Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01107

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text


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Daytona getting
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Vol.90 No.132


DNA hit leads to tri-state arrests


BY MATT ELOFSON
melofson@dothaneagle.com

DOTHAN, Ala. -Houston County
Sheriff Andy Hughes said a DNA hit from
evidence submitted to the Florida crime
lab helped them make two arrests in con-
nection to 11 armed convenience store
robberies across the tri-state region.
Hughes led a joint multi-agency press
conference Tuesday morning to release
details surrounding the recent arrests of
two Dothan men in connection to the se-
ries of armed robberies.
"We began to have a series of violent
armed robberies dating back to March


18. This armed robbery investigation
transcended three states," Hughes said.
"These are some of the most violent rob-
bers I've seen in all my 27 years."
Hughes said authorities were able to
make the two arrests in the robberies
from information developed in the last
two robberies on June 8, along with evi-
dence from an armed robbery in Mari-
anna four days earlier.
Hughes announced the arrest of two
Dothan men, 25-year-old Milas Antwon
Grant III and 32-year-old Throne Thomas.
Smiley, for their alleged involvement in
See ARRESTS, Page 9A


ANGIE COOK/FLORIDAN FILE PHOTO
In this photo, motorists travel along State Road 71, past Green's Supermarket in Marianna. The
store was the scene of an armed robbery on June 4.


AUTISM GROUP COMBINES

ART AND FUN


T he Chipola
AreaAutism
Resource
Center kicked off its
summer activities
with an Autism
and Art Fun Day
Saturday, June 15, at
the First Presbyterian
Church in Marianna.
The event was open
to all children with
autism as well their
non-autistic siblings.
The day started with
kids having a chance
to take part in art
activities like
making pinch pots
out of clay, drawing,
mixing colors and
painting. When the
kids got tired of
making their
masterpieces they
went outside to play.
The group is planning
a bowling trip for its
July event. RIGHT:
Dillon Shelton shows
off some of the
paintings he did
during Autism and
Art Fun Day.


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


ABOVE LEFT: Tyler Armstrong, Trevor Shelton and Katelyn Armstrong explore the First Presbyterian Church
playground, Saturday in Marianna. ABOVE RIGHT: Everitt Shelton, Emilee Shelton and Benjamin Alvarez go for a spin
Saturday in Marianna.


)CLASSIFIEDS...7B


)) ENTERTAINMENT...6B


) LOCAL...3A


) OBITUARIES....9A


)) STATE...5A


School lunch


prices on the rise

State mandate adds a nickel


BYANGIECOOK
acook@jcfloridan.com

When public school
classes start back this fall,
parents will be shelling out
a bit more money for their,
kids' school meals.
The Jackson County
School Board voted Tues-
day to approve a recom-
mendation from incoming
Food Service department
head April Jones that the
price of meals increase by
five cents.
The nickel jump, Jones
said, is intended to help
bridge the gap between
revenue paid lunch meals
generate at the schools
and. the amount of reim-
bursement received from
the state.
According to calculations
reviewed by the USDA,

New School
St rtin
))Breakfast ,
Students: Free
Adults: $1.55
)) Elementary Lunch
Students: $1.90
Adults: $3.05
Secondary Lunch
Students: $2.15-
Adults: $3.05


five cents is the low-
est increase the depart-
ment could implement
- though it doesn't come
close to closing the rev-
enue/reimbursement gap,
Jones said. That's why she
anticipates that incremen-
tal increases in meal prices
will continue in years to
come.
The increase will apply to
all full-price, paid meals.
Reduced-price meals will
not be affected.
For those interested in
applying for free or re-
duced-price meals, appli-
cations for the next school
year are expected July 1.
They will be available to
download and print at
JCSB.org, or electronic ap-
plications can be complet-
ed and submitted online at
LunchApp.com.

Meal Prices
i.. th ll .1


Reckless driver


draws drug charge


From staff reports
A Central Florida man
was arrested on a drug
charge in Jackson County
after a fellow motorist
called to report him as a
reckless driver on Inter-
state 10, triggering a traffic
stop.
The caller reported a
reckless driver behind
the wheel of a westbound
black Infiniti around 7:40
a.m. Tuesday, and a deputy
was dispatched to be on
the lookout for it. Around
the 142-mile marker in
Jackson County, the offi-
cer saw a matching vehicle
swerving in and out of its
lane.
He pulled the car over
around 7:30 a.m. and spoke
with the driver, identified


) SPORTS...1B


as Justin D. Sweetman,
37, of Wesley Chapel. In a
~press release
incident, of-
ficials said
the officer
noted that
Sweetman
Sweetman "appeared to
be under the
influence of an unknown
controlled substance."
With Sweetman's con-
sent, the deputy searched
the car and discovered a pill
bottle with several marked
and unmarked pills, ac-
cording to the release. The
officer identified 14 hydro-
codone pills that Sweet-
man had no prescription
for, and he was arrested on
a charge of trafficking in
hydrocodone.
)) OPINION...8A


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint



11 1 81 01
65161 80050 9


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WJACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


High 91
ILow -71


Thursday
Isolated Showers & Storms.



"\." ,High- 90
^ sLow -71o


Saturday
Isolated Showers & Storms.


High-.90
C Low 70

Friday
Isolated Showers & Storms.


'. High 90
f Low 71


Sunday
Isolated Showers & Storms.


. High: 91 .i, r.n
. Lo :1 High: 91


"< High: 92
t- 3Lov: 72


'' Hligh: 92


High: 92
Low: 73
- /


SHigh: 87
PRECIPITATION Low: 76


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.37"
3.21"
3.60"


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Year to date
Normal YTD
Normal for year


4:46 PM
8:27 PM
4:51 PM
6:02 PM
6:36 PM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
44.50 ft.
7.36 ft.
5.80 ft.
3.96 ft.


: H. igh: 90
_ Low: 71


24.c2
27.66"
59.26"


- 6:28 AM
- 11:54 AM
- 7:01 AM
- 7:34 AM
- 8:07 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3 4 5 0 I

THE SUN AND MOON T
Sunrise 5:38 AM
Sunset 7:47 PM
Moonrise 3:48 PM July July June June
Moonset 2:55 AM 8 16 23 30


FLORIDA'S REAL

PANHANDLE COUNTRY

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9,

0LISEF !HOR nO -WA HRPa TES"


'~~1~3ik ~ J [itif LJ fl (o ) -a


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher -Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478 ,
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday; and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local. taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is-
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


TQDAY, JUNE 19
USDA and Brown Bag Food Give-away 8 a.m.
at Eldercare Services, 4297 Liddon St. in Marianna.
tall 482-3220.
: "5 Steps to Rapid Employment" Workshop
9 a.m. to noon at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
)) Books That Shaped America Exhibit 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library,
Marianna Branch, 2929 Green St. See the exciting
display of 100 books by American authors that have
shaped and influenced the lives of Americans. Call
482-9631.
) Jackson County Tourist Development Council
Meeting 10 a.m. at the Russ House, 4318 Lafay-
ette St. in Marianna. Call 482-8060.
"Dig Into Reading" with the Jackson County
Public Library's Summer Reading Program
Graceville Civic Center. Preschool age from 10-11
a.m. and school age 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. For reser-
vations call 482-9631.
)) Reunion for former employees of the Old
Jackson Hospital located then on 3rd Avenue
in Marianna -11 a.m. at the Oaks Restaurant in
Marianna. Individuals who worked during the 1930's
through the 1970's or )rn) ti-v before the new
hospital was built are invited to attend this Dutch
treat luncheon. Call 592-6344.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
Sto 1p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Internet/Email Basic Computer Class Part 1
- Noon to 3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career Training
Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Free class
teaches basic use of the Internet, how to send and
receive emails and how to protect your computer.
Call 526-0139.
)) "Dig Into Reading" with the Jackson County
Public Library's Summer Reading Program
- Campbellton at The Gallery. Preschool age from
2-3 p.m. and school age 3:15-4:15 p.m. For reserva-
tions call 482-9631.

'THURSDAY, JUNE 20
)) Jackson County Growers Association/Mari-
anna City Farmers Market 7 a.m. to noon at
Madison St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh fruits


and vegetables grown by local farmers.
Chipola College registration for Summer
Session II classes 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Classes begin
Monday, June 24 with late registration continuing
through noon on June 25. The schedule of classes is
available online at www.chipola.edu. Call 718-2211.
Marianna Blood Center's Mobile Unit will be at
the Northwest Florida C:'mrnui, iii., Hospital in Chi-
pley 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The need for blood is unending.
The process takes 30-45 minutes. Save up to three
lives with one donation. Call 526-4403.
)) Books That Shaped America Exhibit 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library,
Marianna Branch, 2929 Green St. See the exciting
display of 100 books by American authors that have
shaped and influenced the lives of Americans. Call
482-9631.
)) Caregiver Support Group Meeting -11 a.m.
to noon in the First Presbyterian Church Social
Hall, 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Open to all
family caregivers providing care to loved ones or
friends. Confidential group, facilitated by a profes-
sional group counselor. Coffee, water, light snacks
'provided.
Chipola Civic Club Meeting Noon at The
Oaks Restaurant, Highway 90 in Marianna. The
CCC's focus is the local community, "Community,
Children & Character". Call 526-3142.
Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2290.
)) Job Club Noon to 3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills; get job search assis-
tance. Call 526-0139.
)) Chipola Healthy Start Board of Directors
Meeting 2 p.m. in the Community Room at the
Marianna One Stop Career Center. Call 482-1236
ext 304.
Employability Workshop, "Mack Interview-
ing" 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
)) Jackson County Republican Party's 2013
Reagan Day Dinner VIP Meet and Greet at 5 p.m.
followed by dinner and program at 6 p.m. at the Ag-
riculture Conference Center, 2741 Pennsylvania Ave.
in Marianna. $25 per person for the Meet and Greet
and dinner is $40 per person or $75 per couple.


Keynote speaker will be Will Weatherford, Speaker
of the Florida House. Call 527-3900,209-7150 or
209-7377.
)) Jackson County NAACP Meeting 5:30 p.m.
in the St. James A.M.E. Church basement, 2891
Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.
Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group
- 5:30 p.m. at Jackson Hospital Cafeteria Board
Room. Free to attend: Curriculum developed by ex-
smokers for those who want to become ex-smokers
themselves. Call 482-6500.
)) Kidney Smart Class 5:30-7 p.m. at Marianna
Davita Clinic,-2930 Optimist Drive in Marianna.
Class is designed for people with early and later
stages of chronic kidney disease who are not on
dialysis, along with- jnrii, members and caregiv-
ers. Learn how kidneys function, causes of chronic
kidney disease, how to avoid dialysis and what
treatment choices are best. No cost, light refresh-
ments will be served. Call 482-5328.
)) Reunion Meeting for all former members
of the United Voices for Christ Mass Choir of
Jackson County 6 p.m. at Jim's Buffet& Grill in
Marianna. Call 594-3778.'
)) 6th annual Summer Concert Series featur-
ing Late Nite Radio 7-9 p.m. at Madison Park in
Marianna. This free event is presented by Jackson
County Parks and Recreation and Main Street
Marianna.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, JUNE 21
Books That Shaped America Exhibit 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library,
Marianna Branch, 2929 Green St. See the exciting
display of 100 books by American authors.that have
shaped and influenced the lives of Americans. Call
482-9631.
)) Marianna Blood Center's Mobile Unit will be
at the Jackson County Courthouse 10:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m. The need for blood is unending. The process
takes 30-45 minutes. Save up to three lives with one
donation. Call 526-4403.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for June 17, the latest
available report: Two accidents,
three suspicious vehicles, one
suspicious incident, two suspi-
cious persons, one escort, two
highway ob-
-^ -: structions, one
"-. ... *' burglary, one
C IR-JME physical dis-
~ turbance, two
S burglar alarms,
one physical disturbance, two
burglar alarms, two traffic
stops, three larceny complaints,
one criminal mischief com-
plaint, one trespass complaint,
one obscene or threatening
phone call, one found or aban-
doned property report, one
follow-up investigation, three
animal complaints, one assist
of another agency, three
public service calls, one
patrol request and two threat/


harassment complaints.

Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following incidents
for June 17, the latest available
report: One armed/dangerous
person, one drunk pedestrian,
one accident, two abandoned
vehicles, three reckless driv-
ers, three suspicious vehicles,
two suspicious incidents, one
suspicious person, one funeral
escort, one highway obstruc-
tion, one structure burglary,
one vehicle burglary, one physi-
cal disturbance, one pedes-
trian complaint, one prowler,
21 medical calls, four burglar
alarms, four traffic stops, two
larceny complaints, two crimi-
nal mischief complaints, two
follow-up investigations, one
assault, one suicide attempt,
two animal complaints,
two assists of motorists or


pedestrians, two assists of other
agencies, one property damage
complaint, one public service
call, one criminal registrations,
three transports, two Baker
Act transports, one 911 hang-
up and one forgery/worthless
check'complaint.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
)) James Paramore, 21, 2968
Jefferson St., Marianna, posses-
sion of marijuana (less than 20
grams).
)) Daquin Simmons, 34, 2803
Penn Ave., Marianna, child
neglect, battery (domestic),
violation of county probation.
)) Sidney Lacey, 25, 3937AWest
22nd St., Panama City, violation
of county probation.
)) Mary Hall, 38, 2803 Penn
Ave., Marianna, fugitive from
justice, child neglect, bat-


tery (domestic), violation of
probation.
)) Jeffrey Helms, 29, 5264
Carter Loop, Marianna, viola-
tion of state probation.
)) John Murphy, 51, 22108 NW.
Navajo Lane, Fountain, hold for
court/DOC.
)) Christopher Ferrell, 23, 25538
NE Evans St., Altha, violation
of county probation, no valid
driver's license.
)) Kindall Torbett, 43, 4571 Bel-
lamy Bridge Road, Marianna,
fleeing/attempting to elude a
police officer.
)) Caretha Walden, 53, 62675
Hartsfield Road, Greenwood,
worthless checks-five counts.
))John Riley, 50, 3158 Bump
Nose Road, (Apt. E), Marianna,
battery.

Jail Population: 214

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


TEAM RAHAL MILLER
Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-GMC-Nissan
^_^ 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL

(850) 482-3051 =


Weather Outlook


WfIC-Up CALL


-12A WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2013







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


CREDIT BUREAU


SCHOLARSHIP


ESTABLISHED AT CHIPOLA


SUBMITTED PHOTO
he Associated Credit Bureaus of Florida recently established
a scholarship endowment at Chipola College with a
contribution of $29,183. Here, Don Hughes of the Credit
Bureau of Marianna presents the check to Chipola Foundation
Director Julie Fuqua. The scholarship will be awarded annually to
an education major with the first award in August of 2014.


Animal Adventures presented at


Landmark Park every Friday
Special to the Floridan snake, cave dweller rat phen Messer, a certified
snake, the albino gopher wilderness medic will be
Each Friday through snake and more. here discussing the crit-
July 26, Landmark Park > June 28: Great Gators ters in our backyards that
will present Animal Ad- Tim Ward, an officer bite and sting. He will also
ventures, a special one with the Alabama Depart- have tips on how to treat
hour educational program ment of Conservation will those bites. Several live
which provides a unique present a program on one specimens will be on hand
opportunity to learn about of south Alabama's most for park visitors to view up
our natural world. Chil- misunderstood creatures, close.
dren ages 5 and older are the American Alligator. )) July 26: Life of a
encouraged to come with A combination of slides, Honeybee
their youth groups and skins and skulls as well as Philip Carter will ex-
families to see firsthand a live alligator will be used plain why the honeybee is
the wonder of many native to illustrate and teach par- truly one of nature's most
animals, ticipants about the lifestyle amazing insects and their
Programs begin at 10 and habits of this threat- importance to humans as
a.m. in the Interpretive ened animal, well as plants. In this pro-
Center Auditorium. A noon )) July 12: Champion Cats gram we will explore hon-
session may be available if SheilaAndreasen, Found- eybee communication and
the morning session fills, er of Kee Kitty Friends cat life cycle, honeybee pro-
Animal Adventures are free rescue and exhibitor with tection and harvesting as
with paid gate admission, The International Cat As- well as pollination and the
$4 for adults, $3 for kids, sociation will share her hive environment.
free for members. Event is regional and international Landmark Park is a 135-
sponsored byWells Fargo. award winning cats. Learn acre historical and natural
June 21: Slithering about rescue, adoption, science park located on
Snakes pet care and show oppor- U.S. Highway 431 North
Join reptile enthusiast tunities for kids. in Dothan, Ala. For more
Page Whatley as he intro- ) July 19: Backyard information, or to register
duces visitors to snakes Bandits for a program, contact the
and their unique charac- Summer's warmer park at 334-794-3452.


teristics. Reptiles joining
Whatley for the program
include the Eastern In-
digo Snake, the hog-nosed


weather is the perfect time
to view lots of beautiful
insects. But some of those
insects can be painful. Ste-


Certified Pile Burners Course is July 24


Special to the Floridan

The Florida Forest Ser-
vice and ,UF/IFAS Exten-
sion will be conducting
a Certified Pile Burners
Course on July 24.
This course will showyou
how to burn piles legally,
safely and efficiently. Most
importantly, it could save a
life. If you burn piles regu-
larly, don't put off register-
ing for this training. When
the weather is dry, certified
pile burners will receive
priority for authorization
to burn. Also, certified pile
burners are allowed to burn
up to two hours longer
per day and get multiple
day authorizations. Don't
wait.
The number of training
offered and attendance at
each training is limited.
This training will be held
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
at the Jackson County Ex-
tension Office located at
2741 Pennsylvania Avenue
in Marianna. Go to http://
jackson.ifas.ufl.edu to
download the registration
packet, which includes the
program agenda and di-
rections to the facility.
Registration is required


to attend and class size is
limited.
To attend please down-
load, complete and return
the registration form with
the following:
)) Your full name, as
wanted on your pile burn-
ing certificate.
Your mailing address,
where you want the certifi-
cate mailed.
)) Your Florida Forest Ser-
vice Customer Number, it
is the number that you are
required to give the FFS
when you call in for your
burn permits. If you do not
know it please call the local
FFS office and ask them to
create one for you.
)) Your email address, if
you have one and/or con-
tact phone number.
)) A check made out ,to
"Extension Services" for
$50.
The first 50 individuals to
provide these five require-
ments will be registered;
there will be a 7-day non-
refundable fee limit. If you
do not make the training
and did not contact our
office at least one week be-
fore the class, you will not
receive a refund. There will
be a test at the end of the


Marriage, Divorce


The following marriages
and divorces were re-
corded in Jackson County
during the week of June
10-14:
Marriages
SJeffrey Michael Herron
and Bethany Ann Barton.
)) Michael Deandre
Johnson and Amy Lashay
White.
)) Jordan Lee Springer
and Hillary Nicole Bonin.
)) Allen Michael Walker
and Rebecca Carol Aaron.
)) ZacharyM. Robertson
and Lakarole' Kaye Brooks.
)) Robert Joseph Mor-
risseau, Jr. and Teresa
LawannaWard.
Calvin Turner and Faye


Gibbons.
) Randall Todd Seals and
Tarisa T. Wesley.
) Marquis Lamar Mitch-
ell and Coriska Sherrail
Allison.
)) RandyWilliam Sealey
and Heather Marie
MaGee.
)) Victor Manuel Roman
and NancyValles Vazquez.
)) Randy Marcus Lewis
and Tiese Shameka
Mathis.
)) Joshua PaulWilkins
and Brittany Allis Holmes.
)) Tony Alexander
Gordon and Samantha
Danielle Norsworthy.
Divorces
)) None reported.


SGAS WATCH
Gas prices are going up. Here are
the least expensive places to buy
gas in Jackson County, as of
Tuesday afternoon.
1. $3.34, Loves Travel Center,
2510 Hwy. 231, Cottondale
2. $3.35, Tom Thumb, 3008 A
Jefferson St., Marianna
3. $3.39, Dar-Bee's Quick Stop,
6189 Hwy. 90, Cypress
4. $3.39, Greens BRP, 2846 Hwy.
71, Marianna
5. $3.39, Murphy Oil, 2255 Hwy.
71 S., Marianna
6. $3.41, Travel Center, 2112
S Hwy. 71 S., Marianna
7. $3.42, Pilot, 2209 Hwy. 71,
Marianna
8. $3.44, BP-Steel City, 2184
Hwy. 231 S., Alford

If you see a lower price,
contact the Floridan newsroom
,at editonrial@lcfloridan.com.


session. You must receive a
grade of 70% or higher on
the exam and demonstrate
a proper pile burn with
your local FFS office to be-
come certified.
Once you are certified
it will be noted with your
customer number, thus it
is important for us to have
the proper number. If you
do not have a customer
number the FFS office will
set one up for you.
Here a few frequently
asked questions, more are
included in the registra-
tion packet:
)) Why should I be a certi-
fied pile burner? Certified
pile burners are trained to
burn piles legally, safely
and efficiently. Most im-
portantly, it could save a
life.
Also, when the weather
is dry, certified pile burn-
ers will receive priority
for authorization to burn
by, the FFS. Also, certified
pile burners are allowed
to burn up to two hours


longer per day and get mul-
tiple day authorizations.
) Is there a test? Yes,
the test is 20 questions
and open-book. You must
receive a score of at least
70% to pass.
)) What if I don't pass?
Very few people fail the
test but if you do, you will
be provided another op-
portunity to take the test at
a later date. If you fail the
second time, you must re-
register and take the train-
ing again.
)) How long does my certi-
fication last? As long as the
person with the certifica-
tion uses their number at
least five times in a period
of five years their certifica-
tion will not expire under
the current program. You
MUST complete the certi-
fication burn within a year
of taking the class.
)) Will I be certified at the
end of the one day train-
ing? No, you will need to
follow the written instruc-
tions that you will receive


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from the Forest Service to
become certified. You will
need to complete a simple
burn plan, have it reviewed
and approved locally by
the FFS'and also have the
burn itself reviewed and
approved by the FFS. From
that point, the local FFS of-
fice will send the expected
documentation to Talla-
hassee to recommend cer-
tification for you.
For additional informa-
tion on this specific train-.
ing contact Doug Mayo at
482-9620.


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LOCAL


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19,2013 + 3AF







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


silo mi .- :
SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Anna Elizabeth Milton (left) and Gabrielle Grace
Melvin (right) receive DAR Good Citizenship
Medals and certificates from Chipola Chapter
Regent Sharon Wilkerson.


Jayka-Kate Spradlin of Malone Schoc
receives the DAR Good Citizenship Meda
from Committee Chairman Doris Spears.


I. .,. .' .. I..
-Sneads Elementary School fifth grader Layhl
Emily Gilmore of Poplar Springs School is Brock receives the DAR Good Citizenship
proud of her DAR Good Citizenship Medal. Medal from Doris Spears.


Conner Vickery of
Cottondale
Elementary
School receives
the Good
Citizenship Medal
from Chipola
Chapter Vice
Regent Carolyn
Jordan.


r/~*9~ j j z


U
'~ ~ ~U


Area youth recognized by DAR


Special to the Floridan

Chipola Chapter, Na-
tional Society Daughters of
the American Revolution,
believes that educating
our youth about American
citizenship is of supreme
importance for national
defense. Twenty-four Na-
tional Defense Awards
were recently presented
to students in Calhoun,
Holmes, Jackson, Liberty,
and Washington Coun-
DI ties by the Chipola Chap-
d ter DAR National Defense
Committee.
The Good Citizenship
Award is presented each
year to fifth-grade students,
"who fulfill the qualities
of honor, service, cour-
age, leadership and pa-
triotism." The following re-
ceived the medal for 2013:
Altha Public School, Kelsie
Edenfield; Blountstown El-
ementary, Kendal Hatchet;,
Carr School, Autumn Rais-
beck; Bethlehem School,
John Hardy; Bonifay
Middle School, Cheyenne
Glass; Ponce de Leon El-
ementary, Jordan Rolling;
Poplar Springs School,
Emily Gilmore; Cottondale
Elementary, Conner Vick-
a ery; Graceville Elementary,
P Shayla Pinkard; Grand
Ridge, Alanna Smith;
Malone, Jayka-Kate Spra-
dlin; Riverside Elementary,
Sandralee Kent; Sneads
Elementary, Layla Brock;
Dayspring Christian Acad-
emy, Abbi Watson; Victory
Christian Academy, Lauryn
Tucker; Hosford, Matthew
Shular andVernon Middle
School, Hannah Lamarre.
The Good Citizenship
Medal was presented to
Blue Springs Society offi-
cers Gabrielle Grace Mel-
vin and Anna Elizabeth
Milton for their service
and leadership in C.A.R.


The Children of the Ameri-
can Revolution is the old-
est patriotic organization
for young people in the
nation.
The DAR has awarded
ROTC medals since 1967
because the ROTC is an im-
portant source of trained
officers for our armed
forces. The recipients of
the award are chosen for
"qualities of dependabil-
ity and good character,
adherence to military dis-
cipline, leadership abil-
ity and a fundamental and
patriotic understanding of
the importance of ROTC
training."
This spring Chipola
Chapter presented the
Bronze JROTC Medal to
Cadet Bridget Vickers of
Chipley High, C/SMJ Am-
ber Hayden of Holmes
County High, Battalion
Commander Emily Whit-
taker of Liberty County
High School and Cadet
Carolyn Poppell of Vernon


High School.
Doris Spears serves as
Chairman of the National
Defense Awards Commit-
tee for Chipola Chapter,
NSDAR. Presenters who
helped her are: Rosie Smith
Gay, Rita Maupin, Brenda
Shiver, Sharon Wilkerson,
Carolyn Jordan, Christy
Bloechi, Mary Ann Gibbs,
Elizabeth Glover, Dorcas
Jackson, Betty Roberts and
Cyndi Brock.
For information about
DAR, contact Regent Caro-
lyn Jordan at cdjordan@
bellsouth.net or 638-1947.

Follow us on
Twitter


'I


twitter.com/
Jcfloridannews


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]'i C/SMJ Amber Hayden of
Holmes County High School
Bethlehem School fifth receives the DAR Bronze
grader John Lane Hardy JROTC Medal from Chipola
shows his DAR Good Chapter National Defense
Citizenship Medal and Committee Chairman Doris
certificate. Spears.


JROTC Bronze Medal
recipient Battalion
Commander Emily
Whittaker of Liberty
County High School
is congratulated
by Chipola Chapter
National Defense
Committee Chairman
Doris Spears.


Hosford fifth AS,
grader Matthew .
Shular receives '
the DAR Good
Citizenship
Medal from DAR i
member Betty
Roberts.


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~l4A WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2013


LOCAL


It


" lfr .-.., 1


,?







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Boyfinds


loaded


gunin


theater
The Associated Press

TAMPA Police say a
9-year-old boy found a
loaded gun inside a bath-
room stall at a movie the-
ater in Tampa's Ybor City
neighborhood.
The incident happened
on Father's Day, while
Zane Noland, his 15-
year-old brother and his
dad were attending a 3
p.m. showing of the new
Superman movie, "Man
of Steel."
Shortly after the film
started, the boy said he
went to the bathroom.
The Tampa Bay Times
reports he found loaded
Glock 26 on top of a toilet
paper dispenser in the
theater's restroom. The
child then told his father,
48-year-old Marine vet-
eran Wesley Noland.
"Dad," he said. "There's
a gun."
Wesley Noland says he
took the firearm and his
son into a private bath-
room designed for fami-
lies and called 911. He
disarmed the gun and
put it on a diaper chang-
ing table.
Police responded in
minutes. Authorities
took the gun and are try-
ing to find the owner and
determine whether the
weapon has ever been
used in a crime.
"We did our Superman
deed for the day," Noland
said he told Zane. "We
protected people from
getting hurt."


NTSB rules

in Mayo

helicopter

crash
The Associated Press

MIAMI Financial
pressures contributed to
a helicopter pilot's deci-
sion to continue flying
through deterioraLing
weather before crashing
in north Florida, killing
a Mayo Clinic heart sur-
geon and technician on
their way to retrieve a
heart for transplant, ac-
cording to the National
Transportation- Safety
Board.
Neither the Bell 206
helicopter nor pilot E.
Hoke Smith of SK Lo-
gistics in St. Augustine
were experiencing
any problems before
the crash early in the
morning on Dec. 26,
2011, according to the
NTSB probable cause
report, published late
Monday.
However, the heli-
copter was not certified
to handle the sporadi-
cally misty and overcast
conditions between the .,.
Mayo Clinic in Jackson-.
ville and Shands at the
University of Florida in
Gainesville. *
The board found that
Smith's decision to con-
tinue flying in the poor
conditions resulted in
the crash in a remote,
wooded area in Clay
County, killing all three
men on board.
Smith did not make
any backup plans for
the organ transport.
Other SK Logistic pi-


lots told investigators
that they would have
made the same flight but
would have arranged
for ground transpor-
tation or a flight by a
fixed-wing aircraft if
they could not complete
the mission as sched-
uled, according to the
report.
"Contributing to the
pilot's improper deci-
sion was his self-induced
pressure to complete the
trip," according to the
report.
.;;, -,o- ,;,-,,'':,',::, -:. : ,


Daytona frontstretch getting $400M facelift


The Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH
Daytona International
Speedway is getting an-
other facelift, this one
considerably bigger than
the last.
Three years after a com-
plete repaying project, the
famed track is overhauling
the frontstretch to enhance
the "fan experience."
International Speedway
Corp., which owns Day-
tona and 12 other NASCAR
tracks, announced fund-
ing approval Tuesday. ISC
estimates the redesign
with cost between $375
million and $400 million.
Daytona had hoped to
get some public funding,
but the Florida House of
Representatives declined
to even vote on a bill'that
would have provided fi-
nancial assistance to sev-
eral sporting venues in the
Sunshine State.
ISC pushed forward
anyway, scheduling the
project to begin July 5 and
be completed by January
2016 in time for the Ro-
lex 24 At Daytona and the
Daytona 500.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this artist rendering provided by Daytona International Speedway on Feb. 22, shows a
proposed addition to the speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla. International Speedway Corp.,
which owns Daytona and 12 other NASCAR tracks, announced funding approval Tuesday,
June18.


The redevelopment
will give Daytona's aging
grandstands a modern
look and feel. It will include
expanded entrances and
a series of escalators and
elevators to transport
fans to three different
concourse levels, each
featuring spacious and
strategically-placed social
"neighborhoods" along
the nearly mile-long front-
stretch. Those 11 neigh-
borhoods, each measuring
the size of a football field,


will allow fans to meet and
socialize during events
without ever missing any
on-track action.
"We are truly creating
history with this unprec-
edented endeavor," ISC,
CEO Lesa France Kenne-
dy said. "I commend the
board's decision to move
forward on our plan to
redevelop the company's
signature motorsports fa-
cility, thereby shaping the
vision of Daytona for the
next 50 years.


"The decision was made
with strong consideration
of the current macroeco-
nomic condition and a
clear view for our long-
term growth. This signifi-
cant private investment
is a strategic use of our
capital that will ensure
the long-term viability of
the iconic speedway, and
when completed, will
contribute favorably to
the company's revenues,
as well as to our com-
munity and the sport


as a whole."
Backstretch grandstands
will be removed while wid-
er and more comfortable
seating will be installed
throughout the front-
stretch. When the project
is complete, Daytona will
have reduced its capacity
by 46,000 seats to 101,000.
"The redevelopment
of Daytona Internation-
al Speedway reaffirms
its status as the 'World
Center of Racing' for years
to come," France Ken-
nedy said. "It is impera-
tive that we build upon
my grandfather's vision to
create a world-class facil-
ity with premium ame-
nities to provide unpar-
alleled experiences for
our guests and partners.
Doing so will ensure that
the Daytona 500 and all
our other events continue
to drive our business while
serving as a significant
economic engine for the
region."


Dissident: Repression forced family to flee


The Associated Press

MIAMI Ome of several
Cuban dissidents recently
allowed to visit Europe
and the U.S. after Cuba
changed its travel laws said
Tuesday she decided to
seek refuge in Miami after
facing continued repres-
sion on the island.
Rosa Maria Paya said she
and her family have been
the subject of threats, ha-
rassment and increased
vigilance since her father's
death last year and follow-
ing her return to Cuba in
April.
"'We wanted to rest a bit
from the persecution we
faced in Cuba," Paya said,
"and continue working on
the opposition's proposals
for change and transition
to democracy."
Paya, 24, is the daughter
of the late Oswaldo Paya,
the lead organizer of the
Varela Project, a signature-
gathering drive regarded
as the largest nonviolent
campaign to change the
system Fidel Castro estab-
lished in 1959. The petition


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asked authorities for a ref-
erendum on guararfteeing
rights such as freedom of
speech and assembly in
Cuba.
In July 2012, Paya and
youth activist Harold Cep-
ero died in a car crash
in Bayamo, Cuba. The
two men and another
passenger were in a car
driven by Spaniard An-
gel 'Carromero, who lost
control and struck a tree,
according to government
authorities. Carromero
was convicted of vehicular
homicide and sent to
Spain to serve a four-year
sentence."
Paya's daughter, wife and
others have insisted the
crash was not an accident.
They assert that witness
accounts, text messages
and statements made af-
ter the crash raise ques-
tions about the Cuban
government's account.
Rosa Maria Paya spoke
with government officials
in the U.S. and Europe to
press for an international
investigation.
Rosa Maria Paya was


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allowed to leave in April
after Cuba eliminated the I
exit permit that had been
required of' islanders for
five decades. She was one
of several prominent Cu-
ban dissidents to visit the
U.S. and appears to be the
first to have returned to
Cuba and then sought sta- 1
tus as a political refugee in
the U.S.
,She 'said that when she
returned to Cuba, immi-
gration officials at the air-
port told her, "Welcome."
But the threats, vigilance
and oppression against her
family and others involved
in the movement her fa-
ther started intensified,
she said.



t '.
/ "


~L


Lookfor details in the

June 23, 2013

edition of the

J.C.,,CKSON COUNTY



FLORIDAN

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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN e www.jcfloridan.com


Waiting for word from Bernanke, stocks move higher


The Associated Press

NEW YORK It's all
about the Fed. Still.
U.S. stocks moved higher
Tuesday, helped by news of
a pickup in home building
and low inflation. But the
Federal Reserve loomed
large, with investors trying
to guess what the central
bank will say Wednesday
about how long it plans
to keep stimulus pro-
grams in place. For many,
the market was in a hold-
ing pattern as investors
waited for Wednesday's
announcement.
The market's gains were
steady and broad. The
Standard & Poor's 500 in-
dex rose 12.77 points, or
0.8 percent, to 1,651.81. All
10 of its sectors rose, led by
industrial and telecommu-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Wednesday, May 22 photo, Federal Reserve Chairman
Ben Bernanke testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. The
Federal Reserve ends a policy meeting Wednesday, June 19.


nications companies. The
Russell 2000, an index of
smaller companies, closed
at a record high but fell
just shy of the 1,000-point
milestone.


Tuesday's wait-and-see
vibe came from a famil-
iar template. The Fed has
had an outsized effect on
the stock market in recent
weeks, with the major


indexes getting yanked
back and forth as investors
try to guess how long the
central bank will keep sup-
porting the U.S. economy.
Some investors say it's
troubling that the mar-
ket is relying more on the
central bank for direction
than economic funda-
mentals. The latest turning
point was May 22, when
Fed Chairman Ben Ber-
nanke startled markets by
announcing that the cen-
tral bank could soon pull
back on its bond-buying
program if the economy
improves.,
"Here we are again," said
Gregg Fisher, founder and
chief investment officer
of Gerstein Fisher in New
York. "We don't know what
the action'will be. We're all
trying to figure that out."


The Fed's role in the
market has swelled since
the 2008 financial crisis.
The central bank, which
traditionally has been
best-known for helping set
interest rates, has taken
an increasingly bigger role
in trying to amp up the
economy. Its bond-buying
program is meant to keep
interest rates low, which
can encourage borrowing
and drive investors into
the stock market. The Fed's
purchases have swollen its
portfolio to $3.4 trillion,
a four-fold increase since
before the crisis.
"The game is different
from what it used to be,"
said Mark Spellman, port-
folio manager for Value
Line Funds in New York.
"It's not just, 'Is the Fed go-
ing to raise (its benchmark


interest rate) up or down?'"
It's 'Is the Fed going to keep
buying $85 billion worth of
bonds each month?'"
Analysts predicted that
Bernanke would use his
Wednesday news confer-
ence to cast a reassuring
tone and make it clear that
the Fed won't pull back on
any of its programs until
it's sure the economy can
handle it. He's also likely
to drop more hints about
when the Fed could start
trimming its stimulus
programs. Some said that
recent market volatility
hasn't been caused by fear
that the Fed will pull back
on its stimulus programs
- most everyone expects
that to happen eventually.
It's more because investors
don't want to be surprised
when it does.


Chrysler agrees to recall of Jeeps at risk of fire Jo, J rcf


The Associated Press --


DETROIT Chrysler
abruptly agreed to recall
2.7 million older model
Jeeps Tuesday, reversing a
defiant stance and avoid-
ing a possible public rela-
tions nightmare over fuel
tanks that can rupture
and cause fires in rear-end
collisions.
In deciding on the re-
call, Chrysler sidestepped
a showdown with gov-
ernment safety regula-
tors that could have led to
public hearings with wit-
nesses providing details of
deadly crashes involv-
ing the Jeeps. The dispute
ultimately could have
landed in court and hurt
Chrysler's image and its
finances.
The company said calls
from customers con-
cerned about the safety of
their Jeeps played a part
in its going along with the
government's request.
Earlier this month, the
automaker refused the


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this 2001 photo, rows of 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokees are
lined up outside the Jefferson North Assembly Plant in
Detroit.


government's request to
recall Jeep Grand Chero-
kees from model years
.1993 through 2004 and
Jeep Libertyg from 2002
through 2007.
The National Highway
Traffic Safety Adminis-
tration, the agency that
monitors vehicle safety,
contends that the Jeep
gas tanks can rupture
if hit from the rear, spill-
ing gas and causing
a fire. NHTSA said a three-
year investigation showed


that 51 people had died in
fiery crashes in Jeeps with
gas tanks positioned be-
hind the rear axle.
Two weeks ago, Chrys-
ler said that the vehicles
aren't defective, despite
prior statements to the
contrary from NHTSA.
The company vouched for
the vehicles' safety again
Tuesday.
Chrysler said thatdealers
will inspect the vehicles
and install trailer hitches
to protect the gas tanks.


The company said vehicles
without hitches will get
them, as will those with
broken hitches or hitches
that aren't from Chrysler.
Chrysler Group LLC,
which -is majority
owned by Fiat SpA of Italy,
wouldn't say how much
the hitches would cost, al-
though they sell for about
$200 each on Internet
sites.
Erik Gordon, a law and
marketing professor at
the University of Michi-
gan, says Chrysler realized
it was headed for a pub-
Jic relations disaster and
decided to reverse course.
"What happened is
they get surprised by how
loud and huge the cry is.
They didn't want to take
the public relations hit,"
Gordon says.
Gordon says Chrys-
ler's image will still get
dinged a little "because
it looks as if they have
done the right thing only
because they were forced
to."


House, Senate on diverging paths on agency budgets


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The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Re-
publicans controlling the
House unveiled slashing
cuts Tuesday to a program
that helps localities build
community development
projects, while their ri-
vals in the Democratic-
led Senate proposed to
restore GOP cuts to inter-
national food aid and nu-
trition help for pregnant
women.
An Energy. Department
spending bill that would
cut President Baiack
Obama's requests for re-
newable energy programs,
meanwhile, began its ad-
vance through the House
Appropriations Commit-
tee as the battling cham-
bers continued to proceed
down wildly divergent
budget tracks.
Senate Democrats were
pressing to restore deep
cuts to domestic programs
like education, housing,
health research and a va-
riety of other programs de-
spite agency budget "caps"
more than $90 billion be-
low the $967 billion level
set under current law.
At issue was Congress'
nuts and bolts budget work
- the annual spending
bills funding day-to-day
agency operations but
it was taking on the ap-
pearance of a slow-motion


train wreck with the most
likely result being even
larger across-the-boafd
cuts than were imposed
earlier this year.
As long as Obama and
congressional Republicans
remain stalemated over
the big-picture budget is-
sues of taxes and curbing
benefit, programs like
Medicare and food stamps,
federal agencies remain
stuck with deep, across-
the-board spending cuts
known as sequestration.
The calendar is working
against reversing seques-
tration for the current bud-
get year expiring oh Sept.
30 and hope is fading for
a budget deal that would
stave off even deeper cuts
this fall.
The current situation has
evolved from the failure of
Obama and Congress to
follow tip the hard-fought
2011 budget and debt deal,
which created seques-
tration as a $1.2 trillion
backstop if Congress and
Obama failed to deliver
alternative deficit cuts to.
replace it. Originally de-
signed to be so punishing
as to force the sides to an
agreement, sequestration
now has become a grim re-
ality, squeezing the Penta-
gon by about 8 percent and
cutting domestic agencies
by about 5 percent.
"I would anticipate that


we probably see the se-
quester happen a second
time," Sen. Roy Blunt, R-
Mo., said.
Unless Congress acts, se-
questration will cap agency
operating budgets at $967
billion next year, though
so-called emergencies like
overseas military opera-
tions and most disaster aid
would add to that. House
Republicans are sticking
with the caps but cutting
domestic programs even
more deeply in order to
channel resources to the


Pentagon.
The result is measures
like the $44 .billion trans-
portation and housing
bill released Tuesday by
the House Appropriations
Committee. The bill cuts
the popular community
development grant pro-
gram, which funds proj-
ects like sidewalks, play-
grounds and low-income
housing rehabilitation, by
$1.3 billion, to just $1.6 bil-
lion, the lowest level since
the Ford administration in
the 1970s.


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19,2013 7A F


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-[


Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Editorial


In surprise vote,


Iran elects a


moderate leader
Scripps Howard News Service
considering how carefully Iran's ruling powers
tried to stack the deck, Sunday's election of mod-
erate Hasan Rowhani as president had to come
as a surprise, if not an actual shock, to them all.
The powerful Guardia Council winnowed the candi-
date field from several hundred to eight: Rowhani and
seven hardliners with close ties to the regime. Former
President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, perhaps the
country's most popular politician, was barred from
running.
Two of the hardliners dropped out of the race earlier
in the month, presumably increasing the electoral
chances of a like-minded candidate.
In the closing days, Rowhani suddenly seemed to
come out of nowhere, attracting large and enthusiastic
crowds. Two things became clear: Voters made apathet-
ic by the corrupt and stolen 2009 election were rejoin-
ing the electoral process, and demoralized moderates
would not boycott it, either.
Rowhani surged so fast that operatives of Supreme
Leader All Khamenei didn't have time to rig the results.
Of the 36 million votes cast, Rowhani curiously, the
only cleric in the race got just over half: 50.7 percent.
That avoided a runoff and deprived Khamenei, the
Guardian Comuncil and the paramilitary Revolutionary
Guards of their last opportunity to fix the race.
The candidate who most worried the West Iran's in-
transigent nuclear negotiator, Saeed Jalili, who is said to
be "100 percent" against detente with the West- came
in third, with only 11.3 percent of the vote.
In a postelection news conference, Rowhani, 64,
promised to support a "new era" of relations with the
West and to follow "the path of moderation and justice,
not extremism."
The president has limited powers. Decisions regard-
ing the nuclear program, foreign affairs and defense
remain the prerogative of Khamanei and the clerics.
But accommodations in all three areas will have to be
made if Iran is to shed the economic sanctions that
have crippled its economy and pushed inflation above
30 percent. 'Importantly, Rowhani promised greater
transparency and step-by-step measures to reassure the
West that Iran is not intent on building a nuclear weap-
ons capacity. The last time the West made any progress
on nuclear inspections was when Rowhani was Iran's
chief nuclear negotiator.
When he takes office in August, Rowhani has two
things going for him: his sizable electoral mandate and
the fact that he's not the incumbent president the
abrasive, combative Mahmoud Amadinejad, a loose
cannon on the world stage.
At least initially, Rowvhani has the good will and high
expectations of the West, which his predecessor never
had.


Con' your representatives

Florida Legislature

jState Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 5
District Office:
Administration Building, Room 186
Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701
Coley 850-718-0047
www.MyFloridaHouse.gov


Gaetz


State Sen. Don Gaetz, R-District 1
District Office:
4300 Legendary Drive
Suite 230
Destin, FL 32541
850-897-5747
866-450-4366 (toll free)


Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O Bo.' 520
Marianna FL 32447 or fa.xing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to ecditorial,'1cfloridan.com. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter Be sure to
include your full-address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed For more information call 850-526-3614.


A better choice for our culture


A t a recent Thursday-morn-
/ ing press conference, House
L IDemocratic leader Nancy
Pelosi was asked to explain the
moral difference between the 20-
week2old babies whom Dr. Kermit
Gosnell killed in his Philadelphia
clinic and the unborn children that
legislation sponsored by Arizona
Republican Rep. Trent Franks
would help protect. It's a perfectly
reasonable question, one she an-
swered with derision and evasion.
The incident perfectly illustrated
something that was noted more
than four decades ago by the jour-
nal CaliforniaMedicine: "The very
considerable semantic gymnastics
required to rationalize abortion as
anything but taking a human life
would be ludicrous if they were
not often put forth under socially
impeccable auspices, It is. suggested
that this schizophrenic sort of sub-
terfuge is necessary because while a
new ethic is being accepted the old
one has not yet been rejected."
We owe it to ourselves as much as
to the lives stuck in our semantics
gymnastics to stop dodging and'ask
the question: Does a baby, at any
stage in pregnancy, really have no
value unless the mother wills it?
Eighteen years ago, Pope John
Paul II saw howthe poison of such
thinking was spreading in his
encyclical on The Gospel of Life:
"Conscience itself, darkened as it
were by such widespread condi-
tioning, is finding it increasingly
difficult to distinguish between
good and evil in what concerns the
basic value of human life."
I thought of JPII while recently lis-
tening to Chuck Todd, host of "The


KathrynLopez

Daily Rundown" on MSNBC.
Ruminating on the latest manu-
factured outrage over a Republican
politician's anti-abortion com-
ments, Todd noted with what
sounded like both nostalgia and
bewilderment that pro-lifers
used to be better at talking about
the issue. Now, it could be argued
that the media pounces on and
amplifies pro-life missteps while
ignoring the everyday debate. Still,
the man has a point.
I suspect Todd and I have differ-
ent views on abortion. But unlike
Rep. Pelosi, who declared abortion
"sacred ground," he probably sees
that a bill seeking to ban abortion
after 20 weeks when a child
could feel pain isn't the same as
banning every one of them.
Implicit in Todd's comment
seemed to be a kind of gratitude
for the pro-life position, or at least
the impulses behind it. It's good to
have people thinking about how to
make the world more hospitable to
life. 'Anti-abortion" and "pro-life"
are just words, but behind them
is more than just "no" to Roe, but
also "yes" to practical help for life:-
crisis-pregnancy centers and adop-
tion counseling, welcome arms.
You don't have to be a dedicated
abortion opponent to see some


good there.
And that's what's missing in the
perennial media kerfuffles about.
the rhetorical abortion battles as
fought by politicians: stories of
people who have chosen life, re-
gardless of the sacrifice, and of the
people who helped them make that
decision and live with it.
"When I have surgery, I stay with
Jesus on the cross. I pray'in my
heart for Mama, Dad, and Ben."
That's 6-year-old Grace Polvani,
who, along with her older brother
Benedict, has a genetic syndrome
that keeps them both in and out of
hospitals. The two of them embrace
life, understanding sacrifice to be
a necessary and even redemptive
part of it.
Sacrifice "is what you're in for,"
Chiaro Polvani shared in a re-
cent interview with the Sisters
of Life, which run a mission for
women who need help raising their
children.
Abortion is a violence of the most
intimate sort. The more we accept
it as a "sacred ground," as Pelosi put
it, as some kind of sign of libera-
tion, the more we miss the culture it
promotes, where men are discon-
nected with no shame from
their children, where women sub-
mit to being used rather than cher-
ished, aid where babies we know
to be humans, not mere tissue or
cells, are discarded. A culture that
helps people rise to challenges and
make sacrifices has got to be a bet-
ter choice. It's about choosing love
- in life and even public policy.
. Kathryn Lopez is the editor-at-large of National
Review Online www.nationalreview.com. She can
be contacted at klopez@nationalreview.com.


Immigration debate is all about border security


here's a fundamental conflict
at the heart of the Senate
debate over the Gang of Eight
comprehensive immigration re-
form bill. Most Republicans believe
a policy to integrate 11 million
currently illegal immigrants into
American society must be condi-
tioned on stronger border security
and internal enforcement. Most
Democrats don't. At its bottom,
that's what the fight is about.
Most Republicans believe secu-
rity must come before integration,
in one of two ways. Some believe
enhanced security must be in place
not a plan, but a reality before
the 11 million can be granted tem-
porary legal status. (In the world of
the Senate, "temporary" means six
to 10 years.) It's probably fair to say
that a majority of the Republican
voting base holds that opinion.
Other Republicans believe en-
hanced security must be in place
again, reality, not a plan be-
fore the legalized immigrants can
move on, after 10 years, to perma-
nent legal resident status, signified
by a green card, and ultimately on
to citizenship.
What unites the two camps is the
conviction that enhanced security
must actually be in place before
today's illegal immigrants are al-
lowed to stay in the U.S. for the rest
of their lives.
Many Democrats pay lip service
to the idea; after all, it's pretty
popular not just with Republican
voters but with Democrats and in-
dependents, too. But they don't see
enhanced security as something
that has to happen before immi-
Sgrants may move forward.
If there were any doubts that
many Democrats do not support
enforcement before integration,
those doubts were dispelled recent-
ly by Sen. Richard Durbin, a leading
Democrat on the Gang of Eight.
"We have de-linked a pathway to
citizenship and border enforce-
ment," Durbin told National
Journal. And Sen. Charles Schumer,


ByronYork

another leading Democrat in the
Gang, called a Republican attempt
to strengthen the link between en-
forcement and the path to citizen-
ship "a nonstarter."
As Democrats see it, reform must
move today's illegal immigrants to
temporary legal status, and then to
permanent legal status, and then
to citizenship without any major
obstacles along the way. A require-
ment that any of those steps be
dependent on specific security and
enforcement improvements is a
nonstarter not just for Schumer but
for Senate Majority Leader Harry
Reid and most other Democrats.
Right now, Durbin, Schumer
and Reid have the advantage. The
Gang of Eight bill being debated
in the Senate does not require any
security advances before illegal im-
migrants are granted a decade-long
"temporary" legal status. And all
that is required before those same
immigrants move on to permanent
legal status and citizenship is that a
"Comprehensive Southern Border
Security Strategy" be "substan-
tially deployed and substantially
operational."
What does "substantially" mean?
It could mean anything, which is
why lawmakers who don't want
to place specific security require-
ments before permanent legaliza-
tion like it.
When Sen. John Cornyn pro-
posed to take out the word "sub-
stantially" and replace it with the
specific standards for border secu-
rity- 100 percent surveillance of
the border, a 90 percent apprehen-
sion rate Democrats immedi-
ately rejected it. They vowed never


to even negotiate the issue.
Both Democrats and Republicans
have been happy to let the public
think the bill is tougher than it is.
For example, Sen. Marco Rubio, the
leading Republican on the Gang
of Eight, talks all the time about
the importance of putting new
security measures in place, but he
means before immigrants are given
permanent status, not before the
temporary, decade-long legaliza-
tion that starts the process.
Rubio made that crystal clear in a
recent Spanish-language interview.
"First comes the legalization," he
told the network Univision. "Then
come the measures to secure the
border." He added that legalization
"is not conditional" that is, it
doesn't depend on any new secu-
rity measures being in place.
A number of Republicans were
surprised by Rubio's words. When
he talked about enhanced security
these last few months, they
thought he meant security before
the first round of legalization. He
didn't.
And just to make it unavoidably
clear, last week the Senate voted
on an amendment proposed by
Republican Sen. Charles Grassley
that would have delayed the first,
S"temporary" legalization until
six months after border security
was actually in place. Rubio voted
against it, along with the rest of
the Gang of Eight and nearly every
Democrat.
And even when it comes to the
granting of permanent legal status,
the Gang bill requires "substan-
tial" deployment of new security,
whatever that is. There's simply
no requirement that the border
be definitely, measurably secure
before today's immigrants com-
plete the journey from illegality to
citizenship.
That's the way the Gang of Eight
wants it.

Byron York is chief political correspondent for
The Washington Examiner.


-J.








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
Phone:(850)526-5059
www.mariannachapelfh.com

Arthur
Johnnie
Hagan

Arthur Johnnie Hagan
age 82 of Marianna passed
away at his home on Tues-
day, June 18, 2013.
Mr. Hagan was a lifelong
resident of Jackson County
born on May 29, 1931 to
the late William Monroe
and Susie Hatcher Hagan.
He served his country in
the United States Army and
was a retired tug boat cap-
tain. He continued his hard
work by owning and oper-
ating City Cab Company in
Marianna which he retired
from in 2005. Mr. Hagan
was an active member of
Hasty Pond Baptist Church
and was faithful and loving
servant to his Lord.
Mr. Hagen was preceded
in death by his parents.
He is survived by his wife
Christine H. Hagan of Ma-
rianna, three daughters
Tausha Shores of Marian-
na, Yolanda Gibson of Ma-
rianna and Sandra Franklin
of Grand Ridge, sister Hel-
en Porter Rudd and hus-
band John of Marianna, a
host of grandchildren and
great grandchildren.
Services for Mr. Hagan
will be at 2:00 P.M. on
Thursday, June 20, 2013 at
the Hasty Pond Baptist
Church with interment to
follow in the church ceme-
tery.
A time of remembrance
will be held from 6:00 P.M.
to 8:00 P.M. on Wednes-
day, June 19, 2013 in the
Marianna Chapel Funeral
Home.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is charge of ar-
rangements. Expressions of
sympathy my submitted
online at
www.mariannachapelfh.com

Peel Funeral Home
Bonifay, FL
(850) 547-4144

James Archie
Yates, Jr.

Mr. James Archie Yates,*
Jr., age 48, of Campbellton,
Florida died .June 16, 2013
after a short illness. Mr.
Yates was born December
14, 1964 in Bonifay, Flori-
da. His family lived in Ver-
non, Florida until 1975 be-
fore settling in Cottondale,
Florida." Mr. Yates was a
farmhand and beekeeper
throughout his life.
Mr. Yates is predeceased
Sby his father, James Archie
Yates, Sr. and a brother,
James Allen Yates.
He is survived by his
--wife, Tammy Catron Yates
of Campbellton, FL; his
mother, JoAnn. Reeder
Yates of Marianna, FL; one
sister, Kathy and Rusty
Holmes, niece Brittany
Holmes Wilkins and Josh,
nephews, Tommy Holmes
and Bobby Holmes all of
Marianna, FL; one brother,
Keith Yates, niece Brandy
Yates, nephews, Justin
Yates and Josh Yates all of
Graceville, FL; special
friends the Villeda family
and Macalister/Waddell
families of Campbellton,
FL.
Funeral services will be
held 11:00 AM Wednesday,
June 19, 2013 at Pleasant
Hill Free Will Baptist
Church with Rev. Arlester
Macalister and Speaker
Lamont Ennis officiating.
Interment will follow in the
Pleasant Hill Cemetery
with Peel Funeral Home of
Bonifay, FL directing. Visi-
tation will be one hour pri-
or to the service. Memorial
donations may be given to
Hospice of Emerald Coast,
4374 Lafayette Street, Ma-
rianna, FL 32447.


1Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


Workldng together to weather life's storms


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Jackson County Emergency
Management Director Rodney
Andreasen and a fellow guest
speaker shared the podium at the
most recent Chamber of Com-
merce Power Breakfast, team-
ing up to inspire local business
owners to think ahead about how
their companies would go on in
the wake of a disastrous tornado
or other crisis.
Andreasen was joined by Bryan
Koon, director of Florida's Divi-
sion of Emergency Management.
The state director stressed that lo-
cal businesses need to face a seri-
ous reality; in the wake of a storm,
they shouldn't expect the Federal
Emergency Management Agency
to arrive an hour later with cash
in hand to help them re-establish
operations. They should expect
to be on their own for a while in
the aftermath. Businesses need
to review their insurance policies
now to make sure their coverage
is adequate, Andreasen said. They
should identify potential alterna-
tive locations to open up shop
if their space is damaged. They
should consider cloud storage for
their vital information, so that it
won't be lost if their computers
and related equipment is dam-
aged beyond repair.
Although those remarks were


geared to the business sector in
that moment, the overall mes-
sage on readiness was, in fact,
meant for the entire community.
Andreasen said Koon is carrying
forward a "whole community"
approach to disaster readiness
that was first put forward by his
predecessor, Craig Fugate, who
has since moved on to a leader-
ship position at the federal level.
It's an initiative that Andreasen
believes could be the salvation of
the local area.
Andreasen will be taking that
notion-further as time goes on;
talking to church groups and
other organizations about some
of the things they need to do to be
ready. He said getting prepared
with backup plans and working
together will not only ensure for
their own well-being, but it can
assist others in the community
who may need a helping hand
when a crisis hits.
"Instead of communities de-
pending on the government to
respond, we're turning inward,"
Andreasen said. "We're looking at
businesses, community groups,
churches, other organizations
and individuals to both assist oth-
ers and to prepare themselves."
He said he envisions a day; for
instance, when church leaders of
all faiths would meet and work
out a feeding plan for local resi-
dents in the event that a weather


disaster left people without the
means to cook at home or go to a
local restaurant. A tornado could
effectively wipe out the business
corridors and destroy homes, he
pointed out, and many people
could be left with little recourse
without some careful planning.
Andreasen said some work is
already being done to build a


"whole community" infrastruc-
ture for disaster response. For
instance, Walmart and Lowe's
stores have already committed to
being part of that structure. He'll
be making the rounds at various
organizations in the weeks and
months to come as he attempts
to get the community engaged. in
long-range preparedness efforts.


Jury can't reach verdict in murder trial of Detroit cop


The Associated Press

DETROIT A judge
declared a mistrial Tues-
day after jurors failed to
reach a verdict in the trial
of a Detroit police officer
who fatally shot a 7-year-
old girl during a chaotic
search for a murder sus-
pect that was recorded by
a reality TV crew.
Loud voic-
es could be
L '!'_ heard in the
IF jury room
a few hours
before ju-
rors threw
Weekley in the towel
and were
dismissed. They sent three
notes, the last one indi-
cating they still couldn't
reach a unanimous ver-
dict on the third day of
deliberations, despite en-
couragement from Wayne
County Judge Cynthia
Gray Hathaway.
Joseph Weekley, a mem-
ber of an elite police
squad, was charged with
involuntary manslaugh-
ter in the death of Aiyana
Stanley-Jones.
He was accused of be-
ing "grossly negligent" in
how he handled his sub-
machine gun as his black-
clad,, masked and armed
unit stormed the Detroit


Arrests
From Page 1A
the robberies.
Local investigators have filed
Sone armed rob-
bery charge in
connection to the
crimes. A Houston
County Sheriff's
investigator filed
a first-degree rob-
Grant III bery charge against
Smiley on Monday
charging him with
the robbery of the
Pansey Grocery
BP Bait and Tackle
store on US 84 just
east of Ashford on
Saturday, June 8.
The Pansey store
robbery was also
one of two that occurred on the
same day that turned violent as
gunfire erupted during the rob-
bery. Hughes previously told the
Eagle the Pansey store owner re-
turned fire at two masked gun-
men as they fired guns into the
store while entering the building.
Hughes said Tuesday they also
learned Smiley suffered a gun-
shot wound to the arm during
an exchange of gunfire with the
convenience store owner in Pan-
sey. Two young girls were also
inside the store at the time of the


home.to capture a suspect
in May 2010. Police threw
a stun grenade through a
window, and Weekley was
the first officer through
the door.
Weekley told jurors that
he accidentally pulled the.
trigger during a struggle
with the girl's grand-
mother, but Mertilla Jones
denied interfering with
the gun. Weekley was not
charged with intentionally
shooting Aiyana.
The hunt for a murder
suspect was being record-
ed by a crew from "The
First 48," a police show on
A&E Networks. Some vid-
eo shot from the sidewalk
was part of the evidence.
The jury could have con-
victed Weekley of involun-
tary manslaughter, a felo-
ny, or reckless discharge of
a firearm, a misdemeanor.
He also could have been
cleared of all charges.
"This is a bittersweet
outcome: Bitter because
Weekley was not con-
victed, and sweet in that
justice for Aiyana Jones
will come soon," said Ro-
land Lawrence, leader of
a group called Justice for
Aiyana Jones Committee,
which pressed for charges.
The judge listed several
factors for the jury to con-
sider on. the involuntary


manslaughter count. To
convict, the jury had to
find that he willfully disre-
garded possible injuries to
others by failing to control
his gun, as well as other
elements,
"We are stuck," the
jury said in its first note
Tuesday.
Before dismissing the
jurors, the judge asked if
anyone believed that more
deliberations would be
fruitful if "some matters"
could be addressed. She
didn't elaborate. Only one
juror raised her hand.
"One out of 12 probably
won't be enough," Hatha-
way said.
The mistrial doesn't
mean the charges go away.
Hathaway wants to dis-
cuss the status, including
another trial, on July 25.
"The Wayne County
prosecutor's office is
prepared to proceed
with the case," Prosecu-
tor Kym Worthy said in a
statement.
There was no immedi-
ate comment from Week-
ley or his attorney, Steve
Fishman.
Weekley, the last witness
during the eight-day trial,
admitted he must have
pulled the trigger, but only
because he was trying to
wrest the gun from Jones.


robbery, but no one else was
injured.
"We're very fortunate no one
was killed," Hughes said.
On the same evening as the Pan-
sey robbery, gunfire also erupted
at another store robbery in near-
by Early County, Ga., which left
a woman with a minor gunshot
wound to her back.
A half dozen of the robberies
occurred in Houston County, two
happened in Georgia, another
happened in Marianna, another
in Enterprise and another in
Abbeville.
Hughes said during six of the
robberies, shots were fired. He
also said the robbers assaulted
and "pistol-whipped" a clerk in
three of the robberies.
Hughes said both suspects
have a prior criminal history, and
Smiley has twice served time in
prison. He also said both suspects
have confessed to the robberies,
but he declined to comment on
specifically which robberies.
"Without getting a DNA match
we'd probably still be looking for
these guys," Hughes said.
DNA
Jackson County Sheriff Lou
Roberts said they needed a "rush"
on the DNA analysis, which they
got after they proved "exigent"
circumstances existed or that
people's lives were possibly in


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
This undated family photo shows Aiyana Stanley-Jones, 7,
who was shot and killed May 16,2010, by a shot from a Detroit
police officer during a raid of a Detroit home in search of a
murder suspect.


No other officers, howev-
er, testified about a strug-
gle with Alyana's grand-
mother. One said Detroit
police are taught specific
-techniques to keep a gun
away from someone who
grabs it.
Prosecutor Rob Moran
all but accused Weekley
of lying, telling the jury
in closing remarks: "It did
not happen."
Weekley said he was


danger if they did not identify
it quickly.
Roberts said investigators with
his office submitted evidence
from the BP store robbery in Mar-
ianna that happened on June 4 to
their state crime lab for testing.
After asking for a "rush" on the
analysis at ,the state crime lab
they had their results the follow-
ingweek on June 12. Those results
Roberts said led to a Combined
DNA Index System (CODIS) hit, a
national DNA data base, leading
them to the Grant suspect. Hous-
ton County Sheriff's deputies ar-
rested Grant in Dothan the next
day on a fugitive warrant.
"We could see this escalating,
that was our concern," Roberts
said. "They were getting more
brazen about their crimes and the
brutality involved."
Roberts said connecting Grant
to the robberies with DNA, then
looking into his known associ-
ates, lead to their second suspect,
Smiley. He also said their investi-
gation showed Grant had recently
moved to Dothan from Florida,
and Smiley likewise from Mid-
land City.
"These two were the main ones,
but there are probably other
known associates involved," Rob-
erts said. "It was a combined ef-
fort of not one but many agencies
that made this possible. The bad
guy knows no boundaries, and we


distraught after the shoot-
ing and was shaking and
vomiting.
"I just feel devastated
and depressed," he tes-
tified. "I'll never be the
same, no."
Separately, a videogra-
pher for the "The First 48,"
Allison Howard, is charged
with perjury and with-
holding video crucial to
the investigation. Her trial
is set for June 24.


don't either."
Local authorities have turned
the cases over to the FBI and the
U.S. Attorney's Office. Hughes
said both suspects were taken to a
detention facility in Montgomery
Tuesday as they were turned over
to federal custody
Kevin Davidson, an assis-
tant U.S. attorney with the U.S.
Attorney's Office, said the U.S.
Attorney's Office will be handling
the case now after local authori-
ties sought their assistance along
with the FBI.
Davidson said the two suspects
will be tried by the federal gov-
ernment in one consolidated case
rather than multiple separate cas-
es in three different states."
Hughes was joined by nearly a
dozen law enforcement officers
from the tri-state area, includ-
ing Roberts, Sheriff William Price
from Early County, Ga., Dale
County Sheriff Wally Olson, Hen-
ry County Sheriff William Mad-
dox, Capt. Stacey Robinson with
the Dothan Police Department
and Enterprise Police Chief T.D.
Jones.
Price called the arrests a "bless-
ing" for their area.
"I'm from a small town and stuff
like this truly shakes us up," Price
said.

Matt Elofson is a reporter at
the Dothan Eagle.


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Quality Service at Affordable Prices

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Jackson County Emergency Management Director Rodney Andreasen answers
questions at First Friday, June 14, in Marianna.


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LOCAL & NATION







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Brazil protesters keep up pressure on government


The Associated Press
SAO PAULO Protest leaders called for
another huge demonstration in Brazil's
largest city Tuesday, building on historic
turnouts spawned by widespread frus-
tration over decades of government red
tape, high prices and shoddy services
even as the nation's economic fortunes
have risen.
With Sao Paulo girding for another
march, the mobilizations have shown a
rare spotlight on the growing discontent
among the country's booming middle
class that public infrastructure and qual-
ity of government haven't kept up with
economic gains.
The protests started with a group in-
censed about a 10-cent hike in subway
and bus fares, the Free Fare Movement,
which is mostly composed of students.
The demonstrations exploded Monday
night, however, after images broadcast
nationwide showed police attacking the
fare protesters during a rally Thursday in
Sao Paulo.
The thousands who have since filled
Brazilian cities have largely hailed from
the middle class, with many holding
up signs complaining about grievances
such as poor public safety and knotty
bureaucracy.
"We're massacred by the government's
taxes, yet when we leave home in the
morning to go to work, we don't know if
we'll make it home alive because of the
violence," said Maria Claudia Cardoso,
accompanied by her 16-year-old son at a
march Monday in Sao Paulo.
"We don'thave good schools for our kids.
Our hospitals are in awful shape. Corrup-
tion is rife. These protests will make his-
tory and wake our politicians up to the
fact that we're not taking it anymore!"'
President Dilma Rousseff, a former
leftist guerrilla who was imprisoned and


i:;.Tr- : ,,u.-i e d l 'rE ::,
KABUL, Afghanistan The Taliban and
the U.S. said Tuesday they will hold talks
on finding a political solution to ending
nearly 12 years of war in Afghanistan,
as the international coalition formally
handed over control of the country's se-
curity to the Afghan army and police. ,
The Taliban met a key U.S. demand by
pledging not to use Afghanistan as a base
to threaten other countries, although the
Americans said they must also denounce
al-Qaida.. ; '
But President Barack Obama caudoned
that the process won't be quick or easy.
He described the opening of a Taliban
political office in the Gulf nation of Qatar
as an "important first step toward recon-
ciliation" between the Islamic militants
and the government of Afghanistan, and
predicted there will be bumps along the
way.
Obama, who was attending the G-8
summit ,in Northern Ireland, praised Af-
ghan President Hamid Karzai for taking a
courageous step by sending representa-
tives to discuss peace with the Taliban.
"It's good news. We're very pleased with
what has taken place," U.S. Secretary
of State John Kerry said in Washington.
British Prime Minister David Cameron,
whose, country has the second-largest
contingent of troops in Afghanistan after
the U.S., called opening the office "the


tortured during Brazil's 1964-85 dictator-
ship, appeared to embrace the protests
Tuesday, even though her government
was a prime target. "Brazil today woke up
stronger," she was quoted as saying by a
statement released by her office.
"The massive size of yesterday's pro-
tests prove the energy of our democracy,
the force of the voice of the street and the
civility of our population," Rousseff said.
The movement has gathered Brazilians
from all walks of life with a central lament:
The government provides woeful services
despite a large tax burden.
Brazilians have long tolerated pervasive
corruption, even as millions have moved
out of poverty over the past decade. Many
of them have begun to demand more
from their government and are angry
that billions of dollars in public funds are
being spent to host the World Cup and
Olympics while few improvements are
made on infrastructure elsewhere.
Maria do'Carmo Freitas, a 41-year-old
public servant from Brasilia, said she was
excited about the protests even though
she hadn't taken part.
"I'm loving it. It's been a long time since
we Brazilians decided to leave our com-
fort zone to 'tell our leaders that we're not
happy about the way things are going,"
said Freitas. "We pay too much in taxes
and we get bad services in exchange, bad
hospitals, bad public education, public
transportation is terrible."
Gilberto Carvalho, Rousseff's general
secretary, said the protests reflect a richer
population.
"The impression is that we have over-
come some obstacles, but society wants
more," Carvalho said.
The office of the United Nations' High
Commissioner for Human rights "urged
the Brazilian authorities today to exercise
restraint in dealing with spreading social
protests in the country."


right thing to do."
-Officials with the Obama administra-
tion said the office in the Qatari capital
of Doha was the first step toward the ulti-
mate U.S.-Afghan goal of a full Taliban re-
nunciation of links with al-Qaida, the rea-
son why America invaded the country on
Oct. 7, 2001, shortly after the Sept. 11 Iter-
rorist attacks against the United States.
The officials, who spoke on condition
of anonymity becZaue they were not au-
thorized to speak on the record, said U.S.
.representatives will begin formal meet-
ings with the Taliban in Qatar in a few
days.
The top U.S. commander in Afghani-
stan, Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford, said
the only way to end the war was through
a political solution.
"My perspective has always been that
this war is going to have to end with polit-
ical reconciliation, and so I frankly would
be supportive of any positive movement
in terms of reconciliation, particularly an
Afghan-led and an Afghan-owned pro-
cess that would bring reconciliation be-
tween the Afghan people and the Taliban
in the context of the Afghan constitution,"
he said.
The transition to Afghan-led security
means U.S. and other foreign combat
troops will not be directly carrying the
fight to the insurgency, but will advise
and back up as needed with air support
and medical evacuations.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A demonstrator waves a Brazilian flag during a protest in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Monday.


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Afghanistan

US, Taliban to start talks on ending war


I FF-I!


"7IlOA WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19,2013


WORLD










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Alabama-Florida Shootout


SMalone takes two-of-three


-[vrniMARK ~ ~ SKNE / FLO iRtIDA
Chai Baker gets ready to go up for a layup during a Malone game earlier
this summer.


BY DUSTIN KENT the rest of the day.
dkent@jcfloridan.com Malone coach Steven Welch
said that the injury was believed
TheMaloneTigers overcame an to be a srain that would keep
injury to Chai Baker on Monday Baker out for at least the rest of
evening to take two out of three this week, though the initial scare
games at the Alabama-Florida was that the wrist was broken.
Shootout at Poplar Springs. "It was scary," the coach said.
The rising senior guard Baker, "We all had a collective sigh
who has led the Tigers in scor- when it happened. He just came
ing in each of the past three sea- down on a routine layup and.got
sons, came down hard on his left us feet tangled up and jammed
wrist in the opening minutes of it. I've had a kid break his wrist
Malone's first game against Car- like that before, but the X-ray
roll (Ala.) and did not return for right now shows up negative.


Hopefully, it's nothing."
The remaining Tigers picked
up much of the slack in Baker's
absence, turning a close game
early against Carroll into a 54-39
victory before falling to Geneva
58-56 in overtime.
Alonze Bailey nailed a buzzer-
beating shot at the end of regu-
lation to send the Geneva game
into OT, but Geneva won the tip
and scored first in the sudden
death extra session to win the

See MALONE, Page 3B


Sports Briefs

Alabama-Florida
Shootout

The annual Alabama-
Florida Shootout at Poplar
Springs pitting high school
boys basketball teams from
Florida against squads from
Alabama finishes up today.
Marianna plays Arnold
at 9 a.m., Relhobeth at 11
a.m., and Carroll and 1 p.m.;
Graceville opens with Re-
hobeth at 10 a.m., then plays
Carroll and noon, and Zion
Chapel at 2 p.m.; Malone
plays Walton at 4 p.m.,,Ge-
neva County at 6 p.m., and
Houston County at 8.p.m.

Cottondale Summer
Basketball
SConondale High School
plays host to Bainbridge
(Ga.)j, Chipley, and Ruther-
ford on Thursday, with Cot-
tondale facing Bainbridge at
3 p.m., Chipley vs. Bain-
bridge at 4 p.m., Chipleyvs.
Rutherford at 5 p.m., and
Cottondale vs. Rutherford at
6p.m.

Marianna Swim Team
The MNiarianna Swim Team
is a local, recreational swim
team for boys and girls ages
4-18. Practices are held from
5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Monday
through Thursday through
August at Chipola College
PooL
Meets are held on Sat-
urdays throughout the
summer.
Registration is open. All we
require is that the swimmer
swim one full pool length
(25 yards) and that children
under 10 have parental su-
pervision during practices.
The registration fee of
$35 payable to MIST helps
' cover cost of life guards and
relay events at meets. Team
T-shirts for members will be
an additional $5 and $15 for
non-members. Pool mem-
bership is also required by
Chipola College.
For additional informa-
tion please call Vicki Pelham
at ,482-2435; Angie Bunting'
at 209-8918; Julie Smith at
557-3292; Monica Bolin
at 209-2388; or email your
questions to MST2010@
centurylink.net.

Bulldog Wrestling Club'
The BulldogWrestling
Club is starting practice for
the summer season.
Practice will be Tuesday
and Thursday nights from
5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the
old Marianna High School
wrestling room.
All Jackson County kids
ages 5-18 are welcome to
join. For more information,
call MHS coach Ron Thore-
son at 272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com, or
fax them to 850-482-4478.
The mailing address for the
paper is Jackson County
Floridan P.O. Box 520 Mari-
anna, FL 32447.


LEARNING THE BASICS


MARK SKINNEK / LUKRIUAN
oach Tyrone Dawson helps Max Harkrider with his bunting stance during a hitting camp at
Chipola College last week.


Chipola
Womeaen's Hoops










Lady Indians

have '13 class

nearly done

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Chipola Lady Indians bas-
ketball coach Greg Franklin
has added three more players
to his nearly-completed 2013
recruiting class, raising the
roster number to 14 players,
with one spot still left for a fi-
nal addition.
The Dubach, La., native Key
headlines the latest group of
Lady Indians to sign, as the 5-
foot-8 guard comes to Chipola
fresh off of a senior season in
which she led her Dubach Lady
Hornets team to a Class C state
title by scoring 41 points in the
championship game after put-
ting in 42 in the semifinals.
Franklin said that Key, who
was also a state high jump
champion in Louisiana, has
the ability to make an immedi-
ate impact on the Lady Indians
next season.
"She's a phenomenal ath-
lete," the coach said. "Barring
injury and attitude, she can be
one of the better players in the
country. She just has to come
in and work because no one is

See CLASS, Page 3B


Prep Basketball


Big run lifts GHS over Cairo
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com


MARK SKINNER / FLORIDAN
Graceville's Rashard McKinnie tries to put a shot up in traffic during a game
earlier this year's late summer.


The Graceville Tigers
scored the final 12 points
of the game to erase a late
deficit and surge past Cairo
(Ga.) for a 38-31 victory
Tuesday afternoon at Mari-
anna High School.
Cairo led 31-26 after a
13-2 run' of its own with
just under seven minutes
to, play, but the Tigers' de-
fense held the Syrupmakers
scoreless.for the remainder
of the game.
Derek White ended a
nearly 12-minute field
goal drought for the Tigers
with bank shot after being
fouled on a step-through
move at the free throw line
for a three-pointplay to cut
the lead to two.
A steal and layup by
Rashard McKinnie tied the
game up with 4:35 to play,
and backto back free throw
conversions by Marquavi-
ous Johnson gave Gracev-
ille a 35-31 edge.-
A three-pointer from the
left corner by McKinnie
proved to be the dagger,
making it 38-31 with 1:56
remaining.
McKinnie scored all 10
of his points in the second
half, while White led the
way with 18 points.
Johnson chipped in six
points, and Jalin Lawson
four, with the quartet of
Graceville scorers account-
ing for all 38 of the team's
points.
The game got off to a

See GHS, Page 3BL
*- : .' :
-s







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


- ;,. A r i.. -. ...- _-' -.


TENNIS
Wozniacki, Tomic
advance at Eastbourne
EASTBOURNE, England
Defending champion
Tamira Paszek was forced
to retire with a left thigh
injury during her first-
round match against
2009 champion Caroline
Wozniacki at Eastbourne
Tuesday.
Wozniacki was leading
6-2, 2-2 when Paszek was
forced off.
The Austrian, who was
chasing her first win on
the WTA tour since Janu-
ary, was broken at 3-2 and
Wozniacki then broke
again to take the opening
set'. Paszek broke to lead
2-1 in the second set but
received treatment, lost
her next service game and
retired.
A single break of serve
late in each set gave
Australia's Bernard Tomic
a 6-3, 6-4 victory over
British wild card James
Ward.

Venus Williams pulls
out of Wimbledon
WIMBLEDON, England
Five-time Wimbledon
champion Venus Williams
has pulled out of the
grass-court Grand Slam
tournament because of a
lower back injury.
Williams' agent, Carlos
Fleming, says Wimbledon
was told of her decision
Tuesday.
Williams, who turned 33
on Monday, was bothered
by her back during a first-
round loss at the Frenlch
Open last month, then
cited that injury when she
and her younger sister
Serena withdrew from the
doubles competition. in
Paris.
The older Williams
played at Wimbledon
each of the last 16 years -
never missing it since her
debut in 1997. She won
the title in 2000-01,2005
and 2007-08. Williams lost
in the first round at the All
England Club last year.
Play begins at Wimble-
don next Monday.

Malisse ousts Ferrer
in Topshelf Open
ROSMALEN, Nether-
lands French Open
finalist David Ferrer lost
his first-round match
Tuesday at the Topshelf
Open, a grass-court tour-
nament held the week
before Wimbledon.
A single service break
in the second set was
enough for Xavier Mal-


IF


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mike Harmon stands by his truck before practice for a Truck Series race at Charlotte Motor Speedway. Harmon has turned
himself in to authorities in North Carolina after warrants were issued for him and a business partner.


isse of Belgium to beat
defending champion
and top-seeded Ferrer in
straight sets, 7-6 (3), 6-3.
The 2011 champion
Roberta Vinci had no such
problems, brushing aside
Kaia Kanepi 6-3, 6-3 in
the first match on center
court to reach the second
round.
Second-seeded Stanislas
Wawrinka was playing
Steve Darcis later Tues-
day in the first round.
Wawrinka was to play Igor
Sijsling, but the Dutch-
man pulled out with a
stomach problem.
AUTO RACING
Driver in NC turns
himself in on
charges
SHELBY, N.C. NAS-
CAR driver Mike Harmon
has turned himself in
'to authorities in North
Carolina after warrants
were issued for him and a
business partner.
Sheriff's deputies in
Rowan County say war-
rants were issued for
Harmon and the busi-
ness partner on Monday.
Authorities say the men
,are charged with break-
ing and entering and
larceny after breaking and
entering.
Investigators say the
men allegedly stole at
least seven vehicles from
NASCAR's truck racer
Jennifer Jo Cobb last year.
Harmon once was the
team manager for Cobb's
Nationwide racing team.


The charges are a result
of search warrants exe-
cuted at a storage shed at
a North Carolina location
and at Harmon's shop in
Mooresville on May 28.
Harmon surrendered in
Shelby on Monday after-
noon. It was not clear if he
has an attorney.
BASEBALL
City sues MLB over
A's proposed move
SAN JOSE, Calif. A
Northern California city
is suing Major League
Baseball over the Oakland
Athletics' pursuit of a new
ballpark in the city.
In a lawsuit filed on
Tuesday in federal court,
the City of San Jose says
MLB has been dragging
its feet in having owners
vote on the A's proposed
move to San Jose.
The lawsuit says MLB
has controlled the loca-
tion of teams under the
"guise" of an exemption to
federal antitrust law. The
lawsuit is disputing that
exemption.
The San Francisco
Giants have objected to
the A's potential move
on grounds they relied
on territorial rights to
the San Jose-area market
when the Giants built
their ballpark.
MLB Commissioner
Bud Selig appointed a
committee to study the
matter.
He has previously said
additional litigation over
the A's move would be


unproductive.

HOCKEY
Datsyuk, Red Wings
agree on extension
DETROIT Pavel Dat-
syuk and the Detroit Red
Wings have an agreement
on a three-year contract.
The Red Wings said
Tuesday they had agreed
to terms on a deal to keep
Datsyuk through the
2016-17 season. He can't
sign the contract until July
5 because he was entering
the last year of his current
deal.
The Russian superstar
has said he wanted to
stay with the Red Wings
instead of returning home
to play following the
2013-14 season.
Datsyuk led Detroit with
15 goals and 49 points
in the 48-game, lockout-,
shortened season. He tied
for third on the team with
nine points in the post-
season, which ended in
the second round against
Chicago. He helped the
Red Wings win the Stanley
Cup in 2002 as a rookie
and again in 2008.

Couture agrees to ex-
tension with Sharks
SAN JOSE, Calif. -The
San Jose Sharks have
agreed to a contract
extension with star center
Logan Couture to keep
him off the market next
summer.
A person familiar with


the deal confirmed the
extension Tuesday, which
was first reported by
Comcast SportsNet Call- .
fornia. The person spoke
on condition of anonym-
ity because the contract
can't be signed until
the free agency window
opens July 5.
Couture is owed $3
million next season in the
final year of a two-year,
$5.75 million contract.
Couture would have been
eligible to be a restricted
free agent next summer.
! The 24-year-old Couture
has emerged as one of the
Sharks' top players. He
has led the team in goals
the past two seasons and
often drew the toughest
defensive matchups this
season.
OLYMPICS
Diving great Louga-
nis to marry in fall
NEWYORK Former
Olympic diving champion
Greg Louganis plans to
get married this fall.
People magazine says
the 53-year-old Louga-
nis will marry paralegal
Johnny Chaillot.
The four-time gold
medalist is the only man
to win consecutive Olym-
pic titles in springboard
and platform diving in
1984 at Los Angeles and
1988 at Seoul.
After his diving career
ended, Louganis revealed
he was gay in 1994 and
announced he was HIV-
positive a year later.


Louganis is helping
Olympic hopefuls as an
athlete mentor for USA
Diving. He's also been fea-
tured as a coach on ABC's
reality diving competition
"Splash."
HORSE RACING
Animal Kingdom no
factor at Royal Ascot
ASCOT, England Ken-
tucky Derby champion
Animal Kingdom was
unable to go out a win-
ner, fading quickly in the
Queen Anne Stakes on
Tuesday in his last race
before retirement.
Animal Kingdom had a
mediocre start and was no
factor in the prestigious
race a straight mile on
the opening day ofthe
Royal Ascot meet.
Animal Kingdom won
the Derby in 2011 and the
$10 million Dubai World
Cup this year. Not since
1936 has a Derby winner
run at Royal Ascot.
Declaration of War eas-
ily won the Queen Anne.
The horse ridden by Jo-
seph O'Brien and trained
byAidan O'Brien finished
ahead ofAljamaaheer and
Gregorian.
After the traditional pro-
cession down the course
led by Queen Elizabeth II,
a minute of silence was
held for Henry Cecil, the
legendary trainer who
died last week at 70.
BASKETBALL
Pelicans workout
Burke, Carter-Williams
WESTWEGO, La. New
Orleans has taken a closer
look at two of the NBA
draft's top point guard
prospects.
The Pelicans, who have
the sixth selection in
the June 27 draft, Friday
worked out Michigan's
Trey Burke and Syracuse's
Michael Carter-Williams.
Maryland center Alex Len,
coming off surgery last
month for a stress fracture
to his left ankle, was in
town but did not work
out.
Burke, the AP player of
the year in 2013, averaged
18.5 points and 6.7 assists
per game in leading the.
Wolverines to the national
championship game.
Burke feels he "can
make an impact right
away and help this team
win."
Pelicans general man-
ager Dell Demps says New
Orleans is looking for the
best fit, whether or not
that choice would be a
major contribution this
season.


College World


UNC drops LSU


The Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. Bri-
an Holberton homered,
freshman Trent Thornton
pitched a strong seven in-
nings and No. 1 national
seed North Carolina ex-
tended its stay at the Col-
lege World Series with a
4-2 victory over LSU on
Tuesday.
The Tar Heels (58-11)
play North Carolina State
or UCLA in an elimination
game Thursday. The No.
4-seeded Tigers (57-11)
went 0-2 in their first CWS
appearance since winning
the 2009 national title.
Holberton's 12th homer
of the season staked the
Tar Heels to a 2-0 lead in
the first inning against LSU
starter Cody Glenn (7-3),
and Colin Moran singled to
make it 3-0 in the third.
Thornton (12-1) worked
around two singles and
three walks to hold the
Tigers scoreless until the
fifth. Leading 4-2, Thorn-
ton walked Christian Ibarra
to start the eighth and was
relieved by Chris McCue.
McCue hit Sean McMul-
len in the arm with 2-2
pitch to load the bases with
two out. That brought up
Mark Laird, who had a
double and four singles in
his first eight CWS at-bats.
jBut McCue got Laird to fly


out to short left field and
keep it a two-run game.
McCue worked a perfect
ninth for his second save.
Carolina, which lost 8-1
to North Carolina State in
its CWS opener, remains
the only team in the coun-
try to not lose back-to-back
games this season. The Tar
Heels are outscoring op-
ponents 85-30 after losses,
and their 58 wins are a
school record.
LSU scored only three
runs in two CWS games.
National freshman of the
year Alex Bregman, who
was batting a team-leadcng
.374, was hitless in eight
at-bats. Raph Rhymes,
batting .337, was 0 for 9 in
Omaha and stranded eight
base runners against the
Tar Heels. Christian Ibarra,
batting .311, finished the
season hitless in his last 22
at-bats.
Thornton, who has
served in every capacity on
the Carolina pitching staff,
was making sixth start in 29
appearances but first since
March 27.
He got the call over avail-
able weekend starters
Hobbs Johnson and Benton
Moss, both of whom have
struggled of late. Thornton
came in as the Tar Heels'
best pitcher in the post-
season, having allowed two
runs in 211-3 innings.


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LSU players react in the dugout after losing 4-2 to North
Carolina on Tuesday in Omaha, Neb.


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SPORTS






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN *. www:icflo m


C1 coach with last year's second- quick, fast athletes, and she's one' with size, quickness, and the Akaraiwe, and 6-foot-2 Evelyn
C I sS leading Chipola scorer, Kristine of those," Franklin said. "l tee,.estlJrv,p ply bor ibg and gkhaior, who wiljoin retiring
FBrance. ,-.. '. .. ,-like she's a very' good 1o6j0iA : w Mthurs.ra'iihg' 6-toot sopho iore Treyvonnrma
From Page1B "She's a knock-down shooter,":ment to havn we've got going on tuauity '" Brooks to give the team a deep
great from day one. But if she has Franklin said of Moore. "She's a We're going to play 90 feet next "We've got everything we and talented frontcourt after
the right attitude and work ethic, pure shooter, but one thing I've year and she could be a big cog want," the coach said. "It will having only one true post player
she can end up being really, re- said about her is that she's a bas- to the wheel." change our game, but it won't, last year.
ally good." ketball player first, but if I had Franklin said he hopes to add We'll still play defense first, and But while the enhanced size
Franklin had to beat out Trinity to take a shot at the end of the one more signee to the class, the the offensive end will take care should be a big plus for the Lady
Valley, Northwest Florida State, game, I'd like for her to take that "best available player," regard- of itself. Defensively, we're going Indians next season, Franklin
and Central Arizona for Key's shot. I've got three or four now less of position. to press you and trap you and try said it's his roster's versatility
services: as he did for the other who I feel good about taking that That addition will be a luxury to raise the amount of posses- that will serve it best.
two latest signees: Greeleyville, shot and she's one of them." for a roster that already gives the sions in the game. We'll still take "We will not play a traditional
S.C., native Naomi Moore, and In the 5-foot-2 Sophus, the coach twice as much depth as he a lot of threes, but now we have style. We'll play some people in
South Alabama transfer Dia- Lady Indians add another quick had in his first season as coach the ability to ram the ball inside different positions than they're
monisha Sophus. athlete to the backcourt and a when he had a seven-player ro- when we need abig bucket when normally in because we can get
The 5-foot-7 Moore is a pure playerwith Division-I experience station almost the entire season, we need it. That's an ability we mismatches. That will always
scorer, averaging 21.8 points per after competing in 24 games for Chipola still managed to win didn't have last year." be the way we play the game,"
game for her Murray War Eagles South Alabama as a freshman. 25 games including two in the The Lady Indians have brought he said. "Come hell or high wa-
team last season while grabbing "She's an extremely good ath- national tournament despite in size with 6-foot-2 FSU transfer ter, we're going to find the open
8.8 rebounds and handing out lete. She has some things that the lack of numbers or size, but Ebony Wells and three Nigerian person, share the ball, and make
five assists, and earned a favor- she's got to get better at, but at what Franklin appears to have post players in 6-foot-3 Ljeoma sure we know exactly where we
able comparison from her new this point we're talking about for his second season is a team Onwuekwe, 6-foot-5 Nkem want to get the basketball."


With the first points not Graceville's first points an early 9-4 lead. seconds tying the game lar Springs today, taking
coming for almost five came on a free throw by But White kept the Ti- up at 16-16 at the break, on Rehobeth (Ala.) at
F minutes on a Cairo of- White with 13:30 left in gers close with 12 first- The Tigers will next 10 a.m., Cairoll (Ala.) at
From Page B fensive rebound and the first half, with the Syr- half points, with a three- compete at the Alabama- noon, and Zion Chapel
sluggish start both ways, put-back, upmakers jumping out to point play in the waning Florida Shoot6ut at Pop- (Ala.) at 2 p.m.


Malone
From Page 1B
game.
Malone finished the
night strong with a domi-
nant 58-36 win over Ar-
nold, leaving Welch im-
pressed with his team's
ability to adjust so quickly
without its best player.
"I thought we played
great," the coach said. "We
were up seven (against


Carroll) when I took Chai
into the locker room, and
we were up 19 when I came
back out. I thought (Bai-
ley) did a great job, (Ant-
wain Johnson) shot it very
well, and everyone played
good. Chancellor Lockett,
Xavier Gray, and Taqualan
Brelove especially stepped
up for us."
The coach said that
playing without Baker
for a little while could be
good for his players, who


typically look to him to do
much of the heavy lifting
offensively.
"I think it's a great op-
portunity for us to grow up
a little bit and play without
Chai. It lets him rest and
lets us learn to play with-
out depending on him
too much," Welch said.
"Sometimes it turns into
the Chai and (Johnson)
show if we're not careful.
They are our best scorers
and sometimes we end


up looking for them too
much."
The absence ,of Baker
also gave Johnson an op-
portunity to take on an
even larger role in the of-
fense, and Welch said that
he made the most of it and
continues to prove this
summer that he can be
one of the premier play-
ers in the area in his junior
season.
"I don't know what he's
going to do when the crap


hits the fan, but he's in the
conversation with any-
body in 1A when he's on,"
the coach said. "Obviously,
Chai is the more proven
player, but I'm not going
to stay that Chai is that
much better than him. He
played like he's capable of
playing (Monday). He puts
in the work to get better
and he shows all the right
stuff. Now is the time to do
it, and I think he's going to.
I've got faith in him."


Welch said that he antici-
pated resting Johnson and
Bailey in Tuesday's second
day of action at Poplar
Springs to give his younger
players more experience.
Malone will wrap up
their three, days at Poplar
today with games against
Walton, Geneva County
(Ala.), and Houston Coun-
ty (Ala.) before returning
to action June 29 for the
Tiger Shootout at Gracev-
ille High School.


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-14B WEDNESDAY. JUNE 19, 2013


SPORTS


NBA FINALS


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
San Antonio forward Tim Duncan talks with head coach Gregg Popovich during the team's shootaround before Game 6 of the
NBA Finals against the Miami Heat Tuesday in Miami.




Popping the press



Spurs coach Popovich has been at his best


in news conferences during the finals


The Associated Press

MIMIAMI During his
team's Game 3 rout of the
Heat, Gregg Popovich was
shown on TV talking to his
players while they were in
the process of burying Mi-
ami with a stirring offen-
sive display.
"When you're open, let it
fly," the Spurs' coach told
them. "Put your name in
the paper."
'A day later, San Anto-
nio guard Gary Neal was
asked about that bit of
encouragement.
"That's what you guys
hear," Neal said- with a
chuckle, implying the give-
and-take isn't always so
sunny.
In his 17th season coach-
ing the Spurs and his fifth
NBA Finals, Popovich is
having one breakout se-
ries, with this team one
win from another title en-
tering Game 6 on Tuesday
night.
It's'also been a banner fi-
nals for Popovich in the in-
terview room. He has spent
almost two weeks now be-
ing questioned about the
health of Tony Parker, the
Spurs' defensive strategy
against LeBron James and
Danny Green's remarkable
3-point shooting.
At times, he's been il-
luminating, as when he
spoke admiringly of James'
ability to drown out criti-
cism when things, aren't
going his way. At other
times, he's been funny, his
dry wit and deadpan deliv-
ery drawing laughs when
least expected.'
Mostly, however, he's
been combative, sarcastic
or just plain dismissive.
Mostly, he's just been Pop.
Whether he's dragged kick-
ing .and screaming into
those live television in-
terviews during games or
he's having his teeth pulled
during postgame news
conferences, Popovich has
been as irascible as ever.
"Pop is always funny to
me" Green said. "So when
I watch his press confer-
ences they kind of give me
a good chuckle."
One more win means
Popovich will have his fifth
championship. One more
win means he also won't
have to do anymore news
conferences for quite some
time. Would winning the
trophy mean more to him
than ending those news
conferences? Hard to say
A look at some of Pop's
greatest hits from these
finals:

j THE GOOD POP: When


an 11-year-old Latino boy
who sang the national an-
them before Game 3 was
the subject of racist re-
marks on Twitter, Popov-
ich leapt to the defense of
Sebastien De La Cruz.
"He's a class act," Popov-
ichsaid. "Way more mature
than most his age. And as
much as those comments
by the idiots saddens you
about your country, he
makes you feel the future
could be very bright."

THE DISMISSIVE POP:
Popovich was asked after a
109-93 loss in Game 4 why
Manu Ginobili had been
so ineffective to that point
in the series.
"I don't know," he said. "If
I knew that I would have
already fixed it."

THE INSTRUCTIVE POP:
In illustrating the matura-
tion of James before Game
2, Pop relished a chance to
send a couple digs toward
his favorite targets in the
media.
"He's a grown man. He
doesn't need any of you
to tell him anything," he
said. "He knows more than
all of you put together. He
understands the game. If
he makes a pass and you
all think he should have
shot it, or he shoots it and
you think he should have
made a pass, your opin-
ions mean nothing to him,
as they should not mean
anything to him."

THE TRITE POP: Popovich
was asked about his strat-
egy going into Game 5 and
whether he could do any-
thing different after James,
Dwyane Wade and Chris
Bosh struck for 85 points
in Game 4.
"I'd hate to be trite and
say anything is possible,"
he cracked. "Your question
demands my triteness."

THE CRAZY POP: Popov-
ich said he has nothing to
do with the unflappable
nature of the Spurs as a
team, and that it's all a tes-


tament to Tim Duncan.
"I think it's just a reflec-
tion of their personali-
ties," he said. "If anybody
is crazy in the group, it's
me. They pretty much
have an even keel. Timmy
Duncan sets the tone, and
he just competes. Whether
he does well or whether
he does poorly, game in,
game out, year in, year out,
he competes and people
just follow that."

THE COMBATIVE POP:
When the Heat went small
and won big in Game 4, a
reporter wanted to know if
Popovich thought smaller
lineups were a growing
trend across the NBA. Nice
try.
"You're not serious,"
he said. "You want me to
talk about the state of the
NBA?"

THE ENLIGHTENING POP:
While decrying the lack of
job security in the coach-
ing profession these days,
Popovich let everyone
know why he thought the
Spurs were so successful.
"The continuity I think
breeds, it breeds trust, it
breeds camaraderie, it
breeds a feeling of respon-
sibility that each member
holds towards the other,"
he said. "The ability to be
excited for each other's
success, not to develop ter-
ritory and walls, but to stay
participatory. To be able to
discuss, to argue and come
out at the end on the same
page with the same pas-
sion and the same goals.
"And I think without
continuity that's pretty
impossible, because all
the immediate tendencies
of instant success starts
to take over and that just
breeds failure."

THE FUNNY POP: Popov-
ich was asked to compare
Green tb former standout
Bruce Bowen after Game
5.
"I guess they both are
similar in the fact that nei-
ther one of them has any


moves," he said. "They
just shoot it. They don't re-
ally dribble or do anything
else."

THE PHLEGMATIC POP:
On why he switched which
end of the court his offense
started at on the road this
season: "I was bored."

THE UNSYMPATHETIC
POP: It is well known that
Popovich rode Parker hard
when he first came to the
NBA from France as a 19-
year-old point guard. That
subject came up after
Parker led the Spurs to a
win in Game 1.
"Are you related to Tony?
Are you concerned I treated
him badly? You seem very
concerned about Tony's
treatment," Popovich said.
"Tony makes $900 million
a year.... He's fine."

THE STUBBORN POP: No
matter how many ways it
has been asked, Popovich
won't concede to the suc-
cess the Spurs have had in
making things difficult for
James. Is that maybe be-
cause he doesn't want to
make James angry?
"You're digging really
deep," Popovich said. "You
must need to write an ar-
tidcle by 4 o'clock today or
something."

THE CONFOUNDEb POP:
After Parker was injured in
Game 3, one reporter won-
dered if Popovich would
"mail in" Game 4 by rest-
ing Parker in hopes of hav-
ing him at full strength for
Games 5, 6 and 7.
"I have to tell you that
phrase 'mail in Game 4,' it
confuses my whole brain,"
he said. "I don't think I can
think past that comment. I
would like to help you, but
I don't know how to help
you."


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Tour de France


Race readies for


100th edition


The Associated Press

PARIS The direc-
tor of the Tour de France
expects Bradley Wiggins
to come roaring back in
2014 after not defending
his crown in this year's
race that starts in just over
a week.
"I think he'll have his
motivation back and be
back," Christian Prud-
homme said in an in-
terview Tuesday in his
Paris office. Elite athletes,
he noted, "can fall very
low but rebound very
quickly."
The first two stages in
2014 run through York-
shire in northeast Eng-
land, with the third going
from Cambridge to Lon-
don, so Wiggins will be on
home ground.
"I think he'll be very
strong," Prudhomme
said.
With a sore left knee
ruling Wiggins out of this
year's race, Prudhomme
identified the Briton's
teammate at Sky, Chris
Froome, as the rider to
beat this July at the 100th
edition of cycling's show-
case race.
"I think it will be Froome
and Sky against the rest of
the world."
Prudhomme warned
that the first 'stages on
the French island of Cor-
sica could be treacherous.
After a fiat opening stage
on June 29 that British
sprinter Mark Cavendish,
among others, will have
his eye on, the race ven-
tures over more jagged
terrain inland and up the
island's west coast. From
Corsica, the Tour crosses
to the French mainland.
"Those who haven't
scouted out the Corsican
stages will have made a big
mistake. On the evening


of the first stage, they'll be
telling themselves, "It's all
flat!" Prudhomme said.
"Two days later they will
have understood why the
automobile Tour of Cor-
sica is called 'the rally of
10,000 bends.' Not only
does it go up and down, it
turns all the time."
In the 12 months since
Wiggins became the first
Briton to win the Tour,
Lance Armstrong admit-
ted in January that he
doped for all seven of
his Tour wins from 1999-
2005. Those titles have
been stripped from him
and not reattributed.
"The picture of cycling
we saw this winter is not
the picture of cycling to-
day. It is the picture of
cycling in the past, even if
it is a recent past," Prud-
homme said.
He said "the fundamen-
tal difference" between
the Armstrong era and
now is cycling's pioneer-
ing introduction five
years ago of its so-called
biological passport. That
consists of blood tests
overtime on riders to look
for abnormal readings
and variations that-could
point to doping, trigger-
ing either more tests or
disciplinary action if the
proof of cheating is strong
enough.
He suggested the sport
deserves more credit for
its anti-doping measures.
"In all sports, there are
good people, real cham-
pions, and cheats," he
said. "Cycling cheated
before the other sports,
more than the others,
but it got things under
control. When the police
catch thieves, we congrat-
ulate them. When cycling
catches cheats, people
say, 'there are still things
going on.'"


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Bus 850-482-3425 Fax 850-482-6823
Toll Free 1-877-364-6007
linda.pforte.bxrs@statefarm.com
Good Neighbor Since 1986







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Track and Field


A* THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Tyson Gay reacts after winning the Men's 100-meter during the IAAF Diamond League Grand Prix competition on May 25 in New
York. His surgically repaired hip mended, Gay ishustling down the track without so much as a hitch.





Off and Running


Gay's hip is healed and he's ready for US Championships


The Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa -
For a little bit, Tyson Gay's
first step tearing down the
track made him wince and
his next made him won-
der: Would he ever be the
same sprinter again?
The runner who cap-
tured three gold medals
at the 2007 world champi-
onships. The runner who
broke the American 100-
meter record in 2009.
Each time .Gay hustled
down the lane last summer,
he felt a hitch in his surgi-
cally repaired right hip. It
was a constant source of
concern, especially going
into the, Olympic trials.
He was just hoping that
his hip would hold up,
which it did and he made
the London team. But he
wasn't the same sprinter as
he finished a disappoint-
ing fourth.
These days, he doesn't
give the hip a second
thought. He just may be
in his best shape in years,
heading into the U.S.
championships this week
-possibly eyen his best
shape-ever.;
"He's in a good place right
fiow," his coach, Lance
Brauman, said. "He's doing
a lot of really good 'things.
He did some stuff the oth-
er day and we did a video
Analysis and he looked the
best he's ever looked on
film. Hopefully, this sum-
mer shows it."
For the first time in a
long while,'there are really
no restrictions on Gay. He
can run until his heart's


content.
Only, he's slowing down
to speed up. See, he's al-
ways prided himself on the
philosophy of "one more"
one more curve to hone
his technique, one more
burst- out of the blocks,
one more rep in the weight
room.
To conserve his hip, the
30-year-old is training
wiser.
"Still training really hard,
though," Gay said. "But the
name of the game is to stay
healthy"
AAd he hasn't felt this
healthy, since, well, he
can't even really recall. He's
been constantly plagued
by hamstring and groin
ailments, along with the
hip. Pain became a con-
stant companion around
the track. Being healthy
again is a heavy weight off
his shoulders.
"I don't have a lot of stress
going on right now," Gay
said. "Everything is just go-
ing well for me. It's going
really well."
He's turning in fast times,
too, running 9.86 seconds
at a meet in Kingston, Ja-
maica, last month, the
,fastest .time in the world
this Season. He followed
that up with a win at the
Adidas Grand Prix meet in
NewYork.
That silenced any doubts
about his health.
"It took me a year or so
to get over that hip sur-
gery," said Gay who set the
American record (9.69) at a
2009 meet. "I'm now head-
ing in the right direction."
Although Gay has the


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green light, Brauman
doesn't want to push him
too much and they've
learned when to back off.
"It's about being patient,
taking it day by day and
not trying to do everything
in one day," Brauman said.
"Because thathip was more
of an issue over the years
than people realize. Now
that he's healthy, he's ca-
pable of doing again what
he's capable of doing."
SThe rejuvenation of Gay
has certainly been noticed
by his fellow sprinters.
"Tyson looks like he's in
rare form once again," Jus-
tin Gatlin said.
It's the form that once led
Gay to dominate the world
of sprinting until Usain
Bolt came along.
In any other generation,
Gay would've been the
talk of track. But he's taken
a back seat to Bolt as the
powerful Jamaican has set
world records (his mark
stands at 9.58) and cap-
tured two straight Olym-
pic 100-meter titles. Gay is
tied with Yohan Blake for
the fastest time ever run by
someone not named Bolt.
"In my mind, it doesn't
take away anything he's


tied for the second-fastest
person to walk on earth.
That's not too bad," Brau-
man said. "When he's on
and he's healthy and ev-
erything is going well, he's
awfully good. Obviously,
he's one of the best ever."
Gay is anxiously awaiting
the 100 meters at nation-
als, where he and Gatlin
will be the favorites. Gay
finished runner-up at tri-
als last summer on a hip
that bothered him so bad,
he ran on grass during
workouts to save some
wear and tear.
"I'm not going into the
race feeling like I have
one hand tied behind my
back," he said.
If he's feeling good after
the 100, Gay may even run
the 200 at nationals as well.
That wasn't even a consid-
eration last summer, given
the state of his balky hip.
"I'm just going to take
it one race at a time," Gay
said. "I'm still working on
being the best I can be."
The plan going forward
is to keep sprinting until at
least the 2016 Rio Games
as Gay searches for that
Elusive individual Olympic
medal.


Design for Atlanta


stadium given OK


The Associated Press

ATLANTA The board
overseeing planning for a
new Falcons stadium in
downtown Atlanta gave
the thumbs-up Tuesday
to a design that invokes
the giant bird's wings and
would feature enormous
windows showcasing
views of the city.
The approval from the
Georgia World Congress
Center Authority's board
of governors clears the
way for the 360 Archi-
tecture firm to create a
detailed schematic plan.
The board also must sign
off on that plan, which is
expected to be finalized in
April 2014.
"I think you can just
imagine Monday Night




BrrjierOwner
(850) 209-4705 ce
C;2I iSurvS,,','n l.yS


Ontu.LD
SMARTER. BOLDER FASTER.


Century
Sunny S
Proper


Football and the shot with
the city lit up," said 360
Architecture's Bill John-
son during a presentation
of the preliminary design,
which includes an angu-
lar exterior meant to in-
voke falcon wings and an
opening in the seats for
giant windows.
The design also aims to
minimize end zone seat-
ing, maxil-ize sideline
seating, and features a
"video halo" of screens
around the upper part
of the stadium, Johnson
said.
State and city officials
have signed off on the $1
billion, retractable-roof
stadium. Officials esti-
mate $200 million in pub-
lic bonds will be used to
build it.




II "i
rn l "


y 21 ai,.O H.,, '0
southh ,wi,,i FL
ties (850) 526-2891


LOCAL NEWS, YOUR WAY.
WEEKNIGHTS AT 5:00, 6:00, & 10:00


I


STA IFORMED!HH
I : .. I^^^


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2013 5BF








16B WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2013


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


BORN LOSER BYARTAND CHIP SANSOM
TkkT 6LUS6OM ARLEtNE, I NOW,&LwAs, t6ceP ?ANOI71
T GUtP 1$ GOSSWPIN G IM W'0YOUTl4NSP'5
I>\ gR ThOW1 I 7 II\ \ "C o0UT
lit I \j-- gjo "OUT


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE


Y'KNoW, FRANCIS, YOU
HAVE A POINT' EVEN
THOUGH JENNY'S MY
FIRST CHOICE,THERE
ARE LOTS OF OTHER
GIRLS I LIKE,TOO'


WHILE I'M WAITING
FOR JENNY TO DUMP
ARTUk,WWHY SHOULD
I SIT AROUND DOING
NOTHING

LA- I


UNTIL SHE AND Il
GET TOGETHER T I
[CAN PLA.YTHE FIELPD'


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


H4ow
DOES
THE
FIELD.
FEEL HI, \
ABOUT L-ADIES.
THIS?

i 0


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI

TA4LIGT STtULJlSHir'4t3 'Nt' PR8YN&
PF i c~tr 3: 24-L mayGeTr-tTH
LI WISH MM IGH T
MY WtSH "-NtGNT.,.r _____,__
PA FOR @aBaB GsraFveg

-; 01
li 7 //1 s! 'o_



FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES

YOU MA, THOSE AgRN'T"
*TN' OU7,TA gS


AH! HALL IREAIOD YOU
OF 5OME OTHER VWllI"S YW
FA.. ER 5MAID?

D)OI


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK
sK i,'J \i 11. t' IT w t WEC
T8rKC *WiT rX'rLAviT
LREi-OT O l 'NTIJr




it.t
'.Ll


LIKE4/'TH EOLY&OOD
ARLO...."
HE CAME.
AROIJUD
\ / Wi~i


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


6,13 U hla rn StoCx Irterna1lcnal -C. Ost by Universal UC! k tor UFS, f. 3
"I've already had three days
off sick this month."


ACROSS 39 Prefix with
1 Hamlet's dLnt
oath 40 Gauges
4 Dud 42 Dateless
8 Bistro 44Ossobuco
12Circle base
portion 47Charitable
13 Take on donation
cargo 49 Major
14Indigo appliance
plant 51 Dance
15 Alley Oop's wear
kingdom 53Eggnog
16Verdi time
masterpiece 55 Pilot's dir.
17 Ryan and 56 Molecule
Tilly component
18Join up 57 Lahore
20 Mushroom language
part 58 Promos
22 Gross! 59 Earth's
23 Sunburn neighbor
remedy 60 Big
25 Pearl name in
producer speakers
29 Seize 61 Summer
31 Coffee hrs.
source
34 "West- DOWN
world" 1 Renown
name 2 Wry humor
35 Art style 3 Pierre's
36Joule school
fractions 4 Ostentatious
37 Vikings org. 5 Cafe au -
38 Labor 6 Weird
Dept. 7 Little
division legumes


Answer to Previous Puzzle


8 Caravan
beast
9 Windflowers
10 Brownish
fruit
11 Loop trains
19 Computer
graphics
21 Mammoth
entrapper
24 Per person
26 "Auld
Lang -"
27 Clump of
hair
28 Vogue rival
30Anaconda
31 Put
money on
32 Goofs
33 Rabble-
rouser


35 Medicine
amounts
40"Ben-Hur"
studio
41 Insulation
measure
(hyph.)
43Grads
45 Down the
road
46 Advances
48 Rebuff
49Takes a
mate
50 Take five
51 Woolen
cap
52 Ms. Hagen
54 Galleon
cargo


C Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


6-19 10t 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Cetebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"XG AVC UDHJN NXJ IBKXVBKF, BK'J
X UDHJN KNXK NXJ VBIZC, KNXK NXJ
NXC X VBMZ AM BKJ ATG."
- EAXG YBDA

Previous Solution: "If you stick with vision, it might not all work, but some of it
will be absolute genius."-- Kim Cattrall
TODAY'S CLUE: senba fn
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 6-19


Horoscope
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) The buzz is likely to
be about you and some
exciting development that
you're involved in.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Some confiden-
tial information from an
unexpected source could
come your way. However,
there's a chance you might
not give it the proper
importance.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- The impression you
make on friends today is
likely to be so good, ev-
eryone will have a feeling
that they should be doing
something special for you.
Don't be surprised if one
or two do.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-Take this golden op-
portunity to focus on your
biggest aAd most ambi-
tious objectives.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-You're likely to learn
something important
when trying to teach
another. It behooves you
to be nice to those who ask
for help, and to pay atten-
tion to your work.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Greater returns than
what.you would normally
expect are possible from a
sideline endeavor. Review
what happens to see what
future opportunities exist.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) If you hang out
with someone who you
feel is always lucky, his or
her fortune could rub off
onto you.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -Things are changing
for the better, and it looks
like you're going to get all
the help you need for a
critical project.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -Thattingle you feel
in your chest could be
a direct hit from one of
Cupid's arrows.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Things are getting
back on course, andyou're
Likely to start getting the
results you desire.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -You'll be particularly
good at most anything you
take on today. "7-
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -Yesterday you were
better at handling small
transactions than large
endeavors. Conditions are
,reversed today.


Annies


Dear Annie: My sweet, kind 33-year-old
college-educated husband has regressed
into a teenager. He has always been
a marijuana user, but a year ago, he
befriended "Jake," and now the two of
them smoke marijuana daily. They spend
their evenings riding skateboards, play-
ing video games and hanging out with
college kids.
I would like to buy a house, have
children and further my education. My
husband says he wants the same things,
but he always has an excuse for not
saving money. We both have good jobs,
and he promises to start putting money
aside "next month." It never happens. I
know he won't give up pot. He says he
will get divorced before he quits smok-
ing marijuana, and I knew that before we
married.
Am I wrong to put my foot down and


James Patrick Murray, a former sportswriter,
said, "Show me a man who is a good loser, and
I'll show you a man who is playing golf with his
boss."
That reminds me of a story about Sam Snead,
who still has the most wins on the PGA tour.
While an office boy, he was playing golf with
his boss. They reached a downhill par 4 that
was more than 300 yards. Snead, who had the
honor, waited. His boss suggested that Snead
should hit his drive. Snead pointed out that
the foursome in front was still putting orf the
green.
"Do you want a job tomorrow?" asked his
boss.
"Yes, sir."
"Then drive."
Snead hit his ball onto the green into the
middle of the foursome. And I guess that Snead
won the match.
At the bridge table, it is important to track los-
ers. In this deal, how should South play in four
spades afterWest leads the diamond queen?
South has five losers: three hearts and two di-
amonds. He can discard a heart on the club ace,
but needs to trump a diamond in the dummy.
Declarer should take the first trick on the
board, pitch a heart on the club ace, play a dia-
mond to his ace, and lead another diamond. In
a moment, he will ruff his last diamond with
dummy's spade 10, so that East cannot over-
ruff. South will take six spades, two diamonds,
one club and that diamond ruff in the dummy.


expect him to grow up? Or do I need to
lighten up and let him have his fun?
FEELING LIKE MY
HUSBAND'S MOTHER

Dear Feeling: You and your husband do
not have compatible goals. He wants to
be an irresponsible child while you do all
the work. And so far, you have gone along
with that. Maybe he's afraid to grow up,
maybe he's too addicted to pot, maybe
he's simply a Peter Pan.
Ask him to come with you for counsel-
ing so the two of you can work on a more
equitable partnership. If he is unwilling
or if nothing changes, there is no future
here unless you want to spend the next
several years mothering this grownup
child. It's a painful lesson to learn that
love isn't always enough to turn someone
into marriage material.


North


West
#74
YAJ7
* Q J10 9
*9762


06-19-13


102
V 8542
* K73
*AJ53
East
#653
V K103
84
KKQ1084
South


AKQJ98
VQ96
*A652



Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
PAssKNTJ Pass


Op


Pass 1 NT Pass
Pass 4 # All pass


ening lead: 4Q


' '.-'e .. .


ENTERTMNOVINT







wwwJCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIEDS


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, June 19, 2013- 7 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED



ARKET PLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE:. WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an' ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
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actuatly occupied by that portion of.the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of r.,' a.] .ynniiTe, t n ire oT,.f.iuLt ,f..lr
such advertisement Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising Is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.
0r dadlnescal tol re orvist ww~jclordancom


Ir- ANNOUNCEMENTS
GEEAL&SPCAL OTCE


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Need a Babysitter? Will baby sit in my home
anytime, days, nights, weekends and drop-in
welcome. Nice neighborhood located on
Deering Street. Call Gwen 850-557-8239
($) FINANCIAL
BSINEzSSOPR NI


Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
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(I6) MERCHANDISE

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

SRiding Lawn Mower: Husqvarna, 48" cut, 3
'blade, 3 bag, like new. This is a steal at $1450
Call 334-793-4767 or 334-797-6931

4-Wheeler: 110cc fun for all. $900 new, will
take $500 OBO. Must sell. 5 yrs. old, hardly
used. Call Steve @ 334.796.1724


STOP GNAT, FLY, & MOSQUITO BITES!


ANNE'S DAYLILIES .w
S 827 S. APPLETREE ST
Dothan, Daylilies ($1- up)
334-792-0653 or 334-797-9657
Free Perennial with purchase! .
L............................ j

Alto Saxophone: Nearly new. Barely used.
$900 new. $500 OBO. Grab it before band
camp!!! Has a scratch, plays great.
Call Steve @ 334.796.1724
Baby Grand Piano: Sohmer & Company "1959"
Model 57 in mint condition, purchased in
2003 after minor restorations and very little
play, but has been continuously tuned. Ma-
hogany wood with maple finish. Matching
wood bench included. $12,000 334-589-3422
? 4f PETS & ANIMALS

Sweet female calico needs good home.
850-482-2994.

Beautiful AKC registered 1/2 English Cream
Puppies. Sire is AKC English Cream with
Champion Bloodlines, OFA certified hips and
elbows. Dam is AKC American Golden. Puppies
are very light in color and raised with small
children and other pets. (334)379-2145.
Bulldog Puppies- English, Male and female for
adoption. Contact me if you are willing to have
them at g.w120@yahoo.com


Free Jack Russell Terrier 1-2 yrs old, neutered,
has all shots. Very loving 482-1008 or 624-6825


I uuy "wansP a[or Natural
Insect Repellent.FDg L utiful
Family and Pet SafeP a
Available at The Home Depot


JUNE SHiUW

OF REALESTAT

^^^^Real Estate Offices, Convenience Stores
Shopping CtesAnRetr a
l. a -


Sudoku


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Level: h -2 f3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.


Solution to Tuesday's puzzle
412679853
57938461 2
368152497
83476 1 529
196523748
257498361
925836174
68194 7235
74321 5986
1 9 6 5 23 7.4 8

92 5 8 3 6 1 7 4
6 8 1 9 47 2 3
1714 L 211 9 8


6/19/13


Lab puppies: AKC. 2 left, The price is right.
Call 229-308-0117.
Lost Dog-brown lab mix, near Marianna High
School Stadium, off Caverns Road. 693-9630
(6) FARMER'S MARKET

,, BLUEBERRIES

U-Pick $7.00 per gallon
We-Pick $20.00 per gallon
Co. Rd. 33 in Columbia
I* 334-796-8165 4
r ---------------------------------
1' Julian Aplin
^ U-pick Peas
and
S Tomatoes
; 4334-792-4775

ePm
;. Aplin
4 Farms
Tomotoes,
lly "sweet corn,
cucumbers,
Sqaush, okra, peppers,
cabbage, & Zucchini
Open Mon-Sat (7-6)
v 334-792-6362. 4n
CreekWater Blueberry Farms
U-Pick $S. or We-Pick $15. gallon
334-406-4405 or 334-588-2708
Hartford 2 mi. from 4-way stop
3354 E. Co. Rd. 16 Follow Signs




FRESH SWEET CORN
May 29th July 7th
GREEN CIRCLES FARM
233 Cooler Rd, Bainbridge
229-246-1724
Yellow, White and Bi-Color
Varieties Available Market Price

S Frozen Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-352-2199
850-209-3322 or 850-573-6594
S4128 Hwy 231

Hendrix Farm Produce
Now Open Hwy. 52 Slocomb
U-Pick or U-Pick Tomatoes
334-726-7646 4

SHewett Farms
SPeas, Corn, Squash,
Cucumbers, pickles,
okra & snap beans
Off hwy 90 between Cypress
& Grand Ridge on Mayo Rd.
Bobby Hewett
850-592-4156
or 850-899-8709
VEITCH'S BLUEBERRY FARM
7772 Howell Rd. Sneads, FL 32460
YOU PICK BLUEBERRIES
Opening June 1 Tues- Sun 9 a.m. 6 p.m.


Pe an A d Fast, easy, no pressure
P lace an A d 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.
www.jcfloridan.com.


4

5 3 16 8

6 --5 7

_9 5 3

_5 8

1 9 2

1 9 7

9 4 7 8 5

3 2


a.--


,)\ \


I


; ,ImTlma8B


- - -- 7991E--








8 B Wednesday, June 19, 2013 Jackson Couny pri4an


'*0I so
___________________________________________ .1. ___________________________________________


- MooneyHam
Farms
U-PICK PEAS 6 miles N of Grand Ridge,
or 2.1 miles S of Dellwood on Hwy 69.
$7./per 5 gal. bucket,
Field opens at 6:30- 6:30
7 days/wk. -"
Dark & White Peas & Butterbeans i",
Ready to Pick
* 850-718-7750 4.
^ Naturally Grown Blueberries ^
U-Pick or I-Pick or We-Pick
334-714-4703 Located 52 W
3J mL from circle turn (R) Look for signs.
All you can eat while picking in the field




, a


HOME GROWN, FRESH




Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
334-793-6690 0



BALLARD DAYLILILIES *
252 N. Co. Rd. 9 (3 miles N. Slocomb)
S1.O0 & up. FREE Amaryllis w/ purchase.
4 334-886-2273 or 1-866-745-1243


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
I 334-389-2003 4. J

($ -EMPLOYMENT


Precast Concrete Workers Needed for
Marianna Plant. Rate is $12 $15 pr hr for
workers w/ Precast Exp. Benefits and paid
Holidays after probationary period.
Please email resume to
david.davis@hanson.biz or gracie.dowdy
hanson.biz or call 850-482-2830

J: #J/,!^^ JM .^J4



PAPER
TRANSPORT; INC.
DRIVERS
Paper Transport, Inc has IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS for CLASS A DRIVERS for
Our dedicated accounts.
HOME WEEKLY
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$1000 SIGN ON BONUS!
Qualified Driver could be hired
within a Week!




Log Truck Driver needed
Must have clean driving record,
Drug screen required
* Call: 850-658- 4609 -


(~)


EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


N Academia Tutoring m
* Now accepting students Pre K 5th grade I
certified teacher $25. per hr. sm. group class
L discounts. Call: 334-685-9493. I
ChildCare Training Class
6wk. Homestudy Childcare Director Course
$300. Call Mrs. Alaina 334-714-4942

lean Your Closet ~ Collect Some Cash


sLook ahead to your
future! Start training
FRTI$7 for a new career in
Medical Assisting,
COLLEGE Medical Office
Administration,
Pharmacy Technology, Electrical Trades &
HVAC! Call Fortis College
888-202-4813 For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu
f^\ RESIDENTIAL
(L1_)I REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


1/1 Apartment for Rent. ,
For info call 850-579-8895 |
1BR/1BA, nice clean apt. in town
screened porch, large yard $450. mo.
No pets. 850-557-2000 for more info.




*, Beach Cottage for Rent: 3BR 1.5BA,
Large screened porch, Beacon Hill
(Near Mexico Beach) $500/wk
850-482-2539 or 201-888-2388

1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent Included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4.
2BR/2BA Duplex 2152 Lovers Ln. $450. mo.
$450. dep. Grand Ridge Call 850-592-5571
3BR/2BA House in quiet neighborhood
in Chattahochee, recently renovated inside
and outside. $650 Mo. + $650 Dep.
1BIR1BA Efficiency Apartment in quiet
neighborhood in Chattahochee recently
renovated inside. $350 Mo. + $350 Dep.
Call 850-592-7276
Alford 4/2 Lg. Home w/ CH&A 2 car garage
fenced back yd. $850 mo. + dep.
859-579-4317 & 850-866-1965 Avail. Now
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
'Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
House for Rent: 3BR/2BA Hwy 71 South
No Pets. $750. Mo. + $750. Dep.
Call 850-482-4400
*2SES3Xo3 0 I033S
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountrylivlng.com.
850-209-8847 4.
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

-. 2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes ||
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595 I

[ 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself) |
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595


0~ S S~


4/2 dbl. wd. on Sac. 4 miles to Wal-mart,
appliances included. $850. mo Ref. Req.
850-526-3108 or 850-693-6507
For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @> $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maint.incl.
850-593-4700 4,,
Quiet, well maintained Park, Water/sewer/
garbage/lawn included. Available Now
3/2 DW $625. & 3/2 $575. & 3/2 $500.
Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4

(^J RECREATION


4-Wheeler Artic Cat 1999 runs, needs some
work, has heavy duty pully on the front, rack
on back. $500. OBO 334-790-4276 after 6 pm.

1985 Gambler 17ft Bass Boat with a year 2002
Evinrude 115HP Motor- Includes Depth Finder
and Trolling Motor. Equipped with CD '
player/Radio, 2 live wells, and life-vets. Re-
cently had new carpet installed and professio-
nally painted. Storage Cover Included. Trailer is
in great condition! $3400 OBO. Contact 334-
372-1019 or 334-482-1172 for more info.
Blue Fin Bass 1998 Elimator All Aluminum Bass
Boat, 50 HP force engine, galvanized trailer-
new tires, all in very good condition, 2 live well
boxes, 4 new seats, new Humminbird fish find-
er $3,995 OBO 828-837-1314 or 828-421-0998
^( .-a-., t. Fisher Freedom Deluxe
', """"c--M .e2006 22' pontoon: 90hp
yM mercury, 4 stroke, less
maJtn. hn SOhrs, pristine condi-
tion, custom trailer
w/guides, trolling mtr, battery charger, front &
rear electric anchor, extra lh-linj chair & cus-
tom cover. $14,500. 334-493-6496; 334-504-2555
Stratos 1996 Bass Boat, 201 Pro XL w/Trailer,
2003 Evinrude 225 h.p. (low hours), Trolling mo-
tor, GPS, 2 Depth finders, extra. SS Prop., Built
in Battery Charger. Lots of Extras, Excellent
condition, garage kept. Must see. $10,500 229-
334-0224
ThP icle ,ifietdfi -


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Keystone 2007 30' Travel Trailer 30-RLS
Outback Sidney Edition. Weight 7700# Q-bed,
rear living w/picture window, 2 swivel chairs.
Sleeper sofa, Living & dining rm. slide out
w/awning. 2-entrances, new tires, outside sink
w/2 burner propane stove. Kept under shelter.
$14,000. 334-897-6929 or 334-475-6309.

(id TRANSPORTATION


Buick 1994 LaSabre : white, power windows,
power brakes, AM/FM stereo, run great, low
mileage, excellent condition $1,700 OBO. Call
352-812-9924
Cadillac 1989 Seville
only a few ever made,
runs great, looks great,
too much to mention. Must See !
$2400. OBO 334-648-3171.
CHEVY 1995 CAPRiCE-Clean, runs great, cold
air, fully loaded $3,300 OBO 334-740-0229
A DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
GOT BAD CREDIT?.
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy
i j slow credit ok
S$ Down/lst Payment,
Tax, Tag & Title
* Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
Honda 2008 Accord EX-L: Burgundy, 4 Door,
Automatic, leather, sun roof, heated seats,
all the extras. $14,900. 334-300-4418
.......... Honda 2012 Accord Coupe
i.EXL: Automatic transmis-
siorn with paddle shift,
navigation, sunroof, heat-
ed leather seats, 6 disc CD player. Has around
9,500 miles. Asking $24,900. Call 334-268-3900.
Jeep 2010 Wrangler Unlimited right hand drive
vehicle, 4 door, 4 wheel drive, automatic, hard-
top, alloy wheels. Green pearl color. 45,000
miles. $22,795. 229-308-9778
Mustang 2002 GT convertible, good shape,
gray in color with blacktop, 4- new tires,
runs great 334-792-1070 or 334-435-2151


PANAMA CITY BEACH CONDO
2/1.5, Pool, Tennis, Club House
Fully Furnished On Front Beach Road
$125/Night S750/Week, $80 Cleaning Fee
334-300-6979 or 334-393-3559 N


^~^ JP Your guide to great local.

^*^^ W ~businesses &s services **.,

3IRECTORY


Call 526-3614 to place your id,


Lighthouse Electrical
Unlimited, LLC
Residential Electrical
Remodels Service W ork
f #ER13014408 Insured
L (850)272-2918 lcky Mose
IOJIJ.~I~a7IOwner


QcRg~
CLE4NJNG


Lu-I Builer
Owner/operator
4854 Dogwood Dr.
Marianna, FL 32446
iann\ ,on70o-oo


,lanlng ie uur eso ~ u- o
13 ocdcoemmerclalcleenlng@yahoe.com &rs
[3 www.ocd-commercial-cleaenln.com o & NSUHH}


Clay O'Neal's r
Land Clearing, inc. t0 ,w
ALTHA, FL
850-762-9402 W/7V
Cell 850-832-5055 a'?fHBC



P Trolling Motor Repair
Affordable Service! o Fast Repair!
Most Cases 1 Week Turnaround.
Servicing Minn Kota & Motorguide.
_ 850-272-5305


NEW& USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELOW RETAIL PRICES!


TRIPLE
JTTJ


850.526.1700
Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
2978 Pierce Street
(behind Tim's Florist)


Affordable Lawn Care
Low Overhead=Low Prices.
850-263-3813 850-849-1175




Chad 0's Lawn F/X '
Commercial & Residential r ss
Spring, Clean-up &
Monthly Maintenance
Full Lawn Care Service
*' Free Estimates
Family Owned & Operated
Chad Oliver I 850-573-7279 ,

HAPPY

HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
I Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME |




"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured



AHIIDHMAN .'
pnrsuncwns.w SER VICE o~
PAli .DECK "^l K'
SRI. CA'PiTY AND MORE
850.557.2924 I
850.209.9373 ai r


:MARIANNA CITY 84 M^adisn S
: FARMERS Tues Thurs Sat
i MARKET 7amo


I* Io


$239500
35Years in Business


SHIVER PREssRE WASHING
," ^ H0 mes.Barfns, Sidewalks, etc.
i -w~rjGuaranteed---


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


JAC KSOCON ^ ^


FLORIDAiI'
jcfloridan.com


inonsrer^

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


CLASSIFIED


G.M. Properties of PC
;'^.. Beach e 800-239-2059
Sg Fully Furnished Condos
*s f - & Townhouses
near Pier Park..
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $250 nt.
Portside Resort starting @ $125.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
www.gmproperties.com









www. ICFI, ORIDAN.com


H 7 W Toyota 2013 Tacoma
r"h-i '-,. 4 dr. 4 wheel drive. TRD off
' riL .rc'3ad piack jge. Automatic
Itran-misison, rear locking
differential, tow package,
CD player. White exterior with grey interior.
Approx. 9,500 miles. $31,500. 334-268-3900


2006 Iron horse TX Chopper fully customized
blue w/graphics, S&S 124 cu. ft. motor, boss
dual intake V&H big radius exhaust, garage
kept, exc., cond. 10,400 miles, $10,599. O00
334-445-0366 MUST SEE !!
2007 Harley Davidson Dyna
Low Rider. 19,000 miles.
V.j Exc. cond. Garage kept &
well maintained, regular
V service intervals. Sundown-
er touring seat & backrest,
luggage rack, Rush mufflers V H fuelpak & K N
air filter. New rear tire & battery. Lots of extras
and chrome. See to appreciate. $8,700. Call
334-804-4035
Honda 1100 Shadow 26,000 miles, windshield,
saddle bags, floor boards lots of extras, nice
bike $3500. 334-406-2306


Suzuki 2006 Grand Vitara 125K miles, good
cond. great little compact SUV $6500.
334-791-8977.


Commercial 2005 GreatDane 48ft. Reefer
SB300+ Thermoking with lift gate, in good
condition $18,000 080 334-797-1095.
Ford 2004 F150 long bed 108K miles, nice truck,
well taken care of with tool box. $7500.
334-406-2306.
Ford XLT S150 1995 Ext. Cab, runs good, teal
green, Heat & Air works, 302 engine $2000. Also
willing to trade for a compact car in good run-
ning condition. 850-693-5812 or 850-557-8365.
Massey Ferguson Tractor md#1215
with Massey Ferguson 225 ft. mower
$4000. 334-797-8523


f For sale by Owner
2006 Pontiac Montana SV6,
88K miles, 7 passenger
Sliding power door, rail
guards, back-up assist,
front/rear CD/MP3, DVD w/remote, fabric w/4
captain seats. Maintained w/mbst service
records. 60-75% tread $5,900 334-790-6618
WANTE D AUTOS

1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!

^VS0t 24 ^?4.e 7eg~
AUTQ BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

CALL FOR TOP PRICE
S FOR JUNK VEHICLES

I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664
r, m m -- m , m * wwmo, 1m, m m , o m;rn m-,
Got a Clunker
,. .-l -,We'l be your Junker!
S'. We buy.wrecked cars
".-, and Farm Equip. at a
~">-" -s'.'= ~fair and honest price!
$325 & tComplete Cars
CALL 334-702-4323OR 334-714-6285.

a We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not !
334-794-9576 or 344-791-4714--


LEGALS


lEii[N[ O:TTTInC-IES ^^,]
LF16052
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 12-000431-CA
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
GARRY WAYNE COX; RHONDA GAIL COX;
UNKNOWN PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY;
Defendants.'
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated 13th May, 2013,
and entered in Case No. 12-000431-CA, of the
Circuit' Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and
for JACKSON County, Florida. JPMORGAN
CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is
Plaintiff and GARRY WAYNE COX; RHONDA
GAIL COX; are defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash AT THE
NORTH DOOR, AT 4445 LAFAYETTE STREET,
MARIANNA IN JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
32446, at 11:00 A.M., on the 27th day of June,
2013, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
PARCEL #1:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 34, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 8 WEST,
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN
NOO55'21"E, 2414.82 FEET; THENCE
N8341'28"W, 103.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE RUN N7543'33"W, 210.18
FEET; THENCE RUN N0645'43"W, 139.19 FEET
TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
OAK STREET; THENCE RUN S8926'33"E, ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 223.11 FEET; THENCE
DEPARTING SAID R/W RUN S00055'21"W, 187,90
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAIN-
ING .794 OF AN ACRE MORE OR LESS
PARCEL #2
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4
OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 8
WEST OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE
SOO55'21"W, 250 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE N8338'10"W, 103.52 FEET;
THENCE N7543'33"W, 210.18 FEET; THENCE
S8938'37"W, 330.49 FEET TO A POINT ON THE
EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF EDENFIELD
DRIVE; THENCE S00055'21"W, ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 182.0& FEET; THENCE DE-
PARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE ON A BEAR-
ING OF S8918'18"E, 681.47 FEET; THEN
N00002'53"W, 124.43 FEET; THENCE
N8338'10"W, 41.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. CONTAINING 2.611 ACRES MORE OR
LESS.
A person claiming an interest in the surplus
-from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 13th day of May, 2013.
/s/DALE RABON GUTHRIE
As Clerk of said Court
By Tammy Baily
As Deputy Clerk
This Notice is provided pursuant to Administra-
tive Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the '
Americans with the Disabilities Act, If you are a
person with a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O.
Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is


Jackson County Floridan *


WedneF-sday, June 19, 2013-
Wednesday, June 19, 2013- 9 B


less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.
Submitted by:
Kahane & Associates; P.A.
8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000
Plantation, FL 33324
Telephone: (954) 382-3486
Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380
Designated service email:
notice@kahaneandassociates.com
File No.: 11-07833 JPC
June 12, 19, 2013
LF16053
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2011-CA-000913
JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association as
Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance,
LLC
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Gerald David Layton a/k/a Gerald Layton and
Desiree B. layton a/k/a Desiree' Layton; Jack-
son County, Florida Acting through the State
Housing Initiatives Partnership Pro-
gram
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
dated May 22, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.
2011-CA-000913 of the Circuit Court of the 14th
Judicial Circuit in and for Jackson County, Flori-
da, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National
Association as Successor by Merger to Chase
Home Finance, LLC, Plaintiff and Gerald David
Layton a/k/a Gerald Layton and Desiree B. Lay-
ton a/k/a Desiree' Layton, Husband and Wife
are defendantss, I, Clerk of Court, Dale Rabon
Guthrie, will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE JACKSON
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL
STANDARD TIME on July 25, 2013, the following
described property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to-wit:
THE SOUTH 1/2, OF A PARCEL OF LAND DESCRI-
BED AS BEGINNING ON THE WEST SIDE OF DA-
VIS STREET, 56 YARDS NORTH, OF THE SE COR-
NER, OF THE NW 1/4, OF THE NE 1/4, OF SEC-
TION 3, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST,
AND THENCE RUN NORTH 70 YARDS, THENCE
WEST 70 YARDS, THENCE SOUTH 70 YARDS,
THENCE EAST 70 YARDS, TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; BEING IN THE CITY OF GRACEVILLE,
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA32440.
THE ABOVE PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULAR-
LY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A 3/4" IRON PIPE (NO ID)
MARKING THE SE CORNER, OF.THE NW 1/4, OF
THE NE 1/4, OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 6
NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE S 89 54'11" W, A DISTANCE
OF 30.62 FEET; THENCE N 000 00'00" ALONG
THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF FLORI-
DA STREET, AND SOUTHERLY EXTENSION
THEREOF, A DISTANCE OF 168.00 FEET, TO A
1/2" IRON ROD AND CAP (PSM 6525), SAID
IRON ROD BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, N 000 00'00" E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 105.00 FEET, TO A 1/2" IRON ROD
AND CAP (PSM 6525), THENCE, LEAVING SAID
WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, N 88
43"00"W, A DISTANCE OF 210.00 FEET, TO A
1/2" IRON ROD AND CAP (PSM 6525); THENCE S
0000'00" E, A DISTANCE OF 105.00 FEET; .
THENCE S 88 43'00" E, A DISTANCE OF 210.00
FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. ,
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850)
747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance is less than sev-
en (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call
711.
/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Jackson County, Florida
/s/Tammy Bailey
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHe, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(561) 998-6700
(561) 998-6707


A Dvrteo I,,ST F [ fFEbIsUitinw jfloi]gww 'm.S - c s ,-.


Diamond Ring 1.25K $275. firm 850-482-3537


Shotgun-Mossberg 12 ga., $465. 850-326-4544


Exterior door w/jamb,36x80. $150. 850-482-2636 Trolling Mtr: Evin. 12/24volt $300. 850-272-5305


Flute: Good pads, nice case. $99. 850-592-8769
Kenmore Freezer: 2ftx5ft $150 850-209-7098
Mobility Scooter needs batt. $350. 850-360-4657
Photo Printer NEW Cannon $65. 850-482-2994.
Picnic Tables- (2) 1 new, both $80. 850-557-3071
Pistol-Sig Sauer 1911.22 cal. $350. 850-325-4544
Pistol-S&W .35' mg. Mod 586 $500 850-325-4544
Rice Cooker Black & Decker $5, 850-482-7888.
Rifle-303 British Enfield. $350. 850-325-4544
RV Satellite Package: no receiver $75 209-4500


TV: 1080P HD 46" $100. 850-557-3071
TV-Toshiba, Color, 27" $75. (850)209-3008
Waterbed Frame Q-sz. $75. 850-482-6022.
Weight distribution hitch: 3 bars $275 209-4500
Window: 29x30, dbl pane, $100. 850-482-2636
Wingback Chair- Rose, Petite, $40 850-209-3008
Wood Bedroom Set- $400. 850-557-3071

4 AI.rE RI'IS E IN I
_THi-E: CLA-SSIFIEDpS|


Everybody's talking about what's in the classified.


CLASSIFIED


U U


Clean Out Your Garage


and Turn the Items You've


Forgotten Into Cash.


That old collection of clutter might not mean much to you

anymore, but chances are someone out there would love it. By

using the Classifieds, you'll make it easier for them to find,

and easier for you to sell. So try it today!




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN

(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


W W W.j %-I'


LF16059
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRNiCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 32-2013-CA-000155
REGIONS BANK D/B/A REGIONS
MORTGAGE
Plaintiff,
v.
CLARICE H. ZIEGLER; ET AL.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CLARICE H. ZIEGLER; and all unknown par-
ties claiming by, through, under or against the
above named Defendant, who is not known to
be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties
claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other
claimants
Current Residence Unknown, but whose last
known address was:
4101 MCCALL LN., MARIANNA, FL 32448
429 TOCOA ROAD, HELENA, AL 35080
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following property in Jackson
County, Florida, to-wit:
LOT 6, BLOCK "A" OF PINEVIEW SUBDIVISION,
AN UNRECORDED PLAT IN JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA:
COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST COR-
NER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTH-
WEST 1/4 OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH,
RANGE 10 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA;
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY LINE
OF SAID FORTY A DISTANCE OF 136.40 FEET TO
AN EXISTING IRON PIPE AND CALL THIS THE
POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID
FORTY A DISTANCE OF 136.40 FEET TO AN EX-
ISTING IRON PIPE; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES
00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF
300.40 FEET-TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT SET
ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF
MCCALL STREET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES
43 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID STREET A
DISTANCE OF 136.40 FEET TO AN EXISTING
IRON PIPE; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MI-
NUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF
300.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
THIS PARCEL IS LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 17,
TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST, JACK-
SON COUNTY, FLORIbA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 12425
28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL
33716, on or before July 30, 2013 or within thirty
(30) days after the first publication of this No-
tice of Action, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court at 4445 East Lafayette
Street, P.O. Box 510, Marianna, FL 32447, either
before service on Plaintiff's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint petition.

WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this
day of 10th day of June, 2013.
/s/ Dale Rabon'Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
IF YOU AREA PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
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Major League Baseball



Harvey leads Mets to win against Braves in 1st of 2


The Associated Press

ATLANTA Matt Harvey
pitched six hitless innings,
John Buck homered and
the New York Mets held off
anotherAtlanta comeback,
beating the Braves 4-3 on
Tuesday in the first game
of a doubleheader.
Harvey (6-1) didn't allow
a hit until Jason Heyward's
fluke infield single leading
off the seventh but tired in '
the eighth as the Braves
tried to rally for the second
straight game. Trailing 4-0,
Atlanta scored three runs
and had the bases loaded
before Bobby Parnell, the
fourth Mets pitcher of the
inning, fanned Chris John-
son to end the threat. Par-
nell earned his 10th save
with a scoreless ninth.
Harvey had a career-high
13 strikeouts and surren-
dered just three hits.
Buck homered in the
fourth. Braves rookie Alex
Wood (0-1) took the loss in
his first career start.
The Braves opened the
five-game series against
their NL East rival with the
team's 21st comeback win
of the season, a rain-de-
layed 2-1 victory that end-
ed at 1:22 a.m. less than.
12 hours before the start of
the start of the day-night
doubleheader.
Dillon Gee took a 1-0
lead to the ninth, but Fred-
die Freeman won it for
the Braves with a two-run
homer.
The Braves didn't come
close to a hit off Harvey
through six innings, their
only baserunners on a pair


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Atlanta catcher Gerald Laird scores along with second
baseman Dan Uggla (26) in the eighth inning in the opening
game of a doubleheader against the New York Mets on Tuesday
in Atlanta.


of walks in the third. Final-
ly, Heyward reached safely
on perhaps the weakest
ball hit off the New York
starter all day a weak
dribbler up the first-base
line.
Harvey came off the
mound to field it and
flipped to first base, but
there was no one there
to catch it. Lucas Duda,
making just his second
start of the season at first,
charged in and left the bag
uncovered.
New York padded its
lead with two runs in the
eighth, just enough to hold
off the Braves. In the bot-
tom half, Gerald Laird led
off with a walk, Dan Ug-
gla reached on a bad-hop.
single and Andrelton Sim-
mons knocked out Harvey
with Atlanta's first clean


hit, a sharp single between
shortstop and third base.
Pinch-hitter Brian Mc-


Cann struck out against
LaTroy Hawkins, but Jor-
dan Schafer singled in two
runs to make it 4-2. An-
other pinch-hitter, Justin
Upton, grounded into a
forceout to leave runners
at first and third before the
Mets made another pitch-
ing change, bringing on
towering lefty Scott Rice to
face Heyward.
Heyward lined a double
off Duda's glove to make it
4-3. After Rice intentional-
ly walked Freeman, Parnell
struck out Johnson.
The Braves struck out 16
times in all.
Harvey finally got a lit-
tle run support from the
Mets, who had scored only
18 runs in his previous 10
starts while he was in the
game. Largely because
of that, he had eight no-
decisions in a stretch of
nine appearances before


the hard-luck 2-1 loss to
the St.. Louis Cardinals in
his previous appearance,
snapping a stretch of 14
consecutive starts without
a loss dating to his final ap-
pearance of 2012.
New York stretched its
lead to 4-0 with a pair of
runs in the eighth off Da-
vid Carpenter. Pinch hitter
rordany Valdespin walked
with the bases loaded, and
Omar Quintanilla followed
with a sacrifice fly.
Another touted Mets
prospect, Zack Wheeler,


was scheduled to make his
debut in the nightcap as
New York showed off what
it hopes will be the future
cornerstones of its long re-
building job.
While Wheeler is ex-
pected to head back to the
minors for more season-
ing, Harvey is already one
of the NL's most dominant
starters in his first full
season. He eclipsed his
previous career high.of 12
strikeouts in a May 7 game
against the Chicago White
Sox.


San Jose sues MLB


over proposed move


The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO Ma-
jor League Baseball is
dragging its feet on hav-
ing team owners vote on
the Oakland Athletics'
proposed move to a new
ballpark 40 miles south in
San Jose, San Jose city offi-
cials said in a lawsuit filed
Tuesday.
The lawsuit --filed in
federal court in San Jose
- is disputing MLB's .ex-
emption to federal anti-
trust law, which MLB has
used as a "guise" to con-
trol the location of teams,


accordingto the suit.
S"It's time for someone
to take on this supposed
baseball exemption from
antitrust laws," said attor-
ney Phil Gregory of Cotch-
ett, Pitre & McCarthy, the
law firm representing the
city. "The City of San Jose
is a perfect candidate to
make that challenge."
The San Francisco, Gi-
ants have objected to
the A's potential move on
grounds they relied on
territorial rights to the San
Jose-area market when
they built their ballpark,
AT&T Park.


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