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Jackson County Floridan ( April 2, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958

Material Information

Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: April 2, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01050

Related Items

Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958

Material Information

Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: April 2, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01050

Related Items

Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text




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opening day 1B

a17,000-readers daily in print and online


I n ". iobSeq 5j PkgScq 002 .
__ OF FLORIDA HISTORY.
-17007 . .
TLLE FL 32611-7007
Vol. 90 No. 76
&he Hope School


Falcons need donations to buy championship rings


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.cofn
The Hope School Falcons have
built a winning reputation at the
Florida Special Olympics basketball
tournament. They've been the state
champions four times since 2007.
They're coming off back-to-back
titles, having won the 2012 and
2013 championships in dominating
victories as they dispatched their
opponents and moved through the
final four. In this year's quest, every
member of the nine-man squad
scored points for the team.
The championship means a lot to
the players; from the very start of
each season,. Coach Don Holland
and assistant coach Jimmy Martin
make sure they have their eyes on
that prize.
The team practices four days a


week in roughly
two-hour ses- o
sions. Hol-
land said ev-
ery practice
starts with
talk of the
state champi-
onship. Most
of this year's
key players were
young substitutes
with limited play-
ing time when their up-
perclassmen netted the 2007 title.
They've come up through the ranks
motivated and focused; and they've
come through with wins that gave
their community a sense of pride.
Now the school wants its commu-
nity to come through for the boys.
As sweet as victory is, something


has yet been missing
from their celebra-
K- tions in 2007, 2009,
2012 and 2013.
They've never re-
ceived champi-
onship rings. The
Hope School fam-
fly is determined
to do something
about that now, and,
they need the com-
munity's help to buy the
rings.
They'll need at least eleven-they
want to buy at least two for play-
ers who were part of the previous
championship squads but who
have since moved on.
The rings cost $140 each,

See RINGS, Page 5A


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/ FLORIDAN
ABOVE: The Hope School Falcons pose with a trophy purchased
by the school's special activities committee to celebrate their
latest state championship win. The Falcons also won state cham-
pionships in 2007, 2009 and 2012. LEFT: The Hope School family
thinks it's high time their four-time state basketball titlists get,
championship rings, to show support for their hard work.


UNION GROVE SCHOOL RENOVATION


.. -









PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/ FLORIDAN
Among the musicians who took the stage Saturday during the 2nd annual Union Grove School Renovation Fundraiser and Fun Day
were (from left) Queen Granberry, Charles Milton, Eva Palmer, Charles Callantis, Earlean Paramore and Taye Horn.



Food, folks and fun raises funds


he air at the old Union Grove
School was filled with the smells
of food and the sweet sounds of
gospel music Saturday during a fund-
raiser furi day.
*. The event, put on by the Union
Grove Alumni Association, was raising
money for the ongoing renovation of


the school into a community center.
The school closed in 1970.
Chairperson Bettye Worlds-Dickens
said the event raised almost $5,000
from donations and the sale of
chicken and fish plates. The people
who ate at the school enjoyed
music performed by several groups


and soloists during the day. There
were also games ranging from
cards to basketball for people to
play.'
Worlds-Dickens said the event went
well and that they sold out of food
plates.
Alumni could also see several of their


II
ql :se e--


, ;i


Nancy Hall, Carrie
Crawford and
Vera Langston
relax as in the
shade as they
eat lunch at the
Union Grove Whole
School Reunion
Committee's
second annual
Renovation
Fundraiser and Fun
Day.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN FILE PHOTO
A wide variety of art styles were on
display inside Citizens Lodge during
the Paint-n-Pork Fest art show. This
year's festival is set for April 19-20
in Marianna.

Art contest

set to put

the paint in

Paint-n-Pork

Art entries welcome
for April event
From staff reports
In addition to mouth-water-
ing foods, this year's Paint-n-
Pork Fest, formerly known as
the Marianna Arts Festival and
BBQ Cook-Off, promises fun and
good times for the whole family
with a huge selection of arts and
crafts, jewelry and other goods,
a children's area, and local top-
name live entertainment, Flori-
da BBQ Association-sanctioned
barbeque contests and new to
Paint-n-Pork this year a steak
cook- off for those who think they
have the grill skills to pay the
bills. And don't forget Saturday's
fireworks show that will light up
the night sky.
A signature event of the festival
is its art contest, which is open to
all ages and every skill level. All
artists, be they budding or in full
bloom, are afforded a chance to
participate at Paint-n-Pork.
Event chair Lisa Pelt, who's
helped with the art contest since
the festival's beginning, says it's
only gotten bigger and better in
the 10 years she's been involved.
Open to all ages and all skill
levels, Pelt said children are espe-
cially encouraged to enter the art
contest. Each kid pre-K through
fifth grade can expect a partici-
pation ribbon for their effort.
Ribbons and cash prizes await
the first-, second- and third-
place entries for both the adult
and student divisions.
For the adults, the first place

See CONTEST, Page 5A


)) CLASSIFIEDS...4-5B


) ENTERTAINMENT...3B


) LOCAL...3A


) OBITUARIES...5A


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint


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Take it on the Run-


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Email Alerts, Mobile Alerts and RSS Feeds subscriptions are FREE
Home Delivery plus Unlimited Online $11.23 per mo


Afghan teenager fatally
stabs U.S. soldier 6A

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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


-72A TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 2013


Weather Outlook


High 760
Low 580


Wednesday
Cloudy. Possible Showers.


High 690
Low -470


Friday
Clearing & Mild.


High 730
Low- 51


Saturday
Sunny & Mild.


TIDES ULTRAVIOLET INDEX
Panama City Low 1:05 AM High 2:37 PM
Apalachicola Low 3:56 AM High 1:05 AM 0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
Port St. Joe Low 1:10AM High 3:10 PM
Destin Low 2:21 PM High 3:43 PM 0 1 2 3 4 0-
Pensacola Low 2:55 AM High 4:16 PM


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville.


Reading
49.28 ft.
13.21 ft.
9.09 ft.
7.67 ft.


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:28 AM
Sunset 7:01 PM
Moonrise 12:49 AM Apr.
Moonset 11:35 PM 10


Apr. Apr. Apr.
18 25 3


FLORIDA'S SEAL

PANHANDLE J8cOiTB

MEDIA PARTNERS wJAQ 100.9-

LISTERHOTS


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays,8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six-months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT

In a Sunday-edition story about the
most recently-designated Century
Pioneer Family Farm, a list of previ-
ously-designated farms in Jackson
County was included. The name of
one farm was inadvertently omitted.
The list should have included the
Cary Joseph Pelt family farm.


The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.
I


CoRImmu ity Calendar


TUESDAY, APRIL 2
)East Jackson County Economic Development
'Council Business of the Month Recognition-10
a.m. at Blondie's Food-and Fuel, corner of Highway
90 and Highway 69 in Grand Ridge. The public is
invited to attend.
Optimist Club of Jackson County Meeting
- Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna.
Orientation -Noon-3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
a Marianna/FPU Public Information Forum
-4-6:30 p.m. at the Marianna City Hall Commis-
sion Room, located at 2898 Green St. The City of
Marianna encourages all city residents to attend
an informational session about the April 9 Florida
Public Utilities purchase referendum. Additional
sessions are scheduled. Call 482-4353.
) Chipola College Community Chorus-6-7:30
p.m. in the Center for the Arts at Chipola College.
Singers, aged High School and above are welcome
to sing with the Community Chorus and will per-
form on the April 16 Chipola Ensemble Concert. Call
718-2376 or heidebrechtd@chipola.edu.
) Marianna City Commission Regular Meet-
ing-6:30 p.m. at the Marianna City Hall Commis-
sion Room, 2898 Green St. Call 482-4353.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3
AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation -9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.n.-4:30 p.m. for an ap-
pointment.
) Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida
Board of Directors Meeting-11 a.m. at the De-
partment of Children and Families, 2505 W. 15th St.
in Panama City. This meeting is open to the public.
Conference call number 1-888-670-3525, guest
code 4998489399.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting -Noon-
1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
Basic Computer Class Part 1-12-3 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90,
.vlarianna. Learn basic components and use of a
computer. No cost to attend. Call 526-0139.

THURSDAY, APRIL 4
"I "International Chat n' Sip"-8:30-10 a.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library, Marianna Branch,
2929 Green St. The publicist invited to enjoy a
relaxed environment for the exchange of language,
culture and ideas among our local and international
communities. Light refreshments will be served.


Call 482-9124.
n Grief Workshop-10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Covenant
Hospice, 4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E, Marianna. This
workshop is for those who have suffered the loss of
a loved one or would like to learn how to help those.
that are grieving. This workshop is free to the public
and light refreshments will be provided. Registration
is required. Call 482-8520 or toll free 888-817-2191.
) Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2290.
) Job Club -Noon-3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills; get job search assis-
tance. Call 526-0139.
Kindle Fire Ebook Class-3-4 p.m. at the Jack-
son County Public Library, Marianna, Branch, 2929
Green St. Learn how to check out and download
Jackson County Public Library books from the
Axis 360 system. Participants should have a basic
knowledge of how to use a Kindle Fire. To register
call 482-9631.
) Marianna/FPU Public Information Forum
-4-6:30 p.m. at the McLane Center, 4291 Clay St.
in Marianna. The City of Marianna encourages all
city residents to attend an informational session
about the April 9 Florida Public Utilities purchase
referendum. One additional session is scheduled.
Call 482-4353.
n AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation-4-7 p.m. at the Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. for an ap-
pointment.
)) Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group-
5:30 p.m.at Jackson Hospital in the Cafeteria Board
Room. Free to attend. Curriculum developed by ex-
smokers for those who want to become ex-smokers
themselves. Call 718-2545.
D VFW & Ladies Auxiliary Meeting 6 p.m. at
2830 Wynn St. in Marianna. Covered-dish supper
followed by a 7 p.m. business meeting. Call 372-
2500.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, APRIL 5
n Jackson County Chamber of Commerce First
Friday Power Breakfast-7 a.m. at the Jackson
County Extension Center, 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue
in Marianna. Guest speaker will be Paul Smith,
Pastor of Rivertown Community Church. Call 482-
8060.
) Knitters Nook-lO a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Money Sense-Noon-4 p.m. at the Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna.
This is a financial literacy class that helps with bud-
geting, saving and other financial topics. No cost to


attend. Call 526-0139.
) Two-Toe Tom Beauty Pageant-6:30 p.m. at
the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville. Divisions
will include Tiny Baby Miss, Baby Miss, Toddler
Miss, Tiny Miss, Future Little Miss, Little Miss, Baby
Mister, Toddler Mister and Little Mister. Proceeds
will benefit the Two-Toe Tom Festival celebration.
Admission is $3 per person and children three and
under admitted for free. Call 263-4744.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
Deadline to enter the Jackson County Pag-
eant-Little Miss, 1st grade and Junior Miss, 6th,
7th, or 8th grades in the Jackson County School
District, privately enrolled or home schooled in
the JCSD. Miss contestants must be ages 17-21
by October 1, 2013. All contestants must perma-
nently reside in Jackson County and may not be a
temporary residence elsewhere. Obtain forms at
JacksonCountyPageants.com or call 693-0809,
718-7095 or 209-5842.

SATURDAY, APRIL 6
n Marianna Woman's Club Annual Spring Yard,
Bake and Plant Sale-7 a.m. corner of Clinton and
Caledonia Streets. Items donated by members and
their families include: Furniture, clothing and house-
hold items. "Opportunity drawing" for a birdhouse
creation by local artist Lanet James to be held mid
day, tickets are $1 or six for $5. Proceeds from this
event will be used for a variety of club projects. Call
209-5747.
n Cottondale High School Project Graduation
Car Wash-9 a.m. at AutoZone Hwy. 90 in Mari-
anna. Call 326-3521.
n Line Dance Contest-10 a.m. at Marianna Mid-
dle School Gym, sponsored by the team members
of "The Spirit of Keston", Theme is "Mama, I've Got
Shoes", and proceeds will benefit the 2013 March of
Dimes March for Babies. Admission for non-partici-
pants is a pair of baby shoes or booties which will
be donated to families of premature babies. Small
registration fee for participants. Register call 209-
5664,482-5837 or 594-6581.
) Grand Opening of North Florida Wild West
Show-10 a.m.-4 p.m. located at 2134 Hwy. 231S,
Cottondale. Event is free to the public. Enjoy gun-
fight shows, country music, card sharks, pony rides,
train rides and more. Refreshments will be available
for a small fee. Call 557-9928.
) West Florida Electric Kilowatt Kowboys
Relay Trail Ride-10 a.m. at 810 Satellite Road in
Graceville. Ride ends at 12 noon with a BBQ lunch
and door prizes. $15 per person, wagons welcome.
Horses must have current Coggins. All proceeds
will benefit the Holmes County Relay for Life. Call
557-3372.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police
Department listed the follow-
ing incidents for March 31, the
latest available report: One
accident, one dead person,
one missing juvenile, two
abandoned
.S vehicles, two
-" i ~]-- suspicious
C 4 vehicles, three
MZ' suspicious per-
sons, two verbal
disturbances, one fire with
police response, one prowler,
one residential fire, 10 medical
calls, three traffic crashes, one
burglar alarm, three fire alarms,
32 traffic stops, two criminal
mischief complaint, one civil
dispute, three follow-up inves-
tigations, one juvenile com-
plaint, one assault, one suicide
attempt, one noise disturbance,


one animal complaint, one as-
sist of a motorist or pedestrian,
two assists of other agencies,
three public service calls,
one welfare check, and
four threat/harassment
complaints.
Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following incidents
for March 31, the latest avail-
able report: Six abandoned ve-
hicles, one suspicious Vehicle,
one physical disturbance, one
verbal disturbance, one burglar
alarm, three traffic stops, one
larceny complaint, and one civil
dispute.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were


booked into the county jail
during the latest reporting
periods:
) Johnny Wilson, 27, 2006 Ja-
cob Road, Cottondale, battery,
battery by strangulation.
) Shelby Melton, 37, 2883 Law-
renceville Road, Cottondale,
battery-domestic
violence.
> Maria Victores, 60, 1979 Pe-
tes Way, Sneads, driving under
the influence, reckless driving.
) David Moseley, 41, 609
Allen Ave, Panama City, fugitive
from justice (Geneva Co.,
Ala.).
) Jose Delgado, 26, 215
Petunia Drive, Taylor, Ala., no
driver's license.
) Ashley Dewey, 34, 4767
Grand Oaks Circle, Marianna,
battery (domestic violence).
) Naneita Millwood, 37, 2940
Daniels St., Marianna, battery
(domestic violence).


n Terrance Turner, 33, 707
Dewey Johnson Way, Gretna,
possession of cocaine, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia
) Christopher Rowan, 29, 6273
Village Ave., Cypress, battery
(domestic violence).
) Jesus Hunt, 22, 6168 Ezell
Road, Graceville, possession of
contraband at state correctional
institution.
) Willie Nix, 58, 6103 Mellow
Trail, Marianna, aggravated
assault with a deadly weapon,
child abuse.
) Jonathan Donnell, 25, 30S
River Road, Franklin, Ga., driv-
ing while license suspended or
revoked.

Jail Population: 207
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call 1-888-
404-FWCC (3922).


-.b..


WAKE-UP CALL









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


4-H Club enjoys

L picnic and


LOCALTUESDAY.APRIL2, 2013 3A17


CUTE


KID


Easter e
Special to the Floridan

The Country Bumpkins
4-H Club enjoyed a fun-
filled afternoon together
on March 24, to celebrate
Easter with a time of good
food and fellowship. For
the picnic, club leader
Terri Hardin provided the
spacious area with lots of
room for the children to
fly kites, play soccer,
throw the Frisbee, and
even catch fish. Club
members work hard all
year to raise money for
their activities, participate
in livestock judging com-
petitions and serve the
community through vari-
ous projects. This event
was a time for the families
to relax and enjoy being
together on a beautiful
spring day.
For lunch, club mem-
bers and their families
enjoyed sub sandwiches,
chips, cookies, soft drinks,
and a giant Easter egg
cake made by leader Terri
Hardin. After their picnic
and activities, the race
was on to see who could
find the most Easter eggs.


gg hunt
Nearly five hundred
eggs were hidden for the
children to hunt, with
each egg containing a
special prize inside. The
children went back to
their fishing fun after the
egg hunt and everyone
cheered in excitement
for Beau Miles, Elizabeth
Hailing and Nik Hailing
when they caught catfish
at different locations of
the pond.
4-H is the youth de-
velopment program of
the Florida Cooperative
Extension Service and
the University of Florida's
Institute of Food and Ag-
ricultural Sciences. 4-H is
open to all youth between
the ages of 5-18 regard-
less of gender, race, creed,
color, religion or disability.
The focus of 4-H is to
provide young people
with opportunities to
develop life skills through
participation in commu-
nity clubs, project clubs,
day camps, residential
camps, school enrichment
programs and competitive
events. For more informa-
tion about joining 4-H


)UDMII IturnuluI)
Country Bumpkins 4-H members stop their activities for a moment to pose for a group
picture. From left: Adrianna Hill, Aaron' Driggers, Faith Hardin, Nik Hailing, Alex Hill, Andrew
Driggers, Myra Miles, Ariana Driggers, Noah McArthur, Beau Miles, Andrea Driggers, Adam
(special guest) and Elizabeth Hailing.


Nik Hailing pulls in the catfish
he caught ,following the egg
hunt.
or starting a 4-H club in
your community, contact
the Jackson County 4-H
Agent Ben Knowles at 482-
9620. For more informa-


Elizabeth Hailing shows the Beau Miles proudly displays
fish she caught at the 4-H the fish he caught, as dad,
Easter picnic. Johnny looks on.


tion about the Country
Bumpkins Club, please


contact the club leader
Terri Hardin at 272-3728.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Pictured is
Keaton
Thomas
NeSmith, age 3. He
is the son of Kevin
& Jodi NeSmith of
Sneads.


Early Learning Coalition

hosts local VPK registration


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Sonja Guthrie at the honey sampling table. .


DAR members


learn importance


of beekeeping


Special to the Floridan

Chipola Chapter,
NSDAR heard about
the importance of bees
at the March meet-
ing from beekeeper
*i Sonja Guthrie. Guthrie,
president of the Apalachee
Beekeepers Association
told of the numerous
plants that depend upon
bees for pollination. One
of these, almonds, could
not survive without bees
because the almond blos-
soms receive 100% of their
pollination from bees.
In California flatbed
trucks loaded with bee
colonies are brought into
the almond groves when
the trees are in bloom to


be sure of pollination. As
part of the interesting
program, members and
guests were invited to a
honey tasting table where
they compared honey
made from four different
nectars.
The next meeting of
Chipola Chapter, NSDAR
will be at-lla.m. on Mon-
day, April 15 at the Mari-
anna Beef'O' Brady's. The
program will be by Nancy
Burns, who will speak
about "Technology Today."
Hostesses will be
Rosie Gay and Pauline
Trotter. For informa-
tion please contact Vice
Regent Carolyn Jordan at
638-1947 or cdjordan@
bellsouth.net. "


Special to the Floridan

The Early Learning
Coalition of Northwest
Florida will hold Volun-
tary Pre-Kindergarten
registration forl families
in Jackson County at their-
office on Friday, April 12
from 8 a.m. 12 p.m. The
coalition office is located
at 4636 Hwy. 90, Suite E in
Marianna.
To be eligible for VPK,
children must turn 4 on or
before September 1, and
they must live in Florida.
When enrolling for VPK,
parents will need to bring
1 proof of child's age and
one proof of Florida resi-
dency. Typical examples
for each are:
a For proof of age: Birth
Certificate, Passport or
Military ID.
For proof of residency:
Driver's License, Utility
Bill (must show street
address), Residential
rental agreement, Florida
Vehicle Registration Card
or pay stub.


Vice Regent Carolyn Jordan, (left) welcomes Sonja Guthrie.


"The VPK program is a
great way to help prepare
children to be successful
in school and in life," said
Lynne Eldridge, execu-
tive director for the Early
Learning Coalition of
Northwest Florida.
"Parents have many
different quality programs
to choose from when
looking to enroll their
child in VPK." she
said.
The Early Learning
Coalition of Northwest
Florida is a non-profit
organization that exists *
to grow healthy children,
parents and the relation-
ship between them and
administers Child Care
Resource and Referral,
School Readiness, and
Voluntary- Prekindergar-
ten programs in a seven
county service area.
To find out more infor-
mation about VPK or to
find an enrollment in
your area call 1-866-269-
3022 or visit' www.elcnwf.
org.


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2. $3.52. Loves Travel Center.
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4. $3.52. Pilot. 2209 Hwy 71.
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LOCAL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Sneads


Lewis seeking return to Town Council


Submitted by candidate

Greg Lewis, a lifelong
Sneads resident and re-
tired business owner, has
announced his candidacy
for the Group 4 Sneads
Town Council seat.
Lewis served on the
Town Council from 2004-
2011. The candidate states
that during that time many
projects were successfully
completed that benefit the
town today. Those proj-


ects included: street pav-
ing, new sidewalks on Old
Spanish Trail and Hwy 90,
park benches on Hwy 90,
water and sewer service to
Seminole Commerce Park,
upgrades to the wastewa-
ter lift stations and col-
lection system, additional
improvements to Adam T.
Wilson Park which includ-
ed the Jamie Messer Skate
Park, updated commu-
nication equipment and
Jaws of Life for our First


Responders with Sneads
Volunteer Fire Department
and the remodeling of our
JCFR building to keep the
ambulance stationed in
Sneads. Many of these
projects were entirely grant
funded with no additional
costs to our residents.
"I am running for Sneads
Town Council Member
(Group 4) and I am ask-
ing for your support. Hav-
ing served on the council
for three terms I feel I am


experienced and unique-
ly qualified for the job. I
know the people of Sneads
and share many of their
concerns regarding the fu-
ture of our town," the can-
didate stated. "I believe in
being available and, more
importantly, accountable
to all the citizens of our
town."
Remember the Town
Election is April 9, 2013.
Thhnk you for your
consideration.


Alexander announces candidacy for Town Council


Special to the Floridan

Jerry L. Alexander has
announced that he is a
candidate for election to
the Sneads Town Council,
Group .TV Seat. This seat
was held by Mr. Sammy
McAlpin, until his death
last year.
Alexander is a native
of Altha, Florida, and
has resided in Sneads
for the past 30 years. He
retired in 2000, following Alexander -
25 years of service with
the Florida Department of of the U.S.A.E, from 1958-
Corrections. 1961. He is a member of
Alexander is a veteran Sneads Memorial Post


#241 of the American Le-
gion, where he proudly
serves on the Funeral
Honor Guard. Additional-
ly, he is a proud Life Mem-
ber of the National Rifle
Association; .a member of
Grand Ridge Lodge #169,
F&AM; Tallahassee Scot-
tish Rite Temple; and
Shaddai Shrine Temple in
Panama City, Florida.
He is also a Charter Mem-
ber of FOP Lodge #156 in
Sneads. He is a Protestant
by faith.
Alexander and his
wife, Mary, have two
sons; George (Heidi),


who lives in Sneads, and
works in Security at Flor-
ida State Hospital, and
Charlie (Annie),who is
a pharmacist in Fresno,
California. He has one
step-daughter, Cyndi
(Tim), of Cape Coral,
Florida. Alexander is the
proud grandfather of four;
Caleb, Meg, and Cooper, of
Sneads, and Elizabeth of
Fresno.
"If elected to the Town
Council, I will, to the best
of my abilities, strive to
do what is best for the
entire Town of Sneads, fair
and impartially," Alexan-


der said in announcing
his candidacy. "And, I look
forward to the opportu-
nity of working with Town
Manager Connie Butts,
and the other Council
members,by continuing
the. civil working envi-
ronment that has existed
for the last four years. I
believe strongly in the
'Government in the Sun-
shine' law....no backroom
deals out of sight of the
people."
The election is set for
April 9th, with polls open
at Town Hall, from 7. a.m.
until 7 p.m.


Brief


Safe on


the Lake


Festival


is May 4

Special to the Floridan

The Sneads First
Annual Safe on the Lake
Festival is planned for
Saturday, May 4 from
2-6 p.m. CST at the
Sneads Park on Lake
Seminole.
This event is sponsored
by the Jackson County
Sheriff's Department
and The Town of
Sneads.
Activities for all
ages will include:
Music, safety exhibits/
free safety items, arts
and crafts vendors, food
vendors, free children's
activities, a live alligator
and K-9 dogs. For further
information call Sneads
Town Manager Connie
Butts at 593-6636.


Lobbyist gift ban would get tweaks under bill


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.
- Florida lawmakers have
complained for eight years
that they can't even ac-
cept a cup of coffee under
the lobbyist gift ban. They
could have that cup of cof-
fee under a bill that won its
first committee approval
Monday.
Sen. Tom Lee, who is
given-credit for the gift ban
passed in 2005, is sponsor-
ing the bill (SB 1344). He


says it tweaks the zero-tol-
erance gift ban without go-
ing back to the days when
lobbyists routinely spent
tons Of money on expen-
sive meals and drinks for
lawmakers.
Lee's proposal would al-
low exceptions for one
non-alcoholic beverage. It
would also allow a meal,
beverage and registration
fees for a scheduled meet-
ing or event in which the
lawmaker is asked to speak
or make a presentation.


Another exception would
allow the use of meeting
space in government to
government events.
"It's very narrowly draft-
ed and as long as you're
having a single meal in a
single sitting associated
with a speaking engage-
ment, I don't think there's
much opportunity for
us to go awry," said Lee,
R-Brandon.
And if lawmakers do ac-
cept a meal at an event at
which they're speaking,


they will have to report it.
"I want to thank Sen.
Lee for tweaking this law.
It was needed," said Sen.
Arthenia Joyner, who has
complained in the past
about not being able to ac-
cept a bottle of water when
visiting district schools.
Lee originally drafted,
the bill to allow lawmakers
to accept meals up to $25
at widely attended events
that the media were also
allowed to attend, but re-
moved the language be-


cause it was difficult to
write it so that it couldn't
be exploited.
"It's unfortunate, but bad
apples spoil the bunch,"
said Lee.


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Rubio claims pivot point on immigration overhaul


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON What-
ever immigration deal
might be claimed by labor
and business, or by Demo-
crats and Republicans,
Sen. Marco Rubio of Flor-
ida is serving notice it has
to go through him.
The tea party favor-
ite made it clear over
the weekend he has a
make-or-break role for the
most sweeping immigra-
tion changes in decades.
It's a high-risk strategy
that also puts his
presidential ambitions on
the line.
Four Republican sena-
tors 'are involved with
Democrats in crafting
a bipartisan bill to se-
cure the nation's borders,
improve legal immigration
and offer eventual citizen-
ship to millions now in
the U.S. illegally. But only
Rubio has the conserva-
tive bona fides plus life-
story credibility to help
steer the bill through the
Senate with strong
support from the GOP
and give it a chance in the


In this March'12 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. speaks on
Capitol Hill in Washington.


House; where conservative
Republicans hold more
sway.
More. than anyone else,
Rubio, the son of Cuban
immigrants, could have
the clout to hold off rebel-
lion from conservative talk
show hosts and a Republi-
can base whose opposition
helped kill immigration
changes last time around,
in 2007. And perhaps only
Rubio could sink the en-
tire effort just by walking
away.
If the first-term senator
decides against the bill,
"that just takes all the oxy-
gen out of the room," said
Al Cardenas, chairman of


the American Conserva-
tive Union.."It may pass
the Senate with Demo-
crats' support ... but that's
not the kind of support
you want out of the Senate
if you expect passage out
of the House."
With that unique sta-
tus, Rubio is walking a
fine line. He's helping
negotiate the politically
combustible legisla-
tion, which the biparti-
san group is expected'to
unveil next week, while
also taking care to main-
tain the conservative sup-
port that makes him so
important to the process
in the first place.


For Rubio, more so than
the other Republicans
involved Sens. John
McCain and Jeff Flake
of Arizona and Lindsey
Graham of South Caro-
lina there's danger in a
full-throated embrace of
comprehensive immigra-
tion legislation. For some
conservatives, it will al-
ways be toxic: It's a priority
for Democrats and Presi-
dent Barack Obama that
some foes see as granting
amnesty to millions of
law-breakers.
But Rubio also could see
the biggest political payoff.
Helping shepherd a com-
prehensive, immigration
bill to passage could win
support from Hispanic
voters that could be criti-
cal if he runs for president
in 2016. GOP nominee Mitt
Romney's dismal show-
ing among Hispanic and
Asian voters last Novem-
ber helped seal his loss,
and McCain and many
other Republicans warn
that the GOP risks per-
manent minority status
if it doesn't resolve the
immigration issue.


COMERFORD VAULT
MEMORIAL SERVICE


Pete Comerford Owner & Operator
593-6828 1-800-369-6828
comerfordvaultmemorial @ hotmail.com
Hwy. 90 W Sneads, FL


BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


Lewis


-14A TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 2013


LOCAL & STATE










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com

Obituaries


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl. 32446
850-482-2332

Hershel
Dwane
Basford

Hershel Dwane Basford,
85, of Shady Grove died
early Easter Sunday morn-
ing, March 31, 2013.
He was born to L. D.
(Renzie) and Susie Basford
on August 13, 1927. He was
married to his sweetheart,
Nada, who predeceased
him, for almost 60 years.
Mr. Basford was a retired
farmer and a retiree of ACI
in Sneads. He and Nada
enjoyed traveling and
Southern Gospel music. He
thoroughly enjoyed talking
with his many friends and
family members. He was a
member of Grand Ridge
Baptist Church where he
served as a deacon and
Sunday School teacher for
several years. He loved
God, his family, and his
country.
He is survived by four
children, Terry (Ralph)
Crago of Pace, Ronda (Jes-
\sie) Edenfield of Marianna,
Steve (Patricia) Basford of
Shady Grove, and Sandra
(Ben) Harrell of Grand
Ridge, his grandchildren,
Patrick (Lindsay) Crago,
Daniel Crago, Katrina
(Timmy) Reese, Heather
Wartenberg, Adam (Laura)
Basford, Jonathan (Lacey)
Basford, Seth .(Meghan)
Basford, and Joshua (Jessi-
ca) Harrell and his great-
grandchildren, Alexandria
Langford, Sasha Reese,
Jackson, Owen, and West-
on Basford, Ella and Au-
drey Basford, Reanna,
Nadalyn, and J. J. Harrell.
He is also survived by five
brothers and sisters, Eldis
Pope of Marianna, Lester
(Myrtle) Basford of Marian-
na, Maxine (Johnny) Ham-
ilton of Marianna, Chester
(Frances) Basford of
Chattahoochee, and Faye
(Jimmy) Harrison of Boaz,
Alabama. Other survivors
include sisters-in-law, Viv-
ian Basford of
Chattahoochee and.. Lola
Nell Roberts of Shady
Grove, brother-in-law, Jim
Richardson of Marianna
and numerous nieces and
nephews
He was predeceased by a
brother, Alfred Basford of
Chattahoochee, and a sis-
ter, Ann Richardson of Ma-
rianna.
Funeral services will be 2
p.m. Wednesday, April 3,
2013 at Grand Ridge Bap-
tist Church, with Rev.
Caron Harn and Rev. Matt
Basford officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in Cow
Pen Pond Cemetery with
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel di-
recting.
Visitation will be from 5
till 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 2,
2013 at Grand Ridge Bap-
tist Church.
Mr. Basford's six grand-
sons will honor their
grandfather by serving as
pallbearers.



Contest
From Page 1A

prize is $100, second place
is $50 and third place is
$35. Student artists will
have a chance to win $35
for first place, $25 for sec-
ond and $20 for third.
Last year, the contest at-
tracted around 200 pieces
of art and Pelt says she's
hoping for more this time
around.
Paint-n-Pork Art Contest
entry form and fees are
due Friday, April 12. Entry
fees are $5 per piece for
adults and $3 per piece for
students.
Entries are accepted in


a variety of media and
categories including
drawing, mixed media,
painting, photography,
quilting, sculpture, texture,
woodwork and, for those
tough-to-classify pieces,
miscellaneous.
All "artists are asked to
drop off their works be-
tween 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.
on Thursday, April 18.


Flowers will be welcome
or donations in Mr.
Basford's honor may be
made to Grand Ridge Bap-
tist Church, Grand Ridge,
Florida.
Expressions of sympathy
maybe made online at
vwww.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850-482-2332

MaryL
Hatcher

Mary L Hatcher, 92, died
Sunday, March 31, 2013, in
Jacksonville.
Arrangements will be an-
nounced by James & Sikes
Funeral Home Maddox
Chapel.
,Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida. 32446
Phone 850-526-5059

Marilyn
Christine Neri

Marilyn Christine Neri
age 82 of Alford passed
away at her home on Sun-
day, March 31, 2013.
Arrangements are incom-
plete and will be an-
nounced later by Marianna
Chapel Funeral Home.

James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850-482-2332

Robert
Rossberg

Robert Rossberg, 74, of
Marianna, died Sunday,
March 31, 2013, at Jackson
Hospital.
Arrangements will be an-
nounced by James & Sikes
Funeral, Home Maddox
Chapel.

Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
Phone 850-526-5059

Lauree C.
Smith

Services for Mrs. Lauree
C. Smith will be held at
10:00 AM today in the Ma-
rianna Chapel Funeral
Home with Dr. Steve
Pickern officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in the New
Hope Baptist Church Cem-
etery.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements.
Expressions of sympathy
may be submitted online at
www.mariananchapelfh.com.


Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


A panel of three judges -
each hailing from outside
Jackson County will get
started early Friday rriorn-
ing, combing through all
the entries to find the best
of the best. By the time the
festival opens for business
at noon that day, ribbons
will be displayed on the
winning pieces.
Festival-goers are wel-
come to tour the collec-
tion of art contest entries,
Friday and Saturday, inside
the lodge at no additional
charge.
The 10th Annual Paint-n-
Pork Festival will be April
19-20 at Citizens Park in
Marianna. Daily gate ad-
mission is $3 per person.
For additional informa-
tion about the Paint-n-


Pork Art Contest, call Pelt
at 526-3214 or co-chair
Cindy James at 526-4057,
email artcontest@mari-
annaartsfestival.com or
visit the festival website,
www.mariannaartsfes-
tival.com, where you can
find rules and forms for all
festival contests.


TUESDAY, APRIL, 2013 5AF


JAY HARE/DOTHAN EAGLE
In this Feb. 27 photo, Dr. Steve Harris of Dothan points to a photograph of a ship model as he discusses his hobby making
ship models inside of his home in Dolthan, Ala. Building models has been a hobby of the Dothan doctor since he was a kid.
But Harris' attention to detail and extensive knowledge of early ships led to an opportunity to help Florida celebrate its his-
tory. Harris was asked to build ship models of the vessels used by the explorer Juan Ponce de Leon as part of the Viva Florida
500 celebration marking the 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leon's expedition to Florida in 1513. The models are currently on
display in St. Augustine, Fla.



Events to commemorate




Ponce de Leon's arrival


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida officials
are rolling out a vast history lesson
to commemorate the first wave of
Europeans.to hit the state's beaches
half a millennium ago.
The officials on Monday
unveiled a series of events start-
ing this week as part of a statewide
campaign calledViva Florida 500,
a yearlong commemoration to
mark the 500th anniversary of
Juan Ponce de Leon's landing on
the state's east coast. The Spanish
explorer became the first recorded
European to arrive on Florida's
shores on or around April 2, 1513.
He is responsible for giving Florida
its name, calling it "La Florida"
in part because of the land's lush
plant life.
A replica of a 16th-century Span-
ish galleon will make port calls up a
strip of the Florida coast in com-
ing weeks, and a three-day exhibit
this week will feature rarely seen
historical documents.
Florida Secretary of State Ken
Detzner called the commemoration
"a teachable moment," especially
for young people.
"I want young people to remem-
ber that they're just not here for the
sunshine," he said at a state Capitol
news conference. "They're here to
learn and remember who we were


*as a people, how we became to be
Florida."
The commemoration also carries
potential economic benefit. State
officials hope the events will en-
courage visitors to linger longer in a
state known as a vacation haven.
"The Viva Florida 500 commemo-
ration is providing the Florida
tourism industry with an historic
opportunity to expand travelers'
perceptions of the state," said Will
Seccombe, president and CEO of
Visit Florida.
A 170-foot replica of a 16th-
century Spanish galleon is sailing
from Puerto Rico to Florida for the
Viva Florida 500 commemoration.
The ship is scheduled to make port
calls in Miami, Fort,Lauderdale,
Cape Canaveral and St. Augustine
from April 15 to June 3.
Meanwhile, some rarely seen
historical documents will go on
public display later this week at the
Museum of Florida History in Talla-
hassee. The documents, on display
from Thursday to Saturday, include
Florida's original 1838 constitu-
tion and a 1586 map of Sir Francis
Drake's West Indian voyage.
The Florida Bureau of Archaeo-
logical Research will offer behind-
the-scenes tours of its conserva-
tion lab, which is responsible for
preserving archaeological objects
excavated from state's land and


waters. The lab tours, available
Thursday through Saturday, will
showcase such artifacts as pre-
historic canoes and shipwreck
materials.
The commemoration also will
feature a 30-minute television spe-
cial in English and Spanish and a
series of public service announce-
ments that will be broadcast
statewide in each of Florida's key
markets.
Detzner said he recently talked
with the-Seminole Tribal Council
about its possible partnership in
the yearlong commemoration.
Native Americans lived in what be-
came Florida for thousands of years
before the arrival of Europeans.
"We respect that, we honor that,
and we appreciate all of the contri-
butions that they have made, both
in the past, the present and to the
future," he said.
Asked how Native Americans
might view the history, Detzner
said, "We have to remember that
part of this experience was
conflict. We can't ignore that. But
we also have to remember that as
part of this experience, we live to
learn, we learned to live together,
we've grown together. There's
no other state that can represent
the kind of diversity that we have
here in Florida of cultures and
religions."


Briefs


Senate OKs guns bill
aimed at mentally ill
TALLAHASSEE -A
bill that would temporar-
ily suspend a mentally ill
person's gun rights has
unanimously cleared a
Senate panel.
The Senate Criminal
Justice Committee on
Monday passed the bill
(SB 1000) that would
authorize a 90-day sus-
pension of the ability to
buy or keep a firearm or
ammunition and to carry
concealed weapon.
The suspension would
be triggered if a person
was involuntarily com-
mitted for psychological
examination and found to
be a threat to him- or her-
self and others. An initial


Rings
From Page 1A

being'purchased as part
of a bundled deal that will
give the team a discount.
The stone will be a vi-
brant blue to reflect the
team colors. The image of
a basketball and hoop will
be overlaid atop the stone.
The band will have the
-word 'Falcon' visible near
the stone, and each ring
will have its owner's name
engraved on the inside
band. The ring will bear
the player's jersey number,


90-day suspension
can be extended if a
treating physician or
psychologist deems it
necessary.
The measure is sup-
ported by longtime guns-
rights activist Marion
Hammer. She is a former
National Rifle Association
president.


Bill to outlaw "bongs"
moves forward
TALLAHASSEE) -The
Senate version of a House
bill that would outlaw the
sale of marijuana pipes
known as "bongs" has
cleared a key legislative
panel.
The Senate Criminal
Justice committee ap-


as well.
Since several staff mem-
bers associated with the
team are ordering and pay-
ing for their own memo-
rial championship rings
out of pocket through the
provider, Herff-Jones, the
school was able to put
down a deposit and get
package pricing- to secure
the players' rings. Some
donations have also been
made to help since school
officials announced inten-
tion to get the rings, but
the school needs roughly
$1,200 more by at least
May 3. That's the order-
ing deadline. No donated


proved the bill (SB 1140)
unanimously on Monday.
State law now allows
certain retailers to sell
the pipes if at least 75 per-
cent of their sales come
from tobacco products or
they have no more than
25 percent of "certain
drug paraphernalia" sales.
The Senate and House
bills (HB 49) would
eliminate that exception
and make any sale a
first-degree misdemean-
or. Second and subse-
quent violations would
jump to a third-degree
felony.
Rep. Darryl Rouson is
sponsoring the effort in
the House. Rouson is a
self-described former
drug user who wants to
"take away.the conve-


funds will be used to pay
for anything except player
rings.
Honorary coach Mil-
licent Braxton is helping
coordinate donations.
She can be reached at the
school by calling 482-9616,
ext. 238.
Holland said the play-
ers have been asking
about their rings through
a couple of seasons now.
They've been assured that
they'll get rings at some
point, and Holland said he
feels it's time to fulfill that
promise.
"It'll mean a great deal to
them," he said. "They've


nience" for addicts.

Man dies following
house fire
FERNANDINA
BEACH- A man died fol-
lowing a northeast Florida
house fire.
The Fernandina Beach
Fire Department reports
that firefighters respond-
ed to the home early
Sunday morning. Crews
rushed into the home and
pulled the man out. The
man, whose name wasn't
immediately released,
was taken for treatment
but later died.
The Florida Times-
Union reports tiat the
cause of the fire remains
under investigation.
From wire reports


accomplished four state,
titles, and back-to-backs
are really special. They
have the heart and mind
to win for Hope School,
and they know they're a
great quality basketball
team. They know that, but
winning a state title, they
really ought to be getting
rings. I think they'll feel
more secure about the
title when they get those.
It's a big thing."
If money can be raised
for the, the rings will be
presented to the players in
a ceremony on May 31, the
last 'day of this academic
year.


Jackson County Vault & Monuments

Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90

i 8805 482-1041 Ij


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


~----- --`--` --=r=


LOCAL & STATE






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


i6A TUESDAY, APRIL2, 2013


Afghan teenager fatally stabs US soldier


The Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan An Af-
ghan teenager fatally stabbed
an American soldier in the neck
as he played with children in
eastern Afghanistan, officials
said Monday, as the U.S. death
toll rose sharply last month with
an uptick in fighting because
of warmer weather.
Last .week's calculated at-
tack shows that international
troops still face a myriad of
dangers even though they
are increasingly taking a
back seat in operations with
Afghan forces ahead of a
full withdrawal by the end of
2014.


i,.
c-
,
rr
F~~l~


Just one U.S. service member
was killed in February a five-


year monthly low
- but the Ameri-
can death toll
climbed to at least
14 last month.
Overall, the
number of Ameri-
cans and other


foreign forces
killed in Afghanistan has fallen
as their role -shifts more to-
ward training and advising
government troops instead of
fighting.
But a series of so-called insider
attacks on foreign troops by Af-
ghan forces of insurgents dis-
guised as them has threatened


to undermine the trust needed
to help President Hamid Karzai's
government take the lead in se-
curing the country after more
than 11 years at war.
The attack that killed Sgt.
Michael Cable, 26, of Philpot,
Ky., last Wednesday occurred af-
ter the soldiers had secured an
area for a meeting of U.S. and
Afghan officials in a province
near the volatile border with
Pakistan.
But one of two senior U.S.
officials who confirmed that
Cable had been stabbed by a
young man said the assailant
was not believed to have been
in uniform so it was not being
classified as an insider attack.


In this March 28 photo, U.S. Army carry team move a transfer case
containing the remains of Army Sgt. Michael Cable, 26, of Philpot, Ky., at
Dover Air Force Base, Del.


NKorea's parliament
meets amid tension
SEOUL, South Korea -
After weeks of war-like
rhetoric, North Korean
leader Kim Jong Un gath-
ered legislators Monday
for an annual spring
parliamentary session tak-
ing place one day after top
party officials adopted a
statement declaring build-
ing nuclear weapons and
the economy the nation's
top priorities.
The meeting of the Su-
preme People's Assembly
follows near-daily threats
from Pyongyang, includ-
ing vows of nuclear.strikes
on South Korea and the
U.S.

UN to vote on
arms trade treaty
UNITED NATIONS -
The U.N. General As-
sembly is expected to vote
Tuesday on what would be
the first U.N. treaty regu-
lating the multibillion-
dollar international arms
trade after Iran, North
Korea and Syria blocked its
adoption by consensus.
Assembly spokesman
Nikola Jovanovic told
The Associated Press on
Monday that the resolu-


In this March photo, Aurora, Colo., theater shooting suspect
James Holmes sits in the courtroom during his arraignment
in Centennial, Colo.


tion to adopt the treaty
requires support from a
majority of the 193 U.N.
member states. Since the
treaty had strong support
when it was brought be-
fore U.N. members,
its approval is certain..
There has never been an
international treaty regu-
lating the estimated $60
billion global arms trade.

Prosecutors seek
execution for Holmes
CENTENNIAL, Colo.-
For James Holmes, "justice
is death," prosecutors said
Monday in announcing
they will seek his execu-
tion if he is convicted in
the Colorado movie


theater attack that killed
12 people.
The decision dis-
closed in court just days
after prosecutors publicly
rejected Holmes' offer to
plead guilty if they took
the death penalty'off the
table elevated the
already sensational case
to a new level and could
cause it to drag on for
years.


"It's my determination
and my intention that in
this case, for James Eagan
Holmes, justice is death,"
District Attorney George
Brauchler said, adding
that he had discussed
the case with 60 people
who lost relatives in the
July 20 shooting rampage
by a gunman in a gas mask
and body armor during a
midnight showing of the
latest Batman movie.

Man dies while trying
to steal auto part
SHELBY, N.C. Cleve-
land County sheriff's
deputies say a Rutherford
County man has died
while trying to' steal a
catalytic converter from a
wrecked car.
Deputies say 28-year-old
DanielYount died early
Sunday morning.
Deputies sayYount and
32-year-old Dawn Bradley
had entered a business


southeast of Shelby
around 5 a.m. on Easter
morning. The company
has a number of wrecked
and disabled cars and cus-
tomers can pay to remove
salvageable parts.
Investigators sayYount
had jacked up a vehicle
and was trying to remove
a catalytic converter when
the jack slipped and the
vehicle fell on him. He
died at the scene.

I-77 reopens
following pileup
GALAX, Va.- Virginia
State Police on Monday
identified the three vic-
tims of a chain-reaction
crash involving nearly 100
vehicles along a moun-


tainous, foggy stretch of
Interstate 77.
The victims were
identified as William M.
Sosebee, 33, of Allen, Ky.;
KathernWorley, 71, of Iron
Station, N.C.; and Andrew
Katbi, 24, of Delphos,
Ohio.
State police said Sosebee
and Worley were passen-
gers in different vehicles
that struck the same
tractor-trailer, while Katbi
was the driver of another
vehicle that reared-ended
a tractor-trailer. All died at
the scene.
Authorities reopened the
northbound lanes Sunday
night and the southbound
lanes around midnight
Monday.
From wire reports


Voters will soon decide whether

to purchase our electric system.

A City-owned system can lower

rates, hold the line on taxes

and keep our money right

where it belongs...invested in

our community.


Roger Clay
Former Mayor .
Retired Educat(


I,





I,
ond
or


We Can Do This


34 Florida cities already run successful
electric systems, including Blountstown
and Chattahoochee.In fact,Quincy's city
electric system has the lowest rates in the
state. And Marianna will get help from
all those Cities in the event of a storm.


Marianna already successfully operates
water wastewater and natural gas utilities
- we can provide electric too.


Lower Electric Rates
FPU pays way too much for wholesale power
and they pass on the cost to us. If voters
approve, Marianna can take over the system
and lower rates for every home and business
in town.
Jonathan Fuqua
Owner of Tommy's Auto Glass


LocSal C{on trol
If Marianna takes over the system, rates will be
set locally by your City Commission instead of
for-profit FPU.The Commission works for local
people, not out-of-town investors.
Howard Milton, Jr.
Former Mayor and Retired Educator



CoTm aaunaity Investxrent
We pay the highest electric rates in the state.
If voters approve purchasing the system,
Marianna will be able to lower our rates and
invest, extra money in our community for
things like roads and public safety
John Walker
Marianna Community Leader


Business Seiase
This idea just makes sense. As business owners
and citizens we can keep more money in our
pockets and more money in our community
We can invest in the city attract new businesses
and help our economy grow.
Mark Panichella"
Owner of Madison's Warehouse Restaurant


MiunicipalElectric Association 417 E College Ave, Tallahassee, FL 32301 independently of any committee.


IKMELSON DISCOUNT
K EL SON DRUGS

Wherefw o ana Park At 74e DVoo


3008 Jefferson St. Marianna, FL


_ ___ _I __ _ill ~__1111__1_1_=1_=_~==1_=~=1__===~=1_=~


~d ~l~~----r~rP-ssr~Y~iLIJ~i*f~LC~-L~ C-L~T


~;a~l~B~C~I~EAI~~~~CtPIEI~AIIC~aPP.a~S~ l;.1"`rCl


NZ~I~ION & WORLD















Harper's homers mark opening day



Harper's homers mark opening day


The Associated Press

Josh Hamilton jumped into a
cab, headed to Great American
Ball Park and got all nostalgic.
The Los Angeles Angels new-
comer saw Cincinnati fans
packed downtown and remem-
bered making his big league de-
but in the same spot a while ago.
"People are lined up in the
streets, there's the parade," he
said. "It's just an awesome feel-
ing. It never gets old opening
day especially when you're
where you started."
All across the majors, baseball
was in full swing Monday.
Bryce Harper put on quite a
show in Washington. The 20-
year-old star hit home runs his


first two times up and earned a
few "M-V-P!" chants during a 2-0
win over Miami.
At Target Field in Minnesota,
players and fans bundled up.
It was 35 degrees with 17 mph
winds as the Twins took on ace
Justin Verlander and the AL
champion Detroit Tigers.
"It's whoever whines about it
the least, I think, who'll have the
best chance of winning today,"
Twins first baseman Justin Mor-
neau said.
The slugger's remedy for the
cold?
"Put hot sauce all over and
throw some long sleeves on and
some long johns and go out there
and run around and enjoy it," he
joked.


The hot chocolate line was 12
to 15 people deep at the ballpark
while the beer vendors were gen-
erally talking among themselves.
"It's opening Day. You can't not
come," said fan Ripley Peterson,
dressed in six layers for the chill.
"I love baseball, I love the Twins.
Opening day is a special thing.
Unless it's like a blizzard I'm go-
ing to be here."
The 2013 season officially
opened Sunday night when the
Houston Astros beat Texas.
Most every other team was in
action Monday. From old rivalries
on the coasts Red Sox-Yankees
in New York, Giants-Dodgers in
Los Angeles there was plenty

See HARPER, Page 2B


Washington Nationals left fielder Bryce Harper (34) hits his second home,
run of the game in the fourth inning of Monday's opening day game against
the Miami Marlins in Washington.


Sports
Briefs
Louisville's Kevin Ware
resting after surgery
Kevin Ware is already up and
walking, and he's got a nice
souvenir to keep him compa-
ny until he's cleared to return
to Louisville.
Cardinals coach Rick Pitino
brought the Midwest Regional
championship trophy when
he visited Ware, who remains
hospitalized after surgery to
repair a gruesome fracture in
his right leg.
"He was real excited about
(the trophy)," Pitino said after
visiting Ware again Monday
morning. "I said to him, 'You
want me to bring it back or
stay with you?' He said, 'It's
staying with me.' I said, 'All
right; just make sure you don't
lose it.'"
During a2-hour surgery
Sunday night, doctors reset
Ware's broken tibia and in-
serted a rod into the bone. Be-
cause the bone broke through
the skin, Pitino said doctors .
are monitoring Ware to make
sure no infection develops. If
there are no complications, he
should be released Tuesday.
The Cardinals plan.to leave
for the Final Four in Atlanta
onWednesday night, and
Pitino said they expect to have
'Ware with them. Ware is origi-
nally from New York City, but
he moved to the Atlanta area
before high school.

SSource: Browns trade QB
Colt McCoy to Niners
CLEVELAND -A person
familiar with the deal says the
Cleveland Browns have traded
quarterback Colt McCoy to
San Francisco.
McCoy, who started 21
games for the Browns in three
seasons, has been sent to the
49ers for a late-round draft
pick, said the person who
spoke Monday to The Associ-
ated Press on condition of
anonymity because the teams
have not yet announced the
trade.
McCoy became expendable
last week when the Browns
signed veteran backup Jason
Campbell, who is expected to
challenge Brandon Weeden
for the starting job.
CBSSports.com was first to
report the deal.

Raiders acquire QB Matt
Flynn from Seahawks
ALAMEDA, Calif.- The
Oakland'Raiders are chang-
ing directions at quarterback
once again.
The Raiders acquired
Seattle backup Matt Flynn
on Monday for draft picks,
signaling an end to Carson
Palmer's brief tenure as starter
in Oakland.
Fox Sports reported Palmer
was expected to be dealt to
Arizona. The Raiders paid a
hefty price when they ac-
quired Palmer from Cincin-
nati midway through the
2011 season, trading a 2012
first-round draft pick and
2013 second-rounder for the
former Pro Bowler. They now
will move on from Palmer
before they have even finished
paying up on the trade.

-From wire reports


SNEDWS FOOTBALL


BOOSTED


SUBMITTED
Sneads' Head Football Coach Bill Thomas is seen with the new hand held blocking pads pur-
chase by Citizen's Field Football Inc.


Pirates benefit from local fundraising


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

An organization devoted to help
the Sneads High School football te<
has a membership of roughly 250, a
continues to grow. In existence only
few months, Citizen's Field Football I
has already raised enough money to b
blocking pads and weightlifting equj
ment for the team.
In early March, several members
the club cooked a batch of smoked ri
outside McDaniel's Grocery Store
Sneads, and raised more than $3,000
the fundraiser.
Because of their efforts, the Sneads
rates are starting to train on some ni
equipment. Nine hand-held block
pads were delivered recently to Pirn
Coach Bill Thomas, for instance.


As for the weightlifting :racks, the.orga-
nization paid for the metal used, and in-
mates in a welding work program at ACI
ng were tasked with building the racks.
im David Goff, a member of CFF, estimat-
nd ed that the assist helped cut the costs of
r a the racks significantly. He estimated the
nc. school would have had to pay 75 percent
uy more to buy commercially-produced
ip- racks.
The organization will hold its first pub-
of lic meeting on April 9 and the opportu-
ibs nity to be a member remains open. The
in membership fee is $20 a year, Goff said.
in The April 9 meeting will be held at the
West Florida Electric Cooperative on U.S.
Pi- 90 near Sneads, at 6 p.m.
ew For more information about the orga-
ng nization, visit citfield.inc@gmail.com, or
ite visit the club's Facebook page at Citizen's,
Field Football Inc.


Football


Mothers
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Snead head football Coach Bill
Thomas is bringing the mothers
of his players in for a training
tutorial on April 12, showing the
moms what their sons will be do-
ing during their summer training
camp. The women will also get a
chance to run a play or two, lift
some weights and perhaps go
through some intense mat drills.
Members of the Citizens Field
Football booster club will cook
the mothers a meal, as well.
Thomas said he thinks the ses-
sion will be a winning play.
"You know what they say; if
mama's not happy, nobody's
happy. I figure if the mothers
see what I'm trying to do, to re-
enforce things that better young
men out of them-not just make
them better. football players- I
think I'll have that many more
people working with me to help
them. I want them to see and
really experience some of what
their sons are facing out here, the
demands that are on them, the
kind of commitment and disci-
pline it takes, and what we're try-
ing to accomplish."
Thomas said he got the idea at
a gathering about eight years ago
from a head coach who had run
the program. He said he prom-
ised himself then that, if he were
ever a head coach again, he'd put
it in play himself. Thomas had
spent a few years as head coach
for Apalachicola High School,
,but was then an assistant coach
at Arnold High School in Pana-
ma City. Sneads is his first head
coaching position since he heard
about the training session for
moms.
He said the mothers will be

See MOMS, Page 2B


College Football

Frazier, Wallace adapting to Auburn's new offense


The Associated Press

AUBURN, Ala. Kiehl Frazier
is trying to abide by former Au-
burn quarterback Cam Newton's
advice to forget about last year.
It should help that Frazier
and Jonathan Wallace who
both started games last season
- are operating with a new but
familiar offense and coaching
staff during the Tigers' spring
practice.
The chance to get counsel
from Newton, the 2010 Heisman
Trophy winner and the Carolina
Panthers' quarterback, doesn't
hurt either. Newton has been
taking classes at Auburn during
the NFL's offseason and Frazier
said he runs into him two or
three times a week.
"He's like, 'Forget about last
year. This is an offense that I did
well in and you can do well in,
too,'" Frazier said Saturday.
"I know I can be a good quar-
terback in this league," he add-
ed. "I've just got to step up and
do it."
He and Wallace are locked
in a two-man competition for
the starting job this spring, but


Teammates congratulate Auburn running back Cameron Artis-Payne
after a touchdown during Friday's spring football practice in Auburn, Ala.


that race will widen significantly
in August when junior college
signee Nick Marshall and prep
standouts Jeremy Johnson and
Jason Smith report for preseason
camp.
For now, they're the Tigers'
only scholarship players at a po-
sition where the team has strug-
gled since Newton's one-year
stopover en route to a national
title.
Auburn held its first practice


in full pads Saturday at Jordan-
Hare Stadium as the Tigers im-
plement coach Gus Malzahn's
no-huddle, spread-style of-
fense. Both players said they're
still trying to get the tempo up
to Malzahn's liking.
Malzahn recruited Wallace
and was Auburn's offensive co-
ordinator during Frazier's fresh-
man season when he was used
mostly in a Wildcat quarterback
role.


Wallace played in a spread
system in high school and had
to adjust after both struggled at
times running a pro-style sys-
tem last season.
"It's just part of the game as far
as getting a new coordinator,"
Wallace said. "Coach Malzahn,
he knows what he's doing. It's
just up to us to study every-
thing every day and just do what
they're telling us. That's the big- *
gest thing, is details. We have to
pay attention to details. As long
as we're able to do that, we'll be
fine."
Both quarterbacks have
worked on their weight during
the offseason. Wallace said he
has put on about 10 pounds,
up close to 210, while trying to
maintain his mobility. Frazier
said he's lost 10 or 15, down from
230 during the season.
Malzahn offered a tepid re-
view of their performance on
Saturday.
"There was some good and
there was some bad," he said. "A
lot of it, you know, anytime you
go first day in pads, and you've

See AUBURN, Page 2BL


11__ ____11~1__1_11_111II___-_










-12B + TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


College Football



Georgia's potential excites QB Murray


The Associated Press

ATHENS, Ga. Quar-
terbackAaron Murray sees
no reason why Georgia's
offense can't surpass the
big numbers it posted last
year.
The Bulldogs return all
but one starter from a
team that set a school re-
cord in scoring, won the
Southeastern Conference
Eastern Division and fin-
ished 12-2 to rank fifth in
The Associated Press' final
poll.
With Georgia's spring
game one week away, Mur-
ray believes depth at each
position will pay dividends
as several starters and role
players are learning new
positions and accepting
more responsibility.
"It's pretty smart rotat-
ing guys in, seeing who fits
with who, especially with
the offensive line," Murray
said this week. "They al-
ways want to get a set guy
in there. This is the time
you want to experiment."
Murray said he hasn't
been too concerned with
personnel groupings this
spring because he knows
coach Mark Richt and of-
fensive coordinator Mike
Bobo want him to concen-
trate on his timing.


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray (11) throws a pass during
Saturday's spring practice in Athens, Ga.


"I don't even know half
the time who's where
- running back, receiver,
linemen, tight end," Mur-
ray said with a smile. "I
just say, 'Hut,' and hope-
fully I get some protection
and somebody ends up in
the right place to catch the
ball."
Murray's most talented
receiver, Malcolm Mitch-


ell, is hardly averse to
making big changes be-
fore the.season starts.
Two summers ago,
Mitchell was a true fresh-
man learning the play-
book and trying to gain
the trust of Murray and
Richt. Last spring, Mitch-
ell was learning to play
cornerback because Richt
had suspended three de-


fensive backs who missed.
games in the first month.
Mitchell, who had an
injured hamstring and
couldn't play in the 2012
spring game, played four
games on defense before
returning to his natural
position of receiver be-
fore the Sept. 29 win over
Tennessee.
Now with the departure
of longtime starter Ta-
varres King, Mitchell has
moved again this time
from flanker to split end.
"It's just a lot more field
to get open with," Mitch-
ell said. "I'm loving it. It
is a lot to get adjusted to.
On the boundary, the ball
comes a lot quicker. You
don't have that much time.
The ball's out. But in the
field; you have to be pa-
tient sometimes for some
of your routes and know
the quarterback's going to
get it to you."
Todd Gurley and Keith
Marshall, who comprise
one of the nation's top
tandems at tailback, are
concentrating on pass
protection and communi-
cation skills to give others
a chance to run the ball.
Gurley took just two
handoffs in a scrimmage
earlier this week, and Mar-
shall hasn't been working


a full load in practice since
coming back from a slight
hamstring injury.
Richt and his staff want
to take a longer look at
early enrollees J.J. Green
and A.J. Turman. Kyle
Karempelis is getting ex-
tra snaps with the second
team as Brandon Harton
returns from an undis-
closed injury.
Gurley and Marshall
last year combined for
2,144 yards rushing and
25 touchdowns, so the
Bulldogs know what to
expect from the two rising
sophomores.
The pair's experience has
been a blessing to Murray
this spring, particularly
when he's running the
no-huddle.
"To be able to line up
quickly, call a play and go
instead of having to make
sure everyone knows what
they're doing and tell them
what to do," Murray said.
"That slows it down and
lets the defense get set up.
It definitely helps. Those
guys know what they're
doing. They're confident. I
trust them when it comes
to protection, route run-
ning, everything. It's defi-
nitely comforting know-
ing those guys have been
in battle with me for a full


season already."
Gurley, who said he's
added 12 pounds of mus-
cle since Georgia beat Ne-
braska in the Capital One
Bowl, understands his role
this spring has expanded
beyond the field.
S"I'm not a freshman any-
more," Gurley said. "With
you guys coming in like J.J.
and A.J., it's like I'm taking
on that role to look after
those guys and teach them
just like Ken (Malcome)
and Richard (Samuel) and
all those other guys did for
me last year."
The Bulldogs got a boost
on Thursday when right
tackle John Theus re-
turned to practice for the
first time since undergo-
ing offseason foot surgery.
Theus, who started 14
games as a true freshman
last season, said he worked
with the second-string.
He's one of five returning
starters on the line.
"Mainly the big thing
today was me just getting
back in there and trying
to get after it and get back
in the swing of things,"
Theus said. "Football is a
game of repetition. The
more you do it, the better
you get. It's just a matter
of me getting back into it
after the time off."


Harper
From Page 1B
to celebrate with a dozen
games.
"The three big holidays
- Thanksgiving, Christ-
mas and opening .day,"
LA co-owner Stan Kasten
said, watching the stands
at Dodger Stadium fill up
before the game against
World Series champion
San Francisco.
A few minutes later, a
stadium camera swung to
Vin Scully's booth, where
he's starting his 64th
season, and the revered
broadcaster pronounced:
"It's time for Dodger
baseball."
Dodgers co-owner Mag-
ic Johnson was standing
on the mound before the
game when manager Don
Mattingly came out and
signaled for a reliever. In
came Hall of Famer Sandy
Koufax wearing his No. 32
vintage jersey, and the ol'
left-hander threw out.the
first ball to former Dodg-
ers ace Orel Hershiser.


There was a lot more
to remember and honor,
too.
Players, managers,
coaches, umpires and
everyone else in uniform
wore patches in tribute to
those killed last December
in the shooting at Sandy
Hook Elementary School
in Newtown, Conn.
At Yankee Stadium, the
names of the 20 children
and six educators who
died scrolled on the video
board in center field dur-
ing a moment of silence.
The honor guard included
members of Newtown po-
lice and firefighters.
Nationals general man-
ager Mike Rizzo had a
patch attached to a lapel
on his pinstriped charcoal
suit. It has the seal of New-
town, a picture of a black
ribbon and 26 little black
stars, each representing a
victim of that shooting.
"It's so we don't forget
about the people in New-
town," Rizzo said, tapping
the patch with his hand.
"It honors them and keeps
them in our thoughts."


At Citi Field in New
York, the Mets honored
hundreds of Hurricane
Sandy responders mnd
volunteers in a pregame
ceremony. A large orange
heart with a blue NY logo
was placed in center field
and storm volunteers
wearing white shirts lined
up around it in the shape
of home plate.
The team donated
1,000 opening day tick-
ets to storm responders
and those affected by the
destruction.
First responders from
several organizations,
including the NYPD and
FDNY, lined up in uniform
behind the infield dirt,
facing. the stands. They
remained there as players
from the Mets and San Di-
ego Padres lined up along
the baselines for pregame
introductions
Singer and actress
Emmy Rossum sang the
national anthem backed
by 50 choir members from
the Scholars' Academy
School Chorus from the
Rockaways, an area hit


hard by Sandy.
Opening day-prompted
Hamilton to recall his
first game in the majors,
in Cincinnati in 2007 af-
ter he overcame years of
drug abuse. The All-Star
outfielder who joined the
Angels in the offseason
returned to Cincinnati for
an unusual interleague
opener.
"I enjoyed myyear here,"
he said. "It was the begin-
ning of everything that's
happened so far in my ca-
reer, so it's always going to
hold a special place in my
heart. It's always fun to
come back to the places
where you began."
In Washington, there
is an abundance of opti-
mism. Good reason for it,
as the Nationals come off
a season in which they led
the majors with 98 wins.
Stephen Strasburg threw
the first pitch against the
Marlins at 1:09 p.m. That
was 4 minutes later than
scheduled, because all
the pregame -festivities,
which included unveiling
a red, white and blue sign


atop the outfield score-
board that read "NL East
Division Champions" in
all caps.
The Nationals also gave
out all manner of individ-
ual awards from 2012: a
Gold Glove for first, base-


man Adam LaRoche; Sil-
ver Sluggers for LaRoche,
shortstop Ian Desmond
and Strasburg; NL Man-
ager of the Year for Davey
Johnson; and an execu-
tive of the year plaque for
Rizzo.


----- "--






2 & 3 BEDROOM MODELS
AVAILABLE
$80,000 $130,000
Price Range

Owner Financing
Available to
Qualified Buyers


Vist s a -gsuarddveopmntco


I L77T1e


_U_~~*


Auburn
From Page 1B
got three days under your
belt and you're playing a
lot of inexperienced guys,
there's guys that are not in
the right place, or guys that
don't block and so some-
times it makes the quarter-
backlooklike it's really ugly.
But overall I'd say it was an


Moms
From Page 1B
walked through the en-
tire football program to
some extent, will visit the
weight room, the old gym-
nasium where his team
does some training, and, if
a new training area behind
the weight room is ready by
then, he'll have them work
out in that area as well.
Thomas said he's look-
ing forward to the exercise,
and that he anticipates it
will help make the moms
his advocates in the train-
ing process.
Thomas said he's feeling
fortunate as he takes over
the Snead High School
football program. On the
job just a few weeks, he
already has a booster club
working by his side on be-
half of the program. The
Citizens Field Football Inc.
formed last November and
has already' raised mon-
ey to pay for some new
weightlifting equipment
and blocking pads.
"They're going to be a big
Idifference-maker in our


average day for them."
Frazier struggled with
turnovers and other things
last season before losing
the starting job, and he had
shoulder problems.
He said his confidence
ebbed during that time
but that he never consid-
ered transferring espe-
cially after Malzahn was
hired as Gene Chizik's
replacement.


program," Thomas said
of the boosters. "All- the
things I need here, I would
not be able to get without
them. Their excitement
about it is really making a


"Wheriever I committed
I knew I was going to stay
at Auburn through my four
years so I knew whoever
we brought in I was go-
ing to stay here," he said.
"It being coach Malzahn
was kind of a pleasant sur-
prise because that's who I
expected to play for when
I got here. I think every-
body's happy that coach
Malzahn's back."


lot happen. I heard abodt
them when I interviewed
for the job, and I thought
it could be a good thing.
It's turned out to be'a great
thing."


Of Helping the World Hear Better!


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Benefits of hearing instruments very bytype and degree ol hearing loss noise environment, accuracy of hearing
evaluation andproper d. Not to be combined with others offers or previous purchases. Limited time only.


I


\- SATURDAY
:t "i( I^ '" APRIL 27

7a.m.- p.m


*O \Houston County Farm Center

Sn $33 28
Snp ces Ore O n insidel0'xl0' outside 10'x20'
8' TABLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR RENT


SELL YOUR ITEMS

TO HUNDREDS!
i g{0t I-. *000] I I[l V99L SIe e~e S S [ I *O@I ]I &~ e ~


Individuals & Businesses Welcome
MAIL YARD SALE SPACE RESERVATION AND PAYMENT TO:
Dothan Eagle Attn: NIE Yard Sale P.O. Box 1968, Dothan, AL 36302
OR DROP OFF AT: 227 North Oates Street, Dothan, AL
Name:


Address:


City:


State: Zip: Phone:
Email address:
What type of items for sale:

Number of inside spaces needed(s33 ea) Number of outside spaces needed('28 ea)
Number of tables needed(t10 ea)
My payment of $ is enclosed Please charge my credit card
fnrde numher" eXn.


uS4I5.4JuSe.


or more
information call:
334-702-6099
tIA


NOT TO BE SOLD BY VENDOR:
firearms, live animals, provocative materials, tobacco/drug
paraphernalia, food or drink, or any other goods that the Events sponsored he
Management deems inappropriate for sale on the day of the event. oT,- i ,
Spaces subject to limitation. DOTHAN LAGLE
proceeds benefit Newspaper In Education


--


I ~' ~



I vuu flillupl.







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


a&! 5LEA
BLEAH! 8LEAq!-






BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
,0 .
IwoW be YOUR AN.UNL DR.ERE 5AY5'1 5H\P3HAPE!
PI ,IC.AL EX A NtP'ON GOT O


BIG.NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
rnM "CHEER UP, DON'T WAANT ME To
READY NATE! YOU E THE ASSIsTANT
FoR f LooK LIKE COACH, Et? .
PRACTICE. YOU'RE AFRAID I'LL
GONG TO A EARRAS S
FUNERAL' EtCs


WELL, THERE'S NOTHING
WRONG WITHA LITTLE
EMSBARRAS5IENT IT
TEACHES YOU HOW To
COPE WITH TINGS!


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
HOTc\ ITS RoM~1 f~e~i DN'T G~boU N~ THOae
tTwIN',< are PLSNTeO S~bT5, 9ovMorots...1itey'Re
if1)1 INCERf~iN ElfoTs aLoNO CUT~ IN~ FoRS1S, Soak~t) 'N
10-e oaoDND THeN ~* CHeM'.CaLs 1-treN pLacer
UpTo BeltRl e ~ HTet.INt tE~e-'Tfe FbweP CbMt'aNY.
~tbLeso


ENTERTAIN] VIENT


t PLAY ON
A TEAM
CALLED THE
"CREAM
PUFFS I'VE LT
COPED
ENOUGH ;'




\ljnJ


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON
DID Y00 HEAR ABOUT THE HE PAID FOR AN EXPEDITION
GOY WHO STARTED TO FINlD THE ROCKET EIGI .ES,
"AMAZOM"0 FROM APOLLO f11!


THEY'VE BEED R5OTIfIG Oh
THE FLOOR OF THE ATLANTIC
OCEAN FOR OVER 40 YEARS!


4-2 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another..
"EMPWEMJJ H MP, DP MYR MJHM K P

HDJJ EW FL NW FG EWPF CMNW DY

FGW HLZJR." EMEW ZVFG


Previous Solution: "A fool and his money are soon parted, but it is remarkable
how many fools have money to part from." Edgar Guest

TODAY'SCLUE: O slenbae
@2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 4-2


FAR BE IT FROM ME TO BAY
HE HA' TOO MUCH MOtEY...




yp


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
You ACTUALLY "3 AND IT WOULD HAVE WORKED HE CAME OUT OF THE SPELL AND
PLANNED TO STOP .Too, BT APPARENTLY THE POTION ( CHASED AFTER ME, AND ALL THE OTHER .
THE CHARGING WASN'T STRONG ENOUGH, AND IT WORE DINOSAUR FOLLOWED D BEHIND t IM rCI
DINOSAURS? OFF ON MY FIRST DINO SUBJECT' EXACTLY LIKE I'D INSTRUCTED! T


ALLEY OOP BYJACK AND CAROLE BENDER
YOU'RE sUCh A SCRAWNY LET ME GUESS! THE YE5 I KEPT SAYING THE WORDS THAT
LITTLE RUNT, WIZER. HOW WORDS THAT WERE SPOSED WERE SUPPOSED TO MAKE THEM STOP ,. '
DID YOU PLAN T'STOP i T'STOP THE DINOSAURS ( BUT ONCE THE POTION WORE OFF I LOSi -
THOSE DINOSAURS? 'F WERE "ALLEY OOP," RIGHT? MY CONTROL OVER THEIR MINDS.
I TRAINED SO THAT EXPLAINS WHY
THE TO STOP 'l.YOUWERE RUNNINGT~HROUGH
WHEN wTHEY HAt EO\,T ~ TE JUNGLE LIKE A MANIAC
< CI wo- TWO WORDSYELLIN' MY NAME!


THAT A BABY BY PAUL TRAP
F\o,4e s
\s e
sprmn pee?"3 `
finsll uVP/ s
here p

,;
?Yirb


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


a- Laq runtSoC Irir nan i


"The doctor said to sleep on your stomach
tonight and he'll see you in the morning."


ACROSS
1 Allow
4 Blond
shade
7 Vigoda and
Fortas
11 King
beater
12 Mets'
former
ballpark
14Whimper
15 Game bird
17 Helm
position
18 Mull over
19 Avalanche,
to a moun-
taineer
21 And, for
Wolfgang
22 Strong
soap
23 Prepared
to propose
26 Removed
the pits
29 Manhattan
river
30 Berets and
fedoras
31 indent key
33 Firearms
lobby
34 Renown
35 Yesteryear
36 Havana
residents


38 Fixed the
piano
39Top
40 Cosmonaut
space lab
41 Bwana's
trip
44 Silly tricks
48 Attired
49Vikings'
vessel
51 Exude
moisture
52Loud cry
53Santa -
winds
54 Mon.
follower
55 Deli loaf
56 Lair

DOWN
1 Reindeer
herder
2 Mic
problem
3 Babysitter,
often
4 Agreement
5 Piece of
broken
glass
6 Pullet
7 Astonished
8 Composer
Bartok
9 Big pitcher


Answer to Previous Puzzle


SA W T
ECR 1U A
PL AiN H
T U PIE LIO
V EIE
LU GIE S
A2KIIN Co
BEG MA
SAV OR
CAT
WEAR



opeativeO
HOL STE
ONE AV
MSG DA
10 Luge or
sleigh
13 Jock
16 Grown-up
20 Nay
opposites
23 Cowboy
Maynard
24DEA
operative
25 Hairy twin
26 Shepard
and
Levene
27 007's alma
mater
28 Press
one's luck
30 With ease
32 -and-
breakfast


EST APB
LAI LOA
I CCUPED
CI3O MgE
GEL
HdERAIL D
Z E ESSE
Y TITHE
BAT
ETHANE
IN E BON
ID RENO
IS LO W
34Just
35 Mongol
dwellings
37 Knife parts
38 Prickly
sensation
40 Macho
41 Glasgow
citizen
42Slugger
Moises -
43 Disconcert
45"If - a
Hammer"
46 Movie
47 Wingspread
50Above, in
verse


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


TUESDAY,APRIL2, 2013 3B-


HOrOSCOpe

ARIES (March 21-April
19)- Be extremely care-
ful that you don't achieve
your purposes at the
expense of someone else.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Usually you can do
quite well in partnership
situations, but this isn't
likely to be the case if your
aims differ from others.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
A potentially profitable
endeavor could become
active, but you'll need
to redesign it in order to
capitalize on it.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Don't get too closely
involved with someone
who has a dubious reputa-
tion. Take plenty of time to
really find out what your
potential partners are all
about.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
If you're giving a price
quote for ajob or service,
be sure your estimated
cost is as accurate as
possible.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) -When required to
manage a serious situation
for another, don't treat it
indifferently.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
If you're not on top of
things, someone might
seize the reins and make a
decision in his or her best
interests, not yours.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Guard against an
inclination to hold on to
an idea long after it has
proven to be unproduc-
tive. It's important to think
on your feet.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Strive to be
logical when making an
assessment that would di-
rectly affect your financial
position. Don't put all of
your hopes on Lady Luck.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) In order to be a
true leader, you must not
be afraid to take charge
of situations, even if you
don't have a lot personally
invested in their outcome.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Several important
objectives can be achieved
today, provided you don't
trip over your own feet.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Be careful, because
a well-intentioned friend
might offer you some ad-
vice that, if you treat it as
gospel, could prove costly.


Annie's Maibox


Dear Annie: My father, my brothers and
I all served during Operation Iraqi Free-
dom. Only my father and I deployed to
combat areas.
Dad retired five years ago and is show-
ing drastic symptoms of PTSD. .He is
stockpiling food and medical supplies
and keeps trying to get my wife and me to
"prepare" for when "it all hits the fan." He
spends hours a day obsessively watching
the news and getting angry at the televi-
sion. Our children used to spend time
unsupervised with my parents, but that
stopped when I found a loaded handgun
in his bathroom cabinet.
My mother has broached the topic of
therapy, and I've offered to go with him,
as I've been wrestling with some mild
PTSD issues myself. But my brothers in-
tercede every time and say Dad's fine and


Bridge


William Lyon Phelps was a popular columnist
and public speaker who taught the first American
university course on the modern novel. He said, "If
at first you don't succeed, find out if the loser gets
anything."
At the bridge table, a loser usually gives a trick to
the opponents. Sometimes, though, taking that trick
can be costly. In today's deal, what should be the re-
sult in four spades after West leads the club king?
Note East's balancing one-no-trump overcall. This
shows only 11 to 15 points. With a normal strongno-
trump, East doubles and rebids in no-trump.
South's three-heart rebid and North's jump to four
spades were aggressive but reasonable. North liked
his three-card spade support, a ruffing value in
South's second suit and an ace.
South wins the first trick with dummy's ace, plays
a heart to his queen, cashes the heart ace, and leads
another heart. Should West ruff with his spade 10 or
pitch a minor-suit card?
In general, if declarer is about to ruff a loser, the
defender should discard.
Here, if West ruffs, the contract can be made. South
trumps the (say) club continuation, ruffs a heart on
the board (bringing down East's king), and plays a
spade to his nine. He continues with a high trump
and loses only two spades and one diamond.
IfWest correctly discards at trick four, the play gets
interesting. South ruffs, trumps a club in his hand
and leads another heart. Now West must ruff He
then leads a minor, and South cannot avoid losing
another two spades and one diamond to East.


it's no big deal, and they convince him
not to go. I believe this is dangerous. I've
been unable to find any home counseling
services, and even our pastor says this is
out of his realm of expertise. What other
options are out there?
NEWYORK SON
Dear Son: You may have better luck get-
ting your father to accept help if you ap-
proach this as a possible medical prob-
lem, rather than a psychiatric issue. We
also suggest you ask him to join you for
an exercise or yoga class, which can be
useful for some PTSD sufferers. Also,
please contact the VA's National Center
for PTSD (ptsd.va.gov) or Military One
Source (militaryonesource.mil) at 1-800-
342-9647, and ask to speak to a counselor
or get a referral to local military treatment
facilities.


North 04-02-13
4 865
Y 74
*9853
4A652
West East
Z1o2 1AJ3
Y83 YK962
S10 7 6 2 K Q 4
,KQ974 A 10 8 3
South
~ KQ974
VAQJ 105
SAJ


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 Pass Pass 1NT
3 V Pass 4 All pass


Opening lead: a K


Ij; tY Ijn i~jzl UC: cr lor U;S, ill]







4 B Tuesday, April 2, 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




MARKET PLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publishers employees or othervjse and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. Alladvertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


For deadlines call toll-free onanr vii wIcfoia~o


ANNOUNCEMENTS,;


I *BE I'
Key West Flordia
April 23-29,2013
Washington DC/Patriotic Tour
June 27-July 2, 2013
Ride The Rails (West Virginia)
July 22-26, 2013
Best of China (Beijing City)
October 15-23 2013


CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!


($)


FINANCIAl.;


BUSIgNESSIOPPO


Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com


Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
504-915-1474


AC: Complete package unit $500. 850-272-8470
Battery charger: 200 amps $100. 850-482-2636
Ent Center wood, shelfs $100. 850-596-2969.
Generator Troy Built 5500 $500. 850-638-2446
Glock-35: 40 cal. $500. Call 850-592-7265
Ladder 24ft. fiber glass $110. 850-638-2446.
Laptop: HP G61, 3GB mem $350. 850-693-5098


P) MERCHANDISE

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Alabama 1992 National Championship artist
proof, signed coach Stallings & Daniel Moore
"The Tradition Continues" 23"x 29"
exc. cond $900. 334-655-2727.
Brunswick Pool Table: Beautiful, Traditional
Ball & Claw, Bar Size Table with Custom Tan
Felt; dark mahogany wood; with 6 pool sticks
of different weights, caulk; a wooden stick/
accessory holder that is round and sits on the
floor; a ball set; both racks (8 ball & regular);
several felt brushes, etc. Original Price was
around $3,000. Selling for $700, 334-685-2898
Tow Dolly: pull behind, good condition, new tie
down straps $600. Call 334-618-2516 or 850-569-
2750

Piano used; in fairly good condition. Asking
$500. Call (850) 526-3474 in evenings.
fmelvinl23@gmail.com
(~S PETS & ANIMALS

FREE: 2 kittens '6 weeks old. Need good home
850-482-5880 or 850-272-4908.
FREE: Kittens to loving home. multi-colorl-F &
1-M 850-272-4908 or 850-482-5880
I I
AKC Brittany Spaniels Orange/White. 4 males
and 4 females. Excellent hunting blood line.
(Nolan's Last Bulllett). Tails docked and dew
claws have been Iremoved. Will be Ready on
March 29th. Call (229) 724-8839 if interested.
German Shepherd Puppies: AKC registered,
first shots,, mother has German bloodlines.
Black and tan, black and silver. 5 males, 1
female.7 wks old. 850-768-9182 or 850-849-3707.
Reg. English Bulldog puppies UGA blood line
both dam and sire, shot records up to date
o$1200. 229-237-2935


Prom Dress: size 6 $175. 850-482-2636
Push Mower- no gas required.$99. 850-592-8769
Stove & Oven Hotpoint $125. 850-209-6977.
Table & Chairs w/ 4 chairs $200. 850-569-2969
Washer & Dryer stakable $400. 850-569-2969
Window: New 29x30 White $100. 850-482-2636


SUPER PUPPET SALE! Chihuahua,
Shih-Tzu mix puppies and Morkies.
Now taking deposit on Papillions.
334-718-4886 plynn@sw.rr.com

(i) FARMER'S'MARKET


GRASS & MILK FED BEEF!!
Freezer Ready Esto meat.
GREAT QUALITY!!
Quarters and Halves. USDA Inspected
ESTO MEATS CALL 850-263-7777


F SP D


850-573-6594


Frozen Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
4 4128 Hwy 231


IX&A1i [ *. 1;11 -1h0l
r............................... 1
.- Bahia seed for sale 4-
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
* or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L...................................
S Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia'& Coastal
r.2ve Daytime 334-585-3039,
'--- after 5pm & weekends 585-5418


Cattle: 30 bred cows 3 to 7 years old and
50 bred heifers for sale. Most are Angus and
Brangus cross with a few Charolais cross.
For more information call 334-303-9285.


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
S334-389-2003

NeeD TO PLACe AN AD?
JJt's simple, call one of our friendly
Classified representatives
and they will be glad to assist you,


Sudoku


level: H [; [3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Friday's puzzle
321574986
496832517
578916243
847291635
152683794

639745821
915 368472
283457169
764129358


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


4/2/13


YEilB


EMPLOYMENT


I EDUCATION


CHIPOLA COLLEGE
is accepting applications for
the following positions:


WELDING INSTRUCTOR
CAREER COACH WELDING PROGRAM
Minimum qualifications and job duties are
available at www.chipola.edu/personnel/job.
APPLICATION DEADLINE IS
OPEN UNTIL FILLED.
To obtain an application, contact
Human Resources at pippenwechipola.edu
or at (850)718-2269. Candidates may be
subject to background investigations.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


River Valley Rehabilitation
Center Is now hiring:
RN'S & LPN'S
7a-7p & 7p-7a SHIFT
C.N.A'S
3-11 SHIFT
$1.00 SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL
FOOD SERVICE AIDE
5a-1:30p/1a-8p SHIFT
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
8a-5p shift FT
Taking applications for C.N.A Classes for
April Deadline for Application April 1st,
Class starting April 8th.
Great Pay and Benefits Health,
Vision & Dental
Please Apply at:
River Valley Rehabilitation Center
17884 NE Crozier Street
Blountstown, Fl. 32424
Ph: (850) 674-5464
Fax: 674-9384
Email: rvhrc@southernltc.com
Drug Free Workplace- Safe Minimal Lifting
Environment An EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D


President/CEO
Jackson County Chamber of Commerce
The Jackson County Chamber is accepting
applications for the position of President/
CEO. Min.3-5 yrs leadership experience with
bachelors degree or equivalent education or
business experience required. Prefer some
experience with a non-profit, a Chamber, or
membership organization led by a board of
directors. Proven skills needed in public
relations, public speaking, marketing,
e-communications, business operations,
planning, and P&L management. Must be
able to interact effectively with entrepre-
neurs, business owners, executives, elected
officials, civic leaders and volunteers. Must
be able to self-relocate to Jackson County.
Position closes April 15th. Submit resume
to jcchambersearch@gmail.com.


Network Specialist
Local Company growing and expanding,
looking for experienced Network Specialist
for installing Lg. commercial printers &MFP's
Benefits. Salary Negotiable
Send Resume to: The Dothan Eagle
Box EE 227 N. Oates St Dothan, AL 3633


f EDUCATION
'- & INSTRUCTION


LOOK
FOLLOW YOUR PASSION! Become a Daycare
Director 6 wk. Homestudy Course $300.
Call Mrs. Alaina 334-714-4942 9am 5pm


S- Fast, easy, no pressure
P l c \ an A d 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

\\ www.jcfloridan.com


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3

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CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Tuesday, April 2, 2013- 5 r
Tuesday, April 2, 2013 B


Enrolling Now!
Training in
FOR TIS ElectricalTrades,
COLLEGE Assisting,Pharmacy
Technology and More!
Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 for consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu





COTTONDALE VILLA
APARTMENTS
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR 1 & 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS RENTAL
Assistance Available to Quailified Appliants
CALL: (850) 352-2281
TDD USERS 1-800-548-2456
Office Opened Tuesday & Thursday
EQUAL HOUSING 3111 Willow St.
OPPORTUNITY Cottondale, FL 32431




GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids-* HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL. Call 850-482-4663

S OU3, G fl OPPOWUNlI .Y


2/2 3136 Aycock Rd. 900 sq. ft. washer/dryer,
flat screen TV's $650. mo. $650. dep. utilities,
dish, garbage water & sewage w/pool
(Appointment Only) 850-352-2951 850-573-1864


- 1BR/1BA, nice clean apt. in town screened
porch, large yard $450. mo.
No pets. 850-557-2000 for more info.




1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4=
3/2 brick with CH&A Alford FI
$695 mo. + dep. 850-579-4317; 850-866-1965
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Large 2BR/1BA Cottage with family room all
updated w/central air, very large fenced yard,
in county. 5 minutes to downtown off 73 North
or 90 West. $550. Mo + Dep. Call 765-425-5288


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
850-209-8847 4.
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

2 &3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595




S 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 Located between
Grand Ridge & Sneads. Includes water &
garbage. $360. Mo n 850-573-0308 -




Poultry Farm for Sale 4 houses, Poultry farm
and 5000 sf residence, 2 car garage, 64 acre,
U.S. Hwy. frontage, huge barn, generator, Trac-
tor, farming equipment, $1,100,000 for more in-
fo. Kaan 334-596-8311




h Eagle 2010 190 Yamaha
150 G3 bassboat
4-stroke warr 2014
Humminbird 788ci, 2
chairs, 2 butt seats, galv
trailer, hydraulic steering, many extras,
$18,500. Call 334-616-1918 or 334-355-0326

r^HnfldI, I,


Xtreme

Boats
08l


Packages From
$4,995
All Welded
All Aluminum Boats


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Triton '07 188SF Fish and Ski: Mercury Optimax
150HP, 24 volt trolling motor, trailer included,
garage kept, like new conditions, less than
150 hours, $19,000. Call 334-685-3921

1999 Winnebago 32' motorhome:
Sleeps 6. Excellent condition. Gas engine with
gas saver system installed. 32K miles. Must see
to appreciate! $12,000. Call 334-685-3810
Fleetwood 1997 35ft Bounder: 1 slide-out, back-
up camera, leveling jacks, generator, low miles
39k, run goods, new tires. $17,500. OBO
Call 850-482-7554 or 850-209-3495
MEed a M9ew -ome? Chedc out the Classifid


BMW 1995, leather int. good gas mil. green in
color, 4-door $3,200..firm 334-793-2347
BMW 2005 X3 white with tan interior, 165,000
miles, V6, auto, excellent condition, full sun-
roof. $10,000, 850-263-4913
Buick 2005 LaSabre: 56k miles, beige, new tires,
fully loaded, beige leather interior, very nice
condition. $5,500. Call 334-589-0637
CHEVY 1995 CAPRICE-Clean, runs great, Cold
air, fully loaded $3,800 OBO 334-355-1085
Chevy 2010 Impala, Great family car with great
fuel mileage, fully loaded. $300 down $300 per
month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.
SCorvette 2003 Z06 50th
Anniversary Edition
Metallic Blue 6 speed, 405
hp, 40,500 miles, Excellent
Condition $19,195.
334-475-3735 after 6PM.

DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
GOT BAD CREDIT?
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy slow credit ok
$0 Down/lst Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull or Drag will trade
RIDE TODAY! FREE $25. gas giveaway
Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
Honda 2007 S-2000 76k mi.
Car is awesome! $19,500!
Let the top down and go
cruising! Black on black
convertible. 6 spd. Adult
owned. Clean well maintained. Responsive lit-
tle rocket! below NADA. Come look, give it a
test drive & you'll be hooked. 334-805-4740
S Mitsubishi 2004 Eclipse De-
pendable, one owner, great
gas mileage, sunroof, few mi-
nor blemishes, 120,000 mi,
Automatic. Asking $6,000.
Will take best offer. Call Jen-
nifer at 334-791-0143
Mitsubishi 2012 Galant, Like new! Must sell!
$200 down, $259 per month. Call Ron Ellis 334-
714-0028.
Nissan 2010 Sentra, Navigation, Leather, Sun
roof, Must sell! $200 down, $249 per month..
Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Toyota 2011 Yaris: silver with black interior, 4
door sedan, bucket seats, one owner, automat-
ic, 5980 miles, 40MPG Hwy, $13,995. Call or
Text 334-618-6588 LIKE NEW !!
Toyota 2012 Corolla, Great gas saver, fully
loaded, low miles, very nice car. $200 down,
$250 per month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.


Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Senior Citizens Discouut
FREE ESTIMATES 334-798-0687











I

Clay O'Neal's sRCO
Land Clearing, Inc. BM ,mE
ALTHA, PL
850-762-9 2 0
Cell 850-832-5055 a S


NEWa USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELW RETAIL PRICES!
TRIPLE 850.526.1700
J s Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
2978 Pierce Street
(behind Tim's Florist)


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


2012 Harley Road King
Black. Only 1400 mi. 6 spd
103 ci 1600cc, security sys-
tem, ABS brakes, cruise,
back rest with luggage
rack. Bought last fall, still
under warranty. 2 helmets included. Wireless/
Bluetooth/ FM radio intercom system. (approx
$600 value) Adult owned, title in hand. $16,500
obo. 334-794-9388 or pwt.1202@yahoo.com
Harley Davidson 2000 Ultra Classic Tour Glide:
loaded plus extras, blue and silver, only 8500
miles, new tires. $8,300. Call 334-585-5396
Harley Davidson 2006 Soft tail Standard:
4600 miles, vinson/haines pipes, 250 rear
wheel, bronze pearl, lots of chrome, 25K
invested. Asking $10,000. Firm. 334-793-3611
Harley Davidson 2007 Heritage Softtail Classic
exc. cond, new tires, new battery,
lots of chrome $12,500.
334-712-0493 or w-334-793-8028
Honda 2005 VT 1100C
Shadow Spirit: black and
chrome, good condition,
like new, 3400 miles, one
owner, clean title never
wrecked, new tires.
Asking $6300. Call 334-596-1171
Honda 2005 VTX 1300-R
Nicest one in Alabama,
Too much chrome to list.
$9,500. 4(en 334-693-9360



Chevrolet 2003 Trailblazer
4x4. Excellent condition.
Garage kept since pur-
chase. Fully loaded 4x4.
105,00 miles. Must see to
appreciate. Black with grey interior. $7,200.
Phone 850-956-2623


4000 Ford Tractor good condition, new engine
$4,250.334-791-0700
Dodge 2000 Dakota RT: black, fully loaded, 5.9
liter 360 Magnum, Bridgestone tires, beautiful
and rare truck, pampered and well kept, runs
and drives excellent & clean carfax available.
Serious inquiries only. $7,200. Call 334-585-0121
Please leave a message.
Ford 2003 Ranger Edge ext. cab good condition
89K miles, $5,900. 334-446-0044 Susan
Ford 2010 F250 Super Duty Super Cab Lariat:
white, fully loaded, 4X4, low miles, excellent
condition $37,500. Call 334-685-2318
GMC 1986 2500 Series: 4 door, 2 seater but no
back seat, 8 cyl, 91k miles, one owner, garage
kept, very good condition. $3,800. Call 334-792-
3756
International 1995 4900: Flat Bed Truck, DT466,
AC, 125k miles. $6,000. Call 334-897-6346 or
334-406-7200
Massey Ferguson Tractor md#1215 w/MF220 \
5 ft. mower, good cond. $6700. 334-797-8523.
Toyota 1994 Tacoma 4-wheel drive as whole or
parts. 334-689-9436.


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
"s'aOef 2'4 Toaoawsf7.gIa
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


Lawn Care &
Outdoor Property
Maintenance
*) Free Estimates
Call Woody 850-526-2030


IT'S AS EASY
AS 1 -2 3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


HAPPY

HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
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Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured


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I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664

Got a Clunker
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and Farm Equip. at a-
fair and honest price!
$325 & tComlete Cars :
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285
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LF160086
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
WATER USE PERMIT
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chap-
ter 373, Florida Statutes, the following applica-
tion for a water use permit has been received
by the Northwest Florida Water Management
District:
Application number 107375 filed 02/28/2013
Bigham Farms, Inc., 4795 Old U.S. Road,
Marianna, FL 32446
Requesting a maximum withdrawal of
12,528,000 gallons per day from the Floridan
Aquifer System for Agriculture use by existing
facilities.
General withdrawal locations) in Jackson
County: T6N, R10W, Sec.15, 16, 17, 20, 21, 22, 23
Interested persons may submit written
comments/objection or submit a written re-
quest for the notice of proposed agency action
(NOPAA) regarding the application by writing
to: Division of Resource Regulation, Northwest
Florida Water Management District, attn: Terri
Peterson, 152 Water Management Drive, Hava-
na, Florida 32333. A NOPAA will be mailed only
to persons who have filed such requests. A
NOPAA must be requested in order to be ad-
vised of further proceedings and any public
hearing date. Written comments/objection or
NOPAA requests must be received by 5:00 p.m.
eastern time on April 16, 2013.
No further public notice will be provided re-
garding this application. Publication of this no-
tice constitutes constructive notice of the per-
mit application to all substantially affected


You CALL.. WE COME To You!
RED'S MOBILE
....SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE.
, 850-209-9713,
ED WAR /MAGGI, OWNER
-S


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JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAN


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monster"

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


www Ir T.RTImAN enm


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CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES


Chad O's Lawn F/X
Commercial & Residential
Spring Clean-up &
Monthly Maintenance
Full Lawn Care Service'
Free Estimates
Family Owned & Operated
Chad Oliver I 850-573-7279


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I







-16B + TUESDAY. APRIL 2,2013


SPORTS


College Football


Ash 2 TDs, 2 INTs in Texas spring game


The Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas Texas
unveiled the quicker up-
tempo offense the Long-
horns hope will carry
them back to the top of
the Big 12.
When it worked well,
David Ash passed for
touchdowns in four scor-
ing drives Saturday night
in Texas' annual spring
scrimmage. And when it
didn't, Ash threw two in-
terceptions that looked
like just the kind of gaffes
that sometimes surfaced
last season.
Coach Mack Brown
stressed at the start of
spring drills he wants the
Longhorns to push a fast-
er pace on offense, noting
the success of other pro-
grams around the coun-
tiry doing it.
"I think we'll go back to
scoring points like we're
used to," Brown said.
Texas didn't use the
up-tempo offense the
entire scrimmage, but
used enough of it that
Brown said he liked what
he saw and promised it
will be polished into an
even faster unit in the
fall. Brown wants the ball
snapped within 15 sec-
onds and the offense was
inconsistent hitting that
mark.
"I like it," Ash said of the
quicker pace. "The spring
game shows us where
we're at and.we need to
take ownership of that."
Ash was 17 of 24 for
162 yards. Two of his first


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Texas quarterback David Ash (14) throws a pass during Saturday's spring game in Austin,
Texas.


four drives against the
No. 2 defense included a
38-yard touchdown pass
to Mike Davis and a 24-
yarder to Kendall Sand-
ers. Ash threw his two
interceptions when Texas
sprinkled several starters
into the defense against
the first-time offe.ne-.
The first turnover'Was
an improvised shuffle
pass on a scramble that
flew into a defender's
arms. The second came
when Ash overthrew a
deep route.
"He's got to be smarter
than that," Brown said of
the shuffle pass pickoff.
"Other than that, he man-
aged the game really well
and made the right calls."
The second turnover
came just before halftime.
OffensivecoordinatorMa-
jorApplewhite, who heads
into his first full season as


Nowitzki keeping


The Associated Press

DALLAS Dirk Nowit-
zki finally leads the Dal-
las Mavericks' in scoring
again. He has more work
to db if he wants to make
the playoffs for a 13th
straight season.
The 7-foot German
passed teammate O.J.
Mayo even before getting
a season-high 35 and hit-
ting a last-second 3-point-
er to complete a stirring
rally against Chicago over
the weekend.
The Mavericks started
winning at a playoff pace
once Nowitzki got settled
in after missing the first
27 games following the
first knee surgery of his
career. Their playoff odds
still aren't good going into
a critical game Tuesday
night at the Los Angeles
Lakers, one of the teams
they're chasing, but with-
out a 15-1 run in the final
minutes of the 100-98 win
over the Bulls, the odds
would be even worse.
In other words, they're a
reflection of feisty owner
Mark Cuban with their
core of four veterans with
at least 13 years of NBA ex-
perience apiece.
"Nobody gives up. I think
we're all competitors,"
Nowitzki said. "Mark ... is
probably the biggest com-
petitor. You see the tweets
with Donald Trump every
day. They're competing
over Twitter, those two
morons. And obviously
the leadership of this
team with the older guys.
We've all obviously got a
lot of pride, a lot of fight,
and that's what you'll be
seeing these last couple of
weeks."
Nowitzki said the same
thing about the Lakers,
who started the season as
a good bet to win the West-
ern Conference after put-
ting Dwight Howard and
Steve Nash alongside Kobe
Bryant. They've changed
coaches and battled inju-
ries and chemistry issues,
and started Monday tied
with Utah for the final
playoff spot in the West, a
game and a half ahead of
Dallas (36-37).
Ultimately, the Lakers
and Mavericks might be
looking up at the Jazz, who
have by far the best home
_record of the three and


play five of their next six
in Utah. The Mavericks,
meanwhile, are starting a
four-game trip with stops
in playoff-bound Denver,
Sacramento and Portland,
where Dallas rarely plays
well.
"Even if we win (against
the Lakers), it doesn't
mean we're in," Nowitzki
said. "So we're in a tough
situation, but we're sure as
heck going to try."
At least .the Mavericks
have Nowitzki in playoff
form. He's averaging 19.9
points per game since the
All-Star break, when it was
safe to say recovery from
knee surgery was behind
him, and he's shooting 63
percent over his past eight
games.
He's had several vintage
Nowitzki games in recent
weeks hitting big shots
in fourth quarters but
even those at times have
been illustrations of Dal-
las' up-and-down season.
Case in point: the last
time the Mavericks played
the Lakers. Nowitzki had
probably his best game of
the year to that point with
a season-high 30, but Bry-
ant was just a little better,
getting 38 in theLake"
103-99 win.
That was one of many


Texps' play caller, said in
a real game situation, the
turnover would have cost
Texas a chance to deliver
a knockout punch to an
opponent.
"I want him to be hard
on himself in those situa-
tions, but he's had a great
spring," Applewhite said.
The turnovers at least
showed Brown a more op-
portunistic defense. The
Longhorns had one of the
worst defenses in school
history last season when
the Longhorns went 9-4
and tied for third in the
Big 12.
Defensive coordinator
Manny Diaz said prac-
ticing against Texas' up-
tempo offense will get the
Longhorns ready to face
the high-powered offens-
es in the Big 12 like Okla-
homa, Baylor and West
Virginia.


"It will prepare us for
what we'll see in the fall,"
Diaz said, "I wanted to see
us play fast, tough and
physical."
Texas also got its first
look at freshman quar-
terback Tyrone Swoopes,
who had two strong runs
after breaking tackles in
the backfield. Although
Texas has a capable
backup to Ash in senior
Case McCoy, Brown said
Swoopes has worked his
way into the third spot.
Johnathali Gray rushed
six times for 45 yards and
a touchdown.
Texas hasn't challenged
for the Big 12 title since
winning it in 2009. That
will change in 2013, Ash
said.
"We're very experi-
enced," Ash said. "We're
going to contend for the
Big 12 title."


playoffpush
days the Mavericks didn't four point
figure to have much hope "He's ch
to keep their playoff streak bit to get
alive. spot," May
"We're not.perfect," Dal- zki. "He ca
las coach Rick Carlisle That's wh
said. "In many ways we've help lighted
embraced our imperfec- bereadytc
tion. And I think in our sit- beside hin
uation that's what you've
got to do."
Nowitzki still needs help,
just as he did when the
Mavericks won the title
in 2011. Mayo was the go-
to guy while Nowitzki sat
to start the season, but it
didn't take long for teams
to figure that out and make
things hard on him.
Plus, Mayo's never been
the top option, so it's re-
ally been a season-long
struggle. He's led the team
in scoring just twice in the
past 24 games, and now .
he's battling a bum shoul-
der from a collision in last
week's win over the Los
Angeles Clippers the
first for Dallas this season
against the top four teams
in the West standings at
the time.
While Nowitzki was
making just about every-
thing against the Bulls,
Mayo was having-his worst
shooting day in Dallas. He
made one of 13 from the
field and finished with


LOCAL NEWS, YOUR WAY.
WEEKNIGHTS AT 5:00, 6:00, & 10:00


alive
5s.
romping at the
into the eighth
yo said of Nowit-
arries a big load.
y we're here, to
en it. We have to
o throw punches
M."


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


College Basketball


Louisville guard Peyton Siva (3) holds up the Cardinals' trophy
as Louisville players celebrate their 85-63 win over Duke in
Sunday's Midwest Regional final in in Indianapolis.


Louisville the



'sure thing'


The Associated Press

The word of the season:
Parity.
The team of the moment:
Louisville.
For a college basketball
season in which it seemed
anybody could beat any-
body, and the No. 1 rank-
ing was never secure, Rick
Pitino's Cardinals have
certainly cemented ,them-
selves as a prohibitive
front-runner now that
there are only four teams
left. They head to Atlanta
listed as 3-5 favorites in Las
Vegas, after dispatching ev-
eryone from Duke to North
Carolina A&T with equal
ease on their way to the Fi-
nal Four.
Trying to stop them will
be Michigan, Syracuse and
Wichita State a pair of
No. 4 seeds and a No. 9, all
serving as great examples
of how difficult it was to
sort out the contenders
from. the pretenders head-
ing into the 2013 version of
March Madness.
"Cinderella found one
glass skipper," said Gregg
Marshall, coach of Wichita
State, which beat No. 1-
seeded Gonzaga and No.
2 Ohio State on its way to
adding some mid-major
mojo to the Final Four. "We


won four -games. I don't
think she found four glass
slippers. When you get
to this point, you're good
enough to win it all."
Pitino said he does, in
fact, believe in parity during
this, a season in which the
team at the top of The As-
sociated Press poll changed
five times in five straight
weeks at one point.
He called the Midwest
Region, where the Cardi-
nals were seeded first and
won their games by an av-
erage of nearly 22 points,
"the death bracket."
"I've experienced quite
a few NCAAs," said Pitino,
who is coaching his sev-
enth Final Four team. "I've
never played the likes of a
Colorado State in the sec-
ond round. They're a team
that was very much capable
of, getting to a Final Four.
Then Oregon was just abso-
lutely terrific. Then certain-
ly Coach K and Duke ... To
play Duke in an Elite Eight,
never mind a Final Four, it
was a death bracket."
But fueled by emotion
after teammate Kevin Ware
gruesomely broke his leg,
the Cardinals (33-5) beat
Duke by 22 points, the sec-
ond-most lopsided loss of
the season for coach Mike
Krzyzewski's team.


~L09 M4273 gffAlkwm If


If you are an area church that would like to
be featured in this year's edition contact the
advertising department of the Jackson County
Floridan at (850) 526-3614
or email salesjcfloridan.com.

Deadline for advertising is April 12, 2013.


_______ ------------------------~"-------.--.-..


STYIFOMD