 4 wheel drive, automatic, hard-
top, alloy wheels. Green pearl color. 45,000
miles.$ 2,7q 229-30nR-q77R


Toyota 2013 Tacoma
4 dr. 4 wheel drive. TRD off
road package. Automatic
transmission, rear locking
differential, tow package,
CD player. White exterior with grey interior.
Approx. 9,500 miles. $31,500. 334-268-3900


2006 Iron horse TX Chopper fully customized
blue w/graphics, S&S 124 cu. ft. motor, boss
dual intake V&H big radius exhaust, garage
kept, exc., cond. 10,400 miles, $10,599. OBO
334-445-0366 MUST SEE !!!
Lot,.-. s- 2008 HD Sportster-883
Lots of upgrades &gear!
~Black/chrome, 3k miles, all
X HD gear.(men's lg/XL and
ladies' med/Ig jackets,
chaps; helmets, rain suits,
HD upgrades (aux lights, saddle bags, comfort
seat, chrome engine guard, passenger back-
rest. $5,100. Great bike, greatly loved, great
DEAL! Call Sam 334-790-3307
Honda 1100 Shadow 26,000 miles, windshield,
saddle bags, floor boards lots of extras, nice
bike $3500. 334-406-2306


Suzuki 2006 Grand Vitara 125K miles, good
cond. great little compact SUV $6500.
334-791-8977.


Commercial 2005 GreatDane 48ff Reefer
SB300+ Thermoking with lift gate, in good
condition $18,000 OBO 334-797-1095.
Ford 2004 F150 long bed 108K miles, nice truck,
well taken care of with tool box. $7500.
334-406-2306.
Ford XLT S150 1995 Ext. Cab, runs good, teal
green, Heat & Air works, 302 engine $2000. Also
willing to trade for a compact car in good run-
ning condition. 850-693-5812 or 850-557-8365.
Massey Ferguson Tractor md#1215
with Massey Ferguson 225 ft. mower
$4000. 334-797-8523


jFor sale by Owner
2006 Pontiac Montana SV6,
88K miles, 7 passenger
sliding power door, rail
guards, back-up assist,
front/rear CD/MP3, DVD w/remote, fabric w/4
captain seats. Maintained w/most service
records. 60-75% tread $5,900 334-790-6618



1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!

rPOl "s 24 AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


CALL FOR TOP PRICE

FOR JUNK VEHICLES


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664

CASH Guaranteed
Highest prices paid for Junk, old Farming
Equipment, Tractors, Semis, Junk Cars
Nothing to big, nothing to small
4 334-596-7791 4





a* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not !
3L 7495I or i44 7 4
L - - - - - - - - - - L .


(2~Y


LEGAL Sti


L AL5 ql[oTInCE[S

LF16059

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRNiCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 32-2013-CA-000155
REGIONS BANK D/B/A REGIONS
MORTGAGE
Plaintiff,
v.

CLARICE H. ZIEGLER; ET AL.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: CLARICE H. ZIEGLER; and all unknown par-
ties claiming by, through, under or against the
above named Defendant, who is not known to
be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties
claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other
claimants
Current Residence Unknown, but whose last
known address was:
4101 MCCALL LN., MARIANNA, FL 32448
429 TOCOA ROAD, HELENA, AL 35080

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following property in Jackson
County, Florida, to-wit:
LOT 6,'BLOCK "A" OF PINEVIEW SUBDIVISION,
AN UNRECORDED PLAT IN JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA:

COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST COR-
NER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTH-
WEST 1/4 OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH,
RANGE 10 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA;
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY LINE
OF SAID FORTY A DISTANCE OF 136.40 FEET TO
AN EXISTING IRON PIPE AND CALL THIS THE
POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID
FORTY A DISTANCE OF 136.40 FEET TO AN EX-
ISTING IRON PIPE; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES
00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF
300.40 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT SET
ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF
MCCALL STREET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES
43 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID STREET A
DISTANCE OF 136.40 FEET TO AN EXISTING
IRON PIPE; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MI-
NUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF
300.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

THIS PARCEL IS LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 17,
TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST, JACK-


Wednesday, June 26, 2013- 9 B


I- Pzzluu. t4-Jvo-utso -1


(NOPAA) regarding the application by writing
to: Division of Resource Regulation, Northwest
Florida Water Management District, attn: Terri
Peterson, 152 Water Management Drive, Hava-
na, Florida 32333. A NOPAA will be mailed only
to persons who have filed such requests. A
NOPAA must be requested in order to be ad-
vised of further proceedings and any public
hearing date. Written comments/objection or
NOPAA requests must be received by 5:00 p.m.
eastern time on July 15, 2013.
No further public notice will be provided re-
garding this application. Publication of this no-
tice constitutes constructive notice of the per-
mit application to all substantially affected
persons.







The Classifieds Today L_


CLASSIFIED


SON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 12425
28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL
33716, on or before July 30, 2013 or within thirty
(30) days after the first publication of this No-
tice of Action, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court at 4445 East Lafayette
Street, P.O. Box 510, Marianna, FL 32447, either
before service on Plaintiffs attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this
day of 10th day of June, 2013.
/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk

IF YOU AREA PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO EXTRA COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT JANE CHAFIN, COURT MANAGER, P.O.
BOX 510, MARIANNA, FL 32447,850-482-9552,
WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF .
THIS SUMMONS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771 OR
1-800-955-8770 (V) VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERV-
ICE.
LF16062 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE JACKSON
COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION OF ITS IN-
TENT TO CONDUCT A PUBLIC HEARING TO RE-
VIEW THE FOLLOWING AND OTHER BUSINESS:

The Jackson County Planning Commission will
consider:
1. A proposed Land Use Change from Agricul-
ture 2 (AG2) to Commercial Future Land Use on
a 0.64-acre site located at 5263 Dove Nest Lane
in unincorporated Jackson County, Florida
(Section 29, Township 6N, Range 9W), Joyce
Henry.

2. A proposed Land Use Change from Agricul-
ture 2 (AG2) to Residential Future Land Use on
5.06 acres (+/-) located approximately 1.5
miles south of the Marianna City Limits on the
east side of Hwy 73 S in unincorporated Jack-
son County, Troy McCoy.

The public hearing will be held in the Jackson
County Commission Board Room
of the Administration Building located at 2864
Madison Street, Marianna, Florida,
on Monday, the 1st of July, 2013 at 7:00 p.m..

Anyone desiring information may contact the
Community Development Department between
7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
at 4487 Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida or
contact by phone at (850) 482-9637.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabil-
ities Act, persons needing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this meeting should
contact the Planning Secretary at Jackson
County Community Development no later than
5 days prior to the meeting. The Planning Sec-.
retary may be contacted at 4487 Lafayette
Street, Marianna, FL, 32448, (850) 482-9637, or
(800) 955-8771 (TDD).
LF16060

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF: 1995 Burgundy/Maroon
Toyota Tacoma Truck
VIN#4TAVN410352015371
CASE NUMBER: 13-557 CA
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE PROCEEDINGS

TO: ALL PERSONS WHO CLAIM AN INTEREST IN
THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY, WHICH
WAS SEIZED ON OR ABOUT JUNE 4,2013, IN
MARIANNA, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA:

Said property is in the custody of the City of
Marianna Police Department. Any owner enti-
ty, bona fide lienholder, or person in posses-
sion of the property when seized, has the right
to contest the Petition for Forfeiture by filing a
Response with the Circuit Court within twenty
(20) days of the publication of this notice, with
a copy of the Response sent to H. Matthew
Fuqua, Attorney for the City of Marianna Police
Department, at Post Office Box 1508, Marianna,
Florida 32447. A Petition for Final Order of For-
feiture has been filed in the above styled
cause.

/s/ H. Matthew Fuqua
H. MATTHEW FUQUA
Bondurant & Fuqua, P. A.
4450 Lafayette Street (32446)
Post Office Box 1508
Marianna, Florida 32447
850-526-2263
mfuqua@bffloridalaw.com
Florida Bar No. 0451101
ATTORNEY FOR CITY OF MARIANNA
POLICE DEPARTMENT
LF16065
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR WATER USE
PERMIT
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chap-
ter 373, Florida Statutes, the following applica-
tion for a water use permit has been received
by the Northwest Florida Water Management
District:

Application number I 07400 filed 06/07/2013
Sturgeon AquaFarms, LLC, 1000 NW 159th
Drive, Miami, FL 33169
Requesting an annual average daily withdrawal
of 5,760,000 gallons per day from the Floridan
Aquifer System for Aquaculture use by existing
and proposed facilities.
General withdrawal locations) in Jackson
County: T06N, R08W, Sec. 18A, 18D
Interested persons may submit written
comments/objection or submit a written re-
quest for the notice of proposed agency action


l


Weather'forecas


0j-.






-110B WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Serena Williams returns a shot against Luxembourg's Mandy Minella during their first-round singles match at the All England
Lawn Tennis Championships in London on Tuesday.



Back on court, Williams



stretches winning streak


The Associated Press

LONDON After a
week filled by a headline-
grabbing, off-court tiff
with Maria Sharapova and
a series of apologies stem-
ming from a magazine
profile, Serena Williams
got back to doing what she
does best.
Better than anyone in the
world right now, really.
Extending her winning
streak to 32 matches, the
longest single-season run
on the women's tour since
2000, Williams began her
bid for a sixth Wimbledon
championship and 17th
Grand Slam title overall
with a 6-1, 6-3 victory over
92nd-ranked Mandy Mi-
nella of Luxembourg on
Tuesday.
"You can call her pretty
much unbeatable," Mi-
nella said. "She's playing
better than ever. ... Every
time she steps on court,
you can see why."
And yet Williams, the
defending champion at
the All England Club, and
Patrick Mouratoglou, the
French coach who's been
helping her during the cur-
rent 75-3 stretch that dates
to the start of Wimbledon
last year, both gave this as-
sessment: There are areas
of her game that could use
some fine-tuning.
"After today, there's so
many ways that I can im-
prove," the No. 1-ranked
and No. 1-seededWilliams
said, "and that I'm going to
need to improve if I want
to be in the second ,week
of this tournament."
Really? How about some
examples?
"Come on," Williams re-
plied, tilting her head and
smiling.
Here was Mouratoglou's
take after watching Wil-
liams win her first 17 ser-
vice points and compile a
25-5 edge in total winners
on Centre Court: "I mean,
of course, not everything
is perfect yet. It's interest-
ing to see what we need to
work on for the (coming)
days."
They also agreed that
she did not have too hard
a time setting aside the
events of the previous
seven days, which in-
cluded a lot of saying "I'm
sorry" face-to-face with
Sharapova, at a news con-
ference, in two separate
statements posted on the
web over things Wil-
liams was quoted as say-
ing in a Rolling Stone story.
Williams made a negative
reference in a phone con-
versation to a top-five
player's love life (the
piece's author surmised
that was about Sharapova)
and an off-the-cuff remark
about a witlely publicized
rape case in the U.S. that
was perceived by some as
criticizing the victim.
I "It hasn't been a distrac-


tion," Williams insisted.
"I'm just here to focus on
the tennis."
All in all, by easily win-
ning her first match since
winning the French Open
on June 8, she helped re-
store order at Wimbledon
24 hours after a chaotic
Day 1 that included the
only first-round Grand
Slam loss of 12-time major
champion Rafael Nadal's
career and a scary-look-
ing, knee-twisting tumble
by two-time Australian
Open winner Victoria Aza-
renka during her win.
The highest-seeded
player to depart Tuesday
was No. 10 Maria Kirilen-
ko, beaten 6-3, 6-4 by
teenager Laura Robson,
the first British woman
to beat a top-10 player at
Wimbledon in 15 years. Of
the 10 local players who
entered the tournament,
Robson and reigning U.S.
Open champion Andy
Murray, last year's runner-
up at the All England Club,
are the only two left.
"It's hard for all the Brit-
ish players to come in here
and, you know, lose first
round," said Robson, who
beat Kim Clijsters at the
2012 U.S. Open in the last
match of the four-time
major champion's career,
"because you just feel ex-
tra disappointed."
Other women winning
easily included No. 4 Ag-
nieszka Radwanska, the
2012 runner-up to Wil-
liams; 2011 French Open
champion Li Na; and No.
7 Angelique Kerber, who
eliminated Bethanie Mat-


tek-Sands of the U.S. 6-3,
6-4.
Nadal's straight-set loss
to 135th-ranked Steve
Darcis was still a main
topic of conversation, and
top-seeded Novak Djokov-
ic called it a reminder that
"you cannot take anything
or anybody for granted."
"To be honest, I was
expecting him to be a
bit rusty on the court,"
Djokovic said. "In the
opening rounds, obvious-
ly, it's very dangerous for
top players who haven't
been playing on grass. ...
On the other side of the net
is somebody that is lower
ranked, he has nothing to
lose, so he's going for his
shots."
As Djokovic dispatched
34th-ranked Florian May-
er of Germany 6-3, 7-5, 6-
4, the only real, hitch was
when he slipped to the
Centre Court grass. No. 4
David Ferrer, who reached
his first Grand Slam fi-
nal at the French Open
but lost to Nadal, took
two falls and said he felt
a "little bit of pain" in his
left ankle during a 6-1, 4-6,
7-5, 6-2 victory over 101st-
ranked Martin Alund of
Argentina.
Sam Querrey, an Ameri-
can seeded 21st, lost 7-6
(6), 7-6 (3), 3-6, 2-6, 6-3
to 59th-ranked Australian
Bernard Tomic in a match
most noteworthy for what
Swas said afterward.
Tomic ripped the ATP
for barring his father, who
is also his coach, from at-
tending tournaments for
12 months .because of


pending assault charges
and said he'll ask Wim-
bledon to let Dad attend
his next match. Querrey,
meanwhile, was miffed
that Tomic got a chance to
collect himself while being
checked by trainers after
saying he felt lightheaded
in the fourth set.
"I knew he was kind of
dizzy, but let's go; it's a
physical game," Querrey
said. "That's part of it. If
you're dizzy or hurt, you've
got to play through it. You
can't just take breaks.
That's not why I lost. But
I felt I had some momen-
tum there and that leveled
the playing field for the
fifth set."
It's been difficult for
any opponent to things
close against Williams
lately, even if she claimed
Tuesday, "I never feel
invincible."
Her practice-makes-
perfect pledge might give
future opponents pause,
starting with Caroline
Garcia, who will face Wil-
liams in the second round
for the second Grand Slam
tournament in a row. After
losing to Williams 6-1, 6-
2 at the French Open last
month, Garcia made these
observations: "I need to
work on my game to pose
more problems for her
next time" and "She hits
hard."
You don't say.


WVIMBLEDON


The Associated Press

LONDON As loss
after loss after loss piles
up for Arantxa Rus a
record-equaling 17 in a
row after her quick Wim-
.- bledon exit
at least
A give the
Dutch ten-
S. .. .. nis player
S credit for
I this: She's
Rus not giving
Pp.
The 156th-ranked Rus
was beaten 6-4, 6-2 Tues-
day by Russia's Olga Pu-
chkova in the first round
on Court 9 at the All Eng-
land Club. The WTA said
the only other woman
it knows of who lost 17
consecutive main-draw,
tour-level matches was
Sandy Collins of the U.S.,
who did it from 1984-87.
"This year is not a good
year for me," Rus said in
what might'be consid-


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ered something of an
understatement.
"I lost a lot of matches,"
she continued. "Yeah, it's
hard, but I try to keep
working hard. That's the
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Rus' most recent vic-
tory in a tour-level match
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And so began the
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who has been ranked as
high as 61st and known
some measure of success .
in the past. Her most
notable win came at the
French Open in May
2011, when she surprised
second-seeded Kim Cli-
jsters 3-6, 7-5, 6-1 in the
second round.


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