<%BANNER%>
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01066
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text
Cn 2 JobSeq 52 PkgSeq 002
***********- **ALL FOR ADC 320
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
. GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


IB Hornets crushed by Wildcats
Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online







FLORIDAN


"RC plane

enthusiasts
soar high

9A


Vol.90 No.92



Murder suspect turns himself in


From staff reports


Murder suspect Andrew Da-
vid Johnson Jr. turned himself
in early Tuesday morning at the
Marianna Police Department.
That agency turned him over to
the Jackson County Sheriff's Of-


Jonnson


fice. He is expect-
ed to make his first
court appearance
on the charge
'Wednesday and is
being held in the
Jackson County
Jail.


Authorities say he was accom-
panied, by his mother when he
arrived at MPD headquarters.
Johnson, 38, is accused of kill-
ing his 25-year-old girlfriend,
Krista Shante Stevenson, on
Sunday.
A deputy found Stevenson in-


jured with multiple stab wounds
"and lying in her home roughly
16 minutes after she called for
help around 3:26 that morning,
saying that Johnson was threat-
ening her but not reporting any
injury at that time. The deputy
summoned an emergency medi-


cal team to her home at 5753 Fort
Road, but Stevenson had died by
the time they arrived. She was
pronounced dead at the scene.
'As of 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, au-
thorities had not questioned
Johnson, reporting that he had
invoked his right to silence.


0 _~__


First Federal acquires



Chipola Community Bank


From staff reports

First Federal Bank of Florida
has acquired Chipola Communi-
,,ty Bank, purchasing all deposits
and substantially all other assets
and liabilities of the bank. The
transaction closed April 19. The
terms of the transaction will be
released at a future date, accord-
ing to a First Federal press release
announcing the acquisition.
The deal includes all insured
and uninsured deposit accounts
and all loans of Chipola Com-
munity Bank. Until notified oth-
erwise, customers should con-
tinue to make payments as they
have in the past.
Senior Executive Vice Presi-
dent and Chief Operating Officer
of First Federal, Pam Hitt said
that former Chipola Community
Bank and First Federal Bank of
Florida customers should con-
tinue banking as they do today*
using the same bank accounts,
payment coupons, online sign-
on, credit cards, ATM and check
cards, checks and bank branch-
es. Any pending changes will be
shared with customers well in
advance, Hitt indicated.
First Federal first opened in,
1'962 as a Savings and Loan in
Live Oak. Today the.bank has a
portfolio of business, mortgage
and personal deposits, serves
more than 55,000 customers, and
employs more than 350 people.
First Federal is examined by
the Office of the Comptroller
of the Currency (OCC) and is
ranked as "Well Capitalized." It
earned a "5-star, Superior Finan-
cial Stability" rating from Bauer
Financial, Inc., according to a
press release about the acquisi-
tion. First Federal Bank of Flori-
da is Member FDIC and an Equal
Housing Lender.
President and CEO of First Fed-
eral, Keith C. Leibfried said the


,ANIt COOK/[LURIUAN
A First Federal banner covers the sign outside the former home of Chipola
Community Bank on Tuesday in Marianna.


company has sent First Federal
associates to the acquired bank
in order to ensure a smooth tran-
sition by assisting "in the resolu-
tion process."
The acquisition of Chipola
Community Bank, located at
4701 Highway \90 in Marianna,
will make the third branch in
Marianna, for First Federal. It
acquired The Bank of Bonifay in
2010 and has a branch at 2914


Green Street. It is also currently
building a second location at
4213 Lafayette Street. For more
information about the acquisi-
tion, customers may call Cus-
tomer Care Center toll-free at
(877) 209-1626 or the former
Chipola Community Bank
branch at (850) 526-7144. Addi-
tional acquisition information
can also be found on First Feder-
al's website, www.ffsb.com.


A n ener-
A-I geticturtle,
possibly a
box turtle, tries
to elude a swarm
of hungry mos-
quitoes during a
slow-speed chase
near U.S. 90 last
week. For warm
weather-loving
turtles and peo-
ple, temperatures
are expected to
stay in the lov to
mid 80s through
Sunday.


I T I.

ANGIE COOK/FLORIDAN FILE PHOTO
USF Professor Erin Kimmerle talks with U.S. Senator Bill Nelson
(foreground) and the media during a press conference near a
graveyard at the now-closed Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys, on
Wednesday, March 27, in Marianna.

NAACP to sponsor


meeting on Dozier


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

The local NAACP will host
a four-hour meeting on Sat-
urday to discuss issues sur-
rounding the work being
done by the University of
South Florida in the burial
grounds at the old Dozier
School for Boys.
USF research team leader
Erin Kimerlee and' attorney
Nicholas Cox from the office
of Attorney General Pam
Bondi have both commit-
ted to be at the session, ac-
cording to Jackson County
NAACP President Rev. Ron
Mizer.
Sponsored, by the state
and local NAACP, the ses-
sion is open to the public
and scheduled to run from
noon until 4 p.m. on April
27. It will be held at Jackson
Alternative School, located
at 2701 Technology Circle.
Bondi and Medical Exam-
iner Michael Hunter have


entered motions in court
seeking permission to ex-
hume the remains at Dozier
in an attempt to clarify how
many people were buried
there throughout the 111-
year history of the school,
to locate the specific
gravesites, and to identify
who is buried where. Ques-
tions about those issues
have persisted through the
years.
Judge Bill Wright is as-
signed to the 'case. In a
recent case management
hearing, Wright said he is
not sure this is a matter for
his court, and asked AG rep-
resentative Nicholas Cox to
show him evidence that he
should in fact be involved
before he proceeds with a
decision. Cox said at the
time that he expected to
have that information to
Wright in a few days. The
court file does not currently
include any supplemental
material from him.


Man living inunrented

apartment arrested


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

A man who was living
rent-free in a Marianna
apartment without the
knowledge of the landlord
has been arrested on
multiple local charges,
and also faces potential
extradition to face
additional, more serious
problems in Georgia and
Alabama.
According to the
complaint filed against
Lewarrentay Jones,
the Marianna Police
Department had to sift
through various pieces of
false information provided
by the suspect before
learning his true name.
Jones is currently charged
locally with burglary of an
unoccupied dwelling and
giving a false name to law
enforcement. In Seminole
County, Ga., and in Houston


County, Ala., he is listed as a
fugitive from justice. '
In their
complaint,

authorities
say that Jones
is wanted in
,, Georgia for
Jones two counts
of aggravated
assault with a firearm, two
counts of armed robbery,
possession of a firearm
during the commission of
a crime, and violation of
probation. He is wanted
by the Dothan Police
Department on a warrant
for felony robbery. Both
warrants and extradition
were confirmed through
the agencies, according to
the local complaint.
His local troubles
began last Saturday,
when a Marianna Police

See ARREST, Page 9A


) CLASSIFIEDS...7B


) ENTERTAINMENT...6B


> LOCAL...3A


)) OBITUARIES...9A


) STATE...5A


)) SPORTS...1B


> BUSINESS...6A


This Newspaper ,f" .,
Is Printed On '~ .
Recycled Newsprint l '




II 6 6I II0 II
7 6 161 8,0050, 9
I^'f.


SLOW-MOTION RACE
",'., ..


.. A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


Follow us





Facebook Twitter


-~~1~--~-1.--~11~-~___11~11__----__1~ 1~-__11---1. ~_1__1-----___~_


. I- . _r_' '. ,-_. :.'








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


_.,,. High- 81
Low -650


Thursday
Isolated Showers.



.'. High 820
Low 60o


Saturday
Partly Cloudy & Warm.


, High 840
' Low-600

Friday
Partly Cloudy & Warm.



-,. High 840
._ Low- 610


Sunday
Isolated Showers.


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.00"
2.45"
3.10"


Low
Low
Low
,Low
Low


Ye.i to date
Normal Y TD
Normal toi year


6:47 PM
9:39 AM
5:52 PM
7:03 PM
7:37 PM


High
High
High
High
High


RIVER READINGS Reading
Woodruff 47.10 ft.
Blountstown 10.37 ft.
Marianna 8.58 ft.
Caryville 8.33 ft.


, amu-tJ G


Weather Outlook


- 8:41 AM
- 4:15 AM
- 9:14 AM
- 9:47 AM
- 10:20 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


**** :-?MJ^ High: 81
: -- .Low: 58 .
,. *-'. -. 7," ..*,x~r l , ..: 1
, :4'. '" '.' t'.; .. i.t.. yiirt.' ,

-> '' : ,':r.,,-" '-. High:81
..C ^ -. C, :-5 *
* ur1*> HI^^ '* '^Ri ^!-


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2~ 3 4 5 I

THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:03 AM
*Sunset 7:15 PM
Moonrise 6:19 PM May May Apr. May
Moonset 5:44 AM 10 18 25 2


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com
CONTACT US
Telephone:'850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478.
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through.Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state ahd local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
'occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non4nser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or *
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
,anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
'suitable for print The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy is to
correct mistakes promptly.-To report an er-
ror, please call'526-3614 Monday-Friday.
Concerning a name which appeared in the
Tuesday edition's Jackson County jaildock-
et, the Floridan has since learned that the
name was falsely given to authorities by a
suspect whose actual name is Lawarrentay
Devorn Jones. The name which appeared
in the docket, provided by authorities, was
Tradarious Koonce. That individual is not
charged with anything in Jackson County
and is not in any way connected to the case
involving Jones.


TODAY
n Chipola College Financial Aid Application
Deadline -for Summer I and II. Call 718-2211 or
visit www.chipola.edu. -
Chipola College Fall 2013 Registration-8
a.m.-3 p.m. for current students. Call 718-2211 or
visit www.chipola.edu.
) "Books That Shaped America" Exhibit-10
a.m.-6 p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library,
Graceville Branch, 5314 Brown St. Nearly 100
books, displayed in a self-guided, walking tour
through the library, each written by an American,
beginning with the first book published inAmerica,
in 1640. Exhibit is modeled after the Library of
Congress 2012 exhibit. Call 263-3659.
First Federal Bank of Florida' Mortgage Center
Ribbon Cutting-11 a.m. at 2912 Green St. in
Marianna. Join them and meet their lenders. Lunch
will be served.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon-
1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
n Internet/Email Basic Computer Class Part
2-Noon-3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career Training
Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn basic use of
the internet, how to send and receive e-mails and
how to protect your computer. No cost to attend.
Call 526-0139.
) Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees An-
nual Strategic Planning Session-4 p.m. in the
Classroom of the Hospital. The planning session -
will be followed by the Board of Trustees regular
monthly Finance Committee and Board meetings.
Call 718-2629.

THURSDAY, APRIL 25.
Tickets on Sale for Chipola College Children's
Theatre Production "Alice in Wonderland" -
for Thursday, May 9 at 7 p.m. Purchase online at
www.chipola.edu. Contact Charles Sirmon at 718-
2227 or sirmonc@chipola.edu.
) Chipola College Fall 2013 Registration-8
a.m.-3 p.m. for current students. Call 718-2211 or
visit www.chipola.edu.
D "Books That Shaped America" Exhibit-10
a.m.-6 p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library,
Graceville Branch, 5314 Brown St. Nearly 100
books, displayed in a self-guided, walking
tour through the library, each written by an Ameri-
can, egirnning .%ali the first book published
in America, in 1640. Exhibit is modeled after
the Library of Congress 2012 exhibit. Call
263-3659.


)) Area Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc.
Board of Directors Meeting-10:30 a.m. at 2414
Mahan Drive in Tallahassee. This meeting is open to
the public. Agendas are available upon request. Call
850-488-0055.
n Sunland Center Volunteer Appreciation
Program and Picnic-11 a.m. CST at the Sunland
Environmental Park, 3700 Williams Drive, Marianna.
All Sunland volunteers and donors are invited to.
attend. Reservations can be made by calling 482-
9373.
) Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group-
Noon at Jackson Hospital Hudnall Building in the
Community Room. Free to attend. Curriculum .
developed by ex-smokers for those who want to
become ex-smokers themselves. Call 482-6500.
) Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2290.
D Job Club Noon-3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn job
seeking/retention skills; get job search assistance.
Call 526-0139.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, APRIL 26-
n Knitters Nook-10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) "Books That Shaped America" Exhibit-10
a.m.-6'p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library,
Graceville Branch, 5314 Brown St. Nearly 100
books, displayed in a self-guided, walking tour
through the library, each written by an American,
beginning with the first book published in America,
in 1640. Exhibit is modeled after the Library of
Congress 2012 exhibit. Call 263-3659.
) Relay for Life of Central Jackson County-3
p.m.-9 a.m. on Saturday, April 27 at Citizens Lodge
in Marianna. Events will include the opening cer-
emony, the survivors lap, caregivers lap, luminaria
ceremony and the closing ceremony. Each dollar
raised will help save a life. Call 573-5353.
) Senior Singles Get-Together 6 p.m. at
Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Deli, downtown Marianna.
Single seniors age 50 and older are encouraged
to get acquainted, form friendships. Games, food,
prizes and a guest speaker are planned. No charge;
donations accepted (proceeds fund charitable
endeavors of Marianna's Gathering Place Founda-
tion). Call 526-4561.


D Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and.
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856, 573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, APRIL 27
Chipola Area Autism Resource Center Yard
Sale/Fundraiser-7 a.m.-Noon 4438 Davis St.
in Marianna. This is an effort to raise money for
resources as well as recognize April as Autism
Awareness Month.
) Custom Knife Show and Sale-8 a.m.-Noon
CST at The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement, Blount-
stown. The Southern Knife.makers will be on site to
show and sell one of a kind knifes and take orders
for custom made knifes. From 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
there will be a knife making demo at the Settlement
Blacksmith Shop, see blades hammered out to
shape from the Forage to the Anvil. $5 admission,
children under 12 free. Call 674-2777 or e-mail info@
panhandlepioneer.org.
St. Joseph Masonic Lodge #99 of Marianna's
12th Annual Spring Fun Day-.9 a.m.-2 p.m. at
the Greenwood Town Park, U.S. 162 in Greenwood.
Everyone is welcome to attend, activities for the
entire family. Call 594-6181 or 209-4951.
n "Gait-way to Fun Paso Fino" Horse Show-
9:30 a.m. at Jackson County Agriculture Center,
3631 U.S. 90 in Marianna, featuring the "horse with
the smooth step'" and historic ties to Florida. Point
classes.for youth, novice, amateurs and profession-
als. This family friendly event is free and will include
stick ponies, trail, speed, 1r-: tn.ity and costume.
Call 570-8645.
)) Alford Community Health Clinic Hours -10
a.m. until last patient is seen, at 1770 Carolina St. in
Alford. The free clinic for income-eligible patients
without medical insurance treats short-term
illnesses and chronic conditions. Appointments
available (call 263-7106 or 209-5501); walk-ins
welcome. Sign in before noon.
) Reception and Book Signing-10 a.m.-2 p.m. at
the Laurden-Davis Art G liI'r, 110 W. Penn Avenue
in Bonifay. Local author D.J. Phillabaum will be
signing "Once and Forever Love". Refreshments will
be served. Books may also be purchased at her web
site http://djphillabaum.com.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St: in Marianna.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
Semail editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for April 22, the
latest available report: Three accidents,
one reckless driver, one suspicious vehicle,
two suspicious incidents, two suspicious
persons, two escorts, one U.S. obstruc-
tion, one drug offense, one report of a
firearm discharged, four traffic stops, four
follow-up investigations, one retail theft,
two assists of other agencies, one property
damage complaint and one welfare check.


Jackson County
Sheriff's Office

The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following
incidents for April 22, the latest available


report: One accident, one dead person
(natural causes), one missing juvenile,
one abandoned vehicle, three suspicious
vehicles, one suspicious person, one escort,
two reports of mental illness with violence,


CR]ME
. -' '_ -


one structure burglary,
one vehicle burglary, one
physical disturbance, three
verbal disturbances, one
prowler, 18 medical calls,
three traffic crashes, one
robbery alarm, one report


of shooting in the area, 10 traffic stops, one
larceny complaint, one criminal mischief
complaint, one civil dispute, three trespass
complaints, one found/abandoned proper-
ty report, one follow-up investigation, one
noise disturbance, one animal complaint,
one assist of a motorist or pedestrian, five
assists of other agencies, one child abuse
complaint, two public service calls, one
welfare check, three transports, and one


threat/harassment complaint.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
periods:
)) Titus Bellamy, 41, 2744 Bellamy Circle,
Cottondale, aggravated assault and battery
on a law enforcement officer, criminal mis-
chief, resisting arrest with violence.
) David Swanger, 54, 3958 Sylvania Planta-
tion Road, Greenwood, hold for Gadsden
Co.
) Maynor Lopez-Domingo, 24, 2834
McPherson St., Marianna, battery-domes-
tic violence.
Jail Population: 186
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agency.To report a wildlife violation,
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


'- High: 82
Loi: 60


.-' High-.83
SLo: 60 ,



.- .'-"g-78



59. 20
59.20"


o% LO,:: 66





.' Loss: 60


PRECIPITATION


FLORBIDA'S -s fEL

PANHANDLE 0ClOUNT

MEDIA PARTNERS w.WAQ "

L 0 F R W U


12A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013


WAKE-UP CALL


High: 84


"/w


~r~io~J


L








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


CHIPOLA NURSING STUDENTS GRAUDATE


SUBMITTED PHOTO
T hirty-four students recently completed the associate degree nursing program at
Chipola College. The graduates are (front row from left): Chris Peters, Troy Black,. Da-
vid Bush, Gary Goodson, ErikWickstrum, Jim Walker, Ben Durham, Chase Johnson,
Jason Moore, Tim Pittman, Ron Campbell and James Ward. Back row: Katelyn Strickland,
Julie Arroyo, Brooke Vickery, Lana Skipper, Megan Gardner, Ashley Craven, Brittany Bur-
dock, Keara Conrad, Cindy Brogdon, Joanne Player, Jamie Owen, Ashley Pitts, Melissa Sims,
Brannon Evans, Sarah Mathis, Michelle Schouest, .Courtney Wall, Emily Streukens, Brittany
Gardner, Whitney Edwards and Amanda Daniels. Erica Pruschen is not pictured. Graduates
are now qualified to take the state certification examination to become Registered Nurses.
The pinning ceremony for the class is scheduled for Wednesday at 3 p.m., in the new Chipo-
la Center for the Arts.


Autism Center holds yard sale fundraiser


Special to the Floridan

In an effort the raise
money for resources as
well as recognize April as
Autism Awareness Month,
the ,Chipola Area Autism
Resource Center, Inc. will
have a yard sale on Sat-
urday, April 27, 7 a.m. to
noon. The yard sale will
be held at the CAARC's fu-
ture home located at 4438.
Davis Street in Marianna.
In the near future,,
the CAARC will hold its
monthly meetings at the
Davis Street location.


Also, it plans to provide a
space where the children
can enjoy getting together
for social and recreational
activities, with supervi-
sion, while the parents
meet.
The center was founded
by several families from a
local autism support
group that was formed in
2010. Due to the growing
number and diverse ages
of children diagnosed
with an Autism Spectrum
Disorder in our local
communities, the CAARC's
mission is to raise aware-


ness of autism. Some im-
mediate goals of CAARC
are to promote autism
related educational
opportunities in the area,
as well as offer individu-
als diagnosed with ASD,
family members, care-
givers, professionals and
interested community
members a place to get
information on resources
and seek emotional sup-
port and guidance.
The CAARC support
group meets the second
Tuesday of'every month
at the Fellowship Hall


of The First Presbyte-
rian Church located on
the corner of Clinton
and Jefferson Streets in
Marianna, from 6-7 p.m. It
holds discussions on cur-
rent, significant issues
dealing with Autism.
Find out more about the
group by visiting Chipola
Area Autism Resource
Center, Inc. on Facebook
or by mailing one of
the directors: Syntha Al-
varez, Ann Marie Shel-
ton or Sue Armstrong at
caarcinfo@embarqmail.
com.


Specht shares tales of biking journey


Special to the Floridan

Troop 3 Boy Scouts
held their weekly meet-
ing .on April 15, at the
Scout Hut at Wynn Street
Park. Scouts and lead-
ers began preparations
for their annual bike hike
and camping trip in May
at St. Marks in Tallahas-
see. A special gupst, Eagle
Scout Stephen Specht,
visited to share his recent
experiences while bicy-
cling 2,600 miles across
America.
Specht, a former mem-
ber of Troop 3, described
his adventures in p6dal-
ing all the way from San
Diego, CA to St. Augus-
tine. He began his journey


SUDIVl1 I ILLT rTPUIU
Eagle Scout Steven Specht shares interesting stories with
Troop 3 scouts about his 2,600 mile bicycle journey across
America.


at the end of February and
returned in April, making
a total of 49 days on the
highways and interstates
of America. During his
travels, he incurred flat
tires, bent rims and bro-


Special to the Floridan Johnson
) Fourth place: Dtucil-
The Marianna Duplicate la Brown and Betty
Bridge Club announces Brendemuehl
winners for the game ) Fifth place: Ida Deal
played April 15. Knowles and Sara Lewis
) First place: Hollie )) Sixth place: Mary
Gunderson and James Lou Miller and Sharon
Gunderson Morgan
*)). Second place: Kurt .) Seventh place: Elaine
Opfermann and Douglas Yost and Libby Hutto
Parker )),Eighth place: John Selfe
) Third place: Armin and Roselyn Wheeler
Kunkler and Barbara The Marianna Bridge


GAS WATCH
6,3. p r,-. rgoingup. Here are-
Ir .:t prsivenplaces to buy
ga:, Ir _n l- :onr County, as of
Tue.d), 31terr oon.
1. $3.34. Murphy Oil, 2255 U.S.
71 S, Marianna
2. $3.34. Pilot, 2209 Hwy 71,
Marianna
3. $3.34. Travel Center, 2112 U.S.
71 S. Marianna
4. $3.35. Loves Travel Center,
U.S. 231, Cottondale
5. $3.35. McCoy's Food Mart
2823 Jefferson St., Marianna
6. $3.39. BP Steel City, 2184
U.S.. 231 S, Alford
7. $3.39. Chipola Mart, 4195
Lafayette St. Marianna
8. $3.39. Dar-Bee's Quick Stop,
6189 U.S. 90. Cypress
It U,' e 3 /.:.L er price,
t th,:- -t. ,-idan newsroom
t ,,t ,,, ,., t:ioridan.com .



Companion A ni4ial Medicine & Surgery
S :...., ?. :...,.,,.g. :

We Appreciate the Citizens of
Jackson County and your support.
2909 Jefferson Street 850-482-3520


ken spokes on his tires.
He traveled 136 miles on
his most productive day
and 37 miles on his slow-
est day.
,Specht expressed how
grateful he was that the


Club is sanctions
American Contra
League. The gam
every Monday a
at St. Luke's E
Church, 4362


Mot (E


weather was good for him
the entire journey, though
he did see some snow in
the mountains and some
rain coming through New
Orleans, LA. He conveyed
to the scouts the impor-
tance of eating healthy
food and, if possible, train-
ing for such a trip. Troop
3 scouts had many ques-
tions for Specht, who kept
the scouts captivated with
his greatest memories and
things he will do different-
ly on his next trip.
The Marianna Optimist
Club is the chartering or-
ganization for Troop 3 Boy
Scouts. For more infor-
mation about Boy Scouts,
call Scout Master Bill
Kleinhans at 526-2897.


uinces winne'rs


Special to the Floridan

After serving at The Bap-
tist College of Florida in
Graceville for 10 years, Ce-
cilia Raley, Assistant Pro-
fessor of Christian Coun-
seling, has officially retired
leaving behind a legacy of
love. Raley taught courses
in Psychology, Counsel-
ing, Mental Disorders and
Family Life Education.
Raley was known through-
out the BCF campus as a
very graceful, loving and
extremely sweet-spir-
ited professor who always
made herself available, to
students. *
"Mrs. Raley is a prime ex-
ample of what we should


be as Christian women,"
reflected Christian Coun-
seling graduate Samantha
Fann.
Just before spring break,
BCF students, faculty and
staff gathered to celebrate
Raley's ministry and ser'
vice to the college. During
the farewell, several faculty
and students spoke words
of gratitude and appre-
ciation towards Raley and
many eyes were tear-filled
as students reflected on
the tremendous impact
she had on their lives. Ral-
ey's love for' the students
and the college will always
be remembered and cher-
ished as she moves into the
next chapter of her life.


MMS'S CLUB Y.U.


HOLDS SEMINAR

.' J' *


T he Marianna Middle School's Club Youth Un-
chained sponsored a seminar on Monday, April
15 in the school's cafeteria. The guest speaker
was Carmen Smith, program coordinator for Chipola
Healthy Start. The topic was the importance of a higher
education. Smith's essential question of the day was,
Why make life harder than it has to be? A little more
,than 20 Club Y.U. members attended theseminar and
learned how becoming a more educated iidivduals
can help them live a more comfortable lifestyle, help
them be a happier and healthier people and provide
more choices for career opportunities and higher pay-
inrg jobs.


ULxx.5./-k3 TV V E5xxx% Marriage,
ed by the St. in Marianna. Anyone Divorce Report
ct Bridge is welcome to come and The following marriages
ie is held play or observe. For more and divorces were recorded
.t 1 p.m. information and part- in Jackson County during
Episcopal ners call Libby Hutto at the week of April 15-19:
Lafayette 526-3162. Marriages
) Sam Laymon White, Jr.
and Kandi Ann Bowen.
,., .L, ) Jody Levin Burch and
Rebecca E. Neff.
4 22 0I36 5.3 1-1225 294 l)) James Aaron Conrad
and Jessica Blake Hosey.
5 0-9.. )) Robert Lee Blanken-
4.,23 8.71 06 36 r Jot available ship and Michelle Kristen
224 0.0.0.0 Kelly.


(E) 4'17 099 8 9-6.6 7-8-9.31.32
t,,li 2-9 3 3. 6 I 7
(E' 4 I. 1-I3.6 4 1-93 1 24K2.33


(11)1


S39 E. 0.4
4,19 7 2.7 6 7.9S8
6.0.0 1.9.0.0
4/20 1.i.9 7 2.6-1
2 75 0 4-15


12.16 20.24-33

4 9 17.31-32


Sun (E') 4.21 16.3 9.-' 40 1.5716.32


SuIn I M


8-11 8.5.4.4


E = E.rening drawing M = Midday drawing
'J ER''B1 L LJ


Saturday%


4 20' 6.8-3039.44S


Wednesday 4 '17 13-1.636-485S5


PB 20
PB.28


0 I0i M I I


Saturday 4'20
W:V-dnresdy 4/17


7 8 33-35.39.40
15 -8.39 52-53


't


ra4


.tra 4


For lottery information. call 850487 7777 or 900 737-7777




FIRSfBAITfISI


SUNDAY: WEDNESDAY:
Sunday) School: 9:30 AM"I Fellowship Supper: 4:15 PM
Morning Worship: 10:45 AM Children's Choir: 4:45 PM
Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Bible Stud): 6:00 PM
www.fbcmarianna.org


n Glen Phillip Register
and Freeta C. Martin.
) Dennis Ernest Slongo
and Roberta L. Sears.
) Willie James Williams
and Jessica Jenice Godwin.
Divorce
) Tracy Baggett vs. Wil-
liam Baggett, Jr.


IN STORE:
Ring Sizing, Watch
Repair, Custom Design,
Pearl Re-stringing,
Restoration
Free Jewelry Cleaning
Layaway
Est. 1971 2)

matson
GEMOIOGMTS
850.482.4037
watsonjewelers.com


SUBMITTED PHOTO
BCF Christian Counseling majors, Ashley Bates and Grace
Collins, honor Cecilia Raley with a bouquet of flowers during
her farewell.


Raley retires after


10 years with BCF


Marianna Bridge Club annoi


460 w. .0- aian, L324
(850).526-2861


a I Et.ae.a t eeds





OUIDA MORRIS PAT FURR CLARICE BOYETTE
(850) 209-4705 (650) 209-8071 (850) 573-1572
Broker/Owner Furr19gmsn.cbm
C21sunnysoOaol.com




DEBBIE RONEY SMITH ED McCoY BEVERLY THOMAS
(850) 209.8039 (850) 573-6198 (850) 209-5211
debbleroneysmith www.emccoyrealty.com
@embarqmall.com emccoyOi@yahoo.com
BRENDA MORGAN mor century21.com799
BRENDA MORGAN I renda.morganfcentury21 .comrn L


----`~-------~~~~-"1~~1~~1---`--`


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 3A-


t I


LOCAL














Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Florida Voices


Revamp teacher


evaluation system

irst the Legislature had an evaluation plan to
identify which Florida teachers deserved "merit"
pay raises, but it had no money. Now, lawmakers
have $480 million earmarked for "performance-based"
teacher raises next year, but they don't have an evalua-
tion system that is credible or even understandable.
It is time that Gov. Rick Scott and Florida's legislative
leaders acknowledge, once and for all, the evaluation
system's failures and fix what has become a public pol-
'icy embarrassment. The courts could not figure it out,
the state's school boards and superintendents could not
figure it out, and even U.S. Secretary of Education Arne
Duncan weighed in this week, saying, politely, "I think
Florida can get to a much better place.".
Florida's teachers and teacher unions are suing the
state, arguing the evaluation program is unfair. They are
right, and more and more Florida lawmakers are agree-
ing with them.
The evaluation system was born out of the Student
Success Act of 2011, another of Florida's many educa-
tion reform measures that was implemented before
being tested, let alone perfected. It was backed by
former Gov. Jeb Bush and his Foundation for Florida's
Future, and rushed through the Legislature and onto
- Scott's desk. Problem is, nobody listened to critics who
said the evaluation system, which calls for student test
scores to count for half of a teacher's performance mea-
surement, was unfair since most teachers do not teach
subjects covered by statewide tests.
Here we are two years later, and that is exactly the
basis of the teacher lawsuit filed last week.
We understand that lawmakers want teachers held
accountable, to weed out the bad teachers. That is a
laudable goal, given the increasing importance of qual-
ity education in today's global economy.
We also understand the teachers' outrage at being
judged on test scores with no consideration for stu-
dents' socioeconomic backgrounds, parental support,
adequacy of resources or the fact that they could be
judged based on students they never taught yes, that
is how hurriedly this law was ramrodded through the
Legislature.
Lawmakers are beginning to get it. Bills currently
moving through both chambers of the Legislature
would send each of Florida's 67 local school districts
lump sums of teacher raise money, with the stipula-
tion that they be given out based on performance and
not across the board. The local school districts would
decide which teachers are deserving. That is a far better
way, although hardly perfect.
A full generation of Florida schoolchildren have gone
through the FCAT process, and in spite of the many po-
litical, mechanical and bureaucratic foul-ups along the
way, Florida is making remarkable and steady educa-
tional progress. That is largely thanks to its teachers and
local school officials.
Maybe our lawmakers should recognize that, and
when they have a major policy change like a teacher
evaluation and merit pay plan they should take the
time to run it past those who will have to implement it
and live with its results. Our guess is, the ,outcome will
be something that won't end up.in the courts and will
actually be understandable.
Ocala Star-Banner


Contact your representatives

Florida Legislature


Coley


State Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 5
District Office:
Administration Building, Room 186
Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701
850-718-0047
www.MyFloridaHouse.gov


State Sen. Don Gaetz, R-District 1
District Office:
4300 Legendary Drive
Suite 230
Destin, FL 32541
850-897-5747
Gaetz 866-450-4366 (toll free)
www.FLSenate.gov

U.S. Congress


Southerland






Nelson


U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland II, R-2
1229 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
202-225-5235
@RepSoutherland
www.Southerland.House.gov

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla.
716 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 2(8510
202-224-5274
@SenBillNelson
www.BillNelson.Senate.gov

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.
317 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
202-224-3041
@MarcoRubio
www.Rubio.Senate.gov


Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, PO Box 520,
Marianna FL. 32447 or fa;,ing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial@jcfloridan com. The Floridanfeserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to in
clude your full address and telephone number. These will
only be used to verity the letter and will not be printed


Neuharth brought fresh vision to news


T en USA Today did its
\ city-by-city rollout in 1982,
V Atlanta was second on the
list, and Al Neuharth jetted in for a
big news conference.
I'm sure the CEO of Gannett Co.,
who died last week at his Cocoa
Beach home at age 89, had several
different modes big business
executive, manager, columnist,
flamboyant public figure and on
thit morning, he seemed to revert
to his 1960 Miami beat reporter
role. Never mind the business side
of it, he talked about newspapering
the way reporters talk shop,.
. His paper was going to give the
customers what they wanted, in
ways they wanted it, Neuharth
said. If that meant 10 inches of
bullet items instead of ponderous
40-inch think pieces, if it meant
color weather maps and big-grid.
TV listings or more stories about
the Grammys and fewer about the
nuclear-freeze movement or run-
ning editorials side-by-side with
rebuttal pieces so be it.
Indulgent chuckles echoed from'
the ivory towers of journalism
academia to the executive suites of
major papers to the reporters in the
back of the campaign bus. We joked
about "McPaper" and how USA
Today was aiming at Pulitzer's "Best
Investigative Paragraph" category.
"TV on newsprint," we sneered, a
bunch of "charticles," movie star
fluff and trend pieces.
And, of course, the cardinal sin
in the view of all reporters living
paycheck to paycheck: This guy was
known for making papers make
money.
Give it two years, everybody fig-
ured. It'll be 31 next September.
As I was leaving the Atlanta
Merchandise Mart that day, vans
from the Atlanta Journal were
all over downtown. It seemed a
little early to be swapping out the


morningAtlanta Constitution for
the afternoon Journal, but then I
noticed they were
changing the "rack
'cards," those posters
on the front of the
vending machines
.-..- weather-beaten
old boxes right next
Cotterell to Neuharth's new
sidewalk racks.
The rack cards featured big
pictures of the Atlanta papers'
star columnists under a headline,
"Your Old Friends Are Right Here!"
(Translation: You doh't want that
new paper.) .
Well, I thought, we can laugh at
this upstart; obviously, somebody
in management must have been
worried.
As obituaries have noted, Neu-
harth changed American journal-
ism. He wasn't a press baron like
William Randolph Hearst, who
100 years ago shamelessly used his
papers to promote some causes or
film stars while ordering blackouts
on others.
Pretty soon, a lot of newspapers
started doing color weather maps,
localizing stories and expanding
their TV grids. Not that they quit
ridiculing USA Today but, in three
decades that saw newspapers clos-
ing, there was more than grudging
respect for the new one.
Neuharth obits noted that the
paper lost money for years. But they,
also pointed out that Neuharth was
one of the earliest news executives
to realize something else about the
changing news landscape that
you can't cover a large, diverse com-
munity with a staff that looks like
the cast of "The Front Page."
He held managers accountable, in
their paychecks, for hiring women
and minority staff. By 1988, the seg-
ment of non-white-male reporters
and editors in Gannett newsrooms


was 47 percent higher than the in-
dustry average. Soon, women made
up 40 percent of the company's
management, technical and sales
staff.
When the Tallahassee Democrat
was still a Knight-Ridder paper, we
were told to upgrade our Rolodexes
with new sources. Don't quote the
same four or five guys on different
topics, develop a range of sources
that reflects the community we
cover.
A former Nashville reporter who
came to Tallahassee told me editors
there would go through stories, ask-
ing reporters the race and gender of
each person in it. Where there was
a choice of sources, they'd ask if the
reporter had sought a diverse range
of people inrthe story.
Capitol reporters don't spend a
lot of time with their CEOs, but
Neuharth visited Tallahassee when
his second wife, LoriWilson, was a
state senator from Brevard County.
Sanders Lamont, then the Gannett
bureau chief in the Capitol, said
Neuharth ordered his employees
to treat Wilson like every other
politician in town and they did.
amount said last week he never got
any heat from his editors in Cocoa,
Fort Myers or Pensacola about '
covering Wilson.
That was probably during that
1973 session, when the Senate
paused in debate one day to recog-
nize a distinguished visitor seated
in the public gallery. Neuharth,
already well known in Florida, stood
up and waved.
A few minutes later, some senator
noticed the guy sitting near him,
and they paused again.
It was Don Shula, coachpf the
world champion Miami Dolphins.
Bill Cotterell is a retired reporter who covered
government and politics 44 years for United
Press International and the Tallahassee Demo-
crat. Contact him at bilicotterell@gmail.com


Rubio undermines majority on gun sales


(( n God we trust" might be In that case, they should dem-
the planet's most familiar onstrate political integrity and
national motto, appearing intellectual consis-
on trillions of U.S. coins and trea- tency by sponsoring
sury bills circulating everywhere. legislation to repeal
But perhaps the time has come for '.. all the gun laws now
a new one, more reflective of how on the books.
the rest of the world sees us: : '. For that matter,
"In guns we trust." let them repealall
If the NRA continues to have its Dyvkman laws why have any
way, it will be the gun, not the bald since laws aren't fool-
eagle, that symbolizes America. proof? and let society sink into
A more appropriate icon, how- total anarchy. One bright side to
ever, would be a human silhou- that would be putting Wayne LaPi-
ette, hands raised in surrender, to erre out of work. Even better: There
represent the cowardice the gut- would be no need for professional
clenching, sweat-pouring, sallow- pols like Rubio, Burr, and Flake.
faced, knee-trembling,- odor-spew -. .What's'the poirrtof having a Con-
ing cowardice that explains why gress when it can be paralyzed so
the Congress of the greatest nation easily by a small but vociferous and
on earth can't enact something as deep-pocketed lobby?
simple and sensible as universal The debacle in the Senate brings.
background checks. to mind a book entitled The Frozen
So here's a challenge for Marco Republic: How the Constitution
Rubio, the Florida flash whose is Paralyzing Democracy, writ-
presidency would confirm the ten in 1996 by one Daniel Lazare,
Peter principle; for Richard Burr, a freelancer who postulated that
the senior senator from my state, equal state representation in the
who praised the courage of the Senate should be scrapped, and the
Newtown parents when they lob- Constitution with it.
bied Congress but couldn't muster He made a fair case about the
enough within himself; for Jeff composition of the Senate, but
Flake of Arizona, who couldn't look none at all about how that might
Gabby Giffords in the eye when actually be changed. He proposed
she stammered out her plea for his simply that the House should
support, and for all the other 42 overthrow the Senate and call for a
senators who wouldn't even allow plebescite to ratify the deed. That
the issue to come to a vote. was, needless to say, long before
If they sincerely believe the NRA there was a Tea Party to take over
propaganda they were parroting to the House.
the public that expanded back- Small-state control of the Senate
ground checks wouldn't prevent is surely the most unfortunate of
criminals from getting guns then the surviving compromises from
they must also believe that the the constitutional convention
existing law, applying only to li- of 1787. It's the only one.that is
censed dealers, doesn't work either, expressly excluded, in Article.Five,
that the million denials since 1998 from the amendment process.
haven't saved lives. A Washington Monthly blogger,


Ed Kilgore, calculated that the
senators from the 25 largest states
gave 33 yes votes to the Manchin-
Toomey compromise, against only
17 no votes, which was better than
the three-fifths margin necessary to
break a filibuster. But the senators
from the 25 smallest states voted 29
to 21 against.
What is not written in the Con-
stitution or even implied by its
text is the power of a minority
to forever frustrate debate on any
issue it chooses. In 1787, the fram-
ers specified only five instances ;
requiring supermajority votes: .
for the Senate to ratify a treaty or
convict an impeached opicer, for
either house to expel a member,
to override a veto, and to propose
constitutional amendments.
Consider what they did not think
needed more than a majority
vote: levying taxes, laws to deprive
citizens of life, liberty, or property;
even declarations of war.
The Senate's tradition of un-
limited debate, embodied in the
filibuster, derives from the power
of each house to make its own
rules. Even that can be changed at
the opening of each new Congress
- and should be.
But even the filibuster, as origi-
nally contrived, was ostensibly
to prolong debate rather than to
prevent it. The policy of requiring
a three-fifths vote even to begin de-
bate is a travesty of democracy. It is
faithless to the Constitution and to
the people. It begs to be scrapped,
along with the careers of hacks like
Rubio, Burr, and Flake.

Martin Dyckman is a retired associate editor
of the newspaper formerly known as the St.
Petersburg Times. He can be reached at dyck-
manm@bellsouth.net








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Briefs
Bill about high school
sports gets review
TALLAHASSEE --A bill
seeking to rein in some
power wielded by Florida's
main governing body for
high school athletics has
received an initial review
from the state House.
The measure (HB 1279)
underwent revisions Tues-
day and could come up for
a floor vote this week.
Opponents, led by the
Florida High School Ath-
letic Association, contend
the bill would create a ,,
system of athletic "free
agency" by allowing stu-
dents to change schools
at will if they met the new
school's academic and
athletic requirements.
Rep. Larry Metz, the
bill's sponsor, denied the
claim. He says the FHSAA
would preserve its initial
role in enforcing eligibility
standards.
Other supporters said
the bill reins in some of
the FHSAA's power.
The bill would put time
limits on eligibility inves-
tigations and allow judges
to hear appeals.

Man gets life
for fatal robbery
FORT MYERS- A south-
west Florida man has been
sentenced to life in prison
for strangling and robbing
a woman.
A Lee County judge sen-
tenced 26-year-old Shane
Simpkins on Monday. A,
jury found him guilty in
March of second-degree
murder.
Authorities say the Cape
Coral handyman strangled
64-year-old Mary Ann
Zarb and dumped her
body near the Lee-Char-
lotte county border in
April 2011. He then cashed
about $25,000 in her
checks.
Simpkins claimed a co-
worker, Christopher Neu-
berger, was the one who
actually killed Zarb while
they were working at her
Estero home. Neuberger
actually testified against
Simpkins as part of a plea
agreement. The Naples
Daily News reports that he
received 10 years in prison
for his part in Zarb's death.

Scott pushes freeze
in student fees
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott is putting pres-
sure on Florida's public
universities to hold down ,
fees charged to students,
making it a condition for
two universities seeking,
state approval for con-
struction projects on their
campuses.
Scott indicated Tuesday
he refused to go along with
granting bonding approval
for the projects at Florida
State University and
Florida International Uni-
versity until the schools
agreed to keep costs down
for students.
In one instance, the
Republican governor said
he extracted a promise
from Florida International
to freeze a transportation
access fee for six years as a
prelude to winning bond-
ing approval for a new
parking garage on FIU's
campus in West Miami-
Dade County. The fee is
paid by every student,
including those walking or
cycling to class, he said.
"It's the right thing to
do," Scott said of the fee
freeze during a meeting of
the.Florida Cabinet at the
Capitol.,
From wire report


No bail for suspect in alleged terror plot


The Associated Press *

MIAMI A Pakistani-
born man accused along
with his younger brother
in an alleged terror plot to
detonate bombs in New
York City was critical to
the plan because of his
financial support, a fed-
-eral prosecutor told a
Miami judge at a bail hear-
ing Tuesday.
Assistant U.S. Attorney
Karen Gilbert *also said
that Sheheryar Alam Qazi,
30, had full knowledge
that 20-year-old Raees
Alam Qazi was learning
how to make explosive
devices via the Internet
and was determined to
mount an attack to avenge
deaths caused by U.S.
drones in Afghanistan and
elsewhere.
'He full well knew what


his brother was intend-
ing to do," Gilbert said of
the elder Qazi. "He played
a very significant role,
because he paid all the bills
to enable his brother."
U.S. Magistrate Judge
Chris McAliley denied
bail for Qazi, finding that
he is a great risk to flee
to Pakistan and avoid
prosecution. The brothers
have been locked up since
their arrests in November
on charges of attempting
to use a 'weapon of mass
'destruction and conspir-.
ing to provide material
support to terrorists.
Both men, who are
naturalized U.S. citizens,
have pleaded not guilty.
If convicted, they face a
possible life prison sen-
tence. Sheheryar Qazi was
seeking release on bail
Tuesday, with his attorney


"Don't worry about
what people think.
Think about what you
are going to do for
Allah."
Sheheryar Alam Qazi,
Suspect

Ronald Chapman trying
to show he wasn't aware
of his brother's plans and
would not flee to Pakistan
if released.
Much of Tuesday's
hearing centered on a
statement Raees Qazi
made to the FBI af-
ter his arrest. Raees
Qazi had traveled to
New York from South
Florida over the long
Thanksgiving weekend
with hopes of landing a job
to make enough money to
pull off his attack, said FBI


agent Paul Carpinteri.
But, Carpinteri testified,
Raees Qazi returned home
after four days because
he couldn't find a job
and underestimated how
expensive NewYork would
be. When he was arrested,
Carpinteri said Raees
Qazi told them his older
brother "was fully aware
of his plot to conduct an
attack, he just didn't know
where and when."
Under cross-exami-
nation from Chaprhan,
Carpinteri was repeat-
edly asked if Sheheryar
Qazi ever explicitly made
incriminating statements
in the many FBI record-
ings made of conversa-
tions with informants and
over the telephone.
"He didn't say he pro-
vided money so (Raees)
could make a bomb,


right?" Chapman asked.
"He did not say that,"
Carpinteri. replied.
Instead, the FBI agent
and Gilbert said the two
spoke in a kind of code
that danced around the
specific language of a
Violent attack. For
example, in a phone call
between them, Raees Qazi
raised concerns about
returning to South Florida
from New York because
he had already shaved his
beard a significant step
for a Muslim man to take.
Carpinteri said that was
done in preparation for
the attacks, so Raees Qazi
could blend in.
According to the FBI
recordings, his brother
replied: "Don't worry
about what people think.
Think about what you are
going to do for Allah."


- Sneads.FFA annual


banquet is May7


iHL .. I. i, I, f
Kent Hendrix, 47, holds his Samurai sword on Tuesday in Salt Lake City. Hendrix, a Samurai
sword-wielding Mormon bishop came to the aid of a woman who was being attacked in front
of his house.

Mormon bishop uses Samurai


sword to chase off attacker


The Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY A
Samurai sword-wielding
Mormon bishop helped'a
'neighbor woman escape
a Tuesday morning attack
by a man who had been
stalking her.
Kent Hendrix woke
up Tuesday to his teen-
age son'pounding on his
bedroom door and tell-
ing him somebody was
being mugged in front of
their house. The 47-year-
old father of six rushed
out the door and grabbed
the weapon closest to him
- a 29-inch high carbon
steel Samurai sword.
He came upon what
he describes as a melee
between a woman and a
man. His son stayed inside
to call 911 while he ap-
proached the man along
with other neighbors who
came to help. The martial
arts instructor didn't hesi-
tate in drawing the sword
and yelling at him to get
on the ground.
"His eyes got as big as
saucers and he kind of


U.S. customs plane
intercepts cocaine
JACKONSVILLE U.S.
customs officials helped
law enforcement in
Panama intercept more
than 3,300 pounds of
pure cocaine this past
weekend.
U.S. Customs and
Border Protection crew-
members aboard a P-3
aircraft were patrolling
the open waters near
Panama City, Panama,
Saturday when they
detected a speedboat
carrying four suspects,
fuel barrels and multiple


gasped and jumped back,"
Hendrix said by phone
Tuesday afternoon. "He's
probably never had any-
one draw a sword on him
before."
The man ran down the
street with the barefoot
Hendrix and others in
pursuit. Hendrix said he
couldn't catch the man be-
fore he fled in his car, but
he picked up ChapStickl
that the man dropped and
memorized his license
plate.
"I yelled at him, 'I've got
your DNA and I've got
your license plate: You are
so done,'" Hendrix said.
The suspect, 37-year-old
Grant Eggersten, turned
himself in to police an
hour later, said Unified
Police Lt. Justin Hoyal. He
was booked on charges
of robbery, attempted
burglary, trespassing and
violation of a stalking
injunction.
Hendrix, a pharmaceu-
tical statistician, was one
of several neighbors who
came to the woman's aid
after she began yelling for


packages, the agency
reported.
The crew notified
Panama law enforcement
and directed three inter-
ceptors to the speedboat's
location. Panamanian
law enforcement fired
warning shots, causing


help, Hoyal said.
The incident began just
after 7,a.m. when the 35-
year-old woman came out
of her front door, Hoyal
said. Eggersten was hiding
behind her carport and at-
tacked her, knocking her
to the ground, Hoyal said.
He took her keys and
tried to open the door into
her house, Hoyal said.
That's when the woman
ran down the street call-
ing for help.
,The woman did the right
thing by fighting back and
calling for \help, Hoyal
said. She suffered minor
injuries.
Hendrix, a bishop in The
Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints, said
it was the first time in 30
years of practicing mar-
tial arts that he's used the
sword. He didn't swing it
at the man, only showing
him he had it.
He said he's proud of his
14-year-old son for alert-
ing him and quickly call-
ing 911. He said the fam-
ily is still abuzz about the
events.


the speedboat to stop.
The suspected traffickers,
all claiming Colombian
citizenship, were arrested.
The fuel barrels were
filled with cocaine, an
estimated value of more
than $242 million.
The Associated Press


Special to the Floridan

The Sneads FFA will
hold their annual par-
ent/member banquet
on Tuesday, May 7 at 6
p.m. in the Sneads High
School gymnasium. The
FFA members, families,
faculty, and community
members look forward
to this event each'year.
Many details go into
making this night a
success.
Along with the banquet,
a silent auction will also
be held and will begin at
5 p.m. This is a fun time


Former Miami officer
sentenced for bribes
MIAMI A former
Miami police officer was
sentenced Tuesday to
just over a year in federal
prison for accepting hun-
dreds of dollars in bribes
as a police officer to
protect a check-cashing
business.
U.S. District Judge
Robert Scola sentenced
Harold James, 29, to one
year and three months.


and will also compensate
for monies spent in pre-
paring for the banquet as
well as trips throughout
the year. The Sneads FFA
is asking for any donation'
possible whether it be
monetary, a percentage
off, or an item to be auc-
tioned. Donations will be
greatly appreciated and
businesses will be recog-
nized by the FFA.
For additional infor-
mation regarding this
event or to make a dona-
tion contact Sneads FFA
Advisor Stan Scurlock at
482-9004 ext. 269.


Prosecutorshad recom- .
mended a year and a half,
citing a plea agreement,
prompt admission of
guilt and cooperation
with investigators.
James pleaded for leni-
ency and understanding
at his hearing, explaining
that he inade a stupid
mistake.
"If anybody asked me
for the shirt off my back,
I gave it to them," James
told the judge.
The Associated Press


State Farm a
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710 "'INSU""ANC"


Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc
Linda J Pforte, Agent .
2919 Penn Avenue, Suite B,
Marianna, FL 32448-2716
Bus 850-482-3425 Fax 850-482-6823
Toll Free 1-877-364-6007
linda.pforte.bxrs@statefarm.com
Good Neighbor Since 1986


in Urology


For kidneys, bladder and the male reproductive system, Jackson Hospital .has the key services
you need. From noninvasive lithotripsy to treat kidney stones, to MRI and diagnostic imaging
to detect cancer and chronic conditions, to surgery services, our team provides the urologic
care you need right here in Jackson County.


For a urology referral or mor6 information about our
urologic surgical services, please call 850.526.2200.


qv Jackson
Hospital


4250 Hospital Drive Marianna. Florida 32446 850.526 2200 www.jacksonhosp.com


111------------------=------------------


mj L-


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24,2013 5AF


4:, ,
? ;


' Growing a Healthier Community.


STATE, LOCAL, NATION







-16A + WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013


BUSINESS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Friday, March 29, photo, a worker helps frame a new
home under construction in Matthews, N.C. The Commerce
Department reports on new-home sales for March on Tuesday,
April 23.



New-homes sales


rise 1.5 percent


in March to 417K


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP)
U.S. sales of new homes
rose in March to a season-
ally adjusted annual rate
of 417,000. The increase
added to evidence of a sus-
tained housing recovery at
the start of the spring buy-
ing season.
The Commerce Depart-
ment said Tuesday that
sales of new homes in-
creased 1.5 percent. The
gain brought the level
higher than February's
pace of 411,000, though
below January's 445,000
- the fastest pace since
July 2008.,
New-home sales are still
below the 700,000 pace
considered healthy by
most economists. But the
pace has increased 18.5
percent from 352,000 a
year ago.
Most economists see
more gains ahead, as
housing is likely to remain
a consistent driver of eco-
nomic growth this year.
"With increasing signs
of a softer U.S. economy
springing up in the spring,
we can take comfort ir the
resilience of the housing
recovery," said Jennifer
Lee, senior economist at
BMO Capital Markets.
Steady job creation
and near-record-low
mortgage rates are spur-
ring more Americans to
buy houses. The rise in de-
mand is helping to boost
sales and prices in most
markets. Higher prices
tend to make homeowners
feel wealthier and encour-
age more spending.


A limited supply of both
new and previously oc-
cupied homes has also
helped boost prices.
The inventory of new
homes for sale increased
2 percent in March to
a 153,000, the second
straight gain. Still, that's
the equivalent of. a 4.4
month supply at the cur-
rent sales pace and his-
torically lean, according to
Jim O'Sullivan, chief U.S.,
economist at High Fre-
quency Economics.
The median price of a
new home rose to $247,000
in March. That's 3 percent
higher than a year ago.
The March sales gain
came from a 20.6 percent
increase in the Northeast
and a 19.4 percent rise in
the South. Sales fell 20.9.
percent in the West, where
problems of supply have
hampered home buying.
Sales were down 12.1 per-
cent in the Midwest.
Sales of previously oc-
cupied homes dipped in
March from February, ac-
cording to the National As-
sociation of Realtors. Still,
sales were 10.3 percent
higher than a year earlier.
The Realtors' group cited
the low supply as a reason
sales fell in March. But in
a positive sign, the inven-
tory of previously occu-
pied homes increased for
the second straight month.
That suggests more sell-
ers are confident that the
recovery will continue
and they can sell at a good
price.
Low inventories have
helped drive more con-
struction of new homes.


AT&T loses contract

phone subscribers in lQ


The Associated Press
DALLAS AT&T lost
phone subscribers from
its contract-based plans
for the first time in the
latest quarter, in a. sign'
that growth in the indus-
try is stalling now that
most Americans have
smartphones.
The company said Tues-
day that it added a net
296,000 devices to its con-
tract-based plans in the
first quarter, but the gain
was due entirely to tablets,
which carry lower monthly
fees.
Excluding tablets, the
carrier lost a net 69,000
devices from its contract-
based plans, the first such
loss.
When AT&T was the only
U.S. carrier with the iPhone
between 2007 and 2011, it
regularly added more than
the 1 million net new de-
vices to its contract-based
plans per quarter.
Overall, the shift re-
sulted in slower growth in
what people pay on aver-


age for each device every
month. Average revenue
per user under contract
rose 0.9 percent, down
from a 1.9 percent gain in
the fourth quarter through
December.
The results mean AT&T,
the nation's second largest
wireless carrier, is slipping
further behind market
leader, Verizon Wireless,
which said last week that it
added a net 677,000 devic-
es to contract-based plans
in the quarter.
Verizon ended the quar-
ter with 93.2 million de-
vices under contract com-
pared to 70.7 million for
AT&T.
The results came as AT&T
reported a 3 percent gain
in net income to $3.7 bil-
lion, or 67 cents per share,
for the quarter that ended
March 31.
Excluding the sale of an
advertising business, ad-
justed earnings came to 64
cents per share, matching
the expectation of analysts
polled by FactSet.


Apple to dole out $100B to shareholders


The Associated Press

NEW YORK Apple is
opening the doors to its
bank vault, saying it will
distribute $100 billion
in cash to its sharehold-
ers by the end of 2015. At
the same time, the com-
pany said revenue for
the current quarter could
fall from the year before,
which would be the first
decline in many years.
Apple CEO Tim Cook
also suggested that the
company won't release
any new products until
the fall, contrary to expec-
tations that there would
be a new iPhone and iPads
out this summer.
Apple Inc. on Tuesday
said it will expand its
share buyback program
to $60 billion the larg-
est buyback authorization
in history. It is also raising
its dividend by 15 percent
from $2.65 to $3.05 per
share. The dividend yield
will be about 3 percent
at current stock prices.
The average yield for the
top 20 dividend-paying
companies in the U.S. is
3.1 percent, according to
Standard & Poor's.
Investors have been
clamoring for Apple to
give them access to its
cash hoard, which ended
March at an unprecedent-
ed $145 billion. Apple's
tight grip on its cash, along
with the lack of ground-
breaking new products,
has been blamed for the
steep decline in its stock
price over the winter.
News of the cash bo-
nanza coincided with the
company's release of a
poor quarterly outlook for
the three-month period
that ends in June.
Apple released its fiscal
second quarter earnings
after the stock market
closed Tuesday. The com-
pany's stock initially rose 5
percent to $425 in extend-
ed trading, then retreated
$2.63, or 0.7 percent, to
$403.50 as the CEO talked
about new products arriv-
ing in the fall. i


THEASSOCIAITEDPRESS
In this Monday April 1, photo, a man leaves an Apple store with an iPhone and an iPad in his
hands in central Beijing, China. Apple Inc., the maker of the iPhone and iPad, reports quarterly
financial results after the market closes on Tuesday.


The shares are still down
40 percent from a peak of
$705.07 hit on Sept. 21,
when the iPhone 5 went
on sale.
"The decline in Apple's
stock price over the last
couple of quarters has
been very frustrating for
all of us ... but we'll con-
tinue to do what we do
best," CEO Tim Cook
said on a conference call
with analysts after the
release of the results. But
he reinforced that the
company's job is not to
boost its stock price in the
short term.
"The most important
objective for Apple will al-
ways be creating innova-
tive products," he added.
Apple's results beat the
consensus estimate of an-
alysts who follow the com-
pany, though it posted its
first profit decline in ten
years.
Net income was $9.5 bil-
lion, or $10.09 per share,
down 18 percent from
$11.6 billion, or $12.30 per
share, in the same period
a year ago.
Revenue was $43.6 bil-
lion, up 11 percent from
last year's $39.2 billion.
Analysts were expecting
earnings of $9.97 per share
on revenue of $42.3 billion,
according to FactSet.


Stocks gain on earnings;

fake tweet shakes stocks


The Associated Press

NEW YORK Compa-
nies that do the best when
the economy is improv-
ing led the market higher
Tuesday after several of
them reported strong
quarterly earnings.
Coach, a maker of luxu-
ry handbags, and Netflix,
which streams TV shows
and movies ,over the In-
ternet, were winners after
announcing profits .that
impressed investors. Fi-
nancial stocks rose after
Travelers' earnings beat
the expectations of finan-
cial analysts who follow
the company.
That's a change from
earlier'this year. The stock
market's surge in 2013
has been led by so-called
defensive industries such
as health care, consumer
staples and utilities. In-
vestors buy those stocks
when they're unsure
about the direction of
the economy and want to
own companies that make
products people buy in


bad times as well as good.
Until now, they've been
less enthusiastic about
stocks of companies that
provide discretionary
goods and services and do
best in good times.
"For a change we are ac-
tually seeing more cyclical
parts of the economy lead
the market," said Michael
Sheldon, chief market
strategist at RDM Finan-
cial Grbup.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average and the Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index
both rose 1 percent, and
for a third straight day.
Stocks closed higher
even after financial mar-
kets were shaken in the
early afternoon when a
fake tweet on The Asso-
ciated Press Twitter ac-
count prompted a sudden
sell-off.
A twitter posting say-
ing that there had been
explosions at the White
House and that President
Barack Obama had been
injured was sent at 1:08
p.m. Eastern time.


BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


For the quarter that just
started, Apple said it ex-
pects sales of $33.5 bil-
lion to $35.5 billion. In
the same quartetlast year,
sales were $35 billion. Wall
Street was expecting sales
of $38 billion. ,
The June quarter is
generally a weak one for
Apple, since consumers
tend to wait for the next
iPhone, which the compa-
ny usually releases in the
fall. But a year-over-year
decline is a signal that Ap-
ple is failing to capitalize
on the continued growth
of smartphone sales. Sales
are tapering off in U.S. and
other mature markets,
and not many consumers
in India and China can af-
ford iPhones.
"Our fiscal 2012 results
were incredibly strong
and that's making com-
parisons very difficult this
year," said Cook.
Apple shipped 37.4 mil-
lion iPhones in the lat-
est quarter, up 7 percent
from a year ago. That
confounded expectations
that shipments might
fall, but it was still a weak
number compared to
many previous quarters,
when shipments doubled
year over year. The aver-
age wholesale price of an
iPhone also fell to $613


as Apple cut the price
of its oldest model, the
iPhone 4, to appeal to
buyers in developing
.countries.
Apple started paying a
dividend last summer and
has been buying back a
modest number of shares,
enough to balance the di-
lution created by its em-
ployee stock option pro-
gram but not to make a
dent in its cash pile. The
company says it's now
expanding the buybacks,
which started in October
and are set to run till the
end of 2015, from $10 bil-
lion to $60 billion. It's rais-
ing the quarterly dividend
starting with the payment
due May 16.
The company has faced
continued pressure from
Wall Street over the use of
its cash, which earns less
than 1 percent in inter-
est. Investors reason that
if the company has no
better use for the mon-
ey, it should be handing
it over to shareholders.
The company had said
it was considering ways
to use the money, and this
year engaged in a public
debate with a hedge fund
manager who wanted it
to institute a new class of
shares to attract dividend-
loving investors.


7'' V 2884 Jefferson St.
SDowntown Marianna
'"--- "-----..---.-------------'-,, "
850.482.6855


Debbie RKotiey Smith

850-209-8039 cell
CALL OR TEXT!
debbieroneysmith@embarqmail.com
Century 21
Sunny South
Properties
S. F. M30 90
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER. ,larirria. FL


Itl I






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


- V,-V


~yp/ ~\


$207
$C38


,.. -- '
Tray Pack Chicken
Breast Tenders..................
Tennessee Pride
Sausage Patties ..............
Farmland Whole Boneless Sliced
Pork Loins......................




Fully Cooked
Hot Wings. ........ ..........


Farmland Hickory,
Applewood or Peppered 06
Bacon ......................... 24oz
Jennie-0 92
Turkey Burgers ............. 3 Ibox


Small Pork
Spareribs.....................

.Cook's Shank Portion
. Smoked Ham...............
Butt Portion .... *121 .Ib.
Royal Sliced Smoked
Picnic Shoulder......


1 l!
I b


A A A


Bar'S'
Jumbo Franks

99(11oz.


Bar'S' 4x6.
Cooked Ham
$1, 84
1 Ib.
package


Bar 'S' Reg. or Thick Sliced
Bologna
$118
1 16 oz.


Wishbone, 16 oz. .6
Ranch or Italian...... ................ 1


Budweiser, 14 oz. 77
Mild or Hot Wing Sauce. ...........


Taco Bell, 10.7 oz. S 1
Dinner Kit................... .......$


Yellow or White 3
Fresh Corn ear


Jumbo Sweet lb.
Vidalia Onions


Fresh Express Crisp 12 oz
Garden Salad
S* .. O KOiTe


73(
Zucchini 3 b
Squash


3-p00ck
3-pack


- d

' I


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 + 7AF


2







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-18A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013


More rain expected for swollen Midwest rivers


The Associated Press

PEORIA HEIGHTS, 111.
- More rain on Tuesday
was the last thing flood
fighters across the Mid-
west wanted to see, add-
ing more water to swollen
rivers now expected to
remain high into next
month. ,
Floodwaters were rising
to record levels along the
Illinois River in central Illi-
nois. In Missouri, six small
levees north of St. Louis
were overtopped by the
surging Mississippi River,
though mostly farmland
was affected.
The Mississippi and Il-
linois rivers have crested
in some places, but that
doesn't mean the danger is
over. The National Weather
Service predicts a very
slow descent, thanks in
part to the additional rain
expected to amount to an
inch or so across several
Midwestern states.
"The longer the crest,
definitely, the more strain
there is on the levee," said
Mike Petersen, a spokes-
man for the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers in St.
Louis.
The biggest problem ar-
eas were in Illinois, on the
Illinois River. In Peoria
Heights, population 6,700,
roads and buildings were
flooded and riverfront
structures were inundated.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jennifer Rock uses her cell phone to take photos to send to a friend of flooding from the Il-
linois River Tuesday, April 23, in Spring Bay III. Floodwaters are rising to record levels along the
Illinois River in central Illinois.


Firefighters feared that if
fuel from businesses and
vehicles starts to leak, it
could spark a fire in areas
that could be reached only
by boat.
"That's our nightmare:
A building bums and we
can't get to it," said Peoria
Heights Fire Chief Greg
Walters. "These are com-
bustible buildings and we
have no access to them
simply because of the
flooding."
About 20 to 30 homes
and businesses near the
river have been evacuated,


he said.
Among those still in their
homes was Mark Reather-
ford, a 52-year-old unem-
ployed baker. He's lived for
decades in the same split-
'level home with a gorgeous
view: a small park between
him and the Illinois River.
By Tuesday afternoon,
as a chilly rain continued
falling, the river had rolled
over the park and made it
to Reatherford's home, cre-
ating a 3-foot-deep mess
in the basement. Reath-
erford had cleared out the
basement furniture and


was hopeful the main floor
would stay dry.
Now, he's considering
moving.
"You can't get a better
view than what we've got
here," he said. "The sun
comes up over the river,
moon comes up ... and
now you've got this. I'm
getting too old to deal with
this."
In downtown Peoria,
thousands of white and
yellow sandbags stacked
3 feet high lined blocks of
the city's scenic riverfront,
holding back floodwaters


that already had surround-
ed the visitors' center and
the 114-year-old former
' train depot that lately has
housed restaurants. Across
the street, smaller sandbag
walls blocked off riverside
pedestrian access to Cat-
erpillar's headquarters and
the city's museum.
In nearby Chillicothe,
more than 400 homes have
been affected by the flood,
said Vicky Turner, direc-
tor of the Peoria County
Emergency Management
Agency. Many homes have
been evacuated, but oth-
ers whose owners have
had their buildings raised
over the years because of
flooding have chosen to
stay put, Turner said.
"They row back and forth.
... up to the main road,"
she said.
In .Missouri, officials in
the flood-weary hamlet of
Clarksville were optimistic
that days of furious sand-
bagging would hold back
the Mississippi. At times
toiling in heavy rain, crews
built a second wall of dirt
and sandbags behind the
original barrier, and by
Tuesday morning calm was
restored. The Mississippi
appeared to be receding,
ever so slowly, from the
community 70 miles north
of St. Louis.
S"We're feeling much bet-
ter," Mayor Jo Anne Smiley
said.


Hackers

compromise

AP Twitter

account

The Associated Press

NEW YORK Hack-
ers compromised Twitter
accounts of The Associ-
ated Press on Tuesday,
sending out a false tweet
about an attack at the
White House.
The false tweet said
there had been two ex-
plosions at the White
House and that Presi-
dent Barack Obama was
injured. The attack on
AP's Twitter account and
the AP Mobile Twitter
account was preceded
by phishing attempts on
AP's corporate network.
The AP confirmed that
its Twitter account had
been suspended follow-
ing a hack and said it was
working to correct the
issue.
The false tweet went
out shortly after 1 p.m.
and briefly sent the Dow
Jones industrial aver-
age sharply lower. The
Dow fell 143'points, from
14,697 to 14,554, after the
fake Twitter posting, and
then quickly recovered.
A Securities and
Exchange Commission
spokeswoman declined
to comment on the
incident.'


Miss. man in ricin case: 'I love my country'


The Associated Press they could be re-instated if
.' prosecutors so choose.
TUPELO, Miss. -Charg- Attorneys for Curtis have
es were dropped Tuesday suggested he was framed,
against the' Mississippi and an FBI agent testified
man accused of sending in court this week that no
ricin-laced letters to Presi- evidence ofricin was found
dent Barack Obama and in searches of his home. At
others, while authorities a news conference Tues-
searched at another man's day, they declined to dis-
home in connection with cuss whether they were
the case. told what new informa-
* The surprising move was tion the government had
announced in a brief docu- uncovered.
ment filed in federal court "I respect President
in Oxford hours after. Paul Obama," Curtis said to re-
Kevin Curtis was released porters. "I love my coun-
from custody. The charges try and would never do
were dismissed without anything to pose a threat
prejudice, which means to him or any other U.S.


official."
Prosecutors couldn't im-
mediately be reached for
comment. -
In Tupelo, numerous
law enforcement officers
converged on the home of
another Mississippi man,
including some in hazmat
suits.
Everett Dutschke
(DUHST'-kee) said in a
phone interview with The
Associated Press that the
FBI was at his Tupelo home
Tuesday for the search con-
nected to the mailing of
poisoned letters to Obama,
U.S. Senator Roger Wicker
of Mississippi and a state


judge. Dutschke said his
house was also searched
last week.
Dutschke has maintained
his innocence and says
he doesn't know anything
about the ingredients for
ricin. He said agents asked
him about Curtis, whether.
Dutschke would take a lie
detector test and if he had
ever bought castor beans,
which can be used to make
.the potent poison.
"I'm a patriotic Ameri-
can. I don't have any
grudges against anybody.
I did not send the letters,"
said Dutschke, who hasn't
been arrested or charged.


Bomb suspect influenced by mysterious radical


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON In the
years before the Boston
Marathon bombings, Ta-
merlan Tsarnaev fell un-
,der the influence of a new
friend, a Muslim convert
who steered the religiously
apathetic young man to-
ward a strict strain of Is-
lam, family members said.
Under the tutelage of a
friend known to the Tsar-
naev family only as Misha,
Tamerlan gave up box-
ing and stopped studying
music, his family said. He
began opposing the wars
in. Afghanistan and Iraq.
He turned to websites and
literature claiming that the
CIA was behind the ter-
rorist attacks of Sept. 11,
2001, and Jews controlled
the world.
"Somehow, he just took
his brain," said Tamerlan's
uncle, Ruslan Tsarni, who
recalled conversations
with Tamerlan's worried
father about Misha's influ-
ence. Efforts over several
days by The Associated
Press to identify and in-
terview Misha have been
unsuccessful.
Tamerlan's relationship
with Misha could be a
clue in understanding the
motives behind his reli-
gious transformation and,
ultimately, the attack it-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FIlE
In this April 19, photo, Ruslan Tsarni, the uncle of the Boston
Marathon bombing suspect, speaks with the media outside his-
home in Montgomery Village in Md.


self. Two U.S. officials say
he had no tie to terrorist
groups.
Throughout his reli-
gious makeover, Tamerlan
maintained a strong in-
fluence over his siblings,
including Dzhokhar, who
investigators say carried
out the deadly attack by
his older brother's side,
killing three and .injuring
264 people.
"They all loved Tamer-
lan. He was the eldest one
and he, in many ways,
was the role model for his
sisters and his brother,"
said Elmirza Khozhugov,
26, the ex-husband of
Tamerlan's sister, Ailina.
"You could always hear
his younger brother and
sisters say, 'Tamerlan said
this,' and 'Tamerlan said
that.' Dzhokhar loved him.


He would do whatever Ta-
merlan would say.
"Even my ex-wife loved
him so much and re-
spected him so much,"
Khozhugov said. "I'd have


arguments with her and
if Tamerlan took my side,
she would agree: 'OK, if Ta-
merlan said it.'"
Khozhugov said he was
close to Tamerlan when he
was married and they kept
in touch for a while but
drifted apart in the past
two years or so. He spoke
to the AP from his home
in Almaty, Kazakhstan.
A family member in the
United States provided the
contact information.
Tamerlan Tsarnaev was
killed in a police shootout
Friday. Dzhokhar Tsar-
naev was charged Monday
with -using a weapon of
mass destruction to kill,
and he could face the
death penalty if convicted.


Broker/Owner
(850) 209-4705 cell
C21SunnriySo@aol.com


SMARTER. BOLDER FASIER.


COME
MEMO
Let us help you
with a memorial
of BEAUTY and
DURABILIT)

: .:. ,,- *.
( t


---- n


Pete Comer
593-68
comerfordvat
Hwy.


CHIPOLA

4 COMMUNITY


OBANKC
Marianna's Only Locally Owned Community Bank


Century 21
Sunny South
Properties


4 ,;'. Hwy ', 1J *
Mrinariii FL ,
(850) 526-2891
7. ." -_. -- j.- -


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


4701 Highway 90

Marianna, FL 32446


Phone: 850-526-7144

Fax: 850-526-7166

chipolacommunitybank. com


;RFORD VAULT
RIALL SERVICE


All Work & Material Guaranteed

Burial Vaults, Mausoleums,
Benches, Markers
and All Cemetery Supplies




ford Owner & Operator
;28 1-800-369-6828
ultmemorial@hotmail.com
90 W Sneads, FL


Member
FDI


1. -


NATION







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Obituaries
Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
Phone 850-526-5059

Jack
Barwick, Jr.

Jack Barwick, Jr., 37 of
Marianna passed away on
Tuesday, April 23, 2013 at
his home.
Arrangements are incom-
plete and will be an-
nounced later by Marianna
Chapel Funeral Home.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home of Marianna, FL,
(850) 526-5059, is in charge
of arrangements.
Express condolences at
www.mariannachapelfh.com
Sign the guest book at
www.dothaneagle.com.
Lanier-Andler
Funeral Home
Sneads, Florida
Phone 850-593-9900

Rebecca Lynn
Taylor

Mrs. Rebecca Lynn Tay-
lor, age 58, a native of Fort
Worth, Texas, passed away
at her home near
Chattahoochee, Fldrida,
Sunday morning, April 21,
2013, after a lengthy illness.
She and her husband, Greg
have bden residents of
Chattahoochee for thirty
six years coming from Mo-
bile, Alabama. She attend-
ed the First Baptist Church
of Chattahoochee and had
retired from the Florida
State Hospital with the
QMHP after twenty years of
service. She owned and
operated Becky's Fashions
in Chattahoochee from
.1998 till 2009. i
Becky is survived by her
beloved husband, Greg
Taylor; her mother Mary
Wood; her daughter, Ra-
chel Green and her hus-
band Jonathan; her son,
Michael Taylor and his wife
Kaleigh; also three broth-
ers, Lawrence, Robert and
David Wood.
Visitation with the family
will take place at 10:00 AM
EDT, Thursday, April 25,
2013, First Baptist Church
in Chattahoochee, one
hour prior to the Memorial
Service at 11:00 AM EDT.
The family wishes to ex-
press their appreciation to
all Becky's friends who,
have stood by her in this
difficult time and all who
patronized her business in
Chattahoochee. Also to the
Covenant Hospice person-.
al who cared for Becky so
faithfully
Lanier-Andler Funeral
Home (850) 593-9900 is in
charge of arrangements,
Sign the guest book at
www.d6thaneagle.com.


Florists

Artisdc Designs Unlimited Inc.
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456 .


Okla. gambling scandal
suspect surrenders in Fla.
OKLAHOMA CITY An Anadar-
ko technology company owner and
his wife accused of being involved ,
in an illegal gambling operation in
Florida have surrendered to


jS -" -. K .t: '*

^ I: : -'



PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
An R/C plane throws its nose skyward and proceeds to hover a few feet above the ground
like a helicopter.



Up, up and away

From staff reports I. ,


C old tempera-
S tures and windy
weather didn't
keep people from gath-
ering at the Chipola R/C
Aviators airfield Saturday
to watch the club's mem-
bers put their planes
through the paces.
According to club pres-
ident Francis Kellison the
6th annual fly-in turned
out pretty well and
attracted a good number
of spectators.
All pilots were club
members.
The fly-in normally at-
tracts pilots from outside
the club, but Kellison
said a lot of pilots are
hesitant to fly in windy,
weather. He added that,
to a 1/4-scale remote
control plane, a 20 mph.
wind is equivalent to a
80 mph. wind for'a full-
sized aircraft.
The show was a fund-
raiser to help the club
pay off a debt owed on
the flying field.
Kellison said the .
group's next show will be
Aug. 24.
He said that he hopes
that fly-in will have a
warbird (military aircraft):
theme, but any kind of


Rylin Youmans and Drew Whitford, right, keep the crowd
hopping with a speedy remote control car Saturday during
a break at the Chipola R/C Aviators Fly-In.


* r~ ~


Some of the 23 planes taking part in the Chipola R/C
Aviators Fly-in were more unique than others, like this,
famous World War I flying ace's aircraft.


plane will be able to fly
in it.
However, he added


Florida authorities.
Online court records show Chase
Egan Burns and wife Kristin Burns
appeared last week before a judge in
Seminole County, Fla., where they
face racketeering and other charges.
The records show fugitive from jus-'
tice charges they faced in Oklahoma


that pilots with a warbird
would not have to pay an
entry fee.


were dismissed after their appear-
ance and extradition hearings set
Friday were cancelled.
Chase and Kristin Burns were
among 57 people arrested last
month on felony charges related
to a charity that purported to help
homeless veterans.


Chipley, Bonifay


men facing


drug charges


From staff reports

The Holmes County.
Sheriff's Office reports that
recent arrests in the Pitt-
man community resulted
in meth-related charges
being filed against /two
men from Chipley and
one from Bonifay.
Multiple charges


In the
early morn-
ing hours
of Tuesday,
April 16,
an HCSO
deputy
conducted
a traffic
stop in the
Pittman
comm u -
nity, for an
equipment
violation.
According
to a sher-
'iff's office


' ^

Baxley





Vincent
Vincent


press release, the driver
of the vehicle, 19-year-old
Charles Howard Vincent,
and his passenger, Bring-
ham Ray Baxley, also 19,.
both exhibited suspicious
behavior during thestop.
Officials say further inves-
tigation revealed signs 'of
illegal drug activity.
During a search of the
vehicle, deputies discov-
ered finished metham-
phetamine, a bottle con-
taining a large amount
of meth oil and drug
paraphernalia.
Vincent and Baxley, both


of Chipley, were placed
under arrest and charged
with pos-
session of a
controlled
-- substance
(m e t h -
amphet-
ami n,e ),
Johnson trafficking
in meth-
amphetamine, manufac-
ture of paraphernalia and
possession of marijuana-
less than 20 grams. The
two remain in the Hol-
mes County Jail, each on a
$27,000 bond.
Possession of listed
chemicals
On Thursday, April 18,
an HCSO deputy con-
ducted a traffic stop in the
Pittman community, for a
tag violation. The vehicle's
driver, 43-year-old Jerry
Hiram Johnson of Bonifay,
was then placed under ar-
rest for the traffic offense.
During a search of John-
son's person, the deputy
said he located a box of
pseudoephedrine hid-
den in Johnson's boot.
HCSO reports that dur-
ing'an interview, Johnson
said he purchased the
pseudoephedrine to use
in the manufacture of
methamphetamine.
Johnson was charged
with attaching a tag not
assigned and possession
of listed chemicals. He
remains in the Holmes
County Jail on a $10,000
bond.


Raccoon tests


positive for rabies


From staff reports

A raccoon killed in a
fight with a dog south of
Marianna has tested posi-
tive for rabies, according
to Jackson County Envi-
ronmental Health Direc-
tor T.G. Harkrider.
The raccoon was tested
at the Department of
Health Pensacola Branch
Lab after the incident on
Land Drive, authorities.
said. The dog has been
quarantined to prevent
possible spread of the
disease.
Harkrider issued some
tips for dealing with the
threat of rabies.
One of the most impor-
tant measures is to have
pets vaccinated against
the disease, as required by
local and state law.
Immediately contact the
Jackson County Health
Department if you think
you, someone .you care
about, or a family pet has'


been bitten by or other-
wise exposed to a sus-
pected rabid animal.
"Please call us with
information and ques-
tions related to exposure"
Harkrider said. "We need
to act quickly in some
cases to save people's
lives. Never shoot a bit-
ing animal in the head,"
he added. "An intact brain
is needed to determine if
the animal is rabid. If you
shoot them in the head
and destroy the brain, we
have to assume the ani-
mal was rabid.
"Without negative lab
results, treatment to the
victim has to begin. Please
call us. You can reach us
24 hours a day and 7 days a
week through our answer-
ing service at 526-2412."
The agency can also be
reached at 482-9227 dur-
ing normal weekday busi-
ness hours for additional
general information.


Arrest
From Page 1A

Department officer
stopped to speak with
him while on patrol in
.town. "I' observed a black'
male wearing camoflauge
shorts, a black shirt, and
a black ski cap walking
on the sidewalk on Broad


Follow us on
Facebook


Jackson County
Floridan


Street towards Madison
Street," the officer wrote
in his complaint. "I then
made the block 'and
observed the subject at the
intersection of Madison
and Broad Street. I then
exited my patrol vehicle
and made contact with the
subject, who voluntarily
stopped and spoke with
me."
The officer said he asked
Jones for his identification,
and Jones 'said he didn't
have any on him but gave
a name that, as it turned
out, was not his own. When
he offered -a date of birth,
Jones seemed to hesitate
over the information, the
officer indicated. When
the officer ran the name
and given date of birth to
check for any warrants,
the dispatcher reported
that there was no record of
warrants on anyone by the
name Jones first gave.
Jones then told the


officer that he could offer that dwelling.
his Social Security number.' That officer reported


When the officer got ready
to look up the number
Jones provided, he asked
again for a name and
date of birth. According
to the officer, Jones gave a
different date of birth the.
second time; there was a
10-year difference in the
two dates he gave, the office
reported. Additionally, the
Social Security number he
gave the officer came back
to yet another person.
Jones was detained for
giving false information.
The officer noted other
inconsistencies in Jones'
statements. For instance,
he allegedly told the
officer that he was going to
a specific dwelling in the
Spring Street Apartments
complex where his
girlfriend lived. Another
officer was dispatched
to check out that story
with the occupant of


back in a few minutes with
.surprising news; it was an
unrented dwelling. When
Jones'personwas searched,
the officer reported, a key
for that apartment was
found in his pocket. An
officer went back to the
apartment, noting that
the blinds were open and
that the apartment had no
furniture or water supply
in operation. The officer
went inside and made his
way to the second floor.
There, he saw several
articles of clothing on the
floor of a bedroom, along
with two phone chargers
and an iPhone. Among
clothing was a camoflauge
t-shirt that "perfectly"
matched the shorts Jones
was wearing, the officer
noted.
The officer confronted
Jones about how he got
the key; Jones said he


rented the apartment
for $600 a month, but
could not provide the
name of the person to
'whom he allegedly made
payment. The owner of
the complex was reached
and confirmed that the
apartment had not been
rented, to Jones. Police did
not speculate about how
Jones obtained the key, but
noted that maintenance
had been working in the.
area the day before.
Additionally, officers
noted that the back door
to the apartment did not
secure property and could
be pushed open when
locked. Officials theorized
that this may have been
Jones' initial point of
entry.
Police also noted that
theydiscoveredaFacebook
page in his phone, in the
name of Gerod Mac Gray,
which had Jones' picture
on the .home page of the


account, but officers
could not find a record of
an individual under that
name.
Jones was taken to
the Marianna Police
Department and later to
the county jail. He was
initially booked under the
initial false name that he
gave, Tadarius Koonce,
but authorities eventually
through consultation
with the Dothan Police
Departmentthattheperson
they had in custody was
not Koonce. Authorities
learned this by comparing
Jones to the Dothan Police
Department's booking
photo of Koonce; they
didn't match.*
Personnel with the
Jackson County jail
were able to learn Jones'
true identity through
fingerprints, a process that
also led to the discovery
of the warrants in Georgia
and Alabama.


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
Quality Service at Affordable Prices
Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90
i 850-482-5041 J


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964 L


`----`.;il------;;~-i~-;-*-;~;---~;i


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 9AF


FROM THE FRONT







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Car bomb at French Embassy in Libya wounds 3


The Associated Press

TRIPOLI, Libya A car
bomb exploded Tuesday
outside the French Em-
bassy in Tripoli, wounding
three people and partially
setting the building on fire
in the worst attack on a
diplomatic mission in the
North African nation since
the U.S. ambassador was
killed last year.
The attack in the heart
of the capital put new
pressure on the Libya's
new leaders to rein in
the lawlessness that has
gripped the country since
2011, when rebels ousted
Moammar Gadhafi in a
civil war and then refused
to lay down their arms.
No group claimed. re-
sponsibility for the
attack, but suspicion fell
on the militias and the ex-
tremists in their ranks that
are fighting the central
government in Tripoli for
control.
Some Libyans blamed
Islamic militants seeking


,zThJ


Rmm.FS(


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Police tape closes the site of a car bomb that targeted the French embassy wounding two
French guards and causing extensive material damage in Tripoli, Libya, Tuesday, April 23. The
explosives-laden car was detonated just outside the embassy building in Tripoli's upscale
al-Andalus neighborhood, officials said.


to avenge France's mili-
tary intervention in Mali to
dislodge al-Qaida-linked
forces from the northern
part of the West African
country.


The motive for the attack
was not immediately clear.
On its official website, the
Libyan government de-
nounced such attacks,
which it said are "directly


targeting Libya's security
and stability."
French President Fran-
cois Hollande called the
bombing an assault on all
countries engaged in the


fight against terrorism.
"France expects the Lib-
yan authorities to shed the
fullest light on this unac-
ceptable act, so that the
perpetrators are identified
and brought to justice,"
Hollande said in a state-
ment from Paris.
The Obama adminis-
tration also condemned
the violence, with State
Department spokesman
Patrick Ventrell calling it "a
direct attack on all Libyans.
who fought a revolution in
order to enjoy a democrat-
ic future with security and
prosperity."
"We look to the Libyan
government to continue
its efforts to strengthen
security across Libya and
to bring the perpetrators
of this crime to justice," he
said.
Tuesday's bombing was
the first in Tripoli, which
has been relatively quiet.
However, the eastern city
of Benghazi saw a rise in
violence last year, includ-
ing the Sept. 11 attack by


militants on the U.S., dip-
lomatic mission that killed
U.S. Ambassador Chris
Stevens and three other
Americans.
The explosives-laden car
was detonated just outside
the French Embassy in
Tripoli's upscale al-Anda-
lus neighborhood early in
the morning, before any
of its staff arrived, accord-
ing to two Libyan security
officials.
"I heard a loud boom,
and immediately after that,
windows were shattered
and parts of my house
were damaged," said Saqr
al-Qarifi, whose home is
adjacent to the embassy.
The blast wounded two
French guards and ignited
a fire at the embassy en-
trance that engulfed some
of the offices inside, the
officials said. A Libyan girl
who was having break-
fast in a nearby house
was also hurt, Deputy
Prime Minister Awad al-
Barassi said on his official
Facebook page.


Iraq on edge after deadly raid on protest camp


The Associated Press

BAGHDAD Security
forces stormed a Sunni
protest camp in northern
Iraq on Tuesday, sparking
deadly clashes in several
towns and sharply inten-
sifying rage at the Shiite-
led government. The un-
rest and a spate of other
attacks, mostly targeting
Sunni mosques, killed at
least 56 people.
The violence could mark
an ominous turning point
in the four-month Sunni
protest movement, which
is posing a stubborn chal-
lenge to Iraq's stability a
decade after the toppling
of Saddam Hussein. ,
There was no immedi-
ate claim of responsibil-
ity for the attacks on three
Sunni mosques, and it was
unclear if there was any
connection to the storm-
ing of the protest camp.
Sunni extremists such as
al-Qaida have in the past
targeted moderate Sun-
nis. But if Shiite militias
were behind the attacks,
it would raise fears of a re-
turn to the open sectarian
fighting of 2006 and 2007
when Iraq was on the brink
of civil war.
The raid on the protest
camp drew harsh condem-'
nations from Sunni lead-
ers and foreign diplomats,
and raised fears that Iraq is
being pushed back toward
all-out sectarian fighting
like that fueling civil war in
neighboring Syria.
Prime Minister Nouri.al-
Maliki swiftly announced
the formation of a special
ministerial committee
to investigate what hap-
pened, underscoring wor-
ries that anger over the
incident could spill out of
control.
"What happened today
is a total disaster," parlia-
ment speaker Osama al-
Nujaifi, a Sunni, said at a


with Associated Press re-
porting of the incident.
As Iraqi forces tried to
make arrests, they came
under heavy fire from sev-
eral types of weapons and
were targeted by snipers,
according to the Defense
Ministry account. Authori-
ties reported detaining 75
people and seizing mul-
tiple machine guns, hand
grenades, daggers and
swords.
Outrage over the morn-


ing raid soon spread
through other Sunni parts
of the country.
Gunmen tried to storm
army posts in the nearby
towns of Rashad and Ri-
yadh, leaving 13 of them
dead, according to De-
fense Ministry, police and
hospital officials.
Demonstrators also
clashed with police in the
restive western province of
Anbar.
In Fallujah, mosque


loudspeakers urged resi-
dents to protest in soli-
darity with Hawija. About
1,000 took to the streets,
with some chanting "War,
war." Clashes later erupted
between gunmen and se-
curity forces in the center
of the city, leading authori-
ties to announce an over-
night curfew.
A policeman near a pro-
test site in Fallujah was
killed by sniper fire, ac-
cording to local officials.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This citizen journalist image provided by the Rebels Gathering
of Hawija on the group's Facebook page shows people inspect-
ing protesters' dead bodies at a hospital in Hawija, 150 miles
(240 kilometers) north of Baghdad, Iraq.


televised news conference.
He appealed for calm and
called 'for those respon-
sible to stand trial.
"If this bloodshed
spreads to other provinces,
God forbid, there will be a
huge fire that we cannot
put out," he said.
The" security crackdown
began at dawn in the for-
mer insurgent stronghold
of Hawija, about 240 kilo-
meters (150 miles) north of
Baghdad. Like, many pre-
dominantly Sunni com-
munities, the town has
seen months of protests
accusing the government
of neglect and pursuing a
sectarian'agenda.
The raid occurred four
days after a checkpoint
jointly run by the police
and army near the town
came under attack. Mili-
tants seized a number of
weapons before retreating
into the crowd of protest-
ers, according to the De-
fense Ministry. Authorities
had been trying to negoti-
ate with local and tribal
officials to hand over those
responsible.
Iraq's Defense Ministry
said 23 people were killed
Tuesday in Hawija, includ-
ing three soldiers as well
as militants who were us-


COme in clay toseeour... '..,

" -' .. . . ' "' '


atHatton tu Apattments
Mention tlhisd and receive


Spacious 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartment
Homes for Seniors 55+ from $546!*


AMENITIES INCLUDE:
Weekly Transportation for You!
To Wal-mart, the grocery store,
and to Marianna for lunch!
FREE Internet Cafd I Elevator
Updated Community Room
Indoor Pool with Retractable
Roof & New Furniture!
Full Activity Calendar -
with Yoga, Water Aerobics, Crafting,
Bingo & Much More!
New Hallways | Fitness Center
Electric Included in Rent!
Free Cable for a year!


Come in for your


850-593-5777

HATTON HOUSE
SENIOR APARTMENTS
2045 3'0 Ave, Sneads FL 32460
hattonhouse@doamniuminc.com
hatton-house-apartments.com


ing the protest grounds
as a safe haven. It said
members of al-Qaida and
Saddam's outlawed Baath
Party were among the mili-
tants' ranks.
In its account of the raid,
the Defense Ministry said
it warned demonstrators
to leave the protest area
Tuesday before moving in.
Amateur video posted on
YouTube by protest sup-
porters shows dozens of
officers in riot gear and at,
least four anti-riot water
cannon trucks facing off
against a group of men.
Many of the civilians were
carrying swords, and secu-
rity forces could be heard
urging them to retreat
as a helicopter hovered
overhead.
It was not possible to ver-
ify the video's authenticity,
but it appeared consistent


J

.~ 'J.' A~4 __________ .~ ~ -~ ~ ..
,~ 4...
IW'W~~B*~' V -~ ..~- ..


Register To


n!


Visit our booth at the

Paint an4 Pork Fest and register to win a


Friday


April 19th




FLORI-DAN


Saturday

April 20th

You can also register online at
www.jc'flcridt. co, grill or in our office at
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna FL


No purchase necessary. Drawing to be held June 28, 2013.


~_I_ _~


llOA WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013


WORLD







a.



L..


* ..
y. *...
K.
-~~'i -~'''
..r~.-,


V--


High School Baseball



Wildcats stun Hornets W


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Cottondale Hornets were
dealt a heartbreaking defeat
Monday night in Altha, falling to
the Wildcats 4-3 after giving up
a 3-0 lead in the seventh inning
of a District 3-1A quarterfinal
tournament game.
The game was scoreless
through four innings before
Cottondale broke through for
three runs in the top of the fifth;
with Jake Kernoschak getting
a single, Ryan Morrissey draw-
ing a walk, and Josh Simmons
doubling to score both for a 2-0
lead.
Simmons later scored on a
wild pitch to make it 3-0 and


Sports in Brief

High School Softball
The Marianna Lady
Bulldogs will host their first
round game of the 4A state
playoffs Thursday night
against Florida High at 7
p.m.

Chipola Baseball
Chipola will head to
Panama City on Wednesday
for the second of a two-game
set with the Gulf Coast State
Commodores at 5 p.m.

BCF Golf Tournament
The Men's Golf Team at The
Baptist College of Florida
(BCF) is hosting a golf
tournament to raise funds
to offset the cost of team
expenses. The tournament,
which is open to the general
public, will be held Saturday
at the Dothan Natiopal Golf
Club on Highway 231 South
near Dothan, Ala.
The Scramble will begin
with a shotgun start at 1 p.m.
Entry fee for each person is
$40, which includes 18 holes
with a cart, rwo.mulligans,
and a buffet dinner. There
will be an awards ceremony
immediately following the
tournament with prizes for
first place, second place,
longest drive, and closest to
the pin.
For more information or to
register, contact Coach Free-
man at 850-263-3261 ext.
453. Registration will also
be.available at the course at
noon before the tournament

Atomic Pride
Golf Tournament
The Atomic Pride Golf
Tournament will be held
Saturday at Dogwood Lakes
Golf Course in Bonifay at 8
a.m.
The format is ai four-person
scramble with a $45 entry
fee that includes a mulligan,
lunch, and a drawing for
door prices. Trophies will be
awarded for first, second,
and third place and there
will be prizes for longest
drive and closest to the pin.
Proceeds benefit the
Atomic Pride Booster Club
and help pay consutuction
costs of the new concession/
restroom facilities at Poplar
Springs High School's base-
ball and softball fields.
Hole sponsorships cost
$50, and it's $25 for a pro-
gram sponsor.
For more information,
contact Gordon Wells at 263-
6260, 263-4191, or 638-2205.

Bulldog Wrestling Club
The Bulldog Wrestling Club
is starting practice for the
summer season.
Practice will be Tuesday

See BRIEFS, Page 2B


put the Hornets nine outs away
from a win.
But in the bottom of the sev-
enth, the Wildcats drew a pair
of walks to start the inning off
of Cottondale's Trent Jackson,
with a two-out RBI double later
bringing home Altha's first run
of the night.
Two more walks forced in
the second run of the inning,
and a misplayed fly ball in the
outfield allowed Altha to score
the game-winning runs. for the
walk-off victory.
It was a bitter defeat for the
Hornets, but coach Greg Ohler
said he had no regrets about
sticking with the senior Jackson
throughout the final inning.
"You never want the season


to end on a seventh inning like
that, but it happens. There was
no way I was bringing Trent out
of the game," he said. "With a
three-run lead and him on the
mound to get the last three outs
of a game, I'd do that 100 more
times."
Jackson went the distance for
CHS, giving up two earned runs
on five hits and six walks with
four strikeouts.
The Hornets had just three
hits on the night, with Simmons
going 1-for-3 with a double,
two RBI, and a run, Kerfioschak
1-for-3 with a run and two sto-
len bases, and Austin Baxley
1-for-3.

See CRUSHED, Page 2B


S.,..i


E.





MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Cottondale's Willie Pippin grabs some air before going into a slide at third
base.


CHIPOAI SIGNING




Chipola adds Baker


PHOTO CARE OFKELSEYWELCH
Malone Tigers basketball star Ty Baker (sitting) signed a scholarship to play for the Chipola Indians in a ceremony Tuesday afternoon at Malone
School. Pictured behind Baker, from left: Joc Calloway, Malone coach Steven Welch, aunt Shirl Williams, mother Niki Keys Baker, brother Chai
Baker, father Mendes Baker, and Chipola coach Patrick Blake. Contributed Photo


Malone star makes it official with Indians


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Malone star Ty Baker made
it official Tuesday afternoon,
signing his letter-of-intent
to play college basketball for
the Chipola Indians and head
coach Patrick Blake in a cer-
emony at Malone School.
The 6-foot-6 Baker com-


mitted to Chipola earlier
this month and affirmed his
choice Monday with his par-
ents, brother Chai, Tigers
coach Steven Welch, and Blake
all in attendance, as well as his
classmates.
"It feels good. I wasn't ex-
pecting any kind of special
treatment, but it means a lot to


hard to get here, but now I just
have to work harder."
Baker averaged 15.7 points,
10 rebounds, and 1.8 blocks
per game in his senior season
with the Tigers, leading them
to their second straight 25-win
season.
But the high-flying future
Indian said he knows he will


me," Baker said. "I've worked have to raise his game to com-


pete at the next level.
"I've got to improve on my
weaknesses, work on my
ball-handling and strengthen
my shot, and I have to hit the
weight room hard," Baker
said. "But I think I'll be able to
help them next year with my
versatility."

See BAKER, Page 2B


Chipola Baseball


Indians wrap up regular T


season in Panama City


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Indians will wrap up
the' Panhandle Conference sched-
ule today, against Gulf Coast State
in Panama City in a game that sud-
denly has no real meaning for either
team.
That's because the Indians (34-19
overall, 11-8 in conference) took the
first of the two-game set Monday
night in Marianna 7-3 to clinch the
conference's second state tourna-


ment bid over the Commodores (30-
20, 9-10), who needed to win to set
up a virtual play-in game today.
But a strong start by freshman
pitcher Michael Mader and a 10-hit
performance by the Indians' lineup
was enough to give Chipola the
only win it needed to clinch second
place.
It was the sixth straight Panhandle
Conference victory for Mader, but
the Chipola pitching staff as a whole

See INDIANS, Page 2B


l "' *';

MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Josh Barber handles a play at second for Chipola on Monday.


NEW YEAR, NEW JAGS Coming in tomorrows edition of the Jackson County Floridan
Jacksonville officially MF ------ -- i E C. 4 m P I E sL I% P PR r u i s i -- --
unveils their new logoandPO R TS

upcoming NFL Draft. E/C 1* E l i -eune Iun.rn .:- %,v ; v,1lhIC..1y tp Ipr l
f '--V'- Pri e, :, I t- I ,.,p eztenl._ .:ii Hir 7ponrI ,.ical id.ar O 0
i I.... .... ......... ....... ... .. ... ......... ........ ... ..... .....







-12B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013


SPORTS


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Braves starting pitcher Mike Minor throws against the Colorado Rockies during the first'game of a doubleheader on Tuesday
in Denver.




Braves batter Rockies


The Associated Press

DENVER On the coldest day
at Coors Field, the Atlanta Braves
won a game between the hottest
teams in the major leagues.
Starting a day-night doublehead-
er that opened with a 23-degree
temperature, Justin Upton hit his
major league-leading 10th home
run, Dan Uggla and rookie Evan
Gattis also connected and the
Braves beat the Colorado Rockies
4-3 Tuesday.
Reed Johnson, playing right field
for Atlanta because Jason Heyward
underwent an appendectomy
Monday night, went 4 for 4 with
three doubles. Heyward was put on
the 15-day disabled list.


Colorado and Atlanta each began
the day at 13-5, tied for the best re-
cord in the major leagues.
This was the coldest gametime
temperature in the majors since it
began collecting data in 1994, ac-
cording to STATS. The Rockies said
the previous low at Coors Field was
28.
Pitching in short sleeves while
many of the other players were
bundled up, Mike Minor (3-1) al-
lowed three runs, and five hits in
six innings. By the time Craig Kim-
brel, pitched a one-hit ninth for his
eighth save in eight chances, the
temperature had warmed up to 27.
Gattis hit a tiebreaking home run
in the fourth and ended the game
by throwing out Wilin Rosario try-


ing to steal second.
Jeff Francis (1-2) gave up four
runs and six hits in four innings,
leaving him with an 8.44 ERA.
Ground crews began working
at around 6 a.m. to clear several
inches of snow from- the play-
,ing surface at Coors Field, which
opened in 1995. While there was
no sign of snow on the field when
the game started, some parts of the
ballpark remained closed, includ-
ing the snow-filled Rockpile sec-
tion in center. Workers hosed off
the snow on the stand of evergreen,
trees beyond the center field wall:
It was important that the trees
be cleared of the snow because
they're part of the green "batters'
eye" background.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


TIG V
T:r .!1 ,,.-1


0 ri


S .- I -





MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
randon Pippin gets an out at first for
Graceville. The Tigers came back from
a 7-0 deficit to defeat the Wewahitchka
Gators in the quarterfinals of the District 3-
1A tournament in Wewahitchka. Clay Jen-
kins had three hits for Graceville, and Jared
Padgett had 14 strikeouts in seven innings to
get the win for GHS. With the win, the Tigers
advanced to Tuesday's semifinals to take on
top seed Vernon at Sneads High School.


Baker
From Page 1B

Blake said that while
he loves what Baker will
bring to the table as a bas-
ketball player, it was the
total package that drew
him to the Malone star.
"He's just a tremendous
kid and personifies the
type of student-athlete we
want to have at Chipola,"
he said. "On the basket-
ball side, he's been with
a great winning program
and coach Welch has done


Crushed
From Page 1B

Morrissey also walked
twice, scored once, and


Briefs
From Page 1B
and Thursday nights
from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
at the old M.arianna High
School wrestling room.
All Jackson County kids
ages 5-18 are welcome to
join. For more informa-
tion, call MHS coach Ron
Thoreson at 272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan P.O. Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447.


an unbelievable job. Ty's
going to come in and have
a chance to make an im-
mediate impact with us.
"But it's not just what he
can do on the court, but
also how he handles him-
self off the court. He's a
great young man. He's just
a genuine, hard-working
kid. He looks you in the
eye, is very receptive, and
is a kid that as a coach you
want to coach. He listens
and does everything he's
supposed to do and does
it with hard work."
Baker's former coach
said he believes that his


had a stolen base.
It was a disappointing
way for seniors Jackson,
Morrissey, Simmons, and
Willie Pippin to end their
careers at CHS to say the
least, but Ohler said their


Indians
From Page 1B

raised its game down the
home stretch, with the
Indians allowing just 13
total runs over the last
five league games all
wins.
"Yeah, our pitching staff
really threw well the last
couple of weeks and gave
us a chance to regroup,"
Indians coach Jeff John-
son said. "We started to
swing the bats a little bet-
ter and play better defen-
sively. We've got a chance
here to see if we can get a
little bit better and go to
the tournament and do


now former player will
thrive at Chipola.
"I think he's got a chance
to be real good there.
With his athleticism, if
he can mature physically
a little bit and put some
more weight on and keep
working on his game like
the last five or six years,
he'll have a chance to be
an impact player," Welch
said. "They're getting a
good one."
Welch was a former
teammate of Baker's fa-
ther, Mendes, in the 1990s
at Malone, so watching
Ty move up to the college


contributions would go no
less appreciated.
"The kids were under-
standably emotional after
the game and so was I, but
all you can do is hug them
and cry with them," he


well there."
The FCSAA state tour-
nament will be held May
10-14 in Lakeland, but
before then, the Indi-
ans still have one more
game to go with today's
5 p.m. meeting with the
Commodores.
However, with the game
now having no signifi-
cance to the postseason,
the Indians will certainly
approach it differently
than a typical Panhandle
game.
Johnson said he would
likely start freshman
right-hander Shane
Crouse, whose last out-
-ing was a one-inning re-
lief stint April 9 against


level is a particularly spe-
cial moment, the coach
said.
"I've known Ty since he
was born," he said. "To
watch him grow up and
develop over the years has
been an honor. His fam-
ily on both sides are great
people. I'm just really
proud of Ty for where he
is and I'm excited about
his future."
The future for Baker at
least for the next two years
- will be with an Indians
program that finished last
season ranked No. 13 in
the nation with a record


said. "This was an amazing
group of seniors that did a
lot for CHS baseball."
With the win, Altha ad-
vanced to Tuesday's semi-
final round to take on the
Sneads Pirates..


Alabama.Southern.
Sophomore right-
hander Preston Johnson,
who was the team's top
starter early in the year,
will also pitch, with the
Chipola coach saying he
wanted to get both pitch-
.ers around two-to-four
innings on the mound.
"We just want to get
some guys in there who
, need some work to get
some reps and get bet-
ter," the coach said. "We'll
probably throw a couple
of other guys too."
The Indians have now
won eight of their last
nine games.


of 25-4.
The Indians moved to a
more up-tempo, pressure
defense style of play un-
der Blake in his first year
as head coach, and he
said that Baker's talents
area great match with the
way he wants his teams to
continue to play.
"With his length and
athleticism, he'll fit in


perfectly," Blake said.
"It's very similar to how
Malone plays with how
they get up and down the
court. I think he'll fit per-
fectly with what we try to
do. We's very versatile and
can guard multiple posi-
tions. I think it will be an
easy transition for him.
He'll be a great asset to
our program."


Wanna quit smoking??
Have a loved one
who wants to quit??


LET US HELP YOU
REACH YOUR GOAL!

VAPOR TECH INC.

A HEALTHIER LIFESTYLE


www.vaportechinc.org
vaportechinc@yrnail.com
Monday-Saturday 9am-6pm
4944 B Malloy Plaza, Marianna
(850) 482-0036


Free flavor and nicotine
customization!
Over 150 flavors to
choose from!


WOo ALTL'S




Check& andServre
Important step in ensuring that your unit
is working at its peak efficiency;
saving you energy, 'money and concern!


482-8802
www.woodallstotalcomfort.com
Offer good through April 30, 2013
FL# CAC058636


LOCAL NEWS, YOUR WAY.
WEEKNIGHTS AT 5:00, 6:00, & 10:00


SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER. '
PAT FURR
Sunny South Properties
4630 H\wy. 90, Marianna, FL .
Business: 850.526.2891 YOUR
Cell: 850.209.8071 success is
furrl9@embarqmail.com miy business!


STAINORMED


----~11. ... .. ....................


-_-II_~1II_I_____.___.___~. iii


II


H ^^^ ej'st Mextcanf

Restaurant yyyin. 20121^


------I-__________._~.I_.______








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, APRIL24, 2013 o 3BF


10 THINGS TO WATCH FOR: NFL DRAFT


The Associated Press

NEWYORK- Since
.1936, the NFL has picked
the best of college football
to join the pro league.
From the very first pick
Jay Berwanger, who
also was the first bust,
never playing a down in
the NFL to last year's
No. 1, Andrew Luck, the
draft has always offered
plenty of intrigue for
teams and fans.
Here are 10 things to
watch for during the
three-day NFL draft begin-
ning Thursday night:

Commissioner
Huggy Bear
How many hugs can
Roger Goodell endure
from all the burly offen-
sive and defensive players
expected to be selected
in the first round? Last
year, he embraced many
first-round picks who took
the stage and was nearly
hugged into submission
by the likes of Fletcher
Cox, Dontari Poe and
Melvin Ingram.

Show Me
a Quarterback
Will any quarterbacks be
taken in the first round?
Possibilities include Geno
Smith, Matt Barkley and
EJ Manuel, but this is-far
from the glamour year
of 2012, when QBs were
huge: Luck, No. 1; Robert
Griffin III, No. 2; Ryan
Tannehill (No. 8); Brandon
Weeden (No. 22). The last
time no quarterback was
taken in round one was
1996 (Tony Banks was a
second-rounder, No. 42,


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Some analysts have Notre Dame's All-American linebacker Mante Te'o back to being a first-
round cinch, even after a great season was marred by a poor game against Alabama followed by
the hoax involving a deceased "girlfriend." He did not perform well at the NFL combine but did
better at pro day in South Bend.


br the Rams); the last time
only one was taken was
2001 (MichaelVick, first
overall) and the last time
two were taken was 2010
(Sam Bradford and Tim
Tebow).

Fashion Statement
Fashionistas surely will
be tracking the expensive,
colorful designer suits,
hairstyles (think dread-
locks) and even socks
of the draftees as they
take the stage after being
selected. (Think Griffin,
the Redskins' top pick in
2012, who wore a baby
blue jacket, checkered-
patterned shirt, purplish
tie with horizontal stripes,
and burgundy and gold
socks with the words "GO
CATCH YOUR DREAM."


Te'o Time
When that will be
exactly is anyone's guess.
Some analysts have Notre
Dame's All-American line-
backer Manti Te'o back to
being a first-round cinch,
even after a great season
was marred by a poor
game against Alabama fol-
lowed by the hoax involv-
ing a deceased "girlfriend."
He did not perform well at
the NFL combine, but did
better at pro day in South
Bend.

Beefing Up Early
Watch for all the beef
early in the first round.
There's a chance seven of
the first 10 picks could be
really big fellas. Among
them are offensive line-
men Luke Joeckel (306


pounds), Eric Fisher (306),
Chance Warmack (317),.
Lane Johnson (303),and
Jonathan Cooper (311);
and defensive linemen
Sharrif Floyd (297) and
ZiggyAnsah (271).

Will Tide Roll Again in
First Round?
A year ago, the national
champions had four
players picked: RB Trent
Richardson (No. 3), SS
Mark Barron (No. 7), CB
Dre Kirkpatrick (No. 17)
and LB Dont'a Hight-
ower (No. 25). National
champs again, there are
five that could end up as
first-rounders: Warmack,
cornerback Dee Milli-
ner, offensive tackle D.J.
Fluker, defensive tackle
Jesse Williams, and run-
ning back Eddie Lacy.


Family Ties
Every year, a slew of
players with family ties to
the NFL are draft eligible.
This year is no exception,
with a few dozen all-in-
the-family connections.
Among them are QBs
Nate Montana (son of
Joe Montana) and Jor-
dan Rodgers (brother of
Aaron Rodgers), Jake Ryan
(son of Pat Ryan), Duron
Carter (son of Cris Carter),
Luke Tasker (son of Steve
Tasker), Kyle Long (son
of Howie Long, brother
of Chris Long) and Baker
Steinkuhler (son of Dean
Steinkuhler).

Hall of Fame Pickers
A total of 32 former NFL
players will be announc-
ing second- aAd third-
round picks for teams,
including newly elected
Hall of Famers Jonathan
Ogden (Ravens), Warren
Sapp (Buccaneers) and
Dave Robinson (Pack-
ers). Others making picks
for their former teams
include Deion Sanders
(Falcons) and Larry Little
(Dolphins).

Best Storylines
Houston cornerback D.J.
Hayden and South Caro-
lina running back Marcus
Lattimore.
Hayden was moments
from death last November
after an on-field collision
with a teammate tore a
blood vessel off the back
of his heart. He was taken
to a hospital, underwent
lifesaving surgery, and
now could be a first-round
pick. He ran a 4.33 40-yard


dash at Houston's pro day
in March, and now he'll
wait to see if a team be-
lieves his talent and speed
is worth the risk.
In 2011, Lattimore tore
the ACL in his left knee
midway through the sea-
son. He returned last year,
and in October, the star
running back suffered a
horrific injury to his right
knee against Tennessee
- it was dislocated and
ligaments were damaged
as he was tackled. He had
surgery a month later,
continued rehabbing, and
at South Carolina's pro day
recently he impressed NFL
scouts so much they ap-
plauded after his workout.
He says he's confident he'll
be ready to play when the
2013 season starts.

Mr. Irrelevant
As the draft draws to a
close Saturday, the fun
revs up with the final pick,
aka Mr. Irrelevant. As they
did last year, the Colts
have the honor at pick No.
254. Last year, they went
for Northern Illinois quar-
terback Chandler Harnish
(Andrew Luck was the
Colts' other QB pick-- at
No. 1 overall). The last
pick will be awarded the
Lowsman (opposite of
Heisman) Trophy during
a weeklong celebration
at the Balboa Bay Club in
-Newport Beach, Calif. In
2012, Harnish's first trip
to California included golf
at Big Canyon Country
Club, a visit to Disneyland
and parties galore. The
founder of Irrelevant Week
is Paul Salata, a former
USC and NFL receiver.
The first Mr. Irrelevant was
WR Kelvin Kirk in 1976.


Braves' Heyward put on


DL after appendectomy


The Associated Press

DENVER .Atlanta
Braves right fielder Ja-
son Heyward was placed
on the 15-day disabled
list on Tuesday after an
appendectomy.
The team said late Mon-
day that Heyward had sur-
gery at Rose Medical Cen-
ter in Denver.
Manager Fredi Gonzalez
said before the opener of
!Iuesday's day-night dou-
bleheader against Colo-
rado that there was no set
timetable for ,Heyward's
return. The Braves recalled
infielder Tyler Pastornicky
from Triple A Gwinnett to
fill Heyward's roster spot.
Heyward was off to a slow
start, batting .121 with two
homers and five RBIs. Still,
the Braves began the day
with a 13-5 record.
"A couple of days ago
when we were in Pitts-
burgh, he felt like he had
some stomach fires go-
ing," Gonzalez said, "and
then it just kept getting


more localized, moving to
his right side."
After Monday night's
game was postponed due
to snow and the Braves
returned to their hotel in
Denver, Heyward called
team trainers and said
pain in his right side had
become acute.
Team physician Dr. Joe
Chandler examined Hey-
ward, and tests revealed
the problem with his ap-
pendix. Chandler accom-
panied Heyward to the
hospital, with the Rock-
ies medical staff helping
smooth the admission
process.
"Everything went well,"
Gonzalez said. "Dr. Chan-
dler was here and he did
a terrific job. The doctors
from the Rockies helped
out and got him into the
hospital here. They got
him in and got him out
(of surgery) in about 45
minutes."
Gonzalez said he had a
chance to visit with Hey-
ward in the hospital before


coming to the ballpark.
"He was in good spirits,
beat up a little bit, as you
can expect, from the sur-
gery," Gonzalez said. "He's
just drained."
Gonzalez expects Reed
Johnson and Jordan Scha-
fer will see time in right
field in Heyward's absence.
Johnson was scheduled to
start Tuesday's opener.
Left fielder Justin Upton
has played right field in
the past.
"Justin is doing a great
job in left field and why
would I want to move him
back for 10-12 days? He's
getting used to that left-
field position, so we'll just
leave him there," Gonzalez
said.
Gonzalez said Heyward
may be discharged from
the hospital as soon as
Tuesday night but may re-
main in Denver for a day
or two before flying back to
Atlanta. 'Heyward won't be
going with the team when
it leaves after Wednesday's
game for Detroit.


[..











THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Atlanta Braves' right fielder
Jason Heyward walks away
from the batting cage after
taking his cuts in pre-game
warmups. After complaining
of pain for a few days, Heyward
was taken to a Colorado
hospital where his appendix
was removed. The break may
in some ways to Heyward, how
has been struggling early this
season.


INSURANCEE AGENCY


l,,iair.v ira*% "s Lar ges t:
Sel'ecti'wi' .i t'th the

L ; st'f Pi ice.s

LIFE AUTO
HOME COMMERCIAL


Sales & Service
From Utility to
Goose Neck Equipment







S Truck Trailer & Rental




Behind Ruby Tuesday


.. ......... .... . ....... I__








NATIONAL BASKETRBAIL ASSOCIATION


Pacers' Paul George wins NBA's Most Improved Award


The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Pacers
forward Paul George spent
the past summer turning
himself into a better player.
Now he's planning to dedi-
cate himself to becoming
the NBA's best all-around
player.
A few minutes after ac-
cepting the league's Most
Improved PlayerAward, the
6-foot-9 swingman prom-
ised to work even harder to
attain the biggest rewards
of all an NBA title and
perhaps an MVP
"I think I can play at an
MVP level. I think that's
very much within reach,"
George said Tuesday. "For
me, it's all about being con-
sistent and having that ag-
gressive mindset."
George has already
emerged as one of the
league's top young players,
which explains his run-
away victory in the ballot-
ing. He received 52 of 120
first-place votes and 311
points, more than double
the total of New Orleans'
Greivis Vasquez, who had
13 first-place votes and 146
points. Milwaukee's Larry
Sanders was third with 141
points and was one of three
players to receive 10 first-.
place votes.
As part of the award,
a 2012 Kia Sorrento will
be donated to the Haw-
thorne Community Cen-
ter, George's hand-picked
charity.
George is also expected
to be one of the top vote-
getters for the Defensive
Player of the Year Award, an
honor coach Frank Vogel
lobbied hard for Tuesday.
The question is whether
George has what it takes to
challenge for the league's
top individual honor.
"With the physical talent
he has, with the drive he
has, there's no ceiling for
him," Vogel said.
If 2012-13 proved any-
thing, it's that George is a
man of his word.
Before leaving town after
last season's Eastern Con-
ference semifinal loss to
LeBron James and eventual
champion Miami, George
walked into Vogel's office
and promised to come
back with a more aggres-.
sive mindset and as a more
versatile scorer.
LeBron James' guidance
helped him reach those
goals. The two worked out
together in Las Vegas as
the U.S. team prepared for
the Olympics, -but all the
while George was watching


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Indiana Pacers' Paul George (right) goes up for a dunk against Atlanta Hawks' Al Horford during the second half of Game 1 in the first round of the NBA playoffs
on Sunday in Indianapolis.


and learning from the best
- riot just James.
"It was huge. Me, grow-
ing up, idolizing guys like
Kobe, watching his whole
regimen, watching what
time he got up to work out,
watching what he was put-
ting in his body," George
said. "The younger guys,
we was totally the oppo-
site, so I had to kind of take
notes and follow what they
were doing."
The results impressed his
teammates, coaches and
many around the league.
George averaged 17.4
points and 7.6 rebounds
this season, both career
highs, and was the only
player in the league with
at least 140 steals and 50
blocks. He earned his first
All-Star appearance, led
Indiana to its first Central
Division crown in nine
years and became the
fourth Pacers player to win
the Most Improved Player
Award since 2000. The oth-
ers were Jalen Rose, Jer-
maine O'Neal and Danny
Granger.
In 2011-12, George aver-
aged 12.1 points and 5.6
rebounds and made just 19
of 52 shots from the field in
the 4-2 playoff loss to the
Heat.


Granger, for one, isn't sur-
prised by George's success.
"I was working out with
Paul and a couple of other
players about five days be-
fore the (2010) draft and
Larry Bird called and asked
me what I thought about
him. I told him, 'You better
draft him,'" Granger said.
"Sometimes you have tal-
ent viewing players and
seeing what they can do for
a team. He had that talent
and, at 6-9, Paul possesses
a lot of ability a lot of guys
don't have."
The announcement
came less than 48 hours
after George played his
most complete game' of
the season. He joined Mark
Jackson as the only play-
ers in franchise history to
record a triple double in
the NBA playoffs. George
finished with 23 points, 11
rebounds and 12 assists.in
the Pacers' 107-90 Game 1
win over Atlanta giving
Indiana its first 1-0 series
lead since 2006. Game 2 is
Wednesday night in Indy.
After showing steady im-
provement through each
of his first tw6 NBA sea-
sons, George finally got
his chance to lead when
Granger went down with
a left knee injury. Granger,


Indiana's top scorer the
previous five seasons,
played in only five games.
So George took it upon
himself to make up for the
absence.
"He's a rare breed with his
purity for the game and his
willingness to play team
basketball at both ends of
the court and his drive to
get better," Vogel said. "I
think he was ready to ex-
plode whether Danny was
in or out."
Despite shooting just 3
of 18 from the field Sun-
day, George made his first
17 foul shots to tie Reggie
Miller's postseason mark
for best free-throw per-
centage in a single game,
then missed his 18th and
final attempt.
Soon he was picking up
his first big award.
He doesn't expect it to be
his last.
"A lot of players don't get
an opportunity to make
the playoffs and have a
team that can win the
championship," George
said. "Coach says all the
time that this could be your
last time in the playoffs. So
I've really not focused on
where I need to get bet-
ter or thought about the
offseason yet."


Cavs, Mike Brown agree to deal


The Associated Press

CLEVELAND A person
with knowledge of the situ-
ation tells The Associated
Press that. Mike Brown has
agreed in principle to a
contract with the Cavaliers
to return as their coach for
a second.time.
Brown has not yet signed
his new deal, but has
agreed to take the job, ac-
cording to the person who
spoke Tuesday on condi-
tion of anonymity because
negotiations were ongoing.
The person said Brown's
hiring could be announced
Wednesday.
Brown went 272-138 and
went to the playoffs all five
season with the Cavs, team-
ing with LeBron James on
a run to the NBA Finals in
2007. He was fired after the
Cavs lost to Boston in the
2010 Eastern Conference
semifinals. He spent one
full season with the Lakers
and was fired by Los An-
geles five games into this
season.

Bobcats fire Mike
Dunlap,after 1 season
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Mike Dunlap is one and
done with the Charlotte
Bobcats.
The Bobcats said Tues-
day they've fired Dunlap as
coach after a single season.
The Bobcats went 21-61
under Dunlap, finishing
with the second-worst re-
Icord in the NBA ahead of


only the Orlando Magic. that we needed to make
Charlotte won just seven a change with the head
games in the strike-short- coach position.
ened 2011-12 season, but "We want to thank Mike
tripling last year's victory for his contribution and
total and a three-game wish him the best in his fu-
winning streak to close the tAre endeavors."
season weren't enough to The move means the
save Dunlap's job. Bobcats will have a third
Bobcats president of head coach in as many sea-
basketball operations Rod sons. Owner Michael Jor-
Higgins said a search for dan is still looking for the
a replacement will begin right person for the job.
immediately. Dunlap was hired last
"(General manager) Rich June after working as an as-
Cho and I conducted our sistant coach at St. John's,
season-ending review and the first person to make a
met with coach Dunlap direct move from an assis-
to reflect on this season," tant coach at the college
Higgins said. "As an orga- level to a head coaching
nization, it was decided position in the NBA.


Ap il Specials
Mufflers & Exhaust
-A W


ISESI TIR a SERVICE


_8.501-526-8"3. 1

Store Hours. Mon-Fn 7am-5:30pm Sat,'

Bar NI Tjije


,ipa. -a Pm


Houston County Farm Center

pcone 33e-, s $28
spaces c e insidelO'xlO' outside 10'x20'
8' TABLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR RENT


SELL YOUR ITEMS..


TO HUNDREDS1


Individuals &Businesses Welcome
MAIL YARD SALE SPACE RESERVATION AND PAYMENT TO:
Dothan Eagle Attn: NIE Yard Sale P.O. Box 1968, Dothan, AL 36302
OR DROP OFF AT: 227 North Oates Street, Dothan, AL
Name:


Address:


City:


State: Zip: Phone:
Email address:
What type of items for sale:_
Number of inside spaces needed($33 ea) _Number of outside spaces needed($28 ea)
Number of tables needed(10 ea)


My payment of $ is enclosed
Card number:


Signature:

or n mrec
information coll:
334-702-6099
L'2 076099


Please charge my credit card

exp.


NOT TO BE SOLD BY VENDOR:
firearms, live animals. provocative materials, tobacco/dnig
paraphernalia, food or drink, or any other goods that the Events sponsored by the
Management deems inappropriate for sale on the day of (he event. T i /i
Spaces subject to limitation. DOTHAN EAGLE
proceeds benefit Newspaper In Education


e{ :ei] :1 .

FRONT END & TIRE SERVICE
"Not JustA Front End Shop"
We can take care of ALL YOUR AUTO NEEDS!
2984 Dekle Street COBB'S 1 4167 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32448 (2 Bl dgs Down from COBB'S 1)
Marianna, FL 32448
850-526-4706 COBB'S 2 M50.432-2028
850-482-2028
Hours: Monday-Friday 7:00AM 5:00PM
WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS!!


--,-


-14B + WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


r.ddre g:








NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


F quLIliIy
J Florida

Equalitv f ""


F I'


"--i


F101m
F"- 1, lii


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former Baltimore Ravens reserve linebacker Brendon
Ayanbadejo talks to reporters during a news conference in
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on Tuesday;


Ex-Ravens LB


Ayanbadejo talks


equality in South FL


The Associated Press

FORT LAUDERDALE -
Former Baltimore Ravens
reserve linebacker Bren-
don Ayanbadejo called
on professional athletes
Tuesday to stand up for
marriage equality because
he said it is "the right thing
to do."
Ayanbadejo took his
support for gay marriage
to South Florida, where his
career started with Miami
in 2003 and where he has
lived for the past decade.
"We are calling on every-
body across all spectrums
of sports," he told a news
conference in Fort Lauder-
dale, where he was joined
by the civil rights organi-
zation Equality Florida.
"I think the star power,
especially with athletes,
allows us to hit a demo-
graphic. ... I think this al-
lows us to have our voice
reach a little bit deeper to
people who wouldn't nor-
mally hear our message."
The 36-year-old Ayan-
badejo (eye-uhn-bah-
DAY'-joe) said he had a
"bigger calling than foot-
ball" and this was it. I have
a chance now to help so
many more people than I
did while in football."
An open proponent of
gay marriage, Ayanbadejo
spoke in favor of it in No-


vember, before Maryland
passed a law allowing it,
and also prior to the Su-
per Bowl. He also recently
spoke at arallyon the steps
of the Supreme Court.
He was cut from the Ra-
vens this uionth and ini-
tially suggested the roster
move stemmed from his
controversial stance. He
has since backed off that
position and said the team
has supported him since
.he began talking about
equality in 2009.
"They said go ahead
and use your platform,"
he said. "And not only did
that make the Ravens look
good and also we won the
Super Bowl, but also it's a
good example for other,
teams in the NFL as well."
Earlier this month, he
told The Baltimore Sun
that up to four NFL play-
ers may soon come out as
gay. He told The Associ-
ated Press on Tuesday that
a group of athletes were in
touch with equality orga-
nizations and "we are just
trying to facilitate them
so they can have a sup-
port group amongst each
other."
Ayanbadejo, who said
he is not gay, said he is a
product of biracial parents
who would not have been
able to marry in the '60s in
several states.


11 picks give Dolphins flexibility in draft


The Associated Press

MIAMI The Miami
Dolphins go into the draft
with enough picks to field
a team. Now the goal is to
field a winning team.
After many months of
patient maneuvering, the
Dolphins accumulated
11 picks, beginning with
the 12th overall selection
Thursday. They have five
of the first 82 selections,
the most in the NFL.
So they should come
out of the weekend with
a bounty of new talent, a
foundation for the future,
and a new direction after
four consecutive losing
seasons the franchise's
longest such stretch since
the 1960s.
General manager Jeff
Ireland, much-maligned
for decisions in previ-
ous drafts, swung several
deals to put Miami in such
a favorable position. He
knows the Dolphins can't
botch it.
"A lot of thinking and a
lot of planning went into
this," Ireland said. "The
fact that we do have 11
draft picks, and five in the
top three rounds, that's
important. It doesn't come
around very often that you
have that kind of clout in
the draft. We need to take
advantage of it."
The abundance of early
picks affords the Dolphins
considerable leverage in
trade talks. There has been
speculation they'll move
up in the first round, but
with myriad needs, it's also
possible they'll trade the
No. 12 selection for mul-
tiple lower choices.
"Obviously you have op-
tions I like to use the
word 'ammunition' to
go up if you wanted to,"
Ireland said. "Certainly
there are opportunities to
do that, and there are also
opportunities to move
back and move around.
"I've got enough am-
munition to get to the first


"The fact that we do have 11 draft picks, andfive in the top three rounds, that's
important. It doesn't come around very often that you have that kind of clout
in the draft. We need to take advantage of it."
Jeff Ireland,
Dolphins general manager


pick ifI wanted to," Ireland available at No. 12.


said, smiling slightly. "But
I don't see myself
doing that."
Whatever the
moves, they could
prove pivotal for
the Dolphins' GM,
a Bill Parcells pro-
tege preparing for
his 15th draft and his sixth
in Miami. Fans mindful of
so-so draft results in re-
cent years have clamored
for Ireland's firing.
Not one player remains
with the team from Ire-
land's first season with Mi-
ami in 2008, and the 2011
draft netted only one start-
er center Mike Pouncey.
Second- and third-round
picks have been especially
disappointing.
"I am aware of it," Ireland
recently told reporters.
"You guys keep me aware
of it qflite often."
Now that second-year
coach Joe Philbin and his
staff have settled into their
jobs, they'll likely have
more input in the Dol-
phins' draft room this time
around. But Ireland said
his approach remains the
same.
"Obviously you are try-
ing to upgrade the room
and the dynamics of the
room," he said. "Certainly I
haven't changed too much
in regard to picking play-
ers. I have been doing it a
long time now."
The biggest need is a re-
placement for left tackle
Jake Long, who departed
to the Rams in free agency.
Miami would likely need
to trade up to select Luke
Joeckel of Texas A&M, Eric
Fisher of Central Michigan
or Lane Johnson of Okla-
homa, but D.J. Fluker of
Alabama is expected to be


Fluker is a right tackle,


I,.
P(


whichwould mean
moving Jonathan
Martin a sec-
ond-round pick
last year from
the right side to
left tackle. %
"It would be a


great bet at right tackle if
Jonathan Martin can get
it done at left tackle," draft
analyst Mel Kiper Jr. said.
"It will help your running
game as the best running
blocking right tackle to
come out in years."
But will Ireland use such
a high choice on a player
perceived as the fourth-
best tackle available? And
will he devote yet another
first-round pick to an of-
fensive lineman?
Miami took Long as the
first overall pick in 2008
and Poyncey as the 15th
overall choice last year.
"If I get another Pouncey
and another Jake Long, I
would do it every draft,"
Ireland said. "Those kinds
of guys are pretty darn
good. I wish I had a whole
team full of Mike Pounceys
and Jake Longs."
But in the next breath he
added, "I'm not going to
pigeonhole myself just to
take an offensive lineman.


I think we have a couple
other positions that we
might go after."
A defensive back or de-
fensive lineman are other
possibilities with the first
pick. Less pressing needs
include guard, running
back, outside linebacker
and tight end.
Whatever the position,
the Dolphins seek play-
makers who can change
the course of a game in
one snap. Miami ranked
27th in yards in 2012, when
the wideouts caught only
three touchdown passes,
and the defense tied for
fourth-worst in takeaways
- statistics that under-
score the lack of a big-play
capability.
With the team in the
market for so many up-
grades, perhaps Miami will
keep all 11 picks. Quantity
is important to Philbin.
"Ideally we'd add 11 ex-
cellent football players to
the roster, and create an
even more competitive
atmosphere than we have
right now," the coach said.
"We all know the draft, and.
free agency for that matter,
are not necessarily exact
sciences.
"But I'd rather have 11
than five. So I'm excited
about it."


SField 138


., 6 I/T2 Metal s4 59
6U2'T-Post -
iTP Also Available:
Wood Fence Post.
S 15.5 ga. Barb Wilre
& Other Fencing Supplies

H(S' BVIa -ima
.850)4 8 2-55 3


U ,atfood.S gratSric-es .gaj- .HIm S


i


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013 5B F









-16B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
(I DREAD DON'T JORRM ABOUT IT...
GETTING YOU HAVE A LONG
OLD... (eAYTO 6 O...


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
W44-Y SHOULD I WAIT "DEAR. HONEY CAKES:
FOR SOME GIRL. TO YOU ARE THE MOST
WRITE A NOTE TO ME? INCREDIBLE GIRL ON
I'M WRITING A NOTE THE PLANET. THE
- TO E.' TWO oF us ARE
,T +iFDESTINED TO BE
" SOUL HATES."


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


"WELL--AREN'T YOU 601 RGN
TO ASK AC WNWM I ORN'T
WNITO TNLK. BOUT IT ?


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
r MoBso Y a-Y eoooss!N -y ARE YOU NoE
GET ME IS IER- SOME. DOING ANY- N H ERE
\ OUT OF HNE DOWN . i TINGoGTO GE STAY! IN'S
HE ,! THE ,n HIMOUT? ORDERS OU
~ Eat*c?-




...j;. 1
HE ,E '


THAT A BABY BY
sreck-
oe.\\1 e4
-.NO Y WrYT


KIT'N' CARLYLE BYLARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


kltncartyle@comcast.net ~ www,Gocomics.comm









I'M-_










0 2013 UFS, Inc.
Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS


4.24 0 LaughingStlocInternational Inc, DIst by Universal UClick tor UFS, 2013
"Can I help It if your birthday coincides
with the electricity bill?"


ACROSS
1 Started a
poker
game
6 Uses the
door
12 Empty a
semi
14 Onlooker,
maybe
15 Preceding
16 Salad
makings
17Colo.
neighbor
18 Lyric poem
19 HMO
workers
21 Quaint
lodging
23Sawbuck
26 Business
VIP
27 High
dudgeon
28 Caused
resentment
30Yoko -
31 Pac-Man
morsel
32 Farewell
33 Kind of
wave
35 Half of hex-
37 NFL events
38 Liniment
39- Abner


40 Mouse
alert-
41 Grassy
field
42Turkey
serving
43Throw in
44Square
root of IX
46 Understood
48 Burns
51 Pencil end
55 Mainte-
nance
56 Glean
57 Leaves of
grass
58 Stopped a
squeak

DOWN
1 Add the
audio
2 Navigator's
dir.
3 Sitcom ET
4 Glances
5 Fictional
plantation
6 Incite
(2 wds.)
7 Ancient
ointment
8 Chirped
9 Barely
manage


Answer to Previous Puzzle


QUI I
TN I
ICE
PUM
TS

SA I
ELM
TEM
XIE
R)
B AS
ATE
LA D.I


10Toon
Chihuahua
11 AARP
members
13 "Raging
Bull" star
19 Hireling
20 Draw
aimlessly
22 Stinging
plant
24 Left
25 Required
26 Portable
beds
27 Inactive
28 Skiing
mecca
29 Evening
34 Served


EC OB
AL MMU
RA AM
NAHS
NAR
LES UT
EW AS
EO|TH|
RKET
DIBS
B IICE
OT Rt
DZ E LC
0 0D EL


36 Fixed, as
an election
42 Speech.
problems
43 Video
game
pioneer
45- fixe,
47Hydrox
rival
48 Long
sandwich
49 Mil. rank
50Wanted
poster
abbr.
52 Part of
RSVP
53 Night to
celebrate
54 Sunburned


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


q 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Horoscope

TAURUS (April 20-May
20) It behooves you to
get in touch with someone
you met whonr you'd like
to know better. Something
nice could happen.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) People will likely be
responsive to your needs.
Express yourself if you find
that you need assistance.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Try to pal around with
a friend whose ideas are
compatible with yours.
Conditions are excellent
for both of you to gain
something.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Even though you'll have
little control over certain
events, things should work
out to your advantage.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Don't be afraid to
take a risk. Not only will
your judgment be good,
you're likely to advance a
personal interest.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
Any project that requires
creativity should be your
cup of tea. Should you find
yourself teamed with one
equally talented, the world
will be your oyster.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) A recent relationship
is likely to take on much
greater dimensions. Each
party will begin to see the
other in greater depth.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) Conditions
that have a bearing upon
your material well-being
could be positive. In fact,
personal gain is likely.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Watch out for a rare
opportunity to say exactly
the right thing to the right
person at the right time.
You won't get a second
chance.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) A financial develop-
ment could take a turn
for the better. Significant
gains could be on their
way.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Yield to your urges,
especially if they are di-
recting you to get in touch
with people you've been
neglecting
ARIES (March 21-April.
19) When it comes to
financial dealings, your
instincts should be good.
There will be no need to
second-guess yourself.


Anniels9 le
iSl ,[l a 3 ,


Dear Annie: When I was 11 years old, I
made an insulting remark to one of my
older sister's teenage friends, teasing her
about her acne. The next day, my mother
loudly confronted me about it, and my
grandmother and sister joined in. For
the next several months; if I said any-
thing my mother didn't like, she'd angrily
remind me of the horrible thing I'd done.
For years after, she'd allude to it. This
continued until I was close to 30.
Last year, my mother told me this same
girl had been working as a waitress after
dropping out of college, and that my
comments about her acne had ruined
her self-esteem. At that point, I tracked
her down and asked her whether she
was still upset with me over the incident
all those years ago. She said she didn't
remember it at all. She said her
lifestyle choices were the result of her
rebelling against her domineering
parents and had nothing to do with me.
During a recent car trip with my par-
ents, my mother brought this up again.
I loudly said, "That was 24 years ago, and


At the bridge table, if you have the necessary
values, sometimes you have to jump. But at least
you can do it while staying firmly anchored in
your chair.
With that huge hint, it should not be hard to
work out what South should rebid in today's deal,
after opening one heart and hearing partner
respond one spade.
South should rebid three hearts, which shows at
least a six-card suit and typically seven winners.
This usually equates to 15 or 16 high-card points
(perhaps an excellent 14 or an uninteresting 17).
This hand is a maximum, but that does not hurt
occasionally.
The play in four hearts should not be so tough.
After West takes three club tricks and shifts to a
spade, South wins the fourth trick with his king,
draws trumps, unblocks the diamond ace, crosses
to the spade ace, and discards his last spade on
the diamond king.
As a defensive point, how should East card so
that West knows he can cash three club tricks?


I'm tired of hearing about it. If you
don't stop, I will leave." My mother told
me to "go," and I had my father pull
over, and I took my bag and walked back
home.
I haven't spoken to my parents in six
months, and I don't miss them. Really,
Annie, when can a 35-year-old man
expect forgiveness for something he
did when he was 11? I may have been a
rude kid, but I had a mother who called
me "fat" and "pudgy." I guess I learned
it from her. Is my mother crazy, or do I
have to do some penance?
NEWYORKER
Dear New Yorker: Your mother seems
vindictive and obsessive. You have
acknowledged your rudeness toward this
young woman and, we assume, apolo-
gized to her at some point. But when
a child is 11, a parent should use such
incidents to teach kindness. Your mother
used it as an excuse to hold something
over your head for eternity. You are right
not to tolerate such comments any
longer.


There are actually two solutions. A few pairs lead the queen from ace-king-queen,
partner being asked to give a count signal. Here, therefore, East would play first the
six, then the three, to show an even number. Alternatively, if West starts with the club
ace, East would play his three to deny the queen, the honor touching the two prom-
ised by West's lead. Then, West should continue with the club queen and East should
signal remaining count, playing the four to say that he has an odd number left.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famouspeople, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"YC, OL 0 KYAVT SAZ VONW J FYZCWX

KWFZAXB J FT DWW ZCW LXAOZOYF YL
J VV ZCW MYX E LYX MYRWFI"
DADJF S. JFZCYFB


Previous Solution: "My theory is that if you look confident you can pull off
anything even if you have no clue what you're doing." Jessica Alba
TODA YS CLUE: slenba 3
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 4-24


North 04-24-13
A 8 5 4
S52
KQ63
972
West East
* J 9 3 A Q 10 7
V974 VJ 8
* 9842 J 1075
*AKQ *J643
South
Kh6 2
S VAK Q 10 6 3
SA
10 8 5
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
1 V Pass 1 Pass


Opening lead: 4 A


,~------=-----------


COMICS








www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, April 24, 2013- 7 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED



MARKETPLACE


($)


FINANCIAL


BUSINESSOPPRgTUsNI


Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and.$5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com
Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
504-915-1474

(?) MERCHANDISE

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main JeweJry & Loan 334-671-1440.
r" ..................."..............
* ANNE'S DAY LILIES ,
827 S. APPLETREE ST
: in Dothan, Day Lilies ($1- up)
Amaryllis & Iris ($3 up)
.334-792-0653 or 334-797-9657
L ................................
Me) PETS & ANIMALS

n CFA Registered Persian Himalayan
Blue Point Kittens. litter trained & ready
for-their new homes. $100. $200.
4. Call 334-774-2700 After 10am

1I n AKC Rottweiler puppies (2)
deposit to hold. $500. 334-794-2291
German Shepherd Puppies: AKC registered,
first shots,, mother has German bloodlines.
Black and tan, black and silver. 5 males, 1
female.Twks old. 850-768-9182 or 850-849-3707.
Mini Australian Shepherd: ASDR beautiful pups
born 3/15. Blue merles, red merles, tri's & bi;s.
See @ facebook.com/ huntsminiaussies or call
706-761-3024
Papillon Puppies Dual Registered w/ CKC &
UKC $600. Breed is over 800 yrs. old. with no
medical defects. very loving non aggressive,
hypoallergenic, Call: 334-393-0938 or
334-379-0805 dmlugo@centurylink.net
Retriever Puppies Sire is Full English Cream
Golden $250. $350. Ready May 1st.
334-692-5402
Super Puppies Sale
Morkie $175, Shih -Chi Mix $175,
Chi-A-Poo S300, Chinese Chihuahua
Female mo 334-718-4886 4


G.M.'Properties of PC
S Beach 800-239-2059
Fully Furnished Condos
-.-= "/ &Townhouses
near Pier Park. r E L
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $250 nt.
Portside Resort starting @ $125.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
www.gmproperties.com


Sudoku


() FARMER'S


MARKET


Registered Black Angus Cows / Calf pairs for
sale, most have been bred back. Exc. blood
line includes Mitty in Focus, Hover Dam,
Objective and more, price varies depending
on bloodline and cows. 334-798-5137.


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
, 334-389-2003 .o


Vine Ripe Tomatoes


Home Grown Greens
Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
I 220W. Hwy52Malve rn



Aplin Farms
Strawberries
Lettuce
You Pick
We Pick
Open Mon-Sat (8-6)
4 334-726-5104 4M


EMPLOYMENT


AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-
MINDED, NEWSPAPER CARRIERS

Alford
Earn an average of

$600
per month


Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus
BE YOUR OWN BOSS 2 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.
Come by and fill out a bid at the
Jackson county Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL


AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-
MINDED, NEWSPAPER CARRIERS

GRAND RIDGE
Earn an average of

$800
per month
Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus
BE YOUR OWN BOSS 1 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.
Come by and fill out a bid at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL


Level: [2 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold'borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to Tuesday's puzzle


6 7 8 4 5 1 3 2 9


8 6 2 3 9 5 1 4 7

1.9 457612983

7 8 9 5 3 6 4 1 2-

5321847596 7 3 8


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


25 Drivers

Trainees

NEEDED NOW !
Learn to drive for
Werner Enterprises
Earn $800 per week!
No experience needed !
Local CDL Training
job ready in 15 days!
1-888-368-2198


Executive Secretary
d Must have high school
diploma or GED, including
or supplemented by
course work in secretarial
sciences, and 3-5 yrs. exp. In secretarial
or administrative work, including
significant computer and budget
experience. Salary set at $22,269.00/yr.
Must have a valid FL drivers license prior
to employment.
Equipment Operator IV
Must have high school diploma or
equivalent with l.to 3 years of experi-
ence in the safe operation of heavy
motorized equipment (motor grader).
Must have valid Class A CDL prior to
employment. Salary set at $20,591.00/yr.
Equipment Operator III
Must have a high school diploma or
equivalent with 3 or more years
experience in the safe operation of
motorized equipment -- in the
construction and repair of roads,
Must have a valid Class A Commercial
Driver's License prior to employment.
Salary set at $19,753.00


Submit Jackson County employment ap-
plication to the Human Resources Dept.,
2864 Madison St., Marianna, FL 32448. Ph
482-9633. www.jacksoncountyfl.net/
Deadline to apply is 05-06-2013
EOE/AA/Vet Pref/ADA/ Drug-Free Workplace

Assistant Property Manager
Responsible: Under the direction of the
Property Manager for all phases of the
property operations and to act as main
point of contact in the absence of the
Property Manager. Performs a variety of
administrative/clerical duties and has
primary responsibility for the collection
and post of all income due to the
property. Demonstrates knowledge of
Fair Housing and other legal issues and
local ordinances as they affect the
property's operations.
Email Resume to: p.gingrich @aol.com


Local Newspaper
Subscription Sales
Flexible Schedule
Big Commissions
Training Provided
Contact Jon Tate
850-677-1177
Leave message for call back


Yard Maintenance Help Needed
Equipment furnished. $10. an hour
Call 850-482-4320
) ,EDUCATION
&INSTRUCTION

S Classes Forming Now
for Medical Assisting,
FORDTIS Electrical Trades and
FORThI More!
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu


In The Classifieds


Bahtia seed for sale -
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102 x
L................................. J
END OF SEASON SALE ( prices reduced )
Quality Coastal Hay; Large Rolls
Fertiized & Weed Control 850-209-9145
p Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
afte Daytime J34-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418


9 4 6 1

7 9

1 2 9 7

6 3 9

4 8

8 5 3

93 2 5

4 8

3 6 4 7
-- -- ---_- -


S. ......


4/24/13











B W d d \ il 24 2013* Jacks n


(.," -" RESIDENTIAL
1rlJ) REAL ESTATE FOR RENT







1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
n- 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4-
2BR/1BA Hou se 6914 Oaks St.
Grand Ridge $450. Mo. + $450. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
2BR/1BA Newly Renovated 2658 Railroad St.
Open floor plan. Cottondale. No Pets.
$450 Mo. + $400 Dep. Call 850-352-4222
4/2 home in Alford FIl
$800 mo. + dep. 850-579-4317; 850-866-1965
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
m* 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maint.incl.
4- 850-593-4700 4.


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountryliving.com.
850-209-8847 4.


2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CHkAA $325- $500/Month.
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Messhge


S, 2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes I
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595 I


2BR 1BA at Millpond $495 + dep. very nice,
water/sewer/lawn maintenance included,
access to pond, No pets 850-209-3970.
2BR/2BA Newly remodeled in quiet area.
Very clean. Water, sewage, garbage and yard
care provided. No smokers, no pets.
$5_00 + deposit. Call 850-718-8158._

>* 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

Single Wide Mobile Home: 2BR/1BA
Near Sunland, clean and small pets okay.
$450. Mo + $500. Dep. Call Joanne 850-693-0570

\ COMMERCIAL
(fm n REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Office Buildings for Lease 3200 sq. ft.
& 4200 sq. ft. 850-718-6541

( --- RESIDENTIAL
L REAL ESTATE FOR SALE.



Foreclosure Homes For Sale
2161 Katie Avenue. Grand Ridge 3BR/2BA
double wide mobile home with land. $49,000.
555 Satsuma Road. Chattahoochee.
3BR/1BA 1665SF home. $49,000.
CreditUnion Owned. Call 850-663-2404


17 Acres: If it's peace and quiet you're
looking for, you've found it.
Getaway from the hustle and bustle of the city,
only 8 miles from Chattahoochee.
This 4BR/2BA doublewide mobile home is
almost 2,200 SF and has a split flpor-plan with
fireplace. 17 ACRES, 2 Ponds, Carport. Wildlife.
Contact Michael 850-533-6011!
Feel free to drive by and take a look!
NO OWNER FINANCING


FSBO: 3BR/2BA Brick Home. Well maintained
and updated, fireplace with gas logs, new paint
and carpet, hardwood floors, nice yard 1 acre
with fruit trees. $129,900. Call 850-482-3233 or
850-209-0459 please leave message.


1979 14x68 Riverchase 2.2, fireplace, nicely
furnished, upgraded master bath, porch &
deck included $12,500. 850-718-6541
MUST BE MOVED 4m

W RECREATION



Honda 2007 Foreman ATV;
2-wheel & 4-wheel Drive. Elec-
tric wench, 190 hours on it;
$4600 OBO 334-596-9966



.>' 2008 Crownline 19 SS, 30.5
-._ ;.' "' hrs. Mercruiser 4.3L, Facto-
,'i-- r', ,akebc'3rd tower, cus-
.fltom cover, snap-in carpet,
walk thru transom, trailer
brakes, SS cleats, flip-up captain's chairs, Sony
marine stereo & sub-woofer, bimini top, stain-
less steel rub-rail upgrade, trailer tie downs, SS
windshield lock, SS cupholders, chrome wheels
Garage kept always. 334-796-9479
2008 Seadoo 150 Speed-
IL. p ster: Yellow and black,
S8r Bimini top. wakeboard tow-
e' r & rac.,., ski locker,
ifront/rear storage, built in
cooler, only 60 hrs, garage kept, Hydroturf in-
stalled on deck, Sony Marine CD/MP3 radio
with AUX, 5 adult life jackets (match boat) and
2 children, tow ropes, anchor, 2 tubes. $12,500
OBO. Text 334-333-1380 for more pics and info.

25 ft. Party Barge Pontoon 2011 Suntracker
Regency edition only 75 hrs. 150hp Mercury
Opti Max engine, with 2 axle trailer & lots of
extras, ready for the water, take over
payoff $41,000. Call 334-763-9124
BOAT Crownline BR 180 135hp bimini top,
Crownline trailer, new tires, $7,000.
334-618-5169
Pontoon Boat 2008 20ft. G3 fish & Cruise, pur-
chased new July 2009, 30 gallon gas tank, fish
finder, 90HP, 4-stroke, Yamaha engine. Exc. gas
mileage. Asking $15,000. 334-897-6929.


Keystone 2006 Sidney Edition md# 30ROLS
30ft. pull behind. Like new, total use 7-8 times,
sheltered when not in use.
Asking $15,000 334-897-6929.
Rockwood 2007 Travel Trailer 33ft. 2bd. well
maintained, barn stored, great unit! $17,500.
1]334-899-6408 call before 8:30 pm


1999 Winnebago 32' motorhome:
Sleeps 6. Excellent condition. Gas engine with
gas saver system installed. 32K miles. Must see
to appreciate! $12,000. Call 334-685-3810

(g) TRANSPORTATION


U-- 1983 Buick LeSabre
m Limited: Two owner
vehicle, and yes,it was a
little Grandmother's Car!! 123,500 mi, 5.0
liter V8, Sedan. All stock, All originalAM/FM
radio, power locks & windows, tilt steering,
-remote outside mirror adjustments, original
velour seat covers, split front seats w/armrest,
power adjustable driver's seat, heat/AC works
great, wire spoke hubcaps, big trunk, front
window power units replaced. Engine kept
tuned regularly, new battery, all belts, water,
pump & hoses replaced, good tires. Vinyl roof
needs care Left front corner/side hit by deer.
Drives great, runs strong, cleans up nice!
$1,975. 334-687-2330 or maczack@bellsouth.net


Buick 2005 LaSabre: 56k miles, beige, new tires,
fully loaded, beige leather interior, very nice
condition. $5,500. Call 334-589-0637
CHEVY 1995 CAPRICE-Clean, runs great, cold
air, fully loaded $3,500 OBO 334-355-1085, 334-
-740-0229


DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
GOT BAD CREDIT?7
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy
Slow credit ok
SO0 Down/Ist Payment,
Tax, Tag & Title
12 months OR 1200 mile warranty
RIDE TODAY! FREE $25. 'gas giveaway
Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
.. Honda 2007 S-2000 76k mi.
Car is awesome! $19,500!
~' 1 Let the top down and go
icrusing! Black on black
convertible. 6 spd. Adult
owned. Clean well maintained. Responsive lit-
tle rocket! below NADA. Come look, give it a
test drive & you'll be hooked. 334-805-4740
/. -.. Vw i Hyundai 2004 Sonata, V-
-- 'W6' 6, GLS. 4 door, automat-
ic. loaded, like new,
68.000 miles, very clean,
$6475. Call 334-790-7959.
Hyundai 2012 Elantra, $200 down, $269 per
month. No Credit Refused. Call Ron Ellis 714-
0028.
Nissan 2012 Altima, Like new, under warranty,
No Credit Refused! $200 down, $269 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 714-0028.
Toyota 2007 Prius,
White, fully
loaded, excellent
.. W ~ condition, 70K
o miles, $12,500
850-499-7560


VW 2011 Jetta, All Applications Accepted. Low
miles, great fuel mileage, still under factory
warranty. $300/down, $300/month. Call Steve
334-791-8243.


1985 Harley Davidson
FXRT80.37,000 miles.


wth $5,000 of added
chrome. $10,000 like new. Call 334-464-0639
2007/8 Qlink LD250 Legend 250cc
low miles, runs good, $900
call Randy 850-693-0566
2008 Harley Davidson
Softail Classic.
,. Like new, only 5900 miles.
Gold and1black with lots of
chrome. Excellent condi-
tion. $12,000 obo. If interested, call Frank at
334-790-9733 or send email to fab@graceba.net
2011 Yamaha V-Star 950 Nothing wrong with
this excellent Cruiser! Only 1316 miles. Garage
kept & title in hand. Yamaha XVS95AL Blue 950
cc. Great gas mileage without compromising
,power. Cobra slip on exhaust gives it a more
aggressive sound (original exhaust included if
you want to tone it down). Show Chrome back-
rest. $6,750 OBO. Call Fred 334-379-4549
2012 Harley Road King
.. Black. Only 1400 mi. 6 spd
." 103 ci 1600cc, security sys-
tenm, ABS brakes, cruise,
^ tb ack rest with luggage
;.rack. Bought last fall, still
under warranty. 2 helmets included. Wireless/
Bluetooth/ FM radio intercom system. (approx'
$600 value) Adult owned, title in hand. $16,500
obo. 334-794-9388 or pwt.1202@yahoo.com
SHarley Davidson 2004
Ultra Classic Elect ra Glide
S- -(FLHTCUI) glacier pearl
white, loaded, diamond
pi.plaid. chrome trim, engine
covers, remote security
system, 15k miles, excellent condition, garage
kept, one owner. $10,600. Call 334-794-4731
Harley Davidson 2005 Dyna Low Rider, ridden,
$7000. DR Field and Brush trimer, exc. cond.
$800. 334-791-0701.
Honda 2006 250 Rebel 13K miles, 70-80 miles
per gal. nice hwy. cruiser with classic leather
saddle bags, windshield, never used full face
helmet $2450. OBO 850-557-1629.
Kawasaki 2006 Vulcan 500 LTD 2040 miles, red
in color, garage kept, $2800. 850-773-4939


Chevrolet 2003 Trailblazer
4x4. Excellent condition.
Garage kept since pur-
tchase. Fully loaded 4x4.
105,00 miles. Must see to
. appreciate. Black with grey interior. $7,200.
Phone 850-956-2623
.' Ford 1998 Explorer XLT.
..i- -~ Red in color. Grey leather
interior. 6 cyl. 112 k miles.
Very nice inside and out.
$5,500 OBO. Call or text 334-806-6004.


Chevrolet 2007 Silverado 2-door, 8 cyl. silver in
color, 68,491 miles, $15,500. 334-797-8523.
Tractor 240 Massey Ferguson : deisel engine
with bottom plow, garage kept, less 600 hours,
good condition. $7,500. Call 334-794-3226


Ford 2004 F-150 Lariat, ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED.
loaded, 78k miles, leather, pwr window, door
locks, tuneau cover, tow pkg., new tires.
$250/down, $300/month. Call Steve 334-791-
8243.
Ford Tractor 9N with 4ft. bushhog,
good working condition. 229-869-0883.


SDodge 2005 Caravan STX,
V-6, loaded, 3rd row
seat, front and rear air,
103,000 miles, $5925. Call
334-790-7959.



1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!

arT "4 24 Hour T7owingO
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES

I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING + 334-792-8664

a We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
334-794-9576 or 344-791-4714


(~)


LEGALS


www.TCFLORIDAN.com


u s- vieantstj% .% ri:1 1a lwJ ~ SF LIrI a
-IF -- I


/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Jackson County, Florida

/s/ Tammy Bailey
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT

Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360
Boca Raton, Florida.33431
(561) 998-6700
(561) 998-6707
LF160104

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2011-CA-000966

Bank of America, National Association
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
James L. Bailey, Jr. and Kathleen D. Bailey
a/k/a Kathy Bailey; SunTrust Bank
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
dated April 5, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.
2011-CA-000966 of the Circuit Court of the 14th
Judicial Circuit in and for Jackson County, Flori-
da, wherein Bank of America, National Associa-
tion, Plaintiff and James L. Bailey, Jr. and
Kathleen D. Bailey a/k/a Kathy Bailey are
defendantss, I, Clerk of Court, Dale Rabon Gu-
thrie, will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE JACKSON
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL
STANDARD TIME on MAY 16, 2013, the follow-
ing described property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOT NO. 18 OF THE VILLAGE AT INDIAN
SPRINGS AN UNRECORDED PLAT:

COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST COR-
NER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH,
RANGE 9 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA,
THENCE N 0635'22W A DISTANCE OF 310.18
FEETTO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING
THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF A CURVE; N
3803'31"W A DISTANCE OF 30.00 TO A NAIL
AND DISC IN THE CENTERLINE OF OLD HICKORY
ROAD; THENCE N 51056'29"E A DISTANCE OF
512.60 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 77043'04"E A DIS-
TANCE OF 742.37 FEET, THENCE N 75013'27" E A
DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET TO A NAIL AND DISC
IN THE CENTERLINE OF INDIAN SPRINGS ROAD;
THENCE N 14046'33"W A DISTANCE OF 539.41
FEET; THENCE N 41018'31"E A DISTANCE OF
1,096.41 FEET; THENCE N 12013'27"E A DIS-
TANCE OF 870.00 FEET; THENCE N 80039'15"E A
DISTANCE OF 816.51 FEET; THENCE N
1243'45"E A DISTANCE OF 953.71 FEET;
THENCE S 72046'55"E A DISTANCE OF 564.41
FEET; THENCE N 2525'31"E A DISTANCE OF
400.00 FEET; THENCE N 61007'20"E A DISTANCE
OF 400.00 FEET; THENCE N 13002'17"E A DIS-
TANCE OF 200.00 FEET; THENCE N 76057'43"W
A DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY
ROAD "D"; THENCE N 13002'17"E ALONG THE
WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID ROAD A
DISTANCE OF 58.42 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE N 7654'04"W A DIS-
TANCE OF 250.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT AND CALL THIS THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, THENCE S 25054'27"W A DISTANCE OF
139.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT;
THENCE S 48004'40"W A DISTANCE OF 151.56
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE
CONTINUE S 4804'40"W A DISTANCE OF 149.49
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF A GRADED
STREET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE
SAID RIGHT OF WAY ALONG A CURVE BEING
CONCAVE TOWARDS THE RIGHT HAVING A
DELTA ANGLE OF 5746'09"; A RADIUS OF 50.00
FEET; AN ARC DISTANCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY OF 50.41 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT MARKING THE P.R.C.; THENCE CONTINUE
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY ALONG THE EAST-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF A CUL-DE-SAC ALONG
A CURVE BEING CONCAVE TOWARDS THE LEFT
HAVING A DELTA ANGLE OF 67049'09"; A RADI-
US OF 100.00 FEET; AN ARC DISTANCE ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY OF 118.28 FEET TO A CON-
RETE MONUMENT; THENCE N 2259'54"E A
DISTANCE OF 254.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE S 76054'04"E A DISTANCE
OF 125.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT;
THENCE CONTINUE S 76054'04"E A DISTANCE
OF 125.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
THIS PARCEL IS LOCATED IN THE NORTH HALF
OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 9
WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850)
747-5338, at least seven (7) days' before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance is less than sev-
en (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call

/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Jackson County, Florida
/s/Tammy Bailry
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT

Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHi, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(561) 998-6700
(561) 998-6707
LF160103

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2011-CA-009602


Pr


I I


CLASSIFIED


LF160102

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
'Case #: 2011-CA-001024

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association as
Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance,
LLC, as Successor by Merger to Chase Manhat-
tan Mortgage Corporation
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Sharonda M. Ramsey
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
dated April 15, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.
2011-CA-001024 of the Circuit Court of the 14th
Judicial Circuit in and for Jackson County, Flori-
da, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National
Association as Successor by Merger to Chase
Home Finance, LLC, as Successor by Merger to
Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation, Plain-
tiff and Sharonda M. Ramsey are defendantss,
I, Clerk of Court, Dale Rabon Guthrie, will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE JACKSON COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL STAND-
ARD TIME on MAY 30. 2013, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING 1/2 INCH IRON
ROD MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 29, TOWN-
SHIP 06 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST,'JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND CALL THIS THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 50
MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF
255.00 FEET TO AN EXISTING 5/8 INCH IRON
ROD WITH AN ALUMINUM CAP STAMPED BAN-
NERMAN SURVEYORS, INC. (LB 5106); THENCE
NORTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 40 SECONDS
EAST A DISTANCE OF 230.00 FEET TO AN EXIST-
ING 5/8 INCH IRON ROD WITH AN ALUMINUM
CAP STAMPED BANNERMAN SURVEYORS, INC.
(LB 5106); THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 50 MI-
NUTES 09 SECONDS FAST A DISTANCE OF
255.00 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH IRON ROD WITH AN
ALUMINUM CAP (LB 5106) SET ON THE EASTER-
LY LINE OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 06 NORTH,
RANGE 12 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA;
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 40
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE OF
SAID, SECTION A DISTANCE OF 230.00 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT TO:
A 20' WIDE INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITIES
EASEMENT DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 816, PAGE
0785 OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 29,
TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST, JACK-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG.
THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID QUARTER A DIS-
TANCE OF 10.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD SET AT
THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF A 20 FOOT WIDE
INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT; LYING 10
FEET RIGHT AND 10 FEET LEFT OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 09 SECONDS
WEST ALONG THE CENTER LINE OF SAID EASE-
MENT A DISTANCE OF 255.00 FEET TO AN IRON
ROD SET; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST ALONG
THE CENTER LINE OF SAID EASEMENT A DIS-
TANCE OF 947.02 FEET TO AN IRON ROD SET AT
THE TERMINUS OF SAID EASEMENT. SIDELINES
OF SAID EASEMENT TO MEET AT ANGLE
POINTS, RIGHT-OF-WAY LINES, OR SECTION
LINES.

ALSO SUBJECT TO A 10' WIDE INGRESS, EGRESS
AND UTILITIES EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS:

COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING 11/2 INCH IRON
ROD MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 29, TOWN-
SHIP 06 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST, JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND CALL THIS THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 50
MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF
10.00 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST A DIS-
TANCE OF 230.00 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 09 SECONDS
EAST A DISTANCE OF 10.00 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH
IRON ROD WITH AN ALUMINUM CAP (LB 5106)
ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID SECTION;
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 40
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE OF
SAID SECTION A DISTANCE OF 230.00 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING..

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089. Panama City, FL 32402 at (850)
747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance is less than sev-
en (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call


I


Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage Succes-
sor by Merger to Union Planters Bank, NA.
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Pamela W. Massey a/k/a Pamela Massey and
William D. Massey, Jr. a/k/a William D. Massey
a/k/a William Massey, Wife and Husband; Cap-
ital City Bank; Discover Bank;
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
dated April 8, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.
2011-CA-000602 of the Circuit Court of the 14th
Judicial Circuit in and for Jackson County, Flori-
da, wherein Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mort-
gage Successor by Merger to Union Planters
Bank, NA., Plaintiff and Pamela W. Massey
-a/k/a Pamela Massey and William D. Massey,
Jr. a/k/a William D. Massey a/k/a William Mas-
sey, Wife and Husband are defendantss, I,
Clerk of Court, Dale Rabon Guthrie, will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE JACKSON COUNTY


____j









www.JCFLORmIAN.com CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, April 24, 2013- 9 B


COURTHOUSE, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL STAND-
ARD TIME on MAY 16,2013 the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE
EAST LINE OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 5
NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 90 AND RUN S 84 DE-
GREES 02'00" W ALONG SAID NORTHERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 1822.77 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING (P.O.B.); THENCE CON-
TINUE S 84002'00" W, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY LINE 210.02 FEET; THENCE N 01048' 28" E,
400.00 FEET; THENCE S 84005'27" W 641.10 FEET
TO THE WEST LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 33; THENCE N 01048'28" E, 404.97
FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF THE CSX RAILROAD (FORMER-
LY L&N RAILROAD); THENCE N 84000'43" E
851.26 FEET ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE; THENCE S 01048'33" W 805.98 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, (P.O.B.)
AND
COMMENCE AT A POINT WHERE THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 90
INTERSECTS THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWN-
SHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST, THENCE RUN
EASTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 90 A DISTANCE OF
441.11 FEET TO'POINT OF BEGINNING OF THIS
DESCRIPTION: THENCE CONTINUE EASTERLY
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE
OF 200 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 2 DEGREES
07 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF
400 FEET; THENCE RUN IN A WESTERLY DIREC-
TION PARALLEL TO THE SAID NORTHERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 90 A DIS-
TANCE OF 200 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH TO
POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability whb needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama.City, FL 32402 at (850)
747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
uponrt receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance is less than sev-
en (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call
711.
/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF TIIE CIRCUIT COURT
Jackson County, Florida
/s/Tammy Bailey
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHt, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(561) 998-6700
(561) 998-6707



LF160106
NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION
THE JACKSON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
Purpose and Effect: Pursuant to Chapter 120 of
the Florida Statutes, the School Board of Jack-
son County will hold a rule adoption meeting in
conjunction with the regularly scheduled meet-
ing on May 21, 2013 for the purpose of amend-
ing or adopting the following rules to comply
with the provisions of controlling laws, admin-
istrative rules and guidelines.

PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO REFERENCED
DOCUMENTS
Code of Student Conduct
Proposed changes include:
District-Wide School Uniform Polick To main-
tain an atmosphere conducive to learning and
to prepare students for working environments, .
the Jackson County School Board will require
that all students, grades 6-12, conform to an
acceptable attire in the Jackson County
Schools as defined by a district wide uniform
school dress policy.
Cost to agency: None. Cost or benefit to those
affected: The purchase price of required cloth-
ing. Impact on open market: Merchants or
businesses offering required apparel for pur-
chase will benefit economically. Origination
and authorization: Steve R. Benton Sr. 4/22/13
District-Wide Alternative School-Short Term
Program designedto keep students in school.
This is an alternative to out-of-school suspen-
sion and serves as a deterrent to truancy and
potential drop-outs.
Cost to agency: Cost will fluctuate with stu-
dent enrollment rate. Cost or benefit to those
affected: 'None. Impact on open market:
None. Origination and authorization: Steve R.
Benton Sr. 4/22/13
District-Wide Cell Phone Use Specific disci-
plinary steps will be listed for violation of cell
phone policy currently in place.
* District-Wide Bus Discipline Plan Specific
disciplinary steps will be listed for violation of
school bus policy currently in place.
Cost to agency: None. Cost or benefit to those
affected: None. Impact on open market:
None. Origination and authorization: Steve R.
Benton Sr. 4/22/13
Jackson County Student Progression Plan
Proposed changes include:
* The Valedictorian/s will be selected based on
tl~e highest weighted grade point average
(GPA). Students must complete at least four
(4) Level 3 or higher courses (Florida Course
Code Directory).
* The Salutatorian/s will be selected based on
the 2nd highest weighted grade point average


(GPA). Students must complete at least four
(4) Level 3 or higher courses (Florida Course
Code Directory).
* Beginning with the 2014 graduates, to partici-
pate in graduationceremonies, all fines and
fees must be paid in-full by the last senior
school day.
Cost to agency: None. Cost or benefit to those
affected: None. Impact on open market:
None. Origination and authorization: Steve R.
Benton Sr. 4/22/13
IF REQUESTED, A HEARING WILL BE HELD:


DATE:
TIME:
PLACE:


May 21, 2013
4:00 P.M. Central Standard Time
Board room of the School Board of
Jackson County, 2903 Jefferson
Street, Marianna, FL 32446


THE ENTIRE TEXT OF EACH PROPOSED RULE
AND/OR REFERENCED DOCUMENT, AS WELL AS


A FULL LISTING OF RELEVANT STATUTES, CAN
BE INSPECTED AND/OR COPIES MADE BY THE
PUBLIC, DURING OFFICE HOURS, MONDAY
THROUGH FRIDAY, AT THE ADDRESS GIVEN
ABOVE.


LF160106
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2012-CA-000794

Wells Fargo Bank, National Association
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Frederick E. Hudnall Jr. and Malinda J. Hudnall,
Husband and Wife; Compass Lake in the Hills
Property Owners Association, Inc.; Unknown,
Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Un-
known Parties claiming by, through, under and
against the above named Defendant(s) who
are not known to be dead or alive, whether
said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as
Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other
Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2,
If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by,
through, under and against the above named
Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or
alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim
an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees,
Grantees, or Other Claimants
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
'dated entered in
Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000794 of the Circuit
Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for
Jackson County, Florida, wherein Wells Fargo
Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Fred-
erick E. Hudnall Jr. and Malinda J. Hudnall, Hus-
band and Wife are defendantss, I, Clerk of
Court, Dale Rabon Guthrie, will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT
DOOR OF THE JACKSON COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL STANDARD
TIME on
,the fol-
lowing described property as set forth in said
Fipal Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 15, BLOCK 118, COMPASS LAKE HILLS UNIT
FIVE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A-4, PAGE 130
THROUGH 140, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850)
747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance is less than sev-
en (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call
711.
/s/Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Jackson County, Florida
/s/ Tammy Bailey
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHt, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(561) $98-6700
(561) 998-6707
LF160105
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2010-CA-0b0582
CitiMortgage, Inc.
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Crystal L. Dunaway; Capital One Bank (USA),
National Association f/k/a Capital One Bank;
State of Florida, Department of Revenue; Clas-


LA


sic Carpet Cleaner of Bay County, Inc. d/b/a
Classic Carpet
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
dated April 9, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.
2010-CA-000582 of the Circuit Court of the 14th
Judicial Circuit in and for Jackson County, Flori-
da, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff and
Crystal L. Dunaway are defendantss, I, Clerk of
Court, Dale Rabon Guthrie, will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT
DOOR OF THE JACKSON'COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL STANDARD
TIME on MAY 30,2013, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-
wit:
LOT 6, BLOCK G, GREEN OAKS SUBDIVISION,
UNIT NO. 1, BEING A PART OF NW 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 5, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 25, PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850)
747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time be-
fore the scheduled appearance is less than sev-
en (7) days. If yotu are hearing impaired, call
711.
/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Jackson County,.Florida
/s/ Tammy Baily
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHI, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(561) 998-6700
(561) 998-6707
LF160100
STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINAL JUSTICE
STANDARDS & TRAINING COMMISSION,
Petitioner
vs.
CHRISTOPHER M. FINCH, Case #35030
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CHRISTOPHER M. FINCH,
Residence Unknown


AA Big Books 1st & 2 edition $500.ea 263-1039
Baby Clothes -boys 12-18 mo. $30 bx 693-3260
Bed frame K sz. wrought iron $100. 628-1198
Bedrm suite complete set $350. 850-592-5227
Bed: twin, complete. $50. 850-592-1260
Eureka Hepa upright Vac $100. 850-482-2994
Freezer uprigtht white $175. 850-592-6921
Grider Swing $150. 850-592-6921.
Guitar Alvarez 70's 12 string $150. 850-482-6022
Guitar Alvarez 70's 12 string $150. 850-482-6022
Ladder-10', "A", Fiberglass. $70. 850-638-2446
Lamp w/ wh. shades 2 silver $15. 850-594-7334
Mirror w/shelves: $50. 850-693-3260.
Office Chair leather (rolling) $55. 850-482-2994


YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative
Complaint has been filed against you seeking
to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in
accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any
rules promulgated thereunder.
You are required to serve a written copy of
your intent to request a hearing pursuant to
Section 120.57, F.S. upon Jennifer C. Pritt, Pro-
gram Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism
Program, Florida Department of Law Enforce-
ment, P. 0. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida
32302-1489, on or before June 22, 2013. Failure
to do so will result in a default being entered
against you to Revoke said certification pur-
suant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27,
F.A.C.
Dated: April 22, 2013-
Ernest W. George
CHAIRMAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE STANDARDS
AND TRAINING COMMISSION
By: -s- Lee Stewart, Division Representative
11 -- -


One Man Auger -6"& 8" Bits. $500. 850-638-2446
Play Station 1 with extras $60. 850-272-1089
Printer Dell all in one $25. 850-482-4132.
Range $150. OBO 850-209-6977
Sofa dk. blue floral $100. 850-628-1198
Store racks chrome, (2) $75 each. 850-592-1260
Stove, gas, Kenmore $75. 850-592-1260
Table leather top antique $40. 850-263-1039.
Trailer enclosed " plywood 4x8 $350. 482-6022
Trimmer Mower -Elec. Start $400. 850-638-2446
TV 26" Magnavox $85. 850-594-7334.
Wedding gown, new, sz 16, $500 850-693-3260.
Corn Cob broom/mop $30. 850-263-1039


|Your guide to grnocb r

BUSI ESS &IN



, SERVICE DIRECTO'RIY

*. ... C a l . ; -. i. -
..... Call 526-3 14o place yo :


NEW& USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELBW RETAIL PHICE8!
ri ti-. 850,526.1700
s Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
tJ2978 Pierce Street
(behind Tim's Florist)



Clay 0'Neal's m* g,
Land Clearing, Inc. =,PWN=
ALTHA, FL AMER M
















HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME




Beautification of Your Home
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
111ffitin11 Logft (50)69-90


I


Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Senior Citizens Discount
FREE ESTIMATES -* 334-798-0687


Affordable Lawn Care
Low Overhead=Low Prices
850-263-3813 850-849-1175




ThAT'S ClAssiFiEd


Chad O's Lawn F/X
Commercial & Residential
Spring Clean- up &
Monthly Maintenance
Full Lawn Care Service
Free Estimates
Family Owned & Operated
Chad Oliver 850-573-7279
SEFSTRG


BESTWAYf
*y
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN NORTH FLORIDA
Been in Busines ineo 1989
WE f
HAVE E
OVER 0
DIFFERENT SIZES!
YOU CAN CHOOSE
S COLOR & STYLE!
-, BUIL ON SITE 850-747-8974
2919 Hwy 231 North Panama City, FL


Gal


This Month s Special

$319500
35 Years in Business
W_ WEMOvPo' N B oUlluis K J


2844cMadison St.
. M[IANMA CITY [so
FARMERS Tues Thurs Sat
:MARKET '
SA 7am-noon




You CALL... WE COME To You!
RED'S MOBILE
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE.
850-209-9713
EDWARD MAGGI, OWNER


an idea that SELLS.


Don't Shell Outa

Lot ofCash;Use

the Classifieds.
Smart shoppers know about
the bargains hidden within
the Classified pages. In the
Classifieds, you can track
down deals on everything
from tickets to trailers. It's
easy to place an ad or find
the items you want, and it's
used by hundreds of area
shoppers everyday.
Go with your instincts and use
the Classifieds today.
JACKSON COUNT-Y FLORIDAN
(850) 526-3614
(800) 779-2557







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Jaguars unveil new uniforms, 2-tone helmets


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. The
Jacksonville Jaguars took the lat-
est step in the franchise's make-
over Tuesday, unveiling new
uniforms and a two-tone helmet
that's sure to elicit positive and
negative responses.
Billionaire owner Shad Khan,
coach Gus Bradley and six
starters were on hand for the
reveal.
Khan called the new design "a
piece of art." He said the NFL
Nike Elite 51 uniforms, first worn
by Seattle last season, represent
the rebuilding Jaguars perfectly.
"We're young, we're contem-
porary and it looks to the fu-
ture," he said.
The redesigned jersey, pants
and helmet are the latest
changes for the Jaguars since
Khan took over in January 2012.
He revamped the locker room
and the training room,, made
plans to install massive video
boards inside the stadium, hired
a new general manager and a
new head coach, and unveiled a


Jacksonville Jaguars players Eugene Monroe (left), Uche Nwaneri (center)
and Marcedes Lewis (right) model variants of the Jaguars new uniforms
during their reveal. The Jacksonville Jaguars previewed,the team's new
Nike designed uniforms Tuesday afternoon in the West Touchdown Club at
EverBank Field.


new logo.
So what's left to do?
"Winning, winning," Khan
said. "That's what's left. That's
the most important part.... I ab-
solutely think (these) are pieces,
and it's a commitment that you
set the stage that we want to
provide the best and then expect
the best. The end result is having
a franchise that is winning and a
contender. That's where we want


to have it."
The new uniforms which
have four color combinations
- include an aggressive, rede-
signed font, claw marks on the
shoulders and a "Jags" patch
over the heart that serves as a
tribute to the city's strong mili-
tary presence.
It's the second time in the
last four years that Jacksonville
completely redesigned its uni-


forms. In April 2009, nearly four
years to the day, former owner
Wayne Weaver
1<'a announced new
uniforms in an ef-
fort to establish a
more permanent
identity for the
franchise.
New helmet The Jaguars went
22-42 in those,
so Khan figured it was/time for
change.
Players welcomed the new
duds.
"We all want to represent
something," guard Uche
Nwaneri said. "We represent the
Jaguars; we represent that city of
Jacksonville, and this uniform is
our way of basically represent-
ing those people on Sundays. I
feel like you have to look good
when you have a uniform like
that to represent your city.
"For what Nike and Mr. Khan
were able to do, they really have
stepped up what we're going to
be about this year with our uni-
form. It starts from the smallest
details. The uniform is. a testa-


ment to that."
Tight end Marcedes Lewis ac-
knowledged that the. uniforms
mean little in the grand scheme
of things. .
"The most important thing
about it is that it's comfortable,"
Lewis said. "As far as the color
scheme, I think they did a good
job. I'm impressed."
The black and gold helmets
got mixed reviews. They feature
a unique paint scheme (also de-
signed by Nike) that fades from
matte black in the front to gold
in the back a two-tone look
that's uncommon in the NFL.
"It's pretty dope," Nwaneri
said. "I didn't know what to say
when I saw it. I was shocked,
like, 'Whoa, this is really some-
thing.' It's unique, something
that nobody else has, and the
Jaguars are the first ones to use
the matte and glossy finish and
combination. I think that's really
going to be a pioneering thing.
You're going, to see more teams
in the NFL switch to something
like this eventually. We're really
proud of it."


(Great .

Expe stations


$0 Down & 0% Financing for 36 Months


Command lawns. Capture attention. Bring home the new Kubota Kommander today -
Great Expectations start here. Offer ends May 31, 2013.



Panhandle Tractor, Inc.
5003 Hwy. 90
Mariana, FL 32446
(850) 526-2257


q-

www.kubota.com................. ..
,,u fodeal.O t nlq ui -m -,, , h ,""-
See us for details Optional equipment may be shown


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE Jack-
sonville's rebuilding proj-
ect is entering its key
phase.
Under new general man-
ager. Dave Caldwell and
first-year coach Guls Brad-
ley, the Jaguars' already
purged the roster and
signed a few stop-gap free
agents:
Now comes the really
important part: the NFL
draft.
Caldwell and Bradley
want to build through the
three-day draft, which be-
gins Thursday night. It's
the new regime's first real
chance to put its stamp
on the small-market
franchise.
Jacksonville has seven
picks, beginning with the
second overall selection.
With holes on both sides
of the ball, the Jaguars
could go in just about any
direction at No. 2.
Trading down, though,
seems to be a long shot.
"I'd be surprised if
we don't draft second,"
Caldwell said Monday.
Offensive tackle, de-
fensive line/outside line-
backer and cornerback
are the team's most press-
ing needs. Quarterback
and safety are positions
expected to be addressed,
too.
The Jaguars have their
top pick narrowed down
to two guys presumably
whichever player Kansas
City doesn't take but
Caldwell and, Bradley
didn't offer any clues as to
who it will be.
Since the Jaguars have
had one of the league's
most inept pass rushes
over the last five years, av-
eraging 24 sacks a season
since 2007, many believe
Oregon's Dion Jordan or
BYU's Ziggy Ansah could


be capable cornerstones.
Both would play the ul-
tra-athletic "Leo" position
in Bradley's revamped
defense.
But Jordan is coming off
surgery to repair a torn la-
brum in his right shoulder,
and Ansah has stamina
concerns after playing
just one full season as a
starter.
While Caldwell and Brad-
ley have no pressure to
.win right away the Jag-
uars are in the first of what
is considered a three-year
rebuild some wonder
whether they would want
to take any risks with the
most significant decision
of their tenure.
Luke Joeckel of Texas
A&M and Eric Fisher of
Central Michigan, both of-
fensive tackles, seem like
safer selections.
"It makes our run game
better, it makes our pass
game better, it makes our
defense better," Caldwell
said. "If you can bolster our
offensive line and give our
quarterback the opportu-
nity to have 3 1/2 seconds
versus 2.4 seconds, that
makes our team better,
makes everybody around
him better."
The Jaguars already
have a solidified starter
at left tackle with Eugene
Monroe, but Bradley and
Caldwell admittedly talked
about scenarios in which,
they draft Joeckel or Fisher
and move the rookie to the
right side.
"There's some conversa-
tion of doing that," Bradley
said. "It'd be a good situa-
tion up front. You'd like to
think if he's that high of a
draft pick and that talefit-
ed, they should be able to
flip over to right tackle."
Caldwell and Bradley
still plan to add a quarter-
back to the mix, but they
stopped short of guaran-


Everyoneis invited to the


Mobilizing Americans to insure our local &
national leaders remember and acknowledge this
country was birthed in prayer and reverence for God.
Slhur a :ay 2, 2018B
Wnlfl.na First United Methodist Church
Wepley Center


A complimentary breakfast will be
served at 6:30 am followed by the
program at 7:00 am.
Music provided by Riverside Elementary Children's Choir
Fj m *r i n f ato ': (' -4
r' :w ," -" ;;'; ., -


teeing they would draft
one. Former first-round
pick Blaine Gabbert and
Chad Henne are compet-
ing for the starting job, and
a newcomer could have an
equal shot at being under
center this fall.
The Jaguars explored ac-
quiring quarterback Matt
Flynn, but opted not to
trade for the former Se-
attle backup. Flynn ended
up in Oakland.
Jacksonville sent sev-
eral coaches and front of-
fice executives to watch
quarterback Geno Smith's
pro day at West Virginia,
but that may have been
a smoke screen to entice
trade options. No one bit,
leaving the Jaguars with
the No. 2 pick.
Jacksonville could see
more interest in its sec-
ond-round selection.
"The 33rd pick will be a
valuable pick," Caldwell
said. "I think what happens
is every team kind of sees
how the first round un-
folds and then you come
into the second round
and everybody has their
game plan to see who's still
available."


2013 Graduation

Section on May 26th.


l. .et your

j~i^- -









Me re;f th0 .i



Send us your

graduate's favorite' i Marianna High School

photo along with your We ore 50 proud of
you and all of your,
special message to be accomplishments. But most
of all we are proud of the
in the Jackson County ( person you hove chosen to
e C ou nty's be. You have blessed our
Foridan 's lives so much.May God


S bless ydu as you begin this \
('. .) next chapter of your life.
We Love You!
f-' Mom ond Dad
.- '.'- :-. 7- ,


To have your graduate's message included in this keepsake edition, please
send a color photo and $25 to: Graduation 2013, C/O Jackson County
Floridan, P.O. Box 520, Marianna, Florida or drop it off at our office located at
4403 Constitution Lane. Be sure to include the graduate's name, your special
message and a daytime phone number.


For 'more information call (850)526-3614

Deadline to submit your information is May 10, 2013 at 5 p.m.


Jaguars looking for impact


player with No. 2 pick


110B 3 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 2013