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Jackson County Floridan ( April 9, 2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
April 9, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01055

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
April 9, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01055

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text


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Informing more than 7 ,i readers daily in print and online


City Electioan 0;sy
Today is Municipal Election Day in
Cottondale, Marianna and Sneads.
Polling places are open 7 a.m. to
7 p.m. Results will be posted
tonight at JCFloridan.com.


Tigor's
fe" '


SFL O,,, l'' ; :'
FL ORIDAN


Vol. 90 No. 81


Southerland bill would expand


reach of technical assistance


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Speaking at a public meeting in the engine bay of Marianna Fire
Department on Monday, U.S. Congressman Steve Southerland
talks about the Building Rural Communities bill he plans to
introduce this week in Washington as lawmakers return to
session.


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
U.S. Congressman Steve
Southerland was in Mari-
anna on Monday to an-
nounce his intention to file
a bill which, if passed as
proposed, would expand
the reach of an existing
USDA technical assistance


fund. A set-aside within
the USDA's Rural Devel-
opment-Essential Com-
munity Facilities (CF) pro-
gram, the assistance fund
is currently limited to use
on water and wastewater
projects. Through it, Mari-
anna recently obtained
money to get the technical


assistance it needed to car-
ry out a drainage improve-
ment plan associated with
a street project.
Expanding the use of
the fund would allow ru-
ral communities to hire
consultants to help them
find and compete for
USDA grants and loans


to fund a wider range of
projects, things like im-
proved police and fire sta-
tions, health clinics, senior
centers, courthouses and
other assets.
The legislation, as pro-
posed, would also allow
See BILL, Page 5A


WILD WEST SHOWDOWN


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/ FLORIDAN
Smoke flies from the barrel of Marshall Jim Slade's (also known as Gary Mack) gun during a main street showdown
with the James Gang Saturday.


Outlaw Cody Mack gives Timothy Wilson of Grand Ridge a few
u tips on using a Red Ryder BB gun Saturday at the Florida Wild
West Show's shooting gallery.


Don Moore wore many hats during the Wild West show
Saturday. In addition to being the doctor, dentist, optometrist,
veterinarian, judge and undertaker for the "town" of Broken
Horn,he was also the post-shootout humorist.


Living




history
BY MARK SKINNER
Banks were robbed and jails were
broken out of as country music
and gun'smoke filled the air of
Steel City Saturday.
The excitement was courtesy of a living
history event being put on by North Florida
Wild West Shows.
The group, which has been entertaining
people around the country for 25 years, even
provided a jail to break out of and bank to
rob.
According to Marshall Jim Slade (also
known as Gary Mack) the organization is
hoping to have living history events like this
one periodically in the county.
In addition to music and historical action-
the event also had vendors as well as pony
and train rides and Mack said they will try to
add different things for future shows.
Visitors could also get an early taste of the
group's annual Haunted House, which will be
open from Oct. 17-31.


BY ELLEN NOTBOHM
Special to the Floridan

April is Autism Awareness Month.'
What does that mean, to parents of
children with autism, and those who
think autism doesn't touch them?
Awareness was an ambitious goal
10 years ago, but today, awareness


> CLASSIFIEDS...4-5B

This Newspaper .)
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint 'M



7 I65161 0 II 5 9
7 561 80050 9


that doesn't result in action feels hol-
low to me. A society can be as aware
of autism as they are of the weather
but if, like the old weather cliche, ev-
eryone grumbles but nobody does
anything about it, awareness can
turn divisive, driving our children
with autism farther to the edges of
community. Some still see autism


) ENTERTAINMENT...3B


)) LOCAL...3A


as a dubious diagnosis, a resource-
suck on schools and insurance com-
panies. But what of this cold hard
calculation: what will it cost society
through 60 years of adulthood if in
childhood we do not do everything
in our power to produce a healthy,
See AUTISM, Page 5A


>> OBITUARIES...5A


!~ ~F'f
~ '~ L-!i'
I ~ II
rL :' ,~ .~.


) STATE...4A


1M 1I'ILALD)CO S ',. HOSPICL
CAR SHOAW FUJ INAISER


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Judge Jamme Bowers checks out the muscle cars, K-cars and
custom cars on display at a fundraiser car show for Emerald
Coast Hospice Saturday.


The plastic cobra lurking under the hood didn't deter
Richard Dominguez's detailed examination of this Shelby
Cobra's engine Saturday. It was one of the many vehicles
on display at a car show being put on by the Fire and Iron
Station 202 Motorcycle Club as well as the Marianna Sears
and Big Lots stores. Money raised from the event's entry fee
will go to Emerald Coast Hospice to send children who have
lost loved ones to a bereavement camp to learn how to cope
with grief.


,IA.K '. ,. ..iA 5' ;,


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Eight-year-old Ambria Tanner introduces Gayle Dibemedetto
to EB ( short for Easter Bunny) during the annual Marianna
Woman's Club Spring Yard, Bake and Plant Sale Saturday.


) SPORTS...1B


Mary Basford flips through
one of the many books at
the Marianna Woman's
Club's Spring Yard, Bake and
Plant Sale on Saturday. It
is one of club's two annual
sales to raise money for its
community projects. The
clubs' major project for this
year is offering eight $500
scholarships to Chipola
College.


))WEATHER...2A


Take it on the Run -

NO


Email Alerts, Mobile Alerts and RSS Feeds subscriptions are FREE
Home Delivery plus Unlimited Online $11.23 per mo


Autism awareness is not enough


Follow us




Facebook Twitter








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook
A.M. Fog. P.M. Warmth.

Today Justin Klefer / WMBB


High 8501
Low 61 0




High 84 High- 820
S. Low -640 Low 570


Wednesday Thursday
A.M. Fog. P.M. Warmth. Scattered Showers & Storms.



.' High 760 ., High 750
SLow 490 -,:'_' Low 52'


Friday Saturday
Clearing & Cooler. MoStly Sunny & Mild.



FLORIDA'S REAL

PANHANDLE Ou

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 0oo.-

hiLjjIST.iNiFiRSiijiniiij -ffliUD


24 hours 0.00" Year to date 1IS 4'
Month to date 0.42" Normal YTD I 25
Normal MTD 1.08" Normal for year 59.26
TIDES


Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


6:03 PM
10:35 AM
6:08 PM
7:19AM
7:23 PM


High
High
High
High
High


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


9:21
4:34
9:54
10:27
11:00


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3' 4 ..7 8 '0 1


THE SUN AND MOON


Reading
47.78 ft.
10.86 ft.
8.51 ft.


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.


7.23 ft. 12.0 ft.


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:20 AM
7:05 PM
5:41 AM
6:40 PM


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520. Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually'
occupied by-that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.










I C L IR I AEJ/ .co% M


Community Calendar


TUESDAY, APRIL 9
Municipal Election Day-7 a.m.-7 p.m. Voters in
Cottondale, Marianna and Sneads go to the polls.
Call 482-9652.
Chipola College early registration- for cur-
rently enrolled students fpr Summer I and II. Call
718-2211 or visit www.chipola.edu.
) Optimist Club of Jackson County Board
Meeting Noon at 4476 Broad St. Marianna.
) Republican Club of West Florida Meeting
- Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna. Guest
speaker, Chuck Hudson will make a presentation on
identity theft. Call 352-4984.
D Orientation -Noon-3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
) Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County
Senior Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna.
Call 482-5028.
) Autism Support Group Meeting 6 p.m. in the
First Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall, Marianna
(Clinton Street entrance). Family members, caregiv-
ers and service providers welcome. Call 526-2430.
) Chipola College Community Chorus-6-7:30
p.m. in the Center for the Arts at Chipola College.
Singers, aged High School and above are welcome
to sing with the Community Chorus and .'..ill per-.
form on the April 16 Chipola Ensemble Concert. Call
718-2376 or heidebrechtd@chipola.edu.
)) Digital Photography: Getting Started With
Your SLR/DSLR Camera-6-8 p.m. at the Jackson
County Public Library, Marianna Branch, 2929
Green St. This class is intended for individuals who
are new to photography and would like to learn
the basics of using a SLR/DSLR camera. Students
need to be comfortable using an Internet based
computer including how to use the mouse. Bring a
digital camera and USB cord to class. Class is free,
registration is required. Call 482-9631.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10
Jackson Hospital First Birthday Celebration
of its Arts-in-Healthcare Program-9-10 a.m.
in the Hudnall Building Community Room, 4230
Hospital Drive in Marianna. After a brief program,
enjoy birthday cake while viewing patient artwork
displayed in the traveling gallery. Call 718-2696.


)) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation -9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. for an ap-
pointment. ,
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting
- Noon-1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Meth-
odist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Basic Computer Class Part 2-12-3 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90,
Marianna. Learn basic components and use of a
computer. No cost to attend. Call 526-0139.

THURSDAY, APRIL 11
Citrus Workshop-8 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Jackson
County Extension Conference Center, 2741 Pennsyl-
vania Avenue in Marianna. Growers will learn about
citrus varieties best suited for our area, valuable
ways to manage diseases and insects, soil fertility
and Good Agricultural Practices for Citrus. Horti-
culture Agent Rob Trawick will lead the workshop.
Lunch will be provided. Registration is required no
later than April 10. Call 482-9620.
) Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2290.
)) Job Club Noon-3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills; get job search assis-
tance. Call 526-0139.
)) Tools to Quit Tobacco Session-4 6 p.m. at the
Jackson Hospital Cafeteria Classroom. Free nicotine
patches and/or gum for program participants. To
register call 482-6500.
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation-4-7 p.m. at the Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. for an
appointment.
) Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group-
5:30 p.m.at Jackson Hospital in the Cafeteria Board
Room. Free to attend. Curriculum developed by ex-
smokers for those who want to become ex-smokers
themselves. Call 718-2545.
) NAACP Local Chapter to Host a Town Hall
Meeting-6 p.m. at St. James A.M.E. Church, 2891
Orange St. in Marianna on the topic of Dozier School
for Boys. Representatives of the state NAACP will
be in attendance to receive comments and share
information.
) Chipola Artist Series Event, Three on a


String-7 p.m. at Chipola College Center for
the Arts. Three on a String perform classic old
standards, country, bluegrass, and folk mixed with
comedy and humor for the entire family. Tickets
are available online or at the Center for the Arts Box
Office. Contact Anita Price, 718-2277 or price@
chipola.edu.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, APRIL 12
Flea Across Florida Yard Sale at Ascension
Lutheran Church-7 a.m.-2 p.m. at 3975 U.S.. 90 in
Marianna. Sale will include furniture, clothing, house
wares, etc. Call 482-4691.
) Flea Across Florida-Chipley is on the list of
stops. Event is'hosted by communities along a 272
mile stretch of 1-10 from Lake City to Pensacola.
Clubs, organization, church groups and the public
have been invited to participate. Sales sites ranging
from large multi-organization sites to individual
sites will be along U.S.. 90 across Washington
County. Vendors will be selling antiques, collect-
ibles, furniture, odds and ends, hand- crafted items
and traditional yard sale fare.
) Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida
Voluntary Pre-Kindergartern Registration-8
a.m.-12 p.m. at 4636 U.S.. 90, Suite E in Marianna.
Children must turn 4 on or before September land
must live in Florida. Parents will need to bring proof
of child's age and Florida residency. Call 1-888-269-
3022 or visit www.elcnwf.org.
) Wiregrass Master Gardner Association
Annual Spring Plant Sale-9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the
Dothan Area Botanical Gardens, 5130 Headland
Ave. Dothan, AL. Plants to be included are: Annuals,
perennials, vegetables, herbs, ground covers, vines
and ornamental grasses, trees, shrubs, bulbs, house
and tropical plants and succulents. Admission is
free. Call 334-798-1034.
) Knitters Nook-10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Wor-
ship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna.
Adult, teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856, 573-1131.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar. Jackson County Floridan, P 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 3244j,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
.li.e ondup--
PoliceRoundu


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police Department
listed the following incidents for April 7,
the latest available report: One missing
juvenile, one escort, one report of illness,
two verbal disturbances, two burglar
alarms, nine traffic stops, one follow-up
investigation and one fight in progress
reported.


Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office
and county fire/rescue reported the
following incidents for April 7, the lat-
est available report: One accident, one
hospice death, one missing juvenile, one
stolen vehicle, two reckless drivers, four
suspicious vehicles, two suspicious inci-
dents, one suspicious person, one
special detail, one escort, on verbal dis-
turbance, one pedestrian complaint, two
prowler reports, one gas leak, 17 medi-
cal calls, one traffic crash, three burglar
alarms, 36 traffic stops, one criminal
mischief complaint, one civil dispute,
two trespass complaints, one follow-up
investigation, one noise disturbance,
one fraud complaint, two assists of
motorists or pedestrians, two assists of
other agencies, two public service calls,
one transport, one patrol request
and one threat/harassment
complaint.


Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
periods:
) Manikia Milton, 38, 615 Saint Rose
Road, Grand Ridge, driving under the
influence.
Caryn Kaufman, 25,
.. -~ 5176 Fort Road, Green-
.R..L.. F wood, battery-domestic
-i-1R. violence.
n Donald Butler, 55, 1922
Edenfield Drive, Grand Ridge, possession
of drug paraphernalia, fraudulent use of
a credit card, possession of a prescription
medicine without prescription.
) Dennis Moore, 44, 5453 Creel
St., Graceville, driving while license
suspended/revoked.
) Aundra'Yonna Bell, 19, 2425 Carpenter
Cemetery Road, Grand Ridge, retail theft.
) Rebekah Creech, 18, 2018 Fowler Road,
Ashford, Ala., violation of conditional
release.
)) Dcmetrius lohnson, 23, 41132 Herring
Ave., Marianna, violation of conditional
release.
a Courtney Walker, 23, 208 Stephens Ave.,
Mary Ester, no motor vehicle registration.
) Chad Brown, 33, 5166E U.S. 90, Mari-
anna, burglary of a dwelling.
) Utriskell Brown, 40, 4469 Russ Road,
Cottondale, burglary of a dwelling, dealing
in stolen property, defrauding a second-
hand dealer.


)) Alexander Adan, 26, 2659 Randall Lane,
Cottondale, hold for Leon Co.
)) Michael Chemielewksi, 40, 9535 NW
Felix Flanders Road, Altha, fleeing and at-
tempting to elude.
) Henry Carter, 43, 3083 Gilmore St., Mar-
ianna, battery-domestic violence, resisting
arrest without violence.
) Melinda Self, 30, 2403 2nd Ave., Alford,
possession of a controlled substance-two
counts, possession of drug paraphernalia.
)) Jeremy Kirkland, 31, 1331 Beaver Dam
Road, Bonifay, violation of county proba-
tion, driving while license suspended or
revoked.
) Zachary Gonnelli, 23, 1022 Aloha Way,
Lady Lake, resisting arrest without vio-
lence, battery on a law enforcement officer.
)) Joseph Cogburg, 32, 2589 Rowell Road
(Apt. B) Cottondale, burglary with battery,
battery-domestic violence, impairing or
impeding telephone/facilitating burglary.
)) Danielle Adams, 22, 25538 N Main St.,
Altha, retail theft.
) Joseph Hamm, 35, 2045 Filmore Drive,
Marianna, obstruction by disguise, posses-
sion of controlled substance, possession of
drug paraphernalia.
) Hugo Pena, 31, 3205 Atwood Terrace,
Columbus, Ohio, no valid driver's license,
,hold for ICE.
) Stephanie Rabon, 23, 745 1st St.,
Chipley, non-child support.
Jail Population: 201
To report a crime, call Ci imeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agencyTo i epolt -,iiii. i....I ,t:..
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


Apr. Apr. Apr.
18 25 3


12A TUESDAY, APRIL 9,2013


WAIE-UP CALL








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Scoutmaster Bill Kleinhans introduces and welcomes new
Troop 3 Boy Scout Sean Connolly.

Troop 3 prepares


for fishing campout
Special to the Floridan

Troop 3 Boy Scouts held
their weekly meeting on
April 1 at the Scout Hut
at Wynn Street Park. Sev-
eral of the Scouts recently -

three-day hiking and
camping experience at
Pine Mountain, GA. This
meeting, which followed
spring break from school,
focused on making prepa- Scoutmaster Bill Kleinhans
rations for the troop's up- is assisted by Senior
coming fishing campout Patrol Leader Levin Berry
and working on require- (background) in presenting a
ments for scouts to earn fishing class for Troop 3 Boy
their fishing merit badges. Scouts.,
Anew member to Troop 3
Boy Scouts-was introduced Marianna. "Mr. K" brought
to the group. Sean Connol- a wide variety of tackle and
ly and his dad attended the supplies to show to the
meeting to get to know ev- Scouts; and he also dis-
eryone, as they make plans cussed many of the proper
to move to the Marianna techniques and strategies
area this summer. involved in the enjoyment
Scoutmaster Bill Klein- and success of the sport of
hans gave an informative fishing.
presentation on the vari- The Marianna Optimist
ous types of fishing poles, Club is the chartering or-
bait, lines and all equip- ganization for Troop 3 Boy
meant needed for the full Scouts. For more informa-
day of fishing together tion-about Boy Scouts, call
during their next cam- Scout Master Bill Klein-
pout at Walker's Pond near hans at 526-2897.

Cute

da
Pictured is 4-year-
old Alexandra
Huang, swimming
-- in a pool on Easter
Sunday afternoon in
Safety Harbor. Her

and Julie Huang of
SSafety Harbor. Her
grandparents are
c* ,. Paul and Tama Huang
Sof Marianna.
SUBMITTED PHOTO

Florida Lottery
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LOCAL


ROBERTS IS TOP


CHIPOLA EMPLOYEE


SUBMIITElDPHUOl
D r. Jayne Roberts has been selected the Chipola College
Faculty/Administrator/Other Professional Award of the
month for April. Roberts has served as a Vice President
of Student Affairs since 1986. Roberts (right) is congratulated by
Chipola president Dr. Gene Prough.



CHIPOLA MATH HONORARY


INDUCTS MEMBERS


SUBMITTED PHOTO
T he Chipola College chapter of Mu Alpha Theta, a national
honorary mathematics club, recently held an initiation for.
new members. Pictured are officers, new members and
sponsors, (from left, front row) Jaren Bannerman, Jae Jung Hyun,
Wesley Chevillot, Allen Campbell, John Whittington, Jackson
Nathanael Cagle, (back row) Annie Braxton, Rachel Pelt, Linsey
Basford, Brandi Brubaker, Meghan Delang, Meghan Wilder and
Joy Ree Ashmore, sponsor. Mu Alpha Theta is an international
mathematics society for high school and two-year colleges. The
purpose of Mu Alpha Theta is to stimulate a deeper and more
effective interest in mathematics.


TUESDAY, APRIL 9,2013 3AF

CHS honor rolls
Special to the Floridan

Cottondale High School has
released its honor rolls for the
third nine-week term.
Sixth Grade
A Honor Roll Lilly Ball,
McKenzie Gay, Blayton See and
Cody Shores.
A /B Honor Roll Savannah
Bizaillion, Christopher Bran-
non, Bethany Fowler, Deana
Holland, Mason Jones, Payton
Melvin, Makayla Morris, Isaiah
Perry, Grace Prieto, Courtney
Stephens, Janalyn Stephens,
Caroline Sweet, Emily Tyler and
CJ Young.
Seventh Grade
A Honor Roll Brittany
Dominguez, Summer Hayes and
Gracie Zick.
A/B Honor Roll Kristen Ad-
ams, Christopher Brown, Dylan
Cassatt, Christopher Corbin,
Logan Deese, Joshua Folsbm,
Tiyana Gray, Kyle Kelley, Tanya
Prieto, Colby Roland, James
White and Jephri White.
Eighth Grade
A Honor Roll-Hannah White.
A/B Honor Roll William Ad-
kins, Michael Black, Melissa Ha-
zell, Kender Kikilidis, Magnolia
Leclerc, Hailey McClain, Laramie
Pooser, Haley Scurlock, Brittney
Shores and Bradley Vickery.
Ninth Grade
A Honor Roll Brendon Hales,
Joyelle Saun, McKaylah See,
Kevin Tharp and Zoee Warren.
A/B Honor Roll Daniel
Lewis, Faith Long, Brently Mc-
Clain, Roy Sampson, Savannah
Sizemore, Austin Stephens and
Alana White.
10th Grade
A Honor Roll Cheyanne
Franklin, Breanna Harrell, Nikita
Hill, Destinee McDaniel and
Chelsea Morris.
A/B Honor Roll Andrew
Bizaillion, Taylor Czecholinski,
Alex Lamb, Cameron McKinney,
Connor Melvin, Sueellen Mosier
and Sabrina Trino.
11th Grade
A Honor Roll Patrick For-
tunato, Samantha Maloy, Mary
Raines and Taylor Tate.
A/B Honor Roll Kylee Crose,
Sierra Dominguez, Dakota
Haddock, Justin Klotz, Veronica
Peacock, Kourtnie Richardson,
Alycia Robinson, Charles Scott,
Brooke Shores, Grace White,
Jessica Wilkinson and Mercedes
York.
12th Grade
A Honor Roll Maggie
Braxton, Lily Festa, Elijawaun
Jackson, Jonathon Odom and
Kristian Sullivan.
A/B Honor Roll Linda
Black, Alexis Blount, Haley
Boggs, Kendriece Gardner,
Cody Hamm, Lindsey Hancock,
Kitana Hill Rosario, Trenton
Jackson, Ryan Morrissey, Austin
Nix, Taajwar Pope and James
Smith.


| IPhilip
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4/01 4-62 4-22 3 Not available *
92-56289 Sponsors and auction items are
4/02 03-5 39.0.7 2.13.17.28-35
630 .34I needed for Covenant's Garden Gala


(L) 4/u03 9 5 9 1l 11 7 101/iU19-22
(M) 806 8-4-74
(E) 4/04 6-3.4 0-3-8-2 8.21.32-33-34


Special to the Floridan


Thurs (M) 938 6-3.17 Covenant Hospice
Fn. (E) 4/05 7-1.7 742.8 1-11-12:2830 invites area businesses to
Fri (M) 0-9-5 9.7.8-8 join them in participation
Sat. (E) 4/06 1.1.4 8558 -'2.4.15.3034 of this year's Garden Gala.
Sat. (E) 4/06 1-4 8558 -24153034 Auction items such as gift
Sat (M) 8-4-8 1793 certificates, jewelry and
Sun (E) 4/07 584 0-5-6.3 6.13-26-31-34 artwork and multiple level
Sun. (M) 1-7.9 61-6-1 sponsorships are needed
"., E = Evening drawing. M = Midday drawing to support the eighth an-
nual Garden Gala benefit-
IEA ,"a .ing Covenant Hospice, to
Saturday 4.06 4 78.29-39 PB 24 be held on Saturday, June
Wednesday 4/03 1,.6812.35 PB 3. 22, at the National Guard
Ii_____ Armory located on High-
Saturday 406 21, 161720-40 ra 2 way 90 West in Marianna.
Saturday 4.0 21316.17.20-40 ra 2 The evening includes
Wednesday, 4/03 6-7-20-46-48-51 :or lottery information. call 850 487.7777 or 900 737 7777 silent and live auction,


tasting and exhibits and
much more. The featured
garden art guests will find
at the event are swings,
benches and Adirondack
chairs, as well as terra
cotta flower/tree pots that
have been transformed
into stunning pieces of art
by local artists.
Tickets are $60 per
individual and $100 per
couple. The Garden Gala
is critical to furthering
Covenant's mission in the
Marianna service area.
"Proceeds from the Gar-
den Gala help offset the
$2.3 million of indigent
care; along with


contributing to the pro-
grams not reimbursed by
Medicare, such as Be-
reavement and Social Ser-
vices, Chaplain Services,
Children Support Services
and Volunteer Programs,"
said Jennifer
Griffin, Development
Manager.
To become a sponsor,
donate an auction item
or for more information,
call Jennifer Griffin at
482-8520 or 209-8008; or
via email Jennifer.griffin@
covenanthospice.org.


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-14A TUESDAY, APRIL 9. 2013

State
Brief
Bill calls for separate
offenses for attacks
TALLAHASSEE- At-
tacks against pregnant
women would result in
separate charges for the
death or injury to their
unborn children under
a bill that has cleared a
Florida Senate panel.
The bill (SB 876)
sponsored by Sen. Kelli
Stargel, R-Lakeland, was
advanced by the Senate
Criminal Justice Com-
mittee on a 4-2 vote
Monday.
The measure would
apply to an unborn child
at any stage of develop-
ment. If the bill becomes
law, the death or in-
jury of an unborn child
would be recognized as
a separate offense from
any crime committed
against the expectant
mother.
Sen. Chris Smith, D-
Fort Lauderdale, said he
has problems with the
bill because someone
could face additional
criminal charges without
knowing a woman was
pregnant.

Senate panel clears
bill on sick leave
TALLAHASSEE A
business-friendly bill
that would forbid local
governments from re-
quiring businesses to of-
fer paid or unpaid family
and medical leave has
cleared a Senate panel.
The Senate Judiciary.
committee voted for
the bill (SB 726) 6-3 on,
Monday. Bill sponsor
David Simmons said he
wants the state to have
sole control over such
leave to avoid a patch-
work system of local and
county laws.
But dozens of op-
ponents flooded the
meeting room to say that
the bill hurts part time
employees who can't af-
ford to take unpaid time
off from work to deal
with sick children and
other relatives.
Orange County
residents got enough
signatures for a ballot
referendum requiring
businesses to give paid
sick time to workers but
the county commission
never placed it on the
2012 ballot.

Restrictions on
welfare cash approved
TALLAHASSEE -A
Florida Senate commit-
tee has approved a bill
that would prohibit
welfare recipients from
using debit-like electron-
ic cards to access cash
benefits at strip clubs,
liquor stores and gam-
bling establishments.
The bill (SB 1048) sailed
through the Senate Chil-
dren, Families and Elder
Affairs Committee on a
.9-0 vote Monday.
Supporters said the
debit-like cards are used
for food stamps and
other forms of assistance.
Sen. Eleanor Sobl,
D-Hollywood, said the
bill is aimed at making
sure the cards are used
for public-assistance
benefits that provide
necessities.
From wire reports


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Sheriff: Couple, kidnapped sons now in Cuba


The Associated Press

TAMPA A Florida cou-
ple suspected of kidnap-
ping their two sons from
the woman's parents are
in Cuba, authorities said
Monday.
The Hillsborough Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office received
information that the Hak-
ken family had arrived
on the island nation, ac-
cording to a news release.
Investigators say they're
working with the FBI
and the U.S. State De-


apartment to verify their


reports.







Chase Hakken


It wasn't
.immediately
clear what,
if anything,
authorities
could do to
retrieve the
family from
Cuba. An


e-mail seeking comment
from the State Depart-
ment wasn't immediately
returned.
The, sheriff's office al-
leges that Joshua Michael


Hakken entered his moth-
er-in-law's house north of


Cole Hakken


Tampa early
Wednes -
day, tied
her up and
fled with his
sons, 4-year-
old Cole and
2-year-old
Chase.


Federal, state and lo-
cal authorities had been
searching by air and sea
for a boat Hakken recent-
ly bought. The truck that
Hakken, his wife Sharyn


and the boys had been
traveling in was found late
Thursday, abandoned in a
parking garage in Madeira
Beach. Authorities say'they
had been looking up and
down the entire Gulf coast
from Pensacola to the Keys
and the Intracoastal Wa-
terway. An Amber Alert for
the boys has been issued
in Florida, Louisiana and
other states.
The boys had been living
since last year with their
maternal grandparents,
who were granted per-


manent -custody Tuesday.
Joshua Hakken lost custo-
dy of his sons last year after
a drug possession arrest in
Louisiana, and he later
tried to take them from a
foster home at gunpoint,
authorities have said. Au-
thorities have previously
characterized the Hakkens
as'"anti-government."
The Hillsborough
Sheriff's office has is-
sued an arrest warrant
for Joshua Hakken on
charges of kidnapping and
several other counts.


Community learns to live with roar from jets


As Joint Strike
Fighter fleet grows,
Community-learns
to live with the noise

The Associated Press

VALPARISO Dive shop
manager Bryan Kenning-
ton chatted with custom-
ers about masks and fins
on a recent afternoon
over the roar of an F-35
Joint Strike Fighter jet as it
streaked above the down-
town Valpariso business.
"That's the sound of
freedom; I love it," Ken-
nington said. A group of
young military men shop-
ping for dive equipment
agreed with nods and
thumbs-ups.
But not everyone in this
town likes the noise cre-
ated by the jets belonging
to Eglin Air Force Base's
new Joint Strike Fighter
training squadron. The
town sued the Air Force
to force those in charge
of the sprawling base to
mitigate noise from the
supersonic and stealth
F-35, which is supposed to
be adopted by the U.S. Air
Force, Navy and Marines,
many NATO countries and
other allies.
Valpariso and the Air
Force have since settled
the dispute with the
military, agreeing to some
noise-mitigation steps.
While not everyone is


happy with the results,
the fighter pilots and the
residents seem to be mak-
ing things work in part
because of a noise com-
mittee established after
the lawsuit.
As the military contin-
ues its push to replace its
aging fighter jet fleet with
variants of the F-35, towns
from Vermont to Ari-
zona have raised similar
concerns about noise, and
some are looking to this
Florida Panhandle town
to find out how com-
munities can make peace
with fighter jet noise. The
governor of Vermont,
where 18 to 24 F-35s are
supposed to be based,
recently visited Eglin to
see how much noise the
planes generate.
Eglin has 22 F-35s and
could eventually have 59.
The F-35 is the Pentagon's
most expensive weapons
program, at a total esti-
mated cost of nearly $400
billion. The Pentagon en-
visions buying more than
2,400 F-35s, but some
members of Congress are
balking at the price.
It's unclear how much
louder the planes are than
other aircraft. Opponents
cite Air Force charts indi-
cating that the F-35 can
be at least twice as loud as
the F-16. Others say that's
an unfair comparison
because measuring sound
involves factors including
how the planes are flown,


weather conditions, the
time of day and how long
people are exposed.
The 13,000 residents of
Valpariso, which sits
on the northeast corner of
Eglin Air Force Base, have
grown accustomed to the
sounds of fighter jets and
helicopters. But the city
argued in its lawsuit that
the F-35 was something
much louder than
anything it had
experienced.
"There is no question
those jets are noisier than
other jets their engines
are two to three times big-
ger," Mayor John Arnold
said. "I was never against
the F-35 itself- I
wanted the Air Force to
do things to help with the
noise."
Arnold said the noise
levels to date have been
manageable, but he still
worries about what will
happen when more F-35s
arrive. He fears properties
near the base could be de-
valued. City Hall, a school
and businesses are near
the end of the runway.
"I feel that the Air Force
has tried to work with us,
but the whole process has
been frustrating. We never
know who makes the final
decisions about anything
to do with situation. We
don't know what will hap-
pen when they do get 57
or so F-35s out there."
Air Force Col. Michael
Contratto, a fighter pilot


Brevard Zoo to open



sea turtle hospital


The Associated Press

VIERA Brevard Zoo
plans to open a hospital
to treat injured or sick sea
turtles.
Florida Today reports the
Sea Turtle Hospital is ex-
pected to open in October,
thanks in part to a $39,800
grant awarded from rev-
enues generated by the
Florida sea turtle specialty
license plate.
The newspaper reports
the hospital will be next
to a state-of-the art vet-
erinary facility opened
last year at Brevard Zoo. It
would primarily treat tur-
tles stranded because of
fibropapilloma, which is a
deadly viral disease.
The Sea Turtle Conser-
vancy, a nonprofit that
administers the state's


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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo Rep. Joe Garcia, D-Fla., (left) aids staff and
volunteers from the Florida Keys-based Turtle Hospital as they
release a rehabilitated loggerhead sea turtle into the ocean off
Islamorada, Fla. Brevard Zoo will be opening a similar hospital
in October.
sea turtle license plate full-time husbandry co-
grants, noted in a summa- ordinator. This will be
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who has worked with the
community to mitigate
noise concerns about the
F-35 program, said he
thinks the F-35 generates
about the same level of
noise as other fighter jets.
"I've been around a lot
of aircraft, and determin-
ing the noise levels would
involve some highly ana-
lytic work because there
are a lot of variables the
Navy pilots might fly with


their gear down and that
could create more noise,
the atmospherics are dif-
ferent day to day, and the
noise might carry more."
The pilots are not al-
lowed to break the sound
barrier, creating a sonic
boom, unless they are over
the open ocean, he said.
Contratto said Eglin
takes all noise complaints
seriously, logging and
investigating each one.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Obituaries
Lanier-Andler
Funeral Home
L Sneads, Florida
Phone 850-593-9900

Ellis Lamar
Branch

Mr. Ellis Lamar Branch,
age 91, of Shady Grove
went to be with the Lord on
April 6, 2013, after a
lengthy illness. He was a
lifelong resident of Jackson
County, Florida and a
farmer most of his life. La-
mar was also a lifelong
member of the Shady
Grove Methodist Church
where he led music for
many years and was a U. S.
Army Veteran of World War
II with the Army Air Corp.
He loved to tell stories of
selling watermelons on the
Birmingham Market. He
also owned the Shady
Grove Store where every-
one loved to gather to
catch up on the local news
and get a Moon Pie and RC
Cola.
Lamar was preceded in
death by his wife, Avie Dell
Ham Branch, his parents,
James Thomas and Essie
Branch, his brothers,
Wilmer, Aubrey, E. J., Tho-
mas Jr. and J. T. Branch, his
sister, Margie Branch
Wester and his sons, Ethan
and Carl Branch.
Lamar is survived by his
sister, Alvie Cauthan, two
sons, Harold Branch and
his wife Judy and Cecil
Branch and his wife Joy, a
daughter, Charlotte
Branch, daughters-in-law,
Janice and Rita Branch, 15
grandchildren, 38 great
grandchildren, 12 great
great grandchildren and a
host of nieces and nephews
and lifelong friends.
Visitation with the family
will take place Tuesday,
April 9, 2013, 12:00 till 2:00
PM CDT, at the Shady
Grove Methodist Church
with the Funeral Service
starting at 2:00 PM CDT.
Committal and Interment
Service will follow at Shady
Grove Cemetery.
The family would like to
thank Emerald Coast Hos-
pice for their dedicated
service. In lieu of flowers,
family requests memrhorial
contributions be made to
Shady Grove Methodist
Church located at 7305
Birchwood Road, Grand
Ridge, Florida 32442.
Lanier-Andler Funeral
Home.in Sneads, FL. Is in
charge of arrangements.
PH 850-593-9900.
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446

Wayne
Thomas
Morris

Wayne Thomas "Cow-
boy" Morris funeral serv-.
ices will be at 10 a.m.,
Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel.
Internment will follow at
Salem Free .Will Baptist
Church Cemetery with
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel di-
recting.


Florists

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Father sobs on 911 after kids burie(


The Associated Press

STANLEY, N.C. A
North Carolina man tear-
fully begged authorities to
hurry to his house to Tes-
cue his daughter and her
cousin, who were buried
when the walls of a 24-
foot deep pit he dug on his
property collapsed.
Jordan Arwood, 31, was
operating a backhoe Sun-
day night in the pit when
the walls collapsed and he
called 911.
Arwood's desperate
voice is heard on a re-
cording released by the
Lincoln County Sheriff's
Office on Monday, when
the children's bodies were
recovered.
"Please hurry ... My chil-
dren are buried under tons
of dirt ... They're buried
under tons of clay ... It fell
on top of them," he said
sobbing.
When the dispatcher
asked him if he could see
the children, Arwood said
he couldn't.
"The entire wall col-
lapsed on them. Get a
crane. Get a bulldozer. Get
anything you can, please,"
he said. "There's no way
they can breathe."
As the dispatcher began
encouraging him and
with people wailing in the
background Arwood
began praying.,
"Lord lift this dirt up
off these children ... so
the children will be alive
and well ... I have to get
my kids. Lord, please," he'
said..
The bodies of the two
young cousins, 6-year-
old Chloe Jade Arwood


THEASSOCI
In this image made from video and provided by WSOC-TV Charlotte, authorities v
rescue two children at a construction site, Sunday, April 7, in Stanley, N.C. Two tel
stations are reporting that two children are trapped under clay at a home under const
in Lincoln County near Charlotte.


and 7-year-old James Levi
Caldwell, were dug out
Monday.
Later on Monday, sher-
iff's deputies removed
firearms and a marijuana
plant from Arwood's mo-
bile home. Arwood is a
felon whoais not allowed
to have guns. He was con-
victed in 2003 for posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance with intent to sell.
The father had been dig-
ging with a backhoe on
the site Sunday, Sheriff
David Carpenter said. In-
vestigators described the
pit as 20 feet by 20 feet
with a sloped entrance
leading down to the 24-
foot bottom. The children
were at the bottom of the
pit retrieving a child-sized


pickaxe when the walls
fell in on them, Carpenter
said.
The sheriff would not say
what. Arwood was build-
ing or whether he had
any professional help. He
did say that investigators
would be looking into re-
ports from neighbors that
Arwood had been build-
ing some sort of protective
bunker.
"They were so distraught
we hope to be able to talk
to them today and come
up with some informa-
tion on that," Carpenter
said. "It's a very large hole.
It would look to be some-
thing like that, but I don't
know. ... We're going to
find out exactly what his
intentions were."


He said deputies
be speaking with
planning and zon:
ficials about any po
building code viola
the site.
Andrew Bryant, a
ner with the Lincoln
ty Planning & Inspi
Department, said i
mits had been issue
On the tape, A
said he didn't knov
happened.
"They were insi4
hole helping to get
thing and the mwa
lapsed," he said.
At one point, th
patcher warned hi
to put pressure on t_
But Arwood said he
reach the children.
"If this was you'an


LOCAL & NATION


FDA approves return of drug for morning sickness


The Associated Press


WASHINGTON Talk
about a comeback: A treat-
ment pulled off the mar-
ket 30 years ago has won
Food and Drug Adminis-
tration approval again as
the only drug specifically
designated to treat morn-
ing sickness.
That long-ago safety
scare, prompted by hun-
dreds of lawsuits claiming'
birth defects, proved to be
a false alarm.
Monday's FDA decision
means a new version of,
the pill once called Ben-
dectin is set to return to


Bill
From Page 1A
local governments to use
the funding to train em-
ployees, and get.financial
advice in trying to.not only
secure government grants
and loans, but also in set-
ting up a repayment plan
for the loans. The bill also
includes provisions that
would allow the commu-
nities to engage experts
who would monitor and
help them properly main-
tain the funded facilities
after they're completed.
Southerland wants 3-5


U.S. pharmacies under a
different name Diclegis
- as a safe and effective
treatment for this preg-
nancy rite of passage.
In the intervening de-
cades, the treatment is
widely believed to have
undergone more scru-
tiny for safety than any
other drug used during
pregnancy.
"There's been a lot of
buzz about this. Nothing
better has come along"
to treat morning sickness
in those 30 years, said Dr.
Edward McCabe, medi-
cal director for the March
of Dimes, who welcomed


percent of the CF fund set
aside for this type of assis-
tance. If roughly $21 mil-
lion is devoted to the CF
fund this year as expected,
the set-aside would mean
that from $630,000 to a
little, more than $1 mil-
lion would be available
for rural communities to
request.
In Southerland's 2nd
Congressional District, of
which Jackson County is
a part, there are 14 coun-
ties; 12 of those are rural in
nature, he said, and could
potentially benefit greatly
from the dedication of
funds to provide them


the step.
"We know safety-wise,
there's zero question," said
Dr. Gary Hankins of the
University of Texas Medi-
cal Branch in Galveston,
who headed one of the
company-financed stud-
ies of Diclegis that led to,
its approval.
U.S. sales of Diclegis are
expected to begin in early
June, according to Cana-
da-based manufacturer
Duchesnay Inc. The com-
pany has long sold a ge-
neric version of the pill in
Canada under yet another
name, Diclectin.
For all the names, the


technical assistance across
a wider range of projects.
Southerland said he be-
lieves there is bi-partisan
support for his proposal,
called the Building Ri-
ral Communities Act. He
said he expects to file it
soon after he returns to
Washington for session
this week.
State legislator Marti
Coley joined Southerland
at Monday's announce-
ment, the Representative
and Speaker Pro Tempore
expressing her support of
the plan. Southerland re-
vealed the bill at a public
meeting in the engine bay


main ingredients are the
same: Vitamin B6 plus
the over-the-counter an-
tihistamine doxylamine,
found in the sleep aid Uni-
som. U.S. obstetricians
have long told nauseated
pregnant women how
to mix up the right dose
themselves.
In fact, in 2004 the Amer-
ican College of Obstetri-
cians and Gynecologists
issued guidelines calling
the combination a first-
line therapy.
The difference that pre-
scription-only Diclegis
would offer: Combining
both ingredients with a


outside the Marianna Fire
Department main station,
located at Marianna City
Hall.
Also joining Southerland
for the announcement
were representatives of the
non-profit Southeast Ru-
ral Community Assistance
Project, which works with
USDA in providing tech-
nical assistance for hire
to communities on wa-
ter and wastewater proj-
ects. That entity supports
Southerland's proposal,
and a representative of the
organization said it
wants to expand into
some of the other areas


delayed-release coating
designed to help women
take a daily dose before
their fiausea sets in.
The return of an FDA-
cleared treatment is need-
ed, said ACOG spokesman
Dr. Jeffrey Ecker, an obste-
trician at Massachusetts
General Hospital who
wasn't involved in the
study of Diclegis.
"It's not magic," Ecker
cautioned, saying few
women see their symp-
toms completely disap-
pear with the medication.
"But for some it allows
them to be much more
functional."


of assistance that his bill
addresses.
Southerland said his
legislation is modeled
after the technical assis-
tance program for water
and wastewater, which he
said he believes has been
of great service to com-
munities which could
not otherwise afford to
hire high-caliber technical
experts.
He also said that, because
the technical assistance
fund would be taken from
the already- established
CF program, the set-aside
would mean no additional
cost to taxpayers.


Autism
From Page 1A

self-sufficient adult?
So let's go beyond aware-
ness, to Autism Action
Month. What might that
look like?
) It starts with food.
Raise/allocate funding
for research and outreach
on feeding therapies, and
for food programs and
nutrition education. Too
many children with autism
have multiple feeding is-
stues. The National Insti-
tutes of Health report that
children from food-inse-
cure households are two-
thirds more likely to be
at risk of developmental
problems than those from


households with enough
to eat. Further, the child
with autism may suffer se-
vere lack of essential nutri-
ents due to his hypersensi-
tive gustatory, tactile and
olfactory systems and in-
sistence on eating only
a few, often highly pro-
cessed, foods. Without
adequate nutrition, chil-
dren can't learn to their
full potential, can't
"behave."
) Raise/allocate fund-
ing for sensory evalua-
tions of classrooms, and
for sensory makeovers of
classrooms. Noise, visual
clutter, smells and textures
can make learning almost
impossible for some of our
kids. Sensory classroom
accommodations ben-
efit all kids, not just those


with autism.
a Restore or create
Adapted PE programs
throughout K-12. Physical
education can be a con-
fusing mix of motor skills,
rules and social complexity.
Adapted PE special-
ists make modifica-
tions to equipment and
curriculum, so that chil-
dren with supplemental
needs can participate in
general education PE
with their peers, eras-
ing yet another distinc-
tion that may separate the
child with autism from his
contemporaries.
) Create opportunities
for not only participation
but for leadership. Many
children with autism live
with a constant stream
of messages telling them


what they do wrong or in-
adequately. But all children
are ,good at something.
Creating opportunities for
them to lead and teach re-
inforces their sense'of be-
ing part of a community in
which there will always be
people more and less capa-
ble. Example: A child who
knows his favorite book in-
side out can lead a group
in reading it, then present
questions about the main
characters, setting and se-
quence of events.
) Curricula in indepen-
dent living skills, trades.
Many high-schoolers are
clamoring for old-fash-
ioned life skills classes like
consumer math- sal-
ary/benefit calculations,
household budgeting,
savings/investments, re-


sponsible use of credit, tax
preparation. And let's re-
trieve introduction of the
trades from community
college and bring them
back to high school. Trades
are necessary to society,
and not every student
is headed for college (or
should be). Students with
autism often have nar-
row interests but may be
highly skills in a particular
area. Encouraging employ-
ment and independence
through trades is every bit
as legitimate as encourag-
ing college attendance.
n Jobs. Let's ask employ-
ers to create one new job,
even part-time, for a teen
or adult with autism. We'll
provide a short workshop,
an online tutorial or read-
ing links that will help them


design simple accom-
modations that will allow
the employee with autism
to succeed.
Author Walker Percy
said, "To become aware
of possibility is to be onto
something." Being onto
something is a good start,
but it's not an achievement
until it becomes
something. When we con-
vert possibility to deed, we
move beyond awareness
into the kind of action that
makes way for our kids to
taken- their rightful places
in their communities, and
for those communities
to see themselves as the
beneficiary.
Ellen Notbohm is the author of "Ten *
Things Every Child with Autism
Wishes You Knew." She can be
-reached at www.ellennotbohm.com.


Jackson County Vault & Monuments

Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90
I 850-482-5041 In


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


TUESDAY, APRIL 9,2013 5Ar



I in collapse
children in the dirt, you'd
be moving the dirt, too,"
he said.
Arwood's hQuse was at
the end of a gravel-covered
road dotted with modular
and mobile homes. It's a
tight-knit rural communi-
ty where neighbors sit out-
side on front porches and
look out for each other.
When word spread about
the disaster, they ran to
Arwood's house and began
helping. On Monday, they
were somber, saying they
were heartbroken for the
family. They said Arwood
told them it happened
without warning and that
he tried to. grab the chil-
dren, but they were just
beyond his reach.
ATEDPRESS It was no secret that Ar-
work to wood was digging a two-
levision story deep hole. Neigh-
ruction bors said it wasn't unusual
to see children in the pit
when the girl's father was
would working there.
county Neighbor Bradley Jones,
ing of- who works in construc-
)tential tion, said there was no
tions at structure to support the
pit's tall dirt walls and that
a plan- there was some concrete
Coun- on a ledge on top of the
sections hole.
no per- In recent days, the hole
ed. was muddy from the rain.
krwood He said he warned his
w what daughter, Chelsea, who
babysits for the children,
de the not to go in.
some- "It was dangerous. There
ill col- was nothing to reinforce
those walls," he said.
ae dis- Chelsea said Arwood
.m not told her that he was build-
he dirt. ing the structure to "pro-
had to tect his family" it was go-
ing to be a bunker.
id your "It's so sad," she said.









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Japan increasingly nervous about North Korea nukes


The Associated Press


TOKYO It's easy to
write off North Korea's
threats to strike the Unit-
ed States with a nuclear-
tipped missile as bluster:
it has never demonstrated
the capability to deploy a
missile that could reach
the Pacific island of Guam,
let alone the mainland
U.S.
But what about Japan?
Though it remains a
highly unlikely scenario,
Japanese officials have
long feared that if North
Korea ever decides to play
its nuclear card it has not
only the means but sev-
eral potential motives for
launching an attack on To-
kyo or major U.S. military
installations on Japan's
main island. And while a
conventional missile at-
tack is far more likely, To-
kyo is taking North Korea's
nuclear rhetoric seriously.'
On Monday, amid re-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this 2012 photo released by Korean Central News Agency,
North Korea's Unha-3 rocket lifts off from the Sohae launch
pad in Tongchang-ri, North Korea. I


ports North Korea is pre-
paring a missile launch
or another nuclear test,
Japanese officials said they
havestepped up measures
to ensure the nation's safe-
ty. Japanese media report-
ed over the weekend that
the defense minister has
put destroyers with mis-


sile interception systems
on alert to shoot down any
missile or missile debris
that appears to be headed
for Japanese territory. .
. "We are doing all we
can to protect the safety
of our nation," said chief
Cabinet spokesman Yo-
shihide Suga, though he


I I


AL.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Floral tributes are seen being left outside the house of former
British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher who died from a
stroke at age 87, in London, Monday, April 8.


Thatcher, even


in death, divides


world opinion


The Associated Press
Combative and* deter-
mined to get her way, Mar-
garet Thatcher divided
opinion down the middle
in life and in death.
Many leaders lauded
Thatcher for her steely
determination to mod-
ernize Britain's industrial
landscape, even at the
cost of strikes and riots,
and to stand beside the.
United States as the west
triumphed in the Cold War
versus the Soviet Union.
Others saw a pitiless tyrant
who preferred conflict to
compromise.
British Prime Minister
David Cameron lauded
his 1980s predecessor as
"a great Briton," but others
particularly Europe's so-
cialists who often clashed
with her were less en-
amored in their reactions
to the death Monday of the
conservative icon.
Flags at Buckingham Pal-
ace, Parliament and across
the United Kingdom were
lowered to half-staff. Buck-
ingham Palace said Queen
Elizabeth II would send a
private message of sympa-
thy to the Thatcher family.
Government officials be-
gan preparations for a Lon-
don funeral with military
honors at St. Paul's Cathe-
dral next week, followed by
a private cremation.
"As our first woman
prime, minister, Marga-
ret Thatcher succeeded
against all the odds," Cam-
eron said in Madrid. He cut
short his trip to Spain and
canceled a visit to France
to return to London for the
funeral preparations.
"The real thing about
Margaret Thatcher is
that she didn't just lead
our country. She saved
our country," Cameron
said, "and I believe she'll
go down as the greatest
British peacetime prime
minister."
In Washington, President
Barack Obama said many
Americans "will never for-
get her standing shoulder
to shoulder with President
(Ronald) Reagan, remind-
ing the world that we are
not simply carried along
_bv the currents of history.


We can shape them with
moral conviction, unyield-
ing courage and iron will."
And former first lady
Nancy Reagan said her
husband and Thatcher
"enjoyed a very special
relationship" driven by a
common hatred of Com-
munism. "Ronnie and
Margaret were political
soul mates," she said in
a statement that lauded
Thatcher's "clear vision and
strong determination to
stand up for her beliefs at
a time when so many were .
afraid to rock the boat."
In Poland, Foreign Minis-
ter Radoslaw Sikorski said
his country should erect a
statue of the British lead-
er. In a tweet he praised
Thatcher as "a fearless
champion of liberty, stood
up for captive nations,
helped free world win the
ColdWar." 9
Former Prime Minister
Tony Blair, who ousted the
Conservative Party from
power seven years after
Thatcher's resignation,
conceded that Thatcher
had been right to challenge
labor union power the
traditional bedrock for
Blair's own Labour Party.
"Very few leaders get to
change not only the po- '
litical landscape of their
country but of the world. ,
Margaret was such a lead-
er. Her global impact was
vast," said Blair, who cred- i
ited Thatcher with being
"immensely supportive"
despite their opposing
views on many issues.
"You could not disrespect
her character or her contri-
bution to Britain's national
life," Blair said.
Not all Britons agreed.
Several hundred people
gathered in Glasgow and in
London'sBrixtonneighbor-
hood for impromptu cel-
ebrations, complete with
party hats and streamers.
The National Union of V'
Miners which tussled ,
with Thatcher in a long
1984-85 strike, and lost ,1
- expressed condolences
to Thatcher's family, but
said: "The damage caused
by her fatally flawed poli-
tics sadly lingers on. Good '
Riddance."


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WORLD


and Ministry of Defense
officials refused to con-
firm the reports about the
naval alert, saying they
do not want to "show
their cards" to North
Korea.
North Korea, meanwhile,
issued a new threat against
Japan.
"We once again warn
Japan against blindly toe-
ing the U.S. policy," said
an editorial Monday in the
Rodong Sinmun, the offi-
cial newspaper of its ruling
party. "It will have to pay
,a dear price for its impru-
dent behavior." J
Following North Korea's
third nuclear test in Feb-
ruary, Japanese experts
have increasingly voiced
concerns that North Korea
may already.be able to hit
- or at least target U.S.
bases and major popula-
tion centers with nuclear
warheads loaded onto its
medium-range Rodong
missiles.


"The threat level has
jumped" following the
nuclear test, said Narush-
ige Michishita, a former
Ministry of Defense of-
ficial and director of the
Security and Interna-
tional Studies Program at
Tokyo's National Gradu-
ate Institute for Policy
Studies.
Unlike North Korea's
still-under-construction
intercontinental ballistic
missile, or ICBM, program,
its arsenal of about 300
deployed Rodong missiles
has been flight tested and
is thought to have a range
of about 1,300 kilometers
(800 miles).
That is good enough to
reach Tokyo and key U.S.
military bases includ-
ing Yokota Air Base, which
is the headquarters of the
U.S. 5th Air Force; Yoko-
suka Naval Base, where the
USS George Washington
aircraft carrier and its bat-
tle group are home-based;


and Misawa Air Base, a key
launching point for U.S. F-
16 fighters.
Michishita, in an analy-
sis published late last
year; said a Rodong mis-
sile launched from North
Korea would reach Japan
within five to 10 minutes
and, if aimed at the center
of Tokyo, would have a 50-
percent probability of fall-
ing somewhere within the
perimeter of Tokyo's main
subway system.
He said Japan would be
a particularly tempting
target because it is close
enough to feasibly reach
with a conventionally or
nuclear-armed missile,
and the persistent animos-
ity and distrust dating back
to Japan's colonization of
the Korean Peninsula in
1910 provides an ideologi-
cal motive.
Also, a threat against Ja-
pan could be used to drive
a wedge between Tokyo
and Washington.


I





'I


Spores
Briefs


High School Baseball
Tuesday- Cottondale at
Sneads, 6 p.m.; Marianna at
Crestview, 6 p.m.
Wednesday- Graceville at
Ponce de Leon, 2 p.m.
Thursday- Sneads at
Graceville, 5:30 p.m.; North
Florida Christian at Marian-
na, 7 p.m.; Malone at Altha,
6 p.m.,
Friday- Cottondale at
Wewahitchka, 6 p.m.; Laurel
Hill at Malone, 6 p.m.;


High School Softball
Tuesday- Chipley at
Sneads, 6 p.m.; Arnold at
Marianna, 6 p.m.; Altha
at Malone, 4 p.m., and
6:30 p.m. (doubleheader);
Graceville at Poplar Springs,
6p.m.
Thursday- Poplar Springs
at Cottondale, 6 p.m.;
SGraceville at Arnold,6 p.m.;
Marianna at Port St. Joe, 7
p.m.
Friday-Sneads at Mari-
anna, 6 p.m.; Cottondale at
Malone, 6 p.m.


Chipola Baseball
The Indians will play a
non-conference road game
Tuesday against Alabama
Southern at 3 p.m., before
starting a three-game series
with Tallahassee on Friday at
home at 4 p.m.
Chipola will then travel
to Tallahassee on Saturday
for the second game of the
series at 1 p.m.


Chipola Softball
The Lady Indians will play
a pair of conference road
doubleheaders this week,
heading to Niceville on
Thursday to take on North-
west Florida State at 4 p.m.
and 6 p.m., and going to
.Panama City on Saturday
to face Gulf Coast State at 1
p.m. and 3 p.m.


MHS Baseball Golf.
Tournament
There will be a Marianna
High School baseball golf
tournament April 13-14 at
Caverns Golf Course, with
thousands in cash and prizes
to be awarded;
The format is three-man
scramble with morning
flight at 8 a.m. and after- ,
noon flight at 1 p.m. Cost is
$65 per person and is first
-come first serve.
For more information,.
contact Patrick Bryan at 209-.
0627, Nikki Bryan at 209-
8155, or Caverns Golf Course
at 482-4257.


Travel Ball Tryouts
Southern Elite-lOU Fast-
pitch Softball will be holding
tryouts April 13 at 2 p.m. at
Alford Recreation Park, with
]2U having tryouts April 14
at 3 p.m. at Alford Recreation
Park.
For more information call
850-258-8172


Bulldog Wrestling Club
The Bulldog Wrestling Club
is starting practice for the
summer season. .
Practice will be Tuesday
and Thursday nights from
5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the
old Marianna High School
wrestling room.
All Jackson County kids
ages 5-18 are welcome to
join. For more information,
call MHS coach Ron Thore-
son at 272-0280.


Sports Items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com, or
fax them to 850-482-4478.
The mailing address for the
paper is Jackson County
Floridan P.O. Box 520 Mari-'
anna, FL 32'447..


Indians get massive win over 'Dores


Bert Givens gets a hit for Chipola last week.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Chipola Indians picked
up a massive conference victory
Saturday in Panama City, scoring
a pair of runs in the 10th inning
to knock off the Gulf Coast State
Commodores 4-2 and keep their
hopes of a postseason berth
alive.
Chipola (5-7 .in the Panhandle
Conference) came into the game
in danger of falling four games
behind Gulf Coast (7-5) for sec-
ond-place in the league stand-
ings with eight games to play.
Only two teams from the Pan-
handle get to advance to the


state tournament, and a loss Sat-
urday would've made the odds
of the Indians making the trip to
Lakeland extremely long.
Fortunately for the Indians,
they got a big pitching perfor-
mance from freshman Michael
Mader and a huge two-out hit by
Chase Nyman in the 10th to pull
out the win.
Mader went nine innings and
allowed just two earned runs
on five hits and a walk with four
strikeouts to earn the win, with
reliever Taylor Lewis closing it
out in the 10th to get the save.

See INDIANS, Page 2B


MALONE BASI(ETBiJL




Baker chooses Chipola


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Malone's Ty Baker slam dunks during a game against Marianna played in the Chipola College
Gym. Baker has committed to play for Chipola.


GHS Bdseb.all


r. j r jF l : n"- i l l"
Brandon Pippin gets an easy out at first for Graceville during a recent
game against Malone.

Tigers, Padgett defeat


Slocomb; fall to Ariton


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Graceville Tigers split a pair
of games in Sloeomb, Ala., on
Saturday, losing to Ariton (Ala.)
8-2 before rebounding with a 5-1
victory over Slocomb thanks to a
dominant pitching performance
from sophomore Jared Padgett.
The left-handed ace of the Ti-
gers' staff had his best outing
of the season thus far, going all
seven innings and striking out
a whopping 18 Slocomb batters
while allowing just three hits and
two walks.
Denny Elligson staked Padgett


to an early lead with a two-RBI
single in the top of the first in-
ning to make it 2-0 Tigers, with
GHS adding single runs in the
fourth, sixth, and seventh to so-
lidify the victory.
Hudson Forsyth led the
Graceville offense, finishing
4-for-4, while Padgett added a
double, and Jarrett Brogdon, Ty-
lerWertenberger, and Elligson all
had hits.
The Tiger bats weren't nearly as
lively in the first game, as Gracev-
ille collected just three total hits
against Ariton.


See TIGERS, Page 2B


Malone star

.commits to

Indians
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
Malone star center Ty Baker
has made his college choice
and verbally committed to play
for the Chipola Indians next
season.
The 6-foot-6 Baker was second
for the Tigers in scoring dur-
ing the 2012-13 season behind
brother Chai, finishing the year
averaging 15.7 points per game
to go along with 10 rebounds
and 1.8 blocks per game.
Baker has helped lead Malo-
ne to 50 wins and two district
championships over the past
two seasons and will look to
continue that success for one of
the top JUCO programs in the
country in Chipola.
The super-athletic post player
was also pursued by Northwest
Florida State and Coffeyville
(Kan.) Community College,
but Baker said the opportunity
to play early and play close to
home put Chipola over the top.
"Playing close to home and
being able to watch my brother
play and have him be able to
come see me (was a big factor),"
he said. "It will be better for my
Malone fans and Jackson Coun-
ty fans to get to see me play right
down the road."

See BAKER, Page 1B


Wakulla halts MHS


streak with 6-3 win


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Bulldogs had
a three-game winning streak
snapped Saturday at home,
falling to the visiting Wakulla
War Eagles 6-3.
Marianna was coming off of
wins over Hooper Academy
(Ala.), Bay High, and Walton,
but the War Eagles used a four-
run second inning and a solid
combined pitching perfor-
mance to leave with a victory.
Jacob Walker started and
went 2 1/3 innings on the
mound to get the win for
Wakulla, allowing one earned
run on two hits and two walks


with three strikeouts before
giving way to Garrett Woofter
for 2 2/3 innings.
Woofter allowed no runs
on one hit, one walk, and five
strikeouts, with Kaleb Atkins
and Bryan Nichols pitching the
final two innings to close it out
for Wakulla.
Marianna got two runs off of
Atkins in the sixth to trim the
margin to three, but Nichols
shut the door in the seventh,
allowing just one of four bat-
ters to reach on a walk.
Brad Middleton started on
the mound for the Bulldogs
and lasted just two innings,

See WAKULLA, Page 2B


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Taylor Strauss gets an out at second for Marianna during the Bulldogs
game against Wakulla Saturday. L


.0

a' "


' ,


-p










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


MHS Track


MHS girls take 2nd at North Florida Invitational


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna track
team competed in the
North Florida Invitational
in Panama City over the
weekend, with the girls
team taking second in the
final team standings, and
the boys finishing fifth.
The MHS girls scored
81 points as a group, with
West Florida Tech winning
the event with 91 points.
West Florida Tech also
won in the boys compe-
tition, finishing with 165
points, with Marianna
ending up with 59.
Tia Bass was the only


first-place finisher for
Marianna in the girls or
boys competitions, as the
senior won the shot put
with a mark of 37 feet,
11.75 inches.
Bass also took third in
the discus throw with a
mark of 87 feet, 9 inches.
Shakira Hansford gave
the MHS girls a second-
place finish in the triple
jump with a mark of 33
feet, 10 inches, with Bri-
anna Johnson placing
fourth in the event at 31
feet, 3 inches.
Hansford and Johnson
placed second and third
in the girls' 300-meter
hurdles, with Hansford


posting a time of 50.63
seconds and Johnson
50.72 seconds.
Kiandree Decree fin-
ished fourth for MHS in
the girls' 100-meter dash
with a time of 13.58 sec-
onds, with Krishayun-
na Baker sixth at 13.82
seconds.
Decree and Baker were
third and fourth in the
200-meter dash, with
Decree posting a time of
28.45 seconds, and Baker
29.3 seconds.
Natasha Smith led the
way for Marianna in the
distance running events,
placing fifth in the 1600-
meter run at 5:53.16 and


seventh in the 3200-meter
run at 13:44.1Q.
It was a pair of third-
place finishes for the MHS
girls relay teams, with the
4x100 team finishing with
a time of 53.3 seconds and
the 4x400 team coming in
at 4:33.45.
The best individual fin-
ishes for the Bulldog boys
were third place by Zach
Brockner (1600 meters),
Roderick Copeland (triple
jump), and Quashawn
Johnson (long jump).
Johnson finished with
a mark of 20 feet, 1 inch,
while Copeland hit 41 feet,
3 inches in the finals, and
Brockner came in at 5:05.


Brockner's teammate,
Isaiah McFarland, fin-
ished right behind him
in the 1600 with a time of
5:06.83.
Copeland also took fifth
in the 200 meters with' a
time of 24.77 seconds, and
McFarland was sixth in the
3200 meters at 11:39.04.
The Marianna boys
4x400 relay team finished
second with a time of
3:36.82, while the 4x100
team (45.96 seconds) and
4x800 team (8:39.43) both
took third.
Richard Davis came in
sixth in the shot put for
MHS with a mark of 38
feet, 10.5 inches.


College Football


Ex-Auburn DB pleads guilty to first-degree robbery


The Associated Press

OPELIKA, Ala. For-
mer Auburn defensive
back Mike McNeil was
sentenced to serve at least
three years in prison Mon-
day after pleading guilty
to first-degree robbery for
an incident his attorney
characterized as "possibly
a prank."
Lee County Circuit Judge
Christopher Hughes ac-
cepted, McNeil's plea deal
Monday as his trial was set
to begin. Under the deal,
McNeil received a 15-year
split sentence: He must
serve three years, plus
three years of supervised
probation, and pay $2,000
in restitution. If he violates
any terms, the judge could
sentence him to the re-
mainder of the 15 years.
McNeil, 24, and three
teammates from theTigers'
2010 national champion-
ship team were charged
with armed robbery and
dismissed from the team
in March 2011. Antonio
Goodwin is serving a 15-
year sentence while Da-
kota Mosley and Shaun
Kitchens are awaiting trial.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former Auburn football player Mike McNeil (left) who is charged with armed robbery, talks to
his lawyer, Ben Hand, during a hearing in his case Thursday in Opelika, Ala.


The judge accepted a
"best-interest" plea where
McNeil didn't have to ad-
mit guilt. McNeil respond-
ed "Yes, sir" when Hughes
asked if he believed pros-
ecutors had enough evi-
dence to produce a guilty
plea.
McNeil's attorney, Ben
Hand, said there was some
evidence the alleged rob-
bery at a mobile home was
a prank that went awry.


"Ifyou look back at Mike's
history, he has a real good
history," Hand said. "He
worked with Fellowship
of Christian Athletes, did a
lot of good things. Worked
with children in a hospital,
always had a good reputa-
tion. And what could be
portrayed as possibly a
prank ended up very bad.
"He was distressed about
it. Any time you're fac-
ing going to prison, that's


tough. But he understood
what the law was and un-
derstood what could have
happened."
Witnesses at Goodwin's
trial had testified that Mc-
Neil had a gun in the rob-
bery at a mobile home.
Hand said information
could have come out at tri-
al to support the conten-
tion that it was a prank. He
said "everybody seemed
to know everybody" at the


home, but some people
were present that they
didn't realize would be
there.
"He was taken over there
by these other guys," Hand
said. "Somebody else was
driving. He didn't know
what was going to hap-
pen and when the other
guys went into the trailer
and he went in to get them
out, it all went bad from
there as far as leaving, and
(there was) a set of facts
that were difficult to prove
otherwise."
McNeil, who wore a gray
suit and a short haircut af-
ter appearing in court Fri-
day with dreadlocks, nod-
ded to family members
while he was led out of the
courtroom in handcuffs.
Prosecutors agreed not
to pursue other charges
against McNeil, who was
initially charged with five
counts of first-degree
robbery.
The plea also requires
him to "testify truthfully"
against other defendants
in the case if called as a
witness. If convicted, Mc-
Neil could have served at
least 20 years.


Baker
From Page 1B
There will be an oppor-
tunity for playing time with
two of Chipola's three post
players graduating in Earl
Watson and Kruize Pinkins,
but Baker said his main fo-
cus right now is just to get
better as a player.
"I just want to improve my
weaknesses like ball han-
dling and strength, to just
gain a couple of pounds
and get better at my weak-
nesses," he said. "I want to
get stronger and improve
as a player so that I'll be
able to play at a four-year
university."
The success of the Mari-
anna High School alum.
Pinkins, who earned All Pan-
handle Conference honors
after a sophomore season of
posting 11 points and seven
rebounds, was a factor in
the decision to commit to
Chipola, Baker said.
"To see him get out there
and lose weight and im-
prove on his ball handling
and shooting, that was an
inspiration and it motivated
me," he said. "I knew I could
go play on that level and
prove it the same way that
he did."
Baker said he had oppor-
tunities to play at smaller
four-year schools, but want-
ed to use the two years of ju-
nior college to not only im-
prove his game but improve
the quality of his offers in
the process.
His high school coach, Ste-
ven Welch, said that there is
no doubt in his mind that
Baker has the talent to be
a high-major player in the
near future.
"I think that all depends
on Ty. If he really commits
to developing his perim-
eter game with his size and
length and athleticism and
gets where he can guard
multiple positions, then
the sky is the limit," he said.
"He can be a high Division-I
player if he commits to do-
ing all that stuff, and I really
think he's going to because
he's got the right attitude."
Welch said that the signing
ceremony for Baker would
likely be early next week at
Malone School.


Indians
From Page 1B
The Indians led 2-0 after
scoring twice in the first in-
ning, but the Commodores
rallied back to tie it up with
two of their own in the bot-
tom of the sixth.
That's where the score
remained until the top of
the 10th when Luis Tunon


reached on an error and
stole second, and Bert Giv-
ens followed with walk to
set the stage for Nyman's
heroics.
With the runners mov-
ing on a 0-2 pitch, Nyman's
single allowed both to score
put the Indians back in
front.
Lewis closed the down in
the bottom of the 10th by
sitting the Commodores


down in order with a pair of
groundouts and a strikeout.
Tres Penny took the loss
for Gulf Coast, giving up
the two rains in the 10th,
with Austin Carpenter start-
ing and surrendering two
earned' runs on eight hits
and two walks with four
strikeouts in seven innings.
Chipola out-hit Gulf Coast
9-5, with Cameron Gibson,
Nyman, and Clayte Rooks


all contributing two hits,
while Nyman was 1-for-2
with two RBI, and Givens
was 1-for-4 with two runs.
Dalton Kelley led the
Commodores with two hits,
while Matt Miller was 1-for-
4 with two RBI.
The Indians return to
Panhandle play Friday with
a home game against Tal-
lahassee at 4 p.m., with
TCC hosting the Indians on


Saturday at 1 p.m.
'Gulf Coast was sched-
uled to host the first of two
against Pensacola State
on Monday evening be-
fore traveling to Pensacola
for the second matching
rl-


Wednesday.
Chipola and Gulf Coast
will playtwice more to finish
the regular season, with the
first coming in Marianna on
April 22 and the second in
Panama City on April 24.


Wakulla
From Page 1B
surrendering five runs -
four earned on three
hits and two walks with
two strikeouts.'
Walker Roberts went
the final five innings
for MHS, allowing one
earned run on three
hits and a walk with two
strikeouts.
Taylor Strauss and Reid
Long led the Bulldogs
with two hits each, with
Long also scoring once,
while Trent Nobles was
1-for-2 with a walk and
an RBI, and Mason Mel-
vin walked twice, scored
once, and had an RBI.


For Wakulla, Bailey
Metcalfwent 2-for-4 with
a run and two RBI, while
Jeff Barnes drove in three
runs, Brandon Geiger
was 1-for-3 with a walk
and two runs, and Atkins
was 1-for-3 with a double
and a run.
DeQuan Simmons
walked twice, scored a
run, and had an RBI.
Wakulla improved to
12-5 with the win, while
Marianna fell to 11-7.
The Bulldogs were
scheduled to take on
Blountstown on Monday
night and will travel to
Crestview tonight before
returning home Thurs-
day to host North Florida
Christian.


BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


Tigers
From Page 1B
GHS was up 1-0 after an
early run, but Ariton broke
through against Tigers start-
er Clay Jenkins and led 6-1
by the time Jenkins left the
game after the fifth.
"I just think he's pitched so
much lately that he's start-
ed to get a little fatigued,"
Graceville coach Bryant
Hardy said of his senior Jen-
kins. "He's thrown a lot of
gaines for us."
The two-game split left the
Tigers with a record of 5-13,
though the coach said that
perhaps his team's strong
performance in the win
over Slocomb can translate


to stronger play to close the
season.
"I hope we're able to take
back some momentum,"
Hardy said. "I knowSlocomb
is doing well in their area, so
that was a good win for us.
Hopefully we'll see some
momentum coming back.
Padgett is starting to throw
the ball again like he did last
year."
I The Tigers were sched-
uled to take on Cottonwood
(Ala.) today, but that game
has been canceled.
The scheduled Friday
road game against Ponce de
Leon has been changed to
Wednesday at2 p.m. Gracev-
ille will finish the week with a
home game against Sneads
on Thursday at 5:30 p.m.


Rpiil Spe.ials
Mufflers & Exhaust

B ^ i^ i i, Jl tl 1..I... ,


of Marianna
IS NOW OFFERING
















2 & 3 BEDROOM MODELS
AVAILABLE

$80,000 $130,000
Price Range

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Available to
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11 (80)2-,35


. ...........


-12B TUESDAY, APRIL9,2013


SPORTS






































THtAT'S HOW EVERY-
ONE'S RAIN WORKS!
YOU FILTER.OUT THE
GARBAGE SO YOU
CAN POCUS ON THE
GOOD STUFF F
WHAT'S THE
f5'pOtDtSTUFF'?r


)UP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
"'-ou K,~soe0,VL? s SoMe UIeN T\Ae. BaLL Ta
, .; & Deept? STliNG Sa', KIGoF LWay OFTe../
a1o T H4TrING a Base~aW9LL R.Coc-teTOrHro--N '^aLi J
Li Xea


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR

? 7zc r^

ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
POOR .W R! I NAT~ Y"N-

/ -i







THAT A BABY BY PAUL TRAP
'vJher&e.-Jer
t orr. pui-+s me os 0
in o.Io'5t

c,,, e \o beco3se [
poys r-ourn r-ec'
'-in t-e dryer/


10851


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


-9 t I aughin gSlock Inglonat l ,,l Inc,, DiWl by Univorsal UCI ck Wor UFS, 2013
"Are you sure the referee didn't hit
me a couple of times?"


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


ACROSS
1 Identify,
slangily
4 Siren
8 Mortgage
12 Time to
celebrate
13 Curved
molding
14Net surfer
15 Relax
(2 wds.)
17 Blackberry
stem
18Well-
groomed
19Do
homework
20 Boot liner
22 A mind of
own
23 Word on a
battery
26Autumn
colors
28 Barracks
off. ,
31 Bombay
nanny
32 Spleen
33 Sci-fi
Doctor
34 Wayfarer's
refuge
35 Ms. Farrow
36 Gangplank
locale
37 Jar's need


Answer to Previous Puzzle


38 Purple
vegetable
39 Famous
last word
40 Stockholm
carrier
41 Wolf, say
43 Cool
46 More polite
50Jal -
51 Ladies'
rooms
54 Broker's
advice
55 Grand Ole
5630-day mo.
57Grease
gun target
58 tches
59 Parapsy-
chology
topic

DOWN
1 Cathedral
seating
2 Harmful
3 DNA
component
4 Russian
export
5 Back when
6 Plaintive cry
7 Briefcase
Item
8 Conduits
9 Hairy twin


36 Cookout
locale
38 Howl at the
moon
40 Pasture
entrance
42 Mr. Rooney
and Mr.
Griffith
43 Blast-off
org.
44 Holly tree
45Takea spill
47 Movie
48 Mythical
archer
49 Host's plea
51 Man, once
52 Unseal,
poetically
53 Ode
inspirer


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" booKs
at QullDrlverBooks.com


4-9 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrty Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
"GM XFL LMY VL'TL UOO 'ALTTP
WZTGMNLT WFSV' NHLWXW, TLUOOP,
VL AHWX FUJLM'X CLLM SM XFL
W FSV." IUTGOPM IUMWSM

Previous Solution: "I will miss him (L.A. Lakers' owner Jerry Buss) dearly ... we
lost a legend in our business." Jerry West
TODAY'S CLUE: d slenbez
S 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 4-9


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: I have lupus and suffer terri-
bly. Some days are better than others, but
most include fatigue, pain or some other
symptom. Yet, when friends greet me,
they say, "How are you? You look good."
Rather than greet me this way, I would
prefer they not ask about my illness, be-
cause I haven't felt well in 17 years. Could
you please tell readers in this position to
simply say, "It is so good to see you"? That
way, I don't feel obligated to speak about
my current condition.
SICK AND TIRED OF BEING SICK
AND TIRED

Dear Sick: Your suggestion is a good one,
and we hope people will keep it in mind.
But we don't believe these friends actually
expect a rundown of your illness, nor are
you obligated to talk about it. Greeting
someone with, "How are you?" is gener-


Bridge
Celine Dion said, '"Golf is a search for perfection,
for balance. It's about meditation and concentra-
tion. You have to use hand and brain."
In bridge you must use your brain to gain the
most from each hand you hold. And in this week's
columns, we are looking at balancing, when one
player, if he passes, will end the auction.
If the dealer opens one of a suit, the next two play-
ers pass, and the fourth player jump-overcalls two
no-trump, it is no longer unusual, showihngat least
5-5 in the two lowest unbid suits. Now it is natural.
In principle, the intervenor has a hand with which
he would have opened two no-trump, but he might
be a point or, two short of the normal requirements
when he has a respectable six-card minor.
In this deal, though, South has a classic two-no-
trump opening and a balancing two-no-trump
overcall. North transfers into hearts, then rebids
three no-trump to offer a choice of games. South,
with only two hearts, passes.
After West leads the spade queen, how should
South plan the play?
Declarer starts with eight top tricks: two spades,
three hearts and three clubs. He should work to get
a fourth heart winner. After winning the first trick
in his hand with the spade ace (to keep dummy's
king as an entry), South should cash his heart ace,
then overtake the heart queen with dummy's king.
He continues with the heart 10 to drive out the jack
and ends with nine tricks.
Note that if declarer gets greedy, cashing his two
hearts, then crossing to the spade king, he goes
down.


ally rhetorical. You aren't expected to re-
spond other than to say, "Fine, thanks," or
some short variation. Because you haven't
truly been well for years, it stands to rea-
son that you would take questions abopt
your health more literally than intended.

Dear Annie: Thank you for printing
the letter from "Rocky Mount, Va.," who
thought dogs should be allowed at the fu-
nerals of masters who have died. To have
a dog at a funeral privately, prior to the
public gathering, is a good idea -prob-
ably for bqth humans and dogs.
There is a famous painting by Sir Edwin
Landseer (1802-1873) entitled "The Old
Shepherd's Chief Mourner," depicting a
pointer leaning against a casket with its
head on top of the casket. It brings tears
to my eyes anytime I even think of it.
-WATERTOWN, WIS.


West
4 QJ 10 6 5 2
V43
*AKQ


North 04-09-13
4 K4
V K10976
* 853
*762


East
73
YJ852
7 74
10 8 54 3


South
1A98
VAQ
J 10,9 6 2
4AKQ

Dealer: West
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
14 Pass Pass
2 NT Pass 3 Pass
3 Pass 3 NT All pass


Opening lead: 4 Q


10 Stoop down
11 Card after
deuce
163-D quality.
19 Ave.
crossers
21 Legal
offenses
22 Form a
thought
23 Colorado
ski town
24 Old Dodge
model
25 Make shore
27 Buffalo's
lake
28 Do the
butterfly
29 Clarified
butter
30 Pulled apart


ENTERTAINMENT


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE


you KNOW WHAT
'YOUR PROBLEM IS?
YOUR. B,RAINN ONLY
REMEMbER.S STUFF
LOUVRE INTERESTED IN'
No KIDDING,
FRARCIS!


TUESDAY, APRIL 9,2013 3Br


Horoscope
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Don't allow size, cir-
cumstances or people to
intimidate you. A positive
attitude could work won-
ders at this time.
TAURUS (April 20-May20)
New life can be breathed
into an enterprise that you
were going to toss onto the
scrap heap. You'll be glad
you gave it a second shot.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Relax and allow yourself
to tune into some fortu-
itous currents. Circum-
stances are shifting in your
favor.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Something quite
fortunate could be escap-
ing your notice. However,
you'll shortly learn of it,
and be very happy.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
There is a lucrative mar-
ket for some special tal-
ent or knowledge that you
possess. Make your wares
known.
VIRGO. (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
A big opportunity could
present itself through an
unusual source. It might
usher in all that you've
been waiting for.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Involve yourself with
the type of people who can
.make things happen and
substantial benefits are
probable.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) You're in a different
kind of cycle where sev-
eral of your ambitions now
have good chances of be-
ing fulfilled.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Several close
associates hold you in high
esteem. These people want
you to succeed.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -You usually function
best when you focus on
one thing at a time, today
could be an exception. The
more that is being thrown
at you, the better.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) An endeavor in
which you're involved is
now being managed by
someone who isn't as ca-
pable as you are. It's time
you assume management
of the situation.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Over the coming
months, you could be in
one of the strongest fi-
nancial trends you've ever
experienced.


gill








4 B Tuesday. April 9. 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www..ICFLORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLAC


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
Insertion. Adjustment for errors Is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. ,The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually o:upieO .t, that porhon of meIn adalvertlmr.ent in rklcn the error o:ocurred wrerrer such error is due to negligence of the publishers employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
-.ucn aavertiserrnrt Display Ads are not guaranteea posilion AJi aa~erising is subleri to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


_E I.0'.H.E-&S:P .rISiTB-y0in_,.,LT CA.
rd&~AAILI %Z..27- ____________ ________1_


Key West Flordia
April 23-29, 2013
Washington DC/Patriotic Tour
June 27-July 2, 2013
Ride The Rails (West Virginia)
July 22-26, 2013
Best of China (Beijing City)
October 15-23 2013



SS :





Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com

Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
504-915-1474

I) MERO,

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.


Dolls Porcelain w/stand, $9/ea, 850-482-7665
Guitar Alvarez 70's 12 string $150. 850-482-6022
Prom Dress: sz/ 6, $150. 850-482-2636
Tires: (4) H/T P225/70R16 $60. 850-482-2636
Trailer Hitch NEW cond. $29. 850-482-7665


s* Singer Slatomatic Sewing Machine
w/ attachment, blonde wooden cabinet,
long sewing arm, spool $250. 334-886-3061

04"PETS & ANIMALS

CFA Registered (3) Persian Himalayan
Blue Point Kittens. Born 1-16 and ready
for their new homes. $250. $350.
Call 334-774-2700 After lOam
FREE- Kittens to loving home. multi-colorl-F &
1-M 850-272-4908 or 850-482-5880

AKC Brittany Spaniels Orange/White. 4 males
and 4 females. Excellent hunting blood line.
(Nolan's Last Bullett). Tails docked and dew
claws have been removed. Will be Ready on
March 29th. Call (229) 724-8839 if interested.
German Shepherd Puppies: AKC registered,
first shots,, mother has German bloodlines.
Black and tan, black and silver. 5 males, 1
female.7 wks old. 850-768-9182 or 850-849-3707.
Maltese puppies 2-males CKC Reg. 1st shots,
mother on-site April 18th. 850-832-2655
SUPER PUPET SALE Chihuahua,
SiiTu mix puppes and Morkldes.
1 Now taking depouitton Paplions.
,,.334-718-4m plynn@sw.rr.com
Yellow Labs: 10 wks. old. Full blooded, no pa-
pers. Parents on premises. Great family dog!
Colors from blonde to red. $150. 334-388-5617
or 334-488-5000




GRASS & MILK FED BEEF!!
Freezer Ready Esto meat
GREAT QUALITY!!
Qa s and USDA Inspected
ESTO MEAT- CALL 850-263-7777


Trolling motor: 651b thrust. $300. 850-272-5305
Tux 40R, black $100. 239-272-8236
Wheelchair hi-back NEW $200. 850-557-2184.
Window: 29x30 dbl,LowE, $100. 850-482-2636


2 8 5_54

5 1 2 7

6
---- -- -


5 1 6

31 24

6 8 3

7

8 4 6 9

65 4 3
2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserve


wo Bahia seed for sale 4-
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
................................
END OF SEASON SALE ( prices redu )
Quality Coastal Hay; Large Rolli
Fertilzed & Weed Control 850-209-9145
Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418

Cattle: 30 bred cows 3 to 7 years old and
50 bred heifers for sale. Most are Angus and
Brangus cross with a few Charolais cross.
For more information call 334-303-9285.


f Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.

Call Pea River Timber
334-389-2003 m,

E[M ILYMENT




Doctor
needed for
Medical Weight
Loss Clinic
Flexible hours
Dothan area
$150. per hour
Call: 337-826-6758
or Send Resume to:
QTC@hughes.net





JWT B"


Level: 0 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Friday's puzzle
965147832
487 2 3 51 6 9
2 31986745
7268 9351 4



8 5 4 7 1 9 326
679328451
312564978


4/9/13


I


River Valley Rehabilitation
Center Is now hiring:
RN'S & LPN'S
7a-7p & 7p-7a SHIFT
C.N.A'S
3-11 SHIFT
$1.00 SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL
FOOD SERVICE AIDE
5a-1:30p/11a-8p SHIFT
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
8a-5p shift FT Required minimum of
three (3) years experience in third party
billing/ collections and Medicare/ Medic-
aid with at least one (1) year experience
in a supervisory capacity required.
HEALTH INFORMATION
COORDINATOR
8a-5p FT Must be LPN with previous
medical records experience preferred
Great Pay and Benefits
Health, Vision & Dental
Please Apply at:
River Valley Rehabilitation Center
17884 NE Crozier Street
Blountstown, Fl. 32424
Ph: (850) 674-5464
Fax: 674-9384
Email: rvhrc@southemltc.com
Drug Free Workplace- Safe Minimal Lifting
Environment An EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D


President/CEO
Jackson County Chamber of Commerce
The Jackson County Chamber is accepting
applications for the position of President/
CEO. Min.3-5 yrs leadership experience with
bachelors degree or equivalent education or
business experience required. Prefer some
experience with a non-profit, a Chamber, or
membership organization led by a board of
directors. Proven skills needed in public
relations, public speaking, marketing,
e-communications, business operations,
planning, and P&L management. Must be
able to interact effectively with entrepre-
neurs, business owners, executives, elected
officials, civic leaders and volunteers. Must
be able to self-relocate to Jackson County.
Position closes April 15th. Submit resume
to jcchambersearch@gmal.com.
Network Specialist
Local Company growing and expanding,
looking for experienced Network Specialist
for installing Lg. commercial printers &MFP's
Benefits, Salary Negotiable
Send Resume to: The Dothan Eagle
Box EE 227 N. Oates St. Dothan, AL 3633
EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION

Enrolling Now!
4 Training in
FO RT ElectricalTrades
FORTIS Medical Assisting,
COLLEGE Pharmacy Technology
and More!
Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 for consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu
(,L" "- RESIDENTIAL
LLJ REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


COTTONDALE VILLA
APARTMENTS
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR 1 & 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS RENTAL
Assistance Available to Quailified Appliants
CALL: (850) 352-2281
TDD USERS 1-800-548-2456
Office Opened Tuesday & Thursday
EQUAL HOUSING 3111 Willow St.
OPPORTUNITY Cottondale, FL 32431
1 41t 14. Hl0H' On'4Yl,'N,

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!


: ... .... .I ri Fast, easy, no pressure
Slac l an Ad I 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

\\\_ www.jcfloridan.corn


AObSe


Sudoku


red.


PLAESANAD


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CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan *


Tuesday, April 9, 2013- 5 B


GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL. Call 850-482-4663
0






1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own.
Lot rent included. For details
4 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4,
2BR/1BA House 6914 Oaks St
Grand Ridge $450. Mo. + $450. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
2BR/1BA With family Room 1100SF all updated
w/central air, country atomsphere with large
fenced yard. Near town off 73 North and Hwy
90 West. $550. Mo + Dep. Call 765-425-5288
3/2 brick with CH&A Alford Fl
$695 mo. + dep. 850-579-4317; 850-866-1965
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
*w 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"ProperyManagement Ls OurONLY Business"

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes In Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer Included.
http:// www.charloscountryllving.com.
4 850-209-8847 4.
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes In Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595




4 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 Located between
Grand Ridge & Sneads. Includes water &
garbage. $360. Mo 4 850-573-0308 4m




Poultry Farm for Sale 4 houses, Poultry farm
and 5000 sf residence, 2 car garage, 64 acre,
U.S. Hwy. frontage, huge barn, generator, Trac-
tor, farming equipment, $1,106,000 for more in-
fo. Kaan 334-596-8311


* LEASE OPTION TO BUY 2940 DowWd SLh
V/2 CH&A close to RiverAld"
Sc, Hd/Wd FIs, Lg.denOn ir lot.
$119,500. Owner Fin. 850-184641'


1979 14x68 Riverchase 2/2, fireplace, nicely
furnished, upgraded master bath, porch &
deck Included $12,500. 850-718-6541
#. MUST BE MOVED m




2008 Crownline 19 SS, 30.5
hrs. Mercruiser 4.31, Facto-
ry wakeboard tower, cus-
tom cover, snap-in carpet,
walk-thru transom, trailer
brakes, SS cleats, flip-up captain's chairs, Sony
marine stereo & sub-woofer, bimini top, stain-
less steel rub-rail upgrade, trailer tie downs, SS
windshield lock, SS cupholders, chrome wheels
Garage kept always. 334-796-9479
BOAT Crownline BR 180 135hp bimini top,
Crownline trailer, new tires, $7,000.
334-618-5169
-. Eagle 2010 190 Yamaha
150 G3 bassboat
4-stroke warr 2014
Humminbird 788ci, 2
chairs, 2 butt seats, galv
trailer, hydraulic steering, many extras,
$18,500. Call 334-616-1918 or 334-355-0326
Pontoon Boat 2008.20ft. G3 fish & Cruise, pur-
chased new July 2009, 30 gallon gas tank, fish
finder, 90HP, 4-stroke, Yamaha engine. Exc. gas
mileage. Asking $15,000. 334-897-6929.

Keystone 2006 Sidney Edition md# 30ROLS ,
30ft. pull behind. Like new, total use 7-8 times,
sheltered when not in use.
Asking $15,000 334-897-6929.
Rockwood 2007 Travel Trailer 33ft. 2bd. well
maintained, barn stored, great unit! $17,500.
334-899-6408 call before 8:30 pm

1999 Winnebago 32' motorhome:
Sleeps 6. Excellent condition. Gas engine with
gas saver system installed. 32K miles. Must see
to appreciate! $12,000. Call 334-685-3810
Fleetwood 1997 35ft Bounder: 1 slide-out, back-
up camera, leveling jacks, generator, low miles
39k, run goods, new tires. $17,500. OBO
Call 850-482-7554 or 850-209-3495


( ) TRANSPORTATION
A O FRSA
BMW 1995, leather int. good gas mil. green in
color, 4-door $3,200. firm 334-793-2347
Buick 2005 LaSabre: 56k miles, beige, new tires,-
fully loaded, beige leather interior, very nice
condition. $5,500. Call 334-589-0637
Chevy 2010 Impala, Great family car with great
fuel mileage, fully loaded. $300 down $300 per
month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.
SCorvette 2003 Z06 50th
-%iV Anniversary Edition
Metallic Blue 6 speed, 405
i p. 40.500 miles, Excellent
Condition $19,195.
334-475-3735 after 6PM
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
GOT BAD CREDIT?
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy slow credit ok
$0 Down/Ist Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull or Drag will trade
RIDE TODAY! FREE $25. gas giveaway
,4 Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
Honda 2007 S-2000 76k mi.
Car is awesome! $19,500!
Let the top down and go
cruising! Black on black
convertible. 6 spd. Adult
owned. Clean well maintained. Responsive lit-
tle rocket! below NADA. Come look, give it a
test drive & you'll be hooked. 334-805-4740
Hyundai 2004 Sonata, V-
S6, GLS, 4 door, automat-
ic, loaded, like new,
68,000 miles, very clean,
$6475. Call 3341790-7959.
Mitsubishi 2004 Eclipse De-
pendable, one owner, great
gas mileage, sunroof, few mi-
nor blemishes, 120,000 mi,
Automatic. Asking $6,000.
2 i.0.. will take best offer. Call Jen-
nifer at 334-791-0143
Mitsubishi 2012 Galant, Like new! Must sell!
$200 down, $259 per month. Call Ron Ellis 334-
714-0028.
Nissan 2010 Sentra, Navigation, Leather, Sun
roof, Must sell! $200 down, $249 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Toyota 2012 Corolla, Great gas saver, fully
loaded, low miles, very nice car. $200 down,
$250 per month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.

1985 Harley Davidson
FXRT80. 37,000 miles.
Great shape. $7,000 obo.
Also have 2002 soft tail
with $5,000 of added
chrome. $10,000 like new. Call 334-464-0639
2008 Harley Davidson
Softall Classic.
Like new, only 5900 miles.
Gold and black with lots of
chrome. Excellent condi-
tion. $12,000 obo. If interested, call Frank at
334-790-9733 or send email to fab@graceba.net


2012 Harley Road King
Black. Only 1400 mi. 6 spd
103 ci 1600cc, security sys-
tem. ABS brakes, cruise,
back rest with luggage
rack. Bought last fall, still
under Warranty. 2 helmets included. Wireless/
Bluetooth/ FM radio intercom system. (approx
$600 value) Adult owned, title in hand. $16,500
nhno 334-7q4-93RR or nwt.1202tfvahoo.com


Harley Davidson 2006 Soft tall Standard:
4600 miles, vinson/haines pipes, 250 rear
wheel, bronze pearl, lots of chrome, 25K
detsevni Asking $10 000. Firm. 334-793-3611


Harley Davidson 2007 Heritage Softtail Classic
exc. cond, new tires, new battery,
lots of chrome $12,500.
334-712-0493 or w-334-793-8028


Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Senior Citizens Discount
FREE ESTIMATES -+ 334-798-0687











Clay O'Neal's ,,,l ,
Land Clearing, Inc. g nOcBias
850-762-9402
Cell 850-852-S0S5 0 a t e.




NEW& USED TIRES
NEW TIRE BELOW RETAIL PRICES
TRIPLE 850.526.1700
T* s Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
Sn 2978 Pierce Street
L d Cl(behindc Tim's FlNorist)


Honda 2005 VTX 1300-R
Nicest one in Alabama,
Too much chrome to list.
$9,500. Ken 334-693-9360


Chevrolet 2003 Trailblazer
4x4. Excellent condition.
Garage kept since pur-
chase. Fully loaded 4x4.
105,00 miles. Must see to
appreciate. Black with grey interior. $7,200.
Phone 850-956-2623
Ford 1998 Explorer XLT.
~<-y^-- .- Red in color. Grey leather
Sgo interior. 6 cyl. 112 k miles.
Very nice inside and out.
$5,500 OBO. Call or text 334-806-6004.

4000 Ford Tractor good condition, new engine
$3,950. 334-791-0700
Chevrolet 2007 Silverado" 2-door, 8 cyl. silver in
color, 68,491 'miles, $15,500. 334-797-8523.
Dodge 2000 Dakota RT: black, fully loaded, 5.9
liter 360 Magnum, Bridgestone tires, beautiful
and rare truck, pampered and well kept, runs
and drives excellent & clean carfax available.
Serious inquiries only. $7,200. Call 334-585-0121
Please leave a message.
Ford 2003 Ranger Edge ext. cab good condition
89K miles, $5,900. 334-446-0044 Susan
Ford Tractor 9N with 4ft. bushhog,
good working condition. 229-869-0883.
GMC 1986 2500 Series: 4 door, 2 seater but no
back seat, 8 cyl, 91k miles, one owner, garage
kept, very good condition. $3,800. Call 334-792-
3756
International 1995 4900: Flat Bed Truck, DT466,
AC, 125k miles. $6,000. Call 334-897-6346 or
334-406-7200
Toyota 1994 Tacoma 4-wheel drive as whole or
parts. 334-689-9436.


flridan


f c t


S Dodge 2005 Caravan STX,
V-6, loaded, 3rd row
seat, front and rear air,
103,000 miles, $5925. Call
334-790-7959.


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
qa4M'" 4 24 oWr 7Towng
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

-CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664

Got a Clunker
W y e We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
s Eand Farm Equip. at a
Fair and honest price!
$325 & t Complete Cs
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285
r -------------------------- ------
a* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
334-794*9576 or 344-791-4714



Check out the Classifieds


I.


Y ,-e to great ,oc :"
businesses &son




VICE DIRECTORY

Call 526-3614 to place your 00Fi.


You CALL... WE COME To You!
RED'S MOBILE
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE
850-209-9713
EDWARD MAGGi, OWNER



Chad 0's Lawn F/X
Commercial & Residential
SSpring Clean-up &
Monthly Maintenance
Full Lawn Care Service
Free Estimates
Family Owned & Operated
Chad Oliver I 850-573-7279


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME



"Beautification of Your Home"
SCarpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured


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SELF ST ORAG


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$319500
35 Years in Business
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BESTWAY
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LociST MANUf!a[ru i OF Pi)TiLAit B, uiINe6 Ni NNaRm FLORniD
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COLOR & STYLE!
BUILT ONESIJTE 850-747-8974
1919 Hwv 231 North Panama City; FL


I


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Basketball Hall of Fame


Pitino leads Naismith class


The Associated Press

ATLANTA Rick Pitino
got the phone call of a life-
time and an incredible text
at the same time.
Last Wednesday, John
Doleva, the president of the
Naismith Memorial Hall of
Fame, called seven people
to tell them they'd in the
class of 2013.
Pitino was one of the
seven.
"When I got the call I was
trying to call my wife over
so she could hear it and I'm
trying to put it on speaker
phone and a text keeps
beeping as I'm getting this
special call," Pitino, said
Monday, just hours before
he led Louisville against
Michigan in the national
championship game. "I
saw the text. 'Go Gophers. I
got the job.'"
It was his son, Richard,
who had just found out he
was chosen to be the head
coach at Minnesota.
It's been that kind of week
for Pitino, who is among 12
people overall who will join
the class of 2013.
The others announced
Monday at a ceremony at
the Final Four were col-
lege coaches Guy Lewis of
Houston, Jerry Tarkanian of
UNLV and Sylvia Hatchell.
of North Carolina, former
NBA stars Bernard King
and Gary Payton and for-
mer University of Virginia
star Dawn Staley.
The inductions will take
place in Springfield, Mass.,
on Sept. 8.
Inductees announced
previously were: Edwin E.B.
Henderson, a direct elect
by the Early African Pio-
neer Committee; longtime
Indiana Pacers guard Roger
Brown; Oscar Schmidt of
Brazil, the leading scorer
in Olympic history; Richie
Guerin, a star for the New,
York Knicks in the 1950s;
and, Russ Granik, the long-
time assistant commis-
sioner of the NBA.
It was Pitino, however,
who stole the show.
His Cardinals are in the


Louisville coach Rick
Memorial Basketball
Monday in Atlanta.


championship game and
a win would make him the
first coach to win a title at
two schools. He won it all
with Kentucky in 1996.
On Saturday, Golden-
cents, a horse which Pi-
tino co-owns, won the
Santa Anita Derby, a major
prep race for the Kentucky
Derby.
"I was looking around
for lightning," Pitino joked.
"This was such a special
moment."
Pitino, the only coach to
take three schools to the
Final Four, has won 661
games in 28 seasons as a
college coach and his 47-16
record in the NCAA tourna-
ment is the third-highest
winning percentage among
active coaches.
He also had two stints
in the NBA with the Bos-
ton Celtics and New York
Knicks.
When he was a young as-
sistant with the Knicks from
1983-85, Pitino forged a re-
lationship with King, one of
the most feared scorers in
his playing days.
"I remember Rick as a
very young coach, a coach
starting his career, a coach


Me :
...
.. .






." ." '


' .
.. .. r ,-,


who knew the game," said
King, who averaged 22.0
points in his 15-year NBA
career, including averag-
ing 34.8 points in the 1984
NBA playoffs. "I remember
Rick came with me to the
NBA All-Star game and we
were flying from Denver to
San Antonio. We talked a 16t
about that even though we
had somihe injuries we had
to get off to a good start.
"That first game in San
Antonio I scored 50 points.
The next day in Dallas I had
a milk shake and a turkey
sandwich and scored 50
points again. I guessyou can
say this is the culmination
of my life in basketball "
Payton was known as
"The Glove" for his defen-
sive prowess in his years
with the Seattle SuperSon-
ics. He was a two-time
Olympic gold medalist.
Lewis led Houston to five
Final Fours in his 30 years
with the Cougars.
Tarkanian took three
schools to the NCAA tour-
nament but he will always
be known for his teams at
UNLV that made four Final
Four appearances and won
it all in 1990.


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2WK~ wP7o3 f5 ft cnc~Jx


If you are an area church that would like to
be featured in this year's edition contact the
advertising department of the Jackson County
Floridan at (850) 526-3614
or email salesjcfloridan.com.

Deadline for advertising is April 12, 2013.


. . . . . . . .. .. . :
--:i!k ; ~' :- ,. ] ;iI :: ,.:: ~ . '. ',


Community involvement means investing
in a better tomorrow for all of us.

Enriching the artistic landscape, fueling the
dreams of local athletes and promoting other
causes year after year helps our community
flourish for generations to come.


FLORIDA PUBLIC
U T I L I T I [ S


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pitino looks on during the Naismith
Hall of Fame class announcement


See more ways we're
helping the community.
Plus, learn how we can help
you conserve energy with
our free tools, value-added
programs and other
energy-efficiency incentives.


-16P TUESDAY, APRIL 9, 2013


SPORTS


. .. 1. .