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Jackson County Floridan ( April 10, 2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
April 10, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01056

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
April 10, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01056

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text





Hornets win on Senior Night lB


Budget cuts ground
Air Force, Navy aircraft 9A


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


.. .. .. ADC
* .5 RIDAN


I'N 1I
CA!NISV1 LLE 320l ]l-7007


2013 MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS.


ire --JIM


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Stephen Amos on Tuesday campaigned for people to vote no on a ballot referendum for the city Of Marianna to
create a city-owned electrical service.






Power down

Marianna voters issue resounding 'no' to city electric


By ANGIE COOK
acook@jcfloridan.com

Voters in Cotton-
dale, Marianna and
Sneads went to the polls
Tuesday for the 2013
Municipal Elections.
Unofficial results
show the Cottondale
referendum to drop the
number of town council
seats and extend their
term length as passing.
Over in Sneads, Greg
Lewis will return to
city council, represent-
ing group IV He de-
feated challenger Jerry
Alexander.
Marianna voters
chose newcomer Allen
Ward over current May-
or James Wise for the
group 3 city commis-
sion seat. Ward, reached
by phone Tuesday night
while he was attending
a school event with his
daughter, said he was
excited by the news and
glad that all the hard


.. .. .. .- .. ,-.

Gary Dean and Jerry Lewis
look at some preliminary
voting totals posted at
Marianna City Hall on
Tuesday night.

into his campaign didn't
go to waste.
Several supporters of
Florida Public Utilities
(and opponents of the
electric utility purchase
referendum) cam-
paigned on Marianna
sidewalks for most of
the day. When the vote


work supporters put count was announced


inside City Hall shortly
after the polls closed,
it only took moments
before cheers could
be heard outside the
building.
City Manager Jim


Lewis


Electric franchise purchase
referendum
716 No
310 Yes .

City Commission Group 3
313 Allen E Ward 11
75 James B \,'

Sneads
City Council Group IV
89 Greg Lewis
77 Jerry L. Alexander

Cottondale
Charter amendment referendum
23 Yes
12 No


Dean said the referenp-
dum's defeat means
Marianna now begins a
process to "unwind" its
settlement agreement
with electric power
provider FPU.


AG Pam Bondi's


rep talks to county


about Dozier


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Attorney General Pam
B.ondi sent one of her
lead attorneys to Jackson
County on Tuesday to dis-
cuss why she is pursuing
the exhumation of bodies
buried at the old Dozier
School for
BoysinMar-
V. ianna, and
to smooth
over any
friction that
the lawsuit
Landry she filed for
Landry that pur-
pose may
havecassureated
be called upon between her
office and
the Jack-
son County
Commis-sioners several
Cox sion. The
AG attorney Nicho-torney
also came to reassure the
county that it would not
be called upon to pay for
any of the work that will
be done ifit is allowed byto com-
the courts. That has been
a concern expressed by
commissioners f several
times as the matter has
unfolded with the
AG attorney Nicho-n
las Cox, who is working
on the Dozier matter for
Bondi, apologized to com-
missioners for not having
communicated with the
board before the motion
was filed for court per-
mission to exhume the
bodies.
Assigned to Circuit
Judge Bill Wright, no deci-
sion has yet been made on
that request. In part, that's
because the AG's office
at some point asked the
court to stand by until it
could meet with the coun-
ty. Tuesday's session could
trigger the court process,
with hearings potentially
able to now commence if
the attorney signals readi-
ness to move forward.
Likewise, Wright has also
not ruled on the county's
subsequent motion to be


designated an intervening
party in the lawsuit.
Attorney Cox said Tues-
day the state has no desire
to "mute" the county, Hav-
ing heard the AG lawyer
out on that point, County
Attorney Frank Baker said
the county is still unlikely
to drop its motion to be an
intervening party, "as the
board has a profound in-
terest in the proceedings."
On Tuesday, attorney
Cox told commission-
ers that he simply hadn't
thought of contacting the
commission before the
court order was requested.
He pointed out that he had
reached out to State Attor-
ney Glenn Hess and Jack-
son County Sheriff Lou
Roberts and felt that was
sufficient contact at the
time. He apologized, how-
ever, in retrospect, and
said he wanted the county
and state to be partners in
a quest to bring closure to
the families of those who,
are buried at "Boot Hill"
cemetery on the Dozier
grounds, and to those
who wonder whether
there are other bodies in
a suspected second cem-
etery, the as-yet phantom
burial ground sometimes
anecdotally referred to as
"Cedar Hill."
Among those who won-
der about the possibility
of a second cemetery are
representatives of the lo-
cal, state and national
NAACP
At Tuesday's meeting,
representatives of the or-
ganization appeared be-
fore commissioners to ex-
press those concerns.
Dale Landry, a regional
vice president in the state
NAACP and a member of
the national leadership,
said he thinks it's impor-
tant for the state to pursue
its quest to exhume bod-
ies buried at the known
cemetery on the old Dozi-
er School for Boys campus

See DOZIER, Page 9A


Jackson County accepts offer on property


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Jackson County Com-
missioners on Tuesday ac-
cepted a $360,000 offer for
the county's community
development building and
the 1.25 acres it occupies at
4487 Lafayette St. in Mari-
anna. The board must find
space for the community
development department
if Southeastern Retail De-
velopment still wants the
property at the conclu-
sion of a 180-day inspec-
tion period included in the
agreement the company
proposes. The deal would
close 60 days after the in-
spection period expires,
and the county would have
an additional 30 days to
vacate the property.
With roughly eight


months to make arrange-
ments if the deal goes
through, the situation has
prompted fresh discus-
sion of the county's overall
space needs now and in
the future. The board on
Tuesday set a workshop
for 5 p.m. on April 23 to
discuss the topic.
In recent years, the coun-
ty board has talked about
the possibility of building
a new administration com-
plex to house community
development and most
other county departments
and started an escrow ac-
count toward that purpose
using host fees from Waste
Management.
At the workshop, com-
missioners are expected
to talk about whether they
want to make that leap,


or whether they'll instead
build a space for commu-
nity development alone or
come to some other solu-
tion for the department
and possibly other county
functions. Commissioners
will be weighing the cost of
all options.
With today's low loan
interest rates and an ea-
ger-to-work construction
industry willing to offer
competitive prices, some
board members may be-
lieve the time might be right
for a major investment.
On the other hand, some
are wondering whether
the county is ready to take
on the large long-term
debt that would likely be
necessary to build big.

See PROPERTY, Page 9A


-eiI
57151'M~


L"..


.4-


* A.
71


MARK SKINNER/FL.ORIDAN
Jackson County Commissioners on Tuesday accepted a $360,000 offer from a company
that wants to purchase the county's Community Development building on Lafayette Street.
According to Jackson County Administrator Ted Lakey, the company, Southeastern Retail
Development, typically acquires sites and matches them to retailers such as Walgreens.


> CLASSIFIEDS...7-9B


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s ENTERTAINMENT...6B



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Vol.90 No. 82


Election Results
Marianna


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-12A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013


Weather Outlook


Thursday
Partly Cloudy. Windy.
Storms.

", High- 800
_ V Low 54


Saturday
Sunny & Mild.


" ih: 86
I- Lo: 63


'" lllgh: 82
Lou: 66
,,, *,w...r-,


SLot':6877
L, o : 68


PRECIPITATION


2"4 h.iiIl-
NTIDulh tI date.
Nunnal MID
TIDES


' 42'
1.22'


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blointstown
Marianna
Caryville


6:57 PM
10:52 PM
7:02 PM
8:13 AM
8:47 PM


L o : 63 igh: 86 -
---- Low: 63 '
b" .,il' 'lU .-. --: ...- -,
-- High: 84 -, ig :"""' r , '
. .. --- Low: 63 6 ', "', ,. ..


u Low6 62 -
High: 78 .
Low:.65


I D'
5b.2o" "
ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
47.07 ft.
10.16 ft.
8.32 ft.
6.9 ft.


9:36
5:23
10:09
10:42
11:15


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme


) 1 2 3 4 9 m


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:19 AM
Sunset 7:06 PM
Moonrise 6:17 AM
Moonset 7:37 PM


Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr.
10 18 25 3


FLORIDA'S W REAL.

PANHANDLE COUNTRY

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9PM

hLl IISTENllOl HO URLY||EA THERUPDATE


H Nj-w


JACKSON CO!'. :: Y

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520. Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months: and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher.
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and -
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
Ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
riot acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
Thr,: .I.:i :.-,11, County Floridan will publish
hews of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
'Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
rightto e lit ill .ii nI : i ,,,

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Ii ~


TODAY
n Jackson Hospital First Birthday Celebration
of its Arts-in-Healthcare Program-9-10 a.m.
in the Hudnall E.uilinrg C,: mi ., ,unit-, Room, 4230
Hospital Drive in Marianna. After a brief program,
enjoy birthday cake while viewing patient artwork
displayed in the traveling :ii,-r ,. Call 718-2696.
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation -9 a.m.-i p.m. at Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. for an ap-
pointment.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon-
1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Basic Computer Class Part 2-Noon-3 p.m. at
the Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway
90, Marianna. Learn basic components and use of a
computer. No cost to attend. Call 526-0139.

THURSDAY, APRIL 11
n "Establish Your Own Satsuma Grove" Work-
shop-8 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Jackson County Exten-
sion Office, 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue in Marianna.
Experts will speak on Best Management Practices
'1i. jlh,, f-, tii--i:il watering, pest management
and frost issues. A field trip to Mack Glass' grove will
follow the instructions. This workshop is free but
registration is required by April 10. Call 482-9620.
) Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2290.
) Job Club -Noon-3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills: get job search assis-
tance. Call 526-0139.
Jackson County Friends of the Library Board
Meeting-1 p.m. at the Marianna Branch, 2929
Green St. Members of the Friends are welcome to
attend. Call 526-3885. P
)Jackson County School Board Regular Work-
shop Meeting-4 p.m. at the School Board Meeting
Room, 2903 J-:tr:,on St. in Marianna. This meeting
is open to the public. The agenda is posted at www.
jcsb.org. Call 482-1200.


)) Tools to Quit Tobacco Session-4-6 p.m. at the
Jackson Hospital Cafeteria Classroom. Free nicotine
patches and/or gum for program participants. To
register call 482-6500.
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation-4-7 p.m. at the Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. for an ap-
pointment.
) Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group-
5:30 p.m.at Jackson Hospital in the Cafeteria Board
Room. Free to attend. Curriculum developed by ex-
smokers for those who want to become ex-smokers
- n, ,:1.,.- Call 718-2545.
NAACP Local Chapter to Host a Town Hall
Meeting-6 p.m. at St. James A.M.E. Church, 2891
Orange St. in Marianna on the topic of Dozier School
for Boys. Representatives of the state NAACP will
be in attendance to receive comments and share
information.
) Chipola Artist Series Event, Three on a
String-7 p.m. at Chipola College Center for
the Arts. Three on a String perform classic old
standards, country, bluegrass, and folk mixed with
comedy and humor for the-entire family. Tickets
are ,. Iltiil: online or at the Center for the Arts Box
Office. Contact Anita Price, 718-2277 or price@
chipola.edu.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
,nit,:.,t- to personswith a desire to stop drinking;
papers .*i11 not be signed.

FRIDAY, APRIL 12
n Flea Across Florida Yard Sale at Ascension
Lutheran Church-7 a.m.-2 p.m. at 3975 Hwy. 90
in Marianna. Sale will include furniture, : ithiiig,
house wares, etc. Call 482-4691.
Flea Across Florida-Chipley is on the list of
stops. Event is hosted by c immuniiuinie: l l.on g a 272
mile stretch of 1-10 from Lake City to Pensacola.
Clubs,.organization, church groups and the public
have been invited to participate. Sales sites ranging


from large multi-organization sites to individual
sites will be along Hwy. 90 across Washington
County. Vendors will be selling antiques, collect-
ibles, furniture, odds and ends, hand- crafted items
and traditional yard sale fare.
Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida
Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Registration-8
a.m.- Noonat 4636 Hwy. 90, Suite E in Marianna.
Children must turn 4 on or before September l and
must live in Florida. Parents will need to bring proof
of child's age and Florida residency. Call 1-888-269-
3022 or visit www.elcnwf.org.
) Wiregrass Master Gardner Association
Annual Spring Plant Sale-9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the
Dothan Area Botanical Gardens, 5130 Headland
Ave. Dothan, AL. Plants to be included are: Annuals,
perennials, vegetables, herbs, ground covers, vines
and ornamental grasses, trees, shrubs, bulbs, house
and tropical plants and succulents. Admission is
free. Call 334-798-1034.
) Vegetable Pest Workshop-9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
at the UF/IFAS Washington County Extension Office
East Wing Conference Room, 1424 Jackson Avenue
in Chipley. Learn how to reduce vegetable pests in
the farm or spring garden. Cost is $,10 to include
lunch at 12 noon. Call 638-6180 or email mjorwat@
ufl.edu.
Knitters Nook-10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856, 573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, APRIL 13
Flea Across Florida Yard Sale at Ascension
Lutheran Church-7 a.m.-2 p.m. at 3975 Hwy. 90
'in Marianna. Sale will include furniture, clothing,
house wares, etc. Call 482-4691.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar. Jackson County Floridan, P.O 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
e-mail editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for April 8, the
latest available report: One accident, one
hospice death, one suspicious vehicle, two
suspicious incidents, two suspicious per-
sons, one escort, one burglary of a vehicle,
one verbal disturbance, one burglar alarm,
five traffic stops, one criminal mischief
complaint, two trespass complaints, one
assault, one noise disturbance, five animal
complaints, one assist of another agency,
one open door or window discovered
on patrol and one threat/harassment
complaint.


Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following
incidents for April 8, the latest available re-
port: One armed or dangerous person, two
accidents, five abandoned vehicles, five
suspicious vehicles, three suspicious inci-
dents, one suspicious person, one escort,
three burglaries, two physical disturbances,
two verbal disturbances, 12 medical calls,


one traffic crash, one burglar alarm,
seven traffic stops, one criminal mischief
complaint, two civil
disputes, one trespass
......_ complaint, one found/
; CRI ME abandoned property report,
.< ..^ ... one juvenile complaint,
one fraud complaint, one
assist of a motorist or pedestrian, one retail
theft, one assist of another agency, three
public service calls, two criminal registra-
tions, one welfare check, one transport,
one Baker Act transport, one threat/harass-
ment complaint, one 911 hang-up, and one
forgery/worthless check complaint.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
periods:
) Nicholas Hollis, 18, 2883 Lawrenceville
Road, Cottondale, possession of marijuana
-less than 20 grams.'
) Evan Davis, 19, 760 Brown St., Chipley,
possession of marijuana with intent to
distribute, possession of a firearm while in
commission of a felony, battery on a cor-
rectional officer.
)) Nathan Brown III, 33, 436 Martin Luther


King Blvd, Midway, resisting an officer
without violence.
) George Moore, 22, 2756 Panhandle
Road, Marianna, stalking.
) Douglas Daniels, 45, 5756 Oscar Road,
Greenwood, violation of state probation.
) Jermaine Riley, 23, 4270 Graham St.,
Marianna, violation of county probation.
) Clifford Monette, 41, 2720 E 3rd St.,
Panama City, failure to appear (assault-two
counts).
) Wesley Stephens, 23, 2367 Corbin Road,
Cottondale, hold for Calhoun Co.
) Peggy Dennis, 66, 5791 Flat Road,
Greenwood, fraud, retail theft, resisting a
merchant.
) Otis Fears, 57, PO. Box 1668 Or-
ange Beach, Ala., possession without a
prescription.
) Roy Fears, 49, 19660 Cottonwood Road,
Gordon, Ala., hold for Holmes Co., posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia, possession of
methamphetamine, driving while license
suspended or revoked.
) Jamie LeClerc, 35, 1788 Virginia St.,
Alford, worthless check.

Jail Population: 213
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agency. To report a wildlife violation,
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


High 820
Low -570


S High 790
Low 500

Friday
Clearing & Cooler.


.; High- 79
,( Low- 62


Sunday
Possible Storms.


WIKC-UP C(AL


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


S C. i'Il 10 d..llI "
Normial NTD
Nonial to yclar









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Chipola shines at State AFC Convention


Special to the Floridan

Chipola College was one
of the most talked-about
colleges at the recent Asso-
ciation of Florida Colleges
annual convention in Palm
Harbor.
Chipola garnered nu-
merous honors, includ-
ing chapter recognition,
membership awards and
leadership awards.
The Chipola chapter was
named a Platinum Chap-
ter, the highest recogni-
tion a chapter can receive
for chapter activities and
leadership. The Chipola
chapter also won a mem-
bership award for having
one of the highest percent-
ages of full-time employ-
ees as AFC members.
Chipola's automotive
technology program was
awarded the Occupational
and Workforce Educatibn
Commission's Exemplary
Practice Award. Chipola
instructors John Gard-
ner and Chase Vlieg and
executive vice' president
Dr. Jason Hurst presented
the practice, "Time to Re-
invent the Wheel" at the
conference. The practice
emphasized today's evolv-
ing student and how work-
force training and pro-
grams must also change.
Chipola's public relations
office also won three Exem-
plary Practice Awards from
the Communications and
Marketing Commission.
The group was awarded
a first olace award for Spe-
cialty Advertising/Promo-
tion Items for the Center
for the Arts Grand Open-
ing bookmark souvenir
and Best Bang for the Buck


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Chipola College received numerous honors at the recent Association of Florida Colleges Annual Convention. Pictured (from
left): Pat Barfield, who won the Distinguished Service Member Award; Chipola chapter president Angie Tyler with the Platinum
Chapter Award, the highest recognition a chapter can receive; and Evelyn Ward, Chipola publications coordinator, who won
three Exemplary Practice Awards and the Honorary Life Membership Award.


Award for the 2011 Chipola
Yearbook. The PR office
also won a second place
award for the redesign of
the Chipola Workforce De-
velopment brochure. Dr.
Bryan Craven is the direc-
tor of the Chipola public
relations office. Evelyn
Ward is the publications
coordinator.
Several Chipola employ-
ees presented educational
sessions at the conference.
Chipola English professor
Dr. Rachel West presented,
"Employees as Donors:
Who Are They and Why Do
They Contribute." West's
presentation highlighted


her doctoral research on
the giving patterns of state
college foundation donors.
Her research at three Flor-
ida state colleges showed
that 40 percent of individ-
ual donors were past and
present employees.
Dr. James Froh, dean
of the School of Busi-
ness. and Technology at
Chipola, presented a ses-
sion, "Faculty Teaching
Online." Froh discussed
different avenues for offer-
ing coursework online and
guidelines to help faculty
be better prepared for the
online classroom.
Publications coordinator


Evelyn Ward presented a
session on "Creating Your
Leadership Growth Plan."
The session included a
study of leadership styles
and the traits most used
in them, to help aspiring
leaders decide which ap-
proach was best for their
personal growth.
Pat Barfield was honored
with the Distinguished
Service Member Award.
The award was given for
her exceptional leadership
and achievements at the
chapter, region and state
level. Barfield, depart-
mental staff assistant for
institutional development


and planning, also serves
as the vice president-elect
for regions and chapters
and sits on the state Board
of Directors. During the
convention,
Immediate past presi-
dent Ward was awarded
the highest honor the As-
sociation bestows, the
Honorary Life Member-
.ship Award. The award
recognizes significant,
long-term contribution to
AFC and the state college
system.
Ward also was acknowl-
edged by the Chipola
chapter as their Un-sung
Hero for her service behind


the scenes. Ward was also
recognized as a member of
the first class earning the
new AFC Certified College
Professional certification.,
The leadership program,
which began in February
2012 provides AFC mem-
bers with the opportunity
to earn a designation relat-
ed to their work as a college
professional, and exposes
them to content and lead-
ership experiences they
may not be able to obtain
elsewhere. The designa-
tion will be recognized not
only by their college, but
by the entire Florida State
College system.
Several Chipola em-
ployees will serve in state
leadership roles next
year. Ward will serve as
the awards chair and Al-
ice Pendergrass will serve
as chair of the credentials
committee. Both will sit
on the state Board of Direc-,
tors. Dr. Froh is chair-elect
of the communications
and marketing commis-
sion. Also attending the
convention from Chipola,;
were: Angie Tyler, Katy
Flowers, Kim Collins and
Becky Davis.
AFC is a statewide organi-
zation open to all employ-
ees, retirees and trustees of
Florida's 28 state colleges.
AFC provides professional
development opportuni-
ties for its members, and
represents the interests
of community colleges
before the Florida Legis-
lature. Today, all 28 of the
state's public colleges sup-
port the work of the Asso-
ciation as do nearly 9,000
individual employee and
retiree members.


ALTRUSA DONATES CLOTHING


A ltrusa Interna-
tional of Marianna
recently donated


W.i ltgently used clothes to
the Chipola Nursing
Pavilion in Marianna.
They also donated the
clothing and other items
leftifrom their yard sale
fundraiser to Chipola
... Ministries. Pictured
(from left) are Carolyn
SGlass, Altrusa President;
Tamnera Hudson, Altrusa
member; and Tina Sims
and Cheryl Laycox from
Chipola Nursing Pavil-
ion.
SUBMITTED PHOTO

Honor Rolls


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Special to the Floridan

Sneads High School has
released its honor rolls for
the third nine-week term.

Ninth Grade
A Honor Roll Mallory
Beauchamp, Allison Cort,
Logan McCord, Kaylee
Messer, Ashlyn Roberts
and Amber Taylor.
A/B Honor Roll Marga-


Kinsinger, Brianna McCaf-
frey and Hunter Powell.
A/B Honor Roll Cait-
lin Chason, Violeet Collier,
Miriam Estok, Gerri Har-
din, Destinee Hays, Chas-
ity McGriff, Shelby Moult-
on, Alek Rogers, Macey
Searcy, Christin Suber, Sa-
vannah Thompson, Kelsey
Walters, Jeremy Wert and
Aaliyah Williams.


ret Aaron, Dakota Baggett, 1th Grade
Allison Brown, Alexandria A Honor Roll Jacob
Bryant, Orion Douthit, Brown Ryne Danford,
Nina Durden, Emily Edge, Kaitlin Dennison, Craig
Elizabeth English, Jakob Grice, Logan Peel, Mary
Farmer, Chloe Gilbert, Lo- Pintado, Jenna Poole,
gan Gilley, Djimon Gray, Ashleigh Tharpe, Alaynah
De'Aryll Green, Casey Gro- Weiss and Melissa Wray.
ver, Blake Johnson, Keely A/B Honor Roll- Chelsey
Johnson, Brianna McDon- Brown, Shelbi Byler, Kristal
ald, Brian Moran, Alyssa Cooley, Kyle Coy, Destinee
Perkins, Madison Pickens, Douthit, Jonathan Edge,
Joseph Scott, Sandra Stew- Andy Faria, Morgan Gain-
art, Jeffery Tye and Patrick er, Savannah t3osnell, Tay-
Wilkinson. lor Green, Bianca Hernan-
"dez, Daphne Humphries,
10th Grade Kelsey Jenkins, Matthew
A Honor Rol Jackson Lewis, Mallory Myhill,
Basford, Donovan Hamil- Chelsey Neely, Justice Oz-
ton, Arthur Johnson, Sierra burn, Hannah Pearson,





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Business: 850.526.2891 YOUR
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Taylor Reed, Ryan Rogers
and Charlis Wilkes..

12th Grade
A Honor Roll Caleb
Alexander, Alston Burch,
Christin Fowler, Courtney
Fowler, Victoria Harrell,
Hayley Johns, Shelby Law-
rence, Lindsey Locke, Tay-
lor Logan, Sarah Lowen-
thal, Savanna Owens,
Georgia Pevy, Christa Rob-


ison, Ashley Rogers, Jenna
Sneads, Brandy Strickland
and Whitney Thomas.
A/B Honor Roll Jas-
mine Bowers, Cambraige
Chason, Tyler Cook, Dallas
Goff, Amanda Hamilton,
Marah Johnson, Delantre
Keys, Austin Lombardo,
Alexanderia Maphis, Ken-
dra Rogers, Jared Watts,
Leah Williams and Emily
Wray.


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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013 3AF


LOCAL













Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Florida Voices



Trailer




tribulations

SA while Panama City considers cracking down on
/\ small mobile homes, officials must be careful
S V not to crush a small business.
The City Commission today is scheduled to hear the
second reading of a proposed ordinance that would
prohibit trailers with limited escape routes "FEMA
Park Model Trailers" from being in mobile home
parks. Officials point to a 2004 fire in which a woman
died from smoke inhalation while lying in her bathtub.
Her trailer was not of the variety under consideration;
it had front and back doors, whereas the FEMA trailers
have a front door and two windows on the same side of
the structure, which officials say limits escape.
It's puzzling why a nine-year-old fire is just now the
impetus for a new ordinance. But the most pressing
concern involves Katie Adair, owner of Mill-Village on
2952 E. Business 98, which is the property where the
2004 fatal trailer fire occurred.
Adair, who bought the property in 2010, says the city
is trying to retroactively impose the ordinance, forcing
her to remove two park model trailers. Shortly after she
placed the trailers there three years ago, code enforce-
ment officers cited her for a violation and ordered her
to remove the structures. She refused.
A city magistrate found the property was a "mobile
home park" and the park model trailers were not mo-
bile homes. The magistrate said the city was autho-
rized to remove the trailers and charge Adair for their
removal.
However, she appealed the decision, and last year
Judge Michael Overstreet disagreed with the magis-
trate's decision. He found that since the park model
trailers were not mobile homes, Adair was not in
violation of the city's ordinance against placing mobile
homes within city limits.
The city appealed the decision to the First District
Court of Appeal in August 2012, but the court denied
the appeal. Adair said code enforcement has contin-
ued to file violations against her property. She told The
News Herald's Zack McDonald that she has accrued
more than $20,000 in legal fees, which she said have
prevented her from being able to afford improvements
on the property.
"They are just bleeding me with lawyer fees, trying to
make me cave," Adair told McDonald.
. If the ordinance passes, Adair would have 30 days. to
file for appeal or possibly face removing the trailers at
her own expense.
,. The city shouldn't pass an ordinance that retroactively
punishes a property owner officials have been unable
to influence through due process of the legal system.
The ordinance should grandfather in existing proper-
ties, especially if there are unresolved questions about
the legality of the trailers. Or the city can just wait until
the issue is fully adjudicated before it changes the rules.
Panama City News-Herald


Contact your
representatives

Florida Legislature
State Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 5
District Office:
Administration Building, Room 186
Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle '
Marianna, FL 32446-1701 .
850-718-0047
www.MyFloridaHouse.gov

State Sen. Don Gaetz, R-District 1
District Office:
4300 Legendary Drive
Suite 230
Destin, FL 32541
850-897-5747
866-450-4366 (toll free)
www.FLSenate.gov

U.S. Congress
U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland II, R-2
1229 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
202-225-5235
@Rep_Southerland
www.Southerland.House.gov

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla.
716 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
202-224-5274
@SenBillNelson
www.BillNelson.Sehate.gov

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.
317 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
202-224-3041
@MarcoRubio
www.Rubio.Senate.gov


Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O. Box 520,
Marianna FL, 32447 or taxing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial@icfloridan.com. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call 850-526-3614.
-4


Boss, keep your nose out of my free time


BY PIERRE TRISTAM
In 1764, Geneva clockmaker
Robert Covelle had the experi-
ence of impregnating a woman
not his wife and the misfortune to
be sniffed out by the government.
He was required to get on his knees
and apologize to the city state and
to God. Absurd. But butting into
the private thoughts and affairs
of citizens had been the custom
for centuries. So were humiliating
rituals.
Covelle refused to kneel. Admit-
ting to an indiscretion was one
thing, genuflecting his apologies
quite another. It took five years
- and a little help from Voltaire
- but Covelle won his case. The
government abolished the genu-
flection ritual, and privacy's sphere
swelled a puff.
The American workplace is still
waiting for its Covelle. Government
has little sway over individuals'
private lives, but corporations' pre-
sumptions on workers' behavior on
and off the job have more in com-
mon with the inquisition than the
Bill of Rights. Transgressors aren't
made to kneel, quite. But they're
routinely humiliated, silenced,
censured or fired over speech or
behavior companies should have
no right to police.
The workplace has become a
virtual Panopticon. An architec-
tural design that usually applies to
prisons, in which authorities peer
down on inmates, is now imposed
on workers, within or without walls.
Thanks to computer tracking, video
surveillance, GPS, even those com-
puter-chipped ID cards employees
are almost always required to carry,
bosses can be all-seeing, all the
time. Every key, mouse-click and
email is logged, supposedly to en-
sure efficiency and prevent slouch-
ing, though it also may keep track '
(subtly if illegally), of unionizing


activity or whistleblowing. That's
when you're on the boss' time.
What of when you're not?
Let's not confuse the matter.
Employers can Google employees
all they please. But penalizing an
employee based on the results
crosses the line. Absent the dis-
covery of criminal activity, little to
nothing gives an employer the right
to discipline or fire an employee for
doing or saying or writing some-
thing off the job on Facebook, on
Twitter, on a blog anymore than
that employer has the right to fire
someone because of sex, religion
or race.
Yet it's routine, whether it in-
volves the firing of an employee
by a Christian boss because the
employee's agnostic podcasts are
discovered, the firing of a police
officer because his wife posed nude
or the innumerable cases of people
fired over Facebook indiscretions
(Lindsey Stone posting an image
of herself flipping the finger at the
Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in
Arlington comes to mind).
Let's take a recent and particu-
larly repugnant case repugnant
in every sense. Joseph Cassano
is the son of New York City's fire
commissioner. He was a paramedic
in the New York Fire Department,
which doesn't exactly have a stellar
reputation in the diversity de-
partment. Cassano had a Twitter
account. He was fired over it. Here
are three examples of his postings:
"MLK could go kick rocks for all I
care, but thanks for the time and
a half today." And: "Getting sick of
picking up all these Obama lovers
and taking them to the hospital
because their medicare pays for an
ambulance and not a cab." And: "I
like jews about as much as hitler
#toofar? NOPE."
Idiotic? Certainly. Offensive? Sure.
Bigoted? Absolutely. But firing him


for it is more offensive in every
sense not to the First Amend-
ment, which shouldn't be invoked
here, but to the right of every em-
ployee to be left alone off the clock.
Cassano did not do anything illegal.
He did not speak those words in the
conduct of his job. They are irrel-
evant to the conduct of his job, un-
less the department can document
that his personal bigotry affects his
performance. If every personally
racist employee were to be fired,
America's current unemployment
rate would rival that in the Depres-
sion (when bigotry on and off the
job was a national pastime).
It's not just the small fry who
pay the price. Executives are fired
over affairs (whether the bebedded
colleague reports to the executive
or not), Tweets and other undue
peeping at personal conduct.
Employers get away with the
voyeurism because we've let
them. They've blurred the line
between home and work to their
overwhelming advantage, becom-
ing what government and church
used to but are no longer allowed
to be: overlords of conduct at the
expense of personal privacy, its
sphere reduced to a puffy
illusion.
It's not enough that workers' pay
is. stagnant, benefits are eroding,
job security is nonexistent and
labor organizing is treated as firing
offense. The Bill of Rights now
stops not just at the employer's
door but at the employee's, too,
with little recourse in an economy
that keeps workers on their knees
by default.
I'm picturing Lindsey Stone's
finger again, in a far more deserv-
ing context.
Pierre Tristam is editor and publisher of Fla-
glerLive.com, a non-profit news service based
in Palm Coast, Fl. He can be reached at editor@
flaglerlive.com.


Letters to the Editor


Urge legislators to vote NO
on the 'Parent Trigger Bill'
In Jackson County we love our
schools. Along with our churches,
our schools are the backbone of
our communities. It is here that we
build lifelong bonds to our com-
mutnities. Many of our schools have
had generations of families attend-
ing and graduating from "their"
school. Our schools play a huge
role in what make Jackson County
the special place that it is.
There is a nefarious plan be-
ing put into place in Tallahassee
that will change the face of public
schools forever. In some instances
a school can struggle to make the
grade (fortunately, this is not the
case with our schools). If the "Par-
ent Trigger" bill is signed into law,
a struggling school will be targeted
by a privately owned charter-
school company for acquisition.
The company will then engineer
a hostile takeover of the school. If
more than half the school's parents
are convinced to sign a petition,
the school board will be forced to
turn the public school over to the
private company. This bill is be-
ing sold as a means to "empower'
parents. Parents already have a
legal place at the table. They are
a big part of any school. State law
already allows for a public school
to be converted to a charter school.
The irony of the situation is that
once a public school is taken over


by a private company, parents
are completely excluded from the
school's decision making process.
If the school board refuses to
grant the charter, the company can
appeal to the state Board of Educa-
tion. These companies have made
thousands of dollars in campaign
contributions, ensuring influence
over the decision making process.
The company can then "convince"
the State Board of Education to give
them control of the public, neigh-
borhood school. The State Board of
Education (please note that mem-
bers are all political appointees)
has the final say in this matter.
Some further points to consider;
) Children enrolled at the school
will have to enter a lottery to see if
they can continue to attend their
school. Meaning the neighborhood
school may not be available for
students who live near the school.
) State law prohibits geographic
attendance zones for charter
schools. A neighborhood school is
now open to the entire county.
) Qnce a privately owned charter-
school company takes over a public
school, there is.no mechanism for
parents to return the school to a
public school. The private compa-
ny will maintain ownership of the
public school unless the charter
school earns multiple F grades.
n Charter-school-management
companies are for-profit. They
charge fees of 10 percent to 15
percent for their services. This


guarantees that they make
money regardless of student
performance.
) Local school boards are
prohibited by law from limiting or
capping charter-company fees and
salaries, no matter how excessive.
Not much of this Parent Trigger
bill makes sense, unless you hap-
pen to own a private charter school
company. Several Legislators have
direct connections to these private
companies, yet see fit to pass laws
such as this.
School Districts throughout
the state have invested billions of
OUR tax dollars in public-school
land, buildings and infrastructure.
These neighborhood schools are
OUR schools. They don't belong to
the school board, the Legislature,
the governor, or the state Board
of Education and they certainly
don't belong to a privately owned,
for-profit charter-school company.
They belong to us because they've
been bought, paid for and main-
tained with our hard earned tax
dollars.
Please make sure all of our
neighborhood schools stay public
schools by urging the defeat of this
bad legislation. Please call Senator
Gaetz today at 850-487-5001 and
tell him to vote NO on the Parent
Trigger Bill.
Regards,
DAVE GALLOWAY
President, JCEA
Grand Ridge


Gaetz


Nelson


INH ROWmIN










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Microsoft

assault on

Google shows

industry shift
The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO
- Microsoft is skewer-
ing Google again with ads
and regulatory bashing
that say as much about
the dramatic shift in the
technology industry's
competitive landscape as
they do about the animos-
ity between the two rivals.
The ads that began
Tuesday mark the third
phase in a 5-month-old
marketing campaign that
Microsoft Corp. derisively
calls "Scroogled." The
ads, which have appeared
online, on television and
in print, depict Google as
a duplicitous company
more interested in increas-
ing profits and power than
protecting people's privacy
and providing unbiased
search results.
This time, Microsoft is
vilifying Google Inc. for
sharing some of the per-
sonal information that it
gathers about people who
buy applications designed
to run on smartphones
and tablet computers
powered by Google's
Android software. Earlier
ads have ripped Google's
long-running practice'of
electronically scanning the
contents of people's Gmail
accounts to help sell ads.
Other ads attacked a re-
cently introduced
policy that requires retail-
ers to pay to appear in
the shopping section of
Google's dominant search
engine.
"We think we have a bet-
ter alternative that doesn't
do these kinds of nefarious
things," said Greg Sullivan,
Microsoft's senior man-
ager for Windows Phone,
the business taking aim
at Google's distribution
of personal information
about buyers of Android
apps.'


U.S. companies are posting more jobs, filling few


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON U.S.
employers have more job
openings than at any oth-
er time in nearly five years.
That's in part because they
seem in no hurry to fill
them.
And it helps explain
why the job market
remains tight and unem-
. ployment high. Even as
openings have surged 11
percent in the past year,
the number of people
hired each month has
declined.
Why so many openings
yet so few hires?
Economists point to
several factors: Some un-
employed workers lack
the skills employers want.
Some companies may
not be offering enough
pay. And staffing firms


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In this Jan. 22 photo, job seekers meet with employers at a
job fair in Sunrise, Fla.


and employment experts
say that in a still-fragile
economy, many busi-
nesses seem hesitant to
commit to new hires.
They appear to be hold-
ing out for the perfect
candidate.
"We're living in a fear-


based environment right
now," says Kim First, CEO
of The Agency Worldwide,
a recruiting firm for phar-
maceutical and biotech
companies.
Those who do have jobs
these days are unlikely to
lose them. Layoffs have


sunk to a pre-recession hiring remained lower
level. than it was a year ago,
But First says that corn- when it was nearly
panies feel they can't 4.5 million.
afford to take a risk by The figures suggest that
hiring someone who the Great Recession may
doesn't appear to be an have transformed the
ideal fit for the job they've job market in ways that
advertised', economists still don't fully
"They are reallyreluctant understand. Normally,
to make that leap of faith," more openings lead, over
she says. Companies "need time, to stronger hir-
someone to come in and ing and steadily lower
hit the ground running." unemployment.
The Labor Department Yet in May 2008, when
said Tuesday. that the job openings were as nu-
number of job openings merous as they are now,
rose 8.7 percent in Feb- the unemployment rate
ruary from January to a was 5.4 percent. Now, it's
seasonally adjusted 3.93 7.6 percent.
million. That was the most And in 2007, before the
since May 2008. recession began, em-
At the same time, corn- players were hiring an
panies hired a season- average of 5.2 million
ally adjusted 4.4 million people a month 15 per-
people, just 2.8 percent cent more than in Febru-
more than in January. And ary this year.


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The'Associated Press

NEWYORK Materials
and energy companies led
the stock market higher
Tuesday, sending the Dow
Jones industrial average
to its second all-time high
in a week.
The Dow closed at
14,673.46, a gain of 59.98
points, or 0.4 percent.
'The Standard & Poor's
500 index also rose 0.4
percent, closing less
than two points below its
own all-time high set
April 2.
The prices of metals like
copper, gpld and silver
have rebounded this week
after slumping for the
first three months of the
year on waning demand.
Oil is also rising
following a sharp decline
last week.
"You're seeing some
pretty decent action in


the overall market, with
today's leadership com-
ing from the basic mate-
rials sector," said Robert
Pavlik, chief market strat-
egist at Banyan Partners.
"It's an area of the mar-
ket that does represent
some value because it's
underperformed."
The rise in basic materi-
als such as precious met-
als was caused by a weak-
ening of the dollar against
other currencies, HSBC
analyst Howard Wen said.
Commodities are typi-
cally priced in dollars and
a decline in the currency
allows overseas buyers
to purchase materials at
lower prices.
Materials companies
were the biggest gainers
of the 10 industry groups
in the S&P 500, rising 1.1
percent. Energy compa-
nies posted the second
best return, increasing


0.8 percent. Those two
groups have been among
the weakest in the market
this year.
On Tuesday the S&P
500 rose 5.54 points to
' 1,568.61. The index closed
at a record high of 1,570.25
on April 2. The Nasdaq
composite gained 15.61
points, or 0.5 percent, to
3,237.86.
The gains suggested that
the Dow and S&P 500 may
be poised to break out of
a trading pattern they've
followed for the last three
weeks.
Stocks have mostly
moved sideways since
the middle of March. The
Dow has alternated be-
tween small gains and
losses after starting the
year on a tear. Signs of
slowing growth and con-
cerns about the outlook
for Europe had checked
investors' confidence.


Penney CEO's challenge: Can it be fixed?


The Associated Press

NEWYORK-- There
won't be an easy fix for J.C.
Penney if it can be fixed
at all.
As Mike Ullman takes
the reins again less than
two years after his depar-
ture, he faces a Herculean
task to undo the mess
left by CEO Ron Johnson,
who was ousted Monday.
With the department store
retailer in the middle of a
disastrous overhaul that
has driven away shoppers,
the 66-year-old Ullman
has to quickly figure out
what parts of Johnson's
legacy to keep and what to
trash.
The overarching ques-
tion is whether the
century-old company can
be saved at all. Very few
retailers have recovered
from a 25 percent sales
drop in a single year, like
that suffered by Penney.
under Johnson's watch.
On Tuesday, the retailer's
stock price dropped more
than 12 percent to a 12-
year-low of $13.93 as in-
vestors' worries escalated
about Penney's future.
"Ullman can't go back
to the old ways, but he
can't do what Ron Johnson
did," said Ron Friedman,
head of the retail and
consumer products group
at Marcum LLP, a national
accounting and consulting
firm. "I think there will be
a combination of the two.
But he has to make some
quick moves." 1
Apparently, the com-
pany's board of directors
felt Ullman, who served
as Penney's CEO for seven
years and is known for
strong relationships with
suppliers and calm, steady
execution, would be the
best choice right now to
secure the company's"
future. But it could take
Ullman 18 months to
stabilize the business, says
Burt Flickinger III, presi-
dent of retail consultancy
Strategic Resource Group.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A hopper carries a J.C.
Penney bag, Tuesday, in New
York.

He gives the chain a 50-50
chance to survive.
"The odds are declining
every day," said Flickinger,
noting that rivals like
Macy's are taking away
market share. "Com-
petitors see blood in the
water."
Johnson, the master-
mind behind Apple Inc.'s
successful retail stores,
lasted just 17 months. He
faced an ever-growing
chorus of critics calling
for his resignation as they
lost faith in the aggressive
overhaul. The rapid-fire
changes included get-


ting rid of coupons and
most discounts in favor
of everyday low prices,
bringing in new brands
and remaking its outdated
stores. Johnson's goal was
to reinvent the stodgy
retailer into a mini-mall of
hip specialty shops.
Instead, Penney's
loyal shoppers went in
search of deals elsewhere,
and the chain didn't at-
tract the younger and
more affluent shoppers
that Johnson coveted.
Now the 1,100-store
chain is burning through
cash. In the past year, the
company lost nearly a
billion dollars and saw its
revenue tumble by nearly
$4.3 billion to $12.98
billion. Customer traf-
fic dropped 13 percent.
Steep sales declines have
continued, say analysts,
even though Johnson
added back some sales
events and coupons early
this year.
Some speculate that
Ullman may ditch the
everyday price strategy
and instead ramp up the
return to discounting and
coupons to get shoppers
back in the stores. But that


Rapid Weight Loss has


will still be an expensive
move. Michael Binetti,
an analyst at UBS Invest-
ment Research, and others
believe that Ullman also
will temporarily suspend
the rollout of the mini-
shops, which started late
last year and feature such
brands as Joe Fresh and
Levi's.
When the overhaul of its
home area is completed
next month, the company
will have carved up 30 per-
cent of its store space into
mini-boutiques. But after
that, Ullman is expected
to pull back the pace of
the rollout as Penney tries
to conserve cash. That
means that some suppli-
ers who expected to have
mini-shops could be left
in the lurch.
Ullman also will have
to find ways to boost em-
ployee morale amid
severe cuts that have
slashed the work force by
nearly 30 percent.


Dow Jones average doses


at another record high


Isn't it time you led a Spry life?

Inside the Jackson County Floridan tomorrow

Jillian Michaels Encourages OINvUs ONw ACEso oo,...
Parents To Create IS'
A Healthy Legacy For Their Kids -

A Menu Plan To Boost Your STRONq
Metabolism -fi

Top Sports For Kids Who Hate
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Dr. Oz And The Experts At
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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013 o 5A-


BUSINESS









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


JTE KIDS


i.i ,lIT iEi Hl: ,
Sophia Lynn Toole is the daughter of
Miranda Moats and Sean Toole of
Marianna.


SUBMI IDtuT PUIU
Isaiah Jaice Jorge is the son of Miranda
Moats of Marianna.


Judge undecided on
sale of Anthony story
TAMPA- A judge said
Tuesday that he will take
30 days before deciding
whether the trustee in
Casey Anthony's bank-
ruptcy case can sell the
commercial rights to her
life story as a means to
clear some of her out-
standing debts.
Federal Judge K. Rod-
ney May said that though
he is worried about
the effect on imposing


long-term restrictions on
Anthony, he will review
the motion submitted
by bankruptcy trustee
Stephen Meininger.
"I am skeptical about
the property rights," May
said. "It could be used as
an injunction dressed up
as a sale."
Meininger's lawyer
said that he has received
offers of $10,000 and
$12,000 from people who
want to purchase the
rights to the story.
From wire reports


GAS WATCH
Gas' prices are going up. Here are
the least expensive places to buy
gas in Jackson County, as of'
Tuesday afternoon.
1. $3.44, McCoy's Food Mart,
2823 Jefferson St., Marianna
2. $3.48, Mobil Food Mart, 2999
Jefferson, Marianna
3. $3.48, Murphy Oil, 2255 U.S.
71 S., Marianna
4. $3.49, KMEE II,539210th St.,
Malone
5. $3.49, LOVES Travel Center,
2510 U.S. 231, Cottondale
6. $3.49, Pilot, 2209 U.S. 71,
Marianna
7. $3.49, Travel Center, 2112 U.S.
71 S., Marianna
8. $3.51, BP-Steel City, 2184
U.S. 231 S., Alford
If you see a lower price,
contact the Floridan newsroom
at editorial@icfloridan.com.


SES TOP READERS


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Pictured are Sneads Elementary School students who earned the highest A.R. points for
the third nine weeks and were recently awarded reading ribbons. Students are listed
by grade and points earned. First grade: Gabbi Sellers, 26.4; Jake Porter, 24.8; and Ella
Sprouse, 18.5. Second grade:Tristan Jones, 59.0; Morgan Edwards, 38.2; and Tommy Dunaway,
37.6. Third grade: Peyton Brown, 50.9; Abigail Hicks, 47.1; and Sunshine Ayers, 39.8. Fourth
grade: Katelyn Dunaway, 106; Hunter Grooms, 91; and Elise Smith, not pictured, 83.3. Fifth
grade:Faith Hardin, 169.1; Trevor Carpenter, 145.1; and Lucy Sloan, 118.6.



Gambling parlors contributed to officials


The Associated Press

ORLANDO The
number of strip-mall
parlors with slot-like
computer games such
as those targeted in a
racketeering investigation
could shrink if the Florida
governor, as expected,
signs a bill banning the
operations that have
contributed more than
$100,000 to local political
campaigns:
Some estimates put the
number of gaming parlors
in Florida at almost 1,000,
and investigators targeted
almost 50 affiliated with
AlliedVeteransoftheWorld.
The purported charity was
a front for a $300 million
gambling operation and
gave just a small portion
toward veterans, state
investigators have said.
The defendants say the
parlors are merely places
where people can legally
play sweepstakes games
while using the Internet.
But Florida legislators last
week voted to ban them
and Gov. Rick Scott was
expected to sign the bill
Wednesday and his office
said the law will take effect
right away.
What is unclear is
whether gaming parlor
interests will challenge


it in court. Tallahassee
attorney David Ramba,
who is an agent for many
of the political committees
that represent the industry,
said he. has told his
clients to shut down their
operations Tuesday night.
Nearly 90 local officials
and candidates in 20
Florida counties received
political contributions
from the parlors -
sometimes called "Internet
cafes" their owners and
their political committees
over the past few years,
according to an Associated
Press review of county-by-
county campaign records.
It included a sheriff whose
agency was a part of the
probe.
On the state level,
more than $1 million was
contributed to officials and
candidates by companies
with ties to Allied Veterans.
Some top ,politicians in
Florida and North Carolina
scrambled to give back the
money or at least explain
it. Former Lt. Gov. Jennifer
Carroll resigned last month
after she was interviewed
as part of the probe. She
denies wrongdoing.
In local races that
usually cost much less
to run, the gambling
affiliates and their owners
donated to sheriffs, judges,


Florida Lottery

Mon. (E) 4/08 4-6-2 4-2-2-3 13-17-19-28.32
Mon. (M) 9-2-5 6-2-8-9
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Wed. (E) 4/03 9-5-9 1.01.1 7.10-1719 22
Wed. (M) 8-0 6 84-74
Thurs (E) 4/04 6-3-4 0-3-8-2 8-21-32-33-34


Thurs. ,(M)
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Sun (M)


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4-06 4.7829-39


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Saturday 4-06 21316
Saturday 4-06 2.131617


mayoral candidates,
county commissioners,
prosecutors, clerks of
courts, property appraisers
and tax collectors.
The bulk of the
contributions were in
Duval County, home
to Jacksonville, where
officials received about
$50,000 from the local


parlors and their owners.
The Jacksonville City
Council in 2010 considered
shutting down the
centers. But city council
members instead passed
compromise legislation
that capped the number of
existing cafes and required
them to pay fees and be
better regulated.


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Cookie Monster, Elmo get in Times Square trouble
The Associated Prgss L r . l'4 1F -~]


NEW YORK Cookie
Monster stands accused
of shoving a 2-year-old.
Super Mario was charged
with groping a woman.
And Elmo was booked for
berating tourists with anti-
Semitic slurs.
Times Square is crawl-
ing with entrepreneurs
who dress up as pop-cul-
ture characters and try to
make a few bucks posing
for photos with visitors to
the big city. But some of
these characters are unlike
anything you've seen on
"Sesame Street" or at Dis-
neyWorld.
They smoke, they use
foul language, and they
can be aggressive. At least
three of them have been
arrested in the past seven
months.
"He was using words that
were really bad," said Par-
mita Kurada of Stamford,
Conn., who told police she
got into a dispute this week
with a man in a Cookie
Monster costume who de-
manded $2 for posing with
her 2-year-old son, Samay.
Kurada said that when
she told the Cookie Mon-
ster that her husband
needed to get cash, the
shaggy blue creature
pushed the boy and began
calling her and the child
obscene names.
"It was very scary for us,


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Elmo and two Hello Kitty characters pose for photos with a little girl in New York's Times Square
on Tuesday.
and I was crying. I didn't In the wake of the latest $2 and $5 a photo as long
want to provoke him, so arrest, the bustling "Cross- as they don't block traffic,
I said, 'We'll give you the roads of the World" was sell merchandise or de-
money, but stop yelling!'" filled Tuesday with per- mand payment, police say.
she said. former, including multi- That's a ticketable offense
Osvaldo Quiroz-Lopez, pie versions of Mickey and that can cost about $60.
33, was charged with as- Minnie Mouse, Hello Kitty, "1 don't think they should
sault, child endangerment a Transformer robot, Lady charge, but if they're un-
and aggressive begging. Liberty, Super Mario and employed or homeless,
His lawyer did not im- Elmo.* and this is the only way
mediately return a call for Many of them are immi- they can make money,


comment.
Asked by a WNBC-TV
reporter why he no lon-
ger likes the character he
sees on "Sesame Street,"
little Samay said: "Because
Cookie Monster give me
boo-boo."


grants trying to eke out a
living in what appear to be
knockoff costumes.
As street performers pro-
tected by the First Amend-
ment, they are free to roam
Times Square and work for
tips that average between


it's OK,". said Lauren Lar-,
cara of Oakland, N.J., who
posed with a torch-carry-
ing Statue of Liberty.
Laura Vanegas, a 45-.
year-old native of Ecuador,
changes into her Liberty
robes and applies copper-


green face paint behind
the Times Square military
recruiting station. She said
she picks up $30 to $50 on
her eight-hour shift.
Steve Crass, dressed as
a robot in fluorescent red
and white plastic panels,
said he has made as much
as $280 during his six-hour
stint in front of Toys R Us.
He acknowledged: "Some
. of the characters are a little
too aggressive."
Police spokesman Paul
Browne said in an email
that the department has
had "occasional issues
with the 'faux paws' in
Times Square, but they're
nominal."
The case against the Su-
per Mario charged with
groping is still pending.
The Elmo accused of an
anti-Semitic rant pleaded
guilty in September to dis-
orderly conduct and was
sentenced to two days of
community service.
City Council Speaker
Christine Quinn called the
Cookie Monster case "just
horrible" and said law-
makers have been looking
into how to regulate the
characters. But she noted
the issue is, well, fuzzy.
"It's very challenging le-
gally because dressing up
in a costume and walking
around Times Square is,
we believe, a First Amend-
ment-protected activity,"


said Quinn, a candidate to
be New York's next mayor.
Similar'cases of misbe-
havior by costumed per-
formers have been report-
ed in Hollywood.
Disney did not respond
to a request for comment,
while the Sesame Work-
shop, the organization be-
hind "Sesame Street," said
it has not authorized such
uses of any its characters in
any city and is looking into
what actions it can take.
Anthony Elia, a New
York lawyer in the intel-
lectual-property field, said
the entertainment groups
probably have a case for
trademark infringement,
but "the challenge prob-
ably would be getting a
bunch of self-employed
entrepreneurial individu-
als to stop."
It's not the easiest way
to make a living. On a
day when temperatures
pushed 80, they sweated
in their outfits, coming out
from under their oversized
costume heads only to
grab a hot dog or a smoke.
When one posed for a
photo, two or three others
dashed over and joined in.
"Want to take a picture?"
a furry red Elmo asked a
tourist. Moments later,
he declined to speak to a
reporter, saying through
his costume, "I no speak
English."


Gun control vote set
Thursday in Senate
WASHINGTON-The
Senate's top Democrat
is setting Congress' first
showdown vote for Thurs-
day on President Barack
Obama's gun control drive
as a small but mounting
number of Republicans
appear willing to buck
a conservative effort to
prevent debate from even
beginning.
Majority Leader Harry
Reid of Nevada an-
nounced his decision
Tuesday as the White
House, congressional
Democrats and relatives of
the victims of December's
mass shooting in New-
town, Conn., amped up
pressure on GOP lawmak-
ers.to allow debate and
votes on gun control pro-
posals. Twenty first-grad-
ers and six educators were
gunned down at Sandy
Hook Elementary School,
turning gun control into a
top-tier national issue.
"We have a responsi-
bility to safeguard these
little kids," Reid said on
the Senate floor, pointing
to a poster-sized photo
of a white picket fence
that had slats bearing the
names of the Newtown
victims. "And unless We
do something more,than
what's the law today, we
have failed."


Briefs


Police: Pilot of fatal,
flight was testing
WASHINGTON Tex-
ting by the pilot of a medi-
cal helicopter contributed
to a crash that killed four
people, federal accident
investigators declared
Tuesday, and they ap-
proved a safety alert cau-
tioning all pilots against
using cellphones or other
.distracting devices during
critical operations.
It was the first fatal com-
mercial aircraft accident
investigated by the Na-
tional Transportation Safe-
ty Board in which texting
has been implicated. And
it underscored the board's
worries that distractions
from electronic devices
are a growing factor in
incidents across all modes
of transportation.
While no U.S. airline
crashes have been tied
to electronic device use,
the Federal Aviation
Administration in Janu-
ary proposed regulations
prohibiting airline flight
crews from using cell- .
phones and other wireless
devices while a plane is in
operation.

Voters pick Jackson
Jr.s House successor
CHICAGO -While
Democrat Robin Kelly is
widely expected to capture


Tuesday's special elec-
tion for former U.S. Rep.
Jesse Jackson Jr.'s seat over
Republican Paul McKinley,
any winner will face big
challenges.
. Illinois' newest member
of Congress will have big
shoes to fill: Jackson was
a 17-year incumbent who
served on the powerful
House Appropriations
Committee and brought,
home nearly $1 billion to


the district. He also had
strong relationships with
mayors, activists and vot-
ers across the district that
includes city neighbor-
hoods, suburbs and some
rural areas.
Jackson pleaded guilty in
February in federal court
to lavishly misspending
$750,000 in campaign
funds.

From wire reports


lDebbie Itoney Smith

850-209-8039 cell
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NATION









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Obituaries

James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332
www.jiimi sandtsl lkestluinw homns.comn

Adam E.
Bigale

Adam E, Bigale, 74, of Ma-
rianna, died Monday, April
8, 2013, at Chipola Nursing
Pavilion.
Arrangements will be an-
nounced by James & Sikes
Funeral Home Maddox
Chapel.


Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456
10


Report

The following marriages
and divorces were record-
ed in Jackson County
during the week of April
1-5:
Marriages
n Charles Speights and
Karen Lasha Jones.
)) Brian Matthew Coom-
er and Jill Marci Jackson.
)) Allen Tyrone Ruff, Jr.
and Jessica McCleland
Jackson.
)) John Donald Frank and
Kristine Rae Reuschling.
) Christopher Rondall
Bess and Noy Segev.
) Frank Allen White and
Sharon Denise Godwin.
)) Jody Dewayne Toole
and Linda Kay Haynes.
Divorces
) Nacole Thomas vs.
Archie Lee Thomas.
a Judy Lynn Roberts vs.
Darrell Richard Roberts.
) Susan Jones Covington
vs. William Covington.
) Kristina Rae'Johnson
vs. David Giles Johnson.


Student


arrested


in college


stabbings

The Associated Press

CYPRESS, Texas A stu-
dent went on a building-
to-building stabbing at-
tack at a Texas community
college Tuesday, wounding
at least 14 people many
in the face and neck be-
fore being subdued and
arrested, authorities and
witnesses said.
The attack about 11:20
a.m. on the Lone Star
Community College Sys-
tem's campus in Cypress
sent at least 12 people to
hospitals, while several
others refused treatment
at the scene, according to
Cy-Fair Volunteer Fire
Department spokesman
Robert Rasa. Two people
remained in critical con-
dition Tuesday evening at
Memorial Hermann Texas
Trauma Institute, spokes-,
woman Alex Rodriguez
said.
Diante Cotton, 20,
said he was sitting in'
a cafeteria with some
friends when a girl clutch-
ing her neck walked in,
yelling, "He's stabbing
people! He's stabbing
people!"
Cotton said he could not
see the girl's injuries, but
when he and his friends
went outside, they saw a
half-dozen people with
injuries to their faces and
necks being loaded into
ambulances and medical
helicopters.


Budget cuts ground Air Force, Navy aircraft


The Associated Press

NORFOLK, Va. The
U.S. Air Force plans to
ground about a third of its
active-duty force of com-
bat planes and a top gen-
eral warned Tuesday that
the branch might not be
able to respond immedi-
ately to every event when
needed.
The Air Force didn't im-
mediately release a list of
the specific units and bas-
es that would be affected
on Tuesday, but it said it
would 'cover some fight-
ers, bombers and airborne
warning and control air-
craft in the U.S.., Europe
and the Pacific.
Gen. Mike Hostage,
commander of Air Combat
Command at Joint Base
Langley-Eustis in Virginia,
said the branch would
focus its budget and re-
sources on units support-
ing major missions, like
the war in Afghanistan,
while other units stand
down on a rotating basis.


THEASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In a May 29, photo, a formation of U.S. Navy Blue Angel
fighter jets perform a flyover during the United States Na-
val Academy graduation and commissioning ceremonies in
Annapolis, Md.


"The current situation
means we're accepting
the risk that combat air-
power may not be ready to
respond immediately to
new contingencies as they
occur," Hostage said in a
statement.
The Air 'Force says, on
average, aircrews "lose
currency" to fly combat
commissions within 90 to


120 days of not flying and
that it generally takes 60
to 90 days to conduct the
training needed to return
aircrews to mission-ready
status.
Returning grounded
units to mission ready sta-
tus will require additional
funds beyond Air Com-
bat Command's normal
budget, according to Air


Force Officials.
"Even a six-month stand
down of units will have
significant long-term,
multi-year impacts on our
operational readiness,"
Air Combat Command
spokesman Maj. Brandon
Lingle wrote in an email to
The Associated Press.
For affected units, the
Air Force says it will shift
its focus to ground train-
ing. That includes the
use of flight simulators
and. academic train-
ing to maintain basic
skills and aircraft knowl-
edge, Lingle said. Aircraft
maintainers plan to clear
up as much of a backlog
of scheduled inspections
and maintenance that
budgets allow.
On the same day, the
U.S. Navy confirmed that
the Blue Angels aerobatic
team would be cancelling
the rest of its season.
Toin Frosch, the Blue
Angels lead pilot and team
commander, announced
the news late Tuesday


Cuba to turn over Florida couple and children


The Associated Press


HAVANA Cuba said
Tuesday that it will turn
over to the United-States
a Florida couple who al-
legedly kidnapped their
own children from the
mother's parents and fled
by boat to Havana, ending
days of drama that evoked
memories of the Elian
Gonzalez custody battle of
more than a decade ago.
Foreign Ministry offi-
cial Johana Tablada told
The Associated Press in a
written statement Tues-
day that Cuba had in-
formed U.S. authorities of
the country's decision to
turn over Joshua Mi-
chael Hakken, his wife
Sharyn, and their two
young boys.
She did not say when the
handover would occur,
but reporters saw Sharyn
Hakken leaving the dock
of Havana's Hemning-
way Marina in the back
seat of a Cuban govern-
ment vehicle and workers
later said that all four



Dozier
From Page 1A

and to determine whether
a separate cemetery was
also located on the cam-
pus, given that segregation
policies of the time could
make that a likely reality.
Unknowns about the
burial grounds have been
rumored for years, fueled
in part by stories of ex-
treme beatings and abuse
at the institution's infa-
mous "White House" pun-
ishment room.
In a report created by the
University of South Flori-
da professor who has led
the examination of Dozier
grounds so far, Dozier
death records have been
characterized as spotty
and conflicting in places.
Additionally, she point-
ed out in her report, the
crosses that were placed
in the Boot Hill cemetery



Property
From Page 1A
County Administrator
Ted Lakey gave commis-
sioners some estimated
numbers to consider be-
tween now and the work-
shop. To build a 10,000
square-foot building,
about the size the com-
munity development de-
partment would need, the
county would probably
need to borrow almost $2
million, with annual pay-
ments of $124,632 over 20
years likely, Lakey said.
To build a 55,000 square-


IHs A S I ';iSS
This photo combination made from undated images
provided by the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office shows
35-year-old Joshua Michael Hakken, (left) and his wife,
34-year-old Sharyn Patricia Hakken.


Hakkens had been taken
away.
An AP reporter spotted
the family earlier Tues-
day beside their boat at
the marina. A man who
resembled photographs
of Joshua Michael Hak-
ken yelled out "Stop! Stay
back!" as the reporter ap-
proached, but there was
no outward sign of ten-
sion or distress between
the family members.
Tablada said the Foreign


were put there long after
its use was discontinued.
A Boy Scout team did
that work symbolically in
honor of the deceased, in
some cases many decades
after the deaths, and did
not work from records
that would allow accurate
placement of the crosses
as true grave markers. She
advocates for exhuma-
tion so that a dependable
record can be established
and all remains potentially
identified.
, But, with some of the
bodies in the ground for
many decades, and with
no easy way to find all
descendants to obtain
comparative DNA, local
officials are not convinced
that can be Ultimately
done, and question the
worth of the plan. No re-
lation to attorney Cox, lo-
cal historian Dale Cox is
one source county com-
missioners depend on for
some of their information,


foot structure to house
most county departments,
the county might have to
borrow almost $11 mil-
lion, with 20 years of an-
nual payments coming to
roughly, $692,136, Lakey
suggested.
He also estimated costs
for building structures at
sizes between those two
extremes.
The board also talked
about potential funding
sources for the construc-
tion. They have an escrow
fund they set aside several
years ago with a portion
of the money generated
from host fees the county


Ministry had informed
U.S. diplomats on the is-
land "of the Cuban govern-
imn iljt's willingness to turn
over ... U.S. citizens Joshua
Michael Hakken, his wife
Sharyn Patricia and their
two minor sons."
She said Cuba tipped
the State Department
off to the Hakkens' pres-
ence on Sunday and that
from that moment "dip-
lomatic contact has been
exchanged and a profes-


and have assigned him to
assist Baker in represent-
ing the county's interest
in court. AG attorney Cox
said he found historian
Cox to be a wealth of in-
formation once they met
and consulted, and said
that the historian has
shown him plat maps and
other information that
may help support the be-
lief that no other grave-
yard exists, and that might
help the state's attempt
to answer some of the lin-
gering questions about
Dozier.
Historian Cox has ex-
pressed opposition to the
wholesale exhumation of
remains several times at
public gatherings, saying
there is ample informa-
tion in the record to make
clear who is buried there.
Further, he says, the fami-
lies of the deceased should
be consulted before the re-
mains are disturbed. The


sional and constant com-
munication has been
maintained."
U.S. authorities say Hak-
ken kidnapped his sons,
4-year-old Cole and 2-
year-old Chase, from his
mother-in-law's house
north of Tampa. The boys'
inaternal grandparents
had been granted perma-
nent custody of the boys
last week.
The U.S. and Cuba share
no extradition agree-
ment and the island na-
tion is also not a signatory
of the Hague Convention
on the Civil Aspects of
International Child Ab-
duction, an international
treaty for governmen-
tal cooperation on such
cases.
Cuba has harbored
U.S. fugitives in the past,
though most of those
cases date back to the
1960s and 70s, when the
island became a refuge
for members of the Black
Panthers and other mili-
tant groups. More recent-
ly, dozens of Cuban Medi-


and only been able to find
family members for eight
of the 50 or more boys
buried there, he said, is a
strong indicator that, if the
exhumation does proceed,
the state will be no closer
to identifying the remains
by individual than they
are now, since descendant
DNA would be needed for
comparison.
He was there Tuesday to
reiterate his stance on the
issue, and tempers flared
as the various parties dis-
cussed the matter. After
Landry likened the Dozier
"White House" punish-
ment room to an area he
had seen as a soldier on a
visit to a World War II-era
Dachau concentration
camp and gas chamber
site in Germany, historian
Cox responded. "Dachau?
Really?," he said in an in-
credulous tone, repeating
the phrase loudly after
Landry left the podium


care fraud fugitives in the
U.S. have tried to escape
prosecution by returning
to the .island.
But Cuba has cooper-
ated with U.S. authorities
in returning several crimi-
nal fugitives in recent
years, including. Leon-
ard B. Auerbach in 2008.
Auerbach was wanted
in California on federal
charges of sexually abus-
ing a Costa Rican girl and
possessing child pornog-
raphy. He was deported.
In 2011, U.S. marshals
flew to Cuba and took
custody of two American
suspects wanted in a New
Jersey murder.
Hakken lost custody of
his sons last year after a
drug possession arrest in
Louisiana and later tried
to take the children from
a foster home at gunpoint,
authorities said. A war-
rant has been issued for
his arrest on two counts of
kidnapping; .interference
with child custody; child
neglect; false imprison-
ment and other charges.


his own say at the dais.
Then turning to address
commissioners, he com-
mented that, if Dozier's
White House was compa-
rable to Dachau, "Then
I'm Santa Claus."
Earlier, when former
NAACP President El-
more Bryant questioned
the motives of historian
Cox in objecting to the
exhumation of all graves
at Dozier, Cox stood up
from his seat in the audi-
ence and pointed out that
he was in fact in the room
available to answer for his
motivations.
Later, when historian
Cox and two or three other
people-notrepresentatives
of NAACP-were speaking
in loud apparently con-
frontational voices out-
side the meeting room, a
deputy stepped outside to
check on the dispute. The
parties dispersed with no
law enforcement interven-


fact that the state has tried and he stepped up to have tion necessary.


receives from Waste Man-
agement. That source
generates about _: .'II 11111)
a year, but the ligore fluc-
tuates to some extend
because the fee is based in
part on how much waste
is taken to the landfill in
a given reporting period.
Since its establishment
in 2005, it has generated
more. than $1,746,000,
ibut commissioners have
dipped into it to buy the
Lewis Building next to the
current administrative
office, as well as to pur-
chase the free-standing
Supervisor of E'lections
office a block away. The


board has also spent
some of the fund on cer-
tain improvements to the
Jackson County Courf-
house. There's now a bal-
ance in that account of
$519,882.
After 2014, the county
will see an influx of tax
money if it doesn't renew
the then-expiring 10-year
tax break that it gave Fam-
ily Dollar as an incentive
to bring its distribution
center here. The annual
tax revenue from that
source is estimated at al-
most $260,000.
The county also gets
rental dollars for space


it leases to entities in a
building downtown, that
'income coming to more
than $200,000 a year.
Commissioners also have
access to a utility fund of
roughly $2.7 million a year
that the county depends
heavily upon to fund cer-
tain general revenue ex-
penses but which might
also be tapped for addi-
tional purposes.
Commissioners will meet
in their regular last-of-the-
month board session im-
mediately following the
workshop, but no decision
on the space issue is ex-
pected at either meeting.


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at the team's Pensacola
Naval Air Station head-
quarters standing in front
of the one of the iconic
blue-and-gold jets. Frosch
said the news marks the
first time since the Korean
War that the team would
not make the air show
rounds.
"The Navy held off as
long as possible with the
hope of salvaging some of
the season," Frosch said.
"We hope we'll be turned
back on for 2014."
As the news trickled
out, business owners and
residents of the coastal
enclave where the team is
based were disappointed.
"I just think it's sad that
there are political games
being played. I doubt the
Blue Angels are even half
of 1 percent of the en-
tire Navy budget," said
Lloyd Proctor, co-owner
of Blue Angel Hot Tubs in
Pensacola. Proctor and his
wife named their business
after the team 10 years
ago.


WEDNESDAY, APRIL10, 2013 9AF


LOCAL & NATION









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Briefs
NKorean capital
shows calm, not panic
PYONGYANG, North
Korea Scores of North
Koreans of all ages planted
trees as part of a foresta-
tion campaign armed
with shovels, not guns. In
the evening, women in
traditional dress danced
in the plazas to celebrate
the 20th anniversary of
the late leader Kim Jong
Il's appointment to a key
defense post.
Despite more warn-
ings from their leaders of
impending nuclear war,
people in the capital gave
no sense of panic.
Chu Kang Jin, a Pyong-
yang resident, said every-
thing is calm in the city.
"Everyone, including me,
is determined to turn out
as one to fight for national
reunification ... if the
enemies spark a war," he
added.
The North's latest warn-
ing, issued by its Asia-Pa-
cific Peace Committee,
urged foreign companies
and tourists to leave South
Korea.

Iraq AI-Qaida unites
with Syrian group
BEIRUT Al-Qaida's
branch in Iraq and the
most powerful rebel
extremist group in Syria
have officially joined ranks
against President Bashar
Assad to forge a poten-
tially formidable militant
force in the Middle East.
The merger of the Islam-
ic State in Iraq and Jabhat
al-Nusra forms a new
entity that could be an
even stronger opponent in
the fight to topple Assad
and become a dominant
player in what eventually
replaces his regime.
The new group, called
the Islamic State in Iraq
and the Levant, un-
derscores the growing
confidence and muscle of
Islamist radicals fighting
on the rebel side in Syria's
civil war.

Man kills 13 people in
shooting rampage
VELIKA IVANCA, Serbia
- He went from house
to house in the village at
dawn, cold-bloodedly
gunning down his mother,
his son, a 2-year-old cous-
in and 10 other neighbors.
Terrified residents said if
a police patrol car hadn't
shown up, they all would
have been dead.
Police said they knew
of no motive yet in the
carnage Tuesday that left
six men, six women and
a child dead in Velika
Ivanca, a Serbian village
(30 miles southeast of
Belgrade.
From wire reports


AMghan women in prison over 'moral' crimes
The Associated Press "


KABUL Lost and alone
in a strange city Mariam
called the only person
she knew, her husband's
cousin. She worried he
wouldn't help her because
she had left her home in
Afghanistan's northern
Kunduz province, flee-
ing to the capital Kabul to
escape his relentless and
increasingly vicious beat-
ings. But he promised to
help. Too busy to come
himself he sent a friend
who took her to "some
house", held a gun to her
head and raped her.
Finished with her he set-
tfled in front of a TV set, the
gun on a table by his side.
Choosing her moment,
Mariam picked up the gun
shot her assailant in the
head and turned the gun
on herself.
"Three days later I woke
up in the hospital," she
said, slowly, shyly remov-
ing a scarf from her head
to reveal a partially shaved
head and along jagged scar
that ran almost the length
of her head where the bul-
let grazed her scalp.
From the hospital Mar-
iam was sent to a police
station and from there
to Badam Bagh, Afghan-
istan's central women's
prison where she told her
story to The Associated
Press. For the past three
months Mariam has been
waiting to find out why
she is in jail, the charges
and when she can leave.
"I haven't gone to court. I
am just waiting."
Hugging a ratty brown
sweater to protect her from
the damp cold of the pris-
on, Mariam is one of 202
women living in the six-
year-old jail. The majority
of the women packed are
serving sentences of up
to seven years for leaving
their husbands, refusing
to accept a marriage ar-
ranged by their parents,
or choosing to leave their
parent's home with a man
of their choice all so-
called "moral" crimes,
says the prison's director
general Zaref Jan Naebi.
Some of the women were
jailed while pregnant, oth-
ers with their small chil-
dren. Naebi says there
are 62 children living with
their imprisoned mothers,
sharing the same grey steel
bunk-beds, napping in
the afternoon hidden be-
hind a sheet draped from
an upper bunk, oblivi-
ous to the chatter and the
crackling noises from the
small fussy television sets
shoved off to one side of
the rooms.
The Taliban were thrown
out 12 years ago ending
five years of rule and re-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Female prisoners sit in their cell at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. The majority of
the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by
their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called "moral" crimes.


gressive laws that enforced
a tribal tradition and cul-
ture more than religious
compulsions denying girls
schools, ordering women
to stay indoors unless ac-
companied by a male, and
in some of the more severe
cases even blackening the'
first story windows so
prying eyes could not see
women within. Women
were forced to wear the
all- encompassing burqa
or suffer a public beating.
In the first years after the
Taliban's December 2001
removal strides seemed.
to be made for women,
schools opened, women
came out of their house,
many still in the burqas
but appearing on televi-
sion and getting elected to
Parliament.
But women's activists
in Kabul say within a few
years of the Taliban's oust-
er the ball was dropped,
interest waned and even
President Hamid Karzai
began making statements
that harkened back to
the Taliban rule saying
women really should be
accompanied by a man
while outside their home.
A new law was enacted
called the Elimination of
Violence Against Women
(EVAW), but its imple-
mentation is erratic and
rare, says the United Na-
tions Assistance Mission
on Afghanistan, whose
human rights arm moni-
tors such things.
An UNAMA report is-
sued in December last
year says it is difficult
to even get information
about violence against
women from the authori-
ties partially because they


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don't want to look bad if it
showed that little was be-
ing done and little, if any,
official documentation on
violence against women
exists.
While it might not be
against the law to run away
or escape a forced mar-
riage, the courts routinely
convict women fleeing
abusive homes with "the
intent to commit zina (or
adultery)" which are most
often simply referred to as
"moral crimes," says the
report.
"Perceptions toward
women are still the same
in most places, tribal laws
are the only laws followed
and in most places noth-
ing has changed in the
basics of women's lives.
There are policies and
papers and even laws but
nothing has changed,"
said Zubaida Akbar whose
volunteer Haider organi-
zation fights for women's
rights and sends lawyers
and aid workers to the
women's prison to defend
the inmates in court.
In the overwhelmingly


male dominated legal sys-
tem, Akbar said even when
an inmate gets in front of
the judge, "he says 'it is
her husband, she should
go back and make it work.
It is her fault and not her
place to leave him not


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in our society.'"
Afghanistan remains a
deeply conservative soci-
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and tribal jirgas still hand
out rulings that offer girls
and women to settle debts
and disputes.


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If you are an area church that would like to
be featured in this year's edition contact the
advertising department of the Jackson County
Floridan at (850) 526-3614
or e-mail salesjcfloridan.com.

Deadline for advertising is April 12, 2013.


- 11 . .. 1. 1 1 . I


-110A V.'EF-.JE -E AY, APRIL 10, 2013


WORLD









* I


Cottondale High School Baseball


= Hornets win on Senior Night


nMARKc sIfNlRnK/! taLUKIUlLA
Justin Lipford pitches for Cottondale at a game last week.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Cottondale Hornets sent
their seniors out in style Monday
night in Cottondale, knocking
off the visiting Wewahitchka Ga-
tors 4-2 in the team's final regu-
lar season home game.
Senior pitcher Trent Jackson
started and went all seven in-
nings to earn the victory, while
Wesley Spooner came through
with a big two-run home run in
the sixth inning to help secure
the win.
"We played pretty well," Hor-
nets coach Greg Ohler said after


the game. "Trent scattered some
hits around and pitched a real
good game. It was 'Senior Night'
so the players' emotions were
high, so it was good to be able to
get control of that and just play a
good game."
The Hornets led 2-1 through
two innings, with Spooner's
homer making it 4-1 going into
the seventh.
Jackson started slowing down
a bit in the final inning, allowing
a run to score and the tying run
to get to the plate for the Gators
with two outs, but he finished it
off by inducing a fly ball out to
left field to end the game.


The right-hander gave up one
earned run on six hits, three
walks, and four strikeouts.
Jackson also went 2-for-2 with
a run and an RBI at the plate,
with Spooner going 2-for-3 with
a home run, a double, a run, and
two RBI.
Justin Lipford had a hit and an
RBI for Cottondale, and Thomas
Lipford got a hit and scored a
run.
Tad Gaskin took the loss for
Wewahitchka, going six innings
and surrendering four earned
runs on eight hits, two walks,

See HORNETS, Page 2B


MALONE '/ SHS BASEBALL.




Pirates pop Tigers


'1' -



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*-, ' . . ..

,, ,..: .^ : ... ,./ ',,. ': ', ..
/ *



j u i. S. .


S .- .. ,
I- ,'* -" ** .' '.. . . ** t.
MARK SKINNER / FLORIDAN
Malone's Austin Lockhart races toward first base as Sneads' Devin Hayes races toward Lockharts' bunt Monday night.


Hayes, Sneads lead SHS past Malone


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Pirates got a strong
pitching performance from senior
Devin Hayes and cruised to a 6-1
home victory over the Malone Ti-
gers on Monday night.
Hayes allowed one run in five in-
nings of work and gave up just three
hits and two walks to earn the win,
with Dustin Sneads pitching the fi-
nal two innings to get the save.
Sneads came on in relief of Hayes


in the sixth inning with the bases
loaded and no outs and the Pirates
nursing a 5-0 lead and managed to
get out of the jam with just a single
run crossing the plate.
Catcher Austin Lombardo re-
corded the first out by picking off a
Malone runner at first base, and af-
ter the Tigers got a hit to push their
only run across, the Pirates record-
ed a double play to end the inning.
'"That was a big jam for us to get
out of," Sneads coach Mark Guerra
said after the game. "We were in a


little bit of trouble there in that in-
ning, but Dustin came in and did
a great job and finished the game
out."
Jonathan Sikes started for Malone
and took the loss, giving up four
earned runs on two hits and four
walks with two strikeouts in 2 2/3
innings.
Brett Henry came in and recorded
the final out of a four-run third in-
ning for Sneads and kept the Pirates

See PIRATES, Page 2B


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

It was a bittersweet night for the
Malone Lady Tigers in Graceville on
Monday evening, as they pulled out
a 10-6 road victory, but only after
watching a teammate suffer a serious
injury.
Malone junior Angelica Livingston
suffered a broken ankle sliding into
home plate in the sixth inning and
had to be taken to the hospital, caus-
ing an hour delay in the game.
r Livingston's run gave her team a 6-3
lead and Malone was able to withstand
a late charge by Graceville to hold on
for its sixth victory of the season.
First-year Malone coach Preston
Roberts, who went with Livingston to


the hospital and left assistant coaches
Jay Newsom and Joe Bob Baxter to
coach the team to the end, said it was
impressive for his players to be able to
finish the gamp and get the win after
watching one of their teammates go
down.
"I think we were playing real well
before the injury, but of course you're
going to have a letdown with the delay
and seeing a teammate being taken
off in an ambulance," he said. "But I
was proud of them for holding on to
the lead, and I was proud of the assis-
tants for taking over and bringing us
home."
It wasn't easy, as Graceville cut a
four-run lead to one with three runs
in the bottom of the sixth inning, but
Malone answered with three of its own


in the top of the seventh, and reliever
Jakivia Hearns shut the door on GHS
in the bottom of the seventh to secure
the win.
Hearns went the final four innings
in the circle, allowing three hits and
three walks with six strikeouts, while
Sheyanna Chambliss started and
went three innings to get the win, giv-
ing up six hits and two walks with four
strikeouts.
Malone got off to a hot start with
four runs in the top of the first and led
5-3 through three innings.
It was just the second road win of
the season for Malone, and Roberts
said that the hot start was the key.
"We haven't won on the road

See MALONE, Page 3B


International Athletics


Thatcher had


troubled time


with UK sports

The Associated Press

LONDON Margaret Thatcher barely con-
cealed her distaste for sports while serving as
prime minister of Britain. Instead, she tried to use
the athletic arena as a political weapon of sorts
during the Cold War, and even took on the soccer
establishment as violence at matches damaged
the nation's image.
So divisive was Thatcher's 11-year rule of Brit-
ain that her death at the age of 87 on Monday
produced no tributes from the country's major
sporting institutions. The Premier League even
told soccer clubs that they would not have to
hold a minute's silence in honor of the late British
leader.
"She never really understood sport until it mi-
grated and sometimes mutated beyond
the back page, or impacted on other areas of
policy," Sebastian Coe, who became a legislator-
with Thatcher's Conservative Party after win-
ning Olympic titles as a runner, recalled in his
autobiography.
During her first year in power, Thatcher asked
British athletes to boycott the 1980 Olympics
in Moscow following the Soviet invasion of Af-
ghanistan. According to recently released letters
from the time to the British Olympic.Association,
Thatcher warned that their "attendance in Mos-
cow can only serve to frustrate the interests of
Britain."
But Coe, in his 2012 book, recalled endors-
ing Labour legislator Austin Mitchell's view that
Thatcher's stance was "mean and petty and stu-
pid, and a demonstration of impotence rather
than anything else."
Though some British competitors stayed away,
in an early show of the limits of Thatcher's at-
tempts to impose herself on the world stage,
many including Coe defied the premier's
advice and took part. The United States boycotted
the games.
"Using (sport) as a weapon was both craven
and self-defeating," said Coe, who won the first
of two 1,500-meter Olympic titles in Moscow and
was the chief organizer of last year's Olympics in
London.
Thatcher also considered ordering Britain's soc-
cer teams to pull 'out of the 1982 World Cup after
the U.K. went to war with Argentina over the Falk-
land Islands.
Although neither England, Scotland nor North-
ern Ireland were due to play in the same group as
Argentina, there were fears they could meet in the
later stages of the tournament in Spain. The Brit-
ish eventually feared that a boycott could be used
by Argentina as a propaganda coup, and Thatcher
backed off from a battle with soccer authorities.
Soccer problems closer to home vexed Thatcher
as well, especially as disorderly conduct among
fans damaged the country's reputation.
The problem came to a head in 1985 when riot-
ing by Liverpool fans at the European Cup final
between their team and Italy's Juventus in Brus-
sels caused a stampede that left 39 people most
of them Italian fans dead.
Thatcher said those responsible for the rioting
"have brought shame and disgrace to their coun-
try and to football (soccer)."
"We have to get the game cleaned up from this
hooliganism," Thatcher added, as English clubs
were eventually banned from European club
competitions until 1990.
The tragedy in Brussels ultimately had a positive
effect on crowd behavior in England. Increased se-
curity at the grounds, bans on the sale of alcohol
at games and a general feeling of disgust among
fans led to a dramatic drop in violence.
But Thatcher's response to another major soccer
tragedy- the Hillsborough disaster infuriated
fans and reinforced her enduring unpopularity
among sections of the public.
A crush at the 1989 FA Cup semifinal against
Nottingham Forest led to 96 Liverpool fans dying
after being herded into caged-in enclosures that
were already full.
Many died because of a lack of attention from
police and emergency services, but it was only last
year that campaigners finally gained an apology

See THATCHER, Page 3BL


Malone / GHS Softball



Malone girls hold off Graceville


400"


..d "









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


High School
Baseball
Wednesday- Gracev-
ille at Ponce de Leon, 2
p.al.
I'hiirsday- Sneads at
Graceville, 5:30 p.m.;
North Florida Christian
at Marianna, 7 p.m.;
Malone at Altha, 6 p'.m.
Friday- Cottondale at
Wewahitchka, 6 p.m.;
Laurel Hill at Malone,
6 p.m.;

High School
Softball
Thursday- Poplar
Springs at Cottondale.
6 p.m.: Giace\ille at Ar-
nold, 6 p.m.; MNlaianna
at Port St. Joe. 7 p.m.
Friday- Snead, at
Marianna, 3:30 p.m.:
Cottondale at Malone.
6 p.m.

Chipola Baseball
The Indians w-ill start
a ithee-game seies'
with Tallahassee on
Friday at home at 4 p.m.
Chipola will then
travel to Tallahassee on
Saturday for die second
game of the series at I
p.m.

Chipola Softball
The Lady Indians will
play a pair of confei -
ence road dotublehead-
ers this week, heading
to Nicelille on Thurs-
day to take on North-
west Florida State at 4
p.m. and 6 p.m., and
going to Panama City
on Saturday to face Gulf
Coast State at 1 p.m.
and 3 p.m.


MHS Baseball Golf
Tournament
There will be a Mari-
anna High School base-
ball golf tournament
April 13-14 at Caverns
Golf Course, with
thousands in cash and,
prizes to be awarded.
The format is three-
man scramble with
morning flight at 8 a.m.
and aftemoon flight at
1 p.m. Cost is $65 per
person and is first bome
first serve.
For more information,
contact Patrick Bryan
at 209-0627, Nikki
Bryan at 209-8155, or
Caverns Golf Course at
482-4257.




Hornets
From Page 1B
and four strikeouts.
Cole Harper, Bryan Har-
ris, and Jesse Roberson all
had two hits apiece to lead
the Gators, who fell to 4-
6 in District 3-1A and in
a three-way tie for fourth



Pirates
From Page 1B

off the board in the fourth
and fifth innings.
The Pirates added an
insurance run in the sixth
off of Eric Perdue before
Antwain Johnson became
the fourth Malone pitcher
of the night and recorded
the final out of the inning.
Each team managed
just three total hits on the
night, with Brandon Moats
going 1-for-3 with two RBI,


Travel Ball Tryouts
Southern Elite IOU
Fastpitch Softball will
be holding tryouts April
13 at 2 p.m. at Alford
Ilucle,,Liion Park, with
12U having tryouts
April 14 at 3 p.m. at
Alford Recreation Park.
For more information
call 850-258-8172.

BCFGolf
Tournament
-he Men's Golf Team
at The Baptist College of
Floi ida I B( F) is hosting
a golf tournament to
raile funds to offset the
cost ot team expenses
I he tournament. which
is open to the gen-
elal public, will be held
April '27 at the Dothan
Nationald olt Club on
Highw\a 231 south
neai Dothan. Ala.
T he Scramble will
begin with a shotgun
start at 1p.m. Entry
fee for each person is
$40, which includes 18
holes with a cart, two
inulligans, and a buffet
dinner. Theie will be an
awards ceremony im-
mediately following the
tournament with prizes
for first place, second
place, longest drive, and
closest to the pin.
For more information
or to register, contact
Coach Freeman at
850-263-3261 ext. 453.
Registration will also be
available at the course
at noon before the
tournament

Bulldog Wrestling
Club
The Bulldog Wrestling
Club is starting practice
for the summer season.
Practice will be
Tuesday and Thursday
nights from 5:30 p.m.
to 7 p.m. at the old
Marianna High School
wrestling room.
All Jackson County
kids ages 5-18 are wel-
come to join. For more
information, call MNHS
coach Ron Thoreson at
272-0280.

Sports Items.
Send all sports items
to editorial@jcflori-
dan.com, or fax them
to 850-482-4478. The
mailing address for the
paper is Jackson County
Floridan P.O. Box 520
Marianria, FL 32447.


with the Hornets and
Graceville Tigers.
Cottondale was sched-
uled, to play Sneads on
Tuesday night before tak-
ing on Wewahitchka again
Friday.
Wewahitchka was set to
travel to Vernon to play
the first-placed Yellow-
jackets on Tuesday, while

and Hayes and Hunter
Johnson each picking utp a
hit and an RBI.
Cade Hall walked twice
and had an RBI for the
Pirates.
Austin Lockart, Hunter
Eddins, and Sikes each
had a hit for Malone.
"We scored off a few
mistakes they made, but
we weren't really kill-
ing the ball," Guerra said
of his team. "We had a
couple of good hits to
score runs, but we had to
manufacture some runs.
We're not hitting the ball


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MARK SKINNER /FLORIDAN
Faith Moore scoops up a grounder to the outfield for Marianna
last week.


Mosley rallies



past Marianna

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Mosley Lady Dolphins overcame an early 6-2 defi-
cit to rally past the Marianna Lady Bulldogs 8-7 on Mon-
day night in Marianna to snap a three-game win streak
for MHS.
Mosley (13-5) used a five-run fourth inning to take a
7-6 lead, and then pushed across another run in the fifth
to break a 7-7 tie to go ahead for good.
Marianna (14-4) was coming off of wins over Godby,
North Florida Christian, and Walton, and appeared
poised to make it four straight early on Monday night.
After Mosley posted a two-run top of the first off of
Lady Bulldogs starter BreannaWillis, Marianna respond-
ed with a four-run first to surge into the lead.
Linsey Basford doubled to score Alli-Ann Bigale for the
first run of the inning, with Connor Ward following with *
a two-RBI double to plate Basford and Whitney Lipford
to make it 3-2, with a Yazmine Bellamy RBI hit rounding
out the scoring in the first.
The Lady Bulldogs added to their lead in the second in-
ning on a two-run home run by Lipford to make it 6-2.
After falling behind in the fourth, Marianna tied it
back up in the bottom of the inning when Bonnie Bigale
walked and scored on an error to make it 7-7.
Marianna had an opportunity to tie or win the game
in the bottom of the seventh when Basford doubled and
Bellamy singled, but a strikeout ended the game and any
notion of a comeback.
Willis took the loss for the Lady Bulldogs, giving up
eight runs three earned on 11 hits and three walks
with a strikeout in five innings, while Taylor Hussey
pitched two scoreless innings of relief and allowed just
one hit.
Lipford, Basford, Bellamy, and Ward all had two hits
each for Marianna, with Ward and Lipford driving in
two runs, while Lipford and Alli-Ann Bigale each scored
twice.
Marianna was scheduled to host Arnold on Tuesday
night before going on the road t6 take on Port St. Joe on
Thursday and finishing the week Friday with a home
game against Sneads at 3:30 p.m.


High School VoUeyball


Lady Bullpups start season with win


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Marianna Lady
Bullpups volleyball team
started their season with a
solid win over Seaside last
Thursday.
In game one, it was a 25-
13 win, with Sydnee Good-
son picking up five ace
serves, while Valerie, Sims
notched three and Selena
Ubias had two.
Angelica Godwin has two
kills on attacks and Halee
IHatcher one kill.
It was a 25-10 game two
win against Seaside, with
Goodson again leading on
ace serves with four.
Kaleigh Bruner picked


Graceville will wrap up
district play with a road
game against Ponce de
Leon today and a home
game against Sneads on
Thursday.
The Hornets have now
won five of their last six
overall and three of the last
four in district, but Ohler
said his team must con-


like we should be. It seems
like we're not putting hits
together. We're sort of
spreading them out.
"We need to do a better
job of scoring runs here
soon for us to make it to
the playoffs and get deep
into the playoffs."
The Pirates improved
to 13-7 overall and were


up two aces while Maddi
Basford and Ansley Carter
recorded one each.
Godwin again had two
kills and Carter was on the
board with one kill.
Marianna took a pair of
wins also against Emerald
Coast in the tip-off classic
with a 25-10 win in game
one and a 25-23 nail-biting
win in game two.
Carter had five aces, with
Sims on the board with two,
while Basford and Good-
son both had one ace serve
each and Goodson added
seven service points.
In game two Carter re-
corded four aces, with
Goodson, Bruner and
Ubias all adding one ace


tinue to improve to finish
the season strong.
"We've been playing
pretty well, but we just
can't have those innings,
where we fall asleep," he
said. "We 'have to go out
there each night and play
the best we can play, and
if the other team is better,
then they're just better."


scheduled to host district
foe Cottondale on Tuesday
night before playing an-
other league game Thurs-
day night in Graceville.
Malone, which fell to 11-
7, will finish the week out
with a road game against
Altha on Thursday before
hosting Laurel Hill on
Friday. .


.-


I



*g


serve each.
Angelica Godwin was the
workhorse on blocks and
attacks, recording three
kills, while Hatcher had two
kills and Carter had one.
Jordan Sapp did a great
job blocking throughout


the game.
Following the game, MMS
coach Kim DeFelix praised
her team's play.
"The girls played great,"
she said. "We had great
plays in all areas of the
game."


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-12B WEDNESDAY. APRIL 10, 2013


SPORTS


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY. APRIL10,.2013 3Br


High School Softball



Lady Pirates bomb Bay


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Lady Pirates
notched another impres-
sive victory Monday night
in Panama City, knock-
ing off Bay High 11-1 to
improve to 20-3 on the
season.
Sneads has now won 12
of its last 13 games, the last
three before Monday's win
coming over North Florida
Christian,. Vernon, and
Baker.
The Lady Pirates have
mostly dominated with


pitching and defense, but
it was the bats that did
most of the work Monday
night, totaling 14 hits.
A three-run second in-
ning .gave SHS the early
edge, with another run
coming in the third, four
more in the fourth, and
two in the fifth.
Brooke Williams led the
Lady Pirates with three hits
and two RBI, while Shelbi
Byler had two hits and two
RBI, and Brandy Strickland
had a hit and two RBI.
Emily Glover and Alex
Maphis both had two hits


and an RBI, while Brandi
Walden and Alaynah Weiss
had a hit and an RBI, and
Cambridge Chason and
Kalee Cain also had a hit.
Bay got its only run in the
second inning on a solo
homer by Ashley Beason,
but that was one of just
two hits that the Lady Tor-
nadoes got off of Williams
all night.
Williams walked four and
struck out three, going all
five innings to get the win.
"This was one of the bet-
ter games we've had all'
year," Sneads coach Kelvin


Johnson said. "Not only
did we hit it well but we hit
it real hard. The last two
games, I think we've hit the
ball extremely well against
two good pitchers. I think
some girls are getting in a
groove right now, which is
real comforting with us be-
ing in the playoffs this next
week."
Sneads was scheduled to
host Chipley on Tuesday
night for 'Senior Night,' be-
fore finishing the week and
the regular season Friday
with a road game against
Marianna at 3:30 p.m.


Basketball



Lewis thrilled by Hall election


The Associated Press

HOUSTON Ninety-
one-year-old Guy Lewis
has difficulty speaking be-
cause of recent strokes.
But the huge grin on the
face of the former Hous-
ton coach Tuesday con-
veyed his elation at finally
being inducted into the
Naismith Memorial Bas-
ketball Hall of Fame a day
before.
Lewis coached the Cou-
gars for 30 years, but is
best known for leading the
Phi Slama Jama teams in
the 1980s.
"It's pure joy and we're
not even upset that it took
so long ... dad is used to
winning in overtime," his
daughter Sherry Lewis
said.
The event was attended
by former player Elvin
Hayes, a fellow Hall of
Famer. Hayes had cam-
paigned for Lewis's elec-
tion and boycotted all
events related to the Hall
since his induction in
1990 because Lewis hadn't
received the honor.
"That was a great wrong
done and all of the sud-
den, it's right," Hayes
said. "And once it's right,
it doesn't even make any
difference what happened
in the past."
Lewis sat in a wheelchair
by his daughter while she
answered questions on his


Malone
From Page 1B
consistently and that's be-
cause we've gotten off to
such slow starts," he said.
"But the girls bought into



Thatcher
From Page lB

from the British govern-
ment absolving fans of any
responsibility for the di-
saster in Sheffield.
Thatcher was accused
of being involved in a
decades-long cover-up
that shielded police from
responsibility.
"We know she had sly
meetings the evening of


behalf. Wearing a red ca-
ble knit sweater and a red-
and-white Houston hat,
Lewis smiled and laughed
often during the event
where he was presented
with red roses and sat
near the several trophies
he earned while coaching
the Cougars.
"I'm just glad he gets
to be back in Hofheinz,"
Sherry said of the pavilion
where the Cougars play.
"He's just so at peace now
and happy."
Lewis finished his career
at Houston with a 592-279
record. His teams made
five Final Four appear-
ances, including three in
a row from 1982-84. He
reached the NCAA tour-
nament 14 times and cap-
tured six Southwest Con-
ference titles. He helped
the Cougars to 27 straight
winning seasons from
1959-85 and was named
national coach of the year
in 1968 and 1983.
Along with Hayes, he also
coached fellow All-Ameri-
cans Hakeem Olajuwon
and Clyde Drexler. The
three players were named
to the NBA's Top 50 great-
est players list in 1996. He
and North Carolina's Dean
Smith are the only men to
coach three players from
that list while they were in
college.
"We can give him credit
for his great accomplish-


that and we got off to a
very good start this time."
Sara Newsom led Malo-
ne with three hits, while
Hearns and Tierra Brooks
were both 2-for-4 with two
RBI, and Sabra Cullifer was
2-for-4.

the disaster and the morn-
ing after at the ground and
that is when the cover-up
'started," Margaret Aspi-
nall, chairwoman of the
Hillsborough Family Sup-
port Group, said Monday.
Thatcher used the Hills-
borough disaster to press
ahead wittl plans for Eu-
rope's first compulsory
membership program for
soccer fans. But in the
face of opposition led by
the Labour Party, which
described the member-


ments, 592 wins and all
that, but he's won more
players over and made
them believe and made
them successful men than
he has victories," said Lyn-
den Rose, who was a part
of the great teams in the
1980s.
Lewis is also known
for putting together the
"Game of the Century" at
the Astrodome in 1968 be-
tween Houston and UCLA.
It was the first regular-sea-
son game to be broadcast
on national television.
Houston defeated the Bru-
ins in front of a crowd of
more than 52,000 which,
at that time, was the larg-
est ever to watch an in-
door basketball game.
He also helped with the
integration of college bas-
ketball in the South by
recruiting Hayes and Don
Chaney to Houston. They
were the first black players
for the Cougars and some
of the first in the region.
He was inducted into the
College Basketball Hall of
Fame in 2007.
"Basketball in the state
of Texas and through-
out the South is all due
to coach Guy V. Lewis,"
Hayes said. "He put ev-
erything on the line to
step out and integrate his
program. Not only that,
he had vision to say: 'Hey,
we can play a game in the
Houston Astrodome.' Not


Taylor McDaniel led
Graceville offensively, go-
ing 3-for-4 with two dou-
bles and three RBI, with
Kaylee Vaughn finishing
3-for-4 with two runs and
two RBI, and Caitlin Miller
2-for-5 with a double.

ship cards as "an offense
against common decen-
cy," the program was not
introduced.
While sport is barely
mentioned in Thatcher's
autobiography, Major used
his own tome to say that
sport was not "a guiding
interest in her life" de-


only that, he just was such
a motivator and such an
innovator that created so
many doors for the game
of basketball to grow."
If Lewis was upset about
being snubbed by the
Hall for so many years, he
never showed it. While his
friends, relatives and for-
mer players railed against
his exclusion, he had said
in the past that it never
bothered him.
His supporters were
happy he was still around
to celebrate the moment.
"When you're 91, good
news is always great news,"
Rose said. "We were happy
because the sentiment be-
came, would it happen
while he was alive?"
Lewis understands ev-
erything going on around
him, but suffers from
aphasia due to his strokes,
which makes it hard for
him to convey his thoughts
into words.
"He knows what he
wants to say, I just kind
of have to guess," Sherry
said. "He's still Guy Lewis
in there."
He will be enshrined
into the Hall on Sept. 8 in
Springfield, Mass. Sherry
said that they haven't yet
decided if he'll be able to
make the trip or who will
deliver his speech there.


McDaniel also went all
seven innings in the circle
to take the loss for GHS,
giving up six earned runs
on 11 hits, two walks, and
five strikeouts.
Graceville dropped to 6-
10 with the loss.

spite Thatcher's husband,
Denis, being a keen golfer
and a one-time rugby
referee.
"She tried occasionally to
show an interest, and duti-
fully turned up to watch
great sporting events, but
always looked rather out of
place," Major said.


BV0oUN:JI


Bl-4u -


-'


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
R eid Long gets a hit for the Bulldogs
during a game against Blountstown
Monday night. Marianna went on to
defeat Blountstown 2-1.


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SPORTS


Golf


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


I Ht ASSOUIAI LtU HRLb


Thaworn Wiratchant pulls a club out of his bag during a practice round for the Masters on Tuesday in Augusta, Ga.


Wiratchant latest Thai to make it to Masters


The Associated Press

AUGUSTA, Ga. Tha-
worn Wiraqchant is happy
by nature, and on this day
his smile was as wide as
the fairways at Augusta
National.
He is making his Masters
'debut at age 46. It was a
rugged road to beautiful
Magnolia Lane, as it was
for the three players from
Thailand who preceded
him.
Golf was merely a means
for survival. Thaworn
picked up balls on the
practice range until he was
13 and old enough to cad-
die. He learned to play with
only a pitching wedge, and
it was years before he had
pieced together enough
clubs to call it a full set.
He became good enough
to turn pro at age 21, and
it wasn't long before he
started winning, first in
Thailand and then on the
Asian Tour.
It all was worth it when
Thaworn received a phone
call in January inviting him
to play in the Masters.
"It's a dream," Thaworn
said, tapping his heart at
the thought of the invita-
tion. "I never thought I
would get the chance."
Standing on the first tee
on a quiet Sunday after-
noon for his first practice
round, Thaworn gazed
down the first fairway. Was
it everything he imagined?
He smiled broadly without
taking his eyes off the golf
course until it was time
to hit. With a distinctive
swing hands are high
above his head at the top
of his swing he belted
a tee shot toward the fair-
way bunker and was on his
way.
Thailand had gone 35
years since its first play-
er, Sukree Onsham, last
played at Augusta. Now,
Thaworn is the third Thai
in the last five years in the
Masters.
Thongchai Jaidee was
invited in 2006 and earned
his way back in 2010 from
being top 50 in the world.
-prayad Marksaeng was
invited in 2008, and he
worked his way into the
top 50 to earn a spot in
2009.
None of them had it
easy.
Thongchai's only club
was the worn head of a
Wilson 3-iron that he at-
tached to a bamboo stick,
his only club for two years.
Prayad grew up in poverty,
sleeping with 10 sibJings
in the upper room of a
two-story house. He drove
a three-wheel taxi for six
hours in the morning, cad-
died, and then sold veg-
etables in the train station.
His first club was a piece of
metal attached to a stick,
with a worn bicycle tire as
the grip.
"If you want to be good,
_you have to work hard,"


Thaworn said through an
interpreter.
Thaworn has won 15
times on the Asian Tour,
the most of any player,.
and he won the Order of
Merit last year. He was the
highest-ranked Thai when
he received the invita-
tion. Thongchai since has
,moved past him and near-
ly qualified for the Masters
on his own. A third Thai,
Kiradech Aphibarnrat, re-
cently joined them among
the top 100 in the world
when he won the Malay-
sian Open.
"It's really cool to see
these guys," said Tiger
Woods, whose mother is
Thai. "I've been there a
bunch of times and have
seen the golfing programs
really grow. Golf wasn't
a sport that anyone ever
played. It was for the very,
very elite. But it's neat to
see these guys who have
worked so hard, work
themselves up through
caddie programs or just
find a stick and a ball and
try and make something
work. There's a lot to be
said about that. They know
and they understand work
ethic, and they go to it."
Augusta National long
has had an eye toward Asia,
an emerging force in golf.
That's one reason it joined
with the Royal & Ancient
to create the Asia Pacific
Amateur, which awards a
spot in the Masters to the
winner. Guan Tianlang, a
14-year-old from China,
won last year and is the
youngest player ever at the
Masters.
Thaworn speaks very
limited English, enough
to say "green jacket" when
asked about the Masters,
and "Tom Watson" when
asked his favorite player.
His inspiration, however,
was Sukree, the first Thai
to play in the Masters in
1970.
Sukree is living in Bang-
kok and still competes in
a few two-day events for
those 70 and older. The
only memento he brought


home from Augusta was
a plate with the Masters
logo, though he's not sure
where it is. His memory of
his two appearances, how-
ever, is vivid.
"I was so excited and
so proud to be the first
Thai to play the Masters,"
Sukree said. "I remember
seeing so many audiences
even in the practice round
on Tuesday. The crowd got
even bigger during the
competition. I had to ad-
mit that I have never seen
so many fans before."
He played his first round
with Dave Stockton, who
later that year won his
first major at the PGA
Championship.
"The only thing that I re-
call is that I bowed to him
on the first tee because I
wanted him to feel com-
fortable," Stockton said.
"And then he birdied the
first hole. And I think he
might have made eagle on
the second hole. And in my
mind I'm thinking, 'Forget
this, you better start play-
ing because this guy is not
too overwhelmed.'"
Like the other Thais who
eventually followed his
path, Sukree began as a
caddie and learned to play
by watching. During the
Vietnam War, he said an
American military officer
often came to the Hua Hin
district in Thailand to play
golf. He saw that Sukree
had potential and gave him
a set of clubs, and Sukree
began taking it seriously.
He doesn't remember
why he was worthy of an
invitation to play in the
Masters, perhaps because
he was runner-up in the
World Cup in Singapore in
1969. And he had no idea
that some 40 years later,
a Thai playing at Augusta,
National would not be that
unusual.
"I'm happy that we will
have more and more Thais
playing the Masters," he
said. "Three of them have
made fame for the nation,
from European and Asian
tours. I knew that someday


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there would be more Thais
playing the Masters ... and
that day has arrived.
"I know all of them. I feel
proud that they can play
there," he said. "I have no
idea if I was their inspira-
tion because it was a long
time ago. I just knew that
one day where would be
other Thais playing in the
Masters."
Sukree never made the
cut in his two appearanc-
es. He shot 78-84 in 1970,
finishing ahead of only
former Masters and U.S.
Open champion Ralph
Guldahl, who was 58. A
year later, he shot 77-78
and missed the cut by five
shots.
No Thai has made it to
the weekend at Augusta.
Prayad opened with a 70
in 2009, only to follow with
an 84.
As long as it took to get
here, and as hard as he
worked, Thaworn has
modest goals. Wearing a
green jacket is not among
them just the men-
tion of winning made him
smile and shake his head
as if that were too much to
ask.
"If I made the cut," he
said, "it would make me
happy."


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


National Football League



Ex-players call brain-injury panel a 'sham'


The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Former
NFL players trying to sue the
league over concussion-linked
injuries argued in court Tuesday
that the NFL "glorified" violence
and profited from damaging hits
to the head.
Players' lawyer David Freder-
ick also accused the league of
concealing the emerging science
about concussions over several
decades, even after creating a
Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
committee in 1994.
"It set up a sham commit-
tee designed to get information
about neurological risks, but in
fact spread misinformation,"
Frederick argued at a pivotal
federal hearing to determine if


the complaints will remain in
court or be sent to arbitration.
U.S. District Judge Anita Bro-
dy's decision could be worth bil-
lions to either side.
About 4,200 of the league's
12,000 former players have
joined the litigation. Some are
battling dementia, depression
or Alzheimer's disease, and fault
the league for rushing them
back on the field after concus-
sions. Others are worried about
developing problems and want.
their health monitored.
A handful, including popular
Pro Bowler Junior Seau, have
committed suicide.
NFL lawyer Paul Clement in-
sisted that teams bear the chief
responsibility for health and
safety under the players' col-


lective bargaining agreement,
along with others.
"The one thing constant
throughout is these agreements
put the primary role and respon-
sibility on some combination
of the players themselves, the
unions and the clubs," Clement
argued.
"The clubs are the ones who
had doctors on the sidelines
who had primary responsibil-
ity for sending players back into
the game," he added at a news
conference after the 40-minute
hearing.
U.S. District Judge Anita Brody
appeared most interested in
whether the contract is suffi-
ciently specific about health and
safety issues to keep the matter
in arbitration.


"The thing that concerns me is
you say it talks about it 'all over,'"
Brody said to Clement, "It has to
be really specific. That's what I
have to wrestle with."
Frederick said the contract
is "silent" on latent head in-
juries, making the lawsuits
appropriate.
Brody is not expected to rule
for several months, and the cases
could take years to play out if her
ruling is appealed, as expected.
Players' family members on
hand for the hearing included
Kevin Turner, a former Phila-
delphia Eagles, running back
now battling Lou Gehrig's dis-
ease; Dorsey Levens, a veteran
running back who made a 2012
documentary on concussions
called "Bell Rung" and Mary Ann


Easterling, whose husband, for-
mer Atlanta safety Ray Easter-
ling, was the lead plaintiff in the
litigation before he committed
suicide last year.
Attendees might have momen-
tarily thought they were on the
playing field, as a power prob-
lem at the federal courthouse
caused muggy conditions in the
courtroom. The judge insisted
that the well-heeled crowd of
lawyers remove their suit jackets.
Frederick did so, while Clement
declined.
Both more typically find them-
selves at the U.S. Supreme Court,
where Clement has fought gay
marriage laws and state health
care mandates, and Freder-
ick has pursued consumer
protection cases.


College Basketball


Pitino visits New Orleans for title game without his team


The Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. Lou-
isville coach Rick Pitino
went to New Orleans to
watch the Cardinals' wom-
en's team play Connecticut
in Tuesday night's NCAA
championship but with-
out his players.
Under NCAA rules, nei-
ther the school nor Pitino
could pay for the players
to get to New Orleans to at-
tend the game. The NCAA
says it granted a waiver to
Louisville, early Tuesday
that would have allowed
the school to pay for the
trip, but the school says it
had already made plans to
go home.
Pitino, his staff and
several administrators
were expected to attend
the women's final. The
team plane landed about
2:25 p.m. EDT, and play-
ers immediately boarded a
bus back to campus. A few
dozen spectators looked on


from a fence at Louisville
International Airport.
After Louisville beat
Michigan 82-76 Monday
night in Atlanta, players
and Pitino hinted at going
straight to New Orleans
to support the surprising
women's team against the
Huskies in the final. The
men and their coach have
frequently attended wom-
en's games this season and
both programs have said
they feed off each other's
success.
For the women's big mo-
ment against the Huskies,
it will be Pitino looking on
from the stands.
"They all wanted to go to
the women's game," Pitino
said after the game. "We
asked the NCAA and they
said it's illegal, we were go-
ing to take the plane and
go see them, which is a
shame. I guess it's an extra
benefit....
"If we could ever win two
championships, men's and


women's, it would abso-
lutely be awesome."
Back home, city officials
were figuring out how to
honor the school's success.
The mayor's office said
in a statement Tuesday
morning that it was work-
ing with the university on a
community celebration to
celebrate both programs'
accomplishments. The
date and time depended on
when coaches and players
from the teams would be in
town at the same time.
In the meantime, the


school, the city and even
Kentucky Gov. Steve Bes-
hear are basking in another
milestone for Bluegrass
State basketball.
Last year was Kentucky's
turn in the spotlight,
achieved with a Final Four
win over Louisville en route
to its eighth championship.
This season began with the
Cardinals and Wildcats
ranked 2-3 behind Indiana
but ended with Louisville
reigning over the sport.
"It couldn't be a bigger
day for the Commonwealth


of Kentucky," Beshear said
afterward on the floor of
the Georgia Dome. "For
the Cardinals to win it this


year, UK won it last year.
You talk about the basket-
ball capital of the world, it's
right here in Kentucky."


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BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
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ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


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MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER
r t i


41-10 I,1 n u igSol nl omillonla Inc.I nt ,D l Unvoran UliIcK lorUl'S 0t3
"That's the third time you've
agreed with him."


ACROSS
1 Young
chicken
6 After
sunset
11 Take me to
your -
13 Noted
canal
14 Downhill
skiing
15 Clear, as a
drain
16 Speaker
pro -
17Victrola
maker
18 Caustic
solution
21 Feel
anxious
23 Female
whale
26 Charged
particle
27 Blvds.
28 Sanskrit
dialect
29 Worked
with clay
31 Irrationally
extreme
32 Collins and
Donahue
33 Deliberately
,vague
35 Untold
centuries


36 Lowest
high tide
37Zilch
38 Family pet
39Camels'
backs
40 Utter
41 Belly
dance
instrument
42 Electrical
unit
44 Prone to
47Gives
feedback
51 Brats'
opposites
52 Emailer
53 Approves
54 Physicist
Nikola -

DOWN
1 Marlins' st.
2 Aunt or
bro.
3 Sharp bark
4 Amend
5 Extensions
6 Skater -
Kerrigan
7 Cuzco
founder
8 Hoedown
partner
9 insurance
gp.
10 Give a
ticket to


Answer to Previous Puzzle


12 Weed out
13 Happy
rumbles
18 Walked
favoring
one leg
19"Anyone
home?"
(hyph.)
20 Novel part
22 Cash in
coupons
23 Cruise
quarters
24 Ms.
Newton-
John
25 Over a
broad
range
28.Faux -
30 Loop trains


31 List of prior
arrests
(2 wds.)
34 Fog and
steam
36 Birthday-
suit
wearers
39 Popcorn
nuisances
41 Submit
43 Currycomb
target
44- -tzu
45 Squid fluid
46 Turkish
title
48 IRA
investments
49Util. bill
50 Mexican
Mrs.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


4-10 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrny Cihe r c tog read from quotations by famous people, past and present
Ea ch letter i the cipher stands lotr another

"YNTX KBP IXINMO YKRW KBP SVYY RN

XBPEMX WVYY WCX DKIX VR GKYYXP
JXGKERX NH PKMZBXRR."
DX B X H NSY XM

Previous Solution: "In the end we're all 'Jerry Springer Show' guests, really, we
just haven't been on the show." Madlyn Manson
TODAY CLUE: sTenbez
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 4-10


Dear Annie: I have been
married to "Dennis" for
eight years. Early on, Den-
nis couldn't do enough for
me. Now, if my car won't
start, he yells at me and
says to call a tow truck. If
I ask him to spend time
with me, he always has
other things to do. On
the rare occasion when
we attend a social event
together, he abandons me
so he can "work the room"
and have a great time with
everyone else. We arrive
together and leave to-
gether, and the rest of the
time, I sit alone, miserable
and forgotten.
Dennis will go above
and beyond for others.
It doesn't matter if it's
the middle of the night,
raining, snowing, spend-
ing money we don't have,


missing meals, birthdays,
holidays and our daugh-
ter's school programs. If
it's a chance to make him-
self look good, he's there
with a smile and compas-
sion. I get the repairman
to take care of me with a
handshake and a bill. But
when I ask-Dennis to treat
his family with the same
enthusiasm, he calls me a
selfish nag.
Yes, I resent all the
people he helps, because
they get the side of my
husband that belongs to
me. I'm told to take care
of myself because he's
too busy helping others
and inflating his ego. I get
whatever is leftover. I love
Dennis, but I'm starting to
feel that he only gave me
his adoration and
helpfulness because he


Today we will look at the third bid that
changes its meaning in the balancing posi-
tion. If the dealer opens one of a suit and
the next player makes a single jump overcall
in a different suit, it is weak. However, if the
opening bid is followed by two passes, a
single jump overcall in the pass-out seat is
intermediate, promising a good six-card suit
and 14 to 16 high-card points. South's two-
spade jump overcall in this deal is textbook.
After North raises to four spades, West
leads the spade king, cashes the spade ace,
and exits with a heart to dummy's king. How
should South continue?
At first glance, declarer needs one of the
two diamond finesses to work. But the
contract is guaranteed with an elimination
and endplay. South plays a club to his ace,
overtakes the club jack with dummy's king,
ruffs the last club in his hand, and returns to
the board with a heart.
With trumps drawn and both red suits
eliminated, declarer plays a diamond to his
10. West wins with the jack but is endplayed.
If he returns a diamond, it is away from the
king into South's ace-queen. Or if West leads
a heart, declarer ruffs on the board and
sluffs his diamond queen.


Horoscope

ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- You'll do your best work
with enterprises you origi-
nate or can control. Stick
to these sorts of undertak-
ings, and you'll go far.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) The beginning of
an interesting cycle could
be under way. The first
instance of it will be some-
one going out of his or her
way to repay a kindness.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- An endeavor you have
high hopes for is likely to
take a turn for the better.
Even if it isn't as huge as
you envisioned, give it
time to develop.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- Don't despair if a project
isn't turning out to be as
grandiose as you hoped. It
may just need tweaking to
make it perfect.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- This might be the per-
fect day to light the fuse on
something that you expect
to be influential. Timing is
everything.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.22)
- Transformations could
have a good effect on your
finances. The results will
be pleasant.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
23) Someone whose
influence exceeds yours is
beginning to view you as
a partner for a project. An
alliance could develop.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Continue to perform
in. ways that could impress
your superiors, because
they likely have their eyes
on you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) People of
all types are likely to be
drawn to you because,
perhaps without even
realizing it, you have
charisma.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) The lucky feeling
you have is likely to be
accurate. Rely on it, even
if surface indicators don't
appear to be supporting it.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) If you have some
ideas or plans that you
would like to develop, go
for it.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Although your
financial trends may have
been erratic, you should
relax. Stabilizing influenc-
es are entering the picture.


was trying to win my
heart. How do I deal with
this?
-WIFE OF PLUMBER
WITH LEAKY PIPES AT
HOME
Dear Wife: Some people
put on a good show for
others, but at home, they
let down the facade. We
.recommend counseling,
preferably with Den-
nis, but without him if
necessary. We also sug-
gest you stop relying on
your husband to provide
your social life. Instead
of sitting "miserable and
forgotten," develop your
conversational skills. Get
involved in some local
activities that interest you
so you are less dependent
on Dennis's availability.
You need to take better
care of yourself.


North 04-10-13
4 6432
SAK
S864 3
K74
West East
4 AK 4A5
V QJ9643 V 10 72
SK J 5 9 7 2
SQ 8 410 9 65 3 2
South
4 Q J 10 9 8 7
V 85
AQ 10
4 AJ

Dealer: West
Vulnerable: East-West
South West ,North East
1 V Pass Pass
2 4 Pass 4 4 All pass

Opening lead: 4 K


-16B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10,2013


ENTERTAINMlENT








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Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

*4 Singer Slatomatic Sewing Machine
w/ attachment, blonde wooden cabinet,
long sewing arm, spool $250.334-886-3061
PETS & ANIMALS

CFA Registered (3) Persian Himalayan
Blue Point Kittens. Born 1-16 and ready
for their new homes. $250. $350.
Call 334-774-2700 After 10am
FREE: Kittens to loving home. multi-colorl-F &
1-M 850-272-4908 or 850-482-5880

,* ACK German Shepherd puppies 2-F, 4-M
2-solid white $400. $500. 1st shots.
parents on site, big body dogs. 334-379-0221
AKC Brittany Spaniels Orange/White. 4 males'
and 4 females. Excellent hunting blood line.
(Nolan's Last Bullett). Tails docked and dew
claws have been removed. Will be Ready on
March 29th. Call (229) 724-8839 if interested.
German Shepherd Puppies: AKC registered,
first shots,, mother has German bloodlines.
Black and tan, black and silver. 5 males, 1
female.7 wks old. 850-768-9182 or 850-849-3707.
Maltese puppies 2-males CKC Reg. 1st. shots,
mother on-site April 18th. 850-832-2655
SUPER PUPPET SALE! Chihuahua,
Shih-Tzu mix puppies and Morkles.
Now taking deposit on Papillions.
334-718-4886 plynn @sw.rr.com
Yellow Labs: 10 wks. old. Full blooded, no pa-
pers. Parents on premises. Great family dog!
Colors from blonde to red. $150. 334-388-5617
or 334-488-5000


S FARMER'. MARKET


GRASS & MILK FED BEEF!!
Freezer Ready Esto meat
GREAT QUALITY!
Quarters and Halves. USDA Inspected
ESTO MEATS CALL 850-263-7777

."-


850-573-6594


Frozen Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
. 4128 Hwy231


Bahia seed for sale -'
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
* experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
S or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
END OF SEASON SALE ( prices reducd)I
FerizedA& Weed Lontrol s50-209-9145
Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418

Cattle: 30 bred cows 3 to 7 years old and
50 bred heifers for sale. Most are Angus and
Brangus cross with a few Charolais cross.
For more information call 334-303-9285.

Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tractto small / custom Thin
Call Pea River Timber
334-389-2003 4


Sudoku


(1*)


EMPLOYMENT


River Valley Rehabilitation
Center Is now hiring:
RN'S & LPN'S
7a-7p & 7p-7a SHIFT
C.N.A'S
3-11 SHIFT
$1.00 SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL
FOOD SERVICE AIDE
5a-l:30p/lla-8p SHIFT
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
8a-5p shift FT Required minimum of
three (3) years experience in third party
billing/ collections and Medicare/ Medic-
aid with at least one (1) year experience
in a supervisory capacity required.
HEALTH INFORMATION
COORDINATOR
8a-5p FT Must be LPN with previous
medical records experience preferred
Great Pay and Benefits
Health, Vision & Dental
Please Apply at
River Valley Rehabilitation Center
17884 NE Crozier Street
Blountstown, Fl. 32424
Ph: (850) 674-5464
Fax: 674-9384
Email: rvhrc@southemrnltc.com
Drug Free Workplace- Safe Minimal Lifting
Environment An EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D


Barbies (5) collectibles $20. ea. 850-592-2881
Bed full sz. complete $60. 850-592-2881
Dolls Porcelain w/stand, $9/ea, 850-482-7665
Dryer GE good cond. $100. 850-592-7280.
Riding Mower: Cub Cadet 15HP $300. 209-0747


JH I!HI UI!I hIIII I, @ @ 2013 The Mepham Grdup. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


Doctor
needed for
Medical Weight
Loss Clinic
Flexible hours
Dothan area
$150. per hour
Call: 337-826-6758
or Send Resume to:
QTC@hughes.net

A-DH-V-[-R-T-I- --N-G
aCr i *i. t Z c t: SEL LS



DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA
Now Hiring Full Time
4 Warehouse Positions 4
1st, 2nd, and 3rd Shifts
Competitive Pay and Benefits Package!
Onsite Interviews will be conducted at
Family Dollar Distribution Center
2PM 4PM Tuesday, April 16,2013
3949 Family Dollar Parkway,
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must be 18 Years Old.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace


Sofa table & 2 end tables. $200 850-569-2969
Trailer Hitch NEW cond. $29. 850-482-7665
Trolling motor: 651b thrust. $300. 850-272-5305
Tux 40R, black $100. 239-272-8236


Level: [2-3 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit.
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to Tuesday's puzzle
2 1 6 8 739 5 4

S7384591 4 2 6 8 3 12
57942-6-831
9 2 53 4 7 -1 6-8


6 5211 -8- 9- 4-L-9
193752486
847639512
6521 847 93


4/10/13


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN


jcfloridan.com


LmonsBerI
FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


www.JCFLORIDAN.coni


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, April 10, 2013- 7 B


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7 9

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8 B Wednesday, April 10, 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.,JCFILOtIDAN.com


GEERL 0MPOYET:OBLEHOESFR EN A.ITS FO*SLELEGL* OTCE


President/CEO
Jackson County Chamber of Commerce
The Jackson County Chamber is accepting
applications for the position of President/
CEO. Min.3-5 yrs leadership experience with
bachelors degree or equivalent education or
business experience required. Prefer some
experience with a non-profit, a Chamber, or
membership organization led by a board of
directors. Proven skills needed In public
relations, public speaking, marketing,
e-communications, business operations,
planning, and P&L management. Must be
able to interact effectively with entrepre-
neurs, business owners, executives, elected
officials, civic leaders and volunteers. Must
be able to self-relocate to Jackson County.
Position closes April 15th. Submit resume
to jcchambersearch@gmall.com.

Network Specialist
Local Company growing and expanding,
looking for experienced Network Specialist
for installing Lg. commercial printers &MFP's
Benefits, Salary Negotiable
Send Resume to: The Dothan Eagle
Box EE 227 N. Oates St. Dothan, AL 3633

() EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


Enrolling Now!
Training in
F DO TIC ElectricalTrades
FOR TIS Medical Assisting,
COLLEGE Pharmacy Technology
and More!
Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 for consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

fX7l RESIDENTIAL
ILL 1 REAL ESTATE FOR RENT



COTTONDALE VILLA
APARTMENTS
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR 1 & 2 BEDRqOM APARTMENTS RENTAL
Assistance Available to Quailified Appliants

CALL: (850) 352-2281
TDD USERS 1-800-548-2456
Office Opened Tuesday & Thursday

EQUAL HOUSING 3111 Willow St.
OPPORTUNITY Cottondale, FL 32431

tf 0'A


GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.

1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL. Call 850-482-4663



21311 I2 B antFoRen tI





1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
-1 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4.
2BR/1BA Hou se 6914 Oaks St.
Grand Ridge $450. Mo.'+ $4501 Dep.
.* Call 850-592-5571
2BR/1BA Newly Renovated 2658 Railroad St.
Open floor plan. Cottondale. No Pets.
$450 Mo. + $400 Dep. Call 850-352-4222
2BR/1BA With family Room 1100SF all updated
w/central air, country atomsphere with large
fenced yard. Near town off 73 North and Hwy
90 West. $550. Mo + Dep. Call 765-425-5288
3/2 brick with CH&AAlford FI
$695 mo. + dep. 850-579-4317; 850-866-1965
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
m 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com_
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting G $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maint.incl.
___ *I850-593-4700 4-


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountryliving.com.
850-209-8847 4-
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595 I


4 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself) |
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 Located between
Grand Ridge & Sneads. Includes water &
garbage. $360. Mo 4 850-573-0308 4-

C ~RESIDENTIAL
iI REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Poultry Farm for Sale 4 houses, Poultry farm
and 5000 sf residence, 2 car garage, 64 acre,
U.S. Hwy. frontage, huge barn, generator, Trac-
tor, farming equipment, $1,100,000 for more in-
fo. Kaan 334-596-8311


LEASE OPTION TO BUY 2940 Dogwood St.
3/2 CH&A close to Riverside
Sch., Hd/Wd Fis., Lg. den on corner lot.
$119,500. Owner Fin. 850-718-6541


1979 14x68 Riverchase 2/2, fireplace, nicely
furnished, upgraded master bath, porch &
deck Included $12,500. 850-718-6541
MUST BE MOVED 4,

RECREATION


2008 Crownline 19 SS, 30.5
Irs. Mercruiser 4.3L, Facto-
ry wak-tboard tower, cus-
tarn i- r,. sna.p-in carpet,
walk thru transom, trailer
brakes, SS cleats, flip-up captain's chairs, Sony
marine stereo & sub-woofer, bimini top, stain-
less steel rub-rail upgrade, trailer tie downs, SS
windshield lock, SS cupholders, chrome wheels
Garage kept always. 334-796-9479
BOAT Crownline BR 180 135hp bimini top,
Crownline trailer, new tires, $7,000.
334-618-5169
Eagle 2010 190 Yamaha
150 G3 bassboat
4-stroke warr 2014
Humminbird 788ci, 2
chairs, 2 butt seats, galv
trailer, hydraulic steering, many extras,
$18,500. Call 334-616-1918 or 334-355-0326
Pontoon Boat 2008 20ft. G3 fish & Cruise, pur-
chased new July 2009, 30 gallon gas tank, fish
finder, 90HP, 4-stroke, Yamaha engine. Exc. gas
mileage. Asking $15,000. 334-897-6929.


Jayco 2009 Jayflight FB22 Travel Trailer
sleeps 6, fully equipt $8500, 334-889-3383
Keystone 2006 Sidney Edition md# 30ROLS ,
30ft. pull behind. Like new, total use 7-8 times,
sheltered when not in use.
Asking $15,000 334-897-6929.
Rockwood 2007 Travel Trailer 33ft. 2bd. well
maintained, barn stored, great unit! $17,500.
334,899-6408 call before 8:30 pm


1999 Winnebago 32' motorhome:
Sleeps 6. Excellent condition. Gas engine with
gas saver system installed. 32K miles. Must see
to appreciate! $12,000. Call 334-685-3810
Fleetwood 1997 35ft Bounder: 1 slide-out, back-
up camera, leveling jacks, generator, low miles
39k, run goods, new tires. $17,500. OBO
Call 850-482-7554 or 850-209-3495

TRANSPORTATION


, 1 \1983 Buick LeSabre
Limited: Two owner
vehicle, and yes,it was a
little Grandmother's Car!! 123,500 mi, 5.0
liter V8, Sedan. All stock, All originalAM/FM
radio, power locks & windows, tilt steering,
remote outside mirror adjustments, original
velour seat covers, split front seats w/armrest,
power adjustable driver's seat,'heat/AC works
great, wire spoke hubcaps, big trunk, front
window power units replaced. Engine kept
tuned regularly, new battery, all belts, water.
pump & hoses replaced, good tires. Vinyl roof
needs care Left front corner/side hit by deer.
Drives great, runs strong, cleans up nice!
$1,975. 334-687-2330 or maczack@bellsouth.net


BMW 1995, leather int. good gas mil. green in
color, 4-door $3,200. firm 334-793-2347
Buick 2005 LaSabre: 56k miles, beige, new tires,
fully loaded, beige leather interior, very nice
condition. $5,500. Call 334-589-0637
Chevy 2010 Impala, Great family car.with great
fuel mileage, fully loaded. $300 down $300 per
month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.
,. ."' Corvette 2003 Z06 50th
-_'^ -,'fl Anniversary Edition
Metallic Blue 6 speed, 405
hp, 40,500 miles, Excellent
Condition $19,195.
334-475-3735 after 6PM
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
GOT BAD CREDIT?
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy slow credit ok
$0 Down/lst Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull or Drag will trade
RIDE TODAY! FREE $25. gas giveaway
Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550


... ..... Honda 2007 S-2000 76k mi.
Car is awesome! $19,500!
Let the top down and go
cruising! Black on black
convertible. 6 spd. Adult
owned. Clean well maintained. Responsive lit-
tle rocket! below NADA. Come look, give it a
test drive & you'll be hooked. 334-805-4740
- .-. > -r.- -.r! Hyundai 2004 Sonata, V-
6, GLS, 4 door, automat-
ic, loaded, like new,
68,000 miles, very clean,
$6475. Call 334-790-7959.
Mitsubishi 2004 Eclipse De-
S pendable, one owner, great
gas mileage, sunroof; few mi-
nor blemishes, 120,000 mi,
Automatic. Asking $6,000.
Will take best offer. Call Jen-
nifer at 334-791-0143
Nissan 2010 Sentra, Navigation, Leather, Sun
roof, Must sell! $200 down, $249 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Toyota 2012 Corolla, Great gas saver, fully
loaded, low miles, very nice car. $200 down,
$250 per month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.


1985 Harley Davidson
FXRT80. 37,000 miles.
Great shape. $7,000 obo.
Also have 2002 soft tail
with $5,000 of added
chrome. $10,000 like new. Call 334-464-0639
A 2008 Harley Davidson
I S ". Softail Classic.
Like new, only 5900 miles.
c .l s Gold and black with lots of
''-- chrome. Excellent condi-
tion. $12,000 obo. If interested, call Frank at
334-790-9733 or send email to fab@graceba.net
s H ^ 2012 Harley Road King
7 7- W.Black. Only 1400 mi. 6 spd
S-', 103 ci 1600cc, security sys-
i te, ABS brakes, cruise,
back rest with luggage
r -rack. Bought last fall, still
under warranty. 2 helmets included. Wireless/
Bluetooth/ FM radio intercom system. (approx
$600 value) Adult owned, title in hand. $16,500
obo. 334-794-9388 or pwt.1202@yahoo.com
Harley Davidson 2006 Soft tail Standard:
4600 miles, vinson/haines pipes, 250 rear
wheel, bronze pearl, lots of chrome, 25K
invested. Asking $10,000. Firm. 334-793-3611
Harley Davidson 2007 Heritage Softtail Classic
exc. cond, new tires, new battery,
lots of chrome $12,500.
334-712-0493 or w-334-793-8028


=- ,I


I onda 2005 VTX 1300-R
Nicest one in Alabama,
Too much chrome to list.
$7,500. Ken 334-693-9360


--SPORTjUTILTY,

Chevrolet 2003 Trailblazer
4x4. Excellent condition.
W a Garage kept since pur-
chase. Fully loaded 4x4.
105,00 miles. Must see to
appreciate. Black with grey interior. $7,200.
Phone 850-956-2623
.. Ford 1998 Explorer XLT.
Red in color. Grey leather
Interior. 6 cyl. 112 k miles.
Very nice inside and out.
$5,500 OBO. Call or text 334-806-6004.


4000 Ford Tractor good condition, new engine
$3.950. 334-791-0700


Chevrolet 2007 Silverado 2-door, 8 cyI. silver in
roloc 68 491 miles $15 500 334-79 3


Dodge 2000 Dakota RT: black, fully loaded, 5.9
liter 360 Magnum, Bridgestone tires, beautiful
and rare truck, pampered and well kept, runs
and drives excellent & clean carfax available.
Serious inquiries only. $7,200. Call 334-585-0121
Please leave a message.


Ford Tractor 9N with 4ft. bushhog,
good working condition. 229-869-0883.
GMC 1986 2500 Series: 4 door, 2 seater but no
back seat, 8 cyl, 91k miles, one owner, garage
kept, very good condition. $3,800. Call 334-792-
3756
International 1995 4900: Flat Bed Truck, DT466,
AC, 125k miles. $6,000. Call 334-897-6346 or
334-406-7200
Toyota 1994 Tacoma 4-wheel drive as whole or
parts. 334-689-9436.


a Dodge 2005 Caravan STX,
2 q-- V-6, loaded 3rd row
seat, front and rear air,
103,000 miles, $5925. Call
334-790-7959



1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
Warer 'ds 24 o!Wr 7T n
Al TTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


CALL FOR TOP PRICE

FOR JUNK VEHICLES


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664

Got a Clunker
S 't. ** We'll be your Junker! :
We buy wrecked cars .
and Farm Equip. at a
;_ fair and honest price!
$325 & tfComplete Cars i

L .............................
r- --------------------------------
[a* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
334-794-9576 or 344-791-4714_


Ai


LEGALS


LF160078
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-211-CA
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JENNIFER SASSER A/K/A JENNIFER L. SASSER,
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUL-
TURE RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA)


N.A., and UNKNOWN TENANTSS,
Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated February 11, 2013, and an
Order Reopening Case and Rescheduling Fore-
closure Sale entered in Case No. 11-211-CA, of
the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Cir-
cuit, in and for Jackson County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and
JENNIFER SASSER A/K/A JENNIFER L. SASSER,
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUL-
TURE RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, and CITIBANK (SOUTH DA-
KOTA) N.A. are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the front
door of the Courthouse in Marianna, Jackson
County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Central Time, on
April 18, 2013, the property set forth in the Fi-
nal Judgment of Foreclosure and more particu-
larly described as follows:
See Attached Exhibit "A"
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
DATED: March 18, 2013
/s/ DALE RABON GUTHRIE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
Garvin B. Bowden, Esq. -
Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden,
Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
EXHIBIT "A"
Description: (New Parcel)
Commence at a 1/2 inch iron rod and cap (PSM
2142) marking the northeast corner of the
northwest 1/4 of the southeast 1/4 of Section
28, Township 4 North, Range 10 West, Jackson
County, Florida, thence N.88 -23'47"W., along
the north boundary of said northwest 1/4 of
the southeast 1/4, a distance of 263.59 feet to a
1/2 inch iron rod and cap (PSM 2142), said iron
rod being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence
continue N.88-23'47"W., along said north boun-
dary, a distance of 134.00 feet to a 1/2 inch iron
rod and cap (PSM 2142); thence departing said
north boundary and run S.00 -39'46"W., a
distance of 328.51 feet to a 1/2 inch iron rod and
cap (PSM 2142) on the south boundary of the
north 1/2 of the north 1/2 of aforesaid north-
west 1/4 of southeast 1/4; thence S.88 -
19'59"E., along said south boundary, a distance
of 134.00 feet to a 1/2 inch iron rod and cap
(PSM 2142); thence departing said south boun-
dary and run N.00 39'48"E., a distance of
328.66 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Con-
taining 1.00 acres, more or less.
ALONG WITH a 30' ingress, egress and public
utility easement, over and across the following
described property; Begin at a 1/2 inch iron rod
and cap (PSM 2142) marking the northeast
corner of the northwest 1/4 of the southeast
1/4 of Section 28, Township 4 North, Range 10
West, Jackson County, Florida; thence
S.00-39'46"W., along the east boundary of said
northwest 1/4 of southeast 1/4 and the end of
the maintained right of way of Colony Lane, a
distance,of 30.00 feet; thence departing said
east boundary and said right of way and run
N.88-23'47"W, a distance of 30.00 feet; thence
N.00- 39'46"E., a distance of 30.00 feet to the
north boundary of said northwest 1/4 of south-
east 1/4; thence N.88 23'47"W along said north
boundary, a distance of 178.44 feet; thence
S.00- 39'43W., a distance of 30.00 feet; thence
N.88-23'47"W., a distance of 55.15 feet; thence
N.00- 39'43"E., a distance of 30.00 feet to a 1/2
inch iron rod and cap (PSM 2142) on aforesaid
north boundary of northwest 1/4 of southeast
1/4; thence S. 88 23'47"E., along said north
boundary, a distance of 25.14 feet to a 1/2 inch
iron rod and cap (PSM 2142); thence N.00 -39'43
"E., a distance of 30.00 feet; thence S.88 *
23'47"E., a distance of 238.44 feet to the east
boundary of the southwest 1/4 of the northeast
1/4 of said section; thence S.00 39'43"W.,
along said east boundary, a distance of 30.00
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.


LF160092
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No: 2012 CA000049
Community South Credit Union,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Dietrich G. Covington and Tina M. Covington,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA
STATUTES

NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Summary
Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November
28, 2012, in Case Number 2012 CA 000049, of
the Circuit Court in and for Jackson County,
Florida, in which Community South Credit Un-
ion is the Plaintiff, and Dietrich G. Covington
and Tina M. Covington, are the Defendants, I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash
at the Jackson County Courthouse, 4445 Lafay-
ette Street, Marianna, FL 32447, at 11:00 A.M.
on May 9,2013, the following-described prop-
erty set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure:
See Exhibit "A" attached
Notice is also given pursuant to 45.031(2)(f),
Florida Statutes, that any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as of the date of
the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
DATED: April 1,2013.
JACKSON COUNTY CLERK OF COURT
Clerk of the Court
By /s/ Tammy Bailey
As Deputy Clerk
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and correct copy
of the foregoing Notice of Sale was furnished
by U.S. Mail on April 1, 2013 to:
Chad D. Heckman
326 Williams Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32303-6320
Dietrich G. Covington
Tina M. Covington
14486 Jamaica Dogwood Dr
Orlando, FL 32828-4830
Exhibit "A"
The N 1/2 of a parcel of land described as
follows:
One acre, more or less, in the NE 1/4 of NW 1/4
of Section 34, Township 6 North, Range 13
West, being better described as: Beginning at a
point on East right of way line of State Road
No. 77 South of Graceville, 355 feet South of
boundary line; thence continue South on right
of way line of State Road No. 77 a distance of
210 feet; thence East 210 feet; thence North 210
feet; thence West 210 feet to the POINT OF BE-
GINNING, lying and being in Jackson County,
Florida.


G.M. Properties of PC
Beach 800-239-2059
Fully Furnished Condos
r f& Townhouses
near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $250 nt.
Portside Resort starting @ $125.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
www.gmproperties.com


I


, ,
-
,


Call 52603614 to sell


your item In the


thS"'
Classified todayll


';, ?4
44A ,^










www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIEDS


.J ackson (County Floridan *


Wednesday, April 10, 2013 -9 B


LF160090
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE JACKSON
COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION OF ITS IN
TENT TO CONDUCT A PUBLIC HEARING TO RE
VIEW THE FOLLOWING AND OTHER BUSINESS.

The Jackson County Planning Commission will
consider:
I. PUBLIC HEARINGSS:
A. Old Business:
(1)Review and recommendation of the pro-
posed Jackson County Land Development Code
(LDC) to the Board of County Commissioners.
The public hearing will be held in the Jackson
County Commission Board Room of the Admin-
istration Building located at 2864 Madison
Street, Marianna, Florida, on Monday, the 15th
of April, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Anyone desiring information may contact the
Community Development Department between
7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
at 4487 Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida or
contact by phone at (850) 482-9637.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabil-
ities Act, persons needing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this meeting should
contact the Planning Secretary at Jackson
County Community Development no later than
5 days prior to the meeting. The Planning Sec-
retary may be contacted at 4487 Lafayette
Street, Marianna, FL, 32448, (850) 482-9637, or
(800) 955-8771 (TDD).

LF15946
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION;
CASE NO: 32-2011-CA-000559
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 25,
2013, and entered in Case No. 32-2011-CA-
000559 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth
Judicial Circuit in and for Jackson County, Flori-
da in which The Bank of New York Mellon, as
Successor Trustee under NovaStar Mortgage
Funding Trust, Series 2006-3, is the Plaintiff and
Boneda C. Beeler,, are defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash in/on at
the North Door of the Jackson County Court-
house, 4445 Lafayette Street, Marianna, FL
32446, Jackson County, Florida at 11:00AM
CST/12:OOPM EST on the 2nd day of May, 2013,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
A PARCEL OF LAND IN MARIANNA, FLORIDA,
ADJOINING THE WEST SIDE OF PARK STREET
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE NE
CORNER OF LOT 4, OF BLOCK 11, OF WEST
MANOR, UNIT NO. 2, ACCORDING TO PLAT
THEREOF, ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING ON THE WEST LINE
OF PARK STREET, THENCE GO NORTH ALONG
SAID WEST LINE 100 FEET, THENCE GO WEST
170 FEET, THENCE GO SOUTH 100 FEET TO A
POINT WHICH IS 150 FEET NORTH OF THE
NORTH LINE OF DECATUR STREET AND THENCE
GO EAST 170 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, BEING IN THE N 1/2 OF SECTION 3,
TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST, JACK-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 2977 PARK ST., MARIANNA, FL 32446-
3115
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated in Jackson County, Florida this 25th day
of March, 2013.
/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Jackson County, Florida
By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
Albertelli Law
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
(813) 221-4743
09-28610
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.


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NATIONAL BASIKETBAL.L ASSOCIATION


Pat Riley says


Heat will be


ready for playoffs


The Associated Press
MIAMI Pat Riley said
he wakes up around 11
a.m. these days then heads
into the office to chat
with fellow Miami Heat
executives Nick Arison
and Andy Elisburg about
nothing.
He's lying, of course.
There might not be any-
one in the Miami organi-
zation who savors playoff
time more than Riley, the
Heat president with eight
championship rings in his
collection. And with Mi-
ami on the cusp of setting
a franchise record for wins
in a season, Riley sounds
very much like he's ready
for another postseason
run.
"It's the ultimate dream
for me," Riley said. "It re-
ally is."
Riley last coached on
April 16, 2008, the end of
Miami's miserable 15-win
season.
All that's happened since
is the promotion of Erik
Spoelstra to head coach,
the acquisition of LeBron
James, Chris Bosh, Ray
Allen, Mike Miller, Shane
Battier, Mario Chalmers
and others to play along-
side Dwyane Wade, two
trips to the NBA Finals,
one championship and
288 regular-season and
playoff victories third-
most in the league over
that span.
And barring all-out col-
lapse, Miami will head
into the playoffs later this
month as the No. 1 overall
seed in the league, guar-
anteed home-court ad-
vantage through the NBA
Finals.
"They're ready," said Ri-
ley, who sits opposite the
Heat bench during home
games, rarely showing any
outward signs of emo-
tion. "They know that they
have something to play
for. They know they have
the weapons to go out and
play for it.
"They're so smart as
a team. They're getting
themselves ready on their
own clock and Spo is get-
ting them ready the same
way. They'll be ready to
play."
Riley rarely gives
interviews about
the state of the Heat
anymore, preferring the
overwhelming majority
of the focus and spotlight
remain on Spoelstra and
the players. He issued a
statement through a team
spokesman late last month
directed at Boston Celtics
president of basketball
operations Danny Ainge,
who chided James for
complaining about the
way he is officiated.
Riley's response was
swift, direct and slightly
profane, though it served
as a reminder that there's
plenty of fire still burning
within him.


"I knew after 2008,
that 15-win season, that
that was it. But I never
realized that I would
have an opportunity to
watch and thoroughly
enjoy just the players
on the practice court,
watch them warming
up, watch them playing
the game, watch them
celebrate, watch them
have fun. It's just been
an absolute Godsendfor
me at this stage of my
career"
Pat Riley,
Miami Heat president
And when he met with
reporters Sunday at a Heat
charity event one that
had "the future" as a theme
and raised more than
$503,000 for South Florida
charities Riley seemed
to address his own future,
indicating that his work in
Miami is not over yet.
"I just want to keep
helping them," Riley said.
"I want keep bringing
in pieces that's going to
complement them and
hope we can have one of
those 10-year rides, you
know? You think about ev-
ery team, the Celtics in the
'60s and the Lakers in the
'80s and the Bulls and then
again the Spurs, those guys
have been together for
eight, nine, 10 years. And
if we can keep this group
together for eight, nine,
10 years, we're all going to
have some fun."
What happens down the
road is secondary these
days to Riley and the Heat,
however.
For them, the priority is
right now.
Since 1970, only four
franchises the Lakers,
Chicago, Detroit and
Houston have been
able to successfully defend
an NBA championship.
Miami will enter the
postseason favored to
become the fifth club on
that list, which was Riley's
goal when putting the core
of this roster together iqr
2010.
At that time, he used
the word "dynasty" when
talking to season-ticket
holders.
For the Heat to get
there, a second straight
title would seem to be an
obvious prerequisite.
"I knew after 2008, that
15-win season, that that
was it," Riley said. "But I
never realized that I would
have an opportunity to
watch and thoroughly en-
joy just the players on the
practice court, watch them
warming up, watch them
playing the game, watch
them celebrate, watch
them have fun. It's just
been an absolute Godsend
for me at this stage of my
career."


MHS BASEBALL

Golf Tournament

April 13 & 14
CAVERNS GOLF COURSE

Thousands In Cash And Prizes
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3 MAN SCRAMBLE
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LUNCH PROVIDED BOTH DAYS
Several Prize Holes To Be Awarded!


PLATINUM SPONSO
Marianna
Toyota

Florida Pub
Utilities


iitE


G'6rAd..
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat's LeBron James (center) reacts from the bench to a foul called on teammate Ray Allen in the second half of a game
against the Philadelphia 76ers on Saturday in Miami.







V. __-


II
I'


II


Tradition


WMaAn Ato es'tr & RSQ oo^-o

Friday, Ap I 9TH 12 Noon until 10PM

Saturday, Apri 20T' 9:ooAM until

JACKSON COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE
a ITTIOTTFIP, CLA SSIC CAR SHOW &
AN'XTI-J '.L'rI C TO SECTION
SATURDAY, APRIL 20

FINE ARTS CONTEST ARTS & CRAFTS
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Civ 8,O nsoo,,9Wp sn,0I
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6:40 to 7:40AM -,~

DON'T MISS THE


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DIAMOND SPONSORS

FLORI DAN N

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Jackson Hospital
Marianna Rolary Club Dr Jana C
Hancock Bank Chipol


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For More Information

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4577 Lodge Drive Marianna, FL


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STREET CORNER SYMPHONY
PERFORMING: SATURDAY 6:00PM
Second Season Runner's Up on NBC's "The Sing Off"


11011B WEDNESDAY. APRIL 10. 2013


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN wwwjcfloridan.com