Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01102

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text


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Vol. 90No.127-


Missing Sneads man found


Helicopter spots Silver Alert subject lying in Calhoun County woods


BYANGIECOOK
acook@jcfloridan.com
Four days after he was last
seen by his family, the search
for an 87-year-old Sneads man
ended Monday night, when he
was found lying on the edge of a
wooded area in remote Calhoun
County.
Hayes Louis Dickens had been
the subject of a Florida Silver


Alert after he went missing on
'hi ..... Friday. Making
I his disappearance
Particularly wor-
gii risome are two
S.. medical issues he
,^^^r has: Alzheimer's
disease and a
Dic--n heart condition
requiring daily ni-
troglycerin treatment.
A statewide Silver Alert was


also issued for Dickens in 2012.
That time, his whereabouts were
unknown for only a few hours.
He was reported missing after
a car trip to Tallahassee took far
longer than expected, but was
located later that same day.
This time, it was a call from
an Altha man who spotted the
vehicle described in the Silver
Alert that brought the ordeal to
an end.


According to a report from the
Calhoun County Sheriff's De-
partment, shortly after 6:30 p.m.
Monday night, a CCSD depu-
ty was dispatched to George
O'Bryan Road, southeast of Al-
tha, to respond to a possible
sighting of Dickens' car.
At the scene, the officer spoke
with Mark O'Bryan, who said
he saw a beige Lincoln Town
Car pass his home on Sunday


morning, but did not see the ve-
hicle leave the area. O'Bryan lat-
er located the car and got the tag
number, which CCSD dispatch
confirmed was Dickens'.
At the end of the road, the of-
ficer saw Dickens' car, which
appeared to be stuck in a
plowed field. It was locked and
unoccupied.
See FOUND, Page 9A


BASEBALL TOURNAMENT PLAY


-'.- .,.
1K




PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
IGHT: Sneads' Kooper Alexander tries to slide past Malone's Riley Robinson during a Machine Pitch All-Star Tournament game in
Blountstown Monday night. To see how Jackson County's young All-Stars are faring in tournament play around the Panhandle, see
page lB. LEFT: A happy Trevor Nunnery stops at first base as the Malone Ozone All-Stars keep the ball rolling during a game against
Havana in Blountstown Monday night. For more photos from Monday night's games, go to, www.jcfloridan.com/.


Fire causes

closure at

Greenwood

Supermarket

BYANGIECOOK
acook@jcfloridan.com

A Monday morning fire in Greenwood
has temporarily closed the town's only gro-
cery store.
Christine Smith, one of the owners of
Greenwood Supermarket, said Tuesday
that the landmark business should be back
serving customers this week.
"My husband was thinking (Wednesday),
but it's looking more like Thursday."
Clean-up efforts are still underway, a
tough task made tougher because the fire
knocked out power to the whole store.
The fire was discovered around 5 a.m.
Monday, when a store employee who was
opening up for the day's 'business saw
smoke. Smith said this is the first fire the
supermarket's had since she became part-
owner in 1994.
The cause of the fire, which started
in the store's stockroom, is still under
investigation.


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
LEFT: While waiting for electricians to restore power, Greenwood Supermarket Manager Rhonda Melnik sought out a sunlit spot in the
store Tuesday. A fire early Monday morning knocked out the power to the local landmark. RIGHT: Jeremy Campbell with S&S Electric works
on restoring the power at the Greenwood Supermarket on Tuesday.


CLASSIFIEDS...7B

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MiAL-IIILLER
Chevrolet.Buick-Cadillac-GMC-Nissan
NISSAN TEAM
8501). 48"136 1t






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


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11 I.i: 74


<. High: 97
LoA: 72


-j '*, High 99
Low 75


SThursday
Isolated Storms. Hot.


NJ / High 93
] ; Low -710


Saturday
Mostly Sunny & Warm.


.. ', High 940
'_, Low -720


Friday
Scattered Storms. Humid.


High 92
Low 71


Sunday
Mostly Sunny & Warm.


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.04"
2.04"
2.20"


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Year to date
Normal YTD
Normal for year


10:01 PM High
1:01 AM High
10:06 PM High
11:17 PM High
11:51 PM High


Reading
45.67 ft.
7.43 ft.
7.00 ft.
6.42 ft.


'. High: 91
Low: 76
w~


25.o5"
26.26"
59.26"


- 11:19AM
8:18AM
- 11:52 AM
- 12:25 PM
- 12:58 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 f1t.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 5:37 AM
Sunset 7:44 PM
Moonrise 9:05 AM
Moonset 3:51 PM


July June June June
8 16 23 30


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JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager- Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
-subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months:.
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices:
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


TODAY
Baseball Hitting Camp 9 a.m. to noon at
Chipola College. This camp will meet Wednesday
and Thursday, June 12-13, for ages 7-18. The cost is
$100. Call 718-2243.
)) Books That Shaped America Exhibit 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library,
Marianna Branch, 2929 Green St. See the exciting
display of 100 books by American authors that have
shaped and influenced the lives of Americans. C ..ill
482-9631.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United '.I, ti. t
Church. 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
)) Basic Computer Class Part 2 Noon to 3
p.m. at the Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
Highway 90, Marianna. Free class teaches basic
components and use of a computer. Call 526-0139.
)) Marianna Blood Center's Mobile Unit will be
at Calhoun Correctional Institution in Blount-
stown from 1-6 p.m. The need for blood is unending.
The process takes 30-45 minutes. Save up to three
lives with one donation. Call 526-4403.

THURSDAY, JUNE 13
Jackson County Growers Association/Mari-
anna City Farmers Market 7 a.m. to noon at
Madison St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh fruits
and vegetables grown by local farmers.
)) Books That Shaped America Exhibit 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library,
Marianna Branch, 2929 Green St. See the -: l ig
display of 100 books by American authors that have
shaped and influenced the lives of Americans. Call
482-9631.
)) Chipola Civic Club Meeting Noon at The
Oaks Restaurant, Highway 90 in Marianna. The
CCC's focus is the local community, "Community,
Children& Character." Call 526-3142.
D Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group
- Noon at Jackson Hospital Hudnall Building in
the C :.irimurii, Room. Free to attend. Curriculum
developed by ex-smokers for those who want to
become ex-smokers themselves. Call 482-6500.
)) Job Club- Noon to 3 p.m. at- I J ::,.'. ill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job :e- iri, r,:tiiiti.:.n skills; get job search assis-
tance. Call 526-0139.
)) Employability Workshop, "Making Positive
First Impressions" 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna
One Stop Career Center, 4636 -hi i... ., 90, Mari-
anna. Call 718-0326.


)) Chipola Regional Workforce Development
Board General Meeting 6,p.m. at the Workforce
Board Office in Marianna. C 11 718-0456.
)) Town of Grand Ridge Regular Monthly Council
Meeting 6 p.m. at the Grand Ridge Town Hall. The
public is invited to attend. Call 592-4621.
) Lecture: "Holy Cow, I Have Cancer! Now
What?" by David Schell, Ed.D, LPC, NCC 6:30
p.m. at G, i., .1.ii' First United tll.,.l I Church,
1111 Eighth Avenue (Hwy 2). Books available for pur-
chase and signing. A fellowship time with refresh-
ments will noi.-. in,, lecture. Call 263-3342.
)) 6th annual Summer Concert Series featuring
Rebel Syndicate 7-9 p.m. at Citizens Lodge in
Marianna. This free event is presented by Jackson
County Parks and Recreation and Main Street
Marianna.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United 1,ti..:.jiI Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.
)) Deadline to register for Session 2 Swimming
Lessons at Chipola College. Session 2 will be June
17-27, with classes available at 10 a.m. or 7 p.m,.
'.1,, d, 1, Ti! ,i i,: Cost is $55. Pre-registration is
required. Call 718-2473 :. .,: i I.,..I -lii for
m ore i ,ii,r c i-i i, ii

FRIDAY, JUNE 14
Books That Shaped America Exhibit 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. ii hi 1-1: :I.:i i County Public Library,
Marianna Branch, 2929 Green St. See the- ItiI
display of 100 books by American authors that have
shaped and influenced the lives of Americans. Call
482-9631.
)) Knitters Nook -10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Lit., -ir, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
)) Marianna Blood Center's Mobile Unit will be
atthe Walmart Supercenter in Chipley 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. The need for blood is unending. The process
takes 30-45 minutes. Save up to three lives with one
donation. Call 526-4403.
)) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups.' Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856, 573-1131.
)) A Walk in the Park Concert Series 7:30 p.m.
at Compass Lake in the Hills, 645 Compass Lake
Drive in Alford, featuring Jerome Jackson's tribute


to Elvis, Twenty on Red, and Shane Owens. Event is
sponsored by the Compass Lake Men's Club. For
tickets call 579-4303.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United '.irh,.d,: i
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, JUNE 15
Pancake Breakfast 7-10 a.m. in the Club
House at Panhandle Pioneer Settlement, located in
Sam Adkins Park off of Highway 20 in Blountstown.
$5 for adults, $3 for children 6-12 and free for
children 5 and under. All funds raised will ::-i,-iit Hr,
Panhandle Pioneer :- tn i,-,r Call 674-2777 for
more information.
)) Jackson County Growers Association/Mari-
anna City Farmers Market 7 a.m. to noon at
Madison St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh fruits
and vegetables grown by local farmers.
)) 10th annual Florida Caverns State Park
Butterfly Count 8 a.m. CST at Florida Caverns
State Park parking lot. An all-day count of the but-
terflies found in a 15 mile diameter circle centered
around the park. The park entrance fee will be
waived, advise the office you are participating in the
National American Butterfly Association event. Call
850-575-7662.
)) Books That Shaped America Exhibit 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. ,ii -i 11 1, ..,-ii County Public Library,
Marianna Branch, 2929 Green St. See the exciting
display of 100 books by American authors that have
shaped and influenced the lives of Americans. Call
482-9631.
)) Chipola Area Autism Resource Center's
Autism and Art Day -10 a.m. to noon at the
Marianna First Presbyterian Church F-Ii,:,. :!i[ Hall.
Tables will be set up for children/youth with autism
and their families to explore several different types
of art including: Painting, drawing and clay art.
Bring a cover-up. Light refreshments will be served.
Call 557-7146, 573-4666 or 272-6099.
Fundraiser for Citizen's Field Football, Inc.
-11 a.m.at' 1,a i, ,,Il's Grocery Store, Hng'.. 3, 90
in Sneads. Whole and half-rack ribs starting at $20
and $10 -.,-ii .:i1 Donations will benefit Sneads
High School Football. Contact cii -i, -, r: .i, ,ii
com.
)) The Annual Cloud Reunion #22 Noon at the
i. l .,:.. ,lI CormmLinity Center in Dellwood. Descen-
dants of James "Jim" and Annie Sylvester "Vester"
'"J, ii Cloud are invited to attend and keep the
Cloud tradition going. Paper goods and ice will be
provided. Call 592-6525.


Thesubmission deadline for this calendaristwo ,,. i,.,i i..,lii iii', iiSubmit to: ConimuniityCalendar, Jacksoni CouLnty Floridan, P.O. Box520. Marianna. FL32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
.. ....... ..


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for June 10, the latest
available report: One accident
with injury, two accidents with-
out injuries, two suspicious ve-
hicles, two suspicious persons,
one information
Report, one
_, funeral escort,
SCRIME one burglary,
S-i one disturbance
(physical), two
disturbances (verbal), four
burglary alarms, four traffic
stops, one obscene/threaten-
ing call, two follow-up inves-
tigations, one assault, one
noise/disturbance call, two
animal complaints (dog), one
assisting motorist/pedestrian,


three calls to assist other agen-
cies, one baker act/transport,
one patrol request and one
threat/harassment.

Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriffs
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following incidents
for June 10, the latest available
report: Two armed/dangerous
persons, two hospice deaths,
one missing juvenile, one *
abandoned vehicle, two suspi-
cious vehicles, one suspicious
person, three information
reports, two highway obstruc-
tions, two burglary calls, one
disturbance (physical), two fires
(single commercial), one report
of power line down, 27 medical
calls, two traffic crashes, one


burglary alarm, one robbery
alarm, two fire alarms, seven
traffic stops, five larceny re-
ports, four calls to serve papers/
ex-partee, two civil disputes,
two reports of trespass, one
follow-up investigation, one
suicide or attempt, one report
of fraud, two assisting motor-
ists/pedestrians, three calls
to assist other agencies, three
reports of child abuse, three
public service calls, one finger
printing, one criminal registra-
tion, two welfare checks, three
transports, one baker act/trans-
port, one patrol request, two
reports of threat/harassment
and two 911 hang-up calls.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were


booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
)) Spencer Trawick, 39, 6180
llighway 90, Marianna; battery
(domestic violence).
)) Darryl Garland, 21, 4076 Mc-
Cary i)rive, Marianna; failure to
appear.
)) Tiffany Newell, 18, 5373
Brown St., Graceville; violation
of county probation.
) Jessica Barfield, 29, 2484
Dellwood Cypress Road, Grand
Ridge; hold for Calhoun County.


Jail Population: 220


To re port a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call 1-888-
404-FWCC (3922).


TEAM RAHAL MILLER
i Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-CMC-Nissan
.^ 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL "'

S (850) 823051
aa r 1 ... ; Jl ^ .. ... ,,, ^^ i^-',i!',H M


Weather Outlook


SHigh: 99
I" Lim.: 74


PRECIPITATION


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
1 2 3 4 5 /,:,


a


-12A WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 2013


WAKE-UP CALL


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. --I-' sj








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Ashmore and Milton win. Kirldand Award at


Special to the Floridan

Chipola College faculty
members )oy Ree (Georgia)
Ashmore and Vikki Milton
have been nominated by
their colleagues as co-re-
cipients of the Kirkland
Award for Excellence in
Teaching.
The Kirkland Award
was established by broth-
ers J:R. Kirkland and Da-
vid Kirkland in honor of
their parents, Carolyn and
the late Willis Kirkland of
Marianna. The award pro-
vides $1,000 to the annual
recipient.
Ashmore has served
as an assistant profes-
sor in mathematics since
2005. She also serves as
faculty adviser to the Mu
Alpha Theta Mathematics
honor society. Ashlnore
serves on several college
committees including:
Learning Management
Systems; Curriculum and
Courses of Study; Institu-
tional Planning and Ac-
countability; Instructional
Resources Committee and
AFC Professional Develop-
ment. She was selected to


serve on thle committee
that developed curriculum
for a First Year Learning
Experience course for new
students.
Her colleague JoAnn Ev-
erett says, "Joy Ree has a
unique ability to assess the
learning needs of her stu-
dents. She prepares ma-
terials that make it easier
for students to assimilate
and retain concepts. Her
student evaluations re-
flect the appreciation that
students have for her class
presentations."
Ashmore plays a major
role in the annual Math-
ematics Olympiad for
high school students by
coordinating the algebra
II ciphering competition.
She serves as the liaison
between the college and
mathematics dual enroll-
ment teachers. She has
actively participated in the
Association of Florida Col-
leges chapter serving as
Professional Development
Committee Co-Chair. In
this role, she organized
the Leadership 360 Semi-
nar series for college em-
ployees. She supports the


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Chipola College faculty members Joy Ree (Georgia) Ashmore,
(right) and Vikki Milton (left) are co-recipients of the Kirkland
Award for Excellence in Teaching. They are pictured here with
Dr. Jason Hurst, executive vice president.


college's Fine Arts program
and is a member of the Ap-
plauding Chipola Theatre
Fund. She also is a volun-
teer statistician for the col-
lege Brain Bowl team. Ash-
more is a previous winner
of the Chipola Faculty/Ad-
ministrator/Other Profes-
sional Award of the month
award.
She and her husband
Steve have one child. The
family is active in the Altha
United Methodist Church.


Professor Vikki Milton
has served 20 years at the
college teaching various
courses in the business and
technology department.
In addition to teaching,
Milton also serves as fac-
ulty adviser to the Chipola
chapter of Phi Beta Lamb-
da business association.
The chapter has won nu-
merous state and national
awards. In this role, Milton
also has been elected as
the District 1 State Adviser


and serves on the Florida
PBL Executive Board.
Milton also served for
several years as sponsor of
the Chipola Cheerleader
squad. Milton has served
on the following college
committees: Governance
Council, Marketing and
Recruitment; Budget Re-
view and Development,
Computing and Telecom-
munications, Website
Development, Staff and
Program Development,
and Alumni/ Homecom-
ing. She also served on
the Business/Technol-
ogy Building Renovation
Committee.
She is an active mem-
ber of both the Council
of Chipola Educators and
the Association of Flori-
da Colleges. She is chair
of the college's Learning
Management System Task
Force which is evaluating
currently available LMS's
to support Chipola's tran-
sition moving toward a
more integrated learning
environment for students.
Milton's colleague Nancy
Burns says, "Many stu-
dents who have entered


ChjpiiTii ^,

careers or gone on to uni-
versities come back to tell
her of their success and
how well Mrs. Milton pre-
pared them."
Two members of Chipo-
la's Information Technol-
ogy staff Matt White
and Kelly Lanier are
Milton's former student.
Milton and her husband
Johnny have two children.
The family is active in the
First Presbyterian Church
of Marianna.
Previous winners of fe
Kirkland Ward include
current faculty Dr. Girna
McAllister, Robert Ivey,
Lee Shook, JoAnn Ever-
ett, Nancy Burns, Dr. Lou
Cleveland, Dr. Rose Cavin,
Dr. David Hilton, John
Gardner, Stan Young and
Geraldine DeFelix; faculty
emeriti Mary McClendon,
Dr. Stephen Shimmel,
Kathryn Roberts, Brenda
Alford, Paul Huang, Peggy
Register, Charlene Lor,
Lonnie Keene, the late
Donald Holley, the late Dr.
Bill Brievogel, the late Doh
Adams, and former faculty
Dr. Cherry Ward, Jean Tay-
lor and Dr. Robert Dunkll.


Sneads FFA celebrates big year at annual banquet


S Special to the Floridan

The Sneads FFA Annual
End-Of-Year Awards Ban-
quet was held on May 7
at the Sneads High School
Gymnasium. It was held to
honor and recognize the
FFA members who have
been successful during
this school year.
The highlights of the
evening -were the Career
Development Event pre-
sentation, giving out the
Alunmi and senior awards,
the Honorary Member cer-
emony, the senior officers'
retiring addresses and the
announcement of the next
year's officer team.
A meal of Caesar salad,
soup, smoked steak, po-
tato casserole, green beans
and Texas sheet cake was
served by the Sneads High
School Band and Sneads
FFA officers. There was
both a silent and live auc-
tion to help raise funds for
-the chapter to attend the
State FFA Convention in
June. There were goods do-
nated by various business-
es, wood projects made by
FFA members in the silent
auction, several gourmet
cakes, and a Disney ticket
package was auctioned off
by Phyllis Daniels in the
live auction.
The Sneads FFA chapter
would like to thank ev-
erybody who contributed
to both the silent and live
auctions, as well as spon-
sored tables for the ban-


.. _., . , -,. ,SUBMITTED FHOTOS
Doug Stone presents FFA Alumni Awards to Shelby Lawrence SUBMITTEDPHOTOS
Alumni Scholarship and Cole Hamilton, Alumni Essay Conte, Pictured are Senior Retired Officers Georgia Pevy, President; Brandy Strickland,
Alumni Scholarship Chaplain; Lindsey Locke, Historian and Shelby Lawrence, Vice President.
Winner.


FFA Advisor Stan Scurlock presents Scholarship Awards to
senior members Georgia Pevy and Lindsey Locke.


quet. Without them, the
banquet would not have
been a success.
During the awards por-
tion of the banquet the
following were recognized:
Orion Douthit, Star Chap-
ter Greenhand; Gerri Har-
din, Star Chapter Farmer;
Shelby Lawrence, Sneads
FFA Alumni Scholarship;
Cole Hamilton, Sneads


FFA Alumni Contest; Geor-
gia Pevy, Farm Bureau Out-
standing Supervised Agri-
cultural Experience Award;
Lindsey Locke and Georgia
Pevy, Senior ScholarAward;
Cole Hamilton, Excellence
Award; Georgia Pevy, Eagle
Award for excellence in
leadership. The Agricultur-
al Sales Team, consisting
of Georgia Pevy, Ashleigh


Mike Hatton presents Georgia Pevy
Outstanding SAE Program Award.
Tharpe, Nick Goodwin, Teacher
Cole Hamilton and Desti- acknowl
nee Douthit, and the Agri- accompl
cultural Communications The
Team, consisting of Lind- Membem
sey Locke, Taylor Reed and year are
Shelby Lawrence, were rec- Toole, Je
ognized for winning at the din, Joy(
state level. Also, Georgia Thomas
Pevy, Florida Association and Alan
of Agricultural Educators They we
Outstanding Agriscience orary in
Student and Stan Scur- Sneads
lock, FAAE Agriscience to their:
support


the Farm Bureau

of the Year, were
edged for their
lishments.
new Honorary
rs inducted this
: Rick and Barbara
erry and Terri Har-
ce Dudley, Rhonda
, Robert Douthit,
n and Sharon Pevy.
ere elected to hon-
embership in the
FFA Chapter due
r assistance and
to the chapter


throughout the year.
Brandy Strickland, Lind-
sey Locke, Shelby Law-
rence, and Georgia Pevy
were recognized as the
senior officers for this year
and delivered their retir-
ing addresses. Finally, the
2013-14 officer team was
announced. The new of-
ficers are: President, Cole
Hamilton; Vice President,
Gerri Hardin; Secretary,
Ashleigh Tharpe; Treasur-
er, Taylor Reed; Reportek,
Samantha Rabon; Sentinel,
Orion Douthit; Parliamen-
tarian, Joe-Mac Scott; His-
torian, Jacob Brown; Chap-
lain, Halley McDaniel; Sr.
Student Advisor, Destinde
Douthit; Jr. Student Advi-
sor, Don Young Dowling
and Chair of Committees,
Trent Whittington. .
This year's Sneads FFA
annual end-of-the-year
Awards Banquet was quite
a success.


W', Divorce Report


The following were re-
corded in Jackson County
during June 3-7:
Marriages
)) Zachary Brooks
Johnson and Ayla Renee
Register.
) Justin David Sikes and
Ashlee Renee Watts.
) Justin Lee Lyons and
Lauren Danielle Milton.
) William David Cody
Meredith and Kaitlin
Caroline Mosier.


Divorces
)) Gregory Glover, vs.
Latoya Glover.
)) Ashley Weeks vs. Wil-
liam Weeks.
)) Kelly E. Silcox vs. Mi-
chael L. Silcox.
)) Kaci Leigh (;raw-
ford vs. Matthew' Tyler
Crawford.
)) Ashlie Register' Tyus vs.
Louis Michael Ty'us.
)) Donald A. Smith vs.
Effie Marie Smith.


GAS WATCH
I -I, 1, 11 1. 1 1 1,i i ir' Hereare


t1.. III" I ,I I- I I I, s o t
11-It[ I I it 11v,. I ,I S f

1. $3.29. Greens BPR 2846 Hwy
71, Mm iainna
2. $3.32, McCoy's Food Mart,
2823 Jetlersnn SI.. Marianna
3. $3.34. BP-Steel City, 2184
Hwy. 231 S.,.Alford
4. $3.35, LovS Tiavel Center,
2510 llwy. 231. Coltondale
5. $3.35. Tom 1 hiiib. 3008 A
Jofilei son Sl., Mai ianna
6. S3.38. RP Slatioi. 5184 Hwy.
231 S., Camiphellton
7. $3.39. A&S Food, 4255 South
St.. Malriiiina
8. $3.39. Nfi B,.,'r Quick Stop,
6189 Hwy. 90. Cyi less
ii i
', h i r r, ,, p ,, ,


6/10 7-4-7
1-1-1
6/11 0-7-8
0-7-11
6/5 8-2-2
1-4-4
6/6 5-6-9


Mon.
Mon.
Tue.
'ue.
Wed.
Wed.
Thurs.
Thurs.
Fri.
Fri.
Sat,
Sat,
SurL.
Sun.


6-9-54
5-2-9-3
2-6-7-7
3-3-8-1
5-3-6-8
6-2-1-4
8-4-7-6


2-1-3 7-8-2-5
6/7 6 8-0 7-9,0.4
3,2.5 2-1-0-0
6/8 5.2-6 4 4-2,5-0
7-78 i. 1
6/9 1-8-7 7-7-3.5
3-8-7 6-6-4-I


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LOCAL


----I














Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Another Opinion


Blame



Congress for



the Postal



Services decline
tephen King would have a hard time coming up
with a more horrifying plot for the U.S. Postal
Service.
Established in the Constitution, the U.S. system of
post offices was converted in 1971 into an independent,
self-supporting agency that's supposed to operate as a
commercial entity.
But thanks to our nation's dysfunctional Congress, the
Postal Service has become a zombie agency.
It's starved for money, and lurches from idea to idea to
achieve financial viability.
But nearly every time the Postal Service comes up
with a potential solution BANG! Congress shoots
it in the head.
It's a messy metaphor, but lawmakers are almost
single-handedly (with the aid of labor unions) killing a
venerated American institution whose first postmaster
general was the beloved Founding Father Benjamin
Franklin.
Like many institutions (including newspapers) its
business has declined in part because of technological
innovations....
When clear-thinking members of Congress sought
to allow the Postal Service to raise postage rates more
easily, senators like Thomas Carper of Delaware called
for nuance.
Is it any wonder Congress is less popular than lice and
NFL replacement refs?
The Postal Service doesn't need nuance. It needs to be
brought back to life. Congress needs to pass a compre-
hensive bill that gets rid of health-care pre-funding and
lets the Postal Service function with the autonomy that
was envisioned back in 1971.
Unless, of course, Congress prefers sucking the life
from one of the nation's great institutions.

Orlando Sentinel


Contact your representatives

U.S. Congress


U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland II, R-2
1229 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
202-225-5235
@RepSoutherland
www.Southerland.House.gov

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla.
716 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
202-224-5274
@SenBilNelson
www.BillNelson.Senate.gov

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.
317 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
202-224-3041
@MarcoRubio
www.Rubio.Senate.gov


Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor. P.O Box 520,
Marianna FL. 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 orsend
email to editorial@jcfloridan.com. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verity the letter and will not be
printed. For more informatiOn call 850-526-3614.


American women deserve better


if think it's without question
|that pregnancy to a woman
can completely disrupt her
life."
In 1971, Sarah Weddington ar-
gued in front of the Supreme Court
that pregnancy is a burden women
ought to have the legal option to be
freed from. In New York City today,
the most recent numbers available
show that two in five pregnan-
cies end in abortion; the rate is 60
percent if the child in the womb
happens to be black. Statewide they
are lower, but still execrably high.
In the midst of this abysmal culture
of death, Weddington recently
joined the Empire State's governor
in insisting that abortion access be
expanded there..
Which leads to a question do
we, as a culture and as people, ac-
tually prefer abortion? Has the rhet-
oric shifted from "safe, legal and
rare" to "safe, legal and frequent...
even expected"?
That sounds quite miserable. If
we don't actively prefer abortion, it
seems that we too often have come
to accept that abortion is a neces-
sary problem-solver, whatever
the cost. We've come to ignore or
simply erase life and its inherent
dignity, its potential and endless
possibilities for redemption.
Americans have deep empathy
for a woman who finds herself in
a difficult situation, and they want
to know that she'll be safe. And
so stories like the recent one in El
Salvador, where a woman sought
an abortion and wound up instead
giving birth to a child who could
not survive on her own, or the
tragic tale of Savita Halappanavar,
the Indian woman who died in
Ireland, get international attention.


Savita, it was claimed,.died because
she could not obtain an abortion.
In truth, the investigation made
clear, she died of an infection, and
not because an abortion was not
performed on her.
This verdict did not receive as
much press as her death did, of
course. All too often, we form opin-
ions without knowing the facts of
the matter.
What is never made clear is that
being pro-life does not mean that
a woman loses her right to life. It
is an abortion regime that insists
that there are not two patients in
the equation: the mother and the
unborn child.
In arguing for what would be-
come the right to legal abortion,
Weddington went on to say: "If the
pregnancy would result in the birth
of a deformed or defective child,
she has no relief. Regardless of
the circumstances of conception,
whether it was because of rape,
incest, whether she is extremely
immature, she has no relief."
Marriage and babies can actually
help mature us! Great sacrificial
experiences build character and
make heroes of everyday women
and men. There's relief there, if
we look for it. There is sacrifice
but there is also joy. What is the
purpose of our lives, anyway? With


all our "progress" in medicating
fertility, not only is it not foolproof,
leading to heartache and tremen-
dous expense, we still die, after all.
Science, like life, has its limits. In
facing our challenges, we can learn
and live and love more fully.
'Serrin Foster of Feminists for Life
views Weddington's posture an
unintentional betrayal of women.
'As her arguments for abortion
before the Supreme Court made
clear, Weddington saw the discrimi-
nation and other injustices faced
by pregnant women," Foster says.
"But she did not demand, that these
injustices be remedied. Instead, she
demanded for women the 'right'
to submit to these injustices by
destroying their pregnancies."
Weddington, and the feminist
movement that has long embraced
legal abortion, "discounted the
strength of women to overcome
obstacles, and the resolution of
society to support mothers," Foster
argues.
Supporting Andrew Cuomo's
"Women's EqualityAct," which,
among other things, would allow
non-doctors to perform abortions
in the state, Weddington said: "New
York was the state we looked to.
Around the country, women always
said, 'If you can, just make it to New
York...'"
Real leadership would march us
out of this morass. Women deserve
better than believing they have a
right to escape pregnancy through
murder. Women and men need
support in embracing life in all its
challenges and fruitful operations.
Kathryn Lopez is the editor-at-large of National
Review Online www.nationalreview.com.
She can be contacted at klopez@
nationalreview.cornm.


How can GOP win young voters?


Sfter back-to-back presiden-
tial defeats, the Republican
arty is obsessed with rein-
venting itself. Or, more accurately,
it's obsessed with talking about
reinventing itself.
This is like someone who, having
gained 25 pounds, debates the
virtues of various diets while lying
on the couch, eating junk food. It's
a first step, but a tiny one.
Poor Bob Dole had the temerity
to say that this isn't his Republican
party. Nearly 90, the former sena-
tor and Republican presidential
nominee said last month that he
doubted whether he, Richard Nixon
or Ronald Reagan could even be
nominated for president by the
current party.
"I think they ought to put a sign
on the (Republican National) Com-
mittee doors that says 'Closed for
Repairs,'" and spend the next six
months coming up with a positive
agenda, Dole said on Fox News
Sunday.
Conservatives pounced, calling
Dole old, irrelevant and worse.
Eventually, though, status-quo
Republicans may be forced to hear
the wake-up calls. Yes, plural.
In March, a Republican task force
commissioned by Republican
National Chairman Reince Priebus
warned in its "Growth and Oppor-
tunity Project" report that the party
has marginalized itself and risks
future presidential losses unless it
makes changes. Among the prob-
lems is age.
"Young people are increasingly
rolling their eyes at whht the party
represents ... When someone rolls
their eyes at us, they are not likely
to open their ears to us," the report
said.
Reagan may be a beloved GOP
icon, but no one under the age of
51 was old enough to vote for him


MarshaMercer


when he first ran for president, the
report noted, adding, "Our party
knows how to appeal to older vot-
ers, but we have lost our way with
younger ones.
It's even worse than that.
When voters under 30 were asked
what words they associate with
"Republican Party," they respond-
ed: closed-minded, racist, rigid,
old-fashioned.
And the Democratic Party? Soft,
said some, but most picked toler-
ant, diverse and open-minded.
These are findings from a new
report by the College Republican
National Committee. The com-
mittee analyzed voter polls and
conducted its own focus groups
and survey of voters under 30 for
"Grand Old Party for a Brand New
Generation." The report calls on
Republicans to turn the GOP brand
around, update their tech presence
and rethink their policies.
Young people have been voting
Democratic for president since
1992, so long that it may seem the
natural order. President Barack
Obama won 5 million more votes of
people under 30 than Mitt Romney
did last year, and that was enough
to ensure Obama's victory, despite
Romney's winning 2 million more
votes of people over 30.
It wasn't always this way. In 1972,
the first presidential election when
18-year-olds could vote, 52 percent
of voters utinder 30 cast ballots for
Richard Nixon. Ronald Reagan won
4


59 percent of young voters in 1984,
and George W Bush lost young vot-'
ers by just 2 points in 2000 -while
losing seniors 65 and more than 4
points.
Democrats should not enjoy the
Republicans' dilemma too much.
It's not that young people love
Democrats, the college Republicans
report. It's that young people hate
Republicans more.
At the start of their survey, the
College Republicans' researchers
asked young voters to complete
two non-political sentences: "I
hope people see me as..."And "I
hope people never see me as..."
They were given a long list of attri-
butes. This was before any mention
of politics, and the idea was to get
a sense of what the young people
valued.
Interestingly, the most common
answer to "I hope people see me
as..." was intelligent, followed
by caring and hardworking. Way
down the list were creative, unique,
adventurous and cool.
And "1 hope people never see me
as..." stupid. Lazy and incompetent
were close behind. Farther down
were closed-minded, negative and
unhelpful.
"For the GOP, being thought of
as closed-minded is hardly a good
thing. But if the GOP is thought of
as the "stupid party," it may as well
be the kiss of death," the report
said.
Cue the comments last year by
Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, who
was right on target when he said
Republicans have to stop being "the
stupid party."
But how? What can Republicans
(do to win back the youth vote in
presidential elections? l'd love to
hear your ideas.
Mar sha Mercer writes from Washington.
Contact her at marsham.ieicer @yahoo.conm.


Southerland






Nelson





Rubio


E
0V
~6/i11


2013 Jeff Stahler/Dist, by Universal UClick for UFS








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN # www.jcfloridan.com


Chipola Chapter Regent Sharon Wilkerson (left) and Vice
President General Barbara Makant (right) congratulate Emily
Howell for 50 years as a DAR member.


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
ABOVE: Vice President General Barbara Makant installs the Chipola Chapter officers for 2013-15. Pictures (from left): Makant,
Librarian Ruth Kinsolving, Historian Alma Milton, Treasurer Joyce Dennis, Chaplain Dorcas Jackson and Regent Carolyn Jordan.
Not pictured: Vice Regent Glenda Bowden, Registrar Marilyn Clere, Corresponding Secretary Marianne Harrison and Recording
Secretary Rosie Smith Gay.
RIGHT: Emily Howell is surrounded by her son, daughter, granddaughters and great granddaughters. Seated (from left) are:
Sarah Hewett, Lily Roberts and Brook Cummings. Standing (from left): Karey Hewett, Emily Howell, VPG Barbara Makant, Karen
Henrickson, Randy Howell (holding granddaughter Vivian Howell), Kristin Roberts and Heather Howell (holding son Judson).
DAR vice president general visits local chapter

D-A-R vice pres ident general visits local ch-ape


Special to the Floridan
C hipola Chapter,
National Society
Daughters of the
American Revolution,
was honored by a visit
from national Vice
President General


Barbara Makant in
May.
The luncheon meeting
was held in the historic
Ely-Criglar Mansion,
home of DAR member
Ruth Barnes Kinsolving.
Vice President General
Makant reported on the


many DAR programs for
youth including Junior
American Citizens and
Children of the Ameri-
can Revolution. Makant
also gave an up-date on
Southeastern Guide Dogs
for which her project as
State Regent from 2009-11


raised $130,000. The
presentation of the DAR
Fifty-Year Certificate to
Emily Golson Howell by
Vice President General
Makant was a highlight
of the meeting. Makant
installed the new Chipola
Chapter officers in an


impressive "flower"
ceremony.
The next meeting of
Chipola Chapter will
be the DAR/C.A.R./SAR
Constitution Week lun-
cheon on September 21
at MacKinnon Hall of St.
Luke's Episcopal Church


in Marianna. For more
information about DAR
please contact Regent
Carolyn Jordan at cdjor-
dan@bellsouth.net and
638-1947 or Registrar
Marilyn Clere at klr-
wud@wildblue.net and
593-5715.


EJCEDC

RECOGNIZES

BUSINESS OF THE

MONTH





PW
-2

, ,A.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The East Jackson County Economic Development Council
recently honored the Sneads Tax Collector's Office as its
June Business of the Month. The Sneads Branch of the Tax
Collector's Office, located at 8087-A Highway 90 in Sneads,
offers the same services that are offered at the main office
in Marianna. Services offered at any branch are: Renewing of
tags or purchasing one for the first time; making application
for Florida titles, transferring Florida titles, out-of-state
titles and collecting sales taxes on a purchase between two
individuals; purchase any type of fishing license, permits and
stamps; payments accepted for all property taxes current or
delinquent. In addition, as of Oct. 1, 2011 the Tax Collector's
Office assumed the responsibility of Florida Drivers License,
which is located at 3613 Highway 90 West in Marianna. This
service is not offered at any of the Tax Collector's Offices
at this time. For information on the services offered by the
Tax Collector call the Sneads Office at 593-6737, Graceville
Office at 263-3218, Marianna Office at 482-9653 or the,
Drivers License Office at 482-9602. Pictured (from left) are:
Homer Hirt, Helen Grice, Sherry Brown, Roberta Cotton and
Genene Hall.


Town Hall meeting is June 17


Special to the Floridan

The city of Marianna is
sponsoring a town hall
meeting on Monday,
June 17, from 6-8 p.m. at
the McClane Community
Center located at 4291 Clay
St. Town hall meetings are


forums where there are
discussions about issues,
problems and opportuni-
ties for the community.
This is the City's way of
making information and
services more accessible
to the community. Plan
to attend in order to:


meet and talk with city of-
ficials, learn more about
the city's process for
eliminating dilapidated
structures, become
more knowledgeable
about community safety,
find out the status
of road paving and


utility installations, learn
more about summer
community events, and
much more. Plan to at-
tend this informative


evening
ties. City
available
questions.


of opportuni-
officials will be
to answer


WellCare executives convicted in fraud trial


The Associated Press
TAMPA Fouir former
WV-elt m,;, executives have
been convicted of some,
but not all, charges follow-
ing a Medicaid fraud trial
in Florida.
WellCare CEO Todd
Farha, WellCare CFO Paul
Behrens, Harmony Behav-
ioral Health vice president
William Kale and vice pres-
ideit of operations Peter
Clay all faced multiple
counts of medical fraud,
conspiracy and making
false statements. But after
several weeks of delibera-


were unable to reach ver-
dicts for the more serious
charge of conspiracy to
commit medical fraud on
each defendant.
Farha was found guilty
of two counts of health
care fraud, and acquitted
of six other charges in-
cluding giving false state-
ments. Behrens also was
found guilty of two counts
of health care fraud and
two counts of making false
statements, but was ac-
quitted of other two other
false statement charges.
Kale was found guilty of
two counts of health care


Prosecutors say they
haven't decided whether
to retry to deadlocked
conspiracy counts.
A sentencing date hasn't
been set. On each of the
health care fraud counts,
Farha, Behrens and Kale
face uip to 10 years in
prison. The other charges
carry a maximum of five
years.
Prosecutors say the
four men defrauded the
government out of more
than $30 million. Dealing
exclusively with Medicare
and Medicaid claims, au-


thorities say the executives
produced false documents
and formed Harmony Be-
havioral as a "shell com-
pany" to inflate the costs
for behavioral health-care
services.
Defense attorneys say
the expenses were legiti-
mate. They say the state
knew about the arrange-
ment but failed to give
WellCare and other com-
panies any guidance. They
accused federal prosecu-
tors turning a contrac-
tual dispute into a federal
crime.


tions, jurors in Tampa told fraud and Clay was found ..--"
U.S. District Judge James guilty of two counts of 88-t-r-
Moody on Monday they making false statements, \I L> ( 1884je personn St.
Downtown Marianna
ACLU: pill mill database leaked patient info _______ 850.482.6855


MIAMI The Ameri-
can Civil Liberties Union
is looking for answers
after it says confidential
prescription drug infor-
mation for 3,300 patients
stored in a statewide da-
tahase has landed in the
hands ol'a third party.
'The ACLU alleges
ilic leaked infornma-
lion includes patient's
prescriptions, birthda4es,


addresses and other
private information. The
information was given to
prosecutors and defense
attorneys inVolusia
County, but ACLUJ said
'lTesday that someone00W
who was not part of any
criminal investigation
randomly found out their
prescription information
was among those leaked.
From wire iepo' Is


Do you have'Cute Kids'?
EnmI youl '(. ule Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.comrn, ,-,ii ti IL ,'to P.O, Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or Im i,,i Iiin n by
our olfiIe' fl;j14'41" Conmstil utiiri Lane In Marianna.
1/, 'y\ I I ii it ., , i itl I ,' t ,', I County ties. Include child's full name, parents' name(s) and 4 resideince. This is a free
".-F 't Ih f -'ll ," 1 ll -. "11.l -,1', 10 Fi." r', i,'h li.


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 2013 #5AF


LOCAL & STATE








NJA C K S O N C O IJ T "( F I. O RF (' ,/ ) 1 iI.- .i V,rr .* r ,,


Day 2 of Zimmerman jury selection, questioning


The Associated Press

SANFORD During
two days of questioning,
prosecutors and George
Zimmerman's attorneys
were unable to find po-
tential jurors who hadn't
heard something about
the fatal shooting of 17-
year-old I ia%,-ii Martin by
the neighborhood watch
volunteer.
By thle end of the day
'i'rl.i\,, the attorneys
had questioned 14 po-
tential jurors in person,
and more than 40 jury
candidates had been dis-
missed after filling out a
questionnaire.
Zimmerman is pleading
not guilty to a second-de-
gree murder charge fthiat
could carry a life sentence
if he is convicted, lie
claims he shot Martin in
self-defense. A 44-day de-
lay in Zimmermnan's arrest
led to protests around tihe
United States.
Protesters (quest ionied
whether the Sanford Police
Department was seriously
investigating (lie case ol'
Martin, a black teen from
the Miamni area. Zimnner-
man identifies himself


o '


4.


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../ '
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/


IHE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Barbara Jackson, of Sanford, Fla., protests outSide the Seminole County Courthouse during
the George Zimmerman trial Tuesday, June 11 in Sanford. Zimmerman has been charged with
second-degree murder for the 2012 shooting death of Trayvon Martin.


as I lspanic.
Judge Debra Nelson
has said she will keep the
identifies of il ie selected
jurors iinoiiymoousl bil she
rejected ia dt'lei se reqiLuesl
to selCislerli the inilial jury
pool o(l'!>)0 residents.
Aft'v r recitiog details
aibouit Ihe case she had
heard in Ile :news, |iror"l-
I'' a while, f eiyal' riree,
lohtl llhe .illi.ii..$ .(Ihy'ro


going to hiive a ihardt lime
finding jtulros wilo haven't
heard alboul lih c case and
can only hiopte lheiy find
residents who caul keel) an
open mind.
"1 hiaven'l lived under a
rock for the past year," she
said. "It's pretty hard for
people not to have gotten
some information."
Juror "B-65," the poten-
ial juror with the least


knowledge of the case, was
a middle-aged black wom-
an who says she learned
about it when a prayer
was held at her church
for the parties involved
in the confrontation. She
said she no longer owned a
television.
Juror "B-35," a middle-
aged black man who owns
vending machines, de-
scribed protests last year


over Martin's shooting as
"saber-rattling." He won-
dered why there weren't
protests over the fatal
shootings of other African-
American men in Sanford,
the Orlando suburb where
Martin was killed in Febru-
ary 2012. He also said he
believed Zimmerman de-
served his day in court.
"I think they politicized
it and made it a racial is-
sue, and I didn't like that,"
said Juror "B-35."I wasn't
agreeing with the racial
connotation."
Juror "B-7," a middle-
aged white man, said he
didn't think Florida's so-
called stand-your-ground
law was necessary in the
state given other self-de-
fense laws that were in
place prior to its passage.
'Thie law allows a person to
invoke self-defense if they
feel a fatal shooting is nec-
essary to prevent death or
great bodily harm.
/iilnimeriniian's attorney,
Mark O'Mara, decided not
to exercise his client's right
to have a judge decide
whether the case could be
dismissed under the law.
Juror "B-7" also said he
thought news media coy-


erage of the case had been
"speculative" and devoid
of hard facts.
"Juror B-86," a single
mInother of two soons who
works at a school, indicat-
edshe may have troubleig-
noring news stories about
Martin's suspension from
high school at the time
he was visiting Sanford.
The judge has prohibited
defense attorneys from
mentioning during their
opening statements either
the suspension, Martin's
past marijuana use, or any
fights he got into.
Attorneys need to find six
jurors and four alternates.
In Florida, 12 jurors are
required only for criminal
trials involving capital cas-
es, when the death penalty
is being considered.
Defense attorneys asked*
potential jurors if be-
ing isolated during the
trial would be a hardship,
indicating they plan to
ask Nelson to sequester
the jury. Jury candidates
who move on from the ini-
tial round of questioning
about their knowledge of
the case, face other rounds
of interviews with the
attorneys.


NYC bomb plot details settle little in NSA debate


,Tho Associated Pr ess

WASHINGTON The
Obama administration de-
classified a handful of de-
tails Tuesday that credited
its PRISM Internet spying
program with intercepting
a key email that unraveled
a 2009 terrorist plot in New
York.
The details, declassified
by the director of national
intelligence, were circu-
lated on Capitol Hill as
part of government efforts
to tamp down criticism of
two recently revealed Na-
tional Security Agency sur-
veillance programs.
Najibullah Zazi's foiled
plot to bomb the New York
subways has become the
centerpiece of that effort.
It remains thile most seri-
ous al-Qaida plot inside
the United States since the
9, 11 terror attacks.
In the rush to defend the
surveillance programs,
however, government of-
ficials have changed their
stories and misstated key
facts of the Zazi plot. And
they've left out one impor-
tant detail: The email that
disrupted the plan could
easily have been intercept-
ed without PRISM.
The debate over the sur-
veillance echoes one from
years earlier, over Presi-


THF .\SSO 'ATFDFPRE S FILE
In this 2009 photo, Najibullah Zazi leaves his apartment in Au-
rora, Colo., for a meeting with his attorney. The Obama admin-
istration declassified a handful of details Tuesday, that cred-
ited its PRISM Internet spying program with intercepting a key
email that unraveled a 2009 terrorist plot in New York.


I
dent George W. Bush's war-
rantless wiretapping and
harsh interrogation tactics.
Critics said the govern-
ment had gone too far but
the administration said
the techniques were lawful
and kept America safe.
"What is clear from this
information released bythe
DNI is that each of these
programs is authorized by
law, overseen by Congress
and the courts and subject
to ongoing and rigorous
oversight," said Sen. Mitch


McConnell, R-Ky.
Zazi, an Afghan-Ameri-
can cab driver living in the
Denver suburbs, was an al-
Qaida-trained bomber. In
September 2009, he sent a
coded message to a Yahoo
email address in Pakistan.
Months earlier, British offi-
cials had linked the Yahoo
address to a known al-Qa-
ida operative.
"The marriage is ready,"
the email said in part.
The NSA intercepted
that email, touching off a


frenzied two-week inves-
tigation in New York and
Colorado that led to Zazi's
arrest. He pleaded guilty
and provided informa-
tion that helped send two
friends to prison.
That much has been
known for years. The gov-
ernment has put Zazi
back in the news now
because the Washington
Post and Guardian news-
papers revealed the ex-
istence of two classified
surveillance programs last
week.
In one program, the gov-
ernment sweeps utip the
phone records of millions
of Americans every day
and stores them in a digi-
tal library. That program
was authorized by the USA
Patriot Act, passed shortly
after 9/11.
The second, called
PRISM, taps into major
U.S. technology compa-
nies and monitors emails
in the search for foreign
terrorists. That program
was authorized by 2007
and 2008 laws that allow
the government to moni-
tor, without specific war-
rants, emails believed to
belong to foreigners.
When news of the phone-
records program broke, of-
ficials quickly credited it
with thwarting an attack.


"Within the last few
years, this program was
used to stop a terrorist at-
tack in the United States,"
said Rep. Mike Rogers,
the Republican chairman
of the House Intelligence
Committee.
A senior intelligence offi-
cial confirmed soon after-
ward that Rogers was talk-
ing about Zazi, but offered
no explanation.
On Sunday, Sen. Dianne
Feinstein, the Democratic
chairwoman of the Senate
Intelligence Committee,
also credited the phone
program with thwarting
the Zazi plot.
Now, in talking points
declassified by the admin-
istration, the government
says that Internet eaves-
dropping, not archiving
phone records, disrupted
Zazi's plans.
The use of PRISM to
catch Zazi does little to
resolve one of the key
questions in the surveil-
lance debate: whether the
government needs to take
such vast amounts of data,
sometimes sweeping up
information on American
citizens, to keep the coun-
try safe.
That's because, even be-
fore the surveillance laws
of 2007 and 2008, the FBI
had the authority to and


did, regularly monitor
email accounts linked to
terrorists. The only differ-
ence was, before the laws
changed, the government
needed a warrant.
To get a warrant, the law
requires that the govern-
ment show that the target
is a suspected member of
a terrorist group or foreign
government, something
that had been well estab-
lished at that point in the
Zazi case.


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Southern bapgis, Convention I (


First black president Luter re-elected .


1Thr A] u iotl'ltlF Press

IHOUSTN-ON '1 li i'iilil
rn Baptisl (Convention mre-
elected its first black presi-
denli, the Rev. F'rd luter
lit., at its trminl meeting
'lTiesday.
butler vywas first elected
inl .'l l.'. His lif-idchi y
cones at a11 ime when idie
nation's largest 'rotestailnt
denonliiation is trying to
move '\ iiiid its Itradition-
al wlite Sotlerin bise.
The' '\i.,~iI ill' lila riul
Soulher'u Ii.lvvI CIiCn-
venlitioll climniGs 1 iiillli
Inlenih'i s, hiu in 'i11l il"t
nouncd lIthat imlullemlership
declined i 'il ftr' ilr
sixth im.i..li yeair.
lltetr wasits ulliopposed for


re o-'lection and received a
standing ovation. South-
ern Baptist presidents can
serve a tlaxitllllum of two
i '.11r termlls.
Also on Tuesday, del-
egates maide mIotions ili.iI
included a request for a
task force to look into aller-
natives to the Boy Scouts
of America, now thai the
Scouts have agreed to
allow gay mnlmbers.
ThanIl motion was re-
ferred to a committee, but
it is \' dlelv expecild that
tile denominationl's lead-
ership on \V\'rdl-ildi\ will
propose a similar reso
lution, possibly recoin-
ii'itihilii; that Southern
Baptist churches no longer
sponsor Boy Scout troops.


Southern Baptist church-
es are independent and the
convention cannot order
them to drop ties with the
Scouts. However, churches
are occasionally kicked out
of the convention.
SBC Executive Commit-
tee President and CEO
Frank Page, during his ad-
dress, mentioned his own
efforts to persuade Scout-
ung leaders to maintain the


exclusion of gay members.
"We are utinder attack," he
told members. "The world-
view of God and Jesus and
tlp Holy Spirit is utinder
attack."


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16A + WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 2013


STATE & NATION








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.comn


Bill to revamp militaryjustice faces uphill fight


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON -Ambi-
tious legislation to stanch
the growing number of
sexual assaults in the
armed forces by overhaul-
ing the military justice
system faces an uncertain
future due to vigorous ob-
jections from senior De-
fense Department leaders
and key members of Con-
gress who are concerned
the proposed changes go
too far.
The bill crafted by Sen.
Kirsten Gillibrand, D-
N.Y., cleared an important
hurdle Tuesday when the
Senate Armed Services
personnel subcommittee
that she chairs approved
the measure. But the leg-
islation must get through
the full committee and its
chairman, Sen. Carl Levin,
D-Mich., has signaled his
intent to offer an alterna-
tive that would mute the
most aggressive reforms
in Gillibrand's bill.
Gillibrand's legislation
would remove command-
-ers from the process of
deciding whether serious


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
As Congress investigates the growing epidemic of sexual assaults within the military, the
Senate Armed Services Committee holds a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington on June
4 to demand answers from top uniformed leaders about whether a drastic overhaul of the
military justice system is needed.


crimes, including sexual
misconduct cases, go
to trial. That judgment
would rest instead with
seasoned trial lawyers
who have prosecutorial
experience and hold the
rank of colonel or above.
Her bill would take away a
commander's authority to
convene a court-martial.
That responsibility would
be given to new and sepa-
rate offices outside the vic-


tim's chain of command.
But Levin and other
lawmakers, echoing fears
voiced by the Jdint Chiefs
of Staff, believe that cut-
ting commanders out of
the legal process would
undermine their abil-
ity to enforce good order
and discipline within the
ranks.
"Commanders ought to
have and use the tools that
are. the most effective in


terms of changing climate
and affecting the behavior
of people in their units,
and that's to have avail-
able to them the power to
send to a court-martial,"
Levin said Monday.
The Armed Services
Committee is scheduled
to meet Wednesday to
vote on the provisions
that will be included in a
sweeping defense policy
bill for the 2014 fiscal year


that Oct. 1.
Levin's alternative, which
has bipartisan support,
would require a review
by an individual higher
in the chain of command
if a commander decides
not to prosecute a sexual
assault case. It would
make it a crime to retali-
ate against victims who
report a sexual assault
and relieve command-
ers of their responsi-
bilities if they do not cre-
ate a climate receptive
for victims who report
crimes.
Sen. Lindsey Graham,
R-S.C., the personnel
subcommittee's top Re-
publican, said command-
ers shouldn't be sidelined
from sexual assault cases.
He and Sen. Roy Blunt,
R-Mo., both voted against
Gillibrand's legislation,
which the panel passed by
voice vote.
"I don't think you quite
resolve a problem in
the military without the
chain of command buy-
ing into it and being held
more accountable," Gra-
ham said.


Boiler room explosion rattles California high school


The Associated Press

SANTA ANA, Calif. -An
explosion Tuesday in the
boiler room of a South-
ern California high school
gymnasium briefly lifted
up the building's roof,
damaging the structure
but causing no major
injuries.
The blast around 7:30
a.m. at Valley High School
in Santa Ana was in a
girls' locker room and
happened before classes
began, although some
students were arriving on
campus, authorities said.
Security camera video
broadcast by KABC-TV
showed the fiery explosion
lift up the building's roof
as at least a half-dozen
people ran from the area.
The blast also blew doors
off their hinges and sent
smoke billowing from the


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this still image taken from a security camera show stu-
dents at Santa Ana High School reacting during a explosion
in the boiler room Tuesday, June 11 in Santa Ana, Calif. The
explosion happened near the school's gym and it caused
significant structural damage to the building.


building, which houses
the gym, locker rooms and
offices.
No students or staff were
inside, said Deidra Powell,'
a spokeswoman for the


Santa .Ana Unilied School
District.
Seven students suffered
minor injuries such as
anxiety, ringing in their
ears and headaches, Pow-


ell said. Four students sit-
ting on a park bench with
their backs to the boiler
room were taken to the
hospital for their injuries.
"They were more just
shook up," said Orange
County Fire Author-
ity spokesman Capt. Jon
Muir. ,
Muir said the explosions
ripped off a door and
blew it about 75 feet, tore
at least three other doors
from their hinges, knocked
down ceiling tiles, and lift-
ed the roof 4 to 5 inches off
its load-bearing wall.
"It was a very big deal,"
he said. "It's fortunate
there were no kids inside.
It was a big explosion."
lFire investigators believe
they nmay be looking at a
mechanical or gas-related
problem since the force of
the blast went up and not
out, Muir said.


Most of the damage was
limited to the area be-
tween the girls' and boys'
locker rooms, Powell said.
A bomb squad also was
called in as a precaution.
The campus was re-
opened around 8:30 a.m.
and students attended
regular classes, although
some courses held near
the blast site were moved
to a different location.
"It is the end of the
school year, and it's notr
going to cause any major
disruption to things that
were planned," Powell
said.
Seniors were not on
campus because they
were preparing elsewhere
for graduation ceremo-
nies. The last day of school
is Thursday.
The school, which
opened in 1959,-has about
1,800 students enrolled.


Nation Briefs

Feds: Morning-after
pill appeal on hold
NEWYORK A govern-
ment appeal in the legal
fight over allowing girls of
any age to buy emergency
contraception without
prescriptions has officially
been put on hold.
Federal prosecutors
said Tuesday in a letter to
a NewYork City appeals
court both sides have
agreed to stop litigating
while they await a ruling
from a lower-court judge.
The Department of Jus-
tice notified U.S. District'
Judge Edward Korman on
Monday it had decided
to reverse course and
comply with his order to
'allow sales of the morn-
ing-after pills without
age or other restrictions.
It said it would withdraw
the appeal of the order if
the judge agrees with its
plan to fast-track Food
and Drug Administration
approval.

Gunman was held for
mental evaluation
LOS ANGELES- A re-
tired Santa Monica police
officer says the gunman
who killed five people last
week was held for mental
evaluation by hospital
staff after police raided his
home for explosives seven
years ago.
Former police officer
Cristina Coria says 23-
year-old John Zawahri
made violent threats to
another student, teach-
ers and campus police
officers while a student
at Olympic High School.
Coria says she helped
serve a search warrant on
Zawahri's home months
later looking for explosives
and weapons.
School board member
Oscar de la Torre says of-
ficers found bomb-making
materials.
Coria says Zawahri was
admitted to a hospital for
psychiatric evaluation. Po-
lice would not divulge de-
tails of his record because
he was a juvenile. Zawahri
was killed Friday by police
after a gun battle.
From wire reports


Court hears terse testimony in e-book trial


The Associated Press

NEW YORK Macmil-
lan CEO John Sargent, who
testified this week at a trial
over alleged price-fixing of
e-books, was no one's idea
of a friendly witness.
Of the five publishers the
U.S. Justice Department
sued last year, Macmil-
lan was the last to settle
and the most defiant. The
government alleged that
Macmillan, HarperCollins,
Simon & Schuster, Penguin
Group (USA) and Hachette
Book Group illegally con-
spired to raise wholesale
prices in an effort to help
Apple make headway
against Amazon in the e-
books market. Speaking
last month at BookExpo
America, the publishing
industry's annual conven-
tion, Sargent labeled the
government's view of the
e-market as "extraordi-
narily myopic."
"They carried the water
for Amazon, when it had
92 percent of the market,"


he said, criticizing the jus-
tice department for caring
more about price than a
possible monopoly. "The
senior guys, (Attorney
General) Eric Holder, are
just incompetent."
Apple is the only defen-
dant left in the antitrust
suit, filed in response to the
2010 launch of the iBook-
store and a new "agency"
pricing system. Publishers,
who had worried that Am-
azon's pricing of some new
e-book releases at $9.99
was crippling to the indus-
try, welcomed the arrival
of Apple and an "agency"
model that allowed pub-
lishers, not retailers, to set
the cost of e-books. Many
new releases were sold for
$12.99 or $14.99, a change
the government has cited
as unfair to consumers.
Apple has insisted that
its entrance into the e-
book market improved the
online book industry and
stabilized prices for the
long term.
Sargent, 56, has said he


only settled because Mac-
mnillan, owned by the Ger-
mnan-based Holtzbrinck
Publishers, was "not large
enough to risk a worst-
case judgment," an opin-
ion he clearly still held on
the stand. Whether utinder
direct or cross testimony
in U.S. District Court on
Monday and Tuesday,
the lean, graying Sargent


changed neither his pos-
ture nor manner of speak-
ing. His dark eyes stared
right at the questioning at-
torney, his answers terse.
"What I'm doing here is
negotiating," he said in re-
sponse to questions from
Justice Department lawyer
Mark Ryan about exchang-
es he had with Apple over
contract terms.


ED MCCOY
850-573-6198 cell ,
emccoy02@yahoo.com i
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The Associated Press

BEIRUT The Syrian
rebels' defeat in Qusair
cost them more than a
strategic stronghold. It
has left them with a bat-
tered spirit and deep
frustration.
Their lesson from the
fight: No matter how hard
they try, they run into a
major wall their weap-
ons are no match for the
regime's. Desperate for
successes, some in the
opposition are calling for
changes in tactics, away
from trying to hold un-
tenable territory toward
more radical operations,
such as attacks on military
bases to seize weapons or
even increased suicide
bombings against regime
strongholds.
The loss of Qusair, a
town near the Lebanese
border, was particularly
stinging. Over the course
of a year, rebels hold-
ing the town had heavily
fortified it with tunnels,
mine fields, and booby
traps. When' the regime
assault came last month,
with Syrian troops backed
by elite Lebanese Hezbol-
lah guerrillas, they fought
back ferociously.
But in the end they were
outgunned and outnum-
bered, and were forced
into a harrowing flight
when the town fell last
Wednesday.
Only now emerging
from hiding after their es-
cape, several activists and
a doctor who had been in
the town described flee-
ing with thousands of res-
idents and fighters, with
the wounded hobbling
on crutches or being car-
ried for miles across the
countryside. They came
under repeated attack in
the fields as regime forces
chased them from village
to village in a four-day
pursuit, killing more than
100 rebels and civilians,
they tpld The Associated
Press.
"We can't feel our feet
after the long march,"
said Hadi Abdullah, an
activist who had been
in Qusair coordinating
with the rebels. In the
.group he fled with, there
were 800 people who had


S i 'PHOTOSIBY HTIlEASSOCIA[ED PRESS
Taksim, Square is flooded by tear gas as clashes between protesters and police continue into the night in Istanbul Tuesday.



Clashes in Istanbul continue


The Associated Press

ISTANBUL Riot police fired tear
gas, water cannon and rubber bullets
in day-long clashes that lasted into
the early hours Wednesday, over-
whelming protesters who had been
occupying Istanbul's central Taksim
Square and its adjacent Gezi Park in
the country's most severe anti-gov-
ernment protests in decades.
The crisis has left Prime Minister
Recep Tayyip Erdogan looking vul-
nerable for the first time in his de-
cade in power and has threatened
to tarnish the international image of
Turkey, a Muslim majority country
with a strongly secular tradition, a
burgeoning economy and close ties
with the United States.
Thousands of police moved in ear-
ly Tuesday, pushing past improvised
barricades set up by the protest-
ers who have swarmed through the
massive square and accompanying
Gezi Park in their tens of thousands
for the past 12 days.
Police fired repeated rounds of
tear gas that rose in stinging plumes
of acrid smoke from the square in
running battles with protesters hurl-
ing fireworks, bottles, rocks and fire-
bombs. In a cat-and-mouse game
that lasted all day, the police repeat-
edly cleared the square, only for
demonstrators to return.
More than 30,000 converged on
the square again as dusk fell and
were repelled by water cannon, rub-
ber bullets and tear gas after Istan-
bul's governor, Huseyin Avni Mutlu,
said the police came under attack by
"marginal groups." .
The area reverberated with the
echoes of exploding tear gas canis-
ters into the night, while volunteers
ferried dozens of injured people to
waiting ambulances.
Early Wednesday, police sur-
rounded Gezi Park, where protesters
had set up a tent city, firing repeat-
ed rounds of tear gas into the area.
Protesters scrambled to flee from
the choking chemicals, abandoning
tents and belongings. A few dozen
gradually returned after the column
of riot police had passed, surveying
the damage.
A peaceful demonstration against
Gezi Park's redevelopment that be-
gan more than two weeks ago has
grown into the biggest test of Erdo-
gan's authority in his decade of pow-
er, sparked by outrage oyer a violent
police crackdown on May 31 against
a peaceful sit-in in the park.
The unrest has spread to 78 cities
across the country, with protesters
championing their objections to
what they say is the prime minister's
increasingly authoritarian style and
his perceived attempts to impose a
religious and conservative lifestyle
on a country with secular laws -
charges he rejects.
Four people have been killed,


Found
From Page 1A

Multiple agencies then
responded to the scene.
Sneads Police Chief Burt
McAlpin, reached by
phone Tuesday, said join-
ing CCSD to assist in the
search were officers with
his department, the Jack-
son County Sheriff's Office
and FHP, plus K-9 units


A petrol bomb explodes in front of riot policemen during clashes in Taksim Square
in Istanbul, Turkey, Tuesday.


including a policeman, and about
5,000 have been treated for injuries
or the effects of tear gas, accord-
ing to the Turkish Human Rights
Foundation.
Gezi Park, with its thousands of
camped-out demonstrators young
and old,. has become the symbol
of the protests. Both the governor
and the police initially promised
that only Taksim Square would be
cleared, not the park.
But late into the night, the gover-
nor indicated a more muscular po-
lice sweep was imminent.
"We will open the square when ev-
erything normalizes in the area, and
our security forces completely con-
trol the area," Mutlu told A Haber
news channel. "Our children who
stay at Gezi Park are at risk, because
we will clean the area of the marginal
groups," he said, referring to what
the government has said are trouble-
makers among the protesters.
"We won't allow our government to
be seen as weak," Mutlu said.
Some 300 miles (500 kilometers)
away in Ankara, the capital, police
fired water cannon and tear gas to
disperse several hundred protest-
ers some throwing stones who
gathered in sympathy with the Istan-
bul counterparts.
Tuesday's clashes came a day after
Taksim saw its smallest gathering
since the demonstrations began.


from Houston County and
a tracking team the Cal-


McAlpin


houn Cor-
r e c t ional
Institution.
With day-
light fading
on George
0 B r y a n
Road, the
search dogs


had just been deployed
and the helicopter could
be heard in the back-
ground. That, McAlpin


The government had said Erdogan
would meet with some of those oc-
cupying the park on Wednesday to
hear their views.
"The relative calm yesterday was
deceptive," said Robert O'Daly, Tur-
key analyst for the Economist Intel-
ligence Unit.
"Mr. Erdogan's offer of dialogue ap-
pears to have been merely tactical.
The appearance of riot police in the
square this morning and renewed
use of teargas against the protesters
fits better with his defiant rhetoric,"
he said.
Erdogan, a devout Muslim, says
he is committed to Turkey's secular
laws and denies charges of an au-
thoritarian manner. As he defended
his tough stance, he gave critics little
hope of a shift in his position.
"Were we supposed to kneel before
them and say, 'Please remove your
pieces of rags?'" he asked, referring
to the dozens of banners and flags
the protesters had festooned in the
square. "They can call me harsh, but
this Tayyip Erdogan won't change."
Confident of his position of power
after winning the last elections in
2011 with 50 percent of the vote, Er-
dogan has insisted he will prevail.
He made it clear that he has come to
the end of his patience with the pro-
testers, whom he accused of sullying
Turkey's image abroad and being
vandals and troublemakers.


said, is when word came
over the radio that the
CCSD air unit had spotted
Dickens lying on the edge
of a nearby wooded area.
"It was a tense moment."
That's how McAlpin de-
scribed the time between
hearing that Dickens had
been located and getting
confirmation that he was
alive.
"It's by the grace of
God that the helicop-
ter spotted him it was


getting dark."
He said a sunburned and
dehydrated Dickens ap-
peared somewhat disori-
ented, but was cooperative
with his rescuers. He was
taken to Jackson Hospi-
tal in Marianna for treat-
ment and reunited with
loved ones who'd been
searching for him for four
long days.
"The family is very thank-
ful," McAlpin said.
"They've been praying."


Syrian rebels



reeling from



loss of Qusair


This June 5 photo released
by the Syrian official news
agency, SANA, shows
Syrian soldiers loyal to
President Bashar Assad in
the town of Qusair, in Hornms
0 province, Syria.


been wounded during
the three-week siege of
the town. The first fled in
vehicles, but then had to
abandon them to go off
road, trying to escape at-
tention. "We walked for a
long distance on foot. We
had doctors and nurses
but no supplies."
"For sure, the regime
outdid us in this battle,
but this doesn't mean we
will surrender," he said.
Building on its triumph
in Qusair, a key cross-
roads town of supply lines
between Damascus and
western and northern
Syria, President Bashar
Assad's military is now
pressing ahead with an
offensive against rebel-
held areas in two major
cities further north, Hornms
and Aleppo.
Prompted by the re-
gime's advances, the
Obama administration
began discussing Monday
whether to arm Syria's
rebels. U.S. officials said a
decision could come later
this week. The U.S. and
its European -allies have
been reluctant to provide
more sophisticated weap-
ons, fearing they would
fall into the hands of ex-
tremists among rebel
ranks.
For the rebels, Qusair's
loss marks a new phase
in the grinding civil war,
now in its third year with
more than 80,000 killed.
Now, they face a more
confident Syrian military,
backed by Shiite fighters
from Iraq and Lebanon's
Hezbollah.
After the fall of Qusair,
for example, rebel ad-
vances in Eastern Gh-
outa, a suburb southeast
of Damascus, came to a
halt, said the spokesman
for the rebels' Military
Council of the Damas-
cus Suburbs, who identi-
fied himself by his first
name, Mosab, for security
reasons.
"It had a morale impact
definitely. Some battal-
ions were distraught, but
others rose up to avenge
Qusair," he said. "Of
course the regime is on
the offensive, aided by
outside forces ... The only
way for us to tip the bal-
ance is to be steadfast."


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS


Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
2911 leffterson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


JMADmOX CHAPEL SNEAS CHAPELs
MADDOX CHAPEL SNEADS CHAPEL,


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Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90
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There were no

obituaries or

death notices

submitted to the

Floridan as of the

deadline at 4 p.inm.

yesterday.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 2013 9ArV


FROM THE FRONT & WORLD





lfi{,'Q' I;0 ,!Yr (IFLORIDOAN w 'w.jcflloridalncom


:10A 'J A3 .;, \'/,L& W


COUNTY I IONOikS YEARS OF SERVICE __


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S


I


P-1-
AIGIECOOt/FLORIDAIN
ounty 'l i iIniI.'..i( i ('.i11.111 iIil I1 ii I ILockey (i il-liH poses for a photo 'illi employees b iring honored for their ;irs ofservice to the
cointyITi.l.iy in M i.iiiii ,iii ll'et a'er e11 ii iiiupai officer Timothy Ham (five yar i, senior probation ol'fi( .r St-acey Goodson (20
yI.,iJ, 11 ,1.ii i,.,.iiiil Susat Ila)on (33 y,.1i8,). ,qiiupniip -'n l operator Tennvson Hill (15 years), ctLiij)p i'iil operator Jeff Baker (25
years), rctiiiiiil.IImi.,i Ir Kennieli (ICook (15 y,'l )I ii(l executive secretary Sharon McRoy (15 years). Not shown: Correctional officer James
l "oy (ivr y.i I s d a;id adinitiislrailive supportI lloh'i IIililI (five years).


GALLERY OF ART

GETS READY FOR SUMMER

EDUCATION PROGRAM
... .. ...i..


UN official: 11 million
in Sahel face hunger
UNITED NATIONS
- More than 11 million
people are still facing
hunger in Africa's Sahel
region and urgent inter-
national aid is needed, a
top U.N. humanitarian
official said Tuesday.
Robert Piper, the U.N.
Regional Humanitar-
ian Coordinator for the
Sahel, said the region
is struggling to recover
from a drought last
year despite better
projections for rain and
harvest. He said climate
change has unleashed
crises like droughts more
frequently on the Sahel,
one of the poorest re-
gions in the world, mak-
ing it harder for farmers


World Brief
and villagers to recover.
Last year's drought came
barely two years after the
Previous one, he said.
Piper said the U.N. has
asked for $1.7 billion in
aid for the Sahel this year,
but only 36 percent has
been received. He said aid
came quickly last year in
response to the drought
but the challenge is to


keep it coming this year.
Piper said 11.4 million
people still face food
insecurity, including 5
million children at risk of
acute malnutrition. That's
down from the 18 million
people last year but it's
"still a huge caseload," he
said at a news conference.
From wire reports


SDebbie Roney Smith
-850-209-8039 cell
CALL OR TEXT!
deJ -,I rriitri',rrLtr'1rrhi- Com
Cerirury21
Sunrn y South
w j | Properrties
,l~ ,'4F-1H.1 'S 90i
SMARTER BOLDER FASTER U ,,--a FL


MARKKINNrR FLORIDAN
L illie Clark, executive director of The Gallery of Art in
Campbellton, works on getting an outside cooking and dining
area ready the center's second annual summer education and
recreation program. The program, which is open for kids ranging in
age from 4 to 15 years old, starts on Thursday and will end on Aug. 10.
The last day to register for one of its 40 openings is Monday. Gallery
Administrator Doris Claybrone said the program will include
everything from a weekly water fun day to educational activities like
writing and math. AtteIndee, will also have their own "jobs" to do
,tI i ng the stin nmir program. Some will earn tokens by helping to
,,WI VC food, others will e.irn tokens by working as a cashier for tokens,
.Id others will be boo)kkeepers to.help everyone keep track of
their tokens. There will even be a token "bank," she added. Claybrone
s.aid (hlis is to help the hlildrent not only learn about jobs and
ispi INisilii', but to also let them see what their parents have to do
to r. iin the faimily's money. The kids will be able to spend their tokens
on things ranging from snacks to movie tickets for a small theater
tlWv lh,ive -sri up at the gallery.

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6St~AiA yx66zaa1

&aaeian S <>y/ /2& *


Guests will enjoy an evening filled with art, tasting, exhibits,
live music by "The Moonlighter's" and a delicious dinner.
We will feature hand painted terra cotta pots, custom
constructed Adirondack chairs, benches, and swings
transformed by local artists into a one-of-a-kind piece of art.
For more information, please call
850-482-8520 or 888-817-2191, or visit
www.eventsatcovenanthospice.org/gardengala


Covenant
H 0 S P I C Es

Licensed in Florida in 1983
4215 Kelson Avenue, Suite E I Marianna, FL 32446
www.covenanthospice.org
The proceeds generated from this event help fund the unfunded and under-funded programs of Covenant Hospice.
These programs include Bereavement, Chaplain Services, Children's Support and Volunteer Services.
Our mission is to enable patients to live as fully and comfortably as pc.ssible d.irig Ime ,3nd oI trhe lihes


LOC/IL & WORLD


i --

















Marianna Summer League
S Basketball
Thursday- Marianna vs.
Mosley, 4 p.m,; Bay vs. Sneads, 5
p.m.; Bainbridge vs. Port St. Joe.
6 p.m.; Graceville vs. Blount-
stown, 7 p.m.

Cottondale Summer
Basketball
Cottondale High School plays
host to Rickards and Doihan
High on Thursday afternoon.
with Cottondale facing Rickards
at 3 p.m., Rickards vs. Dothan
at4 p.m., and Cottondale vs.
Dothan at 5 p.m.

Chipola Baseball Camps
Chipola baseball coach leftf
Iohnson will offer two more
camps: a hitting camp June
12-13, and a skills camp June
17-18.
The camps are for ages 7-18
and all cost $100. and meet
from 9 a.m. to noon.
For more information, contact
Chipola assistant coach Chris
Hutcheson at 850-718-2243.

Chipola Softball Camps
Chipola softball coaches
Jimmy and Belinda Hendrix will
offer a skills camp on June 17-
18 and a hittingcamp June 19 at
Chipola College.
The camps are for all ages and
both will run from 1 p.m. to 4
p.m., with a $100 cost for the
hitting camp, $50 for the skills
camp, and $135 for both.
Campers should bring a glove,
a bat, tennis shoes, and cleats.
For more information, call
.850-718-2358.


Children's Swimming
Lessons
Chipola College will offer
children's swimming lessons for
ages 4 and up as scheduled on
the following dates: Session 2:
June 17-27 with a deadline of
June 13.
..-Classes are available d( 10a.m.
or 7 p.m. Sessions include eight
45-minute classes which meet
Monday through Thursday for
two weeks.
Cost of regular swimming
lessons is $55. Pre-registration
is required with a $ late registra-
tion fee. For more information,
call 718-2473 or visit www.
Schipola.edu.

Marianna Swim Team
The Marianna Swim Team is
a local, recreational swim team
for boys and girls ages 4-18.
Practices are held from 5 p.m.
to 6:30 p.m., Monday through
Thursday through August at
Chipola College Pool.
Meets are held on Saturdays
throughout the summer.
Registration is open. All we re-
quire is that the swimmer swim
one full pool length (25 yards)
and that children utinder 10 have
parental supervision during
practices.
The registration fee of $35
payable to N IST helps cover cost
of life guards and relay events at
meets. Team T-shirts for mem-
bers will be an additional $5
and $15 for non-members. Pool
membership is also required by
Chipola College.
For additional information
please callVicki Pelham at
482-2435; Angle Bunting at
209-8918; julie Smith at 557-
3292; Monica Bolin at 209-2388;
or email your questions to .
MST20l0@centurylink.net.

Bulldog Wrestling Club
The BulidogWrestling Club is
starting practice for the sum-
mer season. .
Practice will be Tuesday and
Thursday nights from 5:30 p.m.
to 7 p.m. at the old Marianna
'High School wrestling room.
All Jackson Counry kidsages
5-18 are welcome to join.
For more information, call
MHS coach Ron Thoreson at
272-0280.


Sports Items
Send all sports items to edito-
rial@jcfloridan.com, or fax them
to 850-482-4478. The mailing
address for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan P.O. Box 520
Marianna, FL 32447.


Ozone All Star Baseball


Marianna Ozone knocks


out Cottondale, 15-0


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Marianna Ozone All
Stars took their second straight
big win over Cottondale in the
District 3 tournament in Ver-
non, blanking the Cottondale
All Stars 15-0 in three innings
on Monday night.
The victory advanced Mari-
anna to Tuesday night's finals
against Holmes County and
eliminated Cottondale from
the tourney.
Marianna wasted little time
seizing control of Mondays
game, scoring four runs in
the first inning and posting 11
mote in the second inning.
Wesley Rogers led the Mari-
anna attack with two hits,
while Randall Smith, Wilton
Pittman, Will Saunders, Beau


High School Basketball


SBrown lifts Yellowjackets past Tigers


MARK SKINNER / FLORIDAN
Graceville's CJ Smith tries to keep
the ball away from a Vernon player
during a summer league game
Tuesday. ,


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Vernon Yellowjackets got
24 points from Austin Brown to
knock off the Graceville Tigers
55-51 in summer league bas-
ketball action on Tuesday night
at Marianna High School.
The game was a rematch of
a June 4 matchup at MHS that
the Tigers won 41-31.
It appeared early on that


Graceville might make it two in
a row over its district rival after
jumping out to a 9-2 start in the
game's first three minutes.
Rashard McKinnie scored
six of the first nine points all
on steals and layups with
Derek White banking in a
three-pointer.
Vernon fought back with a
14-3 run to take a 16-12 lead on
a driving bucket by Brown with


8:55 left in the first half.
Marquavious Johnson then
caught fire from three to push
Graceville back out in front,
putting in four three-pointers
in four minutes to make it 27-
24 GHS.
But the Yellowjackets closed
the half on a 9-2 run, with a
deep three by Brown making it

See BROWN, Page 4B


All Star Baseball
IVIALONE All BASEBALL ____......


1~


:' :'4. I
,,t: < ... ... "



:.. -" l*- .. -::- ^ .. ^- ***".^.*,^' ^-. .. ; ","' .'/'. -:* ',; /

MARK SKINNER / FLORIDAN
Connor Harrell fields a grounder for the Malone Machine Pitch All-Stars Monday night.




Back-to-back wins


Malone slips by Sneads'in Machine Pitch tourney


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Malone Machine
Pitch All Stars made it two
wins in two tries in the
District 5 tournament in
Blountstown on Monday
night, knocking off Sneads
14-12.
With the win, Malone ad-
vanced to Tuesday night's
matchup with Blount-
stown, while Sneads was
set to play Liberty County
on Tuesday in an elimina-
tion game.
Sneads got out to the


early 2-0 lead after plating
a pair of runs in the top of
the first inning, but Malo-
ne answered with five runs
in its half of the first, and
added three more runs in
the bottom of the third to
go up 8-4.
But Sneads rallied in the
fourth inning with six runs
to take a two-run lead,
with Malone responding
once again with a six-run
fifth inning to go in front
for good at 14-10.
The Sneads All Stars
managed two runs in


the top of the sixth to get
the deficit back down to
two, but the rally ended
there.
The Malone team was
led offensively by five dif-
ferent players with three
hits each, as Connor Har-
rell and Tanner Padgett
each went 3-for-3 with
three runs scored, while
Riley Robinson, Ethan
Baxter, and Deontae Re-
inhardt were both 3-for-3
with two runs.

See MALONE, Page 2B


;. .. -- '" "* > : .. -*? *" *:?' :_
MARK SKINNER /FLORIDAN
Gavyn Carter gets a hit for the
Malone Ozone All-Stars Monday
night during a game against
Havanna.


Malone Ozone

bounces back

with bigwin

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Malone Ozone All Stars
bounced back from an open-
ing round loss on Saturday to
take a 14-4 win over Havana
in four innings Monday at
the District 5 tournament in
Blountstown.
Malone fell 15-3 to Liberty
County on Saturday, but came
back strong Monday thanks to
a big hitting performance and
a solid start on the mountmd by
Jaret Weber.
Weber went three innings
to get the win, giving up just
two runs on a hit with four
strikeouts.
Dylan Padgett and Trent
Martin both notched three
hits to lead a Malone offense
that tallied 16 hits in total, with
Blayne Hewett, Gavyn Cart-
er, and Weber all adding two
hits.
Malone scored six runs in the
first, two in the second, and
four more in the third to take
a 12-2 lead through three in-
nings and cruise to the victory.
Coach Lenny Weber said his
team's performance was a wel-
come change after Saturday's
opener.
"The play was a whole lot
better," he said. "We threw
way more strikes, made more
plays on defense. In the first
inning, (Havana) had two runs
and two guys on, and Dylan
Padgett caught a line drive at
first base and stepped on the
bag to get us out of the inning.

See OZONE, Page 2B


Dixie Youth Baseball


Marianna AAA


eliminates Graceville


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent
The Marianna Dixie Youth
AAA All-Stars are one step clos-
er to a district championship
after soundly defeating the
Graceville All-Stars in Bonifay
Monday evening 13-1.
The loss eliminated Gracev-
ille from ftirther competition.
Graceville finished the tour-
nament with a win over Chi-
pley and losses to Holmes
County and Marianna.
Marianna jumped out to an
early lead in the first inning,
picking up 12 runs and never
looked back.
Sterling Crumpler walked
to start things off, stole sec-
ond, and moved to third on a
sacrifice by Waylon Crumpler


before Brady Donaldson then
sacrificed him home for the
first of 12 runs in the inning.
Garrett Roper singled and
moved to second on the throw
before scoring on Ben Wiggins'
RBI single.
Deacon Temples singled
home Wiggins, with Beau Ham
doubling home Temples to
make it a 4-0 game.
Hank Sims and Cole Nobles
drew walks, with Blake Barber
singling home another.
Tucker Brock then took one
for the team and picked up an
RBI, and Zane Monk joined
the RBI parade when he. drew
a walk before Sterling Crum-
pler cleared the bases with a

See AAA, Page 2BL


Alday, and Ryder McDaniel all
had a hit.
Wilton Pittman started on the
mound and got the victory for
two scoreless innings in which
he allowed just one hit and two
walks with four strikeouts.
Smith finished it out with a
perfect third inning by striking
out the side.
Marianna also topped Cot-
tondale 19-0 on Friday's open-
ing day of the tourney before
falling to Holmes County 7-0
on Saturday.
Marianna coach Rhett Rog-
ers said Monday's win was a
nice bounce back for his team.
"They were disciplined at the
plate, drew a lot of walks, got
some timely hits, and we were

See MARIANNA, Page 2B






-l2B WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 2013


SPORTS


.ACKS'UN COUN I Y I-I Ok[)AN www.jcfloridan.com


Tar Heels edge Gamecocks to reach Omaha


Tar Heels edge Gamecocks to reach Omaha


The Associated Press

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. North
Carolina carried a No. 1 rank-
ing nearly all year along with the
expectation of returning to the
College World Series.
It turned out the top overall
seed in the NCAA tournament
would have to fight though all
kinds of trouble deficits, mis-
takes, bullpen-taxing games
to reach that goal.
Colin Moran hit an RBI triple in
a three-run sixth inning and staff
ace Kent Emanuel picked up his
first career save by getting the
final two outs to help UNC beat
South Carolina 5-4 on Tuesday.
By winning the decisive third
game of the weather-delayed su-
per regional series, the Tar Heels
(57-10) secured their sixth trip to
Omaha in eight seasons.
It also capped a stressful two
weekends of NCAA play, from a
13-inning comeback win against
Florida Atlantic in the final game
of the'Chapel Hill Regional to the
pair of one-run wins against the
Gamecocks (43-20).
"It doesn't really matter how
you get there," UNC coach Mike
Fox said. "Baseball's a tough
game, you never know how it's
going to go. At the end of the day,
we're going, so that's the most
important thing."
Yet Fox has said all those mo-
ments have made a tough team
even tougher which explains
how the Tar Heels managed to
regroup after falling behind on a
morale-killing two-run mistake
in the fifth.
The Tar Heels went ahead for
good in the sixth, then Emanuel
who had thrown 238 pitches
in three NCAA tournament ap-
pearances -- came on for a pair
of one-pitch outs that sent the
UNC players spilling out of the
dugout and onto the field to
celebrate.
"I think we just have a lot of
confidence late in games," Mo-
ran said. "It kind of builds over
time and it's hard not to be con-
fident, no matter how much
you're down after how much
we've come back and how many
times."
Reliever Trent Thornton (11-
1) earned the win, allowing one
earned run over 4 2-3 innings as
the Tar Heels tied a program re-


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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
North Carolina pitcher Benton Moss throws against South Carolina during an NCAA college baseball tournament super regional game on Tuesday.


cord with their 57th victory.
North Carolina will see a famil-
iar opponent in Omaha the
Tar Heels will open CWS play
Sunday against instate and At-
lantic Coast Conference rival
North Carolina State. The last
time the teams met, UNC won
an 18-inning marathon on the
way to the ACC tournament title
over Memorial Day weekend.
South Carolina had won the
national championship in 2010
and 2011, then finished second
last year. The Gamecocks were
back within a win of Omaha un-
der first-year coach Chad Hol-
brook, a former UNC player who
had also worked as an assistant
under Fox.
UNC won Saturday's series
opener 6-5, then South Carolina


won Sunday's elimination game
8-0. But on a mistake-filled Tues-
day for both teams, the Game-
cocks will be left to wonder
what-if after the sixth inning.
After Moran's triple scored
Landon Lassiter to cut the defi-
cit to 4-3, the Gamecocks made
a throwing error that brought
home Moran to tie it. A few bat-
ters later, reliever Tyler Webb en-
tered with the bases loaded and
walked Skye Bolt to give UNC the
5-4 lead.
South Carolina got the tying
runner on base in the seventh,
eighth and ninth innings but
couldn't score.
'"There's not too much differ-
ence between the two teams,"
Holbrook said. 'And ultimately
we didn't do enough to win tihe


two games that they won. It'll
haunt me for a long time, but
I'm also awfully proud of our
players."
Brian Holberton's two-run
homer in the second had given
UNC a 2-1 lead and T'hornton
- who came on in the third for
starter Benton Moss had held
down the Gamecocks -into the
fifth.
But with two outs, UNC cen-
ter fielder Chaz Frank dropped a
routine fly ball that allowed the
Gamecocks to score a pair of un-
earned runs for a 3-2 lead.
South Carolina got Tanner
English's RBI double to make it
4-2, but Moran's big hit re-en-
ergized a home crowd that had
gone quiet after Frank's drop.
The teams combined for five


errors. South Carolina finished
with three in each of the super
regional games.
"In postseason play, when
you're playing a great team, ev-
ery little mistake is magnified,"
Holbrook said. "We made our fair
share this weekend and it's dis-
appointing. We lost two games
and both games were there for
us to win."
Reliever Adam Westmoreland
(7-4) took the loss, allowing
two hits and three runs in 3 1-3
innings.
UNC's 'win closed a series
delayed two days by weather.
Friday's opener was postponed
due to heavy rain from Tropical
Storm Andrea, then Monday's
third game was postponed due
to rain and thunderstorms.


Marianna
From Page 1B
able to save a little pitch-
ing only playing three in-



Ozone
From Page 1B
Then Jaret struck out



AAA
From Page 1B

stand-up triple.
Waylon Grumpier sin-
gled home Sterling Crum-
pler and Donaldson then
singled home the final run
of the inning.



Malone
From Page 1B

Jason Jordan was also 2-
for-3 with two runs scored


nings," he said. "The kids
are hustling and play-
ing hard and doing what
we ask them to do. We
had a bad game against
Bonifay, so we just have to


the side in the second
and you could pretty
much see the wind go
out of (Havana's) sails af-
ter that. We just played


Waylon got the nod on
the mound, going one in-
ning and allowing no runs
on one walk, while striking
out three.
Donaldson came on in
the second inning and
retired the side in order
with two strikeouts and
a groundout to Roper at
second.


for Malone.
Malone coach Michael
Padgett said that he has
been very pleased with
the way his players have
performed in the tourna-
ment thus far.


correct it. We'll try to get
after them again and see
how it goes."
Holmes County went
into Tuesday night's game
undefeated, meaning that


with a whole lot better
effort."
Malone was scheduled to
play again Tuesday night
against Grand Ridge.


Ben Wiggins closed
out the game in third
and fourth innings, giv-
ing up one run on three
walks, while striking out
five.
Ham had a two-out sin-
gle in the second but was
left stranded.
The final Marianna run
came in the bottom of the


"The kids have done
a good job. I told them
if they want to win,
they've got to score runs,
and to do that you've
got to put the bat on the
hnll anrd lh?'v dr Arnn,


Marianna needed two
wins over Holmes County
in order to win the
title, while Holmes
County needed just
one.


With a victory, Malone
would take on the win-
ner of Tuesday's game be-
tween Blountstown and
Sneads tonight.


third inning when Ster-
ling Crumpler doubled
with one out and scored
on Waylon Crumpler's
sacrifice.
Marianna was scheduled
to take on Holmes County
on Tuesday night at 6 p.m.,
with a win putting them
in tonight's championship
game.


that," he said. "They all
stayed together when
they got behind (Mon-
day), pulled through,
and worked together as
a team to come back and
XAnn 11


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.comn

*i ",I ,,,.'j i n' ''. l t." *. ,'*


Slowpokes still a


problem for


championship golf


There is no reason golf
should take this long
to play
That's why players I
Merion for the U.S. Open
received a notice when
they registered that warned
about pace of play. The
fear was
that slow
play was
damaging
the game's
popular-
Doug ity, and the
S instructions
rerguson in the notice
could not
have been clearer.
"Be observant, reach
your decision quickly and
execute your shots with
promptness and dispatch."
Just don't get the idea
anything will change. This
notice was handed out at
1950 U.S. Open.
If the players at the U.S.
Open this week would
read David Barrett's book,
"Miracle at Merion," on
Ben Hogan's victory at
1950, they might laugh.
Or maybe cry.
Joe Dey, the USGNs
executive director at the
time, is quoted in the book
as saying, "The time has
come when we simply
must act if the game is not
Sto be seriously injured."
The size of the field for
the 1948 U.S. Open at Riv-
iera was 171 players. It was
lowered to 162 players the
following year at Medinah,
but that didn't seem to
help. Dey lamented that
the first group (three-
somes) took 3 hours, 27
minutes to complete the
opening round, while the
last group took a whopping
4 hours, 16 minutes.
"That is just awful, and
it doesn't make sense,"


Dey said. "It hasn't been
so long since three hours
was considered adequate
for a round. This is murder
on spectators as well as on
players who wish to play at
a reasonable speed."
At the rate championship
golf is going, three hours
might soon be considered
adequate to make the turn.
So when the USGA an-
nounces Wednesday that it
is launching a comprehen-
sive campaign to combat
pace of play, there is reason
for skepticism.
The campaign is geared
toward the recreational
game. It will study what
causes slow play and at-
tempt to find solutions
aimed at the player and
golf course manage-
ment. That's a good start,
because the problem with
slow play in golf is not at
the professional level. That
distinction must be made.
There are exceptions to
be sure a lot of them.
Kevin Na and his hor-
rific pre-shot routine of
intentional misses at The
Players Championship last
year. Keegan Bradley and
his start-stop-start stride
into the ball to play the
shot. Guan Tianlang at the
Masters. Ben Crane at any
tournament.
Tournament golf should
abide by the rules, which
in this case is Rule 6-7
- play without undue
delay But championship
golf is different from the
recreational game. The
greens are faster than most
golf fans can imagine. The
golf courses are bigger.
Rare is the par 5 that can't
be reached in two shots.
It's still a game, but for tour
players, it's also their (well
paying) jobs.


SPoors


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12,2013 3SEI


,, i. T, : ^ ';','; i i ',,' n ., v .- Is



Simpson remembers thr-:



of US Open championship


The Associated Press

ARDMORE, Pa. Webb Simpson
felt the true weight this week of win-.
ning a U.S. Open championship.
He's been stopped by strang-
ers, been interviewed with his tro-
phy by his side, and quizzed abopt
the bird man who interrupted his
celebration.
But it was registering for this year's
Open at Merion Golf Club when the
feat really hit him.
"It brought back so many good
memories of winning the tourna-
ment last year,;" he said Tuesday.
Simpson emerged from a fog-filled
final round at Olympic Club in San
Francisco with a 1-over 281 to win in
only his fifth time at a major.
He hasn't won a tournament since,
but it hasn't softened the impact the
championship had on his career.
"There hasn't been a day that went
by that I haven't thought about win-
ning the U.S. Open, being the U.S.
Open champion, being announced
on the first tee as U.S. Open chainm-
pion," hb said. "That hasn't gotten
old. 1 don't want that to change. So
it's been a great year. It's been a fast
year."
He recalled being crushed at the
start of the week because he missed
his son's first steps. By the tifne Simp-
son won the trophy, it turned out to
be one of the best weeks of his life.
His championship speech on the
course was interrupted by a man
who stepped in front of TV cameras
and made bird noises.
"Usually that's the first question,
tell me about bird man," Simpson
said. "People thought that it took
away from the ceremony. I thought it
added to it. Everybody wants to talk
about it. I got an official 'Bird Man'
hat now. I don't think we'll be seeing
him this week."


I IE ASSUUCIA LERU I'(L
In this June 17,2012 photo, Webb
Simpson holds up the championship
trophy after winning the U.S. Open
Championship tournament.
The PGA Tour will use a lift-clean-
and-place rule in certain tourna-
ments. The USGA, however, is un-
likely to bend for the U.S. Open at
Merion Golf Club.
"I hope they make the right call,"
Graeme McDowell said. "If it's pick-
ing up mud, then I think we need to
lift, clean and place just for a level
playing field. I'm not a guy that con-
trols the mud ball very well. I'm a low
spinner. Every time I get mud on the
ball, my deviation gets quite heavy.
I'm hoping they make the right call."
The U.S. Open could come down
to fewest mud balls asmuch as bird-
ies and bogies.
"I think mud balls are a problem. I
think they're unfair," McD)owell said.
"I think golf is designed to be played
from a closely mown fairway. If you
hit it in that fairway you deserve a
great line and a great opportunity
to attack the green surface. That's
the reward you get for hitting the
fairway."

WICKER SHOCK: Resting atop the
flag sticks, wicker baskets are the of-
ficial symbol of Merion.


They're officially the biggest head-
MUD BALLS: Merion is wet. The ache for caddies.
course is soft. And the balls are caked Sure, fans and Merion Golf Club
in mud. traditionalists love the baskets. The
That's a problem, flag sticks don't have flags, and the
Players don't think it's fair that a origin of the color-topped pins re-
round can potentially become af- mains a mystery.
fectced by the ball landing in ihe islop. So also is the maker of the baskets.


The club guards the secret so tightly
that few know who crafts them.
"We'll never play anything like
this," defendingU.S. Open champion
Webb Simpson said. "It's a once-in-a
lifetime opportunity. It's just part of
the tradition of Merion, part of the
tradition of the club.When I was here
in September they told me they were
going to keep the wicker baskets arid
I was pretty excited about it."
While the baskets color up the
course, they also stay as stationary
as the sticks. Which way is the wind
blowing? Might to have to try the ol'
tested way of licking a finger to mea-
sure wind strength and direction.
Wicker doesn't budge.
"It makes their job harder," Simp-
son said. "They might be a little on
edge to keep their job this week. We
Like it because it's different. I hon-
estly think it will make us make de-
cisions quicker. We're sitting there' a
lot of times and we see one flag ovpr
here blowing that way and a flag over
here blowing that way, we get con-
fused and second guess."
It could still be tricky for Open
contenders.
"You just have to commit and trust
yourself, trust your caddie and trust
you've got the wind right," former
U.S. Open champ Rory McIlroy said.

HAD'HIS PHIL Phil Mickelson al-
ways knew he would be home in San
Diego the day before the U.S. Open
at Merion. Wet weather put him
home a little early
His daughter, Amanda, is graduat-
ing from the eighth grade onWedne6-
day and is a featured speaker. Mick-
elson left early due to rain at Merion,
giving him a few days of practice in
pristine weather.
He will fly back after the ceremony,
in time for him to tee off at 7:11 a.rh.
at Merion.
Amanda is his oldest daughter.
She was born the day after the 1999
U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2, where
Mickelson carried a beeper and
pledged to withdraw if his wife had
gone into labor. That was the first of
his record five runner-up finishes i
the U.S. Open.








-l4B WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 2'013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NFL


Te'o talks football to reporters


The Associated Press

SAN DIEGO Manti
Te'o is just one of the guys.
He's confident he can be
a three-down linebacker
in the NFL.
It takes some serious le-
verage to play against tight
end Antonio Gates.
Being drafted by the San
Diego Chargers has put the
former Notre Dame star in
a "perfect place" because
of the support from those
in the organization.
Oh, and Te'o and some
friends "just chilled and
had a good time" last
month in Hollywood at
a party hosted by Maxim
magazine, which included
Te'o's fake girlfriend on its
list of the world's 100 hot-
test women.
Kept largely off limits
since the draft by rookie
head coach Mike McCoy,
Te'o was allowed to speak


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
San Diego Chargers rookie linebacker Manti Te'o grabs a catch
during Chargers NFL football training camp on Monday, May
20,2013.


with reporters for the first
time in more than a month
as the Chargers opened
minicamp Tuesday.
Questions about football
outnumbered the ones
about the fallout from him
being the target of a hoax
involving a fake girlfriend.
Te'o said he's had no
problem putting behind
him the issues that dogged


him since they surfaced in
January.
"Whenwe're out on the
football field, everything
else doesn't matter," he
said. "Thankfully for me,
I'm surrounded by a bunch
of teammates who have
really pushed me to be
better. All they care about
is that No. 50 is working
his butt off. I'll take care


of the work ethic part and
for them, they just make
sure that I'm going in the
right direction. Personally,
that hasn't been difficult at
all.
"We have a saying in
the defensive room: 'Keep
the main thing the main
thing.'" I'm here to play
football. I'm here to be
the best Charger I can be
and I'm not going to let
anything get in the way of
that. We'll keep the main
thing the main thing."
The last time Te'o was
allowed to speak with re-
porters was on May 10
during rookie minicamp.
Since then the team has
had several weeks of or-
ganized team activities,
which are basically prac-
tices in helmets, shorts
and jerseys, but no pads.
Minicamp is the same
thing, with no pads until
training camp.


Next up for Redskins' RG3: rehab


The Associated Press

ASHBURN, Va. After
showing that he can now
do "explosive sprinting"
- his dreadlocks flowing
'behind him as he dashed
from sideline to sideline in
the end zone of the Wash-
ington Redskins practice
bubble Robert Griffin III
then held a news confer-
ence that referenced LeB-
ron James, Tim Tebow and
"Bridezillas."
Next up for Griffin:
working his rehab into his
honeymoon.
Griffin again worked on
the side Tuesday as the
Redskins begin their spring
minicamp, the franchise
quarterback wearing a
tight long-sleeve white
T-shirt instead of a jersey
and sporting the now-fa-
miliar large black brace
on his right knee. He 'ran
drills with other rehabbing
players as he's done all
spring but the newest
element to his routine is
the ramped-up sprinting
that he hopes keeps him
on pace to be full-go when


training camp starts in late
July.
"I've said it a bunch a
times," Griffin said. "I'm
pretty confident I'll be
ready."
Before that, thee's the
matter of getting married
to longtime fiancee Re-
becca Liddicoat. Griffin
will have another couple of
weeks of rehab at Redskins
Park, during which he plan
to begin cutting drills, but
then his attention shifts to.
his big off-field day and the
juggling act of making sure
he's still tending to his sur-
gically reconstructed knee.
"I'm planning ahead to
make sure I do the things
I have to do while I'm on
that honeymoon," he said.
"And I think I'm a respon-
sible guy, so I'll make sure
I do everything I have to, to
be ready cutting run-
fling, working out and
so when I get back and they
see me, they'll be not only
impressed but they'll feel
safe and sound to put me
out there."
At least the wedding
planning hasn't been too


TH E ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III (left) and
teammate Fred Davis, both coming back from injuries, warm
up as the Redskins conduct an offseason NFL football practice


on Thursday, May 23,2013.
big of a distraction. Grif-
fin says his future wife has
fully taken charge of those
details.
"I have no say," he said.
"Basically that's just how
it rolls. I'm just trying to
make sure she doesn't be-
come a Bridezilla. She'll
be fine, but I'm doing little
things here and there be-
hind the scenes, with the
groomsmen, and little stuff
for the wedding. She'll set
everything utip and then
ask me whether I like this
or that, and sometimes I


actually have a choice and
sometimes it doesn't really
matter what I say. It's her
day, so she's got to enjoy
it."
Griffin worked in a men-
tion of James when asked
about whether he's men-
tally prepared for a set-
back in his rehab: "Like
I think LeBron said, 'You
don't play the game afraid
to get hurt.'" Griffin even
got asked for his thoughts
on Tebow signing with the
New England Patriots: "I
wish the best for him."


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In this Sept. 25,2011, photo, Baltimore Ravens fullback Vonta
Leach looks on from the sidelines during the first quarter of
an NFL football game.


FB Leach cut by Ravens

in salary-cap move


The Associated Press

OWINGS MILLS, Md. -
Vonta Leach was released
Tuesday by the Baltimore
Ravens, who failed to
agree on a restructured
contract with the three-
time All-Pro fullback.
Leach was an integral
part of a running game
that helped the Ravens
become champions last
season. Paving the way
for standout halfback Ray
Rice, Leach made the Pro
Bowl in each of his two
seasons with Baltimore
and was a key figure in
the locker room.
"He played a significant
role in helping us get to
the AFC Championship
game in 2011 and win the
Super Bowl last season,"
general manager Ozzie
Newsome said. "He added
to our toughness and will
to win. Plus, he provided
leadership."
After negotiations be-
tween Newsome, Leach
and the player's agent
reached a standstill, both
sides agreed it would be
best to terminate Leach's
contract. But Newsome
left open the possibility
that Leach could return
if he fails to find an ad-
equate suitor in the free
agent market.
"We could revisit this
before or during training
camp," Newsome said.
Baltimore began athree-
day mandatory minicamp
Tuesday without Leach,
who ran 21 times for 67


yards and one touchdown
while with the Ravens. He
also had 36 catches for
212 yards.
"Vonta's been as much
the heart and soul of
this team as anybody
since he's been here,"
coach John Harbaugh
said. "He's been a great
leader. He's been a tre-
mendous performer. I've
never had more fun with
a player since he's been
there.
"He's just a great guy,
and he established us in
a lot of ways. He estab-
lished the personality of
our offense as a physical,
hard-nosed unit over the
last couple years. I wish
him nothing but the best,
and I'm sure he'll do re-
ally well. I'm sorry to see
him go."
Leach's departure was
a hot topic following the
late afternoon practice.
"We're going to miss
him on the football field,
but I think the tough
thing is that you lose
out on a friend, a great
teammate," quarterback
Joe Flacco said. "I'm just
going to miss him be-
ing around the locker
room."
Defensive tackle Haloti
Ngata said, "That was
weird when I heard about
it. He's a monster. He's
a great blocker. And it's
just going to weird with-
out him. He was defi-
nitely a character on our
team, and he was a good
teammate."


Saints find normal offseason refreshing


The Associated Press

METAIRIE, La. No scandals. No
holdouts. No suspensions.
With the Saints only days from
starting their last vacation until train-
ing camp opens in late July, they're
relishing the sense of normalcy that
has defined this offseason in New
Orleans.
,They talk of spirited, productive
workouts in the weight room and on
the field, and about strong leader-
ship from reinstated coach Sean Pay-
ton. They also appear confident that
they have a real chance to quickly
regain the status of contenders they
held from 2009 through 2011 be-
fore the NFL unleashed the findings
of its bounty investigation and sub-
sequent sanctions in 2012.
"This is why I came here," middle
linebacker Curtis Lofton said Tues-
day following one of the Saints' final
practices of the offseason. Lofton
arrived as a free agent a little more


Brown
From Page 1B
33-29 at the break.
Graceville quickly tied
the game to start the sec-
ond half thanks to an of-
fensive put-back by McK-
innie and a bucket by Jalin
Lawson, but a steal and
dunk by Alex Brown and a
steal and three-point play
by Austin Brown put Ver-
non back up four with 15
minutes left.
The Tigers briefly got
back to within -one with a
three-pointer by McKinnie
and a free throw by.John-
son with 10:50 to play, but
Vernon pulled away late
thanks to a pair of beau-
tiful finishes at the rim by
Austin Brown.
SThe first came off of an


out-of-bounds lob from
Alex Brown, with Austin
catching and completing
the play with one hand to
make it 53-46.
A pretty spinning layup
off glass by Austin Brown
with 1:27 to play gave the
Yellowjackets a nine-point
edge.
Graceville answered with
a quick spurt with a three-


point play by McKinnie,
who followed it up with a
steal and bucket to make
it 55-51 with 7.1 seconds
left.
But the Tigers never got
closer.
McKinnie finished with
18 points to lead GHS,
while Johnson scored
15 points on five three-
pointers, with Alex Brown


Payton was reinstated in January,
and since voluntary workouts for
2013 season began in April, there
have been no distractions from
football.
Any contracts which were rene-
gotiated were done .so quietly and
without player absences another
sharp departure from last year, when
star quarterback Drew Brees held
out for his current five-year, $100
million deal until July. During 2012
minicamp, as well as the non-pad-
ded practices known as OTAs (orga-
nized team activities), assistant head
coach Joe Vitt was in charge and
former backup quarterback Chase
Daniel was working with the first
team.
Brees has said this offseason
seems like the first normal one he's
experience since 2009, noting that
in 2010, the team was coming off
a Super Bowl victory and that the
2011 offseason was wiped out by a
lockout.
-----------------.....


adding 10
Vernon.


points for


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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew
Brees passes during NFLfootball practice
at their training facility on Tuesday.
than a year ago, only to spend his
first season in New Orleans on a 7-
9 squad that was never coached by
Payton for a single practice.


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SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12,2013 5B -


National bFootball League


New Patriots quarterback Tim Tebow is surrounded by reporters and cameramen after practice on Tuesday in Foxborough, Mass.


TirTEBOWMANA


TEBOWVMAN IAa


The Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
- Tim Tebow is back on
the field with an NFL
team the New England
Patriots.
The Patriots announced
the signing of the former
Jets quarterback on Tues-
day, six weeks after he was
cut by New York and just
in time for the start of the
three-day Patriots mini-
camp that runs through
Thursday.
Tebow practiced with
veteran New England
starter Tom Brady and
backup Ryan Mallett.
The newest Patriot wore
No. 5, not his familiar 15
- which belongs to Mal-
lett on his shorts and
helmet. The QBs wore red
jerseys without numbers.
"First and foremost, I just
want to thank the Patriots
for giving me an oppor-
tunity. I'i very thankful,"
Tebow said on the field
after practice. "It's such
an honor to be a Patriot
and play for Coach (Bill)
Belichick and for Coach
(Josh) McDaniels, learn
under Tom (Brady), and be
a part of this very success-
ful franchise."
Two people with knowl-
edge of the, deal told The
Associated Press that
Tebow wag signed for two
years with no guaranteed
money. One person says
he will make the veteran's
minimum salary, $630,000
in 2013, with incentives.
The people spoke on
condition of anonymity
because terms of the deals
had not been announced.
ESPN first reported
terms of the signing.
'Anything we do, we feel
is in the best interests of
the team," Belichick said
at a standing-room-only
news conference before
practice. "We'll see how it
goes."
With 15 video cameras
and more than 40 media
members in the audience,


Belichick said, "We've been
in front of bigger crowds
before."
Tebow, 25, is being re-
united with McDaniels,
the Patriots offensive co-
ordinator who was Den-
ver's head coach when
the Broncos traded into
the first round to take him
with the 25th draft pick
in 2010. McDaniels stood
next to Tebow on the prac-
tice field.
"I'm looking forward to
working hard every single
day, and getting a lot better,
and learning under some
great people," Tebow said
during his 40-second visit
with reporters. "So, that's
all I got. But thank you so
much and God bless. I'm
sure we'll be talking more
soon."
There is no guarantee
that Tebow will still be
with the Patriots when
training camp begins next
month, but if the Patri-
ots keep him, he would
have time to develop as a
quarterback since Brady
holds that job. Tebow even
could be tried at tight end,
where the status of Rob
Gronkowski is uncertain
after he had his fourth op-
eration on his broken left
forearm on May 20 and
faces back surgery this
month.
Asked if Tebow would
be used at quarterback,
Belichick, in his usual low-
key manner, said, "we're
going to do what we think
is best for our football
team. We'll see."
He also said during the
news conference last-
ing about nine minutes
that Tebow is "a talented
guy. He's smart. He works
hard."
Tebow's NFL career ap-
peared to be over when the
Jets released him on April
29 and no team rushed to
sign him. But Belichick de-
cided to bring in the 2007
Heisman Trophy winner
who led Florida to two na-
tional championships.


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"I'm happy for the young
man to get another op-
portunity in the league
and things like that. We've
already mentioned' that it
didn't work out here," New
York coach Rex Ryan said.
"Obviously, Tim had more
success in Denver than he
did here."
After the NFL draft, in
which they selected quar-
terback Geno Smith from
West Virginia, the Jets de-
cided to release Tebow
just more than a year
after a dressed-up, high-
profile press conference
that welcomed him to the
organization.
New York went 6-10 last
season, lost its final three
games and finished tied
for last place in the AFC
East with Buffalo. New
England, meanwhile, went
12-4, won the division and
advanced to the AFC title
game.
"I felt like it was a learn-
ing opportunity for me.
There was a lot that I'll take
from it," Tebow said at the
end of the season. "There's
a lot that I learned, and
there are lot of relation-
ships that I've built, so I
know that it happened for
a reason.
Now, he joins a rival who
swept the Jets last season,
including an- embarrass-
ing 49-19 loss that New
York endured at home on
Thanksgiving night.
"It's not a surprise to me
that Tim would be picked
up. Obviously, as I've said
before, he's a tremendous
young man and very com-
petitive. I look forward to
competing against him,"
said Ryan, who is getting
used to seeing his former
players and staff members
catch on elsewhere.
"If you look throughout
our league now, you've
got Tim with New Eng-
land, (tight end) Dustin
Keller in Miami and (de-
fensive coordinator) Mike
Pettine and Co. in Buf-
falo, so there's a lot of my


former guys throughout
the league," Ryan added.
"(Running back) Shonn
Greene in Tennessee,
who we're going to go up
against (too). With that,
I've always wished those
guys the best.
"Unless they play against
us, obviously."
The last time Tebow
threw a pass in Foxbor-
ough, Denver lost in the
divisional playoff round
to the Patriots 45-10 in the
2011 season. He complet-
ed 9 of 26 passes for 136
yards with no touchdowns
or interceptions and five
sacks in that game and
gained 13 yards on five
rushes.
When he was traded to
the Jets with great fanfare
in March 2012, there was
speculation he might re-
place Mark Sanchez as the
starting quarterback. But
when Sanchez struggled,
he was replaced by Greg
McElroy late in the season.
Tebow threw only eight
passes all year and played
primarily as the protector
for the Jets' punter.
Tebow's presence on the
team and absence from
the field fed a media fren-
zy in NewYork.
The spotlight will be
dimmer in Foxborough
where Belichick tightly
controls which players
can talk to the media and
what they can say. When
they go beyond those lim-
its, Belichick sometimes
forbids them from talking
with reporters.
But does Belichick need
any advice from Ryan on
how to handle Tebow?
"Oh, please, he's not go-
ing to listen to me, and
he shouldn't," Ryan said.
"He'll just do what he does,
and that makes sense."
Former Broncos general
manager Ted Sundquist
sees the logic in the Pa-
triots' decision to bring
Tebow to minicamp.
"If you can find a club
that's mature enough to


n Tebow back on field


ter deal with Patriots


handle it as an organiza-
tion, then you're going
to find the right spot for
him," Sundquist said.
"What I mean by that is
all the media mania and
that sort of thing. The club
says, 'Look, this is the rea-
son we're bringing him on.
We feel he can bring X, Y, Z
and A, B, C to the table.'
"Explain it to Tim, ex-
plain it to the media, ex-
plain it to your fan base
and explain it to your
organization."
The Patriots run a com-
plex offense and Tebow
had trouble grasping the
strategy in Denver. But
the presence of McDaniels
could help him.
"If there's one guy in the
NFL who's a fan of Tim
Tebow or pulling for him,
it would be Josh McDan-
iels," said former Jets and
Patriots offensive lineman
Damien Woody, now an
ESPN analyst.
"I think they'll take their
time developing him,"
Woody said. "The Patriots
are one of those teams that


like to develop guys, and
they'll even trade them if
it works in their favor. In
the more immediate fu-
ture, having played in New
England, I know one thing
they value is versatility.
They're going to try to use
Tebow in positions where
they feel they can maxi-
mize his talent."
As an NFL rookiein 2010,
Tebow threw just 82 pass-
es in nine games, starting
three.
In 2011, he started 11
games and threw for 12
touchdowns and six inter-
ceptions. He led Denver to
a wild-card win over Pitts-
burgh before the division-
al loss to New England.
He was traded to New
York after that season
when Denver signed Pey-
ton Manning. With the
Jets, Tebow completed six
of eight passes and ran 32
times for 102 yards.
Tebow, who won the
Heisman as a sophomore,
has 2,422 passing yards
and a 75.3 rating as an NFL
quarterback.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
YCOUR tU$W 5TN 'z"TOt'I'Wt l | AW R FERRIKG TOPOULT, B Oke^ TILYDU TRYf
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YOUR.CROICE.OFFISR SPELLING OF
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SKIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"If you want to read the editorials, you'll
have to wait until I've finished
the comics."


ACROSS
1 Joke
5 PC
alternative
8 Opposite
of haw
11 Stares
rudely
13 Calendar
abbr.
14 Leafy
climber
15"The
Mummy"
setting
16 Less
mature
18Therefore
20 Watered
silk
21 -shaven
23 Flow back
24 "Bali-"
25 Mascara
applicator
27- Clapton
31 Pipe fitting
32Guzzle
33 Jay of
late-night
TV
34 Woeful cry
36 "What's
for me?"
38 Falstaff's
prince
39 ntwine


40 Prefix for
second
41 Cease
42- out
(relax)
44 Garden
decoration
46 Earth tone
49 "Hey, you!"
50 Basement
fixture
52Tuscany
setting
56Pamplona
cheer
57 Mineo or
Bando
58 Quay
59 Embroider
60 Monsieur's
summer
61 Remainder

DOWN
1 Slangy
coffee
2 Poultry
product
3 Under-
handed
4 Conical
home
5 Rochester
clinic
6 GI mail
drop
7 Ant's
morsel


Answer to Previous Puzzle
H A P H 'A D C PRI
AELG0RRA A EI











8 Chevalier 37 Throat
musical feature
AGE 1 1L I -L EI
DA R WT l BE L





9 Even once 43 Wipe out
SII A AI RI










10"Jane'-" 45 Furry
12 Drinking swimmer
tubes 46 Alin
17 Dynamite spacecraft
inventor 47 EPack
SATL DIMENUl
U S E LI A I CONI
S EC M IAATEC:AKI




98 Chevaier 37Throatanimal



21 -lily 48 Make tea
22 Soft purple 49Volcano
musi23 Decorative goddess
9 Evenborders 51 H43Wipeouse pet
1024"JCurane -" 453Livy's
261492 Drinking swimmereeting
tubessel 54 Brown of.
1728 Changamite spbig bandscecraft
invength 5547So farck




29 Foolish
1930 Chewiyng animal
2135 Ear- lily 48Make tea
22evSoft purple 49Volcanoning
23 Decorative goddess
borders 51 House pet
24 Cure 53 Livy's
261492 greeting
vessel 54 Brown of.
28 Change the big bands
length 55 So far
29 Foolish
30 Chilly
35 Early
evening


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


6-12 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter i the cipher stands for another.
"ZHEXGLEJGX HW EBX LGE PM

VGHEHIS WPYXEBHIS EBLE VHZZ RX
GXLA EVH KX; N P J G I LZHWY VB8LE VHZ-Z
RX GXLA PIKX." KTGHZ KPII PZZT

Previous Solution: "For six years, I kept my five Olympic medals wrapped in a
plastic bread bag beneath my bed." Mary Lou Retton
TODAY CLUE: Oslenbav
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 6-12


Horoscope
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) If you're not careful,
instead of magnifying your
virtues and minimizing
your faults, you're more
likely to amplify some of
the less attractive aspects
of your personality.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- Since certain endeavors
that usually come easy to
you could be fraught with
unforeseen complica-
tions, you had better allow
plenty of time to maneu-
ver and recoup..
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Don't allow serious
matters to become boring
or oppressive.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- If your optimism turns
out to be unfounded, dis-
appointment will naturally
follow. Don't let others
mislead you into believ-
ing a too-rosy portrayal of
things.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Unless you show that
you're working hard to
achieve your desires, Lady
Luck is likely to direct her
efforts elsewhere.
. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) There is a strong
possibility that you will be
more prone to focus on
the details than on the big
picture.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -You will likely
be inclined to tempt the
fates in areas where you
know the odds are stacked
against you. This is foolish.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -Today you could
knowingly make an agree-
ment that benefits the
other party much more
than it does you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) If you should hap-
pen to make a mistake
in your work, don't try to
hide it. If you do, it could
lead to complications.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Temporarily
postpone purchasing a,
luxury item if it doesn't fit
comfortably within your
budget.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -You might promise
to do something that you
know to be impossible. Ly-
ing would be a bad idea.
TAURUS (April.20-May
20) Most of your boasts
will ring hollow, with no
one believing you. You'd be
better off telling it like it is.


Aniude's Mailbox


Dear Annie: I have a friend who has a
divorced daughter with two children.
The ex-husband has a good job with the
government. My friend is very strapped
for money and sends as much as she can
to the daughter. The daughter claims the
ex-husband does not pay child support
regularly.
I feel the daughter should go to his em-
ployer about the child support. There are
laws about this. But my friend and her
daughter both believe this might cause
him to lose his job. Then there would
be no money coming at all. I disagree. I
don't believe you can be fired for garnish-
ment of wages. But talking to my friend is
like talking to a wall.
The new wrinkle is, the ex-husband
is about to remarry. I have known this
guy since he was a teenager, and he is
a fine man. I don't, however, have the
same warm feelings toward my friend's
daughter. Is there some way I can look


This layout was in yesterday's column. Then
South, hunting for 10 tricks in four spades,
ruffed' the second heart and immediately
played on diamonds to take six spades, two
diamonds and two clubs. (If diamonds had not
been 3-3, declarer would have tried the club
finesse.)
Now let's turn to the defenders' hunt for four W
tricks. How can they succeed after West leads
the heart king? y
South's sequence, a takeout double over +
East's weak two followed by a jump to four
spades, showed a very strong hand with at least 4
a six-card suit. North hoped that no one would
double!
East should realize from the bidding and the
dummy that South has only one heart. Maybe
West has a trump winner, but if not, the de-
fenders must take three minor-suit tricks.
These might come automatically, but perhaps
South has a strong club holding that needs to
be led through. (There cannot be a need for an
immediate diamond shift.)
East should overtake West's heart king with
his ace and switch to the club nine (the high
card denying an honor in the suit).
South can win, cash the spade and diamond
aces, and play a second diamond, but East
overtakes West's jack with his queen and leads
another club. Here, this leaves declarer with no
chance, having to lose four tricks.


into her claim about the child support
without causing trouble? My friend is
about to lose her house, and I don't think
she should be giving away her money to
her daughter. I realize this is none of my
business, but watching the effect this has
on my friend breaks my heart.
-JUST CONCERNED

Dear Concerned: We cannot caution you
enough to stay out of this. The mother
may suspect her daughter is not telling
her the truth and wants to give her the
money anyway. The daughter may be
perfectly honest about the child support,
rendering your.high opinion of the ex-
husband unwarranted. And there could
be other thiings going on of which you are
unaware. If the daughter is not receiving
child support, she can take the matter to
the courts. We understand your concern,
but no good can come from your snoop-
ing around.


North 06-12-13
1074
542
*8 6 4 3
*,8643
4653
'est East
532 46
KQ9 V A J 10 7 6 3
KJ9 Q105
Q 1074 4982
South
SA K Q J 98
V8
A72
A KJ

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
2Y
Dbl. 3 Y Pass Pass
14 Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: f K


-J


-I6B WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT







CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, June 12,2013- 7 B
Jackson County Floridan* Wednesday, June 12, 2013 7B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED
AMT C



A KSoSOMLo FL P -LAC~


3 A D


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
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Publ;calon Potl;cy Eno. and Omnissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or E,-ora r., Duti,.al,,rn e>.epil it. i ,nri iof Lr. c,-,i m-f Irn ad for the first days
insertio3n PdJustrnmii tu e,-,ori I-. limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages aN',nrg uut c1i Euo ir. naderi.mr-, .r,-u -yn,] Ir-. amE,-unt paid for the space
actually occupied t n irial ponori, f the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the pu',: r.,',- ,-rTpr-,.-: ,:r -irr.,i-,r.i arnd i-re .nrsan be no liabilt lor non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
Sauci advernierrent L'rlayf Ada are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, -n.. :r :i. :.ty aint a, urnde, i'-, arpDrp',alt a ,f,cairWjo,

I [ I I I I ll llosr


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Available at The Home Depot

Alto Saxophone: Nearly new. Barely used.
$900 new. $500 OBO. Grab it before band
camp!!! Has a scratch, plays great.
Call Steve @ 334.796.1724
Trombone 1955 King Liberty 2-B HN white, very
good condition. $1000. 229-793-2141


TV, .


Baby Grand Piano: Sohmer & Company "1959"
Model 57 in mint condition, purchased in
2003 after minor restorations and very little
play, but has been continuously tuned. Ma-
hogany wood with maple finish. Matching
wood bench included. $12,000 334-589-3422

Ij)PETS &'ANIMAL'P-!

Abandoned female calico cat 850-482-2994.

Border Collie Puppy: adorable 9 week old male
$200 Call 850-693-0139
Miniature Schnauzers, CKC,
2 Males, Females, Salt 'n Pepper,
Born 4/22/13, Ready June 3rd. $350
lucretiafarris @farristrucking.com,
850-263-4354
Super Puppies Sale
Shilb-CM Mix $125, Chinese Chibuahm
Female and Papillons. Now Taidng Deposits
on Yorldes, Shih-Poo and Japenese chins.
-o 334-718-4 6 4=




'O' BLUEBERRIES |
U-Pick $7.00 per gallon
SWe-Pick $20.00 per gallon
Co. Rd. 33 in Columbia
334-796-8165 4 -!
Ken's Blueberry Patch
U-Pick We-Pick
7233 Butler Rd. Sneads FL
0 Naturally Good ,
850-592-4270 or 850-718-6995
FRESH RODUC


FRESH SWEET CORN
9 May 29th & July 7th
GREEN CIRCLES FARM
233 Cooler Rd, Bainbridge
229-246-1724 ,
Yellow, White and Bi-Color
Varieties Available Market Price
Naturally Grown Blueberries 4m
U-Pick or I-Pick or lWie-Pfc
334-714-4703 Located 52 W
3.3 mL from circle turn (R) Look for signs.
SAll yoan can eat whHe picking In the field


Sudoku


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Level: 0 2] 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to Tuesday's puzzle
817345926
52 4697381
369128745
5-2-4-6--9 -73-8 1-5
78246 1 593
135972864

4968-53217
243719 658
9 715 86432
658234179


6/12/13


i Frozen Green
Peanuts
^1^ .,* We also have
shelled peanuts
850-352-2199
850-209-3322 or 850-573-6594
4128 Hwy231

Hendrix Farm Produce
Now Open Hwy. 52 Slocomb
S334-726-7646 4i


I HOME GROWN. FRESH



Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
334-793-6690
VEITCH'SBLUEBERRY FARM
7772 Howell Rd. Sneads, FL 32460
YOU PICK BLUEBERRIES
Opening June I Tues- Sun 9 a.m. 6 p.m.


SBALLARD DAYLILILIES
252 N. Co. Rd. 9(3 mies N. Slocomb)
$1.00 & up. FREE Amaryllis w/ pwdurchase.
S 334-886-2273 or 1-866-745-1243
TREES TREES
TREES
| 12 ft.tall 30 gal.
'' -, containers
IJ $69.95 buy 2
Sget one FREE
Live Oaks, Crape Myrtle,
Cherry Laurel & Magnolias
By appointment
334-692-3695


SBuying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No trac --- 0-smal /Cso hng
Call Pea River Timber
334-389-2003


c a n A d Fast, easy, no pressure
la c a n A24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.
www.jcfloridan.com


6 5

6 8

8 1 5 19 2

8 9 3
3 _2 _1

1 4 5
46 8 _5_ 5 9

9 3__

5 7
-_^ -_ ----


.. I:: : : :. .i .. . .. '' . .. .


ImC-L A.S. S I F mI mE. D







8 B W'ediiesdai. June 12. 2013 Jacksion Counti Floridan


($*) EMPLOYMENT


A leading
NOW HIRING Health Care
facility
La. . is seeking
qualified applicants for the
following position:

FT Advanced Registered
Nurse Practitioner
Needed to work in a busy pain
management clinic specializing in
interventional pain therapy.
Florida license required.

Send resumes to: Dothan Eagle
Classifieds Box "MMM" 227 North
Oates Street, Dothan, AL 36303



E Equip. Oper. Ill
M Must be a high school
tiih graduate or its equivalent
So an have 3+years of exp.
in the operation of heavy
motorized equipment. Must have a valid
class A CDL prior to employment;
Starting Salary set $19,753.00/yr.

Equip. Opera. I
Must have high school graduate or its
equivalent and have some exp. driving
heavy motorized equipment. Must have
valid Class B CDL prior to employment.
Salary set at $18,074.00/yr.

9-1-1 Address Technicain
Must have a high school diploma or
G.E.D. supplemented by course work in
Geography Informatiom System
Management or a closely related field.
Must be able to demonstrate experience
in the use of computers including
WinXP, VISTA, CAD/GIS and data base
software. Must have a valid FL drivers
license prior to employment
Starting Salary $18,074.00

Food Service Worker
Must have a high school diploma or GED
with 1-2 years of institutional experience
in preparing food for large numbers or
people. Valid FL drivers license prior to
employment. Salary: $17,236.00/yr.
Submit Jackson County employment ap-
plication to the Human Resources Dept,
2864 Madison St, Marianna, FL 32448. Ph
482-9633. www.jacksoncountyfl.net/

Deadline to apply is 06-24-2013
EOE/AA/Vet Pref/ADA/ Drug-Free Workplace

E Su
&,-IN" .......;.W .W


CLASSIFIED


66 S


S NOW ENROLLING for
SMedical Assisting,
R TIS Medical Office
R TIS Administration,
COLLEGE Pharmacy Technology,
Electrical Trades &
HVAC! Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu
-^ "< IesibENTIAL
( REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


1/1 Apartment for Rent.
For info call 850-579-8895
,o 1BR/1BA, nice clean apt in town
screened porch, large yard $450. mo.
No pets. 850-557-2000 for more info.

ina'~ : [:1 =[r :FQi=.] fT1 I T :UI 1
2S. S B patent orRen i


*4 Beach Cottage for Rent: 3BR 1.5BA,
Large screened porch, Beacon Hill
(Near Mexico Beach) $500/wk
850-482-2539 or 201-888-2388

1 & 2BR Apartments In Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
v* 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
2BR/1BA Newly Renovated 2658 Railroad St.
Open floor plan. Cottondale. No Pets.
$450 Mo. + $400 Dep. Call 850-352-4222
3BR/1BA Spacious Home with large rooms,
hardwood floor, CH&A, large garage and
fenced backyard. 4323 Derring St.
$725 Mo. + $600 Dep. Call 850-643-8806
3BR/2BA House in quiet neighborhood
in Chattahochee, recently renovated inside
and outside. $650 Mo. + $650 Dep.
S1BR/1BA Efficiency Apartment in quiet
neighborhood in Chattahochee recently
renovated inside. $350 Mo. + $350 Dep.
Call 850-592-7276
S4/2 Lb. Home w/CH&A 2 car garage
fenced back yd. Ib Afford Sw mo. +Idep.
855M 317 & 850-61965- Avail Now
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
SE 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property-Management Is Our ONLY Business"
House for Rent: 3BR/2BA Hwy 71 South
No Pets. $750. Mo. + $750. Dep.
Call 850-482-4400

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes In Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charioscountrylving.com.
S850-209-88474,,
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes In Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $3ZS- $S5/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message


SCHOOLS & INSTRUCTION


RECREATION


Bass Tracker 2002 17ft 2" long all welded alum.
hall, w/ console, special edition Pro team
175XT 40hp tracer by Mercury Marine, trolling
motor, motor guide, 4300 ft. operated, tilt trail-
er, alum. w/ spair tire. $4000. 850-557-4925.
"4-irJa y _.-- Fisher Freedom Deluxe
fili. ,." l ~2006 22' pontoon: 90hp
' Mercury, 4 stroke, less
-5(than 50hrs, pristine condi-
tion, custom trailer
w/guides, trolling mtr, battery charger, front &
rear electric'anchor, extra fishing chair & cus-
tom cover. $14,500. 334-493-6496; 334-504-2555

2009 K-Z Spree Travel Trailer: Model 260RBS,
26ft., weight 5100 Ibs., with large slide out.
This camper is like new the stove/oven and the
detachable outdoor grill have never been used.
Also has Winegard auto seeking satellite,
mounted on roof ready to use. Price $19,500.
For more information call: 334-790-4010.
RUVi IT! iELL IT! FIND IT!


% % %..TICFLORTDAN.com


.- 2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595 I

# 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by Itself),
on quiet lot In Sneads. 850-209-8595

For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn mainLincl.
850-593-4700
Quiet, well maintained Park, Water/sewer/
garbage/lawn included. Available Now
3/2 DW $625. & 3/2 $575. & 3/2 $500.
Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 _-
C'g| RESIDENTIAL
(ILJ REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

5080 Peanut Rd Graceville. 4 bedroom 2 bath
on over 4 acres nice well maintained home
nestled under large oaks.
$115,000. 850-258-9442


I-. JUNE SHOW C xSE


OF IREALSTN-

-a.. , "i'c- e S :t ,





Im *1 |Your guide tobgra ,lof

|utMnes* &semces
mINESS&S-



lCE DIRECTORY. I


Call 526-36.14to p-ace y.u*l4


IO WER WA H N


Affordable Lawn Care
Low Overhead=Low Prices
850-263-3813 850-849-1175
BU\ OZI


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc.
ALTHA, FL
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055


WEOFER CWMEI

AWRBMWUI
SBWMNswMw
MMYOMm


PTrolling Motor Repair
Affordable Service! Fast Repair!
MostCases 1 Week Turnaround.
rvicing MInn Kota & Motorgulde.
850-272-5305


NEW& USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELOW RETAIL PRICEI81
TRIFL- 850.526.1700
---*"r* ,Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
2978 Pierce Street
X JP ____ (behind Tim's Floristl


ELECTRICAL WORK; I


Lighthouse Electrical
Unlimited, LLC
Residential Electrical
Remodels Service Work
II t#ER13014408 Insured
8 Rlcky Mosher
S(850)272-2918 O rRlcky er


LordiBuller
0 1110 Owlnel/Oi )Oiilor
COMMERCIAL 4854 Dogwood Dr.
CLEANING Mari.ann, FL 32146
CIonIno I. Our OlbsoIo.l. (850) 728-3832
..................................... ..............................................
i ocdcommorlalcloanlngOya hoo.con
Swww.ocd-commorclnlclleonnlng.conm BAW & tJS& I


Spr 'ingMailing Spe S S

Hous r fice
*Incue iosadCres


MARIANNA CITY 2844 Madison St
FARMERS TusrSat
MARKET --
l7am-nooI


I SELF STORAGI


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME

:'*f *10


"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured


In The Classifieds


Chad O's Lawn F/X
Commercial & Residential f
Spring Clean-up &
Monthly Maintenance
Full Lawn Care Service
Free Estimates
Family Owned & Operated
Chad Oliver I 850-573-7279 *


Motor Home: Owvn a 35 ft. diesel pusher motor
home for only $34k. 1996 Alegro Bus, dual roof
air conditioners, dual heaters, three awings,
hydraulic jacks, 6.5 k generator, rear view
camera. New roof, tires, refrigerator, TV,
microwave, DVD/VHS player, carpet and couch
and chairs recovered. Call 334-805-7014
(rX) TRANSPORTATION

ATS FO*SLE
Chevy 1992 Corvette Convertible, fully loaded,
70.000 miles, asking $15.000. 334-441-6042
Dodge 2006 Magnum R/T Hemi Fully loaded
with sunroof over 116,000 miles. $10,500.
334-441-6042 1-Owner Car
S DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?_
GOT BADCREDIT?_
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy
slow credit ok
$0 Down/lst Payment,
Tax, Tag & Title
-0 Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
Honda 2008 Accord EX-L : Burgundy, 4 Door,
Automatic, leather, sun roof, heated seats,
all the extras. $14.900. 334-300-4418
..... B Honda 2012 Accord Coupe
ljiB S EXL: Automatic transmis-
sion with paddle shift,
navigation, sunroof, heat-
ed leather seats, 6 disc CD player. Has around
9.500 miles. Asking $24.900. Call 334-268-3900.
Jeep 2010 Wrangler Unlimited RHD.
Green pearl color, 45,000 miles. $22,795.
229-308-9778 ,
Lincoln 2003 Town Car executive model dual
zone AR, alloys wheels, tan/leather document-
ed service up to date, 156K miles, runs & looks
great, tinted windows, front CD player, 19 City,
25 Hwy. $6000. OBO. 334-360-5222
azda 20095 Sport -57K
Miles, Dark Gray, Fully
Loaded, New Tires, New
Battery, Excellent Condi-
tion $8,950 334-370-6239
Mustang 2002 GT convertible, good shape,
gray in color with black top, 4- new tires,
runs great 334-792-1070 or 334-435-2151
Toyota 2013 Tacoma
4 dr. 4 wheel drive. TRD off
road package. Automatic
transmission, rear locking
differential, tow package,
CD player. White exterior with grey interior.
Aoorox. 9.500 miles. $31.500. 334-268-3900


I!


I TREE SERVICE I


m











www..ICFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIED


MOTORYCLESLEGALSL
:,[V^2007 Harley Davidson Dyna -
Low Rider. 19,000 miles. LEALNT-I CE
Exc. cond. Garage kept &
well maintained, regular LF16052
service intervals. Sundown-
er touring seat & backrest, IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
luggage rack, Rush mufflers V H fuelpak & K N CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
air filter. New rear tire & battery. Lots of extras COUNTY, FLORIDA
and chrome. See to appreciate. $8,700. Call CIVIL DIVISION
334-804-4035 CASE NO. 12-000431-CA
wlH 2006 TX Chopper fully customized blue JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL
w/graphics, S&S 124 cu. ft. motor, boss dual ASSOCIATION
intake powder coated blue, 10,400 miles, Plaintiff,
$11,800. OBO 334-445-0366 MUST SEE !!
Yamaha 1100 (1980) Midnight Special, storage vs.
for 25 yrs. Like NEW $2500. 850-718-6541. GARRY WAYNECOX; RHONDA GAIL COX;
Yamaha FZ6 2007 13,500 miles, red, helmet UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF
included, $4000.850-526-5595. THE SUBJECT PROPERTY;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Commercial 2005 GreatDane 48ft. Reefer
SB300+ Thermoking with lift gate, in good NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
condition $18,000 OBO 334-797-1095. Judgment of Foreclosure dated 13th May, 2013,
Ford XLT S150 1995 Ext. Cab, runs good, teal and entered in Case No. 12-000431-CA, of the
green, Heat & Air works, 302 engine $2000. Also Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and
willing to trade for a compact car in good run- for JACKSON County, Florida. JPMORGAN
ning condition. 850-693-5812 or850-557-8365. CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is
ning condition. 850-693-5812 or 850-557-8365. Plaintiff and GARRY WAYNE COX; RHONDA
Massey Ferguson Tractor md#1215 GAIL COX; are defendants. I will sell to the
with Massey Ferguson 225 ft. mower highest and best bidder for cash AT THE
$4000. 334-797-8523 NORTH DOOR, AT 4445 LAFAYETTE STREET,
TMC u ^ nniT, t ,A ,,hoi dive MARIANNA IN JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
TC35 New Holland 2003 Tractor 4-wheel drive, MARIANNA IN JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
front end loader, 41S hours, diesel, $15,500 32446, at 11:00 A.M., on the 27th day of June,
front loar,34 77u8r8ssel 2013, the following described property as set
334-691-2803 or 334-797-7881. forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
_ _ _ _ PARCEL #1:
SFor sale by Owner COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
2006 Pontiac Montana SV6, NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SEC-
88K miles, 7 passenger TION 34, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 8 WEST,
sh0 1 sidinQ power door, rail JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN
Guards, back-up assist, ra N0055'21"E, 2414.82 FEET; THENCE
gur ds, bac-up as, N8341'28"W, 103.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF
front/rear CD/MP3, DVD w/remote, fabric w/4 BEGINNING; THENCE RUN N7543'33"W, 210.18
captain seats. Maintained w/most service FEET; THENCE RUN N0645'43"W, 139.19 FEET
records. 60-75% tread $5,900 334-790-6618 TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
WTED AUTOS OAK STREET; THENCE RUN S8926'33"E, ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 223.11 FEET; THENCE
DEPARTING SAID R/W RUN SOO55'21"W, 187.90
1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAIN-
YOUR TOWING NEEDS! ING .794 OF AN ACRE MORE OR LESS
rqWS r'sA 4 onr Tosiui7 PARCEL #2
AUTO BODY& RECYCLING COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
PAYING TOP DOLLARFOR JUNK CARS THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624 OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 8
WEST OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE
AS uarante S00o55'21"W, 250 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
CASH Guaranteed GINNING; THENCE N8338'10"W, 103.52 FEET;
Highest prices paid for Junk, old Farming THENCE N7543'33"W, 210.18 FEET; THENCE
Equipment, Tractors, Semis, Junk Cars S8938'37"W, 330.49 FEET TO A POINT ON THE
Nothing to big, nothing to small EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF EDENFIELD
DRIVE; THENCE S0055'21"W, ALONG SAID
334-596-7791 RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 182.06 FEET; THENCE DE-
PARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE ON A BEAR-
i i ING OF S8918'18"E, 681.47 FEET; THEN
I N0002'53"W, 124.43 FEET; THENCE
M E N8338'10"W, 41.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. CONTAINING 2.611 ACRES MORE OR
room..nima.moommmu --1111.ON.. .s.. ow LESS.
Got a Clunker
S We'll b yur Junker A person claiming an interest in the surplus
We'll be your Junker from the sale, if any, other than the property
ivli~iU L ~We buy wrecked cars -owner as of the date of the Ils pendens must
-' ,!- and Farm Equip. at a file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
~-'.'Jv 'fair and honest price!
i325_& t Complete Cars : Dated this 13th day of May, 2013.
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-7146285 j /s/DALE RABON GUTHRIE
L ............". a 22.0 ft 0 a 0 0 0 a a 0 a a aa As ,Clerk of said Court
6 We buy Wrecked Vehicles By Tammy Baily
S Running or not! As Deputy Clerk
S 334-794-9576 or 344-7914714 This Notice is provided pursuant to Administra-
_____________^_________----- tive Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the
SIAmericans with the Disabilities Act, If you are a
person with a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O.


,Jhckson (County FloridaIn


Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.
Submitted by:
Kahane & Associates, P.A.
8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000
Plantation, FL 33324
Telephone: (954) 382-3486
Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380
Designated service email:
notice@kahaneandassociates.com
File No.: 11-07833 JPC
June 12, 19, 2013
LF16053
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2011-CA-000913
JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association as
Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance,
LLC
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Gerald David Layton a/k/a Gerald Layton and
Desiree B. layton a/k/a Desiree' Layton; Jack-
son County, Florida Acting through the State
Housing Initiatives Partnership Pro-
gram
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
dated May 22, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.
2011-CA-000913 of the Circuit Court of the 14th
Judicial Circuit in and for Jackson County, Flori-
da, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National
Association as Successor by Merger to Chase
Home Finance, LLC, Plaintiff and Gerald David
Layton a/k/a Gerald Layton and Desiree B. Lay-
ton a/k/a Desiree'. Layton, Husband and Wife
are defendantss, I, Clerk of Court, Dale Rabon
Guthrie, will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE JACKSON
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL
STANDARD TIME on July 25, 2013, the following
described property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to-wit:
THE SOUTH 1/2, OF A PARCEL OF LAND DESCRI-
BED AS BEGINNING ON THE WEST SIDE OF DA-
VIS STREET, 56 YARDS NORTH, OF THE SE COR-
NER, OF THE NW 1/4, OF THE NE 1/4, OF SEC-
TION 3, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST,
AND THENCE RUN NORTH 70 YARDS, THENCE
WEST 70 YARDS, THENCE SOUTH 70 YARDS,
THENCE EAST 70 YARDS, TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; BEING IN THE CITY OF GRACEVILLE,
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA 32440.
THE ABOVE PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULAR-
LY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A 3/4" IRON PIPE (NO ID)
MARKING THE SE CORNER, OF THE NW 1/4, OF
THE NE 1/4, OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 6
NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE S 89 54'11" W, A DISTANCE
OF 30.62 FEET; THENCE N 00' 00'00" ALONG
THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF FLORI-


Wednesday, June 12, 2013- 9 B -


DA STREET, AND SOUTHERLY EXTENSION
THEREOF, A DISTANCE OF 168.00 FEET, TO A
1/2" IRON ROD AND CAP (PSM 6525), SAID
IRON ROD BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, N 000 00'00" E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 105.00 FEET, TO A 1/2" IRON ROD
AND CAP (PSM 6525), THENCE, LEAVING SAID
WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, N 88
43"00"W, A DISTANCE OF 210.00 FEET, TO A
1/2" IRON ROD AND CAP (PSM 6525); THENCE S
0000'00" E, A DISTANCE OF 105.00 FEET;
THENCE S 88 43'00" E, A DISTANCE OF 210.00
FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850)
747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance Is less than sev-
en (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call
711.
/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Jackson County, Florida
/s/ Tammy Bailey
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHt, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360.
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(561) 998-6700
(561) 998-6707


Call a Classified Sales Representative
for Employment Advertising, Pets,

Announcements, Transportation,

SFarm & Garden, Recreation,

Real Estate & Merchandise JJ

at 702-6060 or (800) 779-2557
to place your ad in
\DOTHAN EAGLE
JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN
The ENTERPRISE LEDGER ARMY FLIER /
VTHE DOTHAN PROGRESS
^^^ -..THE EUFAULA TRIBUNE .
^ OPELIKA-AUBURN NEWS








Adets yu COLSUF frFE b iiin w^efaia^cm e st o dtis


Clean Out Your Garage


and Turn the Items You've


Forgotten Into Cash.


That old collection of clutter might not mean much to you
anymore, but chances are someone out there would love it. By
using the Classifieds, you'll make it easier for them to find,
and easier for you to sell. So try it today!




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN

(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


3 Lamps-$20 ea. 850-263-1039
AA Big Book- 1st Ed., $500. 850-263-1039
AA Big Book-2nd Ed. $450. 850-263-1039
Air Purifier NEW $35. 239-272-8236.
Amp Vox with reverb. $125. 850-482-6022
Barbies (2) collectibles $20. 850-582-2881
Bose Radio w/ remote $275. 850-263-6144
Broom Mop Head- $25. 850-263-1039
Bumper Trailer Hitch $29. like new 482-7665
Car speaker box for 2-12" $35. 850-482-8310
Cast Iron Fry Pan w/Legs -$30. 850-263-1039
Chair-$30. 850-263-1039
Chair-$30. 850-263-1039
Coffee Table-Oval, Lthr. Top, $25. 850-263-1039
Desk chair: rolling leather/arms $45. 482-2994
Dialogue Paintings- Signed, $60 pr. 850-263-1039
Diamond Earring Cluster 1K, gold $400 790-4892
Dining Table no chairs $250. 850-569-2194.
Dresser (2) $40. each 850-592-2881.
Floor Lamp-$30. 850-263-1039


Glass Insulators- 3 $10 ea. 850-263-1039
Jelly Bean Container- $5. 850-263-1039
Ladder 20 ft. ext. $50. 850-762-3370
Michelin Tire-225 70R 19.5, $100. 850-482-6022
Mirror: 33 X 43 w/ screws, Free. 850-526-3333
Needlepoint Serenity Prayer -$20. 850-263-1039
Office Desk steel $150. 850-569-2194.
Photo Printer NEW Cannon $65. 850-482-2994.
Saddlebags for motorcycle NEW $45. 592-2881.
Scooter-needs battery $200. 850-263-1039
Sofa Bed good condition $100. 850-569-2194
Table sm. dinette w/leafs $25. 850-762-3370
Tire 23565R17- $35. 850-483-6022
Tire P265/R18 $15. 850-482-6022
Trailer enclosed %3" plywood 4x8 $125. 482-6022
TV 19" HD cable $50. 850-372-4680.
Windows shutters: 5 sets $50. 850-526-3333
A D EFt--I s S E |9
-VHIE 4CLAS&- S9IF11EEDS2


jo S JACKSON COU

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jcfloridan.com

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0y FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS,


Sniff Iuta l eal


in the Classifieds,
Shoppers with a nose for bargains head straight for the
Classifieds. In the Classifieds, you can track down deals
on everything from cars to canine companions. It's easy
to place an ad or find the items you want, and it's used
by hundreds of area shoppers every day.
Go wlht your Insticts and no the Classifds lily.

JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN
(850) 526-3614 6r (800) 779-2557





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridclanf.com


Sla. iey Cup Finals


,, ..
* C.e


'E~


BOSTON BRUINS AT
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS
I.., .t j -,1 Cup Finals
3, p m. TV: NBC


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS


Boston defenseman Torey Krug (left) and Chicago goalie Corey Crawford will be big players in the Stanley Cup Finals, where penalty killing could play a big role in the series.



Special teams could be crucial in Cup finals


The Associated Press

CHICAGO The last
two teams in the NHL
playoffs are really good
when one of their players
is sent to the penalty box.
It's an entirely different
situation when they get a
power play.
When it Comes to pen-
alties in the Stanle Cup
finals, the Chicago Black-
hawks and Boston Bru-
ins might just prefer to
keep everyone on the ice.
Heading into Game 1 on
Wednesday night, goals on
special teams have been
so scarce for these teams
that a couple for either
side could tip the series in
one direction.
"The special teams are
kind of key, if you want to
(have) success," Chicago
forward Michael Frolik
said Monday. "We try to
talk about it all the time
... and make sure we're on
the same page. It's espe-
cially going to be key right
now.
When the Blackhawks
are forced to play a man
down, Frolik and Marcus
Kruger are so persistent
it almost resembles an
even-strength situation.
And the Bruins have hulk-
ing defenseman Zdeno
Chara and goalie Tuukka
Rask, who is swallowing
everything at the net these
days.
Combine those skilled
players with months of.
practice, and it's easy to
see why the conference
champions are such good
penalty killers.
"Typically, it's hard to
score in any situation
just because at this point
everybody is dialed into
,their systems and as con-
centrated as you can be
as to positioning and not
making mistakes and err-
ing on the side of caution,"
Boston defenseman An-
drew Ference said.
With Frolik and Kruger
tying up the action on top
of the zone, Chicago has
allowed just three goals
in 58 power-play oppor-
tunities for an astounding


94.8 percent kill rate. Los
Angeles got two of them
in the Western Confer-
ence finals, but one was a
meaningless goal by Tyler
Toffoli at the very end of
the Blackhawks' 4-2 vic-
tory in Game 2.
The 92.5 percent finish
for the 2000 New Jersey
Devils is the best play-
off rate for a Stanley Cup
champion in the last 25
years, according to STATS.
"I think they do a good
job of fronting shots," Bos-
ton coach Claude Julien
said of Chicago's penalty
killers. "You really have
to work hard to get the
shots through. That's what
they are, they're very pa-
tient; they're very aggres-
sive when you do lose, I
guess, control of the puck.
And if they feel they can
get on you, they'll get on
you quick. They've done a
good job that way."
Pittsburgh had con-
verted an NHL-best 28.3
percent of its power-play
chances heading into the
Eastern Conference finals
against Boston, but the
high-powered Penguins
went 0 for 15 with the man
advantage during the Bru-
ins' impressive four-game
sweep.
One of the lasting images


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BeTePesnYu nwYu a e


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I,,. I ,,,,I.., I

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i


from Boston's postseason
run came with Pittsburgh
on the power play in the
second period of Game 3.
Bruins forward Gregory
Campbell broke his right
leg when he dove to block
Evgeni Malkin's hard shot,
then limped around for
more than 30 seconds un-
til Boston cleared the zone
and he was able to get off
the ice.
Campbell's gutsy display
served as inspiration for
the Bruins, and they went
on to finish off the Pen-
guins with a 1-0 victory
on Friday. But Campbell
will miss the remainder
of the playoffs, presenting
a challenge for the series
against Chicago.
"It just means some
other guys have to step
in and do the job," Julien
said. "(Campbell) is an
elite penalty killer for us.
Like anything else, when
you lose a player like that
it certainly hurts your
team. But at the same
time, there's also guys that
come up and step up and
do a great job just like our
young Ds did when our
three Ds were hurt."
When it comes to scor-
ing on Boston, whether
it's even strength or on the
power play, the last line of


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" No Pre-Packaged Food
" No ELercie No Drugs
" No Caloric Counting
" No Hormones
" No Diet Pills
" No Group Sessions
" No Liquid Protein


Thlis Program Is Safe For An,
-- -l is J Helth Problem!
I/ffir.I' u, foi Of Our Mfn c'. 4'%id /i- I liiiitIiif. !
Ouida Morris IMarilUlna FL,................ -os 23 Ibs
David Pitts tBlountiLown, [L)................ Lost 31 lbs
Judy Redmon (Marlanna, FL).................Lost 35 lbs
John Rosenberger (Grand Ridge, FL) .....Lost 130 lbs
Melissa Hall (Blountstown, FL) ..............Lost 53 lbs
jeanifer Powell (Marianna, FL) .......... ...Lost 30 lbs
Jay Reagan (Marlanna, FL) .................... Lost 40 Ibs
People from ages 10 to 81 have safely done the program.


defense may be the most
difficult one to solve. Rask
has been terrific through-
out the playoffs, making
an NHL-best 497 saves.
Led by the 26-year-old
Finn, Boston has yielded
seven goals in 52 power-
play opportunities for an
86.5 percent kill rate in the
postseason.
"We're facing a goalie
that in the last round was
as good as any of the goal-
ies we've seen over a seg-
ment of two years in the
playoffs," Blackhawks
coach Joel Quenneville
said.
While the penalty killing
has been great for both
sides, the power play for


the Blackhawks and Bru-
ins has been, well, power-
less. Each team has seven
goals with the man advan-
tage in the playoffs. Bos-
ton had an NHL-worst 18
power-play goals during
the regular season, com-




SE:rn,, r'Ownr-r
S (850) 209-4705 ci
C 21 SurirnySo,'.':ol.ci


S R.On LER FASTER
SMAtRTER BOLDER FASTER'


pared to 25 for Chicago.
Quenneville and Julien
have faced a steady stream
of questions about the lack
of production, and that's
likely to continue in this
series especially with
the PK units on each side.





ell
0rTi


Century 21
Sunny South
Properties


(8 0)5 H6-2' '. 1

(850) 526-2891


INSURANCE AGENCY


Marianna 's


Largest Selection


wit/i the


Lowest Prices

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