Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01096

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text
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Informing more than 17,00(1 readers daily in print and online







FLORIDAN


Storm chasing critical,


profitable and
dangerous


.- .


6A


Vol. 90 No. 121


Mental health grant sought


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
A mental health care provid-
er is pursuing a grant to help
implement a new program in
Jackson County that could help
people who have been arrested
and have been identified as hav-
ing mental health and substance
abuse issues. The money would


cover services to be provided
while the individual is outside
jail walls, either awaiting fur-
ther court action or after their
charges have been resolved.
Jackson County commission-
ers have given Life Management
permission to seek out the grant,
which requires a 50 percent
match. Because Jackson County


is a fiscally constrained com-
munity, however, the match can
be "in-kind," rather than a cash
match, and could be satisfied by
services that Life Management
already provides in the county.
At a recent commission meet-
ing, Life Management represen-
tative Jeff Stone had requested
and received permission to


apply for the money on the
county's behalf. Stone is the fo-
rensic component director for
the company, which operates in
six area counties. The grant he's
seeking would be used in Jack-
son County only.
With that organization's exist-
ing services figured in to calcu-
late the available match for the


new program, Life Management
can seek roughly $210,000 over
the three-year life of the grant,
with the money split into an-
nual increments of $70,000 if the
grant were awarded at the level
sought.
It would help pay the cost of
See GRANT, Page 5A
I


FUN RISING FUNDS


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
As canoes are being moved into positron, Kathy Donofro paddles her kayak away from the dock Saturday morning during
the fifth annual Canoe for Cancer fundraiser.


Canoeing for cancer


WNW -- .--* - 1 From staff reports


Andrew, Alex and Wyatt Mooney and Pernith McCoy paddle their
canoe out to join this year's Canoe for Cancer convoy Saturday.
4


SWEET

SOUNDS
Musicians from Florida,
Alabama and Georgia
converged on New Salem
Baptist Church Saturday to spend
the day filling its air with the sweet
sound of dulcimer music.
The lth annual event, which
was put on by the Chipola Dul-
cimer Association, drew 21
musicians.
According to the CDA's Joyce
Shores, dulcimers are. stringed
acoustic folk instruments that
are believed to have originated
within the Appalachian region of
the United States. She added that
while dulcimers are mentioned
in the Bible, it isn't know if the
contemporary instruments are the
same thing.


)CLASSIFIEDS...4-5B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On s
Recycled Newsprint



I7 6 5 1 6 1 150 911


ne of the -lingg that inspired Sheila
Hayes to start her Cdlut for Cancer
fundraiser five years ago was her own
mnthe 's battle with the disease.
It was perhaps fitting, then, that her mom,
Sheila Johns, was one of ;lict cancer survivors
who took part in this year's event.
Hayes said she started it as a way of raising
money to help people fighting cancer with
both their regular bills and expenses such as
traveling to get cancer treatment.
This year it brought inat least $1,500. That
money is a mixture of donations from the
cormn tun1itv and money donated by the 50
to 60 cancers, kayakers and tubers who took
part Saturday.
Half of the money will be going to a local
person dealing with cancer with the rest be-
ing donated to Covenant Hospice. ,


Adrian Lincoln, Patricia Belote and Dale
Pal er were providing accompaniment
for the dulcimer jammers Saturday. They
are members of the Pelican Pickers from
Shalimar, Fla.


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


)) ENTERTAINMENT...3B


))LOCAL..3A


ABOVE: Dulcimer player and fans
were packed into the dining hall
at New Salem Baptist Church on
Saturday.
LEFT: This year's Dulcimer Jam
brought in 21 musicians from Florida,
Alabama and Georgia.


) STATE...4A


FLORIDAN FILE PHOTO
In this photo, the Santa Fe women's basketball team checks
in at Comfort Inn and Suites in Marianna. Sixteen teams
and their fans from throughout Florida poured into Jackson
County for 2013 Junior College Men's and women's state
basketball tournament. After 18 consecutive years of being
hosted at Chipola College, the event moves to Ocala in
2014.

Tournament loss

means money loss


State basketball
event moves out
of Marianna

BY ANGIE COOK
,].roh ) rlr ii, ,,,rlm

Chipola College will
not host next year's state
JUCO bhiketball tourna-
ment, an event that has
been played at the Mari-
anna school for nearly
two decades. The col-
lege and local sports fans
won't be the only ones
frt.eling (it- loss; area busi-
nesses will, too.
The majority of athletic
directors in the Florida
College System Activi-
ties Association recently
voted to award the tour-
nament hosting contract
to College of Central Flor-
ida in Ocala. If the award
process is completed as


*
expected, CF will host the
event for the next three
years, when the contract
will be up for bid again.
In the meantime, sev-
eral business owners in
and around Marianna are
likely to feel the tourney's
absence, as a previously
I estimated $250,000 typi-
cally spent during the
March event and the re-
sidual impact that money
(which former Jackson
County Chamber of
Commerce CEO Art Kim-
brough put at $1 million)
has, as area businesses
keep spending, vanish.
Jay Bhakta, owner of
four Marianna hotels,
said what makes the state
,basketball tournament
the No. 1 event for his es-
tablishments is the nearly
200 area rooms that are
occupied when around
See TOURNEY, Page 5A


County agrees to


replace old wells


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalteil@jcfloi idan.com
Jackson County Com-
missioners have agreed to
lake care of some unfin-
ished business on White-
ville Road. The board
voted last week to spend
an estimated $10,000 to
replace two private wells
off Whiteville Road east
of Cottondale. That work
is at least eight years
overdue.
When Jackson County
paved Whiteville Road
east of Cottondale a few
years back, it did so with
grant funding. The road
)) SPORTS...IB


department obtained
right-of-way easements
in order to complete that
work in the early 2000s.
IWo private wells were lo-
cated in the right-of-way
that the county needed to
pave the road to the prop-
er standard.
Tolb get the right-of-way
it needed, the county
agreed to handle the
abandonment and clo-
sure of the old wells and
replace them with new
ones to be placed else-
where on the property of
See WELLS, Page 5A


) WEATHER...2A


SJUNE SHOWCASE OF REAL ESTATE
|1 JUNE SHOWCASE OF REAL ESTATE'


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_ _- J ...........


>)OBITL..APIlE '.;A






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


Today


Partly Cloudy. Isolated Storms.


Justin Kiefer / WMBB


SHigh -910
SLow-710


Wednesday
Scattered Storms


High 90
Low -72


Friday
Scattered Storms.


-; ,


High 900
L Low -70

Thursday
Scattered Storms.


*High -910
Low 7i


Saturday
Scattered Storms.


TIDES ULTRAVIOLET INDEX
Panama City Low 5:30 PM High 7:05 AM
Apalachicola Low 9:05 PM High 12:45 PM 0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 114
Port St. Joe Low 5:35 PM High -7:38 AM .,
Destin Low 6:46 PM High -8:11 AM 0 1 2 .3,-
Pensacola Low 7:20 PM High -8:44 AM


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Reading
41.94 ft.
4.52 ft.
5.59 ft.
1.85 ft:


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


5:38 AM
7:41 PM
2:55. AM
4:20 PM


KLEIN
June June June May
8 16 23 31


FLORIDA'S 11

PANHANDLE JCY

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9"'

S0 LISEFOHULWAHR 1 D,


JACKSON COUNTY

FL~ORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy.
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


JCFLoCRIANI-COICfM


Community Calendar


I
TUESDAY, JUNE 4
Books That Shaped America Exhibit -June
4-8 at the Jackson County Public Library, Marianna
Branch at 2929 Green St. Everyone is invited to
see the exciting display of 100 books by American
authors that have shaped and influenced the lives of
Americans. Call 482-9631.
))Jackson County Growers Association/Marl-
anna City Farmer's Market 7 a.m.-noon at
Madison St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh fruits
and vegetables grown tIy local farmers.
)) Marianna Blood Center Mobile Unit will be at
Northwest Florida Reception Center, Chipley
-9 a.m.-2 p.m. The need for blood is unending. The
process takes 30-45 minutes. One donation can
save up to 3 lives. Call 526-4403.
)) Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees Building
and Grounds Committee Meeting -Noon in the
Boardroom. Call 718-2629.
)) Optimist Club of Jackson County Meeting
- Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna.
) Orientation Noon -3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
)) Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens. 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
)) Employability Workshop "Creating Effective
Resumes" 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop
Career Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call
718-0326.
)) City of Marianna Regular Commission Meet-
ing -6 p.m. at City Hall, 2898 Green St. The public
is invited to attend. Call 718-1001.
)) Children's Summer Feeding Program Meeting
-6 p.m. at St. James A.M.E. Church, 2891 Orange
St. in Marianna. This is the final organizational
meetingfor the program and to discuss potential
distribution sites in outlying areas of Jackson Coun-
ty.The public is invited to attend. Call 615-2934.
)) Chipola Area Gator Club's Gator Gather-
ing-6:30 p.m. social time at the Jackson County
Agriculture Center, Highway 90 West, Marianna.
Curtis Head, Assistant Director of University of
Florida Gator Boosters will be the guest speaker.
Smoked steak dinner will be served at 7 p.m. Hot
dogs, potato chips and candy will be provided free
to children. Deadline to make reservations is Sun-
day, June 2. Call 482-3095 or 482-34p9.
)) Florida Cattle Identification Rule Workshop-
6:30-9:30 p.m. at the Agriculture Conference
Center, 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue, Marianna. The
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services is developing a Cattle Identification Rule
which will go into effect January 1,2014 and they
are seeking feedback from cattle producers on the
draft version of the rule. For specific questions call
850-410-0944.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5
) Marianna Blood Center Mobile Unit will be at
Florida Department of Revenue -9-11 a.m. and at


Oglesby Plants International from.1-3 p.m. The need
for blood is unending. The process takes 30-45
minutes. One donation can save up to 3 lives. Call
526-4403.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
-1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
)) Basic Computer Class Part 1-Noon-3 p.m. at
the Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway
90, Marianna. Free class teaches basic components
and use of a computer. Call 526-0139.

THURSDAY, JUNE 6
*Jackson County Growers Association/Marl-
anna City Farmnner's Market -7 a.m.- noon at
Madison St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh fruits
and vegetables grown by local farmers.
)) Marianna Blood Center Mobile Unit will be at
Signature HealthCare in Graceville -8 a.m.-4
p.m. The need for blood is unending. The process
takes 30-45 minutes. One donation can save up to 3
lives. Call 526-4403.
)) Chipola Civic Club Meeting- Noon at The Oaks
Restaurant, Highway 90 in Marianna. The CCC's
focus is the local community, "Community, Children
& Character". Call 526-3142.
)) Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2290.
* Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group-
Noon at Jackson Hospital Hudnall Building in the
Community Room. Free to attend. Curriculum
developed by ex-smokers for those who want to
become ex-smokers themselves. Call 482-6500.
P Garden Gala Preview Social --Noon -2 p.m. at
Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kelson Avenue, Suite E in
varianna. Preview the eclectic pieces of garden
furniture art for the Covenant Hospice Garden-Gala.
)) Job Club Noon -3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills; get job search assis-
tance. Call 526-0139.
)) Employability Workshop "Mock Interview-
iqg"-2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
)) First Meeting of the Teen Book Club Meet-
ing -3 p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library,
Marianna Branch, 2929 Green St. At this meeting,
everyone will be given a list of young adult books
to choose from. Throughout the duration of the
club, members will take turns reading everyone's
choices. Call 482-9631.
)) VFW & Ladies Auxiliary Meeting 6 p.m. at
2830 Wynn St. in Marianna. Covered-dish supper
followed by a 7 p.m. business meeting. Call 372-
2500.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, JUNE 7
)) Marianna Blood Center Mobile Center will be
at Graceville Correctional Facility 7 a.m.-2
p.m. The need for blood is unending. The process


takes 30-45 minutes. One donation can save up to 3
lives. Call 526-4403.
)) Knitters Nook -10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant
-6:30 p.m. at the Washington County Agricultural
Center. Categories will include: Sugar Baby Miss,
Baby Miss, Toddler Miss, Tiny Miss, Future Little
Miss and Little Miss. Admission is $5 per person,
children 3 years and under admitted free. Call 263-
4744.-
)) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, JUNE 8
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conversation
Commission's freshwater license-free fishing
day. Cast a line into the water and get hooked on
freshwater fishing. All limits and size restrictions ap-
ply. Check out MyFWC.com/Fishing for fishing trips,
locations and rules.
) Troop 3 Boy Scouts Yard Sale Fundraiser-7
a.m. on the basketball courts at Wynn Street Park
in Marianna. A variety of household items, clothes,
televisions, sports equipment, collectibles and
much more will be for sale. All proceeds will be used
to help scouts attend summer camp and with on-
going scouting expenses. Call 209-3798.
Jackson County Growers Association/Marian-
na City Farmer's Market-7 a.m.-noon at Madison
St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh fruits and
vegetables grown by local farmers.
Reunion Meeting for former members of the
United Voices for Christ Mass Choir of Jackson
County-10 a.m. at the Jackson County Public
Library. Call 594-3778.
)) Alford Community Health Clinic Hours -10
a.m. until last patient is seen, at 1770 Carolina St. in
Alford. The free clinic for income-eligible patients
without medical insurance treats short-term
illnesses and chronic conditions. Appointments
available (call 263-7106 or 209-5501); walk-ins
welcome. Sign in before nofn.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
Jackson County Training School, Union Grove
and St. Paul Class of 1971 "Sweet 60th Birthday
Celebration"-6 p.m. at the Cottondale Civic
Center in Cottondale. Fee is $100 for 1971 class-
mates, $75 if a couple who graduated in 1971. Invite
6 guests free of charge. Attire will be formal wear.
Deadline to pay fees is May 25. Call 850-228-9942.
Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant-
6:30 p.m. at the Washington County Agricultural
Center. Categories will include: Petite Miss, Miss
Preteen, Young Junior Miss, Junior Miss, Teen Miss
and Miss. Admission is $5 per person,children 3
years and under admitted free. Call 263-4744.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcflorldan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for June 2, the latest
available report: three suspicious persons,
one physical disturbance, one burglar
alarm, one report of shooting in the area,
11 traffic stops; one larceny complaint and
one welfare check.


Jackson County Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following
incidents for June 2, the latest available
report: One missing adult, two abandoned
vehicles, one reckless driver, one suspi-
cious vehicle, two suspicious incidents,
one suspicious person, one highway
obstruction, three verbal disturbances,
one pedestrian complaint, one prowler,
18 medical calls, three traffic crashes (one


Police Roundup
with entrapment), three burglar alarms,
two fire alarms, 25 traffic stops, two larceny
complaints, one criminal
-. .,. ,=1 mischief complaint, one
t L accidental shooting re-
t %ilkyiE ported, two civil disputes,
* '-E. one trespass complaint, two
follow-up investigations,
one assault, one noise disturbance, two
animal complaints, one assist of motorist
or pedestrian, one retail theft, four assists
of other agencies, one transport, one 911
hang-up and three field checks.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
periods:
)) Richard Ford III, 29, 3167 Huttersfield
Circle, Tallahassee, carrying a concealed
weapon, possession of a firearm by a con-
victed felon, possession of marijuana-less


than 20 grams.
)) Jano Espin, 39, 7971 McKeown Mill
Road, Sneads, disorderly intoxication.
Jessie Turnmer, 24, P.O. Box 3, Blount-
stown, violation of court order.
)) Virginia Young, 57, 7971 McKeown
Mill Road, aggravated assault with a deadly
weapon, felony domestic battery, domestic
violence.
)) Amos Burks, 36, 2818 Wynn St.,
Marianna, driving under the influence.
)) Kenneth McRoy, 60,2598 Front St., Cot-
tondale, fugitive from justice (Alabama).
)) Atlantis Michaelson, 41, 7206 West
Matador Lane, Homosassa, fugitive from
justice (Colorado).
)) Cleven Dixon, 47,2708 Basin Ave. (Apt.
2), Dothan, Ala., violation of state proba-
tion (felony driving while license suspend-
ed or revoked)
Jail Population: 22
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agency. To report a wildlife violation,
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


9^


-72A TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 2013
4


Wmcc-up CRLL


m






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.comn


Chipola College Summer II registration is June 20


Special to the Floridan

Chipola College regis-
tration for Summer Ses-
sion II classes is Thurs-
day, June 20 from 8 a.m.-5
p.m. Classes begin Mon-
day, June 24, with late
registration continuing
through noon on Tuesday,
June 25. The schedule of
classes is available online
at www.chipola.edu.
Application for dead-
line for the Fall 2013 se-
mester is August 1. Early
Fall registration for
current students is June
10-13.
There are several steps in
the application process:
)) Complete the col-
lege Admission Appli-
cation; call 718-2311 for
assistance;
) Request your high
school to send a final tran-
script to Chipola College
Admission and Records
Office; and
)) Take the College Place-
ment Test; call 718-2284
for assistance.
Students should report
to Room 156 in the Stu-
dent Services Building


and sign in to see an
academic advisor.
Chipola offers (lithe
Bachelor of Science De-
gree, the Associate in
Arts Degree, the Associ-
ate in Science Degree and
Workforce Development
programs. Bachelor's De-
grees include: Science
Education Middle Grades
(5-9); Biology Educa-
tion Secondary Grades
(6-12); Mathematics Edu-
cation Middle Grades (5-
9); Mathematics Educa-
tion Secondary Grades
(6-12); English Educa-
tion, Exceptional Student
Education and Elemen-
tary Education; Busi-
ness Administration with
concentrations in
Management or Ac-
counting and a
Bachelor of Science in
Nursing (BSN). Addition-
ally, the college offers the
Educator Preparation Insti-
tute, aTeacherCertification
program for those with
a B.S. in a non-teaching
field.
The Associate in Arts
(A.A.) degree is designed
for students who plan to


complete their first two
years of college work and
then transfer to a four--
year program at Chipola
or another college oruni-
versity. Credits earnedd
are transferable and are
applicable toward a bach-
elor's degree. Academic
advising guides that out-
line requirements .for spe-
cific majors are available
from Student Affairs and
are located on the college
website 'at www.chipola.
edu.
Several Associate in Sci-
ence (AS) and Workforce
programs are offered
which provide training
for high wage jobs. Work-
force programs include:
Automotive Service Tech-
nology, Firefighter, Law
Enforcement Officer, Cor-
rectional Officer, Cosme-
tology, Cross-Over Correc-
tions to Law Enforcement,
Cross-Over Law Enforce-
ment to Corrections,
Nursing Assistant and
Welding.
Associate in Science (AS)
programs include: Busi-
ness Administration, Early
Childhood Education.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Chipola College registration for Summer Session II classes is Thursday, June 20,8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Classes begin Monday, June 24. Here, students work in a college writing lab. The schedule of
classes is available online at www.chipola.edu. For information, call 718-2211.


Computer Inf6rmation
Technology, Fire Science
Technology, Criminal Jus-
tice Technology (Crime
Scene Track), Network-
ing Services Technol-
ogy, Culinary Manage-
ment, Nursing (RN and


LPN), Nursing LPN to RN,
Paramedic to RN, and
Recreation Technology.
College Credit Certificate
programs include: Child
Care Center Management,
Information Technol-
ogy Management, CISCO


Certified Network Associ-
ate, Emergency Medical
Technician (EMT) and
Paramedic.
The schedule of classes
is available online at www.
chipola.edu. For informa-
tion, call 718-2211.


ALTRUSA HOLDS OFFICER INDUCTION


S. The May program meeting of Altrusa International of
M Marianna was the induction of new officers at the lovely
-1'I U historical home of Altrusa member Ruth Kinsolving. The
...'B members had a lovely evening of fellowship and reminders of
... the many ways the club helps our community. The induction
" was performed by membership chair, Nina Goodson. Pictured
.,1 i (top to bottom): Kathy Milton, Director; Carolyn Glass, Past
I BPresident; Georgeann Smith Adkinson, Treasurer; Regina
Hargis-Williams, Secretary; Donna Rogers, Vice President and
Charlene Lord, President.


'Garden Gala Preview Social' is June 6


Special to the Floridan

Covenant Hospice Gar-
den Gala Committee in-
vites the public to attend
the "Garden Gala Preview
Social" on Thursday, June
6 from 12-2 p.m. at Cov-
enant Hospice, 4215 Kel-
son Avenue, Suite E in
Marianna. This free event
will showcase the out-
standing works of art that
will be for auction at the
8th annual Garden
Gala on June 22. Guests
attending the Preview
Social will have the op-
portunity to vote on their
favorite piece, which will
help the Artist Commit-
tee determine which cre-
ations will be in the live
auction portion of the
Garden Gala.
The Garden Gala event is
renowned for the garden


SUbMI I LU HIUIU
Artist Suzanne Payne shows off her hand painted swing from
last year's Garden Gala.


furniture hand painted
by local artists. This year,
artists had the choice of a
bench; swing, Adirondack
chair, terra cotta flower
pot, window or door to
transform into their can-
vas. Tickets for the Garden
Gala are available'now for
$60 per individual or $100
per couple.


Covenant Hospice is a
not-for-profit organiza-
tion dedicated to provid-
ing compassionate, com-
prehensive end-of-life
care to patients and their
loved ones during times
of life-limiting illness
based on need, not their
ability to pay. With the
help of your donation,


Covenant Hospice of Mari-
anna will be able to con-
tinue providing special
care in Calhoun, Jackson,
Holmes and Washington
Counties. The proceeds
generated from your do-
nation help fund the
unfunded and under
funded programs of Cov-
enant Hospice. These pro-
granms include Bereave-
ment, Chaplain, Children's
Support and Volunteer
services.
A gift to Covenant Hos-
pice is truly an invest-
ment in our mission to
add life to days when days
can no longer be added
to life. Thank you for
your consideration. For
more information about
the Garden Gala, please
contact Jennifer Griffin at
482-8520,orwww.eventsat-
covenant.org/gardengala.


APPLEWHITE

ADDRESSES OPTIMISTS

CLUB MEMBERS


SUBMITTED PHOTO
M arianna Optimist members
recently welcomed Certified
Public Accountant Sara
Applewhite of Carr, Riggs & Ingram as
their guest speaker. Applewhite spoke to
the local gathering of men on a number of
related topics including tax preparation,
estate planning and retirement planning
along with IRA and DROP rollover. Apple-
white is a partner in the firm and has more
than 33 years of public accounting experi-
ence. CRI has locations across eight states
and is reported to be the 28th largest CPA
firm in the nation. Applewhite is joined in
the photo with club program chairman Ken
Stoutamire(left) and club president Lowell
Centers.


Troop 3 Boy Scouts honor Scoutmaster "Mr. K"
Special to the Floridan


Troop 3 Boy Scouts of
Marianna met early for
their weekly meeting on
Memorial Day, May 26, in
order to begin their routes
to pick up the U.S. flags
throughout town. Upon
collecting and storing all of
the flags displayed by the
Kiwanis Club, scouts met
at the Scout Hut for their
regular meeting.
Troop 3 Advancement
Coordinator Barry Till-
man and Eagle Scout
Levin Berry worked with
the scouts on learning and
practicing rope tying skills,
specifically the diagonal
and shear lashings. Fol-
lowing their lesson and
skills challenge, scouts
enjoyed a friendly game
of dodge ball outside. To
conclude the meeting,
scouts gathered around
their beloved Scoutmaster
Bill Kleinhans, a.k.a. "Mr.
K", to express their appre-
ciation for another greal
year in scouting for 'roop
3 and to present him with
a Boy Scout trophy as a to-
ken of gratitude for all thai
he does for all of his boys
in Troop 3.
Scouts will meet again
soon to perform a swim
test prior to going to


AC I "I ") I; IANCCICOMV


Scoutmaster Bill
Kleinhans, "Mr. K", shows
hisappreciation trophy from
his Troop 3 scouts.




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Twitter


twitter.com/
Jcfloridannews


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Beckham tours Miami stadiums; city hopes for team


The Associated Press

MIAMI Soccer star
David Beckham may be
setting his sights on a new
sports venture: a profes-
Ssional soccer team in
Miami.
The newly retired Beck-
ham toured Sun Life and
Florida International Uni-
versity stadiums and met
with Miami-Dade County
Mayor Carlos Gimenez on
Saturday.
"We're ready and we're
excited about the pos-
sibility of having top-
flight professional soccer
back in Miami," Gi-
Smenez said. "With people
From all over the world liv-
ing in our community, this
is an ideal market for MLS
and David Beckham is the
: right person to make it
Happenn"
SMiami has had a Major
,League Soccer team be-
i


fore; the Miami Fusion
held matches in Fort Lau-
derdale from 1998 to 2001,
before shutting down be-
cause of poor attendance.


This time around, city of-
ficials hope a team would
succeed.
"The whole community
loves soccer down here,"


FIU Executive Director for
Sports and Entertainment
Pete Garcia said.
Garcia said university
officials delivered a pre-


In this photo released by
Miami-Dade County, former
soccer star David Beckham
poses for a photo with Miami-
Dade County Mayor Carlos
Gimenez, in Miami. Beckham
may be setting his sights on a
new sports venture: A profes-
sional soccer team in Miami.
The newly retired Beckham
toured Sun Life and Florida
International University sta-
diums and met with Miami-
Dade County Mayor Carlos
Gimenez on Saturday.



sentation to Beckham and
Marcelo Claure, president
and CEO of Brightstar
Corp. and a member of
the. FIU Board of Trust-
ees, explaining the draw
of a professional team in


Miami. HIe said FIU offi-
cials hope Beckham and
Claure will start an MLS
team and choose FIU as
their stadium.
"Our stadium is state of
the art, brand new, and it's
made for soccer," Garcia
said.
He also noted that a ma-
jority of the university's
52,000 students are His-
panic, and many of them
avid soccer fans.
"I know it would be suc-
cessful now," he said.
Beckham started his
career with Manchester
United and also played
for Real Madrid, Los An-
geles Galaxy, AC Milan
and Paris Saint-Germain.
He became a global super-
star not only in the sports
world, but also through
fashion and his marriage
to a pop, star wife, for-
mer "Spice Girls" singer
Victoria.


State Briefs


Search for escaped
kangaroo's owners
continues
LACOOCHEE- Authori-
ties continued to search
Monday for the owners of
a kangaroo that was cap-
tured after ten hours on
the run in Pasco County
when wildlife officers used
a tranquilizer to stop him.
The owners of the
animal had not yet come
forward, the Pasco County
Sheriff's Office said in a
statement.
The 200-pound male
kangaroo was spotted
Saturday in the area of
Lacoochee and led depu-
ties on a lengthy chase
that ended nearly ten
hours later.
Authorities also released
three 911 recordings to the
sheriff's office regarding
the kangaroo on the run.
One caller spotted the
animal in the middle of
the road and gave direc-
tions to the 911 dispatcher
as to the elusive animal's
whereabouts.
"He's just hopping
around," one caller said.
"He's hopping around and
then comes back. He's go-
ing up and down the road.
: And he's a big kangaroo,
too."
The same caller also
told dispatchers they were
recording the kangaroo
"because it's cool."
"He's having a merry
old time," the caller said.
"He's been on the move for
quite awhile tonight," the
dispatcher replied.
Authorities said a family
living in the area has other
kangaroos, but they have
not claimed the kangaroo
as their own. One caller to
the sheriff's office suggest-
ed the animal came from a
nearby zoo.
Wildlife officials said a
person can own a kan-
garoo if they have the
specific permits to do so.

Tampa socialite sues
government over
Petraeus scandal
WASHINGTON A
STampa, Fla., socialite and
her husband are claiming
in a lawsuit that the gov-
ernment willfully leaked
damaging information
about them in the scandal
that led to the resignation
of Gen. David Petraeus as
CIA director.
Jill Kelley and Scott
Kelley filed the lawsuit on
Monday in federal court
against the FBI, Pentagon
and unidentified officials
in the government, claim-
ing the couple's privacy
was violated.
Jill Kelley became the
focus of national media
attention after it was
revealed she received
anonymous emails from
Paula Broadwell, Petraeus'
biographer and mistress.
Broadwell allegedly told
Kelley to stay away from
Petraeus.
The lawsuit claims
the federal government
violated the Privacy Act.
The Kelleys are seeking
_]monetary damages and


an apology, among other
things.


Bella: Jungle Island
contest names baby
flamingo
MIAMI-- Meet Bella. It's
the name given to Jungle
Island's newest baby
flamingo.
The park in Miami
said Monday that it had
received an overwhelming
response to the flamingo
naming contest that began
last week. And although
they won't know the sex of
the newest member of the
flock for a few months, the
park decided to go with
the name Bella anyway.
Park officials kept a
watchful eye on the fla-
mingo during the Memo-
rial weekend after hatch-
ing, a process that takes
three days.
The winner of the nam-
ing contest will receive
Tickets to the park, as well
as a Miami Marlins game.
This is the first baby fla-
mingo to hatch this year.
Another eight or nine eggs
are being incubated.
More than 70 flamingos
call Jungle Island home.


car, who owned the car,
who found the child, how
long he had been inside
or whether there could be
any charges in the child's
death.
Family members told
the Pensacola News
Journal that the little boy
wandered outside after
telling his grandfather that
he was going to see his
grandmother in another
room. The family said
the boy liked SpongeBob
SquarePants and monster
trucks.
Deborah Andrews,
the boy's grandmother,
contacted the Sheriff's
Department, fearing he
had been abducted.
"All I could think of was
'Oh my God, did someone
take my grandson,"' An-
drews told the newspaper.
Andrews said the tod-
dler, who was a fan of cars,
trucks and monster trucks,
was able to open and close
car doors on his own, but
it didn't occur to anyone
to check the vehicle's back
seat until hours later. At
one point, an investigator
suggested opening the
trunk of the vehicle, but
did not find the child.


Pensacola boy, 2,
found dead in car
PENSACOLA- Inves-
tigators were awaiting
a medical examiner's
report before releasing
details about a missing
2-year-old found dead
on the floorboard of a car
in Pensacola, authorities
said Monday.
Hezekiah Brooks was
reported missing around
2:30 on Sunday after-
noon near his home. He
was found in the car that
evening.
Sena Maddison, spokes-
woman for the Escambia.
County Sheriff's Office,
said an investigation into
Brooks' death was ongo-
ing. Maddison said her
department was not yet
releasing details about
why the child was in the


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"I don't know why I
didn't check the car," An-
drews said, holding back
tears. "Why didn't I look in
the car? Why?"


ORLANDO- The Fifth
District Court of Appeal
has ruled that George
Zimmerman's attorney
can depose a lawyer for
the family of Trayvon
Martin.
The court issued the
ruling Monday that said
Mark O'Mara can "take
a limited deposition" of
Benjamin Crump to ask
him about a key witness
for prosecutors.
Crump interviewed the
teen known as "Witness
8" shortly after Martin's
shooting death in Febru-
ary 2012. Prosecutors
say Witness 8 was on the
phone with Martin mo-
ments before he died.
Circuit Judge Debra
Nelson had twice denied
O'Mara's request.
Martin was fatally shot
by Zimmerman during a


GAS WATCH
Gas prices are going up. Here are
the least expensive places to buy
gas in Jackson County, as of
Monday afternoon.

1. $3.34. BP Steel City,
2184 U.S. 231 S., Alford
2. $3.34, Loves Travel
Center, 2510 U.S. 231, Cot-
tondale
3.$3.37, Chipola Mart,4195
Lafayette St., Marianna
4. $3.39, BP Station, 5410
River Road, Sneads
5. $3.39, Chevron, 4153
Lafayette St. Marianna
6. $3.39, Dar-Bee's Quick
Stop, 6189 Hwy 90, Cypress

If you see a lower price,
contact the Floridan newsroom
at .ditorial@jcfloridan.com.


confrontation at a gated
community in Sanford, an
Orlando suburb. Zimmer-
man is pleading not guilty
to second-degree murder,
claiming self-defense. His
trial is set for June 10.


PUNTA GORDA -Four
llamas were evaluated
Monday at a southwest
Florida veterinary hospital
after being involved in
a crash on Interstate 75,
authorities said.
Charlotte County Fire-
Rescue officials said a
pickup truck carrying a
trailer with four llamas
crashed at mile marker


6/03 3-9-9
9-4-9
5/28 0-7-3
3-4-2


Mon.
Mon.
Tue.
Tue.
Wed.
Wed.
Thurs.
Thurs.,
Fri.
Fri.
Sat.
Sat.
Sun.
Sun.


164, near Punta Gorda,
shortly after 2:30 p.m. The
truck crashed into a bridge
over the Peace River and
the trailer tipped onto its
side.
One of the llamas was
injured, officials said.
"The animals were very
easy to deal with," said
Charlotte County Fire-
Rescue spokeswoman
Dee Hawkins-Garland, al-
though "they were startled
and had been tossed
arou Lind in that trailer."
Hawkins-Garland added:
"I've been with the depart-
ment for 24 years and this
is the first time I've ever
dealt with llamas."
From wire reports


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Zimmerman team
can depose Martin 4 llamas involved in
attorney car crash


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James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332
http://www.jamesandsik
esfuneralhomes.com/

Loria Michelle
Berry

Loria Michelle Berry, 45,
of Marianna passed away
May 31, 2013 in Panama
City. .
Loria was born Septem-
ber 16, 1967 in Pensacola,
and was a lifelong resident
of Marianna. She was a
beautiful' woman who
loved her family and
friends. Loria was the
proud mother of Levin Jon
and Faith Michelle. While
her death was sudden, the
impact she had on the lives
of others will never be for-
gotten.
Loria attended Trinity
Baptist Church.
She is survived by her
son, Levin Jon Berry; her
daughter, Faith Michelle
Dunbar; her parents,
Johnny and Elaine A. Ho-
ward all of Marianna;
brother, Stephen (Karl)
Yozviak of Spring, TX.; sis-
ter, Cheri (Michael) Hinson
of Crestview; brother, Sa-
muel (Fernann) Yoviak of
Tallahassee and Sally &
Steve Yoviak of Crestview
and numerous nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will be
at 2 p.m., Tuesday, June 4,
2013, at Trinity Baptist
Church with Pastor Roland
Rabon officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in New
Hope' Baptist Cemetery
with James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel di-
recting.
The family will receive
friends from 6-8 PM on
Monday, June 3, 2013 at
James & Sikes Funeral
Home in Marianna.
Flower's will be accepted
or memorial contributions
may be made to First Fed-
eral Bank of Florida in her
children's fund.
Expressions of sympathy
maybe made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhonies coni
Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
Phone 850-526-5059

!. James
Cozart

S. James Cozart age 77 of
Marianna passed away on
Sunday, June 2, 2013 in
Jackson Hospital. He was
born in Graceville on Au-
gust 16, 1935 to the late Si-
meon J. Cozart, Sr. and
Mamie Annette Mclntosh.
James served his country in



Wells
From Page 1A

the landowners involved.
No one is sure why, but
that never happened.
It may have been a mat-
ter of money; the grant
may not have included
enough funds to carry out
that part of the project, for
instance, Green speculates.
Since he wasn't head of the
department at that time,
he says he can only guess
about how this task slipped
through the cracks.
Since no one was living in
either of the houses located
on the involved property at
the time, the issue never
came up. But now an heir
to the property has decid-
ed to move into one of the
homes. When he started
making arrangements to
do that, he discovered he
had no water coming to
the house.
Further checking also


the United States Army and
would later settle in Jack-
son County to marry his
loving wife Sarah and raise
his family. He retired from
Cottondale High School
where hlie served several
years teaching and coach-
ing football. James would
also retire from the State of
Florida as a District Super-
visor with Florida Depart-
ment of Children and Fam-
ilies. James was a member
of the Elks Lodge and en-
joyed spending his leisure
time fishing.
He was preceded in
death by his parents, and a
sister Dorothy Jean Regis-
ter.
Mr. Cozart is survived by
his wife of 53 years Sarah
Cozart of Marianna, son Ja-
mie Cozart and wife Angie
of Marianna, daughter
Laurie Griggs and husband
Walt of Oviedo, FL,
brother-in-law Eddie Reg-
ister of Graceville, grand-
children Abby Cozart, Tyler
Cozart, Stephanie Griggs
and Brian Griggs, step
grandchildren Ryan Lipsey
and Jordan Thigpen, great
grandson Tully Cozart and
step great grandson J.D.
Thigpen, and a host of nie-
ces and nephews.
Family will receive
friends at Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home on Thurs-
day, June 6, 2013 from 5:00
P.M. to 7:00 P.M.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to the
charity of choice in re-
membrance of Mr. Cozart.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements. Expressions of
sympathy may be submit-
ted online at
www.mariannachapelfh.com.

James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850.482.2332

Flora L. Dodds

Flora L. Dodds, 91, of Ma-
rianna died October 4, 2007
at her home on Lipford
Road.
A native of Cleveland,
Ohio, Mrs. Dodds had re-
sided in Marianna for a
number of years. She was
previously an Administra-
tion Assistant for a Luggage
Repair Shop.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Henry S. Dodds and hter
parents, I1'ihltnri1 Francis
and Flora Mercer Jones
Grove.
Survivors include her
daughter, Linne Dodds of
Marianna and her son,
James Dodds of Vermont.
Memorization was by cre-
mation with James & Sikes
Funeral Home Maddox
Chapel directing.


revealed that one of the old
wells had been damaged. A
broken pipe makes it im-
possible for water to flow
from the well to the house.
They may have been dam-
aged for some time, lead-
ing to the possibility that
the well water has been ex-
posed to the elements and
contamination.
How and when it was
damaged is unclear, but
commissioners acknowl-
edged that it did assume
responsibility for the aban-
donment and closure of
the wells years ago, as well
as installing new ones on
the properties involved.
Green estimates that it
will cost around $5,000 to
do that work. The county
declared the project an
emergency situation and
authorized Green to get
two or three estimates
on the costs and engage
a contractor once he ob-
tains a release of liability
from the property owners
involved.


COTTONDALE FOOD DRIVE


COLLECTS OVER 500 ITEMS


SUBMITTED PHOTO

iss Petite Heart of the USA Cottondale Ashley Hicks, a student at Cottondale
Elementary School, poses with goods donated during a recent food drive
she organized at her school. Ashley's mother, Tammy Hicks, says the event
brought in over 500 items to help feed hungry kids through Backpack for Kids Jackson
County, a program run out of the school board's district office. Tracy Goodwin's
first-grade class collected the most items, winning a pizza party for the effort.






Senate votes on small




changes to int'l food aid


The Associated Press

WAYIINGTON The Senate
on Monday voted to make modest
changes to the way international
food aid is delivered, a much scaled-
back version of an overhaul pro-
posed by President Barack Obaima
earlier this year.
Senators adopted an amendment
by voice vote to a wide-ranging farm
bill Monday that would lighlNdv
boost dollars to buy locally-grown
food close to needy areas abroad.
CturuLnlh. most food aid is grown
in the United States and shipped to
developing countries, an approach
the Obama administration says is
inefficient.
The Senate farm bill would allo-
cate $40 million aiinnuilly for a lo-
cal purchase program an increase
from current dollars, but still a small
portion of the $1.8 billion spent on
food aid. The amendment spon-
sored by Republican Mike Johanns,
of Nebraska, and Democrat Chris
Coons, of Delaware, would boost
that to $60 million annually.


Grant
From Page 1A '

crisis intervention for ar-
rested persons who have
mental health issues mak-
ing it difficult to stabilize
their lives after incarcera-
tion. That determination
would be made in screen-
ings paid for with grant
funds.


Many food aid groups have long
argued that buying food .abroad
would be quicker, less expensive
and more beneficial to local farmers
than the current method that ben-
efits U.S. farmers and shippers. The
Obama administration in April pro-
posed shifting almost half of the in-
ternational food aid money to more
flexible accounts that allow for cash
purchases abroad, saying such a
move would be more efficient.
But that proposal has so far fallen
flat in Congress, where farm-state
lawmakers who oversee agriculture
spending and the farm bill have
been reluctant to shift money away
from American farmers. Farm and
shipping groups launched strong
campaigns against the proposal,
lining up oppl-oiiion in both the
House and Senate even before
Obama proposed the changes in his
April budget.
Rajiv Shah,. the administrator of
the U.S. Agency for International
Development, has said that chang-
es are necessary as a humanitarian
crisis in Syria and recent droughts


The primary intent of
the intervention is to help
divert such people from
self-destructive paths
that may have led to their
incarceration. Teaching
them stresscoping skills,
monitoring their progress
in life plans worked out
with a counselor and in
the process helping them
stabilize their psychiatric
health could help cli-
ents avoid future arrests


and improve their lives
in general. Stone said the
grant program is meant
in part to be an avenue
through which persons
with multiple arrests can
find a way to stop the
cycle.
The grant would come
through the Florida De-
partment of Children and
Families. Stone said the
majority of referrals for the
programwouldlikelycome


in Africa have sapped food aid from
other countries in need.
He said that buying food locally
is often the only practical option
in war-torn countries where truck-
ing in large amounts of food is not
safe and shipping U.S. food can of-
ten take several weeks. Only a small
portion of thie U.S. food aid budget
allows for cash purchases abroad,
including the added dollars for the
local purchase program.
Aid groups that supported the
changes praised the amendment
but said they would like to seevnore
significant overhaul.
"This change to the farm bill,
while small, will help our aid pro-
grams reach more hungry people
with life-saving assistance," said
Eric Mmunoz, senior policy advisor
for Oxfam America. "We are glad to
celebrate any improvement, howev-
er modest, that can bring our food
aid programs into the 21st century.
However, this modest improvement
should not be used as an excuse to
put aside bigger changes that are
desperately needed."


through the medical pro-
viders at the jail, but that
individuals would be able
to present themselves for
screening and potential
help, as well. Treatment
would be individualized
to the needs of each client,
he said.
He must have the'grant
request turned in to DCF
by July 9. A decision on
funding could be made
this fall.


-. -~u'xv- ~ A. a.. at t&,.t~23 t2t2tZ~Vt~Aflt' I -


Tourney
From Page 1A
400 players swarm to town
with coaches, cheerlead-
ers, parents and fans in
tow.
"It's a very, very impor-
tant event."
Next spring, Jackson


County will see a marked
uptick in' room vacancies
and a drop in sales for local
restaurants and other busi-
nesses that benefit from
the annual influx of spend-
ers laundry mats, gro-
cery and drug stores, etc.
Also taking a hit is Chipola
College itself.
Not only do ticket sales


help the school's athletic
department, but Bryan
Craven, the school's di-
rector of public relations,
said the Chipola em-
ployee association, which
sells concessions at the
games, stands to lose sev-
eral thousand dollars that
would normally go toward
scholarships.


Despite the FCSAA vote
- which Craven specu-
lated was influenced by
many schools' desire for
a more centralized venue
- Chipola College could
host the event again.
When the time comes,
he said, the school will
consider bidding to bring
the tournament back


to Marianna.
"We feel like we put on
a top-notch tournament,
our hospitality is second
to none, our venue is out-
standing and our fans love
basketball."
Those, Craven said,
are the elements that
could swing a future vote
Chipola's way.


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Quality. service at Affrlable Prices
Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90
850-482-5041 1,


Obituaries


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TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 2013 # 5A-


LOCAL & NATION






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Afghanistan


Bomb kills 9 children, 2 U.S. troops


The Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan -
A suicide bomber target-
ing U.S. troops outside an
Afghan government office
killed nine children walk-
ing home from school and
two of the Americans on
Monday, the latest sign
that this year's fighting
season could be one of the
deadliest of the 12-year-
old war.
An increase in casual-
ties among Afghan civil-
ians and security forces
reinforces fears that for-
eign combat forces will be
leaving behind a country
in the throes of relentless
violence when they with-
draw next year.
An Afghan official in-
sisted that despite the
escalating carnage, the
insurgents have made no
advances.
With.peace talks appar-
ently dead in the water,
the Taliban and other mili-
tants have fiercely stepped
up attacks in recent
weeks, unleashing mul-
tiple bombings, sieges of
international aid groups'
compounds and armed
attacks on police posts na-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Afghans look at shoes that remained at the scene after a
vehicle was hit by a road side bomb in the Alingar district
of Laghman province, east of Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday,
June 3.


tionwide, and testing the
ability of Afghan soldiers
and police to hold their
ground by themselves.
"Thelevel ofviblence this
year is the highest it has
been since the war start-
ed in 2001," said Thomas
Ruttig of the Afghan
Analysts Network, who
conducted a detailed
study of the first two
months of the annual
Taliban spring offen-
sive. His analysis of at-
tacks over two months
puts the violence on


par with 2011, the
deadliest year of the
war up to now.
Afghan officials say the
insurgents have won no
new territory or advan-
tage, beyond causing may-
hem. But the death toll
has soared. In thepast two
weeks alone, violence has
killed 125 Afghan civilians
and injured 287, a 24 per-
cent increase in casualties
from the same period last
year, the United Nations'
mission said.
Monday's civilian death


toll reached 16 when a
family in another eastern
province drove their vehi-
cle over a roadside bomb,
killing all seven people
inside.
The U.N. blamed mili-
tant attacks for 84 percent
of the recent civilian ca-
sualties, saying that tac-
tics like suicide bombings
near schools and planting
roadside bombs around
the country may amount
to war crimes.
The Afghan army and
police are fighting the in-
surgency with little or no
help from international
forces set to pull out next
year after'fighting in Af-
ghianistan since the 2001
U.S.-led invasion to top-
ple the Taliban for shel-
tering al-Qaida's terrorist
leadership after the Sept.
11 attacks.
Apparently to test the
Afghan forces mettle, or
rattle a nervous popu-
lace, the insurgents have
chosen to ratchet up at-
tacks rather than join a
halting peace talk effort
- or 'simply wait until
after most international
troops leave by the end of
next year.


Residents watched until flames descended


The Associated Press They were still there on
Monday along with doz-
PALMDALE, Calif. ens of other people who
- Smelling smoke, Scott fled a vast wildfire that
Reader watched and chewed through more
waited for hours as a huge than 46 square miles of
plume drew ever closer to old chaparral and threat-
his home in the rural com-- ened two hamlets at the


munity of Lake Hughes
in northern Los Angeles
County.
It didn't take much for
him to decide when it was
time to get out.
"We saw flames and
that was it," Reader said.
"That's all we needed to
see."
He packed some belong-
ings into a trailer, loaded
up the dogs, and he and
his girlfriend drove to a
Red Cross shelter in near-
by Palmdale on Saturday.


edge of Angeles National
Forest.
Firefighters had doubled
containment of the blaze
to 40 percent by Monday,
as cool, moist air moved in
to replace torrid weather.
The flames moved out of
rugged mountains and
onto the floor of the high
desert Antelope Valley,
where the fire became
easier to fight.
"The fire moved into
an area where vegetation
changed from real dense


to real sparse," U.S. Forest
Service spokesman Matt
Corelli said.
With only widely scat-
tered homes in the area,
firefighters were able to
work more on attacking
flames than on structure
protection, he said.
At least six houses have
been destroyed by the fire,
nine more were damaged,
and 2,800 people fled 700
homes in Lake Hughes
and Lake Elizabeth, 45
miles northwest of down-
town Los Angeles.
During the weekend,
flames were fanned by
unpredictable winds that
pushed hotspots in differ-
ent directions.
Reader, 44, said he was
astounded to see how fast-


flying embers blew from
a ridge a half-mile away
and across Lake Hughes
to suddenly ignite brush
near his backyard.
"It just jumped right over
the lake, no problem," he
said.
Reader received word
that his house survived,
but others weren't so
fortunate.
Monique Hernandez, 37,
also saw the fire jump the
lake and decided to flee
the mountaintop home
she and her parents rent-
ed in March.
The family put their dog,
photos and clothes into
a van and sped down a
mile-long dirt road. An
hour later, they learned
their home had burned.


More than 65 countries sign Arms Trade Treaty


The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS
- More than 65 countries
signed the landmark trea-
ty regulating the multibil-
lion-dollar global arms
trade Monday and the
United States announced
it will sign soon, giving a
strorig kickoff to the first
major international cam-
paign to stem the illicit
trade in weapons that fuel'
conflicts and extremists.
The announcement by
U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry that the U.S.
- the world's largest
arms dealer will sign
is critical, but the treaty's
ultimate strength rests on
support by all major arms
exporters and importers.
While the treaty was over-
whelmingly approved on
April 2 by the U.N. Gen-
eral Assembly, key arms
exporters including Rus-
sia and China and major
importers including India,
Saudi Arabia, Indonesia
and Egypt abstained and
have given no indication


yet that they will sign it.
Signatures are the first
step to ratification, and
the treaty will only take
effect after 50 countries
ratify it.
Finland's Foreign Minis-
ter Erkki Tuomioja, a key
treaty backer, predicted
that there will be 50 rati-
fications "within slightly
more than a year but
the real test is, of course,
getting those who still
have doubts or who have
not made up their minds,
to sign on and ratify."
The treaty will require
countries that ratify it to
establish national regula-
tions to control the trans-
fer of conventional arms
and components and to
regulate arms brokers, but
it will not control the do-
mestic use of weapons in
any country. It prohibits
the transfer of conven-
tional weapons if they
violate arms embargoes
or if they promote acts of
genocide, crimes against
humanity or war crimes,


BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT
T- "7 ; , ' i ' L ,: ' ,, ,


and if they could be used
in attacks on civilians or
civilian buildings such as
schools and hospitals.
What impact the treaty
will have in curbing the
global arms trade es-
timated at between $60
billion and $85 billion
- remains to be seen. A
lot will depend on which
countries ratify it, and
how stringently it is im-
plemented once it comes
into force.
U.N. Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon told a special
event marking the sign-
ings that the treaty shows
that "the world has finally
pult an end to the 'free-for-
all' nature of international
weapons transfers."
"The treaty ... will make
it harder for weapons to
be diverted into the illicit


market, to reach warlords,
pirates, terrorists and
criminals or to be used
to commit grave human
rights abuses or violations
of international humani-
tarian law," Ban said.
He urged all countries
- especially major arms-
trading countries to
sign and ratify the treaty
saying "the eyes of the
World are watching arms
traders, manufacturers
and governments, as nev-
er before."
At the morning session,
62 countries signed the
treaty, and in the after-
noon five more signed,
bringing the total to 67,
about one-third of the
U.N.'s 193 member states
which U.N. disarmament
chief Angela Kane called
"impressive."'!


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This June 2, image taken from video in Union City, Okla., shows
the vehicle that longtime storm chasers Tim Samaras, his son
Paul and colleague Carl Young were killed in Friday when a
powerful tornado hit near El Reno, Okla.


Storm chasing


critical, profitable


and dangerous


The Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY -
While most people take
shelter when a tornado ap-
proaches, a growing throng
heads for the prairies, be
they scientists hoping to
protect the public from a
twister's fury or amateurs
armed with little more
than a smartphone, a digi-
tal camera and a desire to
sell 15 seconds of video to
the nightly news.
But the deaths of three
respected researchers
near Oklahoma City have
renewed questions over
whether the risk of dash-
ing off into violent storms
in Tornado Alley is too
great regardless of the
adrenaline rush.
"I think there will be
some who will step back
and say: Am I really do-
ing something safe here?'"
said Michael Armstrong,
a meteorologist for KWTV
in Oklahoma City. "I think
you'll probably have others
... that just feel that invin-
cibility that they've always
felt and they'll keep doing
what they're doing and ba-
sically look at it as though
it was an aberration or an
outlier."
Longtime storm chasers
Tim Samaras, his son Paul
and colleague Carl Young
were killed Friday when
a powerful tornado near
El Reno, Okla., turned on
them as they were con-
ducting research. The
National Weather Center
issued a statement say-
ing they are likely the first
"storm intercept fatalities"
among researchers.
Oklahoma is consid-
ered the "mecca of storm
chasing," Tim Samaras
told National Geographic
just last month, and there
are often hundreds of
storm chasers lining the
roads. Seasoned storm
trackers provide criti-


cal fieldtdata that can't be
gleaned from high-pow-
ered Doppler radar, veter-
an meteorologists say. But
they're increasingly com-
peting with storm-chasing
tours, amateur weather
enthusiasts inspired by ca-
ble TV shows and tornado
paparazzi speeding from
storm to storm.
Samaras' colleagues said
he took numerous safety
precautions, spending
hours looking at weather
models and developing
safe escape routes and
rendezvous points. All
were done in case his crew
would have to pull away
from a tornado and use
well-maintained roads
that wouldn't turn into
"pancake batter" in rain.
"St6rm chasing isn't
about what you see on TV
It's about forecasting and
safety .preparation," said
Ben McMillan, a storm
chaser from Des Moines,
Iowa, who teamed up in
2011 with Samaras and Ed
Grubb of Thornton, Colo.,
for the Discovery Channel
show "Storm Chasers."
Samaras also usually
drove a three-quarter ton
truck with a reinforced lin-
ing, Grubb said, but had
a smaller truck last week
because he was on a three-
week research trip focused
mostly on lightning.
Many amateur, storm
chasers are looking to
capture heart-pounding
video of a massive, dan-
gerous twister and cash
in by selling the footage
to television stations or
documentary filmmakers.
Television stations and
other news outlets gener-
ally pay up to $500 to use
certain video, and storm
chasers will reach' out
to several different ones.
Sometimes, they're not
even after money, but
hearing their name read
aloud on the air.


a blended worship experience


summer


','ip:ie band and organ


worship

t--.t. -ent heroes"


9:00a.m. in the sanctuary











first united methodist church marianna, florida
.'.' ri. ; "4:-';" '- '* ",';">1 ':' CF


-16A TUESDAY, JUNE 4,2013


NATION & WORLD







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'^ /^ Jj'*;l***'i ;"' \r


Sports
Briefs
Marianna Summer
League Basketball
Tuesday- Sneads vs. Port
St. Joe, 4 p.m.; Graceville vs.
Sneads, 5 p.m.; Port St. Joe
vs.Vernon, 6 p.m.;Vernon vs.
Graceville, 7 p.m.
Thursday- Bainbridge vs.
Mosley, 4 p.m.; Marianna vs.
Blountstown, 5 p.m.; Mosley
vs. Blountstown, 6 p.m.; Bain-
bridge vs. Marianna, 7 p.m.

Chipola Team Basketball
Camp
Chipola College and Mari-
anna High School will host
the Chipola Team Camp for
boys basketball this weekend,
with games running Friday
and Saturday.
Friday's games begin at
8 a.m., with the last games
starting at 4 p.m., while
Saturday's games begin at 9
a.m., with the last game start-
ingat 5 p.m. at Chipola.
Malone, Cottondale,
Graceville, and Marianna will
participate, as well as Chipley
andVernon.

Chipola Baseball Camps
Chipola baseball coach'
Jeff Johnson will offer three
camps: a pitching camp that
will meet June 10-11, a hitting
camp June 12-13, and a skills
camp June 17-18.
The camps are for ages 7-18
and all cost $ 100. though a '
Grand Slam Special rate for all
three camps is $250.
Allbaseball camps meet
from 9 a.m. to noon.
For more information,
contact Chipola:assistant
coachChris Hutcheson at
850-718-2243.

Chipola Softball Camps
Chipola softball coaches
Jimmy and Belinda Hendrix
will offer a skills camp on June
17-18 and a hitting camp June
19 at Chipola College.
The camps are for all ages "
and bothwill run from 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m., with a $100 cost
for the hitting camp, $50 for
the skills camp, and $135 for
both.
Campers should bring a
glove, a bat, tennis shoes, and
cleats.. For more information,
Scall 850-718-2358.

Children's Swimming
Lessons
Chipola College will offer
children's swimming lessons
for ages 4 and up as sched-
uled on the following dates:
Session 2: June 17-27 with a
deadline of June 13.
Classes are available at 10
a.m. or 7p.m. Sessions in-
clude eight 45-minute classes
which meet Monday through
Thursday for two weeks.
Cost of regular swimming
lessons is $55. Pre-registra-
tion is required with a $ late
registration fee. For more
information, call 718-2473 or
visit www.chipola.edu.

Marianna Swim Team
The Marianna Swim Team
is a local, recreational swim.
team for boys and girls ages
4-18. Practices are held from
5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.. Monday
through Thursday through
August at .hipola College
Pool.
Meets are held on Saturdays
throughout the summer.
Registration is open. All we
require is that the swimmer
swim one full: pool length (25
yards) and that children un-
der 10 have parental supervi-
sion during practices.
The registration fee of $35
payable to MST helps cover
cost of life guards and relay
events at meets. Team T-shirts
for members will be an ad-
ditional $5 and $15 for non-
members. Pool membership
is also required by Chipola
College.


For additional information
please call Vicki Pelham at
482-2435; Angle Bunting at
209-8918; Julie Smith at 557-
3292; Monica Bolin at 209-
2388; or'email your questions
to MST2010@centurylink.net.

Bulldog Wrestling Club
The BulldogWrestling Club
is starting practice for the
summer season.


CGHS Basketball


Tigers searching for answersin summer


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Graceville Tigers will
open up their summer schedule
today at Marianna High School
when they take on the Sneads
Pirates at 5 p.m. and theVernon
Yellowjackets at 7 p.m.
The Tigers are coming off of
a season in which they won 15
games and finished atop the
regular season standings in
District 3-1A before suffering a
disappointing season-ending
loss in the district tournament
semifinals.
If Graceville is to find a way
back to the playoffs next sea-
son, it will have to be with a
much younger and more inex-
perienced team after the depar-
tures of senior starters Rasheed
Campbell, Marquis White,
Taylor Rousseau, and Devonte
Merritt.
Seven seniors who played at
least on a semi-regular basis
last season graduated, leaving


coach Matt Anderson with what
he said one of the youngest
teams he has ever coached.
"I think once we get every-
body and get them all on the
same page, we could end up be-
ing pretty good," he said. "But it
will take a while. We'll be a work
in progress. We're probably not
going to look like a good team
this summer."
Jared Padgett, Rashard McK-,
innie, and Daniel Davis return
as the most experienced players
off of last year's team, though
rising junior Marquavious
Johnson was a freshman starter
two seasons ago before a foot
injury sidelined him most of
last season.
There will be five new players
from last season's junior varsity
last club, with JV starters Der-
rick White, Deangelo Bell, AJ
Davis, Chris Oliver, and sixth-
man Quajohn Andrews mov-
ing up, as well as a rising eighth

See TIGERS, Page 2B


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Head Coach Matt Anderson talks to some Tigers during a past practice.
Graceville will open its summer schedule today at Marianna High School
with games against Sneads at 5 p.m. and Bay at 7 p.m.


COLLEGE BSKETBALL





Blount to. Blue Wave


Hornets star signs with FSCJ


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Cottondale Hornets star Je-
rodd Blount will continue his
basketball career at the col-
lege level, signing a letter-of-
intent to play for Florida State
College at Jacksonville on Fri-
day afternoon at Cottondale
High School.
Blount averaged 22.6 points
per game during his senior
season at CHS, helping lead
the Hornets to a district
championship and a playoff
victory.
The 6-foot-3 scoring guard
said that he was glad to get the
chance to continue playing
basketball at the next level.
"It feels great to finally get to
go to school and do what I love
and get an education at the
same time," Blount said. "The
school is nice and the coach is
very intense and hard work-
ing. They said they expect me
to play shooting guard and do
some good things for them
next year."
Blount will play for Flori-
da State College coach Neil
Orr, who has coached the
Blue Wave for the past five
seasons.
The BlueWave coachingstaff
took notice of Blount after a
solid performance in a high
school All Star game, which
led to a campus visit and ulti-
mately to a commitment.
"They liked his size and
athleticism *and how well he
could shoot the ball," Cotton-
dale coach Chris Obert said of
the FSCJ coaches. "He got in
on a visit and they likely him


and he liked them. It seems
like a good fit."
The coach said he believed
that Blount had all the tal-
ent and skills to succeed at
the college level; it was just a
matter of putting in the work
on and off the court to make
it happen.
"With him, I think it's about
just staying focused and put-
ting in the effort every day,"
Obert said. "He's got the tal-
ent to do it; we all know that.
His combination of size, ath-
leticism, skill, and the ability
to score the ball is something
that not everyone has. He's
just got to stay focused and
grind every day. If he does
that, then he can be a great
player."
Blount said he knows he still
has a lot of room to improve
as a player, saying Friday that
he needs to get better at all as-
pects of the game.
"I've got to hit the weight
room and get a long stronger,"
he said. "I need to get better
at dribbling and smarter at
playing the game. I have to
get better on defense and just
work on my footwork and get
quicker, faster, and bigger."
Blount joined his teammate
DJ Roulhac in signing a college
scholarship last week, with
Roulhac inking with Thomas
University on Thursday.
"That's good for the kids,
the school, the program, and
the community," Obert said
of his players signing schol-
arships. "It's great for them to
get the opportunity to move
on and do well for themselves
and their families."


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Cottondale's Jerodd Blount signed with FSCJ basketball program Friday. He
is seen with his mom, Susan Boyd, and CHS Head Basketball Coach Chris
Obert.


SHS Basketball


Pirates open the summer with GHS, St. Joe


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Sneads coach Andy Ward will
see his first action as the Pi-
rates' boys basketball coach to-
day when the Pirates open up
summer play at Marianna High
School with games against Port
St. Joe at 4 p.m. and Graceville at
5p.m.
Ward led the Sneads girls to a
17-win season in 2012-2013 and
will try to find similar success
with a boys team that is coming
off of a District 3 tournament
runner-up finish and a playoff
appearance.
The Pirates lost their starting
backcourt of Devin Hayes and
Jalon Daniels off of that team,
but they return a solid nucleus
led by the talented trio of 6-foot-
3 rising senior Darius Williams,
6-foot-4 rising junior Jeremy
Wert, and 6-foot-6 rising junior
Alfonso Brown.


MARK SKINNER/FLIORIDAN
Head Coach Andy Ward talks to the Lady Pirates after a past practice. He Is
taking over coaching duties for the Sneads High School boys's basketball
team.
Having three players with the his primary focus going into the
size, skill, and athlleticism of summer is simply laying the
those three is a good place for groundwork for what he expects
any team to start, but Ward said from the players and what they
,%.- .


should expect from him.
"Right now, we're just trying
to work on us. We're not worried
about who we're playing. We
just have to work on being dis-
ciplined and taking care of the
ball and getting after it and hus-
tling on defense," he said. "Right
now, it's just about adjusting. I'm
adjusting to (the players), and
they're adjusting to me. Some
played for me with the JV, but
some of them haven't.
"They're getting used to me
and I've got to get used to them
and let them know what I ex-
pect. Hopefully we can get bet-
ter throughout the summer so
we're not starting from square
one next winter."
Ward said that the biggest
thing he wanted his team to
focus on during the summer
was becoming a solid defensive
team.

See PIRATES, Page 2BL


'IVLI Iyet -
X~~bh. _jdlB< I 4 bi. nLB ^l ^B. He







--2B TUESDAY, JUNE 4,2013


SPORTS


Auto Racing


i m :I ": 1 t.TII': fI n I Si n ': .
IndyCar driver AJ Allmendinger talks with team owner Roger Penske before a practice session for the Detroit Grand Prix on
Belle Isle in Detroit last week.


Penske backs Allmendinger


The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. AJ
Allmendinger left Detroit
looking for a place to hide.
Instead, he's received an
outpouring of support and
kind words from the man
who has stood by him all
. alofig.
"Just a tough weekend
after his success at Indy,"
Roger Penske said Monday,.
shrugging off Allmending-
er's crash-filled weekend
of IndyCar racing at Belle
Isle.
Penske took Allmend-
inger to the doubleheader
event at "Belle Isle, the last
announced races right
now on his IndyCar sched-
ule. Allmendinger wrecked
on the first lap Saturday,
then did the same thing on
Sunday, failing to complete
even a single lap over two
days.
Allmendinger was dev-
astated after Sunday's ac-
cident and apologized
profusely.
"I don't know what to
say," he said. "I apologize to


Roger, everybody at Team
Penske, (sponsor) Quicken
Loans, everybody that puts
in the effort, all my guys,
it's embarrassing, honestly
It's embarrassing for me.
Roger deserves better than
that, the sponsors. I don't
know where I go from here.
I'm heartbroken, I don't
even know what to say
anymore."
He was still reeling Sun-
day night when he took to
Twitter to again apologize.
"My mistakes are embar-
rassing and that is an un-
derstatement," he tweeted.
"I'm grateful for Roger and
(at)penskeracing for their
trust and support of me. I
never want to repay them
like this. Sorry to all my
crew guys for making them
work so hard for noth-
ing. I'm so sorry. Not sure
where to go from here. Feel
like I just need to get away
for a few weeks."
The support came quickly
for Allmendinger from oth-
er drivers, including former
teammate and longtime
friend Paul Tracy, Graham


Rahal and three-time In-
dianapolis 500 champion
Dario Franchitti.
"Keep your chin up
mate, we've all been there,"
Franchitti tweeted. "It's
great having you in the se-
ries and your drive in Indy
showed your talent."
Allmendinger led 23 laps
a week ago in his India-
napolis 500 debut for Pen-
ske and might have had a
chance to win if his seat-
belt had not come undone
while leading. The race
was a second chance for
the disgraced driver from
Penske, who was forced
to fire Allmendinger last
summer after the driver
failed a random NASCAR
drug test. Penske stood
by Allmendinger's side as
Allmendinger completed
NASCAR's "Road to Recov-
ery" program.
Once reinstated to com-
pete again, Penske put
together the Indy 500 op-
portunity for Allmend-
inger and entered him in
IndyCar races at Barber
and Long Beach to prepare


him for his return to open-
wheel racing. The Detroit
doubleheader was then
added to the schedule, and
Allmendinger couldn't get
. over letting the team own-
er down.
"I feel so lucky that he be-
lieves in me and that's not
even close to how I want to
repay him," said Allmend-
inger, who downplayed
a jammed thumb he suf-
fered Saturday as some-
how contributing to Sun-
day's wreck. "That's just a
poor excuse right there. It
was just a huge mistake by
me again. Start of the race,
trying to be aggressive, not
kind of get sucked into ev-
erything and just made a
mistake again."
Next up for Allmendinger
is a pair of Nationwide Se-
ries road course races for
Penske at Road America
and Mid-Ohio, and what-
ever Sprint Cup Series
events James Finch allows
him to run. Allmendinger
has run four Cup races for
Finch this year with a best
finish of 11th at Phoenix.


NBA

Jason Kidd retiring from NBA after 19 seasons


The Associated Press


NEWYORK -Jason Kidd
became one of the best by
making others better..
He turned around a
longtime-losing franchise,
guided another to a cham-
pionship, and helped his
last one to its first division
title since the year he came
into the NBA 19 years ago.
Teammates loved him.
The U.S. national team
needed him.
But he looked more
burned out than brilliant
in the final weeks of the'
season, and on Monday he
decided to end one of the
greatest careers for a point
guard in league history.
"My time in professional
basketball has been an in-
credible journey, but one
that must come to an end
after 19 years," Kidd said
in a statement released by
the New York Knicks. "As I
reflect on my time with the
four teams I represented in
the NBA, I look back fondly
at every season and thank
each and every one of my
teammates and coaches
that joined me on the


"My time in professional basketball has been an
incrediblejourney, but one that must come to an
end after 19 years."
Jason Kidd,
On his retirement


court."
KiddwonanNBAtitleand
two Olympic gold medals,
is second on the career list
in assists and steals, and
was a 10-time All-Star. But
he missed 22 of his 25 shots
in the postseason and was
scoreless in -his final 10
playoff games shortly after
turning 40, and decided to
walk away with two years
and more than $6 million
left on the deal he signed
last summer.
His retirement comes
two days after fellow 40-
year-old Grant Hill, with
whom Kidd shared Rookie
of the Year honors in 1995,
announced his retirement.
Kidd went on from there
to have big impacts on ev-
ery, team he joined. He led
the Nets to two NBA Finals
in 2002-03, helped the Dal-
las Mavericks win the 2011


title, and was on the first
Knicks team to reach the
second round of the play-
offs since 2000.
He averaged 12.6 points,
8.7 assists, 6.3 rebounds
and 1.93 steals in a career
that also included a stop
in Phoenix. Kidd had nu-
merous ways to make his
mark on games, ranking
third on the career list with
107 triple-doubles while
finishing third all-time in
3-pointers made, despite
being considered a poor
outside shooter when he
came into the league.
Dirk Nowitzki, who
played with Kidd on the
Mavs' title team, wrote on
Twitter that Kidl was "one
of the best point guards
ever and one of the fierc-
est competitors I have ever
played with."
'"Amazing career," Nowit-


zki wrote. "He always put
the team and winning
first. All the best to him in
retirement."
The Knicks signed Kidd
away from Dallas last sum-
mer with a three-year deal,
and he helped them flour-
ish with a lineup that often
featured two point guards.
They won 54 games and
their first Atlantic Division
title since 1994, which was
just before Kidd was draft-
ed by Dallas with the No. 2
overall pick.
"Jason's value to the
Knicks and the National
BasketballAssociation can-
not be quantified by statis-
tics alone," Knicks general
manager Glen Grunwald
said. "Everyone here in
New York saw firsthand
what a tremendous com-
petitor he is and why Jason
is considered to be one of
the best point guards, and
leaders, the game has ever
seen."
He averaged 6.0 points,
3.3 assists and 4.3 rebounds
in 76 games for the Knicks
but lost his likely Hall of
Fame-bound game in the
postseason.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com
4

NFL

Former Bills great


Kelly battling cancer


The Associated Press'

BATAVIA, N.Y. -Jim Kel-
ly intends to confront the
cancer found in his upper
jaw bone much like the
Hall of Fame quarterback
has approached many of
the numerous challenges
he's faced in life: Head on.
Revealing on Monday
that he's been diagnosed
with squamous cell car-
cinoma, Kelly drew upon
his family, faith and perse-
verance. Those are three
qualities that have helped
him overcome the death
of his son, Hunter, his
mother and whatever ob-
stacles stood in his way on
the football field.
"You have challenges.
You have to confront
them head on. Add this
is just another one. I'm
down at the bottom. But I
will rise to the top again,"
Kelly said. "I am extremely
confident in my road to
recovery. I plan to tackle
this challenge head on, as
we Kellys always do."


Pirates
From Page'lB
"The biggest thing is
I just want them to de-
fend," he said. "It doesn't
matter if you're scoring if
you can't stop anybody.
If you can defend and get
stops, you're going to find
points along the way, so
that's what I want to focus
on right now, just being
able to get stops. We can
always control our ef-
fort on defense; you can't
always control whether
shots go down."
Size and athleticism on
the interior is always a
great way to build a stout
defense, and the Pirates
will have plenty of that
with Wert, Williams, and
Brown, as well as 6-foot-
3 reserve post Kyle Com-
modore, who is out with a
knee injury he suffered in
spring football practice.
"We've got some size,"
Ward said. "Any time
you've got four guys
that are 6-3 or over, for a
school our size that's pret-
ty good."
Williams, who led
Sneads in scoring last
year, returns after trans-
ferring to Florida High
late last season, joining
Wert and Brown to give
the Pirates three versa-
tile and athletic players
who can beat teams in
the paint and from the
perimeter.
SMore importantly, Ward
said, they'll make the
team much more diffi-
cult to prepare for and to
defend.
"We don't want to be a
-team that's predictable
with who we're going to
go to and who's going to
get the ball, and the one
thing having all three of
those kids gives us is the
ability to do that," the
coach said. "They're all
three going to be a big
part of everything we do,
so you can't just focus on
one person.
"Darius and Wert both
shoot it pretty well, Alfon-
so handles it pretty well


Informed of the diagno-
sis two weeks ago, Kelly
called the prognosis for
recovery "very good." He
said tests show the cancer
is isolated to the jaw and
not spread to other parts
of his body.
Doctors plan to remove
part of Kelly's jaw during
an operation scheduled to
take place at a Buffalo hos-
pital on Friday. It won't be
determined until after the
operation whether he will
require chemotherapy
"We caught it in time,"
the 53-year-old Kelly said.
"It's just another challenge
for me and I know I'll beat
it."
The announcement was
made shortly before the
start of quarterback's 27th
annual Kelly for Kids char-
itable foundation's celeb-
rity golf tournament.
The news of Kelly's
condition immediately
drew support from for-
mer teammates and.
friends attending the
tournament.


for a big kid, and they all
have size, so we can throw
it to them underneath
and give people trouble.
It's nice to have kids with
their length."
While size and interior
play should be no issue,
answers at the guard po-
sition are much more dif-
ficult to find.
Rising junior Hunter
Johnson is the only re-
turning guard with signif-
icant varsity experience,
with varsity newcom-
ers Devonte Green and
Devonte Pettis being
asked to step up and help
fill the void left by Hayes
and Daniels.
Rising senior forward
Dustin Pittman played
primarily on the inside
last season but could see
his ball handling respon-
sibilities increase, though
it's more likely that Brown
will be called on to get the
Pirates into their offense
more often next season.
"We don't have much
experience handling the
ball, so right now (Brown)
will have to play wherever
we need him depending
on the matchups," Ward
said. "He's capable of do-
ing multiple things with
his size, but at this level
you can't afford to not
play him down in the post
some. But when you don't
have a lot of experience
with your guards, you've
got to let him handle it
some too. But we should
be alright there."
Green will also be need-
ed to step in and provide
a spark in the backcourt,
and Ward said he believes
that he is capable of doing
just that.
"He's a good athlete and
he'll get after it and do ev-
erything you ask of him,"
the coach said. 'At any
given time, I feel like I can
put him in the game and
he'll give me everything
he's got. He's just a high
energy guy who will help
in the long run."
The Pirates will not play
again until June 13 at Mar-
ianna High School against
Bay High and Marianna.


Tigers
From Page 1B
grader in 6-foot-3 CJ Smith,
who Anderson said may or
may not start out on var-
sity next year.
Rising senior Dayleon
Russ returns after spot duty
last season, while 6-foot-
4 rising junior post player
Jalin Lawson will give the
Tigers some added size in
the paint after not play-
ing last year, and Poplar
Springs guard Kyler Trim
transfers in after starting
for the Atomics last year.
While the roster isn't
very big on experience on
continuity at the moment,
Anderson said that it's
comprised of an unusually
high number of players
Jwho at least have the po-


tential to be contributors
next season.
"We'll be deep; we just
don't know how good we're
going to be," the coach
said. "We might be deep
and bad, deep and medio-
cre, or hopefully deep and
good. (This summer) is re-
ally about finding out who
we are and what we've got.
We're just so young with
only three seniors to speak
of, two or three juniors,
and the rest ninth and 10th
graders."
To that point, the Tigers'
starting IV backcourt last
season of Bell and White
could very well be the
starting varsity backcourt
next season, and the soph-
omore class overall will
be counted on to provide
consistent production.
But the key for GHS


could be if Johnson re-
gains his pre-injury form
and if skilled forward Dan-
' iel Davis can step up in his
junior season and help re-
place some of the scoring
punch left behind by Mar-
quis White.
Anderson said that, thus
far, both players are show-
ing good signs in practice.
"Marquavious is playing
well and starting to shoot
the ball again like he was
(before the injury). He's
stronger now as a junior
than he was as a freshman
and he's defensively so
much quicker than we had
at that position last year,"
the coach said. "He's had a
good start to the summer
so far. I hope it carries over
into the games, and I think
it will.
"Daniel is starting to


come along and learning
to play hard. He still needs
to get a lot better funda-
mentally, but at times he
looks really good. He can
shoot the ball and he's a
big, strong kid who can re-
bound it and score a little
inside. But he still has his
,moments, and he's got to
get better defensively."
The Tigers will also, play
in the Chipola Team, Camp
this weekend at ,Chipola
College and Marianna
High School, opening up
Friday against Marianna at
9 a.m. at MHS.
Graceville will also play
Bay High and Seminole on
Friday at Chipola, and will
open Saturday's action at
9 a.m. against Chipley at
Chipola before finishing
up with Bainbridge and
Daleville.







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
, ON=KOUR'S STEK.TO"I YOU o NOW, 50 t AEE-5 ,CTRTNNLY, IS OTWlN
HIS LIKING? | N ISHOTkIAGLIKECk LIK A00,STCM "I,45lll 60t>SEA.


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
HOW COME ALL THE LILA AND I WERE
GIRLS WHO ARE PER.- GETTING ALONG GREAT'
FECT FOR. ME ALREADY SHE WAS THE FIRST
HAVE BOYFRIENDS? GIRL WHO MADE ME
7F^ FORGET ABOUT...
0.
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SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
I 1[-4toTLr Karie iias ( se sTaPep m te
MI F iew l, BUT WHaT i n T-e 3acl<.
SHeReaULL' waNit'pas | W sT
SIeaL.o-Lie aWY:RaMMe -.-.-,


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR
5 M/6IE T1R ABoUT YYEA,0TIA
UWM'E 15 "14AT 5HiE HURT, I


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
7 6UZ THREW WIZER IN TN PIT OVER T"HAAT '- SINCE WHEN
DINOSAUR BIZNESS, AN' THEN WHEN A PAI"NG.- DO PEOPLE NEED
STRANGER ASKED IF HE'D PROTECTED WIZER 5.r 1 HIASTE TIME WORR1I
RIGHTS. NE THREW HIM IN THERE, TOO! m-y!, ABOUT RIGHTS?
S- .IELL ME
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ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
i7T SEEMS TO ME 'V I"1 ', 7 WELL,THEY CAN TURN 'T
I. J>.'uE WINDS OF CHANGEjVy-ouRE . R AROUND AND BLOW RIOHT
/nA. ',E BLOWN ACRO,t I ". RI'C 1 -. "6T ACK OUT! MOO WILL '
' .'MFCC5S MOUNTAIN RANGE!t I FI CCY'! Y NEVER CHANGE!
a ,1/ )/ "3


THAT A BABY BY PAUL TRAP
For centuries, ...,,oT "
the Hopishad Stories of cultural v4o, -\jjLL
no written importance s-- "'T-Ae
language. are still passed yige'-H ?t-c.-W _
From generation to 'ov5 EX. \\-.'
^ \- ?generation through c)- c\r _. ^'--"_-
Soral tradition.





KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRYWRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER
fwww.CoComics.c.m J^:SS5--_l kitncarlyle@comcast.netlI


6 -s In ilii]!,hgS, k 1 Mien1t1o1. Inc, I l b y U W I wby l U(thc lU or 1 ) S, 1013

"Sweetheart, don't forget your lunch."


ACROSS
1 Actress
Ryan
4 Gumbel or
LeMond
8 Long hike
12"Exodus"
name
13 Diva
Ponselle
14Dog
owner's
shout
15Shook
17 Green
Gables girl
18Trap-
shooting
19Chip make
20 Common
website
abbr.
22 Explosive
initials
23 Cast a ballot
26 Sci-fi
vehicles
28 XXI times C
31 In the
distance
32 Flair for
music
33 Storm
center
34Gridiron
grp.
S35"It's cold!"
36 Ms. Eyre


37 Paul Anka's
"- Beso"
38 Actress
Moore
39 Depot info
40Sinbad's
bird
41 Benicio
Toro
43 Got going
46 Fill with
happiness
50007's school
51 Rustic rug
54 Obstacle
55 -.spumante
56 Groom's
vow
(2 wds.)
57 Store event
58 Peak
59 Modern

DOWN
t 1 Dallas
cagers
2 Viking
; name
S3 Taunt
4 Persona
non -
5 Nonsense!
6 Compass pt.
7 Traipse
8U-
9 Housing
expense
0lSeacoast
eagle


Answer to Previous Puzzle


CL UE LE
AA TA Li

-AY

21 aR 01F
USN ARcE





22 SE lterin
SEALiEl
WI T)HE RE
OLE A
NEMOM
11 Boat's
bottom
16 Allude
19 Good
connections
21 Canadian
province
22Sweltering
23Wind
indicator
24 Switch
positions
25 Cantina
fare
27 Pasture
locale
28 Carnivore's
diet
29 Feathered
talker (var.)
30 Average
grades


VIPP RETE
EE AT0NJ
-A F PANS
N IL

13 N

AIL
BO
B IA BLSAM
RBS |VALU
EAIF^ETA

I BE
EDI EURO0
T E R I ME
5D TSAR
36 Congeals
38 Coach
Shula
40 Home
appliance
42 Hair-raising
43 Consumer
advocate
Myerson
44 Sicilian
volcano
45 Objective
47Similar
48Waterfront
event
49 Plenty, to a
poet
51 Bleat
52 PC button
53 PIN
prompter


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Dear Annie: I was overweight through-.
out most of my childhood and became
morbidly obese after high school. When I
was in college, I had terrible self-esteem
and a horrible body image. I never dated.
Three years ago, I had gastric bypass and
have since lost more than 200 pounds.
I've been trying to start dating, but the
individuals I have approached are either
seeing someone else or are not interest-
ed. I tried online dating sites, but the men
who responded all live far away, some in
other countries, and I'm leery of proceed-
ing. I am not sure about the bar scene and
am unaware of any singles groups in my
area.
So, I guess I would like some advice on
how and where to start relationships.


Peter Thomson, an Australian golfer who won
the British Open five times,.said, "Every tourna-
ment lihs its climax, its winning moment. If you're
not watchful, you will miss it and lose your best
chance."
A bridge deal often has its winning moment. If
you're not watchful, you wvill err and go down in
your contract or fail to defeat the declarer. In this
deal, South is in five clubs. West leads a low heart,
East winning with his king and (best) continuing
with the heart ace. How can South prevail?
After South's strong artificial opening and North's-
weak artificial response, the bidding was natural.
East thought about sacrificing in five hearts, but
was dissuaded by the unfavorable vulnerability.
(Five hearts doubled should cost 500.)
Declarer seems to have 11 easy tricks: one spade,
five diamonds and five clubs. However, to get five
diamond tricks, South must draw trumps, unblock
his ace andking of diamonds, and get to the dum-
my. What is his dummy entry?
It is the club eight. But if South ruffs the sec-
ond hear in the dummy, that will be the losing
moment, destroying that entry when the trumps
break 3-1, not 2-2. Instead, declarer should discard
a spade from the board at trick two.
If East continues with a third heart, South's pret-
tiest play is to ruff with his club nine, draw trumps,
cash the top diamonds, overtake the club seven
with dummny's eight, and run the diamonds.
Alternatively, South can ruff low, pitch a second
spade from the board, draw trumps, cash his two
diamonds and spade ace, and enter the dummy
with a spade ruff.


ENTEITPJNIVIINT


BREAKING OUT OF MY SHELL

Dear Breaking: There are better online
dating sites that will match you up with
men in your area (or at least in the same
country). Try again. You also should ask
your friends and relatives to introduce
you to available men they know. Local
churches and synagogues often have
singles groups, and you should be able
to attend some functions without having
to be a member. Most importantly, proj-
ect a confident, positive exterior. Smile.
Guys like women who are fun to talk to.
And while you are searching for a date,
participate in activities that interest you.
This will have the added benefit of mak-
ing you more interesting to be around.


Opening lead: V 3


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another,
"MNGZ 'B' MNYY VR DNNP HNM
WCX RNEY, HNM WCX SXYY-JXVBD,
HNM WCX.UROGCX, HNM ONEM
XTXMOWC V B D. V YNTX VW."
- CKBZ JKYYKMP

Previous Solution: If you adore her, you must adorn her. There lies the secret
of a happy marriage." Dress designer Anne Fogarty
TODAY CLUE: Aslenbe.L
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 6-4


North 06-04-13
J J76
S10
QJ1072
88542
West East
41052 4KQ4
VJ763 VAK9852
* 98643 4 5
46 4J103
South
4 A983
VQ4
AK
4AKQ97

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West

South West North East
24 Pass 2# 2V
34 4V 54 Allpass


-- ------- --- ---


TUESDAY,JUNE4,2013 3BF-


Horoscope
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-You'll be more alert to
opportunities and nu-
ances in the morning than
in the afternoon.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -Your methods could
be quite imaginative and
innovative today. Don't
let associates who cannot
match your thinking shut
you down.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
If you put too much
emphasis on your own
interests, expect to meet
with resistance from oth-
ers. Good things can hap-
pen if your considerate.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Be extremely careful of
your words when talking
to a sensitive friend. Words
could be misconstrued.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
A project might require
more resources than you
have at your disposal. To
be on the safe side, have
someone ready to help.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Remember, when
you make things tough on
others, you make things
tough on yourself as well.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -If you want
to have productive day,
you must follow a realistic
plan.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) There isn't likely to
be anything wrong with
the way you think, but you
might have to compro-
mise to placate another.
AQUARIUS (Jari. 20-Feb.
19) Some lucky de-
velopments are a strong
possibility. However, un-
less you're willing to share
the benefits, with others,
you could end up feeling
dismal.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Most of your af-
fairs will turn out favor-
ably, with one exception.
There is a possibility you
might repeat an error in
judgment
ARIES (March 2 1-April
19) Don't take anything
at face value, especially
financial matters. There
could be hidden benefits
as well as hidden pitfalls.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) A willingness to
cooperate and a desire to
do what's best for all will
ease many of the day's
confrontations. Do more
giving than taking.







4B Tnpedav .TJune d 2011 *-T Jknn 'Cunntv Flnridan


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Christmas in New York City, BqigApple
December 1-8 2013
Christmas Lights Tour New Orleans. LA.
Cruise on Steamboat Natchez Mississippi
December 13-15 2003
Tournament of Roses Parade, Pasadena CA
Los Angeles, Grand Canyon,
Las Vegas, Sedona, AZ
December 29, 2013 / January 8, 2014
For more information, call Merita Stanley
4 850-594-9980

($) FINANCIAL
BUSINESSOPPORTUNIT


Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
.cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com

Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
504-915-1474

() MERCHANDISE



DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
NEEDED I BUY SEALED/
UNEXPIRED BOXES
CALL BOB (334) 219-4697
OR 850) 710-0189



SANNE'S DAYLILIES -
S 827S. APPLETREE ST
SDothan, Daylilies ($1- up)
334-792-0653 or 334-797-9657
Free Perennial with purchase!

STOP GNAT, FLY, & MOSQUITO BITES!
Buy Swamp Gator Natural
.; Insect Repellent.
4 Family and Pet Safe
SAvailable at The Home Depot




Miniature Schnauzers, CKC,
2 Males, Females, Salt 'n Pepper,
Born 4/22/13, Ready June 3rd. $350
lucretiafarris @farristruckldng.com,
850-263-4354
Super Puppies Sale
Shih-Chi Mix $125, Chinese Chiluahua ,
Female and Papflions. Now Takldng Deposits
on Yorldes, Shih-Poo and Japenese ddns.
334-718-4886 4m

W l '"... : .'.:''. r ...;S I rT'..



S Frozen Green
Peanuts
; We also have
Shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
s50s-573-6594 4128 Hwy 231














Vine Ripe Tomatoes



Home Grown Greens
Other Fresh Vegetables.!
All Farm Fresh!


1 Aplin Farms
Strawberries
Peaches, Green
Beans, Sqaush,
lettuce, cabbage, Broccoli,
onions & Zucchini
Open Mon-Sat (8-6)
4 334-726-5104 4

FRESH SWEET CORN
I May 29th & July 7th
GREEN CIRCLES FARM
233 Cooler Rd, Bainbridge
229-246-1724
Yellow, White and Bi-Color
Varieties Available Market Price

Hendrix Farm Produce
Now Open Hwy. 52 Slocomb
334-726-7646 4

VEITCH'S BLUEBERRY FARM
7772 Howell Rd. Sneads, FL 32460
YOU PICK BLUEBERRIES
Opening June 1 Tues- Sun 9 am. 6 p.m.



BALLARD DAYLILILIES
252 N. Co. Rd. 9 (3 miles N. Slocomb)
$1.00 & up. FREE Amaryllis w/ purchase.
334-886-2273 or 1-866-745-1243

TREES TREES
TREES
:: 12 fttall 30 gal.
: containers
S $69.95 buy 2
get one FREE
Live Oaks, Crape Myrtle,
Cherry Laurel & Magnolias
By appointment
334-692-3695



"Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
Notracttosmal / Custom Thinning
Cail Pea River Timber
i 334-389-2003 4.

[li~l~ia~fNT-


ADRENALINE RUSH!
You'll also get career training and money for
college., If you're ready for the excitement, join
the Army National Guard today.' _,lt
SSG Ambrocio Bias- D--- -
850-294-7349 -10
NATIONALGUARD.com 1-800-GO-GUARD

([?^ EDUCATION'
) & INSTRUCTION


m w Academia Tutoring
SNow accepting students Pre K 5th grade
certified teacher $25. per hr. sm. group class
Discounts. Call: 334-685-9493. J
BBnBil nM n n M nM M M M. 0 IlIMNi M


NEED A TUTOR?

Math & Science All Levels
I on 1 or Avail. on Skype
Call Ben 727 631 7576

RESIDENTIAL
GA ) REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

Clinton St. Room & kitchen, all utilities inci
$395; other furn. rooms for $375 727-433-RENT


1/1 Apartment for Rent .
For info call 850-579-8895
I B/:!AV.41Apartment FoIRetin



*n Beach Cottage for Rent: 3BR 1.5BA,
Large screened porch, Beacon Hill
(Near Mexico Beach) $500/wk
850-482-2539 or 201-888-2388

1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
4 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
2BR/1BA Newly Renovated 2658 Railroad St.
Open floor plan. Cottondale. No Pets.
$450 Mo. + $400 Dep. Call 850-352-4222


3BR/1BA Spacious Home with large rooms,
hardwood floor, CH&A, large garage and
fenced backyard. 4323 Derring St.
$725 Mo. + $600 Dep. Call 850-643-8806


4/2 Lg. Home w/CH&A 2 car garage.
fenced back yd. in Afford $850 mo. + dep,
850-579-4317 & 850-866-1965 Avail. Now
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
*1 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
M :I LE H ESFOR RENT
2/2 MH South of Cottondale Central Heat/Air,
$550. + dep. & 2/1 MH H/A $450. + dep. water&
lawn care is furnished, 850-352-4393/ 209-4516
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
# 850-209-8847 4m
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message
.,6


2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595


II 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595
For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maint.incl.
Ie* 850-593-4700 4,
Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 located between
Grand Ridge & Sneads.
Includes water, garbage & pest maint.
$360. Mo o 850-573-0308 4n


2- windows white 32x60 $25. ea. 850-526-2845.
Black Bookcase -Tall, $15. 850-693-4657
Black TV Stand -Small, $15. 850-693-4657
Broyhill Dresser- Wood, 8 drws. $45. 693-4657
Camera Olympus 600UZ, $149, 850-482-7665
Coffee table: oak, 2 end table,$75. 850-482-2155-
Daybed w/Trundle- Queen, $75. 526-3333
Dolls Porcelain w/stand, $9 ea. 850-482-7665
Guitar Amp Vox with reverb. $125. 482-6022
Lawn mower: 6.75 hp, 22" cut $75. 850-482-2155
Michelin Tire- 225 70R 19.5, $150. 850-482-6022
Motorcycle Helmet -ASX, $75. 850-482-6022


www..ICFLORIlIDAN.com


. ..D I tirstla.......... ..... .... .. ..... .. ... iiI IV*o :UILI"[[TI


S.r REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


5080 Peanut Rd Graceville. 4 bedroom 2 bath
on over 4 acres nice well maintained home
nestled under large oaks.
$115,000. 850-258-9442


RECREATION


Bass Tracker 2002 17ft 2" long all welded alum.
hall, w/ console, special edition Pro team
175XT 40hp tracer by Mercury Marine, trolling
motor, motor guide, 4300 ft. operated, tilt trail-
er, alum. w/ spair tire. $4000. 850-557-4925.
S' Fisher Freedom Deluxe
" i 201'6 22' pontoon: 90hp
-? *- .- 'M:rcury, 4 stroke, less
t th-in 50hrs, pristine condi-
tion, custom trailer
w/guides, trolling mtr, battery charger, front &
rear electric anchor, extra fishing chair & cus-
tom cover. $14,500. 334-493-6496; 334-504-2555
Stratos 1987 150HP Evinrude, 701b. trolling mo-
tor, 2-depth finders, new batteries, very good
boat, $2800. 334-714-8512

2009 K-Z Spree Travel Trailer: Model 260RBS,
26ft., weight 5100 Ibs., with large slide out.
This camper is like new the stove/oven and the
detachable outdoor grill have never been used.
Also has Winegard auto seeking satellite,
mounted on roof ready to use. Price $19,500.
For more information call: 334-790-4010.
I _2010 Keystone 32'
^-- J Travel Trailer 278-RLS
>. -j~~ I slide, tan interior option,
queen bedroom, new a/c
unit in 2012, rear leaving feature with 2 swivel
rockers & large window, sleeps 4-6, lots of stor-
age, excellent cond, $19,500 OBO. 334-693-5454
2012 Travel Trailer Coleman, 14 foot/ 1 owner-
used 7 nights in local park. Exc. cond., garaged,
roof A/C unit. Plus additional accessories pur-
chased including Sway Control Bars
$7,900/334-699-1925
Motor Home: Own a 35 ft. diesel pusher motor
home for only $34k. 1996 Alegro Bus, dual roof
air conditioners, dual heaters, three awings,
hydraulic jacks, 6.5 k generator, rear view
camera. New roof, tires, refrigerator, TV,
microwave, DVD/VHS player, carpet and couch
and chairs recovered. Call 334-805-7014

TRANSPORTATION


Chevrolet 2011 Aveo, 4 door, Super Sharp! $200
down, $219 per month, Call Ron Ellis 334-714-
0028.
Chevy 1992 Corvette Convertible, fully loaded,
70,000 miles, asking $15,000. 334-441-6042
Dodge 2006 Magnum R/T Hemi Fully loaded
with sunroof over 116,000 miles. $10,500.
334-441-6042 1-Owner Car
Ford 2011 Focus, loaded, like new! $200 down,
$229 per month, Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Honda 2010 Civic EX, 4 door, sunroof, low
miles, under warranty. $200 down, $269 per
month, Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Honda 2011 Civic LX: 4 door, power window,
power lock, 16k miles, white, excellent condi-
tion, 40MPG Highway & 33MPG City $14,000.
Call 334-790-6581
SHonda 2012 Accord Coupe
EXL: Automatic transmis-
sion with paddle shift,
Navigation, sunroof, heat- .
ed leather seats, 6 disc CD player. Has around
9,500 miles. Asking $24,900. Call 334-268-3900.
Lincoln 2003 Town Car executive model dual
zone AR, alloys wheels, tan/leather document-
ed service up to date, 156K miles, runs & looks
great, tinted windows, front CD player, 19 City,
25 Hwy. $7000. OBO. 334-360-5222
Toyota 2012 Corolla GREAT GAS SAVER, 2 to
choose from. Still under factory warranty. $300
down, $300 per month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-
791-8243.


NEW WhiteWindow- 29 x 30 $100 (850) 482-2636
P265/R18 Tire- $15. 850-482-6022
Sleeper Sofa: Queen $250. Call 239-272-8236
Stereo AM/FM, turntable. $85. 239-272-8236
Surround Sound 300wt. 6 sp. $85. 239-272-8236
Tire 23565R17- $35. 850-483-6022
Tires-2/23560R16 $60. 850-482-6022
Trailer enclosed W" plywood 4x8 $150. 482-6022
Tux 40R, black $100. 239-272-8236
VHS Movie Camera- $60 OBO. 850-592-2881
White Dresser-$20. 850-693-4657


Sudoku


9 5 2 3


4 7 __ _8___

9 6 42.

1

5 4_ 49


8

2 3 6 1


9 1


5 76 4
- _ _4 _ - _


Level: U '2 3

Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve STjdokLu,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Friday's puzzle
5478631<29
918527463
9 1 8 5 2 74 6 3

23 5 6 4197589 1
235674891

8 7 9 1 5 2 3 46
1 649382~75

482396517
791285634
356744 8 2 3 9 6 5 1 782
7- 9- 1 --2 8 5 6 3 4

3 -5 617,4111L 98-L-2_


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


* 3BR/2BA House in quiet neighborhood
in Chattahochee, recently renovated inside
and outside. $650 Mo. + $650 Dep.
*+ 1BR/1BA Efficiency Apartment in quiet
neighborhood in Chattahochee recently
renovated inside. $350 Mo. + $350 Dep.
Call 850-592-7276


LfPI


I.


Avri syor"OLSUFfoFREb visitin vwwj cl --da^cm Seitefrdtis


Sudoku


^ .. -*.. .


6/4/13








www.JCFLORIDAN.com


AUTS FOR SAL
fMazda 2009 5 Sport -57K
Miles, Dark Gray, Fully
I Loaded, New Tires, New
Battery, Excellent Condi-
tion $8,950 334-370-6239
JMazda 2010 Mazda3 I
Sport: silver with gray
interior, clean and clear
title, excellent condition,
93k highway miles, great travel car, new
tires, 17" alloy rims, regularly changed oil
with only Mobil 1 full synthetic ojil.
PERFECT STARTER CAR!
Asking $9,900. Call 334-333-1380


'2007 Harley Davidson Dyna
Low Rider. 19,000 miles.
Exc. cond. Garage kept &
well maintained, regular
Ij o service intervals. Sundown-
er touring seat & backrest,
luggage rack, Rush mufflers V H fuelpak & K N
air filter. New rear tire & battery. Lots of extras
and chrome. See to appreciate. $8,700. Call
334-804-4035
AIH 2006 TX Chopper fully customized blue
w/graphics, S&S 124 cu. ft. motor, boss dual
intake powder coated blue, 10,400 miles,
$11.800. OBO 334-445-0366 MUST SEE !!!
Yamaha FZ6 2007 1t3,500 miles, red, helmet
included, $4000. 850-526-5595.
SPORTo UTlI LI~liTY

Honda 2010 CR-V, certified, great fuel mileage,
best selling SUV Honda has. $300 down, $300
per month. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243.
Ic"m=g -i:L. M I 0;Ylt j t i*AP1
TC35 New Holland 2003 Tractor "4-wheel drive,
front end loader, 415 hours, diesel, $15,500
334-691-2803 or 334-797-7881.
TRACTOR FOR SALE-Ford 4000, 52 H.P. Diesel, 6
FT. Bush Hog, 6 FT. Heavy Duty Adjustable Disk
With Grease Bearings, 205-902-4212
0Ikl~l 0o

1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
X" -4s 24 %ot ?(MM4V
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLARFOR JUNKCARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

j j CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES

I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 1 334-792-8664

CASH Guaranteed
Highest prices paid for Junk, old Farming
Equipment, Tractors, Semis, Junk Cars
Nothing to big, nothing to small
4334-596-7791 4




S DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
GOT BAD CREDIT?
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy
A slow credit ok
$0 Down/lst Payment,
Tax, Tag & Title
Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550

-Got a Clunker
: |We'll be your Junker!
a F E nd F EpWe buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
: $325 &f Complete Cars.
CALL 334-7024323 OR 334-714-6285
............. .......... .......
:* We buy Wrecked Vehicles

S Running or not!
or 34M 7914714





LF160132
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION DIVISION:
SCASE NO.: 32-2010-CA-00581
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LILLIE F. ADDINGTON et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated April 18,
2013 and entered in Case NO. 32-2010-CA-00581
of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judi-
cial Circuit in and for JACKSON County, Florida
wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plain-
tiff and LILLIE F. ADDINGTON; EARL FORD;
TENANT #1 N/K/A MICHAEL GRIMSLEY are the
Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash at NORTH
DOOR JACKSON COUNTY COURTHOUSE, MA-
RIANNA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 20th day
of June, 2013, the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judgment:
PARCEL 4: COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING CON-
CRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 5
NORTH, RANGE 9 WEST OF JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 52
MINUTES 28,SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF


SOUTHWEST 1/4,393.89 FEET AND CALL THIS
THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 28 SECONDS
WEST, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, 155.96 FEET
TO AN EXISTING CONCRETE MONUMENT,
THENCE DEPARTING SAID SOUTH LINE ON A
BEARING OF NORTH 26 DEGREES 47 MINUTES
48 SECONDS WEST, 570.81 FEET, THENCE .
NORTH 41 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 52 SECONDS
EAST, 211.17 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES
28 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST, 80.0 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 23
SECONDS EAST, 334.80 FEET, THENCE NORTH
69 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 37 SECONDS.WEST,
ALONG THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF A 50 FOOT IN-
r GRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT,.
399.83 FEET TO A POINT BEING ON THE EAST-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF BELAIRE DRIVE,
THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 52
SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE, 25.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 69 DE-
GREES 58 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, ALONG
THE CENTERLINE OF SAID EASEMENT, 398.06


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


- S


FEET, THENCE SOUTH 62 DEGREES 01'MINUTE
17 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID CENTERLINE,
60.0 FEET TO THE RADIUS POINT OF A 60.0
FOOT CUL-DE-SAC OF SAID EASEMENT,
THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 42
SECONDS WEST, 60.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01
DEGREE 33 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST, 853.23
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT TO ROAD RIGHT OF WAY ALONG THE
NORTHERLY LINE THEREOF FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS EASEMENT.
TOGETHER WITH A PERPETUAL NONEXCLUSIVE
EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILIT-
IES OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DE-
SCRIBED PROPERTY:
COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST COR-
NER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTH-
WEST 1/4 OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH,
RANGE 9 WEST OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORI-
DA;THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 38 MI-
NUTES 14 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST
LINEOF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SOUTHWEST
1/4, A DISTANCE OF 1353.04 FEET TO AN EXIST-
ING IRON ROD MARKING THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SOUTHWEST
1/4; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 58 MINUTES
34 SECONDS WEST, 126.16 FEET TO A SET IRON
ROD (PSM NO 6111); THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 78 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 34 SECONDS
WEST, 102.91 FEET TO AN EXISTING CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 78 DE-
GREES 58 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST, 467.21
FEET TO AN EXISTING IRON ROD (PSM NO.
4927) MARKING A POINT ON THE EASTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF BELAIRE DRIVE (A 60
FOOT EXISTING DIRT ROAD); THENCE SOUTH 19
DEGREES 58 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 415.02 FEET
TO A SET IRON ROD (PSM NO. 6111) AND CALL
THIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
SOUTH 69 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 37 SECONDS
EAST, 407.59 FEET TO A SET IRON ROD (PSM
NO. 6111) MARKING A POINT ON A 60 FOOT
CUL-DE-SAC AND CALL THIS THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE EASTERLY, SOUTHERLY AND
WESTERLY ALONG SAID CUL-DE-SAC THROUGH
A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 310 DEGREES 10 MI-
NUTES 15 SECONDS, HAVING A RADIUS OF 60.0
FEET FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 324.76 FEET TO
AN EXISTING IRON ROD (PSM NO. 6111);
THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 37
SECONDS WEST, 399.83 FEET TO AN EXISTING
IRON ROD (PSM NO. 6111) MARKING A POINT
ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF FORESAID
BELAIRE DRIVE; THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 58
MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
RIGHJ OF WAY, 50.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING.
A/K/A 5841 ELF LANE, GREENWOOD, FL 32443
I
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on May 30, 2013.
Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F10046085 WELLSLPS-FHA---Team 1 -
F10046085
"*See Americans with Disabilities Act"
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled; at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.
ADA Coordinator
P.O. Box 1089
Panama City, Florida 32402
Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717
Hearing Impaired: Dial 711
Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcourts.org

LF160133
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2012-CA-000794
Wells Fargo Bank, National Association
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Frederick E. Hudnall Jr. and Malinda J. Hudnall,
Husband and Wife; et al.
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE
PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY
TO:Frederick E. Hudnall, Jr.; ADDRESS UN-
KNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
IS: 3071 Beaverhead Street, Alford, FL 32420
Residence unknown, if living, including any un-
known spouse of the said Defendants, if either
has remarried and if either or both of said De--
fendants are dead, their respective unknown
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors,
lienors, and trustees, and all other persons
claiming by, through, under or against the
named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned
named Defendant(s) and such of the aforemen-
tioned unknown Defendants and such of the
aforementioned unknown Defendants as may
be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui
juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has
been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on
the following real property, lying and being and
situated in Jackson County, Florida, more par-
ticularly described as follows: .
LOT 15, BLOCK 118, COMPASS LAKE HILLS UNIT
FIVE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A-4, PAGE 130
THROUGH 140, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RE-


CORDS OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
more commonly known as 3071 Beaverhead
Street, Alford, FL 32420.
This action has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN &
GACHK, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose ad-
dress is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite
100, Tampa, FL 33614, within thirty (30) days
after the first publication of this notice and file
the original with the clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs attorney or imme-
diately there after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the
21st day of February, 2013.
/s/Dale Rabon Guthrie
Circuit and County Courts
By: Rachael Lamore
Deputy Clerk


IEGAL-NOTIICE

If yoq are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850)
747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance is less than sev-
en (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call'
711.
LF160131 LEGALNOTICE
The School Board of Jackson County will
receive bids in the office of the Superintendent
of Schools until Thursday, June 27, 2013, at 9:30
a.m. at which time they will be publicly opened
and tabulated for:
16-01 Fire Extinguisher Services
Bids forms may be picked up at the Jackson
County School Board Office located at 2903 Jef-
ferson Street, Marianna, Florida, 32446, during
the normal working hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., Monday through Thursday. The forms
will be in the Facilities Office.
The Board reserves the right to reject any and
all bids and or accept the one most beneficial
to its operation.
/s/ Kenny Griffin
Chairman of the Board
Attest
/s/ Steve Benton
Superintendent of Schools
NOTI [E]OFlA LE0YIq=
LF160126
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2012-CA-00476
MIDFIRST BANK
Plaintiff,
V.
GERALD HAYES A/K/A GERALD W. HAYES;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GERALD HAYES A/K/A
GERALD W. HAYES; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTSS,
WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES,
SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.
Defendants.
NOTICEOF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Fi-
nal Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 15,
2013, in this cause, I will sell the property situ-
ated in JACKSON County, Florida, described as:


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BEGIN 300 FEET SOUTH OF THE NE CORNER OF
THE NE 1/4 OF NE 1/ OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP
6 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST; AND RUN SOUTH
300 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 100 FEET; THENCE
WEST 407 FEET; THENCE NORTH 100 FEET,
THENCE fAST 407 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. ,
a/k/a 5186 HIGHWAY 77, GRACEVILLE, FL
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rianna, FL 32446, to the highest bidder for cash,
except as prescribed in paragraph 4, in accord-
ance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated at Marianna, Florida, this 16th day of
May, 2013.
/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Jane Hatcher
Deputy Clerk
DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A..
Jackson County Floridian
12425 28th Street North, Suite 200
St. Petersburg, FL 33716
(727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
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PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO EXTRA COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
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9552, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RE-
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-16B TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 2013


Tennis


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Serbia's Jelena Jankovic celebrates winning against Jamie
Hampton of the U.S. in two sets 6-0,6-2, in their fourth round
match at the French Open at Roland Garros stadium in Paris
on Monday.

American women


go 0 for 3 Monday


The Associated Press

PARIS -A day before Ser-
ena Williams puts her 28-
match winning streak on
the line at the French Open,
the three other U.S. women
left in field tried to join her
in the quarterfinals.
Sloane Stephens, Jamie
Hampton and Bethanie
Mattek-Sands all lost in
straight sets.
The '17th-seeded Ste-
phens had the toughest
task of that American trio
on Monday, facing de-
fending champion Maria
Sharapova, who took con-
trol midway through the
first set en route to a 6-4,
6-3 victory.
"There's a lot of room for
a few things to improve,
and I think she will. I think
she has a big game. She has
big strokes; pretty good
serve. Maybe not as con-
sistent as she would like at
this point, but ... she has a
lot of time to \develop it,"
said Sharapova, who com-
pleted a career Grand Slam
bywinning the 2012 title in
Paris.
"This is a really impor-
tant time in her career,"
Sharapova said about the
20-year-old Stephens. "If
she's in the right hands
at the right time, I'm sure
she's going to have a great
career."
Next for Sharapova is a
match against No. 18 Jele-
na Jankovic, who needed
barely an hour to eliminate
the 54th-ranked\ Hampton
6-0,6-2.
"Today was just a tough
day. Really was. I really
don't know what else to
say," said the 23-year-old
Hampton, -who surprised
2011 Wimbledon champi-
on Petra Kvitova on Satur-
day to earn a debut appear-
ance in the fourth round of
a Grand Slam tournament.
"Just everything that was
hitting my racket was going
out today, unfortunately.
Everyone has those days.
Got to learn to get through
them."


Her match against
Jankovic, the 2008 U.S.
Open runner-up, was the
last of the day and was
played in a nearly empty
Court Suzanne Lenglen,
following a five-set men's
match.
"That match lasted, like,
five hours. I had coffee, as
well," Jankovic said about
waiting around for her
turn. "I was trying to stay
awake."
She and Sharapova go
way back: Both trained at
the Nick Bollettieri Ten-
nis Academy in Florida as
kids.
The 67th-ranked Mat-
tek-Sands, who beat 2011
French Open champion Li
Na in the second round,
got off to a 4-1 start against
12th-seeded Maria Kirilen-
ko before faltering and
losing 7-5, 6-4. Kirilenko
reached her first French
Open quarterfinal in her
10th try.
Mattek-Sands' lead
started slipping away, but
she still was ahead 5-4
when she asked for medi-
cal attention. From there,
Kirilenko won four games
in a row. Kirilenko, who is
engaged to two-time NHL
MVP Alex Ovechkin of the
Washington Capitals, also
was visited by a trainer, get-
ting a massage on her right
shoulder in the second set.
"I made a couple of mis-
takes here and there," Mat-
tek-Sands said, "and in
tennis, it can change pretty
quickly."
Kirilenko's opponent
Wednesday will be two-
time Australian Open
champion Victoria Aza-
renka, whose fourth-round
match was tied at 3-all be-
fore she took the next nine
games to beat 2010 French
Open title winner Frances-
ca Schiavone 6-3,6-0.
Azarenka, 26-2 this
season, will now try to
reach her first semifinal
at Roland Garros; she's
been at least that far at
the three other major
tournaments.


NFL


Seattle TEs step up after injury


The Associated Press

RENTON, Wash. Los-
ing Anthony McCoy to an
Achilles tear two weeks
ago has thrown a wrench
into the Seattle Seahawks'
plans for their tight end
position.
The Seahawks were
hoping fifth-round pick
Luke Willson would be the
missing piece to bolster
offensive production from
the group along with Mc-
Coy and starter Zach Mill-
er. But once the Seahawks
filled that hole, another
one emerged. McCoy's in-
jury will likely force him to
miss the entire upcoming
season. He was waived/in-
jured by Seattle last week
and landed on injured re-
serve with the Seahawks
after clearing waivers.
McCoy had overcome
inconsistency to become
a reliable second option
for the Seahawks last year.
McCoy had been prone to
drops in his first two sea-
sons but managed to catch
the ball with more regular-
ity last year. He caught 18
passes for 291 yards and
three touchdowns for the
Seahawks while becom-
ing a competent blocker
as well.
"He continued to devel-
op every year. Get better.
Get more mature, under-
stand the game better and
really develop as a tight
end," Miller said.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Seattle Seahawks tight ends Zach Miller (86), Sean McGrath (84) and Luke Wilson talk
with quarterback Russell Wilson (3) at the NFL football team's facility in Renton, Wash. on
Monday.


Tight ends coach Pat
McPherson lamented the
loss of McCoy and stressed
how far he has come the
last few seasons.
'"Anthony has really ma-
tured as a person and as a
player," McPherson said.
"Anthony is brilliant smart.
He barely takes a note and
he remembers what you
said three weeks ago. I
know when I put Anthony
into a game that he's going
to know exactly what he's
supposed to do and really
shows great effort on a re-
ally consistent basis."
Now Seattle has to re-
place that production.
McCoy's injury creates
an opportunity for Sean
McGrath, Victor Marshall,
Darren Fells and Cooper
Helfet td possibly win a
roster spot. McGrath ap-


pears to be the likeliest
candidate to seize control
of the position. McGrath
spent most of last season
on the practice squad for
Seattle after being signed
as an undrafted free agent
out of Division II Hender-
son State.
McGrath was elevated
to the active roster late in-
the season and played in
the final two games of the
regular season and both
playoff games for the Se-
ahawks. While Willson
was drafted to give Se-
attle more of a downfield
receiving threat from the
position, McGrath fits the
traditional tight end mold.
He's worked to get bigger
this offseason and im-
pressed the coaching with
his play last season.
"He rarely makes a mis-


take," McPherson said.
"Very versatile, can play
both tight end spots, and
makes plays."
With McCoy out of the
picture, there is likely at
least one roster spot at the
position available behind
Miller. Though he under-
stands the opportunity
available, McGrath isn't
trying to let the situation
affect how he approaches
the game.
"Really nothing's
changed. I'm always trying
to push the person in front
of me," McGrath said.
"Whether it's Zach or An-
thony I'm coming hungry
and ready to compete."
"I'm just trying to get
better every day, get on
the field and get one more
tick than I did last year,"
he said.


Arizona's top pick moves into starting lineup


The Associated Press

TEMPE, Ariz. The
Arizona Cardinals opened
their final session of OTAs
Monday shrugging off the
scorching desert heat as
first-round draft pick Jona-
than Cooper moved in at
the starting guard spot on
the revamped left side of
the team's offensive line.
Cooper said he came into
the offseason workouts ex-
pecting to compete for a
starting job after Arizona
chose him out of North
Carolina as the seventh
pick overall in this year's
draft.
The 6-foot-2, 311-pound
lineman would start along-
side left tackle Levi Brown,
who was sorely missed a
year ago after he tore his
right triceps in a preseason
game and sat out the entire
season. Installing Cooper
at left guard means that
Daryn Colledge shifts to
the right side.
"It's getting a little bit
easier every day but I'm
really still trying to focus
on learning the playbook,"
Cooper said after Monday's
workout. "The physical as-
pect will be there, but I'm
really just trying to be more


of a technician and more
mentally sound."
Cooper has been in Ari-
zona for all the OTAs, as
well as separate workouts
for the rookies.
"He's getting so manyreps
he can't help but improve,"
coach Bruce Arians said.
"He's had a lot of things
thrown at him, a lot of dif-
ferent looks defensively,
but he's holding his own.
He's not a rookie anymore.
He's already had enough
snaps to be a sophomore."
Of course he and the rest
of the team have yet to don
pads for the new Cardinals
coach.
Cooper said it's the men-
tal aspect that's so different
from what he dealt with in
college.
"Just the playbook, there's
so many components to it,"
he said, "so many layers,
so many different calls, so
many different situations
that you're in that you have
to be prepared for. I feel
like that's been the tough-
est part of the transition."
Although he has yet to
sign a contract, Cooper
said it's important for him
to be on hand for every off-
season workout.
"If I want to do what I


have plans to do, then I
have to be here," Cooper
said. "I can't afford to miss
time. That's really not an
option for me."
College, who started at
left guard most of his ca-
reer, with a few snaps at
center, said he understands
why the Cardinals want to
keep their first-round pick
on the same side of the ball
where he played at North
Carolina. Colledge, enter-
ing his ninth NFL season,
said it's a challenge to move
to the right side but h6 is in-
tent on making it work.
"It's just one of those
things where you've got


to get the fundamentals
down," he said. "I think it's
an easier transition at guard
than it is tackle. The stance
isn't quite as staggered. For
me, I'm really just switch-
ing hands and kicking my
feet a little bit. It will come
slow but it will come steady
and hopefully by camp I'll
be in a good flow."
Monday's session was the
first of four days of OTAs,
with temperatures expect-
ed to hover at 100 degrees,
which conclude shortly af-
ter noon.
"Oh I love it. Who doesn't
love this heat, right?" Coo-
perjoked.


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PGA Tour


Janzen disqualified for metal spikes


The Associated Press

ROCKVILLE, Md.--Two-
time champion Lee Janzen
has been knocked out of
U.S. Open qualifying for
wearing metal spikes at a
golf course that doesn't al-
low them.
Janzen was atWoodmont
Country Club for a 36-hole
qualifier and opened with
a 75 on the North course
when it was discovered he
was wearing metal spikes.
All players were informed
in a May 20 letter from the
Michael Cumberpatch of
the Mid-Atlantic Golf As-
sociation, the official in
charge of the Woodmont
qualifier. The second item.
right before the item
that says shorts are al-
lowed said steel spikes
were not allowed for the
qualifying rounds or even
the practice rounds.
Cumberpatch later said
in an interview with Golf
Channel that all but two
sectional qualifying sites
ban metal spikes for the
qualifier. The exceptions
weree in Columbus, Ohio,


and Memphis, Tenn.,
where the majority of PGA
Tour players were compet-
ing. Metal spikes are al-
lowed on the PGATour and
the major championships,
even at the U.S. Open.
Janzen said on Twitter
he received the spikes rule
in an email. "More con-
cerned about my game. 71
1st round put me way back
anyway," he tweeted.
Only eight players from
the Woodmont qualifier
advance to the U.S. Open
hext week at Merion in
suburban Philadelphia.
Janzen won the 1993 U.S.
Open at Baltusrol and' the
1998 U.S. Open at Olympic
Club.
Asked if there might have
been confusion about the
spikes because Janzen
played a Web.com Tour
, event in the Washington
area, Cumberpatch told
Golf channel "The only
confusion would be you
didn't read the documen-
tation you're required to
read."
"You're responsible for
knowing the conditions


under which you're play-
ing," Cumberpatch said.
Janzen was disquali-
fied for the metal spikes
nearly eight years after a
short-lived debate about
spikes on the PGA Tour.
A petition in August 2005


sought support from the |
Player Advisory Coun-
cil to get rid of the metal
spikes. Janzen was quoted
in a story in USA Today as
saying, "It's got no chance.
You can't ban metal
spikes."


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