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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01071
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text

Ctn 2 JobScq 51 PkgSeq 002
*******ALL FOR ADC 320
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32613-7/007


Marianna
'Dawgs
look for
redemption

1B


Informing more than -,'l 'i readers daily in print and online






FLORIIDAN


) p


FDA: Miorlrng-after pill
OK for ages 15 and up

8A


Vol. 90 No. 97


Woman wins $3 million


top prize in scratch-off game


From staff reports
The Florida Lottery announces
thatWanda Spencer, 51, of Camp-
bellton, claimed a $3,000,000
prize in the Gold Rush Tripler
scratch-off game at Florida Lot-
tery headquarters in Tallahassee.
Spencer purchased her winning
ticket at Kmee I, located at 5243


Highway 231 in Campbellton.
Spencer chose the one-time,
lump-sum payment option for
her winnings, in the amount of
$1,950,000. She has won smaller
amounts on scratch-off games
before, but this is her first experi-
ence claiming a top prize.
The Florida Lottery offers ap-
proximately 60 scratch-off games-


at any given time through vend-
ing machines or counter dis-
plays at more than 13,000 retail-
ers statewide. Scratch-off games
make up approximately 58 per-
cent of ticket sales and gener-
ated more than $495 million for
the Educational Enhancement
Trust Fund (EETF) in fiscal year
2011-12.'


Wanda Gai Spencg
$3,000,000.00


SUBMITTED PHOTO


Wanda
Spencer
poses with
her husband
after claiming
her $3 million
prize at
Florida Lottery
Headquarters
in Tallahassee.


FULL MOON RISING


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN,
W while large portions of the Earth were treated to a partial lunar eclipse
Last Thursday, Jackson County had to make do with this big full moon.
It is seen rising over the Marianna High School Baseball Field.
According to the Farmer's Almanac, the April full moon is often known as a
"Full Pink Moon" because of a flower that blooms early in the spring. However,
it also is known as an egg, fish or sprouting grass moon. If you weren't able to
travel to the eastern hemisphere for the eclipse, there will be eclipses affecting
North America on May 25 and Oct. 18. According to EarthSky.org, the May eclipse
may be too minor to be visible, though.


Chipola Brain Bowlers


Fla. House to recognize team


BY ANGIE COOK
acook@jcfloridan.com

The Florida House of Repre-
sentatives will recognize mem-
bers qf the 2012-13 Chipola
College Brain Bowl team today
in Tallahassee.
From the chamber floor, State
Rep: Marti Coley, R-Marianna, is
scheduled at 11:30 a.m. EDT to
acknowledge the Chipola visi-
tors, who will be seated in the
House gallery.
The House Speaker pro


) CLASSIFIEDS...7-9B


tempore is expected to note
some of the team's accomplish-
S. ments which are
outlined in a reso-
lution (HR 9091)


Young


she introduced in
April.
Head Coach Stan
Young, in a phone
interview Tuesday,
said he and the


majority of the team would make
the trip to the State Capitol.
"We think it's a tre-
mendous honor to be


) ENTERTAINMENT...6B


) LOCAL...3A


recognized by the Florida House
of Representatives."
Today's recognition is testa-
ment to the many record-set-
ting accomplishments Young,
assistant coach Robert Dunkle
and the team have earned
over the last few years at the
regional, state and national
level.
The Brain Bowl team also
will be recognized Thursday in
Marianna at the high school
tournament at 1:30 p.m. CDT in
Building Z, Chipola College.


> OBITUARIES...9A


They love



* their wheels


DEBORAHBUCKHALTER/FLORIDAN
Larry lonetz is nearing the end of a 1700-mile journey aboard his
recumbent tricycle. He got to Marianna on Monday, stayed over, and
traveled on through Gadsden County on Tuesday. He expects to make
Jacksonville a little later this week, where his trip will end. Scratches
visible here on the body of his bluevelo trike bear evidence of a traffic
mishap that happened just before he started his trek, but it didn't
dissuade him from his planned journey.

Trike enthusiast takes

slow ride into retirement


BY DEORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

If you thought you saw a gi-
ant banana cruising through
Jackson County on Monday
or Tuesday, you don't need
to get your eyes or mental


health checked. That was Wis-
consin resident Larry Ploetz
rolling along in a bright yel-
low recumbent tricycle. By
the time he got to Marianna
on Monday, he had logged
See PLOETZ, Page 9A


DEBORAH BUCKHALTER/FLORIDAN
Compass Lake resident Eddie Monk gets ready to take off in the
souped-up Corvette he bought from a famed driver's race-training
school for amateurs.

Local man buys race-training

car from famed driver


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Eddie Monk spent some of
his working years as a me-
chanical engineer, designing
machines. Now he owns the
Outpost gun shop in Mari-
anna, having closed his store
of the same name in Dothan,


) OPINION...4A


) SPORTS...1B


Ala., about 10 years ago to
concentrate on the smaller
location here.
"I love Marianna," Monk
said. "I'm a country boy from
Ozark, Ala., so living in Com-
pass Lake is kind of like being
at home, and here I'm only
See MONK, Page 9A


) WEATHER...2A


This Newspaper up
Is Printed On i .
Recycled Newsprint 'A,




7 65161 80050 9


Facebook Twitter


Follow us


~__1~___11111_1__~_1____~11__ 1111---111~ ~








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook
Scattered Showers & Storms.
Today Justin Kiefer / WMBB


High 800 ,
/1 Low 610
I ."


High 800
-W j Low 600


Thursday
Showers & Storms Likely.


High 740
Low 53


Saturday
Possible Showers & Storms.


.- High 760
.": *Low 550

Friday
Scattered Showers & Storms.



High- 790
Low 560


Sunday
Partly Cloudy & Mild.


,. High: 79
,.. Lus: 61


SIliovh: 79
y Los%: 63
,_., : -


L ih:
;" Low: 67


PRECIPITATION


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0"
2.93"
4.05"


Year to date
Normal YTD
Normal for year


Low 12:27 AM
Low 3:26 PM
Low 12:32 AM
Low 1:43 AM
Low 2:17 AM


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryyille


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
46.04 ft.
9.36 ft.
7.67 ft.
6.08 ft.


. fli h Hi h: 81
----- -' --' ,,," I-t, : hi

High: 81 '
Lq%: 62


, \ High: 78
S Low: 66


20.22"
59.26"


- 2:02 PM
- 11:06 AM
- 2:35 PM
- 3:08 PM
- 3:41 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


* High: 81
LUM: 62


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 S 2 3 4 72

THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 5:57 AM
Sunset 7:20 PM
Moonrise 12:28 AM May May May May
Moonset 11:34 AM 10 18 25 2


FLORIDA'S MgREAl

PANHANDLE COUaNTRY

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9M

L0* SISTNOHULYTH UP


\* rmfirtr 11rJ U^^Ic
w- r: : u Ka ,
flub i i gjb
L_ I*.^~i ~
Iro Gf-LI.--
I^


J.V'i -, ':Di Ci ,' TY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614' *
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
'Mailing Addressi
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three, months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are.available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be 1 good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


TODAY
Jackson County Public Library Marianna
Branch located at 2929 Green St. will begin a series
of renovations/repairs starting with a new roof. The
drive-through alley from Green St. to the park-
ing lot on the.Caledonia side of the Library will be
closed. The public may access the parking lot from
Caledonia St.
) 10th Annual Sunland Retirees Luncheon .- 11
a.m. at the Oaks Restaurant, U.S. 90 in Marianna.
All Sunland retirees are invited to attend and enjoy
food ind tel,:. :nl"p For reservations call 526-5107
or 482-2881.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Basic Computer Class Part 1 Noon to 3 p.m.
at Gd .:'ill Career Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90,
Marianna. Free class teaches basic components
and use of a computer. Call 526-0139.

THURSDAY, MAY 2
"International Chat n' Sip" 8:30-10 a.m.
at the Jackson County Public Library, Marianna
Branch, 2929 Green St. Everyone is invited to
enjoy a relaxed environment for the exchange of
language, culture and ideas among our local and
international communities. Light refreshments will
be served. Call 482-9124.
a Free Presentation on Elder Law 9:30 a.m. at
the Jackson County Senior Citizens, 2931 Optimist
Drive in Marianna. Program will be presented by
Glenda Swearingen, attorney at law, who special-
izes in all legal topics concerning senior citizens.
Continental breakfast will begin at 8:30 a.m.
) Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2290.
Job Club Noon to 3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills; get job search assis-.
tance. Call 526-0139.
) Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group-
Noon at Jackson Hospital Hudnall Building in the
Community Room. Free to attend. Curriculum
developed by ex-smokers for those who want to
become ex-smokers themselves. Call 482-6500.
) High School Brain Bowl Tournament 130
p.m. in the Literature/Language E.i.ni'lIng at Chipola
College. The public is invited to watch the 20-min-
ute championship round. At 1:50 p.m., high school
awards will be handed out followed by recognition
of Chipola's :, in i state championship Brain Bowl
team.
) Employability Workshop, Completing Applica-
tions 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 U.S. 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
) VFW & Ladies Auxiliary Meeting 6 p.m. at
2830 Wynn St. in Marianna. Covered-dish supper


f,1,,,..- ,. by a 7 p.m. business meeting. Call 372-
2500.
) The William Dunaway Chapter, Florida Soci-
ety, Sons of the American Revolution Meeting
- 6:30 p.m. at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna.
The program will be a PowerPoint presentation
by Compatriot Bill Talley, Pri :neI:., of War of the
American Revolution." Anyone interested in the SAR
is welcome to attend. Call 594-6664.
) Chipola College Graduation Ceremony 7
p.m. in the Milton H. Johnson Health Center. Chipola
alumnus Lamar Polston will deliver the commence-
ment address. Parents, relatives and friends are
invited to a reception immediately following the
ceremony. Call 718-2211.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed. /

FRIDAY, MAY 3
Knitters Nook 10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Money Sense Class Noon to 4 p.m. at Good-
will Career Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna.
This is a financial literacy class that helps with
budgeting, saving and other financial topics. Class
is free. Call 526-0139.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care i. lijl,'I. Call
209-7856, 573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, MAY4 '
Partners for Pets Yard Sale 7 a.m.-i p.m. at
4011 Ilaintenance Drive, Marianna. Variety of items
'will be for sale. Donated items can be dropped off
at the Shelter Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
Proceeds will benefit the Partners for Pets Shelter.
Call 482-4570.
) Self-Defense Class 9 a.m. at Chipola Fitness
Center, 4230 Lafayette St. in Marianna. Lora Fisher,
Self-Defense Awareness & Fi n iii i:.ih ir:, Exchange
Instructor will teach this class. Event is hosted by
the Jackson County Sheriff's Ci:,- indi Chipola
Fitness Center. Women 13 years of age and up are
welcome to attend. Cost is $15 per person. To make
reservations call 482-9664 ext. 116.
) Covenant Hospice Third Annual Junior Flower
Pot Workshop for Children 9 a.m. to noon at
Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kelson Avenue, Suite E in
Marianna. Workshop is free and is for children ages


5-14. Refreshments, flower pots and art materials
will be provided. Registration is required by May 1.
Call 482-8520.
Family Preparedness Expo-10 a.m.-3 p.m. at
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints,
3141 College St. in Marianna. There will be displays,
demonstrations, samples and informational mate-
rial on more than 75 subjects ranging from food
preservation to cooking outside, making soap to
raising rabbits and from first aid kits to sewing on
a button. Refreshments will be available and door
prizes given away. Call .526-4645.
) Covenant Hospice Third Annual Junior
Flower Pot Workshop for Children -1-4 p.m.
at Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E in
Marianna. Workshop is free and is for children ages
5-14. Refreshments, flower pots and art materials
will be provided. Registration is required by May 1.
Call 482-8520.
) "Safe on the Lake" 2-6 p.m. at Sneads Park
on Lake Seminole. Event is sponsored by the
Jackson County Sheriff Department and the town
of Sneads. Learn about safety on the water, browse
vendor booths and enjoy food and activities. Call
593-6636.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SUNDAY, MAY 5
2013 Washington County's Miss Heart of the
USA Pageant 2 p.m. at the Panhandle Shrine
Club, 1425 Brickyard Road, Chipley. I i,: ri: ill
include: Baby Miss, Tiny Miss, Little Miss, Petit Miss,
Junior Miss, Teen Miss, Miss and Ms. Proceeds will
benefit the Washington County Council on Aging.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
6:30 p.m.,at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in.the
board room of C .-1 i-nb Liitn'. raceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, MAY 6
a Chipola College Registration for Summer I 8
a.m.-6 p.m. Call 718-2211 or visit www.chipola.edu.
Jackson County School District Preschool/
Early Head Start Registration for the 2013-2014
School Year -1-3 p.m. at Early Ci nidi .-.d Center
in Marianna. Preschool is for c Iiii'i-,i 3 or 4 years
old on or before Sept. 1 and Early Head Start is for
children 2 years old or younger. Bring the child's
birth certificate, Social Security card, proof of all
family income and completed registration forms.
Registration packets are available at the Early Child-
hood Programs Office. Call 482-1266.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police Department

The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for April 29, the
latest available report: One accident, one
suspicious incident, one escort, one verbal
disturbance, one fire, four traffic stops, one
larceny complaint, one fraud complaint,
one assist of another agency and two
public service calls.

Jackson County Sheriff's Office

The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following
incidents for April 29, the latest available
report: Two accidents, one dead person
(natural causes) one hospice death, one
stolen vehicle, one stolen tag, one reckless


driver, four suspicious vehicles, two suspi-
cious incidents, three suspicious persons,
two escorts, one highway obstruction,
S-, ._ two reports of illness, one
burglary of a vehicle, one
physical disturbance, three
SRIJME verbal disturbances, three
"--- pedestrian complaints,
three fire calls, one prowler,
24 medical calls, one traffic crash, four
burglar alarms, three fire alarms, five traf-
fic stops, three larceny complaints, one
criminal mischief complaint', one follow-
up investigation, one juvenile complaint,
one noise disturbance, one sex offense,
two fraud complaints, one retail theft,
one assist of another agency, three public
service calls, two criminal registrations,
two welfare checks, six transports and


one 911 hang-up.

Jackson County Correctional Facility

The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
periods:
SAlex Williams, 23, 640 Caladium Circle
(Apt. C), Panama City Beach, failure to ap-
pear (trespass).
) Lillie Blount, 40, 2841 Rockwell St. (Apt.
B), Marianna, retail theft, child neglect.
)) Samuel Bowers, 59, 5892 Oscar Road,
Greenwood,. grand theft.
Jail Population: 181

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call 1-888 404-FWCC (3922).


Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan / ,
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL. Curlis Rogers
'SBilly Kendalmle0-. John Brvan Team Sales,' Nick Spina
\(850) 482-3051 Rdel eal; Invenory Mng. eales


I__


12A WEDNESDAY, MAY1,.2013


WRICE-UP CILL


2







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


MARIANNA FFA HAS BIG DAY AT COMPETITION Farmer supports Jackson

|..'i I ^ County through America's

ife .,, : Farmers Grow Communities


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Marianna FFA had a big day at the FFA District 1 Ornamental Horticulture
Competition held recently. Marianna won first place in Landscape Operations,
Marketing, Consumer Use and Landscaping and third place in Artistic Arrangement.
Teams had to prepare a seven- to 10-minute demonstration and answer five minutes of
questions on their selected area. Winning teams advance to state competition at the University
of Florida later this month. Team members are (front row from left) Katie Mayo, Julia Velez,
Katy Moss, CierraWard and Madlyn Daniels; and (back row) Caroline Rogers, Megan Tillman,
lake Daniels, Tim Snyder and Tyler McCallister. Not pictured is Megan Schrenker.


Special to the Floridan

The Malone FFA Chapter
and Chipola Family Min-
istries in Marianna have
each received a $2,500 do-
nation through a program
in the Monsanto Compa-
ny's philanthropic arm, the
Monsanto Fund/ America's
Farmers Grow Communi-
ties. The two entities were
selected to receive the
contribution by two local
farmers, Stephen and Milo
Jordan, who sought out the
donation on behalf of their
community.
Grow Communities pro-
vides farmers in eligible
counties the chance to win
a $2,500 donation for a lo-
cal nonprofit organization
of their choice. To further
support counties declared
natural disaster areas by
the U.S. Department of Ag-
riculture due to the drought
this year, winning farmers
in these counties are able to
seek out double donations
for a total of $5,000.
Jackson County was
declared a disaster area
by the USDA, giving the
Stephen and Milo Jordan


families the opportunity
to choose two organiza-
tions to receive $2,500 ao-
nations. The Malone FFA
Chapter will use the dona-
tion to offset costs associ-
ated with FFA event travel.
Cliipola Family Ministries
plans to use the donation
to provide food and cloth-
ing for those in need in
Jackson County
"Malone FFA encour-
ages young people to learn
about agriculture and helps
continue the farming tradi-
tion, which is rich in our
community," said the Jor-
dans in a Monsanto press
release about the award.
"We hope this donation
will help to enrich the
lives of FFA members and
will hopefully encourage
them to pursue careers in
agriculture."
This year, the Monsanto
Fund will invest nearly $6
million in rural America
through Grow Commu-
nities, which includes
double donations for
counties impacted by the
historic drought. In Flor-
ida, $15,000 is being given
across three counties.


Covenant Hospice's Junior


Flower Pot workshop is May 4


Two creative opportunities
will be offered for children
ages 5-14 on Saturday

Special to the Floridan

Children ages 5-14 will discover their
creative spirit by participating in the
third annual Junior Flower Pot Proj-
ect, a companion event to Covenant
Hospice's signature fundraiser, The
Garden Gala.
Two workshop opportunities are be-
ing offered on Saturday, May 4, the first
is from 9 a.m. to noon and the second
session is from 1-4 p.m. Both work-
shops will be held at Covenant Hospice
located at 4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E in
Marianna.
This is a great way for children to
learn about helping others while having
fun.
Covenant Hospice will present brief,
age-appropriate educational highlights
about the hospice program.
"It offers children an opportunity to


become creative artists and help a char-
itable cause by painting and decorating
terra cotta pots for Covenant Hospice's
Garden Gala" said Jennifer Griffin,
development manager for Covenant
Hospice.
The junior flower pots will be dis-
played as silent auction items at the
eighth annual Garden Gala on June 22,
and proceeds will benefit the compas-
sionate programs of Covenant Hospice,
helping care for those with life-limiting
illnesses and their families regardless of
their ability to pay.
The workshops are free with refresh-
ments, flower pots and art materials
provided.
Pre-registration is required and the
deadline is Wednesday, May 1. The ses-
sions will be filled on a first come, first
serve basis with a total of 12 spaces per
session.
To acquire an application contact
Jennifer Griffin at 482-8520 or Jennifer.
griffin@covenanthospice.org.
Applications can be printed from
the Garden Gala website as well, www.
eventsatcovenant.org/ gardengala.


EXCUSE OUR DUST
\+ "' :' "NO


,..

-




MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
WA ork on a series of renovations and repairs, including a
new road, starts today at the Marianna branch of the
Jackson County Public Library. Maintenance will require
the drive-through alley from Green Street to the parking lot on the
Caledonia Street side of the library to be closed. For more information,
call the library at 482-9631.


Marriage, I.-h D Report


The following marriages
and divorces were re-
corded in Jackson County.
during the week of April
22-26:
Marriages
)) Jimmy Lee Spates and
Kimberly Anitra Johnson.
) Christopher James
Watford arid Angela Ni-
cole Hanley.
Scott M. Walker and
Heather Marie Ozburn.
) Michael Anton
Menchion and Brittney
Tashienna Spears.
Tyler Bradford
Daniels and Kimber Lee
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)) Regena Hughes
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Juanita Alford vs.
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LOCAL


WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 2013 3AF


1II !21" 2-.-3'i, 44








-. I S 4A


Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Florida Voices



One million reasons


for lawmakers to


expand health care

Wth this year's session of the Florida Legislature
i ue to end Friday, lawmakers have passed
some significant legislation. The list includes
bills to reform government ethics rules, create a new
path to high school graduation and keep Everglades
restoration on track.
But the 2013 session could be defined by inaction on
an issue that makes the others seem almost trivial: a
federal offer to provide health-care coverage to a mil-
lion working poor Floridians.
Lawmakers who care about their legacies, and the
lives of so many fellow Floridians, will find a way to say
yes to the offer.
Some 3.8 million Floridians about one in four state
residents who don't qualify for Medicare lack health
insurance, the third worst rate among states.-
The 2010 law that came to be known as Obamacare
called for reducing the number of working poor Ameri-
cans without health insurance by providing federal
funds to states to expand their Medicaid programs. The
law said the feds would cover the full cost in the first
three years, and 90 percent in later years.
For Florida, Washington would put up $51 billion to
the state's $3.5 billion over the next decade. Even Gov.
Rick Scott, no fan of Obamacare, decided the offer was
too good to turn down.
Obamacare is still toxic among Tallahassee Repub-
licans, and Senate GOP leaders didn't want to expand
Medicaid, already a budget-buster in Florida. To their
credit, they came up with a way to say yes that has
gained support from senators in both parties, as well
as Scott, top business groups, the health-care industry
and patient advocates.
The Senate plan, headed toward passage in that
chamber, would redirect federal and state dollars from
expanding Medicaid to giving vouchers to a million
uninsured Floridians to buy private health insurance.
But GOP leaders in the House simply said no. They
crafted a weak alternative, and passed it on a largely
party-line vote. It would use just state funds some
$2.3 billion over the next decade to provide private
coverage to only about 115,000 Floridians.
We get why lawmakers would be skeptical of a new
financial commitment from Washington when the fed-
eral government is running huge deficits. But the Sen-
ate plan doesn't put Florida taxpayers at risk, because
it says the new state health program would end if the
federal funding doesn't come through.
There are other reasons why the Senate's plan is so
much better than the House's. A University of Florida
study predicted the Senate plan would create 121,000
jobs and generate $5.4 billion in state and local taxes
- more than enough to offset the state's cost. And why
would Florida turn down the federal funds for health
care, yet continue to accept billions of dollars from
Washington for transportation, education and so many
other purposes?
For the sake of the million Floridians who would ben-
,efit, House leaders need to accept the Senate plan if
not by Friday, then in a special session called by Scott.
Orlando Sentinel



Letters to the Editor
Submit.letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O. Box 520,
Marianna FL, 32447 or faxing to6850-482-4478"or send
email to editorial@jcfloridan.com. The Flondan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full addressand telephone number. These
will only be used to verity the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call 850-526-3614.


A boomlet of Bush popularity


Americans are notoriously
fickle. Three separate times
while he was president,
George W Bush's approval rating .
plummeted to 25 percent. This,
of course, was the same president
whose approval rating soared to 90
percent after the 9/11 attacks.
As Bush's helicopter lifted off the
U.S. Capitol grounds for his return
to Texas after Barack Obama's
presidential inauguration in Janu-
ary 2009, only about one in three
Americans approved of his perfor-
mance as president.
Bush claims he never wor-
ries about polls or the judgment
of history. When journalist Bob
Woodward asked him in 2003 how
history would judge the Iraq war,
Bush declined to take the bait.
"History. We don'tknow. We'll all be
dead," he said.
As they often do with polarizing
politicians, people have mellowed
toward Bush. Nearly half of adults
now approve of the way he handled
his job as president. While about
three in four Democrats still disap-
prove, that's down from the nine in
10 Democrats who disapproved in
2008 of the way he did his job.
Bush's approval rating overall
equals Obama's, the latest Washing-
ton Post-ABC News poll reported
Tuesday. Such are the power of
silence and absence.
In our ego-driven world, the idea
of someone stepping off the na-
tional stage more or less voluntarily
has definite appeal. Even his critics
admired the way Bush picked up
his paint brushes and went about
his new life in Dallas, refusing to be
drawn into the political fray.
He didn't respond when Barack
Obama and other Democrats
blamed him for the mess he left.


MarshaMercer


' He skipped the 2008 Republican
National Convention to stay in
Washington after Hurricane Gustav,
showing he did learn something
from the disastrously slow response
to Katrina. He declined an invita-
tion to join Obama at Ground Zero
after Osama bin Laden was killed in
2011. Bush also stayed away from
the Republican National Conven-
tion last year.
The 43rd president, in inter-
views surrounding the dedication
Thursday of his presidential library,
began to give his side of his eight
White House years. For example, he
vigorously defended the Medi-
care prescription drug benefit he
expanded, despite Republican criti-
cism that it was too big and costly.
"We were modernizing an anti-
quated system" already in place, he
told the Dallas Morning News. -
He regrets being unable to get an
immigration bill through Congress,
and he called for a "benevolent
spirit" in the debate.
His brand of "compassionate con-
servatism" might yet get a second
look from his party. After losing the
popular vote in five of the last six
presidential elections, the Repub-
lican National Committee finally
conceded that the perception that
the GOP doesn't care hurts Repub-
lican candidates. Imagine that.
It's worth remembering how Bush
cast his compassionate conser-


vatism. "Big government is not
the answer. But the alternative to
bureaucracy is not indifference," he
said in 2000. "We will give low-in-
come Americans tax credits to buy
the private health insurance they
need and deserve," he said.
Democrats typically denounced
Bush's compassion as phony, and
conservatives saw his conservatism
as squishy. Interestingly, tax credits
are what the Affordable Care Act -
Obamacare will give low-income
people in January to buy health
insurance through exchanges.
House Republicans have voted
repeatedly to repeal Obamacare.
This week House Majority Leader
Eric Cantor, R-Va., tried a different
approach. The felicitously titled
"Helping Sick Americans Now Act"
would redirect $300 million from
the health law's Prevention and
Public Health Fund to a tempo-
rary health insurance fund for
people with pre-existing medical
conditions.
The idea was to show that while
they hate Obamacare, Republicans
do care about the sick. Not so fast.
Democrats opposed the measure
for draining the public health fund,
and the White House threatened a
veto. But it was the ire of GOP con-
servatives that forced Cantor to
pull the bill before a floor vote.
Tea party Republicans and other
conservatives refused to vote
for anything short of repealing
Obamacare.
Cantor says he isn't giving up. Can
he win the compassion argument
among Republicans that Bush
could not? Stay tuned.
Marsha Mercer writes from Washington.
You may contact her at marsha.mercer@yahoo.
com. 2013 Marsha Mercer. All rights
reserved.


Legislating becomes more opaque


BY BILL COTTERELL
During the past week to 10
days, House and Senate
negotiators have worked on
scores of details, big and small, in
the $74 billion state budget for the
fiscal year starting July 1.
Some of their meetings have last-
ed about 90 seconds. Sometimes,
the roll call takes longer than the
formal exchange.of budget offers in
what is, legally, a "public" meeting.
It's an odd way to make big,
important decisions. There's an
eternal tug-of-war between the
public's right to know as embod-
ied by a bunch of reporters
and their bosses, who want a
good story-- and the legislators'
desire to get things done as
efficiently (for themselves) as
possible.
And, in fairness, they probably
would never get it done if they had
to let a bunch of lobbyists, inquisi-
tive reporters and rubber-necking
tourists wander through their office
suites, looking over shoulders and
picking up papers to ask, "Whatcha
doin that for?" So the real work gets
done by staff, privately, then they
trot out in public and hand sheafs
of papers to each other.
It's complicated by the Florida
Constitution, court cases, statutes,
procedural rules of both cham-
bers and a public-relations sense
among legislators, to at least look
like they're spending our money
openly Given all those competing,
overlapping, sometimes conflicting
requirements, "not illegal" is the
standard to aspire toward.
For those blissfully unfamiliar
with budget basics, here's how it
works, on paper. The governor
proposes a spending plan in late
January. Legislative committees


hold hearings on different parts
of it (education, transportation,
environment) while they wait for
a revised forecast by state econo-
mists, to tell them how much they
have to spend.
Then the House and Senate pass
their versions of a budget.
These two big bills then go to a
joint committee for compromising.
That big panel splits into subcom-
mittees on different sections of the
budget. They agree on most things,
then "bump up" remaining items
to the chairs of the full appropria-
tions committees. They settle most,
then bump up any remainders to
the Senate president and House
speaker.
The whole budget has to be given
to members three days before they
vote on it, which means Tuesday in
the last week of the session, if they
are to adjourn on Friday. That three
days is a constitutionally mandated
72-hour "cooling off period" for
members to examine the budget,
only everybody is so busy in the
last week of a session, they pretty
much have to take each other's
word that it's OK.
No amendments are allowed on
joint committee reports, so the
leadership gets to say, ever so dip-
lomatically, "Take it." (No, not "take
it or leave it.")
What's interesting, even amus-
ing, about all of this is the way the
negotiating committees technically
. comply with Florida's open-meet-
ing laws.
They'll hand out side-by-side
comparisons of budget offers and
the House says, "Right, we will
take the Senate position on items
3, 36, 41A, 62 and 74." The Senate
replies with a list of line-items it
will accept, along with perhaps


some changes in proviso language
to change a funding source from
general revenue to trust funds.
Then, they say. "OK, let us look
this over, and we'll reconvene..." in
10 minutes, three hours, the next
day.
Last Saturday, the budget chair-
men recessed for only a few minute
- the Senate stepping back away
from the table, out of public ear-
shot, while the House conferees
and staffers went to an alcove on
the left side of the cavernous com-
mittee hearing room. They huddled
like football teams, while an
audience of maybe 150 lobbyists,
agency officials and other specti-
tors watched.
Several reporters clustered at
the desk, leaning over it trying to
hear what the senators said in their
rump caucus.
When former House Speaker
Ray Sansom was on trial on charges
of slipping a $6 million airport han-
gar into the budget, disguised'as a
"multi-use" college building, a little
note was a key piece of evidence.
It was a late-arriving budget item
marked "Per S.D.," meaning "per
speaker designate." Sansom, who
was cleared of the criminal charges
on a legal point, was appropria-
tions chairman at the time and next
in line to be speaker of the House.
"Because the speaker wants it" is
more than ample explanation, in
negotiations.
They used to have secret meet-
ings or make deals behind closed
doors. Now, they hide in plain
sight.
Bill Cotterell is a retired reporter who covered
government and politics 44 years for United
Press International and the Tallahassee Demo-
crat. He can be contacted at billcotterell@gmail.
corn.







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


CHIPOLAS 'RIVER TALKS'


HOSTS EPA OFFICIALS


G ary Latham, host of the Chipola College Television program,
"River Talks," recently interviewed representatives from the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Pictured from left
are: EPA Florida Watershed Coordinator Paul Gagliano, EPA South-
eastern U.S. Watershed Coordinator Frank Baker, Chipola TV director
Royce Reagan and host Gary Latham. "River Talks" is a program about
waterways around the Jackson County area. Latham has aired more
than 85 shows in the past 10 years.


RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY IS HELD


On Wednesday, April 24, the Jackson
County Chamber of Commerce
welcomed a new business to the
local community. First Federal Bank of
Florida Mortgage Center located at 2912
Green St. in Marianna held their Ribbon
Cutting Ceremony. There were several
guests on hand to celebrate the special
event.


State Briefs
'Parent trigger' bill
fails in Fla. Senate
TALLAHASSEE,
Fla. For the second
straight year, the Florida
Senate on Tuesday de-
feated a bill promoted as
giving parents a voice in
charting a turnaround
plan for failing public
schools.
The measure champi-
oned by school-choice
supporters failed on a
dramatic 20-20 vote after
a drawn-out debate. Af-
terward, applause broke
out in the gallery, draw-
ing a stern rebuke from
the Senate president.
The debate turned
into a replay from last
year, when a similar
bill passed the Florida
House but died in the
Senate on a tie vote.
Five Republicans in
the GOP-led Senate
switched their votes
from a year ago, in-
cluding four one-time
supporters who voted
against the measure
Tuesday.
House to vote on
malpractice changes
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida House on Tues-
day took up a bill that
critics say would make it
harder to pursue medi-
cal malpractice claims.
But the bill also had
fallen victim to a tactic
by Democrats upset that
the House Republican
leadership won't accept
federal money to fund
a Medicaid expansion
alternative asking a
long series of questions
about bills that was
slowing session to a near
crawl.
House members
discussed but have
not yet voted on the
bill (SB 1792), which was
already approved by the
Senate.
It's a measure that's
favored by Senate
President Don Gaetz,
R-Niceville, and is
sponsored by his son,
Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fort
Walton Beach, in the
House.
From wire reports.


Fla. Senate passes Negron's Medicaid bill


The Associated Press'


TALLAHASSEE The
Senate passed a bill with-
out debate Tuesday that
would accept more than
$50 billion federal dollars
and offer health coverage
to more than 1 million
Floridians under the fed-
eral health law. The move
sent a strong message to
the House that the Senate
is not backing down on a
Medicaid expansion alter-
native, making a compro-
mise unlikely in the final
days of session.
But House Republicans
refused to consider the
bill and have resisted ac-
.cepting any money tied
to President Obama's Af-
fordable Care Act and
instead passed a bill that
would use $237 million in
state funds to cover about
115,000 residents.
House Democratic
Leaders Perry Thurston
and Mia Jones met with
Gov. Rick Scott Tuesday
morning and urged him
to veto the budget should
the Legislature fail to ap-
prove a health coverage
expansion plan this ses-
sion that relies upon avail-
able federal dollars.
"I'm sure our governor
knows it's time for him to
step up and get involved
... He should call a spe-
cial session and he should
veto this budget," Thur-
ston said.
Later Tuesday, Thurston
and other angry House
Democrats used a pro-
cedural move to stall the
session in its final days to
express their frustration
over the Medicaid grid-
lock, and required that all
bills must be read in full
before they are voted on.
Republicans responded
by using an "auto reader"
machine that reads bills.
One bill took more than
20 minutes to read.
He said the drastic situ-
ation required drastic
tactics and that House
Democrats want afford-
able health care for Florid-
ians "by whatever means
necessary."
"We could go ahead and
(adjourn) and leave 1.2
million people hanging.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dr. Ileana Fuentes (right) prepares to examine Cardji
Caliste, 7, at the Borinquen Health Care Center, Monday,
April 15, in Miami. Caliste, who is covered by Medicaid, was
visiting the clinic with her mother for neck pain due to a
recent car accident.


People are dying. This is
about saving lives. The bill
is there, the finances are
there," Thurston said.
Thurston, D-Fort Lau-
derdale, said they planned
to continue. on with
the stall tactic through
Wednesday.
Scott, House Democrats,
Florida hospitals, health
advocates and a diverse
mix of business and labor
groups all lined up in sup-
port of the Senate bill pro-
posed by Republican Joe
Negron that would draw
down more than $50 bil-
lion federal dollars over
the next decade and give
it to an estimated 1.1 Flo-
ridians. The bill would not
expand Medicaid but give
money to residents to pur-


chase private insurance.
The federal government
has agreed to pay 100 per-
cent of the costs for the
1.1 million newly insured
and 90 percent for three
years after, but House Re-
publicans worry the feds
will not make good on a
promise, leaving them on
the hook.
It's unclear how much,
if any, pressure Scott will
place on his Republican
colleagues in the House
even though he signaled
his support for Medic-
aid expansion. The gov-
ernor would' not answer
questions Tuesday about
whether he'd spoken to
any lawmakers individu-
ally about Medicaid ex-
pansion alternatives.


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ItereA.re Somne Of Our smc'sft, c, it .'.
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Judy Redmon (Marianna, FL)................Lost 32 lbs
John Rosenberger (Grand Ridge, FL) .....Lost 130 lbs
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People from ages 10 to 81 have safely done the program.


Cal o mr ifrmtonStt sttiSn poitmn fra re ostittin


Water Use Permitting Rule

Making Workshop is May 16


Special to the Floridan

Farmers and ranchers
in Northwest Florida
are invited to attend
a workshop to discuss
and comment on draft,
changes to permitting
rules on irrigation wells.
The workshop will be held
Thursday, May 16 at 5:30
p.m. at the Jackson County
Agricultural Conference
Center located at 2741
Pennsylvania Avenue in
Marianna.
Staff from the Northwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District will provide
information on statewide
consumptive use permit-
ting consistency, CUPcon
efforts, including a review
of the draft rule language
and an explanation
of what the proposed
changes will mean for the
agricultural community.
The purpose of CUPcon
is to improve consistency
in the consumptive/water
use permitting programs
implemented by Florida's
five water management
districts. Anticipated
changes of interest to
farmers in the panhandle
include:
)) Current water use
permittees with wells
eight inches in diameter
or larger will switch from
a, General Water Use Per-
mit to an Individual Water
Use Permit. This will be
an administrative change
that will require minimal
information and no fee to
complete.
) Permittees will see mi-
nor changes to reporting
forms and requirements.
This includes a new state-
wide form for pumping
reports and a new form
for crop reports, both of


which will include
information very similar
to what users currently re-
port. It also includes meter
calibration or discharge
verification reports.
The District is commit-
ted to working with the
Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consum-
er Services and permit-
tees, including well own-
ers and agricultural users,
to make this transition as
easy as possible.
Draft rule language
will be available on the
District's website at www.
nwfwmd.state.fl.us prior
to the workshop. For more
information on state-
wide CUPCon efforts,
visit http://www.dep.state.
fl.us/water/waterpolicy/
cupcon.htm.
You can also contact the
District at Public.Informa-
tion@nwfwmd.state.fl.us
or 539-5999.


Make her DAY


Margarita style earrings
A halo of diamonds
-. .-" ;;*
'..\. i^r -.,



Starling 3 7 ci
Come buy
it's Margarita Time




Downtown Marianna
watsonjewelers.com
850.482.4037


2884 Jefferson St.
Downtown Marianna


Sin Urology

For kidneys, bladder and the male reproductive system, Jackson Hospital has the key services
you need. From noninvasive lithotripsy to treat kidney stones, to MRI and diagnostic imaging
to detect cancer and chronic conditions, to surgery services, our team provides the urologic
care you need right here in Jackson County.


For a urology referral or more information about our
urologic surgical services, please call 850.526.2200.


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SHospita


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__________~___~________


I nim ofe r. iIemes


~-~-~~~~~--


~e.raa~aarr


LOCAL & STATE


WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 2013 + 5AF


4 0. 82.6855





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Blackwell Angus Boneless
Chuck Roast...................
Blackwell Angus Boneless
Chuck Steaks.................
Carolina Pride All Meat
Jumbo Franks...................




Conecuh Baby Link
Smoked Sausage.............
Carolina Pride 4x6
Honey, Brown Sugar, or Cooked
Ham ................................
Carolina Pride Hot or Mild
Roll Sausage ..................


$310

$122
16 oz.


$323
3y 16 oz.

$163
S 1 0 oz.
$118
16 oz.


S Fresh Whole 0 0
' Fryer................. ............. b

ij family Pack Boneless $ 94
iiikibeye Steaks................ $ b

Bar 'S' 3 63
Corn Dogs .................... $ 3b box


Bar 'S'
Smoked
Sliced Bacon
$199
12 oz.


Carolina Pride
Smoked
Sausage
$199
24 oz.


Carolina Pride
Hot Dogs
or Bologna
79
12 oz.


0 'R PECA,,,,,.


Empress, 11 oz.
Mandarin Oranges.......,...........


Hormel, 15 oz. 2
Chili with Beans ...................... 2


4~IGUL6I1II _____


rb 133
Strawberries 1 lb pkg.


$w 396
Russet $3 20 Ib. bag
Baking Potatoes


Fresh Express
American
or Italian 1 57
Salad 0I oz.


99o
Vine Ripe b99b
Roma Tomatoes


-- C.. r-


- 6A WEDNESDAY. MAY 1, 2013









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Pfizer 1Q profit up, but




drugmaker cuts outlook


The Associated Press

Pfizer Inc.'s first-quarter
net income rose 53 per-
cent despite falling sales,
mainly because the world's
second-largest drugmaker
took big charges a year ago.
Pfizer's results fell short of
Wall Street's expectations,
and the company lowered
its profit and sales fore-
'casts for the year, blaming
sudden worsening of cur-
rency exchange rates.
Pfizer is struggling be-
cause generic competi-
tion is reducing revenue
for two-thirds of its drugs,
more than a dozen of
which are former block-
busters that had brought
in $1 billion or more an-
nually. When drug patents
expire, cheaper generic
versions flood the market,
and most patients quickly
switch to them.
The biggest hit has been
copycat versions of Pfizer's
cholesterol fighter Lipi-
tor, which was the world's
best-selling drug for nearly
a decade until it lost exclu-
sivity in the U.S. in 2011
and in much of Europe last
year. Revenue from Lipi-
tor, which once brought
in about $13 billion a year,
dropped 55 percent to $626
million in the first quarter.
Like other drugmakers,
New York-based Pfizer has
been cutting costs to boost
profit, developing very
expensive drugs for rare
disorders and expanding
sales in emerging markets
such as China. Pfizer also
has been divesting assets
other than its prescription
drugs to repurchase shares
and increase its dividend
to appease shareholders.
"They're having trouble
hitting their sales goals so
they need to make up for
it with financial moves,


THEASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
This 2012 photo shows the exterior of Pfizer in Groton, Conn. Pfizer Inc. Pfizer Inc. reports
quarterly financial results before the market opens on Tuesday, April 30.


like buying back shares,
that help prop up the stock
price," Erik Gordon, an an-
alyst and professor at Uni-
versity of Michigan's Ross
School of Business, wrote
in an email.
For the first quarter, Pfiz-
er reported net income of
$2.75 billion, or 38 cents
per share, up from $1.79
billion, or 28 cents per
share, a year earlier. Ex-
cluding one-time items,
adjusted income was 54
cents per share, a penny
less than the forecast of an-
alysts surveyed by FactSet.
Results were boosted by a
$490 million gain from the
transfer of some product
rights to its joint venture
in China. In the year-ago
quarter, Pfizer took charg-
es totaling $1.66 billion, for
litigation, acquisition and
other costs.
Overall, revenue was
$13.5 billion, down 9 per-
cent from $14.89 billion
a year earlier and below
analysts expectations of
$13.99 billion.
Besides the loss in rev-
enue from many off-pat-


ent drugs, Pfizer posted
lower revenue of some big
sellers protected by pat-
ents, including erectile-
dysfunction drug Viagra,
which was down 7 percent
at $461 million.
Revenue from Prevnar
13, a vaccine for ear in-
fections, meningitis and
other pneumococcal in-
fections, fell 10 percent to
$846 million. Prevnar is
the biggest-selling vaccine
in history, with nearly $4
billion in yearly revenue.
Pfizer blamed the vaccine's
quarterly revenue drop on
shifts in buying patterns in
some countries.
The bright spots during
the quarter were Lyrica,
for fibromyalgia and oth-
er pain, up 12 percent at
$1.07 billion, and anti-in-
flammatory pain reliever
Celebrex, up 3 percent at
$653 million.
In addition, revenue from
consumer health products,
such as Centrum vitamins,
jumped 12 percent to $811
million. Revenue rose 5
percent to $2.42 billion in
emerging markets such


as China a key growth
target for the industry as
U.S. arid European health
programs try to hold down
costs.
Chief Financial Officer
Frank D'Amelio said the
steady weakening of the
yen, euro and other cur-
rencies versus the dollar
since January is expected
to cut revenue by a whop-
ping $900 million over the
course of the year. As a re-
sult, Pfizer cut its revenue
forecast by that amount,
to $55.3 billion to $57.3
billion.
Pfizer also reduced its
profit forecast exclud-
ing one-time items by 6
cents, to $2.14 to $2.24
per share, due to the lower
revenue forecast and its
Feb. 6 initial public offer-
ing of about 20 percent of
its animal health business,
now called Zoetis. Revenue
and costs associated
with Zoetis will still be in-
cluded in Pfizer's results,
but only the profit from the
80 percent Pfizer still owns
will be included in its earn-
ings-per-share figures.


IBM pulls the

stock market out


of a morning slump
The Associated Press they're getting nervous,
but where else are you go-
NEW YORK News ing to put money at this
that IBM will buy back point? Into Europe with
more stock and raise its their political issues? Into
dividend helped pull ma- Treasurys paying less than
jor stock indexes out of a 1.7 percent?"
morning slump Tuesday. The S&P 500 edged up
IBM and other tech 3.96 points to close at
stocks led the Standard & 1,597.57. The slight gain of
Poor's 500 index up. The 0.3 percent pushed the in-
broad-market measure dex to an all-time high for
ended April with a 1.8 the second day straight.
percent gain, the sixth A report of another re-
month in a row the index cord high in European
has climbed higher. unemployment helped
Worries about slower drive money into U.S.
economic growth have government debt, briefly
rattled the stock market sending the yield on the
this month, but it has benchmark 10-year Trea-


consistently bounced
back. Brad Sorensen, di-
rector of market research
at the brokerage Charles
Schwab, said that's a re-
sult of investors having
few alternatives.
"Right now it seems
like every pullback in the
market is seen as a buying
opportunity," Sorensen
said. "People may say


sury note to lowest level
of the year, 1.65 percent.
IBM said it will add a
dime to its quarterly divi-
dend and buy back up to
$5 billion more of its own
stock. Earlier this month,
the company surprised
investors when it reported
a drop in quarterly earn-
ings and sales. IBM's stock
rose $3.39 to $202.54.


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Monster Beverage suing SF


attorney over energy drinks
The Associated Press Monster; the family says amount to 480 n
she died after drinking two of caffeine, ne
NEW YORK Monster 24-ounce cans of Monster times the record
Beverage is suing San Fran- in a short period, maximum for ad
cisco's city attorney over Monster meanwhile has and more than
demands that the com- stood by- the safety of its milligrams per
pany reduce the amount drinks. Earlier this year, FDA has indicate
of caffeine in its energy the company hit back at for adults.
drinks and stop marketing the lawsuit, noting that Although som
to minors. there was no blood test of coffee contain
The company, based in performed to, confirm that feine, Herrera a
Corona, Calif., says it's be- the girl died of caffeine that coffee is sf
ing unfairly singled out by toxicity. and consumed sl
City Attorney Dennis Her- In its lawsuit against San ergy drink maker
rera, who late last year had Francisco's city attorney, trast, specifically
asked Monster to produce Monster Beverage Corp. youth and encou:
documentation showing cites a letter from Herrera to "pound dov
that its drinks are safe. dated March 29 asking the drinks in large c
Since then, Monster says company to reformulate the letter said.
Herrera has asked it to re- its product to "lower the Even as soda
formulate its drinks and caffeine content to safe tion has flagge
change its labels and mar- levels" and to provide "ad- cent years, ener
keting materials, equate warning labels". including Red
A representative for the Monster's current label Rockstar have
city attorney's office, Matt. says people should limit popularity. In 21
Dorsey, said "we're aware themselves to one can ev- volume for ener
of the lawsuit and the city ery four hours and a maxi-. rose by nearly 17
attorney is evaluating his mum of three per day. It according to Bev
options." He added that also says the drink isn't rec- gest, an industry
Monster's marketing "flies ommended for children, That growth s
in the face of emerging people sensitive to caf- about 14 percent
scientific consensus about feine, pregnant women or and has slowed e
the safety of highly caffein- women who are nursing. for the early par
ated energy drinks."' But the city attorney said said John Sicher,
The suit comes at a time in his letter that three cans of Beverage Dige


when the energy drink in-
dustry has come under
intense scrutiny. Herrera's
office got involved in the
issue after the Food and
Drug Administration said
last year that it was inves-
tigating reports of deaths
linked to energy drinks,
which sparked a wave of
bad publicity for the in-
dustry. The federal agency
has noted that the reports
don't prove the drinks
caused the deaths.
New York's attorney gen-
eral has also subpoenaed
Monster as well as the
maker of 5-Hour Energy
shots and PepsiCo Inc.,
which makes Amp as,
part of an investigation
into how energy drinks
are made and marketed.
In addition, the family of
a 14-year-old girl is suing


city


milligrams
early five
amended
Lolescents
the 400
day the
ed is safe

e brands
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iso noted
served hot
lowly. En-
rs, by con-
market to
rage them
vn" their
quantities,

consump-
d in re-
gy drinks
Bull and
surged in
011, sales
*gy drinks
7 percent,
average Di-
y tracker.
lowed to
it in 2012
even more
t of 2013,
publisher
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcflondan.com


18A WEDNESDAY, MAY 1,2013


s" o mBriefs


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
George Zimmerman, defendant in the killing of Trayvon
Martin, arrives with his attorney Mark O'Mara (right) for a
pre-trial hearing, in Seminole circuit court in Sanford, Fla., on
Tuesday.


Zimmerman won't
seek immunity hearing
SANFORD, Fla. The
former neighborhood
watch leader charged with
fatally shooting a Florida
teenager told a judge
Tuesday that he agrees
with his defense attorneys'
decision not to seek an
immunity hearing under
the state's "Stand Your
Ground" self-defense law.
Under questioning
from Circuit Judge Debra
Nelson, George Zimmer-
man repeatedly said "yes"
to a series of questions
asking if he was aware he
was giving up the right
to a hearing before his sec-
ond-degree murder trial
in June. A judge would
have sole discretion in
an immunity hearing to
decide if Zimmerman is
exempt from culpability in
the shooting. A jury would
make the determination in
the murder trial.'
'After consultation with
my counsel, yes, your hon-
or," Zimmerman said.
The judge had set
aside two weeks at the
end of April for an im-
munity hearing should
Zimmerman want one.
Zimmerman's defense at-
torney, Mark O'Mara, told
Nelson during a hearing
in March that he wouldn't
need those days. Prosecu-
tor Bernie de la Rionda
filed a motion last week
asking that Zimmerman
make clear his intentions
on whether he wanted the
hearing.
O'Mara, told the judge
Tuesday there was nothing
in the law that required
the immunity hearing to
take place before Zimmer-
man's trial and could be
requested after prosecu-
tors have presented their
case.

Obama hints at
action against Syria
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama
signaled Tuesday he would
consider U.S. military ac-
tion against Syria if "hard,
effective evidence" is found
to bolster intelligence that
chemical weapons have
been used in the 2-year-
old civil war. Among the
potential options being
readied for him: weapons
and ammunition for the
Syrian rebels.
Despite such.planning,
Obama appealed for
patience during a White
House news conference,
saying he needed more
conclusive evidence about
how and when chemical
weapons detected by U.S.
intelligence agencies were
used and who deployed
them. If those questions
can be answered, Obama
said he would consider
actions the Pentagon and
intelligence community
have prepared for him in
the event Syria has crossed
his chemical weapons "red

"There are options that
are available to me that
are on the shelf right now
that we have not de-
ployed," he told reporters
packed into the White
House briefing room.
Beyond lethal aid to the


rebels, several government
agencies are also drafting
plans for establishing a
protective "no-fly zone"
over Syria and for targeted
missile strikes, according
to officials familiar with
the planning. However, the
officials, who spoke only
on condition of anonymity
because they were not au-
thorized to publicly discuss
the internal deliberations,
stressed that Obama had
not yet decided to proceed
on any of the plans.
As Obama raised the
prospect of deeper U.S.
involvement, Hezbollah's
leader said Tuesday
that his Iranian-backed
militant group stood ready
. to aid Syrian President
Bashar Assad. And new
violence in Syria hit the
capital of Damascus, as
a powerful bomb ripped
through a bustling com-
mercial district, killing at
least 14 people.

Russia charging NASA
$70 million per seat
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.
NASA is paying $424
million more to Russia to
get U.S. astronauts into
space, and the agency's
leader is blaming Con-
gress for the extra expense.
NASA announced its
latest contract with the
Russian Space Agency on
Tuesday. The $424 million
represents flights to and
from the International
Space Station aboard
Russian Soyuz spacecraft,
as well as training, for six
astronauts in 2016 and the
first half of 2017.
That's $70.6 million per
seat well above the
previous price tag of about
$65 million.
Russia currently pro-
vides the only means of
getting people to and from
the space station, and its
ticket prices have soared
with each new contract.
Several U.S. companies
are working on rockets and
spacecraft to launch Amer-
icans from U.S. soil. But
that's still a few years away.
The ability to launch crews
into orbit from America
ended with NASAs shuttle
program in 2011. Even
before the shuttles retired,
the U.S. had been rely-
ing on Russia to transport
long-term residents to the
space station.
NASA Administrator
Charles Bolden said if
Congress had approved
the space agency's request
for more funding for its
commercial space effort,
the latest contract would
have been unnecessary.
He is urging full funding
of the Obama administra-
tion's 2014 budget request
of $821 million in seed
money for the commercial
crew program.
"Because the funding
for the President's plan
has been significantly
reduced, we now won't be
able to support Ameri-
can launches until 2017,"
Bolden, a former shuttle
commander, wrote in a
NASA blog.
It could take longer if
Congress does not fully
support the 2014 request,
he said.
From wire reports


ED MC
850-573-619
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SMARTER BOLDER FASTER
www.emccoyre,


Morning-after pill OK for ages 15 and up


FDA also says the emergency
contraceptive no longer has to be
kept behind pharmacy counters


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
government on Tuesday
lowered to 15 the age at
which girls can buy the
morning-after pill without
a prescription and said the
emergency contraceptive
no longer has to be kept be-
hind pharmacy counters.
The decision by the Food
and Drug Administration
is an attempt to find mid-
dle ground just days before
a court-imposed deadline
to lift all age restrictions on
the drug.
Today, Plan B One-Step
is sold behind pharmacy
counters, and buyers must
prove they're 17 or older to
buy it without a prescrip-
tion. Tuesday's decision
lowers the age limit to 15
- and will allow the pill
to sit on drugstore shelves
next to condoms and sper-
micides or other women's
health products. But cus-
tomers must prove their
age at the cash register.
Teva Women's .Health,
which makes Plan B, said
it would begin over-the-
counter sales in a few
months.
The question is whether
Tuesday's action settles a
larger court fight. Earlier
this month, U.S. District
Judge Edward Korman
of New York blasted the
Obama administration for
imposing the age-17 limit,
saying it had let election-
year politics trump science
and was making it hard for
women of any age to obtain
the emergency contracep-
tion in time. He ordered an
end to all age restrictions
by Monday, for Plan B and
its generic versions.
The FDA said Tuesday's
decision was indepen-
dent of the court case and
wasn't intended to address
it. Technically, the FDA ap-
provedTeva's application to
sell Plan B in this manner.
The Justice Department
remained mum on wheth-
er it planned to appeal
Korman's decision, and
the White House had no
immediate comment.
The women's group that
sued over the age limits
said Tuesday's action is
not enough, and it will
continue the court fight if
necessary.
Lowering the age limit
"may reduce delays for
some young women but


it does nothing to address
the significant barriers
that far too many women
of all ages will still find if
they arrive at the drug-
store without identifica-
tion," said Nancy Northup,
president of the Center for
Reproductive Rights.
The FDA said the Plan B
One-Step will be packaged
with a product code that
prompts the cashier to ver-
ify a customer's age. Any-
one who can't provide such
proof as a driver's license,
birth certificate or pass-
port wouldn't be allowed
to complete the purchase.
In most states, driver's li-
censes, the most common
form of identification, are
issued at age 16.
"These are daunting and
sometimes insurmount-
able hoops women are
forced to jump through
in time-sensitive circum-
stances, and we will con-
tinue our battle in court
to remove these arbitrary
restrictions on emergen-
cy contraception for all
women," Northup said.
Other contraceptive con-
traception advocates called
the move promising.
"This decision is a step
in the right direction for
increased access to a prod-
uct that is a safe and effec-
tive method of preventing
unintended pregnancies,"
said Sen. Patty Murray, D-
Wash. "It's also a decision
that moves us closer to
these critical availability
decisions being based on
science, not politics."
Social conservatives had
opposed any efforts to
loosen restrictions on sale
of the morning-after pill,
arguing that it was impor-
tant for parents and medi-
cal professionals to be in-
volved in such decisions.
involving young girls.
The group Concerned
Women for America
charged that health offi-
cials were putting politics
and so-called progress
ahead of the health of
children as .well as women.
"It makes no sense that
kids need parental per-
mission to take aspirin at
school, but they're free to
buy and administer Plan
B," Penny Nance, CEO and
president of CWA, said in a
statement.
Half the nation's preg-
nancies every year are
unintended, and doctors'


RI unly fowrom'".
yoQilger thai aget17


P E0ll ji ,11-11


groups say more access to
morning-after pills could
cut those numbers. The
pills contain higher doses
of regular contraceptives,
and if taken within 72 hours
of unprotected sex, can cut
the chances of pregnancy
by up to 89 percent. But it
works best if taken in the
first 24 hours.
The FDA had been
poised to lift all age limits
and let Plan B sell over-the-
counter in late 20.11, when
Health and Human Ser-
vices Secretary Kathleen
Sebelius, in an unprec-
edented move, overruled
her own scientists. Sebelius
said some girls as young as
11 are physically capable
of bearing children but
shouldn't be able to buy
the pregnancy-preventing
pill on their own.
President Barack Obama
supported Sebelius' move
and a spokesman said
earlier this month that the
president's position hadn't
changed.
The Justice Department
could appeal Korman's rul-:
ing and seek a stay. If grant-
ed, the appeals process
would move through the
courts, while Plan B is sold
over the counter when-
ever Teva has the product
repackaged to meet FDA's
requirements.
Absent a stay, "we will
want to go back to court
as quickly as possible


One lhia L
One LP;5e


and ask the judge to hold
them in contempt," said
Janet Crepps, a senior
counsel for the Center for
Reproductive Rights.
The FDA said Tuesday.
that Teva had provided
data proving that girls as
young as 15 could under-
stand how Plan B works
and use it properly, without
the involvement of a health
care provider. Teva plans to
conduct a consumer-edu-
cation program, and indi-
cated it is willing to audit
whether stores are follow-
ing the age requirement,
the agency said.
FDA said its ruling ap-
plies only to Plan B One-
Step, and not to generic
versions of the pill which
would remain behind
pharmacy counters with
the age- 17 restriction.
If a woman already is
pregnant, the morning-af-
ter pill has no effect. It pre-
vents ovulation or fertiliza-
tion of an egg. According
to the medical definition,
pregnancy doesn't begin
until a fertilized egg im-
plants itself into the wall
of the uterus. Still, some
critics say Plan B is the
equivalent of an abortion
pill because it may also be
able to prevent a fertilized
egg from attaching to the
uterus, a contention that
many scientists and Ko-
rman, in his ruling said
has been discredited.


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The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Jurors
in the civil .case between
Michael Jackson's mother
and concert giant AEG
Live got another glimpse
of the singer's private life
on Tuesday through the
eyes of a paramedic who
described the singer's
bedroom and the frantic
efforts to revive the King
of Pop on the day he died.
Many other moments
from the singer's life will be
exposed as the case pro-
gresses over the next sever-
al months, with witnesses
expected to testify about
secret medical treatments,


Let
with
of
Dl

A


lavish spending and tender
moments spent with his
mother and children.
In the nearly four years
since his death, nearly ev-
ery aspect of Jackson's life
has been explored in court
proceedings, documenta-
ries, books and news sto-
ries. Still, the negligence
case filed by his mother
against AEG promises to
deliver the most detailed
account of the singer's
addiction struggles.
Jackson died from a pro-
pofol overdose in 2009
while preparing for a se-
ries of comeback con-
certs at AEG's 02 Arena in
London.


Jury gets first glimpses into Jackson's
private life as testimony begins in civil case


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850.482.2332

Lydia Barnes

Lydia Barnes, 58, of
Alford passed away Mon-
day, April 29, 2013 after an
extended illness
A native and life long resi-
dent of Alford, Mrs. Barnes
was a member of Round
Lake Baptist Church and
was a former employee
with Jackson County
Health Department serving
as a CNA.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Johnny Barnes; her pa-
rents, Walter and Mary
Barbarian Stephens; two
sisters, Lela Mayo and
Sharon Parmer all of
Round Lake.
Survivors include her chil-
dren, daughters, Rae
McLean and husband
James of Ponce de Leon
and Stacy Williams and
husband Bear of Round
Lake; son John Barnes and
wife Bonnie of Marianna;
four grandchildren, Ryan
and Raven Williams, Madi-
son and Gracie McLean;
five step grandchildren, Di-
na, Chris, Aaron, Timothy
and Savanna; 11 great
grandchildren; two broth-
ers, Johnny Stephens and
wife Cindy of New Liberia,
LA, Terry Stephens and
wife Paula of Sneads; two
sisters, Dianne Porter and
husband Larry of Marian-
na, Cherryl Turner and
husband Dean of Fountain;
one brother-in-law Eddie
Mayo of Round Lake and a
host of nieces and nephews
and her dog Buddy Roscoe.
Funeral services will be
at 2 pm Friday, May 3, 2013


at Round Lake
Church with Rev
Jones officiating.
ment will follow
liams Family C
with James & Sikes
Home Maddox Ch
reacting.
The family will
friends from 5 tc
Thursday, May 2,
Maddox Chapel.
Expressions of s1
may be made onlin
www.jamesandsikesfunerali
Forbes Funeral I
380 North Loden
Macclenny, FL3
(850) 559-33f

Harold]
Strickla


A.










Harold H. "Junior
land, age 86 of St
Florida passed awa
day, April 25, 2013
surrounded by hi
family. Mr. Strickla
commercial fisher
a retired Tenneco C
pany Tug Boat Ca
lifelong resident of
County, he was a
of the Saint Mar
Baptist Church. He
so a member of thi
man's Association
Cattleman's Ass(
He enjoyed fishing
ing, riding horses
ing livestock. Hi
spending time v
family and friends.


He is survived by his de-
voted wife of sixty nine
years: Nettie Kirkland
Strickland; sons: Harold
"Hoppy" (Julia) Strickland
III, Jerry Gordon Strick-
land, and Skip Floyd all of
St. Marks; grandchildren:
Dana (Thomas) Wilson,
Jimmie (Cristy) Padgett,
Shane Strickland, and
Charles Strickland all of St.
Marks; and fourteen great
grandchildren. He is also
survived by numerous nie-
ces, nephews and other
family members. He was
preceded in death by his
brother: Gilbert Strickland,
his son: Doug Strickland
and daughter: Verdie
Padgett.
Graveside funeral serv-
ices will be held 12:00pm,
Saturday, May 4, 2013 at
H.H. Strickland Jr. Ceme-
tery, 133 H.H. Strickland
Road, Crawfordville, Flori-
da with Pastor Jonathan
Kilpatrick and Reverend
David Carraway officiating.
The family will receive
friends 4-7:00pm, Friday,
May 3, 2013 at the St.
Marks First Baptist Church,
14 Shell Island Road, St.
Marks, FL. Family requests
contributions be made to
Big Bend Hospice, the Epi-
lepsy Foundation, or St.
Marks First Baptist Church.
Arrangements are under
the care and direction of
Forbes Funeral Home. 850-
559-3380. Please sign the
online guestbook at
huttp://,www.forbesfunerallione.net/
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street,
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332

Mary Lou
Tyus


Baptist Mary Lou Tyus, 71, of
v. Larry Greenwood, died Monday,
Inter- April 29, 2013, at her resi-
at Wil- dence.
;emetety Mrs. Tyus was born in
Funeral Two Egg, and was a lifelong
lapel di- resident of Jackson County.
She was a lofigtime mem-
receive ber of Welcome Assembly
o 7 pm of GodChurch, where she
2013 at served as a Sunday School
teacher, a Sunday School
sympathy Superintendent, and was
e at on the church's Mission
omnes.com Team. She retired from
Sneads High School after
lome 34 years of service. Mrs.
Street Tyus loved her family, her
2063 church, reading, and work-
80 ing in her flowers.
She is preceded in death
H. by her parents, John Willis
and Annie Lois Powell; one
nd daughter, Ronda Tyus
Murphy.
SShe is survived by her
J husband, George W. Tyus;
two sons, Rodney Tyus and
Si! wife, Kelley, of Marianna,
Rex Tyus and wife, Jackie,
of Greenwood; two broth-
ers, Willis "Clinton" Powell
and wife, Gloria, of
Dellwood, John Powell and
wife, Dianne, of Malone;
one sister, Cora Strickland
and -husband, Larry, of
Greenwood; 15 grandchil-
r" Strick- dren and five great grand-
Marks, children.
SThurs-' Funeral services will be

at home, at 10 am Friday, May 3,
s loving 2013 at Welcome Assembly
nd wasa of God Church with Dr.4
man and Thomas Batts and Rev.
Oil Coin- Harold Tyus officiating. In-
ptain. A terment will follow in Wel-
pWakulla come Assembly of God
member Church Cemetery with
rks First James & Sikes Funeral
e was al- Home Maddox Chapel di-
e Fisher- reacting.
and the The family will receive
ociation. friends from 6 to 8 pm
g, hunt- Thursday, May 2, 2013 at
and rais- James & Sikes Maddox
e loved Chapel.
ith his Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesancdsikesftuncralhoines.com


Hungarian workers' leader Sandor Racz dies


The Associated Press

BUDAPEST, Hungary,
- Sandor Racz, a labor
activist and leading figure
during Hungary's anti-So-
viet Revolution of 1956,
died Tuesday at age 80.
The World Federation
of Hungarians, of which
Racz was honorary presi-
dent, confirmed that he
died while receiving treat-
ment for an undisclosed
illness at the National
Institute of Oncology


in Budapest.
The 1956 uprising broke
out on Oct. 23 uand was
crushed by the Soviet
army in early November.
But as president of the
Budapest central workers'
council, Racz and other
labor leaders pressed
ahead with the objectives
of the movement for sev-
eral more weeks, negotiat-
ing with pro-Soviet Prime
Minister Janos Kadar
and top Soviet military
officers.


Ploetz
From Page 1A
almost 2,500 miles in a quest that, by
Thursday, will have taken him from
the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean,
with a dip down to the Gulf Coast
mid-journey.
Ploetz is a retired software engi-
neer who, in his early career, helped
create medical MRI technology.
He'll turn 60 in October, and this
solo trip is a gift he gave himself.
With the blessings of his wife Jea-
nette, and a device on board that
would allow her to track his move-
ments every 10 minutes, he set off
on his journey March 25, beginning
in San Diego. He travels about 80
miles a day, and expects to finish
the trip before the end of this week.
His bluevelo trike, with a fiber-
glass body, Weighs about 80 pounds.
His gear including a tent, extra
tires, repair kits and freeze-dried
food adds another 40 pounds.
The trike is outfitted with two tiny
rear-view mirrors and a horn, and
is 'entirely human-powered. He can
outrun dogs a fact he proved
many times as curious canines gave
chase along the way. He's been pur-
sued by everything from an English
boxer to a trio of Chihuahuas.
He's faced other challenges in his


Monk
From Page 1A

45 minutes from Panama City or
Dothan or Tallahassee. I live where
I can hear the crickets, but close to
other places if I want to go do some-
thing they have to offer."
As a man with machine design in
his skill set, it is not surprising that
Monk is attracted to high-perfor-
mance cars.
As a youngster who used to race his
tricycle down the sidewalk against
his neighborhood buddies, it was
natural for him to be interested in
other forms of racing as an adult.
Those two interests merged as he
aged, and he became a big NASCAR
and Road Course racing fan. Last
year, he bought something that il-
lustrates those interests in a way
that's hard to miss.
He bought a bright yellow Cor-
vette, but it's no run-of-the-mill
production model. It has racing-
model decals and other markings
that distinguish it as something
special.
He bought the 2011 Grand Sport
Bob Bondurant Road Course Race
Edition from the professional racer's
training school for amateur drivers.
Bondurant buys 11 of the cars each


"As we age, we say, 'what's next
in my life?'I've prayed more on
this trip, and I've (come to decide
that) I'll be trying to help others
more."
Larry Ploetz,
Wisconsin resident traveling cross-country


travels, and a fairly serious one be-
fore he ever got started. Nine days
before his departure, he was riding
his trike when a car in his path ran
a stop sign. He honked his horn
and the car stopped, but not be-
fore causing Ploetz to veer off into
a ditch filled with ice-cold water.
His trike was scratched on one side,
but the dangerous encounter didn't
change his plan. He didn't have the
scratches repaired, either, consider-
ing them badges of honor in a way.
He said he's met a lot of friendly
people at stops along the way, and
that he's heard more friendly beep-
beeps than annoyed horn-blow-
ers as motorists zoom past him on
the nation's highways. He keeps
to the shoulder when he can, but
sometimes, when it's safer to do
so, takes to the outside edge of the
road. Ploetz usually stays in motels
after a day's travel, but has camped
out about 20 percent of the time.


year, and sells the old models when
he takes them out of service and
replaces them with new ones. The
car had just 6,000 miles on it when
Monk flew to the training school
to pick it up last year. He drove it
home from Phoenix, Ariz. He uses
a pickup truck for most day-to-day
driving, but takes the 'Vette out
for long drives, occasional errands
and to Corvette club events. He
takes special care when parking the
car, sometimes walking far out of
his way to make sure he's picked a
parking spot with some open space
around it. He wants to avoid park-
ing lot dings, and keeps it in a secure
garage when he's not driving it.
The car is different from true rac-
ers in at least one respect; it has a
lot of creature comforts that those
wouldn't, like heated leather seats,
a back-up camera, a heads-up
display, a navigation system, and
other extras. "It's fun to drive on the
street," Monk said.
The car has a 900 -hp engine,
compared to 565 hp for the engine
in Corvette's most powerful produc-
tion model, the ZR1. Monk has had
the car at its top speed of 225 miles
per hour, but only in a controlled,
road course environment.
In taking on the car, Monk took on
some additional expenses; a new


LOCAL & NATION


Tests link deadly ricin to letter suspect


The Associated Press

TUPELO, Miss. Ricin
was found in the former
martial arts studio of the
man suspected of sending,
poison letters to President
Barack Obama and other
public officials, and was
also discovered on a dust
mask and other items he
threw in the trash, federal
prosecutors said in a court
document made public
Tuesday.
The affidavit says an.
FBI surveillance team saw
James Everett Dutschke
remove several items from
the studio in Tupelo, Miss.,
on April 22 and dump
them in a trash bin about
100 yards down the street.
The items included a dust
mask that later tested pos-
itive for ricin, the affidavit
said.
Traces of ricin also were
found in the studio and
Dutschke used the Inter-
net to buy castor beans,
from which ricin is de-
rived, the affidavit said.
Annette Dobbs, who
owns the small shop-
ping center where the
studio was located, said
authorities padlocked the
door to it sometime the
search. She said Tuesday
that FBI agents haven't
told her anything, includ-
ing whether the build-
ing poses a health threat.
Inside the studio is one
large room with a smaller
reception area and a con-
crete floor. Police tape
covered the front and the
small back door.
Dutschke, 41, was arrest-
ed Saturday by FBI agents


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Everett Dutschke stands in the street near his home in
Tupelo, Miss., and waits for the FBI to arrive and search his
home on April 23.


at his home in Tupelo, and
is being held without bond
pending a preliminary and
detention hearing Thurs-
day in U.S. District Court
in Oxford.
The FBI searched his
home, vehicles and stu-
dio last week, often while
wearing hazardous ma-
terials suits. Attention
turned to Dutschke af-
ter prosecutors dropped
charges against an Elvis
impersonator who says he
had feuded with Dutschke
in the past.
Dutschke told The Asso-
ciated Press last week that
he didn't send the letters.
His lawyer, federal public
defender George Lucas,
had no comment Tuesday
absput the information in
the affidavit.
Dutschke was arrested
as part of the investigation
into poison-tainted let-
ters sent to Obama, U.S.
Sen. Roger Wicker and Lee
County, Miss., Judge Sadie
Holland.


The affidavit said nu-
merous documents found
in Dutschke's home had
"trashmarks" that were
similar to ones on the let-
ters sent to the officials.
"Trashmarks are flaws
or marks that come from
dirt, scratches, or other
marks on the printer. They
are transferred to each
piece of paper that is run
through the printer," it
said.
It also describes text
messages allegedly sent
between two phones sub-
scribed to Dutschke's wife,
including one on April 20
that said "get a fire going"
and "we're coming over to
burn some things."
The FBI has not yet re-
vealed details about how
lethal the ricin was. A Sen-
ate official has said the ri-
cin was not weaponized,
meaning it wasn't in a form
that could easily enter the
body. If inhaled, ricin can
cause respiratory failure,
among other symptoms.


No antidote exists.
The most notable case
of ricin poisoning was in
1978, when a Bulgarian
dissident was lethally in-
jected with it by an opera-
tive of that country's secret
service.
Dutschke also bought
50 castor beans off eBay
in November 2012 and 50
more in December 2012,
the affidavit said.
The affidavit had been
sealed since it was filed
Friday in U.S. District
Court in Oxford. It also said
that on evening of Dec. 31,
2012, someone using his
"computer downloaded
a publication, Standard
Operating Procedure for
Ricin, which describes
safe handling and stor-
age methods for ricin, and
approximately two hours
later, Immunochromo-
.tography Detection of Ri-
cin in Environmental and
Biological Samples, which
describes a method for
detecting ricin."
An expert at the National
Bioforensics Analysis Cen-
ter in Fort Detrick, Md.,
said the extraction process
employed in this case ap-
pears to have been more
involved than "merely
grinding castor beans,"
the affidavit said.
"A witness, who is not
named in the document,
told investigators that
Dutschke once said years
ago that he knows how to
make poison that could
be sent to elected officials
and "whoever opened
these envelopes contain-
ing the poison would
die."


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
Quality Service at Affordable Prices
Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90
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3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


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Sometimes, when out on a long
stretch of road, he has had no
choice but to camp out under the
stars in his small pop-up tent.
It has been a journey of reflec-
tion, he said, a quest that took him
far from home but closer to know-
ing how he'll spend his retirement
years.
He's seen vast stretches of "deso-
late places" in the Southwest, where
old towns no longer viable have
dried up as new technology made
their industries obsolete. He has no
intention of living out such a fate in
retirement.
"As we age, we say, 'what's next
in my life?'" Ploetz explained. "I've
prayed more on this trip, and I've
(come to decide that) I'll be trying
to help others more."
He already helps the school asso-
ciated with his church with its com-
puters and technology, and he ex-
pects to lend his expertise to many
others as he gets home and settles
into retirement.
He also has established a side
business for himself in his subdi-
vision. He repairs computers and
bicycles in a 10 to 15 mile radius
around his home. He makes house
calls and he gets there on his
tricycle.
Read more about his journey at
cab-ram.com.


set of tires would run him about
$2,500. Of course, compared to the
$30,000 tires that NASCAR drivers
must purchase to run their races,
Monk can put it in perspective.
An oil change on the car, with its
12-quart oil pan, costs in the neigh-
borhood of $200. He changes the oil
every 3,000 miles.
On the upside, the powerful car's
gas mileage isn't so bad; gets about
19 miles to the gallon. Monk says
the car's engine is "kind of idling"
at 70 mph, because the ramped up
horsepower means the engine is
operating at only about 1,000 revo-
lutions per minute at that speed. A
regular car would be at about 3,000
revolutions per minute at the same
speed, with the additional revolu-
tions causing the engine to guzzle
more gas.
Monk said that he's more than
happy with the car and willing
to deal with the extra expenses it
means. He's made peace with hav-
ing given up another road course
ride a Saleen Mustang so that
he could afford to buy this one.
He doesn't plan to race; doing
that, he said would be cost prohibi-
tive. He's content with his road trips,
instead and is anticipating the next
idle sunny day, where he can "take.
the top off and just ride."







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Hezbollah warns of possible Syria intervention


The Associated Press

BEIRUT The leader of
Lebanon's Hezbollah mili-
tant group said Tuesday
that Syrian rebels will not
be able to defeat President
Bashar Assad's regime mil-
itarily, warning that Syria's
"real friends," including
his Iranian-backed mili-
tant group, were ready to
intervene on the govern-
ment's side.
In Damascus, a power-
ful bomb ripped through
a bustling commercial
district, killing at least 14
people and bringing Syria's
civil war to the heart of the
capital for the second con-
secutive day.
Hezbollah, a power-
ful Shiite Muslim group,
is known to back Syrian
regime fighters in Shiite
villages near the Lebanon
border against the mostly
Sunni rebels fighting to
topple Assad. The com-
ments by Sheik Hassan
Nasrallah were the stron-
gest indication yet that his


1. j







THEASSOCIA
In this photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrians walk on shattere
from damaged shops at the scene of a powerful explosion which occurred in the central
of Marjeh, Damascus, Syria, on Tuesday.


group was ready to get far
more involved to rescue
Assad's embattled regime.
"You will not be able to
take Damascus by force
and you will not be able to
topple the regime militar-


ily. This is a long battle,"
Nasrallah said, addressing
the Syrian opposition.
"Syria has real friends in
the region and in the world
who will not allow Syria
to fall into the hands of


America or Israel."
Hezbollah and Ira
close allies of Assad
els have' accused th
sending fighters to
Syrian troops tryii
crush the 2-year-old


Assad uprising, which the
U.N. says has killed more
than 70,000 people.
Deeper and more overt
Hezbollah involvement in
the Syrian conflict is al-
most certain to threaten
stability in Lebanon, which
is sharply split along sec-
tarian lines, and between
supporters and opponents
of Assad. It also risks draw-
ing in Israel and Iran into a
wider Middle East war.
Nasrallah said Tues-
day ,there are no Iranian
.. forces in Syria now, except
:- for some experts who he
,. said have been in Syria for
decades. But he added:
S. "What do you imagine
ATED PRESS would happen in the fu-
d glass ture if things deteriorate in
district a way that requires the in-
tervention of the forces of
resistance in this battle?"
Hezbollah has an arse-
in are nal that makes the group
. Reb- the most powerful military
em of force in Lebanon, stronger
assist than the national. army.
ng to Its, growing involvement
I anti- in the Syrian civil war is


already raising tensions
inside the divided coun-
try and has drawn threats
from enraged Syrian rebels
and militants.
Nasrallah also said his
fighters had a duty to pro-
tect the holy Shiite shrine
of Sayida Zeinab, named
for the granddaughter of
Islam's Prophet Muham-
mad and located south of
Damascus.
He said rebels have
captured several villages
around the shrine and
have threatened to destroy
it.
"If the shrine is de-
stroyed things will get out
of control," Nasrallah said
citing the 2006 bomb-
ing of the Shiite al-Askari
shrine in the Iraqi city of
Samarra. That attack was
blamed on al-Qaida in Iraq
and set off years of retalia-
tory bloodshed between
Sunni and Shiite extrem-
ists that left thousands of
Iraqis dead and pushed
the country to the brink of
civil war.


Company IDs 7 killed in Afghanistan plane crash


The Associated Press

DETROIT Building
model planes and working
on real ones comprised
Gary Stockdale's passion,
filling the family's base-
ment with models in his
youth, jumping into avia-
tion as a career at age 16
and later working at two
Detroit area airports.
The 51-year-old Stock-
dale also knew the dangers
of flying, his older brother
told The Associated Press
Tuesday.
"He always said it was
dangerous," said Glenn
Stockdale, 55. "He would
always say 'you either will
' die in a car crash or a ball
of flame in a plane.'"
Gary Stockdale was one
of seven Americans killed
when their National Air
Cargo plane crashed Mon-
day near an Air Force base
in Afghanistan.'
Six of the victims were
from Michigan and a sev-
enth was from Kentucky,
said Shirley Kaufman,
National Air Cargo vice
president.
Those killed include pi-
lots Brad Hasler of Tren-
ton, Mich. and Jeremy
Lipka of Brooklyn, Mich.;
first officers Jamie Bro-


Kaufman said the plane
- owned by National Air-
lines, an Orlando, Flor-
ida-based subsidiary of
National Air Cargo was'
carrying vehicles and oth-
er cargo.


Realtor
eur.e-.: 850-258-4947
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This family photo shows Michael Sheets of Ypsilanti, Mich.
Sheets is of one of seven Americans killed in a cargo plane
crash just after takeoff, from Bagrarm Air Base in Afghanistan.


kaw of Monroe, Mich. and
Rinku Summan of Canton,
Mich.; loadmaster Michael.
Sheets of Ypsilanti, Mich.;
and maintenance crew-
man Timothy Garrett of
Louisville, Ky.
As loadmaster,' Sheets
was responsible for mak-
ing sure the weight and
balance of the cargo was
appropriate.
The Dubai-bound Boe-
ing 747-400 operated
by National Air Cargo
- crashed just after take-
off Monday from Bagram
Air Base around 11:20 a.m.
local time, the National
Transportation Safety
Board said in a statement
Tuesday.
The accident site is with-


in the perimeter of Bagram
Air Base.
The Taliban quickly
claimed responsibility for
downing the plane, but
NATO said later the claims
were false, and there was
no sign of insurgent activ-
ity in the area at the time of
the crash.
The Afghanistan Minis-
try of Transportation and
Commercial Aviation is
leading the investigation.
The NTSB is investigating
the crash alongside the
ministry. The team will be
composed of three NTSB
investigators, as well as
representatives from the
Federal Aviation Admin-
istration and Boeing, the
NTSB said.'


A complimentary breakfast will be served at 6:30 am
followed by the program at 7:00 am. I
Music provided by Riverside Elementary Children's Choir.
Formoreinformationcall(850)42 II I


Russia had elder Boston

suspect under surveillance


The Associated Press

MAKHACHKALA, Rus-
sia Russian agents
placed the elder Boston
bombing suspect un-
der surveillance during a
six-month visit to south-
ern Russia last year, then
scrambled to find him
when he suddenly disap-
peared after police killed
a Canadian jihadist, a
security official told The
Associated Press.
U.S. law enforcement
officials have been trying
to determine whether Ta-,
merlan Tsarnaev was in-
doctrinated or trained by
militants during his visit
to Dagestan, a Caspian
Sea province that has
become the center of
a simmering Islamic
insurgency.
The security official
with the Anti-Extremism
Center, a federal agency
under Russia's Interior
Ministry, confirmed the
Russians shared their
concerns. He told the AP
that Russian agents were
watching Tsarnaev, and
that they searched for him
when he disappeared two
days after the July 2012
death of the Canadian
man, who had joined the
Islamic insurgency in the
region. The official spoke
only on condition of ano-
nymity because he was not
authorized to speak to the
news media.
Security officials suspect-
ed ties between Tsarnaev
and the Canadian an
Ethnic Russian named Wil-
%f, ?(; -5? :-;-:.2 / :.':-;. -


liam Plotnikov accord-
ing to the Novaya Gazeta
newspaper, which is known
for its independence and
investigative reporting and
cited an unnamed official
with the Anti-Extrem-
ism Center, which' tracks
militants. The newspa-
per said the men had so-
cial networking ties that
brought Tsarnaev to the at-
tention of Russian security
services for the first time in
late 2010.
It certainly wouldn't
be surprising if the men
had met. Both were ama-
teur boxers of roughly
the same age whose
families had moved from
. Russia to North America
when they were teen-
agers. In recent years,
both had turned to Islam
and expressed radical
beliefs. And both had trav-
eled to Dagestan, a re-
public of some 3 million
people.
The AP could not in-
dependently confirm
whether the two men had
communicated on social
networks or crossed paths
either in Dagestan or in
Toronto, where Plotnikov
had lived with his parents
and where Tsarnaev had
an aunt.
After Plotnikovwas killed,
Tsarnaev left suddenly for
the U.S., not waiting to
pick up his new Russian
passport ostensibly one
of his main reasons for
coming to Russia. The of-
ficial said his sudden de-
parture was considered
suspicious.


Send us your

graduate's favorite

photo along with your

special message to be

in the Jackson County

Floridan's

2013 Graduation

Section on May 26th.


Let your


special

graduate


know how


proud you

are of them!




) J7effwfJ U6ercI (<
Marianna High School

Were SO proud of
you and all of your
accomplishments.But most
of all we are proud of the
person you have chosen to
be. You have blessed our
S lives so much. May God
bless you as you begin this
nextchapterofyourlife.

We Love You!
Mom and Dod

/z


To have your graduate's message included in this keepsake edition, please
send a color photo and $25 to: Graduation 2013, C/O Jackson County
Floridan, P.O. Box 520, Marianna, Florida or drop it off at our office located at
4403 Constitution Lane. Be sure to include the graduate's name, your special
message and a daytime phone number.


For more information call (850)526-3614
Deadline to submit your information is May 10, 2013 at 5 p.m.


.r Dais M sanl

ww.af~lniloynIcom


~P1


I


110A WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 2013


WORLD








,^ ^ .* ;7: L : ..,, Y' **.. .*

-.. .
F tL d' .. ^ .. -; :- * * -' -.: ^




Lady Indians getng bigger, deeper
Lady Indians getting bigger, deeper


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

In his first season as head
coach, Greg Franklin took an
undersized Chipola Lady Indi-
ans squad to 27 wins and a trip
to the final eight in the national
tournament.
In his second year on the job,
Franklin will field a much big-
ger and deeper team thanks to
his work on the recruiting trail
so far, with six incoming play-
ers set to join three returning
players, and more likely on the
way.


Sports in Brief

High School Baseball
The Marianna Bulldogs
will travel to MNladison County
on Wednesday to take on
the Madison County Cow-
boys in the regional quarterfi-
nals of the 4A state playoffs
at 6 p.m. Central Daylight
Time.
The winner will moie to the
regional semifinals to'take
' on the winner ofPensacola
Catholic and Florida High on
NMay 7.
The Sneads Pirates host the
IA regional semifinals May 7
against the Bozeman Bucks
at 7 p.m., with the winner to
face the winner of Liberty
County vs. Vernon in the
regional finals on May 10.

Chipola Softball
The Chipola Lady Indians
open play in the FCSAA State
Softball Tournament on
Friday in Pensacola, taking
on State College of Florida at
.noon.
Chipola will play again
Friday at 5 p.m. win or
lose, facing the winner of
Hillsborough vs. Tallahassee
with a %ictorv, and taking on
the loser of that game \with a
loss.
The tournament will
continue on Saturday and
conclude on Sunday.


Chipola Baseball
The Chipola Indians \%ill
open play in the FCSAA State
Baseball Tournament on Nlay
10 in Lakeland, taking on
Miami-Dade at 6 p.m. Central
Daylight Time.
Chipola will play again
Saturday win or lose, facing
the winner of Seminole State
vs. State College ot Florida at
6 p.m. with a win, and taking
on the loser of that game at
noon with a loss.
The tournament will con-
clude May 14.

Chipola Lifeguard
Course
Chipola College will offer
the American Red Cross
Lifeguard course beginning
Tuesday.
Students must be 15
years of age. Cost is $200. A
prerequisite swim test must
be taken before the cowuse.
There is no charge to take the
test.
Course meetings \\ill be
held from 4:30-8:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, Wednesday, and
then May7-10,'with the final
test on May 11.
For information, orto
schedule a swim test,
call Rance Massengill at
850-718-2240,..

Rob Fowler Memorial
Golf Tournament
The fifth annual Rob Fowler
Memorial Golf Tournament
willbe held May 11 at Dog-
wood Lakes Golf& Country
Club in Bonifay.
Registration is at 7:30 a.m.
with a tee time of 8 a.m. For-
mat is four-person scramble,
with an entry fee of $50 per
person, including greens
fee, cart, and catered lunch.
Single and team entries are
, welcome.
To sponsor or pre-register,
contact Kevin Taylor at 850-
326-1525 or Brian Taylor at
850-381-4894.
See BRIEFS, Page 2B


After having just seven rota-
tion players and none that were
taller than 6-foot last season,
the Lady Indians have added
6-foot-2 Florida State transfer
Ebony Wells and 6-foot-3 Nige-
rian Ljeoma Onwuekwe out of
Nazareth High School in New
York City.
Both will bring an added di-
mension of legitimate post size
and bulk on the interior that
Chipola lacked last season.
Wells was a consensus top
100 recruit in the country com-
ing out of high school in 2011,
.and Franklin said that she will


have a major impact on the
Lady Indians on the court and
in the locker room.
"She's going to be an anchor
for us," the coach said. "She's a
leader. She meshed well with
our girls when she came on her
workout, and she'll add a lot
of stuff that we need. She's 6-2
and really strong with a great
body. I think she's going to help
us a lot, not just with her play
inside, but with the identity of
the team.
"She'll be a maturing force

See INDIANS, Page 2B


Head
coach
Gregory
Franklin
talks to
the Lady
Indians
during a
timeout.


SIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL




Seeking redemption


The Marianna Bulldogs keep an eye on the field during a recent game against North Florida Chr


Bulldogs coach: Players 'hungry' for win


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Bulldogs lost their third
straight game to district rival Pensacola
Catholic in the league title game last
week.
If they want to get a fourth shot at the
Crusaders, they'll have to take care of
business tonight when they travel to
Madison County to take on the Cowboys
in a 4A Regional Quar-
terfinal playoff game at not wor
6 p.m. Central Daylight "I'mnot worra
Time. pitching as mu
The Bulldogs (16-10) about us doing
take on the Cowboys things. We'veg
(16-9), with Pensacola upand throw
Catholic facing Florida make things lu
High on the other side ings
of the top end of the bats."
bracket, with the win-
ners of the two games
to face each other in the
regional semifinals May 7.
The undefeated Crusaders ranked
No. 1 in the nation are expected by
most to move past the Seminoles and
would host a hypothetical fourth match-
up with the Bulldogs, who they knocked
off 9-0 in the district title game.
But Marianna coach Carlan Martin
said his primary concern at the moment
is just getting his players to put forth a
better performance against the Cowboys
than they did against the Crusaders.
"I have a tendency to worry more about
our guys and doing what we're supposed


t


ai


to do and how we're supposed to do it.
When you do that, you're usually in pret-
ty good shape," he said. "Looking back
at the (district title game against Catho-
lic), it was not so much about what they
did to us but what we did to ourselves. If
we're ready to play (tonight), we'll have as
much success as we possibly can. If not,
then we'll be coming back and packing up
and getting ready for summer baseball."
In that district title game, the Bulldogs
had two first-inning
errors that led to four
daboutour Catholic runs and the
h asIam Crusaders rolled on
the little from there.
it topic it It was a performance
aroundand that Martin said was
pen with our disappointing given the
,ppenv our magnitude of the mo-
ment, but he believes
Carlan Martin, his players are ready
Marianna coach to recapture their top
form against Madison.
"The kids seem to be hungry and
want to redeem themselves after the
game the other night," he said. "I didn't
feel like they were ready to play, but I
know they're glad they didn't have to
experience that as their last game of
the season. This game gives them a new
shot."
Right-handed pitcher Adam Dewitt
started that game on the mound for the
Bulldogs and pitched well in the loss, but
it will be lefty Reid Long who gets the nod
against the Cowboys.
"Reid has been our hottest pitcher of


CONGRATS BULLDOGS


MARK SKINNER / FLORIDAN
The Jackson County Bulldogs nine and under team won the Sneads Invitational
Tournament on April 27. The team is sponsored by the Marianna Optimist Club. The front
row is (from left) Tyler Brown, Riley Robinson, Justin Tye, Brady Tye and Taylor Brown. Bat
boy Cody Byrd is seen sitting in front of the team. The middle row is Zane Monk, Zack
Jernigan, Daniel Stoutamire, Gavin Byrd, Wyatt Burch and Gabe Newsome. The back row
is coaches Rusty Jernigan, Tony Tye, Kenneth Stoutamire, Tullis Tye and head coach Zack
Byrd. Not pictured Coach Brad Newsome.


MARK SKINNER /FLORIDAN
istian.

late, but the beauty of this is that we've
also got Hayden Hurst and Adam Dewitt,
who threw real well for us against Catho-
lic, and Walker Roberts, who has done a
great job as closer for us and a relief guy,"
Martin said. "Reid has been the hottest
guy for us lately, but I've got no hesita-
tion about throwing any of those other
guys out there.
"I'm not worried about our pitching as
much as I am about us doing the little
things. We've got to pick it up and throw
it around and make things happen with
our bats."
The Bulldogs hitters are likely to face
Cowboys junior right-hander Zack Mon-
,ey, who has had an outstanding season,
going 6-2 with a 1.56 Earned Run Average
with 76 strikeouts and. 36 walks.
"I don't know if he has anything spe-
cial that we haven't seen before," Mar-
tin said of Money. "We just have to have
good plate appearances when we go
up there. Our kids seem to be focused
in on that right now. It really all comes
down to your mental preparation at this
point."
This point is a place that the Bulldogs
may not have been expected to be after
the way the season started, with veteran
coach Andy Shelton being replaced right
before the season with Steve Dewitt, who
resigned just five weeks later before Mar-
tin was brought in to take his place.
The season has been a trying one for
both Martin and his players, but the
coach said that after a rocky start, he has
been pleased with how things have gone
for the Bulldogs.
See BULLDOGS, Page 2B


Volleyball


Grand Ridge

girls off to




great start

BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Grand Ridge Lady Indians volleyball team
is under new leadership this year but has picked
up where it left off the last three seasons.
Nick Brown took over for veteran coach Ken
Granger and couldn't have gotten off to a better
start, with the A-team Lady Indians now at 6-0
on the young season after their latest win com-
ing over Walton.
Grand Ridge won the match in two games,
25-7 and 25-10.
Previously they won over Marianna Middle
25-18 and 25-15, Freeport 25-8 and 25-18,


See VOLLEYBALL, Page 2BL


-II_1I~ LIII_--l








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN. www.jcflorican.com


TCC withdraws from



FCSAA softball tourney


Special to the Floridan

Tallahassee Community College, on
Monday, announced it has withdrawn
from this weekend's Florida College Sys-
tem Activities Association's Gulf District
Softball Tournament.
TCC withdrew from the tournament on
Sunday after head softball coach Patti
Townsend announced that six play-
ers Marina Cobbs, Dominique Da-
vis, Kelly Engwall, Ashley Heath-Smith,
Brianna Murillo and Brenda Santana
- were suspended for violation of team
rules.
As a result, the Eagles were left with
only eight available players for Friday's
opening round game against Hills-


Indians
From Page 1B
for us because ohe's been
around college basketball
for two years at a high level
and she understands it.
She gets it that you've got
to come in and go to work.
She knows what level of
play we've got to be at, and
that's a big key for us."
Onwuekwe isn't quite
as polished a prospect as
Wells, but Franklin said
she, too, will be a big factor
for the Lady Indians on the
interior.
"She's just going to be
physical for us down there
and strong and athletic,"
the coach said. "She's one of
those kids where when the
athleticism and skill meet,
she's going to be danger-
ous. She's a strong athletic
force and she'll help erase
some mistakes on the pe-
rimeter defensively."
Chipola also has added
Walton wing player Taliah
Moore, who averaged 17.5
points per game for the
Lady Braves last season,
4 as well as 6-foot combo
forward Justina James of
Thomasville (N.C.) Prep, 5-
foot-5 point guard Janisha
Linsey out of Bosse High
School in Evansville, Ind.,
and 5-foot-7 wing shooter
Tiffany Lewis out of Ten-
nessee powerhouse River-
dale High School in Mur-
freesboro, Tenn.
Lewis will look to replace
the long-range shoot-


borough Community College, which
would have resulted in an automatic
forfeit.
"After consulting with Coach (Patti)
Townsend, it was determined that, out
of respect for the integrity of the tourna-
ment, as well as the participating teams,
we would petition'the Panhandle Con-
ference to allow us to withdraw from
the tournament and extend an invita-
tion to Pensacola State College to fill
our spot," said director of athletics Rob
Chaney.
Panhandle Conference and FCSAA of-
ficials approved Tallahassee's request late
Sunday.
Tallahassee ends its season with a re-
cord of 20-26.


ing void left by graduat-
ing Kristine Brance, while
Linsey will try to take over
the point from departing
sophomores Jade Givens
and Jasmine Crawford.
Moore and James will try
to provide some of the in-
side-outside versatility that
Rayven Brooks brought to
the table, but perhaps the
biggest incoming player
for the Lady Indians next
year will be one who's al-
ready on campus, 5-foot-7
redshirt sophomore Khad-
ijah Ellison.
The Roxbury, Mass.,
native signed with Mis-
sissippi State out of high
school when Franklin was
an assistant there before
spending the 2011-12 sea-
son with Pensacola State
and averaging 7.7 points
per game on a Lady Pirates
team that went to the na-
tional semifinals.
She sat out the 2012-13
season after transferring
to Chipola, but Franklin
said she is ready to make a
major impact for the Lady
Indians next year.
"She can play point
guard to power forward,
she can post up and jump
over a 6-3 kid, and she can
take a guard out front and
blow past them and get
to the rim," Franklin said.
"She's got the explosive-
ness of a power forward
and the handle of a point
guard. She's got a great*
knack for the game and
a great feel. She knows
how to get people open,


she's very knowledgeable,
and she has a great IQ out
there.
"I honestly believe that if
we could've had Khadijah
(last season), we could've
been in the national cham-
pionship game."
Ellison and the six new
signees will join returning
Lady IndianA Rahni Bell
and Treyvonna Brooks next
season, but Franklin said
'he still wants to add more
to this recruiting class,
with possibly another post
player on the way.
The coach said that the
added size will not change
his pressing, attacking style
of play but would rather
enhance it and make the
team more balanced and
dynamic.
"It just changes the game.
It erases a lot of mistakes
defensively and allows you
to take a few more chances
and change passing lanes,"
he said. "Obviously, it's
great to get somebody
down there that can score
and get buckets on big
possessions. Last year, we
lived and died with the
three. We still want to shoot
a lot of threes, but we also
want to be able to stick it
inside and get a bucket
sometimes.
"We'll extend up the
floor more defensively be-
cause these kids are good
athletes. How they all fit
together is kind of a mys-
tery right now. But they'll
all have their own little
niche."


in three games to Chipley Rouhlac 18-25,
VoHeV l a 25-23, and 8-15, while they won over Mar-
o P ianna in two games 25-11, 25-19, before
From Page lB winning over Walton 25-16 and 25-18.
Vernon 25-22 and 25-17, and Chipley In the Walton game, the Lady Indians
Rouhlac 25-13 and 25-16. were led by Lace Glover with four aces,
In the Walton game, the Indians were eight kills and 13 digs, with Brianna Da-
led by Taylor Roberts with 14 aces, 18 kills vis picking up two aces, six kills and 10
and 28 digs, followed by Crystal Hernan- digs.
dez with seven aces and 14 digs. Madelyn Goodson contributed heavily
On the board with six aces, 10 kills with five aces, seven kills and five digs,
and 13 digs was Allie Ann McCord, with while Georgia Cloud had four aces, five
Makaelien Sneads picking up 11 aces, 11 kills and nine digs. 1
kills and nine digs. The Lady Indians were scheduled to be
In B-team action, the Lady Indians fell back in action on Tuesday night.


Briefs
From Page 1B

JCCA Golf Tourney
The Jackson County
Cattlemen's Associa-
tion announces that the
SecondAnnual Colonel
Thomas Memorial Golf
Classic is set for May 17
at Indian Springs Golf
Course in Marianna.
There will be a 1 p.m.
shotgun start for the 18-
hole event that features
a four-person scramble,
"pick your partners," and
a modified handicapped
system.
Registration is $60 per



Bulldogs
From Page 1B
"It's probably the most
unique coaching situation
I've had to deal with where
you're taking over mid-
stream and you don't really
get to lay the groundwork
like you would in a regu-
lar season," he said. "It has
been a challenge for (the
players), too, but kids are
pretty resilient. As bad as


person and includes
greens fees, cart and a
steak dinner. There will
be prices for longest drive
and closest to the pin. All
players must have a veri-
fied handicap.
All benefits from the
event will go to FFA and
4-H scholarships at
Chipola. For more infor-
mation, call Matt Dryden
at 850-573-0414, Albert
Milton at 850-718-7834,
Ken Godfrey at 850-209-
7919, or Charlene at
Indians Springs Golf Club
at 850-482-8787.

Bulldog
Wrestling Club
The Bulldog Wrestling

things can get, they have a
tendency to bounce back
pretty quick. Once they get
some consistency to them,
they settle in pretty quick
and that's what they did.
"After the first few days,
we got to know each other
a little bit, and then one
day leads to two and it
starts going by in a hurry.
But I've really enjoyed it for
the most part. I think we've
had a pretty good year, all
things considered."


Club is starting practice
for the summer season.
Practice will be Tuesday
and Thursday nights from
5:30-7 p.m. at the old
Marianna High School
wrestling room.
All Jackson County)kids
ages 5-18 are welcome to
join. For more informa-
tion, call MHS coach Ron
Thoreson at 272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sports items
to editorial@jcfloridan.
com, or fax them to 850-
482-4478. The mailing
address for the paper is
Jackson County Floridan,
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL
32447.


Alabama's McCarron
to drive pace
car in Talladega
TALLADEGA, Ala. -Al-
abama quarterback AJ
McCarron will drive the
pace car before NASCAR's
Sprint Cup race at Talla-
dega Superspeedway.
McCarron will serve as
honorary pace car driver
Sunday, leading the field
around the track before
Sunday's Aaron's 499.
He'll drive a special Ford
Mustang GT.
McCarron has led
the Crimson Tide to
back-to-back national
championships.
He says he's watched
races at Talladega before
and has "always had a
passion to get up to speed
on the track."
Michael Waltrip's No. 55
Aaron's Toyota will sport
an Alabama national
championship paint
scheme. McCarron and
the Tide players got a look
at the car before their
.spring game.

Las Vegas to
build $30 million
bowling center
LAS VEGAS- Las Vegas
is getting a mega-bowling
facility.
South Point Hotel and
Casino announced
Tuesday that it has struck
a 12-year deal with the
United States Bowling
Congress to host several
annual events in a new
$30 million bowling
center.
The new facility will
include more than 60
lanes. The hotel-casino
expects to begin con-
struction this month.
South Point will host
seven championship
events, including the
USBC Women's champi-
onship in 2016 and the
USBC Open Champion-
ships in 2017.
The 2009 USBC Open
Championships, held
in LasVegas, ran for 154
days and generated more
than $120 million for the
city.
Las Vegas Convention
and Visitors Authority
CEO Rossi Ralenkotter
says the new center
puts Sin City on track
to become the premier
destination for bowling
events.

Miami's Golden
and Torretta
win golf challenge
GREENSBORO, Ga.
Miami football coach
Al Golden and former
Hurricanes Heisman Tro-
phy winner Gino Torretta
have won the Chick-fil-A
Bowl Challenge charity
golf tournament.
The Miami team's 11-
under round beat South
Carolina's Steve Spurrier
and Sterling Sharpe by
one stroke on Tuesday,
winning the first-place


INSURANCE AGENCY


L~kR[ .I[' ?Ed R.]


scholarship prize of
$125,000.
Georgia Tech's two-time
defending champion
team of Paul Johnson and
former basketball star
Jon Barry finished tied
for third with Clemson's
Dabo Swinney and Steve
Fuller in the annual tour-
nament at the Reynolds
Plantation resort.
The event pairs coaches
with a celebrity or former
athlete from the coach's
school.
Among other coaches
playing in the event were
Virginia Tech's Frank
Beamer, Alabama's Nick
Saban, Wake Forest's
Jim Grobe, Auburn's Gus
Mulzahn, Mississippi
State's Dan Mullen, Ohio
State's Urban Meyer and
Mississippi's Hugh Freeze.

San Diego-Tijuana
Olympic bid dealt
crippling blow
SAN DIEGO -A cross-
border bid for San Diego
and Tijuana, Mexico, to
host the 2024 Summer
Olympics appeared dead
before arrival Tuesday
when the U.S. Olympic
Committee said interna-
tional rules don't allow
two countries to mount a
joint candidacy.
The news was delivered


Alabama
quarterback
AJ McCarron
listens to
a question
during Media
Day for the
BCS National
Championship
college
football game
in Miami on
._. Jan.5.
SOCIATED PRESS FILE

as San Diego Mayor Bob
Filner and his Tijuana
counterpart, Carlos Busta-
mante, prepared to name
a cross-border planning
committee within the next
week and unveil a logo.
Scott Blackmun, the
USOC's chief executive,
said Friday that the com-
mittee was talking to 10
cities about a possible
bid, including San Diego-
Tijuana. He said the com-
mittee hadn't looked care-
fully at the cross-border
proposal but that it would
"have its challenges."
After more research,
Christopher Sullivan, the
USOC's chief of protocol
and bids, called Filner's
liaison to the commit-
tee on Tuesday to say
the International Olym-
pic Committee charter
doesn't allow for border-
ing countries to host
Summer Games, said
USOC spokesman Patrick
Sandusky.
"There's no opportunity
for them to bid together,"
Sandusky said.
A spokeswoman for
Filner, Lena Lewis, had no
immediate comment. A
spokeswoman for Busta-
mante, Martha Saldi-
var, didn't immediately
respond to a message.

From wire reports


FIS DAY
Now Is The Time For Stocking
3-5 Channel Catfish Redear
5-7 Hybrid Catfish Koi
6-8 Channel Carfish Bluegill (Coppernose) '
Black Crappie (if avail) = Fathead Minnows



Permit Required for all Triploid Grass Carp in Floridal No Exception!
www.floridafisheries.com
To pre-order call: Arkansas Pondstockers 1-800-843-4748
Walk Ups Welcome





"e, --- -






a 53 33'A:if


Window Clings 1 /&MUCH
Yard Signs/A-Frame SignageV MORE!!


-l2B + WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 2013


SPORTS







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.cor


Major League BasebaU


Hot bats in Atlanta


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Marlins' Juan Pierre (left) scores the game-winning run
on a wild pitch by New York Mets relief pitcher Brandon Lyon in
the ninth inning during a game Tuesday in Miami.



Marlins rally



to beat reeling



Mets again


The Associated Press

MIAMI Juan Pierre
scored standing up on a
wild pitch with none out
in the ninth, and the Mi-
ami Marlins came from
behind in the final inning
for the second consecutive
game to beat the reeling
NewYork Mets 2-1 Tuesday
night.
The Mets have lost a
season-worst six games
in a row. They were beat-
en Monday when Miami
scored twice in the 15th in-
ning to win 4-3.
New York's Jeremy He-
fner (0-3) took a 1-0 lead
and a three-hitter into the
ninth but couldn't get an-
other out.
Chris Coghlan singled
to start the inning and
advanced on a passed
ball. When Pierre bunted,
Coghlan beat catcher An-
thony Recker's throw to
third, although the Mets
argued that Coghlan over-
slid the bag.
Brandon Lyon replaced
Hefner, and Donovan Sola-
no hit an RBI single to right
that sent Pierre to third. An
intentional walk loaded
the bases, and Lyon's first
pitch to Greg Dobbs was a
low breaking ball that got
away from Recker, allow-
ing Pierre to score.
That spoiled Hefner's
best outing of the year. He
had a career-high eight
strikeouts and lowered his
ERA from 5.14 to 3.72.
Miami, which ranks last
in the majors in runs, bat-
ting average and hom-
ers, didn't advance a run-
ner beyond first base


until the ninth.
Hard-luck Kevin Slowey
remained winless since
2010 despite allowing only
one run in eight innings to'
lower his ERA to 2.15. The
Marlins have scored eight
runs in his six starts, the
worst run support for any
NL pitcher.
The only Mets run scored
on Recker's sacrifice fly in
the fifth. They totaled four
hits and went 0 for 3 with
runners in scoring position
after going 1 for 18 in those
situations Monday.
Ryan Webb (1-1) pitched
a perfect ninth.
The Marlins were with-
out slugger Giancarlo
Stanton, who went on the
disabled list Tuesday with
a strained right hamstring
and expects to be sidelined
for about a month. Marcell
Ozuna was called up from
Double-A Jacksonville to
replace Stanton and went
1 for 3 in his major league
debut.
David Wright returned to
the Mets lineup after miss-
ing one start with a stiff
neck and went 0 for 4.
Hefner's most awkward
moment came in the sixth,
when he had to scramble
after a grounder hit by
Pierre. The ball hit off He-
fner's glove and chest and
rolled toward first. The
pitcher picked it up on the
run and tossed it for the out
but then skidded across
the infield dirt on one knee
as teammates laughed.
New York's Daniel Mur-
phy doubled to start the
fifth, went to third on a fly-
out and scored the game's
first run on Recker's sac fly.


The Associated Press

MIAMI Miami Marlins
slugger Giancarlo Stanton
expects to be sidelined for
about a month because of
a strained right hamstring.
Stanton underwent an
MRI exam Tuesday and
said the diagnosis was a
grade-two strain on the
one-to-three scale for the
injury. He was hurt trying
to beat out a grounder in
Monday's 15-inning victo-
ry over the New York Mets,
and was placed on the 15-
day disabled list.
The injury occurred
just as last year's NL slug-
ging leader showed signs
of emerging from a pro-
longed slump to start the
season. He hit his first
home run Saturday and
two more Sunday.
'Awesome timing,"
Stanton said facetiously.
"It's a tough break. Pretty
frustrating. It's just one of
those freak things. There's
never a good time, but
this was probably one
of the worst times to do
it."
Last year Stanton hit 37
home runs despite miss-
ing 39 games because of


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Marlins' Giancarlo
Stanton (left) is led off the
field by team trainer Sean
Cunningham after straining
his right hamstring Monday.
injuries. Now the Marlins,
already saddled with the
worst record in the majors,
will be without their best
hitter for several weeks.
"If we could just erase
all of April, that would be
lovely," Stanton said.
He'll be replaced in
right field by 22-year-old
Marcell Ozuna, who was
recalled from Double-A
Jacksonville to make his
major-league debut.
"When I received the
call, I felt very excited,"
Ozuna said. "I didn't sleep
last night."


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS
Atlanta Braves pitcher Tim Hudson smiles after hitting a home run in the fifth inning of a game against the Washington
Nationals on Tuesday in Atlanta.


Hudson homers in 200th

win as Braves beat Nats


The Associated Press

ATLANTA Tim Hud-
son was a dual threat
in his 200th career win,
combining with Anthony
Varvaro on a three-hit-
ter while hitting a homer
and a double to lead the
Atlanta Braves to an 8-1
win over the Washington
Nationals on Tuesday
night.
Hudson (3-1) dominat-
ed the Nationals through
seven innings, striking
out six and walking two
while giving up one run.
One of the three hits he
allowed was an infield
single by Denard Span.
Hudson's bat almost
stole the night. He led off
the second with a double
to left field off Gio Gon-
zalez (2-2) and hit a fifth-
inning homer off Zach
Duke. Bryce Harper made
a leaping attempt to catch
the homer, .but the ball
bounced off his glove and
over the wall.
The Braves won their
ninth straight against
Washington, dating to
' last season.
Andrelton Simmons
had three hits, including a
homer to lead off the first
inning for Atlanta. Fred-
die Freeman had three
singles and three RBIs,
and Evan Gattis drove in
two runs with two hits.
Hudson's homer was
the third of his career and
first since June 20, 2011
against Toronto.
The 37-year-old became
the third active pitcher
with 200 wins, joining
Andy Pettitte (248) and
Roy Halladay (201). Hud-
son is 200-105 in his ca-
reer, including 92 wins
while with Oakland from
1999-2004.
Hudson allowed no hits
until Tyler Moore led off


the fifth with a double
to the right-field corner.
Moore scored from third
on a groundout by Wilson
Ramos.
Moore started with
Jayson Werth being held
out because of a sore left
ankle and tightness in his
right hamstring. Werth
fouled a ball off his ankle
Monday night.
Ian Desmond led off the
seventh with a triple to
right field but was strand-
ed on third as Hudson
ended his night by strik-
ing out Chad Tracy and
Ramos.
Gonzalez lasted only
four innings, allowing five
runs on seven hits and a
season-high five walks.
The left-hander has al-
lowed five or more runs in
three of his six starts this
season, leaving his ERA
at 5.34. It was the second
start this season Gonza-
lez has pitched only four
innings.
After Simmons led off
the first with a line-drive
homer that just cleared
the left-field wall, Justin
Upton reached on a one-
out walk and scored on
a double by Gattis. Chris
Johnson and Freeman
had run-scoring singles
in the second, and Gattis
drove in another run with
a single in the fourth.
The Braves stretched
the lead with three runs
off Duke in the fifth, in-
cluding a two-run single
by Freeman that skipped
past LaRoche's glove at
first base.
B.J. Upton ended the
sixth with a leaping catch
of Adam LaRoche's drive
off Hudson before crash-
ing into the centerfield
wall.
Varvaro pitched two
perfect innings in relief of
Hudson.


Atlanta
Braves
relief
pitcher
Luis Ayala
pitches
against
the Pirates
in a game
at PNC
Park on
April 19 in
Pittsburgh. -.J ,

Braves place Ayala on DL

with anxiety disorder


Thle ,os.cjaled Pre.

ATLANTA The At-
lanta Braves right-hand-
er Luis Ayala has been
placed on the 15-day dis-
abled list because of an
anxiety disorder.
Tuesday's move was
retroactive to April 25.
Right-hander David
Carpenter was recalled
from Triple-A Gwin-
nett in time for Tuesday
night's game against the


Washington Nationals.
Adanta acquired the
35-year-old Ayala from
the Baltimore Orioles on
April 10 for minor league
left-hander Chris Jones.
Ayala was 0- 1 with a 3.86
ERA in five games with
the Braves, all in relief.
Carpenter did not ap-
pear in a game during a
brief earlier stay in At-
lanta before he was sent
back to Gwinnett on
April 22.


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Drivers hit 214 mph during Indy tire test


The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS A new envi-
ronmentally friendly tire and cool
morning temperatures had NAS-
CAR drivers clocking speeds they
weren't even sure were possible
Tuesday.
On the first day of a closed tire test


on Indianapolis' historic 2.5-mile
oval, Mark Martin wrote on Twit-
ter that he had hit 212 mph in the
morning. When Jeff Gordon saw the
post, he asked his own team how
fast he reached and said he was told
214. \
Drivers attributed the speed to
almost perfect conditions in the


morning good grip and a cool
track. In the heat of the afternoon,
Gordon said the tire wear increased
and the speeds slowed.
Clearly, though, those on the track
were encouraged by the results.
Gordon and Trevor Bayne both
said they would embrace a night
race at Indy, too.


Horse Racing

Preakness beefs up security, bans backpacks


The Associated Press

BALTIMORE Back-
packs and duffel bags
will be prohibited at the
Preakness this year, part
of a new security policy at
Pimlico Race Course influ-
enced by the bombings at
the Boston Marathon.
For the first time, only
clear coolers will be al-
lowed in the building
and the infield at the
middle jewel of racing's
Triple Crown. The new
policy also forbids laser
lights and pointers, along
with cameras with lenses
more than 6 inches in
length.
In previous years, back-
packs and duffel bags
were allowed in the vastly
populated infield. Duf-
fel bags were permitted


in the building and the
grandstand, but now duf-
fel bags and backpacks are
forbidden on the entire
premises. The rule applies
to fans, employees and
vendors.
The security measures
will be in effect on the
day of the Preakness, May
18, and Black-Eyed Susan
day, May 17. More than
100,000 fans have attend-
ed the Preakness in 10 of
the last 12 years, includ-
ing a record 121,309 last
year.
The Maryland Jockey
Club instituted thd poli-
cy after consulting with
several federal and local
agencies, including Home-
land Security and the
FBI.
"We do a security plan
starting in October every


year," Jockey Club presi-
dent Tom Chuckas said
Tuesday. "Unfortunately,
with what transpired in
Boston, I met. with more
than 50 people a week ago
and ... based on the Bos-
ton tragedy, we decided to
make some modifications.
Backpacks were one of
them."
The bombs set at the
Boston Marathon on
April 15 were contained in
backpacks.
. "We have upped the lev-
el of security to make sure
nothing like that happens
here," Chuckas said.
He added that there
would be increased secu-
rity personnel at Pimlico
on both days, although he
hopes it will be simpler to
monitor a race track than a
marathon.


College Football

Parents of deceased player sue Tenn. State


The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
The parents of a Tennes-
see State football player
who died after collapsing
during a practice last fall
are suing the university for
wrongful death.
Wayne Jones III, a 19-
year-old walk-on fresh-
man defensive back, died
Nov. 7 at after collapsing
at a team workout. In the
suit filed on in Tennessee's
Division of Claims, Wayne
Jones Jr. and Sonya Johns
say an "unreasonable pe-
riod of time elapsed before
anyone approached him
or attempted to provide
any help" after their son
collapsed.
Jones' parents are seek-
ing $5 million in puni-
tive damages, though the
state of Tennessee can't
be held liable for more
than $300,000 in wrong-
ful death cases under state
law. Tennessee State is a
state university.
"We think it's a serious
case and we're going to test
that isstie with the courts
and see if the court agrees
with us, that punitive
damages should be con-
sidered," said Joe Haynes,
j the lawyer representing


Jones' parents.
The complaint says that
Jones told Tennessee State
coach Rod Reed he wasn't
feeling well before practice
and asked to be excused,
but that he participated in
the workout "upon being
challenged."
"The Tennessee State
University family contin-
ues to mourn the tragic loss


of Wayne Jones III," uiiver-
sity spokesman Rick Dela-
Haya said. "The university
has extended and contin-
ues to extend its thoughts
and prayers to the family.
We are reviewing the com-
plaint that was filed on the
parents' behalf in the Ten-
nessee Claims Commis-
sion and have no further
comment."


"There are some advan-
tages. In the Boston Mara-
thon, there's 25 miles of
space they have to cover,"
Chuckas said. "It's a little
easier here at Pimlico, but
security will need to be on
its toes."
Over the years, Pimlico
has tightened the security
measures for an infield
that once featured empty
kegs and flying beer cans.
Tents, balls, fireworks and
grills were long ago phased
out, and in 2009, the track
forbid fans to bring their
own beverages includ-
ing water.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Golf


Actor fights to save Olympic wrestling
The Associated Press Press in a phone interview it together and we formed organizing a series of pub-
from Montecito, Calif., on a really tight fraternity," lic service announcements
Wrestling has always Monday. Baldwin said. and a celebrity auction
been part of actor Billy Wrestling Baldwin wrestled for to raise money for USA
Baldwin's life. was a pas- two years at Binghamton Wrestling.
With the sport's future sion for before he "surrendered to "There's a lot of appeal
in peril, Baldwin is hop- Baldwinlong the reality" that he wasn't to having these famous
ing his notoriety and Hol- before he big-time college wrestling people step up, and to
lywood connections can ever thought material. That, combined have these .Olympic leg-
help keep it on the Olym- Baldwin a b o u t with the death of his father ends stand up on behalf of
pic program, acting. Alexander, a high school a sport they've never com-
Baldwin, who wrestled Baldwin grewup in Mass- teacher and football coach, peted in," Baldwin said.
at Binghamton Univer- apequa, N.Y, and wrestled pushed Baldwin into work- "But. they get it. They re-
sity before a long career for the high school pro- ing his way through col- spect and understand how
in television and films, gram made prominent by lege instead to help out his important this is."
has joined USA Wrestling's Al Bevilacqua, a longtime family. Baldwin knows that the
Committee to Preserve wrestling coach and offi- Baldwin began his acting IOC members set to vote
Olympic Wrestling as a cial. Bevilacqua now works career soon after gradu- on wrestling's future in
self-described "Hollywood with the Beat the Streets ating from Binghamton, late May aren't likely to be
point person." USA program, which helps appearing in such films as swayed by a few famous
The committee was develop wrestling opportu- "Backdraft" and 'Sliver." folks. His main goal is to
formed in the wake of the nities in urban areas across He's now using his fame keep wrestling's predica-
IOC's recent recommen- the nation and is putting to spread the word about ment alive in the media,
dation that wrestling be on an exhibition featuring the Olympic wrestling both in the U.S. and inter-
left out of the Olympics the U.S., Russia and Iran in movement, nationally, and to remind
starting in 2020. Baldwin is New York on May 15. Beyond his Hollywood everyone of how valuable
charged with keeping the Baldwin's best friend is friends, Baldwin said he's wrestling can be for young
sport's plight on the minds Bevilacqua's son Chris, lined up Wayne Gretzky, men and women.
of the public, and he said who also served as his best Magic Johnson, Mark "The work ethic and the
that he has enlisted Ashtori man at his wedding, and as Spitz, Janet Evans, Bruce discipline and the mental
Kutcher, his brother Alec kids they bonded through Jenner, Carl Lewis, Michael toughness transcend the
Baldwin, Steve Buscemi, the sport. Phelps, Mary Lou Retton, sport of wrestling. And
Mario Lopez, Mark Ruffalo "Wrestling was -kind of John McEnroe and other later in life, when you are
and others in Hollywood like my life when I was in sports figures to support crossing bridges and fight-
and the world of sports to 10th, 11th and 12th grade. I the cause. ing your way through ad-
help him out. ran with this pack of like 15 Baldwin said their help versity as a husband and
"1You can take the young guys and we were all going could be as simple as a father in the pursuit of
man out of wrestling. But through it together. All of publicly endorsing the your life's interest and your
you can't take wrestling out the skin infections and the wrestling movement and career, that will come back
of the young man," Bald- cauliflower ear and the in- supporting it on Twit- to serve you well," Baldwin
win told The Associated juries, we all went through ter. But Baldwin is also said.


The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C.
- Vijay Singh no longer
faces any sanction for us-
ing deer antler spray.
The PGATour said Tues-
day it was dropping the
case against the three-
time major champion.
Tour commissioner Tim
Finchem says new infor-
mation' from the World
Anriti-Doping Agency in-
dicates that using deer
antler spray is no longer
considered prohibited.


The tour confirmed
that the spray Singh .used
contained IGF-1, an insu-
lin-like growth hormone
that is on the tour's list
of banned substances.
Singh was appealing
tour sanctions. under
the anti-doping policy
when WADA clarified its
position.
Finchem says that
based on WADA's posi-
tion, it would not be fair
for the tour to consider
Singh in violation of the
drug policy.


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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vijay Singh, of Fiji, tees off on the ninth hole while wearing
an "Els for Autism" ribbon in his visor during the second
round of the RBC Heritage golf tournament in Hilton Head
Island, S.C., on April 19. '


PGA Tour drops


its doping case


against Singh


P










Basketball


Celtics players happy for former teammate Collins


The Associated Press

WALTHAM, Mass. -
Celtics coach Doc Rivers
wishes Jason Collins had
gotten more rebounds. Jeff
Green liked the screens
his former teammate set.
Jason Terry would love to
have Collins' toughness in
the playoffs.
And they're all happy for
Collins after he came out
as gay.
None of the Celtics ex-
pressed concern Tuesday
about having been on the
same team as a gay player.
They did care about what
he did to help Boston win
games and about how
he might help other gay
athletes.
"There are so many pro-
fessional athletes, there
are so many human beings
that live a dark life, that are
scared to expose it because
of the exposure of sports
and what people may
think about them," Paul
Pierce said. "I think what
he did was a great thing
just to open the door for
a number of athletes who
probably now are going to
have the courage to come
out."
Rivers said Collins told
him he was gay "a couple of
days" before his announce-
ment Monday on Sports
Illustrated's website.
"I don't know if (I was)
surprised, or really didn't
care one way or the other,"
Rivers said. "It's a nonfac-
tor to me. And I know it is
.a factor to a lot of people. I
just have never understood
why anyone cares about
what someone else does.
"He told me he was com-
ing out and I told him,
'great, you know, good.
Let's move forward.' And
I jokingly said, 'I wish you
could have gotten me
more rebounds,' because
that's all I care about."
The 7-foot Collins played
32 games for the Celtics in
his only season with them.
He averaged 1.2 points and
1.6 rebounds ir ,*0.3 min-
utes per game. They traded


*THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Jason Collins poses during Celtics NBA basketball media
day at the team's training facility in Waltham, Mass., on Sept.
28.


him on Feb. 21 to Wash-
ington, his sixth team in
12 seasons. He played just
six games with the Wizards
with four points and eight
rebounds.
Now he's a ftee agent.
Some Celtics said they'd
like to have him back next
season.
"Most definitely," Green
said before practice for
Wednesday night's fifth
game against the New
York Knicks. "He was an
awesome teammate. He
played the game hard. He
set good screens to get me
open. That's all you can ask
for."
The Knicks lead the first-
round series 3-1 and can
wrap it up at home. The
Celtics avoided a sweep
with a 97-90 overtime win
on Sunday in which Ter-
ry scored their last nine
points. But they're still at a
big disadvantage.
Would Terry like Collins
back?
"Definitely needed
his toughness," he said.


"Would love to have it in
this series. He's one of the
toughest guys in the NBA."
Several Celtics praised
Collins as intelligent, very
professional and a good
teammate who was a posi-
tive influence in the locker
room despite his minor
role. They were Phappy
for him that he made his
announcement.
"He's had a huge, tre-
mendous weight"lifted off
of him and that's all you
can ask for any man or
woman is to be at peace
with themselves," Terry
said. "Then you can go find
that ultimate happiness.
"I know how dedicated he
is to his craft and he was a
great teammate, regardless
of his sexual preference. It
didn't matter to me."
Kevin Garnett was "just
happy for him obviously
being able to be himself. ...
Personal preference is just
that. We're here to support
everything he's doing."
Green called Collins "a
good friend" and said "I'm


The A:: t, Prtr'rt, :

NEW YORK ESPN
says that it regrets the
"distraction" caused by
one of its reporters who
described lason Collins
as a sinner after the NBA
center publicly revealed
that he was gay.
Chris Broussard. who
covers the NBA for ESPN.
had said on the air that
Collins and others in the
NBA who engage in pre-
marital sex or adultery
were "walking in open
rebellion to God, and to
lesus Christ." Broussard,
a former reporter for The
New York Times, spoke
during ESPN's "Outside
the Lines" program Mon-
day discussing Collins'
announcement.
In an article in Sports Il-
lustrated, Collins became
the first male athlete in
one of the country's four

truly, truly happy for him."
And, he said, he never
considered the possibility
of having a gay teammate.
"It never crossed my
mind, but I'm not against
it," he said. "We all are
here for the same reason
and that's to win, no mat-
ter if you're gay, if you're
straight. It doesn't matter
to me."
But Rivers knows not ev-
eryone will have a favor-
able reaction to Collins'
announcement if he plays
next season.
"There may be some guy
in the crowd that may want
to voice his opinion," he
said, "but they voice their
opinions pretty well when
we're on the road anyway.
It's just white noise at the
end of the day, and I'm
sure when Jackie Robinson
went on the road, some of
the things he heard, and
they all went away, eventu-
ally, and this will go away


NCAA president calls for inclusiveness


The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Jason
Collins' announcement
could have a profound im-
pact on college sports, too.
NCAA -president Mark
Emmert opened Tuesday's
second Inclusion Forum by
urging campus leaders to
make school policies more
welcoming for women, mi-
norities, disabled athletes
and those with different
sexual orientations.
While he didn't cite Col-
lins specifically during
his speech or in the sub-
sequent question-and-
answer session, Emmert
expressed his support for
the first openly gay active
player in a major Ameri-
can pro sports league. He
acknowledged that Col-
lins' disclosure that he's
gay could have a ripple ef-
fect on how college' athlet-
ic departments treat other
players and coaches.
"At the very least, I hope
it does make it much easier
for athletes in universities
and other environments
to be open about it and be
supported by their coach-
ing staffs and teammates,"
Emmert told The Associ-
ated Press. "We're talking
about a culture change,
and it's slow and arduous,
but what I'm seeing on
campuses is that the inclu-
sion issue has moved up."
When the federal govern-
ment passed Title IX legis-
lation in 1972, it opened
the door to better funding,
better facilities and better
coaches in women's sports.
Many at the forum argued
that men's and women's
sports still are not funded
equally more than four de-
cades later.
Colleges have been at the
forefront of opening edu-
cational opportunities for
minorities and many have
instituted policies regard-
ing job searches that are
intended to expand the


talent pool. Many schools
have been leaders in re-
search for students with
learning and physical dis-
abilities, and now, with
Collins' going public about
his sexual orientation, Em-
mert sees another oppor-
tunity for schools.
"I'm delighted by it," he
said. "The need for a high-
performing athlete to feel
he can be open and honest
about his sexuality is long
overdue."
Emmert has been un-
der fire since announcing
in January that the NCAA
botched its investigation
into the University of Mi-
ami. Some in the media
immediately began calling
for his ouster.
In late February, the
NCAA's executive commit-
tee announced it was giv-
ing Emmert a vote of con-
fidence, a rare and perhaps
unprecedented move.
Then, following an unusu-
ally contentious news con-
ference at the Final Four,
the calls for Emmert's fir-
ing heated up again. ,
This week, is a chance


for Emmert to get back to
business as usual.
It started with the open-
ing of the Inclusion Fo-
rum, which runs through
Thursday. That just hap-
pens to be the same day
the board of directors will
meet to discuss what to do
about rule changes that
were approved in January
but later blocked by the
membership over issues
such as unlimited texting,
. phone calls and emails be-
tween college coaches and
perspective recruits.
Emmert couldn't escape
a series of enough ques-
tions, even from a seem-
ingly friendly audience.
"Female athletes, partic-
ularly basketball players,
seem to be getting singled
out in gender identity
during games. What can
the NCAA do about this?"
one woman from Purdue
asked.
Emmert asked what she
thought could be done.
The woman suggested
sanctioning schools for im-
proper behavior from fans.
"I would certainly sup-


port a proposal that would
do that," Emmert said. "If
that's a rule that makes
sense and there ought
to be some sanctioning
like that, then I hope the ,
membership brings that
forward. I think that would
make good sense."
Even one of Emmert's
signature reforms, tougher
academic standards, was ;
debated.
One man noted that be-
cause of limited educa-
tional resources, it could
lead to a widening gap
between athletes from
lower-income areas and '
those from the wealthier
suburbs given the new re-
quirements. Current rules
require athletes to have a
2.0 GPA in their core high
school courses. Beginning
in 2016, incoming fresh-
men must have a 2.3 in
those classes.


major sports to come out
as gay.
ESPN's Josh Krulewitz
said the network regrets
that a discussion of per-
sonal viewpoints became
a "distraction." The net-
work offered its owni \iew
of Collins' news: "ESPN is
fully committed to diver-
sity. and welcomes Jason
Collins announcement,"
he said.
During his on-the-air
discussion, Broussard
described himself as a
Christian.
"I don't agree with ho-
mosexuality," he said. I
think it's a sin, as I think
all sex outside of mar-
riage between a man and
a woman is."
Broussaid in an online
message on Tuesday said
that he had previously
discussed his point of
view about homosexual-
ity publicly.

as well."
Rivers said Collins' an-
nouncement will "spur
debate and opinions" even
if it doesn't spur other gay


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- z. ,,." .,-k -. i ..'.- --: --'s : m -'- .- ." '- -. : "s3 "


- AE - B!-B M 3rEB' i-


"1I realize that some
people disagree with my
opinion, and I accept and
respect that," he wrote.
"As has been the case in
the past, my beliefs have
not and w-ill not impact
my ability to report on
the NBA. I believe Jason
Collins displayed bra%-
ery with his announce-
ment ... and I have no
objection to him or any-
one else playing in the
NBA."
Collins, in an interview
with 7Th7 New York Tunes
on Tuesday, noted that he
is a Christian, too.
"This is all about toler-
ance and acceptance and
America is the best coun-
try in the world because
we're all entitled to our
opinions and beliefs but
we don't have to agree,"
he said. "And obviously
I don't agree with his
statement.'

athletes to come out.
"Everybody should have
a right to an opinion," he
said. "We.have to have tol-
erance with everyone."


Companion Animal .Idicine A& Surgery
.. *. .. ... -- .-

We Appreciate the Citizens of
Jackson County and your support.
2909 Jefferson Streer 850--182-3520


Wanna quit smoking??
Have a loved one
who wants to quit??


S .1
s.


LET US HELP YOU 6
REACH YOUR GOAL!

VAPOR TECH INC.

A HEALTHIER LIFESTYLE


www.vaportechinc.org
vaportechinc@ymail.com
Monday-Saturday 9am-6pn
4944 B Malloy Plazg, Morianna


(850) 482-0036.


fetE flo,.iand nnl r.ine

S1' O ii ii,
ihoA' Irani


ESPN says it regrets Broussard

comment- on gay NBA player


Wo. .ALLS
a a


Sales & Service
From Utility to
Goose Neck Equipment


UH Truck Trailer & Rental




Behind Ruby Tuesday


WEDNESDAY, MAY1, 2013 + 5B r


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


i


Important [ctp in ensuriln th, i'
is -orkin' at it, peak eflici







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
1 1 WFRANTEVE.R.YOU WER.EJUYT
V IJ 1 Vy II ''A.DREINE AbOUT, KNOCK
I-El-NERt! 1W IT OFF!
,._ ,W.,


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
I BEAT O Y YOU USE 'LAY" WHEN.
I NEED DAONT LAY You PUT SOMETHING
To LAY'I DOWN YOU SOMEWHERE! YOU LAY
DOWN. LI&, A BLANKET ON THE
COWN' GRASS' YOU LAY A
PLATE ON A PLACEMAT'
GETr T
--YEAHI, rGET IT


IP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI

THe Next SoLDe is 2eFodvuLa Govilesses
F THe. VeiUSs de MILO.D ~ OFANCieMTN GFeeae.
( n I -----


50. YOU HAVE A
DO WITH IT?' nO F-


0 -


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


WE DOWNLOAD '
GI6AFYT66 OF
PfgSONA/. DATA
AFOUT YOU.".,




GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


ARLO.& JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON
THE LASTMOVIE YOURECALL 199 AUD r14e "C'ECUH CHICK'S"
5EEIU& )AATA ,WAS IAME 15 MII016 DRIVER.

OPFFTE TO'

OFMY





ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER


WHETHER YOU UNDERSTAND SORRY! -
OR NOT, AS THIS MAN'5 I CANT
ATTORNEY, I DEMAND TM LET YOU
R sGr 'TO PEAK TO HIM! DO-THAT!.
5-1-- ,
(,\-^ ^,,....-
... ,. !'


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


L(, i(tCOP" ,IP T11t N E., Rt.WN V AN
spI.Mv lJIt.r+r 4W V, WANT.
, "e a


4:,;, :.' -ri '. . .


iT WAS
ATALKIE.'


- TNAT PRISONER SORRY! ALL I DO'
CANNOT BE DENIED IS GUARD! YOU'LL -
.THE iG6HT TO TALK HAFTA TALK T KING
1'-TLO HIS ATTORNEY GUZ ABOUT THAT!


.,i I,,

.' .- N


TREMBLE,
MORTAL!
TREMBLE
BEFORETHE
POWER OF THE


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


51 C LaughingStock Inter nc, Disi by Universal UCick or UFS. 2013

"She got a black belt after
her first lesson."


ACROSS
1 Poison
6 Fire starter
11 Kind of
equation'
12 Moths-to-be
13 Magazine
filler
14 Make like
Houdini
15 Scoots
along
16 Pageant
wear
17 Orange skin
18 Hearty
laugh
19About, in
memos
(2 wds.)
23 Verve
25 Uses the
microwave
26 Nimitz '
29 Permit
31 Encoun-
tered
32 Carnival
city
33 Powdery
34 NASA
counterpart
35A-list
37 Oater
backdrop
39 Long past
40 Vinyl
records


41 Cornfield
sounds
45 Bowls over
47 Stray calf
48 Hunting
hawk
51 Rabbit
burrow
52 Bickered
53 Actor
Borgnine
54 Ocean
trenches
55 Attack on
all sides

DOWN
1 Lombardi or
McMahon
2 Follow
3 Haystack
find?
4 Boathouse
items
5 "The
A-Team"
actor
(2 wds.)
6 Huge crowd
7 Edith's
sitcom
husband
8 Rural elec.
provider
9 Upper limit
10 Start of a
bray


Answer to Previous Puzzle

HAL CMS SPCA
EVA RAKE LILT

PREENS SAIGON
MEC H ANI U LN I

W EE TIGcm
YAWED CARESS
AVID POSY HUE
KOD BUSY LARK
WEALTH TEHEE
RAT AAAT
UNEASE SCREAM
ROOF RESONATE
LANNASTEM VET
LOST ETA ENE


11 Speech
problem
12 Breach of
secrecy
16 Artificial
tan sources
18 Lock brand
20 Moniker
21 AAA
suggestions
22This, in
Tijuana
24 Weak, as
an excuse
25 Main rds.
26 Heavy
hydrogen
discoverer
27 Rural
structure
28 Evening, in
Paris


30 Cheers for
toreros
36 Piece of
china
38 Future oaks
40 Give,
temporarily
42 See eye to
eye
43 Actress
Dianne -
44 Dispatched
46 Adversities
47 Be bold
48 Craze
49- you
serious?
50 Size above
med.
51 Spider's
home


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just,Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


5-1 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"EXIT YKTU RHTMZPLT YKT ZMUT

RHTMZPLT YKTV KMIT JKTG YKTV

JMWT PR NLBU M GXEKYUMLT."
- M H NLT F KXYSKSBSW BG MP FXTGSTZ


Previous Solution: "I hate all the things that can happen between the beginning
of a sentence and the end." Leonard Cohen
TODAY CLUE: A slenbeA
@2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-1


Dear Annie: Recently, my wife and I
stayed for four days at the home of one of
her school chums. The gals yakked until
late at night, so I was the first one up ev-
ery morning. I'm an early riser anyway.
I like reading the newspaper with my
breakfast, so when I'd get up, I'd go out-
side and pick up the paper and bring it in.
My wife says it was wrong to get the paper
before our hostess. Anyway, after a couple
of days, the school friend seemed in a snit
about something, and my wife says that
was the reason, even though she never
said so when I asked whether something
was bothering her.
Recently, we were invited to stay with
different friends for a weekend, and I am
getting no end of hassle from my wife to
make sure I wait for our hosts to finish
with the paper. I figure I'll just go out for
coffee somewhere and buy a paper. My
wife says it would be rude to take off at


Katey Sagal, an actress and singer-songwriter, said, "I
think we respond well when we do something well."
At the bridge table, we score well when, inter alia, re-
sponder rebids well our theme this week.
Look at the North hand. What should North bid on the
second round?
When the auction begins like this, if responder rebids
two hearts, it announces weakness (6-9 points). If he
jumps to three hearts, he shows game-invitational val-
ues (10-12 points). This hand, though, is worth game.
North should jump to four hearts.
After West leads the club queen, how should South
plan the play?
With a different hand, North would have other ways to
force to game; we will look at the most important later
this week.
South has four losers in his hand, one in each suit. He
cannot avoid conceding tricks to the missing aces, so he
must do something about the club loser immediately.
Declarer must discard a club from either hand.
There are two ways to do this. The better is to win the
first trick in his hand with the king and to play a spade to
dummy's jack. East takes his ace and returns a club, but
declarer wins with dummy's ace and discards his third
club on the spade king. Then it is time to draw trumps
as quickly as possible.
Alternatively, declarer can win the first trick on the
board and lead the diamond jack. West wins this or the
next diamond and plays another club. South takes this
in his hand and continues diamonds to ditch dummy's
last club. He then ruffs his last club on the board and
turns to trumps.


TAURUS (April 20-
May 20) -You must be
extremely careful not to
show partiality to certain
friends. If you do, you'll
lose the respect of many.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) Don't take on more
tasks than you can com-
fortably manage.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Though there will be
situations in which you'll
need to take some risks,
there will also be times
when you'll need to be
conservative.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- A close.friend might get
hurt if you fail to return
the warmth and consider-
ation that this person has
consistently shown you in
the past.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Self-doubt is likely to be
your worst enemy, so you
need to figure out how to
deal with it. If you don't,
you'll lose momentum.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Be careful, because
.your financial trends will
be mixed. Though you
may gain in some in-
stances, you could suffer
an unexpected loss.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Although you have
excellent leadership quali-
ties, you may not be using
them enough. Step up to
the plate.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Because you'll
tend to hear and see only
what you want to, you
could be cruising for a
bruising. Listen carefully.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Treat all your friends
in your usual considerate
manner, but don't let any-
one walk all over you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) In order to achieve
an important objective,
you must stay focused on
your target at all times. If
you deviate, you are likely
to be thrown off course.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Although your judg-
ment is likely at its sound-
est, unfortunately, you
might allow lesser heads to
rule the day. Don't doubt
your insti-i ts. : ..:
ARIES (March 21-April
19) By working in fits
and starts, you severely
minimize your effective-
ness and productivity. Be
conscientious.


breakfast. Is this idiotic or what?
CALIFORNIA

Dear California: It would be rude to read
the paper in such a way that your hosts
must wait for you to finish, or that you
drag sections of it all over the house and
fill in all the clues to the crossword puzzle.
But there is nothing wrong with reading
the paper early, putting it back together
nicely and having it available to your
hosts when they awaken.
You can resolve this simply enough.
When you arrive, inform your hosts that
you are an early riser, and ask whether
they would mind if ypu fetch their paper
and read it with your coffee, promising to
keep it in pristine condition for when they
are ready to read it. You also could offer to
go to the local coffee shop and bring back
coffee and muffins (and a newspaper) for
everyone else.


North 05-01-13
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West
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A 10 9 7

9A 7 4 2
YA2
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#KQJ985
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Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
1 Pass 1 Pass
2* Pass ??


Opening lead: Q


C'K S EVW 4K fAt t^rrCim' -4riWEBUS
E' tfJ~'otCl1 T hINl IT TIE TO

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-6B WEDNESDAY, MAY 1. 2013


ENTERTAINIVIENT








www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, May 1, 2013-7 B
Wednesday, May 1, 2013- 7 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED



MARKETPLACE


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in ?uh.Is..,n e t to0 tier. esgni ,r. :- Otl of lIr.e d fir me fIrst ay s
Insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising our c,.r r1:- ..- 3..eiserr.,nta s,'cr infe arT-ulI pal'a ir trna space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement hn which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for -,J,-,., -el,: c' r ,a a diertie,'ret berna i-r, am-our.i paid lor
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

F d d ea6 -o0s0 0 I


[$)


FINANCIAL


r.



Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com

Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
504-915-1474

( I) MERCHANDISE

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.


ANNE'S DAY LILIES
827 S. APPLETREE ST
in Dothan, Day Lilies ($1- up)
Amaryllis & Iris ($3 up)
334-792-0653 or 334-797-9657 -
L................................J
9# PETS & ANIMALS


Free Cat: small female calico, rescued, very
sweet. Call 850-482-2994

AKC German Shepherd Puppies: $350. Parents
on site. Up-to-date on shots and worming.
Black and tan. 334-393-7284 OR 334-806-5851
-* AKC German Shepherd puppies 3-M
1- white 2- bl. & tan $350- S450. 1st shots & vet
checked parents on site, 334-379-0221
Collies: AKC reg. Males & Females $400. Born
April 7.2013. Ready May 20th. Sable White.
229-308-3006. alderman.lynn,'.yahoo.ccom
English Bulldog Puppy: AK C I/Female
champion bloodlines. 20 weeks old. health
certificates, S&W. Colors: brindle & white.
1,300n. Call RO5-249-5626 or 843-267-6214


G.M. Properties of PC
"- Beach 800-239-2059
SFully Furnished Condos
- & Townhouses
near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front, starting i -$175 rt.
3bdrm Gull front starting ,4', $250 nt.
Portside Resort starting 4'i $125.
2bdrm Lake front- starting a4 $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting a, $70 nt.
www,gmproperties.com


Mini Australian Shepherd: ASDR beautiful pups
born 3/15. Blue merles, red merles, tri's & bi;s.
See @ facebook.com/ huntsminiaussies or call
706-761-3024
Papillon Puppies Dual Registered w/ CKC &
UKC $600. Breed is over 800 yrs. old. with no
medical defects, very loving non aggressive,
hypoallergenic, Call: 334-393-0938 or
334-379-0805 dmiugo8@centurylink.net
Super Puppies Sale
Morkie $175. Shih -Chi Mix $175,
Chi-A-Poo $300, Chinese Chihuahua
Female -+ 334-718-4886 4m
SIFARMER'S MARKET






..... .... L






S Vine Ripe Tomatoes


Home Grown Greens
Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W.H y52 Malvern




Aplin Farms
Strawberries
& lettuce
You Pick
We Pick
Open Mon-Sat ( 8-6)
0 334-726-5104 40

ee-ad a tMev n-lome.?
ChcL out thfi, Cla!,ifie-Ld


Frozen Green
*Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
850-573-6594 4128Hwy 231


U-Pick We Pick
S Juicy and Sweet
9 miles from Ross Clark Circle
Hw 52 West of Dothan.
Cal33 V18865ad33479II Ia


;. Bahia seed for sale **
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
- experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 33...... 4-775-3749 Ext. 02


{ Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinnigi
Call Pea River Timber
334-389-2003

(li*5 EMPLOYMENT


Administrative Assistant
FT needed for busy Veterinary Office.
Experience preferred. Drop resume at,
Panhandle Vet. 900 Falling Waters Rd.
Chipley, FI. Mon-Fri 8:00-5:00 Deadline for
dropping off resume by May 3rd.


CHIPOLA COLLEGE_
is accepting applications for
the following full-time
positions:


* ASSOCIATE DEAN OF FINE AND
PERFORMING ARTS
* ACCOUNTING/BUSINESS INSTRUCTOR
* ENGLISH INSTRUCTOR
* CHEMISTRY INSTRUCTOR
* MATHEMATICS EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR
* NURSING INSTRUCTOR
* SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTOR
* WELDING INSTRUCTOR
* CAREER COACH WELDING PROGRAM
Minimum qualifications are available at
www.chipola.edu/personnel/jobs .
APPLICATION DEADLINE IS
OPEN UNTIL FILLED.
To obtain an application, contact
Human Resources at pippenw@chipola.edu
or at (850)718-2269. Candidates may be
subject to background investigations.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


'I- ~ -


Sudoku


Level: U 23
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to Tuesday's puzzle
5 4 9 8 2 1 3 6 7
876359241

31 2 71416 8 5 9


724138596


263587914
497213685A


AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-
MINDED, NEWSPAPER CARRIERS

Alford
Earn an average of

$600
per month

Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus
BE YOUR OWN BOSS 2 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.
Come by and fill out a bid at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL


AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-
MINDED, NEWSPAPER CARRIERS

GRAND RIDGE
Earn an average of

$800
per month

Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus
BE YOUR OWN BOSS 1 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.
Come by and fill out a bid at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL



ARNES

Since 1975
BILLY BARNES ENTERPRISES, INC.
IS NOW HIRING
EXPERIENCED FLATBED DRIVERS
EXCELLENT PAY & BENEFITS
HOME MOST WEEKENDS
MINIMUM PAY
REQUIREMENTS INCLUDE:
MUST BE 23 YEARS OLD,;VALID CLASS A CDL,
CLEAN DRIVING RECORD, 1 YEAR
TRACTOR/TRAILER FLATBED EXPERIENCE
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
MARY @ 1-800-844-6458 OPT 1
OR APPLY ONLINE
S www.billybarnes.net

C.D.L with Hazmat
and Tanker
Full benefits.
Apply in person to
Chipola Propane,
4055 Old Cottondale Road
Marianna, FL
Hours 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Monday- Friday.
No Phone Calls Please .!!.


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


L


2 9

9 6 3 7 5

5 1 8

3
- - - 6

6 8 4

7 4
~- ---- -
7 9 5

6 9 1 2 4

2 3
-__ -__ _--- -_


,PLACE AN AD-


5/1/13










B W d d M 1 2013 Jackson C n


25 Drivers


Trainees

NEEDED NOW !
Learn to drive for
Werner Enterprises
Earn $800 per week!
No experience needed
Local CDL Training
job ready in 15 days!

1-888-368-2198



River Valley Rehabilitation
Center Is now hiring:
RUN'S & LPN'S
7a-7p & 7p-7a SHIFT

C.N.A'S
3-11 SHIFT
$1.00 SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL

FOOD SERVICE AIDE
5a-1:30p/11a-8p SHIFT

Painter, Part Time_ Temporary
Opening for a part time interior painter.
Painting experience, a must. Sheetrock
repair, floor, and ceiling tile replacement,
a plus. Apply in person at 17884 N. E.
Crozier St. Blountstown.
Great Pay and Benefits
Health, Vision & Dental.

Please Apply at:
River Valley Rehabilitation Center
17884 NE Crozier Street
Blountstown, Fl. 32424
Ph: (850) 674-5464
Fax: 674-9384
Email: rvhrc @southernitc.com
Drug Free Workplace- Safe Minimal Lifting
Environment An EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D


r Executive Secretary
Must have high school
diploma or GED, including
-v or supplemented by
..- course work in secretarial
sciences, and 3-5 yrs. exp. In secretarial
or administrative work, including
significant computer and budget
experience. Salary set at $22,269.00/yr.
Must have a valid FL drivers license prior
to employment.

Equipment Operator IV
Must have high school diploma or
equivalent with 1 to 3 yearsof experi-
ence in the safe operation of heavy
motorized equipment (motor grader).
Must have valid Class A CDL prior to
employment. Salary set at $20,591.00/yr.

Equipment Operator III
Must have a high school diploma or
equivalent with 3 or more years
experience in the safe operation of
motorized equipment -- in the
construction and repair of roads.
Must have a valid Class A Commercial
Driver's License prior to employment.
Salary set at $19,753.00

Submit Jackson County employment ap-
plication to the Human Resources Dept,
2864 Madison St., Marianna, FL 32448. Ph
482-9633. www.jacksoncountyfl.net/

Deadline to apply is 05-06-2013
EOE/AA/Vet Pref/ADA/ Drug-Free Workplace

PT (30+hrs) Farm/Ranch Hand
Reliable Transportation! Must be
dependable! 850-482-3557 leave msg.
,l^\ RESIDENTIAL
1, REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Apartments for Rent in Greenwood
2 BR $450 1BR $400
Call 850-326-4289
.. f: IijS'jit'] I i ~i~[--


NEW Rugs Deering St. 4320; Cute 1bd 1st fl.
quiet $340. mo. NO PETS also 727-433-RENT.


1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
w 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4a
2BR/1BA House 6914 Oaks St.
Grand Ridge $450. Mo. + $450. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
4 2BR 1BA House for rent,
Safe neighborhood, $500/mo + dep.
850-482-8196 OR 850-209-1301
2BR/1BA Newly Renovated 2658 Railroad St.
Open floor plan. Cottondale. No Pets.
J$450 Mo. + $400 Dep. Call 850-352-4222


CLASSIFIED


3/2 appliances included NO PETS
5374 Cotton St. Graceville, FL
$700. mo S350. dep. 850-263-2045 Lv. Mess.
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
-4 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maint.incl.
,4 850-593-4700 4w


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
.* 850-209-8847 -
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595 I
2BR 1BA at Millpond $495 + dep. very nice,
water/sewer/lawn maintenance included,
S access to pond, No pets 850-209-3970
2BR 2 BA MH'S in Alford, $380 mo. $380. dep.
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2BR/2BA Mobile Home $450 + deposit,
appliances, washer & dryer, water/garbage
& sewer included 850-482-4455
2BR/2BA Newly remodeled in quiet area.
Very clean. Water, sewage, garbage and yard
care provided. No smokers, no pets.
$500 + deposit. Call 850-718-8158.
S3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

nlm COMMERCIAL
ij) REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Office Buildings for Lease 3200 sq. ft.
& 4200 sq. ft 850-718-6541
f RESIDENTIAL
!_j',1' REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Foreclosure Homes For Sale
2161 Katie Avenue. Grand Ridge 3BR/2BA
double wide mobile home with land. $49,000.
555 Satsuma Road. Chattahoochee.
3BR/1BA 1665SF home. $49,000.
Credit Union Owned. Call 850-663-2404


17 Acres: If "it's peace and quiet you're
looking for, you've found it.
Getaway from the hustle and bustle of the city,
only 8 miles from Chattahoochee.
This 4BR/2BA doublewide mobile home is
almost 2,200 SF and has a split floor-plan with
fireplace. 17 ACRES, 2 Ponds, Carport. Wildlife.
Contact Michael 850-533-6011.
Feel free to drive by and take a look!
NO OWNER FINANCING

8 yr. old 2600 sq.ft. 4/3 brick home on 1 acre.
dbl garage, sep. dbl carport & workshop, deck
Beautiful home in Blountstown, near HS
$199,900. nice landscaping _850-674-1433
FSBO: 3BR/2BA Brick Home. Well maintained
and updated, fireplace with gas logs, new paint
and carpet, hardwood floors, nice yard 1 acre
with fruit trees. $129,900. Call 850-482-3233 or
850-209-0459 please leave message.


1979 14x68 Riverchase 2/2, fireplace, nicely
furnished, upgraded master bath, porch &
deck included $12,500.850-718-6541
a4 MUST BE MOVED 4,


RECREATION


J Honda 2007 Foreman ATV;
l _y .i't 2-wheel & 4-wheel Drive. Elec-
s tric wench, 190 hours on it;
f $4800f OBO 334-596-9966


.O.r- O- B 2008 Crownline 19 SS, 30.5
. L . hrs. r.ler:ruiser 4.3L, Facto-
.... ry ;aakeboard tower, cus-
om orn :. :'r, snap-in carpet,
walk -thru transom, trailer
brakes, SS cleats, flip-up captain's chairs, Sony
marine stereo & sub-woofer, bimini top, stain-
less steel rub-rail upgrade, trailer tie downs, SS
windshield lock, SS cupholders, chrome wheels
Garage kept always. 334-796-9479
25 ft. Party Barge Pontoon 2011 Suntracker
Regency edition only 75 hrs. 150hp Mercury
Opti Max engine, with 2 axle trailer & lots of
extras, ready for the water, take over
payoff $41,000. Call 334-763-9124
BOAT Crownline BR 180 135hp bimini top,
Crownline trailer, new tires, $7,000.
334-618-5169
Pontoon Boat 2008 20ft. G3 fish & Cruise, pur-
chased new July 2009, 30 gallon gas tank, fish
finder, 90HP, 4-stroke, Yamaha engine. Exc. gas
mileage. Asking $15,000. 334-897-6929.

1995 30 ft. Travel Trailer fixed up to live in
good condition, cold AC $4200. OBO
334-702-0001 or 386-965-6964 In Dothan
32ft. Travel Trailer 2007 Conquest great cond.
sleeps 4-5, slide out living room $10500.
Motor Home 2002 38ft. Fleetwood Discovery
2-slide outs 35K mi. 330 hp Cummings engine,
mint cond. garage kept, awnings out with TV
outside to view & washer & dryer
$59,500. 334-805-7679.
Amera-Lite 24' Travel Trailer: 2005, AC, new
electric awning, bath tub, bunk house model.
$5,000.OBO Call 334-805-7560
Keystone 2006 Sidney Edition md# 30ROLS ,
30ft. pull behind. Like new, total use 7-8 times,
sheltered when not in use.
Asking $15,000 334-897-6929.
"r---- ".
'- TRANSPORTATION


L -'f Dodge 2001 Ram 1500 SLT,
1 -,4. tilt,, cruise, electric
do,:.rs & windows, sliding
rear window, bedliner,
very cold air, $5,995 OBO. Call 334-237-2634






J UST BROWSE


3 Elec. Wheel Chairs $200. 579-5125
Airless paint spraygun $25. 850-482-4120
Chandelier: $25 Call 850-579-4565.
Guitar amp: Stagg, new. $100. 850-272-7424
Guitar case: like new $100. 850-272-7424
Guitar stand for acoustic-$25. 850-272-7424
Guitar: Yamaha FG160 (1977)$500. 850-272-7424
Laptop: HP G61. $250. 850-372-2929
Office Chairs: leather/fabric $50 850-482-2994


- e nes a
y, ay ,


DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
GOT BAD CREDIT?
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy
A I-. slow credit ok
$0 Down/lst Payment,
Tax, Tag & Title
12 months OR 12,000 mile warranty
RIDE TODAY! FREE $45. gas giveaway
Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
Honda 1991 CRX:
P d1 Hd at.:rhb :l.. :' i-ed
A -- .'. 1,211200 e8O0.
*..i.;'. .:. 'h,:,n,: ?34-1 _??962

-.. -, ---... Hyundai 2004 Sonata, V-
.-. 6, GLS, 4 door, automat-
ic, loaded, like new,
S 68,000 miles, very clean,
$6475. Call 334-9-790-7959.
Hyundai 2012 Elantra, $200 down, $269 per
month. No Credit Refused. Call Ron Ellis 714-
0028.
Nissan 1997 Altima 4 door 168,000 miles.
Great work car $1,OOOOBO. Call 334 803 5906
Nissan 2012 Altima, Like new, under warranty,
No Credit Refused! $200 down, $269 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 714-0028.
Toyota 2007 Prius,
White, fully
loaded, excellent
condition, 70K
miles, $12,500
850-499-7560

VW 2011 Jetta, All Applications Accepted. Low
miles, great fuel mileage, still under factory
warranty. $300/down, $300/month. Call Steve-
334-791-8243.


Lost: Blk/Wht Male Cat 11 mo, purple collar,
bik spot on his chin. 850-573-4512 or text.
Paint spraygun. Campbell $20. 850-482-4120
Resistol 2 cowboy hats 4x $75. 2x $35. 526-2055
Stroller sit or stand like new $45. 850-526-3426.
Swivel Rocker: new lazboy $50 239-272-8236
TV Wall mount: 13"-37" $25. 850-482-4120.
Wm Suits: 2&3 pc. sz 16P $10. Ea. 850-579-4565
Yard Swing Set: metal $15 Call 850-579-4565


B 1iYour guide to great local
businesses & services



'SERVICEDlI RE ry


Call 526-361 4 to place your ad.


NEW& USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELDW RETAIL PRICES!
1I Ri.i 1 850.526.1700
TJ s Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
2978 Pierce Street
(behind.Tim's.Florist)


Trolling Motor Repair
Affordable Service! Fast Repair!
Most Cases 1 Week Turnaround.
Servicing Minn Kota & Motorguide.
850-272-5305


WEO FFERCOMPLETE[
Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc. OMmP 6R
ALTHA, FL. SB WKMOM
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055









H EIM
I| [ M?,tr i IT I At








"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
Wifai f.Lng r,.a (85)56,-293 -


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME



Affordable Lawn Care
Low Overhead=Low Prices
850-263-3813 850-849-1175





Chad O's Lawn F/X
Commercial & Residential
Spring Clean-up & -''
Monthly Maintenance . .
Full Lawn Care Service
F Free Estimates ,,
Family Owned & Operated
Chad Oliver i 850 573 7279
SELFSTORAG


-'7


BESTWAY
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN NORTH FLORIDA
Been in BusinessiSnco 1989
WE fi80
HAVE E
OVER
DIFFERENT SIZES!
S YOU CAN CHOOSE
COLOR & STYLE!
BUILT ONSITE 850-747-.8974
2919 Hwy 231 North Panama City, FL


N


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S' $319500
S35 Years in Business
... -. M.. P. BL.. .... J


:VMARIANNA CITY 2844 Madison St.

.FARMERS Tes Thurs Sat
*MARKET ...

E 3 P-7, M M MI/
S VIE 7am-noon


L You CALL... WE COME To You!
RED'S MOBILE
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE
850-209-9713
EDWARD MAGGI, OWNER

B TRE RVI CE '


AOWV


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an idea that SELLS.


Got Stumps?

HILL'S TREE SERVICE
593-4


N. El


Adets or--OLSUF orFE yvstigWWJmr dtVo.sesiefrdtis


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00


www.JCFLORII)AN.com

1983 Buick LeSabre
Limited: Two owner
-h h.. :l, and yes,it was a
little Grandmother's Car!! 123,500 mi, 5.0
liter V8, Sedan. All stock, All originalAM/FM
radio, power locks & windows, tilt steering,
remote outside mirror adjustments, original
velour seat covers, split front seats w/armrest,
power adjustable driver's seat, heat/AC works
great, wire spoke hubcaps, big trunk, front
window power units replaced. Engine kept
tuned regularly, new battery, all belts, water
pump & hoses replaced, good tires. Vinyl roof
needs care Left front corner/side hit by deer.
Drives great, runs strong, cleans up nice!
$1,975. 334-687-2330 or maczack@bellsouth.net

CHEVY 1995 CAPRICE-Clean, runs great, cold
air, fully loaded $3,500 OBO 334-355-1085, 334-










www.CFLORIDAN.com LASSIFIEDS


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, May 1, 2013- 9 B


2007/8 Qlink LD250 Legend 250cc
low miles, runs good, $900
call Randy 850-693-0566
2011 Yamaha V-Star 950 Nothing wrong with
this excellent Cruiser! Only 1316 miles. Garage
kept & title in hand. Yamaha XVS95AL Blue 950
cc. Great gas mileage without compromising
power. Cobra slip on exhaust gives it a more
aggressive sound (original exhaust included if
you want to tone it down). Show Chrome back-
rest. $6,750 OBO. Call Fred 334-379-4549
Harley Davidson 2005 Dyna Low Rider, ridden,
$7000. DR Field and Brush trimer, exc. cond.
$800. 334-791-0701.
Honda 2006 250 Rebel 13K miles, 70-80 miles
per gal. nice hwy. cruiser with classic leather
saddle bags, windshield, never used full face
helmet $2450. OBO 850-557-1629.
Kawasaki 2006 Vulcan 500 LTD 2040 miles, red
in color, garage kept, $2800. 850-773-4939
Yamaha 2002 TTR125: Great condition!
Includes helmet & small aluminum load ramp.
Located in Dothan, AL. $800 .0BO Contact 863-
221-7680 or coletoncallender@gmail.com.


3 Ford 1998 Explorer XLT.
W" _ Red in color. Grey leather
Interior. 6 cyl. 112 k miles.
Very nice inside and out.
$5,500 OBO. Call or text 334-806-6004.


Ford 1993 Ranger: 5 speed, step-side, cold air,
runs good, black, good condition. $2,100. OBO
Call 334-798-1768 or 334-691-7111
Ford 2004 F-150 Lariat, ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED,
loaded, 78k miles, leather, pwr window, door
locks, tuneau cover, tow pkg., new tires.
$250/down, $300/mohth. Call Steve 334-791-
8243.
Ford Tractor 9N with 4ft. bushhog,
good working condition. 229-869-0883.
Tractor 240 Massey Ferguson : deisel engine
with bottom plow, garage kept, less 600 hours,
good condition. $7,500. Call 334-794-3226


-- Dodge 2005 Caravan STX,,
.. '- ". V-6, loaded,3rd row
seat, front and rear air,
103,000 miles, $5925. Call
334-790-7959.
I For sale by Owner
2 06 Pontiac Montana SV6,,
T 86K miles, 7 passenger
-. sliding power door, rail
guards, back-up assist,
front/rear CD/MP3, DVD w/remote, fabric w/4
captain seats. Maintained w/most service re-
cords. 60-75% tread on tires remain. Org carpet
mats incl. Other extra's. Asking price suggest-
ed by www.kbb.com. 334-790-6618



1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
are4" 424 oo Towai
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


4


CALL FOR TOP PRICE

FOR JUNK VEHICLES


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664

Got a Clunker
We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325 & t Complete Cars
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285
r -- -- -- --- -- -- --- -- -- -- -- -'----
a We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
334-794-9576 or 344-791-4714


K


LEGALS


LF160102

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2011-CA-001024

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association as
Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance,
LLC, as Successor by Merger to Chase Manhat-
tan Mortgage Corporation
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Sharonda M. Ramsey
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
dated April 15, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.
2011-CA-001024 of the Circuit Court of the 14th
Judicial Circuit in and for Jackson County, Flori-
da, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National
Association as Successor by Merger to Chase
Home Finance, LLC, as Successor by Merger to
Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation, Plain-
tiff and Sharonda M. Ramsey are defendantss,
I, Clerk of Court, Dale Rabon Guthrie, will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE JACKSON COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL STAND-
ARD TIME on MAY 30. 2013, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING 1/2 INCH IRON
ROD MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 29, TOWN-
SHIP 06 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST, JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND CALL THIS THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 50
MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF
255.00 FEET TO AN EXISTING 5/8 INCH IRON
ROD WITH AN ALUMINUM CAP STAMPED BAN-
NERMAN SURVEYORS, INC. (LB 5106); THENCE
NORTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 40 SECONDS


EAST A DISTANCE OF 230.00 FEET TO AN EXIST-
ING 5/8 INCH IRON ROD WITH AN ALUMINUM
CAP STAMPED BANNERMAN SURVEYORS, INC.
(LB 5106); THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 50 MI-
NUTES 09 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF
255.00 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH IRON ROD WITH AN
ALUMINUM CAP (LB 5106) SET ON THE EASTER-
LY LINE OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 06 NORTH,
RANGE 12 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA;
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 40
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE OF
SAID, SECTION A DISTANCE OF 230.00 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

SUBJECT TO:
A 20' WIDE INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITIES
EASEMENT DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 816, PAGE
0785 OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 29,
TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST, JACK-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID QUARTER A DIS-
TANCE OF 10.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD SET AT
THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF A 20 FOOT WIDE
INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT; LYING 10
FEET RIGHT AND 10 FEET LEFT OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 09 SECONDS
WEST ALONG THE CENTER LINE OF SAID EASE-
MENT A DISTANCE OF 255.00 FEET TO AN IRON
ROD SET; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST ALONG
THE CENTER LINE OF SAID EASEMENT A DIS-
TANCE OF 947.02 FEET TO AN IRON ROD SET AT
THE TERMINUS OF SAID EASEMENT. SIDELINES
OF SAID EASEMENT TO MEET AT ANGLE
POINTS, RIGHT-OF-WAY LINES, OR SECTION
LINES.

ALSO SUBJECT TO A 10' WIDE INGRESS, EGRESS
AND UTILITIES EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS;

COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING 11/2 INCH IRON
ROD MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 29, TOWN-
SHIP 06 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST, JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND CALL THIS THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 50
MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF
10.00 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST A DIS-
TANCE OF 230.00 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 09 SECONDS
EAST A DISTANCE OF 10.00 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH
IRON ROD WITH AN ALUMINUM CAP (LB 5106)
ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID SECTION;
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 40
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE OF
SAID SECTION A DISTANCE OF 230.00 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850)
747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance is less than sev-
en (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call
711.

/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Jackson County, Florida
/s/ Tammy Bailey
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT

Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(561) 998-6700
(561) 998-6707


LF160104

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2011-CA-000966

Bank of America, National Association
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
James L. Bailey, Jr. and Kathleen D. Bailey
a/k/a Kathy Bailey; SunTrust Bank
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
dated April 5, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.
2011-CA-000966 of the Circuit Court of the 14th
Judicial Circuit in and for Jackson County, Flori-
da, wherein Bank of America, National Associa-
tion, Plaintiff and James L. Bailey, Jr. and
Kathleen D. Bailey a/k/a Kathy Bailey are
defendantss, I, Clerk of Court, Dale Rabon Gu-
thrie, will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE JACKSON
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL
STANDARD TIME on MAY 16, 2013, th6 follow-
ing described property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOT NO. 18 OF THE VILLAGE AT INDIAN
SPRINGS AN UNRECORDED PLAT:

COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST COR-
NER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH,
RANGE 9 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA,
THENCE N 06035'22W A DISTANCE OF 310.18
FEETTO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING '
THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF A CURVE; N
38003'31"W A DISTANCE OF 30.00 TO A NAIL.
AND DISC IN THE CENTERLINE OF OLD HICKORY
ROAD; THENCE N 51056'29"E A DISTANCE OF
512.60 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 77043'04"E A DIS-
TANCE OF 742.37 FEET, THENCE N 75013'27" E A
DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET TO A NAIL AND DISC
IN THE CENTERLINE OF INDIAN SPRINGS ROAD;
THENCE N 14046'33"W A DISTANCE OF 539.41
FEET; THENCE N 41018'31"E A DISTANCE OF
1,096.41 FEET; THENCE N 12013'27"E A DIS-
TANCE OF 870.00 FEET; THENCE N 8039'15"E A
DISTANCE OF 816.51 FEET; THENCE N
12043'45"E A DISTANCE OF 953.71 FEET;
THENCE S 72046'55"E A DISTANCE OF 564.41
FEET; THENCE N 25025'31"E A DISTANCE OF
400.00 FEET; THENCE N 61007'20"E A DISTANCE
OF 400.00 FEET; THENCE N 13002'17"E A DIS-
TANCE OF 200.00 FEET; THENCE N 76057'43"W
A DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY
ROAD "D"; THENCE N 13002'17"E ALONG THE


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easy!


WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID ROAD A
DISTANCE OF 58.42 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE N 76054'04"W A DIS-
TANCE OF 250.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT AND CALL THIS THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, THENCE S 25054'27"W A DISTANCE OF
139.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT;
THENCE S 48004'40"W A DISTANCE OF 151.56
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE
CONTINUE S 48004'40"W A DISTANCE OF 149.49
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF A GRADED
STREET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE
SAID RIGHT OF WAY ALONG A CURVE BEING
CONCAVE TOWARDS THE RIGHT HAVING A
DELTA ANGLE OF 5746'09"; A RADIUS OF 50.00
FEET; AN ARC DISTANCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY OF 50.41 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT MARKING THE P.R.C.; THENCE CONTINUE
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY ALONG THE EAST-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF A CUL-DE-SAC ALONG
A CURVE BEING CONCAVE TOWARDS THE LEFT
HAVING A DELTA ANGLE OF 6749'09"; A RADI-
US OF 100.00 FEET; AN ARC DISTANCE ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY OF 118.28 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT; THENCE N 22059'54"E A
DISTANCE OF 254.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE S 76054'04"E A DISTANCE
OF 125.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT;
THENCE CONTINUE S 76054'04"E A DISTANCE
OF 125.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
THIS PARCEL IS LOCATED IN.THE NORTH HALF
OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 9
WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850)
747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance is less than sev-
en (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call
711.

/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Jackson County, Florida

/s/ Tammy Bailry
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT

Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(561) 998-6700
(561) 998-6707
LF160163

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2011-CA-000602

Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage Succes-
sor by Merger to Union Planters Bank, NA.
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Pamela W. Massey a/Ia Pamela Massey and
William D. Massey, Jr. a/k/a William D. Massey
a/k/a William Massey, Wife and Husband; Cap-
ital City Bank; Discover Bank;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
dated April 8, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.
2011-CA-000602 of the Circuit Court of the 14th
Judicial Circuit in and for Jackson County, Flori-
da, wherein Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mort-
gage Successor by Merger to Union Planters
Bank, NA., Plaintiff and Pamela W. Massey
a/k/a Pamela Massey and William D. Massey,
Jr. a/k/a William D. Massey a/k/a William Mas-
sey, Wife and Husband are defendantss, I,
Clerk of Court, Dale Rabon Guthrie, will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE JACKSON COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL STAND-
ARD TIME on MAY 16, 2013 the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE
EAST LINE OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 5
NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 90 AND RUN S 84 DE-
GREES 02'00" W ALONG SAID NORTHERLY
RIGHT Of WAY LINE, 1822.77 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING (P.O.B.); THENCE CON-
TINUE S 84002'00" W, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY LINE 210.02 FEET; THENCE N 01048' 28" E,
400.00 FEET; THENCE S 84'05'27'"W 641.10 FEET
TO THE WEST LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 33; THENCE N 01o48'28" E, 404.97
FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF THE CSX RAILROAD (FORMER-
LY L&N RAILROAD); THENCE N 8400'43"' E
851.26 FEET ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE; THENCE S 01048'33" W 805.98 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, (P.O.B.)
AND
COMMENCE AT A POINT WHERE THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 90
INTERSECTS THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWN-
SHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST, THENCE RUN
EASTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 90 A DISTANCE OF
441.11 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING OF THIS
DESCRIPTION: THENCE CONTINUE EASTERLY
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE
OF 200 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 2 DEGREES
07 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF
400 FEET; THENCE RUN IN A WESTERLY DIREC-
TION PARALLEL TO THE SAID NORTHERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 90 A DIS-
TANCE OF 200 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH TO
POINT OF BEGINNING.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850)


747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance is less than sev-
en (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call
711.


/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Jackson County, Florida

/s/Tammy Bailey
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT

Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(561) 998-6700
(561) 998-6707
LF160105

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2010-CA-000582

CitiMortgage, Inc.
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Crystal L. Dunaway; Capital One Bank (USA),
National Association f/k/a Capital One Bank;
State of Florida, Department of Revenue; Clas-
sic Carpet Cleaner of Bay County, Inc. d/b/a
Classic Carpet
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
dated April 9, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.
2010-CA-000582 of the Circuit Court of the 14th
Judicial Circuit in and for Jackson County, Flori-
da, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff and
Crystal L. Dunaway are defendantss, I, Clerk of
Court, Dale Rabon Guthrie, will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT
DOOR OF THE JACKSON COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL STANDARD
TIME on MAY 30,2013, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-
wit:
LOT 6, BLOCK G, GREEN OAKS SUBDIVISION,
UNIT NO. 1, BEING A PART OF NW 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 5, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 25, PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator ty mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850)
747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance is less than sev-
en (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call
711.

/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Jackson County, Florida
/s/ Tammy Baily
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHe, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(561) 998-6700
(561) 998-670,7
LF160100
STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINAL JUSTICE
STANDARDS & TRAINING COMMISSION,
Petitioner

vs.

CHRISTOPHER M. FINCH, Case #3A030
Respondent

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: CHRISTOPHER M. FINCH,
Residence Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative
Complaint has been filed against you seeking
to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in
accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any
rules promulgated thereunder.

You are required to serve a written copy of
your intent to request a hearing pursuant to
Section 120.57, F.S. upon Jennifer C. Pritt, Pro-
gram Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism
Program, Florida Department of Law Enforce-
ment, P. 0. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida
32302-1489, on or before June 22, 2013. Failure
to do so will result in a default being entered
against you to Revoke said certification pur-
suant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27,
F.A.C.

Dated: April 22, 2013
Ernest W. George
CHAIRMAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE STANDARDS
AND TRAINING COMMISSION
By: -s- Lee Stewart, Division Representative


Clean Out Your Bedroom and

Turn the Furniture You've

Outgrown Into Cash.

That old furniture might not be the right fit for you anymore,
but chances are someone out there would love it. By using the
Classifieds, you'll make it easier for them to find, and easier
for you to sell. So tryit today!


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN
(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAN

jcfloridan.com




-monster,

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


1


L.[








l10B WEDNESDAY, MAY 1,2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NFL


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jacksonville Jaguars wide receiver Justin Blackmon (14)
runs with the ball during a voluntary veteran NFL football
mini-camp April 16 in Jacksonville, Fla.


Jaguars WR


suspended for


substance abuse


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
- The NFL has suspended
Jacksonville Jaguars wide
receiver Justin Blackmon
for the first four games
of the 2013 regular sea-
son for a violation of the
league's substance abuse
policies.
The league said Tuesday


that Blackmon may partic-
ipate in the preseason and
will be eligible to return to
the active roster on Sept.
30, the day after the Jag-
uars play Indianapolis..
Blackmon was a first-
round draft choice in 2012
out of Oklahoma State.
. Last season he caught 64
passes for 865 yards and
five touchdowns..


NESCAR


Crew members


suspended for fight


with Piquet Jr.


The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
NASCAR has suspended
the' two Richard Chil-
dress Racing crew mem-
bers arrested for fighting
with Nelson Piquet Jr. at
Richmond.
Thomas Costello and
Michael Searce were both
suspended for four Na-
tionwide Series races
and fined $15,000 each
Tuesday. They were also
placed on probation un-
til the end of the year for
the altercation in the mo-
torhome lot after Friday


night's race.
Henrico County police
charged Searce with two
counts of misdemeanor
assault, and Costello with,
one count of misdemean-
or assault,
The altercation hap-
pened long after Brian
Scott and Piquet tangled
on pit road after the race.
Scott approached Piquet,
and Piquet. shoved him
and kicked Scott in the
groin.
Piquet and Scott were
placed on probation until
June 26, as were their re-
spective crew chiefs.


The Associated Press

MADRID Borussia
Dortmund advanced to
the Champions League fi-
nal for the first time since
1997, withstanding a late
rally by Real Madrid to win
their semifinal on 4-3 ag-
gregate following a 2-0 loss
Tuesday night.
Karim Benzema scored in
the 83rd minute and Sergio
Ramos in the 88th, putting
Real Madrid in position to
advance with one more


goal. English referee How-
ard Webb called for five
minutes of stoppage time,
and Borussia Dortmund
hung on to set up the pos-
sibility of the first all-Ger-
man final in soccer's top
club competition.
Bundesliga champi-
on Bayern Munich has
a four-goal advantage
on Barcelona ahead of
Wednesday's game. The
Champions League final is
May 25 at London's Wemb-
ley Stadium.


NFL


Done with Jets, 6 possibilities for Tebow


BY DENNIS WASZAK JR.
The Associated Press

NEWYORK
Tim Tebow was "ex-'
cited" about coming
to the New York Jets.
So much so, he used the
word 44 times in his intro-
ductory news conference
in March 2012.
Well, he must be pretty
thrilled to leave.
After a failed one-year
stint with the Jets, who
never found a consistent
or effective role for the
backup quarterback,
Tebow is free to explore
other options after
New York released him
Monday.
Tebow spent most of
his time on the sideline
with the Jets, except when
l~e was serving as the
personal protector on
punts, and never earned
the confidence of Rex
Ryan even when Mark
Sanchez was benched.
Meanwhile, Tebow did all
he could to not show that
he was, well, the opposite
of excited.
Tebow believes he is still
an NFL-caliber quarter-
back and it appeared his
hometown of Jacksonville
would be the obvious
landing spot until new
general manager David
Caldwell insisted that
wouldn't happen.
There are plenty of
opinions on what the
football future holds for
Tebow, but here's our
Pick 6 of potential job
opportunities:
Chicago Bears
The presence of new
coach Marc Trestman and
former Jets QBs coach
Matt Cavanaugh make the
Bears a possibility to sign
Tebow, who would be a
backup again behind Jay
Cutler. Trestman worked
with Tebow at the Senior
Bowl and before the NFL
draft in 2010, and raved
about his work ethic and
potential to become a
solid passer.
Trestman, the for-
mer coach of the CFL's
Montreal Alouettes, has a
track record of develop-
ing quarterbacks and has
also worked with the likes
of Cutler, Jason Campbell
and Brandon Weeden in
recent years as a con-
sultant when they were
coming out of college.
Tebow might make for-a
good fit as the No. 2 quar-
terback after Campbell
signed with the Browns.
Whether Trestman would
want to start his Bears
career by bringing in the
hype that comes with
Tebow being on the team
could be a deterrent.
San Diego Chargers
Philip Rivers took a ma-
jor step back last season
for the Chargers, but still
can be one of the league's
most productive quar-
terbacks when he's on
his game. So, it's unlikely
new coach Mike McCoy
will look elsewhere for a
starter.
However, McCoy knows
all about what Tebow can
do when given an op-
portunity. The two were
together in Denver when
Tebow pulled off come-
back after comeback
during the 2011 season
and led the Broncos to
the playoffs. McCoy,
then Denver's offensive
coordinator, worked the
offense around Tebow's


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Former New York Jets
quarterback Tim Tebow
warms up before a game
against the Buffalo Bills in
Orchard Park, N.Y., on Dec. 30.

strengths and appeared
to be a magician in the
process.
While it never truly ap-
peared Tebow was a threat
to Sanchez in NewYork,
he could prove to be just
that to Rivers especially
with a coach who believes
in his abilities. Whether
the Chargers, who just
drafted Manti Te'o, would
want any added attention
remains to be seen.
Tampa Bay
Buccaneers
OK, so it's not exactly
the homecoming playing
in Jacksonville would be,
but Tebow would surely
be a big draw in his home
state even if it's as a
backup to Josh Freeman.
The Buccaneers' cur-
rent backups are Dan
Orlovsky, Adam Weber
and third-round draft
pick Mike Glennon, and
Tebow might feel he
could overtake them on
the depth chart as the
No. 2.
Tebow has also spent
time this offseason work-
ing out in Tampa with a
former Buccaneers (and
Jets) quarterback: Vinny
Testaverde.
New England Patriots
Sure, it's a long shot,
but Tebow wouldn't be
brought in to challenge
Tom Brady, of course.
Bill Belichick has a
knack for bringing in
players that other teams
discard -Wes Welker,
DannyWoodhead, Randy
Moss, Corey Dillon, Aqib
Talib and reviving their
careers in New England.
Tebow has always said
he just wants to win, and
the Patriots have sure
done their share of that.
So, playing on special
teams and perhaps
as a fullback/tight end
and being a mere piece
to the puzzle could satisfy
Tebow if theW's pile up.


Two other factors to
consider: Offensive coor-
dinator Josh McDaniels
drafted Tebow out of Flori-
da while he was the coach
in Denver, and being able
to tweak the Jets always
makes Belichick grin a
little under his hoodie.
Montreal Alouettes
The Alouettes hold '
exclusive negotiating
rights to Tebow in the
CFL, where some think he
might ultimately end up.
Alouettes GM Jim Popp
said his team would wel-
come Tebow but as a
backup QB, since 40-year-
old Anthony Calvillo is
entrenched as Montreal's
quarterback. There's some
debate, though, whether
his game might be better
suited there as a quarter-
back. With the CFL's wide-
open fields and pass-
heavy offenses, Tebow's
run-first approach could
further expose his pass-
ing deficiencies. But, he
somehow seems to make
things happen when he
actually gets some snaps


- and might be able to
run all over the place in
Canada.
He could also consider
the recent offer made by
Brett Bouchy, the owner
of the Orlando Predators
who'd love to see Tebow
playing in the Arena
League.
Lecture Circuit
This will always be an
option for the ultra-popu-
lar Tebow, who attracts
huge crowds whenever
and wherever he speaks at
churches and events. He's
not shy about sharing his
strong Christian beliefs,
and his multitude of fans
extend far beyond the
football field.
Tebow is extremely ac-
tive with his Tim Tebow
Foundation, trying to
help and inspire people
around the world. When
Tebow is done playing
football, which he doesn't
believe will be anytime
soon, he could surely turn
appearances as a moti-
vational speaker into a
full-time gig.


State Farm SA
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710 '"""5"A


Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc
Linda J Pforte, Agent
2919 Penn Avenue, Suite B,
Marianna, FL 32448-2716
Bus 850-482-3425 Fax 850-482-6823
Toll Free 1-877-364-60907
linda.pforte.bxrs@statefarm.com
Good Neighbor Since 1986


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Soccer

Dortmund advances to

Champions League final