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Jackson County Floridan ( April 3, 2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
April 3, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01051

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
April 3, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01051

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text





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Cottondale, 15-3


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Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online







FLORIDAN


Customers pack
stores after deal
reached on laws


Four charged in theft of semi's trailer


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
A Greenwood woman is ac-
cused of enlisting the help of
neighbors to steal and scrap
her brother-in-law's semi trail-
er, which had been parked
long-term in an area near her
residence.
Two men and another woman
are also charged in the case.
The two men, Benjamin L.
Durham and John W. Black-
mon, are charged with grand
theft and dealing stolen prop-
erty. The victim's sister-in-law,


Carrie M. Mott, and her friend
Lydia S. Brown, are each ac-


Mott


caused of grand
theft, dealing in
stolen property
and with defraud-
ing a second-hand
metal dealer.
Blackmon, 18,
Durham, 20, and
Brown, 39, all .are


listed as residents of the same
address, 5641 HenryWay. Brown
is Durham's mother. Blackmon
is reportedly engaged to one of
Brown's daughters.


* Mott, 52, is listed as a resident
of 5637 HenryWay and is the sis-
I ter-in-law to the
owner of the trail-
er, Phil Mott.
S Authorities say
S investigators were
called into the
case March 27,
Durham after the owner of
the trailer learned
from his landlord that it had
been scrapped.
The following summa-
ry of investigators' allega-
tions was composed from the


complaints filed in the case:
Investigators subsequently
S interviewed the
S two neighbor-
ing men, who at
first allegedly de-
nied knowledge
S of a trailer hav-
,ing been removed
Brown from the property.
Later, authori-
ties said, the men changed their
story, saying then that a man had
come to scrap the metal and that
they had merely assisted him in
that task when he arrived. But


an investigator questioned that
account when he saw a piece of
Matching metal in
S the bed of a truck
S *parked near the
g.'^. Blackmon/Du-
ram/Brown resi-
dence, a vehicle
that was regis-
Blackmon tered to Brown.
Questioned again
as the investigation progressed,
the men eventually said that they
and the two women had entered


See THEFT, Page 7A


MAGNOLIA RORD


BUS OVERTURNS


From staff reports

The 10 occupants of this
Jackson County School bus es-
caped apparent injury follow-
ing a wreck on Magnolia Road
Tuesday afternoon.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol Sgt. J.D.
Johnson, the bus driver ex-
perienced a medical event
while traveling west down
Magnolia' Road and lost
control of the bus, which
then crossed the east lane
and struck a guard rail. He
added that the bus then turned
over onto its driver side and
slid approximately 100 feet
down the road embankment
before coming to a rest against
a tree.
Another tree blocked the
back exit but the eight chil-
dren and two adults on the bus


were able to escape out of the Two children were taken to
hatch. hospital by a parent with the
The bus was carrying chil- others taken on a bus with
dren, including one in a emergency medical person-
wheelchair, from Hope School nel to Jackson Hospital as a
and ACE. precaution.


Okaloosa County


Padgett top candidate for adminijob


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Okaloosa County Commis-
sioners will sit down today with
Jackson County resident Ernie
Padgett, their top candidate for
the administrator's job, to deter-
mine whether they can come to
terms on a salary and benefits
package.
Padgett learned Tuesday morn-
ing that he was ranked at the top
of the final four candidates be-
ing considered for the position,
and was asked to come in to ne-


SCLASSIFIEDS...6-7B


gotiate salary and other matters
associated with the job. If they
come to terms,
as Padgett antici-
pates, he could be
_- .'.. on the job some-
time this month.
He and Jackson
SCounty Adminis-
Padgett trator Ted Lakey
were the only two
Florida residents to make thb fi-
nal four, from a field of 103 job
candidates.
Padgett retired back to Jack-


) ENTERTAINMENT...5B


> LOCAL...3A


son .County after serving 12
years as Manatee County
Administrator, and said he will
keep his retirement home here
but rent a dwelling in Okaloosa
County if he inks the contract.
Padgett is also a former Jackson
County Commissioner, hav-
ing served on this board from
1980-84. Later, from 1987-1990,
he was Jackson County's admin-
istrator, the first to serve in that
newly-created position.

See PADGETT, Page 7A

) OBITUARIES...7A


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Jackson County Commissioners have sued the architect who designed
the new county Emergency Management/Operations Center, seeking
reimbursements for costs associated with mold problems in the
structure.


Jackson County



sues architect


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

JacksonCountyCommission-
ers have filed a lawsuit against
architect Paul Donofro Jr. and
his family's company, Dono-
fro and Associates, claiming
breach of contract and negli-
gence in the suit. It seeks re-
imbursement for the county's
expense associated with reme-
diating mold problems in the
Emergency Management Cen-
ter, a building that Donofro
and Associates was contracted
to designed. Donofro was the
company's representative on
the project.
The county asserts that the
company should be made to
reimburse the county for mon-
ey that the local government


spent to have the building in-
spected and remediated, and
for related expenses. The in-
spection and remediation pro-
cess commenced when some
employees who worked in the
building began complaining
of ailments shortly after mov-
ing into the new structure in
2010. The remediation was
subsequently carried out, and
the county initially paid the as-
sociated bills. The costs on re-
cord so far come to more than
$116,800, according to county
finance personnel.
The county board members
wrestled for some time with
the question of who they felt
should be held responsible for
reimbursing the money, the

See COUNTY, Page 7A


Railroad work moves west


Cottondale,
Marianna travelers
still effected
BY ANGIE COOK
acook@jcfloridan.com

An ongoing railroad crosstie
replacement project contin-
ues to alter the daily commute
of some Jackson County trav-
elers. Those in Cottondale and
Marianna are currently feeling
the effects as the work moves
west.
CSX Transportation crews in
early March began replacing
crossties along railroads that
run through Jackson, Wash-
ington and Holmes counties.
The scope of the project is
.massive, project contractor
Bernard McAdams told the
SFloridan in February.


) STATE...5A


)) SPORTS...1


Workers are replacing rough-
ly 1,300 crossties per mile, cov-
ering two or three miles a day,
McAdams said. By the time the
project is finished, the team
is expected to have replaced
90,000 crossties and about 100
crossings.. He said CSX only
undertakes replacement on
this scale every seven to nine
years.
As of Tuesday, the Jackson
County Road and Bridge De-
partment lists the following
road closures due to rail work
being done by CSX crews:
Marianna
) Clearmont Road (Detour:
Skyview Drive to US 90), as of
March 27.
) Dryden Road, as of April 1.
Cottondale
Bayberry Road, as of

See RAILROAD, Page 7A

.B ) WEATHER...2A


This Newspaper j*
is Printed On aI
Recycled Newsprint




Slll lll 11
7 65161 80050 9


Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
SERVICE TEAM
i (850) 482-6317


tO WOO
MA NI'-FLI*


gun
is

8A

Vol.90 No.77


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook
Mostly Cloudy. PM Rain.
Today Justin Kiefer / WMBB :-


High 730
Low 61'


k ^
High 680 High -690
Low -57 4 Low 470

Thursday Friday
Showers. Possible Storms. Clearing Breezy & Cool.



S,, High-730 High-77
Low-510 Low- 530


Saturday Sunday
Sunny & Mild. Warm & Sunny.



FLORIDA'S ZREAL

PANHANDLE couty

MEDIA PARTNERS wJAQ Ioo0.9

LITN FRHORY ETERUDTSd


.-:-. -- -- :High 73
r a, Low: 58
., ... . ..


Low: 62


PRECIPITATION


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.00"
0.00"
0.27"


.,itui / 'f.l^ i'L-a .
High: 73 i i '.i .ri .t-
ILow: 59 High: 74
------ SA,? Low: 60 ;.

H High:igh 73
L3 r.-"
.;i yyb .7.. .^ ^ 6r =.-
Low' 4 ,: 61

~4tL.64


Year 1.' djli: 1 I In
N.,m.! IT It, -I-
Normal for year 59.20t


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


2:08 AM
5:20 AM
2:13AM
3:24 AM
3:58 AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
48.18 ft.
12.16 ft.
9.08 ft.
7.28 ft.


3:52 PM
1:05 PM
4:25 PM
4:58 PM
5:31 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme


0 12 3 2.5.


:.1 I


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:27 AM
Sunset 7:01 PM
Moonrise 1:42 AM Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr.
Moonset 12:38 PM 10 18 25 3


te iTmeh 1Tha-ff 54.


g U act ilrfludT it
0
-, ~


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m..to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
:out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
puthi:.h ilg jl material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


1...~


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3
n AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation -9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. for an ap-
pointment.
) Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida
Board of Directors Meeting-11 a.m. at the De-
partment of Children and Families, 2505 W. 15th St.
in Panama City. This meeting is open to the public.
Conference call number 1-888-670-3525, guest
code 4998489399.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Npon-
1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Basic Computer Class Part 1-Noon-3 p.m. at
the. Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway
90, Marianna. Learn basic components and use of a
computer. No cost to attend. Call 526-0139.

THURSDAY, APRIL
" "International Chat n' Sip"-8:30-10 a.m.
at the Jackson County Public Library, Marianna
Branch, 2929 Green St. The public is n. te-,:i t,:
enjoy a relaxed environment for the exchange of
language, culture and ideas among our local and
international communities. Light refreshments will
be served. Call 482-9124.
) Grief Workshop-10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Covenant
Hospice, 4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E, Marianna. This
workshop is for those who have suffered the loss
of a loved one or would like to learn how to help
those that are grieving. This workshop is free to
the public and light refreshments will be provided.
Registration is required. Call 482-8520 or toll free
888-817-2191.
n Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2290.
) Job Club -Noon-3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills; get job search assis-
tance. Call 526-0139.
n Kindle Fire Ebook Class-3-4 p.m. at the Jack-
son County Public Library, Marianna, Branch, 2929
Green St. Learn how to check out and download
Jackson County Public Library books from the
Axis 360 system. Participants should have a basic
knowledge of how to use a Kindle Fire. To register
call 482-9631.


.i :T


n Marianna/FPU Public Information Forum
-4-6:30 p.m. at the McLane Center, 4291 Clay St.
in Marianna. The City of Marianna encourages all
city residents to attend an informational session
about the April 9 Florida Public Utilities purchase
referendum. One additional session is scheduled.
Call 482-4353.
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation-4-7 p.m. at the Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. for an ap-
pointment.
) Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group-
5:30 p.m.at Jackson Hospital in the Cafeteria Board
Room. Free to attend. Curriculum developed by ex-
smokers for those who want to become ex-smokers
themselves. Call 718-2545.
) VFW & Ladies Auxiliary Meeting 6 p.m. at
2830 Wynn St. in Marianna. Covered-dish supper
followed by a 7 p.m. business meeting. Call 372-
2500.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA-room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, APRIL 5
n Jackson County Chamber of Commerce First
Friday Power Breakfast-7 a.m. at the Jackson
County Extension Center, 2741 Pennsylvania
Avenue in Marianna. Guest speaker will be Paul
Smith, Pastor of Rivertown Community Church. Call
482-8060.
) Knitters Nook-10 a.m. at the Jackson
County Public Library, Marianna Branch. New
and experienced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-
9631.
) Money Sense-Noon-4 p.m. at the Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna.
This is a financial literacy class that helps with bud-
geting, saving and other financial topics. No cost to
attend. Call 526-0139.
Two-Toe Tom.Beauty Pageant-6:30 p.m. at
-re r.:i.:e. Iie Civic Center in Graceville. Divisions
will include Tiny Baby Miss, Baby Miss, Toddler
Miss, Tiny Miss, Future Little Miss, Little Miss, Baby
Mister, Toddler Mister and Little Mister. Proceeds
will benefit the Two-Toe Tom Festival celebration.


Admission is $3 per person and c iiiiidir-n three and
under admitted for free. Call 263-4744.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Wor-
ship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna.
Adult, teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits
and hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available.
Call 209-7856, 573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Mariarina.
) Deadline to enter the Jackson County Pag-
eant-Little Miss, 1st grade and Junior Miss, 6th,
7th, or 8th grades in the Jackson County School
District, privately enrolled or home schooled in
the JCSD. Miss contestants must be ages 17-21
by October 1, 2013. All contestants must perma-
nently reside in Jackson County and may not be a
temporary residence elsewhere. Obtain forms at
JacksonCountyPageants.com or call 693-0809,
718-7095 or 209-5842.

SATURDAY, APRIL 6
n Marianna Woman's Club Annual Spring Yard,
Bake and Plant Sale-7 a.m. corner of Clinton
and Caledonia Streets. Items donated by members
and their families include: Furniture, clothing and
household items. "Opportunity drawing" for a
birdhouse creation by local artist Lanet James to be
held mid day, tickets are $1 or six for $5. Proceeds
from this event will be used for a variety of club
projects. Call 209-5747.
) Cottondale High School Project Graduation
Car Wash-9 a.m. at AutoZone Hwy. 90 in Mari-
anna. Call 326-3521.
n Line Dance Contest-10 a.m. at Marianna Mid-
dle School Gym, sponsored by the team members
of "The Spirit of Keston". Theme is "Mama, I've Got
Shoes", and proceeds will benefit the 2013 March of
Dimes March for Babies. Admission for non-partici-
pants is a pair of baby shoes or booties which will
be donated to families of premature babies. Small
registration fee for participants. Register call 209-
5664,482-5837 or 594-6581.
) Grand Opening of North Florida Wild West
Show-lO a.m.-4 p.m. located at 2134 Hwy. 231S,
Cottondale. Event is free to the public. Enjoy gun-
fight shows, country music, card sharks, pony rides,
train rides and more. Refreshments will be available
for a small fee. Call 557-9928.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
- - - - -. ... ........-


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for April 1, the
latest available report: One accident, one
hospice death, four suspicious incidents,
six traffic stops, one larceny complaint,
one trespass complaint, one follow-up
investigation, one juvenile complaint,
one fraud complaint, one retail theft,
one assist of another agency, two public
service calls and one threat/harassment
complaint.


Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office
and county fire/rescue reported the
following incidents for April 1, the latest
available report: Three accidents, one
hospice death, three abandoned vehicles,
one reckless driver, one suspicious ve-
hicle, one suspicious person, one highway
obstruction, one burglary of a vehicle, one
physical disturbance, one fire with police
response, one prowler, one residential fire,


two vehicle fires, one drug offense, 16
medical calls, two traffic crashes, four
burglar alarms, three
... . fire alarms, one report of
shooting in the area, 16
traffic stops, two larceny
SR I ME complaints, one drag
- " -- racing complaint, one
trespass complaint, one
juvenile complaint, one
animal complaint, two fraud complaints,
two assists of motorists or pedestrians,
five assists of other agencies, three public
service calls, 10 criminal registrations, four
transports, one patrol request, one threat/
harassment complaint and one 911 hang-
up.
Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
periods:
) Reginald Spires. 26, 2984A Smith St.,
Marianna, violation of state probation (ag-
gravated dhild abuse).
) Arkito Bunkley, 36, 605 Carnathan
Court, Ft. Walton Beach, violation of state


probation (uttering a forged instrument),
hold for Brevard Co.
n Steve Hawes, 40, 4556 Timberlane Road,
Bascom, aggravated child abuse.
) Christopher Hadden, 33, 5400 Bayline
Drive, Panama City, hold for court/hold for
DOC.
) Irvin Harris, 52, 3120 Lynchburg Drive,
Montgomery, Ala., permitting unauthor-
ized person to drive.
) Christopher Harrell, 30, 2512
Misty Trail, Campbellton, driving while
license suspended or revoked-two
counts.
) Jasmine Harvey, 18, 1623 Vista View
Drive, Montgomery, Ala., driving without a
valid driver's license.
) Carrie Mott, 52, 5641 Henry Way,
Greenwood, grand theft, dealing in stolen
property, defrauding a second-hand
dealer.
) Curtis Lee, 21, 5040 Copperhead Lane,
Bascom, retail theft.

Jail Population: 210
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agency.To report a wildlife violation,
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


I I a iiJhid^, le ejTe


Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan .
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL. ^. K 4al XI ". Curi Rogers
B T (850) 482- 5well Billy Kendall9 ohn Bryan' i Team Sales/ NikSna
(850) 482-3051 Team'Sales Team Sale, Tam.Salesa ;ii; L-inventory Mngr. Team Sales


-2A WEDNESDAY. APRIL 3, 2013


WAKE-UP CALL











JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NEW SENIOR GROUP ORGANIZED







|


SUBMITTED PHOTO
new senior organization has been started in the area called
S "Senior Fellowship Association." The group meets the third
onday of each month at noon in the Youth Center of Mari-
anna First United Methodist Church on Clinton Street. There is
either a speaker or program each month that will be of interest to
seniors. In addition, door prizes are given at each meeting. Mem-
bers are asked to bring a vegetable, salad, dessert or drink to each
meeting for a potluck lunch. The meat is furnished. Membership
dues are $5 per year and everyone is asked to make a $2 donation
at each meeting to help defray expenses. Membership in the Senior
Fellowship Association is not limited to local residents and there is
no minimum age. The next meeting is scheduled for April 15. For
additional information call 482-4120. Pictured are the officers for
the Senior Fellowship Association (from left) Carol Ricks, vice-presi-
dent; Daisie Schoultheis, treasurer; Cheryl Lackey, secretary and
Jerry Conley, president.


Smith will address


First Friday Power


Breakfast
Special to the Floridan

Paul Smith, Pastor of
Rivertown Community
Church will be the guest
speaker of the Jackson
County Chamber of Com-
merce First Friday Power
Breakfast on Friday be-
ginning at 7 a.m. at the
Jackson County Extension
Center, 2741 Pennsylvania
Ave.in Marianna. Smith's
presentation will be "Lead-
ership: Why it Matters,
What it Looks Like."
Smith was a business
6wner in Blountstown for
14 years, and has been the
lead pastor at Rivertown
Community Church for 19
years. His passion for lead-
ership permeates his entire
life. Smith is committed to


on Friday
helping grow other leaders,
not only in the church but
in the community as well.
RCC, one church with mul-
tiplelocations, expandedto
Marianna in 2010, holding
services at Marianna High
School. In three years RCC
Marianna's attendance
grew to over 400. After the
old Woolworth Building
was donated to the church,
RCC raised more than $1
million for renovations in
less than year. As a result,
a previously "dead" shop-
ping center now provides
a foundation for economic
rebirth of the area.
The First Friday Power
Breakfast is sponsored by
Florida Public Utilities. For
additional information call
482-8060.


DEADLINE TO ENTER

JACKSON CO. PAGEANT IS FRIDAY


T he deadline to
enter the Jack-
son County
Pageant is Friday April
5. Little Miss contes-
tants must be in the
first grade and Junior
Miss contestants must
be in the sixth, seventh
or eighth grade in the
Jackson County School
District, privately en-
rolled or homeschooled
in the JCSD. Miss Con-
testants must be ages
17-21 by Oct. 1 All con-
testants must perma-
nently reside in Jackson
County and may not be
a temporary resident
elsewhere. Forms may
be obtained at Jack-
sonCountyPageants.
com or call Heather
Williams at 693-0809,
Debbie Dryden at 718-
7095 or Stacy Larkin at
209-5842. Pictured are
the 2012-2013 Jack-
son County Queens
(from left) Junior Miss,
Delaney Basford; Little
Miss, Jessalyn Jenkins
and Miss, Courtney
Hodges.


Marriage, Divorce Report


The following mar-
riages and divorces were
recorded in Jackson
County during the week
of March 25-29:
Marriages
) Clinton Marvin Hatch-
er and Theresa Shannan
McClain.
) Jeremy Mitchell Deese
and Sarah Leigh McAlpin.
n Charles Christopher
Decree and Chequita Re-
nea Jones.
Reginald Lamar Bell
and Juanita Inez Threatts.
) Johnathan Lee Lipford
and April Genene Webb
Nichols.
) Stephen Gene Burde-
shaw and Haley Jo
Bennett.
) Justin Scott Reagan
and Ashley Elizabeth
Toole.
Ethan Lorell Perdue
and Brittney Deanne
--^-^q-- H


Hamm.
) Rodney Elton An-
dreasen and Donna Kay
Hussey.
) Shannon Ray Bar-
low and Brandy Louise
Barlow.
n Joshua Edward Hol-
mes and Jacqueline Lee
Stewart.
)) Eddie James Brown,
Jr. and Candace Ophelia
Butler.
) Daniel Mark Rathburn
and Jeanette Lee Evans.
) Parrish Michael Boyd
Monroe and Tusdie Ann
Taylor.
) Daniel Davis Min-
ton and Martha Marylou
Moore.

Divorces
B Amanda L. Dykes vs.
Douglas L. Dykes.
) Amy Denise Loftus vs.
Matthew John Loftus.


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WEDNESDAY. APRIL 3, 2013 3AF


LOCAL

















Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Florida Voices



Coerced




compliance




in Destin


News editorialized against a local ordinance
that required people to be quieter or neater or
more polite (we forget which) or face the law's wraih,
a reader telephoned the newsroom to argue with us.
Government has to make citizens conform to certain
norms, he said. "People," he stated solemnly, "must be
controlled."
We recalled that conversation as folks responded to
our March 8 editorial, "Clean up this carport ... or else!"
The editorial questioned the Destin Area Chamber of
Commerce's push to toughen enforcement of the city
code. The chamber wants Destin officials to prohibit
residents from parking cars or boats on their lawns or
piling up too much stuff on their carports.
Shouldn't people be allowed to do as they wish on
'their own property?
No, said quite a few readers. Here's a sample:
) "Regulations must be imposed and enforced to
make people do the right thing."
a "When you and your type start to hurt'others' prop-
erty values, then we have the right to stop it."
) "I should have the right to expect others in the
community to uphold certain standards or suffer the
consequences of coerced compliance."
Yep, all that talk about small government and in-
Sdividual liberty tends to vanish poof! when the
neighbors get messy. Then we hear calls for City Hall to
step in. People must be controlled.
For the record, laws that require private property to
look a certain way- a certain color, a certain size, a
certain degree of tidiness are difficult to justify when
the public's health and safety are not at risk. A contribu-
tor to our Spout Off column said his neighbor's carport
is so junky it's breeding rats. That makes it a health
violation. There's already a law for that.
And, also for the record, it is not government's job to
guarantee your property's value.
If you believe the house next door is an eyesore and
is hurting the resale potential of nearby properties, try.
having a talk with the owner. Fattening the ordinance
books and broadening the reach of government are a
poor substitute for neighborliness.

Northwest Florida Daily News


Letters to the Editor

The truth should be uncovered
I think it is disgusting that anyone would try to hinder
the uncovering of the truth about the Dozier School for
Boys, formerly Florida School for Boys. To try and block
the investigation is the equivalent of admitting the guilt
of the school and those who operated it.
I grew up in Calhoun County. We played ball against,
that school.
Anyone alive during those years and being at all fa-
miliar with the school would have no problem believing
the allegations.
Anyone who would try to block or hinder the truth
coming out should apologize for their lack of con-
science and lack of any sense of morality. Attempts to
cover the truth are pretty much equally as disgusting as
the original abuse. )
It is inconceivable that anyone with ANY moral com-
pass whatsoever would want to deny those impacted,
whether directly or through family and loved ones, the
closure that the truth would bring.
If anyone thinks the truth is a "black eye" for the com-
munity, they would do well to recognize that attempts
to quell the truth is a MUCH BIGGER black eye.
Besides, when the cat is out of-the bag, the man who
tries to stuff him back in the bag can get pretty well
"chewed up"!
STAN DILLARD
Panama City


Why such focus on liquor laws? The industry


A y do normally intelligent
legislators write reason-
able laws on everything
except alcohol?
The easy, obvious answer is
money. Liquor, beer and wine lob-
byists have spent many years, and
millions of dollars, making alcohol
taxes and regulatory rules just the
way they want them. This means
there are always people left out by
the rules, so they hire lobbyists and
try to get them rewritten so they
can get in on the business pref-
erably by elbowing out somebody
else.
The Sarasota Herald- Tribune
last weekend had a good roundup
on the "beverage wars" of the 2013
legislative session, which are fairly
typical of what we have seen in past
sessions. There are at least four bills
seeking to change regulation of the
who, where and how-much factors
for various types of booze sales. The
newspaper's most important point
was that Southern Wine And Spirits
and Florida Beer Wholesalers As-
sociation spread $311,000 among
political parties and members'run-
ning for the Legislature in the past
election cycle.
Beer and spirits companies spend
all that money to gain market ad-
vantages, often very tiny ones. We-
may not know why breweries don't
want to serve certain sized bever-
ages, but you can be sure they have
some monetary interest in stan-
dardizing and limiting their serving
sizes. But once legislators and other
politicians get into the mix, it's
clear the resulting laws aren't for us.
The laws take their strange shapes
because they benefit the industry
that pays for them.
Consider growlerss," for in-
stance. Those are big beer jugs,
filled at the tap by craft brewers and
can be sold in sizes of 32 ounces
or 128 ounces. Rep. Katie Edwards,
D-Plantation, wants to legalize,64-
ounce growlerss," but she's run into
a lot of opposition from the beer,


BillCotterell


industry. In ways dating back to
the repeal of Prohibition, people in
the business have rigged the rules,
and they're only slightly less hostile
to any newcomers than Al Capone
was.
Rather than drive-by
shootings, the modern industry
protects its territory with sensible-
sounding arguments (backed by
campaign contributions) about
keeping the flow regulated, taxed
and as orderly as possible. That is,
they want laws to make it finan-
cially safe for themselves, not for
the public at large.
Many years ago, in many south-
ern towns, they used to say you
could buy a drunk, but not a drink.
That is, you could buy a bottle but
not "liquor by the drink." Legalizing
'drink sales was a factor in keeping
Florida's Capitol in Tallahassee,
when urban lawmakers wanted it
in Orlando 50 years ago. There were
still a lot of"drys" in Leon County,
but they couldn't forever out-vote
the "wets" when state workers' jobs
were at stake.
That's normal business. The
land developers, tourist attractions,
pari-mutuels, power companies all
use their money to elect friendly
candidates who will keep their
taxes low and regulations lax. It
seems that only in alcohol regula-
tion is greed accompanied by a
certain silliness.
Have you ever tried to get from
the main floor of Publix or CostCo
into the liquor store? You prob-
ably had to go outside and enter
through another door. But you can
have beer and wine in the big store.
No doubt this dates back to the
pre-Prohibition era, to protect the
children from every knowing what
a saloon is. In the San Francisco
Bay area many years ago, it was ille-
gal to hang out a sign saying "Bar."
They could say "Nude Dancers,"


but the Victorian formality and
genteel manners that San Francis-
cans are so well-known for would
not let them call a bar what it is.
(Truthfully, I don't think anyone
ever enforced that law).
My first job as a reporter was in
Columbia, S.C., when the state for-
bade signs on liquor stores. Instead,
they painted large red polka dots
all over their facades. But then the
state Supreme Court ruled that the
red dots were a form of advertis-
ing, every bit as traumatizing as the
written word.
There was a long, impassioned
debate about legalizing the red dots
how many, how large, whether
they had to be in a straight line or
sprinkled like chicken pox all over
a storefront, all the same size or
varied. Grown-ups actually argued
about that.
"Brown bagging" was popular
in many southern states back then.
Restaurants couldn't sell you a
drink, but could charge you $1.50
for a little glass of ice, and pretend
not to know what was.in that little
brown bag you brought with you..
Some states allowed "bottle clubs"
where you could go through the
pretense of "joining," then leave
your brown bag between visits..Li-
quor stores, forced to close at sun-
down, had little cardboard clock
faces on their front doors signaling
an odd hour like 7:16 p.m.
Except for taxation and
public health, why not just de-
regulate alcohol? How is the public
served by having to fill two 32-oz.
growlers, instead of a 64-oz. jug?
Why should stores have separate
doors?
Maybe Charles Dickens under-
stood how cold-sober legislators
could get such goofy results. On
another topic, in Oliver Twist, Mr.
Bumble tells a magistrate, "If the
law supposes that, the law is a ass
- a idiot."
Bill Cotterell can be contacted
at billcotterell@gmail.com.


Here's what we really want from our government


T he Legislature is in ses-
sion, busily carrying out the
wishes of Special Interests
Inc., and Gov. Rick Scott is mov-
ing toward the middle. But that's
a mere canard, as any left-winger
conspiracy theorist knows.
Scott just wants to dupe the mid-
dle-of-the-road folks into re-elect-
ing him next year, at which point
he will promptly revert to Oscar
the Grouch mode, dispossessing
orphans and widows, paving the
Everglades and banning Medicaid
to make Florida even more "busi-
ness friendly."
If the Legislature and Scott really
wanted to help the working men
and women, its members would get
busy passing a bunch of laws that
would improve our quality of life.
For starters, instead of giving
every Kindergarten student his own
Uzi, let's authorize law-abiding
motorists to fire paintballs at any
vehicle that doesn't show direc-
tional signals before making turns.
Give us molten lava to dump on
the geezersin Buicks going 35 mph
in the left lane of Interstate high-
ways. And flashing lights and loud
horns to draw attention to anyone


MarkO'Brien

who throws a cigarette butt out the
window of his card.
Pass a law requiring disclosure
by the Tea Party, Tax Watch and
other associations of grumpy old
guys. All of their statements and
press releases should carry a warn-
ing: "We just don't want to share
anything because we've already got
homes, cars, educations, pensions,
Medicare and insurance, and we
don't want anyone cluttering up the
doctor's waiting room when we go
to get our bunions examined."
They should pass another
disclosure law and require that
stores post it prominently for all
the idiots to see when they line up
to buy Florida Lottery tickets. The
message: "Caution, you have less
chance of winning the big prize
than Dennis Rodman has of win-
ning a spot-in the Diplomats Hall of
Fame."
If lawmakers really were on
our side, they would pass legisla-
tion to make convenience stores
and coffee shops for those of us
now forced to wait in line behind


dipsticks who deliberate at length
over whether they want some beefy
jerky along with their lattes. All
stores should have to post signs
above each cashier line: "Decided"
or "Undecided."
Here's a law that citizens
would unanimously enact in a
constitutional amendment: "No
clerk shall make a customer wait to
make a purchase while said clerk
answers the telephone."
Decriminalize marijuana
and put the cops to work ticketing
people who let their dogs poop
anywhere then walk off without
bagging it. Let's have big fines for
restaurant servers who look at your
plate and ask, "Are you still working
on it?" And they should authorize
those of us who don't text, drink or
talk on a cellphone while driving
to travel an extra 10 mph over the
speed limit.
Pass these laws, Gov. Scott, and
you will make my life so much
better that I just might vote for you
next year.
Formerly a columnist for the
Pensacola News Journal, Mark O'Brien is a writ-
er in Pensacola, and the author of "Pensacola
On My Mind" and "Sand In My Shoes."










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPRING BREAKERS

TOUR JACKSON COUNTY


Students from Wellington Christian School, located in Welling-
ton, just west of West Palm Beach are shown at the Russ House
as they ended their tour of this area recently. The first stop
was a tour of the Florida Caverns, where they were met by Pat Crisp,
President of the Chipola Historical Trust. Crisp accompanied them
on a tour of Greenwood, featuring Great Oaks Plantation, describing
life at the antebellum home on a 5,200-acre plantation in the early
1860s. The next stop was the Marianna Federal Correctional Institu-
tion which shows the characteristics of a large prison. The story of
how the prison was emptied at night when a tornado came through
in 2004 fascinates visitors. The next stop was a tour of The Russ
House. A narrative featuring the Ely-Criglar House completed the
tour as the story of the Civil War Battle of Marianna was described for
the visitors while they stood where the skirmish took place almost
150 years ago. The young people who represented Wellington School
are students at the pre-school through 12th-grade college-prep
school which is a ministry of Wellington Presbyterian Church. The
school had students in Rome, Italy; Washington, D.C.; a group tour-
ing Florida and a group doing service projects in Vero Beach.


Inmate charged in
1996 teen's murder
PHILADELPHIA- Po-
lice say they have charged
a Florida prison inmate
in the murder of a teen-
age girl more than a
decade and a half ago in
Philadelphia.
Officials said DNA evi-
dence led them to charge
46-year-old Rafael Crespo
in the murder of 17-year-
old Anjeanette Maldona-
do, whose body was found
in a trash-strewn room in
an abandoned house in
October 1996.
Police said the high
school student was ap-
parently attacked as she
headed to school, then
sexually assaulted and
killed.
Crespo, an inmate in
Bowling Green, Fla., is
back in Philadelphia to
face charges including
murder, rape, and sexual
assault.

Panel OKs parasailing
regulations
TALLAHASSEE A
Florida Senate panel has
approved a bill aimed at
instilling greater safety
for thrill seekers who soar
high above the state's
coastlines while dangling
from a parachute.
The legislation would
bring greater oversight to
the state's approximately
100 commercial parasail
operators, who are now
largely unregulated.
The bill (SB 64) cleared
the Senate Regulated


stte Briefs
Industries Committee
on Tuesday without any
opposition. The measure
comes less than a year
after a woman dropped
from her harness and
plunged nearly 200 feet
to her death off Pompano
Beach.
It would require com-
mercial parasailing busi-
nesses to have insurance.
It would require that each
boat have an observer who
isn't the driver to keep an
eye on the parasailers.

Scott signs repeal
of driving law
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott has signed a
repeal of a law requiring
foreign visitors to have
international driving
permits.
The governor signed
the repeal (HB 7059) on
Tuesday at the Florida
Chamber of Commerce's
International Days event
in Tallahassee.
Under a law that took
effect in January, foreign
drivers who didn't have
a $25 permit translating
their license information
into English could have
been charged with driving
without a license. But the
state highway depart-
ment learned the permit
requirement violates an
international driving
treaty.
Canadian tourists who
drive to Florida surged on-
line to ask that the law be
changed. About 14 million
Canadians visit Florida
each year.


Democrats push
for gun legislation
TALLAHASSEE Two
Miami Democratic law-
makers tried to turn up
the heat Tuesday on their
colleagues to debate gun-
control legislation that has
stalled as Florida's legisla-
tive session reaches the
halfway point.
State Sen. Dwight Bul-
lard and Rep. Cynthia
Stafford pushed their pro-
posals to revise Florida's
so-called "stand your
ground" law, which says
people can use deadly
force if they feel threat-
ened with no requirement
to retreat if possible.
From wire reports


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Hudson will speak


to Republican Club


Special to the Floridan

The fastest growing crime
in America is identity theft,
where every minute 19
people become victims.
Consumers, students, chil-
dren and businesses are
victims.
Chuck Hudson, Jackson
County Executive with
First .Commerce Credit
Union will make an iden-
tity theft presentation to
the Republican Club of
West Florida on Tuesday,
April 9 at noon at Jim's Buf-
fet & Grill in Marianna.
Hudson will discuss the
specific ways how thieves
are stealing personal infor-
mation such as social se-
curity and banking num-
bers. The presentation
explains technology which
allows identity thieves to
intercept data which they
use in duplicating debit
and credit cards and how


age old fraud techniques
are being updated for the
21st century.
Learn how
to protect
r yourself and
what to do if
S you become
a victim.
L Hudson
Name here
is a Jackson
County na-
tive with more than 20
years of banking experi-
ence; He graduated from
Chipola College in 1988. He
has degrees in Finance
and Accounting from the
University of West Florida,
Florida School of Bank-
ing in Gainesville and the
Graduate School of Bank-
ing at LSU. Hudson lives
in Marianna with his wife
Tamara and son Tripp.
It is not necessary to be a
club member or a Repub-
lican to attend. For further
information call 352-4984.


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The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A man
on death row for kidnap-
ping and murdering a Pi-
nellas County girl 33 years
ago lost his latest appeal
on Tuesday.
The Florida Supreme
Court denied Larry Eugene
Mann's request for post-
conviction relief.
Gov. Rick Scott had
signed a death warrant for
Mann on March 1. Mann,
59, is set to be executed by
lethal injection at Florida
State Prison near Raiford
on April 10.
The death penalty is "the
law of our land," Scott said
on Tuesday in response to
the court's opinion. "And
I'm going to continue to
comply with and enforce
the laws of Florida."


Mann was convicted and
sentenced to death for the
kidnapping and first-de-
gree murder of 10-year-
old Elisa Nelson. Mann
smashed her head with a
piece of concrete-encased
steel pipe, court records
show.
Mann's death sentence
was overturned once be-
cause the trial court made
a legal error. He was resen-
tenced to death and the
Supreme Court then af-
firmed that sentence.
In the most recent ap-
peal, Mann's lawyers said
that Florida's sentencing
system "violates evolving
standards of decency" be-
cause it lets jurors recom-
mend a death sentence by
a simple majority vote and
does not require them to
be unanimous.


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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2013 5AF


LOCAL & STATE


IM .'


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Hillshire Farm Polish, Beef or Pork
Smoked Sausage.............


Bryan 4x6
Cooked Ham
Tennessee Pride
Sausage and


or Turkey.....

Biscuit ..........


10 oz

$161
5 20 ct.


Ball Park
Jumbo Franks


148
16 oz.


Farmland St. Louis
Rib Portions

10 lb. box


Royal Smoked
Sliced Bacon
$199
12 oz.


Hidden Valley Seasoned Collards* Turnips Mixed Greens
Come & Get It! Dog Food Armour RanchDressing Margaret Holmes Vegetables
Alpo Potted Meat $a76 91 t
16 oz. 127 oz.
s723 33' "270 91^
16b. 3 oz. Sugary Sam, 29 oz. 12 pack, 12 oz.
161. 3Yam s ......................$145 Faygo Drinks........... 2 53



Vlasic Dale's
Castleberry Corn e Green Beans Sweet Peas Kosher Dills Steak Marinade
Hot Dog Chili Libby Gold Vegetables S 165 204
52 55 4 oz 16 oz
10oz. 5 oz. Variety Pack, 22 ct., 22 oz Armour, 5 oz.
Golden Flake........... ienna Sausage.......44


- 6A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2013


~~P .
'~


199
14 oz.









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Obituaries


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl. 32446
850-482-2332

Hershel
Dwane
Basford

Hershel Dwane Basford
Funeral services will be 2
p.m. Wednesday, April 3,
2013 at Grand Ridge Bap-
tist Church. Interment will
follow in Cow Pen Pond
Cemetery.

James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850-482-2332

Mary L
Hatcher

Mary Lou Hollis Hatcher,
92, of Jacksonville, FL went
home to be with her Lord
and Savior on March 31,
2013 at Community Hos-
pice at St. Vincent's Medi-
cal Center in Jacksonville,
FL.
Born and raised in Ma-
rianna, FL she had resided
in Jacksonville, FL since
1996
She was retired from ho-
tel service work and had
been a homemaker since
retiring. She was a loving
daughter, mother and
grandmother and aunt.
She loved to cook, quilt,
sew, needlepoint and gar-
den.
She loved her family and
enjoyed the time she had
with them. She loved her
Lord and was faithful to her
church as long as her
health'allowed.
She was preceded in
death by her parents, John
T. and Alvia L. Hollis, her
husband, Wyatt Hatcher,
five brothers, Clyde "Boll
Weevil" Hollis, Grady Hol-
lis, Belvin "Red" Hollis,
Chester "Doodle Bug" Hol-
lis, Randolph ."Cotton"
Hollis and two sisters, Es-
telle Hogan fnd Madge
Charlton.
She is survived by her
son, Larry Revell and
daughter-in-law Cheryl, of
St. Augustine, FL, four
grandchildren, Mike Hodg-
es, Leslie Hamilton, Kristy
Locklear (Darrell) and Kerri
Eaton (Rob), twelve great
grandchildren plug
numerous nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will be
at 2:00 PM Thursday, April
4th at James & Sikes Funer-
al Home Maddox Chapel
with Rev. Stephen Potter
officiating.
The family will receive
friends at 1:00 pm preced-
ing the funeral service.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily requests donations be
made to Community Hos-
pice of Northeast Florida,
4266 Sunbeam Rd., Jack-
sonville, FL 32257, 904-268-
5200
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com

Williams Funeral Home
5283 Brown Street
Graceville, Fl. 32440
850-263-5116

James M.
Jdhns

Mr. James M. Johns of
Graceville passed away
Monday, April 1, 2013, at
Flowers Hospital. He was
93.
Visitation will be held
Thursday, April 4, 2013
from 6 to 7:30 P.M. at the
Williams Funeral Home
Chapel. Flowers will be ac-
cepted.
Funeral services will be
held at 10:00 A.M., Friday,
April 5, 2013 at the Wil-


Padgett
From Page 7A

serving. Both communi-
ties have a large military
presence, and Padgett be-
lieve his previous experi-
ence interacting with the
military in Santa Rosa
will give him a good


liams Funeral Home Chap-
el with Bro. Randall Walker
officiating. Burial will fol-
low at the Marvin Chapel
Cemetery with Williams
Funeral Home directing.
Mr. Johns loved his family
and friends. He enjoyed
fishing, farming, and trav-
eling.
Mr. Johns is preceded in
death by his parents.
Survivors include his
daughter, Michele Ells-
worth; three grandsons,
Shawn, Darren, and Mat-
thew Johns; four great
grandchildren Colleen,
Joanah, lan, and Avery.
Condolences may be
expressed online at
www.williamsfuneralhomeservice.com
Obert Funeral Home
1556 Brickyard Road
Chipley, Florida 32428
850-638-2122

Houston
Columbus
Obert

Rev. Houston Columbus
Obert, Age 96, went to be
with his Lord and Savior on
Friday, March 29, 2013 at
10:07 in Jackson Hospital.
.He was a native of Wash-
ington County but spent
the majority of his life in
Jackson County. He was a
dedicated member of Sapp
Community Church where
he sang, played guitar,
preached, and mentored
others. He preached at
many different churches in
the area for many years
and had a radio 'program
for 40+ years on WTOT on
Sunday morning. He en-
joyed fishing, farming, his
family and most of all, serv-
ing his Lord.
He was preceded in
death' by his wife of 50
years, Lettie Dilmore
Obert; parents Christopher
and Minnie Obert and son
Malvin (Buddy) Obert, one
brother, two sisters and
two great grandchildren.
He is survived by his wife
of 20 years Lois Miller
Obert; Sons, W A Obert,
Roland Obert and wife
Martha, and Charles Obert
and wife Hazel; Daughters,
Wilma Aleta Hamilton and
husband Earl, Marilyn
Obert Branch, and Mary
Powell and husband Bud-
dy; Step-Daughters, Glen-
da Goins and husband Wil-
liam, Gail Elizabeth Par-
sons, and Charlotte Jack-
son and husband Tommy;
3 brothers: John Obert,
Mallory "Dock" Obert and
Cecil Obert; 31 Grandchil-
dren; 43 Great-
Grandchildren; and 1
Great-Great-Grandchild.
Funeral Services were
held at lla.m Monday,
April 1, 2013 at Sapp Com-
munity Church in
Cottondale with Paster
Robert Simmons, Shane
Obert (Grandson) and Rev.
Cloys Joiner officiating.
Burial will follow in the
church cemetery with
Obert Funeral Home of
Chipley directing.
Visitation was held at
Sapp Community Church
on Sunday, March 31, 2013
from 5:00 to 7:00p.m.
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850-482-2332

Robert
Rossburg

Robert Rossberg,, 74, of
Marianna, died Sunday,
March 31, 2013, at Jackson
Hospital.
Arrangements will be an-
nounced by James & Sikes
Funeral Home Maddox
Chapel.

Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


basis to build on in
Okaloosa.
Padgett said he's also
familiar with working in
combination communi-
ties like Okaloosa, which
has three very different
sectors with differing
needs; it has a strong
rural area, a high-growth,
more metropolitan sector,
and a coastal region.


PHOTOS BYANGIE COOK/FLORIDAN
Mayor James Wise(right) congratulates April Employee of the Month James Hall, Tuesday in Marianna City Hall.


Marianna notes top city employees


From staff reports

During the regular
commission meeting
Tuesday, Marianna of-
ficials recognized the
city's April Employees
of the Month: James
Hall and Genetta
Washington.
Hall has been employed
with the city Gas Division
since May 2008.
In his recommendation,
Public Works Director
Joe Richey said Hall had
recently been promoted
to foreman because he
demonstrates the abili-
ties required to lead and
direct others within the
Gas Division.
Washington, a
Laundry Aide in the
Marianna Health &
Rehabilitation Center
Housekeeping/Laundry



Railroad
From Page 7A
April 2.
) Sapp Road (Portion:
North of US 90)., as of
April 2.
) West Street, as of
April 1.
) Zion Street, as of
April 1.
Cottondale's Rushin
Road reopened April 1
after repairs to the rail-
road tracks there were
completed.
The CSX crosstie re-
placementprojectshould
conclude in early May,
with rail work in Jackson
County wrapping up well
before.


Theft
From Page 1A
into an agreement about
scrapping, the trailer, ac-
cording to the complaints.
The men had partially dis-
assembled the trailer, of-
ficials said, but soon that
task was abandoned in
favor of having the scrap


County
From,Page 1A


architect, the contractor
who built the structure, or
both.
Ultimately, the county
did not go after the build-
er, Whiterock Construc-
tion. That company is
not named in the lawsuit
and no later action is an-
ticipated against it in this
matter, according to board
attorney Frank Baker.
The lawsuit against
Donofro and Associates
cites a report in which
an inspector had not-
ed an accumulation of
condensation be-
tween the exterior
roof and interior ceiling,


Mayor James Wise (right) congratulates April Employee of the Month Genetta Washington,
Tuesday in Marianna City Hall.


Department, has
worked for the Center


since April 1989. She Administrator Melinda
was nominated by MHRC Gay.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
A crew works on the railroad crossing at Whiteville Road near Cottondale Tuesday.


dealer come pick it up and
take it away.
Brown, Durham i and
Blackmon maintain that
they were told that Ms.
Mott owned the trailer and,
while they had misgivings
about that account, decid-
ed to help with the proj-
ect of having it scrapped
because they all needed
the money they'd get


a condition that "ulti-
mately contributed to the
damage to the structure
and the growth of harm-
ful fungus (mold) and the
development of unhealthy
conditions," the lawsuit
alleges.
The lawsuit alleges that
the company breached
its contracts "by failing to
prepare sufficient plans
and designs for the con-
struction of the project in
such a maqner as to be
fit for human occupation,
or to otherwise comply
with applicable codes re-
garding the health and
safety of the occupants,
or to be free from unrea-
sonable growth of fungus
(mold) which might be in-
jurious to human health,
or to be free from dam-


for assisting.
When questioned,Brown
said she and Mott had
sometimes socialized
and that in the course of
their conversations, Mott
told her that she owned
the trailer and wanted it
scrapped. Brown said she
had doubts, but agreed to
sign off as the owner of the
material during the sales


age due to moisture or
condensation within the
building itself."
The alleged failure re-
sulted in various dam-
ages to the county, the
lawsuit claims, includ-
ing "interference with its
use and occupancy of the
(building); the cost of
construction, restoration
and remediation of the
moisture intrusion and'
fungus (mold) conditions;
the cost of investigation
and services for evalua-
tion; administrative costs;
additional professional
services; and the cost
of repair and replace-
ment of elements of the
(building)..."
The remediation, car-
ried out in recent months,
included installation of in-


transaction, and that Mott
called to arrange the sale
and pick-up.
Altogether, for the in-
tact part of the trailer and
the disassembled scrap,
Brown received $1,056,
.money that was then al-
legedly split with Mott.
Mott has denied any
knowledge of what
happened to the trailer.


sulation on the lower sur-
face of the roof, an addi-
tion that is meant to better
balance the temperature
in the airspace. The con-
trol measure is expected to
prevent further condensa-
tion and mold accumula-
tion. The improvements
also included the removal
of damaged insulation and
ceiling materials, along
with other work.
The county seeks general
and special compensatory
damages, plus reimburse-
ment for the costs of filing
suit. A specific figure is not
mentioned in the notice of
suit.
The Emergency Manage-
ment/Operations Center
is located at the intersec-
tion of Panhandle and Pelt
roads in Marianna.


--Bljg3r~Be


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


Jackson County Vault & Monuments

Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90


850-482-5041


Pinecrest


--------


______~~___~_~~~__~~__ __~_~~~~


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2013 7AP


92b,,^.-q.,


LOCRL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Briefs
North Korea vows to
restart nuke facilities
SEOUL, South korea-
North Korea said Tuesday
it will restart its long-shut-
tered plutonium reactor
and increase production of
nuclear weapons material,
in what outsiders see as its
latest attempt to extract
U.S. concessions by raising
fears of war.
A spokesman for the
North's General Depart-
ment of Atomic Energy
said scientists will quickly
begin "readjusting and re-
starting" the facilities at its
main Nyongbyon nuclear
complex, including the
plutonium reactor and
a uranium enrichment
plant. Both could produce
fuel for nuclear weapons.

UN adopts landmark
arms treaty
UNITED NATIONS
-The U.N. GeneralAs-
sembly overwhelmingly
approved the first interna-
tional treaty regulating the
multibillion-dollar global
arms trade Tuesday, cap-
ping a campaign to keep
weapons from falling into
the hands of terrorists, in-
surgents, organized crime
figures and human rights
violators.
The resolution was ap-
proved by a vote of 154 to
3 with 23 abstentions. As
the numbers appeared on
the electronic board, loud
cheers filled the assembly
chamber.
From wire reports


Customers pack 7n w


gun stores after


deal on laws


The Associated Press
NEWINGTON, Conn.
- Customers packed gun
stores around Connecti-
cut on Tuesday ahead of
a vote expected to bring
sweeping changes to the
state's gun control laws,
including a ban on the
sale of large-capacity am-
munition magazines like
the ones used in the New-
town shooting and a new
classification for more
than 100 types of guns as
banned assault weapons.
Lawmakers have touted
the legislation expected
to pass the General As-
sembly on Wednesday as
the toughest in the coun-
try. Some measures would
take effect right away,
including the expan-
sion of the state's assault
weapons ban, universal
background checks for all
firearms sales, and a ban
on the sale or purchase
of ammunition maga-
zines holding more than
10 rounds. The bill also
addresses mental health
and school security mea-
sures in response to the
massacre.
Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, a
Democrat, supports the
bill and could sign it into
law as soon as Wednesday


night.
In a state with a rich
history of gun manufac-
turing, some companies
said they feel the legis-
lation made them into
scapegoats for the deaths
of 20 first-graders and six
educators in the Dec. 14
massacre at Sandy Hook
Elementary School. At
'least one ammunition
magazine maker is more
seriously considering of-
fers to leave.
"My home is in Con-
necticut, but at this point,
I don't know if I can op-
erate here legally come
Wednesday afternoon,"
said Jonathan Scalise,
owner of Ammunition
Storage Components in
New Britain. He said it's
unclear to him whether
employees in possession
of banned firearms or am-
munition would be break-
ing the law.
Gun shops across the
state reported brisk sales,
Tuesday and said custom-
ers also checked on the
status of orders that they
worried could be canceled
once the new laws take
effect..
The parking lot at Hoff-
man's Gun Center and In-
door Range in Newington
was full Tuesday morning,


Cars jam the parking lot as shoppers leave Hoffman's Gun Center with their purchases in
Newington, Conn. on Tuesday.
with some drivers parking but acknowledged they "The special licensing
on the front lawn. Inside, might get a busy signal and firearms unit is going
customers waited in long once in a while. full bore," he said.
lines to purchase what
was left.
"I. walked through. I Ellen Marsh
walked out because they (CF R:L: 21
didn't have anything. The SMARTER BOIDER. FASTER.
girl told me what's on the 6. Srunn, South FProper es
shelf is what they have. o30 H..., 90 t.anrnna FL 32446
And I totally believe that," *
said Nick Viccione, a gun 850-209- 1 090
owner from Wallingford. ..0 .0
He said people are trying
to load up on ammuni-
tion and buy "anything
semi-automatic."
At other shops, includ-
ing the Delta Arsenal
gun store in Walling-
ford, employees reported Field
difficulty getting through / Fence 1 .
to the state police to run
background checks I \4 Metal 59
needed to complete gun U T-Post
sales.
Connecticut State Police iWolo Available:
Lt. J. Paul Vance said he i5Woo ga. narb Pore
hadn't received any com- I I other Fencing supplies
plaints of people not get- iI ia a Ii
ting through to the office I a l lal i
that handles such checks a o i850 S2-513
i al I I I i l i l I21 l


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If you are an area church that would like to
be featured in this year's edition contact the
advertising department of the Jackson County
Floridan at (850) 526-3614
or email salesjcfloridan.com.

Deadline for advertising is April 12, 2013.


in General Surgery


Sooner or later s,:.nomeone in i our fanil, nma, need general _urger,. -'d '..h n the, I .: ,r- i Tr..t
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"- -- :


Chipola Baseball


Indians top Pirates, snap skid -


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Indians picked up
a much-needed Panhandle Con-
ference victory Monday night in
Marianna, topping the Pensaco-
la State Pirates to avoid a three-
game sweep and snap a three-
game conference losing streak.
Chipola was coming off of a
loss to Northwest Florida State
and back to back defeats to the
Pirates, but the Indians bounced
back Monday thanks to a strong
starting performance from fresh-
man pitcher Michael Mader, who


went seven innings and allowed
just one earned run'on six hits,
one walk, and six strikeouts.
The Indians led 5-1 when
Mader exited the game before
the eighth inning, but the Pirates
fought back with three runs in
the top of the eighth, taking ad-
vantage of an error, a walk, and
a wild pitch by reliever Mikel
Belcher, and getting a two-RBI
double by Jake Swearingen to
make it 5-4.
Taylor Lewis came in for
Belcher and eventually ended
the inning by striking out Toby
Thomas with runners on the


corners to preserve the lead for
Chipola.
Lewis came back on in the
ninth and retired the side in or-
der to earn the save.
After leaving the bases loaded
in the second inning, the Indians
got their first run of the game in
the fourth inning when Ian Rice
walked and scored on a passed
ball to make it 1-0.
A solo home run by Taylor Eads
in the top of the fifth tied the
game for Pensacola, but the In-
dians answered in the bottom of
See INDIANS, Page 4B


I


iI

MARKSKINNER/ FLORIDAN
The Chipola Indians greet Luis Tunon after his home run Monday night.


Chipola Softball


Lady Indians


split with TCC

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Lady Indians split a road dou-
bleheader with the Tallahassee Lady Eagles
on Tuesday night, winning the first game
7-3 before falling 9-1 in five innings in the
nightcap.
Chipola moved to 5-3 in Panhandle Confer-
ence action with the split, while TCC is now
2-6 in league play.
In the first game, Eva Voortman started in
the circle for Chipola and got the win, going
the distance and giving up three unearned
runs on six hits and three walks with two
strikeouts.
The Lady Indians struck first with four runs
in the second inning, with three of them com-
ing on a three-run home run by Megan Borak
off ofTCC starter Samantha Moore.
Moore was relieved by Krysta Hoani in the
third inning, and Hoani pitched three score-
less innings of relief before Moore re-entered
in the sixth.
Chipola went back to work against Moore
in the seventh, getting an RBI double by Mya
Anderson before Katie Harrison added a two-
run home run to make it 7-0.
TCC added three runs in the bottom of the
seventh by taking advantage of three Chipo-
la errors, but Voortman prevented the tying
run from ever coming.to the.plate by getting
Kelly Engwall to pop out to second to end the
game.
In the second game, it was the Lady Eagles'
turn to get the bats going, posting nine runs
on nine hits and knocking out Chipola starter
Karissa Childs after three innings.
Ashley Heath-Smith led the Lady Eagles of-
fensively, going 3-for-4 with three RBI and a
run, while Alexis Huss was 2-for-3 with a run,
Engwall was 1-for-2 with two RBI, and Ma-
rina Cobbs was l-for-2 with two walks, two
runs, and an RBI.
Hoani started in the circle and got the win,
going all five innings and allowing just one
earned run on five hits, three walks, and a
strikeout.
Stephanie Garrels, Shannon Black, and An-
derson each had a hit and a walk for Chipola,
with Garrels scoring the only run on a double
steal with Black in the first inning.
Borak and Alyssa Hathcoat also had hits for
the Lady Indians.
Childs gave up four earned runs on seven
hits to take the loss, while Rosanne de Vries
allowed four earned runs on two hits and
four walks in an inning and 2/3.


mHGH SCHOOL BASEBALL


STILL PERFECT
p I


MARK SKINNER / FLORIDAN


Cottondale's Josh Simmons tries to tag a Vernon runner at second base Tuesday night.


'Jackets remain unbeaten in district


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

COTTONDALE The Vernon Yel-
lowjackets scored six runs in the sec-
ond inning and seven in the fifth to
explode past the Cottondale Hornets
15-3 in five innings in a District 3-1A
contest Tuesday night.
Hunter Farrar had two hits, includ-


ing a three-run home run, and four
RBI, and went the distance on the
mound to get the victory for Vernon.
The Hornets got a run off Farrar in
the first inning when Trent Jackson
was hit by a pitch and scored on an
RBI single by Wesley Spooner, but
theYellowjackets quickly took charge
of the game in the top of the second.
A squeeze bunt by Dalton Gibson


scored Jordan Curry to tie the game,
and Farrar.singled to centerfield to
bring Jordan Basarab to the plate to
make it 2-1.
Jocquel Watson scored on an RBI
groundout by Dylan Kirk, and James
Walsingham's two-RBI double to left
field made it a 5-1 Vernon lead.

See UNBEATEN, Page 4B


LADY BULLDOGS FALL TO DOTHAN


MARK SKINNER / FLORIDAN
Breanna Willis pitches for Marianna at a recent game. The Lady Bulldogs lost to Dothan High 12-2 Monday night in Dothan.


GraceviHe High Softbal


Huge 7th lifts


GHS past PDL

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Graceville Lady Tigers got nine runs in the top of
the seventh inning to rally back for a 13-7 district win
over the Ponce de Leon Lady Pirates on Monday night
in Ponce de Leon.
The win snapped a five-game losing skid for the Lady
Pirates and gave them their first district win since a
March 11 victory over Wewahitchka.
Graceville fell behind 4-3 early on before tying the
game with a run in the top of the sixth.
In the seventh, the Lady Tigers exploded for nine
runs to blow the game open, then held off a PDL surge
in the bottom of the inning, with the Lady Pirates plat-
ing three runs.
Caitlin Miller had four hits and three RBI to lead the
Graceville attack, with Taylor McDaniel going 3-for-5
with a double and an RBI, and Kaylee Vaughn 3-for-5
with two runs and an RBI.
Madison McDaniel was 2-for-5 with three runs and
two RBI, while Angela Clark and Briana Henderson
See GHS, Page 4BL


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72B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2013


Commentary


McIlroy still


sees


the big picture


"A7en the scrutiny
becomes suffo-
cating, it's a good
time for Rory Mcllroy to
get as far away as he can.
So he went to a practice
range on a public course.
Imagine the surprise of
the paying customer at

nicipal Golf
Course a
few weeks
ago who
looked
Doug over to his
Ibrguson left and
saw McIl-
roy, still at
No. 1 in the world and a
two-time major champi-
on, plop down a carry bag
with a Manchester United
logo.
"Why was that such a
big deal?" McIlroy asked
with a mixture of amaze-
ment and bemusement.
This was Wednesday at
the Houston Open, where
morning frost had caused
a two-hour delay in the
pro-am. Instead of re-
treating to the clubhouse
dining room at Redstone
Golf Club to order from
the omelet station, McIl-
roy found a spare booth in
the caddie trailer, where
the fare ranged from
scrambled eggs to peanut
butter on toast.
Just one of the lads.
He made the cut on the
number last week his
first cut against a full field
this year and was mak-
ing a run up the leader-
board in the third round
when he three-putted
for bogey from 5 feet on
the par-5 13th hole. Mc-
Ilroy dropped two more
shots and returned to-
ward the bottom of the
pack.
After lunch, it was back
to work. He could have
sought privacy at the far
end of the range. Instead,
he set up shop in front of a
grandstand where 30 peo-
ple took a seat to watch.
Tom Gillis, a runner-up to
Mcllroy,a year ago at the
Honda Classic, came over
and gave Boy Wonder a
playful push.
There were more smiles
than drops of sweat in this
practice session.
Mcllroy was hitting driv-
er toward the end, pick-
ing out a barren tree on
the horizon as a target for
his draw. He was getting
dialed in when caddie
J.P. Fitzgerald said, "End
it with a good one." The
shape looked to be per"
fect, and the caddie said,
"Beautiful."
,"One more," Mcllroy
said with a smile, and
then he hit that one even
better.
He walked over to the
railing where a dozen kids
had gathered, took out a
pen and began signing.
One of them was a photo
of Mcllroy posing with the
U.S. Open trophy from
Congressional, brown
curls spilling out from un-
der his cap.
"I can't believe I looked
like this," he said. His hair
is much shorter now. He's
more grown up. He turns


24 next month.
This is the state of
McIlroy.
He tied for 45th in the
Houston Open, and while
that would normally be
considered a pedestrian
week, he considers it
progress. He signed up for
the Texas Open this week,
wanting more competi-
tion before going to the
Masters. Perhaps more
telling was how much
happier he looked than in
recent weeks.
That wasn't the case at
the start of the year.
McIlroy is no stranger to
attention, and he brought
that on himself. Winning
the U.S. Open with a re-
cord score. A relationship
with Caroline Wozniacki,
who was No. 1 in women's
tennis when they first
started dating. Winning
the PGA Championship
by a record eight shots.
Climbing to No. 1 in the
world, and then winning
three more tournamerits
against the strongest
fields, made it look as if
the kid would stay on top
for years to come.
And yes, the Nike deal.
With blaring music and
a laser show in Abu Dha-
bi, he was introduced as
the latest global star to
market the swoosh and
made a commercial with
Tiger Woods. Then, he
plunged into a slump.
That's not unusual for
McIlroy, except the expec-
tations have never been
this great, the number of
eyeballs on him never this
many.
Ayear ago, there was orie
stretch in the late spring
when he missed the cut
in four of five tourna-
ments, the last as defend-
ing champion at the U.S.
Open. This year, he missed
the cut in Abu Dhabi, lost
in the first round of Match
Play and quit out of frus-
tration after 27 holes of
the Honda Classic.
In Houston, his shoul-
ders never sagged even as
he was on the verge of an-
other weekend off.
"I learned from the last
few weeks that I've got to
keep my spirits up. There's
no point in getting down
on yourself," Mcllroy said.
"I felt like I was doing
that a bit too much at the
Match Play and Honda,
and you saw what hap-
pened there."
If there was a moment
that showed the state of
his game, it was early in
the second round at Hous-
ton. Mcllroy was some 20
yards behind Dustin John-
son and Keegan Bradley
off the tee as he played
tentatively and tried to
avoid bogeys. After back-
to-back birdies, he swung
more freely and blasted a
tee shot some 15 yards be-
yond Johnson.
He's not that far off.
Asked what will be writ-
ten about him at the end
of the year, a smiling Mc-
Ilroy said:
"Hopefully, the same
things that were written
about me at the end of last
year."


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Tennis


Williams makes transition to clay with win


The Associated Press

CHARLESTON, S.C.
- Serena Williams only
had three days to make
the transition from hard
courts to clay, and it
showed a few times as
she won her opening
match at the Family Circle
Cup.
The world's No. 1 play-
er beat Camila Giorgi
6-2, 6-3 on Tuesday, los-
ing her serve in her sec-
ond game and looking
uncomfortable when the
Italian was able to get
Williams running.
"It was definite-
ly not great for me. I
think I played well, but I
wasn't great footing-wise.
I was just trying to get
my stability," Williams
said.
Williams avoided a rash
of upsets at the first clay
court tournament of the
season.. Three of the top
seeds were beaten in their
opening matches, includ-
ing No. 4 Sloane Stephens,
wholost6-2,6-0toBethanie
Mattek-Sands.
Williams did look shaky
to start. Up 3-2 in the
first set, she was nearly
broken again. She lost
the first three points of
the game before rally-
ing back to win the next
five. Giorgi wouldn't get
another chance to break
Williams the rest of the
match, and only won two
points against Williams'
serve the entire second
set.
Williams said she
figured she would start
slow because she only
got one day of practice
on clay to adjust from
the fast, hard surface
at Key Biscayne where
she won the title for the
sixth time Saturday to
the green, slow clay in
Charleston, where she is
the top seed.
"It was a little awkward
for me," saidWilliams, who
at 31 is the oldest woman
to ever have the world's
top ranking.
She also was facing a
21-year-old rising star
in Giorgi, who caught
Williams' eye last year
by making it to the
fourth round at
Wimbledon.
"I actually have been
watching her. I think
she is a good player and
I knew one day I'd be
playing her," Williams
said.
Giorgi. had only herself
to blame for not taking ad-
vantage of Williams' slow
start. She had eight dou-
ble-faults in -the first set
and 12 for the match. Wil-
liams' broke serve in the
first two games as Giorgi's
second serves went into
the net each time.
Williams advances to
the third round and just
as importantly gets a day
offWednesday. She saidshe
plans on hitting just a few
balls, but mostly resting.
And if last year is any in-
dication, Williams should
get stronger as the tour-
nament goes on. Williams
won her opener 6-3, 6-4 in
the 2012 tournament, and
then lost seven games the
rest of the week.
Another player glad to


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Serena Williams, of the United States, returns to Camila Giorgi, of Italy, at the Family Circle Cup
tournament in Charleston, S.C., on Tuesday.


have a day off is Mattek-
Sands. She beat Stephens
in 57 minutes, one day af-
ter her three-set opening
match wvin went 3:42, the
longest WTA match this
season.
Mattek-Sands pounced
on Stephens, breaking her
in the fourth game of the
match.
"I was able to string some
games together and get
under her skin a bit," said
Mattek-Sands, who slept
for 12 hours after her mar-
athon match, then took a
four-hour nap before the
Tuesday evening session.
Stephens struggled
to place her shots, con-
sistently hitting it just
long or outside. She has
never won a match in
Charleston in three tries,
but still said she was sur-
prised she played so badly
Tuesday night.
. "She played well and
I really couldn't find a
rhythm," Stephens said.
"The balls were going
everywhere
SThe other upsets Tues-
day included qualifier
Jessica Pegula, whose fa-
ther Terrence owns the
Buffalo Sabres, beating
No. t seed Mona Barthel
7-6, 6-1. Seventh-seeded
Carla Suarez Navarro lost
to Stefanie Voegele 6-2,
6-4 and qualifier Vaqia
King defeated No. 14 seed
Yaroslava Shvedova 4-6, 6-
1, 6-4 and.
All the other seeded
players won Tuesday, in-
cluding No. 9 seed Jelena
Jankovic who beat Mela-
nie Oudin 6-4, 5-7, 6-
4 in a match that took
nearly three hours. It was
Jankovic's first win over
Oudin in three matches.
"She has this game
that I really don't like
and doesn't really suit.
me," Jankovic said. "I al-
ways have trouble with
her."
Jankovic, who won in
Charleston in 2007, wasn't
the only former Family
Circle Cup champion to
win Tuesday. No. 15 seed
Sabine Lisicki, the 2009
winner, beat Anna Tatish-
vili 6-0, 6-0.
"It's nice to play on the
clay court," Lisicki said.


"The quick turnaround is
not always easy, but I love
the green clay."
Other seeded players to
advance were No. 10 Ju-


lia Goerges, No. 11 seed
Sorana Cirstea, No, 12
seed Varvara Lepchenko
and No. 16 seed Laura
Robson.


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THIS MORNING @ 5AM
MIDDAY 11AM


Jackson County Planning
Commission Meeting
April 15, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.

The Jackson County Planning Commission
will review and discuss at its regular public
hearing meeting the Jackson County draft
Land Development Code on Monday, April
15, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the Jackson County
Board Room, 2864 Madison Street, Marianna,
FL. The draft is available on-line at www.
jacksoncountyfl.net/community-development
.Questions please call the Community
Development Department at 850/482-9637.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a special accommodation to participate
in this meeting should contact the Planning Secretary at
Jackson County Community Development no later than
5 days prior to the meeting. The Planning Secretary
may be contacted at 4487 Lafayette Street, Marianna,
FL, 32448, (850) 482-9637, or (800) 955-8771 (TDD).
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN .www.jcfloridan.com


Wichita State


Shockers even field


against Final Four rivals


The Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -
The entire basketball pro-
gram at Wichita State runs
on what Louisville coach
Rick Pitino makes in a sin-
gle year, with money left
over to purchase plenty of
trophy cases for Final Four
hardware.
In an NCAA tournament
driven by longshots and
upsets, the Shockers are
in many ways the oddball
of the season's final week-
end: They don't have a big-
time football program like
Syracuse, Michigan or the
Cardinals, and they don't
belong to a major confer-
ence that enjoys a weighty
television contract.
Instead, the Shockers run
their basketball program
on a budget of just $3.1
million, which accounts
for everything from coach
Gregg Marshall's salary to
a robust recruiting budget,
all of the transportation
to road games and every-
thing else that comes with
playing Division I sports.
Pitino, by comparison,
makes $3.9 million in base
salary alone.
But the fiscal dispar-
ity between the three big
schools and a mid-ma-
jor like Wichita State will
hardly matter when the
ball is tossed up Satur-
day night in the Georgia
Dome, and the Shockers
take on the Cardinals for
the right to play for the na-
tional championship.
Everything is equal
when the teams step on
the hardwood.
"Our administration
gives us wonderful sup-
port," Marshall said this
week. "We fly on private
planes every time we leave
town. We have 10,500 fans
at every game. It's a great
place to coach."
That's why Marshall has
rebuffed every overture to
leave.
The calls will undoubt-
edly pick up given what
the Shockers have done
this year, but the longtime
coach ofWinthrop has said
repeatedly that it would
take the perfect opportu-
nity to pry him away.
For one thing, he has
it pretty good at Wichita
State.
The school's robust aero-
space engineering pro-
gram, along with the Na-
tional Institute forAviation
Research right on campus,
means Marshall has plenty
of private planes at his dis-
posal no flying in coach
for this mid-major team.
And that extends to re-
cruiting, where Marshall's
able to cover more ground
than most coaches by dic-
tating when and where the
wheels go up.
"They're kind of like
sports cars, instead of a
school bus. They're more
like Ferraris and Jaguars.
They go pretty fast," Mar-
shall said, joking about the
fleet of private planes.
"That is a great benefit,"
he said. "Our players don't
understand how good they
have it, to go from bus to
private plane to .bus and
in a couple hours be in


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wichita State guard Fred Van Vleet celebrates his team's 70-
66 win over Ohio State in the West Regional final in the NCAA
Tournament on Saturday in Los Angeles.

"We don't have football (the administration
doesn't) want football. They want us to be the best
we can be."
Gregg Marshall,
Wichita State coach


rLJeStI)


WICHITA STATE (30-8)
VS. LOUISVILLE (33-5)
Final Four
5:09 p.m. Saturday; TV: CBS
our hotel."
Then there's the fact
that the Shockers no lon-
ger have a football team
it was disbanded in the
mid-1980s. The money
that the Missouri Valley
school once funneled into
a losing program has, for
the better part of 30 years,
been directed toward the
more successful basket-
ball team.
"I .think for schools
within our conference,
obviously football isn't a
moneymaker for them,"
said Rege Klitzke, Wichita
State's senior associate
athletic director for busi-
ness operations. "If you
compare ourselves to fel-
low conference schools,
not having football is a big
advantage."
It's also one of the rea-
sons the school has been
able to reward Marshall
handsomely.
The coach signed a sev-
en-year extension in 2011
that pushed his base sal-
ary to $900,000 and his to-
tal compensation to more
than $1 million a year.
And while it's far short of
what Pitino is making at
Louisville, Marshall has a
chance to bolster his bank
account with a number
of incentives. He's already
earned an additional
$380,000 for making the
Final Four, and can pick
up another $36,000 by
making the title game and
$200,000 for winning the
school's first national title.
"We have a great bas-
ketball program. We
have tradition, we have


history," Marshall said. "It's
been a lot of great play-
ers, tremendous fan base.
Tremendous support. The
administration loves it. We
don't have football they
don't want football. They
want us to be the best we
can be."
So far, the Shockers have
been as good as anybody.
They've already won a
school-record 30 games,
and reached their first Fi-
nal Four since the 1965
season. Along the way,
the Shockers roughed up
Pittsburgh, upset top-
seeded Gonzaga, beat up
La Salle and then knocked
off second-seeded Ohio
State another big-bud-
get school in the re-
gional finals.
They've proven that a
6-foot-8 forward is just
as tall at Wichita State as
anywhere else, and a point
guard who shoots 40 per-
cent from beyond the 3-
point line can do it regard-
less of the setting.
"Are there financial ben-
efits to making the Final
Four? Sure, we can go into
that ad nauseam," Wichita
State athletic director Eric
Sexton toldThe Associated
Press in a phone interview.
"But what this really repre-
sents is a great chance for
our school to be seen on a
national stage."
And in a world where the
bottom line is more pro-
nounced than ever before
- especially in college,
athletics it's virtually
impossible to put a value
on that kind of exposure.
"It's a great ride, well-
earned and deserved, and
we're not satisfied. We still
have work to do," Sexton
said. "But it's a great win-
dow into our athletic de-
partment, our university
and even our state to be
one of the final four teams
playing."


Michigan











.,

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Michigan's Nik Stauskas reacts after making a three-point shot during the first half of a regional
final game against Florida in the NCAA Tournament on Sunday in Arlington, Texas.

Stauskas adds sharp-shooting swagger


The Associated Press

ANN ARBOR, Mich.
Nik Stauskas took the
pass in transition only to
find himself caught under
the basket with a defender
next to him.
No problem: He dropped
a nifty no-look bounce
pass to a teammate for a
dunk.
On Michigan's next of-
fensive possession, the
freshman from Canada
made an open 3-pointer
from the left wing. Later,
he moved to the left corner
for a 3 and followed that
with a driving layup. Then
it was back to that same
corner for another 3. And
another. And another.
The Wolverines were
playing a regional final,
and Stauskas was mak-
ing it look like a pregame
shooting drill.
"My shot felt good,"
Stauskas said. "So I was
just letting them fly."
Michigan is heading to
its first Final Four since
1993, and it was that 3-
point barrage by Stauskas
on Sunday that sealed a
spot for the Wolverines.
Stauskas made all six of
his attempts from beyond
the arc, scoring 22 points
"in a 79-59 win over Flori-
da. The 6-foot-6 guard is
shooting 45 percent from
long range this season and
his performance against
the Gators was a remind-
er of how good Michigan
can be when everybody is
contributing.
Stauskas is part of a tal-
ented class of freshmen
that also includes for-
ward Glenn Robinson III
and emerging big man
Mitch McGary. The oth-
er two probably arrived
with more fanfare, but it
was Stauskas who turned
heads immediately.
A month into the sea-
son, Stauskas was 27 of 46
from 3-point range, fitting
seamlessly into Michigan's
perimeter-oriented of-
fense.' He wasn't going
to maintain that torrid
shooting, but he needed
only seven games to work
his way into the starting
lineup.
By the time the NCAA
tournament arrived, op-
ponents were aware of
Stauskas. He shot a more
normal-looking 36 per-
cent from beyond the arc
against Big Ten opponents
and went 2 for 12 in Michi-
gan's first three NCAA tour-
nament games. And when
Stauskas isn't contributing
with his outside shooting,
Michigan looks a lot more
beatable.
He went scoreless at
Ohio State in mid-January
in Michigan's first loss of
the season. In a loss to
Wisconsin in the Big Ten


SYRACUSE (30-9)
VS. MICHIGAN (30-7)
Final Four
7:49 p.m. Saturday; TV: CBS

tournament, Stauskas
went 1 of 8 from the field
and scored only four
points. But the potential
for a breakout was


always there.
"He really works at it,
and that's rare with a
freshman," coach John
Beilein said. "A freshman
may have an off night, he
may talk about, 'I'm not
Getting the shots, I'm not
getting the looks.' That's
not Nik. Nik works at his
game to be ready, because
his teammates can pass,
and they know where he is
all the time."


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-4B + WEDNESDAY, APRIL, 2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


MARK SKINNER / FLORIDAN
Sneads' Brandi Walden catches a shot to left field during
Monday night's game.


High School Softball



Bailey, Wewa shut out Sneads


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Wewahitchka Lady
Gators got a big-time
pitching performance from
Brianna Bailey to earn a 3-
0 shutout victory over the
Sneads Lady Pirates on
Monday night in Sneads.
Itwas just the second Dis-
trict 3-1Aloss of the season
for the Lady Pirates, who
fell to 9-2 in league play.
Bailey started and went
all seven innings for the
Lady Gators to get the win,
allowing just three hits all
night, while walking four,


and hitting one batter.
Wewahitchka got its three
runs all in the first inning
off of Sneads starter Mi-
kayla Durden, who made
her first varsity start after
moving up from the junior
varsity squad.
Sophomore Brooke Wil-
liams came on in relief with
one out in the first inning
and finished the game out,
allowing no runs over the
final 6 2/3 innings and giv-
ing up just four hits while
striking out five.
But her effort was wasted
due to the Lady Pirates'
inability to break through


against Bailey, who strand-
ed 10 Sneads batters on the
night.
"We just didn't hit it at
all. We never really got go-
ing," Sneads coach Kelvin
Johnson said. "When we
did hit it good, it was right
to them, and they played
extremely well defensively.
But (Bailey) pitched well
and her defense backed
her up. We never put any
pressure on them."
Alaynah Weiss had two of
the Lady Pirates' three hits,
with Brandy Strickland
adding the other.
Johnson said the loss


wasn't a big deal after the
game, noting that his team
is likely to get the No. 2
seed in the district tourna-
ment, which means a first
round matchup with an
Altha team that the Lady
Pirates have beaten deci-
sively twice this season.
"There's really no advan-
tage to being the (top seed
over the second seed)," the
coach said, "so we tried
a few things and it didn't
work. We didn't score any
runs, and I've never won
a game scoring zero runs.
ButWewa has a pretty good
team."


Sports Briefs


High School Baseball
,> Thursday- Paxton at
Malone, 5 p.m.; Bethle-
hem at Cottondale, 5 p.m.;
Vernon at Sneads, 5 p.m.
> Friday- Walton at
Marianna, 6:30 p.m.; Cot-
tondale at Ponce de Leon,
6p.m.
> Saturday- Wakulla at
Marianna, 3 p.m.

High School Softball
Thursday- Vernon at
Sneads, 6 p.m.; Paxton at
Malone, 5 p.m.; Marianna
at North Florida Christian,
3:30 p.m.
Friday- Walton at
Marianna, 6 p.m.; Baker at
Sneads, 6 p.m.; Cottondale
at Altha, 5:30 p.m.


Chipola Baseball
The Indians will start a
three-game set with Gulf
Coast today in Panama
City at 5 p.m.
Chipola returns home to
take on the Commodores
on Friday at 2 p.m., and
will finish the series Sat-
urday at 1 p.m. at'Chipola
Field.

Jackson County
Track & Field
The first Jackson County
Track & Field Champion-
ships will be held today at
Marianna High School at
1 p.m.
Marianna, Cottondale,
Sneads, Graceville, and
Wewahitchka will all com-
pete in the event.
Cost is $2 for students
and $5 for adults.


Panhandle Seminole
Club Golf Tournament
The 2013 Panhandle
Seminole Club's Annual
Scholarship Golf Tourna-
ment will be held Friday at
Indian Springs Golf Club
in Marianna. This tourna-
ment, along with another
fundraiser, has helped
provide $40,000 over the
past 10 years to deserving
local students and helped
further their education.
Registration and warm-
up will begin at noon
with the shotgun start at
1 p.m. for this four-man
scramble event. Cash
prizes will be awarded to
the first, second, and third
place teains. Additional
prizes will be given for
longest drive, straightest


drive, closest to the pin,
and so on.
The greens fee contri-
bution of $65 will entitle
each golfer to a fantastic
afternoon of golf on a
championship-course (to
help a very worthy cause),
followed by a great meal.
Scholarship (hole) and
prize sponsorships are
also available for this
event. For more informa-
tion, call Roy Baker at
850-526-4005 or 209-1326,
or George Sweeney at
850-482-5526.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan P.O. Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447.


Twins' Hicks happy about debut


The Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS With
Detroit's dominant right-
hander Justin Verlander
staring down at him from
the mound, Aaron Hicks
dug in the batter's box with
two strikes against him.
The curveball came, and
the Minnesota rookie took
a swing, whiffing badly


with his bat way out in
front of the ball.
No, the sight of the 2008
first-round draft pick's first
major league at-bat wasn't
pretty. The 23-year-old
center fielder struck out
the next two times as well
on opening day, and the
Twins lqst to the Tigers 4-2.
Hicks looked disap-
pointed afterward, but he


wasn't discouraged. There
still was plenty to treasure
from his inaugural perfor-
mance, with his familyin
attendance at frosty Tar-
get Field all the way from
Southern California and
the opportunity to meet
his favorite player before
the game. Talking to Torii
Hunter was what he will re-
member and the advice


he received.
"Enjoy the moment
and just enjoy baseball
in general," Hunter told
Hicks. "Have fun and play
relaxed."
If Hicks can become
the player Hunter was for
nearly a decade here, the
Twins will be happy. From
all accounts, Hicks could
be even better,


OPEN FOR LUNCH

CHECK OUT OUR
SPECIALS AND
e MENU ONLINE
850-482-3333
*m o2915 Jefferson St.
Dominos.com Marna


State Farm '^T
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710 NS""ANC


Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc
Linda J Pforte, Agent
*2919 Penn Avenue, Suite B,
Marianna, FL 32448-2716
Bus 850-482-3425 Fax 850-482-6823
Toll Free 1-877-364-6007
linda.pforte.bxrs@statefarm.com
Good Neighbor Since 1986


Unbeaten
From Page 1B

The last run Of the inning
came when Walsingham
scored on a wild pitch by
Spooner.
Vernon added two more
runs in the fourth on an
RBI double byWalsingham


and an RBI infield single
by Hunter Dobbs to make
it 8-1.
The Yellowjackets blew
it open with seven more
in the fifth on four hits,
the big shot coming on a
three-run bomb over the
left field fence by Farrar to
make it a 12-1lead.
A two-run home run by
Trent Jackson in the bot-


tom of the fifth inning pro-
vided the lone highlight for
the Hornets, but the night
belonged totheYellowjack-
ets, who moved to 7-0 in
District 3-1A competition.
Walsingham finished
with two doubles and three
RBI, while Dobbs had a hit
and an RBI, Michael Isen-
hoff a double and two RBI,
and Kirk a double and a


run scored.
Jackson had two RBI and
two runs for CHS, with
Spooner getting a hit, a
walk, and an RBI.
Spooner pitched the first
four innings for the Hor-
nets before being relieved
by Justin Lipford in the
fifth.
The Hornets fell to 2-6 in
district with the loss.


TGHTS for-2 with a run and two walks with five strikeouts.
IL RBI, and Dominique Rob- Graceville is now 4-9 on
inson had a hit and a run. the season and 4-6 in Dis-
From Page 1B
Taylor McDaniel started trict 3-1A competition.
both had two hits, an RBI, in the circle and went all The Lady Tigers were
and a run, and Hunter Mc- seven innings to getthevic- scheduled to go on the
Daniel had two hits. tory, allowing five earned road to take on Altha on
Jossie Barefield was 1-. runs on 16 hits 'and two Tuesday night.


Indians
From Page 1B
the inning with a three-
run shot by Luis Tunon off
.of reliever Matt Muench to
make it 4-1.
Tunon struck again in the
seventh inning with an RBI
single to score Cameron
Gibson to give Chipola a
four-run cushion.
Tunon finished 2-for-3
with four RBI and a run,
while Gibson was 2-for-4
with a run, while Daniel
Mars was 1-for-3 with a
walk and a run, and Rice
walked four times and
scored twice.
Eads and Roy Moulder
each had two hits to lead
the Pirates, with Swearin-
gen going 1-for-3 with a
walk and two RBI.
Muench took the loss for
Pensacola, giving up three
earned runs on two hits
and a walk in an inning of
relief for starter Cristiannel
Cosme, who went 3 2/3 in-
nings and surrendered an
learned run on two hits and


five walks.
With the win, Chipola
moved to 4-5 in the Pan-
handle Conference and
stayed within a game ofsec-
ond-place Gulf Coast State
(5-4) in the standings.


The Indians will face the
Commodores next in a
crucial three-game series
with postseason implica-
tions, with the first game
today in Panama City at 5
p.m.


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Ci~umi nractorar oratocln 2013








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


BORN LOSER BY ARTAND CHIP SANSOM
.LL RIGHT, CLASS, CAN AMONR fHURRICN.
ERR>F"UA"LlTN'< KATT E?
FOR/KE TF ,


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
T'VE GOT A MAJOR
SURPRISE, TEAM! WE'RE NOT CALLED
YOU'RE GOING To THE "CREAM PUFFS"
NOTICE SOMET-lI NG ANYMORE=???
DIFFERENT THIS YEAR!
KOO
If I
I YEAH
coAcH CeAc
AWESoMe!

SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


NO, WE'RE STILL THE
CREAM PUFFS... BUT WE'VE
GOT NATE'S DAD AS
OU ASSISTANT COACH
GIVE HIM A HAND!


WAIT, WHO?
CLAP
SHIKIP5.



C. -


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
SI THOUsHT- ou WELL... .
T WERiE CALLING' MY AS IT -l
N MAEME BECAUSE OU I TURNED OU.1 '
43 NEEDED MY HEP! I DID... ,
r :


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


"T;EF- 7B Go To









pHERMAN BYJIM UNGER


4-3 0 LaughingStocka hleratonar inc, Dist by Univesal UCIck lf UFS 2013

"I'm increasing my odds."


ACROSS
1 London
chap
6 Swift
11 Boxing
venues
12 Hot
fudge -
13 Bedding
14- public
15Mr. Murphy
16"Aquarius"
musical
17 Honeycomb
unit
18 Driving
hazard
19 Bone
below the
elbow
23 Enticement
25 Himalayan
country
26 Sorority
letter
29 Marsh
grass
31 Not even
one
32 Breakfast
grain -
33Worship
34Sneaky
35 Bundle of
wheat
37 Expansive
39Stringed
instrument


40Wind up
41 Raps softly
45 Veep's
boss
47The Rumba
King
48 Collapse
(2 wds.)
51 Lady of
Coventry
52Anxious
53 Egg dish
54 nous
55 Founded

DOWN
1 Bouquet
tosser
2 McEnroe
foe
3 Playwright
Eugene
4 Batman
creator
5 Superman's
emblem
6Jene
sais -
7 Erroneous
8 Snake
River loc.
9 Freeway
clogger
10Islet
11 Waugh or
Baldwin
12 Hitch


Answer to Previous Puzzle


16 Square
dances
18 Flintstone
dad
20 Hosp.
workers
21 Finger
feature
22 Treaty
member
24 Mil. branch
25 More than
want
26 Ritzy
27 Big laugh
(hyph.)
28 Livy's
route
30 Graph
paper
pattern


36 Emerge
38 Piano
exercises
40Counting-
rhyme start
42 Like
gymnasts
43 Did road
work
44 Sports fig.
46"- and
shine!"
47 Deep sleep
48 Prompt
49Journalist
Curry
50 Fluffy's
doc
51 Great
many


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


4-3 2013 UFS, Dist. by universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"AS PKTHN RX UHKTVREI PKTHREI

DW NPK CDXX DW AREGS AOOHKTGS.
MHTS WDH PKH NBD MHKORDJX

CRNNCK UDSX." PRCCTHS XODNN


Previous Solution: "Baseball was, is and always will be to me the best game in
the world." Babe Ruth
TODAY'S CLUE: M slenbag.
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 4-3


Horoscope
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -You are always
desirous of acknowledge-
ment, but you could crave
it more than usual today.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Even though you'll
take most of your involve-
ments seriously, you'll still
be philosophical about
their outcomes. This at-
titude will help you handle
what occurs with grace.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) One of your greater
satisfactions will come
from working with another
on something of mutual
importance.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) It is advisable to get
your mate's opinion before
making a major decision.'
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Don't think that you
won't feel guilty if you fail
to use your time pro-
ductively. Get rid of your
excuses and do it right.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Business and pleasure
can make a compatible
mix, ifydu have respect for
both and split your time
between the two.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
The possibility for do-
ing what you set out to is
very strong, provided you
sustain your motivation.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) If you get into a situ-
ation that is too narrow
or constricted, you could
be extremely uncomfort-
able. Don't allow others to
restrict you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -The best
asset you possess is your
ability to make the most of
whatever you are dealing
with. This is especially true
regarding finances.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Treat your col-
leagues with respect, but
don't let them take over
something that you're al-
ready handling adeptly. Set
.boundaries respectfully.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 19) If you have to
work on something that
requires deep concentra-
tion, do your best to find
quiet surroundings.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Because your
aspirations are likely to be
more practical than most
people's, the possibilities
for realizing your hopes
are greater.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: I have been dating my boy-
friend for four years. We both have chil-
dren from our previous relationships and
share custody with our exes. Until recent-
ly, we had our kids on the same week-
ends. Then my boyfriend's ex decided
that her children cannot be here when my
11-year-old son is staying over.
Because my son is the oldest, he tends
to be blamed whenever the kids do in-
appropriate things. But kids pick up.all
kinds of things in school, from other kids
and from other adults. I feel my son is
being blamed unfairly. My boyfriend's ex
doesn't know me or my children. I have
heard her children say and do things they
should not be allowed to do, but I.seem
to be the only one who notices. My boy-
friend makes excuses for their behavior,
but if my children misbehave, he is quick
to let me know that I need to discipline
them.
The major problem is his 9-.year-old
daughter, who wants to be the center of
attention when she is around her dad. She


Bridge

If you work out the right line of play in this deal, try
not to look surprised! What would you do in three
no-trump after West leads his fourth-highest spade?
Do not be concerned about a low doubleton when
opening one no-trump. Here, if you open one club,
your partner will respond one diamond. What would
you do then? You would have no accurately descrip-
tive rebid.
You start with seven top tricks: one spade (because
of the opening lead), two hearts, two diamonds and
two clubs. You must establish two more club win-
ners to get home. First, though, what do you do at
trick one?
With honor-doubleton on the board, put up the
honor; here, the king. (If it were queen-doubleton on
the board and king-third in your hand, you would
play the queen.) If East plays low, work hard to keep
him off the lead, so that he cannot push a spade
through your queen. Here, though, East takes the
king with his ace and returns the 10. You duck and
win the third spade. Now you must not let West win
a trick, because he would then cash two spade tricks
to defeat you.
It is time for an avoidance play. Lead a diamond to
dummy's king and call for a club. When East plays
the queen, let him take the trick. And when West fol-
lows suit, you are home.
If instead East plays a lower club, take the trick and
cash the other high honor, hoping that West did not
start with queen-third.


becomes upset, demanding and control-
ling, and she recently began sassing me.
I love his children and take care of them
as if they were my own. I understand the
need for them to have individual time
with their parents, but I'd also like them
to learn how to get along with each other.
I blame my boyfriend for letting his ex
control the situation. Am I overreacting?
CONFUSED AND A LITTLE SAD

Dear Confused: You are on shaky ground
when it comes to telling your boyfriend
and his ex how to arrange. their visita-
tion schedule. It is not unreasonable
for the mother to prefer that her kids
have time with Dad without your chil-
dren' around. We think you should try.
to make friends with the ex so you can
work on getting the kids together for
holidays and special occasions. They
will be less belligerent toward one an-
other (and toward you) if they don't
have to compete for their father's
attention at every visit.


North 04-03-13
KK4
V863
*AK75
47642
West East
SJ 9,8 5 2 # A 10 6
SQJi10 9752
QJ 109 84 3
4J109 Q
South
# Q73
VAK4
62
S AK853

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1NT Pass 3 NT Allpass


Opening lead: 5
L


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2013 5B F


ENTERT INNENT









6 B Wednesday, April 3, 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




MARKETPLACE


FINANCIAL


BUS INESSOP CITIES


() ANNOUNCEMEiNTS


I I- -


Key West Flordia
April 23-29, 2013
Washington DC/Patriotic Tour
June 27-July 2,2013
Ride The Rails (West Virginia)
July 22-26, 2013
Best of China (Beijing City)
October 15-23.2013


($)


Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com

Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
504-915-1474

MERCHANDISE


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Alabama 1992 National Championship artist
proof, signed coach Stallings & Daniel Moore
"The Tradition Continues" 23"x 29"
exc. cond $900. 334-655-2727.
Brunswick Pool Table: Beautiful, Traditional
Ball & Claw, Bar Size Table with Custom Tan
Felt; dark mahogany wood; with 6 pool sticks
of different weights, caulk; a wooden stick/
accessory holder that is round and sits on the
floor; a ball set; both racks (8 ball & regular);
several felt brushes, etc. Original Price was
around $3,000. Selling for $700, 334-685-2898
Towpolly: pull behind, good condition, new tie
down straps $600. Call 334-618-2516 or 850-569-
2750

Piano used; in fairly good condition. Asking
$500. Call (850) 526-3474 in evenings.
fmelvinl23@gmail.com
PETS & ANIMALS


FREE: 2 kittens 6 weeks old. Need good home
850-482-5880 or 850-272-4908.
FREE: Kittens to loving home. multi-colorl-F &
1-M 850-272-4908 or 850-482-5880

AKC Brittany Spaniels Orange/White. 4 males
and 4 females. Excellent hunting blood line.
(Nolan's Last Bullett). Tails docked and dew
claws have been removed. Will be Ready on
March 29th. Call (229) 724-8839 if interested.
German Shepherd Puppies: AKC registered,
first shots,, mother has German bloodlines.
Black and tan, black and silver. 5 males, 1
female.7 wks old. 850-768-9182 or 850-849-3707.
Reg. English Bulldog puppies UGA blood line
both dam and sire, shot records up to date
$1200. 229-237-2935
SUPER PUPPET SALE! Chihuahua,
Shih-Tzu mix puppies and Morkies.
Now taking deposit on Papillions.
334-718-4886 plynn@sw.rr.com


3() FARMER'S MARKET


GRASS & MILK FED BEEF!!
Freezer Ready Esto meat.
GREAT QUALITY!!
Quarters and Halves. USDA Inspected
ESTO MEATS CALL 850-263-7777


HrL


850-573-6594


Frozen Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
.I 4128 Hwy 231


r. .....................k......
Bahia seed for sale *-
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
S 'experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
S or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L-----------------------------------.
END OF SEASON SALE ( prices reduced)
Quality Coastal Hay; Large Rolls
Fertiized & Weed Control 850-209-9145

Large rolls of Hay for Sale
S Bahia & Coastal
a eD Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418


Cattle: 36 bred cows 3 to 7 years old and
50 bred heifers for sale. Most are Angus and
Brangus cross with a few Charolais cross.
For more information call 334-303-9285.


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinnin
Call Pea River Timber
334-389-2003

(ilf EMPLOYMENT


CHIPOLA COLLEGE
is accepting applications for
the following positions:
WELDING INSTRUCTOR
CAREER COACH WELDING PROGRAM
Minimum qualifications and job duties are
available at www.chipola.edu/personnel/jobs
APPLICATION DEADLINE IS
OPEN UNTIL FILLED.
To obtain an application, contact
Human Resources at pippenwhchipola.edu
or at (850)718-2269. Candidates may be
subject to background investigations.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


GREAT PET


(4,;)


EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


LOOK
FOLLOW YOUR PASSION! Become a Daycare
Director 6 wk. Homestudy Course S300.
Call Mrs. Alaina 334-714-4942 9am 5pm


Th4T'S ClASsifiEd


Sudoku


Level: h 2 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Tuesday's puzzle

4 1 5 23, 9 7 86
876451392
293678145

934-582671
7 5 1 314 6 9 2 8
682917453
368724519
149865237
5 2 7 19 3 8 6 4


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.
I


4/3/13


r


__ RESIDENTIAL
l! REAL ESTATE. IORS *i

Poultry Farm for Sale 4 houses, Poultry farm
and 5000 sf residence, 2 car garage, 64 acre,
U.S. Hwy. frontage, huge barn, generator, Trac-
tor, farming equipment, $1,100,000 for more in-
fo. Kaan 334-596-8311


RECREATION.


Eagle 2010 190 Yamaha
S 150 G3 bassboat
4-stroke warr 2014
Humminbird 788ci, 2
chairs, 2 butt seats, galv
trailer, hydraulic steering, many extras,
$18,500. Call 334-616-1918 or 334-355-0326
FT ORY DIRECT


Xtreme
Boats
wv


Packages From
$4,995
All Welded
All Aluminum Boats
w.xtremeindustries.com


Triton '07 188SF Fish and Ski: Mercury Optimax
150HP, 24 volt trolling motor, trailer included,
garage kept, like new conditions, less than
150 hours, $19,000. Call 334-685-3921


2 8

9 3, 6

7 4
--_---_-- -



9 1 2 5

1 9 2 7

3 6 1
_- ----- -- --




3 6

7 2__

5 4


River Valley Rehabilitation
Center Is now hiring:
RN'S & LPN'S
7a-7p & 7p-7a SHIFT
C.N.A'S
3-11 SHIFT
$1.00 SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL
FOOD SERVICE AIDE
5a-1:30p/lla-8p SHIFT
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
8a-5p shift FT
Taking applications for C.N.A Classes for
April Deadline for Application April 1st,
Class starting April.8th.
Great Pay and Benefits Health,
Vision & Dental
SPlease Apply at:
River Valley Rehabilitation Center
17884 NE Crozier Street
Blountstown, Fl. 32424
Ph: (850) 674-5464
Fax: 674-9384
Email: rvhrc@southernltc.com
Drug Free Workplace- Safe Minimal Lifting
Environment An EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D


FAMILY(fki LI
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA
Now Hiring Full Time
W Warehouse Positions 4
1st, 2nd, and 3rd Shifts
Competitive Pay and Benefits Package!
Onsite Interviews will be conducted at
Family Dollar Distribution Center
2PM 4PM Tuesday, April 16, 2013
3949 Family Dollar Parkway,
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must be 18 Years Old.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace

President/CEO
Jackson County Chamber of Commerce
The Jackson County Chamber is accepting
applications for the position of President/
CEO. Min.3-5 yrs leadership experience with
bachelors degree or equivalent education or
business experience required. Prefer some
experience with a non-profit, a Chamber, or
membership organization led by a board of
directors. Proven skills needed in public
relations, public speaking, marketing,
e-communitations, business operations,
planning, and P&L management. Must be
able to interact effectively with entrepre-
neurs, business owners, executives, elected
officials, civic leaders and volunteers. Must
be able to self-relocate to Jackson County.
Position closes April 15th. Submit resume
to jcchambersearch gmail.com.
Network Specialist
Local Company growing and expanding,
looking for experienced Network Specialist
for installing Lg. commercial printers &MFP's
Benefits, Salary Negotiable
Send Resume to: The Dothan Eagle
Box EE 227 N. Oates St. Dothan, AL 3633


Classes Forming Now
4) for Medical Assisting,
FORD TIS Electrical Trades and
FOR TIS More!
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu
'1 RESIDENTIAL
J REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


COTTONDALE VILLA
APARTMENTS
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR 1 & 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS RENTAL
Assistance Available to Quailified Appliants
CALL: (850) 352-2281
TDD USERS 1-800-548-2456
Office Opened Tuesday & Thursday
EQUAL HOUSING 3111 Willow St.
OPPORTUNITY Cottondale, FL 32431

PrwnmxxoP---nr

GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL. Call 850-482-4663




2/2 3136 Aycock Rd. 900 sq. ft. washer/dryer,
flat screen TV's $650. mo. $650. dep. utilities,
dish, garbage water & sewage w/pool
(Appointment Only) 850-352-2951 850-573-1864


+ IBR/1BA, nice clean apt. in town screened
porch, largeyard $450. mo.
No pets. 850-557-2000 for more info.




k 3/2 brick with CH&A Alford FI
$695.mo. + dep. 850-579-4317; 850-866-1965
Austin Tyler & Associates -
Quality Homes & Apartments
4 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Large 2BR/1BA Cottage with family room all
updated w/central air, very large fenced yard,
in country. 5 minutes to downtown off 73 North
or 90 West. $550. Mo + Dep. Call 765-425-5288

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountryliving.com.
850-209-8847 4.
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message
., 2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595 I


For more information, call Merita Stanley
1 850-594-9980 1


I


I


I .


m









www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, April 3, 2013- 7 B


Rockwood 2007 Travel Trailer 33ft. 2bd. well
maintained, barn stored, great unit! $17,500.
334-899-6408 call before 8:30 pm


1999 Winnebago 32' motorhome:
Sleeps 6. Excellent condition. Gas engine with
gas saver system installed. 32K miles. Must see
to appreciate! $12,000. Call 334-685-3810
Fleetwood 1997 35ft Bounder: 1 slide-out, back-
up camera, leveling jacks, generator, low miles
39k, run goods, new tires. $17,500. OBO
Call 850-482-7554 or 850-209-3495

(S TRANSPORTATION


BMW 1995, leather int. good gas mil. green in
color, 4-door $3,200. firm 334-793-2347
BMW 2005 X3 white with tan interior, 165,000
miles, V6, auto, excellent condition, full sun-
roof. $10,000, 850-263-4913
Buick 2005 LaSabre: 56k miles, beige, new tires,
fully loaded, beige leather interior, very nice
condition. $5,500. Call 334-589-0637
CHEVY 1995 CAPRICE-Clean, runs great, cold
air, fully loaded $3,800 OBO 334-355-1085
Chevy 2010 Impala, Great family car with great
fuel mileage, fully loaded. $300 down $300 per
month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.
s .i Corvette 2003 Z06 50th
-a Anniversary Edition
Metallic Blue 6 speed, 405
hp. 40.500 miles, Excellent
Condition $19,195.
334-475-3735 after 6PM
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
GOT BAD CREDIT?
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy slow credit ok
$0 Down/lst Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull or Drag will trade
RIDE TODAY! FREE $25. gas giveaway
SCall Steve Pope 334:803-9550
.....- ~ Honda 2007 5-2000 76k mi.
^ Car is awesome! $19,500!
Let the top down and go
cruising! Black on black
convertible. 6 spd. Adult
owned. Clean well maintained. Responsive lit-
tle rocket! below NADA. Come look, give it a
test drive & you'll be hooked. 334-805-4740
Mitsubishi 2004 Eclipse De-
pendable, one owner, great
gas mileage, sunroof, few mi-
nor blemishes, 120,000 mi,
Automatic. Asking $6,000.
:" -- *1 Will take best offer. Call Jen-
nifer at 334-791-0143
Mitsubishi 2012 Galant, Like new! Must sell!
$200 down, $259 per month. Call Ron Ellis 334-
714-0028.
Nissan 2010 Sentra, Navigation, Leather, Sun
roof, Must sell! $200 down, $249 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Toyota 2011 Yaris: silver with black interior, 4
door sedan, bucket seats, one owner, automat-
ic, 5980 miles, 40MPG Hwy, $13,995. Call or
Text 334-618-6588 LIKE NEW !!
Toyota 2012 Corolla, Great gas saver, fully
loaded, low miles, very nice.car. $200 down,
$250 per month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.


-Fi 4 1985 Harley Davidson
FXRT30. 37.000 miles.
Great shape. $7,000 obo.
Also have 2002 soft tail
Smith $5,000 of added
chrome. $10,000 like new. Call 334-464-0639
2008 Harley Davidson
Softail Classic.
A t Like new, only 5900 miles.
Lj~''' Gold and black with lots of
chrome. Excellent condi-
tion. $12,000 obo. If interested, call Frank at
334-790-9733 or send email to fab@graceba.net
iF '- 2012 Harley Road King
Black. Only 1400 mi. 6 spd
103 ci 1600cc, security sys-
tem, ABS brakes, cruise,
-. back rest with luggage
i' rack. Bought last fall, still
under warranty. 2 helmets included. Wireless/
Bluetooth/ FM radio intercom system. (approx
$600 value) Adult owned, title in hand. $16,500
obo. 334-794-9388 or pwt.1202@yahoo.com
Harley Davidson 2000 Ultra Classic Tour Glide:
loaded plus extras, blue and silver, only 8500
.miles, new tires. $8,300. Call 334-585-5396
Harley Davidson 2006 Soft tail Standard:
4600 miles, vinson/haines pipes, 250 rear
wheel, bronze pearl, lots of chrome, 25K
invested. Asking $10,000. Firm. 334-793-3611
Harley Davidson 2007 Heritage Softtail Classic
exc. cond, new tires, new battery,
lots of chrome $12,500.
334-712-0493 or w-334-793-8028
Honda 2005 VT 1100C
Shadow Spirit: black and
chrome, good condition,
like new, 3400 miles, one
J owner, clean title never
wrecked, new tires.
Asking $6,300. Call 334-596-1171
Honda 2005 VTX 1300-R
Nicest one in Alabama,
Too much chrome to list.
$9,500. Ken 334-693-9360


Chevrolet 2003 Trailblazer
4x4. Excellent condition.
Garage kept since pur-
chase. Fully loaded 4x4.
105,00 miles. Must see to
appreciate. Black with grey interior. $7,200.
Phone 850-956-2623


4000 Ford Tractor good condition, new engine
$3,950. 334-791-0700
Chevrolet 2007 Silverado 2-door, 8 cyl. silver in
color, 68,491 miles, $15,500. 334-797-8523.


Dodge 2000 Dakota RT: black, fully loaded, 5.9
liter 360 Magnum, Bridgestone tires, beautiful
and rare truck, pampered and well kept, runs
and drives excellent & clean carfax available.
Serious inquiries only. $7,200. Call 334-585-0121
Please leave a message.
Ford 2003 Ranger Edge ext. cab good condition
89K miles, $5,900. 334-446-0044 Susan
Ford 2010 F250.Super Duty Super Cab Lariat:
white, fully loaded, 4X4, low miles, excellent
condition $37,500. Call 334-685-2318
GMC 1986 2500 Series: 4 door, 2 seater but no
back seat, 8 cyl, 91k miles, one owner, garage
kept, very good condition. $3,800. Call 334-792-
3756
International 1995 4900: Flat Bed Truck, DT466,
AC, 125k miles. $6,000. Call 334-897-6346 or
334-406-7200
Toyota 1994 Tacoma 4-wheel drive as whole or
parts. 334-689-9436.


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!


AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624



CALL FOR TOP PRICE

FOR JUNK VEHICLES


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664

Got a Clunker
= We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325 & Complete Cars
CALL 334-7012-4323 OR 334-714-6285
r-- -------------
a* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not I
334.794-9576 or 344-791-4714


(~)


LEGALS


LF160078
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-211-CA
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JENNIFER SASSER A/K/A JENNIFER L. SASSER,
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUL-
TURE RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA)
N.A., and UNKNOWN TENANTSS).
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated February 11, 2013, and an
Order Reopening Case and Rescheduling Fore-
closure Sale entered in Case No. 11-211-CA, of
the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Cir-
cuit, in and for Jackson County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and
JENNIFER SASSER A/K/A JENNIFER L. SASSER,
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUL-
TURE RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, and CITIBANK (SOUTH DA-
KOTA) N.A. are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the front
door of the Courthouse in Marianna, Jackson
County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Central Time, on
April 18, 2013, the property set forth in the Fi-
nal Judgment of Foreclosure and more particu-
larly described as follows:
See Attached Exhibit "A"
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any; other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
DATED: March 18, 2013
/s/ DALE RABON GUTHRIE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
Garvin B. Bowden, Esq.
Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden,
Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
EXHIBIT "A"


Description: (New Parcel)
Commence at a 1/2 inch iron rod and cap (PSM
2142) marking the northeast corner of the
northwest 1/4 of the southeast 1/4 of Section
28, Township 4 North, Range 10 West, Jackson
County, Florida, thence N.88 -23'47"W., along
the north boundary of said northwest 1/4 of
the southeast 1/4, a distance of 263.59.feet to a

t^BR ..


04"


Ent. Center wood, shelfs $100. 850-596-2969.
Generator Troy Built 5500 $500. 850-638-2446
Glock-35: 40 cal. $500. Call 850-592-7265
Guitar Alvarez 70's 12 string $150. 850-482-6022
Ladder 24ft. fiber glass $110. 850-638-2446.
Laptop: HP G61, 3GB mem $350. 850-693-5098
Prom Dress: sz/ 6, $150. 850-482-2636


1/2 inch iron rod and cap (PSM 2142), said iron
rod being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence
continue N.88*23'47"W., along said north boun-
dary, a distance of 134.00 feet to a 1/2 inch iron
rod and cap (PSM 2142); thence departing said
north boundary and run S.00 *39'46"W., a ,
distance of 328.51 feet to a 1/2 inch iron rod and
cap (PSM 2142) on the south boundary of the
north 1/2 of the north 1/2 of aforesaid north-
west 1/4 of southeast 1/4; thence 5.88 *
19'59"E., along said south boundary, a distance
of 134.00 feet to a 1/2 inch iron rod and cap
(PSM 2142); thence departing said south boun-
dary and run N.00* 39'48"E., a distance of
328.66 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Con-
taining 1.00 acres, more or less.
ALONG WITH a 30' ingress, egress and public
utility easement, over and across the following
described property; Begin at a 1/2 inch iron rod
and cap (PSM 2142) marking the northeast
corner of the northwest 1/4 of the southeast
1/4 of Section 28, Township 4 North, Range 10
West, Jackson County, Florida; thence
S.00'39'46"W., along the east boundary of said
northwest 1/4 of southeast 1/4 and the end of
the maintained right of way of Colony Lane, a
distance of 30.00 feet; thence departing said
east boundary and said right of way and run
N.88-23'47"W, a distance of 30.00 feet; thence
N.00- 39'46"E., a distance of 30.00 feet to the
north boundary of said northwest 1/4 of south-
east 1/4; thence N.88 23'47"W along said north
boundary, a distance of 178.44 feet; thence
S.00- 39'43W., a distance of 30.00 feet; thence
N.88-23'47"W., a distance of 55.15 feet; thence
N.00 39'43"E., a distance of 30.00 feet to a 1/2
inch iron rod and cap (PSM 2142) on aforesaid
north boundary of northwest 1/4 of southeast
1/4; thence S. 88 23'47"E., along said north
boundary, a distance of 25.14 feet to a 1/2 inch
iron rod and cap (PSM 2142); thence N.00 -39'43
"E., a distance of 30.00 feet; thence 5.88 -
23'47"E,, a distance of 238.44 feet to the east
boundary of the southwest 1/4 of the northeast
1/4 of said section; thence S.00 39'43"W.,
along said east boundary, a distance of 30.00
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
LF160087
NOTICE OF CANVASSING OF THE BALLOTS /
ABSENTEE BALLOTS FOR THE SNEADS CITY
ELECTION
NOTICE is hereby given that the Sneads Can-
vassing Board will convene at the Sneads City
Hall Council Room, 2028 Third Ave, Sneads,
Florida at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 9,2013 to
canvass ballots/absentee ballots. Immediately
after the polls have closed for voting, all ballots
will be tallied by the Canvassing Board.
Immediately following the canvass of the bal-
lots, the canvassing board will canvass any
provivional ballots.
This meeting is open to the public


LF15946
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION;
CASE NO: 32-2011-CA-000559
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 25,
2013, and entered in Case No. 32-2011-CA-


Push Mower- no gas required.$99. 850-592-8769
Stove & Oven Hotpoint $125. 850-209-6977.
Table & Chairs w/ 4 chairs $200. 850-569-2969
Tires: (4) H/T P225/70R16 $60. 850-482-2636
Washer & Dryer sfakable $400. 850-569-2969
Window: 29x30 dbl,LowE, $100. 850-482-2636


SYour guide to great local
Businesses & services




SERVICE DIRECTORY


Call 526-3614 to place your ad.


NEW& USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELOW RETAIL PRICES!
*r -i_4 .' 850.526.1700
-TI"s Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
S | J 2978 Pierce Street
(behind Tim's Florist)


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Clay O'Neal's u ,
Land Clearing, Inc. BM nPOEND
ALTHA, PL ARROAESIBOM
850-762-9402 SBavCWMHOVBI
Cell 850-832-5055 a0YWDBa .














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Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured


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WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME




Chad O's Lawn F/X
Commercial & Residential
Spring Clean-up &
Monthly Maintenance
Full Lawn Care Service
Free Estimates
Family Owned & Operated
Chad Oliver 1 850-573-7279



Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Senior Citizens Discount
FREE ESTIMATES =- 334-798-0687



Lawn Care &
Outdoor Property
S3 Maintenance
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Call Woody 850-526-2030


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r, in' ,.tment Only
SroJomerse/tylists
Lisa Shores & Tammy Martabano
10K^ "1 Von 0 ,is0i Us Onl ne ammnwogeinoud,.ne
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COLOR & STYLE!
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2919 Hwy 231 Nortt Panama City, FL



You CALL... WE COME To You!
RED'S MOBILE
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE
850-209-9713
EDWARD MAGGI, OWNER


_ e Link ___


Adets or"OLSUF orFE yvstn jwjfoidncm e iefrdtis


000559 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth
Judicial Circuit in and for Jackson County, Flori-
da in which The Bank of New York Mellon, as
Successor Trustee under NovaStar Mortgage
Funding Trust, Series 2006-3, is the Plaintiff and
Boneda C. Beeler,, are defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash in/on at
the North Door of the Jackson County Court-
house, 4445 Lafayette Street, Marianna, FL
32446, Jackson County, Florida at 11:00AM
CST/12:00PM EST on the 2nd day of May, 2013,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
A PARCEL OF LAND IN MARIANNA, FLORIDA,
ADJOINING THE WEST SIDE OF PARK STREET
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE NE
CORNER OF LOT 4, OF BLOCK 11, OF WEST
MANOR, UNIT NO. 2, ACCORDING TO PLAT
THEREOF, ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING ON THE WEST LINE
OF PARK STREET, THENCE GO NORTH ALONG
SAID WEST LINE 100 FEET, THENCE GO WEST
170 FEET, THENCE GO SOUTH 100 FEET TO A
POINT WHICH IS 150 FEET NORTH OF THE
NORTH LINE OF DECATUR STREET AND THENCE
GO EAST 170 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, BEING IN THE N 1/2 OF SECTION 3,
TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST, JACK-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 2977 PARK ST., MARIANNA, FL 32446-
3115
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
wner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated in Jackson County, Florida this 25th day
of March, 2013.
/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Jackson County, Florida
By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
Albertelli Law
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
(813) 221-4743
09-28610
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at n850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.





6-Lr /?T







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Great Doctors G. r


Celebrating Doctors" Day- very Day

Joinr all of us at Jackson Hospital as we say thank you to every member of our medical staff.
Through the years, they have made a difference, and our community is stronger and healthier
because of their ski and care Many, many thanks to our physicians, and happy Doctors' Day!


/';


Mark Akerson, M.D.
Family Practice
850.482.2910









Doye Bosse, M.D.
Pediatrics
850.482.2004


David Vicik, M... PfihD.
Internal Medicine
Medicat0 ? 'O. ,'..
,, ,' ,, ,


^staJ HSsJe n, Ml.U.. .A.CS,
General' *
850.482.0017


i/'


(.I


Robin Albrittoan, M.D.
Family Practice
850.482.0017


/-';~
it.,-"1
!I?' ~:
E


)'' ;


VeChai Arunakul, M.D.,' F.A.CS.
General Surgery
850L.:. ':' .


Leisa Bailey, M.D.
Family Practice/ Gynecoloqy
Ni ... 71 i Obstetrics
850.547.2209


, A F


John T- Chacko, M.D.
Urology.
850.526.0005


Joe Gay, M.O.
internal Medicine
;.: -.* :434


W, Drnnis Haisrr, MiD.
- I *. 1


Jirayos (Dr. Chin)
Chintanadilok, M.D., F.C.CP.
,, ., ;. Sic-ep Medicine /
-',.i" .. ; M edicine


Richard Goff, M.D.
Family Practice
850.482.2929






."or

Duane Herring. MD.
i i'' 4e!ied crie


Richard Christ.her. M.D.
81f()I0.526.53 00


Teresa Goodpaster. M.D.
General Siurgery
8 50 .4 ,- *'


Murray Baker, M.D.
Emern ency i- ,i, .r,
850.718.256 1









Glenn Clark, M.D.
Radiol-gy
850.7 18.2'80









John Griffin, M.D.
frnergjer/cy M ledirin
850.718.2561


/_. ~,<
/ as ,
If,


Murali Krishna, M.D.
Ii terfnia! Medicine
850.525.3314


Ricky Leff, M.D., F.A.CO.G.
ObsteAtri / 'Gyne: ol
85Q.48 .'yn7/'


7-


Stacy Nichol, Byll, M.D.
Peciia tricks
850.526.6704


'I


Oriandeo Minia, M.D,
-.. '. : Gynecology
850.482.6484


JJs;ph ,Shorrel. M,D,
O ^ ,* > .'-)_


Bern '". ,r.-n:-. D P 0
.:5 3:, <' ,*7^-5" : r


John Spe-nce, M.D.
850.487 2,31(s


Raul Olasvabai, M,D.










Steven Spe-n.e, M.D,
',1' -,"30


GeQrp3e S.j nceh', M .DR/.C
a ti~ri


Not picturedl:
Val Dee '-S f ,i, VM.r
5,'i / ,


daJackon


Growing a Healthier Community

/ /') ,~ital Dri r)t / Ma rrir nna, Florida 32446 / B50, 2 ..22 /


N4O


R.ay MrTiTnga. M.W, F.A C.C.
Cardioldgy
850.482.2205


^C~i-l~lllll--. -_~jZ1Q~-----.^L-~---~--i.--X-_i -_..i_-_-_l__ __-_I.-_...~__li i IIXi. ~YiY~--III-I~


-1 8B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3.2013


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