Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01099

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text



Tropical storm Andrea bearing
down on Florida coast 7A,
Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online




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Vol. 90 No. 124


City Tunrner embraces natural gas

] $300K fueling station coming to Marianna


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Douglas Glass, supervisor of the city of Marianna's Gas Division, shows how
one of the trucks that runs on compressed natural gas refuels. The city has
three vehicles running on compressed natural gas. Two of them, a grapple
truck and a pickup truck, use only natural gas; the third truck uses diesel
and natural gas.


BYANGIECOOK
acook@jcfloridan.com
The city of Marianna is open-
ing the door to possible expan-
sion of its fleet of natural gas-
powered vehicles (NGVs).
On Tuesday, commissioners
approved a nearly $300,000 deal
with Phoenix Energy to con-
struct a new fast-fueling natural
gas station at the city's Public
Works site on South Street. City
officials say that price tag is low
for what they're getting, kept
down because they'll be able
to use existing equipment such
as the fuel purchase tracking
system with the new station.


That's a plus, but that tracking
system coupled with the station's
location makes for a slight draw-
back access. City Manager Jim
Dean is calling it a "limited-ac-
cess" station, but indicated that
any NGV-owner interested in
purchasing fuel from the station
would be able to do so as long as
prior arrangements were made
with the city to do so.
Currently, the city has several
NGVs all fueling from one "slow-
fueling" device. That bottleneck
puts a damper on the prospect of
fleet expansion. With the Phoe-
nix deal, the city will not only
have the capacity for its own
additional NGVs, it will be able


to meet the natural gas fueling
needs of other parties as well.
A staff feasibility report pre-
sented to commissioners in-
cluded Waste Pro, Anderson Co-
lumbia and the Jackson County
School Board among the station's
potential clients.
Phoenix Energy of Birming-
ham, Ala., is the same firm that
converted current city vehicles to
natural gas use and installed the
existing, slow-fueling station.
Dean's recommendation to
"sole-source purchase" the sta-
tion from Phoenix deviates from
purchasing policy, but Dean
See FUEL, Page 7A


COVENANT HOSPICE

TO HOLD GARDEN GALA


during a sneak
preview Thurs-
day, Shelley
Hoffman checks out
,art that will be up for
auction at the 8th an-
nual Covenant Hos-
pice Garden Gala. This
year's gala will be on
June 22 and will have
more than 40 items
decorated by local art-
ists. These range from
windows and doors
to chairs and picnic
tables.


Dress code FAQ

School board answers questions about new dress code


From staff reports
On Thursday, the Jackson County School Board
issued a press release addressing several questions that
have been asked by parents, students and the community
aboutthe newly approved dress code that takes .effect in
the fall.
Frequently Asked Questions
Q: Can students wear cargo-style shorts?
A: Yes. They must extend to the knee.
Q: Can students wear plain, blue denim jean skirts, capris
or shorts?
A Yes. They must extend to the knee.
Q: Is there a "new" policy for shoes?
A: No. The regular school policy will be followed (check
school's handbook).
Q. What type belts can be worn?
A: Plain black or brown belts can be worn.
Q: Are commercial logos/emblems allowed on shirts?
A: Yes. Only small (no larger than size of debit/credit card)
manufactured emblems will be allowed.
Q: Can shirts have student's initials embroidered?
A: No.
Q: Are school name/logo shifts allowed?


A: Yes. They must be appropriate school color and style,
and the name/logo must be no larger than size of debit/
credit card.
Q: Are other colored jeans (other than blue denim) like
pink, red and green allowed?
A: No.
Q: Are elementary school students required to follow this
dress code?
A: No, only grades 6-12; however, other students may fol-
low the dress code if they wish.
Q: Can long-sleeve, button-down, collared shirts be worn?
A: This option was not board-approved.
Q: Other than the standard color shirts (white), what are
the other two colors allowed at each school?
A: Marianna High: Purple and black; Malone School:
Navy blue and orange; Sneads High: Navy blue and gold/
yellow; Graceville High: Black and orange; Cottondale High:
Royal blue and orange; Grand Ridge: Royal blueand black;
Marianna Middle: Purple and black.
Additional information about this fall's new student
dress code for grades 6-12 is available by calling JCSB
Director of Student Services Shirl Williams or Jennifer See,
the new director of director of middle/secondary educa-
tion, at the school board office, 482-1200.


Chipola


Instructors


contracted


by Advance


Auto Parts


i MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola College's John Gardner (right) and Chase
Vlieg will be writing and starring in a series of
videos that will be used to train Advance Auto Parts
employees around the country.

Gardner, Vlieg to
create training videos
From staff reports
At Chipola College Thursday, school officials
shared some news about two of their own.
Automotive instructors John Gardner and
Chase Vlieg have been contracted by a major
aftermarket parts and accessories retailer to
develop an employee training system.
Advance Auto Parts, headquartered in Roa-
noke, Va., has asked Gardner and Vlieg to
write and host 25 videos that the company
will use nationally as its team member train-
ing series.
The instructors' work on the Advance Auto
training system will help prepare store em-
ployees to better serve customers. Accord-
ing to the retailer's website, Advance Auto
employs over 55,000 team members at some
3,900 stores operating in 39 states, Puerto
Rico and the Virgin Islands.
Gi tiln-i sa.i-, "We look forward to creating a
successful training series, empowering parts
specialists with the knowledge they need to
be successful in the automotive parts indus-
try. Our students will be able to use this train-
ing system and our program will benefit from
the acquisition of tools, equipment and parts
that Advance is providing. Our program, col-
lege and community will all benefit from this
cooperate partnership."
He and Vlieg recently travelled to Roanoke
to discuss the project, which has a scheduled
See AUTO, Page 7A


CLASSIFIEDS...6-7B

This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint



II7 6516 1 8005 9


) ENTERT'Irjm.1.I JT...5B


)) LOCAL...3A


I -, 7


)) OBITUARIES...7A


)) STATE...7A


)SPORTS...1B


) BUSINESS...6A


JUNE SHOWCASE OF REAL ESTATE


'I.
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


_-,.,, High 900
Low 70

Saturday
Scattered Storms.



,. / High-890
SLow -71'


Monday
Scattered Storms.


-" -,, High 90
'Q Low -710

Sunday
Scattered Storms.

\ .
-- High-900
Low 72'


Tuesday
Isolated Storms.


PRECIPITATION


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.12'
1.13"
1.20"


Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


YCL' 10 dIc
Nurinal ) TD
Normal for y


7:30 PM Hig
11:06 PM Hig
7:35 PM Hig
8:46 PM Hig
9:20 PM Hig


Reading
42.56 ft.
4.14 ft.
6.19 ft.
3.29 ft.


'* p iim -'; ''(f~s)L-^Aft
High: 89
Low: 68 -' High: 89
Low: 69
: *'' "'-in ; -, ",* '\ W

,, High. 89 i- .
.'> C Lo,: 69 '- -- ,- .,
.. .. '.. '^-
,:- Low' : 70 : .' -
-^,- ,Hlsh;85 *
L'.,*: L ,73 .
:,' "-.' .i:
22 "4

rear 59.26"
ULTRAVIOLET INDEX
h 8:36 AM
h 2:25 PM 0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme


:h
gh
gh


- 9:09AM
- 9:42 AM
- 10:15 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0 1 2 345

THE SUN AND MOON y r- u
Sunrise 5:38 AM LJ L
Sunset 7:42 PM -
Moonrise 4:55 AM June June June June
Moonset 6:59 PM 8 16 23 30


FLORIDA'S EAL

PANHANDLE Jm

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9PM

ISsTENOOEA S


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager- Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months:
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
Marianna Blood Center Mobile Center will be
at Graceville Correctional Facility 7 a.m. to 2
p.m. The need for blood is unending. The process
takes 30-45 minutes. One donation can save up to
three lives. Call 526-4403.
) Knitters Nook -10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced rttter': jre welcomed. Call 482-9631.
Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant
6:30 p.m. at the Washington County Agricultural
Center. Categories will include: Sugar Baby Miss,
Baby Miss, Toddler Miss, Tiny Miss, Future Little
Miss and Little Miss. Admission is $5 per person,
children 3 years and under admitted free. Call 263-
4744.
)) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianrna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, -,'iit: -wd
hang-ups.' Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573'1131.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, JUNE 8
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conversation
Commission's freshwater license-free fishing
day. Cast a line into the water and get hooked on
freshwater fishing. All limits and size -,' -: inin ::ip-
ply. Check out MyFWC.com/Fishing for fishing trips,
locations and rules.
)) Troop 3 Boy Scouts Yard Sale Fundraiser 7
a.m. on the basketball courts at Wynn Street Park
in Marianna. A variety of household items, clothes,
televisions, sports equipment, collectibles and
much more will be for sale. All proceeds %,il be used
to help Scouts attend summer camp and with on-
going Scouting expenses. Call 209-3798.
)) Jackson County Growers Association/Mari-
anna City Farmers Market 7 a.m. to noon at
Madison St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh fruits
and vegetables grown by local farmers.
) Reunion Meeting for former members of the
United Voices for Christ Mass Choir of Jackson
County 10 a.m. at the Jackson County Public
Library. Call 594-3778.
) Photography Class 9:45 a.m. at the Lutheran
Church, 3975 Highway 90 in Marianna. Event is
hosted by The Artist Guild of Northwest Florida.
Cost for nonmembers if $5 and $3 for members.
Call 569-2011.


)) Alford Community Health Clinic Hours 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1770 Carolina St. in Alford. The free
clinic for income-eligible patients without medical
insurance treats short-term illnesses and chronic
c :n.rii,:,nr, Appointments available (call 263-7106
or 209-5501); walk-ins welcome. Sign in before
noon.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in theAA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
)) Jackson County Training School, Union
Grove and St. Paul Class of 1971 "Sweet 60th
Birthday Celebration" 6 p.m. at the Cottondale
Civic Center in Cottondale. Fee is $100 for 1971
classmates, $75 if a couple who graduated in 1971.
Invite six guests free of charge. Attire will be formal
wear. Deadline to pay fees is May 25. Call 850-228-
9942.
Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant
- 6:30 p' n- at thr Washington County Agricultural
Center. Categories will include: Petite Miss, Miss
Preteen, Young Junior Miss, Junior Miss, Teen Miss
and Miss. Admission is $5 per person, children 3
years and uLinder *.liriii-, ir I-, Call 263-4744.

SUNDAY, JUNE 9
42nd annual Green Reunion Noon at Three
-, State Park, north of Sneads, to include
descendants of Solomon Green and Amy Jarman.
Bring a covered dish and a servring ulteriii, every-
thing else will be provided. Call 482-7071 or email
: rg,_ .jr, 't : ,:,,.-I th nt l
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in
the board room of C inmipbLIitui-Ci 'e -. ilie Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, JUNE 10
Baseball Pitching Camp 9 a.m. to noon at
Chipola College. This camp will meet Monday and
Tuesday, June 10-11, for ages 7-18. The cost is $100.
Call 718-2243.
)) Books That Shaped America Exhibit 9 a.m.
to 6 ,:-. n, jt t ij,.1:i : n County Public Library,
Marianna Branch, 2929 Green St. See the exciting
display of 100 books by American authors that have
shaped and influenced the lives of Americans. Call
482-9631.


)) Jackson County Transportation Disadvan-
taged Coordinating Board Meeting -10 a.m.
CST at the JTrans Office, 3988 Old Cottondale Road,
Marianna. The agenda will include regular business
and approval of the Service Plan. This meeting is
open to the public.
)) Marianna Lions Club Meeting Noon at Jim's
Buffet.& Grill. Call 482-2005.
Employability Workshop, "Overcoming Barri-
ers to Employment" 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna
One Stop Career Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marl-
anna. Call 718-0326.
Jackson County Quilter's Guild Meeting
- 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 US 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings are
fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects,
lessons, help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
)) Chipola Beekeepers Meeting 6-8 p.m. at the
Jackson County Extension Office in Marianna. Bring
a dish for the potluck supper. Call 573-7063.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.
Deadline to register for Chipola College's Kidz
College Session 1, June 17-20. The cost is $75 '
which covers supplies and lunch. Call 718-2405.

TUESDAY, JUNE 11
) Jackson County Growers Association/Mari-
anna City Farmers Market 7 a.m. to noon at
Madison St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh fruits
and vegetables grown by local farmers.
)) Books That Shaped America Exhibit 9 a.m.
to 8 p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library,
Marianna Branch, 2929 Green St. See the exciting
display of 100 books by American authors that have
shaped and influenced the lives of Americans. Call
482-9631.
D Panhandle Public Library Cooperative Direc-
tors and Team KOHA Migration Group Meeting
- 10.a.m. at 2862 Madison St. in Marianna. Call
482-9296.
Republican Club of West Florida Meeting
- Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna. Call
352-4984.
)) Optimist Club of Jackson County Board Meet-
ing Noon at 4476 Broad St. Marianna.
)) Orientation Noon to 3 p.m. at Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna.
Learn about and register for free services. Call
526-0139.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police 'i.


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for June 5, the latest
available report: One accident,
one stolen tag, one highway
obstruction, one verbal dis-
turbance, two burglar alarms,
four civil disputes, two fol-
low-up investigations, two
juvenile complaints, two fraud
complaints, one retail theft,
one assist of another agency,
one public service call and one
threat/harassment complaint.

Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/jrescue
reported the following incidents


for June 5, the latest available
report: Four traffic accidents-
one with entrapment, three
abandoned vehicle reports,
three suspicious vehicles, three
suspicious incidents, three
suspicious persons, one escort,


CRIME
I..


one verbal
disturbance,
three fire calls-
one with police
response, 12
medical calls, 11
burglar alarms,


nine traffic stops, one larceny
complaint, three criminal mis-
chief complaints, one civil dis-
pute, three trespass complaints,
two follow-up investigations,
two reports of a fight in prog-
ress, two animal complaints,
one fraud complaint, two
assists of motorists or pedes-
trians, one assist of another


agency, one public service call,
six criminal registrations, one
welfare check, one transport
and three threat/harassment
complaints.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
)) Alvin Rudd, 29, 1894 Proctor
Lane, Grand Ridge, possession
of methamphetamine, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
)) Leroy Laster, 42, 8098 Euge-
nia St., Sneads, possession of
marijuana-under 20 grams.
)) Darrell Arrington, 42, 325
Rexford Church Road, Florence,
MS, sentenced to 180'days in
the county jail.
)) Dakota Klotz, 19, 1338 Fair-


view Road, Marianna, violation
of conditional release.
)) Dustin Brady, 18, 6171 Pluto
Trail, Marianna, hold for Cal-
houn Co.
)) Jacob Formby, 21,830 Joiner
Road, Chipley, burglary, theft,
possession of a controlled sub-
stance (mushrooms).
)) Leanna Formby, 24,178
Christy Lane, Graceville,
burglary.
)) Johnathan Coulliette, 27,
1882 Tobe Lane, Marianna,
driving while license suspended
or revoked, refusal to sign
citation.

Jail Population: 215

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


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Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan IV
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL. cu^Rogors
Ri2k B 'weI BillyKendall' Teanm Sales/
~sTY O OTma(850) 482-3051. aielmyes 'nem BSanS Cenr
T'eim Sale Tea m Sales= Inventory Mngr


7 2A + FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 2013


WfIK.-UP CALL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.comn


PIZZA PAR'! Y, VEN FOR


HOPE SCHOOL GRADUATES


SUBMITTED PHOTO
he American Legion Auxiliary Unit 100 of Marianna hosted a pizza party
luncheon in honor of the Hope School graduates on Thursday, May 23.
Classmates, staff and Auxiliary members joined in the celebration as the
graduates were recognized and presented with a gift card. Pictured during the celebra-
tion seated (from left) are: Grad Joseph Ragan, Legion member Joe Jenkins and grad
Kayla Lipford. Standing on back row: Grad Victoria DeSandro, Auxiliary members Ruth
Davis, Doris Sullivan, Wilma Rauhe, Vivian Jenkins and Mary Pettis, grad Ken Keys and
Principal Sharon Macaluso.


RIBBON CUTTINGS ARE HELD


Special to the Floridan

wo new
Marianna
businesses
held Grand Open-
ings and Ribbon
Cuttings on May
31, BigRon Coin
Laundry and Health
Resolutions.


Healthy Resolutions "An Herbal Life" juice bar and distributor located at 4418 Lafayette St. in
Marianna celebrated its Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting on May 31.


Higher Prices Paid...
Sell Your Gold at...





Paid on Site
4432 Lafayette Street 526-5488 www,.smithandsmithontlnecom


BigRon Coin Laundry located at 4154 Lafayette St. in Marianna celebrated its Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting
on May 31.



Cox to speak at Altha Community Center


LOCAL


Special to the Floridan


The Marianna Duplicate
Bridge Club announces
winners for the game
played June 3.
)) First Place: Doug-
las Parker and Kurt
Opfermann
)) Second Place: Martha
Brennan and John Selfe
)) Third Place: Nancy


Watts and Judy Duell
)) Fourth Place: Mary Lou
Miller and Sharon Morgan
)) Fifth Place: Bill Lies and
Doris Ottinger
)) Sixth Place: Fran-
ces Subalesky and Zillah
Fossum
)) Seventh Place: Libby
Spence and Libby Hutto
)) Eighth Place: Bobbie
Fenster and Linda Hodges


SMITH ADDRESSES

,OPTIMIST CLUB










SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Marianna Optimist Club recently welcomed Pastor Paul
Smith, center, as their guest speaker. Smith is the Senior
Pastor at the Rivertown Community Church, which had its
birth in Blountstown and now has a substantial presence in
Marianna. Smith told the local gathering of men of how he
grew up in the Mennonite Church but later transitioned to an
interdenominational/community church now with more than
1000 members between the two locations. Smith also talked
about the renovation of their soon-to-be new home, the old
Woolworth building in Rivergate Plaza. He said they expect to
be in their new location by January, 2014. Smith is pictured
with club member George Gay, (left) and club president Lowell
Centers.


Miss Pink Heals Beauty

Pageant set for July 13


Special to the Floridan
Guardians of the
Ribbon/Pink Heals Jack-
son County Florida Chap-
ter will be hosting the
first ever Miss Pink Heals
Beauty Pageant on Sat-
urday, July 13 at Evangel
Worship Center located
at 2645 Pebble Hill Road
in Marianna. The doors
will open at 3:30 p.m. and
the pageant is scheduled
to begin at 4 p.m. Admis-
sion to the pageant is $5
per persQn.
Age divisions are as
follows:
Baby Miss:0-24 months
Tiny Miss: 3-4 years
Little Miss: 5-8 years
) Junior Miss: 9-12 years
))Teen Miss: 13-15 years
)) Miss: 16-18 years
The pageant entry fee is
$30 and the photogenic fee
is $10. The pageant is open
to Florida, Georgia and
Alabama.
The deadline to enter
the pageant is July 8. All
ad, sales must be turned
in by July 1 and the
contestant who sells the
most ads will be awarded
a cash prize. Kim Dun-
ham Photography will
be on hand for profession-
al pictures for a minimal
fee.


All money raised from
this pageant will stay local
to assist the women and
children of our area who
are battling cancer. Pag-'
eant applications can be
downloaded from www.
pinkhealsjacksoncounty-
florida.com.
For. more information
contact pageant direc-
tor Jay James at 209-3068
or Debbie Anderson at
693-0953.


FOR HIM





w


The Bulova Accutron
Calibrator
The world's first automatic
timepiece that.gives you
the power to fine tune its
accuracy.
w~atson
JZWELES
Your Hometown Jeweler
Est. 1971
watsonjewelers.com
Downtown Marianna
850.482.4037


Special to the Floridan
Sons of Confederate Veterans,
Camp 2212 and the Order of Con-
federate Rose, Chapter 23 would like
to extend an invitation to anyone
interested in southern history of
the Calhoun County Area to a "meet
and greet" at the .\Alli.i Community
Center on Saturday, June 15 from 11
a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is free.
The purpose of this event is to bring
knowledge to the community about
the Sons of Confederate Veterans Or-
ganization, the Order of Confederate
Rose and the period of history dur-
ing the War Between the Sates. Bar-
beque plates with slaw, bake beans,
bread and dessert will be available
for a donation of $6 per plate. Camp
and OCR members will be available
to assist with family history research.


SII IMII ID I IID'W101
Southern writer and local historian Dale
Cox will be the guest speaker at the Sons
of Confederate Veterans, Camp 2212 and
the Order of Confederate Rose, Chapter
23 "meet and greet" on June 15.

There will be several raffles taking
place with lots of fun for the entire


family. Various re-enactors dressed
in period attire of the 1860's will be
presenting a variety of demonstra-
tions throughout the day.
The key note speaker for this event,
will be southern writer and local his-
torian Dale Cox. At 2 p.m, Cox will
share information and discuss the
events of the War Between the States
and the affect it had on Calhoun
County. Several books that Cox
has written in reference to the sur-
rounding areas will be available for
purchase and signing.


r BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
\PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 2013 3AF


Bridge Club


names winners







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Mt. Tabor M.B.C. celebrates pastor's anniversary


Special to the Floridan,

The Mt. Tabor Missionary
Baptist Church will celebrate
their pastor's sixth anniversary
on Sunday June 9 with services
at 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. The
church is located at 3695 Popular
Springs Road in Marianna.
During Sunday school at 9:30
a.m., they will have visiting of-
ficers and teachers for the adult
Sunday school classes. At the 11
a.m. morning worship service a
tribute program will take place,
with the music being provided
by the Mt. Tabor Youth Choir.
The guest speaker bringing the
message for this occasion will
be the Reverend Anthony "Tony"
Cranberry of Atlanta, Ga. Dinner
will be served following the 11
a.m. service. Everyone is invited
to attend.
Anthony Cranberry, a native of
Marianna, is the son of Aaron III
and the late Anna Cranberry. He
is the brother of Teresa McMillan
(Andra) and Angela Kurtz (Dan),


who reside in Tallahassee and
Windsor, NC, respectively. He
received his elementary and sec-
ondary education in the Jackson
County School System, graduat-
ing from Marianna High School
in 1978.
In August 1971, he was bap-
tized and began his Christian
discipleship at Mt. Tabor Mis-
sionary Baptist Church. As a
youth, he served in various Mt.
Tabor ministries. He also served
as president of the Second West
Baptist Association Youth Divi-
sion, Florida, and was a member
of The Gospel -Travelers, a local
singing group.
In March 1987, Granberry ac-
cepted his call into the Christian
ministry, and preached his first
sermon at Mt. Tabor. After nine
years as an associate minister at
Ebenezer Baptist Church West
in Athens, Ga., he was ordained
and installed as pastor of Hart-
well First Baptist Church in Hart-
well, Ga., where he served for
nearly seven years. He currently


|ri.











SUBMITTED PHOTO
Marianna native Anthony Granberry will be the guest speaker for the
pastor's sixth anniversary celebration at Mt. Tabor M.B.C. on Sunday, June
9. Cranberry is pictured with his wife.


ministers through the Open
Door Community in Atlanta,
Ga., a church that strives to "cre-
ate the beloved community on
Earth by establishing loving and
caring relationships with some of
the most neglected and ignored
children of God: the homeless,
imprisoned, and those addicted


to drugs and alcohol and strug-
gle with mental illness."
Cranberry has served as Clini-
cal Program Director at St. Jude's
Recovery Center, the largest re-
covery community in metro At-
lanta providing outpatient and
residential drug and alcohol
treatment to approximately 200


men and women with a staff of
approximately 100. He has also
served ds staff counselor at the
Care and Counseling Center of
Georgia in Decatur, Ga., where
he provided behavioral health
services to individuals, couples
and families.
He currently manages his own
practice, The Atlanta Counseling
Group LLC in Atlanta and Deca-
tur, where he continues to pro-
vide behavioral health services
to individuals, couples, families
and groups. Additionally, he pro-
vides consultative services to
churches and social service or-
ganizations challenged by orga-
nizational conflicts.
Cranberry is a graduate ,of
Chipola College, Morehouse
College in Atlanta, the University
of Georgia in Athens and Emory
University in Atlanta. He holds
degrees in psychology, religion
and theology, including a doc-
torate in Pastoral Counseling
from the Candler School of The-
ology at Emory University.


The church needs common hymnals to keep it united


here was a time when
the faithful in the heav-'
ily Dutch corners of the'
Midwest would not have been
able to sing along if the organist
played the gospel classic, "Pre-
cious Lord, Take My Hand."
True, some may have recog-
nized the hymn that Mahalia
Jackson sang at the 1968 funeral
of the Rev. Martin Luther King
Jr., since this was the civil rights
leader's favorite: "Precious Lord,
take my hand, lead me on, let
me stand. I am tired, I am weak,
I am worn. Through the storm,
through the night, lead me on to
the light. Take my hand, pre-
cious Lord, lead me home."
But, by 1987, this beloved
African-American spiritual had
*'been added to the Christian
Reformed Church hymnal. A
generation later, it has achieved
the kind of stature that puts it
in the core of the "In Death and
Dying" pages of the church's
new "Lift Up Your Hearts"
hymnal.


"When you're creating a new
hymnal, you know that you have
to retain all those heart songs
that just can't go away," said the
Rev. Joyce Borger, editor of the
1,104-page volume; produced
q in collaboration
with the Re-
formed Church in
America. "We're
talking about the
hymns that you
Terry cannot imagine
Mattingly living without,
_and 'Precious
Lord, Take My
Hand' certainly falls into that
category now. It has become
one of our songs."
Research indicates that the
average church may have "a
repertoire" of 150-plus hymns
- not counting Christmas car-
ols and seasonal songs that
worship leaders can list in the
Sunday bulletin and know that
most people will sing them with
confidence.
The challenge facing teanms


that create hymnals is that
"core songs" will vary radically
from flock to flock, depending
on where they are located, the
dominant age groups in the
pews and the cultural back-
grounds of the worship lead-
ers. The favorite-hymn list of a
World War II-generation pianist
from rural Michigan will overlap
some, but not much, with that
of a Generation X guitarist in
urban Detroit.
Also, while it's impossible to
ignore classics from the Dutch
Reformed tradition, Borger
said that "Lift Up Your Hearts"
also needed to acknowledge
the growing diversity found
in today's churches, in North
America and worldwide. In
the age of increased contact
between believers around the
world, not to mention YouTube,
it's common for suburban
American teens to return from
church trips to Africa or South
America with notebooks full of
new hymns they now cherish.


Then there is the surging
popularity of pop-rock "praise
choruses," which rise and fall
in popularity from year to year,
if not month to month. Also,
the larger the modern church
sanctuary, the more likely it is to
feature video screens on which
lyrics are constantly streamed
into view. Why would digital
worshippers want to tie up their
hands with analog hymnals?
. The pace of musical change is
one reason hymnals are now be-
ing re-created every generation,
as opposed to remaining intact
for ahalf a century or so as in
the past, said-historian John
Witvliet, another member of the
"Lift Up Your Hearts" team and
who leads the Calvin Institute of
Christian Worship at Calvin Col-
lege in Grand Rapids, Mich.
Recent decades have seen a
number of other factors that
have caused musical earth-
quakes, he said, including a
multimedia revolution in wor-
ship facilities, the global surge


of Pentecostalism, the rise of
"megachurch" congregations
driven by "seeker-friendly"
services that value relevance
over tradition and increased
ecumenical contacts between
Catholic, evangelical and liberal
Protestant churches.
Thus, the 965 numbered
selections in this new hymnal
include 137 selections from its
1957 counterpart and 302 from
a 1987 volume.
"There is no period of time
in church history ever in
which there have been this
many waves of change shaping
Christian worship at the same
time," said Witvliet. 'A gen-
eration ago, we assumed that
the hymnal in the pew was a
church's musical repertoire. No
one assumes that now."
But no matter how rapid the
changes, he added, hymnals are
symbols that the "church needs
a common body of music to
help keep it united. There must
be some ties that bind."


K FT I 'ISM ADE OSSBALEB yT E EB U IE SS S W H N OU A E L F UsTo ATTEND W ORSI PSERVICE


CPA'S
4243 W. Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL.
526-3910

West Florida Electric
A Touchstone Energy" Cooperative *t>
ThI pT- fh- n --c
(800) 342-7400
www. westflorida. coop
Graceville Sneads Bonifay


Yo

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Alford First Assembly of God
1782 Tennessee St P.O. Box 228
Alford, FL 32420
Bascom Assembly of God
5516 Hummingbird Rd
Bascom, FL 32423 272-7775
Shugroad@embargmail.com
Cypress Grove Assembly of God
3250 Cypress Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4451
cppressgrovechurch.org
Cords Of Love Assembly Of God
2060 Bethelehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 272-0254
Eastslde Assembly of God Church
4723 Hatton St Marianna, FL
lop4664@yahoo.com 526-2422
El Bethel Assembly of God
2503 El Bethel Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 593-6044
First Assembly of God
5565 Brown St
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3351
First Assembly of God Church
4186 Lafayette St
Marianna FL 32446
482-2800 www.mariannafirst.org
First Assembly of God Church
of Cottondale
2636 Milton St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4626
Faith Haven Assembly of God
7135 Hwy 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-8205
Pilgrim Rest Assembly of God
3347 Pilgrim Rest Church Road
Marianna, FL 32448 579-2300
Welcome Assembly of God
6784 Messer Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5077
Welcomehometom@yahoo.com
BAPTIST
,Alford Baptist Church
1764 Carolina St P.O. Box 6 "
Alford, FL 32420 579-2192
Bethel Missionary Baptist Church
2137 McLeod St
Cypress, FL 592-4108
Bethel Star Missionary Baptist Church
4134 Lincoln Ave
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4866
Bethlehem Baptist Church
2300 Bethlehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-9940
Circle Hill Baptist Church
7170 Circle Hill Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 592-2327


Ir CHIPOLA PROPANE JAMES & SIKES MARIANNA OFFICE *t$ arACY
SGAS COMPANY Funeral Home, Maddox Chapel SUPPLY COMPANY MedEqulp
ILJU l LP & Natural Gas Appliance 9 9 fi Outfitters st0 Sore
Hwy. 90, Marianna 4OIdCdaleRd. Hwy20W Hwvy90 482-2332 .123 Constitution Lan arianna 4422 LAFAYETTE ST.
526-3456 526-2651 674-4040 593-6070 Serving Jackson County Families DOWNTOWN MARIANNA
www.hopkinscars.com Madanna Blountslown Sneads Since 1931 482 4404 850-482-4035

SW ma sor I E 1001 USES arlaie & Service Center
ASSOCIATEIE A U SESID Wa at.- ^ W odSevc
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4155 P,?faye > Marinna (8501-526.5744 MARIANNA, FL 8505 .26-1 Ud UdLU---- _


ur Guide To Local Houses Of Worship

Collins Chapel Baptist Church Friendship Baptist Church of Malone New Galilee Missionary Baptist Church Trinity Baptist Church
5005 3rd Ave (5499 Collihs Chapel Rd) 5507 Friendship Church Rd 2155 Highway 73 South P.O. Box 234 3023 Penn. Ave
Malone, FL 32445 569-5644 Malone, FL 32445 569-2379 Marianna, FL 32447 482-5499 Marianna, FL 482-3705
Crossroads Baptist Church Grand Ridge Baptist Church New Hoskie Baptist Church www.TrinityMarianna.com
Southern Baptist 2093 Porter Ave P.O. Box 380 4252 Allen St Union Hill
3276 Main St P.O. Box 386 Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4846 Greenwood, FL 32443 594-7243 3115 Union Hill Rd
CrttonaleFl. 3I 2431 I.352-2R nrandridnha r ormhau r nmai ,nm .. ...... Marianna, FL 32446 526-5711


Damacus Freewill Baptist
3700 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5878
Dellwood Baptist Church
5512 Blue Springs Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-6954
Eastslde Baptist Church
4785 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 526-2004
www.eastsidebaptistchurch.com
Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church
3360 Gardenview Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4223
Everlena Missionary Baptist
5309 Ellaville Rd
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3900
First Baptist Church
3172 Main St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4586
First Baptist Church
5366 Ninth St P.O. Box 98
Malone, FL 32445 569-2426
Faith Baptist Church
2494 Hwy 71 South
Marianna, FL 482-2869
First Baptist Church
8010 Pope St- P.O. Box 246
Sneads, FL 32460
First Baptist Church of Bascom
4951 Basswood Rd P.O. Box'97
Bascom, FL 32423 569-2699
First Baptist Church of Campbellton
2405 Hwy 2
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3183
First Baptist Church Southern Baptist
987 8th Ave P.O. Box 565
Graceville FL 32440 263-3323
fbcgraceville@bellsouth.net
www.fbcgraceville.org
First Baptist Marianna
2897 Green St Marianna, FL 32446
526-4200 www.fbcmarianna.org
First Freewill Baptist Church of Malone
5440 10th Street (Hwy 71 N.)
P.O. Box 385
Malone FL 32445 850-569-2786
First Freewill Baptist Church
7970 Davis St
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5400


Greater Buckhorn Missionary
Baptist Church
4691 Hwy 162
Marianna, FL 32446 594-5761
Greenwood Baptist Church
4156 Bryan St P.O. Box 249
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3883
Hasty Pond Baptist Church
4895 Hasty Pond Rd, Marianna, FL
Heaven's Way Biker Church
A Ministry of Alford Baptist Church
3924 Woodrest Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 334-806-4258
Holly Grove Free Will Baptist Church
2699 Highway 73S
Marianna, FL 32448 482-3489
Inwood Baptist Church
2012 Inwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 593-5328
Liberty Hill Missionary Baptist Church
5239 Liberty Hill Road
Bascom, FL 32426 569-5949
Little Zion Missionary Baptist Church
3181 Little Zion Rd P.O. Box 190
Sneads, FL 32460 8 592-1614
Lovedale Baptist Church
6595 Lovedale Rd Bascom, FL 32423
592-5415 or 592-2134
Marvin Chapel Free Will Baptist Church
2041 Hope School Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5375
www.marvinchapelfwb.com
Midway Freewill Baptist Church
1600 Church St
6158 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 592-8999
Mount Olive Baptist
60,15 Hwy 2
Bascom FL 32423 569-5080
Mt. Tabor Missionary Baptist Church
3695 Popular Spriings Rd
Marianna, FL 324146 594-4161
Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church
5382 Old US Road
Malone, FL 32445 569-2049
New Easter Missionary Baptist Church
977 Hope Ave
Graceville, FL 32440 658-8344


New Hope F-reewil laptist
Sweet Pond Rd
Dellwood, FL 592-1234
New Hope Missionary Baptist
3996 Wintergreen Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-8802
New Mount Olive Missionary Baptist
2870 Barnes St P.O. Box 312
Marianna, FL 32447 482-7595
New Salem Baptist Church
3478 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 579-4343
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
6687 Brushy Pond Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5696
Pine Ridge Baptist Church
3064 Pine Ridge Church Rd
Alford, FL 32420
Piney Grove Baptist Church
2136 Piney Grovo Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3800
Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church
5481 Pleasant Ridge Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 263-8007
Poplar Springs Missionary Baptist Church
2662 Poplar Springs Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-3176
Providence Baptist Church
6940 Providence Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5481
pbch@ernbarqmail.com
Rocky Creek Baptist Church
5458 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-7508
Salem Free Will Baptist
2555 Kynesville Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4194
www.salremfreewillbaptist.com
Shady Grove Baptist Church
7304 Bichwood Rd
Giand Ridge FL 32442 592-6952
St. Luke Missionary Baptist Church
2871 Orange Street
Marianna, FL 32148 4* '82-2591
St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church
1935 Jacob Road
Cottondale, FL 32,131 263-41097
St. Peter Missionary Baptist
7889 McKeown Mill Rd
PO. Box 326 593-3363


Victory Baptist Church
2271 River Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6699
www.victorybaptistfl.com
White Pond Baptist Church
P.O. Box 458 Mill Pond Rd
Alford, FL 32420 352-4715

CATHOLIC
St. Anne Catholic Church
3009 5th St P.O. Box 1547
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3734
www.stanne@stannemiar.ptdiocese.org
www.stannemarianna.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Caverns Rd. Church of Christ
4448 River Rd
Marianna, FL 482-2605

CHURCH OF GOD
Grand Ridge Church of God
2232 Porter Ave Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5301 oi 592-2814
Marlanna Church of God
(All services interpreted for the
hearing impaired.)
2791 Jetfferson St, Marianna, FL 32446
482-6264 mariannacog.com

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST
Glorious Gospel
Church of God in Christ
4255 Clay St Marianna, FL 32448
594-1096 or 557-4019
Miracle Restoration Center
2997 Hall Street
Mai anna, FL 32448 526-2335
Refuge Tabernacle
Church of God In Christ
2820 Chipola Street
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2607
The New Zion Temple
Church of God In Christ
1022 Washington Ave
Gracevillo, FL 32440
Victory Tabernacle
Church of God In Christ
6752 Highway 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 209-7711


L


F-i


-4A FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 2013


RELIGION







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


RELIGION


FRIDAY, JUNE 7,2013 5AF


TODAY
D Youth Activity Night 6 p.m. at
Marianna Church of God. Ages: 12-19.
Call 482-6264.
)) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen
meetings to "overcome hurts, habits
and hangLups in a safe environment,"
7 p.m. at Evangel Worship Center with
praise and live worship music, testi-
monies and fellowship. Dinner: 6 p.m.
Child care available. Call 209-7856,
573-1131.
)) Pulse 7-10 p.m. at Cypress Grove
Assembly of God Church in Grand
Ridge. Youth outreach program open
to all teens in grades 6-12; shoot pool,
play Xbox and other games, listen to
music, more. Activities are free; low-
cost snacks for sale. Transportation
available (limited area); call 381-2549.

SATURDAY, JUNE 8
Free clothing giveaway 9 a.m.
to noon at Mother Agnes' Closet, 2856
Orange St. in Marianna.
)) District Youth Revival 6 p.m. at
Pope Chapel A.M.E. Church. The dis-
trict consists of youth from Tallahas-
see to Pensacola. The guest speaker
will be Minister Steven Andrews of
Bonifa,. Everyone is invited to attend.
Call (850) 878-8501 or 482-2900.

SUNDAY, JUNE 9
Pastor's Sixth Anniversary Cel-
ebration Mt. Tabor M.B.C. Sunday


School at 9:30 a.m. followed by morn-
ing worship at 11 a.m. Guest speaker
will be Marianna native, Anthony
Granberry of Atlanta, Ga. Music will be
provided by the Mt. Tabor Youth Choir.
Lunch will be served following the 11
a.m. service. Everyone is welcome to
attend.
)) Homecoming Service -10 a.m.
at Welcome Assembly of God. The
Reverend Clinton Hobbs will be the
Homecoming speaker. Everyone is
invited to attend.
3rd Annual Appreciation Day for
the Rev. Waymond Pollock 2:30
p.m. at New Hoskie Baptist Church.
Guest speaker will be the Reverend
Eddie Bowers along with his members
of Little Zion Baptist Church. Everyone
is welcome. Call 594-5053.
)) Men & Women Day 4 p.m. at
Salem A.M.E. Church. Bishop Flavious
Pittman and Pastor Jacqueline Pitt-
man of Ever Increasing Word of Faith
in Marianna will bring the message.
Everyone is invited to attend.
)) Concert Pianist Bryan Popin in
Concert,- 6 p.m. at Marianna First
Baptist Church. Popin has performed
with many well known artists including
Danny Gokey, off of American Idol. Free
concert, a love offering will be taken.

MONDAY, JUNE 10
Vacation Bible School 5-8 p.m.
at Mt: Tabor M.B.C. VBS will run June


Religion Calendar

10-14. It is requested that participants
pre-register in order that T-shirts can
be ordered. Transportation will be
provided if needed. To register call 557-
3452 or 557-3802.

TUESDAY, JUNE 11
Vacation Bible School "God's
Backyard Under the Stars" 5:30-
8:30 p.m. at New Beginning Outreach
Ministries Inc. VBS will run June 11-14.
, Nightly music, arts and crafts, games
and more are planned for youth and
adults. Everyone is welcome to attend.
Call 352-4733.
)) Dare to Live Healed Healing
School Class 7 p.m. in the Bascom
Town Hall at 4969 Basswood Road.,
Free classes taught by Jacquelyn
McGriff.Call 276-6024.

THURSDAY, JUNE 13
Free clothing giveaway 9 a.m.
to noon at Mother Agnes' Closet, 2856
Orange St. in Marianna.

FRIDAY, JUNE 14
D Youth Activity Night 6 p.m. at
Marianna Church of God. Ages: 12-19.
Call 482-6264.
)) An 'Evening of Southern Gospel
Music' 6:30 p.m. at Welcome
Assembly of God Church. Featured
groups will be The Freedom Hill Quar-
tet from Marianna and The Diplomats
from Carrollton, Ga. Everyone is invited


to attend. Call 209-4811.
Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen
meetings to "overcome hurts, habits
and hangups in a safe environment,"
7 p.m. at Evangel Worship Center with
praise and live worship music, testi-
monies and fellowship. Dinner: 6 p.m.
Child care available. Call 209-7856,
5734-1131.
)) Pulse 7-10 p.m. at Cypress Grove
Assembly of God Church in Grand
Ridge. Youth outreach program open
to all teens in grades 6-12; shoot pool,
play Xbox and other games, listen to
music, more. Activities are free; low-
cost snacks for sale. Transportation
available (limited area); call 381-2549.

SATURDAY, JUNE 15
Free clothing giveaway 9 a.m.
to noon at Mother Agnes' Closet, 2856
Orange St. in Marianna.
)) Big Gospel Sing 6 p.m. at Hen-
shaw Chapel A.M.E. Church. Event is
hosted by The Men of Armor of Cotton-
dale, a mentoring group that teaches
young men the essential aspects while
venturing into manhood. All choirs,
groups, soloists and praise dance
teams are welcome. Call 557-1132 or
850-628-2520.

SUNDAY, JUNE16
Annual Men Day Celebration
- Greater St. Luke A.M.E. Church in
Malone. Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.


followed by morning worship at 11 a.m.
Guest speaker will be the Reverend
Calos Jones and music by the Home
Gospel Singers. Everyone is welcome
to attend.
)) Father's Day Program 11 a.m.
at Greenwood Chapel A.M.E. Church.
Guest speaker will be the Rev. Walker.
Lunch will be served immediately
following the service. Everyone is
invited to attend. Call 352-4577 or
569-2045.

MONDAY, JUNE 17
))"Text Jesus" Vacation Bible
School 5:30-7 p.m. at Friendship
M.B.C. VBS will run June 17-21. Every-
one is invited to attend. Call 526-0160.

TUESDAY, JUNE 18
Dare to Live Healed Healing
School Class 7 p.m. in the Bascom
Town Hall at 4969 Basswood Road.
Free classes taught by Jacquelyn
McGriff. Call 276-6024.

THURSDAY, JUNE 20
Free clothing giveaway 9 a.m.
to noon at Mother Agnes' Closet, 2856
Orange St. in Marianna.
Special event announcements for Jackson
County churches are published, free of
charge, each Friday in the Floridan's "Reli-
gion Calendar." Submission deadline: Noon,
Tuesday. Email items to editorial@jcflori-
dan.com, subject line: Religion Calendar.


Colossal Coaster World is
headed to Rocky Creek Baptist
Grab your tickets and head on over
to Colossal Coaster World. Join Rocky
Creek Baptist Church as they experi-
ence the thrill and excitement of a
day at the amusement park.
As they explore the park, kids will
enter Worship Rally at the Main
Gate and make a stop at the Coaster
Alley for Bible study. Then on to
the Cotton Candy Cafe for snacks,
the Adrenaline Zone for recreation,
Tune Town formusic and the Scis-
sors and Stuff Emporium for crafts.
This all takes place Monday, June 24
through Friday, June 28 from 5-7:30
p.m. A nursery will be provided for
the small tots. Teens can experience
"Thrill Seekers". Adults will have the
opportunity to participate in their
own Bible Study. This week of fun,
food and exciting learning opportu-
nities is free of change and open to
everyone, so bring the entire family.
For more information call 762-3333
or 850-643-7711.


New Beginning Outreach
Ministries plans VBS
New Beginning Outreach Minis-
tries, Inc. located at 2254 Magnolia
Drive in Jacob City will be holding
their 5th Annual Vacation Bible
School, "God's Backyard Under the
Stars."
This year's VBS will be held Tues-
day, June 11 through Friday, June
14 from 5:30-8:30 p.m. each night.
Nightly music, arts and crafts, games
and more are planned for both youth
and adults. On Thursday night a
Family Night VBS is planned with
skits from each class along with a
spaghetti dinner. On Friday night to
finalizeVBS, a cook-out will be held
at the Cottondale Recreational Park
from 6:30-8 p.m.
Dr. Marvin and Irene Henderson,
Senior Pastors along with Elder
Kenneth C. Baker, Assistant Pastor
invites everyone to attend. For more
information call 352-4733.

Special to the Floridan


Welcome Assembly of




God hosts an 'Evening of




Southern Gospel Music'


Special to the Floridan

An "Evening of Southern Gospel Music"
will be hosted by Welcome Assembly of God
Church on Friday, June 14, beginning at 6:30
p.m. Welcome Assembly of God is located at
6794 Messer Road, Grand Ridge. The groups
that will be featured are The Freedom Hill
Quartet from Marianna and The Diplomats
from Carrollton, Ga.
Freedom Hill Quartet was formed in 2012
by three of the former members of the now
retired Bibletones Quartet. Shane Mercer,
tenor; Doug Bryan, lead and Ryan Ziglar,
bass, were also joined by Slade Alday, bari-
tone of Donalsonville, Ga. Each of the Quar-
tet members brings a number of years of


experience with them of singing the beloved
* Quartet-style music. Their singular mission
is to share the gospel of Jesus Christ through
excellence in music and testimony. They
have just released their latest CD, "Come Just
As You Are."
The Diplomats, established in 1968, have
been voted for five years in a row for the Top
10 Mixed Group in The Singing News Fan
Awards. Their latest single release, "If Not
For The Blood of The Cross," is rising on the
Singing News Charts.
Dr. Thomas Batts, Pastor, extends a spe-
cial invitation to everyone to come and en-
joy this special "Evening of Southern Gospel
Music." For more information on the event,
call 209-4811.


I I *8I


Vann Funeral Home
4265 Saint Andrews Street
Marianna, FL 32446
Phone: (850) 482-3300
Fax: (850) 482-5363
Concern for the living,
reverence for the dead.


K iSOn\DISCOUNT
E.,tUD \L DRUGS
"w,,t e w 0< P""k
Alt 74c VVn"
3008 Jefferson Street
Marianna, Florida
526-2839


YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Marianna Church of the Nazarene
2987 N Madison St
Marianne, FL 32446 526-3962

EPISCOPAL
St. Luke's Episcopal Church
4362 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 482-2431
parishofflcea tliukosmarianna.org
www.slltukaorimarlanna.org

FULL GOSPEL
Christian Center Church
4791 Shefileld Dr P.O. Box 450
Marlanna, FL 32447
526-4476 or 526-4475
jackwcccmarianna.org
Country Gospel Community Church
Compass Lake In the Hills
650 Apalachlcola Ave
Alftord, FL 32420 (850) 579-4172
Resurrection Life Christian
Fellowship International
2933 Madison Street
Mariannea, FL 526-2617
New Beginnings Worship Center
1165 Highway 69
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5791 www.nbworhlip.com
New Beginning Outreach Ministries, Inc.
2254 Magnolia Dr.
Cottondale, FL 32431 (850) 352-4733
Evangel Worship Center
2645 Pebble Hill Rd
Marianne, FL 32448 526-2232
New Life Family Church
4208 Lafayette Si
Marianna, FL 32,146 526-2132
The Bridge'Church
2515 Commercial Perk Dr
Marianne, FL 32448 209-2733

HOLINESS
Emmanuel Holiness Church
2505 Sandrldge Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5167
Hickory Level Community Church
1221 Dipper Rd
Marianna, FL 32440
482-4696 or 4182-2885
Oak Ridge Freewill Holiness Church
2958 Milton Ave
Mariannea, FL 573-7684
Sneads Community Church
1948 Desoto Ave PRO, Box 1340
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5650

LATTER-DAY SAINTS
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints
3141 College St
Marianna, Fl 32446 482-0159


LUTHERAN
Ascension Lutheran Church
3975 W. Hwy 90
Marianne, FL 482-4691

METHODIST
Bascom United Methodist Church
4942 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 67
Bascorn, FL 32423 594-5755
Cypress United Methodist Church
6267 Comelery Ave
Cypress, FL 32432 263-4220
First United Methodist Church
1111 8"' Ave
Greceville, FL 263-3342
First United Methodist Church
2901 Caledonia St
Marianne, FL 482-4502
Grace United Methodist
4203 W, Keloon Ave
Marlanna, FL 482-4753
Grand Ridge United Methodist Church
6911 Iowa Street
Grand Ridge, FL 32,142
Greenwood Chapel AME
5426 Fort Rd
Greenwood, FL 3244'3 594-1112
Greenwood United Methodist
41220 Bryan St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-5755
Henshaw Chapel AME Church
2370 Glastol St, P.O. Box 535
Cottondale, FL 32431 875-2610
Jerusalem AME Church
2055 Hwy 73
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5085
Kyneasville United Methodist
2875 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4672
McChapel AME Church
4963 Old U.S. Rd
Marianne, FL 569-2184
Mt. Shiloh AME Church
6702 Blscayne Road
Bascom, FL 32423 569-1044
New Bethel Christian Methodist
Episcopal Church
2487 Highway 1
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-4647
Pope Chapel African Methodist
Episcopal Church
14898 Blue Springs Rd, P.O. Box 6000
Marlannn, FL 32447 482-2900
Shady Grove United
Methodist Church
7305 Blichwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 324412 592-9277
Sneads First United Methodist Church
8042 Church St, P.O. Box 642
Snoads, FL 32460 593-6481
luomciembarqmall.comrn


Friendship Christian Methodist
Episcopal (CME) Church
5411 Avery Rd, P.O.Box 302
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-1111
1st United Methodist Church
of Cottondale
P.O. Box 458
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4426
Salem AME Church
5729 Browntown Rd, P.O. Box 354
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3344
Springfield AME Church
4194 Union Rd ,
Marianne, FL 32446 352-4252
St. James AME Church
2891 Orange St, P.O Box 806
Marianne, FL 32447 526-34,40
St. Paul AME Church
5180 Hwy 273, P.O. Box 40
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-0333
Snow Hill AME Church
5395 Snow Hill Rd, PR.O, Box 174
Malone, FL 32445 569-5315
Mt. Olive AME Church
2135 Falrview Rd
Marianne, FL 32448 482-7917
Bethlehem AME Church
3100 Lovewood Rd, P.O, Box 752
Cottondale, FL 32431
352-2111 or 352-4721
Greater St. Luke AME Church
5255 11th Ave, P.O. Box 176
Malone, FL 32445 569-5188


NON-DENOMINATIONAL
2nd Chance Ministries
2840 McPherson St
Marianne, FL 32446 557-9885
Believers Outreach Ministry
3471 Hwy 90 W
Marianne, FL 32446 352-4926
Cypress Creek Community Church
1772 Macedonia Road, PO Box ,196
Alford, FL 32420 638-0360
Ever Increasing Word of Faith
Ministries
3749 Skyvlew Rd
Marianna, FL 324416 526-4704
Heaven's Garden Worship Center
3115 Main Street
Cottondale, FL 32,131
(850) 579-9936 www.aldaspinaorg
Faith Cornerstone Church Ministries
5460 Collins Chapel Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-5600
Foundation Temple Apostolic
Faith Church
3341 Tendell Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-388,1


Glass Community Church
4005 Veteran's Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 272-7205 (850) 263-6715
Haven of Rest Church of Restoration
Worship Center
2261 Haven of Rest Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
Love and Restoration Ministries
2990 Heritage Rd
Marianne, FL 32448 526-2730
Mill Springs Christian Chapel
1345 Mill Springs Rd, P.O. Box 83
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 526.2519
Rivertown Community Church
(Moats at the new Marianne High School)
3546 Caverns Rd
Marianna, FL 32,146 482-2477
Rocky Crooeek Tabernacle
1890 Delta Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 272-0917
St Andrews (FC) Church Ministries
978 Hwy 71 S
Marianne, FL 32448 569-5600
Sunrise Worship Center
2957 Hall St, Marianna, FL 482-8158
PENTECOSTAL
Apostolic Life Church
4070 Old Cottondale Rd
Marianna, FL 482-8720
pastorblggsii oirbarqiiiallcom
Apostolic Revival Center
of Marianne
3001 Hwy 71 N, P.O. Box 634
Marianne, FL 32446 482-3162
Christian Covenant Life Center
2011 Finley Ave.
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 592-4737
Shady Grove Pentecostal Holiness
7541 Shady Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-6203


Sneads Pentecostal Holiness Church
2036 Gloster Ave
Sneads, FL 32460
593-4487 or 593-6949
Praise Life Ministries
7360 Hwy 90, PO. Box 177
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4166
Prayer Temple Church Of Prayer
For All People
3341 Plantation Circle
Marianne, FL 32446 482-3343
United Pentecostal Deliverance
5255 10th Ave
Malone, FL 32445 569-5989
PRESBYTERIAN
First Presbyterian Church
Presbyterian Church (USA)
2898 Jefferson St
Marianna, FL 32446
526-2430 www.firstpresnmarianna.org
fpcmarianna@eimibarqmail.com or
firstpresmarianna @earthlink.net
RESTORATIONIST
Church of Jesus Christ of Marianna
4060 Thomasville Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2282
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
Emmanuel SDA Church
4531 Basswood Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3200
Marianna Seventh Day Adventist
4878 Highway 90
Marianne, FL 32446 526-2487
WESLEYAN
Salem Wesleyan Church
2764 Salem Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 (850) 593-6679
irquomai@gmniail.corn


Religion Briefs







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


From Consumer Reports



Store brands top latest sunscreen ratings


By the editors of Consumer Reports

n Consumer Reports' latest
Ratings of sunscreens, Up
& Up (Target) Continuous
Spray Sport SPF 50 and Equate
(Wal-Mart) Ultra Protection Lo-
tion SPF 50 earned the highest
scores in tests and were among
the least expensive. Some of the
priciest sunscreens that were
tested offered less than their
labeled SPF value, a measure of
protection from burning UVB
rays.
The Food and Drug Adminis-
tration has new rules governing
sunscreens. According to the
agency, one of the most impor-
tant requirements is the testing
and labeling that identifies sun-
screens that are "broad spec-
trum." Broad spectrum means
that the sunscreen should offer
protection against UVB and
UVA rays.
Consumer Reports evaluated
12 sunscreens for their effec-
tiveness at protecting against
UVA and UVB rays, both of
which can cause skin cancer.
Six sunscreens, including the
top-scoring products from
'" Target and Wal-Mart, Copper-
tone Water Babies SPF 50 lotion
and Walgreens Sport Continu-


ous Spray SPF 50 (another store
brand) rated Very Good overall.
They guarded against UVB rays
before and after 80 minutes un-
der water and were Very Good
against UVA rays, all at a cost of
$1.67 or less per ounce.
Tests also showed that pay-
ing more may not buy more
protection, the least effective
sunscreens were among the
priciest.
While there are potential
safety concerns associated with
several sunscreen ingredients
based on animal study findings,
Consumer Reports contin-
ues to recommend the use of
sunscreen as part of a broad
approach to sun protection.
Sun protection
Consumer Reports suggests
using one of its recommended
sunscreens or choosing a prod-
uct that claims broad-spectrum
protection, has a claimed SPF of
at least 40 and is water resistant.
To stay safe, limit time in the
sun, reapply sunscreen every
two hours while outdoors and, if
possible, wear protective cloth-
ing, a hat and sunglasses. And
keep in mind the following tips
when using any sunscreen:
)) Proper application. Apply


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The benefits of sunscreens outweigh potential risks from their ingredients,
says Consumer Reports.
sunscreen 15 to 30 minutes be- Once frozen, sunscreens may
fore sun exposure. Use at least lose effectiveness. The FDA
2 to 3 tablespoons of lotion to requires manufacturers provide
cover exposed skin. For sprays, an expiration date or show that
use as much as can be rubbed a product will remain stable, but
in, then repeat. Reapply every not necessarily maintain its SPF,
two hours or after swimming or for at least three years. Consum-
excessive sweating. Sprays are ers who buy sunscreen without
flammable, so allow them to an expiration date should write
dry before going near an open the date of purchase on the
flame, bottle and toss it after two years.
)) Proper storage. Don't store iswn?
sunscreen in a hot car it may How safe is Su creen?
degrade faster. Skiers take note: Skin cancer is the most com-


mon cancer in the U.S., and
the benefits of sunscreens
outweigh potential risks from
their ingredients. That said,
animal studies have raised some
concerns. Nanoparticles of
titanium dioxide and zinc oxide
have been linked to reproduc-
tive and developmental issues
in animals.
Retinoids, part of the vita-
min A family and an inactive
ingredient in some sunscreens,
have caused an increase in skin
cancers in mice. There's also a
risk of birth defects in people
taking oral acne medications
containing retinoids, though
they differ from the retinoids
in sunscreens. As a precaution,
pregnant women may want to'
choose a sunscreen without
the ingredient retinol or retinyl
palmitate.
Animal studies have indicated
that oxybenzone, which is in
many sunscreens, may interfere
with hormones in the body.
The jury is still out on any harm
that might occur from inhaling
spray sunscreens. Until the FDA
releases results of an ongoing
study, avoid using sprays on
kids, and spray sunscreen onto
your hands before applying it to
your face.


USDA announces CCC lending interest rates for June


Special to the Floridan

The U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Commodity
Credit Corporation has an-
nounced interest rates for
June.
The CCC borrowing rate-
based charge for June is
0.125 percent, unchanged
from 0.125 in May. For
1996 and subsequent crop
year commodity and mar-
keting assistance loans,


the interest rate for loans
disbursed during June is
1.125 percent, unchanged
from 1.125 in May.
Interest rates for Farm
Storage Facility Loans ap-
proved for June are as fol-
lows, 1.250 percent with
seven-year loan terms,
unchanged from 1.250 in
May; 1.750 percent with
10-year loan terms, down
from 1.875 in May and
2.000 percent with 12-year


loan terms, down from
2.125 percent in May. The
interest rate for Sugar Stor-
age Facility Loans for June
is 2.250 percent, down
from 2.375 in May.
The maximum discount
rate applicable, for June
for the Tobacco Transi-
tion Payment Program
is 5 percent, unchanged
from May. This is based
on the 3.250 percent
prime rate plus 2 percent,


rounded to the nearest
whole number.
Past monthly releas-
es announcing interest
rates charged by CCC on
commodity and mar-
keting assistance loans
disbursed for that par-'
ticular month reflect the
interest rate the U.S. Trea-
sury charged CCC for that
month. This was the inter-
est rate specified by CCC
since January 1, 1982, but


the process of establish-
ing the interest rate was
changed by a provision
of the Federal Agriculture
Improvement and Reform
Act of 1996 (the Act), en-
acted on April 4,1996.
Section 163 of the Act
requires that monthly in-
terest rates applicable to
commodity and market-
ing assistance loans are to
be 100 basis points, or 1
percent, greater than the


rate determined under the
applicable interest rate
formula in effect on Octo-
ber 1, 1995. This formula
resulted in a rate equiva-
lent to the amount the U.S.
Treasury charged CCC for
borrowing, for the month.
Further program in-
formation is available
from USDA Farm Service
Agency's Financial Man-
agement Division at
202-772-6041.


Successful Business


Coaching for better performance


T '|ihe job of an
educator is to
L teach students
to see vitality in them-
selves," Joseph Campbell
Coaching is one skill that
managers should practice
on a continual basis as
it has become so much
more important in recent
times. With fewer staff
members and a sustained
emphasis on reducing
costs, managers are being
challenged to coax the
best possible performance
out of everyone on their
team. The obvious answer
here is to coach your em-
ployees to higher levels of
effectiveness.
So often I hear managers
misusing the term "coach-
ing." They think they are
coaching their staff when,
in fact, all they are doing
is correcting bad behavior.
Coaching involves find-
ing the root cause of the
behavior and addressing
that.
For example, imagine
you have an employee
who is always making mis-
takes on their paperwork.
Sure, you can address
this situation by pointing
out his or her errors and
telling them the conse-
quences of continuing on
in this way. However, a
much more effective ap-
proach would be to help
the employee figure out
what is causing them to
make mistakes.
John Wooden said,
"A coach is someone
who can give correction
without causing resent-
ment." This is not easy
to accomplish as there
must be a bond between
the coach and the staff
member. If mutual respect
is lacking, coaching just
will not work, Therefore,
before you can even start
the coaching process, you
must ensure you have a
trusting relationship with
the employee.
The first step in the
coaching process is meet-
ing with the employee.
This is always so tough as
the employee just does
not know what he or she is
walking into and normally
I expects the worst. For this


reason, it is so' impor-
tant that you explain the


Jerry
Osteryoung


reason for
the meet-
ing without
blame or
judgment.
It is also
critical that
you explain
how you
are going to
help them


be better.
SThe next step in the
coaching process is so
important. You must get
the staff member to agree
that there is a problem,
otherwise coaching stalls
right here. This may
seem simple enough, but
sometimes it is tougher
than it sounds. If I see that
the person I am coach-
ing does not recognize
the problem, I often try
to get them to imagine
how others might perceive
their behavior. This shift
in viewpoints normally
works.
Once the problem is
identified, the next step
is to help the employee
expose the root cause
of the problem. This is
referred to as the Socratic
Approach to learning and
* it is where you get the
person to figure out what
the real solution to the
problem is.
In 40 years of teaching
at Florida State University,
I learned that if I told the
students the problem,
they might memorize
it, but they would not
necessarily assimilate it
into their thought process.
However, if I could ask
enough questions (So-
cratic Approach) to help
the student arrive at the
real problem on their own,
it is far more likely to stick
with them.
Once you have identified
the problem, the obvi-
ous next step is exploring
alternatives to correct
the behavior. Once again,
letting the employee do
some of the legwork is so
important. Allow them to
come up with a range of
potential solutions. You
want as much brainstorm-
ing as possible here so the


employee can see how
many options there are to
address the problem.
With a solution in hand,
the next step is developing
an implementation plan.
Setting benchmarks is im-
portant to ensure steady
progress is being made.
It is also critical to get the
employee to commit to
the plan. Without a com-
mitment from them, there
is no way you will be able
to change behavior.
The next step rests large-
ly with you, the manager.
The employee is going
to depend on you to tell
them how they are coming
along, so you must pro-
vide continual feedback.
This is a process they
have never been through
before, so you need
to check in regularly to
help alleviate their uncer-
tainty and keep them on
track.
Finally, when you are
convinced the problem is
solved, the last step is hav-
ing a private celebration
of their success. Tell them
that you are so proud of
them and what they have
accomplished.
Now go out and estab-
lish systems for identifying
when an employee needs
to be coached and how
the coaching will be done.
You can do this!


Local hotel earns TripAdvisor
Certificate of Excellence
Microtel Inn & Suites byWyndham,
Marianna a select service hotel re-
cently announced that it has received a
TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence
award. The accolade, which honors
hospitality excellence, is given only
to establishments that consistently
achieve outstanding traveler reviews on
TripAdvisor and is extended to qualify-
ing businesses worldwide. Only the
top-performing 10 percent of busi-
nesses listed on TripAdvisor receive this
prestigious award.
To qualify for a Certificate of Excel-
lence, businesses must maintain an
overall rating of four or higher, out of a
possible five, as reviewed by travelers on
TripAdvisor and must have been listed
on TripAdvisor for at least 12 months.
Additional criteria include the volume
of reviews received within the last 12
months.
"Microtel Inn & Suites byWyndham,
Marianna is pleased to receive a TripAd-
visor Certificate of Excellence," said Tara
Ervin, General Manager at Microtel Inn
& Suites byWyndham, Marianna. "We
strive to offer our customers a memora-
ble experience, and this accolade is evi-
dence that our hard work is translating
into positive reviews on TripAdvisor."
"TripAdvisor is delighted to celebrate
the success of businesses around the
globe, from Sydney to Chicago, Sao
Paulo to Rome, which are consistently
offering TripAdvisor travelers a great
customer experience," said Alison
Copus, Vice President of Marketing for
TripAdvisor for Business. "The Certifi-
cate of Excellence award provides top
performing establishments around the
world the recognition they deserve,
based on feedback from those who


VCA offers:
" CHRIST-CENTERED EDUCATION
* READING READINESS (PRrE-K3&4)
* LEARNING TO READ (K+)
GRADES 1-12
" MASTERY-BASED, COLLEGE
PREPARATORY CURRICULUM
" INDIVIDUALIZED STUDIES
" LIMITED CLASS SIZE
* WEEKLY CHAPELS
* PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Readiti qis the door to your child's education. Make sure he has. the ki'ys
by enrolling /him in a phoniics-based reading programs like those ,,. / at
Victory Christian Academy.


Victory Christian Academy
2271 River Road, Sneads, Florida 32460
850-593-6699
Scholarships May Be Available!


matter most their customers."

US Treasury sets price
for GM stock shares
WASHINGTON The U.S. Treasury
Department on Thursday set a price of
$34.41 per share for the sale of 30 mil-
lion shares of General Motors stock.
Treasury said the sale will result in
aggregate proceeds to the government
of $1.03 billion. A United Autoworkers
retiree health care trust fund was sell-
ing 20 million of its GM shares as well,
bringing total sales to 50 million shares.
Treasury set the price for its stock
after the markets closed on Thursday.
GM stock closed Thursday at $34.44 per
share. The stock had closed at $35.49
on Tuesday, the highest closing since
December 2010. Shares of GM stock are
up about 19 percent since January
The public offering will help accel-
erate the government's exit from GM
stock, which it got in exchange for a
$49.5 billion government bailout of the
company in 2008 and 2009.
Late last year, the government still
owned 500 million shares of the auto-
maker. But in December, GM bought
200 million shares for $5.5 billion. And
this year Treasury has been steadily
selling its remaining shares of GM stock.
Treasury has said it has a goal of com-
pleting those sales by early 2014.
GM has been encouraging the govern-
ment to exit from its partial ownership
of the company, hoping to shed the de-
risive "Governmqnt Motors" nickname.
On Thursday, GM replaced H.J. Heinz
Co. in the S&P 100 and 500 indices.
The ketchup maker's acquisition by 3G
Capital and Warren Buffett's Berkshire
Hathaway is expected to be completed
by then.
From local, wire reports


Oral & Facial

surgery Center

of Marianni
Barrett R. TfI.
Juan F. Samiau,

S WE PROVIDE:


,Dental Implants Head & Neck Patho
Dentoahlveolar Surgery Cleft Lip & Palate "
Anesthesia Maxillofacial Trauma/
Cosmetic Facial Surgery Reconstruction


Business Briefs


--I6A FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 2013


BUSINESS








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.comrn


Obituaries

James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850.482.2332

R.A. Griffin

Funeral services will be
10 a.m. Friday, June 7, 2013
at James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel.
Burial will follow in
Alford Cemetery.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
Www.jamesandsikesfuneralhonies.cnom
James & Lipford
Funeral Home
5390 Cotton St.
Graceville, FL 32440
850 263-3238
jamesandllpford@yahoo.com

Robert
Jackson

Robert Jackson, 77 of
Graceville, passed away
Wednesday, June 5, 2013 at
his residence.
Funeral service will be
held 10:30 a.m., Saturday,
June 8, 2013 at East Mt.
Zion United Methodist
Church with Revs. David
Cook and Wesley Syfrett of-
ficiating. Burial will follow
in church cemetery with
James & Lipford Funeral
Home in Graceville direct-
ing. Family will receive
friends at the funeral home
Friday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.,
and other times at their
home.
Flowers will be accepted
or those wishing can make
memorials to East Mt. Zion
Cemetery Fund c/o Cindy
Jackson 3864 Boney Bridge
Road Graceville, FL 32440.
Mr. Robert was born in
Holmes County on April
21, 1936 to the late Gillis
and Nellie Pettis Jackson.
A beloved husband, father,
grandfather, brother and
friend, Mr. Robert retired
from the Jackson. County
School Board after 30 years
of service and then enjoyed
working around on his
farm. He was a long time
member of East Mt. Zion
United Methodist Church.
Preceded in death by his
parents, brother Billy Jack-
son, son Freddy Monday,
son-in-law Larry Rogers
and brother-in-law J.E.
Ward.
Survived by his beloved
wife Doris Jackson; daugh-
ters Teresa Sheets (Mike),
Cindy Jackson, Gwen
Steverson, Graceville, Mar-
cia Rogers, Panama City;
daughter-in-law Pat Mon-
day, Wicksburg, AL; sister
Juanita Ward, Bonifay;
sister-in-law Hazel Jack-
son, Graceville, five grand-
children, seven great
grandchildren; beloved
dog "Mookie" and horse
"Hobo".
Expressions of sympathy
can be made at
http://www.jamesandlipford.com/
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, F132446
850.482.2332
www.jhmesandsikes
funeralhomes.com

Bettye Pooser

Funeral services will be
at 10 a.m, Saturday, June 8,
2013 at First United Meth-
odist Church in Marianna.
Burial will follow in Green-
wood United Methodist
'Church Cemetery. The
family will receive friends
from 5-7 p.m. Friday, June
7, 2013 at James & Sikes
Maddox Chapel.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www~jamnesaldsikes furt'lralhomes.cotn

Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


JCFLORIDAN.COM


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.
- The courtyard out-
side the Bradford County
Courthouse in north
Florida will soon become
home to a monument to
atheism.
This small county has
reached a deal to let a
national organization
install a 1,500-pound
granite bench near an
existing Ten Command-
ments monument that
prompted a lawsuit
after it was installed last
year.
The bench will include
quotes from Thomas Jef-
ferson, ,as well as Benja-
min Franklin, John Ad-
ams and Madalyn Murray
O'Hair, the founder of
American Atheists.
It will also include a
list of Old Testament
punishments for violat-
ing the Ten Command-
ments, including death
and stoning.
Will Sexton, an attorney
representing Bradford
County, stressed that the
monument will be paid
for and maintained by
American Atheists.
Sexton said it was being
allowed to be placed in
a "free speech" area that
the county established


LOCAL & STATE


Tropical Storm Andrea bearing down on F

The Associated Press i ',t ,;
"-. J ,,. i,, -.


I


MIAMI The first
named storm of the At-
lantic season hammered
Florida with rain, heavy
winds, and tornadoes
Thursday as it moved to-
ward the coast of Georgia
and the Carolinas, prom-
ising sloppy commutes
and waterlogged vaca-
tion getaways through
the beginning of the
weekend.
Tropical Storm An-
drea was not expected
to strengthen into a hur-
ricane but forecasters
warned it could cause iso-
lated flooding and storm
surge before it loses steam
over the next two days.
Tropical storm warn-
ings were in effect for a
large section of Florida's
west coast from Boca
Grande to the Ochlock-
onee River .and for the
East Coast from Flagler
Beach, Fla., all the way
to Cape Charles Light in
Virginia, and the lower
Chesapeake Bay south
of New Point Comfort. A
tropical storm warning
means that tropical storm
conditions are expected
somewhere inside the
warning area within a day
and a half.
As of 5:45 p.m. EDT on
Thursday, Andrea had
made landfall in Florida's
Big Bend area, about 10
miles (16 kms) south of
Steinhatchee, Fla., with
maximum sustained
winds of near 65 mph (100


kmh).
Rains and winds from
the storm were forecast
to sweep northward along
the Southeastern U.S.
coast Thursday night and
Friday. The storm was
expected to lose steam
by Saturday as it moves
through the eastern Unit-
ed States, according to the
U.S. National Hurricane
Center in Miami.
Florida Gov. Rick Scott
said one of the biggest
risks associated with the
storm for Florida was the
chance of tornadoes, eight
of which had been con-
firmed Thursday across
the state. Scott urged resi-
dents to remain vigilant.
"This one fortunately


is a fast-moving storm,"
he said. Slower-moving
storms can pose a greater
flood risk because they
have more time to linger
and dump rain.
Another threat to Flor-
ida's coast was storm
surge, said Eric Blake,
a specialist at the Hur-
ricane Center. The cen-
ter said coastal areas
from Tampa Bay north
to the Aucilla River
could see storm surge of
2 to 4 feet, if the peak surge
coincides with high tide.
Gulf Islands National
Seashore closed its camp-
grounds and the road
that runs through the
popular beach-front park
Wednesday. The national


seashore abuts Pensacola
Beach and the park road
frequently floods during
heavy rains.
Altogether, 30 state parks
closed their campgrounds
in Florida.
Meanwhile, south Geor-
gia residents were bracing
for high winds and heavy
rains that could lead to
flooding.
On Cumberland Island
off the Georgia cost, the
National Park Service was'
evacuating campers as the
storm approached.
"My main concern is the
winds," said chief park
ranger Bridget Bohnet.
"We're subject to trees fall-
ing and limbs breaking,
and I don't want anybody


Feds, state detail crackdown on timeshare fraud


The Associated Press


MIAMI More than
190 criminal and civil ac-
tions have been brought
across the country over
the past two years to com-
bat the rising problem
of timeshare resale fraud
involving shady telemar-
keting operations, federal
and state officials said
Thursday.
Complaints about time-
share fraud targeting sell-
ers tripled from 2010 to
2011, when more than
6,000 people called a ho-
tline about the problem,
The Federal Trade Com-
mission said. Last year,
there were fewer, about
4,600 complaints, as the
FTC and various law
enforcement agencies
ramped up efforts to stop
the fraud, said Charles


"They use very ag sive high-pre&
defraud people out of their mnmey."


Harwood, acting director
of the FTC Bureau of Con-
suiner Protection.
"Our message to time-
share owners is simple:
Never pay for a promise,
get everything in writ-
ing first, and pay only
after your unit is sold,"
Harwood said. "Our mes-
sage to timeshare scam-
mers is simple, too: Law
enforcement agencies
,at every level of govern-
ment are working togeth-
er to put an end to this
problem."
Investigators have pur-
sued fraud cases involving


timeshare se
every state i
but as a m
destination
the list.
Miami IU
Wifredo Fe
office alone
separate dcr
against 69 d
cluding 41
a now-defu
County
Timeshare
and Market
More than
were scamr
million in tl
of the defend


case, including the two
ure ktaes to owners, have pleaded
guilty.
"They use very aggres-
Wllfredo Ferrar, sive, high-pressure tac-
Miami U.S. attorney tics to defraud people
out of their money," Fer-
rer said.
ellers in nearly Typically the fraud
in the country, starts with a cold phone
aajor vacation call to a timeshare owner
Florida tops looking to sell. The caller
usually says a buyer has
J.S. Attorney been found often of-
*rrer said his fering more money than
e has filed 18 the owner expects and
criminal cases all the owner has to do is
defendants, in- send some upfront cash
involved with to get the deal rolling.
unct Broward In the Broward .County
telemarketer, case, those fees ranged
Mega Media from just under $2,000
ing Group Inc. to $10,000, according to
2,000 people court documents.
ned out of $5 The timeshare owner
hat case. Most never sees the money
ndants in that again.


"The atheists got something they coumdd have had
without having to go ta the court."
Will Sexton,
attorney representing Bradford County


back in 2011. That's the
site of a current monu-
ment that features the
Ten Commandments.
"The atheists got some-
thing they could have
had without having to
go to the court," Sexton
said.
American Atheists
sued the county after
that monument went up
last year and demanded
that it be removed. How-
ever, the Christian group
that paid for the Ten
Commandments monu-
ment filed its own lawsuit
demanding that it remain
in place.
Sexton said negotiations
resulted in the deal letting
the rival monument to be
installed in late June.
Dave Muscato, pub-
lic relations director
for American Atheists,
told The Gainesville Sun
that if religious groups
are allowed to have
monuments "it's only ap-
propriate that we have
matching monuments."
Muscato said Wednes-


day that the monument
in Starke, about 45 miles
southwest of Jackson-
ville, is believed to be
the first one dedicated to
atheism to be placed on
public land in the United
States.
Howard Simon, ex-
ecutive director of
the American Civil
Liberties Union of Flori-
da, said the creation of a
second monument dedi-
cated to atheism shows
the "silly lengths" that
Bradford County must
go to justify allowing
the Ten Commandments
monument. The ACLU
filed a lawsuit to remove
a monument in Dixie
County but dropped it
earlier this year.
"It's apparently the
price the Bradford County
Commission has to pay to
have its religious monu-
ment," Simon said.
Sexton asserted that
other groups could not
put up purely religious
monuments in the area
near the courthouse.


County guidelines require
that the monuments
must include the com-
memoration of peo-
ple, events and ideas
which have historical
significance for both
the United States and
Florida.


Fuel
From Page 1A
said staff research revealed
"no other providers for
this type of purchase," and
called the competitive bid-
ding process, in this irw
stance, "impractical."
The commission ap-
proved the recommenda-
tion and moved to further
embrace natural gas. May-
or Paul Donofro Jr. called
it a "forward-thinking"
decision.



Auto
From Page 1A

completion date of Febru-
ary 2014.
Company executives and
a video production team
were in Marianna Thurs-
day for a press conference
and check presentation on
the Chipola carmpus. Ad-
vance officials presented
a check to the college for
$5,000 to help Chipola au-
tomotive students in need
of funding to take their
Automotive Service Excel-
lence examinations.
Advance has also pledged
thousands of dollars in
tools and equipment for
the college's automotive
program.


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Bradford County to allow atheist monument


James Sikes


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FRIDAY, JUNE7,2013 7AF-



la. coast

getting hurt."
Forecasters were pre-
dicting the storm would
pass through Georgia
overnight, and the island
would likely re-open to
tourists Friday.
"It looks like it's pick-
ing up speed and that's
a good thing because it
won't sit and rain on us so
long," said Jan Chamber-
lain, whose family runs
the Blue Heron Inn Bed &
Breakfast near the Sapelo
Island Ferry station on
Georgia's coast.
In the Carolinas, An-
drea's biggest threat was
heavy rain, with as much
as 6 inches expected, the
National Weather Service
said.
Forecasters didn't expect
major problems, however,
along the most vulnerable
parts of the coast such as
the Outer Banks, a popu-
lar tourist destination.
John Elardo, a me-
teorologist with the Nat
tional Weather Service in
Newport, N.C., said the
storm would push major
waves to the north and
northeast, away from the
Outer Banks, where a se-
ries of storms in the fall
and winter wore away
dunes and washed out
portions of N.C. Highway
12, the only road con-
necting the barrier island
to the mainland of North
Carolina.
Andrea could bring up
to a foot of flooding on the
sound side of the Outer
Banks, Elardo said.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A surfer rides a wave generated by Tropical Storm Andrea in Panama City Beach, Fla. on
Thursday, June 6. Heavy rain poured down on much of Florida on Thursday as the first
tropical storm of the Atlantic hurricane season headed toward the state's western coast,
while a new tropical storm warning was issued for a swath of the U.S. East Coast.







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Philly officials look for cause of deadly collapse


The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA The
search for victims of a
building collapse that
killed six people, including
two Salvation Army work-
ers, wound down Thursday
amid mounting questions
about whether the demo-
lition company that was
tearing down the structure
caused the tragedy by cut-
ting corners.
The four-story building
along Philadelphia's busy
Market Street collapsed
Wednesday onto a Salva-
tion Army thrift shop next
door with a loud boom
and a huge cloud of dust,
trapping employees and
others, including a woman
on her first day on the job
at the store.
"Buildings get demol-
ished all the time in the
city of Philadelphia with
active buildings right
next to them. ... They're
done safely in this city
all the time," Mayor Mi-
chael Nutter said Thurs-
day. "Something obviously
went wrong here yesterday
and possibly in the days
leading up to it. That's what
the investigation is for."
Despite Nutter's reassur-
ances, Philadelphia began
inspecting hundreds of de-


I HE ASUSAI AtEDPLESS
In this photo provided by Jordan McLaughlin, a dust cloud rises as people run from the scene of
a building collapse on the edge of downtown Philadelphia on Wednesday, June 5.


molition sites in the wake
of the collapse. The De-
partment of Licenses and
Inspections said it had 300
open demolition permits
throughout the city; in-
spectors had visited about
30 of the sites by Thursday
afternoon and planned
to get to the rest by next
week.
The spot inspections
included all four con-
struction and demolition
sites connected to Griffin
Campbell Construction,
the demolition contrac-
tor involved in the deadly


collapse. The city found
violations at two sites and
ordered a halt to the work.
As details of Campbell's
checkered legal and fi-
nancial past came to
light, a city councilman
charged that dangerous,
under-the-radar tear-
downs are taking place
throughout the city and
demanded a stricter ap-
plication and inspection
process for demolition
companies.
More than 24 hours after
the collapse, the search
for the dead and injured


was nearly complete, with
no one else believed to be
in the rubble. Firefighters
hosed down piles of bricks
to reduce the dust, and
heavy machinery scooped
up debris.
Rescue efforts were
buoyed early Thursday
when a woman was pulled
out alive and conscious
after 13 hours under the
rubble. Nyra Plekam
was hospitalized in
critical condition and was
said to be floating in and
out of consciousness. At
least 12 others were hurt,


many with minor inju-
ries, and five remained
hospitalized.
"That's why we stay the
course," fire Commission-
er Lloyd Ayers said. "This
person being pulled out
alive is what this rescue
operation is all about."
Officials from the U.S.
Department of Labor and
Occupational Safety and
Health Administration
were at the scene.
The mayor said he was
unaware of any complaints
about the demolition
work done by Campbell in
the days before the trag-
edy. But OSHA said it had
gotten a complaint May
15 that workers at the site
were at risk of falling. The
complaint was still open
at the time of the disaster,
U.S. Labor Department,
spokeswoman Leni Uddy-
back-Fortson said.
OSHA regulates the de-
molition industry and en-
forces standards meant
to ensure worker safety.
Among other things,
its regulations forbid
any wall section exceeding
one story to stand alone
without bracing, unless
the wall was designed that
way. Witnesses have said
they saw a 30-foot section
of unbraced wall before


Senate defeats Democratic, Republican loan plans


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Col-
lege students faced in-
creasing uncertainty
about the cost of new
student loans after sena-
tors failed Thursday to ad-
vance partisan proposals
to keep interest rates from
doubling on July 1.
Dueling measures in
te Senate would have
kept interest rates on
some student loans from
moving from 3.4 percent
to 6.8 percent, although
separate Republican and
Democratic proposals
each failed to win 60 votes
needed on procedural
votes. The failure means
that unless lawmakers
can find a rare biparti-
san agreement, students
are likely to face higher
rates on new subsidized
Stafford student loans
this fall but enjoy greater
certainty on the interest
they will be expected to
pay during the life of their
loans.


"I cannot understand
why we're having a prob-
lem with this," Senate Ma-
jority Leader Harry Reid
told reporters after the
vote.
The top Republican on
the Senate education pan-
el seemed to share that
frustration. "If we can't
agree on this, we can't
agree on anything," said
Sen. Lamar Alexander.
"This is a manufactured
crisis."
The failure comes just
three weeks before in-
terest rates increase on
federally subsidized
Stafford loans return to
2008 levels. For students
who max out their stu-
dent loans every year,
the rate shift would
mean this year's loans will
cost more than $1,000
than last. '
"Congress must act im-
mediately to stop the im-
minent doubling of inter-
est rates on student loans,"
the White House said in
a statement as President


Barack Obama was on his
way to North Carolina to
visit a school.
Democrats in the Sen-
ate unsuccessful sought a
two-year extension of the
current rates while law-
Smakers write a compre-
hensive overhaul of the
student loan process.
Republicans, mean-
while, wanted to link in-
terest rates to financial
markets. Under Senate
Republicans' plan, inter-
est rates would be based
on the 10-year Treasury
*note and, once the rates
were set each year, remain
there until the loans were
paid off.
The GOP parameters
were not that different
from President Barack
Obama's budget proposal,
which also included inter-
est rates linked to mar-
kets, or a version House
Republicans have passed
through their chamber.
Obama threatened to
veto House Republicans'
legislation.


The chairman of the
House Education and the
Workforce Committee,
Rep. John Kline, R- Minn.,
said he does not plan to
revisit his legislation and
that it's up to Obama to
negotiate a deal or get the
blame for higher rates.
"It leaves us with'
one body in Congress
- the House having
passed legislation ... that
would provide the long-
term fix to the student
loan interest rate prob-
lem," Kline told reporters.
That fact is little con-
solation for students
already carrying debt and
likely to pick up more be-
fore graduation.
"I don't think that many
students know it's go-
ing to increase," said Kyle
Pendergast, the student
body president of Indi-
ana's Purdue University.
"I would say that a lot of
students won't notice un-
til they start paying back
their loans. And at that
point, it will be too late."


After Qusair, Syrian army sets sights on heartland


The Associated Press

DAMASCUS, Syria
With fresh momen-
turn from the capture of a
strategic town in western
Syria, President Bashar
Assad's forces have turned
their sights to driving rebel
fighters from the country's
densely populated heart-
land, including the cities
of Horns and Aleppo.
The latest battlefield
success, due in large part
to Lebanese Hezbollah
fighters' increasing role
and the West's continued
reluctance to arm the
rebels, raises the possibil-
ity that Assad can cling to
power for years, even if he
won't be able to recapture
all of the country.
Government troops
pressed ahead Thursday
with an aggressive mili-
tary offensive in Horns
province, seizing control
of the village of Dabaa
just north of Qusair, near
the border with Lebanon.
Hundreds of rebel fighters
who had been entrenched
in Qusair for more than a
year fled Wednesday after
a punishing three-week
assault, retreating to sur-
rounding areas.
The regime triumph in
Qusair, a key crossroads
town of supply lines be-
tween Damascus and
western and northern
Syria, showcased the po-
tentially game-changing
role of Hezbollah in Syria's
civil war and was openly
celebrated in the militant
/group's strongholds in


i riL-foovuliti LL/ vriM-j
In this picture taken on Wednesday, June 5, citizen journal-
ism image provided by Lens Young Homsi, which has been
authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting,
shows damaged buildings are seen in the Jouret al-Chiyah
neighborhood, Horns province, central Syria.


Lebanon and in Damas-
cus, the seat of Assad's
power.
Syrian state-run media
portrayed Qusair's fall as a
turning point in the more
than two-year civil war
that has killed more than
70,000 people.
In reality, though, it's
unlikely that Assad will
be able to roll back rebel
gains across the country.
Dozens of rebel fighter
brigades have taken un-
questioned control of
huge swathes of terri-
tory in the country's north
and east, setting up lo-
cal councils and Islamic
courts to administer af-
fairs in towns and villages.
Kurds have all but carved
out their own separate
existence in the country's
northeast.
At best, Assad will con-
tinue to preside over a di-
vided country, with armed
militias ruling over ethnic


fiefdoms. A violent insur-
gency is likely to continue
even in areas where the


Let
wit)
of B
DU


regime regains control.
But if the regime con-
tinues to enjoy the strong
backing of allies Hezbol-
lah, Russia and Iran, Assad
could try to reassert him-
self in much of Syria, even
if he can't win back all of
the country. 0
Josef Holliday of the
Institute for the Study of
War, a Washington think
tank, said he believes
Assad is not aiming for
outright victory over the
rebels in all of Syria.
"The objective is surviv-
al in what they (regime
loyalists) consider the
strategically important
parts of Syria, with the
majority of the popula-
tion," he said.


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Erdogan calls for


end to Turkey protest


The Associated Press

ISTANBUL Turkey's
prime minister took a
combative stance on his
closely watched return to
the country early Friday,
telling supporters who
thronged- to greet him
that the protests that have
swept the country must
come to an end.
In the first extensive pub-
lic show of-support since
anti-government protests
erupted last week, more
than 10,000 supporters
cheered Recep Tayyip Er-
dogan with rapturous ap-
plause outside Istanbul's
international airport.
Despite earlier com-
ments that suggested he
could be softening his
stand, Erdogan delivered a
fiery speech on his return
from a four-day trip to
North Africa. "These pro-
tests that are bordering on
illegality must come to an
end as of now," he said.
Tens of thousands of pro-
testers have held demon-
strations that have spread
to dozens of cities across
Turkey, sparked by the


violent police reaction last
Friday to what started out
as a small protest against a
plan to develop Istanbul's
central Taksim Square.
Since then, three people
have died two protest-
ers and a policeman -
and thousands have been
wounded. One protester is
on life support in a hospi-
tal in Ankara.
Protesters from all walks
of life have occupied Tak-
sim Square and its park,
objecting to what they say
is Erdogan's increasingly
autocratic and arrogant
manner charges he ve-
hemently denies.
Turks have been awaiting
Erdogan's words upon his
return, seeing them as a
signal of whether the dem-
onstrations would fizzle or
rage on.

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the collapse.
Also, a video of the de-
molition taken Sunday and
posted onYouTube showed
bricks raining down on the
sidewalk as a worker used
a backhoe and claw to re-
move a second-story front
wall.
The sidewalk and the
staircase leading up from
a subway stop appeared
open to pedestrians de-
spite the falling bricks.
Cars and trucks could also
be seen going past, just a
few feet away.
That appeared to violate
OSHA regulations that
say "no material shall be
dropped to any point ly-
ing outside the exterior
walls of the structure un-
less the area is effectively
protected."
A permit issued by the
city indicated that Camp-
bell was to be paid $10,000
for the demolition work, a
seemingly low price given
the location and scope of
work.
Demolition company
owner Griffin Campbell,
who has been arrested on
charges involving drugs,
assault and insurance
fraud and has had two
bankruptcy filings, did not
return calls for comment
Thursday.







*'.~ 141- I..
* .5
-1
'~'i ,,.J#a

a,. '


Sports Briefs
Chipola Team
Basketball Camp
Chipola College and Mari-
anna High School will host the
Chipola Team Camp for boys
basketball this weekend, with
games running Friday and
Saturday.
Friday's games begin at 8
a.m., with the last games start-
ing at 4 p.m., whiile Saturday's
games begin at 9 a.m., with
the last game starting at 5 p.m.
at Chipola.
Malone, Cottondale, Gracev-
ille and Marianna will partici-
pate, as well as Chipley and
Verpon.

Chipola Baseball Camps
Chipola baseball coach
Jeff Johnson will offer three
camps: a pitching camp that
will meet June 10-11, a hitting
camp June 12-13, and a skills
camp June 17-18.
The camps are for ages 7-18
and all cost $100, though a
Grand Slam Special rate for all
three camps is $250.
All baseball camps meet
from 9 a.m. to noon.
For more information,
contact Chipola assistant
coach Chris Hutcheson at
850-718-2243.

Chipola Softball Camps
Chipola softball coaches
Jimmy and Belinda Hendrix
will offer a skills camp on June
17-18 arid a hitting camp June
19 at Chipola College.
The camps are for all ages
and both will run from 1,-4
p.mn., with a $100 cost for the
hitting camp, $50 for the skills
camp and $135 for both.
Campers should bring a
glove, a bat, tennis shoes and
cleats. For more information,
call 850-718-2358.

Children's Swimming
Lessons
Chipola College will offer
children's swimming lessons
for ages 4 and older as sched-
uled on the following dates:
Session 2: June 17-27 with a
deadline of June 13.
Classes are available at 10
a.m. or 7 p.m. Sessions in-
dclude eight 45-minute classes
which meet Monday through
Thursday for two weeks.
Cost of regular swimming
lessons is $55. Pre-registration
is required with, and there is a
late registration fee. For more
information, call 718-2473 or
visit Www.chipola.edu.

Marianna Swim Team
The Marianna Swim Team
is a local, recreational swim
team for boys and girls ages
4-18. Practices are held from
5-6:30 p.m.. Monday through
Thursday through August at
Chipola College Pool.
Meets are held on Saturdays
throughout the summer.
Registration is open. All that
is required is the swimmer'
swim one full ppol length (25
yards) and that children under
10 have parental supervision
during practices.
The registration fee of $35
payable to. MST helps cover
cost of life guards and relay
events at meets. Team T-shirts
for members will be an ad-
ditional $5 and $15 for non-
members. Pool membership
is also required by Chipola
College.
For additional information
call Vicki Pelham at 482-2435;
Angie Bunting at 209 8918;
lulie Smith at 557-3292; Mon-
qica Bolin at 209-2388; or email
your questions to MST2010@
centdrylink.net.

Bulldog Wrestling Club
The Bulldog Wrestling Club
is starting practice for the
summer season.
Practice will be Tuesdays
arid Thursdays from 5:30-7
p.m. at the old Marianna High
School wrestling room.


All Jackson County children
ages 5-18 are welcome to join.
For more information, call
SMHS coach Ron Thoreson at
272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to editorial@
jcfloridan.com, or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address for the paper
i, .1,.kon Counrty Floridan P.O. Box 520
Marianna, FL 32447.


Marianna Basketball



Bulldogs ease



by Blountstown


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Bulldogs opened
their summer season Thursday af-
ternoon at home with a 43-31 vic-
tory over the Blountstown Tigers,
with rising sophomore Herman
Williams scoring 14 points to lead
the way.
The Bulldogs jumped out to a
fast start thanks to some swarming


pressure defense that led to sev-
eral early turnovers and transition
baskets.
MHS set the tone with its full-
court trap, with a forced turnover
leading to lob dunk by Trey Clem-
ons. from Shaquarious Baker to
make it 6-0, and a steal and bucket
by Williams putting Marianna up
10-0 less than three minutes into

See BULLDOGS, Page 2B


I.'.
'' 'I
'I ft
a- -'
'*,~2i ,.*.~''


Garrett
Speights
looks to
make a shot
for Marianna
during a
summer
league game
against
Blountstown
on Thursday
afternoon.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


MACHINE PITCH BASEBALL




Unblemished champs


CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
The Graceville Machine Pitch All-Star team is Neal Adams, Anthony Watford, Zephaniah Brunson, Blaine Woodham, Hunter Burks, Tykeise Facion,
Drew Greenwood, Eddie Monfort, Gabriel Norsworthy, Connor Dillard, Christian Myrick and Tyler Deon.


Graceville goes

4-0 to take

Machine Pitch title

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Graceville Machine Pitch All-Stars
completed a perfect run through the Dis-
trict 3 Tournament on Wednesday night
by faking a 16-7 victory over Marianna in


New-look


Tigers open


summer


at Chipola

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Malone Tigers open their
summer season today in the Chipo-
la Team Camp with games against
Seminole County (Ga.), Mosley,
and Bainbridge
S(Ga.) at Chipola
College.
The Tigers are
coming off of a
25-win season
in 2012-13, but
they had to say goodbye to seven
seniors from that team, includ-
ing starters Ty Baker, Austin Wil-
liams and Anthony Speights, and
key reserves Red Griffin, Desquan
Johnson, Cameron Barnes and
James Dallas.
The group combined to account
for more than 43 points per game
last season, leaving the Tigers and
coach Steven Welch with some big
shoes to fill with some largely un-
proven players.
There will be six new varsity play-
ers expected to compete for time in

See TIGERS, Page 2B


the championship game in Bonifay.
Graceville racked up 24 hits as a team
and used a run of eight straight runs in the
third and fourth innings to blow the game
open and pull away.
It was a dominant run through the tour-
nament for the Graceville All-Stars, who
won all four games they played and more
than doubled up their opponents by a to-
tal score of 66-31.
"It felt good. I was proud for the boys.
They played hard," Graceville coach Rod
Adams said. "They practiced really hard
this year, and I was glad they were able to


do it."
After a 2-2 first inning, Graceville scored
four runs in the top of the third and four
more in the fourth to go up 10-2, with a
three-run fifth inning making it 13-4.
The Marianna All-Stars scored two
more runs in the fifth and another in the
sixth, but the rally stopped there and
they would have to settle for a runner-up
finish.
Tyler Deon led Graceville offensively by
going 4-for-4 with four runs scored, while

See CHAMPS, Page 2B


Cottondale Basketball


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Cottondale head basketball coach Chris Obert runs the Hornets through a drill Tuesday.


Young Hornets face big questions


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com


After dealing with the disappointment of a
district tournament upset in 2012, the Cot-
tondale Hornets' seniors delivered that dis-
trict title last season thanks to a pair of dra-
matic finishes in wins over Graceville and
Sneads.
But the five seniors who represented the
core of that Cottondale club DJ Roulhac,
Jerodd Blount, Sheldon Vann, Eli Jackson, and
Jacquez Walker have all departed, and the
Hornets head into the summer season with


many more questions than answers.
CHS begins its summer schedule today in
the Chipola Team Camp with games against
Walton and Daleville (Ala.) at Marianna High
School.
The Hornets also take on Mosley and
Seminole (Ala.) on Saturday to finish up the
weekend.
It will be a somewhat limited summer
schedule for the Hornets, who only play 15
games in total, but Cottondale coach Chris
Obert said that was necessary for a team that
See HORNETS, Page 2BL








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Local teams compete

in Chipola Team Camp


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Team Bas-
ketball Camp will run to-
day and Saturday, with
four Jackson County teams
competing with other local
teams in games at Chipola
College and Marianna
High School.
The first game begins to-
day at 8 a.m. with Malone
taking on Seminole at
Chipola.
The Tigers will play
two more games today at
Chipola, facing the Mos-
ley Dolphins at 11 a.m.
and the Bainbridge (Ga.)
Bearcats at 1 p.m., but they
will not be a part of Satur-
day's action.
Cottondale plays all four
of its games this weekend
at MHS, first facing the
Walton Braves and Dale-
ville (Ala.) today at 10 a.m.
at 1 p.m.
The Hornets come back
Saturday to play Mosley at
10 a.m. and Seminole (Ga.)
at 1 p.m.
Graceville and Mari-
anna face off in the first
game today at MHS at
9 a.m., with the Tigers
playing their second and
third games of the day at
Chipola against Bay High
at noon and Seminole at
3p.m.
GHS plays three more
games Saturday at Chipo-


Champs
From Page 1B
Anthony Watford was also
4-for-4 with two runs.
Chris Gable was 3-for-3
with three runs for Mari-
anna, with Brady Brock
also finishing 3-for-3 at the
plate.
Up next for both teams
will be the Machine Pitch
state tournament in Wild-
wood starting June 28.
Both Marianna and



Hornets
From Page 1B
returns just one varsity
starter and only a few more
with significant varsity
experience.
"I thinkwe need the prac-
tice time to figure some
stuff out, and we need to
hit the weight room pretty
hard," he said. "We still
play 15 games and in those
games, we'll try to figure
out some of the things we
do pretty well and some
of the things we don't do
so well. We've got a lot of
things to figure out about
ourselves, so it's important
to get practice time and
game time to work through
it."
The most important
thing for the Hornets to
figure out will be who will
score the points for this
team.
Blount and Roulhac did
most of the heavy lifting
for Cottondale last season,
with Blount averaging 22.6
points per game and Roul-
hac 15.6 per game.
No other player averaged
over five points on last
year's team, with Haddock
the leading returning score
at 3.6 points per game.
The team's only return-
ing starter, rising senior
Norris Calhoun, is known
more for. his defense than
his scoring, while rising
sophomores Tristan Brax-
ton and Kadeem Webb
were primarily spot up
shooters who will likely be
required to create more of-
fense now.
Post players Dakota Had-
dock and Kyshon Ali will
also need to step up their
offensive output, while
varsity newcomers Manny
Lockhart, Marcus John-
son, Undreyus Baker, and
Tre Lee will also try to help
pick up the slack left by
Blount and Roulhac.
"We're not as top heavy as
we were last year with guys
like DJ and Rodd, who were
two of the better players in
the area," Obert said. "We
don't have that necessarily,
]but we're a little more bal-
l


la, taking on Chipley at
9 a.m., Bainbridge at
noon, and Daleville at
3p.m.
Marianna follows its
opener against Graceville
today with a 4 p.m. con-
test against the Vernon
Yellowjackets.
On Saturday, the Bull-
dogs will play three games
in their home gym, hosting,
Seminole at 9 a.m., Chipley
at 11 a.m., and Bainbridge
at 3 p.m.
Chipley will play three
games today and three
games Saturday, opening
up today against Bay High
at Chipola at 9 a.m. be-
fore finishing up at MHS
against Walton at noon
and Bainbridge at 3 p.m.
After taking on Graceville
and Marianna on Satur-
day, Chipley will wrap up
the weekend with a 2 p.m.
matchup with Mosley at
Chipola at 2 p.m.
Vernon also has six games
on the schedule, playing
Seminole at 11 a.m. at MHS
and Bay High at Chipola
at 2 p.m. before wrap-
ping the first day against
Marianna.
On Saturday, the Yel-
lowjackets play Mosley at
noon and Walton at 2 p.m.
at MHS, and then finish
up with the last game of
the day Saturday against
Daleville at 5 p.m. at
Chipola.


Graceville competed in the
state tourney last season in
Marianna, though Adams
said he's looking forward
to this year's trip more
since the team will get to
venture outside of Jackson
County.
"Last year was fun in
Marianna, but now we'll
get the experience of trav-
eling and staying in hotels
and all of that," he said.
"That will add to it and
make it extra special for
the kids."


anced on the whole. We've
got a lot of people who are
about the same, so we'll try
to give them some playing
time to show what they
can do.
"(Webb's and Braxton's)
roles will increase signifi-
cantly, as well as Ali and
Dakota. (Calhoun) is the
glue guy. He's the leader of
the bunch, so it's up to him
to make sure this thing
runs how it's supposed to
run."
The coach said he has
been encouraged by the
team's effort and work eth-
ic in practice thus far, but
there's only so much you
can tell before the players
see live competition.
"The biggest thingois the
inexperience. Some of
them don't know what to
expect, and to be honest, I
don't know what to expect
out of them because it's a
different level," Obert said.
"They've been coachable
and they've been working.
There's just a lot of inexpe-
rience out there. They play
pretty well together, but it's
going to take some time
to get them to be what
we need them to be. But
they're good kids who work
hard. We've just got some
areas we've got to improve
on, but a lot of that is just
inexperience."
The No. 1 goal of the
summer, according to Ob-
ert, is to establish the style
and pace the team is going
to play at both ends of the
court, as the Hornets tran-
sition from a more half-
court style last season to
a frenetic, up-and-down
pace with more trapping
and more early offense.
"We were more of a
grinding team last year, but
this year we're going to try
to create more turnovers,
and offensively push the
ball more than we did last
year," he said. "It might be
a little wild and erratic for a
while, but hopefully it will
pay dividends in the end.
We just need a lot of prac-
tice time and game time.
We've only got so much
time right now, so we'll try
to make the most of it."


MALONE ALL-STARS BEGIN TOURNEY
I l ." ,l _.. 1r..-.0 ,--.A".l-, 73_ T. -'- :- 7 ,i .- ,"


The Malone Ozone All-Stars will be playing in the District 5 tournament in
Blountstown starting Saturday. They are (from left/front row) Cole Jordan, Jacob
Dunaway, Dylan Padgett, Trevor Nunnery, Jaret Weber and Blayne Hewett; second
row is Austin Winget, Coleman Duraso, Gavyn Carter, Jarrod Southwell, Austin Stephens
and Trent Martin; the back row is coaches Ricky Martin, LennyWeber and Jason Hewett.


Tigers
From Page 1B
the rotation next season, includ-
ing four junior varsity players
from last season and two rising
freshmen.
It's a lot 9f inexperience for a pro-
gram that was dominated by battle-
tested seniors last year, and Welch
said it didn't take long to notice the
difference in practice.
"It looks different. You kind of
look out there and wonder when
everyone else is going to show up to
practice. It's a little surreal," he said.
"But I like them. They compete and
play hard and they're trying to get
better. They do everything wide
open and that's fun to watch. We've
got a chance to be pretty good be-
fore it's over."
While there is a preponderance of
young players who will be counted
on to contribute next season, the
Tigers do still have the good fortune
to bring back one of the state's best
players in rising senior. guard Chai
Baker, who averaged 21 points per
game last season en route to win-
ning County Player of the Year for
the second straight season.
The explosive 6-foot-3 Baker is
one of only three Malone players
with significant varsity experience,
with rising junior and starting point
guard Antwain Johnson coming
back after posting 11.6 points and
3.3 assists per game last season,
and rising senior Alonze Bailey
set to-join the starting lineup after
becoming one of the team's best
bench players a year ago.
While Baker's role as go-to scorer
will remain unchanged, both John-
son and Bailey will be asked to take
on significantly more responsibility
in the upcoming season.
"(Johnson) is excited about it,"


Bulldogs
From Page 1B
the game.
Bulldogs coach Travis Blanton
subbed out his starting five mo-
ments later and the Tigers took ad-
vantage with a 10-0 run to tie the
game up with 8:55 on the clock.
But Marianna finished' the half
strong, with a bank shot by Rod-
erick Copeland followed by a two-
handed put-back dunk by Williams
and another lob dunk from Baker
to Williams as part of a 13-4 run to
close it out and make it 23-14 at the
break,
A pair of Copeland dunks and
a three-pointer by Jamel Johnson
helped the Bulldogs establish a 30-


Welch said of his expanded role.
"Last year he was a facilitator, but
we know he can score and now it's
going to be expected. We have to
have it from him. It's the same for
Bailey. He goes from being a lim-
ited player playing good minutes
but not huge minutes to being one
of the main guys. Both of those two
have a big transition to make."
Among the newcomers that the Ti-
gers will be counting on is a quartet
of IV players including sharpshoot-
ing guards Chancellor Lockett and
Savon Armstead, as well as 6-foot-
4 post player Cody Henson and 6-
foot-3 forward Xavier Grey, with all
set to be heavy rotation players and
Lockett and Grey likely to start.
Lockett, Grey, and Armstead are
all rising sophomores and Henson
a rising junior, with Welch saying
that the group will be key to the Ti-
gers' future success.
"They're going to be huge for not
only this year but obviously the fu-
ture," he said. "This is a big year for
them. They'll have to carry the load
this year and start getting them-
selves in position to fill those roles.
It's important for all of those guys to
step up this year."
While the size of Henson and the
versatility of Grey will be big factors
next year, the most import addition
to the Malone attack could be the
shooting of Armstead and Lockett,
particularly with the amount of at-
tention likely to be paid to Baker
and Johnson.
"If they can make open shots, I
think we'll be tough," Welch said. "I
would anticipate, and this is how I
would play us, is to load up on Chai
and (Johnson), so if those guys can
step up and hit some key shots and
be consistent shooters, that will
definitely help our cause."
Finding a way to replace the
points lost from last year's team will


18 edge early in the second half,
with a basket and a free throw by
Williams, five straight points by
Johnson, and a tip-in by Antavious
Leonard giving a 20-point cushion
with 11 minutes to play.
The Tigers got the margin as close
as 12 with just over three minutes
to play, but neither team scored the
rest of the way.
Johnson and Copeland added six
points each for the Bulldogs, who
will next compete in the Chipola
Team Camp today and Saturday at
Marianna High School.
The Bulldogs will take on Gracev-
ille today at 9 a.m. and finish tlhe
day against Vernon at 4 p.m. before
coming back Saturday to face Semi-
nole County (Ga.), Chipley, and
Bainbridge (Ga.).


be a challenge, but an even bigger
test will be replicating the defen-
sive dominance the 2012-2013 Ti-
gers often exhibited thanks to their
superior quickness, length, and
athleticism.
Welch said without the shot
blocking of Ty Baker and Speights
at the backline of the defense, the
team will have to adjust its defen-
sive approach.
"My biggest concern with the
team is defensively. I think we'll
be able to score, but there were
stretches last year where we could
be dominant defensively," he said.
"We had good shot blockers in the
back and good ball pressure up
front. We've got to change it up be-
cause we can't get beat out front be-
cause we don't have the erasers back
there anymore. We'll have to play it
a little different, but we're not going
to change who we are either."
This summer will be a far cry from
last year's when Malone was mostly
a.known quantity going into the off-
season, with this-year's team requir-
ing much more maintenance from
the coaching staff.
"Last year, we actually took more
time and worked on schemes and
game plans and 5-on-5 stuff, but
we've had three long practices this
week on nothing but skill develop-
ment, weight training, and speed
and agility," Welch said. "We've got
so much room to improve on those
areas. The guys last year were so ad-
vanced and we didn't have far to go,
but this year we're going to really
have to focus on the basic funda-
mental building blocks of a varsity
basketball team.
"I still think we've got a chance to
be pretty good, but when you lose
seven seniors and replace them
with five ninth and 10th graders, it's
obviously going to be a transition
period."


Auto Racing

IndyCar issues fines
INDIANAPOLIS IndyCar
has issued $40,000 in fines and
placed two drivers on proba-
tion for incidents at Detroit last
weekend.
Sebastian Saavedra was fined
$30,000 for making an obscene
gesture at Marco Andretti, an in-
cident caught on live television.
Will Power was placed on pro-
bation for the rest of the year for
throwing his gloves at Sebastien
Bourdals. And Bourdais was
placed on probation for com-
ments made toward officials on
pit road after an accident.
The Associated Press


--12B FRIDAY, JUNE 7,2013


SPORTS






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


FRIDAY, JUNE 7,2013 3Br


French Open



Sharapova vs Williams in women's final


The Associated Press

PARIS As Maria
Sharapova celebrated her
return to the French Open
final, she let loose one last
scream this one a happy
holler.
Serena Williams won
more quietly and quickly,
and she'll play Sharapova
for the title Saturday
Sharapova, the defend-
ing champion, overcame
11 double-faults to win
a semifinal shriekfest
against Victoria Azaren-
ka, 6-1, 2-6, 6-4. Williams
then advanced to her first
French Open final since
2002 by,dispatching Sara
Errani 6-0, 6-1 in 46 min-
utes of astounding power
and precision.
Williams' win was the
most lopsided women's
semifinal at Roland Gar-
ros since 1984, when Chris
Evert beat Camille' Benja-
min 6-0, 6-0.
Sharapova beat Errani in
the final last year to com-
plete a career Grand Slam,
but she faces a tougher test
this time. She's 2-13 against
Williams, who has been on
a mission after more than
a decade of disappoint-
ment in Paris.
"Obviously whatever
I did in the past hasn't
worked," Sharapova said.
"So I'll have to try to do
something different and
hopefully it will."
The top-ranked Wil-
liams, a 15-time Grand
Slam champion, won her
pnly Roland Garros title 11
years ago by beating her
sisterVenus in the final.
"I'm very happy to be
back in the French Open
final 11 years later," Wil-
liams told the crowd in
French. "I'm still here 11
years later. It's so wonder-
ful for me."
While Williams easily
won her semifinal,


I THA.S CIULiTE I u PLESS
Serena Williams returns the ball to Italy's Sara Errani during their semifinal match of the French Open at the Roland Garros
stadium Thursday in Paris.


Sharapova advanced past
Azarenka with a clamor.
The two most notorious
grunters in tennis wailed
on nearly every swing,
matching pitch and vol-
ume as they swapped
powerful shots from the
baseline. They sounded
as if they were pushing
a stalled Peugeot across
lanes of traffic in the Arc
de Triomphe.
"Come on, Monica,"
a spectator yelled at
Sharapova, referring to one
of the game's great grunt-
ers, Monica Seles.
The aggressive swings
resulted in a seesaw semi-
final. Sharapova whacked
12 aces but was erratic
with her second serve, and
her groundstrokes were


also unpredictable.
She needed five match
points to seal the victory.
Serving for the victory for
the second time, she held
at love and finished with
an ace.
"Those last few points are
the toughest," Sharapova
said. "I'm so happy that I
regrouped and came out at
5-4 and served it out really
well:"
Following a 35-minute
rain delay before the third
set, Sharapova hit four
double-faults in a single
game, the last of them on
break point, to make it 2-
all. She struggled again
with her serve at 5-2, los-
ing a tense, sloppy 12-min-
ute game when she squan-
dered four match points


and double-faulted on the
final two points.
She was steadier at the
end, however, and after
accepting a cursory con-
gratulatory handshake
from Azarenka, Sharapova
screamed through a grin.
"To come back as the
defending champion, it's
extremely 'special to get
back on that stage where
it comes down to the last
two players of the tourna-
ment," Sharapova said.
She improved her record
at Roland Garros to 43-9,
best among active women.
That includes victories in
her past 13 French Open
Matches.
Azarenka, a two-time
Australian Open cham-
pion, was playing in her


first Roland Garros semi-
final. She still believes she
can win a clay-court Grand
Slam title.
"Oh, sure," she said. "Not
this year."
In the men's semifinals
Friday, seven-time cham-
pion Rafael Nadal plays No.
1 Novak Djokovic for the
35th'time, and Frenchman
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga faces
Spaniard David Ferrer.
Williams took control
against Errani by win-
ning 26 of 34 points in the
opening set. The match
was 37 minutes old be-
fore Errani won a game,
and the crowd responded
with a roar as the Italian
raised her arms in mock
jubilation.
Williams was undeterred


and raced to the finish line.
She won 28 of 33 points on
her serve and had a 40-2
advantage in winners while
losing only 16 points.
"I had td win this match,"
Williams said. "So I told
myself, 'Serena, be focused
today."
The result extended her
career-best winning streak
to 30 consecutive matches.
She improved to 20-3 in
major semifinals, and she's
6-0 against Errani.
"What she did today is
unbelievable," Errani said.
"She's very strong. She's an
unbelievable player. She
had a great day."
Sharapova, who lost
her opening set in the
quarterfinals 6-0, started
slowly again against Aza-
renka. Sharapova double-
faulted twice in the first.
game and was broken at
love.
But this time she quickly
righted herself, temporar-
ily finding the range with
her serve and cracking fe-
rocious returns. She won
22 of the final 26 points in
the first set and closed it
out with an ace.
"The serve is definitely
something that you never
knowwhat to expect," Aza-
renka said.
Then Sharapova began
to misfire while Azarenka
found her timing. Con-
sistently stepping into
the court and smacking
groundstrokes close to the
baseline, Azarenka swept
the final four games of
the second set to even the
match.
Next came rain, andwhen
the match resumed both
players struggled to find
any rhythm. The tennis
was louder than the crowd
in the third set when sub-
dued fans quietly endured
a flurry of errors forced
and unforced by the two
big hitters.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Toronto Blue Jays' Melky Cabrera stretches before a baseball game against the San Francisco
Giants on Wednesday in San Francisco.


MLB asks for FedEx, phone


records in drug lawsuit


The Associated Press

NEW YORK Major
League Baseball's lawyers
have issued subpoenas
to Federal Express, AT&T
Mobility and T-Mobile
USA in an attempt to gain
records for its investiga-
tion of players suspected
of using performance-
enhancing drugs.
The subpoenas were is-
sued May 23, according
to a case file in Florida's
Circuit Court for Miami-
Dade County, where MLB
sued Biogenesis of Ameri-
ca, anti-aging clinic head
Anthony Bosch and five
others in March.
MLB asked Federal Ex-
press tq turn over ship-
ment records for Bio-
genesis, Bosch, the other
defendants and a long
list of individuals who
appeared to be affiliated
with Bosch.
MLB asked the phone
companies for call re-
cords, texts and subscrib-
er info for the phones of
Juan Carlos Nunez, an
associate of outfielder
Melky Cabrera who was
banned from big league
clubhouses last year,
.and Porter Fischer, who
m /


was affiliated with the
now-closed anti-aging
clinic.
In addition, a subpoena
was issued for Biogen-
esis and related entities
in March, seeking records
involving maj6r leaguers
and 70 banned substanc-
es. No players were men-
tioned by name.
Bosch agreed this week
to cooperate with MLB's
investigation. Because
any discipline could be
challenged by the players'
association in grievances
before an arbitrator, MLB
likely would want re-
cords to corroborate any
testimony.
There was no indication
in the files whether the
companies planned to
challenge subpoenas.
"FedEx complies with
all valid subpoenas and
we are unable to com-
ment further," company
spokesman Scott Fiedler
said.
AT&T Mobility spokes-
man.Mark Siegel said he
was looking into the mat-
ter, and T-Mobile spokes-
woman Anne Marshall
did not return a phone
call and an email seeking
comment.


MLB opened its latest
drug investigation follow-
ing a Miami New Times
report about Biogenesis in
January. Alex Rodriguez,
Ryan Braun and Cabrera
are among the players
whose names appeared
in Biogenesis documents,
according to various
media reports. All have
denied any wrongdoing.


Cowboys DT Brent tests



positive for marijuana


The Associated Press

DALLAS Dallas Cow-
boys defensive tackle Josh
Brent tested positive for
marijuana while he awaits
trial in a car crash that
killed a teammate, pros-
ecutors said Thursday in
asking a judge to revoke
the player's $100,000 bond
and issue a warrant for his
arrest.
Police have accused
Brent of driving with a
blood-alcohol content
more than twice the le-
gal limit during the Dec. 8
car crash that killed Jerry
Brown, a Cowboys practice
squad player.
Prosecutors said in their
motion that Brent failed
a urine test taken after a
May 24 court hearing in
which they had sought for
his bond to be revoked due
to problems with his alco-
hol monitoring. While the
judge declined to do so, he
did order Brent to provide
a urine sample.
A hearing on the pros-
ecutors' motion had not


wuxte Specials
Mufflers & Exhaust


H .I P I


been scheduled Thurs-
day afternoon. Brent's at-
torney, George Milner,
did not immediately re-
turn a phone message
and a spokeswoman for
the Dallas County dis-
trict attorney declined to
comment.
Brent is required to wear
an alcohol ankle moni-
tor and appear for regular
meetings with a county of-
ficer. Judge Robert Burns
last month ordered a sec-
ond form of monitoring
to take breath samples,
and for Brent to pro-
vide the sample after the
hearing.
The prosecutors' motion
said the test results indi-
cate Brent took marijuana
within 30 days of the test
date and it did not appear
the exposure to marijuana
was second-hand.


"Given the defendant's
prior alcohol-related con-
tacts and the severity of
the charge in this case, it
is the State's belief that the
defendant continues to
pose a threat to the com-
munity," prosecutors said
in the motion.
A crash report released
by suburban Dallas po-
lice says Brent was driv-
ing the night of the crash
with a suspended driv-
er's license from Illinois,
where he pleaded guilty
four years ago .to a mis-
demeanor driving un-
der the influence charge.
Brent and Brown both
played college football at
Illinois.,
Brent faces up to 20 years
in prison if convicted of in-
toxication manslaughter,
though he could also get
probation.


LOCAL NEWS, YOUR WAY.
WEEKNIGHTS AT 5:00, 6:00, & 10:00


STAYINFOMED
I = = I^^^






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN u www.jcfloridan.com


Judge tosses lawsuit by


Pa. governor against NCAA


The Associated Press
HARRISBURG, Pa. A federal
judge on Thursday threw out the
governor's lawsuit against the
NCAA over sanctions against Peyn
State related to Jerry Sandusky, call-
ing his argument "a Hail Mary pass"
that easily warranted dismissal.
U.S. Middle District Judge Yvette
Kane's decision put an early end
to the antitrust lawsuit Gov. Tom
Corbett filed in January in which
he sought to overturn a $60 million
fine, a four-year bowl ban, scholar-
ship limits and other penalties.
She said she could not "find any
factual allegations supporting (Cor-
bett's) allegation of 'concerted ac-
tion' that might nudge its conspira-
cy claim into 'plausible' territory."
The NCAA said it was "exceed-
ingly pleased" and hoped the ruling
would help heal divisions caused by
the Sandusky scandal.
Corbett expressed disappoint-
ment and said he feels strongly the
claims he raised were compelling
and deserved a thorough review'by
the courts.
"Countless individuals and small
businesses throughout the state
will continue to suffer because of
the NCAA's actions," Corbett said.
The judge wrote that even if the
penalties make it harder for Penn
State to recruit quality football
players, that would not make it an
antitrust case.
"The fact that Penn State will of-
fer fewer scholarships over a pe-
riod of four years does not plausi-
bly support its allegation that the
reduction of scholarships at Penn
State will result in a market-wide
anticompetitive effect, such that
the 'nation's top scholastic football
players' would be unable to obtain
a scholarship in the nationwide
market for Division I football play-
ers," Kane wrote.
She said the case raises issues that
are important matters of public de-
bate but not antitrust questions.


I THE ASSOCIAI ED PRESS
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett participates in the National Governors Association
2013 Winter Meeting in Washington on Feb. 23. A federal judge on Thursday threw
out the governor's lawsuit against the NCAA over sanctions against Penn State
related to Jerry'Sandusky.


"In another forum the complaint's
appeal to equity and common sense
may win the day, but in the anti-
trust world these arguments fail to
advance the ball," Kane said.
Sandusky, a former Penn State
assistant football coach, is serving
a decades-long prison sentence
for sexual abuse of 10 boys. He has
maintained his innocence.
The university, which agreed to
the NCAA penalties, was not a party
to the case.
Kane produced a "thorough anal-
ysis and thoughtful opinion," said
Donald Remy, the NCAAs chief le-
gal officer.
"Our hope is that this decision not
only will end this case but also serve
as a beginning of the end of the di-
vide among those who, like Penn
State, want to move forward to put
the horror of the Sandusky crimes
behind the university and those
who want to prolong the fight and
with it the pain for all involved,"
Remy said.


Corbett said the decision was un-
der legal review and did not indicate
if he plans to appeal. His office has
not disclosed the cost for outside
legal counsel to pursue the lawsuit.
During arguments last month, the
NCAA's lawyer said the sanctions
were not likely to harm the overall
market for higher education or for
top-flight football players. He said
antitrust law did not apply and that
the organization acted to enforce
rules about honesty, sportsman-
ship and conduct.
Relatives of the late Joe Paterno,
who was Sandusky's boss for de-
cades, five Penn State trustees and
others connected to the university
have filed their own lawsuit against
the NCAA in county court. That suit
also seeks to overturn the NCAA
sanctions.
Wick Sollers, a lawyer who repre-
sents the Paterno family, said their
lawsuit against the NCAA raises
"significantly different claims and
legal theories."


Saban offers Bama

tix in auction

tied to home sale


The Associated Press
BIRMINGHAM, Ala.
- University of Alabama
coach Nick Saban offered
Crimson Tide football tick-
ets, sideline passes and an
office tour in a charity auc-
tion linked to the sale of his
multimillion-dollar lake
home, set for Thursday.
The New York-based
company selling Saban's
north Georgia home at
Lake Burton, Concierge
Auctions, said fans could
register online to win the
ticket package. The game
tickets and other perks
were to be sold to the high-
est bidder before the sale of
Saban's lake home, initially
priced at $11 million.
All proceeds from the
football package auction
will go to Saban's charity,
Nick's Kids, the company
said. Saban and others
have made donations to
the nonprofit fund, which
has provided money, in-
cluding more than $1 mil-
lion for relief work after
the monster tornado that
wrecked Tuscaloosa in
2011, killing dozens.
Concierge Auctions an-
nounced the charity sale
this week in an email mes-
sage that linked to a web-
site promoting the auction
of Saban's six-bedroom,
9,600-square-foot home,
which has its own three-
story lighthouse. The foot-
ball package will be sold
before the home, the an-
nouncement said.
The charity sale included
four tickets to Saban's pri-
vate family box for a South-
eastern Conference home
game during the upcom-


ing season; a parking pass;
pre-game sidelines passes;
and tours of Bryant-Denny
Stadium, the Crimson Tide
locker room and Saban's
office.
A spokesman for Saban,
Alabama sports publi-
cist Jeff Purinton, said
the sale of the home and
the football package were
separate. An official with
Concierge Auctions didn't
immediately return mes-
sages seeking comment.
Saban issued a state-
ment last month saying
he developed the home
with a builder. Saban and
his family have owned an-
other house on the lake for
12 years.
The director of the Ala-
bama Ethics Commission,
Jim Sumner, said the sales
did not appear to be a prob-
lem under a state law that
prohibits public employees
from personally profiting
from their positions.
"It seems, other than cre-
ating some buzz for people
looking at his property for
sale, the benefits of all of
this goes to Nick's Kids,"
said Sumner, who said he
was unaware of the sale
until contacted by The
Associated Press.
While the stadium and
office tours might sound
exclusive to some fans,
Sumner said they actu-
ally are "a fairly common
thing they do for a lot of
people."
An attorney for the ethics
agency, Hugh Evans, said
the football-related auc-
tion seemed to be nothing
more than "a carrot to get
people to see the property
and maybe bid on it."


College
Basketball III -

Ex-Auburn i

player I' i

pleads I


not guilty

Player accused
of fixing game
The Associated Press
MONTGOMERY, Ala. -
Former Auburn basketball
player Varez Ward pleaded
not guilty Thursday to
charges that he conspired
to fix a 2012 game that his
team lost to Arkansas.
During a brief arraign-
ment hearing in federal
court, Ward stood quietly
as his attorney announced
the plea. U.S. Magistrate
Judge Wallace Capel Jr. set
a July 22 trial date for Ward.
An FBI investigation re-
sulted in a grand jury in-
dicting Ward. He was ar-
rested Monday on charges
of bribery related to a
sports contest and conspir-
acy counts that accuse him
of trying to fix the point
spread in Auburn's South-
eastern Conference game
against Arkansas on Jan.
25, 2012. Ward came off
the bench in that game but
crumpled to the floor after
playing only 19 seconds
with an apparent leg injury.
Arkansas won 56-53.
Ward was suspended be-
fore a Feb. 25, 2012, game,
also against Arkansas, and
didn't play for the Tigers
again.
Ward, a 6'2" guard, av-
eraged nine points per
game and started 17
games in his only season
at Auburn. He'd played two
seasons for Texas before
transferring to Auburn.
Federal prosecutors are
accusing Ward of attempt-
ing to recruit other Auburn
players to help fix the game
and offering to pay other
J players for their help.


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r? ~BUNK BEDS ROPER WASHER
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-14B FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 2013


SPORTS







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
"WE. GOT WAOTREg UOLIlC;TKION I GTRE Pt UST SCEt0 U5 NT LEA TERE-SURE. U .E ( LOT OF
FO K K EW cF(FINT I COUPLE- EE' WEEK! FOY. ,oP^ COPP$Ttg-tTWtt
SCk.b IN TlkE 4 KK\L ,PEOPLE WIT OUT T TO ?O USINE.,SS
4rT",lTO5PkFZI
F^~ ~ T-TO.^-1I r^ ^/OI >NWS ^


BUT IT COULDN'T
HAVE BEEN WHO
I THOUGHT
IT WAS. ,
BECAUSE \ \
SHE MOVED J-
AWAY' -


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
PEOPLE OPPRESSED O I'~~7 D LISTEN I A HRPMpENHH! MEANWHILE, IN THE PIT...
' FOI FAR TO1 LONG, yk1 I. IF Ij, IT'LL NEVER rt 7'7 PUTSCH EH? SO -
KWLSOMEDAY RISETI { H. APPEN YOU'RE SUGGESTiN.
RI6HT THIS WRONG 6u.' ^* I (WE PLOT TO OVER-
I.ROW ,-- -- |uZ7


..AND BASEBALL
I THE AND ROMANCE
PROCESS, DON'T IX.
RIPPED
MY 00
HEART -
OUT' -
'r / R ,


I Guess iXM -a
GLUTeN FoF
PONISHMeNT.





LI7


Ar'A +ha-V
enPur -'A -,/,
lesson:-i
'Pun> \p,-kV\


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Designated
6 Basketball
player
11 Purple
flowers
13 Roof of the
mouth
14 Nutritious
legume
15 Clears
16 Ripen
17 Billboards
18Canine
command
21 Gets closer
23Magna -
laude
26Thole filler
27 "-cost
you"
28 Wise men
29 Opposed
to
31 Prima
donnas
32 Open-back
shoe
33 Obvious
35 Keep an
eye on
36 Soprano's
piece
37 Lemon
cooler
38 Barnyard
abode


39- salt
40A little bit
41 Belly
muscles
42 Meadow
44 River in a
waltz
47 Engraver
51 Oozes out
52 India's
Mother -
53 Malodorous
54 Ms.
Witherspoon

DOWN
1 Goose egg
2 you
with it?
3 Hr. fraction
4 This, in
Barcelona
5 Conde-
scending
6 Funny
people
7 Sorrowful
wail
8 Driver's
fill-up
9 Summer in
Cannes
10 Home tel.
12 Icy
downpours
13 Cultured
gem


Answer to Previous Puzzle


RCA COLO RED
ELF PAPER HI E
BA RR ACUDA UA R E
L EE g

NTSI CMET
EIIP I
LE1 PLY M
YDE LD w I E|LDED
APED A!K ELI
NIB UKE PUMA

ROB[ES G iOVERNS
SHE IRONEDOUT
V A DUNES AMP

18 Talks big 43 Ranch
19 Young bird segment
of prey 44 Dict. entry
20 Coarse 45 Lumberjack
22 Makes tool
different 46 Fanatic
23 Warning 48 Half a bray
24 Kampala's 49 Superman's
country emblem
25 Lightly 50- Dawn
sprayed Chong
28 Central
30 Gary's st.
31 Width
34 Meadow
flower
36 Basilica
parts
39 Receded
41 Import cars


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


6-7 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"R H KK MJB LJ RPGE MJB LJ ... VBE

EPHYH'T OJ TBAP EPCOD GT RPGE
WCDPE PGXH VHHO. EPGE'T G RGTEH

JU ECWH." ECW WADYGR

Previous Solution: "Ask the people in Europe who won World War II ... they say
the United States won the war and saved the world." Bob Feller
TODAY'S CLUE: d sienba n
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist, by Universal Uclick 6-7


Dear Annie: I am a 16-year-old girl in
high school. I have so much to be thank-
ful for, but recently, I have been feeling
like something is wrong with me. Quite
frankly, I am depressed. I am always
tired, anxious and nervous, and I have
outrageous mood swings. I have lost all
focus, ambition and motivation, and
sometimes it just hurts to breathe. I hate
to use this as an excuse for my grades,
but I had been a straight-A student,
and now I have two C's and a B. This is
unacceptable. I hate disappointing my
parents.
Along with the grades and the other
symptoms I mentioned, I am constantly
having trouble eating and recently
resorted to self-harm. Suicidal thoughts
also accompany this, as much as I hate to
admit it. I worry that if I tell my parents,
they will hate me. I don't have a teacher




On a game show, a prize was a trip to a El
pean destination with a week in a luxury
tel that, according to the announcer, inclu
24-hour access to the contestant's room!
At the bridge table, access to one hand
the other can be vital to enjoying success. I
does that apply in this deal?
Against three no-trump, West leads the sp1
nine. How should South plan the play?
In the auction, North's two-diamond nr
was New Minor Forcing, promising at 1
game-invitational values and asking opened
describe his hand further. Three clubs dei
three hearts, indicated a good five-card
and implied a weak spade or diamond hold
(Otherwise, South would have continued w
two no-trump.)
South has eight top tricks: three spades (
en the lead), two hearts and three clubs. Wl
will he find winner No. 9?
Against best defense, there isn't time to I
on diamonds or hearts. Declarer must gi
fourth club trick. But that requires losing
club and having a hand entry in spades.
If South reasonably assumes the spade r
is top of nothing, he can take the first trick
dummy's ace and play on clubs. But it is s
to put in dummy's spade jack. If it wins, Sot
king is his entry; or, if East covers with
queen, South wins with his king and can ge
his hand with the spade 10. But if South err.
playing the spade two, East puts up his qu(
and the contract's door closes.


ENTEBTAINlYIENT


or counselor I feel comfortable confid-
ing in. None of my friends know, and I
am scared that I will do more damage to
myself than I intend. Please help me. I
hide behind a smile every day, and I am
so lost.
DEPRESSED IN HIDING

Dear Depressed: Please tell your parents
you aren't feeling well and ask them to
make an appointment for you to see your
doctor. A lot of what you are describing
may have physiological origins that can
be treated (such as a hormonal imbal-
ance). You can speak to the doctor pri-
vately and tell him what you told us. But
please don't be afraid to discuss this with
your parents. They love and care about
you. They may be worried, but they will
want to help, and you will feel better
confiding in them.


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


THAT A BABY BY PAUL TRAP


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"It's a bicycle roof-rack."


North 06-07-13
4 AJ2
VAK542
+ J976

West East
#98763 Q4
YJ6 VQ1073
*AQ4 *K83
*762 *J1098
South
4 K105
9 8 ,
S1052
4AKQ54

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
l# Pass 1 V Pass
1 NT Pass 2+ Pass
34 Pass 3NT All pass


Opening lead: A 9


Anne's Mailbox


FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 2013 5B -


K,., -scopes


GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Instead of dwelling on
what you don't have, be ap-
preciative of what you've
got.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- Even if certain compan-
ions sometimes annoy you,
concentrate on appreciat-
ing what they do right.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- If you have to work with
someone whom you've dis-
agreed with in the past, try
to let bygones be bygones.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Although circumstances
might force you to social-
ize with someone whom
you've been trying to avoid,
don't let your true feelings
show. It will only make you
look bad.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Be careful about how
you treat a workplace rival.
Others are watching you
closely, so be a gracious
and fair competitor.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Even if you believe
your ideas are far superior
to those of your compan-
ions, you should treat them
fairly.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Try to think be-
yond the material. Don't
be concerned about how
much you can get, but
about the goodwill and
consideration that you can
generate.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) If you are too forceful
and insistent, you're apt to
be disappointed.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Though you're aware
of the plight of someone
who has helped you in
the past, you might take
no action to alleviate
matters. This would be a
shame.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) When around a
friend who is constantly
demeaning others, don't
stand idly by. Do what you
can to change the situation
for the better.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-Your reputation could be
shaky, so tread lightly. Be-
have as if the whole world
is just waiting for you to
make a mistake.
TAURUS (April 20-May20)
- No argument is worth
the cost of losing a friend,
especially if the issue is
completely unimportant.








6 B Friday, June 7. 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIEDS


M WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED

MARKETPLACE


|k) ANN"Uh i4r'l'""


Academia Tutoring
Now accepting students Pre K 5th grade
certified teacher $25. per hr. sin. group class
discounts. Call: 334-685-9493.
TORS 'O IS' NIOR'
World's longest Yard Sale
(starting in Gadsen, AL)-
August 1-4 2013
Christmas in _New York City,0BilApple
December 1-8 2013
Christmas Lights Tour New Orleans, LA.
Cruise on Steamboat Natchez Mississippi
December 13-15 2003
Tournament of Roses Parade. Pasadena CA
Los Angeles, Grand Canyon,
Las Vegas, Sedona, AZ
December 29, 2013 / January 8, 2014
For more information, call Merita Stanley
0 850-594-9980

1$) FiNANCIAL-
USINES OPP 11TUITIES


Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training'and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com

Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
504-915-1474

(*) [MERCI4N1I4EW


DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
NEEDED I BUY SEALED/
UNEXPIRED BOXES
CALL BOB (334) 219-4697
OR (850) 710-0189


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
r~~ ............... .
ANNE'S DAYLILIES
827S. APPLETREE ST
SDothan, Daylilies ($1- up)
334-792-0653 or 334-797-9657
Free Perennial with purchase! V

Buy Swamp Gator Natural
Insect Repellent.
Family and Pet Safe
Available at The Home Depot
.,..


Border Collie Puppy: adorable 9 week old male
$200 Call 850-693-0139
Miniature Schnauzers, CKC,
2 Males, Females, Salt 'n Pepper,
Born 4/22/13, Ready June 3rd. $350
lucretiafarris 0)farristrucking.com,
850-263-4354
Super Puppies Sale
Shih-ChI Mix $125,:Chinese Chihuahua
Female and Papillions. Now Taking Deposits
on Yorkies, Shih-Poo and Japenese chins.
.* 334-718,4a886 "- -

NEED TO PLACE AN AD?
It's simple, call one of our friendly
Classified representatives


and they will be glad to assist you.


..l .


BLUEBERRIES
U, Pck $7.00 per gallon'
We-Pick $20.00 per gallon
Co. Rd. 33 in Columbia
4 334-796-8165 4w
MA *^^^















Vine Ripe Tomatoes



Home Grown Greens
Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!

334-793-6690



p Aplin Farms
_-) Strawberries
V ( Peaches, Green
Beans, Sqaush,
lettuce, cabbage, Broccoli,
onions & Zucchini
Open Mon-Sat (8-6)
4 334-726-5104 4

f FRESH SWEET CORN
4W May 29th & July 7th
GREEN CIRCLES FARM
233 Cooler Rd, Bainbridge
229-1246-1724
Yellow, White and Bi-Color 2
Varieties Available Market Price _4

flendrix Farm Produce
Now Open Hwy. 52 Slocomb
S4 334-726-7646 4
Natunly Grown laebrles ,
A. or "1-ot'ar W kk
334-M-MM Locaftd 52W
33 ou ftom cwhde fta n0 i t for rmied.

VEITCH'S BLUEBERRY FARM
7772 Howell Rd. Sneads, FL 32460
YOU PICK BLUEBERRIES
Opening June 1 Tues- Sun 9 a.m. 6 p.m.


SBALLARD DAYLIULIES
252 N. jo. Rd. 9 (3 mies N. Slocomb)
SL% & up* FREE Amaryfs w/purchase.
334-886-2273 or 1-866-745-1243

TREES TREES
..-. TREES
*^ 12 fLtall30 gal.
p ,containers
S$69.95 buy 2
get oneFREE
Live Oaks, Crape Myrtle,
Cherry Laurel & Magnolias
By appointment
334-692-3695


-ANTD-FRM&GRE


-Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
0No tract to small / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
I 334-389-2003

[*) EMPLOYMENT

City of Marianna has a Police Officer
position available. Call 718-0326 for details.
EOE/Drug Free Workplace Employer


(p)


EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


N Academia Tutoring .I
SNow accepting students Pre K 5th grade *
certified teacher $25. per hr. sm. group class
L discounts. Call: 334-685-9493.


s NOW ENROLLING for
Medical Assisting,
FlDO TIC Medical Office
FO ( fAdministration,
COLLEGE Pharmacy Technology,
Electrical Trades &
HVAC! Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

R-IEN IA 7
hIlfl REAL ESTATE FOR RENT"


1/1 Apartment for Rent
For info call 850-579-8895
2BR1 / BAA par1:f'tF~1met ForIRentin: l



n Beach Cottage for Rent: 3BR 1.SBA,
Large screened porch, Beacon Hill
(Near Mexico Beach) $500/wk
850-482-2539 or 201-888-2388

1 & 2BR Apartments in Marlanna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent Included. For details
a 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
2BR/1BA Newly Renovated 265B I road St
Open floor plan. Cottondale. No Pets.
$45 Mo. + $400 Dep. Cal 850-352-4222
3BR/1BA Spacious Home with large rooms,
hardwood floor, CH&A, large garage and
fenced backyard. 4323 Derring St.
$725 Mo. + $600 Dep. Call 850-643-8806
s 3BR/2BA House in quiet neighborhood
in Chattahochee, recently renovated inside
and outside. $650 Mo. + $650 Dep.
4 1BR/1BA Efficiency Apartment in quiet
neighborhood in Chattahochee recently
renovated inside. $350 Mo. + $350 Dep.
Call 850-592-7276
4/2 Lg. Home w/CH&A 2 car garage
fhmced back yd. In Afford S850 mo. + dep.
850-S79-4317 & 850-666-1965 AvaL Now
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
4* 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Prpperty Management IsOur ONLYBusiness"

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountrylMng.com.
850-209-8847 -.
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roommate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message


YARD


2553 Lakeshore Dr. off Hwy 90 pass Hopkins
Sat. 8th. 7:30-12 dolls, H/H, TV, Christmas
decor, FSU stuff and much more !!!
3-Family Yard Sale 2761 Panhandle Road.
Marianna. Sat June 8th (7am-Noon)
Rain or Shine! Huge Variety of Items!!
4882 Bluesprings Rd. Marianna Sat 8th. 7-1
Suits, hats, shoes, nice clothes for women, kids
men Ig. & sm sz. & baby too. H/H & misc.
Come see and to much-to list.
Backyard Sale 4342 Deering Street. Marlanna
Sat. June 8th (7am-Until) Luggage, Clothes,
Home Decor, H/H items and more!


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


2 2 &3BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595 I

4 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself) l
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595 I

For Rent Greenwood, Marlanna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn mainLincl.
-# 850-593-4700 4w

[i a New Pomn?

ChNc out th Claifiedg
M'I0,"i"XIt ......
(^\\ ,, RESIbEN -:A:."
Llj REAL ESTATE FOdSA .

5080 Peanut Rd Graceville. 4 bedroom 2 bath
on over 4 acres nice well maintained home
nestled under large oaks.
$115,000. 850-258-9442


Opportunity to Buy: $3,795,000 The most
elegant three story, mediterranean style,
gulf front home in Carillon Beach. A 24 hour
guarded, gated community on Panama City
Beach. This 4BR/5BA home with guest
cottage, has italian tile on the first floor
and marble floors on the 2nd and 3rd.
For further info: please call Jim McDaniels
@ 850-238-0251 MIS #608295

S pRECR"
l J ..:: 3 .. iE,^.--',, .';.',i


Bass Tracker 2002 17ft 2" long all welded alum.
hall, w/ console, special edition Pro team
175XT 40hp tracer by Mercury Marine, trolling
motor, motor guide, 4300 ft. operated, tilt trail-
pr. alum. w/ snair tire. $4000. 850-557-4925.


SFisher Freedom Deluxe
S 2006 22' pontoon: 90hp
Mercury, 4 stroke, less
Than SOhrs, pristine condi-
tion, custom trailer
w/guides, trolling mtr, battery charger, front &
rear electric anchor, extra fishing chair & cus-
tom cover. $14,500. 334-493-6496; 334-504-2555


2009 K-Z Spree Travel Trailer. Model 260RBS,
26ft., weight 5100 Ibs., with large slide out.
This camper is like new the stove/oven and the
detachable outdoor grill have never been used.
Also has Winegard auto seeking satellite,
mounted on roof ready to use. Price $19,500.
For more information call: 334-790-4010.
g2010 Keystone 32'
l Travel Trailer 278-RLS
I slide, tan interior option,
queen bedroom, new a/c
unit in 2012, rear leaving feature with 2 swivel
rockers & large window, sleeps 4-6, lots of stor-
age, excellent cond, $19,500 OBO. 334-693-5454

it, 51,F
~~.;MhI


t PANAMA CITY BEACH CONDO I
2/1.5, Pool, Tennis, Club House
Fully Furnished On Front Beach Road
S125S/Night S750/Weeik, $80 Cleaning Fee
334-300-6979 or 334-393-3559



SALES ,


HUGE 2161 Sandridge Church Rd. Fri. 7th & Sat
8th 7-? RAIN OR SHINE items to much to list
Multi Family Yard Sale 4558 Red Oak Trace.
near FL Cavern State Park. Marianna. Sat June
8th (8am-Until) Sectional Sofa, Other Furniture,
H/H item and Clothing! Rain or Shine! *
Multi Family Yard Sale 4787 Country Lake Dr.
Sat. June 8th (7am-Until)
Yard Sale Hwy 73 South 2 Miles. 2485 Fillmoore
Dr. Marianna. Sat June 8th (7am-Until)
Something for Everyone! Come Check it Out!


Sudoku


2- windows white 32x60 $25. ea. 850-526-2845.


Black Bookcase -Tall. $15. 850-693-4657


Black TV Stand -Small. $15. 850-693-4657
Bose Radio w/ remote $275. 850-263-6144
Broyhill Dresser- Wood, 8 drws. $45. 693-4657


Rumner Trailer Hitch $29. like new 482-7665


Camera Olvmous 600UZ. $149. 850-482-7665


Car speaker box for 2-12" $35. 850-482-8310
Coffee table: oak. 2 end table.$75. 850-482-2155
Diamond Earring Cluster 1K. gold $400 790-4892
Dolls Porcelain w/stand, $9 ea. 850-482-7665
Door: Interior, hardware, casing $30. 526-3333
Guitar Amp Vox with reverb. $125. 482-6022
Lawn mower: 6.75 hp, 22" cut $75. 850-482-2155
Michelin Tire-225 70R 19.5, $150. 850-482-6022
Mirror: 33 X 43 w/ screws, Free. 850-526-3333
Motorcycle Helmet -ASX, $75. 850-482-6022
P265/R18 Tire- $15. 850-482-6022
Tire 23565R17- $35. 850-483-6022
Tire: P22570R16 $35 334-482-6022
Trpn>_/2-IS6cn1c tf; Qc5-48-6022


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Level: 0 -2 3]
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.


Solution to Thursday's puzzle
425198637
781623549
639475218
7_ 6 A2_ 3L 5J4 J9
748237956

5,76914823
293856174


367582491
812349765
A-1 -- 4 8 2 _7AA5


-9---5----4 -7---6--. -l3 2

8 15 4 9 7 6 5-1_2


6/7/13


~' 7'.. G.M. Properties of PC
A h".' Beach 800-239-2059
SFully Furnished Condos
& Toqwnhouses
near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $250 nt
Portside Resort starting @ $125.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front, starting @ $70 nt.
www.gmproperties.com


7 8
67


56 81

87 9




1 23

13 75


54

63


Tires: (4) P235/55R/18 $50 334-482-6022
Vanity: 3 drawer no top. FREE. 850-526 3333
White Dresser-$20. 850-693-4657
JWindows shutters: 5 sets $50. 850-526-3333


ci, aiui.. ....... J Q" I.. .....-..r -.... .. .. ..


4- "Illuv"m vv 111-


r


oullipci 11"11.1


i ires-Z/ZJbbUKlt) :W. O.-W-14OZ-OUZZ


I


mm









www.ICFIORIDAN.com


Motor Home: Own a 35 ft. diesel pusher motor
home for only $34k. 1996 Alegro Bus, dual roof
air conditioners, dual heaters, three awings,
hydraulic jacks, 6.5 k generator, rear view
camera. New roof, tires, refrigerator, TV,
microwave, DVD/VHS player, carpet and couch
and chairs recovered. Call 334-805-7014

LMMI TRANSPORTATION
ATS* 0 *"

Chevrolet 2011 Aveo, 4 door, Super Sharp! $200
down, $219 per month, Call Ron Ellis 334-714-
0028.
Chevy 1992 Corvette Convertible, fully loaded,
70.000 miles, asking $15.000. 334-441-6042
Dodge 2006 Magnum R/T Hemi Fully loaded
with sunroof over 116,000 miles. $10,500.
334-441-6042 1-Owher Car
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
l GOT BAD CREDIT?
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy
slow credit ok.
so Down/lst Palmert.,
Tax, Tag A tite
,, Call Steve Pope 33 c'A.J-:, "
Ford 2011 Focus, loaded, like new! $200 down,
$229 per month. Call Ron Ellis 334-714-U028.
Honda 2010 Civic EX, 4 door, sunroof, low
miles, under warranty. $200 down, $269 per
month, Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Honda 2011 CMc LX: 4 door, power window,
power lock, 16k miles, white, excellent condi-
tion; 40MPG Highway & 33MPG City $14,000.
Call 334-790-6581
..... Honda 2012 Accord Coupe
bEXL: Automatic transmis-
sion with paddle shift,
navigation, sunroof, heat-
ed leather seats, 6 disc CD player. Has around
9.500 miles. Asking $24,900. Call 334-268-3900.
ULincoln 2003 Town Car executive model dual
zone AR, alloys wheels, tan/leather document-
ed service up to date, 156K miles, runs & looks
great, tinted windows, front CD player, 19 City,
25 Hwy. $7000. OBO. 334-360-5222
Mazda 2009 5 Sport -57K
Miles, Dark Gray, Fully
Loaded, New Tires, New
Battery, Excellent Condi-
Jtion $8,950 334-370-6239
Mustang 2002 GT convertible, good shape,
gray in color with black top, 4- new tires,
runs great 334-792-1070 or 334-435-2151
Toyota 2012 Corolla, GREAT GAS SAVER, 2 to
choose from. Still under factory warranty. $300
down, $300 per month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-
791-8243.
Toyota 2013 Tacoma
4 dr. 4 wheel drive. TRD off
road package. Automatic
l i transmission, rear locking
differential, tow package,
CD player. White exterior with grey interior.
Approx. 9,500 miles. $31,500. 334-268-3900


l 2007 Harley Davidson Dyna
Low Rider. 19.000 miles.
Exc. cond. Garage kept &
well maintained, regular
service intervals. Sundown-
er touring seat & backrest,
luggage rack, Rush mufflers V H fuelpak & K N
air filter. New rear tire & battery. Lots of extras
and chrome. See to appreciate. $8,700. Call
334-804-4035 .
AIH 2006 TX Chopper fully customized blue
w/graphics, S&S 124 cu. ft. motor, boss dual
intake powder coated blue, 10,400 miles,
$11,800. OBO 334-445-0366 MUST SEE !!!
Yamaha 1100 (1980) Midnight Special, storage
for 25 yrs. Like NEW $2500. 850-718-6541.
Yamaha FZ6 2007 13,500 miles, red, helmet
included, $4000. 850-526-5595.


Honda 2010 CR-V, certified, great fuel mileage,
best selling SUV Honda has. $300 down, $300
per month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243.


Commercial 2005 GreatDane 48f. Reefer
SB300+ Thermoking with lift gate, in good
condition $18,000 OBO 334-797-1495.
Ford XLT S150 1995 Ext. Cab, runs good, teal
green, Heat & Air works, 302 engine $2000. Also
willing to trade for a compact car in good run-
ning condition. 850-693-5812 or 850-557-8365.
Massey Ferguson Tractor md#1215
with Massey Ferguson 225 ft. mower
$4000. 334-797-8523
TC35 New Holland 2003 Tractor 4-wheel drive,
front end loader, 415 hours, diesel, $15,500
334-691-2803 or 334-797-7881.
TRACTOR FOR SALE-Ford 4000, 52 H.P. Diesel, 6
FT. Bush Hog, 6 FT. Heavy Duty Adjustable Disk
With Grease Bearings, 205-902-4212


SFor sale by Owner
2006 Pontiac. Montana SV6,
-88K miles, 7 passenger
sliding power door, rail
guards, back-up assist,
front/rear CD/MP3, DVD w/remote, fabric w/4
captain seats. Maintained w/most service
records. 60-75% tread $5,900 334-790-6618


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!


AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


x CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES

I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664


CASH Guaranteed
Highest prices paid for Junk, old Farming
Equipment, Tractors, Semis, Junk Cars
Nothing to big, nothing to small
S334-596-7791





Got a Clunklelrw
'We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
CAL $325&tComplete Cars
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285


CLASSIFIED


ai* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
3W7949576 or 344-7914714



---LEGAEG CS
I '*:, %' d. ? S


LF160140
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009-CA-001077
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., successor by merger
to BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P.
Plaintiff,
vs.
JENNIFER SAMPSON et al;
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 13,
2013, and entered in Case No. 2009-CA-001077,
of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit
in and for JACKSON County, Florida. BANK OF
AMERICA, N.A., successor by merger to BAC
HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRY-
WIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. is Plaintiff
and JENNIFER SAMPSON N/K/A JENNIFER
MCNEAL SAMPSON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JENNIFER SAMPSON A/K/A JENNIFER MCNEAL
SAMPSON IF ANY; DONALD SAMPSON; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF DONALD SAMPSON IF ANY;
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
JOHN DOE AND; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION; are defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT
THE NORTH DOOR, at 4445 LAFAYETTE STREET,
MARIANNA in JACKSON County, FLORIDA
32446, at 11:00 A.M., on the 20th day of June,
2013, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST COR-
NER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTH-
EAST 1/4 OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH,
RANGE 10 WEST, PER PINEVIEW SUBDIVISION,
AN UNRECORDED PLAT IN JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 02 MI-
NUTES 12 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTER-
LY BOUNDARY OF PINEVIEW SUBDIVISION A
DISTANCE OF 330.40 FEET TO AN IRON ROD SET
IN THE CENTERLINE OF MCCALL LANE; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 22 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF MCCALL
LANE A DISTANCE OF 599.77 FEET TO AN IRON
ROD SET AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE CEN-
TERLINE OF MCCALL LANE AND THE CENTER-
LINE OF HANCOCK LANE; THENCE NORTH 63
DEGREES 09 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST A DIS-
TANCE OF 67.08 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT SET ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
OF MCCALL LANE AND CALL THIS THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY
ALONG THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF
MCCALL LANE ALONG A CURVE BEING CON-
CAVE TOWARDS THE RIGHT, HAVING A DELTA
ANGLE OF 89 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 10 SEC-
ONDS, A RADIUS OF 30.00 FEET, AN ARC DIS-
TANCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY OF 46.78
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT SET ON THE
EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF HANCOCK LANE A
DISTANCE OF 239.85 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 43
MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF
150.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT;
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 44
SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 270.21 FEET TO
A CONCRETE MONUMENT SET ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF MCCALL LANE;
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 22
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTHERLY
RIGHT OF WAY OF MCCALL LANE A DISTANCE
OF 120.38 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
THIS PARCEL CONTAINS 0.93 ACRES MORE OR
LESS AND IS LOCATED IN THE EAST 1/2 OF SEC-
TION 17, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST,
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILIT-
IES:
COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST COR-
NER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTH-
EAST 1/4 OF SECTION 17, T4N, R10W, JACKSON


Jackson County Floridan *


COUNTY FLORIDA; THENCE N 00 DEGREES 02
MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF
330.00' TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 43 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A1DIS-
TANCE OF 398.00' TO A POINT AND CALL THIS
THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF A 60 FOOT WIDE
EASEMENT (BEING 30' RIGHT AND 30' LEFT) OF
THE FOLLOWING CENTERLINE DESCRIPTION;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 22
SECONDS EAST ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF
MCCALL LANE A DISTANCE OF 997.77 FEET A
POINT AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE CENTER-
LINE OF SAID LANE AND THE CENTERLINE OF
HANCOCK LANE, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89
DEGREES 43 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST
ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID LANE A DIS-
TANCE OF 179.66 FEET TO THE TERMINUS.
ALSO
BEGIN AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE CENTER-
LINE OF MCCALL LANE AND THE CENTERLINE
OF HANCOCK LANE THENCE NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 23 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST A DIS-
TANCE OF 300.06 FEET TO THE TERMINUS.
TOGETHER WITH A 2006 ADDISON CAVALIER
DOUBLE-WIDE MOBILE HOME WITH SERIAL
NUMBERS: CV06AL0268504A AND
CV06AL0268504B.
A person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim with 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 5th day of May, 2013.
/s/DALE RABON GUTHRIE
As Clerk of said Court
By Tammy Baily
As Deputy Clerk
This Notice is provided pursuant to Administra-
tive Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the ,
Americans with the Disabilities Act, If you are a
person with a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O.
Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.
Submitted by:
Kahane & Associates, P.A.
8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000
Plantation, FL 33324
Telephone: (954) 382-3486
Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380
Designated service email: notice@
kahaneandassociates.com


L160129
LETTERS OF INTEREST
AND STATEMENTS OF QUALIFICATIONS
For Annual Survey Services
RFQ# 1213- ENG 12
Dear Vendor;

Thank you for your interest in doing business
with the Jackson County Board of County Com-
missioners. Currently, we are requesting Let-
ters of Interest and Statements of Qualifica-
tions from registered, qualified consultant
firms in the State of Florida with experience in
Surveying Services required in support of the
County's Engineering Department. It is the in-
tent of the County to select and negotiate an
Annual Agreement with the top ranked firm to
perform these services required by the Engi-
neering Department for the various county
projects. The selected firms shall serve as the
Jackson County Survey consultants for various
projects. Listed below is some pertinent infor-
mation regarding this Request for Qualifica-
tions:
RFQ number: 1213- ENG 12
Due Date: June 27, 2013 2:00 p.m., at the
Jackson County Engineering Department
2828 Owens Street, Marianna, Fl 32446
Complete copies of the RFQ package can be
obtained from the Engineering Department.
Please direct any questions regarding these
documents to Larry Alvarez at the Jackson
County Engineering Department. Questions
must be submitted in writing to Larry Alvarez
by email to lalvarez@jacksoncountyfl.com or
faxed to (850) 482-9063 with a copy to Jeannie
Bean by email to jbean@jacksoncountyfl.com.
We look forward to working with you.
Sincerely,
Larry Alvarez, County Engineer
Jackson County Board of County
Commissioners


FFriday, June 7, 2013- B
Friday, June 7, 2013 /B


LF160141
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR WATER
USE PERMIT
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chap-
ter 373, Florida Statutes, the following applica-
tion for a water use permit has been received
by the Northwest Florida Water Management
District:
Application number I 07395 filed 0S/30/2013
City of Marianna, Sunland Training Center,
Post Office Box 936, Marianna, FL 32447
Requesting an annual average daily withdrawal
of 990,000 gallons per day from the Floridan
Aquifer System for Public Supply use by an
existing facility.
General withdrawal locations) in Jackson
County: T05N, R09W, Sec. 18C; T05N, R10W, .
Sec. 24; TQ5N, R9W, Sec.18C
Interested persons may submit written
comments/objection or submit a written re-
quest for the notice of proposed agency action
(NOPAA) regarding the application by writing
to: Division of Resource Regulation, Northwest
Florida Water Management District, attn: Terri
Peterson, 152 Water Management Drive, Hava-
na, Florida 32333. A NOPAA will be mailed only
to persons who have filed such requests. A
NOPAA must be requested in order to be ad-
vised of further proceedings and any public
hearing date. Written comments/objection or
NOPAA requests
must be received by 5:00 p.m. eastern time on
June 26, 2013.
No further public notice will be provided re-
garding this application. Publication of this no-
tice constitutes constructive notice of the per-
mit application to all substantially affected
persons.


LF160143
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR WATER USE PERMIT
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chap-
ter 373, Florida Statutes, the following applica-
tion for a water use permit has been received
by the Northwest Florida Water Management
District:
Application number I 07388 filed 05/22/2013
Forrester Farms, 6860 Bill Yance Road, Colum-
bia, AL 36319
Requesting an annual average daily withdrawal
of 352,000 gallons per day from the Floridan
Aquifer System for Agricultural Irrigation use
by an existing facility.
General withdrawal locations) in Jackson
County: T06N, R09W, Sec. 35
Interested persons may submit written
comments/objection or submit a written re-
quest for the notice of proposed agency action
(NOPAA) regarding the application by writing
to: Division of Resource Regulation, Northwest
Florida Water Management District, attn: Terri
Peterson, 152 Water Management Drive, Hava-
na, Florida 32333. A NOPAA will be mailed only
to persons who have filed such requests. A
NOPAA must be requested in order to be ad-
vised of further proceedings and any public
hearing date. Written comments/objection or
NOPAA requests must be received by 5:00 p.m.
eastern time on June 26 2013.
No further public notice will be provided re-
garding this application. Publication of this no-
tice constitutes constructive notice of the per-
mit application to all substantially affected
persons.


LF160131 LEGAL NOTICE
The School Board of Jackson County will
receive bids in the office of the Superintendent
of Schools until Thursday, June 27, 2013, at 9:30
a.m. at which time they will be publicly opened
and tabulated for
16-01 Fire Extinguisher Services
Bids forms may be picked up at the Jackson
County School Board Office located at 2903 Jef-
ferson Street, Marianna, Florida, 32446, during
the normal working hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., Monday through Thursday. The forms
will be in.the Facilities Office.
The Board reserves the right to reject any and
all bids and or accept the one most beneficial
to its operation.
/s/ Kenny Griffin
Chairman of the Board
Attest
/s/ Steve Benton
Superintendent of Schools


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NBA



George Karl out as Nuggets coach


The Associated Press

DENVER The starless
Denver Nuggets just lost
their biggest name on the
bench.
George Karl was oust-
ed Thursday less than a
month after winning the
NBAs Coach of the Year
award. His tenure with the
Nuggets is over after 8/2
seasons.
The longtime coach is
following general manager
Masai Ujiri out the door
in Denver after Ujiri, the
league's executive of the
year, recently left to be-
come GM of the Toronto
Raptors.
"So, we lost a GM now
and a coach, what's next?"
tweeted Nuggets big man
Kenneth Faried.
Karl had just a year left


I ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Denver Nuggets head coach George Karl makes a point during a news conference where he was
named the NBA Coach of the Year in Denver on May 8. Karl is out as coach of the Nuggets. Team
President Josh Kroenke confirmed in an email to The Associated Press on Thursday that Karl's
tenure was over just weeks after he was named the NBA's coach of the year.


on his contract, which this decision. Calls and tatives were not returned But Karl did take to IWit-
may have played a role in emails to Karl's represen- Thursday. ter, posting on his certified


account: "I want to thank
Nuggets fans for their sup-
port over the past 8 yrs.
The karma on the street
was incredible. Denver will
always be home."
There are quite a few
teams currently on the
lookout for a new coach.
The Los Angeles Clippers,
Brooklyn Nets and Phila-
delphia 76ers also have
head coaching vacancies
and the Memphis Griz-
zlies have given coach Lio-
nel Hollins permission to
speak with other teams.
"George has been an
instrumental part of our
success over the past de-
cade, and we appreciate
everything he did to keep
us among the top teams
in the Western Confer-
ence," team President Josh
Kroenke said in a state-
ment. "He is a Hall of Fame
coach whose legacy in


Denver will last for years to
come. George is a legend
in the game of basketball
and I could not have more
respect for him as a person
and coach."
His players shared that
feeling.
"I had a great relation-
ship with him and I was
honored to be coached by
him," forward Danilo Gal-
linari told The. Associated
Press in an email. "Hope-
fully the management now
will do smart choices."
Karl guided the third-
youngest team in the NBA
to the third-best record in
the Western Conference
with a franchise-record 57
wins, but the Nuggets were
bounced from the first
round of the playoffs for
the fourth straight season.
The news of Karl parting
ways was first reported by
Yahoo! Sports.


Tigers beat



Rays 5-2 as



Scherzer



moves to 8-0


Tampa Bay Rays' Ben
Zobrist (18) steals
second base under
the tag of Detroit
Tigers second
baseman Omar
Infante in the game
in Detroit, Mich., on
Thursday. Detroit
won, 5-2.


The Associated Press

DETROIT Max Scher-
zer struck out nine in
seven innings to remain
unbeaten, and Victor Mar-
tinez homered and drove
in three runs to lift the De-
troit Tigers to a 5-2 victory
over the Tampa Bay Rays
on Thursday.
Scherzer (8-0) allowed a
run and four hits, walking
two. He is the first Detroit
pitcher to start the season
8-0 since Jeremy Bonder-
man in 2007.
Joaquin Benoit allowed a
run in the eighth, and Jose
Valverde pitched a perfect
ninth for his seventh save
in nine chances.
Martinez went deep in
the fourth for his fourth
home run of the year, giv-
ing Detroit a 2-0 lead.
Miguel Cabrera drove in a
run the following inning
with a single his major
league-leading 66th RBI.
Roberto Hernandez (3-6)
allowed four runs in 5 1-3
innings.
The first-place Tigers
lead Cleveland by 2 1/2
,games in the AL Central.
The Indians visit Detroit
for a three-game series
starting Friday night.
Scherzer entered the
day holding opponents to
a .187 average. He fanned
Evan Longoria three times
and kept the Rays off the
scoreboard .until an RBI
single by James Loney in


the sixth.
Martinez has struggled
a bit with the bat since re-
turning from a knee injury
that caused him to miss all
of 2012. But there was no
doubt about his drive to
right in the fourth, which
cleared the wall with plen-
ty of room to spare.
Don Kelly led off the
Detroit fifth with a single,
advanced to second on a
groundout and eventually
scored on Cabrera's bloop
single to right-center.
Cabrera finished with
three hits, and, Prince
Fielder had two to extend
his hitting streak to 11
games.
Hernandez pitched 8 2-3
innings without an earned
run in a win at Miami in his
previous start, but he ran
into trouble in the middle
innings against Detroit. Af-
terTampa Bay scored in the
sixth, Hernandez allowed a
leadoff double by Jhonny
Peralta in the bottom half
and a one-out single by
Omar Infante. Pinch-hitter
Avisail Garcia hit a sacrifice
fly off reliever Jake McGee
to make it 4-1.
Cabrera singled and stole
second in the seventh
and scored on a single by
Martinez. Tampa Bay got
a run back in the eighth
on an RBI infield single by
Loney.
Hernandez allowed 10
hits and a walk. He struck
out six.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS


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SPORTS


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