Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01081

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text
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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
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Local show choir brings home gold


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Grand Ridge Show Choir is (from left) back row: TaLaya Terry, Lisa
Johnson, Alexa Harrison, Hillary Oliver, Autumn Pittman, Savannah Dillard,
Leisha Craven, Lacee Glover and Jadah Amisail; Center row (from left) Pre-
cia Driggers, Jennifer English, Chris Sheffield, Reigan Jeter, Katie Robbirds
and Jaylyn Palmer. In front is Anthony Terry. Not pictured is Allison Shelter.


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
The Grand Ridge Show Choir
came home from Orlando with a
trophy and a gold medal finish in
the OrlandoFest Music Festival'
at Universal Studios earlier this
month.
But they've hardly had time to
bask in their victory; on Monday,
the middle schoolers started a
three-day stretch of two-hour
rehearsals for their upcom-
ing dinner theatre show. It will
be held in the school's old gym
this Friday night, starting ,at 6
p.m. Tickets go for $15, and the
price buys a steak dinner and the
show. The money will be used to


pay the choir's startup and travel
costs for the next academic year.
Their expenses include their
show attire, the purchase of mu-
sic, and their summer camp. The
choir members sold candy and
held a .talent show last year to
raise money for the Orlando trip,
which cost them roughly $4,200
total.
This is the choir's second year of
existence, and OrlandoFest was
the group's first competition.
Director Sandra Harrell has
been the music teacher at Grand
Ridge for three years. In choir,
she helps the students hone

See CHOIR, Page 5A


GROWING THE COMMUiITY

4.-.


From staff reports
T 7hile Saturday's ,
\\ clouds and rain
WV may have kept
some people indoors, it
didn't stop JCARC's 12th
annual May Day Plant
Sale.
The group was opening
the doors to its greenhouses
and growing areas as a
fundraiser to help support
its programs for people with
developmental disabilities..
These include vocational
Straining as well as indepen-
dent living and social skills


training and providing work
opportunities.
JCARC Executive Director
Francis Henderson said the
group has had budget cuts,
so they have to raise some of
their own funds.
She said the weather may
have held some people back,
but overall the sale went well
and they had a steady flow
of customers.
The plant sale, which
also included a raffle, silent
auction, food, vendors
and kid's games, brought
in approximately $20,000,
Henderson said.


Vanessa and
Christopher
Andreasen make
their way through the
rows of plants in the
outside growing
area at JCARC on
Penn Avenue.


Rabid raccoon in Jackson County


From staff reports
A raccoon received by the
Jackson County Health Depart-
ment has tested positive for
rabies according to lab results
recently received from the De-
partment of Health Pensacola
Branch Lab. The raccoon fought
with a dog on White Avenue, in-
side the city of Graceville. The
dog has been quarantined to
prevent possible spread of the
disease.


)CcLASSIFIEDS...4-5B
,aaa.-:,---" *.-:-. _:-

This Newspaper
Is Printed On J
Recycled Newsprint




L 865161 00101 9


In a press release from JCHD,
Environmental Health Director
T.G. Harkrider said anyone with
knowledge of bites or other ex-
posure from a suspected rabid
animal to humans or to do-
mestic animals should im-
mediately contact the Health
Department.
Call 482-9227 during normal
working hours. After hours and
on.weekends, the JCHD answer-
ing service, available at 526-
2412, will relay information for


SENTERTAI.MENT...3B


)) LOCAL...3A


assistance concerning animal
bites and other exposure.
Harkrider emphasized the
need for a quick response.
"Please call us with informa-
tion and questions related to
exposure. We need to act quickly
in some cases to save people's
lives."
He also advised to never shoot
a biting animal in the head,
since an intact brain is need-
ed to determine if the animal
is rabid. If the animal's brain is

OBITUARIES..5A


.destroyed, the department has
to assume it was rabid. Without
negative lab results, treatment to
the victim has to begin.
Residents are also urged to have
their pets vaccinated. Harkrid-
er reminds the public that
Jackson County and the state
of Florida have laws requiring
the vaccination of all dogs and
cats.
JCHD can be reached 24 hours
a day, 7 days a week through the
answering service: 526-2412.


)STATE...4A


) SPORTS...1


seeks
trial in
Vegas


Vol. 90 No. 106
Cypress


Man

arrested

on grand

theft charge

From staff report
A Cypress man was arrested
on a grand theft charge late
Sunday evening, and authori-
ties say he admitted taking
some scrap metal from a loca-
tion on Main Street in Cypress
Without per-
Smission of the
owner.
Acting on a tip,
authorities went
to an address on
Suncrest Road
Hopper around 10:30
p.m. that night
and confronted a resident who
identified himself as Ian An-
drew Hopper, about the tip-
ster's suspicion that the stolen
items were there.
According to a press re-
lease from the Jackson County
Sheriff's Office, Hopper, 21, ac-,
knowledged having taken the
items and showed authorities
where they were in his back
yard.


Jackson
County

Scammers

play grandkid

card, trying

for money

From staff reports
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office reports that scammers
are perpetrating a familiar
ruse.
On Friday, May 10, a citizen
received a phone call from
someone claiming to be a
grandchild.
According to JCSO, the sup-
posed grandchild claimed they
were out of the country and
had been involved in a vehicle
crash. The caller instructed the
citizen to wire an amount of
money (in this case, to the Do-
minican Republic) so repairs
could be made to the car of the
other person involved in the
crash.
The "grandchild" said if the
money was not sent, they
would be arrested.
Fortunately, in this case, the
citizen did not wire any money
to the caller.
This is a scam, authorities
say. In March a similar scam
was reported by the Marianna
Police Department.
JCSO advises anyone re-
ceiving a similar call from a
grandchild or other stated
family member to verify the
situation before sending mon-
ey: call the relative by a known
phone number, or contact
another family member who
would have knowledge of their
whereabouts and situation.
If you think you or someone
you know has been the victim
of a scam, contact your local
law enforcement agency. JCSO
can be reached at 482-9624.

1B > WEATHER ...2A


.. ., J.. .= -


Congratulations to the class of 2013'."'3 ;i

fl t grl t

r. .I. SudyMy 6

.,'.r, D J. .Jj Inside Sunday, May 2D"


Skylar Toole and Errol Griffinsmell some jasmine at the JCARC May Day Plant Sale Saturday.


May Day flowers,


plants raise funds


Follow us



Facebook Twitter
Facebook Twitter







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


Today


Cool Start. Mild Day.

Justin Kiefer / WMBB


High 830
Low 56


SHigh -860
.11 Low -60'

Wednesday
Sunny & Warm.


-4 High 86
:S Low -68'


Friday
Possible Shower. Warm &
Humid.


t- g High 86
M Low -620

Thursday
Partly Cloudy. Warm.


SHigh 87
fj4jbLow -640


Saturday
Possible Shower. Warm &
Humid.


TIDES ULTRAVIOLET INDEX
Panama City Low 10:58 PM High 11:45 AM
Apalachicola Low 1:19 PM High 8:53 AM 0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+
Port St. Joe Low -11:03 PM High 12:18 PM _____3_______
Destin Low 12:14AM High- 12:51 PM 0 1 2 ; BK
Pensacola Low 12:11 AM High 1:21 PM _____ .--_ ___ _


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Reading
47.09 ft.
11.16 ft.
6.78 ft.
5.15 ft.


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 5:47 AM
Sunset 7:28 PM
Moonrise 9:25 AM MIy
Moonset 11:18 PM 10


FLORIDA'S 3111.

PANHANDLE ciuRY

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 1.00.9Fm

hLtJJISTENFOR lHOURLYWETHE- 8DA


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

.CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it.does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23.per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs' must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


TODAY
Jackson County Growers Association/Marian-
na City Farmer's Market-7 a.m.-noon at Madison
St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh fruits and
vegetables grown by local farmers.
)) Optimist Club of Jackson County Board Meet-
ing Noon at 4476 Broad St. Marianna.
Republican Club of West Florida Meeting
- Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna. Guest
speaker will be Dr. Joe Gay. Call 352-4984.
)) Orientation Noon-3 p.m. at Goodwill Career '
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
Employability Workshop, Employability Skills
-2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career Cen-
ter, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
Meals on the Run Program- 6-8 p.m. at the
Jackson County Extension Office, 2741 Pennsylvania
Avenue in Marianna. Learn tips and tricks to make
quick, easy, budget-friendly meals in the crock pot,
skillet and microwave. Cost is $7 per person and in-
cludes sample foods, materials and recipe booklet.
Register by May 7 by calling 482-9620.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15
"5 Steps to Rapid Employment" Workshop -9
a.m.-Noon at the Marianna One Stop Career Center,
4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
Jackson County Tourist Development Council
Meeting-10 a.m. at the Russ House, 4318 Lafay-
ette St. in Marianna. Call 482-8060.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon-
I p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
)) Internet/E-mail Basic Computer Class Part
1-Noon-3 p.m. at Goodwill Career Training Center,
4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Free class teaches
basic use of the internet, how to send and receive
e-mails and how to protect your computer. Call
526-0139.

THURSDAY, MAY 16
))Jackson County Growers Association/Marian-
naCity Farmer's Market-7 a.m.-noon at Madison
St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh fruits and
vegetables grown by local farmers.
)) "International Chat n' Sip"-8:30-10 a.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library, 2929 Green St. in
Marianna. Enjoy a relaxed environment for the ex-
change of language, culture and ideas among local
and international communities. Light refreshments
will be served. Call 482-9124.
)) Caregiver Support: Group Meeting 11a.m.
to noon in the First Presbyterian Church Social
Hall, 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Open to all
family caregivers providing care to loved ones or


:omntmunity Calenda
friends. Confidential group, facilitated by a profes-
sional group counselor. Coffee, water, light snacks
provided.
Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2290.
Job Club 12-3 p.m. at the'Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills; get job search assis-
tance. Call 526-0139.
)) Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group-
Noon at Jackson Hospital Hudnall Building in the
Community Room. Free to attend. Curriculum
developed by ex-smokers for those who want to
become ex-smokers themselves. Call 482-6500.
)) Employability Workshop, Job Search Etiquette
-2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career Cen-
ter, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
)) Jackson County NAACP Meeting 5:30 p.m.
in the St. James A.M.E. Church basement, 2891
Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.
Water Use Permitting in Northwest Florida
Rule Making Workshop-5:30 p.m. at the Jackson
County Agricultural Conference Center, 2741 Penn-
sylvania Avenue in Marianna. Farmers and ranchers
in Northwest Florida are invited to attend this work-
shop to discuss and comment on draft changes to
permitting rules on irrigation wells.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, MAY 17
D Knitters Nook-lO a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
)) VFW Post #12046 Barbecue Fundraiser-lO
a.m-2 p.m. across from Winr Dixie in Marianna.
Plates are $6 each and will include barbeque
'chicken with sides. Call 209-1797.
Money Sense Class-Noon-4 p.m. at Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna.
This is a financial literacy class that helps with
budgeting, saving and other financial topics. Class
is free. Call 526-0139.
MHS National Honor Society "Bagging for
Tips"-3:30-6:30 p.m. at Winn Dixie in Marianna.
Proceeds will benefit the John Summers Scholar-
ship to a senior this year at Marianna High School.
Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts; habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
SATURDAY, MAY 18
Jackson County Growers Association/Marian-
na City Farmer's Market-7 a.m.-noon at Madison
St. Park in Marianna. Purchase fresh fruits and


vegetables grown by local farmers.-
)) Large, Multi-Person Yard Sale-8 a.m.-1 p.m.
at the Jackson County School Board Office parking
lot. There will be a large variety of items, to include
some free items. All proceeds will benefit the Hope
School PTO. Call 482-9616 ext. 238.
National Kids to Parks Day-9 a.m.-1 p.mn. EST
at Chattahoochee Park on Lake S6minole, 236
'Booster Club Road, Bainbridge, GA.This is a nation-
wide day of outdoor play to encourage families to
explore neighborhood parks and discover nature.
Enjoy the Buddy Beaver Fun Run, games, prizes,
Army National Guard Rockwall, Muscogee Indians
and much more. The Decatur County Sheriff's
Office will be available to ID children. Call 229-662-
2001.
D Fly-ln-9 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Marianna Municipal
I Airport, 3689 Industrial Park Drive. Featuring the
Lockheed 12 from the movie Amelia and the Chipola
R/C Aviators. Free pancake and sausage breakfast
from 8-10 a.m. for participating pilots. Fly-In prizes
include $500 first, $250 second and $100 third.
Enjoy food and arts and crafts from local vendors.
Young Eagles Air Rides, Helicopter Rides $30. Prize
drawings at 2 p.m. and must be present to win. $1
per gallon fuel discounts (general aviation).
)) Tenth annual Bascom School Reunion-11:30
a.m. at the Bascom Town Hall in Bascom. Call 569-
2412.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
)) The Lady Elks 28th Annual Springtime Beauty
Pageant -7 p.m. in the Malone High School Au-
ditorium, Malone. Divisions will include: Tiny Miss,
Little Miss, Young Miss, Junior Miss, Teen Miss and
Miss. Admission is $5 per person and everyone is
asked to bring pet food donations to help Partners
for Pets. Proceeds will benefit the Florida Elks
Children's Programs. Call 569-2227.

SUNDAY, MAY 19,
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting- 8 p.m. in
the board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, MAY 20
Voluntary PreK Registration for the 2013-
2014 School Year-8-11 a.m. at 2979 Daniels
St. in Marianna, and continue afternoon at the
Jackson County Early Childhood Programs Office,
2950 Cherokee St. in Marianna. Bring child's birth
certificate, social security card and VPK Certificate
or Eligibility. Child must be 4 years old on or before
September 1. Call 482-1266.
"5 Steps to Rapid Employment" Workshop-9
a.m.-noon. at the Marianna One Stop Career Center,
4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P.O 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for May 12, the
latest available report: One stolen vehicle,
one abandoned vehicle, one reckless driver,
two suspicious persons, three escorts, two
physical disturbances, one pedestrian
complaint, two hazardous materials report,
14 medical calls, one traffic crash, one bur-
glar alarm, one fire alarm, 11 traffic stops,
one larceny complaint, one civil dispute,
two trespass complaints, one follow-up
investigation, one assault, one noise distur-
bance, three animal complaints, one assist
of a motorist or pedestrian, three assists of
other agencies, one child abuse complaint,
one Baker Act transport and two threat/ha-
rassment complaints.


Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following


Police Roundup
incidents for May 12, the latest available
report: One hit and run vehicle, one ac-
____ cident, one reckless driver,
T,^_.'- one suspicious incident, 14
.; -- traffic stops, one trespass
.I ]--- T complaint, one follow-up
RIM l investigation, one animal
complaint, one child abuse
complaint, two public ser-
vice calls and one home security check.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
periods:
)) ZackaryJohnson, 18, 3011 Old U.S.
Road, Marianna, reckless driving (alcohol).
)) Constance Smith, 48,9655 Hollow-
brook Circle, Pensacola, battery (domestic
violence).
)) Paul Romanick, 42, 8620 Eight Mile
Creek, Pensacola, battery (domestic
violence).


)) Christopher Fretwell, 26,4028 Lee Road,
driving while license suspended/.revoked.
)) Nell Thomas, 21,4262 Lafayette Road,
Marianna, driving under the influence (al-
cohol), possession of legend drug without a
prescription.
)) Ilan Hopper, 21, 4358 Suncrest Road,
Marianna, grand theft.
)) Karen Williams, 36, 317 Mabry St., Tal-
lahassee, worthless checks.
)) Terence Everett, 48, 2960 Pelican Lane,
Marianna, fugitive from justice (Houston
Co., Ala.)
)) Norquekes Calhoun, 22, 2764 Leland
Drive, Marianna, obstruction by disguise,
battery (domestic violence).
)) Jerry Melton, 36, 2883 Lawrencev-
ille Road, Cottondale, battery (domestic
violence).
)) Patrick Revel, 33,128 Cove Landing
Road, Thomasville, Ga., failure to appear.
Jail Population: 201
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agency. To report a wildlife violation,
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


EC11
May May May
18 25 31


._ JJCFLCORI EA NM.CO M


- 2A TUESDAY, MAY 14,2013


WAKE-UP CALL







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Who's Who


Chipola


students


named
Special to the Floridan

The 2013 edition of
Who's Who Among Stu-
dents in American Junior
Colleges will include the
names of 93 students
from Chipola College
who have been selected
as national outstanding
campus leaders.
Chipola students
named this year are:
)) Afford -William Sin-
gleton and Kaylee Toole.
)) Aitha Katrina Mess-
er and KimberlyWiltse.
)) Bascom Karlee
Floyd.
)) Blountstown Tra-
vis Pittman and Sharlyn
Smith.
)) Bonifay-Anna Bailey,
Jessica Bean, Misty Kirk-
land, Macy Miles, Sheetal
Patel, Cathy Riddle, Brit-
tany Riley,. Jessica Taylor:
and DaraWilkerson.
)) Bristol Anthony
Marotta.
)) Campbellton Keion
Woulard.
)) Chipley Salem
Acuff, Brandi Brubaker,
Jackson Cagle, Cierra
Corbin, Jeffery Pitts, Mer-
edith Saunders, Gregory
Shaub, Ryan Smith, Faith
Tice, Meghan Wilder and
Crystal Zuraff.
)) Clarksville Joshua
Jeffery.
) Cottondale Duante'
Smith.
)) Graceville Jared
Byrd, Rebecca Delgado
and David Miller. -
)) Grand Ridge Rachel
Pelt.
)) Marianna Kristen
Allen, Jaren Bannerman,
Cody Barfield, Linsey
Basford, Dwayne Bentley,
Alexander Bigale, Kristine
Brance, Rayven Brooks,
Brian Chalker, Karissa
Childs, Stephen Clark,
Christian Correa, Jas-
mine Crawford, Meghan
Delang, Cole Evans,
Stephanie Garrels, Robert
Gause, Cameron Gibson,
Christopher Gilmore, Jade
Givens, .Sfeveh Givens,
Jr., Christopher, Godwin,
Terel Hall, ,Dalton Hen-
drix, Sierra Hill, Jeremiah
House, Kathryn, Huff-
man, Karl Jabour, Preston
Johnson, Paul Kelson,
Daniel Kemrn, Donia La-
nier, Michael Lingerfelt,
LaShonda Litfleton, Mi-
chael Mader, Couirtney
Massengill, Jamie McCoy,;
Natalya .Miller,. Mallory,
Mock, Brett'Moore; Ken-
dall ,Norman Partrick,
Jonathan Nyman, Hayley
Parker, Zachary Perkins,
Clayton Rooks, IV, Chan-
Sdler Seay, Latonya Smith,
Jasmine Tanksley, Joshua
Tetlow, Luther Thomas,
Clayton Touchton, Joseph
Uchebo, Eva. Voortman,
Earl Watson and John
Whittington.
Sneads Lauren
Locke.
Westville Reid Da-
vis, Katelyn Miller.
Inclusion in the direc-
tory is based on academic
achievement, service to
the community, leader-
ship in extracurricular
activities and potential
for continued success.
They join an elite group
of students from more
than 1,400 institutions
of higher learning in all
50 states, the District of
Columbia and several
foreign nations.


CAVE D1I7ER THOORED FOR RESCUES


L t. John Authement (right)
presented renowned Jackson
County cave diver Edd
Sorenson with a U.S. Coast Guard
Public Service Commendation
Saturday for his heroism in the
rescue of Alexandra Clark from
twin caves in August 2012.
Authement said it takes special
.kind of person to disregard their
own safety to save someone else
even though it's not their job and
they don't have to.
"It's for people who make a differ-
ence," Authement said of the award.
Normally fewer than a dozen peo-
ple in the U.S. are recognized each
year with the award, he added.
Sorenson said he just thought of
the rescues as a job, though.
"I don't think of good deeds or
accomplishments," Sorenson said,
'All I can do is think about what it
takes to get that person out."
Sorenson rescued four divers in
MARK SKINNTER/FLORIDAN 2012.


Il
* I. l~. 77*.i~ :li


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SUBMITTED PHOTO
A farewell luncheon was held Wednesday, May 8, for 4-H Extension Agent Ben Knowles, pictured
here with his wife, Laura Lee Knowles, and Master Gardener 4-H Liaison Anita Crossley. Knowles
will be working for Extension Services at the University of Florida in Gainesville, where his wife
will attend dental school.


MHS National Honor Society


to hold "Bagging for Tips" event


The National Honor
Society at Marianna
High School will award
the John Summers
Scholarship to a senior
this year
^. :-' atMari-
anna High
School.
S. The MHS
-,. '" National
,,4t.' Honor
'Society
Summers will hold
another
"Bagging for Tips"
event atWinn-Dixie on
Friday, May 17, from
3:30-6:30 p.m. to earn
money for this special
scholarship.
Any organization or
individual that would
like to make a dona-
tion toward this special
scholarship can send
their donations directly to
MHS by addressing


Chipley Farmers Market opens Thursday


Special to the Floridan

The Chipley Farmers
Market will begin its spring
season on Thursday, May
16, at 11 a.m. Market hours
are Tuesday and Thursday
11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Satur-
day 8 a.m.-noon.
The Farmers Market
motto is: "Fresh Produce
From Local Farmers" and is
at the "train depot" farmers
market building, next to
the Washington County
Historical Society. The
Market is at 685 7th St. be-
tween Highway 90 and the


Amtrak Station in Chipley
The Chipley Farmers
Market will feature fresh
squash, English peas,
field peas, new potatoes,
preserves, breads, cakes
and more. More items will
be available as the season
progresses. Interested
vendors should call Market
Manager Wade Jackson at
638-4749.
For more informa-
tion and to obtain a free
growers permit or market
rules, call the Washington
County Extension Service
at 638-6180.


the envelope to: NHS
John Summer Scholar-
ship, c/o Marianna High


School, 3546 Caverns
Road, Marianna, FL
32446.


GAS WATCH
Gas prices are going up. Here are
the least expensive places to buy
gas in Jackson County, as of
Monday afternoon.
1. $3.24, McCoy's Food Mart,
2823 Jefferson St., Marianna
2. $3.29, Murphy Oil, 2255 Hwy.
71 S., Marianna
3. $3.29, Pilot, 2209 Hwy. 71,
Marianna
4. $3.34, Tom Thumb, 3008 A
Jefferson, Marianna
5. $3.35, BP-Steel City, 2184
Hwy. 231S, Alford
6.3.35 LOVES Travel Center,
2510 Hwy. 231, Cottondale
7. $3.37, Chipola Mart, 4195
Lafayette St., Marianna
8. $3.39, Dar-Bee's Quick Stop,
6189 Hwy. 90, Cypress

If you see a lower price,
contact the Floridan newsroom
at editorial@icfloridan.com.


VPK registration


for Jackson County


Schools is May 20


Special to the Floridan

Voluntary PreK Regis-
tration for the upcom-
ing 2013-14 school year
will be May 20 from 8-11
a.m. Registration will be
held at 2979 Daniels St. in
Marianna, the Old Mari-
anna High School Gym.
Registration will contin-
ue after noon at the Jack-
son County Early Child-
hood Programs Office at
2950 Cherokee St., next
to Riverside Elementary
School.
Parents need to bring the
following to registration:
)) Child's birth certifi-
cate and Social Security
card,
)) VPK Certificate of
Eligibility from the Early
Learning Coalition locat-
ed at the One Stop Ca-
reer Center in Marianna.
For more information,
call 482-9140. No student


L .'n i E i
t,,.n i M
Tie i E
T i t.'l,0


will be registered with-
out a VPK.Certificate of
Eligibility.
Applicants must be
4 years old on or be-
fore Sept. 1, 2013, and a
Florida resident.
VPK is not based on in-
come. The VPK day con-
sists of three hours per
day at no charge. Families
are given the opportunity
to extend the day, equal
to a regular school day for
a nominal fee.
VPK will be at the fol-
lowing school sites: Jack-
son County Early Child-
hood Center, Cottondale
Elementary, Graceville El-
ementary Malone School
and Grand Ridge School.
VPK spaces are limited
and will be filled on a first
come, first serve basis.
For more informa-
tion, call the Early Child-,
hood Programs Office at
482-1266.


5.'13 4 S.9 7.4-56

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Wed M I


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E E,.errig drawing.


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Wednesday 5/8 9-14-17-23-25-29 xtra 3
For lottery information, call 850-487-7777 or 900-737-7777


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LOCAL & STATE


CARRIERS COLLECT 5,000 POUNDS OF FOOD


DEBORAH BUCKHALTER/FLORIDAN

hese Marianna Post Office mail carriers picked up an estimated 5,000 pounds of
nonperishables from donors along their routes as local citizens participated in the
annual Letter Carriers' Food Drive, a national effort. The items collected here will be
distributed to a Jackson County food bank for use by local people in need.


HINSON IS TOP CHIPOLA EMPLOYEE


Stacey Hinson
is Chipola
College's Career
Employee for
May. Hinson
serves as
departmental
staff assistant in
Student Affairs
and has worked
at the college
since 2008.
Pictured (from
left) are Chipola
President Dr.
Gene Prough,
Hinson and
Vice President
of Student
Affairs Dr. Jayne
Roberts.


Hospitals could lose $500M in funds


The Associated Press

MIAMI Hospitals nationwide
could lose half a billion dollars in
federal funding for uninsured pa-
tients next year under the national
health overhaul a loss that will
hit especially hard in states that de-
cided against expanding Medicaid
coverage. Cuts could jump to $4 bil-
lion in 2020, according to estimates
released Monday by federal health
officials.
Hospitals that treat a large number
of uninsured residents have relied,
on federal funding in the past to off-
set the cost. But the Affordable Care
Act assumes that more residents will
have Medicaid or private health in-
surance, meaning hospitals would
see fewer uninsured patients and
need less assistance.
But hospitals in states that de-
clined to expand Medicaid such
as Florida, Texas and Pennsylvania
- stand to lose the federal funding
without a corresponding increase
Medicaid-covered patients to offset
it. The decision not to expand means


potentially millions of residents in
those states who would have been
eligible for the expanded Medicaid
coverage will continue going to the
emergency room when they are sick
- and hospitals will be stuck with
the bill.
As originally written, the Afford-
able Care Act required states to ac-
cept the Medicaid expansion as a
condition of staying in the program.
But a Supreme Court decision last
summer gave each state the right to
decide.
So far, 21 states plus Washington,
D.C., have accepted the expansion,
while 14 states have turned it down.
Another 15 states are still weighing
options.
Among the states that aren't ex-
panding Medicaid, Texas hospitals
could lose more than $56 million
next year, Pennsylvania's could lose
nearly $34 million, Missouri's could
lose about $26 million, Alabama's
may lose $17 million and Florida
hospitals could stand to lose more
than $10 million, according to rough
estimates from the Department of


Health and Human Services.
"You have continuing high levels of
uncompensated care but the fund-
ing you had designated to address it
is shrinking so the amount of unmet
costs will grow," said Bruce Rueben,
president of the Florida Hospital
Association.
The .-formula determining cuts
in each state is complicated, but
generally states that have a smaller
number of uninsured patients will
receive larger reductions than states
with high numbers of uninsured pa-
tients. States have broad discretion
to distribute the payments to hos-
pitals and the allotments also vary
greatly among states, so part of the
federal health law "reforms federal
payments to states to help pay for
uncompensated care for uninsured
and low income populations," fed-
eral officials said in a statement.
They also noted Monday that
some states are still trying to decide
whether to expand Medicaid, which
will impact the formulas used to de-
cide how much money to cut from
each state.


Anthony says she can't get fair hearing in Orlando


The Associated Press

ORLANDO Com-
ments made by the judge
who presided over. Casey
Anthony's criminal trial
raise questions about
whether she can get a fair
defamation hearing in
state court in Orlando, her
attorneys said in filings for
her bankruptcy case.
Anthony's attorneys
filed motions last Fri-
day in her bankruptcy
case in Tampa suggesting
that Circuit Judge Belvin
Perry's remarks may have
"trampled" principles
judges are supposed to
follow. Perry told NBC's
"Today" show last week
that he believes there was
enough evidence to con-
vict the Florida mother
who was acquitted in
2011 of murdering her
2-year-old daughter.
The filings by Anthony's
bankruptcy attorneys
were in response to two
people suing Anthony
for defamation. They
_jhad asked a federal judge


overseeing her bankrupt-
cy to lift stays on their cas-
es. The stays were issued
pending resolution of the
federal bankruptcy case.
Perry is the chief judge
for Florida's Ninth Judicial
Circuit, which covers met-
ro Orlando. He has no con-
nection to the bankruptcy
or defamation cases.
"In all events, Judge
Perry's comments create
a perception, both in the
mind of Ms. Anthony and
the public, that there is no
judge in the Ninth Circuit
who could fairly and ef-
fectively oversee any case
involving Ms. Anthony,"
Anthony's bankruptcy
attorneys said in the
motions.
Perry said that when he
read the jury's verdict, he
felt "surprise, shock, dis-
belief" and read it twice.
He also said, "justice will
be served one day by the
Judge of Judges."
A spokeswoman for
Perry didn't immediately
return an email asking for
a response.


Zenaida Gonzalez and
Roy Kronk have sued An-
thony for defamation. Ze-
naida Gonzalez was the
name Anthony initially
gave authorities as Caylee's
possible abductor. Kronk


was the meter reader who
discovered Caylee's re-
mains in 2008. He claims
Anthony's defense team
made multiple false state-
ments about him during
her trial.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com



Lane closures on


SR 73 this week


From staff reports

Motorists traveling SR
73 in Jackson County will
encounter temporary
lane closures Tuesday,
May 14, and Wednesday,
May 15, according to the
Florida Department of
Transportation District
Three office.
FDOT says construction
crews will lay asphalt near
the 1-10 overpass and


south of Peacock Bridge
Road. Lane closures will
remain in effect from 7
a.m. until 5 p.m. .
All construction ac-
tivities are weather-de-
pendent and may be de-
layed or rescheduled in
the event of inclement
weather. Motorists are re-
minded to pay attention
and use caution when
driving through the work
zone.


College presidents


get expensive perks


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A
probe ordered by Florida
Gov. Rick Scott has deter-
mined that the pay and
benefits of state college
presidents varies widely
with little explanation
as to why some presi-
dents earn large six-figure
salaries.
This same review shows
many presidents have
contracts with provisions
that appear to violate law
- or in some instances,
the contracts automati-
cally renew each year
without approval by local
college boards.
Randy Hanna, chancel-
lor of the Florida College
System, said the critical
review is prompting col-
lege boards across the
state to alter and amend
the contracts now offered
to presidents.
Scott last year ordered
his chief inspector gen-
eral to review the salaries
and benefits offered to
the 28 presidents in the
state college system after
trustees at a Jacksonville
college agreed to a $1.2
million severance pack-
age with the outgoing
president.
The probe did not cover
the salaries and benefits
paid to presidents at the
state's 12 public univer-
sities which include
schools such as Univer-
sity of Florida or Florida
State University.
The final report re-
leased Monday showed
that presidents in the
state college system are
receiving nearly $10 mil-
lion in salaries and ben-
efits during the current
fiscal year.
Some of the sala-
ries range from nearly
$144,000 for the president
of North Florida Commu-
nity College to more than
$630,000 to the president
at Miami-Dade College.
State law limits col-
lege president salaries


to $225,000 if the money
comes directly from state
taxpayers. But colleges
are allowed to augment
the salary with money
from other sources.
Chief Inspector General
Melinda Miguel noted
that in some instances
the total amount of pay
and benefits offered to
presidents "was not read-
ily transparent" or that
some contracts offered
benefits for life which
means the total owed by
taxpayers is difficult to
calculate.
Some college presidents
get thousands of dollars
each year in car allow-
ances, housing allowanc-
es or medical insurance
premiums.
One former president at
a college in Bradenton re-
ceived nearly $21,000 for
health insurance premi-
ums. Dennis Gallon, pres-
ident of Palm Beach State
College, receives a stipend
of nearly $96,000 instead
of a car and housing al-
lowance. E. Ann McGee,
president, of Seminole
State College, is receiving
$1,000 a year to pay for
home Internet access.

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'STAY IFORMED


LOCAL NEWS, YOUR WAY.
WEEKNIGHTS AT 5:00, 6:00, & 10:00


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Obituaries

Lanier-Andler
Funeral Home
Sneads, Florida
Phone (850) 593-9900

Constance
Elizabeth Ray
Darby

Mrs. Constance "Beth"
Ray Darby, age 67, a native
of Jacksonville, Florida,
passed away Saturday, May
11, 2013, after a brief ill-
ness. She was of the Prot-
estant Faith and had re-
tired as anr Administrative
Assistant 'at the Florida
State Hospital in
Chattahoochee, Florida.
Mrs. Darby is survived by
her mother, Constance Ray
of Jacksonville, Florida; one
daughter, Allison Darby' of
Panama City Beach, Flori-
da; one son, Darron Darby
and his wife Kelley of Talla-
hassee, Florida; one sister,
Vanessa Luby and her hus-
band Jack of Morrisville,
Pennsylvania; and one
grandson, Thomas Darby
of Tallahassee, Florida.
Mrs. Darby was preceded
in death by her beloved
husband, Gordon, and her
father, Francis Ray.
Visitation with the family
will take place Tuesday,
May 14, 2013 from 5:00 til
7:00 PM CDT at Lanier-
Andler Funeral Home in
Sneads, Florida. Funeral
Services will be held Wed-
nesday, May 15, 2013 at
11:00 AM CDT at Lanier-
Andler Funeral Home
Chapel. Committal and In-
terment Services will be at
Pope Cemetery in Sneads,
Florida. With Rev David
Pipping officiating.
Lanier-Andler Funeral
Home of Sneads, Florida is'
in charge of arrangements.
PH. 850-593-9900.


Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


Morning-


after pill


held up


by appeal

The Associated Press

NEW YORK The
Obama administration on
Monday filed a last-minute
appeal to delay the sale of
the morning-after contra-
ceptive pill to girls of any
age without a prescription.
The legal paperwork
asked the 2nd U.S. Cir-
cuit Court of Appeals in
Manhattan to postpone a
federal judge's ruling that
eliminated age limits on
the pill while the govern-
ment appeals that overall
decision.
U.S. District Court Judge
Edward Korman has
said politics was behind
efforts by Secretary of
Health and Human Ser-
vices Kathleen Sebel-
ius to block the unre-
stricted sale of the Plan B
One-Step morning-af-
ter pill and its generic
competitors.
Last month, he or-
dered that the ievonorg-
estrel-based emergency
contraceptives be made
available without prescrip-
tion and without age re-
strictions. He then denied
a request to postpone his
ruling while the govern-
ment appealed but gave
it until Monday to appeal
again.
Government attorneys
warned that "substantial
market confusion" could


result if Korman's ruling
was enforced while ap-
peals are pending. On
Monday, lawyers argued
that the district court
"plainly overstepped its
authority," and that they
believe they will win the
overall appeal.


DELTA SIGMA THETA SORORITY HOLDS YARD SALE


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


osie McKay and Mary McClendon check out some of the items their fellow Delta Sigma Theta
sorority members had put out during a yard'sale to raise money for the two college scholarships
offered by the group. The scholarships are open to all Jackson County students.


Choir
From Page 1A
their voices, while cho-
reographer and fourth-
grade teacher- Shannon
Grice designs and coaches
movement. Harrell said
Grice was a member of
the show choir at Chipola
College and was involved
on the production side
as well. Additionally, she
dances in competition
with a studio "She's Very,
very talented and she's on
top of all the trends and
changes in this thing. My
hat's off to her, because
she 'does a great job and
keeps the kids excited and
into it," Harrell said of
Grice.
Harrell worked at Chipo-
la 21 years and also ma-
jored in music when she
was a student there. Cer-
tified in music education,
Harrell said she started the
choir as a way to give back
to her alma mater she
graduated from Grand
Ridge back when it was
still a K-12 school.
She said the choir is
growing.
"It was a new concept


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Members of the Grand Ridge Show Choir practice their zombie impressions Monday,.They
were getting ready for their performance of Michael Jackson's song "Thriller" during a dinner
theater at the school Friday.


when we started; there
had been a band here be-
fore, so getting them to
dance and sing- was dif-
ferent," Harrell said. "But
we picked songs they
liked and we performed
for parents at first and
branched out from there.
They are so excited about
winning in Orlando. It
was a great boost, and
they worked so hard to
get there. We're trying to


build interest,'and to make
sure that people who love
the arts, who love to
sing and dance, have a
chance to represent their
school."
She said. she and her
novice troupe identify
quite a bit with the televi-
sion program "Glee"-but
minus the onstage drama
of that hit fictional show.
Just as the "Glee" per-
formers are pushed to do


Government obtains wide


AP phone records in probe


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Justice Department se-
cretly obtained two
months of telephone re-
cords of reporters and
editors for The Associ-
ated Press in what the
news cooperative's top
executive called a "mas-
sive and unprecedented
intrusion" into how news
organizations gather the
news.
The records obtained
by the Justice Depart-
ment listed outgoing
calls for the work ahd
personal phone num-
bers of individual report-
ers, tor general AP office
numbers in New York,
Washington and Hart-
ford, Conn., and for the
main number for the AP
in the. House of Repre-
sentatives press gallery,
according to attorneys
for the AP. It was not clear
if the records also includ-
ed incoming calls or the
duration of the calls.
In all, the government
seized the records for'
more than 20 separate
telephone lines assigned
to AP and its journal-
ists in April and May of
2012. The exact number


of journalists who used
the phone lines during
that period is unknown,
but more than 100 jour-
nalists work in the offices
where phone records
were targeted, on a wide
array of stories about
government and other
matters.
In a letter of protest
sent to Attorney General
Eric Holder on Monday,
AP President and Chief
Executive Officer Gary
Pruitt said the govern-
ment sought and ob-
tained information far
beyond anything that
could be justified by any
specific investigation.
He demanded the
return of the phone re-
cords and destruction of
all copies.
"There can be no pos-
sible justification for
such an overbroad col-
lection of the telephone
communications of The
Associated Press and its
reporters. These records
potentially reveal com-
munications with con-
fidential sources across
all of the newsgathering
activities undertaken
by the AP during a two-
month period, provide a
road map to AP's news-


gathering operations
and disclose information
about AP's activities and
operations that the gov-
ernment has no conceiv-
able right to know," Pruitt
said.
The government would
not say why it sought the
records. Officials have
previously said in public
testimony that the U.S.
attorney in Washington
is conducting a criminal
investigation into who
may have provided in-
formation contained, in
a May 7, 2012, AP story
about a foiled terror plot.
The story disclosed de-
tails of a CIA operation
in Yemen that stopped
an al-Qaida plot in the
spring of 2012 to detonate
a bomb on an airplane
bound for the United
States.
In testimony in Febru-
ary, CIA Director John
Brennan noted that the
FBI had questioned him
about whether he was
AP's source, which he
denied. He called the
release of the informa-
tion to the media about
the terror plot an "unau-
thorized and dangerous
disclosure of classified
information."


their best and to grow, the
Grand Ridge Show Choir
will be asked to stretch
themselves a bit next
year. So far, they've been
singing their melodies in
general unison but next
year Harrell will intro-
duce them to harmony
singing. It's a feat that will
require more of the young
voices. But Harrell said
she's sure they're up to
it. Adding this finesse


to their vocal abilities will
open doors to a wider
range of competitions,
Harrell said.
Friday night's, dinner
theater will include the
three competition songs
they did in Orlando; "Don't
Go Breaking My Heart",
"Soul Sister", and "Call Me,
Maybe".' It will also fea-
ture choir member Leisa
Craven in a solo rendition
of "Temporary Home".
"S6mebody To Love", "Just
The Way You Are", and
"Thriller" will also be per-
formed in the show.
In Orlando, in addition
to winning the gold and
the trophy for their perfor-
mance, the choir earned
a rating of 'good' in a
separate judging category
which considers other fac-
tors'as well.
The members of the
choir are TaLaya Terry, Lisa
Johnson, Alexa Harrisoni,
Hillary Oliver, Autumn Pit-
tman, Savannah Dillard,
Leisha Craven, Lacee Glov-
er, Jadah Amisail, Precia
Driggers, Jennifer English,
Chris Sheffield, Reigan
Jeter, Katie Robbirds, Jay-
lyn Palmer, Anthony Terry
and Allison Shelfer.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A possible shooting suspect in a white shirt (bottom center),
shoots into a crowd of people, Sunday in New Orleans.

Police: Progress made in

Mother's Day shooting probe
The Associated Press halt violent crime.
"The old people are.
NEW ORLEANS New scared to walk the
Orleans police hope a streets. The children can't
$10,000 reward and blurry even play outside," Ronald
surveillance camera im- Lewis, 61, said Monday as
ages will lead to arrests in he sat on the front stop
a Mother's Day shooting of his house, about a half
that wounded 19 people a block from the shooting
and showed again how far site. His window sill has a
the city has to go to shake hole from a bullet that hit
a persistent culture of vio- it last year.
lence that belies the city's Video released early
festive image. Monday shows a crowd
Angry residents said gathered for a bolster-
gun violence which has ous second-line parade
flared at two other city cel- suddenly scattering in
ebrations this year goes all directions, with some
hand-in-hand with the falling to the ground. They
city's other deeply rooted appear to be running
problems such as poverty from a man in a white T-
and urban blight. The in- shirt and dark pants who
vestigators tasked with turns and runs out of the
solving Sunday's shoot- picture. The image isn't
ing work within an agency clear, but police say they
that's had its own troubles hope someone will rec-
rebounding from years of ognize him and notify
corruption while trying to investigators.


Jackson County Vault & MM.mu.lo

Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90
S850-482-5041 I,,


James -Sikes

4278 Lafayeftte Street l Marianna, ft (850) 482-2332


TUESDAY, MAY 14,2013 # 5AF


LOCAL & NATION






-16A TUESDAY, MAY14, 2013


In Brief

US envoy won't
attend Iran arms talks
UNITED NATIONS
-The United States said
Monday it will refuse to
send its ambassador to
any meeting of the U.N.
forum where nuclear
disarmament is negotiated
when it's chaired by Iran
because countries under
U.N. sanctions shouldn't
be allowed to hold such
positions.
Erin Pelton, spokesper-
son for the U.S. Mission to
the United Nations, said in
a statement .that a coun-
try "in flagrant violation"
of U.N. Security Council
and International Atomic
Energy Agency obligations
stemming from its suspect
nuclear program should
be barred from any formal
or ceremonial positions in
U.N. bodies.

"Popo" volcano's
activity increases
MEXICO CITY- Mex-
ico's giant Popocatepetl
volcano may generate lava
flows, explosions of "grow-
ing intensity" and rain
ash that could reach miles
away, the National Center
for Disaster Prevention
said Monday.
Mexican officials were
preparing evacuation
routes and shelters for
thousands of people
who live in the shadow
of Popocatepetl, which is
located 40 miles southeast
of Mexico City. Officials
have created a 7.5 mile
restricted zone around the
cone of the volcano.
Popo, as the volcano is
known, has displayed a
"notable increase in activ-
ity levels" in the last few
days, including tremors
and explosive eruptions,
according to a statement
from the federal govern-
ment. The 17,887-foot
volcano has been disgorg-
ing large towers of steam
and ash since mid-April,
but officials have become
more concerned in recent
days as activity intensified.
Webcams have shown
large chunks of molten
rock spewing from the
crater. On Sunday, the Na-
tional Center for Disaster
Prevention elevated its
warning level to "Yellow
Phase 3," the fifth stage
of a seven-stage warning
scale.

Australia rules out
austerity measures
CANBERRA, Australia
Australia's treasurer says
his economic blueprint for
the fiscal year ahead will
support jobs and growth
without European-style
austerity measures aimed
at reining in the national
deficit.
Treasurer Wayne Swan
will unveil the budget in
Parliament on Tuesday
that is likely to be'the last
for the center-left Labor
Party government, widely
expected to be defeated at
elections on Sept. 14.
In December, his govern-
ment abandoned a pledge
to return the budget to
surplus in'the current
fiscal year that ends on
June 30. The cooling
mining boom and a stub-
bornly high currency have
slashed tax revenue from
corporate profits.
From wire reports


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Search ends in Bangladesh; death toll put at 1,127


The Associated Press

SAVAR, Bangladesh
- Several of the biggest
Western retailers em-
braced a plan that would
require them to pay for
factory improvements in
Bangladesh as the three-
week search for victims of
the worst garment-indus-
try disaster in history end-
ed Monday with the death
toll at a staggering 1,127.
Bangladesh's govern-
ment also agreed to allow
garment workers to form
unions without permis-
sion from factory owners.
That decision came a day
after it announced a plan
to raise the minimum
wage in the industry.
The collapse of the eight-
story Rana Plaza factory
building April 24 focused
worldwide attention on
hazardous conditions in
Bangladesh's garment
industry, where workers
sew low-cost clothing that
ends up on store shelves
around the globe, includ-
ing the U.S. and Western
Europe.
The tragedy came
months after a fire at an-
other garment factory


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bangladeshi soldiers stand at the site where a Bangladesh garment-factory building
collapsed on April 24 in Savar, near Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Monday. Nearly three weeks
after the building collapsed, the search for the dead ended Monday at the site of the worst
disaster in the history of the global garment industry. The death toll: 1,127.


in Bangladesh killed 112
workers.
Swedish retailing giant
H&M, the biggest pur-
chaser of garments from
Bangladesh; British com-
panies Primark and Tesco;
C&A of the Netherlands;
and Spain's Inditex, owner
of the Zara chain, said they
would sign a contract that
requires them to conduct
independent safety in-


spections of factories and
cover the costs of repairs.
The pact also calls
for them to pay up to
$500,000 a year toward the
effort and to stop doing
business with any factory
that refuses to make safety
improvements.
Two other companies
agreed to sign last year:
PVH, which makes clothes
under the Calvin Klein,


Tommy Hilfiger and Izod
labels, and German re-
tailer Tchibo. Among the
Sbig holdouts are Wal-Mart
Stores, which is the sec-
ond-largest producer of
clothing in Bangladesh
behind H&M, and Gap.
Gap, which had been
close to signing the agree-
ment last year, said Mon-
day that the pact is "within
reach," but the company


is concerned about the
possible legal liability
involved.
"This agreement is ex-
actly what is needed to
finally bring an end to
the .epidemic of fire and
building disasters that
have taken so many lives
in the garment industry in
Bangladesh," Scott Nova,
executive director of the
Worker Rights Consor-
tium, one of the organi-
zations pushing for the
agreement.
Meanwhile, the search
for bodies at Rana Plaza
was called off Monday
evening. For more than
19 days, the rubble pile
in the Dhaka suburb of
Savar had been the scene
of frantic rescue efforts,
anguished families and
the overwhelming smell
of decaying flesh. The last
body was found on Sun-
day night.
"Now the site will be
handed over to police for
protection. There will be
no more activities from
the fire service or army,"
said Mohammed Amir
Hossain Mazumder, dep-
uty director of fire service
and civil defense.


OJ returns to court in bid for new trial


The Associated Press

LAS VEGAS A wea-
ry-looking O.J. Simpson
weighed down by shackles
and more than four years
in prison shuffled into
a Las Vegas. courtroom
on Monday hoping to
eventually walk out a free
iman.
His arrival in court to
ask for a new trial in the
armed robbery-kidnap-
ping case-that sent him
to prison in 2008 for up
to 33 years could be heard
before he was seen as a
loud rattling of the chains
that bound his hands to
his waist and restrained
his feet.
His lawyers had unsuc-
cessfully argued to forego
the shackles. After the
65-year-old Simpson was
seated, a guard removed
his handcuffs and clicked
them onto the chair arms


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This combination of Associated Press file photos shows (from
left) O.J. Simpson during three different court appearances
from 1995,2008 and Monday, May 13.


next to him.


tried to make the case


The once glamorous that he had poor legal
football star and TV pitch- representation in the trial
man was. subdued in his involving the gunpoint
dingy blue prison uni- robbery of two sports
form. Grayer and heavier, memorabilia dealers in
he briefly flashed a smile 2007 in a Las Vegas hotel
and mouthed a greeting room. Of the 22 allega-
to people he recognized tions of conflict-of-inter-
before being stopped by a est and ineffective counsel
bailiff. his lawyers raised, Clark
Simpson. listened in-. County District Court
tently as his lawyers- Judge Linda Marie Bell has


agreed to hear 19.
Simpson has said his
former attorney, Yale
Galanter, had rejected ap-
propriate defense moves
and even met with Simp-.
son the night before the
.disastrous heist to bless
the plan as long as no one
trespassed and no force
was used.
Galanter was paid nearly
$700,000 for, Simpson's
defense but had a per-
sonal interest in prevent-
ing himself from being
identified as a witness
to the crimes and mis-
led Simpson so much
that he deserves a new
trial, lawyers for Simpson
claim.
Simpson is expected to
testify Wednesday and
say Galanter advised him
that he was within his
rights to retrieve fam-
ily pictures and footballs
being peddled 'by


memorabilia dealers..
Galanter has declined
comment before his
scheduled court appear-
ance Friday.
A lawyer for Simpson co-
defendant Clarence "C.J"
Stewart testified Mon-
day that a plea deal was
offered to Simpson and
Stewart in the midst of
trial.
Brent Bryson said pros-
ecutors told him the offer
called for a two- to five-
year sentence for each
defendant in return for
guilty pleas. Prosecutors
said they were present-
ing it to Simpson's lawyers
but later said there was no
deal, Bryson said.
Bryson didn't know if
Simpson had ever been
told about the deal by his
lawyer. Simpson, who will
be 70 before he is eligible
for parole, claims he was
not.


Deadly bomb strikes civilian area in east Libya


The Associated Press

TRIPOLI, Libya A
deadly car bomb exploded
Monday near a hospital in
a busy area packed with
civilians in the eastern
Libyan city of Benghazi,
destroying part of the fa-
cility, officials said.
Officials gave conflict-
ing casualty figures, with
death tolls ranging from
three to 10 in the chaotic
aftermath of the attack.
Benghazi, which was the
birthplace of the revolu-
tion that led to the ouster
of dictator Moammar
Gadhafi, has suffered a se-
ries of assassinations and
other attacks, including
the Sept. 11 assaults on
the U.S. diplomatic mis-
si6n that killed Ambas-
sador Chris Stevens and
three other Americans.
The oil-rich North


African nation is still
largely dominated by mili-
tias, many including fight-
ers who battled Gadhafi's
forces during the 2011
civil war, and many at-
tacks are blamed on them
as infighting is rampant in
the battle for control.
But witnesses and ana-
lysts said Monday's explo-
sion stood out because it
struck during the day in a
crowded area, putting ci-
vilians at risk.
"The bombing is sig-
nificant in that it is the
first that targets civilians,"
Frederic Wehrey. of the
Carnegie Endowment for
International Peace said
in an email.
"The bombing is going,
to put renewed pressure
on an already embattled


Ministry of Interior to
reign in the revolutionary
brigades," he added, refer-
ring to militias.
The blast took place on
Beirut Street, a residen-
tial and shopping area in
Libya's second-largest city
and quickly drew protest-
ers to the streets to call
for stronger security mea-
sures. Other vehicles on
the street were destroyed,
and the windows of nearby
buildings were shattered.
Jalaa hospital, just a few
hundred meters (yards)
away from the explosion,
had been protected for
months by Ansar al-Sha-
riah, an extremist group
that disbanded its work
as a militia following pro-
tests by Benghazi resi-
dents after the attack on


Stevens. The hospital is
now secured by a mix of
militias and special army
forces.
Libyan Prime Minister
Ali Zidan acknowledged
the government was in
part to blame for the in-
stability and lawlessness
that continue to plague
the North African nation
19 months after Gadhafi
was captured and killed.
"Authorities did not take
adequate precautions,"
he said in remarks carried
live on Libya's al-Ahrar TV
channel.
Zidan, who did not take
questions from report-
ers, said that Libya is still


trying to create a security
force capable of tackling
such attacks.
It was not immediately
clear who was behind the
attack. Zidan suggested
it could be Gadhafi sup-
porters or "other factions"
- leaving the door open
for a range of groups.
In New York, the U.N.
Security, Council con-
demned in the stron-
gest terms the deadly
attack" and "underlined
the need to bring the per-
petrators of this act to jus-
tice." It urged all countries
to cooperate with Libyan
authorities to pursue the
case.


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Sports
Briefs
Chipola Baseball
The Chipola Indians will play
State College of Florida today
at 9 a.m. Central Daylight Time,
in the championship round
of the FCSAA State Baseball
Tournament in Lakeland.
The winner of that game
will take on Palm Beach
State at noon for the state
championship.
Chipola Softball
The Chipola Lady Indians
will open play in the NJCAA
Softball National Champion-
ship tournament Wednesday
in St. George, Utah.
The tournament will run
through Saturday
JCCA Golf Tourney
The Jackson County Cattle-
men's Association announces
that the Second Annual
Colonel Thomas Memorial
Golf Classic is set for Friday at
Indian Springs Golf Course in
Marianna.
There will be a 1 p.m, shot-
gun start for the 18-hole een
that features a four-person
scramble. "pick your partners,"
and a modified handicapped
system.
Registration is $60 per per-
son and that includes greens
fees, cart. and a steak dinner.
There will be prices for longest
drive and closest to the pin. All,
players must have a verified
handicap.
.Ml benefits from the event
will go to FFA and 4H scholar-
shipiat Chipola. For more
information, call Mart Dryden
at 850-573-0414, Albert Milton
at 850-718-7834, Ken Godfrey
at 850-209-7919, orCharlene
at Indians Springs Golf Club at
850-482-8787.
Marianna Swim Team
The Marianna Swim Team is
a local, recreational swim team
for boys and girls ages 4 -18.
Practices are held from 5 p.m.
to 6:30 p.m., MNonday through
Thursday through August at
Chipola College Pool.
MNleets are held on Saturdays
throughout the summer.
Registration is open. All we
require is that the swimmer
swim one ftll pool length (25
yards) and that children under
10 have parental supervision
during practices.
The registration fee of $35
payable to NIST helps cover
cost of life guards and relay
events at meets. Team T-shirts
for members will be an ad-
ditional $5 and $15 for non-
members. Pool membership
is also required by Chipola
College.
For additional information
please call \Vcki Pelham at
482-2435; Angie Bunting at
209-8918: lulie Smith at 557-
3292; Monica Bolin at 209-
2388: or email your questions
to MNST2010@cenrurlmnk.net.
Coed Softball
Marianna Recreation
Department will offer a coed
adult softball league to begin
play in June.
Teams will consist of five
men and five women with
general rules of play discussed
at managers meeting.
Teams may sign up at The
Marianna Educational and
Recreational Expo (MERE)
located at 3625 Caverns Road
in Marianna through May 29.
The registration fee of $480
for a 12-game schedule and
includes the team's ASA reg-
istration fees due at the time
I of registration. There will be a
mangers meeting Mlay 29 at 6
p.m. at the MERE Complex.
For more information please
contact the MERE at 850-
482-6228. leam mangers may
come by the MERE Complex to
pick up team packets Monday
thru Friday from a.m. to4
p.m.
Managers and coaches may
view a copy of this year's rules
by visiting our website www.


leaguelineup.com/mrd go to
Adult Softball page.
Bulldog Wrestling Club
The Bulldog Wrestling Club is
starting practice for the sum-
mer season.
Practice will be Tuesday and
Thursday nights from 5:30 p.m.
to 7 p.m. at the old Marianna
High School wrestling room.
All lackson County kids
ages 5-18 are welcome to join.
For more information, call
MHS coach RonThoreson at
272-0280.


SHS Football


Sneads seeks to solidify offensive line


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Sneads'Alphonso Brown makes a pass during a practice last week.


TWO WI


*


L ..~;


/


A~.J ~- ~. -


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Pirates had one of
the most potent rushing attacks
in the area in 2012, with running
backs Tre Keys, Jalon Daniels,
and Joe Boyd combining with
quarterback Darius Williams to
produce 2,363 of the team's 2,557
total yards on the ground.
However, none of those play-
ers return in 2013, and only two
of the team's starting five offen-
sive linemen from last season
- center AJ Johnson and tackle
Kyle Commodore are back
this year, making the task of re-
forming the ground game into a
force a trying one for new coach


Bill Thomas.
Making it even tougher has
been the injuries to both John-
son (hip flexor) and Commodore
(knee) that will likely keep both
out all spring.
But the former Arnold assistant
said that there is a bright side to
having to getso many young and
untested players so manyreps in
the spring.
"Honestly, it's helping us com-
pete at the other positions,"
Thomas said of Johnson's and
Commodore's absence. "The
other guys are pretty compat-
ible and pretty close in talent
and size. The bigger ones are

See SNEADS, Page 2B


S AWAY


MARK SKINNNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola's Luis Tunon tags a passing runner at a game earlier in the season.

Indians close in on another state title after win against Palm' Beach State


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Indians put
themselves two victories
away from a state champi-
onship today thanks to a 9-1
victory over the Palm Beach
State Panthers in seven in-
nings Monday at the FCSAA
State Baseball Tournament
in Lakeland.
Preston Johnson started
and went the distance in the
run-rule win, overcoming a
rocky start to finish with a
strong performance, allow-


ing just one earned run on
four hits and four walks with
nine strikeouts.
'Johnson allowed two walks
and two hits in the bottom
of the first, including an RBI
single by Marcus Mooney for
the Panthers' only run.
But the sophomore right-
hander rebounded to retire
seven straight batters and
keep the Panthers in check
the rest of the way.
"Preston was really good
today. I was proud of him,"
Chipola coach Jeff Johnson
said after the game. "He's had


kind of a rough year and had
to deal with that shoulder
soreness, but he pitched ex-
tremely well for us today and
saved our bullpen by going
the distance."
He got plenty of support
from his lineup, which took
full advantage of a Palm
Beach pitching staff that had
problems early and often
finding the strike zone.
Panthers starter Cal Becker
allowed the first six batters he
faced to reach base,' issuing
four walks and allowing two
singles, as the Indians went


YOUTH BASEBALL-SOFTBALL


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
L eft: The Optimist's Chelsea Gardner is about to land a solid hit during an
Angels 9 and 10-year-old softball game against Sneads Friday night at the
MERE. Right: Riley Arunakul wraps up an inning for Zaxby's at the MERE
last week.


up 3-0 before Becker was re-
placed by Trevor Maloney.
Maloney walked in another
run after giving Chase Scott
a free pass, and the Indians
made it 5-0 on a fielder's
choice by Neiker Navarro.
It didn't get much better for
the Panthers in the second
inning, with an error, a hit
batter, and two more walks
forcing in another Chipola
run before Maloney was re-
placed by left-hander Hunter
Kyzar.

See INDIANS, Page 2B


College Baseball


Manatees


make it to


title round
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The State College of Florida
Manatees locked up a spot in
the championship round of the
FCSAA State Baseball Tourna-
ment today in Lakeland with an
8-1 win over the Seminole State
Raiders on Monday afternoon.
Casey Mulholland started on
the mound for the Manatees and
went seven innings to get the
win, allowing just one earned
run on four hits and three walks
with six strikeouts.
Tony Mollica took the loss for
the Raiders, giving up five runs
- four earned on five hits and
two walks in 4 1/3 innings.
State College of Florida scored
two runs in the third inning, an-
other in the fourth, two in the

See MANATEES, Page 2BL


4..*r1'
,, ,. ,..f,^'


. ...............


CI-POL.A. BASEBAiL







-12B TUESDAY, MAY 14,2013


SPORTS


PGA Tour


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods looks toward the crowd as he makes par on the 17th hole during the final round of The Players championship at
TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. on Sunday.




On Golf: Tiger on Sunday


T iger Woods and.
Jack Nicklaus have
never had a con-
versation longer than a
couple of minutes, and
rarely about golf. Maybe
it's because they already
think along the same lines
when it comes to winning
tournaments.
The Players Champion-
ship was another example
of howWoods rarely beats
himself.
Nicklaus was under
the oak tree at Augusta
National last month after
hitting his ceremonial tee
shot when he talked about
one that got away, the
first time he had a share
of the lead going into the
final round of a major and
didn't win. It was the 1971
Masters, and he found the
water trying to reach the
15th green with a 3-wood.
"I don't like to waste
a tournament on one
shot," Nicklaus said.
"If I was today thinking
about strategy of what I
wanted to do on that, I
probably wouldn't have
done it. I put myself out
of the tournament. One
shot shouldn't be a shot
that puts you out of the
tournament."
The island green on the
TPC Sawgrass is nothing
like the 15th at Augusta
National, but it's hard not
to think about Nicklaus
when reviewing the hole
that settled a weekend
duel between Woods and
Sergio Garcia.
Woods was standing on
the 17th tee Sunday when
he looked over and saw
Garcia approaching the


DougFerguson
On the Fringe
par-5 16th green with a
putter in hand, realizing
he was there in two and at
worst would make birdie
to tie Woods for the lead.
SThe pin was in its tra-
ditional Sunday location,
the back right comer be-
hind the bunker. Finding
land is always the priority.
From there, it's a bonus to
catch the ridge that feeds
the golf ball down a gentle
slope toward the hole.
"The thing is, you can
get baited into hitting it
over'there, and that's the
hard part," Woods said. "I
thought that the prudent
play for me was hit it in
the center of the green,
even left-center, and try
and hit kind of a pull-cut.
It I hit a pull-cut, it's go-
ing to have a little bit of
distance to it, and it might
have the shape where it
might land up on top and
feed down. But when I hit
it, a little bit of gust came
up and it stalled out."
The ball stayed on the
front of the green, leaving
a difficult putt from 45
feet. Woods hit a lot of
good putts that didn't go
in Sunday. This might
have been the best putt
that he wasn't expecting
to go in. The pace was
perfect, 3 feet away, and
he made his par. Mission
accomplished.


Garcia, who two-putted
for birdie on the 16th, was
standing on the 17th tee
watching Woods make his
par.
The Spaniard won The
Players Championship in
2008 in a playoff on the
17th hole. Paul Goydos
came up short and in the
water, Garcia found the
green.
This wasn't a playoff.
Garcia, however, went
at the flag and posed over
the shot until he saw the
splash.
'As the ball was in the
air I was thinking, 'Please
be right,' because it was
straight at it," Garcia said.
"It was probably 3 feet
left of the hole. When it
splashed, you think, 'Well,
hopefully I hit a good shot
after this and make 4 and
still have a chance on .the
next.' It's pretty much as
simple as that."'
Only it wasn't that sim-
ple. His next shot bounced
off the mound framing a
bunker and caromed back
into the water. He wound
up with a quadruple-
bogey 7. Adding to his
misery, Garcia put his tee
shot into the water on the
18th for a double bogey.
To say such mistakes
never happen to Woods
would be to ignore the
final hole at Dubai in
2001, when he went for
the green on the 18th
hole and found water for
a double bogey to lose
by two shots. He has lost
tournaments down.the
stretch. More often than
not, the other guy beats
him.
Back to Nicklaus, talking


about Augusta National,
though it can apply to
other golf courses and
situations.
"If you've got a 50-50
chance of doing it, I
wouldn't be doing itj"
Nicklaus said about high-
risk shots. "If you've got a
90-10 chance, think real
hard about it, and try to
make sure you eliminate
the 10."
(Nicklaus said he has
nriever talked to Phil Mick-
elson about this.)
Woods made a mistake
on Sunday when he hit a
pop-hook into the water
on the 14th, leading to
double bogey that gave
hope to about a half-
dozen players, at least
for a short time. That was
because of a bad swing,
which is bound to happen
over 18 hples of a final
round. It's his head that
kept him in the game.
"I stayed really patient,"
Woods said. "I kept telling
myself, 'That was your
only bad swing you made
all day. You can still win
this tournament.'"
He figured if he could
play the last four holes
in 1-under, he would at
least get into a playoff.
He played the last four
in 1 under and won The
Players Championship.
Of the four players tied
for the lead, two went
into the water on the 17th
- Garcia and Jeff Maggert
- while David Lingmerth
made a gallant try. He
missed an 8-foot birdie
chance on the 17th and
had to make a 70-foot putt
down two ridges on the
18th to tie.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


College Baseball


Eagles' season


ended by Chipola


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Tallahassee Eagles
saw a promising season
come to an end Sunday
afternoon at the FCSAA
State Baseball Tourna-
ment in Lakeland, as they
were eliminated by the
Chipola Indians thanks to
a 10-2 run-rule defeat.
The Eagles entered the
tournament as one of
the favorites following a
dominant regular season
that featured 45 total vic-
tories and a Panhandle
Conference champion-
ship title that was won by
a four-game margin.
But an opening day 3-0
loss to Hillsborough gave
TCC a razor-thin margin
for error at the state tour-
ney, with the Eagles com-
ing back Saturday to beat
St. Johns River State 8-4
before facing conference
foe Chipola on Sunday.
The game was close
early on, as the teams re-
mained tied 2-2 through
three innings.
But the Indians surged
out in front with a three-
run bottom of the fourth,
as an RBI sacrifice fly by
Cameron Gibson scored
Christian Correa for the
go-ahead run, and a two-
run double by Daniel
Mars to right centerfield
made it a 5-2 Chipola
lead.
Mars added an RBI sin-
gle in the sixth to make


Indians
From Page 1B
But Tunon greeted the
new pitcher with a hard-
hit double into right field
to score two and put the
Indians in front 8-1.
Bert Givens' RBI dou-
ble in the third inning
brought Ian Rice to the
plate to round out the
scoring for Chipola.
Givens was 1-for-2 with
two walks, two runs, and
two RBI, while Rice led
the Indians with three
hits to go with two runs
and an RBI.
Tunon was 2-for-3 with
a walk and two RBI, while
Chase Nyman had a hit, a
walk, and scored twice.
The Indians are now in
prime position to bring
home their fourth state
title under Jeff Johnson,
with their top two start-
ing pitchers Carlos Misell
and Michael Mader set to
start today with a rested


it 7-2 before the Indians
were able to put the game
away with three more
runs in the seventh.
Correa started the two-
out rally with a single to
left field and later scored
on an RBI double by
Neiker Navarro. to make
it 8-2.
The next batter .Gibson
delivered a single through
the left side of the infield
to bring home Luis Tu-
non and Navarro to give
Chipola the eight-run
cushion through seven
innings to end the game
on the mercy rule.
Gibson finished the day
3-for-4 with a team-best
four RBI, while Navarro
had a huge day going 4-
for-4 with a double, three
runs, and an RBI.
Mars was 3-for-4 with
a double, a triple, a run,
and three RBI, and Cor-
rea was 3-for-3 with four
runs scored.
Tyler York was 2-for-3
with a double and two
RBI to lead TCC, with
Trent Higginbothem also
picking up two hits.
Taylor Lewis started on
the mound and got the
win for the Indians, go-
ing all seven innings and
allowing two earned runs
on five hits and four walks
with four strikeouts.
Patrick Riley took the
loss for the Eagles, sur-
rendering five earned
runs on nine hits and two
strikeouts.


bullpen behind them.
"We've got our pitch-
ing staff intact and we're
ready to go. It's now just
a matter of putting it to-
gether and executing the
plan," the coach said.
"We've got to play our
two best games of the
year and I hope we'll be
prepared to do that. I'm
proud of this group for
getting to this point, but
it's like I told them after
the game, if you don't fin-
ish this, thing off, you'll
be like a lot of other
teams. But if we do, then
you'll put your name in
there with the three other
teams I've taken to Grand
Junction (Colo., for the
JUCO World Series)."
Misell will get the start
against State College of
Florida at 9 a.m. Cen-
tral Daylight Time, "with
the winner to face Palm
Beach State at noon for
the title, a game that
Mader would start should
the Indians make it.


Sneads
From Page 1B
younger, but they're a little
bit behind. The older ones
are not as big as the young-
er ones, but it's been very
competitive in practice.
Any time you get competi-
tion like that you're going
to get better."
Among the remaining of-
fensive linemen left com-
peting for starting spots
are rising senior-Trent Jeter,
rising juniors Bailey Beau-
champ and Austin Goff,
and rising sophomores
Tristen Gosnell and Cam-
eron Powell.



Manatees
From Page 1B
fifth, and three in the ninth
to cruise to the easy win.
Conner Hale went 2-for-
4 with a triple, a walk, a
run, and three RBI to lead
the Manatees offensively,
while Julian Santos was 2-
for-4 with a run and two
RBI, and Andrew McNett
was 2-for-3 with a double,
a walk, a run, and an RBI.
Angelo Amendolare led
the Raiders by picking up
three of the team's four
hits on the day, while Dan
Kennon was 1-for-3 with
the team's only run.
I The loss eliminated


Rising sophomore Gavin
Pittman is also'working at
tight end along with rising
junior Grey Basford.
Thomas said that he has
been pleased thus far with
what he has seen from the
unit, particularly without
Johnson and Commodore
on the field.
"We're getting there, little
by little," the coach said.
"We scrimmaged a little bit
Friday and saw some im-
provement there. We're still
making a lot of mistakes,
but we're blocking better in
spots and we're very aggres-
sive. When you've got your
two best offensive linemen
sidelined and you're still


blocking decent at times,
you only have room to im-
prove from there.
"They've all got heart and
they want to be good, and
they're getting better. I've
been hard on them, but
they don't have any quit
in them. That's all it takes.
They'll keep pushing along
and we'll get there."
The Pirates are also in the
process of finding answers
as to who will be lining up
behind the big boys up
front, though Thomas said
that he likes the collection
of playmakers his team

nE74p4 MIT


has.
Antwan Durn, Javarris
Goodson, Devonte Pettis,
and Eric McWhite have all
gotten reps carrying the
football this spring, with
Dumrn also getting work at
quarterback along with
newcomer Alfonso Brown.
Thomas said that the sur-
prise of the spring thus far
has been McWhite, who
has come out of nowhere
to impress the coaches
with his big-play ability
"He has really improved,"
Thomas said of McWhite.
"He caught a screen pass


the other day and was in
the end zone before you
could blink your eyes. He's
really raw, but he pays at-
tention to detail. From
the first day of practice
to where he's at now, he's
probably improved more
than anybody. Every day he
gets a little better, and his
route-running and block-
ing have really improved.
We've been excited about
it."
Durn and Brown are tak-
ing turns at QB, with Durn
the more elusive runner
and Brown the more natu-


ral passer.
However, Thomas said
he's in no hurry to name a
starter and would have no
issue rotating both in the
fall if he felt that was the
team's best option.
But for both to find suc-
cess this season, the coach
said that the Pirates will
first have to find consis-
tent production in the
trenches.
"The offensive line is
where you win and lose
football games," Thomas
said. "That's the most im-
portant position of all."


Seminole State from the
double-elimination tour-
nament, with the Raiders
previously losing Sunday
to Palm Beach State 3-2 in
12 innings.
It was the third straight
win for State College of
Florida after an opening
day 6-3 loss to Seminole
State on Friday, with the
Manatees rebounding to
beat Miami-Dade 3-0 on
Saturday and Hillsborough
12-6 on Sunday
The Manatees will host
the Chipola Indians to-
day at 9 a.m. Central
Daylight Time, with the
winner to take on Palm
Beach State at noon for the
championship.







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
/LOOK! A "DEAR CHARLIE BROWN, LULCq
POSTCARDS FRO/ THIS I5 THE MOTEL WE ALL DAY
LINUS! STAYED IN THE FIRST THE B
M N16HT..IT HAP A THIS
l(JIMMIN6 POOL, B(T WEE GOIN6G
-- Iy DPN'T 60 5WIMMN6... R F


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
WE DE5PERT.-L'( NEU.>TO6 | 'NIT'5 IW-ONGWITIA OU. Q
K ZE-PLMCEALLOUR. -h- OLU FUR.NITUE-z I
S( OL t> FUoNITU E! / -' TROUT' YOU LKi>
I II P-.._^<--___->' 1 II I EA- L


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
KIM, WHY-'D THEY SAY THEY WANT-
CHE-STER ) HIS HIM TO FOCUS oN
QUIT THE PARENTS HIS SCHOOLWORK,
TEAM MAE BUT I THINKTHEY
HIM. WANT TO KEEP HIM
AWAY FROM ME.


THEY'RE AFRAID HE'S
BECOME UTTERLY
INTOXICATED BY MY
FLIRTATIOUS,
BUBBLY PERSONALITY.


ENTERTAINMENT


I HAVE
THAT
EFFECT MUST..
ON NOT..
PEOPLE. SAY...
ANYTHING.
0

F-i


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


T1 i .,
f'- .x., :P giF'Re
"6 65/sI

~~~~~1 .r:. -A .


BTeC14


.. ..LLS BY BI SCHOR


GRIZZ WELLS BY BILL SCHORR


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
7 ARE YOU KIDDING G ] YOU DESERVE TO SIT DOWN THERE
M,-E? AFTER WHAT YOU) (AN, STEW FOR A WHILE! I JUST CAME To
OL H OP ARE PULLED 'ITH TA O / I ST&ND EETWEEN YOU 6N' GUZ 'TMACE
-. YbOUHEREsb NSAu" .-. "I: 'RE E C.. E.0 LL 4 C.'

14E'

: ', \. \',' i / .....^-; / I~ / .; ,;'- ,- \ ^ : ^
!, ;\y ,,'-.l ., l : ;I 7" ,- "-; . 11
L,., y. ] I / . -__ .. ..

ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
SOMDE FRIEND YOU ARE, YEAH, WELL, 51/ I DON'T KNOW WHY EVERYONE'S 7 NO ----T-
OOP' CAN'T BELIEVE ( WHAT KINDA FRIEND ) MAKING' SUCH A FUSS ABOUT THE '\THANKS
YOU WON'T GET ME WOULD DO WHAT DINOSAUR DEAL! AFTER ALL, (T'YOU ')
0UTTA HERE! YOU DID, WIZER? ) / NO ONE GOI- HU..' r ii


THAT A BABY BY PAUL TRAP

doory
i ~ ~~ -- e e-1. i S A
i \ ;e.Th,=. \ocT(
ofc -
^ -' \o f "
,I ,


ACROSS
1 Spring
shape
5 -, amas,
amat
8 Beat
decisively
12 Bear in the
sky
13Pinch
14Counting
rhyme start
15 Exception
17 Rattle
18 Cook's
vessel
19Action star
Chuck
21 Leavening
agent
24 Soggy
25-
Wiedersehen
26 Unfaltering
30 Shawl or
stole
32 Hwys.
33 Diminishes
37Angry
38 Nosh
39 Selected a
card
40Tarzan's
moniker
43--
matter of
fact
44 Place for
posies


46 Hatfield foe
48 Imitation
50 Actress
Ruby
51 Night light
52 Not skillful
57 Ida.
neighbor
58 Hair styling
goo
59 Canyon
reply
60 Iowa college
town
61 Look at
62 Chimney
dust

DOWN
1 -de-sac
2 Spanish
gold
3 Equal, in
combos
4 Reindeer
herders
5 Erelong
6 Wire gauge
7 Unfenced
8 Helped
with
expenses
9 Provide
new
weapons
10 Loosen, in
a way
11 Parting
words


Answer to Previous Puzzle


OPA|L CE
RO0U E S
P AS
C LIA S
O AR V
ZWIIEBA
RN-I L

APOR
1Xu
E N T RE
A|T|A SE

16 Head
covers
20 Peculiar
21 Swings off
course
22 Kind of
currency
23 Remote
27 Genealogy
chart
28 Party tray
cheese -
29 "The Thin
Man" dog
31 Serfs
34Bric-a- -
35"Eso-"
(PaulAnka
hit)
36 Move in
the breeze
41 Favorite


DC US
I L T L IB
T OaE TO
LIE
DRYU





loc
LIED
CK En e
E VE EP S
SAN
TR A
ANE
A L GAI N
O S E LS A
42 Santa Fe
loc.
44 Engine
sound
45 In unison
(2 wds.)
47 Fleshy
mushrooms
48Austen
novel
49 Changes
direction
.50 Edit out
53 Bridal
notice word
54 Author
Umberto
55 Greek
letter
56 Youngster


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


5-14 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"KWYIY FD GS PSM DS EIYZK ZD

IYOSIKFGE KWZK Z ESST OAZM WZD

HSLY KS KSBG." TIZLZ HIFKFH
UISSXD ZKXFGDSG


Previous Solution: "Miss Renata Tebaldi was always sweet and very firm ... she
had dimples of iron."-- Rudolf Bing, Manager, Metropolitan Opera
TODAY'S CLUE: Islenbav
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal.Uclick 5-14


Dear Annie: My husband and I have
been happily married for 15 years and
recently decided to try an open-mar-
riage lifestyle. We are doing this with full
honesty and respect for each other.
The main problem is that the dating
success is not equal. I found it easier to
"get a date. Whereas, my husband is'hav-
ing a tremendous degree of difficulty. He
has online dating profiles, but no luck. I
am seeing someone who is a wonderful
person, but I want my husband to expe-
rience new things along with me.
Open marriage is still considered
taboo, and it is extremely important to
my husband and me that we are honest
about our marital status with any pro-





This week we are looking at the Stayman (
vention, whose primary job is to try to fir
4-4 major-suit fit after opener immediate
shows a balanced hand.
When the opening bid is one no-trump
responder bids two clubs, it asks opene
show a four-card major. If opener has tw
them, he rebids two hearts. Then, what
the responder do when he has four spades
fewer than four hearts?
If he has game-invitational strength, it
pends upon system. If one no-trump two
trump is natural, showing about nine pc
and inviting game, then responder contir
with two no-trump. Since he used Staymar
must have a four-card major, and since he
not raised hearts, he must hold four spades.
if one no-trump two no-trump is not nati
perhaps a transfer to diamonds, responded
bids two spades.
Opener is expected to place the final cont]
Here, with an absolute maximum, he sign
in three no-trump.
After West leads the diamond king, v
should South do?
Declarer has six top tricks and at least t]
more can come from the clubs. However, if
has the club king, there is a risk the oppon
will collect four diamond tricks to defeat'
The answer? Duck the first trick. If West le
another diamond, it gives you two diam
tricks. If West shifts, you win in hand and
the club 10 (or queen).
Ducking with the A-J-x is called the 1
Coup because this play was first recognize
that English city when whist was popular.


TUESDAY, MAY14, 2013 3BF-


Horoscope

TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Don't hesitate to
push your plans forward if
you feel that your thinking
is superior to that of your
colleagues.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Something you diligent-
ly worked on in the past
but temporarily put aside
9an be revitalized.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Someone quite
inspirational could enter
your life. This charismatic
person will turn out to be
a groundbreaking force in
your life.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- If you and your col-
leagues have put forth the
necessary effort, a project
should come to a satisfac-
tory conclusion.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-You'll have a marvelous
way of expressing yourself
that will capture the atten-
tion of your listeners.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Once you set your mind
on something, you're not
likely to be deterred. If
you trust another be sure
he or she shares your
motivations.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -Two associates
could become stronger al-
lies if you show them how
they can fit in with and
how they would benefit
from your goals.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -A large chunk
of your time will be spent
helping a friend sort out
his or her affairs.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19) Conditions in
general should be rather
harmonious. Your greatest
benefits are likely to be
derived from one-on-one
social engagements.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) If you can, you
should try to spend time
on your favorite pet hobby.
Have a little fun.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -Your energies are
likely to be directed to-
ward social pursuits rather
than mundane or worldly
affairs. It won't be a waste
of time.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -The time is right to
finalize material nego-
tiations, so if you've been
haggling over money with
someone, seal the deal.


spective date. Even though he is happy
for me, I feel compelled to help him. But
I'm not sure how to do it without
overstepping unspoken boundaries.
-OPEN BUT LOST

Dear Open: Are you sure your husband
wants this as much as you do? He may
have agreed to the arrangement only to
please you. We think you need to have
this discussion again and let your com-
mitment to honesty lead the way. Ask
your husband whether he is truly happy
with the idea of an open marriage and, if
so, what you can do to make things easier
for him. Marriage, "open" or otherwise,
requires the ability to communicate.


05-14-13


North
K K764
S103
* 63


*AJ98 ,2
West East
S10953 4 J8
YJ6 VKQ752
* KQ1095 *874
*74 46K63
South
SAQ2
AA984
AJ2
Ql105

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both

South West North East
1 NT Pass 2 A Pass
2 V Pass 2!/2NT Pass
3 NT Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: + K







R T..dav.i 1. M v 1A )fl12 Ta3 n Cnunv 1inrn


CLASSTFTIEDS


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


D~~~~E A T C R LE A SE WITH O PTIO N TO B UYtJ LAV fl~afI


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED

MARKETPLACE


Found: Dachshund/Poodle 51b/F, found at
North Florida rock, well groomed. 850-241-4559
$ .-. :s;--li?:i ,, 'drt, ;' -,.'
BUSINESS S OPPORTUNITIES
^E-----------


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world's largest commercial
.cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com

SJanitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500

504-915-1474




Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
MISCLANEU O 1111 1 ir
Swimming pool, 18'X4', includes pump, filter
and ladder. I just disassembled it and it is
ready to go. Kid leaving for college this
summer and we no longer need it. Call/text
850-209-0522


P iano:BaIdwinwithbech, updggbt, and W
In excellent codition. Must se il
L P Ne otIab C& 334-714279 I.

*nE' ^ ^EEAQS.:.:
.* .'- ".. * ,> ." -. ,
01M A-

Amp Vox with reverb. $125. 850-482-6022
Armoire: Beautiful wood desk armoire with
light. File drawers, keyboard shelf, pull-out
shelf for printer. Must see. Asking $400 OBO.
850-209-3008.
Brand new full-size mattress, box spring and
frame. Paid $300.00 will take $150.850-209-
3008.
Camera Olympus 600UZ. $149. 850-482-7665
Commode/alum adjustable $75. 850-526-1001
Crescent walker $20. 850-526-1001.
Dining Table + 6 Chairs $125. 850-569-1089
Dolls Porcelain w/stand. $9 ea. 850-482-7665
Living Room Suite: Rust color overstuffed sofa,
loveseat & chair. Sacrifice $499. 850-209-3008
Tires (2) LT245/75R/16 $20. 850-482-6022
Tires (2) P265/70R/15 $25 for both 850-482-6022
Tires (3) P245/70R/17 $30. 850-482-6022
Tires (4) P235/ 55R /18 $35 for all. 850-482-6022
Trailer enclosed " plywood 4x8 $250. 482-6022
Trailer Hitch NEW cond. $29. 850-482-7665
Trolling motor: Evinrude 651b$300. 850-272-5305
Twin Beds: (2) $50 Ea. Call 850-693-0665
Walker w/seat basket & brake $80. 526-1001
Window A/C 7000 BTU 115 V $125. 850-569-1089

fAY PET SS &-AN1MALS.
......S ''" *L .. .


SFree Cat: small female calico, rescued, very
sweet. Call 850-482-2994


IUBjH i ABCA Registered Border
Collie Puppies: Black and
white, lilac and white,
M/F $350 Call 229-774-
2662 or 229-220-0232.
Collies: AKC reg. Males & Females $400. Born
April 7,2013. Ready May 20th. Sable/White.
229-308-3006, alderman.lynn@yahoo.com


______ Maltese AKC Pups!
Will be small. S/W,
M & F. Ready Now!
C Will Deliver!
Call 334-703-2500


Super Puppies Sale
Morlde $175, Shih -Chi Mix $175,
Chi-A-Poo $300, Chinese Chihuahua
Female 334-718-4886 4-


--FAR &DAIRYRD'SICTS
-." ^ .** -- :" .' "".. : : .,!: ',. -"-'- '


9 W i 'ii










Vine Ripe Tomatoes
Lei k Sj
'a :W .*.l::% f
WHOI


Home Grown Greens
Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!


S0-334-793-6690 0


AAplin Farms
Strawberries
Peaches, Sqaush,
lettuce, cabbage,
Broccoli, onions &
Zucchini
4You Pick We Pick 4
Open Mon-Sat (8-6)
334-726-5104



U-Pick We Pick
Juicy and Sweet
9 miles from Ross Clark Circle
Hw 52 West of Dothan.




END OF SEASON SALE
Quality Coastal Hay; Large Rolls
Fprtilmzed & Weed Control 850-209-9145
WAN t ] TED IAR[: GAREN :


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinning

Call Pea River Timber
S334-389-2003 ,


[ ). EMPLOYMENT
TRANSPOJ.RAI: N&MOI STICS


We Link


Sudoku


NCH '
I ,
Northwest Florida Community Hospital,
Chipley, FL a leading healthcare provider
in the panhandle is seeking qualified
candidates for the following positions:
Med Surg Nurse Manager FT
RN's FT & PRN (allshifts)
Food Service Supervisor FT

Applications available online at
www.NFCH.org and/or application to:
Email dblount@nfch.org
(850) 415-8106 or Fax (850) 638-0622
Smoke and Drug Free Campus. EOE

Primary Care Practice in North West Florida
is looking for an
ARNP, Family Medicine
for part time or full time employment.
*- Contact Brenda Nichols, Office Manager,
at 850-674-2221 ext. 106 or send resume to
P.O. Box 532, Blountstown, FL. 32424.



Administrator
The Panhandle Public Library Cooperative
System Special District is accepting applica-
tions for an Administrator. The PPLCS Admin
office is located in Marianna, Fl. Coopera-
tive Members are Calhoun, Jackson, Holmes,
and Washington County Public Libraries lo-
cated in rural N. W. Fl. ALA approved
MLS/MLIS Degree and 2 yearsprofessional
public library experience; current driver's li-
cense; U S citizenship and ability to pass a
background screening.
Ideal candidate will also have experience
with an administrative board, public library
relations; budgeting, technical library serv-
ice platforms, webpage development, & com-
mitment to excellence in rural public library
services. Salary range is $50,000 to
$55,000;full time at-will employment.
Contact Mrs. Lennetta Greene Phone:
850-482-9296 for information or link to view
the Job Description and submit an on-line
,I_ application. -

SEDUCATION
ISR& INSTRUCTION



NEED A TUTOR?
Math & Science All Levels
Ion l or Avail. on Skype
Call Ben 727 6317576


Classes Forming Now
for Medical Assisting,
CeD TIf^ Electrical Trades and
FORTfIS More!
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu
(/ rRESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
f-, I =jk;!JTI :D

Apartments for Rent in Greenwood
2 BR $450 1BR $400
Call 850-3264289



o-Cll 850-482-5134 .

1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4m
,o 2BR 1BA House for rent,
Safe neighborhood, $500/mo + dep.
850-482-8196 OR 850-209-1301
-* 3/2 appliances included NO PETS
5374 Cotton St. Graceville, FL
$700. mo $350. dep. 850-263-2045 Lv. Mess.
4/2 Lg. Home w/ CH&A 2 car garage
fenced back yd. in Alford $850 mo. + dep.
850-579-4317 & 850-866-1965 Avail. Now
5/3 2-story home 15 acres, 2-fish ponds,
between Chipley & Graceville. $800. mo fenced
on 3 sides 850-638-2363 or 850-415-3430
*k Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 or austintvlerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"


I LEASE OPTION TO BUY 4/2 4484 Lime St.
HD/WD/ floors, fenced yard $875. mo
or $119,500. Call: 850-718-6541


2/1 $400. includes washer, Dryer & appliances.
850-209-4739 or 850-209-7098
2/2 MH South of Cottondale Central Heat/Air,
$550. + dep. & 2/1 MH H/A $450. + dep. water&
lawn care is furnished 850-352-4393/ 209-4516
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountryliving.com.
4, 850-209-8847 4
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

S 2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
Sin Marianna &Sneads (850)209-8595 |
2BR 2 BA MH'S in Alford, $380 mo. $380. dep.
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2BR/2BA Mobile Home $450 + deposit,
appliances, washer & dryer, water/garbage
& sewer included n 850-482-4455
2BR/2BA Mobile Home near Marianna, CH&A,
Clean, secluded, No Smoking or Pets and
references required. $500 Month + Dep.
Call 850-482-8333
2BR/2BA Newly remodeled in quiet area.
Very clean. Water, sewage, garbage and yard
care provided. No smokers, no pets.
$500 + deposit. Call 850-718-8158.
4 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself) |
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 Located between
Grand Ridge & Sneads.
Includes water, garbage & pest main.
$360. Mo -0 850-573-0308 4
.... REISIDENTIAL-
(ll[J REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Foreclosure Homes For Sale
2161 Katie Avenue. Grand Ridge 3BR/2BA
double wide mobile home with land. $49,000.
555 Satsuma Road. Chattahoochee.
3BR/1BA 1665SF home. $49,000.
Credit Union Owned. Call 850-663-2404


17 Acres: If it's peace and quiet you're
looking for, you've found it.
Getaway from the hustle and bustle of the city,
only 8 miles from Chattahoochee.
This 4BR/2BA doublewide mobile home is
almost 2,200 SF and has a split floor-plan with
fireplace. 17 ACRES, 2 Ponds, Carport. Wildlife.
Contact Michael 850-533-6011.
Feel free to drive by and take a look!
NO OWNER FINANCING

8 yr. old 2600 sq.ft. 4/3 brick home on 1 acre.
dbl garage, sep. dbl carport & workshop, deck
Beautiful home in Blountstown, near HS
$199,900. nice landscaping 850-674-1433


1979 14x68 Riverchase 2/2, fireplace, nicely
furnished, upgraded master bath, porch &
deck included $12,500.850-718-6541
MUST BE MOVED 4
1995 Fleetwood 16x80 3/2 CH&A all electric, all
apple. good cond. $18,000 OBO 850-579-2728 or
850-348-9925 has axle & tires


RECREATION


Golf Car: 2006 Club Car "Precedent"
One owner, gas powered, full weather
enclosure, club/ball washer, club rain
protector, cooler, floor mat, tinted windshield.
$2,900. Phone 334-464-3383

2008 Tahoe 215 Xi Deck Boat, 21.5 ft., Seats 12,
260 HP, 5.0 L. Mer Cruiser, Color HBird,
GPS/FF/Many Extras, Dual Trailer with Brakes,
Excellent Cond. Low Hours, $17,500 334-687-
9311
25 ft. Party Barge Pontoon 2011 Suntracker
Regency edition only 75 hrs. 150hp Mercury
Opti Max engine, with 2 axle trailer & lots of
extras, ready for the water, take over
payoff $41,000. Call 334-763-9124
Bass Boat 2011 G3 Eagle 19 ft. Yamaha 115 hp.
4 stroke, 46 hrs. 2 lowrance HDS8 depth find-
ers, 24 volt Minnkota trolling motor, hydraulic
steering, tilt steering wheel, build in battery
charger, deluxe trailer, snap on cover, garage
kept. $18,000. 334-671-3864.

1995 30 ft. Travel Trailer, fixed up to live in
good condition, cold AC $4200. OBO
334-702-0001 or 386-965-6964 In Dothan


Level: f -2 ]-3

Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Friday's puzzle


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


ILLY
ANES
a.4 3*10745 -
Since 1975*
BILLY BARNES ENTERPRISES, INC.
IS NOW HIRING
EXPERIENCED FLATBED DRIVERS

EXCELLENT PAY & BENEFITS
HOME MOST WEEKENDS
MINIMUM PAY
REQUIREMENTS INCLUDE:
MUST BE 23 YEARS OLD,VALID CLASS A CDL,
CLEAN DRIVING RECORD, 1 YEAR
TRACTOR/TRAILER FLATBED EXPERIENCE
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
MARY 0) 1-800-844-6458 OPT 1
OR APPLY ONLINE
0 www.billybarnes.net


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www..ICFLOR]DA N.com


1999 26ff Jayco Eagle 5th wheel camper .
Sleeps 6, one living room slide, queen size hide
a bed sofa, master queen size bed, 16' awning.
$6,900. 334-673-0533
*2010 Keystone 32'
lam __ ,... Travel Trailer 278-RLS
---1 slide, tan interior option,
queen bedroom, new a/c
unit in 2012, rear leaving feature with 2 swivel
rockers & large window, sleeps 4-6, lots of stor-
age, excellent cond, $19,500 OBO. 334-693-5454
32f. Travel Trailer 2007 Conquest great cond.
sleeps 4-5, slide out living room $10,000.
Motor Home 2002 38ft. Fleetwood Discovery
2-slide outs 35K mi. 330 hp Cummings engine,
mint cond. garage kept, awnings out with TV
outside to view & washer & dryer
$59,500. 334-805-7679.




-Dodge 2001 Ram 1500 SLT,
4x4, tilt, cruise, electric
doors & windows, sliding
JA rear window, bedliner,
very cold air, $5,995 OBO. Call 334-237-2634


lChevrolet 2000 Impala,
loaded, new tires, 66,000
miles, 3.4 liter V-6.4ike
"new! $4995. Call 334-790-
7959.,


DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
GOT BAD CREDIT?
11*1 Pass Repo pass bankruptcy
slow credit ok
$0 Down/lst Payment,
Tax, Tag & Title
12 months OR 12,000 mile warranty
RIDE TODAY! FREE $25. gas giveaway
Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
Ford 1999 Mustang GT: 35th anniversary
edition Pony Pkg with Flomaster, automatic,
Mach sound system, ruby red, leather interior,
ice cold AC, recent tune-up, well maintained
with many new parts, 9 yrs adult owned, good
tires, new battery, 168k miles. $5,200.
Email eS) mustang99ad)yahoo.com
Honda 1991 CRX:
Red Hatchback, 5 speed;
$1,200 OBO.
[ a Phone 334-435-3962

Hyundai 2012 Elantra, $200 down, $269 per
month. No Credit Refused. Call Ron Ellis 714-
0028.
__________Lincoln 1999 Town Car,
Signature, loaded, leath-
er, sunroof, new tires,
106,000 miles, very clean.
_$4500. Call 334-790-7959.
Nissan 1997 Aitima 4 door 168,000 miles.
Great work car $1,000OBO. Call 334 803 5906
Nissan 2012 Atima, Like new, under warranty,
No Credit Refused! $200 down, $269 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 714-0028.
Toyota 2007 Prius,
W fte, fully
loaded, excellent
condition, 70K
miles, $12,500
850-499-7560

VW 2011 Jetta, All Applications Accepted. Low
miles, great fuel mileage, still under factory
warranty. $300/down, $300/month. Call Steve
334-791-8243.


H2005 Honda Goldwing
1800 Calif. Trike.
i... Yellow w/lots of chrome.
6 disk CD changer. Stereo.
Headsets for front & rear.
Cruise control. Reverse
gear. Lots more extras.
56,000 miles in perfect condition. $25,000. Call
334-406-1520 or edhughes2005@hotmail.com
Honda 2006 250 Rebel 13K miles, 70-80 miles
per gal. nice hwy. cruiser with classic leather
saddle bags, windshield, never used full face
helmet $2450. OBO 850-557-1629.
Kawasaki 2006 Vulcan 500 LTD 2040 miles, red
in color, garage kept, $2800. 850-773-4939
Yamaha 2002 tTR125: Great condition!
Includes helmet & small aluminum load ramp.
Located in Dothan, AL. $800 .OBO Contact 863-
221-7680 or coletoncallender@gmail.com.


Ford 1993 Ranger: 5 speed, step-side, cold air,
runs good, black, good condition. $2,100. OBO
Call 334-798-1768 or 334-691-7111
Ford 2004 F-150 Lariat, ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED,
loaded, 78k miles, leather, pwr window, door
locks, tuneau cover, tow pkg., new tires.
$250/down, $300/month. Call Steve 334-791-
8243.
King Tiller 6ft. Brown MFG. Disc 612 ft.
$2500.334-796-6361 (LIKE NEW)
TRACTOR FOR SALE-Ford 4000, 52 H.P. Diesel, 6
FT. Bush Hog, 6 FT. Heavy Duty Adjustable Disk
With Grease Bearings, 205-902-4212


3 For sale by Owner
2006 Pontiac Montana SV6,
88K miles, 7 passenger
sliding power door, rail
guards, back-up assist,
front/rear CD/MP3, DVD w/remote, fabric w/4
captain seats. Maintained w/most service re-
cords. 60-75% tread on tires remain. Carpet
mats incl. Other extra's. Asking price suggest-
ed by www.kbb.com. $6,500 334-790-6618
WNE A T

1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
a' 4 24 q0" 7 AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not-!
N334794-9576 or 344-791-4714


CLASSIFIED


Got a Cluker
"^ ~Well be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
S$325 & _tCmplete Cars
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285
MIllllIElllllllIIlll......l....


t 0-


LEGALS


LF160117
Florida Department of Environmental Protec-
tion Northwest District Waste Management/Air
Resources Program Draft/Proposed Permit No.
0630058-013-AV Green Circle Bio Energy,
Cottondale Wood Pellet Plant
Jackson County, Florida
Applicant: The applicant for this project is
Green Circle Bio Energy, Inc. The applicant's
responsible official and mailing address is:
Greg Martin, Vice President, Green Circle Bio
Energy, Inc., Cottondale Wood Pellet Plant,
2500 Green Circle Parkway, Cottondale, Florida
32431.
Facility Location: The applicant operates the
existing Cottondale Wood Pellet Plant, which is
located in Jackson County at 2500 Green Circle
Parkway, Cottondale, Florida 32431.
Project: The applicant applied April 4, 2013 to
the Department for a Title V air operation per-
mit revision. This is a revision of Title V air op-
eration permit No. 0630058-005-AV, to incorpo-
rate a 110 Hp John Deere diesel-fueled emer-
gency fire pump engine. The existing facility
consists of a wood fuel pellet plant comprised
of a wood fiber receiving and storage area, two
dryer lines, three pelletizing lines and a pellet
load-out area.
Permitting Authority: Applications for Title V
air operation permits are subject to review in
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 403,
Florida Statutes (F.S.) and Chapters 62-4, 62-
210, 621213 of the Florida Administrative Code
(F.A.C.). The proposed project is not exempt
from air permitting requirements and a Title V
air operation permit is requiredto operate the
facility. The Department of Environmental Pro-
tection's Waste Management/Air Resources
Program in the Northwest District is the Per-
mitting Authority responsible for making a per-
mit determination for this project. The Permit-
ting Authority's physical and mailing address
is: 160 West Government Street, Suite 308,
Pensacola, Florida 32502-5740. The Permitting
Authority's telephone number is 850-595-8300.
Project File: A complete project file is available
for public inspection during the normal busi-
ness hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday (except legal holidays), at the
address indicated above for the Permitting Au-
thority. The complete project file includes the
draft/proposed permit, the statement of basis,
the application, and the information submitted
by the applicant, exclusive of confidential re-
cords under Section 403.111, F.S. Interested
persons may view the draft permit by visiting
the following website: http://www.dep.state.fl
.us/air/emission/apds/default.asp and enter-
ing the permit number shown above. Interest-
ed persons may contact the Permitting Author-
ity's project review engineer for additional in-
formation at the address or phone number list-
ed above.
Notice of Intent to Issue Permit: The Permit-
ting Authority gives notice of its intent to issue
a draft/proposed Title V air operation permit
revision to the applicant for the project descri-
bed above. The applicant has provided reason-
able assurance that continued operation of the
existing equipment will not adversely impact
air quality and that the project will comply with
all appropriate provisions of Chapters 62-4, 62-
204, 62-210, 62-212, 62-213, 62-296 and 62-297,
F.A.C. The Permitting Authority will issie a fi-
nal permit in accordance with the conditions/of
the draft/Aroposed permit unless a response
received in accordance with the following pro-
cedures results in a different decision or a sig-
nificant change of terms or conditions.


I r
, H'.


Jackson County Floridan *


So ".

Comments: The Permitting Authority will ac-
cept written comments concerning the
draft/proposed Title V air operation permit for
a period of 30 days from the date of publication
of the Public Notice. Written comments must
be received by the close of business (5:00
p.m.), on or before the encj of this 30-day peri-
od by the Permitting Authority at the above ad-
dress. As part of his or her comments, any per-
son may also request that the Permitting Au-
thority hold a public meeting on this permitting
action. If the Permitting Authority determines
there is sufficient interest for a public meeting,
it will publish notice of the time, date, and lo-
cation in the Florida Administrative Weekly
(FAW). If a public meeting is requested within
the 30-day comment period and conducted by
the Permitting Authority, any oral and written
comments received during the-public meeting
will also be considered by the Permitting Au-
thority. If timely received written comments or
comments received at a public meeting result
in a significant change to the draft/proposed
permit, the Permitting Authority shall issue a
revised draft/proposed permit and require, if
applicable, another Public Notice. All com-
ments filed will be made available for public in-
spection. For additional information, contact
the Permitting Authority at theabove address
or phone number.
Petitions: A person whose substantial inter-
ests are affected by the proposed permitting
decision may petition for an administrative
hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569
and 120.57, F.S. The petition must contain the
information set forth below and must be filed
with (received by) the Department's Agency
Clerk in the Office of General Counsel of the
Department of Environmental Protection, 3900
Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station #35,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Petitions filed
by the applicant or any of the parties listed be-
low must be filed within 14 days of receipt of
this Written Notice of Intent to Issue Air Per-
mit. Petitions filed by any persons other than
those entitled to written notice under Section
120.60(3), F.S., must be filed within 14 days of
publication of the attached Public Notice or
within 14 days of receipt of this Written Notice
of Intent to Issue Air Permit, whichever occurs
first. Under Section 120.60(3), F.S., however,
any person who asked the Permitting Authority
for notice of agency action may file a petition
within 14 days of receipt of that notice, regard-
less of the date of publication. A petitioner
shall mail a copy of the petition to the appli-
cant at the address indicated above, at the
time of filing. The failure of any person to file a
petition within the-appropriate time period
shall constitute a waiver of that person's right
to request an administrative determination
(hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
F.S., or to intervene in this proceeding and par-
ticipate as a party to it. Any subsequent inter-
vention (in a proceeding initiated by another
party) will be only at the approval of the pre-
siding officer upon the filing of a motion in
compliance with Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C.
A petition that disputes the material facts on
which the Permitting Authority's action is
based must contain the following information.
(a) The name and address of each agency af-
fected and each agency's file or identification
number, if known; (b) The name, address and
telephone number of the petitioner; the name
address and telephone number of the petition-
er's representative, if any, which shall be the
address for service purposes during the course
of the proceeding; and an-explanation of how
the petitioner's substantial rights will be af-
fected by the agency determination; (c) A
statement of when and how the petitioner re-
ceived notice of the agency action or proposed
decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues
of material fact. If there are none, the petition
must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of
the ultimate facts alleged, including the specif-
ic facts the petitioner contends warrant rever-
sal or modification of the agency's proposed
action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or
statutes the petitioner contends require rever-
sal or modification of the agency's proposed
action including an explanation of how the al-
leged facts relate to the specific rules or stat-
utes; and, (g) A statement of the relief sought
by the petitioner, stating precisely the action
the petitioner wishes the agency to take with
respect to the agency's proposed action. A pe-
tition that does not dispute the material facts
upon which the Permitting Authority's action is
based shall state that no such facts are in dis-


F-Tuesday, May 14,2013-5
Tuesday, May 14, 2013- 5) B


pute and otherwise shall contain the same in-
formation as set forth above, as required by
Rule 28-106.301, F.A.C.
Because the administrative hearing process is
designed to formulate final agency action, the
filing of a petition means that the Permitting
Authority's final action may be different from
the position taken by it in this Public Notice of
Intent to Issue Air Permit. Persons whose sub-
stantial interests will be affected by any such
final decision of the Permitting Authority on
the application have the right to petition to be-
come a party to the proceeding, in accordance
with the requirements set forth above.
Mediation: Mediation is not available for this
proceeding.
EPA Review: EPA has agreed to treat the
draft/proposed Title V air operation permit as
a proposed Title V air operation permit and to
perform its 45-day review provided by the law
and regulations concurrently with the public
comment period, provided that the applicant
also transmits an electronic copy of the re-
quired proof of publication directly to EPA at
the following email address: oquendo.ana@ep
amail.epa.gov.. Although EPA's 45-day review
period will be performed concurrently with the
public comment period, the deadline for sub-
mitting a citizen petition to object to the EPA
Administrator will be determined as if EPA's
45-day review period is performed after the
public comment period has ended. The final Ti-
tle V air operation permit will be issued after
the conclusion of the 45-day EPA review period
so long as no adverse comments are received
that result in a different decision or significant
change of terms or conditions. The status re-
garding EPA's 45-day review of this project and
the deadline for submitting a citizen petition
can be found at the following website address:
http://www.epa.gov/region4/air/permits/Flori
da.htm.
Objections: Finally, pursuant to 42 United
States Code (U.S.C.) Section 7661d(b)(2), any
person may petition the Administrator of the
EPA within 60 days of the expiration of the Ad-
ministrator's 45-day review period as estab-
lished at 42 U.S.C. Section 7661d(b)(1), to ob-
ject to the issuance of any Title V air operation
permit. Any petition shall be based only on ob-
jections to the Permit that were raised with
reasonable specificity during the 30-day public
comment period provided in the Public Notice,
unless the petitioner demonstrates to the Ad-
ministrator of the EPA that it was impractica-
ble to raise such objections within the com-
ment period or unless the grounds for such ob-
jection arose after the comment period. Filing
of a petition with the Administrator of the EPA
does not stay the effective date of any permit
properly issued pursuant to the proVisions of
Chapter 62-213, F.A.C. Petitions filed with the
Administrator of EPA must meet the require-
ments of 42 U.S.C. Section 7661d(b)(2) and
must be filed with the Administrator of the EPA
at: U.S. EPA, 401 M Street, S.W., Washington,
D.C. 20460. For more information regarding
EPA review and objections, visit EPA's Region 4
web site at http://www.epa.gov/region4/air/p
ermits/Florida.htm.,


LF160111
REQUEST FOR BID
Notice is hereby given to all interested persons
or firms that the City of Marianna will be ac-
cepting sealed bids for the following:
BID NUMBER: 2013-01
BID NAME: Airport Timber Sale #1
GENERAL INFORMATION: The City of Marianna
is seeking qualified vendors to respond to this
Request for Bid to clear-cut any/all marketable
timber on two specific tracts of land generally
located north of the Marianna Municipal Air-
port. A complete copy of the bid packet may
be acquired at the Office of Public Works, City
of Marianna City Hall, 2898 Green St., Marian-
na, Fla. 32446. Additional information may be
obtained by calling 850.482.2281, during regu-
lar business hours.
BID DEADLINE: Sealed bids will be received at
the City of Marianna City Utilities /Finance Of-
fice, located in City Hall, no later than 2:00p.m.
CST, on May 23,2013.


Call 526-3614 to


^C* S Buter
^OCJ 0,1, Owner/operator
COMMERCIAL 4854 Dogwood Dr.
CLEAN I N G Marianna, FL 32446
Cleaning Is Our Obsession (850) 728-3832
Q ecdcommercialcleaning@yahoo.com rn
U www.ocd-commerclal-cleaning.cm BOrN D &N









CIay' 0Nenl Sa
..na Cienn In. S e/,a



ALTH, FLIl
Hou se.r






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IandcluesaWindwndI C aret




850-762-9402 6-
Cell 850-832-5055 Yi.wsapaECt.
I o I ;!: ;


PTrolling Motor Repair
Affordable Service! Fast Repair!
Most Cases 1 Week Turnaround.
Servicing Minn Kota & Motorguide.
Cell 850-272-5305 5



NEW& USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELOW RETAIL PRICES!

TRIPLE 850.526.1700
-1 Ts Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
AJIJ e2978 Pierce Street
rvi cig (behind Tim's Florist)


I II
s 850,-272-5305 ,'J


Low Overhead=Low Prices
850-263-3813 850-849-1175




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Commercial & Residential l ,
*Spring Clean-up &-,
Monthly Maintenance
Full Lawn Care Service
Free Estimates
Family Owned & Operated
Chad Oliver 850-573-7279 ---










SHAPPY

HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME


Hom REPIR B H M RS !
"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured



Li hthouse Electrical
Unlimited, LLC
S Residential Electrical
H Remodels Service Work
f #ER13014408 Insured
S8 Ricky Mosher
(850)272-2918 Owner


I SERVICS OFERDS


:MARIMNNA CITY
:FARMERS
MARKET


2844 Madison St.

Tues, Thurs, Sat

7am-nroon


. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
You CALL... WE COME To You!
RED'S MOBILE
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE .
850-209-9713 I
EDWARD MAGGI, OWNER




This Month's Specia
10-d6
$239500
~- 35 Years in Business


Wi Mcvi P.'uu B~


BESTWAY
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILyii6 i NNowi FLomJOA
w, itn r. tlaoss s Ia 1 M
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B II=I OSO 850.747.8974
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NFL


Jags" Blackmon blames problems on poor decisions


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
Justin Blackmon pinned
his problems on his
decisions.
Blackmon, suspended
the first four games of the
2013 season for violat-
ing the NFL's substance-
abuse policy, acknowl-
edged Monday that he's at
a crossroads in his career
and his personal life. But
the Jacksonville Jaguars
receiver insisted he doesn't
have an alcohol or sub-
stance-abuse problem.
"Out of this whole thing
one of the main things
I would say that I had a
problem with was just
making a poor decision,
making a 'selfish decision
at that and not thinking
about the long term of it
and just thinking about at
the time," Blackmon said
following the team's first
organized team activity.
"If you want to ask if I have
a problem? I have a prob-
lem with making a poor
decision."
Blackmon has a credibil-
ity problem, too.
SItwasjust 11 months ago
that that Blackmoh apolo-
gized for getting arrested
on a DUI charge in Stillwa-
ter, Okla. tests showed
his blood-alcohol content
to be three times the legal
limit and vowed that
this is "not who I'm going
to be."
Blackmon eventually
pleaded guilty to aggra-
vated DUI, which put him
in the league's substance-


Jacksonville Jaguars wide receiver Justin Blackmon speaks with reporters in Jacksonville, Fla. on Monday.


abuse program. Although
he declined Monday to
reveal what triggered his
suspension, it's likely he
failed a random test.
The former Oklahoma
State star and fifth overall
pick in the 2012.draft also
was arrested on a misde-
meanor DUI charge in
Texas in 2010 after officers
caught him speeding on a
suburban Dallas highway.
The charge was later re-
duced to an underage al-
cohol possession charge.
Although it sure seems
like this is a pattern of be-
havior, Blackmon said he's
"confident" his latest mis-
take will be his last.
"I don't think anybody
wants to be in the position
that I'm in right now, and I


don't think anybody wants
to be in a position that can
be any worse," Blackmon
said. "I'm not going to go
into it and say I want to be
in this position because
that's not. where I want to
be. All I can do is come out
here and work every day
and get better each day.
Coach Gus (Bradley) says
every day, 'Today is the
most important day,' and
that's all I can do is come
out here every day and tiy
to. improve and take care
of everything else as it
comes."
Blackmon declined com-
ment when asked whether
he plans to enroll in a re-
habilitation program.
Blackmon, who caught
64 passes for 865 yards and


five touchdowns as a rook-
ie, will miss games against
Kansas City, Oakland, Se-
attle and Indianapolis to
open the season. He will
be eligible to return to
practice Monday, Sept.
30. He will be allowed to
attend meetings and be
inside the facility during
the suspension, but can't
practice or play.
Blackmon apologized to
teammates shortly after
the suspension .was an-
nounced April 30.
"He came across well,"
veteran center Brad
Meester said. "He just
apologized for what he
did. He knew he was
wrong and said it wouldn't
happen again. WVe all ac-
cepted that. -... We can't


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS


control what people do
what they leave here. We
can't change what hap-
pened in the past. We
have to be there for him
and help him through this
and make sure this doesn't
happen again."
Running Maurice Jones-
Drew, though, said reac-
tion to Blackmon's sus-
,pension has been "out of
control."
"The media just blows it
out of proportion," Jones-
Drew said. "A lot of people
make several, mistakes. If
you're that age and you
have that amount of mon-
ey, how would you act? If
you answer that question
truthfully, you can go from
there."
Plenty- of first-round


draft picks, however, go
their entire careers with-
out landing in the sub-
stance-abuse policy or on
the suspended list.
"You have to do the right
thing no matter where you
are," Meester said. "We're
blessed with this opportu-
nity. You'd hate to lose that
opportunity because of
something dumb you did
outside of here. You don't
want that to be the reason
you can't play this game."
If Blackmon gets anoth-
er suspension while in the
program, it would be for a
full season.
"We're going to see what
kind of character he has,"
Jones-Drew said.
Blackmon's four-game
hiatus will cost him
about$220,000. It. also
triggered language in his
contract that voids fu-
ture guarantees, mean-
ing the Jaguars could cut
him without having to
pay about $10 million that
remains on a -four-year,
$18.5 million contract.
Blackmon made it clear
he wants to move on from
the suspension, but the 23-
Syear-old receiver stopped
short of saying he plans to
change his lifestyle.
"I've just got to make
better-decisions," he said.
"Like I said, my problem
was I made a selfish de-
cision and I apologize for
that. I apologized to my
teammates and I apolo-
gized to my family for it.
That's something that I
did and I take full respon-
sibility for it."


College Football


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo, Southern California head coach Lane Kiffin
looks on as senior quarterback Matt Barkley is introduced to
the crowd during a ceremony for the seniors before an NCAA
college football game against Notre Dame, in Los Angeles.


Kifin and USC strive


for drama-free 2013


The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Lane
Kiffin has an idea.
'He's not serious about it.
Not. really. There is, how-
ever, just a hint in his voice
that suggests he's not to-
tally joking, either.
S"I did think the other day
what it would be like to be
a, high school head coach.
Sor to be at a small school,"
Kiffin said. "I thought
about it the other day.
The first time. I wonder if
there's something to that
peace of mind. Maybe it's
something I can go back
and do when I get older.
I'm going to go coach high
school.
"It's just the game. It's the
game in its realest sense
and it's fun. Working with
the kids and not all this
other stuff. You go back
and have fun."
If Kiffin's Trojans have an-
other season like last year,
he may not have to wait
long to give high school a
try.
Nonetheless, on this day,
with spring practice fading
in the rearview mirror, it'd
be hard to find a guy on
the USC campus in a bet-
ter mood than the Trojans'
football coach.
As he relaxes on the big,
white,, leather sectional
couch in his office, sun-
shine spilling through the
sliding glass doors that lead
out to a small patio, Kiffin
Seems at ease as he consid-


ers the future of a coaching
career spent mostly in the
brightest of spotlights.
NFL head coach at 31.
SEC head coach at 33. Head
coach of USC at 34. When
it comes to acronyms, the
37-year-old Kiffin's resume
has some-of the best in
sports on it.
But it's been a bumpy
ride for the boy wonder,
bouncing from one volatile
situation to another. When
it comes to turmoil, Kiffin
seems to either walk into it
or create it. It's a talent that
has made him maybe the
most vilified man in col-
lege football today.
It's part of what prompts
the inevitable question,
but suggest to Kiffin that
he's coaching for his job
this season and he an-
swers, "I always feel like
that's the case."
Kiffin's boss, USC athletic
director Pat Haden, brush-
es off that idea as well. .
"I'm not going to start
getting into those things,"
he said. "I'm not going
to make any pronounce-
ments. Let's just enjoy the
season."
There's definitely a no-
drama vibe, emanating
from USC these days.
The Trojans are still deal-
ing with NCAA sanctions
handed down in 2010 for
the Reggie Bush scan-
dal, but they will be nei-
ther bowl-banned nor
No. 1 going into the 2013
season.


Cubs, Rizzo agree to $41 million, 7-year deal


The Associated Press'

CHICAGO The Chi-
cago Cubs have' viewed
Anthony Rizzo as a part
of their future since they
acquired him.
Now he's locked in.
The slugging first base--
man and the Cubs agreed
Monday to a $41. mil-
lion, seven-year contract
that could 'be worth up
to $68 million over nine
seasons.
"We believe in Antho-
ny," general manager Jed
Hoyer said. "We think he's
going to be a very big part
of our future here in Chi-
cago, and we're excited to',
get a deal done.
The 23-year-old is hit-.
ting .280 with a .352 on-
base percentage. He also
has nine home runs, and
28 RBIs in his third major
league season.
Rizzo realized that he
was taking "maybe a little
bit of a discount now" but
said "it's security for now
and it's a huge weight off
my shoulder,- my fami-
ly's shoulders,, my kids'
shoulders, my grandkids'
shoulders."
Hoyer said talks for
a new deal began with
about two weeks left in
spring training btit were
halted 'before opening
day. They restarted less
than two weeks ago.
Rizzo gets a $2 million
signing bonus, of which
$250,000 is payable within,
30 days of the contract's


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chicago Cubs' Anthony Rizzo'hits an RBI double off St. Louis Cardinals starting pitcher Jake
Westbrook during the first inning of a game, Wednesday, May 8, in Chicago.


approval by Major League
.Baseball and $1.75 million
is payable next Jan. 15.
He receives a $750,000
salary this year, up from
$498,000 under the
agreement he reached in
March. He then will earn
$1.25 million next year,
$5 million apiece in 2015
and 2016, $7 million each
in 2017 and 2018 and $11
million in 2019.
Chicago has a $14.5
million option for 2020
with a $2 million buyout.
If that is exercised, the
Cubs will have a $14.5
million for 2021 with a $2
million buyout.
"This day has come so
fast," Rizzo said. "Look-
ing back on it, when I was
a young kid dreaming
of this day, it's a surreal
moment."
With chairman Tom


BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
\ PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King.& Big Lots) 526-SPIT


Ricketts and president
of baseball operations
Theo Epstein watching,
-the Cubs announced a
deal that has the high-
est average annual value
($5,857,143) for a posi-
tion player with less than
two years of major league
service. Among pitch-
ers in that service group,
Seattle's Hisashi Iwakuma
($7 million), Toronto's


Ricky Romero ($6.02 mil-
lion) and San Francisco's
Madison Bumgarner
($5,592,667) have higher
averages.
"I think it's a great
matchup for both sides,"
Hoyer said. "It is unusual
that it is early, but I think
our knowledge of Antho-
ny and our belief in him
as a person makes that
possible."


OUIDA MORRIS PAT FURR CLARICE BOYETTE
(850) 209-4705 (850) 209-8071 (850) 573-1572
Broker/Owner Furny19@amshn.com
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