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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01073
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text
tn 2 JobSeq 51 PkgScq 002
********-******ALL FOR ADC 320
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
0 BOX 117007
AINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


Lawmakers
complete work
on Everglades bill

7A
'L S- _. :.I [ 7


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online







FLORIDA


w C' Lady,
.P Pirates

face old foe
Liberty County
in playoffs lB


Vol.90 No.99



One killed, two injured in crash


Staff Report
A Sneads man died and two
other residents of the town were
seriously injured in a Grand
Ridge traffic crash early Thurs-


day morning, according to Flor-
ida Highway Patrol reports.
Driver James Daniels, 72, died
in the crash, FHP reports. His
passenger, 65-year-old Annie
McDowell, was seriously injured.


The other driver, Sandra Baxley,
59, also was seriously injured.
According to the FHP, Baxley
was eastbound on U.S. 90 around
8:30 a.m. and turned into the
path of the westbound Daniels


vehicle as she tried to make a left
turn onto State Road 69. The front
of the Chevrolet sedan she was
driving collided with the Ford
truck being driven by Daniels.
Baxley was taken to Southeast


Alabama Medical Center in Do-
than, and McDowell was taken to
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital.
Daniels was initially transported
to Jackson Hospital, according to
reports.


ANGIE COOK/FLORIDAN
Members of the "Marianna Purple" and "Marianna Gold" academic
quiz teams gather for a post-game photo at Chipola College on
Thursday. Shown, not in order, are (Purple) Blake Benton, Jamie
McCoy and Jacob Leff; and (Gold) Chance Pender, Maddie Craven and
Masha Yaroshenko. The Purple team beat Graceville Orange in the
final round of competition to win top prize at the High School Brain
Bowl tournament, an annual event sponsored by the college.


High school



brains invade



Chipola College


BY ANGIE COOK
acook@jcfloridan.com
Name the highest
commercially
navigable lake in
the world without
consulting the Internet.
What about the 19th century
dramatist who wrote "The
Seagull?" Or the Egyptian god
of embalming
who sports the
head of a jackal?
No? Well, like
many of us,
you would
1 have been
SKelsn rendered silent,
at Thursday's
high school Brain Bowl, an
annual academic quiz tour-
nament hosted by Chipola
College. The invitational.
event brought together some
of the brightest students
from area schools. In addi-
tion to Graceville, Cotton-
dale, Malone and Marianna,
schools from Blountstown,
Chipley and Holmes County
were represented. ,
And we didn't forget: Lake
Titicaca, Anton Chekhov and
Anubis. Now you know.
Students with those answers
and more came to match
wits on the Chipola campus
yesterday, with the public
invited to witness a rapid-fire
championship round that pit-
ted "Marianna Purple" (Blake
Benton, Jacob Leff and Jamie
McCoy) against "Graceville
Orange" (Rebecca Delgado,
David Cluff, Caroline Nichols
and Grace White).
Even with the brainpower of
Delgado highest individual
scorer of the entire tourney
and a member of the Chipola
College team-- on their


TOP 10 INDIVIDUALS
1. Rebecca Delgado,
Graceville Orange
2. Blake Benton, Marianna
Purple
3. Jacob Left, Marianna
Purple
4. Patrick Fortunato,
Cottondale Orange
5. Kole Forehand, Holmes
Blue
6.J.P. Leonard, Blountstown
Black
7. Chance Pender, Marianna
Gold
8. Jamie McCoy, Marianrna
Purple
9. Fletcher Dilmore, Chipley
Gold
10. Cary Laird, Chipley Blue

side, Orange was no match
for Purple, who pulled away
quick, leading 110-35 at the
half, and wrapped the round
with a strong 220-95 victory.
College team honored
Following the high school
tourney, school officials
recognized their own Chipola
College Brain Bowl Team for
its incredible success.
The 2013 team not only
set a state record with sixth
consecutive Florida College
System Activities Association
State Championships, but
its winning score of 915-50
against Valencia was the
largest margin of victory in
state finals history.
In January, they won the
North Florida Sectional,
where three separate Chipola
teams qualified for the
community college national
championship. Paul Kelson,
playing solo as "Chipola
Blue," earned the No. 1 seed
See QUIZ, Page 7A


A CLOSER LOOK AT MHS ART


- .- --...
C'".-


C'.I


ANGIE COOK/FLORIDAN
T his graphite-and-watercolor creation by Marianna High School art
student Tensia Clark is one of hundreds of pieces on display in the school
library, part of the MHS Art Exhibit and Silent Auction. The three-day
event a fundraiser for the-MHS art department ends today.





Residents mark Day of Prayer


Staff Report
. Several local entities held
National Day of Prayer events
Thursday morning, like this
one at the gazebo in Marianna's
Confederate Park.
The Concerned American Pa-
triots of Jackson County hosted
this ceremony, which started
with the Pledge of Allegiance
and concluded with a song,
"God Bless America."
At the interdenominational
event, several area preachers
were invited to say a word of
prayer, and some spoke briefly
to the crowd before beginning
their prayer. Participating min-
isters included L.B. "Cap" Poos-
er, Brandon Griffin, Mark Long,
John Rollyson, Chuck Hughes,
Freddie Roulhac, Roland Rabon,
Elder Clifford, Fred Fitzgerald
and Dick Olson.
At the start of the ceremony,
event emcee Sybil Andreasen
led the crowd in a group prayer.
Its basic themes were echoed by


PHOTOS BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER/FLORIDAN
Many local citizens came out to participate in National Day of Prayer
ceremonies around Jackson County, including these folks in the crowd at
Confederate Park.


several of the ministers. It called
for God's blessings, forgiveness
for failures as a nation and help


.in seeking a spirit of renewal,
healing of the national ills and
spiritual awakening.


ABOVE: Fellow ministers and event emcee Sybil Andreasen
bow their heads as the Rev. L.B. "Cap" Pooser says a prayer at
Thursday's National Day of Prayer ceremony. AT RIGHT: Richard
Harrison, decked out in patriotic attire, reads a group prayer
along with the rest of the crowd assembled in Confederate Park
in Marianna on Thursday.


> CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


) ENTERTAINMENT...4B


) LOCAL...3A


) OBITUARIES...7A


) RELIGION...4-5A


) SPORTS...1B


o WEATHER...2A


This Newspaper o k
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7 6 65161 8005 9


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Nw.JCFloridan.com/C


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Follow us





Facebook Twitter


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P$-







-12A FRIDAY, MAY 3 2013


Weather Outlook


High 730
Low 550

Friday
Possible Showers & Storms.


...-. High 770
< Low 560


Sunday
Partly Cloudy & Mild.


.g High-750
Low 550

Saturday
Breezy & Mild.


.- High 80
j Low 580


Monday
Mostly Sunny & Warm.


WAKE-UP CALL



.- High: 76
Low: '54


'. .~ge : "78
- Low: 53


PRECIPITATION


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.13"
0.14"
0.25"

Low
Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Year to date
Normal YTD
Normal for year


1:32 AM
6:31 PM
1:37 AM
2:48 AM
3:22 AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
46.31 ft.
6.22 ft.
8.47 ft.
7.16 ft.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


/ 1L
-:, High: 76
,Aw Loi : 57 7







High: 75
-#M Low: 58

21 I'
1', 46'
51.2 -o'
59.2o


- 4:19 PM
- 12:28 PM
- 4:52 PM
- 5:25 PM
- 5:58 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 'ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


SIlih: 77






SLow: 62






ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
012 3 4

THE SUN ANdI MOON
Sunrise 5:55 AM
Sunset 7:21 PM
Moonrise 1:53 AM May May May May
Moonset 1:39 PM 10 18 25 31


FLORIDA'S Dr

PANHANDLE wEmyl y

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 1009 M

S N O "TH IR,


Ti Tit =-d
aS (mU-m to 1 0

.uuTjs i Ag M ^S-


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and ,
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12;for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising,
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


TODAY
n Jackson County Chamber of Commerce First
Friday Power Breakfast 7-8:45 a.m. at the
Jackson County Extension Center, 2741 Penn-
sylvania Ave. in Marianna. "The Way to Women's
Wellness" featuring Dr. Ricky Leff and Dr. Teresa
Goodpaster is sponsored by Jackson Hospital. Call
482-8060.
) Marianna High School Annual Art Exhibit &
Silent Auction 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the Mari-
anna High School Library. Proceeds will help'fund
the MHS Art Department.
) Knitters Nook 10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Money Sense Class Noon to 4 p.m. at Good-
will Career Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna.
This is a financial literacy class that helps with
budgeting, saving and other financial topics. Class
is free. Call 526-0139.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Wor-
ship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna.
Adult, teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits
and hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available.
Call 209-7856, 573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, MAY 4
Partners for Pets Yard Sale 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at 4011 Maintenance Drive, Marianna. Variety
of items will be for sale. Donated items can be
dropped off at the Shelter Monday-Friday from 8
a.m. to 3 p.m. Proceeds will n:-,tit thle Partners for
Pets Shelter. Call 482-4570.
)) Self-Defense Class 9 a.m. at Chipola Fitness
Center; 4230 Lafayette St. in Marianna. Lora Fisher,
Self-Defense Awareness & Familiarization Exchange
Instructor will teach this class. Event is hosted by
the Jackson County Sheriff's Office and Chipola
Fitness Center. Women 13 years of age and up are
welcome to attend. Cost is $15 per person. To make
reservations call 482-9664 ext. 116.
) Covenant Hospice Third Annual Junior Flower
Pot Workshops for Children 9 a.m. to noon
and 1-4 p.m. at Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kelson
Ave., Suite E in Marianna. Workshop is free and is
for children ages 5-14. Refreshments, flower pots
and art materials will be provided. Registration is
required by May 1. Call 482-8520.
) Family Preparedness Expo 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints,
3141 College St. in Marianna. There will be displays,
demonstrations, samples and informational


material on over 75 subjects ranging from food
preservation to cooking outside, making soap to
raising rabbits and from first aid kits to sewing on
a button. Refreshments will be available and door
prizes given away. Call 526-4645.
) The Barrentine Family Reunion 11 a.m. CST
at the Jackson County Agriculture Center, 3631
U.S. 90 in Marianna. Call 762-4621 or 639-4117.
) "Safe on the Lake" 2-6 p.m. at Sneads Park
on Lake Seminole. Event is sponsored by the
JacksonCounty Sheriff Department and the town
of Sneads. Learn about safety on the water, browse
vendor booths and enjoy food and activities. Call
593-6636.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SUNDAY, MAY 5
2013 Washington County's Miss Heart of the
USA Pageant 2 p.m. at the Panhandle Shrine
Club, 1425 Brickyard Road, Chipley. Divisions will
include: Baby Miss, Tiny Miss, Little Miss, Petit
Miss, Junior Miss, Teen Miss, Miss and Ms. Pro-
ceeds will benefit the Washington County Council
on Aging.
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351W. Lafayette
St.).Attendance limited to persons with a desire to
stop drinking.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in the
board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, MAY 6
a Chipola College Registration for Summer
I.- 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Call 718-2211 or visit www.
chipola.edu.
) Jackson County School District Preschool/
Early Head Start Registration for the 2013-14
School Year 1-3 p.m. at Early Childhood Center
in Marianna. Preschool is for children 3 or 4 years
old on or before Sept. 1 and Early Head Start is for
'children 2 years old or younger. -Erig rtii, child's
birth certificate, Social Security card, proof of all
family income and completed registration forms.
Registration packets are available at the Early
Childhood Programs Office. Call 482-1266.
) Jackson County School District Preschool/
Early Head Start Registration for the 2013-14
School Year 1-3 p.m. at Graceville Elementary
School. Preschool is for children 3 or 4 years old
on or before Sept. 1 and Early Head Start is for
children 2 years old or younger. Bring the child's


birth certificate, Social Security card, proof of all
family income and completed registration forms.
Registration packets are available at the school
site or the Early Childhood Programs Office. Call
482-1266.
) Jackson County School District Preschool/
Early Head Start Registration for the 2013-14
School Year -1-3 p.m. at Grand Ridge School.
Preschool is for children 3 or 4 years old on or before
Sept. 1 and Early Head Start is for children 2 years
old or younger. Bring the child's birth certificate,
Social Security card, proof of 11i tmiliy income and
completed registration forms. Registration packets
are available at the school site or the Early Child-
hood Programs Office. Call 482-1266.
) Employability Workshop, Common Job Search
Mistakes to Avoid 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna
One Stop Career Center, 4636 U.S. 90, Marianna.
Call 718-0326.
Jackson County Quilter's Guild Meeting
- 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 U.S. 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings
are fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects;
lessons, help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
) City of Jacob Regular Monthly Meeting-6
p.m. at the Jacob City Hall. The public is welcome
to attend.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, MAY 7
Chipola College Late Registration for Summer I
- 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Call 718-2211 or visit www.chipola.edu.
EJCEDC Recognizes May Business of the Month
10 a.m. at Kiddie Campus, 7950 Davis St. in
Sneads. The public is invited to attend.
Optimist Club of Jackson County Meeting
- Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna.
Orientation Noon to 3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
) Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
) Jackson County School District Preschool/Early
Head Start Registration for the 2013-14 School
Year 1-3 p.m. at Cottondale Elementary School.
Preschool is for children 3 or 4 years old on or
before Sept. 1 and Early Head Start is for children 2
years old or younger. Bring the child's birth certifi-
cate, Social Security card, proof of all family income
and completed registration forms. Registration
packets are available at the school site or the Early
Childhood Programs Office. Call 482-1266.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for May 1, the
latest available report: One accident, two
abandoned vehicles, one reckless driver,
one highway obstruction, one physical
disturbance, one verbal disturbance, three
burglar alarms, five traffic stops, one tres-
pass complaint, one follow-up investiga-
tion, one juvenile complaint, one assault,
one assist of a motorist or pedestrian, and
four assists of other agencies.

Jackson County Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following
incidents for May 1, the latest available re-
port: One accident, one stolen vehicle, two
abandoned vehicle reports, one reckless
driver, two suspicious vehicles, two


TEAM RAHAL MILLER
Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-GMC-Nissan
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL

ust (850) 482-30511


suspicious incidents, two suspicious per-
sons, one escort, one highway obstruction,
____ ,. three reports of mental
.... illness, two structure
burglaries, one burglary of
-CR' ME a vehicle, one physical dis-
-E turbance, 12 medical calls,
four burglar alarms, one
panic alarm, 13 traffic stops, two trespass
complaints, two follow-up investigations,
two assaults, two animal complaints, one
report of retail theft, two assists of other
agencies, one public service call, one
criminal registration and two welfare
checks.

Jackson County Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
periods:





'... -,


)) Michael Curry, 39, 2443 Hannah St.,
Marianna, failure to appear two counts.
) Leo Logsdon, 51, 4390 Tupelo Court,
Marianna, battery.
) Dawn Baggett, 30, 3845 Old Cottondale
Road, Marianna, violation of parole.
) Tiffany Newell, 18, 5373 Brown St.,
Graceville, battery (domestic violence).
) Jennifer Porter, 29, 2679 Rowell Road,
Cottondale, violation of state probation.
) Joseph Maloy, 32, 1978 Pete's Way,
Sneads, possession of marijuana- less
than 20 grams.
) Brittney Gardner, 22, 5115 East 14th St.,
Panama City, driving while license
suspended or revoked.

Jail Population: 180
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


. iii


7-7. r ,sF yg n '.






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Chipola recognizes outstanding students


Special to the Floridan
Chipola College officials
recognized the accom-
plishments of three of the
college's most outstanding
students at a press confer-
ence Thursday, April 25.
Chipola sophomore Kay-
lee Toole was recently fea-
tured in USA Today for her
nomination to the 2013
All-USA Community Col-
lege Academic ,,Team. John
Whittington was Aamed to
the All-Florida Academic
team. Chipola graduate
Jessica O'Keefe received
the Hites Scholarship from
Phi Theta Kappa Honor So-
ciety. Portraits of Toole and
O'Keefe were unveiled at
the press conference and
will be added to Chipola's
Academic Wall of Honor.
Chipola president Dr.
Gene Prough, says, "These
three young people are not
only some of Chipola's best
students, but they are three
of the best in the coun-
try. They have excellent
academic records and out-
standing records of serving
others."
Kaylee Toole was named
First Team All-USA Aca-


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Pictured (from left) are Jessica O'Keefe, Chipola Senior Vice
President of Instruction Dr. Sarah Clemmons, John Whitting-
ton, PTK Sponsor Alicia Hatcher and Kaylee Toole.


demic Team in USA Today.
The team consists of 20
members nationwide from
1,800 applicants from 800
community colleges.
Toole began dual-enroll-
ment classes at Chipola
the summer before her ju-
nior year at Marianna High
School. She graduated from
Marianna in 2011 as an
honor graduate and top 10
in her class. At Chipola, she
has been active in Phi The-
ta Kappa, Honors Program,
Pre-Med Society, Show
Choir and Science Club.
During her time at Chipola
she has been a part of two


mission trips to Nicaragua
to help improve medical
care and assist in build-
ing homes. On her first
trip, she noticed that most
of the people she met did
not have shoes. When she
returned to the U.S., she
collected 300 pairs of shoes
which were delivered to Ni-
caragua last summer. She
has since collected more
shoes which she will take
to Nicaragua on her third
trip this summer. She also
has served as a counselor
at Joni and Friends Fam-
ily Retreat, watching over


a special needs cnild. 10


SUBMITTED PI
Troop-3 Boy Scouts and leaders pose in front of the fire truck at the Marianna Fire Departm
following a tour given by Captain Brice Phillips and other emergency personnel. Pictured (fr
left) are firefighter/EMT Steve Hall, EMT Joshua Yates, Capt. Brice Phillips, Omar Smith, N(
McArthur, Keary Nichols, Skylar Suggs, Gavin Tharpe, Mathew Pelham, Chad Case, Came
Powell, Troop 3 leader Ken Melvin, Everett Johnson, Scoutmaster Bill Kleinhans, Troop 3 lea
David McArthur, Engineer Jamie Shiver and Troop 3 leader/treasurer Andy Campbell.


Scouts show appreciation, learn

emergency response procedure


will graduate from Chipola
this semester with an As-
sociate in Arts degree in
pre-pharmacy. "I decided I
wanted to pursue a degree
in pharmacy after I fell in
love with my job at Kelson
Drugs, where I have been
employed for two years,"
Toole said. She plans to
continue her studies at Lake
Erie College of Osteopathic
Medicine's School of Phar-
macy. Toole also serves as
a tutor in the Chipola ACE
Lab. She is the daughter of
Steve and Melody Toole of
Marianna.
Jessica O'Keefe, a 2012
graduate of Chipola Col-
lege, is the recipient of the
Hites Scholarship awarded
by Phi Theta Kappa Honor
Society. The scholarship in-
cludes a $7,500 monetary
award. In her PTK service
project, she helped raised
funds, prepare and serve
meals to 250 people at the
Panama City Rescue Mis-
sion. O'Keefe graduated
from Chipley High in 2010.
She is the daughter of Con-
nie Odom and the late Ron
O'Keefe. She is currently
enrolled at the University of


cal Engineering.
JohnWhittington is a 2011
graduate of Sneads High
School where he gradu-
ated with honors. While at
Chipola, he has been a two-
time nominee to Who's Who
Among Students in Ameri-
can Junior Colleges. He re-
cently was awarded a trans-
fer scholarship to Florida
State University in Panama
City. Whittington also was
involved in the Chipola Sci-
ence Club, Mu Alpha Theta,
Honors Club and Phi Theta
Kappa. Through PTK Whit-
tington led a service proj-
ect to renovate the historic
Hard Labor Creek Church
in Washington County.
Through a fund drive and
golf tournament, he raised
$12,000 for the project. He
also convinced area con-
tractors to donate time and
labor for the renovation. To


ole Florida majoring m nChemi- y


Masonic


burial

notice

Special to the Floridan
The officers and mem-
bers of St. Joseph Lodge (
#99, F&AM, PHA of Mari-
anna also sojourning Ma-
HOTO sons and the members of
ent neighboring Lodges are Hi!
rom hereby notified that the Hi
oah Masonic interment of t
ron Brother Rufus C. Neal will
der take place on Saturday,
May 4, at noon.
The funeral will be at
S Hoskie MissionaryBaptist
S Church at 4252 Allen St.
in Greenwood. All Master
S Masons in good standing
S are cordially invited. 4432 Lafay,


date, a new metal roof has
been installed and win-
dows and doors have been
repaired. New pews and a
new podium were also in,
stalled. The exterior of the
church, has been painted
and new landscaping
planted. A wheelchair ramp
also has been installed. A
historical sign describing
the history of the church is
also in place. A dedication
ceremony was held last
year at which donors cele-
brated the restoration. This
project helped him achieve
the recognition of Second
Team All Florida for the Nu
Chi chapter of PTK. Whit-
tington is the son of Steve
Whittington and Stephanie
Gleason. After graduating
from Chipola, he plans to
continue his goal of be-
coming a civil engineer at
FSU/PC.


GAS WATCH
Gas prices are going up. Here are
the least expensive places to buy
gas in Jackson County, as of
Thursday afternoon.
1. $3.32, Pilot, 2209 Hwy 71,
Marianna ..
2. $3.35, BP-Steel City, 2184
Hwy 231 S, Alford
3. $3.35, LOVES Travel Center,
2510 Hwy 231, Cottondale
4. $3.35, McCoy's Food Mart,
2823 Jefferson St. Marianna
5. $3.37, Chipola Mart, 4195
Lafayette St., Marianna
6. $3.37, Tom Thumb, 3008 A
Jefferson, Marianna
7. $3.39, Dixie Food & Gas, 1757
Hwy 231 S, Alford
8. $3.39, Greens BP, 2846 Hwy
71, Marianna
If you see a lower price,
contact the Floridan newsroom
at editonal@cfloridan.com.


Troop. 3 Boy Scouts were
treated to a special visit
from Jackson County Flori-
dan staff writers Angie
Cook and Nola Register
during their weekly meet-
ing on April 22 at the Wynn
Street Park Scout Hut.
Scouts and leaders ex-
pressed sincere apprecia-
tion to these newspaper
friends, as well as the en-
tire Jackson County Flori-
dan staff for the regular
support, encouragement
and coverage the Floridan
provides for them and the
Scouting program. Troop
3 Scouts have benefited
immensely, this past year
by the recognition given
to them through articles
about their community
service projects, activities
and camping experiences
that have been featured.
Scoutmaster Bill Klein-
hans presented Cook and
Register with trophies of
appreciation and a celebra-
tory cake was cut to com-
memorate the occasion.
Following the presenta-
tion, Troop 3 Scouts and
leaders walked to the fire
station on Clinton Street
in Marianna to take a tour
of the facility and learn the
response procedures for
local emergencies.
Capt. Brice Phillips gave
an informative presenta-
tion regarding the daily op-
erations of the Marianna
Fire Station. He explained
that all of their firefighters
are EMT certified and per-
form necessary emergency
procedures to get a patient
ready for the ambulance.
Scouts learned about
the vital pieces of equip-
ment and tools on the
truck for fighting fire and
required medical equip-
ment, including the AED,
or automatic external de-
fibrillator. A tour of the
firehouse revealed the
kitchen, sleeping quarters
and activity center for the
firefighters who are avail-
able 24 hours a day, seven
days a week.
Other staff helping with
the tour included Engineer


Jamie Shiver, firefighter/
EMT Steve Hall and EMT
Joshua Yates.
The Marianna Optimist
Club is the chartering or-


ganization for Troop 3 Boy
Scouts. For more infor-
mation about Boy Scouts,
call Scout Master Bill
Kleinhans at 526-2897.


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FRIDAY, MAY 3, 2013 3AF


LOCAL.







l4A FRIDAY, MAY 3, 2013


RELIGION


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Excited BCF December graduates.


BCF announces Senior Honors


Day and Spring Graduation


Special to the Floridan

The Baptist College of
Florida in Graceville will
hold commencement
exercises on Friday,
May 17 at 10 a.m. for 56
seniors who have com-
pleted all of the require-
ments to earn their
degree. For graduating
seniors, the commence-
ment ceremony held in
the BCF Wellness Center
will mark the culmination


of hard work, sacrifice,
determination and long
hours of study.
In addition to the sig-
nificant number of seniors'
graduating, the recogni-
tion ceremony will include
students Chris Wegmann,
who is the sonofBCF
Professor Susan Wegmann
and Joanna Watkins, the
daughter of DougWat-
kins, Team Strategist and
Theological Education
Ministries for the Florida


Baptist Convention. ,
Spring graduates will be
honored on Wednesday,
May 8 at 10 a.m. dur-
ing Senior Honors Day,
which will be held in the
R. G. Lee Chapel. There
will be a special worship
service and seniors will be
recognized for their GPA
accomplishments.
For more detailed infor-
mation on the graduation
events, please call 263-
3261 ext. 454.


BIRMINGHAM Epis-
copal, Roman Catholic
and United Methodist
bishops who filed a federal
lawsuit two years ago try-
ing to stop enforcement
of Alabama's immigra-
tion law say they feel
vindicated.
"Our concern was
primarily the infringe-
ment on the obligation
of the church to take care
of people regardless of
their status," said retired
Episcopal Bishop Henry
N. Parsley, who still lives


in Birmingham. "I feel
like our concerns have
been upheld by the court
process."
On Monday, the U.S.
Supreme Court declined
to hear Alabama's appeal
of a ruling by the 11th U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals,
which had blocked key
sections of the law that
the bishops had opposed.
The bishops opposed a
section of the law that
outlawed "transporting
unlawfully present aliens"
or "harboring" them,


along with a section
that outlawed having
a contract with illegal
immigrants.
The bishops said that
ministries to immigrants
would be harmed by those
provisions and that church
employees and volunteers
could have been subjected
to prosecution.
The lawsuit by the
coalition of bishops was
dismissed by U.S. Judge
Sharon Blackburn.

From wire reports


Zombies are us


It seems to happen
whenever Steve Beard
hangs out with friends
- especially folks who
don't go to church talk-
ing about movies, televi-
sion and whatever else is
on their minds.
"It may take five min-
utes or it may take as
long as 10,,but sooner or
later you're going to run
into some kind of zombie
comment," said Beard,
editor of Good News,
a magazine for United
Methodist evangelicals.
He is also known for
writing aboutffaith and
popular culture. "Some-
one will say something
like, 'When the zombie
apocalypse occurs, we
need to make sure we're
all at so-and-so's house
so we can stick together.'
It's all a wink-and-a-nod
kind of deal, but the point
is that this whole zombie
thing has become a part
of the language of our
time."
Tales of the living dead,
began in Western Africa
and Haiti, and these mov-
ies have been around as
long as Hollywood has
been making B-grade
flicks. However, the mod-
err zombie era began
with filmmaker George A.
Romero's classic "Night of
the Living Dead" in 1968,
which led to his "Dawn
of the Dead" and "Day of
the Dead." Other directors
followed suit, with hits
such as "28 Days Later,"
"Zombieland," "The Evil
Dead" and "Shaun of the
Dead." Next up, Brad Pitt
in the epic "World War Z,"
due June 21, which could
turn into a multimovie
franchise.
In bookstores, clas-
sic-literature lovers will
encounter a series of
postmodern volumes
clustered under the
title "Pride and Preju-
dice and Zombies." Also,
video-game fans have
purchased more than


50 million copies of the
"Resident Evil" series,
and these
games.
have
S inspired
countless
others. But
Terry anyone
Mattingly who is in-
terested in
the world-
view if not the theology
- of zombie life must
come to grips with the
cable-television parables
offered in the AMC series
"The Walking Dead."
This phenomenon,
said Beard, has become
so influential that it
cannot be ignored by
clergy, especially those
interested in the kinds of
spiritual questions that
haunt people who avoid
church pews. Truth is,
"The Walking Dead" is'
not "about zombies. It's a
show about people who
are trying to figure out the
difference between mere
survival and truly living,"
he stressed in a telephone
interview. "How do you
decide what is right and
what is wrong? How do
you stay sane, in a world
that has gone crazy?...
Where is God in all of
this? That's the unspoken
question."
In his classic book
"Gospel of the Living
Dead," religious-studies
scholar Kim Paffenroth of
lona College argued that
Romero's zombie mov-
ies borrowed from one of
the key insights found in
Dante's "Inferno" that
hell's worst torments are
those humanity creates
on its own, such as bore-
dom, loneliness, mate-
rialism and, ultimately,
separation from God.
As a final touch of pri-
mal spirituality, Romero
-who was raised Catho-
lic added cannibal-
ism to the zombie myth.
"Zombies partially eat the
living. But they actually


only eat a small amount,
thereby leaving the rest
of the person intact to
become a zombie, get up,
and attack and kill more
people, who then likewise
become zombies," argues
Paffenroth. Thus, the
"whole theme of canni-
balism seems added for
its symbolism, showing
what humans would
degenerate into in their
more primitive, zombie
state."
The point, he added, is
that "we, humans, not just
zombies, prey on each
other, depend on each
other for our pathetic and
parasitic existence, and
thrive on each (other's)
misery."
This is why, said Beard,
far too many women and
men seem to be stagger-
ing through life today like
listless shoppers wander-
ing in shopping malls,
their eyes locked on their
smartphones instead of
the faces of loved ones.
Far too often their lives
are packed with stuff, but
empty of meaning.
Romero and his artistic
disciples keep asking a
brutal question: This is
living? "One of the big
questions in zombie sto-
ries is the whole 'Do zom-
bies have souls?' thing,"
said Beard'. "But that kind
of question only leads to
more and more questions,
which is what we keep
seeing in 'The Walking
Dead' and other zombie
stories.... "If zombies no
longer have souls, what
does it mean for a human
being to be soulless? If
you have a soul, how do
you hang onto it?
Why does it seem that
so many people today
seem to have lost their
souls?"

Terry Mattingly directs the
Washington Journalism Center
at the Council for Christian Col-
leges and Universities. Contact
him at tmattingly@cccu.org
or www.tmatt.net.


HisDIRECTORY ISMADEPOSSIBUINSWOsI P


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Yo

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Alford First Assembly of God
1782 Tennessee St P.O. Box 228
Alford, FL 32420
Bascom Assembly of God
5516 Hummingbird Rd
Bascom, FL 32423 272-7775
Shugroad@embargmail.com
Cypress Grove Assembly of God
3250 Cypress Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4451
cppressgrovechurch.org
Cords Of Love Assembly Of God
2060 Bethelehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 272-0254
Eastside Assembly of God Church
4723 Hatton St Marianna, FL
lop4664@yahoo.com 526-2422
El Bethel Assembly of God
2503 El Bethel Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 593-6044
First Assembly of God
5565 Brown St
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3351
First Assembly of God Church
4186 Lafayette St
Marianna FL 32446
482-2800 www.mariannafirst.org
First Assembly of God Church
of Cottondale
2636 Milton St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4626
Faith Haven Assembly of God
7135 Hwy 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-8205
Pilgrim Rest Assembly of God
3347 Pilgrim Rest Church Road
Marianna, FL 32448 579-2300
Welcome Assembly of God
6784 Messer Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5077
Welcomehometom@yahoo.com
BAPTIST
Alford Baptist Church
1764 Carolina St P.O. Box 6
Alford, FL 32420 579-2192
Bethel Missionary Baptist Church
2137 McLeod St
Cypress, FL 592-4108
Bethel Star Missionary Baptist Church
4134 Lincoln Ave
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4866
Bethlehem Baptist Church
2300 Bethlehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-9940
Circle Hill Baptist Church
7170 Circle Hill Rd
Sneads. FL 32460 592-2327


ur Guide To Local Houses Of Worship
Collins Chapel Baptist Church Friendship Baptist Church of Malone New Galilee Missionary Baptist Church Trinity Baptist Church
5005 3rd Ave (5499 Collins Chapel Rd) 5507 Friendship Church Rd 2155 Highway 73 South P.O. Box 234 3023 Penn. Ave
Malone, FL 32445 569-5644 Malone, FL 32445 569-2379 Marianna, FL 32447 482-5499 Marianna, FL 482-3705
N.... ... .A.r.1 ih www.TrinityMarianna.com


Crossroads Baptist Church
Southern Baptist
3276 Main St P.O. Box 386
Cottondale Fl. 32431 352-2636
Damacus Freewill Baptist
3700 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5878
Dellwood Baptist Church
5512 Blue Springs Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-6954
Eastside Baptist Church
4785 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 526-2004
www.eastsidebaptistchurch.com
Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church
3360 Gardenview Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4223
Everiena Missionary Baptist
5309 Ellaville Rd
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3900
First Baptist Church
3172 Main St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4586
First Baptist Church
5366 Ninth St PO. Box 98
Malone, FL 32445 569-2426
Faith Baptist Church
2494 Hwy 71 South,
Marianna, FL 482-2869
First Baptist Church
8010 Pope St P.O. Box 246
Sneads, FL 32460
First Baptist Church of Bascom
4951 BasswoOd Rd P.O. Box 97
Bascom, FL 32423 569-2699
First Baptist Church of Campbellton
2405 Hwy 2
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3183
First Baptist Church Southern Baptist
987 8th Ave P.O. Box 565
Graceville FL 32440 263-3323
fbcgraceville @ bellsouth.net
www.fbcgraceville.org
First Baptist Marianna
2897 Green St Marianna, FL 32446
526-4200 www.fbcmarianna.org
First Freewill Baptist Church of Malone
5440 10th Street (Hwy 71 'N.)
P.O. Box 385
Malone FL 32445 850-569-2786
First Freewill Baptist Church
7970 Davis St
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5400


Grand Ridge Baptist Church
2093 Porter Ave P.O. Box 380
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4846
grandridgebc@embarqmail.com
Greater Buckhorn Missionary
Baptist Church
4691 Hwy 162
Marianna, FL 32446 594-5761
Greenwood Baptist Church
4156 Bryan St P.O. Box 249
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3883
Hasty Pond Baptist Church
4895 Hasty Pond Rd, Marianna, FL
Heaven's Way Biker Church
A Ministry of Alford Baptist Church
3924 Woodrest Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 334-806-4258
Holly Grove Free Will Baptist Church
2699 Highway 73S
Marianna, FL 32448 482-3489
Inwood Baptist Church
2012 Inwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 593-5328
Liberty Hill Missionary Baptist Church
5239 Liberty Hill Road
Bascom, FL 32426 569-5949
Little Zion Missionary Baptist Church
3181 Little Zion Rd P.O. Box 190
Sneads, FL 32460 592-1614
Lovedale Baptist Church
6595 Lovedale Rd Bascom, FL 32423
592-5415 or 592-2134
Marvin Chapel Free Will Baptist Church
2041 Hope School Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5375
www.marvinchapelfwb.com
Midway Freewill Baptist Church ,
1600 Church St
6158 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 592-8999
Mount Olive Baptist
6045 Hwy 2
Bascom FL 32423 569-5080
Mt. Tabor Missionary Baptist Church
3695 Popular Springs Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 594-4161
Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church
5382 Old US Road
Malone, FL 32445 569-2049
New Easter Missionary Baptist Church
977 Hope Ave
Graceville, FL 32440 658-8344


iNew HoskiUtle Baptist hurcin
4252 Allen St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-7243
New Hope Freewill Baptist
Sweet Pond Rd
Dellwood, FL 592-1234
New Hope Missionary Baptist
3996 Wintergreen Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-8802
New Mount Olive Missionary Baptist
2870 Barnes St P.O. Box 312
Marianna, FL 32447 482-7595
New Salem Baptist Church
3478 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 579-4343
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
6687 Brushy Pond Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5696
Pine Ridge Baptist Church
3064 Pine Ridge Church Rd
Alford, FL 32420
Piney Grove Baptist Church
2136 Piney Grove Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3800
Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church
5481 Pleasant Ridge Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 263-8007
Poplar Springs Missionary Baptist Church
2662 Poplar Springs Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-3176
Providence Baptist Church
6940 Providence Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5481
pbch@embarqmail.com
Rocky Creek Baptist Church
5458 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-7508
Salem Free Will Baptist
2555 Kynesville Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4194
www.salemfreewillbaptist.com
Shady Grove Baptist Church
7304 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge FL 32442 592-6952
St. Luke Missionary Baptist Church
2871 Orange Street
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2591
St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church
1935 Jacob Road
Cottondale, FL 32431 263-4097
St. Peter Missionary Baptist
7889 McKeown Mill Rd
P.O. Box 326 593-3363


Union Hill
3115 Union Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-5711
Victory Baptist Church
2271 River Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6699
www.victorybaptistfl.com
White Pond Baptist Church
P.O. Box 458 Mill Pond Rd
Alford, FL 32420 352-4715

CATHOLIC
St. Anne Catholic Church
3009 5th St P.O. Box 1547
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3734
www.stanne@stannemar.ptdiocese.org
www.stannemarianna.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Caverns Rd. Church of Christ
4448 River Rd
Marianna, FL 482-2605

CHURCH OF GOD
Grand Ridge Church of God
2232 Porter Ave Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5301 or 592-2814
Marianna Church of God
(All services interpreted for the
hearing impaired.)
2791 Jefferson St, Marianna, FL 32446
482-6264 manannacog.com

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST
Glorious Gospel
Church of God in Christ
4255 Clay St Marianna, FL 32448
594-1096 or 557-4019
Miracle Restoration Center
2997 Hall Street
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2335
Refuge Tabernacle
Church of God in Christ
2820 Chipola Street
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2607
The New Zion Temple
Church of God In Christ
1022 Washington Ave
Graceville, FL 32440
Victory Tabernacle
Church of God In Christ
6752 Highway 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 209-7711


Religion Brief

Bishops who filed lawsuit against Alabama
immigration law feel vindicated


I


i







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


RELIGION


FRIDAY, MAY3,2013 5AF


Benedict XVI returns to Vatican for first time


The Associated Press

VATICAN CITY Emeri-
tus Pope Benedict XVI
came home to the Vatican
on Thursday for the first
time since he resigned
Feb. 28, beginning an
unprecedented era for the
Catholic Church of having
a retired pontiff living
alongside a reigning one.
Pope Francis welcomed
Benedict outside his new
retirement home a
converted monastery on
the edge of the Vatican
gardens and the two
immediately went into the
adjoining chapel to pray
together, the Vatican said.
The Vatican said Bene-
dict, 86, was pleased to be
back and that he would
as he himself has said
"dedicate himself to
the service of the church
above all with prayer."
Francis, the statement
said, welcomed him with
"brotherly cordiality."
A photo released by the


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS'
In this photo provided by the Vatican newspaper L'Osservatore
Romano, Pope emeritus Benedict XVI, (left) is welcomed by
Pope Francis as he returns to the Vatican from the pontifical
summer residence of Castel Gandolfo on Thursday.


Vatican showed the two
men, arms clasped and
both smiling, standing
inside the doorway of
Benedict's new home as
Benedict's secretary looks
on.
Unlike the live, door-
to-door Vatican-provided
television coverage that
accompanied Benedict's
emotional farewell in
February, the Vatican


provided no television
images of his return
Thursday.
The low-key approach
followed the remarkable
yet somewhat alarming
images transmitted on
March 23 when Francis
went to visit Benedict at
the papal retreat in Castel
Gandolfo, south of Rome,
where Benedict was living.
In that footage, Benedict


appeared visibly more frail
and thinner only three
weeks after resigning.
Some Vatican officials
questioned whether
those images should have
been released, given how
frail Benedict appeared.
Thursday's photo showed
no obvious signs of further
decline.
The Vatican spokesman,
the Rev. Federico Lom-
bardi, has acknowledged
Benedict's post-retirement
decline but has insisted
the 86-year-old German
isn't suffering from any
specific ailment and is just
old.
"He is a man who is not
young: He is old and his
strength is slowly ebbing,"
Lombardi said this week.
"However, there is no
special illness. He is an old
man who is healthy."
Benedict chose to leave
the Vatican immediately
after his resignation to
physically remove himself
from the process of


electing his successor and
from Pope Francis' first
weeks as pontiff.
His absence also gave
workers time to finish up
renovations on the mon-
astery tucked behind St.
Peter's Basilica that until
last year housed groups of
cloistered nuns who were
invited for a few years at
a time to live inside the
Vatican to pray.
In the compact, four-
story building, Benedict
will live with his personal
secretary, Monsignor
Georg Gaenswein, and the
four consecrated women
who look after him,
preparing his meals and
tending to the household.
The building also has a
small library, a study and
a guest room for when his
brother, Monsignor Georg
Ratzinger, comes to visit.
"It is certainly small but
well-equipped," Lombardi
said.
When Benedict an-
nounced his intention to


.resign the first pontiff
to do so in 600 years
- questions immediately
swirled about the implica-
tions of having two popes
living alongside one an-
other inside the Vatican.
Benedict fueled those
concerns when he chose
to be called "emeritus
pope" and "Your Holiness"
rather than "emeritus
bishop of Rome." He also
raised eyebrows when he
chose to continue wearing
the white cassock of the
papacy.
But Benedict made clear
on his final day as pope
that he was renouncing
the job and pledged his
"unconditional reverence
and obedience" to his
then-unknown successor.
Now that they're
neighbors, they might
bump into one another
on walks in the Vatican
gardens or at the shrine
to the Madonna, which is
just a stone's throw from
Benedict's new home.


FRIDAY, MAY 3
Youth Activity Night~- 6
p.m. at Marianna Church of
God. Ages: 12-19. Call 482-
6264.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome
hurts, habits and hang-ups in
a safe environment," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center with
praise and live worship music,
testimonies and fellowship. Din-
ner: 6 p.m. Child care available.
Call 209-7856, 573-1131.
n Pulse 7-10 p.m. at Cypress
Grove Assembly of God Church
in Grand Ridge. Youth outreach
program open to all teens in
grades 6-12; shoot pool, play
Xbox and other games, listen to
music, more. Activities are free;
low-cpst snacks for sale. Trans-
portation available (limited
area); call 381-2549.

SATURDAY, MAY 4
a Women's Conference
- 8:50 a.m.-2 p.m. at East-
side Baptist Church. Keynote
speaker will be Rhonda Kelley,


New Orleans Baptist Theologi-
cal Seminary president's wife.
Neysa Wilkins, anchor at WJHG
TV in Panama City will be the
Praise and Worship Leader.
Tickets are $10 per person
which includes coffee and
muffins for breakfast. Lunch is
also included. All women are
welcome to attend. Deadline
to purchase tickets is Sunday,
April 28. Call 526-2004.
) Free clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.
) Second Annual Mother-
Daughter Banquet 10 a.m.
at New Beginning Outreach
Ministries, Inc. Everyone is wel-
come to attend. Call 352-4733.
) 1st Anniversary Celebra-
tion for Sister Leslie Clayton,
Brother Titus Clayton and
Brother Leamon Sims- 5
p.m. at Pleasant Hill M.B.C.
located at 6704 Reddoch Road,
Grand Ridge. Everyone is invited
to attend..
) Annually Hearts of Love
Tea-5 p.m. at Piney Grove


Religion
Baptist Church. The theme is
"Make a Joyful Noise unto the
Lord." Everyone is invited to at-
tend and enjoy entertainment,
food, fun, fellowship and gifts.
Tickets are $10 and may
be purchased by calling
547-2415.
)) Annual Church Anniversary
6:30 p.m. at the Sneads
Community Church. Guest
churches and pastors will be:
United Pentecostal Deliverance,
Bishop Ernest Freeman; United
New Jerusalem, Bishop Willis
L. Raines, Sr. and Deliverance
Temple, Elder Jesse Matthews.
Call 593-6245.

SUNDAY, MAY 5
Homecoming 10 a.m. at
Circle Hill Baptist Church. The
Gospel Tones will provide the
music and Bill Taylor will deliver
the message. A covered dish
lunch will follow the service.
Everyone is invited to attend.
Call 592-4779.
) Homecoming at Cords
of Love Assembly of God
Church. Following the 10 a.m.


Calendar
Sunday School there will be
singing at 11 a.m. featuring the
Sheila Smith Trio. Dinner on
the ground and more singing
will follow the 11 a.m. service.
Everyone is welcome to attend.
Call 272-0254 or 272-0283.
) Homecoming -10:45 a.m. at
Alford Assembly of God. Heaven
Bound, southern gospel singers
from Navarre will provide spe-
cial music. Everyone is welcome
to attend. Call 579-4804.
n Annual Church Anniversary
-11 a.m. at the Sneads Com-
munity Church. Guest speaker
will be Elder Daryl Howard.
Everyone is invited to attend.
Call 593-6245.

TUESDAY, MAY 7
Dare to Live Healed Heal-
ing School Class 7 p.m. in
the Bascom Town Hall at 4969
Basswood Road. Free classes
taught by Jacquelyn McGriff.
Call 276-6024.

THURSDAY, MAY 9
n Free clothing giveaway -


9 a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.

FRIDAY, MAY 10

Youth Activity Night 6
p.m. at Marianna Church of
God. Ages: 12-19. Call 482-
6264.
) Celebrate Recovery -.
Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits
and hang-ups in a safe environ-
ment," 7 p.m. at Evangel Wor-
ship Center with praise and live
worship music, testimonies and
fellowship. Dinner: 6 p.m. Child
care available. Call 209-7856,
573-1131.
n Pulse 7-10 p.m. at
Cypress Grove Assembly of
God Church in Grand Ridge.
Youth outreach program open
to all teens in grades 6-12;
shoot pool, play Xbox and other
games, listen to music, more.
Activities are free; low-cost
snacks for sale. Transportation
available (limited area); call
381-2549.


SATURDAY, MAY 11
Free clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.

SUNDAY, MAY 12
n Mother's Day Service
-9:30 a.m. Sunday School
followed by worship service at
11 a.m. at Poplar Springs M.B.C.
located at 2662 Poplar Springs
Road, Marianna. Everyone is
welcome to attend. Call 526-
3176. ,

TUESDAY, MAY 14
a Dare to Live Healed Heal-
ing School Class 7 p.m. in
the Bascom Town Hall at 4969
Basswood Road. Free classes
taught by Jacquelyn McGriff.
Call 276-6024.
Special event announcements
for Jackson County churches are
published, free of charge, each
Friday in the Floridan's "Religion
Calendar." Submission deadline:
Noon, Tuesday. Email items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com, subject
line: Religion Calendar.


TIs DRCRISADE T WU AG L F ToATTENDWORSI PSERVICES


Trop Headu Linda Porte Insurance Agency Inc S a"
-,STiler e FARM 2919 PennAvenue
0 MAUn"dwroEzthAZM Suite 8 food stores
,ll8.767-4275 tfr Ci n mVS .. sMarianna,tFL 32448-2716
482-3420 INSURANCE 850-482-3425 (850) 526-4700
2163 Post Oak Ln Mafianna "rpT.& B Sr l Oak Station Shopping Center
www.tropictrailer.com linda'.porte.bxrs@statefarm.com Open Daily from 8am 8pm


Vann Funeral Home
4265 Saint Andrews Street
Marianna, FL 32446
Phone: (850) 482-3300
Fax: (850) 482-5363
Concern for the living,
reverence for the dead.


YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Marianna Church of the Nazarene
2987 N Madison St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-5787

EPISCOPAL
St. Luke's Episcopal Church
4362 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 482-2431
parishoffice@stlukesmarianna.org
www.stlukesmarianna.org

FULL GOSPEL
Christian Center Church
4791 Sheffield Dr P.O. Box 450
Marianna, FL 32447
526-4476 or 526-4475
jack@cccmarianna.org
Country Gospel Community Church
Compass Lake in the Hills
650 Apalachicola Ave
Alford, FL 32420 (850) 579-4172
Resurrection Life Christian
Fellowship International
2933 Madison Street
Marianna, FL 526-2617
New Beginnings Worship Center
1165 Highway 69
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5791 www.nbworship.com
New Beginning Outreach Ministries, Inc.
2254 Magnolia Dr.
Cottondale, FL 32431 (850) 352-4733
Evangel Worship Center
2645 Pebble Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2232
New Life Family Church
4208 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2132
The Bridge Church
2515 Commercial Park Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 209-2733

HOLINESS
Emmanuel Holiness Church
2505 Sandridge Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5167
Hickory Level Community Church
1221 Dipper Rd
Marianna, FL 32448
482-4696 or 482-2885
Oak Ridge Freewill Holiness Church
2958 Milton Ave
Marianna, FL 573-7684
Sneads Community Church
1948 Desoto Ave P.O. Box 1349
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5650

LATTER-DAY SAINTS
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints
3141 College St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-8159


LUTHERAN
Ascension Lutheran Church
3975 W. Hwy 90
Marianna, FL 482-4691

METHODIST
Bascom United Methodist Church
4942 Basswood Rd RO. Box 67
Bascom, FL 32423 594-5755
Cypress United Methodist Church
6267 Cemetery Ave
Cypress, FL 32432 263-4220
First United Methodist Church
1111 8" Ave
Graceville, FL 263-3342
First United Methodist Church
2901 Caledonia St
Marianna, FL 482-4502
Grace United Methodist
4203 W. Kelson Ave
Marianna, FL 482-4753
Grand Ridge United Methodist Church
6911 Iowa Street
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
Greenwood Chapel AME
5426 Fort Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-1112
Greenwood United Methodist
4220 Bryan St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-5755
Henshaw Chapel AME Church
2370 Glastel St, P.O. Box 535
Cottondale, FL 32431 875-2610
Jerusalem AME Church
2055 Hwy 73
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5085
Kynesville United Methodist
2875 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4672
McChapel AME Church
4963 Old U.S. Rd
Marianna, FL 569-2184
Mt. Shiloh AME Church
6702 Biscayne Road
Bascom, FL 32423 569-1044
New Bethel Christian Methodist
Episcopal Church
2487 Highway 1
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-4647
Pope Chapel African Methodist
Episcopal Church
4898 Blue Springs Rd, P.O. Box 6000
Marianna, FL 32447 482-2900
Shady Grove United
Methodist Church
7305 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-9277
Sneads First United Methodist Church
8042 Church St, PO. Box 642
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6481
fumc@embarqmail.com


Friendship Christian Methodist
Episcopal (CME) Church
5411 Avery Rd, P.O.Box 302
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-1111
1st United Methodist Church
of Cottondale
P.O. Box 458
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4426
Salem AME Church
5729 Browntown Rd, PO. Box 354
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3344
Springfield AME Church
4194 Union Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4252
St. James AME Church
2891 Orange St, P.O. Box 806
Marianna, FL 32447 526-3440
St. Paul AME Church
5180 Hwy 273, P.O. Box 40
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-0333
Snow Hill AME Church
5395 Snow Hill Rd, P.O. Box 174
Malone, FL 32445 569-5315
Mt. Olive AME Church
2135 Fairview Rd
Marianna, FL 32448- 482-7917
Bethlehem AME Church
3100 Lovewood Rd, PO. Box 752
Cottondale, FL 32431
352T2111 or 352-4721
Greater St. Luke AME Church
5255 11th Ave, P.O. Box 176
Malone, FL 32445 569-5188


NON-DENOMINATIONAL
2nd Chance Ministries
2840 McPherson St
Marianna, FL 32446 557-9885
Believers Outreach Ministry
3471 Hwy 90 W
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4926
Cypress Creek Community Church
1772 Macedonia Road, PO Box 496
Alford, FL 32420 638-0360
Ever Increasing Word of Faith
Ministries
3749 Skyview Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-4704
Heaven's Garden Worship Center
3115 Main Street
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 579-9936 www.aidaspina.org
Faith Cornerstone Church Ministries
5460 Collins Chapel Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-5600
Foundation Temple Apostolic
Faith Church
3341 Tendell Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3884


Glass Community Church
4005 Veteran's Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 272-7205 (850) 263-6715
Haven of Rest Church of Restoration
Worship Center
2261 Haven of Rest Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
Love and Restoration Ministries
2990 Heritage Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2730
Mill Springs Christian Chapel
1345 Mill Springs Rd, P.O. Box 83
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 526-2519
Rivertown Community Church!
(Meets at the new Marianna High School)
3546 Caverns Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 482-2477
Rocky Creek Tabernacle
1890 Delta Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 272-0917
St Andrews (FC) Church Ministries
978 Hwy 71 S
Marianna, FL 32448 569-5600
Sunrise Worship Center
2957 Hall St, Marianna, FL 482-8158
PENTECOSTAL
Apostolic Life Church
4070 Old Cottondale Rd
Marianna, FL 482-8720
pastorbiggs@ embarqmail.com
Apostolic Revival Center
of Marianna '
3001 Hwy 71 N, P.O. Box 634
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3162
Christian Covenant Life Center
2011 Finley Ave.
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 592-4737
Shady Grove Pentecostal Holiness
7541 Shady Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-6203


Sneads Pentecostal Holiness Church
2036 Gloster Ave
Sneads, FL 32460
593-4487 or 593-6949
Praise Life Ministries
7360 Hwy 90, P.O. Box 177
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4166
Prayer Temple Church Of Prayer
For All People
3341 Plantation Circle
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3343
United Pentecostal Deliverance
5255 10th Ave
Malone, FL 32445 569-5989
PRESBYTERIAN
First Presbyterian Church
Presbyterian Church (USA)
2898 Jefferson St
Marianna, FL 32446
526-2430 www.firstpresmarianna org
fpcmarianna@embarqmail.com or
firstpresmarianna@earthlink.net
RESTORATIONIST
Church of Jesus Christ of Marianna
4060 Thomasville Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2282
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
Emmanuel SDA Church
4531 Basswood Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3200
Marianna Seventh Day Adventist
4878 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2487
WESLEYAN
Salem Wesleyan Church
2764 Salem Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 (850) 593-6679
irquomai@gmail com


1_1___ ____;;;;;_


I






1=JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN # www.jcfloridan.com


SWEENEY WINS FIRST PLACE


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Marianna High FFA member Darbey Sweeney competed in the American Horseman-
ship Challenge in Bonifay at the 10 Buck 2 Ranch where he placed first in Youth
Division. Contestants had to train their horses to negotiate an obstacle course with
13 different events working against the clock. Rider and horse are assessed penalties for faults
associated with the event. Sweeney finished first last year in the Southeast Region. Contestants
are now gathering points to see who gets to travel to Kansas for this year's national finals.



U.S. Army Africa Soldiers help integrate


women in Botswana Defense Force


Special to the Floridan

Recently, the U.S. Army
dropped the ban on wom-
en in combat arms military
occupation specialties,
which was a step forward
for women in the military.
As the U.S. Army takes a
bold move with dropping
the ban, the Botswana
Defense Force is making
similar personnel changes
by having a Woman's Inte-
gration working group to
allow Botswanan females
a chance to be enlisted sol-
diers within the BDE
During the working
group, Col. Sara V. Sim-
mons, U.S. Army Africa G1
director, and Sgt. Maj. Car-
olina D. Johnson, USARAF
equal opportunity sergeant
major, traveled to the BDF
Headquarters from April 5
through 12 to share their
successes and also some of
the challenges women cur-
rently still have in the U.S.
Army.
"We went down to talk
with members of the BDF
to establish a women's
integration work group
that consisted of about 35
males, and females. The
leadership wanted to have
enlisted females be a part
of BDE Currently [there are
only female] officers. When
you integrate females into
a force, you're going to
make sure that integration
is seamless and it doesn't
disrupt the balance or the
morale of current force,"
Simmons, a Johns Island,
S.C., native said. In order to
have the working groups,
USARAF responded to a re-
quest from the BDF chief of
defense forces stating the
leadership was interested
in integrating more women
into the BDE Currently, the
BDF has approximately
100 female officers and
now they want to broaden
it with having enlisted fe-
males. Simmons said they
went to Botswana to share
not only personal experi-


U.., AT~R M IU A rOnuIu
Sgt. Maj. Carolina D. Johnson (right) U.S. Army Africa equal
opportunity sergeant major, thanks Deputy Commander of
the Botswana Defense Force, Maj. Gen. Placid Segokgo, for
his invitation and explains she is looking forward to building
partnership on initiative during a Women's Integration working
group April 5-12. The working groups consisted of 35 male
and female BDF soldiers discussing ways to help integrate
females in the BDF. Topics included housing, current training
infrastructure, instructors, recruiting, retention and women's
health issues. The overall objectives of the working groups
were to identify some of the challenges and opportunities and
to mitigate any issues that may occur with integration.


ences but also how the U.S.
Army transitioned from
1775. "During the week, we
looked at the different chal-
lenges they would have.
We want to help them be
successful when they inte-
grate the enlisted females
into the force. We looked at
everything from housing,
their current training in-
frastructure, their instruc-
tors, recruiting and reten-
tion, women's health issues
- we looked at a myriad
of factors that will impact
the success of enlisting the
females into the Botswana
Defense Forces," Simmons
said.
U.S. Ambassador to Bo-
tswana Michelle D. Gavin
said she could not agree
more with the BDF leader-
ship who have concluded
that superior performance
does not relate to gender,
and that not only the of-
ficer ranks but also the
enlisted ranks benefit
from having women serve
alongside men in the mili-
tary. "Barriers restraining
women's ability to add
value to an organization
remain in place only to the


detriment of that organiza-
tion. It is common sense
to use your entire pool of
talent to build the stron-
gest possible organization.
Passion to serve is not tied
to whether you are a man
or woman, but it is what is
in your heart; it is in your
commitment to country;
and, it is in the talents you
bring to the fight. On these
measures, men and wom-
en walk the same path. This
has not been, and it will not
soon be an easy path. Not
in the United States, nor in
Botswana," Gavin said.
Johnson said the work-
shops helped identify some.
of the challenges and op-
portunities and to mitigate
any issues that may occur.
Even though the idea to
integrate women will be a
slow process, Johnson said
she was humbled to have an
opportunity to be a part of
the working groups. "Work
groups came up with topics
as well as courses of action
and recommendations,
and we just facilitated us-
ing some of the U.S. Army's
methods of decision mak-
ing. Women's integration


is important because they
get the opportunity to be
inclusive not only with just
males, but have the oppor-
tunity to bring more skills
sets, ideas and concepts to
the Botswana force, which
will enhance the mission.
This was just the first mile
of the marathon and I think
it's only going to get better
as we continue to prog-
ress," Johnson, a Marianna
native said.,
BDF participants were
appreciative of the assis-
tance USARAF Soldiers
provided.
"Let me take this time to
extend my gratitude for'the
week spent with you, Sgt.
Maj. Johnson," BDF Lt. Ra-
banthen said. "You were an
inspiration the whole week
and it takes people of your
character to make a differ-
ence such as this in some of
us. We were so enlightened
and encouraged by your
team, and I want to believe
that we will make a differ-
ence in this organization."
Simmons said she looks
forward to the progress the
BDF will make with the in-
tegration, but she knows
in order to have success,
Botswana will have to over-
come cultural norms that
see women as caretakers,
not warriors. "They (BDF)
are going to say how are
they are going to effectively
utilize and manage females
so they don't totally break
their tradition and their cul-
tures and their norms. The
females that were [in the
working groups] were very
interested and they were all
ready' for total integration,
even in the combat units -
they're ready to go forward.
It was very gratifying and a
very productive meeting so
it was great to be a part of
something that is so much
bigger than yourself," Sim-
mons said.
Johnson is a 1983 gradu-
ate of Marianna High
School. She has served in
the U.S. Army for 28 years.


Whitford named


as loan officer


Special to the Floridan

Farm Credit of North-
west Florida announces
that Amber Whitford has
been promoted to loan
officer.
Whitford has been em-
ployed by the organiza-
tion since January 2010.
She most recently served
as a loan specialist.
In her new role, Whitford
will be responsible for fi-
nancing farms, ranches,
recreational properties,
timberland and real es-
tate in Jackson, Washing-
ton, Calhoun, Holmes,
Bay and Gulf counties.
"Amber will enhance and
grow our agriculture loan


portfolio; the skills she has
acquired the past few years
have made her a valuable
asset to our
team," said
Rick Bit-
ner, CEO
jof Farm
Credit of
Northwest
Whitford Florida.
Whitford
is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Florida with a
bachelor's degree in busi-
fiess administration. Most
recently, she graduated
from the Jackson County
Leadership Program. She
grew up in Alachua and re-
sides in Marianna with her
husband, Drew.


Special to the Floridan

There is a need in the
area for adults who care
for children and desire to
make a difference in the
life of a displaced child.
These children, by no
fault of their own, have
been removed from their
homes and as a result
have become part of the
system.
When a child's case goes
before the judge, more
times than not Guardian
ad Litem is assigned to the
case. Guardian ad Litem
and the volunteers give
of their time to represent
and advocate for these
children.
In order to be a volun-
teer and an advocate for a
child, one must meet the
following requirements:
) Complete an applica-
tion, which can be done
online.
) Be at least 21 years
of age. Call about recent
changes if interested and
are at least 19.
) Consent to a criminal
background check.
) Consent to a Level 2
background check, which
includes fingerprints.
) Complete a screening
interview with the local
program.
) Complete 30 hours of


certification training.
A Guardian ad Litem
should be prepared to
commit 6-8 hours per
month, with some months
requiring more and some
requirifig less as dictated
by each case.
For more information,
call Recruiter/Trainer Dan
Fender at 849-3925, the
Blountstown office at 674-
2799, the Chipley office at
638-6043 or the Marianna
office at 482-9127.


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GRIFFIN ADDRESSES

PILOT CLUB


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Pilot Club of Marianna held its April program meeting
at Jim's Buffet & Grill*on April 25. Mary Nell Griffin was
their guest speaker. Griffin spoke about the Jackson County
Weekend Backpack Program. Jackson County School Board
along with community partnerships have teamed up to provide
backpacks of food for children to carry home on the weekend.
For more information on their program, contact the Jackson
County School Board Office. Pictured are Griffin (left) and
IJudy Lanier, Pilot Club president.


4 H . M 3 2












OUIDA MORRIS PAT FURR CLARICE BOYETTE
(850) 209-4705 (850) 209-8071 (850) 573-1572
Broker/Owner Furr19@msn.com
S C2 sunnyso@aol.com


Guardian ad Litem


in need of volunteers


.L-URAL NNWS, TUUK RWT.
THIS MORNING @ 5AM
MIDDAY 11 AM


FRIDA.Y, MAY3, 2013 & 6A


LOCAL & BUSINESS







7A FRIDAY, MAY 3, 2013

Obituaries

James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850.482.2332

Lydia Barnes

Funeral services will be
10 a.m., Friday, May 3, 2013
at Round Lake Baptist
Church.
Internment will follow in
Williams Family Cemetery.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
wwvw.jamesandsikesfuneralhiomes.com
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332

Mary Lou
Tyus

Funeral services will be 2
p.m., Friday, May 3, 2013 at
Welcome Assembly of God
Church.
Internment will follow in
Church Cemetery.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com
James & Lipford
Funeral Home
5390 Cotton St.
Graceville, FL 32440
850 263-3238
jamesandlipford@yahoo.com


Nelda
Yeomans

Nelda Yeomans, 69 of
Chipley, Florida passed
away Wednesday, May 1,
2013 at her residence fol-
lowing an extended illness.
Funeral service will be 11
a.m., Saturday, May 4, 2013
at the Chipley Church of
God of Prophecy with Bro.
Ernie Dupree officiating.
Burial will follow in Marvin
Chapel Cemetery in
Graceville with James &
Lipford Funeral' Home in
Graceville directing.
Family will receive friends
at the church Saturday 10
a.m. until time of service.
Ms. Nelda was born in
Graceville on September
16, 1943 to the late Arthur
and Edna Ward Collins. Be-
loved mother, grandmoth-
er, sister, aunt and friend,
she was a member of
Chipley Church of God of
Prophecy.
Preceded in death by her
parents, two grandchildren
Sara Yeomans, Johnnie
Phillips, two brothers Jerry
B. Collins, Mike Collins and
brother-in-law Harold Glo-
ver.
Survived by her fiancee
James Baker, Chipley; five
children Mitch Yeomans
(Cathy), Marianna, FL, Rick
Yeoman (Sandy),
Hopkinsville, KY, Teresa
Simpson, Chipley, Keith
Yeomans (Heather),
Wausau, FL, Tabatha Phil-
lips (Justin), Elmore, AL;
two brothers Walter Collins
(Betty), Fadette, AL, Morris
Collins (Joyce), Lilbum,
GA; four sisters Marilyn
Balch (Leroy), Panama
City, FL, Edwina Glover,
New Hope, GA, Teresa Ann
Miles (John), Graceville,
Kay Dean Berry (Bobby),
Dallas, TX; fifteen grand-
children, eighteen great
grandchildren.
Expressions of sympathy
can be made online at
www.jamesandlipford.com

Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
*2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com P


W Al


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Top 10 individual scorers at the Chipola College High School Brain Bowl Invitational on Thursday were Rebecca Delgado (Graceville Orange), Blake Benton
(Marianna Purple), Jacob Leff (Marianna Purple), Patrick Fortunato (Cottondale Orange), Kole Forehand (Holmes Blue), J.P. Leonard (Blountstown Black),
Chance Pender (Marianna Gold), Jamie McCoy (Marianna Purple), Fletcher Dilmore (Chipley Gold) and Cary Laird (Chipley Blue).


Quiz
From Page 1A
with a record-breaking
performance.
Work like that, and
bring the top individual
scorer in nearly every
tournament he has en-
tered over the last two
years, is what earned
Kelson his nickname
- "The Truth" (cour-
tesy volunteer assistant
coach Dr. Robert Dunkle)
and has Stan Young, head
coach, calling Kelson not
only today's best com-
munity college player,
but the best community
college player in history.
"His stats will show
that," Young said
Thursday.
As Kelson gets ready to
depart from Chipola Col-
lege, he said he's still de-
ciding where he'll pursue
his four-year degree. He's
facing an age-old choice:
Seminole or Gator? If he
takes his academic quiz
tourney talents to UF,
he'll be able to continue
where his older brother
Dallin Kelson, who is
soon to graduate, too,
leaves off.
Whatever his decision,
Paul Kelson will leave an


Members of the Chipola College Brain Bowl team visit State Rep. Marti Coley at the Florida
House of Representatives on Wednesday in Tallahassee. Coley introduced a resolution
to acknowledge the many accomplishments of the team. Shown (from left) are Wesley
Chevillot, William Singleton, Faith Tice, Jamie McCoy, Katelyn Miller, State Rep. Marti Coley,
Stan Young (head coach) and Paul Kelson.


impressive legacy with a
Chipola Brain Bowl team
that is ready to add to its
amazing list of achieve-
ments, including:
) Third consecutive


Community College
National Championship
at the National Academic
Quiz Tournament in St.
Louis.
) One of only six com-


munity colleges invited to
compete in the Intercol-
legiate Championship
Tournament (ICT),
ranked number five seed.
behind Harvard, Yale,


Stanford, and Brown.
) Second community
college in history to make
the championship round
at ICT in Chicago; fin-
ished initial round robin
with a 6-1 record-in-
cluding a 290-245 win
over MIT-to qualify
for the championship
bracket with Stanford,
Harvard, Yale, Chicago, Il-
linois, Williams and MIT.
CHIPOLA'S PAUL KELSON
) Top individual scorer
in the ICT, averaging
114.55 per 20 tossups
heard at the ICT.
) Recognition by the
State Legislature through
House Resolution 9091.
Coaches Young, a
Chipola math professor,
and Dunkle, a former
Chipola humanities
professor, led. the team in
year-round practice ses-
sions. And adding hard
work to innate talent is
what's helped Chipola
gain national acclaim in
college quiz bowl circles.
Chipola College Brain
Bowl team members are:
Blake Benton, Wesley
Chevillot, Becca Del-
gado, Bobby Gause, Paul
Kelson, Jamie McCoy,
Katelyn Miller, William
Singleton and Faith Tice.


Florida lawmakers wrap up work on Everglades bill


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida law-
makers completed work Thurs-
day on a new plan to help pay for
Everglades restoration, drawing
praise from environmental activ-
ists and the sugar industry after
years, of squabbling over ways to
protect the famed River of Grass.
On the next-to-last day of the
legislative session, the Senate
voted 39-0 to send the measure
(HB 7065) to Republican Gov.
Rick Scott, who later hailed the
bill for providing an "historic in-
vestment" in the Everglades. The
legislation was approved by the
House 114-0 earlier in the 60-day
session.
"We're very proud of this legis-
lation," said Sen.Wilton Simpson,
the lead Senate proponent who
referred to the Everglades as "the
Eighth Wonder of the World."
The legislation would keep in-
tact an existing tax on farmers in
the northern Everglades until the
mid-2030s, although it calls for
the tax rate to decrease starting
in the mid-2020s.
The money from the tax will be
used for water quality restoration
projects that are part of an $880
million plan that was negotiated
between Scott and the federal
government.
The bill also calls for spending
$32 million a year for the next 10
years in an effort to reduce the
amount of phosphorus that en-


conclude decades of drawn out
litigation that have been a bar-
rier to restoration," said Gaston
Cantens, vice president of Florida
Crystals Corp. "This bill is a pact
that will put into statute the con-
sensus between all groups, which
means we can now move forward
together with certainty to build
the final projects for Everglades
restoration."
Robert Coker, senior vice presi-
dent of U.S. Sugar Corp., called
the bill a "true compromise" and
said he hopes it leads to a "lasting
collaboration."
""We've been working on these
issues for more than 20 years and
remain committed to striking the
balance that allows farmers to
grow food, contribute to a strong
economy and also continue to
serve as partners in the state's
restoration plans," he said.
The sugar industry praised the
bill's language allowing sugar
farmers to continue using "best
management practices," paid for
by the farmers. The industry said
those practices have significantly
reduced phosphorus-related
pollution.
The Everglades Foundation also
hailed the bill's final passage.
Foundation CEO Eric Eikenberg
said the bill was "good public pol-
icy" that would provide "reliable
funding" for restoration efforts.
He said it protects language that
has guided Florida's restoration
efforts for two decades.


ters the Everglades.
Scott applauded the bill's final
passage and praised lawmakers
"for seeing the value of Florida's
natural treasures to our com-
munities. We'll continue to work
closely with local communities
and environmental organiza-
tions to ensure we're taking the
steps necessary to be good stew-
ards of Florida's environment."
Lawmakers pushing the bill


touted it as a peace treaty in a
dispute over an ecologically frag-
ile area that has been fought over
for the past two decades.
Sugar interests and environ-
mental activists on Thursday were
quick to praise the final product
headed to the governor's desk.
"Sugar farmers are proud to
have worked closely with envi-
ronmental groups and policy
makers to help craft a bill that will


Lawmakers pass measure
on sick leave
TALLAHASSEE A business-
friendly bill that would forbid
local governments from requir-
ing businesses to offer paid or
unpaid family and medical leave
is on its way to Gov. Rick Scott.
The Florida Legislature passed
the bill Thursday, but only after
stripping out a controversial
provision dealing with wages.
Supporters contend the bill
is needed in order to avoid a
patchwork system of local laws.
Opponents contend the bill


hurts part-time employees who
can't afford to take unpaid time
off from work to deal with sick
children and other relatives.
Orange County residents'got
enough signatures for a ballot
referendum requiring business-
es to give paid sick time to work-
ers but the county commission
never placed it on the ballot. A
judge ordered the measure to be
put before voters in 2014.

Main guilty of daughter's
starvation death
BARTOW A Lakeland man


has been convicted of starving
his infant daughter to death.
A Polk County jury deliberated
for about three hours Wednes-
day before finding 30-year-old
Chauncey Gardner guilty on
Wednesday of aggravated child
abuse and a lesser charge of
aggravated manslaughter of a
child. He had been facing a first-
degree murder charge. He faces
up to 120 years in prison.
Gardner's 5-month-old baby,
Chauntasia, was found dead
Nov. 1, 2009.
Gardner and the baby's
mother, Tivasha Logan, told


detectives that they were un-
aware that they had been feed-
ing the baby an improper ratio
of powdered formula to water.
During closing arguments,.
Assistant State Attorney Mark
Levine described a "long,
drawn-out process" that led to
the baby's death.
"This wasn't something that
happened overnight or hap-
pened quickly," he said.
Logan is serving a life sen-
tence in prison after being
found guilty of first-degree
murder and aggravated
manslaughter of a child.


Court: Cellphone searches
unconstitutional
TALLAHASSEE The Florida
Supreme Court on Thursday
ruled that a police search of
an arrested person's mobile
phone without a warrant is
unconstitutional.
The court ruled 7-2 in a case
out of Jacksonville, overruling
the 1st District Court of Appeals.
But the majority opinion noted
it applies specifically to searches
after the phone has been "sepa-
rated from the person arrested."
From wire reports


Jackson County Vault & Monuments


Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90
850-482-5041 g]


.. 7 ,.A & g ,,I
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell, left, adjusts her life jacket as she
prepares to tour the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in Palm Beach
County on Wednesday. Jewell took over the department from Ken Salazar
earlier this month. Her stop Wednesdayin South Florida is one of her first
official trips and highlights the importance of Everglades restoration to the
agency responsible for national parks and other public lands.


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


LOCAL & STATE


-


'''






-18A FRIDAY, MAY 3, 2013


NATION & WORLD


Case headed to grand jury


Mississippi man
arrested for
making ricin

The Associated Press

OXFORD, Miss. A dust
mask that tested positive
for ricin also contained
DNA from a Mississippi
man suspected of send-
ing poison-laced letters to
President Obama and oth-
ers, an FBI agent testified
Thursday.
The testimony came
during a preliminary hear-
ing for James Everett Dut-
shcke, 41, who was arrest-
ed Saturday at his home
in Tupelo and charged
with making ricin, the
same substance mailed
on April 8 to Obama, U.S.
Sen. Roger Wicker and Lee
County, Miss., judge Sadie
Holland.
Magistrate Judge S. Allan
Alexander ruled that there
was enough probable
cause to send the case to
a grand jury, which are se-
cretive. It's not clear when
one would hear evidence
in this case.
Dutschke's lawyer,.
George Lucas, waived a
detention hearing, but
reserved the right to ask
for one later. That means
Dutschke will remain be-
hind bars for now.
FBI agent Stephen
Thomason said on April
22, agents saw Dutschke
go to his former martial
arts studio in Tupelo and
then throw items in a trash
can down the street. One
of those items was a dust
mask that tested positive
for ricin, he said.
Thomason said the mask
had DNA from two people


THE ASSOCIATED'PRESS FILE
Everett Dutschke stands in the street near his home in Tupelo, Miss., on April 23 and waits for
the FBI to arrive and search his home in connection with the sending of poisoned letters to
President Barack Obama and others.


"In tsr in,
it's deadly."
an unidentified
FBI agent
on it.
He said Dustchke was
the "major. contributor."
The agent did not say who
else's DNA was on it.
Dutschke is second per-
son to be charged in the
case. The first suspect,
Elvis impersonator Paul
Kevin Curtis, 45, was ar-
rested on April 17, but the
charges were dropped six
days later. After his arrest,
Curtis said he was framed
and gave investigators
Dutschke's name as some-
one who could have sent
the letters, according to an
FBI affidavit filed in federal
court.
Curtis said he knows
Dutschke and they feuded
over the years.


During Thursday's hear-
ing, Dutschke sat at the
defendant's table wearing
an orange jail uniform. He
scribbled notes at times
and also shook his head in
disagreement at some of
the testimony.
No possible motive was
discussed.
Much of Thomason's tes-
timony was from an FBI
affidavit made public ear-
lier this week, which said
trace amounts of ricin was
found in Dutschke's former
martial arts studio.
Thomason said Dutschke
used the Internet to make
three purchases of castor
beans, from which ricin
is derived. The affidavit
had said two, but Thoma-
son said the investigation
turned up another.
Lucas, Dutschke's law-
yer, said there was a way to
make ricin in a way so that
it isn't deadly and repeat-
edly questioned the agent


about tests performed
on the substance in the
letters.
"If it's ricin, it's deadly,"
the agent said.
The FBI has not revealed
details about how lethal
the ricin was. A Senate of-
ficial has said the ricin was
not, weaponized, mean-
ing it wasn't in a form that
could easily enter the body.
If inhaled, ricin can cause
respiratory failure, among
other symptoms. No anti-
dote exists.
During the investiga-
'tion, officials searched
Dutschke's home, business
and minivans.
Thomason said docu-
ments from the home had
printer markings similar to
ones on letters sent to the
officials.
Dutschke faces up to
life in prison if convicted
in the ricin case. He's also
facing unrelated charges of
child molestation.


Teen voices anger at resurfaced mom


The Associated Press

HARRISBURG, Pa. -The
teenage daughter of a
woman who just revealed
she abandoned her family
11 years ago said Thursday
the disclosure has angered
her and she is not eager to
restart their relationship.
Morgan Heist, who
learned last week Bren-
da Heist had surfaced in
the Florida Keys, said the
news has made her re-
call with bitterness the
years of mourning she
endured when she as-
sumed her mother was
dead and feared she'd been
murdered.
"I ached every birthday,
every Christmas," said 19-
year-old Morgan Heist, a
freshman at a community
college outside Philadel-
phia. "My heart just ached.
I wasn't mad at her. I want-
ed her to be there because
I thought something had
happened to her."
Brenda Heist's mother,
Jean Copenhaver, said
Thursday that her daugh-
ter "had a real traumatic
time" but was doing OK.
Brenda Heist was re-
leased from police cus-
tody on Wednesday and is
staying with a brother in
northern Florida for now,
Copenhaver said.
Copenhaver, of Bren-
ham, Texas, said she had
spoken with Heist several
times since Friday, when
the 54-year-old woman
turned herself in to police
in Florida and was identi-
fied as a missing person.
"She just said she thought
the family wouldn't want
to talk to her because of
her leaving," Copenhaver
said. "We all assured her
that wasn't the case and we
all loved her"
Morgan Heist said she's
not sympathetic, partly
because her mother had a
choice, unlike the family
she secretly abandoned.
"It's definitely very self-
ish," Morgan Heist said.
"She clearly did not think
of me or my brother or
my dad at all with that
decision. She thought of
herself."
Heist told police she
Made a spur-of-the-mo-
,,rq..rv; ..% ,.." .,.'.. .


"It's more of a
mystery than ever.
Her life was not
hard at all."
Morgan Heist,
19-year-old girl whose mother
abandoned her Lititz, Pa., family
11 years ago and resurfaced
last week in Florida
ment decision in 2002 to
join a group of homeless
hitchhikers on their way
to Florida, walking out on
Morgan, 8, and her broth-
er, then 12.
Brenda and her hus-
band, Lee, were living to-
gether but going through
an amicable divorce when
she learned she had been
denied housing support,
police said. She was crying
about that in a Lancaster
park when three strangers
befriended her and offered
to let her join them.
Morgan Heist said her
parents had agreed to live
near each other once they
divorced. Brenda Heist had
been a bookkeeper at a car
dealership.
"It's more of a mystery
than ever," she said. "Her,
life was not hard at all."
Brenda Heist told police
she slept under bridges
and survived at times by
scavenging food from
restaurant trash and
panhandling.
But Lititz Police Detec-
tive John. Schofield said
Thursday he is looking info
reports that have come in
over the past day suggest-
ing Brenda Heist's time in
Florida included much less
miserable periods.
"We're getting several
calls from people down in
Florida that knew her who
want to say she's not being
truthful with us," Schofield
said.
Heist told a detective
with the Monroe County
Sheriff's Office that she had
recently been arrested in
the Tampa Bay region and
might be in violation of
probation. She told the de-
tective she used the name
Kelsie Lyanne Smith and
provided a date of birth.
Jail and court records
show Kelsie Lyanne Smith,


On the far left is an
S undated driver's
S ...:,' license photo
of Brenda Heist
Sar distributed by
police in 2002 and,
at near left, is an
April 26 photo of
Heist taken by the
Monroe County, Fla.,
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE Sheriff's Office.
with a matching birth date, possession of drug para-
was arrested in January phernalia and providing
on misdemeanor charges false identification to law
of marijuana possession, enforcement.


Send us you

graduate's favorite(

photo along with you

special, message to bc

in the Jackson Count

Floridan'i

2013 Graduatiol

Section on May 26th


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN o www.jcfloridan.com



Bittersweet


end for missing


in Bangladesh


The Associated Press

JURAIN, Bangladesh -
As Farida knelt beside the
linen-wrapped body and
looked at the dress she
herself had purchased,
her sobs of sorrow turned
to tears of painful relief.
She called her husband to
speak the words she had
been praying for during
her week of searching: "I
got her. I got her."
Just moments before,
she had stopped workers
from placing the body in
one of the dozens of un-
marked graves dug for
victims of Bangladesh's
building collapse whose
bodies were too battered
to' identify. With wails
and sheer persistence she
had pushed through the
crowd of onlookers and
forced officials to give her
one last look at the row of
decaying bodies to see if
one might be her beloved
sister-in-law. One was.
"Oh, this is my Fahima!
This is my Fahima!" she
cried at officials. She
pointed out the distinct
spot on her sister-in-law's
forehead and the red sal-
war kameez outfit she
had given her.
Farida, who uses only
one name, said Fahima
had narrowly escaped
the worst fire in the his-


tory of the country's gar-
ment industry last year.
This disaster, she did not
escape.
For Farida and countless
other relatives of the gar-
ment workers who disap-
peared when Rana Plaza
came crashing down, the
past week has been one
of tumbling expectations,
as hope that their loved
ones survived turned into
fears they may have to re-
turn home without even
a body to bury. Many
are impoverished villag-
ers who spent what little
money they had to rush
to a capital they had nev-
er seen, only to find that
news was hard to come
by and officials were often
indifferent.
Without one central list
to track the rescued and
the dead, relatives waited
outside the wreckage or
crisscrossed the congest-
ed city to visit hospitals
and makeshift morgues,
armed with only pho-
tographs and prayers.
Posters of the missing
are plastered on walls
and utility poles across
the industrial suburb of
Savar, where Rana Plaza
had stood. The collage of
faces provides a constant
reminder of the scale of a
disaster that has killed at
least 433 people.


h r.....-. No Exercise No Drugs
Si.. .j No Calorie Counting
I-,,. ,J,, I ,' * No Hormones
.... ,,,' a ,, 1'. No Diet Pils
.... Ja, ).. ........No groupp Sessions
B,-,, Jo. e _No iqudg ProLtein
This Program Is Safe For.Any
Health Problem!
i'(. Ire .oz" (QfOii , t -.-.fitfl Cnihd .
Ouida Morris Mainna, iL.................Lost 23 Ib'.
SDavid Pitts Bmoulwtown, FLj................Lost 31 lbs
Judy Redmon Marianna, FL).................Lost 32 lbs
John Rosenberger (Grand Ridge, FL) .....Lost 130 lbs
SMelissa Hall (aiountstown, FL) ..............Lost 53 lbs
Jeanifer Powell (Maranna,FL) .............Lost 28 lbs
Jay Reagan aranna,FL)...................Lost 37 lbs
People fromages10to81havesafeldonetheprogm.


Maria na, L *e 80-48 -000


Let your


special

graduate


know how
proud you



are of them





e ;, Marianna High School

r We are 50 proud of
you and all of your
e accomplishments. But most
of all we are proud of the
y person you have chosen to
S be. You have blessed our
S lives so much. May God


1

0


bless you as you begin tnis
next chapter of your life.

' We Love You!
Mom and Dad


To have your graduate's message included in this keepsake edition, please
send a color photo and $25 to: Graduation 2013, C/O Jackson County
Floridan, P.O. Box 520, Marianna, Florida or drop it off at our office located at
4403 Constitution Lane. Be sure to include the graduate's name, your special
message and a daytime phone number.


For more information call (850)526-3614

Deadline to submit your information is May 10, 2013 at 5 p.m.


* w 1


~C=ll__~_ _I_


__





* '4~*"~


I-'- '~
~iRe


Sports Briefs

High School Baseball
The Sneads Pirates host
the 1A regional semifinals
Tuesday against the Boze-
man Bucks at 7 p.m., with the
winner to face the winner of
Liberty County vs. Vernon in
the regional finals on May 10.

High School Softball
The Sneads Lady Pirates
will head to Bristol on Friday
night to play the Liberty
County Lady Bulldogs at 6
p.m. The winner will advance
to the state semifinals in Vero
Beach.

Chipola Softball
The Chipola Lady Indians
open play in the FCSAA State
Softball Tournament on
Friday in Pensacola, taking
on State College of Florida at ,
noon.
Chipola will play again
Friday at 5 p.m. win or lose,
facing the winner of Hills-
borough vs. Tallahassee with
a victory, and taking on the
loser of that game with a loss.
The tournament will
continue on Saturday and
conclude on Sundap.

Chipola Baseball
The Chipola Indians will
open play in the FCSAA State
Baseball Tournament on lMay
10 in Lakeland, taking on
Miami-Dade at 6 p.m.
Chipola will play again
Saturday win or lose, facing
the winner of Seminole State
vs. State College of Florida at
6 p.m. with a win, and taking
on the loser of that game at
noon with a loss.
The tournament will
conclude May 14.

Chipola Lifeguard
Course
Chipola College will offer
the American Red Cross
Lifeguard course beginning
Tuesday.
Students must be 15 years
old. Cost is $200. A prereq-
uisite swim test must be
taken prior to the course.
There is no charge to take
the test.
Course meetings will be
held from 4:30-8:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, Wednesday, and
then May 7-10, with the final
test on May 11.
For information or to
schedule a swim test,
call Rance NMassengill at '
850-718-2240.

Rob Fowler Memorial
Golf Tournament
The fifth annual Rob Fowler
Memorial golf tournament
will be held May 11 at Dog-
wood Lakes Golf & Country
Club in Bonifay.
Registration is at 7:30 a.m.
with a tee time of 8 a.m. For-
mat is four-person scramble,
with an entry fee of $50 per
person, including greens
fee, cart, and catered lunch.
Single and team entries are
welcome.
To sponsor or pre-register,
call Kevin Taylor at 850-
326-1525 or Brian Taylor at
850-381-4894.

JCCA Golf Tourney
The lackson County Catdtle-
men's Association announces
that the second annual
Colonel Thomas N'emor ial
golf classic is set for Mlay 17 at
Indian Springs Golf Course in
Marianna.':
There will be a 1.p;mn. shot:
gun start f6r the 18-hole even
that features a four-person
scramble, "pick your part-
ners" and a modified handi-
capped system.
Registratioti.,is $60 p:r per-
son and4haiifliiclude green'-.
fees, cart aridia'stea''din-
net. There ,il be prices for


longest drive and closest to
the pin. All players must have
a verified handicap.
All benefits from the event
will go to FFA and 4H scholar-
ships at Chipola. For more
information, call Matt Dryden
at 850-573-0414, Albert
Milton at 850-718-7834, Ken
Godfrey at 850-209-7919 or
Charlene at Indians Springs
Golf Club at 850-482-8787.
See BRIEFS, Page 2B


High School Baseball



Madison County



ends another


Marianna season


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Just one night after the Madison
County softball team ended the Mari-
anna Lady Bulldogs' season, the Cow-
boys did the same to the Marianna
baseball team Wednesday night with a
,9-1 win in the 4A Regional Quarterfinals
in Madison.
With the victory, the Cowboys ad-
vanced to Tuesday's regional semi-
finals to play host to the undefeated
Pensacola Catholic Crusaders.
Madison County took advantage of
eight walks and two hit batters issued
by Marianna pitching to build an early


lead, scoring three runs in the second
and third innings to go up 6-1.
The Cowboys added three more
runs in the fifth, which was more than
enough support for starting pitcher
Zach Money and reliever Alex Tyson.
Money went 5 1/3 innings to get the
win, allowing one earned run on five
hits and three walks with six strikeouts,
while Tyson recorded the final four outs,
surrendering a hit and a walk with three
strikeouts.
Reid Long started and took the loss
for the Bulldogs, getting pulled in the
second inning for Hayden Hurst, with

See MARIANNA, Page 2B


'1. i f u. I

Reid Long gets a hit for the Bulldogs during a game
earlier this season.


Sneads, Liberty Co.

set for another

playoff battle
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

For the third straight season, the Snea
Lady Pirates (24-5) and the Liberty Cot
ty Lady Bulldogs <22-3) will face off
the postseason, with tonight's regio


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com


The Chipola Lady Indians will
open play in the FCSAA Softball
Tournament in Pensacola to-
day with a first round matchup
against State College of Florida
at noon.
Chipola (38-9) comes into the
tournament as the Panhandle
Conference runner-up, with
State College of Florida (34-18)
finishing third in the Suncoast
Conference.
The game is a rematch of a
March 2 neutral field meeting
that Chipola won 4-2, a victory
that was a part of a 14-game
midseason winning streak for
the Lady Indians.
That streak came to a screech-
ing halt with a 10-0 loss to


. . -,., .. *. ,

.- ,, -




MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola's Hayley Parker gets in front of ground ball during a game earlier
this season.


Northwest Florida State in the
Panhandle Conference opener,
with the Lady Indians starting
league play 7-5 before closing


the conference schedule with
four straight wins.
Chipola assistant coach Jim-
my Hendrix said Thursday that


final matchup in Bristol the second of the
three matchups with a trip to the state
semifinals on the line.
In the previous regional final meeting
in 2011, it was the Lady Pirates who came
out on top with a 5-4 victory, thanks to a
four-run rally in the seventh inning.
The Lady Bulldogs returned the favor in
last season's regional semifinals, winning
3-0 on the strength of a complete-game,
ads nine-strikeout performance by pitcher
un- KaylaJohpson.
in Johnson out-dueled Sneads' Brooke
nal Williams, who also pitched well but was


Sneads'
Alaynah Weiss
makes a catch
,- . during a game
earlier this
i season.The
Lady Pirates
will travel
to Bristol
tonight to
.. take on
the Liberty
County Lady
Bulldogs
in the 1A
Regional
Finals.

victimized by seven fielding errors that
led to all three runs being unearned.
Now a. sophomore, Williams will again
get the nod tonight against the senior
Johnson, and Sneads coach Kelvin John-
son said Thursday this if his team is go-
ing to turn the tables on Liberty this time
around, there can't be a repeat of last
year's defensive performance.
"We definitely can't.make errors. If we
do, then we're in trouble," the coach said.
"They're a really good hitting team and
See FOES, Page 2B


the peaks and valleys of the
season make him see the Lady
Indians as a bit of a wild card at
the state tourney.
"We're so up and down. We're
good enough to win the nation-
al tournament and we're bad
enough to go 0-2 (at state)," he
said. "We've just got to play it
one game at a time. I think we're
ready for the pressure, so we'll
see how we respond as a team.
I think what it comes down to
for everybody in the state tour-
nament is who steps up at the
right time and who gets the big
hit. It's hot pitching and big hits.
That's what we've been trying to
focus on."
Chipola ended the confer-
ence season with doubleheader
See POSTSEASON, Page 2BL


HIGH SCHOOL SOF'TRIBLL





Old foes face off


Chipola Softball


Lady Indians ready for postseason pressure






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


-12B + FRIDAY, MAY 3, 2013


Foes
From Page 1B
they play a tough schedule, so they've seen good
pitching. I don't think we can keep them from scor-
ing runs, so our defense has got to be flawless and
we've got to score. But we've got some big-time play-
ers on our team who can hit good pitching too."
The Lady Pirates put up seven runs in Tuesday's
7-4 win in the regional semifinals against the Port St.
Joe Lady Sharks, who were beaten by Liberty County
6-2 in the District 4-1A title game.
Wewahitchka is another common opponent for
the teams, with the Lady Bulldogs beating them 10-
0 in the regional semis and Sneads winning 11-1 in
the District 3 championship game.
With the teams' similar records and similar perfor-
mances against common foes, it appears on paper
to be an even matchup.
It's also a game that the Lady Pirates have been
pointing to ever since last year's season-ending
defeat.
"The girls have been talking about it from time
to time throughout the year," Coach Johnson said.
"It's a little bit of motivation for them because they
wanted to play Liberty County again. At' the same
time, our goal here is to win a state championship
and we still have to win three more games to do that.
But we've got to take care of business Friday night
first."
While better defense is a big key for the Lady Pi-
rates to be able to do just that, hitting with runners
in scoring position is also big after they stranded
three at second or third in the early innings of last
year's game.
"We had chances to score early in that game and
didn't. This time when we get those chances to score,
we've definitely got to do that," the coach said. "We
can't leave runners in scoring position. Somebody's
got to get the big hits. Brandy Strickland and Cam-
bridge Chason got two big hits (Tuesday), You've got
to get the big hits to be successful, and you've got to
do whatever it takes to win'if you're going to get to
Vero Beach (site of the 1A state finals)."
Getting those hits off of likely starter Kayla John-
son won't be easy, as the senior has had a brilliant
2013 season, winning 14 games and posting a 1.15
ERA with 117 strikeouts and 14 walks in 85 innings.
"She throws it real hard," the Lady Pirates coach
said. "To me, she's their best pitcher. She's very
steady. She gets a strike on you and just goes up on
you and makes you chase pitches, and she throws
strikes. She's one of the fastest pitchers we'll have
seen this year."
On the other side, Williams will have her hands full
pitching to a lineup that has combined for 17 home
runs this season led. by Montana Manley's seven and
Ashley Sikes' four.
"I don't think we're going to be able to win this
game 1-0 or 2-1," Kelvin Johnson said. "It's probably
going to have to be 6-5 or 7-6 for us to win."
But despite the Lady Bulldogs' offensive firepower
and their current 16-game winning streak, the coach
said he was confident that his team had the talent,
toughness, and experience to go on the road and get
a big win.
"Liberty County is better than they were two
years ago, but we've been very successful here
the last three or four years playing big games on
the road and winning," he said. "I'd like to play in
Sneads, but home field is not that big of a deal to
me. We play well on the road. It seems like all of
our big successes in recent years have come on the
road.
"They're a good team, no doubt about it; but we
are too. We won a bunch of games this year and
didn't get here by being bad. We've got five girls off
this team that went to Clermont (to the state finals)
two years ago, so we've got some experience in big
games. I hope it pays off for us Friday night."


Postseason
From Page 1B
sweeps of Pensacola State and Tal-
lahassee, and got two more games in
Saturday against fellow state-quali-
fier Santa Fe, splitting with an 8-6 win
and a 6-5 loss.
In between the close of the confer-
ence and the end of the regular sea-
son, the Lady Indians spent a lot of
time away from the softball field en-
gaging in several team-building com-
petitions such as tennis, volleyball,
kickball and even paint-balling.
Hendrix said the activities were de-
signed to inject some new life into
the team after a long and arduous
season.
"We wanted to try to get back to
where the game is fun and get back
to getting excited to play," he said.
"We're good, but we weren't :play-
ing with any excitement. We've got
to get back to the game. being fun
and playing with some excitement
and energy. We've put the hay in
the barn; now it's time to relax and
play."
State College of Florida comes in
as a defending Gulf District champi-
ons, beating Gulf Coast State in last
year's Gulf District title game before
losing the state championship game
to Atlantic District champ Seminole
State and advancing to the national
tourney.


But the Manatees are without
their ace pitcher from last sea-
son, as sophomore Paige Mat-
thews has missed the last six weeks
due to injury after winning FCSAA
Pitcher of the Year in 2012 while
leading the state in wins, ERA and
strikeouts.
However, State College of Florida
brought back many players from that
team and has eight sophomores in
this year's group.
'"It's going to be good competition,
but we've got to win to play, so it
doesn't matter who we play," Hendrix
said. "They don't have their ace, but
they've got two kids who can throw
it pretty good and they've got all of
their other players."
The Lady Indians have seven soph-
omores of their own who have played
in the state tournament Chipola
went 2-2 in the tourney last season
- and a deep pitching staff that in-
cludes sophomore ace Eva Voortman
and freshmen Karissa Childs and
Rosanne de Vries.
Voortman has been the ace of the
staff, leading the team in wins (17),
strikeouts (95), and posting a 0.88,
ERA, but Childs and de Vries have
been solid as well, with de Vries win-
ning all eight of her decisions this
season and Childs posting a 2.31 ERA
with just 14 walks in 97 innings.
Hendrix said that all three will
get a chance to pitch at the state
tournament.


"In the nine years we've been here,
we've always used at least two (pitch-
ers)," he said. "In 2007, we used three,
and in 2010, we used four. We're not
a team that's going to sit on one and
ride her. On any given day, Evan is
our ace, but Karissa and Rosanne
have given us great innings late in the
season. We trust any one of the three
in a big moment."
All will likely be needed if the Lady
Indians are to win a tournament that
Hendrix called "wide open."
"There's not one team in the, state
that's just overly dominant and above
everyone else," he said. "There will
be surprises throughout the tourna-
ment. Hillsborough could win our
side, Gulf Coast could win our side,
Northwest (Florida State) beat us and
Gulf Coast this year and they could
get hot and win it.
"But honestly, for us, it comes down
to the (Panhandle Conference) and
how we do against them. We measure
ourselves against them more than
any of the other teams. Historically,
it's been the Panhandle Conference
teams (that have been toughest to
get through) in this tournament. It
just really comes down to who gets
hot."
Chipola will play again at 5 p.m.,
win or lose, and will face the winner
or loser out of Hillsborough vs. Pen-
sacola State.


The tournament
conclude Sunday.


is scheduled to


SEC's new network to debut in 2014


The Associated Press

ATLANTA The Southeasterri
Conference and ESPN on Thursday
announced a 20-year agreement to
operate a SEC network that is sched-
uled to debut in August, 2014.
SEC Commissioner Mike Slive said
the SEC network wiJl produce 1,000
live events each year, including 450
televised on the network and 550
distributed digitally. Slive says the
network will carry approximately 45
SEC football games each year "and a
depth of content across all sports."
No financial terms were released
for the deal, which continues through
2034.
The announcement came at a
news conference attended by Slive,
ESPN President John Skipper, 32 SEC
coaches and each of the league's 14
athletic directors. The emphasis was
this is to be a national network.
"We believe this conference has na-
tional appeal," Skipper said. "This is
a national network. This is not a re-
gional network. We understand that
in the 11-state footprint is where the
most passionate fans are, but there
are a lot of SEC fans in California and
Texas and New York and Connecticut
and Virginia and Nebraska."
The league's coaches and athletic
directors said having the national
network will make all sports more
attractive.
"In volleyball, we may want to go


THEASSUUOCIATEDUPRESS
ESPN President John Skipper (left), Southeastern Conference Commissioner Mike
Slive and ESPN Senior Vice President of programming Justin Connolly sit in front of
a large collection of SEC coaches as the wrap up a news conference announcing the
launching of the SEC Network in partnership with ESPN on Thursday in Atlanta.


after players in California or in the
Midwest," said Georgia athletic di-
rector Greg McGarity. "Now they can-
see the SEC is going to have a broad-
cast of Georgia-Florida volleyball
match on ESPN on Tuesday night at
9 o'clock. That's the type of stuff you
can only dream about. Now we have
it unfolding.
"Football, obviously, that's al-
ready well-populated. What it does
for your Olympic sports is just
immeasurable."
Kentucky basketball coach John


Calipari, who already has a national
recruiting base, said the network will
make all SEC schools more attractive
to national recruits.
Still, there was no doubt what sport
drove the deal football. .
Calipari acknowledged he felt left
out as he sat on the stage and heard
only football-refated questions.
Asked where basketball fit in the SEC
picture, Calipari said "I don't know.
How, many men's basketball ques-
tions were there today? Did we have
any? No."


Marianna
From Page 1B
Adam Dewitt going 2 1/3
innings, and Walker Rob-
erts the final inning and
1/3.
The Cowboys posted
seven hits as a team off of
the MHS staff, including
a two-run home run by
Jarrod Burns.
"We just never could
stop the bleeding before it
was too late and we could
never get hits with runners
in scoring position to get
back in the game," Mari-
anna coach Carlan Martin
said. "I tip my cap to (Mad-
ison County). They, did a
better job and were the
better team. They played
better than us and made
the adjustments.
"Pitching was our
strength this year and kept
us in games, but when our
pitching struggles, it really
magnifies our hitting. It
seemed like we played a lot
of one-run ballgames this
year, which your pitching
keeps you in, but when the
pitching isn't there, it puts
a lot of pressure on your
offense."


Martin said that his
pitchers had trouble ad-
justing to the wet condi-
tions that resulted from
light rain during the day.
"We just couldn't throw
off the mound is basically
what it boiled down to," he
said. "We couldn't make
the adjustments. It was a
steady drizzle on and off,
but the mound was kind
of sandy where the guys'
landing foot hit. (The Cow-
boys) pitched first and dug
it out like they liked it, but
we just never could' make
an adjustment off of it."
Money had few issues
dealing with the condi-
tions, keeping the Bulldogs
hitters off balance most
of the night and drawing
praise from their coach
afterward.
"He did a great job. I tip
my hat to him," Martin
said. "He worked quick
and his breaking pitch
was good. He's a good high
school pitcher. I thought
the kid showed some guts.
You can't take anything
away from him. He mixed
it up with a good changeup
and a curveball and did a
great job."
Marianna's only run of


the game came in the top
of the third on an RBI dou-
ble byJT Meadows to score
Long.
Tyler Colson also had a
double for the Bulldogs,
with Mason Melvin, Long,
Chris Johnson, and Rob-
erts all adding singles.
The Bulldogs' season
ended with a record of
16-11, though Martin
said that for a season that
included two coaching
changes with Martin be-
ing named coach just over
a month into the season
- 16 wins and a playoff ap-
pearance was nothing to
be ashamed of.
"I'm proud of the kids.
There's no question they
gave everything they
had," he said. "They had,
to deal with two coaching
changes, and you have to
keep bouncing back and
trying to learn what your


philosophy is and how you
expect things to be done.
It's a learning process, and
they had to do it on the
run and I was proud of
them. They did everything
I asked them to do.
"I thought we had a good
season when you look at all
they've gone through dur-
ing the year. I don't want
to say we overachieved
because the guys would
tell you that we should've
won two or three more
ballgames. But in the big
scheme of things, I think
it was a good year for them
and they have a lot to be
proud of."
The Bulldogs will say
goodbye to seven'seniors:
shortstop Brad Middle-
ton, second baseball Tay-
lor Strauss, first baseman
Johnson, Dewitt, outfield-
er/pitcher Heath Roberts,
centerfielder Meadows


and catcher Melvin.
That leaves some major
holes to fill in the lineup,
but Marianna does bring
back much of its pitch-
ing staff in left-handers
Long and Hurst and the
right-handed Walker Rob-
erts, giving Martin and the
Bulldogs good reason to be
confident heading into the
offseason.
"I'm excited about next
year because we've got a


good group 'coming back
and most of our pitching
back," the coach said. "It's
like every year, you hate
it for the seniors who are
graduating, but you hope
someone will step up and
take their place and get
the job done. That's what
the offseason is all about.
We've got to figure out how
to develop these kids and
get the very best out of
them."


Briefs
From Page 1B
Bulldog Wrestling
Club
The Bulldog Wrestling
Club is starting practice
for the summer season.
Practice will be Tues-
day and Thursday nights
from 5:30-7 p.m. at the
old Marianna High School
_wrestling room.


All Jackson County kids
ages 5-18 are welcome to
join. For more informa-
tion, call MHS coach Ron
Thoreson at 272-0280.

Sports Items

Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan P.O. Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447.


|cy Specials
Mufflers & Exhaust


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SPORTS







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS
'i'


FRIDAY, MAY 3,2013 3BF


Manziel talks football, friendships and fame


The Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS John-
ny Manziel has decided,
he's not going to allow the
pitfalls of fame to stop him
from having a good time,
forging friendships with
rival quarterbacks or even
going back to class in
person.
As for the pressure inher-
ent in living up to the Heis-
man Trophy standard he
set for himself in only his
first season as quarterback
at Texas A&M, he isn't con-
cerned about that, either.
"I'm not thinking about
it. I'm just going out and
playing football and do-
ing the things I've. always
done," Manziel said Thurs-
day, when he visited New
Orleans to accept the
Manning Award, which
recognizes the nation's top
college quarterback. "The
success that. we had last
year I wasn't worried
about my own individual
success. I was just worried
about going out and play-
ing football and trying to
learn the system and get
better."
Following a memorable,
highlight-filled regular
season in which he ac-
counted for 4,600 total
yards, Manziel became
the first freshman ever to
win the Heisman Trophy
- then racked up an ad-
ditional 516 total yards in a
41-13 Cotton Bowl victory
Ever Oklahoma.
And then, the player
sometimes called Johnny
Football found out how
public his private life could
really be.
He was famously pho-
tographed partying in a
Dallas nightclub with a
sparkler in his mouth as if
it were a cigar while flexing
both biceps. Other pho-
tos showed him holding


Sports Briefs
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Duke announces
Jabari Parker signing
DURHAM, N.C. Top
recruit Jabari Parker has
signed his letter of intent
to play at Duke.
The school announced
Parker's signing Thursday
more than four months
after he picked the Blue
Devils over Michigan
State, Florida, Stanford
and BYU during a nation-
ally televised ceremony in
Chicago.
Because that decision
came in December after
the conclusion of the fall
signing period, Parker had
to wait until the spring
signing period began April
17 to make it official.
SOCCER
Manchester United
posts record revenues
LONDON Fresh
from winning a record
20th English league title,
Manchester United is also
keeping up its success
off the field by produc-
ing record revenues while
reducing its debts.
United said Thursday it
is on course to generate
more than 350 million
pounds ($545 million) in
revenue this season after
earning a record 91.7 mil-
lion pounds ($143 million)
in the three months to
March 31.
But the title triumph
has come at a price, with
the player payroll rising
25 percent year-to year
at 44.9 million pounds
($70 million) in the third
quarter.
The club, which is
owned by the American
Glazer family, has reduced
its debt to 367.6 million
pounds ($572 million)


- a drop of 16 percent in
nine months in part by
using the proceeds of an
initial public offering on
the New York Stock Ex-
change in August. United
Shares, which made a
lackluster market debut
St $14, closed at $18.41 on
I(Vednesday.
From wire reports


THE AbSUCIAI ED PREL5
Heisman Trophy winner and Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel (left) poses with former NFL quarterback Archie Manning
and the the Manning Award, which Manziel will be receiving as the nation's top quarterback on Thursday in New Orleans.


what looked like a bottle of
Champagne, raising ques-
tions about whether Man-
ziel, now 20, was partak-
ing in under-age drinking.
Another showed him tri-
umphantly fanning out a
wad of cash at a casino; he
later noted on his Twitter
page it is legal for someone
18 or older to gamble at a
casino.
Even his decision to take
classes online last semes-
ter became controversial.
Manziel has said his deci-
sion to limit himself-exclu-
sively to the virtual class-
room was a reactionto the
attention he was receiving
on campus while simply
walking to class, and he
added Thursday that he
expects to return to regular
classes this summer and
next fall.
"It was just one semester


- something that I need-
ed and wanted to do," he
said.
Manziel said he's adjust-
ing better to life as a celeb-
rity, and is trying not to let
it change him much.
"I continue to slip up
every now and then with
people that you think you
can trust and you really
can't, so I'm continuing to
learn things every day," he
said.
"I'm still having a good
time. I know that. I'm not
letting any of that factor
into my life and what I
want to do," he continued.
"There might be some
cameras here and there
and some things like that,
but I'm going to continue
to still go to some basket-
ball games, continue to
still do things I want to do,
just be smart while I'm do-


ing it."
That includes mak-
ing friends with Alabama
quarterback A.J. McCar-
ron, who during the season
will be among the players
standing between Texas
A&M and a chance at a
Southeastern Conference
championship or more.
"Once football season
comes around, that's when
it becomes rivals," Manziel
said. "Off the field, we're
all 20, 21-year-old kids just
enjoying going to school,
playing football and like
doing the same things. Me
and him have talked on
Twitter, exchanged num-
bers and still continue to
talk every couple weeks. So
I'm maybe building a little
bit of a friendship there,
maybe going on a trip to-
gether this summer some
time or just trying to be


friends and hang out and
have fun."
This July, Manziel plans
to serve as a counselor
at the Manning Passing
Academy in Thibodaux,
La., where he was a camp-
er while in high school.
Manning said he looks
forward to having Manziel
back in a new role.
In introducing Man-
ziel to a luncheon crowd
gathered for the Manning
Award trophy presenta-
tion at the Manning fami-
ly's downtown restaurant,
Archie Manning talked
of how extraordinary he
thought it was for Manziel
to do what he did in his
first season in the SEC, a
conference renowned not
only for its string of na-
tional champions, but also
for defenses loaded with
NFL prospects.


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(Across From Eye Center South)
LARGEST SELECTION OF APPLIANCES & FURNITURE IN THE WIREGRASS!
Y(HUK FIirln, Cii ,n&Or () s r i nr ( OI r i l Yti, ii S D, i iDn Dim li N sim''i 5 I hI

I] O 334-793-3045
L'4. a0ic Bring us the best legitimate price you can find -
we don't beat it, we'll give you the item FREE!


if


Manning highlighted
Manziel's performance
against Arkansas, in which
the Aggie QB compiled 557
total yards.
"That day he broke a
43-year-old Southeastern
Conference record set by
an Ole Miss quarterback
in 1969 vs. Alabama,"
Manning said, referring to
his own 540-yard -perfor-
mance against the Crim-
son Tide. "Thanks a hell of
a lot, Johnny."
Manning and Manziel
both said they were aware
of comparisons made of
their free-wheeling, scram-
bling style of play.
Manning said Manziel's
2012 season was among
the best he'd ever seen for
a college quarterback and
was flattered to hear peo-
ple say Manziel reminded
them of his days at Ole
Miss. Manziel, meanwhile,
said being compared to
Archie Manning is "awe-
some," and an honor.
Manziel will be eligible
to enter the NFL draft after
his next season. He said
he'll make. that decision
with family and his Texas
A&M coaches when the
time is right.
Manning, who is rou-
tinely asked for advice by
top college players' fathers,
given his own experience
with Peyton and Eli, said
his only advice would be
that if a quarterback in the
SEC is not a lock as a top-
10 pick, he should consid-
er how an extra year in the
conference might help.
'Another year in the
Southeastern Conference
is very beneficial to a quar-
terback. The defensive peo-
ple you're playing against
the defensive things you're
seeing, if you stay healthy
it's pretty beneficial as far
as making that transition
into pro football."


WHIRLPOOL OR
FRIGIDAIRE
DISHWASHER
Heavy Duty, Built In,
Regular Wash & Dry
Cycle.
Compare at $318

SALE 229
K IA.A 1 I


5.--
Zia -


3 loa size Commrcial
Compae$32'esign
SALE$229 SALB^^nm$T98


FRIGIDAIRE
26.0 CU. FT.
SIDE BY SIDE
REFRIGERATOR
Cubed & Crushed Ice
Was $1099

SALE$688


TAPPAN
ELECTRIC RANGE
30 inch, plug in, plug out
burners, self-cleaning oven.
Compare $450

SALE S298


LARGEST SELECTION OF APPLIANCES & FURNITURE IN THE WIREGRASS!


9.0 CU. FTT. / -,.J
FRIGIDAIRE --"
CHEST FREEZER
Compare $298
SALE $198

FRIGIDAIRE 20 CU. FT.
UPRIGHT FREEZER
No Frost. Compare $649.
SALE $488


Truckload Sale
2 PC LIVINGROOM
SUITE
Sofa & Loveseat Choice of
Patterns. Compare at $995
SALE $398


-I I -I-1 I I JIIL -r L


KINGi^MSFURITiyiPLrIANIS.


----A


r-


I '
| .

< ,T ,,-.,.







14B FRIDAY, MAY 3. 2013


ENTERTAINMENT
-4


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
/HEM, CHARLIE )WELL WHAT .,,.- / OF COURSE, IT
OLON! I'VE DO IOU T LOOK SO AHEAD..." T NEEDS A LITTLE
60T'NURMOUND THINK? GREAT PATTING DOWN.
ALL FIXED UP!







BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
5FTE TEK THSPE-CL F.ATUR" E ONL'Y RNVETAE TO GIE TWO OO O NIE, FIVE TO NOTRINh
ONTIAE ELE\AENTKN CkOOL OU TRHE-NJOR L-E.kUE a 5EVEJ TO FOUR. AND THREE-
T-BkLL TOURNaA'ERT". B56EBLL Scores5,, TO TWO IN ELEE-N INNIRG5,


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
WHO'S NOT ME. IT'S CALLED "COMMONLY
UP FOR I'M READ- MISUSED WORDS AND
TABLE IN6 A PHRASES IN SPEECH
FOOT- FASCI ATING AND LITERATURE"'
BALL? BOOK,



J b~S~' ^ft^ ^ic^_^f=~^/,


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON
I CAUT BELIEVE SACK IF YOU DOMT CARE FOR THE
HOW FAST TO THE CIEMAA, MAYBE WE COLD
TIME PASSES! SUBJECT... GO TO PLAYS, OR CONCERTS.'



A-77


MM-HM... UH-HUH...OH,
THAT IS SO TRUE!
OH YES!...IT DRIVES
ME CRAZY WHEN
PEOPLE SAY THAT' OH,
AMEN... AMEN!.. YES
OH, YES! YES!


THAT OUGHT TO SLOW
DOW TIME!!


'M A "A
LITTLE
CREEPED I'LL PLA'(.
OUT BUT ONLY
RIGHT IF WE MOVE
NOW. To ANOTHER.
JUST. TABLE.


I'M TEASIG YOU! IVE
ENJOYED EVERYTHING
YOU EVER DRAGGED ME TO!


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
(OOWEE GOES IN SEARCH OF KING GUZ... AH, A FELLOW TRAVELER! YEAH BU, ID
WHAT KIND OF UNEDUCATED .iJ' COULD YOU TELL HE IF THS.)> GO ACK HE I
COUNTRY IS "HIS I HOPE I CAN I ,C ,u' E I ..E '
FIND TH S KING G6 UZ BEFORE THAT - I _- T : .r'' I A-. E -.-i- '
POOR PRISONER EXPIRES! .

'>.-.__ __ '!. -- -....


,- -' '' " , ..- -, L 'I" _



MONTYBYJIM MEDDICK
"n5-t: .r-Fv 1.7' 1-: I" T lF I.:HTE l J tI V ITW k vtil I Th'ttT'11- '11i't14'I
;I IT IAt)-' IE NSErZSCHE-J WHO ONKE rr.T0F '.trT 'TI! EE I


liii I pn
13 sIr


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER
r-


5 3 Lau nSock Irierm na Inc, D by U sl l orUF 013
"I know it's expensive to bring up a kid.
Why come to me with your problems?"


ACROSS
1 Freight
weight
4 Eye rudely
8 Amusing
11 Indiana
neighbor
12 Bargain
13 "Wheel of
Fortune"
buy
(2 wds.)
14 Desire
15Dry spells
17 Friendly
19 Extinct
birds
20Singer
Orbison
21 Call -
cab
22 Where
Nairobi is
25 Make
unhappy
28 Unfold, in
verse
29 Some
NCOs
31 Picket line
crosser
33 Birds' bills
35 Diplomacy
37Cable
network
38 Grouchy
40 Perch
42 Disallow


43 New Year
in Hanoi
44 Carnival
attractions
47 Merry
51 Face mask
attachments
53 Largest
continent
54Coq au-
55 QED part
56 Cartoonist
Kelly
57 Qt. parts
58 Repudiate
59 Skipper's
OK

DOWN
1 Bangkok
native
2 Sty noise
3 Public
official
4 In a weird
way
5 "Pretty
Woman"
actor
6 -tzu
7 Avoided
capture
8 Saudi king
9 Golden
rule word
10 Loch -
monster
11 Barn bird


Answer to Previous Puzzle


16 Prods
18 Jungle
snakes
21 Not fem.
22"- -Tiki"
23 Sweeping
story
24 Kan.
neighbor
25 Linger
26Yodeler's
answer
27 Slaps the
cuffs on
30 Most of
the U.K.
(2 wds.)
32 Plant sci.
34 Sword
36- bien,
monsieur!


39Soaked up
the sun
41 Canada's
capital
43 Snappish
44 Host's
request
45-- -for
keeps.
46 Puts on
47 Caramel-
topped
custard
48 Do as

49Yucky
50 Snack
52 Prior to


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comI


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"CKT OWFKV FX YHTGM OC LT: JT, GX
WRLGK ITFKVX, LRXO IT JFHHFKV OC
GYYTEO 'ETCEHT JWC GMT AFDDTMTKO
DMCL CRMXTHBTX."
IGMIGMG NCMAGK

Previous Solution: "I'm one of those people that thinks things happen for a
reason, and you just have to look for the reason." Clint Black
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 slenba A
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-3


Dear Annie: My husband and I have a
blended family with his two girls and my
three sons. I am so grateful that we both
took on this challenge.
We had some good times, and we had
some bad times, and when I say bad, I
mean horrible. Our children are all adults
now, and we are still butting heads over
them, mostly my boys. He has given up
on two of my sons because he says they
don't respect him, not to mention some
less than legal activity in our home while
we were on vacation.
But, Annie, I feel as if he has never really
cared for them. I try to help them with
rides or letting them wash clothes at our
house or whatever I can do. People ma-
ture at different levels, and maybe I help
too much, but they are my kids. At what
point am I supposed to turn my back on
them? My husband says that because I
help them against his wishes, it means I
love them more than him. That isn't true.
One son is homeless and has to look for


Horoscope

TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Unless you have
absolutely no choice, do
not delegate a critical as-
signment to a surrogate.
If you must do so, keep a
constant check.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -When pressed for
answers about work or
financial questions, you
can be very resourceful.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- For some reason, you're
likely to be unusually
receptive to new concepts.
This asset will prove to be
quite valuable.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Don't hesitate to make
a change to a project. Even
if you're uneasy, you'll find
your comfort zone.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-You may get an oppor-
tunity to spend time with
someone whom you don't
know well. This person
could turn into a friend.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
This is a good day to
begin to distance yourself
from an endeavor that has
proved unproductive.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) If you're wondering
why a recent acquaintance
is starting to warm up to
you, the answer is simple.
You no longer are judging
this person as harshly as
you once did.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -A new way of
adding to your resources
might come about through
an unusual set of circum-
stances. You'll have to be
on your toes to spot it.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -You are about to
enter a new cycle where
your athletic skills could
begin to peak.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Should you amaze
yourself in coming up with
an ingenious concept for
making or saving money,
believe it and use it.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Everybody around
you might require as-
sistance or a backup, but
not you. You'll function
best when operating
independently.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) If you're not afraid to
experiment, you could be
closer to a major achieve-
ment than you think.


a place to stay every night. That breaks
my heart. My husband found him down-
stairs sleeping one morning and told me
that I'd better get him out or he would call
the police. He won't even allow me to let
my son shower here.
I realize the boys need to make it on
their own, but am I supposed to turn my
back on them when they need help? At
what point do you give up on your kids
and choose your husband instead? I feel
like such a horrible mom.
-WORRIED FOR THEM

Dear Worried: Your husband should not
be issuing ultimatums wherein you must
choose between the man you love and
the children you love. This is unfair and
creates tremendous resentment. Your
husband may have good cause to want
the kids out of the house, but it's difficult
to do when they have no place to go. Try
Because I Love You (bily.org), and ask
your husband to work with you on this.


Bridge


Looking up a quotation including "fourth," I came
upon this comment by James Bryce, an English dip-
lomat and author who died in 1922: "Three-fourths of
the mistakes a man makes are made because he does
not really know what he thinks he knows." That gave
me pause. What's the problem?
No Englishman 'would say "three-fourths," he
would say "three-quarters." The quotation has been
"translated." How is that relevant to this deal? All will
be revealed.
Look at the South hand and bidding sequence. What
should South rebid? He has no clear-cut call. He wants
to get to game, but has no idea which one. He solves
the problem by rebidding two diamonds, fourth-suit
game-forcing. It is artificial and asks partner to do
something descriptive. Usually, responder wants to
get to three no-trump, but does not have a stopper in
the fourth suit; or he hopes partner can show three-
card support for his five-card major; or both.
Here, North continues with two spades, and South
jumps to four spades. (Yes, North might have rebid two
spades, not two clubs.) West leads the diamond king,
then shifts to a low club. How should South continue?
Declarer should take trick two with his ace, ruff a di-
amond, play a spade to his ace (getting the bad news),
and ruff his last diamond. He then plays off dummy's
top hearts and top clubs. East ruffs the last top club
and leads a diamond, but South ruffs low and exits
with a low spade to get two more trump tricks with his
king and jack over East's queen. He takes four spades,
two hearts, two clubs and two diamond ruffs.


West
4 --
VJ976
* KQ1054
4J875


North 05-03-13
# 743
V AK852
6
4KQ42
East
# Q 10 9 8 6.


VQ10
4 A832
*109


South
4 AKJ52
V43
* J97
*A63


Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 Pass
1 4 Pass 2, Pass



Opening lead: # K


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI

WAJATC-HiNG -TeLevisioM
Have 9ou evel -OUR aF-TeR HO CaN
NoTIceD. A/ (3e eaosTiNG? '


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT
kitncarlyle@comcast.net www.oComics.com


ISesH


Annie's Mailbox


4







CLASSIFIED


w.ww- T iTr T nDmat nm


Jackson County Floridan *


Friday, May 3, 2013- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED
A -*al*Wa -* *M * -r A


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions Advertisers should creck their ad the first day This. publication hill riot be liable for failure to publeh an ad or for a ryp:.graphic error or anorrs in publiicaonr ecl to the a ienl ot othr cot Cf the ad fo tr ie first day's
Irpertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to Ith cost of that portion of the a id herean the errjr occune, Tle advertiser agrees thag tlhe pubiul-rier snall nol rot inabla lor damage& 3ising oul of error ir. advsertiermnis beaonj the. nmounl paid for the apace
actually occupied by thai pomon offthe advertlsemneni in which the eiror occurred, whetr.er ucn error is due to regl eglgeno of Ini puoiisrner's employees or olharaiise and Ire hall be no iraoli loar nn-irsaertion of any 3dvenisarreni beyond e arrmunt paid for
sucn advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position All advertising Is subletl to approval Rightl s reserved lo edil reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate clas iicaton


A.- 1 :
-,2305 Phillips'Rd. off Kynesville Hwy
Look for Sighs.' Fri. 3rd 10-5 & Sat 4th 8-2
exercise equipment, appliances H/H, clothes,
S something for everyone'!!!!_
2646 StateCorrectional Rd. Sat.4th. 8-1
furniture, power chairs, clothes, tools, hospital
S bed TV's. and much i'iore !!!
3415 Old US Rd. by N. Oaks Sat. 4th. 6:30-11
young mens & women clothes, H/H, misc.
Something for Everyone !!!
3-Families 2483 3rd Ave. Alffrd Sat. 4th. 7-?
lots of H/H items, clothes, electric piano,
porcelain dolls, electronics and more !!!
4135 Park Place Rd. off Bumpnose Rd.
Sat. 4th. 7-? furniture, clothes, baby itmes
and much much more !!!!
Cypress Methodist Churc h Sat. MAy 4th (7-?)
Lots of misc. items. No reasonable offers
refused, Indoors, Rain or shine! Alsotaking
donations. (S of 90 & tracks E to Church)


ESTATE SALE: Wed, Thbrs, Fri & Sat 8-3
4271 Lafayette St. Antiques, furniture,'
. -lassware, primitives, tools, etc. -


GIlANT YARD SALE Sat. May 4th 41908Kelison
Ave.7-12 desks, tables, file cabinets, large con-
ference table, storage containers, large num-
br eb f misc. items CHIPOIA HISTORICAL TRUST


In House MOVING SALE 4981 Basswood Rd.
South of Greenwood. Sat, 4th. 7-2
SEverything must go.
Mdlti Family Sale 5406 Kent Street Malone
Sat May 4th (7am-12) Childrens clothes,
maternity, H/H items, women formal wear,
toys. toddler bed, crib mattress and more!
VFW 12046 SALE 2830 Wynn SL Inside the Post
Fri. 3rd 8-4 & Sat. 4th 8-2
Large variety of Items



Janitorial Business for sale
EquJipent, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
504-915-1474


3 Elec. Wheel Chairs $200. 579-5125
Guitar Alvarez 70's 12 string $150. 850-482-6022
Guitar amp: Stagg, new. $100. 850-272-7424
Guitar case: like new $100. 850-272-7424
Guitar stand for acoustic-$25. 850-272-7424


Guitar. Yamaha FG160 (1977)$500. 8501-272-7424
Ladder: 24 ft Aluminum Ext. $100. 850-638-2920


Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273,5264
www.janiking.com



Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

r.............. .............
ANNE'S DAY LILIES
827 S. APPLETREE ST
inDothan, Day Eilies ($1- up) "
SAmaryllis & Iris ($3 up)
334-792-0653 or 334-797-9657 .
L ................... ............



Free Cat small female calico, rescued, very
sweet. Call 850-482-2994 ,

ABCA.Registered Border
Collie Puppies: Black and
white, lilac and white,
M/F $350 Call 229-774-
2662 or 229-220-0232.


AKC German Shepherd Puppies: $350. Parents
on site. Up-to-date on shots and worming.
Black and tan. 334-393-7284 OR 334-806-5851


Adets yu COLSUF frIIE yvstigv~cfoiw cm e st o dtis


Laptop: HP G61. $250. 850-372-
Office Chairs: leather/fabric $!
Stroller sit or stand like new $4
* Trailer enclosed %" plywood 4)


2929
50850-482-2994
45. 850-526-3426.


Collies: AKC reg. Males & Females $400. Born
April 7,2013. Ready May 20th. Sable/White.
229-308-3006, alderman.lynn@yahoo.com
English Bulldog Puppy: AK Cl /Female
champion bloodlines, 20 weeks old, health
certificates, S&W. Colors: brindle & white.
$1,300. Call 850-249-5626 or 843-267-6214
Mini Australian Shepherd: ASDR beautiful pups
born 3/15. Blue merles, red merles, tri's & bi;s.
See @ facebook.com/ huntsminlaussies or call
706-761-3024
Papillon Puppies Dual Registered w/ CKC &
UKC $600. Breed is over.800 yrs. old. with no
medical defects, very loving non aggressive,
hypoallergehic, Call: 334-393-0938 or
334-379-0805 dmlugoOcenturylink.net
S^~,,..-,,,-.ii.Puples.Sa.l
ChA-P $30t C,. n eSe hhuahua
S334-718-488 .











S1 ;


Vine Ripe Tomatoes


Home Grown Greens
Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. H 52 Malvern




Aplin Farms
Strawberries
:& lettuce -
You Pick
We Pick
Open Mon-Sat (8-6)
34-726-5104 4


Sudoku


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Level: l- ..
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to Thursday's puzzle


5/3/13


Frozen Green

We also have
Shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
850-573-6594 4128 Hwy 231


U-Pick- We Pick
Juicy and Sweet
9 miles from Ross Clark Circle
Hw 52 West of Dothan.


r .............. ..... ......i
Bahia seed for sale 4.-
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
S experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
0END 6 SEANSAlE
Quality C-astal Hay large Ro.s.
Fertgzed Wed Control 5-209-945


fBying Pine / Hardwood in!.
your area.
Notractto small / CustomThinning
Call Pea River Timber
S334-389-2003 .


(II,)i


EM. LOyMElrN


CHIPOLA COLLEGE
is acceptig.applicatlons foq
the following full time'
,: + _positions:' :,
ASSOCIATEDEAROFF NEAND -
PERFORMING ARTS -
ACCOUNTING/BUSINESS INSTRUCTOR
9 ENGLISHLNSTRUCTOR. r
.CHEMIStTl'SV ilaCTO
MATHEMATICS EDUCATION NTFRUCTOR
1 NURSlNG1NSTRUCTOC ;,':
SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTOR l
WELDING INSTRUCTOR
CAREER COACH WELDING PROGRAM ::
Minimum qualifications are available it-
www.chipola.edu/personfel/jobs
APPLICATION DEADLINE IS
OPENUNTIL FILLED,
S Toobjtaln'a licat iif
Human Resources apippen chipola.edu
or at(850)718-229.-~andli maye '.
subject.to background inh tatI6ns
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOiR



M&AL4n


N fora

great buy

in the

Classified


I _________


Place an Ad


Fast, easy,


no pressure


24 hours a day, 7 days a week!


Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


__8_ '4 5 __



1 3
9 5 8 4


---- JL-
63579 __ _

8 - -



3 9

7 2 4
- -


46 75*2 3 8 1 9
8 5 24 A19 637
9 3 1 6 7 8 4 15 2
348267591
5 7 9 1 3 4 2 8 6.
21 68195374'
795346128
62398 1 745
1 484752963


.i


PLACE- ANA


I


.. wl -


- I


L *


. I








6 B Friday, May 3, 2013 Jackson County Floridan


AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-
MINDED, NEWSPAPER CARRIERS


Alford
Earn an average of

$600
per month

Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus

BE YOUR OWN BOSS 2 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out a bid at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL



AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-
MINDED, NEWSPAPER CARRIERS


GRAND RIDGE
Earn an average of

$.00
permonth

Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus

BE YOUR OWN BOSS 1 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out a bid at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL


ILLY
ARNES

Since 1975
BILLY BARNES ENTERPRISES, INC.
IS NOW HIRING
EXPERIENCED FLATBED DRIVERS

EXCELLENT PAY & BENEFITS
HOME MOST WEEKENDS
MINIMUM PAY
REQUIREMENTS INCLUDE:
MUST BE 23 YEARS OLD, VALID CLASS A CDL,
CLEAN DRIVING RECORD, 1 YEAR
TRACTOR/TRAILER FLATBED EXPERIENCE
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
MARY 2 1-800-844-6458 OPT 1
OR APPLY ONLINE
0 www.billybarnes.net


C.D.L with Hazmat
and Tanker
Full benefits.
s Apply in person to
Chipola Propane,
4055 Old Cottondale Road
Marianna, FL
Hours 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Monday Friday.
No Phone Calls Please !!



River Valley Rehabilitation
Center Is now hiring:
RN'S & LPN'S
7a-7p & 7p-7a SHIFT

C.N.A'S
3-11 SHIFT
$1.00 SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL

FOOD SERVICE AIDE
5a-1:30p/11a-8p SHIFT

Painter, Part Time, Temporary
Opening for a part time interior painter.
Painting experience, a must. Sheetrock
repair, floor, and ceiling tile replacement,
a plus. Apply in person at 17884 N. E.
Crozier St. Blountstown.
Great Pay and Benefits
Health, Vision & Dental
Please Apply at:
River Valley Rehabilitation Center
17884 NE Crozier Street
Blountstown, Fl. 32424
Ph: (850) 674-5464
Fax: 674-9384
Email: rvhrc@southernltc.com
Drug Free Workplace- Safe Minimal Lifting
Environment An EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D



Yor -mInth


/ .N Executive Secretary
:, .--x Must have high school
j diploma or GED, including
or supplemented by
course work in secretarial
sciences, and 3-5 yrs. exp. In secretarial
or administrative work, including
significant computer and budget
experience. Salary set at $22,269.00/yr.
Must have a valid FL drivers license prior
to employment.

Equipment Operator IV
Must have high school diploma or
equivalent with 1to 3 years of experi-
ence in the safe operation of heavy
motorized equipment (motor grader).
Must have valid Class A CDL prior to
employment. Salary set at $20,591.00/yr.

Equipment Operator III
Must have a high school diploma or
equivalent with 3 or more years
experience in the safe operation of
motorized equipment -- in the
construction and repair of roads.
Must have a valid Class A Commercial
Driver's License prior to employment.
Salary set at $19,753.00


Submit Jackson County employment ap-
plication to the Human Resources Dept.,
2864 Madison St., Marianna, FL 32448. Ph
482,9633. www.jacksoncountyfl.net/

Deadline to apply is 05-06-2013
EOE/AA/Vet Pref/ADA/ Drug-Free Workplace

) EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


Classes Forming Now
for Medical Assisting,
FOR TIS Electrical Trades and
FORTIS More!
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

( RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Apartments for Rent in Greenwood
2 BR $450 1BR $400
Call 850-326-4289




NEW Rugs Deering St. 4320; Cute lbd 1st fl.
quiet $340. mo. NO PETS also 727-433-RENT.

1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
*, 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
2BR/1BA House 6914 Oaks St
Grand Ridge $450. Mo. + $450. Dep.
4 Call 850-592-5571 .


2BR/1BA Newly Renovated 2658 Railroad St.
Open floor plan. Cottondale. No Pets.
$450 Mo. + $400 Dep. Call 850-352-4222
3/2 appliances included NO PETS
5374 Cotton St. Graceville, FL
$700. mo $350. dep. 850-263-2045 Lv. Mess.
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
4 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maint.incl.
4 850-593-4700 4w


2/1.5 with front addition, garage
on Shady Grove Rd. $350. mo. $350. dep
No inside pets. 850-209-3662
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountryliving.com.
.* 850-209-8847 4.
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325-,$500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595
2BR 1BA at Millpond $495 + dep. very nice,
water/sewer/lawn maintenance included,
access to pond,_No pets 850-209-3970
2BR 2 BA MH'S in Alford, $380 mo. $380. dep.
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2BR/2BA Mobile Home 5450 + deposit,
appliances, washer & dryer, water/garbage
& sewer included -* 850-482-4455
2BR/2BA Newly remodeled in quiet area.
Very clean. Water, sewage, garbage and yard
care provided. No smokers, no pets.
$500 + deposit. Call 850-718-8158.
4 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

fr)^ COMMERCIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Office Buildings for Lease 3200 sq. ft.
& 4200 sq. ft. 850-718-6541
(.) RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Foreclosure Homes For Sale
2161 Katie Avenue. Grand Ridge 3BR/2BA
double wide mobile home with land. $49,000.
555 Satsuma Road. Chattahoochee.
3BR/1BA 1665SF home. $49,000.
Credit Union Owned. Call 850-663-2404


G.M. Properties of PC
Beach 800-239-2059
Fully Furnished Condos
& Townhouses
near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $250 nt.
Portside Resort starting @ $125.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
www.gmproperties.com


www.TCFLORIDAN.com


RANPOR' AO :O .IGN AE L TO SU URN ISHED l 1


__ Iii


9,
5/,
/1


SC Your guide to great local
SBUSINESS businesses & services


SERVICE DIRECTORY


Call 526-3614 to place your ad.


Affordable Lawn Care
Low Overhead=Low Prices
850-263-3813 850-849-1175












ClayO'Neal's P

850-62-9402 5



pn Tfolling Motor Repair
SAffordabe Service! Fast Repair!
Most Cases 1 Week Turnaround.
Servicing Minn Kota & Motorguide.
_ 850-272-5305


NEW& USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELOW RETAIL PRICES!
8ui'T 850.526.1700
------TJs Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
|J 2978 Pierce Street
S9 behind Tim's Florist)


I SEVICE OFFREDI


MAXIANNA CITY
:FARMERS
:MARKET


2844 Madison St.
Tues, Thurs, Sat
7am-noon


Chad O's Lawn F/X 4
Commercial & Residential t ..
SSpring Cleanup &
Monthly Maintenance '
Full Lawn Care Service
Free Estimates
Family Owned & Operated
Chad Oliver I 850573-7279


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME



"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs InsuIredl



Lighthouse Electrical
Unlimited, LLC
Residential Electrical
S Remodels Service Work
#ER 13014408 Insu.rcl
(850)272-2918 Ricky Mosher
to.. u/ / -. x uOwner


1 1'EiVI


You CALL... WE COME To You!
RED'S MOBILE
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE
850-209-9713
EDWARD MAGGI, OWNER




This Month's Special
pl ~$239500
35 Years in Business
WEM P,,,P, i B, i '.



BESTWAY
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN NORTH FLORIOA
Been n Business since 19i89

OVER80
DIFFERENT SIZES!
YOU CAN CHOOSE
.u--. &- ". :- dll COLOR & STYLE!
- B_:BUILTOSIT![ 850-7T7-8974
2919 Hwy 231 North Panama City, FL


17 Acres: If it's peace and quiet you're
looking for, you've found it.
Getaway from the hustle and bustle of the city,
only 8 miles from Chattahoochee.
This 4BR/2BA doublewide mobile home is
almost 2,200 SF and has a split floor-plan with
fireplace. 17 ACRES, 2 Ponds, Carport. Wildlife.
Contact Michael 850-533-6011.
Feel free to drive by and take a look!
NO OWNER FINANCING

8 yr. old 2600 sq.ft. 4/3 brick home on 1 acre.
dbl garage, sep. dbl carport & workshop, deck
Beautiful home in Blountstown, near H5
$199.900. nice landscaping 850-674-1433
FSBO: 3BR/2BA Brick Home. Well maintained
and updated, fireplace with gas logs, new paint
and carpet, hardwood floors, nice yard 1 acre
with fruit trees. $129,900. Call 850-482-3233 or
850-209-0459 please leave message.


1979 14x68 Riverchase 2/2, fireplace, nicely
furnished, upgraded master bath, porch &
deck included $12,500. 850-718-6541
MUST BE MOVED 4,,'
1995 Fleetwood 16x80 3/2 CH&A all electric, all
appl. good cond. $18,000 OBO 850-579-2728 or
850-348-9925 has axle & tires

"( RECREATION


Golf Car: 2006 Club Car "Precedent"
One owner, gas powered, full weather
enclosure, club/ball washer, club rain
protector, cooler, floor mat, tinted windshield.
$2,900. Phone 334-464-3383
Honda 2007 Foreman ATV;
.wheel & 4-wheel Drive. Elec-
tri: wench, 190 hours on it;
$48100 OBO 334-596-9966


,- 2008 Crownline 19 SS, 30.5
I - irs. Mercruis.er 4.3L, Facto-
.- rv .j.eborard tower, cus-
t.r"ntom :cover. s.nap-in carpet,
alL', .thru tr ransom, trailer
brakes, SS cleats, flip-up captain's chairs, Sony
marine stereo & sub-woofer, bimini top, stain-
less steel rub-rail upgrade, trailer tie downs, SS
windshield lock, SS cupholders, chrome wheels
Garage kept always. 334-796-9479
25 ft. Party Barge Pontoon 2011 Suntracker
Regency edition only 75 hrs. 150hp Mercury
Opti Max engine, with 2 axle trailer & lots of
extras, ready for the water, take over
payoff'$41,000. Call 334-763-9124
BOAT Crownline BR 180 135hp bimini top,
Crownline trailer, new tires, $7,000.
334-618-5169
Pontoon Boat 2008 20ft. G3 fish & Cruise, pur-
chased new July 2009, 30 gallon gas tank, fish
finder, 90HP, 4-stroke, Yamaha engine. Exc. gas
mileage. Asking $15,000. 334-897-6929.


CLASSIFIED


?Got Stumps?
CALL
HILL'S TREE SERVICE.
^Si' "- 53-J~SlUi


_ ___ ___ 1 IY __ I _____ ~__


Call 52W614.1to.sell

you r item, in the

Classified. todayl


v


JV








CLASSIFIED


mw ITCri .L RTI~ANC mm


Jackson County Floridan *


Friday, May 3, 2013- 7 B


1995 30 ft. Travel Trailer fixed up to live in
good condition, cold AC $4200. OBO
334-702-0001 or 386-965-6964 In Dothan
1999 26ft Jayco Eagle 5th wheel camper .
Sleeps 6, one living room slide, queen size hide
a bed sofa, master queen size bed, 16' awning.
$6,900. 334-673-0533
32ft. Travel Trailer 2007 Conquest great cond.
sleeps 4-5, slide out living room $10500.
Motor Home 2002 38ft. Fleetwood Discovery
2-slide outs 35K mi. 330 hp Cummings engine,
mint cond. garage kept, awnings out with TV
outside to view & washer & dryer
$59,500. 334-805-7679.
Keystone 2006 Sidney Edition md# 30ROLS ,
30ft. pull behind. Like new, total use 7-8 times,
sheltered when not in use.
Asking $15,000 334-897-6929.

(T TRANSPORTATION


-.; .- .-. fWj Dodge 2001 Ram 1500 SLT,
4x4, tilt, cruise, electric
doors & windows, sliding
rear window, bedliner,
very cold air, $5,995 OBO. Call 334-237-2634
ANIU0 CLSSCVHLE


1983 Buick LeSabre
Limited: Two owner
vehicle, and yes,it was a
little Grandmother's Car!! 123,500 mi, 5.0
liter V8, Sedan. All stock, All originalAM/FM
radio, power locks & windows, tilt steering,
remote outside'mirror adjustments, original
velour seat covers, split front seats w/armrest,
power adjustable driver's seat, heat/AC works
great, wire spoke hubcaps, big trunk, front
window power units replaced. Engine kept
tuned regularly, new battery, all belts, water
pump & hoses replaced, good tires. Vinyl roof
needs care Left front corner/side hit by deer.
Drives great, runs strong, cleans up nice!
$1,975. 334-687-2330 or maczack@bellsouth.net


n n n J qr Jvl\unl YI I ~cuil


H H fB Lincoln Town Car 2006
lSignature Limited
Li- Nreo original
,:.0onrr, always garage
kept, only 39,700 miles.
$17,500. Must see to appreciate 334-714-9672.


CHEVY 1995 CAPRICE-Clean, runs great, cold
air, fully loaded $3,500 OBO 334-355-1085, 334-
740-0229


I


E Toyota 2007 Prius,
White, fully
loaded, excellent
S .... condition, 70K
miles, $12,500
850-499-7560


JILs


VW 2011 Jetta, All Applications Accepted. Low
miles, great fuel mileage, still under factory
warranty. $300/down, $300/month. Call Steve
334-791-8243.


2007/8 Qlink LD250 Legend 250cc
low miles, runs good, $900
call Randy 850-693-0566
2011 Yamaha V-Star 950 Nothing wrong with
this excellent Cruiser! Only 1316 miles. Garage
kept & title in hand. Yamaha XVS95AL Blue 950
cc. Great gas mileage without compromising
power. Cobra slip on exhaust gives it a more
aggressive sound (original exhaust included if
you want to tone it down). Show Chrome back-
rest. $6,750 OBO. Call Fred 334-379-4549
Harley Davidson 2005 Dyna Low Rider, ridden,
$7000. DR Field and Brush trimer, exc. cond.
$800. 334-791-0701.
Honda 2006 250 Rebel 13K miles, 70-80 miles
per gal. nice hwy. cruiser with classic leather
saddle bags, windshield, never used full face
helmet $2450. OBO 850-557-1629.
Kawasaki 2006 Vulcan 500 LTD 2040 miles, red
in color, garage kept, $2800. 850-773-4939


' ~Pass Repo pass bankruptcy
I&WL slow credit ok
$0S Down/lst Payment,
Tax, Tag & Title
12 months OR 12,000 mile warranty
RIDE TODAY! FREE $25. gas giveaway
,Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550

Ford 1999 Mustang GT: 35th anniversary
edition Pony Pkg with Flomaster, automatic,
Mach sound system, ruby red, leather interior,
ice cold AC, recent tune-up, well maintained
with many new parts, 9 yrs adult owned, good
tires, new battery, 168k miles. $5,200.
Email @ mustang99ad@yahoo.com
-" ;,;' Honda 1991 CRX:
I --_ .- '.- R, -d Hat.;hta.: I Sp.F :.:-d;
1.- 1.2)0 OBO.
--'- ,_ Pho-r.e 133 .4.35-3 .2

.....- ---. Hyundai 2004 Sonata, V-
6, GLS, 4" door, automat-
ic, loaded, like new,
68,000 miles, very clean,
$6475. Call 334-790-7959.
Hyundai 2012 Elantra, $200 down, $269 per
month. No Credit Refused. Call Ron Ellis 714-
0028.


Nissan 1997 Altima 4 door 168,000 miles.
Great work car $1,0000BO. Call 334 803 5906


I


r


r-


L-


I


I


Nissan 2012 Altima, Like new, under warranty,
No Credit Refused! $200 down, $269 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 714-0028.


Yamaha 2002 TTR125: Great condition!
Includes helmet & small aluminum load ramp.
Located in Dothan, AL. $800 .OBO Contact 863-
221-7680 or coletoncallender@gmail.com.


Ford 1993 Ranger: 5 speed, step-side, cold air,
runs good, black, good condition. $2,100. OBO
Call 334-798-1768 or 334-691-7111
Ford 2004 F-150 Lariat, ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED,
loaded, 78k miles, leather, pwr window, door
locks, tuneau cover, tow pkg., new tires.
$250/down, $300/month. Call Steve 334-791-
8243.
Ford Tractor 9N with 4ft. bushhog,
good working condition. 229-869-0883.
Tractor 240 Massey Ferguson : deisel engine
with bottom plow, garage kept, less 600 hours,
good condition. $7,500. Call 334-794-3226


,i .Dodge 2005 Caravan STX,
seat, front and rear air,
1 103,000 miles, $5925. Call
334-790-7959.
For sale by Owner
s 2006 Pontiac Montana SV6,
S 88K miles, 7 passenger
". IIj 1, sliding power door, rail
guards, back-up assist,
front/rear CD/MP3, DVD w/remote, fabric w/4
captain seats. Maintained w/most service re-
cords. 60-75% tread on tires remain. Carpet
mats incl. Other extra's. Asking price suggest-
ed by www.kbb.com. $7,500 334-790-6618
;owla Honda 2008 Odyssey EX
-e ..^. MUST SELL! Less than
.. tj M 48,000 mi. 23 mpg. Metallic
-fij silver, 7-8 passenger seat-
&MA ing, power sliding doors.
One owner, no wrecks. Non smoking. Excellent
condition. Carfax available. $14,900. Selling
well below Kelly Blue Book Value. 334-790-7926
____-_____=1_,]___iJ______l

1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
Hare "s 24 HourTo 7
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

S- : CALL FOR TOP PRICE
x FOR JUNK VEHICLES
I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664

Got a Clunker
i, We'll be your Junker!
: '' ^We buy wrecked cars
_--l and Farm Equip. at a
; -s'S- fair and honest price!
$325 & tComplete Cars
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285
r -- ------- -- ----------- ----- ----
S* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not .
334-794-9576 or 344-7914714

LEGALS


LF160110 JACKSON COUNTY
NOTICE is hereby given to all interested per-
sons or firms that sealed proposals will be ac-
cepted at the Jackson County Purchasing De-
partment located at the Jackson County Ad-
ministration building, 2864 Madison Street, Ma-
rianna, FI. 32448 until 2:00PM CST on
05/30/2013 for the following item or items:
RFP NUMBER: 1213-28
RFP NAME: Replace 6 rooftop Gas Packs
(HVAC) units at the Jackson County Correction
Facility
DESCRIPTION: Removal of old units and install
new 7.5% ton, 6.5 ton units
PRE-BID CONFERENCE May 15th 2013 9:00AM
C.T. 2864 Madison St Marianna FI. 32448
OPENING:
Proposals will be opened by the Purchasing De-
partment of the BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS located at 2864 MADISON STREET,
Marianna, Florida 32448 on May 31st 2013 at
10:00 AM C.T.
Bid Packets must be obtained from our web
site www.jacksoncountyfl.us click on purchas-
ing then bids & RFP's. Information or Inquiries
may be made by contacting Stanley Hascher,
Purchasing Agent, at 2864 Madison Street, Ma-
rianna, Florida or voice phone 850-718-0005, or
Fax 850-482-9682.
IMPORTANT
Response packets SHALL be submitted in a
sealed envelope marked SEALED RFP and iden-
tified by the NAME OF THE FIRM, NAME AND
NUMBER OF THE PROJECT, ALONG WITH THE
DATE AND TIME OF OPENING. Opening Date:
May 31st 2013 at 10:00 AM C.T.

EEO STATEMENT
Jackson County is committed to assuring equal
opportunity in the award of contracts and,
therefore, complies with all laws prohibiting
discrimination oh the basis of race, color, reli-
gion, national origin, age and sex.
Dale Rabon Guthrie
Board of County Commissioners
By: Chuck Lockey
Board Chairman


JA.CKSON COUNT Y


FLORIDAN

jcfloridan.com



monsuerm

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS,


Find jobs



fast and


easy.






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NrL



Poll finds support for Redskins name


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON It's
been a rough offseason for
the Washington Redskins,
and not just because of the
knee injury to star quarter-
back Robert Griffin III.
The team's nickname,
which some consider a
derogatory term for Na-
tive Americans, has faced
a barrage of criticism. Lo-
cal leaders and pundits
have called for a name
change. Opponents have
launched a legal challenge
intended to deny the team
federal trademark protec-
tion. A bill introduced in
Congress in March would
do the same, though it ap-
pears unlikely to pass.
But a new Associated
Press-GfK poll shows that
nationally, "Redskins" still
enjoys widespread sup-
port. Nearly four in five
Americans don't think the
team should change its
name, the survey found.
Only 11 .percent think it
should be changed, while
8 percent weren't sure and
2 percent didn't answer.
Although 79 percent fa-
vor keeping the name, that
does represent a 10 per-
centage point drop from
the last national poll on
the subject, conducted in
1992 by The Washington
Post and ABC News just
before the team won its
most recent Super Bowl.
Then, 89 percent said
the name should not be
changed, and 7 percent
said it should.
The AP-GfK poll was
conducted from April 11-
15. It included interviews
with 1,004 adults on both
land lines and cellphones.
It has a margin of sampling
error of plus or minus 3.9
percentage points.
Several poll respondents
told The AP that they did
not consider the name of-
fensive and cited tradition
in arguing that it shouldn't
change.
"That's who they've been
forever. That's who they're
known as," said Sarah Lee,
a 36-year-old stay-at-home
mom from Osceola, Ind. "I
think we as a people make
race out to be a bigger is-
sue than it is."
But those who think
the name should be
changed say the word is


The Washington Redskins logo is displayed at midfield before the start of an NFL preseason game in Landover, Md. on Aug. 28,
2009, The team's nickname, which some consider a derogatory term for Native Americans, has faced a barrage of criticism. But
a new Associated Press-GfK poll shows that nationally, "Redskins" still enjoys widespread support.


obviously derogatory.
"With everythingthat Na-
tive Americans have gone
through in this country, to
have a sports team named
the Redskins come on,
now. It's bad," said Pamela
Rogal, 56, a writer from
Boston. "Much farther
down the road, we're going
to look back on this and
say, 'Are you serious? Did
they really call them the
Washington Redskins?' It's
a no-brainer."
Among football fans,
11 percent said the name
should be changed the
same as among non-fans.
Among nonwhite football
fans, 18 percent said it
should change, about dou-
ble the percentage of white
football fans who oppose
the name.
In Washington, debate
over the name has in-
creased in recent months.
In February, the National
Museum of the Ameri-
can Indian held a daylong


symposium on the use of
Indian mascots by sports
teams. Museum Director
Kevin Gover, of the Pawnee
Nation, said the word "red-
skin" was "the equivalent
of the n-word."
District of Columbia
Mayor Vincent Gray, a
Democrat, suggested that
the team would have to
consider changing the
name if it wanted to play
its home games in the city
again. Delegate Eleanor
Holmes Norton, a Demo-
crat who represents the
district in Congress, said
she's a fan of the team but
avoids saying "Redskins."
Just this week, a D.C. coun-
cilmember introduced
a resolution calling for a
name change, and it ap-
pears to have enough sup-
port to pass, although the
council has no power over
the team.
"We need to get rid of it,"
said longtime local news
anchor Jim Vance in a


commentary that aired in
February. Vance, of WRC-
TV, revealed that he has
avoided using the name
on the air for the.past few
years.
Other media outlets
have done the same. The
Washington City Paper
substitutes the name "Pig-
skins," and DCist.com
announced in February
that it would avoid using
the name in print. The
Kansas City Star also has
a policy against printing
"Redskins."
In March, a three-judge
panel heard arguments
from a group of five Native
American petitioners that
the team shouldn't have
federal trademark protec-
.tion, which could force
owner Daniel Snyder into
a change by weakening
him financially. A decision
isn't expected for up to a
year, and the Redskins are
sure to appeal if it doesn't
go their way. A similar


case, ultimately won by
the team, was filed in 1992
and needed 17 years to go
through the legal system
before the Supreme Court
declined to intervene.
Several poll respondents
told AP that they were
unaware of the ongoing
debate.
"If we're going to say
that 'Redskins' is an offen-
sive term, like the n-word
or something like that, I
haven't heard that," said
David Black, 38, a football
fan from Edmond, Okla.,
who doesn't think a change
is necessary.
George Strange, 52, of
Jacksonville, Fla., who feels
the name should change,
said people might change
their minds if they become
more educated about the
word and its history.
"My opinion, as I've got-
ten older, has changed.
When I was younger, it
was not a big deal. I can't
get past the fact that it's a


Sports Briefs


AUTO RACING
Corvette Stingray to
be Indy 500 pace car
INDIANAPOLIS -The
2014 Corvette Stingray
will be the pace car at this
year's Indianapolis 500.
It's the 12th time a Cor-
vette will lead the tradi-
tional 33-car field around
Indy's 2.5-mile oval.
The car will be painted
Laguna Blue Tintcoat and
the only modifications
from the car sold to the
public will be the safety
features.
Chevrolet has a long his-
tory with the 500. In addi-
tion to being a regular on
the pace-car list, Oldsmo-
bile was the sole engine
producer during the late
1990s and early 2000s and
returned to the series in
2011. The Chevrolet broth-
ers Louis, Arthur and
Gaston all drove in the
race and Gaston Chevrolet
won in 1920.
This year's race is
scheduled for May 26.
NFL
Sapp will be inducted
into Ring of Honor
TAMPA -Warren Sapp
is the newest member of
the Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers' Ring of Honor.
The team formally
announced Thursday
that the four-time All Pro
defensive tackle will be
honored on Nov. 11 at
Raymond James Stadium,
a little over three months
after Sapp is inducted into
the Pro Football Hall of
Fame in Canton, Ohio.
Sapp will join Lee Roy
jSelmon, John McKav, Jim-
B si& ,&Sf,,. : ,,, ,- ..,


mie Giles and Paul Gruber
in having his name dis-
played in the club's Ring of
Honor, which was created
in 2009. The. club also said
Sapp's No. 99 jersey will
be retired during halftime
of that night's nationally-
televised game against the
Miami Dolphins. ,

Colts sign undrafted
free agent Malone
INDIANAPOLIS The
Indianapolis Colts have
.signed undrafted free
agent Nigel Malone.
The 5-foot-10, 180-
pound cornerback spent
the past two seasons at
Kansas State where he re-
corded 109 tackles, picked
off 12 passes, forced one
fumble and recovered
one. Last season, he led
the Wildcats with 14 pass
breakups and tied for the
team lead with five inter-
ceptions. As a junior, he
led the Big 12 with seven
interceptions tied for
third-most in the nation.
He is the 10th undrafted
rookie to sign withIndy
since the draft ended
Saturday.

Jaguars' Caldwell fills
front office vacancies
JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars have
completed changes to
their front office.
General manager David
Caldwell announced
Thursday that he has hired
Chris Polian as director of
pro personnel and pro-
moted Andy Dengler to
assistant director of player
personnel.


Caldwell also named
Kyle O'Brien as director of
college scouting, Paul Ro-
ell as assistant director of
college scouting and Mark
Ellenz as eastern regional
scout.
Polian, the son of for-
mer Indianapolis Colts
architect Bill Polian, has
19 years of NFL scout-
ing experience. He spent
last season as a scout in
Atlanta, working along-
side Caldwell. Polian
also served three seasons
(2009-11) as vice president
and general manager of
the Colts.
Dengler spent the last
two seasons as Jackson-
ville's director of college
personnel. He joined the
franchise in 1998 as a colt
lege scout.
NBA
Burglars strike home
of Heat's Haslem
MIAMI Miami Heat
forward Udonis Haslem's
home in South Florida
has been burglarized,
although authorities say
it's not clear if anything
was taken.
According to a Broward
Sheriff's Office report re-
leased Thursday, someone
broke into the house April
13 by prying open a side
garage door. Deputies
responded after a home
alarm activated, but no
one was inside when they
arrived.
Closets in the house had
been ransacked and alarm
boxes had been ripped
off the walls. Deputies say
some belongings were
found in trash bags and
other valuable items were


left untouched. Authori-
ties surmised that the
thieves left hurriedly when
deputies arrived.
No arrests have been
made.
Thieves also struck the


home of Haslem's team-
mate Chris Bosh in early
April, making off with
$340,000 in jewelry and
other items.

From wire reports


racial slur," Strange said.
"I do have friends that are
Redskins fans and ... they
can't step aside and just
look at it from a different
perspective."
There's precedent for a
Washington team chang-
ing its name because of
cultural sensitivities. The
late Washington Bullets
owner Abe Pollin decided
the nickname was inap-
propriate because of its
association with urban
violence, and in 1997, the
NBA team was rechris-
tened the Wizards.
Other professional
sports teams have Native
American nicknames, in-
cluding the NFL's Kansas
City Chiefs and baseball's
Atlanta Braves and Cleve-
land Indians. But former
U.S. Sen. Ben Nighthorse
Campbell of Colorado,
who is Native American,
said "Redskins" is much
worse because of its ori-
gins and its use in con-
nection with bounties on
Indians.
"There's a derogatory
name for every ethnic
group in America, and we
shouldn't be using those
words," Campbell said,
adding that many people
don't realize how offensive
the word is."'
Numerous colleges and
universities have changed
names that reference Na-
tive Americans. St. John's
changed its mascot from
the Redmen to the Red
Storm, Marquette is now
the Golden Eage instead
of the Warriors and Stan-
ford switched from the
Indians to the Cardinal.
Synder, however, has
been adamant that the
name should not change,
and NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell has said he
supports the team's stance.
General Manager Bruce
Allen said in March that
the team isn't considering
a new name.
Following the sympo-
sium at the museum, the
team posted a series of ar-
ticles on its official website
that spotlighted some of
the 70 U.S. high schools
that us the nickname
Redskins.
"There is nothing that
we feel is offensive," Allen
said. "And we're proud of
our history."

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