Jackson County Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01049

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text

--.......... ALL FOR
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORYo
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007



4A Get planting v
Informing more t


Jr Home & Garden section
.1000 readers daily in print and online


Veterans fight for
disability payments iA


Vol. 90 No 75


Lakey, Padgett in running for administrator job


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com


Jackson County Administra-
tor Ted Lakey and another Jack-
son County resident are among
the final four candidates being
considered to'take over as
administrator for Okaloosa
County. A decision could come
as soon as Tuesday.
Lakey and former Jackson
County Commissioner Ernie


Padgett are the only two Florida
candidates to make the final
four, according
to information
provided by Oka-
S loosa County Hu-
man Resources
Director Kay
Godwin.
Ted Lakey Rick Chaffin of
Texas and Stephen
Layson of Georgia are also in the
hunt. to take over for the current


Okaloosa County Administrator
Jim Curry. He's retiring April 19
after 35 years work-
ing for the county.
Godwin said the
S '. Okaloosa Coun-
ty Commission
A interviewed allfour
candidates Thurs-
Ernie Padgett day and then held
a public session
that afternoon during which the
public could' ask questions as


well. The sessions can be viewed
online at co.okaloosa.fl.us.
The board talked brief-
ly about proceeding with a
recommendation that day, God-
win said, but ultimately decided
to hold off on a decision until
Tuesday, as initially planned.
One commissioner was absent
Thursday, and one of the com-
missioners who was present
said he wanted time to think
about it over the weekend, God-


win added.
Okaloosa County retained
the services of an executive re-
cruiter to help officials build a
field of candidates for the job,
Godwin said. The recruiter, Col-
lin Baenzieger, will be there to
facilitatethe selection process
Tuesday.
The new administrator will be
coming to the job as that county
begins to debate its new fiscal
budget.


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Szalyn Harmon pulls out to an
early lead, as a large crowd of
ds and parents pour onto a
egg-laden softball field Saturday dur-
ing the Grand Ridge Spring Festival.
BELOW: Katelyn and Tanner McAlpin
paused from huntifig eggs to get a
picture with the Easter Bunny


-~4



Slex Gatlin h as c ountinr, a, J
S hatching, his eggs. BELOW: Jerry
IL Al icks II chews on a convenient
Frisbee as he tours the festival with his


ON 8AAND 9A.


-, f'


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna Middle School Director of Bands Amy Allen talks with some
of her sixth-grade students, who were getting ready for their upcoming
Spring Concert.

Concert band on a roll


ANGIE COOK
acook@jcfloridan.com

If there's anyone who can
tell us if success ever gets old,
it might be Amy Allen and her
band students at Marianna
Middle School.
Eighth- and seventh-grade
concert band students at MMS
are still enjoying their most
recent win: Earning straight
"superior" ratings March 9 in
Chipley at this year's Florida
Bandmaster's Association Dis-
trict II Concert Music Perfor-
mance Assessment, or as Allen
says it's known in some circles,.
"FCAT for bands."
At the three-day assessment,
stage judges listen to bands play


three prepared pieces chosen
by their director, rating them on
how well they perform funda-
mental concepts. The bands are
also asked to do what's called
a sight reading, in which stu-
dents are asked to play a piece
of sheet music they've seen for
the first time that day.
From a pool of music pieces
preselected for the MPA, Al-
len says her choices "March
Zuma" by John O'Reilly, "Ome-
ga One" by Larry Clark and "An-
them" by John Edmondson -
had elements in place that she
wanted to teach her students
as they prepared for district.
She also wanted selections that
See BAND, Page 7A


Dunaway family farm receives Century Pioneer Award

BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER together in 1911, and his father ". --__ -
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com bought out their interests in 1916.


The US Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Services'
this week recognized another
Century Pioneer Family Farm in
Jackson County, the 16th local
family to receive the honor since
the program began.
Brothers Kenny and Harry Du-
naway and other family members
met USDA representative Susan
Reese on Friday at the Dunaway
family farm on Nubbin Ridge
Road to receive the large sign
which signifies that honor. To be
a Century Farm, the land must
have been in the same family for
at least.100 years and still be in
agricultural use.
Kenny Dunaway said his father,
Omie C. Dunaway Sr., and two
uncles bought about 200 acres


ui me original l ract, 36 acres stun
remain in possession of the Du-
naway family. Kenny Dunaway
still lives in the house where he
and his four siblings grew up, and
his brother Harry lives next door.
In 2015, the house itself will be
100 years old.
About 10 acres of the land are
devoted to pine trees, five acres
have pecan trees and the rest
is primarily used to raise pea-
nuts. The land is rented to local
farmers.
Dunaway said he helped pick
cotton and harvest peanuts on
the farm as a child, and occasion-
ally plowed the land as his father
raised peanuts, cotton and corn.
Three of his siblings did not live
See FARM, Page 7A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Robert "Kenny" Dunaway's family gather at his farm near Greenwood on Friday to receive Jackson County's latest
Century Pioneer Family Farm Award. Susan Reese with the Florida Department of Agriculture presented the sign
designating that distinction. From the left are Fletcher Dunaway, Elizabeth Goodwin, Susan Reese, Jim Dunaway,
Hap Dunaway, Jorene Dunaway, John Dunaway, Robert Dunaway, Sonny Dunaway and Mike Dunaway.


)CLASSIFIEDS...9B


This Newspaper a''
Is Printed On I H 'A
Recycled Newsprint ', .r



II I11 11! 1
7 65161 8(010 1


> ENTER I UJr. EI rT...7B


))JC LIFE...3A


> OBITUARIES...8A


) OPINION...6A


) SPORTS...1B


) WEEKLY ROUNDUP...10A


TUMARMA HLIBMIiLER1
Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan 7

(850) 482'35 I'


HOPPING DOWN


THE BUNNY TRAIL


Follow us





Facebook Twitter


_1_ _1~1~1_1~-- .111~11_1_---.-.1-1_.1111_1__
CI~Y


1..


FL RIDAN


, * *. .
!, ** \*** **^ .; .>"^ **
fe^^^-i'w^ :^ *




c~U 'iJS_ .d 9S bqor Z t ,u


12A + SUNDAY, MARCH 31,2013


WAKE-UP CALL


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN e www.jcfloridan.com








lz-.. .-E-. . ,,
"A ,.
:' ":, "J'-" ""."-" '- :x " -" .


High- 780
Low 570


Monday
Scattered Thunderstorms.



S. High -71
Low 540


Wednesday
Isolated Thunderstorms.


High 72
1 Low 550


Tuesday
Mostly Cloudy


'1


High 71
Low- 58


Thursday
Isolated Thunderstorms.


24 ,ur.,r11 1 i Ye r t. date Il 2" 1'
Month lo date 2 '4-" No.nnal ID I 16Ni .' '
Normal MID 5.7t Normal for yeai 59.2o
TIDES ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Panama City
.Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


11:45 PM High
8:58AM High
11:50 PM High
8:41 PM High
12:04 AM High


Reading
53.47 ft.
15.59 ft.
10.09 ft.
8.72 ft.


- 12:29 AM
- 1:35 AM
- 1:02 PM
- 1:35 PM
- 2:08 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme

0 1 2 3 4

THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:31 AM .
Sunset 7:00 PMv
Moonrise 11:51 PM Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr.
Moonset 10:32 AM 10 18 25 3


FLORIDA'S REAL

PANHANDLE sUNTM

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 1009'

L jj~IjTiFR ORYWE0EiUDTSIg


'wEG[ 7jteso Tf
-Y-~~ ~~


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

-Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m; to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
'Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
"Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
SHome delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
S$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year .

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for.damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
,publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on .
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community calendar


SUNDAY, MARCH 31
a Alcoholics Anonymous Closed
Discussion 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W.
Lafayette St. in Marianna (in one-sto-
ry building behind 4351W. Lafayette
St.). Attendance limited to persons
with a desire to stop drinking.
Alcoholics Anonymous Meet-
ing 8 p.m. in the board room of
Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, APRIL 1
Marianna/FPU Public Informa-
tion Forum 4-6:30 p.m. at the
Marianna City Hall Commission
Room, located at 2898 Green St. The
city of Marianna encourages all city
residents to attend an informational
session about the April 9 Florida
Public Utilities purchase referendum.
Additional sessions are scheduled.
Call 482-4353.
) Jackson County Quilter's Guild
Meeting 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascen-
sion Lutheran Church, 3975 U.S. 90
West, Marianna. Business meetings
are fourth Mondays; other Mondays
are for projects, lessons, help. All
quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
)) Central Jackson Relay for Life
Committee Meeting 6 p.m. at
Milk & Honey Frozen Yogurt, 4767 U.S.
90-in Marianna. Meetings are planned
for the first Monday of each month
prior to the April event. Volunteers
needed. Contact angelaparker30@
gmail.com or 573-5353.
) City of Jacob Regular Monthly
Meeting 6 p.m. at the Jacob City
Hall. The public is welcome to attend.
Call 263-6636.
) Model Approach to Partnership
in Parenting Course 6-9 p.m. at
4403 Jackson St., Marianna. Course
is free and is designed to promote
partnerships in parenting and help
the licensing agency and prospective
foster and adopting parents mutually
decide on-the best parenting path
for their family. Course is a require-
ment by the State of Florida for those
interested in becoming a foster
parent or adopting. Call 522-4485,
ext. 8404 or kpeek@lmccares.org.
) Woodmen of the World Lodge 65
Monthly Meeting 6:30 p.m. at the
Dellwood Volunteer Fire Department.
A business meeting will be held. All
members are invited to attend, bring
a friend and your favorite soup and
sandwich. Call 482-5255.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room..


of First United Methodist Church,
2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, APRIL 2
East Jackson County Economic
Development Council Business of
the Month Recognition -10 a.m.
at Blondie's Food and Fuel, corner of
U.S. 90 and U.S. 69 in Grand Ridge.
The public is invited to attend.
) Optimist Club of Jackson
County Meeting Noon at Jim's
Buffet & Grill in Marianna.
) Orientation Noon to 3 p.m.
at Goodwill Career Training Center,
4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn about
and register for free services. Call
526-0139.
) Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson
County Senior Citizens, 2931 Optimist
Drive in Marianna. Call 482-5028.
Marianna/FPU public Informa-
tion Forum 4-6:30 p.m. at the
Marianna City Hall Commission
Room, located at 2898 Green St. The
city of Marianna encourages all city
residents to attend an informational
session about the April 9 Florida.
Public Utilities purchase referendum.
Additional sessions are scheduled.
Call 482-4353.
) Chipola College Community
Chorus 6-7:30 p.m. in the Center
for the Arts at Chipola College. Sing-
ers, aged high school and above are
welcome to sing with the Community
Chorus and will perform on the April
16 Chipola Ensemble Concert. Call
718-2376 or heidebrechtd@chipola.
edu.
) Marianna City Commission
Regular Meeting 6:30 p.m. at
the Marianna City Hall Commission
Room, 2898 Green St. Call 482-4353.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist Church, 2901 "
Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3
AARP Foundation Tax-Aide
Volunteers Free Tax Return
Preparation 9 a.m.-l p.m. at
Jackson County Agriculture Center.
Call 482-9620 during business hours
of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. for an appoint-
ment.
) Early Learning Coalition of
Northwest Florida Board of
Directors Meeting -11 a.m. at the
Department of Children and Families,
2505 W. 15th St. in Panama City. This


meeting is open to the public. Confer-
ence call number1-888-670-3525,
guest code 4998489399.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting Noon to 1 p.m. in the
AA room of First United Method-
ist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in
Marianna.
Basic Computer Class Part 1
- Noon to 3 p.m. at the Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90,
Marianna. Learn basic components
and use of a computer. No cost to
attend. Call 526-0139.

THURSDAY, APRIL 4
n Marianna Kiwanis Club Meet-
ing 7 a.m. at the Gazebo Coffee
Shoppe & Grill in downtown Mari-
anna. Call 482-2290.
) "International Chat n' Sip"-
8:30-10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch,
2929 Green St. People are invited to
enjoy a relaxed environment for the
exchange of language, culture
and ideas among our local and
international communities. Light
refreshments will be served. Call
482-9124.
) Grief Workshop 10 a.m.-i p.m.
at Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kelson
Ave., Suite E, Marianna. This work-
shop is for those who have suffered
the loss of a loved one or would like
to learn how to help those who are
grieving. This workshop is free to the
public and light refreshments will be
provided. Registration is required.
Call 482-8520 or toll free 888-817-
2191.
n Job Club Noon to 3 p.m.,at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn job
seeking/retention skills; get job
search assistance. Call 526-0139.
).Kindle Fire Ebook Class 3-4
p.m. at the Jackson County Public
Library, Marianna, Branch, 2929
Green St. Learn how to check out
and download Jackson County Public
Library books from the Axis 360
system. Participants should have
a basic knowledge of how to use a
Kindle Fire. To register call 482-9631.
) Marianna/FPU Public Informa-
tion Forum 4-6:30 p.m. at the
McLane Center, 4291 Clay St. in
Marianna. The City of Marianna
encourages city residents to-.
attend an informational session
about the April 9 Florida Public
Utilities purchase referendum. One
additional session is scheduled. Call


482-4353.
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide
Volunteers Free Tax Return Prepa-
ration 4-7 p.m. at the Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call
482-9620 during business hours of
8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. for an
appointment.
) Quit Smoking Now Class/Sup-
port Group 5:30 p.m.at Jackson
Hospital in the Cafeteria Board Room.
Free to attend. Curriculum developed
by ex-smokers for those who want to
become ex-smokers themselves. Call
718-2545.
V VFW & Ladies Auxiliary Meeting
- 6 p.m. at 2830 Wynn St. in Mari-
anna. Covered-dish supper followed
by a 7 p.m. business meeting.
Call 372-2500.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed
discussion, 8-9 p.m., First United
Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia
St., Marianna, in the AA room.
Attendance limited to persons with
a desire to.stop drinking; papers
will not be signed.

FRIDAY, APRIL 5
) Knitters Nook 10 a.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library, Mari-
anna Branch. New and experienced
knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Money Sense Noon to 4 p.m.
at the Goodwill Career Training
Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna.
This is a financial literacy class that
helps with budgeting, saving and
other financial topics. No cost to at-
tend. Call 526-0139.
Two-Toe Tom Beauty Pageant
- 6:30 p.m. at the Graceville Civic
Center in Graceville. Divisions will
include Tiny Baby Miss, Baby Miss,
Toddler Miss, Tiny Miss, Future
Little Miss, Little Miss, Baby Mister,
Toddler Mister and Little Mister.
Proceeds will benefit the Two-Toe
Tom Festival celebration. Admission is
$3 per person. Children age 3
and younger are admitted for free.
Call 263-4744.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m.
at Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts,
habits and hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m.
Child care available. Call 209-7856,
573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room
of First United Methodist Church,
2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.



Police Roundup


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for March 28, the
latest available report: One
accident with injury, one suspi-
cious person, one highway
obstruction, one burglar alarm,
16 traffic stops, one larceny, one
noise disturbance, one animal
complaint, three assists of other
agencies, two public service.

Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following inci-
dents for March 28, the latest
available report: Five accident
reports, one missing adult,


three abandoned vehicles, two
reckless drivers, one suspicious
vehicle, one
--'--. = suspicious per-
-. --r son, one report
C IfME of mental ill-
? . ness, one physi-
cal disturbance,
four verbal
disturbances, three fire calls, 13
medical calls, eight calls regard-
ing traffic crashes-one with en-
trapment, four burglar alarms,
14 traffic stops, one larceny
complaint, two civil disputes,
one trespass complaint, one
follow-up investigation, one
animal complaint, one assist
of a motorist or pedestrian,
nine assists of other agencies,
two public service calls, four
welfare checks, one transport,
one patrol request and two 911
hang-ups.


Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) John Blackmon, 18, 5637
Henry Way, Greenwood,
grand theft, dealing in stolen
property.
) Benjamin Durham, 20, 5637
HenryWay, Greenwood, grand
theft, dealing in stolen property.
) Yvonne Lipner, 45, 2679A
Powell Road, Cottondale, pos-
session of controlled sub-
stance-two counts (Oxycodone
and Lorazepam), possession
of prescription pills without a
prescription-three counts.
) Lydia Brown, 39, 5637 Henry
Way, Greenwood, grand theft,
dealing in stolen property.
) Nathaniel Flournoy, 26, 4928


Spyglass Drive, Panama City,
loitering and prowling.
) Joseph Cogburn, 32, 2589
Rowell Road (Apt. B), Cotton-
dale, battery-domestic violence.
) James Hoskins, 23, 2009
Festival Lane, Montgomery,
Ala., possession of a controlled
substance (amphetamine), pos-
session of marijuana-less than
20 grams, possession of drug
paraphernalia.
) Onivillio Morales, 34, 3100
Hawthorne St., Sarasota, hold
for Manatee Co.
) Irvin Gardner, 27, 3360 Plan-
tation Circle, Marianna, hold
for Bay Co.

Jail Population: 207
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or'a local law enforcement
agency.To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


Weather Outlook


7 1

1



JCFLC)FI DAN -CC Pi












Cou vI S


Mr. and Mrs. Britton B.
Dennis, Jr. are pleased to an-
nounce the engagement of
their daughter Anna Kathryn
Dennis, to Timothy Andrew
Gilley, son of Mr. Phillip
Gilley and Mrs. Tammie Gen-
try.
The bride-elect is the grand-
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Ronald E. Keel, and Mr. and
Mrs. Britton B. Dennis, Sr.
She is a 2009 graduate of
Marianna High School.


The prospective groom is
the grandson of Ms. Annette
Dalton and the late Mr. J. R.
Grice, and Mrs. Betty Baxter
and the late Mr. Cecil Gilley.
He is a 2010 graduate of
Sneads High School and is cur-
rently employed at Wal-mart
in Lynn Haven, Florida.
The wedding will be an
event of May 11 at St. Luke's
Episcopal Church in Marianna
with Reverend Norman Bray
officiating.


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Sassy is a friendly and outgoing three-year-old female Shih
Tzu mix. If you are interested in adopting her, the shelter is
at 4011 Maintenance Drive in Marianna. Its hours are 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. The
shelter's phone number is 482-4570; the website is www.
partnersforpets.petfinder.com.


On the Menu
April 1-5
Breakfast and lunch for
Jackson County schools.
Monday
B Breakfast: Egg biscuit,
sausage biscuit, assorted
cereal and buttered toast.
Choice of 1: Chilled peach-
es and chilled pears.

s Lunch: Chicken nachos
supreme, assorted wraps,
assorted salads. Choose up
to 3 sides: Refried beans,
steamed corn, fresh as- -
sorted fruit, chilled mixed
fruit.

Tuesday
n Breakfast: Cinnamon
roll, ultimate breakfast
round, banana muffin
loaf. Choice of 2: Pineap-
ple tidbits, fresh assorted
fruit.

) Lunch: Sloppy Joe on
bun, hot grilled ham and
cheese, assorted salads.
Choose up to 3 sides: Fresh
carrot sticks, tater tots,
fresh assorted fruit, pine-
apple tidbits.

Wednesday
a Breakfast: Mini waffles,
oatmeal and toast, as-
sorted cereal and buttered


toast. Choice of 1: Raisins,
assorted4100% juice.

Lunch: Turkey and
gravy over rice, cold cut
on bun, assorted salads.
Choose up to 3 sides: Collard
greens, mashed sweet po-
tato, fresh assorted fruit,
assorted 100% juice.

Thursday
Breakfast: Breakfast
pizza bagel, buttery grits
and toast, assorted cereal
and buttered toast. Choice
of 1: Chilled mixed fruit,
fresh assorted fruit.
Lunch: Baked ziti with
garlic sticks, assorted
wraps, assorted salads.
Choose up to 3 sides:
Mixed vegetables, romaine
salad, fresh assorted fruit,
apple sauce.

Friday
Breakfast: Mini pan-
cakes, assorted cereal and
cinnamon toast, oatmeal
and toast. Choice of 1:
Applesauce, fresh assorted
fruit.

)) Lunch: Hotdog on
bun, cheese pizza, grilled
cheese sandwich. Choose
up to 3 sides: Potato
wedges, steamed sweet
peas, fresh assorted fruit,
chilled pears.


Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your'Cute Kids*' photos to
editorial@jcfloridan.com, mail them to
SP.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
or bring them by our offices at 4403
Constitution Lane in Marianna.

'12'years or under with Jackson County ties. Include child's full
name, parents'name(s) and city of residence.
This is a free service. All entries subject to editing.


Births


Helina Jayde Baker was
born March 21 at Jackson
Hospital. She weighed
6 pounds, 9.2 ounces
and was 20 inches long
at birth. Her parents are
Dawn and John Baker. Her
grandparents are Debra
Rutherford of Marianna
and the late James "Bo"
Baker and Vickie Baker of
Chipley. Her siblings are


Braelynn Danielle By-
rge was born March 18
at Jackson Hospital. She
weighed 7 pounds, 13
ounces and was 19 3/
inches long at birth. Her
parents are Sara Byrge
and Gregory Glover. Her
grandparents are Joe and
Brenda Procter of Mari-
anna and Machall May-


bon of Cottondale.


Daniel Alexander Brogdon
was born March 19 at Jack-
son Hospital. He weighed
6 pounds, 14 ounces and
was 181/2 inches long at
birth. His parent is Mary
Brogdon. His grandparents
are James Brogdon and
Katherine Pons of Sneads.


Micah John Martin Jr. was
born March 20 at Jack-
son Hospital. He weighed
8 pounds, 9 ounces and
was 19 1/2 inches long
at birth. His parents are
Tabitha Dawson-Martin
and Michal Martin Sr. His
grandparents are Theressa
Reed, Lynette Williams,
Billy Comer and Shun and
Micarel Martin of Blount-
stown and John and Angela
Dawson of Bristol.


Mental rest as beneficial as physical rest


It's great to be alive! Sometimes
it's important to remove our
focus from our bills and the
nagging problems that are part of
everyday life, and to simply feel
good to be able to see another day.
When I opened my eyes the other
morning after a good night's rest, I
began to do my normal routine of
mentally laying out the way to bal-
ance my schedule which always
seems hectic for the day.
But, for some reason, I was able
to get away from my daily aggres-
sive mental activities and relax my
mind. Many of us are busy people
in a busy world; but during recent
months I've come to realize the
value of getting the physical and
mental rest it takes to regroup and
refresh our bodies from time to
time.
When I was able to take a deep
breath and relax my mind, I
thought about how blessed it is
to be among the living; especially
during this time in our world's his-
tory. We as today's citizens of the
world are witnesses to historical


events good and bad that will
affect and be spoken of by genera-
N tions to come if God
allows this world to
continue to exist.
Technology is so
advanced today
that inventions and
products are improv-
Thomas ing at a rapid pace.
Vincent We are seeing that the
Murphy biblical prediction
(from Daniel 12:4)
that knowledge would increase
is accurate. With the increase in
knowledge, there always seems to
be a newer and better product on
the horizon.
Speaking of history, who would
have thought, because of some
of the negative activities of our
country's past, that the United
States of America would elect an
African-American president? As an
African American, the emotions
and excitement of witnessing such
a historic event during this day and
time.is hard to express in words.
This is a great time in history to be


a citizen of this world.
If you are a sports enthusiast,
during this era there is an opportu-
nity to witness the abilities of some
of the greatest athletes in history.
Depending on your age, having a
chance to view the performances
from, great athletes like Muham-
mad Ali, Michael Jordan, Michael
Phelps, Serena Williams, Payton
Manning, Kobe Bryant, Larry Bird,
Rodger Federer, Lebron James and
Floyd Mayweather Jr. during your
lifetime shouldn't be taken for
granted.
The variety of music is wider than
at any other time in our history,
because of the many new instru-
mental and electronic sounds
available from the new technology.
Yes, we're living in a new world full
of new inventions, new ideas, new
styles and activities that come with
a large variety of choices; but if you
take the time to take a deep breath
and dwell on the most valuable
things in life from time to time, I'm
sure you'll feel as I do, It's great to
be alive.


Birthdays


Uyosue celebrates
first birthday
E'niah Kemora Uyo-
sue celebrated her first
birthday with a Minnie
Mouse themed party on
Saturday, March 30, at
the McLane Community
Center in Marianna.
Her special cous-


ins Jacavia Johnson,
Ny'miracle White and
Ny'omi White, god-sister
Ty'Leah Tolbert and god
brother La'Cliffton John-
son along with other fam-
ily members and friends
were in attendance for the
special celebration.
Her guests enjoyed
hamburgers, hot dogs,
*sausage dogs, wings,
potato salad, deviled eggs,
meatballs, mini sausages,
chips, cookies, cake, ice
cream and grab bags.
She also enjoyed a party
on Friday, March 29 with
her classmates at.Moth-
erly Love Daycare where
everyone was served
cheese puffs, mini cup
cakes and juice.
Uyosue is the daughter
of LekeriaWilliams and


Lil E Uyosue of Marianna.
Her grandparents are
the late TroyWilliams
of Panama City, Mari-
lyn Thomas Graham of
Marianna, Beauty Udi of
Maorin-; nniU filriryea Unie 4


Niguria and Eric Hayes uo
Marianna. Her godpar-
ents are Marilyn Glynn of '
Donalsonville, Ga., and
Machelle Bank of Phoenix ,
City, Ala., and her special *-'
aunt is Tameeka Williams
of Marianna.

Edenfield celebrates munity Center. Everyone
95th birthday is asked to bring a dish for
this covered dish lunch.
'PI- 1- ] 14-1 ,


The children of mary
Edenfield would like to in-
vite all family and friends
to join in celebrating her
95th birthday on Sunday,
April 7, at 12:30 p.m. CST
at the Grand Ridge com-


County Health rankings reveal

benefits of community partnerships


Special to the Floridan

The Florida Depart-
ment of Health in Jackson
County recognizes the
value in measuring health
outcomes and expresses
appreciation to the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin and
the Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation for the fourth
annual County Health
Rankings & Roadmaps


tool released recently. This
study uses traditional, es-
tablished data, much of
which was obtained from
the Department and is
available to the people
of Florida at www.flori-
dacharts.com.
These rankings serve as
a snapshot of the health of
individuals across coun-
ties in each state. The re-
port highlights that health


BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


is a combined work in
progress across a variety
of community partners.
The Florida Department
of Health through its
county health depart-
ments, works together
to improve the health of
all Floridians. The data
used in these rankings
are available in each state

See RANKINGS, Page 7A


4PPhilip


IN STORE:
Ring Sizing, Watch
Repair, Custom Design,
Pearl Re-stringing,
Restoration
Free Jewelry Cleaning
Layaway
Est.1971 (

w ]atson
H JEWELERS
GEMOLOGISTS
850.482.4037
watsonjewelers.com


Engagement


Dennis, Gilley


My heartfelt gratitude and thanks
are extended to the Sneads Assembly
of God Church, family, friends
and neighbors for their prayers,
prayer chains, food, visits, calls,
cards, words of encouragement,
transportation, and surgery, hospital
and emergency room vigils during
my recent bout with cancer. Your
love and support uplifted me. Our
prayers were answered and-once
again Jehovah Rapha has healed me.
PRAISE GOD!


T~t)hiee~lz S;'ulii>^u


-- ~;'-1"1"-1--------


r;l


1


e-i
;;- '










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Attention tomato lovers: It's time t(


EXTENSION HORTICULTURIST
ROB TRAWICK
University of Florida IFAS

This message is for to-
mato lovers: It's time to
plant.
More specifically, if you
want to grow fresh, flavor-
ful, vine-ripened tomatoes
in your garden, you need
to get them planted by
the middle of April. Early
planting ensures more
production and higher-
quality tomatoes.
Although cooler weather
sometimes comes our way
in late March, hard freezes
definitely are unlikely for
the rest of the season. So
you don't really have to
worry about low tempera-
tures being a problem for
tomatoes you plant now.
When selecting tomato
cultivars, choose those
with the characteristics
you want such as fruit
size, shape and color, as
well as disease resistance
and plant growth habit.
(Determinant or bush cil-
tivars stay short. Indeter-
minate or vine cultivars
grow tall.). Although it is
fun to try new cultivars,
the bulk of yotir tomato
planting should include
varieties that are proven to
produce.well here.


Some of the indeter-
minate cultivars are Big
Beef, Better Boy, Cham-
pion, Fantastic, First Lady,
Monte Carlo, Terrific, BHN
444 (spotted wilt virus re-
sistant) and Pink Girl. Rec-
ommended cherry types,
such as Cherry Grande,
Super Sweet 100 and Sweet
Chelsea, generally are ear-
ly and very productive, but
they also set fruit well in
the heat of summer.
Excellent determinate
types recommended in-
clude Bingo, Bonita, Car-
nival, Celebrity, Empire,
Floramerica, Heatwave
(heat tolerant), Olympic,
Mountain Delight, Moun-
tain Pride, Solar Set (heat
tolerant), Spitfire 'and
Whirlaway. Heat-tolerant
varieties produce better
in the heat of summer and
may be planted as late as
the end of April or early
May. For canning, choose
Royal Chico, Spectrum 882
or Roma.
To be successful, start off
with high-quality trans-
plants. The ideal tomato
transplant is a plant that
is somewhat small (about
as wide as it is tall) .and
is growing actively but
has not begun to bloom.
The leaves should- be
deep green, and the stem


should be stocky. The roots
should be white, and some
soil should still be visible
between roots when you
remove the plant from the
pot.
Newly purchased trans-
plants often have come
right out of the green-
house and might not ready
for the harsher growing
conditions of the garden.
Harden off the transplants
by placing them in a loca-


organic matter content.
During bed preparation,
dig in generous amounts of
compost or aged manure
and a light application of
fertilizer. Don't overdo the
fertilizer at first. You can
always side-dress with
more later on.
Plant tomatoes in raised
beds or on raised rows in
the garden. A common
mistake is to plant the
small transplants too close..
Tomatoes grow best when
spaced at least 18-24 inch-
es apart. Leggy plants may
be planted on their sides
with the top, leafy portion
bent upward and the bare
stem laid into a shallow
trench and covered.
Do not remove healthy,
green leaves to bury the
stem deeper, since this'
might actually stunt the
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN plant.
tion that receives several At planting, each tomato
hours of morning sun for plant should receive about
a:couple of days, and then one cup of soluble fertil-
gradually introduce them izer to get it off to a good
to more sun over a seven- start. Water regularly un-
day period. Also, allow the' til the root system is well
plants to wilt very slightly established, and don't
before watering. forget to keep your plants
Toinato plants need full mulched with 2 to 3 inch-
sun (direct sun for eight, es of leaves, pine straw or
or more hours) for best other materials.
production and should be Tomatoes generally are
planted into fertile, well- trained to grow upright by
drained soil that has high tying them to stakes. Strips


) plant

of old nylon stockings or
cloth are ideal for tying the
plants to the stakes.
* Vining tomato cultivars
are pruned primarily to
make them more manage-
able to train on stakes, but
it also encourages plants
to produce larger, higher-
quality fruit. Prune your
plants by pinching off the
suckers (or side shoots)
that grow where leaves at-
tach to the main stem. This
is called "desuckering."
Tomatoes also may be
grown in cages. Vine types
grow too tall for most
commercial tomato cages,
but they can be grown in
a cage made by creating a
cylinder out of 5-6 feet of
concrete reinforcement
wire. When grown this
way, vining tomatoes are
not desuckered.
Bush varieties of toma-
toes may be grown on
stakes or in a commercial
tomato cages and are not
desuckered grown either
way.
After the first tomatoes
on the plants have reached
the size of a quarter, side-
dress your plants with 1-2
tablespoons of all-pur-
pose fertilizer per plant to
keep them growing vigor-
ously. Repeat that every
four weeks.


With care,
EXTENSION HORTICULTURIST The
ROBTRAWICK thing t
University of Florida IFAS creating
under
Gardening.in shadyareas the ro
can be quite enjoyable, al- itself.
though I know gardeners roots tw
who complain they have ter or 1
trouble gardening success- ing for
fully in the shade. under
Trouble mostly occurs a show
when sun-loving plants are the for]
planted in shady locations, roots. i
Butwhen the proper plants inches
are selected for shady ar- such a
eas, the results can be finely
beautiful and enduring. If yoi
And let's face it who extra s(
wouldn't rather work in a select
shady garden during sum- soil or
rher than a sunny one? no moi
Shady areas often are Do not
created by trees as they of soil
grow larger over the years. of the
At some point, the original can le;
landscape will have to be means
modified to deal with the back sli
reduced light conditions. In add
For inspiration, take a to fill o
drive around older neigh- cover
borhoods with mature tree's r
trees. You'll see how beau- extends
tifully areas under and the rea
around large trees can be do not
landscaped using a variety two ini
of ground covers, annu- Once
als, perennials, shrubs and you co
even small trees. with a


garden
most important
:o remember when
g a landscaped area
a tree is to respect
it system of the tree
Avoid severing any
wo fingers.in diame-
arger. Use a garden-
k to loosen the soil
the tree rather than
eel or spade since
k will damage fewer
Then work in a few
of, organic matter
Is compost and/or
;round pine bark.
u need to bring in
oil to create the bed,
a high quality top-
garden soil, and use
*e than 2 to 4 inches.
Spile several inches
up around the base
trunk, because this
ad to decay. That
you need to pull it
ightly.
edition, if you intend
ver an area that will
a large part of the
oot system (which
s out well beyond
ch of the branches),
Supply more than
ches of soil.
the area is prepared
uld simply plant it
ground cover, such


ners can
as monkey grass (Ophio-
pogon japonicus) or Asian
jasmine (Trachelosper-
mum asiaticum). Both of
these ground covers are
reliable, easy-to-grow and
relatively fast spreading.
Monkey grass, although
not a true grass, looks a lot
like a grass. Asian jasmine
requires more mainte-
nance, since it is a running
vine that must be edged
and cut back periodically
to keep it looking neat. It
grows equally well in sun
or shade making it ideal
for planting areas that in-
clude sun as well as shade.
A great thing about us-
ing ground covers in these
situations is that they will
cover the exposed tree
roots that often make it
difficult to mow under
some trees.
Other ground covers
suitable for larger areas in-
clude ferns, Japanese ardi-
sia (Ardisia japonica) and
creeping liriope (Liriope
spicata). Ground covers
provide variation in plant
height, texture and color in
the landscape.
You don't just have to
stick with ground covers,
however. Indeed, garden-


have it made in the shade


ing in a shady area pro-
vides a chance to grow a
wide variety of beautiful
plants. Gardens in shady
areas also are often easier
to maintain since there
generally are fewer weed
problems, and the beds
may not dry out as fast as
sunny ones.
For colorful bedding
plants in beds that receive
a few hours of morning
sun, try impatiens, coleus,
wax begonia, browallia,
pentas, salvias, caladium
and torenia in summer.
Shade-loving perenni-
als include ferns, hostas,
ground orchid (Bletilla
striata), strawberry be-
gonia (Saxifraga stolon-
ifera), indigo (Indigofera
kirilowii), ligularia, aspidis-
tra (prefers no sun), ajuga,
acorus, acanthus, wild gin-
ger (Asarum spp.), cardinal
flower (Lobelia spp.), toad
lily (Tricyrtis spp.), Indian
pink (Spigelia spp.), violets
and the many tropical gin-
gers -just to name a few.
Shrubs to consider in-
clude hollies, azaleas, nan-
dinas, cleyera, ligustrum,
aucuba, fatsia, mahonia,
pittosporum, hydrangea,
red buckeye, sasanqua,


For thriving organic garden, feed the soil


JOE LAMP'L
Scripps Howard News Service
Gardeners who contem-
plate going organic fall
prey to the hype of the big
print on the package to
make a purchasing deci-
sion. Although helpful in
directing you to use some-
.thing that could produce
'the desired outcome, it
may not be what you in-
tended to put in your soil.
Let's take a closer look.
Organic vs.
nonorganic
All plants receive nu-


trients in chemical form.
They cannot distinguish
between how the nutrient
was derived, whether oor-.
ganic or nonorganic.Whenr:
referring to plant nutri-
tion, "organic" or "natural"
generally refers to any fer-
tilizer with a plant, animal
or mineral base. It must
have one or more essential
nutrients for plant growth.
Nonorganic fertilizers
(also known as synthetic)
are manufactured. They
are made to deliver nutri-
ents rapidly, such as those
that are water-soluble or


- E


JW W4I..


over time as a .controlled
release. Although very ef-
fecthe [or providing rapid
or prolonged periods of
feeding, these have a high
salt index. The potential
risk to plants, the soil food
web and environment in-
cludes burning and dehy-
dration, and the leeching
of unabsorbed chemicals
into watersheds.
Organic nutrients, on
the other hand, must first
be broken down and di-
gested by soil microorgan-
isms, which then release
these nutrients in a form


available to plants while
also improving soil struc-
ture. Unlike water-soluble
synthetics, organically de-
rived nutrients bind to soil
particles and are far less
likely to leech.
The net result is nutri-
ents that remain in the
soil until utilized by plants
and little risk of burning or
dehydration, even in peri-
ods of extreme drought or
over-application.
You could sum it up by
one gardening truth I live

See SOIL, Page 5A


Holland Roche




Custom Home Plans

Let us help you plan

your new home.


We offer customized

designs and stock plans.

WILLIE M.H. ROCHE

(850) 526-5757

^ ^ :..-. ^ ::,^^^ ^}4:l "^ ^ --


camellia and many oth- morning sun.
ers. Most of these prefer There are evensmalltrees
a partly shaded area that
receives a few hours of See SHADE, Page 5A


4
o.-n-.F .r i ja .i t 4 .[


Great Expectations


KU B 0 TA


9 I ID


Mow like the pros worth Kubota's newest zero-turn mower.
Expecvt ir,,riI
E expect llll l~ il'l :l lj ir, .l:
l j mi W '.1,,, 1!! 1r:, l)ii, j-,.!:.,1.V
|~~ ~ ~ ^(S'fc fet, !d'.!'.@H'",'' f r~l"'


Plus $0 Down & 0~i Firin ;ring fI r 36 Months


Panhandle Tractor, Inc.
5003 Hwy. 90
Marianna, FL 32446
(850) 526-2257


www.kubota.com


I


Arlo

14A + SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


HOME & GARDEN








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Squirrels can teach us a lesson in tolerance


RAO MUSUNURU
Tampa Bay Times
Whenever I find a little free
time, I sit on the back porch ap-
preciating the sight and sounds
of nature.
I especially enjoy the squirrels
running around outside climb-
ing the trees and chasing each
other playfully. They take a break,
see me through the screen, sit
straight, munch on the nuts be-
tween their front legs and smile
in between showing off their
small and sharp teeth.
One day, my wife brought to
my attention a small hole at the
bottom of the pool screen made
by the senior squirrel so his fam-
ily and friends can come in and
play.
After a few weeks, I caught the
senior squirrel jumping down
5 to 6 feet on to the top of the
big hibiscus plant by the pool
through a meticulously crafted
circular hole at the top of the
screen, right above the plant. The
rest of the family came through
the bottom hole.
I was astonished after a few
more weeks to see the senior
squirrel climbing up the hibiscus
plant and jumping up several
feet through the air and getting


out through the same hole at the
top of the screen. I could not be-
lieve his acrobatic skills.
My wife- was very worried
about his safety and had the hole
at the top of the screen sealed by
a handyman several times. The
materials were no match for the
squirrel's sharp teeth.
Then, the squirrels learned,
to make their way into the at-
tic, jumping from tree branches
and crawling through the gable
vent to play in the insulated at-
tic anytime of the day or night>
My wife reached her threshold.
She called the handyman again
and had screens put up covering
both sides of the gable vents.
Right after the handyman left,
we were about to leave for the
airport to attend a family func-
tion. As we were pulling the
car out of the garage, we heard
the squirrels running in the at-
tic. They must have hidden or
played dead while the handy-
man worked on the vents.
We looked at each other. We
knew what we had to do. We
canceled the trip and called the
handyman back to let the squir-
rels out. He then reinforced the
screens for the vents.
After a few days, while my wife


Kti 4I


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


was away, I received a call at the been tripped and they called the
office from the security com- police. As I pulled into my drive-
pany that our house alarm had way, I was greeted by the senior


squirrel with what I thought was
a mischievous smile. I knew what
it meant.
He climbed about 20 feet of the
bare wall and crafted a similar,
small circular hole in the screen
covering the vent. That tripped
the alarm even though he could
not get in.
My wife was not happy. These
animals are trespassing, she
said. Really, who owned the land
before us? I asked. Originally the
land belonged to the squirrels,
even before Native Americans, I
pointed out.
We decided to be tolerant. Af-
ter all, they tolerated us all these
years. In a place where most of
the people come from some-
where else, the squirrels existed
for a long time and they will be
here after we exit.
They are well-known for good
qualities like working hard, sav-
ing for the future, playing for fun
and displaying community spir-
it. They show the essentials for
long-term survival. They are also
good at accommodating, adjust-
ing and adopting.
If only we humans could learn.

Dr. Rao Musunuru is a Bayonet Point, Fla.,
cardiologist.


Soil
From Page 4A

by daily: Feed the soil, and
let the soil feed the plants.
That, my friend, only hap-
pens as you build your
soil health with organic
amendments.
Fertilizer basics
Look at any fertilizer
package and you'll find
three numbers promi-
nently listed. These are
the primary nutrients that
are needed in the great-
est quantity by the plants.
These numbers represent
the percentage by weight
of nitrogen, phosphorus
and potassium found in
each package.
Nitrogen (N) is primar-
ily responsible for vigor-
ous growth and a dark
green color. Phosphorus
(P) plays an important role


When referring to plant
nutrition, "organic" or
"natural" generally refers to
any fertilizer of plant, animal
or mineral origin.
in root development and
flowering. Potassium (K)
helps with disease resis-
tance and the overall har-
diness of the plant.
Based on what you are


trying to achieve for a
plant's growing success
should determine which
fertilizer to buy. Organic
alternatives have lower ra-
tios by weight, so it would
take more to achieve the
same nutrient level by vol-
ume. But unlike water-sol-
uble synthetic fertilizers,
organic nutrients stay in
the soil, so less is needed.
Organic Alternatives
Synthetic, manufactured
chemical fertilizers are
listed by their letters for
example, N for nitrogen, P
for phosphorus and K for
potassium. Organic alter-
natives, however, are often
listed primarily by what
they actually are, such as
blood or bone ndeal or rock
phosphate. Yet somewhere
on that package, you'll
find the three important
numbers. They are the key
to knowing what role that
product will play in your


garden.
Here is a partial listing of
the most commonly avail-
able organic nutrients
sorted by their role for
providing nitrogen, phos-
phorus or potassium.
Nitrogen: Dried blood,
blood meal, cottonseed
meal, fish emulsion and
seaweed extract
Phosphorus: Bone meal,
rock phosphate
Potassium: greensand,
.sulfate of potash
I rely 'on these natural
amendments to ensure
that I'm feeding the soil,
which in turn feeds the
plants.
OK, one more time. Re-
peat after me: "Feed the
soil, and let the soil feed
the plants."
Make that mantra part
of your new gardening
protocol and you'll be well
on your way to a safer and
more environmentally
responsible approach to


gardening.

Joe Lamp'l, host and executive
producer of "Growing a Greener


~r I


World" on PBS, is an author and a
paid spokesman for the Mulch and
Soil Council. Contact hiin at email@
joegardener.com. For more informa-
tion, visit www.joegardener.com.


2 I2- LMR' L
dr t jJ 1 um :
m [Hk mii^ : ,I


Shade
Fro,-,n iF- j -

that like partial shade., such
as parsley ha:,\ iorrn, silver
bell. doijvood. Japanese
maple, red bud, hi nge tree,
lapanese \et\, cherr- laurel
and \aLipIol
Mani hjrd\ lern: ci.,n
be planted into thie shadi\
areas of \)iur liindscape.
The ditterent species range
in size fiOm undel a foolt
to a. much as three feet.
The leaves of ferns aIre


called fronds and provide
the plimarn ornamental
feature ol the plants. The
fronds generally are finely
ditided and delicate in
appearance and contrast
beaLutituly ilth coarser
It_:.auredl shade plants such
as hosts, .spidiktra., fasia.
ginger- aind aucuba.
Some excellent fern,
tfr Liue in lte landscape
include maidenhair fern
i -diantumii capillus-\er-
inu-Il, holly tern IC\rturni-
um talcaLumim Irtherleat
fern IRumohra adiantifor-
mii,, Chri.rnmas fern iPo-


lystichurh acrostichoides),
\\ood fern iThelypteris
kunthii, royal fern IOs-
muilnda regalist, auRumn
fern IDryopteris er-thro-
orai, lad\ fern iAth\Tium
filL-femmina and lapanese
painted tern Atrhi-rtum ni-
ponicum 'Plctuni.
Iif ou haie a shady area.
coiunider turning it into
a beauutil gajiden w\ith
shade-loning plants. The
ground covers, perenni-
als, shrubs, trees and ferns
mentioned in this article
can all be planted this
month.


Ilu Ilke an autoniobIle, u,'our hearing,
and cooling s..,tem needs mrainteriance to
operate efi:ientI, 1.all a qualified heating
,an, c,', lir- '.:,rontracTor t, pertor rn a


Wet Florida Electri


West Florida Electric

1**")9"T


-- m.. I I . Iq I -NJ..Il qI I I I $WIN


SUNDAY, MARCH 31,2013 5A7


r~


HOME & GARDEN













Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Florida Voices

New push for Gulf drilling
Honestly. Some folks talk as if the BP oil spill
never happened. They say we need more drill-
ing for oil and natural gas in the eastern Gulf of
Mexico, they promise drilling will bring down the price
of gasoline at the pump, and they assure us nothing
bad will happen because technology has made drilling,
you know, so clean and safe.
Cheaper gas. Check. Spotless beaches. Check.
We tried to squelch our skepticism as we read a pre-
pared statement from Kevin Doyle, executive director
of Consumer Energy Alliance-Florida, which is to be
presented today at a public hearing in Panama City.
The federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is
hosting the hearing. It's about expanded drilling in the
Gulf of Mexico. Consumer Energy Alliance is all for it.
"Utilizing all available domestic oil and gas resourc-
es," the CEA statement says, "will bring energy prices
down for all American consumers and businesses."
Sounds great. But The Associated Press reported last
March that an analysis of 36 years' worth of gas prices
and U.S. oil production showed that drilling had "no
statistical correlation" with prices. "More oil production
in the Urited States," AP concluded, "does not mean
consistently-lower prices at the pump."
Sb there's no reason to think ramped-up drilling in the
Gulf of Mexico will bring down energy costs.
But at least the process will be safe, CEA assures us. It
cites an environmental impact statement that says "any
environmental impact from offshore oil and gas devel-
opment ... would be minimal if all existing regulatory
requirements are met."
Hmmm. Where have we heard that before? Oh, yeah
- we heard it right up until April 19, 2010, when BP's
Deepwater Horizon rig exploded near Louisiana. The
blowout spewed millions of gallons of crude oil, choked
wildlife and crippled tourism for a year. People here still
are trying to recover.
Beware the squeaky-clean promises of those who
would erect oil rigs off our beaches.

Northwest Florida Daily News


Letters to the Editor


Soldier: 'It is good


to finally be home'


On Feb. 22, I was
released from Wal-
ter Reed National
Military Medical Center.
It was a happy day. I had
been at Walter Reed since
July 6. During that time, I
had received hundreds of
cards from people across
the Panhandle, and I have
been the beneficiary of
the prayers of thousands
more. I hope you will
allow me to express my
gratitude and to say thank
you through this letter.
Walter Reed is a
wondrous place albeit for
horrible reasons. The
doctors, nurses and
therapists there are the
very best. Moreover, the
many nonprofit organiza-
tions who are dedicated
to our wounded warriors
ensure that whatever our
soldiers need is provided.
God bless them all.
I am currently assigned
to the Community Based
Warrior Transition Unit
in Orlando, but I will be
living in Panama City
until my medical board
review. It is good to finally
be home.
CARTER HESS
SGT. U.S. ARMY
PANAMA CITY BEACH

Thanks to all
'book lovers
On behalf of the Friends
of the Library, I want to
thank the book lovers of
Marianna and surround-
ing communities for their
support of our recent
Library Book Sale, held
at the Jackson County
Public Library. If books are
treasures, there are many


folks who are richer today
having purchased over
3,000 good used books
at our sale. Your purchas-
es enabled the Friends to
donate more than $2,500
to our library for updat-
ing services and book
selections. Thanks also
to Friends members who
helped.sort and sell books,
amassing over 180 volun-
teer hours for this event.
We were also gratified
to sign up 42 new mem-
bers of the Friends of the
Library on Thursday and
Friday of the sale. Each
$15 membership fee goes
back to the library, and
each new member was
able to take home 10 free
books, creating a win-win
situation for patrons and
the library.
Our sincere thanks to
everyone for supporting
the book sale and
our library.
On Monday, April 15,
from 3-6 p.m., the Friends
of the Library will assist
the library staff as they
host an Open House to
kick off National Library
Week. Circle your cal-
endar to stop by and see
what's new at your public
library. Be on the lookout
for more details soon
in the Jackson County
Floridan.
Happy reading!'
DIANNE OSWALD
FRIENDS OF THE
LIBRARY
EVENTS CHAIR
PS: If you missed the.
big sale days, there is still
a selection of good, used
books available for pur-
chase near the front door
of the library.


PeEP q I o

thSi And theone


qte 0me thi 'vthat

o4Adelly 9alw Preails

be~h&


Did ruling set stage for war over abortion?


ne January day in the
mid-1970s, Supreme Court
Justice Potter Stewart was
riding in a car down Pennsylvania
Avenue when he spotted a crowd
marching up Capitol Hill toward the
court.
Stewart; unaware it was the anni-
versary of the Roe v. Wade decision, i
asked what was happening. People
were protesting against legalized
abortion, Stewart was told.
"I don't understand it," the
puzzled Stewart responded, shaking
his head. "We've decided that."
Longtime Netv York Times reporter
Linda Greenhouse says the court's
chief deputy clerk, who was with
Stewart that day, told her the story
to illustrate how easy some couft *
decisions seem at the time.
Stewart was one of five Republi-
can-appointed justices who voted
in the 7-2 majority to make abor-
tion legal in 1973. When he retired
in 1981, the decision still looked
"rock solid," Greenhouse wrote.
Now, "not so much.".
The justices decided the abortion
issue, but they didn't settle it. The
fight over abortion rights still rages,
and, in a gigantic leap to the past,
could be headed back to the courts.
North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrym-
ple on Tuesday signed the nation's
strictest abortion law, prohibiting
nearly all abortions in the state. .
Dalrymple concedes the measure
likely won'tsurvive a court chal-
lenge but insists it's "a legitimate
attempt by a state legislature to
discover the boundaries ofRoe v.
Wade."
North Dakota jumped over Arkan-
sas, which for a couple of weeks had
the title of strictest abortion law.
Last year, 19 states passed 43 provi-
sions limiting abortion services,
according to the Guttmacher Insti-
tute, a reproductive rights research


MarshaMercer


group.
Could the Supreme Court un-
intentionally have set the stage
for the 40-year war over abortion?
None other than Justice Ruth Bader
Ginsburg, a staunch advocate for
women's equality, has long believed
that when the court stepped ahead
of the legislative process, it ignited
the protest movement.
States were heading toward abor-
tion rights, but not fast enough for
advocates of complete change. Only
four states had repealed their anti-
abortion laws while 13 had liberal-
ized them when the court made
legal abortion the law of the land.
The sweeping ruling was hailed as
a breakthrough. But Ginsburg said
in a lecture in 1992 that it brought
on a backlash that hurt progress in
women's rights.
"Around the extraordinary deci-
sion, a well-organized and vocal
right-to-life movement rallied and
succeeded, for a considerable time,
in turning the legislative tide in the
opposite direction," she said then.
America's story has always been
one of expanding personal rights,
not reining them in. No one could
have imagined in 1973 that four de-
cades later states would be chipping
away at a woman's right to choose.
Ginsburg suggested in the 1992
lecture that the anti-abortion move-
ment might never have gathered
steam had the court taken smaller
steps. We'll never know.
"It's not that the judgment was


wrong, but it moved too far, too
fast," she said last year.
Much has changed in society,
thankfully, since 1973. The Supreme
Court heard arguments Tuesday
and Wednesday on two cases
involving same-sex marriage. Nine
states and the District of Columbia
now allow gay marriage.
Seventeen state attorneys general,
including those in Alabama and
Virginia, filed a legal brief, citing
fallout from Roe and Ginsburg's
comments to contend that the
court should butt out and let the
process work its will. That's not fast
enough for many Americans who
want marriage equality to be the
law of the land.
In the arguments, the justices
seemed reluctant to wade into a
case from California, where voters
banned same-sex marriage with
Proposition 8. Justices seemed far
more likely to strike down the De-
fense of Marriage Act, a 1996 federal
law.that allows only heterosexual
married couples to receive spousal
benefits.
Ginsburg gave a glimpse of her
distaste for DOMA's discriminatory
effects.
The law, she said, creates "two
kinds of marriage: the full marriage,
and then this sort of skim milk
marriage."
When the court rules, probably
in June, we may find out whether
Ginsburg thinks that same-sex mar-
riage has reached the point where
the court needs to step in.
And if, as she hopes, Ginsburg
stays on the court as long as Louis
Brandeis, who retired at 82, the
court's liberal leader could hear an
abortion case.

Marsha Mercer writes from Washington. Con-
tact her at marsha.mercer@yahoo.com. @2013
Marsha Mercer. All rights reserved.


High-performing schools get richer
F lorida Gov. Rick Scott is travel- two have a percentage of black
ing across the state handing students greater than a third of their
out checks to school districts. enrollment. Nine schools have less
Collier County got $2.5 million. than 20 percent.
Escambia County received Less than five miles from the
$751,000. More checks and press governor's press conference, 166
conferences will surely follow, inner-city, African-American el-
but did the funds go to the right ementary students were preparing
schools? RickOutzen for this year's FCAT at Dixon School


The money was from the state's
$134 million School Recognition
Fund, intended for those schools
that have sustained high student
performance or demonstrated
substantial improvement in
student performance.
Schools eligible for recognition
awards include those receiving an
"A" school grade, improving at least
one letter grade from the previ-
ous year, or improving more than
one letter grade and sustaining the
improvement the following school
year. In other words, the high-per-
forming schools get money to get
even better.
The money can be used for faculty
or staff bonuses, to purchase edu-
cational equipment or materials, or
hire temporary staff to help main-
tain or improve student perfor-
mance. The school staff and school
advisory council at each recognized
school jointly decide how to use the
financial award.


In Escambia County, Scott handed
out checks to 14 schools.
"What we are doing at the state
and local levels to enhance the
quality of our education system is
working," crowed Scott. "In con-
junction with our proposed $1.2 bil-
lion increase in educational funding
as part of the Florida Families First
Budget, the school recognition
funding will allow our teachers and
students in Escambia County and
across the state to continue on their
path of success."
Sounds great, but what about the
other 37 Escambia schools? No pay
raises, no ice cream parties, no cool
new educational software.
This seems backwards to me,
maybe even racist. Minority
students, especially in Escambia
County, have struggled with the
FCAT since it was first introduced.
Of the schools that got checks, only


of the Arts. Dixon is an "F" school
according to the state's grading
system, but it also had the greatest
improvement in reading and math
on the FCAT last year of any school
in the district.
Their teachers aren't less dedi-
cated than those at the 14 high-
performing schools. The Dixon
students work as hard, not harder,
than the students in schools in the
white neighborhoods. A $50,000
check could be a difference maker
for Dixon for this school year.
Performance on the FCAT isn't a
valid measurement of the teach-
ers' efforts or the students' hard
work. We need to rethink the school
recognition program and put the
money were it's most needed.
The focus needs to be on those
schools dealing with our students
who are struggling the most.
Rick Outzen is the publisher/editor of Pensac-
ola's Independent News. He can be reached at
rick@inweekly.net.


~1~ c~tt~r:










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850-526-5059

Betty M.
Adams

Betty M. Adams age 67 of
Sneads, passed away on
Friday, March 29, 2013 in
Tallahassee, FL.
Mrs. Betty was a lifelong
residence of Sneads and at-
tended the United Believ-
ers Worship Center. Betty
loved life and enjoyed
spending time with her
grandchildren and lifelong
friends. Ms. Adams favorite
pass times were visiting the
mountains when she could
and watching game shows.
She was preceded in
death by her parents John
R. and Ruby Alday Melton,
and her ex husband
Charles Ned Hall.
Ms. Adams is survived by
her daughter Theresa "Tra-
cy" Rodgers of Bainbridge,
GA, two brothers J.W. Mel-
ton and Rubin Melton both
of Greenwood, two sisters
Ann Gilley of Altha and
Jimmie Boggs of Marianna,
granddaughters Amber
Walden and Caitlyn Rodg-
ers and her great grandson
Elijah Rodgers.
Services for Ms. Adams
will be hold from the grave-
side at 2:00 P.M. on Mon-
day, April 1, 2013 in Dykes
Cemetery with Rev. Elvin
Johnson officiating. A time
of remembrance will be
held on Sunday, March 31,
2013 from 6:00P.M. to 8:00
P.M. in the Marianna
Chapel Funeral Home.
Marianna Chapel Fuher-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements.
Expressions of sympathy
may be submitted online at
www.mariananchapelfh.com.
Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850-526-5059

Mary Heleri
Locke Aplin

Mary Helen Locke Aplin
age 67 passed away on
Wednesday, March 27,
2013.
She was a lifelong resi-
dent of the Washington
/Jackson County area and a
member of the Cypress
Creek Community Church.
Mrs. Aplin was a hard
working loving mother and
grandmother who. loved
the Lord and her two cats.
She was preceded in
death by her parents, John
A. and Dora Lee Dilmore
Parish, four brothers Rob-
ert Parrish, Junior Parrish,
H.E. Parrish and James
Parrish, sister Evelyn Hall.
Survivors include her
son, Ronnie Locke and
wife, Melissa; daughters,
Jean Kornegay and hus-
band, Alan, Marilyn
Lipford and husband, John
and Janice Maloy; brother,


Band
From Page 1A

would let this year's "excep-
tionally strong low brass
and trumpet section" shine.
Asked how she compared
the training process of her
concert.band students to
that of marching band, Al-
len said, "It's a lot harder
work. It's more intense."
The concert band kids are
not in the field, where they
get weekly feedback from
the crowd and can play
popular music to generate
a response. Concert band
gets one shot for the judges.
The MMS musicians' no-

Follow us on
Twitter








twitter.com/
jcfloridannews


Obituaries
Alfred Parrish; sisters, Lois
Shuemake, Christine
Dilmore and Kathereen
Barrett; grandchildren,
Johnathan Lipford (April),
Meghan Locke, Josh
Kornegay (Teri), Charles B.
Locke (Amanda), Jacob
Korengay (Carly), Saman-
tha Maloy and Daniel
Maloy; great grandchil-
dren, Treyton Lipford and
Eli Kornegay.
Funeral services will be
held on Monday, April 1,
2013 at 10 A.M. in Cypress
Creek Community Church
with Pastor James Vickery
and Chaplin Flavors
Pittman officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in the
church cemetery.
Visitation will be held on
Sunday, March 31, 2013
from 5 to 7 P. M. at Ma-
rianna Chapel Funeral
Home.
In lieu of flowers dona-
tions may be made to
Emerald Coast Hospice in
memory of Ms. Aplin at
4374 Lafayette St, Marian-
na, FL 32446.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements.
Expressions of sympathy
may be submitted online at
www.mariannachapelfh.com.
James & Lipford
Funeral Home
5390 Cotton St.
Graceville, FL 32440
850 263-3238
www.jamesandlipford@yahoo.com


Evelyn
Shouppe


Evelyn Shouppe, 92 of
Cottondale, Florida; passed
away Thursday, March 28,
2013 at the Bonifay Nursing
and Rehabilitation.
Mrs. Evelyn was born Jan-
uary 27, 1921 in
Cottondale, Florida to the
late Amos Jackson and
Nancy Etta Sapp Shouppe.
She loved spending time
with her girls and family.
Mrs. Shouppe was a gifted
gardener growing all types
of roses and flowers. She
was a long time member of
Glass Community Church.
Preceded in death by her
husband Josh Shouppe,
son Jimmy Ray Shouppe.
Survived by her beloved
daughters Janice Kirkland,
Cottondale, Nancy Haw-
kins, Bonifay, Connie Pe-
terson, Cottondale; sister
Arvin Scurlock, Cottondale;
five grandchildren and six
great grandchildren.
Funeral service will be
held 2 p.m., Saturday,
March 30, 2013 at the
Chapel of James & Lipford
Funeral Home with Bros.
Larry Hawkins and Glen
Peterson officiating. Burial
will follow in Pilgrim Rest


table showing in Chipley
marks the 11th consecu-
tive time the eighth-grade
group earned the highest
rating used by competition
judges. Their consistency
has earned recognition for
their band director as well.
At the state FBA meeting
in January, Allen for the
second time received
the organization's Five Year
Superior Award, which is
presented to junior high
or middle school band di-
rectors whose bands earn
superior ratings at district
Concert MPA five consecu-
tive years. With this year's
rating, she's one year into
earning her third.
MMS has also received,
several times over the years,
the Florida Music Educa-
tors' Association Music
Enrollment Award for hav-
ing more that 45 percent of
the student body enrolled
in band class. The school
teaches nearly 300 kids a
year in its band program,
Alien says. But she's quick
to mention she gets a lot of
help with that.
Noting the support of
school administrators, fel-
lowfaculty and staff, parents


Cemetery with James &
Lipford Funeral Home in
Graceville directing.
Family will receive
friends at the funeral home
1 p.m. until time of service.
Expressions of sympathy
can be made online at
www.jamesandlipford.com
Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850-526-5059

Lauree C.
Smith

Mrs. Lauree C. Smith age
79 of Marianna passed
away on Thursday, March
28, 2013 in the Jackson
Hospital.
She was born in Miami,
Fl on November 5, 1933 to
the late William Homer
and Laura Willie Rogers
Crockett. Mrs. Smith was a
member of the Miami
Chapter of the Secretary
Club, the Pan-Am and Rod
& Gun Club, a Gray Lady
for the American Red Cross
at the Coral Gables VA
Hospital. She moved to
Marianna in 1984 where
she was very active mem-
ber in the New Hope Bap-
tist Church, the 4H Club,
and the AARP. She enjoyed
camping and volunteering
her time to help other peo-
ple in her community
She was preceded in
death by her parents, her
husband of 52 years Max D.
"M.D." Smith, her brothers
James R. Crockett and Ho-
ward Crockett, one sister
Pauline Shafer.
Mrs. Smith is survived by
her son Vince Smith and
wife Dorothy "Ann" of Ma-
rianna with their children
Casey Emanuel, Tonya
Howie and her boys,
Nevin, Michael and
Kristopher Alexander all of
Monroe, NC, son Richard
R. Smith and his wife Shir-
ley of Ft. Myers, Fl, their
child Lisa Grubber and
husband Chris. Mrs. Smith
is also survived by one sis-
ter Teddye Pearce of Miami
and a host of nieces and
nephews.
Services for Mrs. Smith
will be held at 10:00AM on
Tuesday, April 2, 2013 in
the Marianna Chapel Fu-
neral Home with Dr. Steve
Pickem officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in the New
Hope Baptist Church Cem-
etery.
A time of remembrance
will be held on Monday,
April 1, 2013 from 6:00 P.M.
to 8:00 P.M. in the Marian-
na Chapel Funeral Home.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements.
Expressions of sympathy
may be submitted online at
www.mariananchapelfh.com.



Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
2911 Jefferson St. Marianna
850-372-4456


and the community at large,
Allen says she also relies on
the help of MMS Assistant
Director of Bands Joyce Lin-
gerfelt, who's worked at the
school for eight years and
led the seventh-grade group
through the district Concert
MPA in Chipley.
When Allen speaks about
her students, you can hear
the pride in her voice, but
the Bonifay native steers
clear of taking credit for
their musical successes.
Despite leading it for more
than a decade, she still cred-
its her predecessors, Grady
Brackin and Ron Branning,
with laying the ground
work that helped make
the school's band program
what it is today.
"I inherited a well-oiled
machine," Allen says
humbly.
Now, with spring break
over, it's time to put that
machine back to work. On
May 7, MMS sixth- and
eighth-grade students will
perform a "Spring Concert,"
hosted at Marianna High
School. The performance
starts at 6:15 p.m. and the
community is invited to en-
joy the show for free.


Career Center offers workshops
Special to the Floridan ) Tuesday, April 9 ) Monday, April 29
-What Employers are Effective Communica-
The Marianna One Looking For tion Skills
Stop Career Center has ) Thursday, April 11 ) Tuesday, April 30 -
released the schedule for Mock Interviewing Job Search Etiquette
their April employability n Monday, April 15 In addition to the Em-
workshops. Each of the Effective Networking ployabilityWorkshops, "5
following workshops be- Skills Steps to Rapid Employ-
gins at 2:30 p.m. a Tuesday, April 16 ment"willbeofferedfrom


a Monday, April 1
Common Job Search
Mistakes to Avoid
) Tuesday, April 2- De-
veloping Workplace Skills
) Thursday, April 4 -
.Using Local Labor Mar-
ket Information
) Monday, April 8 -
Completing Applications


Farm
From Page 1A
to see the Century Farm
designation, but Dun-
Saway said they all would
have been proud to know
the land they grew up on
had reached this century
milestone still in the fam-
ily and still being used in
the production of food.
The oldest brother, O.C.
Dunaway, farmed the land
as an adult until he went
into the military during
World War II, then came
back and farmed again
until becoming a rural
mail carrier.
James B. Dunaway, the
next oldest, was also in
the military during World
War II. At Pearl Harbor
on Dec. 7, James survived
that horror and went on to
settle in Utah.
Flora Dunaway Cooke,
their only sister, lived in
Jackson County until she
passed away in 2009.
Kenny Dunaway, him-
self a veteran of the U.S.
Air Force, moved back to
the family farm after he
retired as the Environ-
mental Health Director
for neighboring Gadsden
County. He said was glad
to get home.
"The country is the
place to be," he said. "I've
never really wanted to live
in town."
He remembers playing
marbles in the yard as a
child, reading by lamp-
light, and warming by
the fireplace in winter. He
remembers feeding the
family's chickens, hogs
and cows, recalls cutting


Rankings
From Page 3A
and include information
related to physical envi-
ronment, social and eco-
nomic factors, health be-
haviors, education, crime
rate/law enforcement
and clinical care.
"The Florida Depart-
ment of Health works ev-
ery day to bring together
community partners
around shared goals to
improve health," said Dr.
John Armstrong, Surgeon
General and Secretary of
Health. "As we track our
progress, we are remind-
ed there is no finish
line in our efforts for
better health."
In Jackson County,
there are areas of prog-
ress and plans to pro-
mote future improve-
ment. For example, the
Department recently
celebrated the third
anniversary of the na-
tional accreditation
of their Diabetes Self,
Management Edu- 1
cation Program. The F
Department will also F
be collaborating with
many stakeholders to,
develop and imple-
ment the Community
Health Improvement S
Plan which will be a
focused effort to ad-
dress many health re-
lated issues in Jackson
County.
"The Jackson County E
Board of County Com-
missioners is commit-
ted to working with the
Florida Department of


Top 10 Job Search Tips
) Thursday,. April 18
- Employability Skills
Monday, April 22
- Using Social Media in
Your Job Search
) Tuesday, April 23 -
Surviving a Layoff
)Y Thursday, April 25
- Mock Interviewing


Century Pioneer
Farm Families'
The Dunaways join 15 other
Jackson Counit Century
Pcrineer Farms
James L Beauchamp
William and Faye Gable
Charles Hagler
Ben Hall
Paymond Hart
Ma. Hinson
Myra Phillips Hurst
David L. Kent
Arthur L. Kimbrough Jr
Edwin L. Mozley
William H. Neei
DWayne and Stacey Reese
Lindsay and NJell Roach
I.H. Stone
Charles Hagler
wood for the fireplace,
and bringing cows home
from the pasture many
times. He said living on
the home place often re-
freshes his fond memo-
ries of those old days. The
designation in its way en-
hances the meaning of the
old place, too, he said.
"I think it is a great hon-
or to be able to qualify; not
too many family farms are
left in the family name for
100 or more years. I'm his-
tory minded, anyway. I'm
a member of the Chipola
Historical Trust, and Har-
ry and I are in the Sons of
American Revolution. Our
great-great-great grand-
father, William Dunaway
served in the Revolution-
aryWar, in the 5th Virginia
Regiment."
The local SAR, the Wil-
liam R. Dunaway Chapter,
is name in that ancestor's
honor. The Dunaway
brothers and cousin
Fletcher Dunaway helped


Health in Jackson County
to make Jackson County a
safe and healthy place to
live, work and play," said
Commissioner Chuck
Lockey, Chairman of the
Jackson County Board of
County Commissioners.
"The health of our com-
munity is important to us
all," according to Florida
Department of Health in
Jackson County Health
Department Administra-
tor William Long. "While
there is an opportunity
for improvement in this
ranking, I remain proud
of the work done by our
staff and we will continue
our efforts to make our


9 a.m. to noon on Mon-
day, April 15, Wednesday,
April 17. Monday, April 22
and Wednesday, April 24.
The Marianna One
Stop Career Center is lo-
cated at 4636 U.S. 90 in
Marianna.
For additional informa-
tion call 718-0326.


establish it as the 30th
chapter in the state of
Florida. Kenny Dunaway
said the farm designation
is also a point of pride as
an historic distinction
for the family. He said he
hopes the sign will be an,
honored milepost for the
younger people in the
family and, later, for the
descendants to-to-be.
"I think it's just really
the thing to do, to record
history as we know it so
generations to come will
know more about how life
was lived back then," Du-
naway said. "I think we're
getting so far away from
that, and so it's important
to do anything we can to
keep it alive."
From a favorite and
well-worn family story, he
has an image of his par-
ents preparing to move
into their new home as
young newlyweds. His
mother held a lantern so
that his father could put
the last glass pane win-
dows in their home when
they moved into it in 1915.
It's a made-up picture-he
wasn't even a twinkle in
their eyes at the time-but
it is a vivid and precious
one fashioned from their
lovingly-told memories.
He's rewired the house,
and it nowhas heating and
air conditioning. Some of
those glass windows have
been replaced with more
energy-efficient models.
But those amenities do
nothing to take away from
his affection for the old
place. He plans to keep it
warm and alive with the
company ofloyed ones for
as long as he lives.


state and our county the
healthiest in the nation."
The Rankings include a
snapshot of each county
in Florida with a color-
coded map comparing
each county's overall
health ranking. There are
also new county-level
trend graphs detailing
change over time for sev-
eral of the measurements
including children living
in poverty, unemploy-
ment, and quality of care.
The Department works
to protect, promote and
improve the health of all
people in Florida through
integrated state, county
and community efforts.


Florida Lottery
CASH3 PLAY FANASY


ulon
rue
Tue
Wed.
Wed
Thurs
rhurS
ri
ari
iat


(E) 3'25 8 2 6 9 7.9-3 U-1922-24.35
(M) 6'48 9.4-7.3
(E) 3'26 2-3-2 8.5-9-0 4-14-22-3233
I'M) 5"3'7 4.74 3
iE) 3'27 0-4-7 79-33 2-10 19-20-21
(M) 675 5-026
IEi 3/28 6-3-5 0643 15'6-12'34
(M) 4-23 0838
(E) 3/29 0-2-4 9.9-3 7 10-26-27.29.36
(M) 65-6 2.57..9
(E) 3/30 Not available
i Mi 6.1-3 1-332


(E) 3/24 6-5-7 3-368
IMi 3-6-6 3-7.64
E Evening drawing M= Midday drwirng


saturday 3'30
Wednesday 3/27


512-16-23.27


Not available
7-37-43.4852


IOTITO


Saturday 3/30
Wednesday 3/27


Notl available
.19-24-25-26-28-44


For lottery information, call 850-487-7777 or 900-737-7777


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
Quality Service at Affordable Prices
Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90
j850-482-5041 [


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


_I _i


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 7AF


POWEBAL


FROM THE FRONT






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PARTNERS FOR PETS EASTER FUNDRAISER

11 1,0,-117 ,


ustin Barnes (above) stretches to reach an egg hidden in a bush at
the putt-putt golf course at Kindel Lanes on Saturday during the
Putting for Pets Easter Fundraiser for Partners for Pets. RIGHT:
Jayla Kindelspire keeps an eye out for eggs as she scours the greens.



Seeking to save Peter


Cottontail from extinction


The Associated Press

The New England cot-
tontail was once so com-
mon that Massachusetts
author Thornton Burgess
adapted one named Peter
for the children's stories he
penned a century ago.
But the critter that in-
spired "The Adventures of
Peter Cottontail" and the
enduring song that came
later faces an uncertain
future. Its natural habitat
is disappearing, and with-
out intervention, it could
be unhappy trails for the
once-bountiful bunny.
Conservationists are
hoping a new program to
restore shrub lands across
the Northeast and captive
breeding efforts will help
ensure the New England
cottontail sticks around for
many Easters to come.
"We're making headway,
putting habitat on the
ground in some really key
places," said Anthony Tur,
an endangered species
specialist for the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service. "It's
encouraging."
New England cottontails
were abundant a century
ago, thriving in an environ-
ment of shrubs, saplings,
weeds and vines known as
young forest. But in an un-
common turn of events, it
is declining human activity.
to blame for its lost habitat
- not urban sprawl.


As neglected agricul-
tural lands reverted back
to forest and those forests
matured, the population
of New England cotton-
tails thinned. More than
80 percent of their habitat
disappeared over the past
50 years, according to the
nonprofit Wildlife Manage-
ment Institute.
And now conservation-


ists are trying to prevent
the New England cotton-
tail from appearing on the
endangered species list, a
designation that would re-
quire a more urgent and
costly response that
could restrict land use and
hunting.
The Fish and Wildlife

See COTTONTAIL, Page 9A


Spacious 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartment
Homes for Seniors 55+ from '5461


Great .
Expectations


$0 Down & 0o Financing for 36 Months


Command lawns. Capture attention. Bring home the new Kubota Kommander today -
Great Expectations start here. Offer ends May 31, 2013.



Panhandle Tractor, Inc.
5003 Hwy. 90
Marianna, FL 32446
(850) 526-2257


corn - -
lion, 2013 , ,, -
., .


A
"Kubota s 2013 Limted Warrant/ apples.


CITY OMF N IA R I,, NNA
Mayor & City Commissioners
Post Office Box 936
Marianna, FL 32447
(850) 482-4353 Fax (850) 482-2217
Dear City of Marianna Resident,
On Tuesday, April 9, 2013, all City of Marianna residents will be called upon to:vote on a
referendum to make a very important decision as to whether the City should establish its own electric
utility service by purchasing the electric facilities presently owned by Florida Public Utilities Company
("FPU") located within the City limits of the City of Marianna. This referendum is the result of years of
hard work and the decision to pursue this path has been carefully considered with the primary goal being
to protect the residents of Marianna from having to pay too much for electrical service.
If a majority of the Citizens adopt the change, the City will be able to take ownership of your
electric system resulting in all City residents having input on electric rates and service for our community.
FPU and the Public Service Commission in Tallahassee will no longer setthe electric rates for the City.
Revenues generated from the City owning and operating the electric service could be used to enhance our
quality of life by improving the City's infrastructure such as roads, recreation facilities and other City
property. Remember your vote on April 9th is very important for the future of our City.
We encourage you to contact your Commissioner or thd City Manager, Jim Dean, to discuss this
very important decision at 850-482-4353. In addition, to find out more information the City will be holding
public forums for residents/voters to attend. The dates, time & locations are as follows:
Aprill1st, 2nd, & 8th City Hall Commission Room, 4 pm 6:30-pm.
April 4th McLane Center, 4291 Clay Street, 4 pm 6:30 pm.
It's all about your money Marianna, so practice your right to vote by showing up at the polls on
April 9th to let your voice be heard.


4.--
,4 ALr .i --.


Travis Ephriam, District #1, Commissioner


S "r .-L /. )
ln B., 1 ri I. -t? Cn. ... ....el, r N ....


Aae(p7 (LrQ ~P~4-a


, i..rl.r E E.l .: D. rn.: Ir I .r n i .-..nef



Rico Williams, District #4, Commissioner


I ,l i r0,, ..,,.,a i, [, ,. ... B ,' ... .. -...

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT










i rlly' r) L3 G3 (diYGi

^^ ^M&O3f i -.

f'a a&
Jji~vm (Qg jmr.l s4s


If you are an area church that would like to
be featured in this year's edition contact the
advertising department of the Jackson County
Floridan at (850) 526-3614
or email salesjcfloridan.com.

Deadline for advertising is April 12, 2013.


www.kubpta.
www.kubota.


-I


-18A SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


ri
r


-. .. --.-- -


LOCAL & NATION


'S.^".






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com



HERE COMES


PETER COTTONTAIL



P


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
acob Rabion gets acquainted.with one of
the baby rabbits that Elizabeth Hailing
brought to the Grand Ridge Spring Festi-
val. Hailing, a member of Country Bumpkins
4-H, brought some of the babies for people
to take photos with or to buy. BELOW: Vic-
toria Drake, dressed as a husky, and Kristen
Boatner, as a tiger, take a break during the
Putting for Pets Easter Fundraiser at Kindel
Lanes on Saturday.
I --P~. 'fIId-r ,1- "-' "


LOCAL


Cottontail
From Page 9A
Service and the National
Resources Conservation
Service are working with
landowners and zoos to'
restore natural habitat and
use captive breeding to
rebuild the population.
The government has
been conducting habitat
management and resto-
ration projects for sev-
eral years in collaboration
with private landowners,
land trusts ahnd a few Na-
tive American tribes as
they try to bring back the
New England cottontail.
The New England cot-
tontail is the only rabbit
species native to the re-
gion east of the Hudson
River. And while it has
struggled to deal with the
changing landscape, a
slightly larger cousin has
thrived.
Imported to the region
for hunting in the early
20th century, the Eastern
cottontail has larger eyes
that have enabled it to
avoid predators better. It
multiplied steadily and is
now the dominant spe-
cies in the Northeast, of-
ten popping up on road-
sides and in gardens.
Tom McAvoy a land-
owner in Scotland, Conn.,


A Southern Tradition
.' "

r~~nr~T ~b


was approached by Fish
and Wildlife officials in
2011 about restoring his
land to help the New Eng-
land cottontail make a
comeback. Inactive for the
past 60 years, the former
dairy farm was overgrown
with plants that prevented


vegetation from thriving.
He is opening up por-
tions of forest ohi his land
and planting indigenous
shrubs on what he now
calls Cottontail Farm.
The project's scope is five
years, but he said he wants
to maintain it as "a legacy"


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 9AF


for his family.
"My brother and sons
have been involved in the
project," McAvoy said. "It's
important for me to teach
my grandchildren as well,
and keeping them active
and involved in the stew-
ardship of the land."


Kimberly Mercer Ashleigh Pelfrey
Courmey Bass Laura Smitherman
Christy Lawson Sarah all
4215 Suite Al Kelson Ave
850.482.2478
SCheckoutour Facebook For Specils & iscow -.


APRIL 19TH
Friday, Noon-1Opm SatuSl


For Information of I' Forili
BBQ CONTEST ARTST
Call Richard KundeC.g
850-209-2959 '
bbqconit @morlannaorisfesilval.co orlcont(ii )i

For Information of F Or..r
ART & CRAFT VENDORS 5K-WALK-
Call Alicia Hatcher i', Cd. 19
850-718-7299 850-4
rmnandois.arroria nnaartsiestlvol cornm malgol


N Q T I E


E Lf ElC T i O N


The City of Marianna will be holding an election for City Commission Group 3 and the Florida Public
Utility (FPU) Purchase referendum on April 9, 2013. Allen E. Ward II and James B. Wise qualified
for City Commission Group 3 and any residents in Group 3 can vote on the City Commissioner race
and the FPU referendum issue. Any other residents in the City (Group4 2; 4 & 5) can vote on the
FPU referendum issue. Absentee voting is now available and any questions should be directed to
Kimberly Applewhite, City Clerk or Carolyn Spears, Deputy Clerk, at (850) 482-4353.

Following are sample ballots for the April 9,2013 election:


Group 1, 24 & 5 Ballot

OFFICIAL ELECTION BALLOT
-.1. CITY OF MARIANNA .
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
APRIL 9,2013
Manan ity Hall B
TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE O NEXT TO YOUR
[< CHOICE.
USE BLACK INK PEN.
IF YOU MAKE A MISTAKE, DON'T HESITATE TO ASK FOR A
NEW BALLOT. IF YOU ERASE OR MAKE OTHER MARKS,
YOUR VOTE MAY NOT COUNT.


21 U CITY OF MARIANNA ELECTRIC FRANCHISE
PURCHASE REFERENDUM
If the City Commission of the City of Marianna determines
i that the purchase of Florida Public Utilities Company's
property located within the city limits would give the citizens
M of Marianna local control over their electric rates and
improved services, should the City of Marianna purchase
I Florida Public Utilities Company's property located within
the city limits of the City of Marianna?
YES
NO


IV .
U,.

1 '.- .
*




0m l

' .








a II


Group 3 Ballot


WE-


"Y q


OFFICIAL ELECTION BALLOT .
CITY OF MARIANNA
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
APRIL 9, 2013
Ai r i Marianna Cly Hall Ward 3 c |I
TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE NEXT TO YOUR
*I ,, CHOICE.
USE BLACK INK PEN.
IF YOU MAKE A MISTAKE, DON'T HESITATE TO ASK FOR A
NEW BALLOT. IF YOU ERASE OR MAKE OTHER MARKS,
YOUR VOTE MAY NOT COUNT.


CITY COMMISSIONER
GROUP
(Vote for One)

Allen E. Ward II

James B. Wise

CITY OF MARIANNA ELECTRIC FRANCHISE
PURCHASE REFERENDUM
If the City Commission of the City of Marianna determines
,o that the purchase of Florida Public Utilities Company's
property located within the city limits would give the citizens
I I of Marianna local control over their electric rates and
improved services, should the City of Marianna purchase
U H Florida Public Utilities Company's property located within
the city limits of the City of Marianna?
e YES
NO


A f. .










-'U~~l~s~rreleIB~


-- ---- ---- --~ -sle --I~-l-r- -LILC--P- ----


Oj F









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Briefs
Gas trade group
seeks fracking probe
ALBANY, N.Y. A
formal complaint filed
with New York's lobbying
board asks it to investigate
whether Artists Against
Fracking, a group formed
byYoko Ono and son Sean
Lennon, is violating the
state's lobbying law.
The complaint obtained
by The Associated Press
was made by the Indepen-
dent Oil & Gas Association
to the state Joint Commis-
sion on Public Ethics.
The energy trade group
based its request for an
investigation on an AP re-
port that found that Artists
Against Fracking and its
advocates didn't register
as lobbyists. Registration
requires several disclo-
sures about spending and
activities.
A spokesman for Artists
Against Fracking says
the group's activities are
protected because they
were made during a public
comment period.

Business, labor deal
on worker program
WASHINGTON Big
business and labor have
resolved a dispute over
a low-skilled worker
program that threatened
to hold up agreement
on a sweeping immigra-
tion bill, according to a
person familiar with the
negotiations.
The deal was struck in
a phone call late Friday
night with AFL-CIO Presi-
dent Richard Trumka, U.S.
Chamber of Commerce
head Tom Donohue, and
Democratic Sen. Chuck
Schumer of NewYork,
who's been mediating the
dispute.
The person, who spoke
on condition of anonym-
ity ahead of a formal an-
nouncement, said the deal
resolves disagreements
over wages for the new
workers and which indus-
tries would be included.
That had led talks to break
down a week ago.

Syrian rebels enter
strategic area
BEIRUT Syrian rebels
pushed into a strategic
neighborhood in the
northern city of Aleppo
after days of heavy clashes,
seizing control of at least
part of the hilltop district
and killing a pro-govern-
ment Sunni Muslim cleric
captured in the fighting,
activists and state media
said Saturday.
While there were con-
flicting reports about the
scale of the rebel advance
into the Sheik Maqsoud
neighborhood, the gains
marked the biggest shift
in the front lines in the
embattled city of Aleppo
in months. The city, Syria's
largest and a former com-
mercial hub, has been a
key battleground in the
country's civil war since
rebels launched an of-
fensive on it in July, seizing
several districts before the
fighting largely settled into
a bloody stalemate.
The Aleppo Media Cen-
ter opposition group and
Aleppo-based activist Mo-
hammed Saeed said rebels
seized full control of Sheik
Maqsoud late Friday

From wire reports


." 'i^ r.



SERVICE
Dental Im
Dentoal e
Anesthesi
Cosmetic


Veterans fight changes to disability payments


The Associated Press\

WASHINGTON Vet-
erans groups are rallying
to fight any proposal to
change disability pay-
ments as the federal gov-
ernment attempts to ad-
dress its long-term debt
problem. They say they've
sacrificed already.
Government benefits
are adjusted according to
inflation, and President
Barack Obama has en-
dorsed using a slightly dif-
ferent measure of inflation
to calculate Social Security
benefits. Benefits would
still grow but at a slower
rate.
Advocates for the na-
tion's 22 million veterans
fear that the alternative
inflation measure would
also apply to disability
payments to nearly 4 mil-
lion veterans as well as
pension payments for an
additional 500,000 low-in-
come veterans and surviv-
ing families.
"I think veterans have al-
'ready paid their fair share
to support this nation,"
said the American Legion's
Louis Celli. "They've paid
it in lower wages while
serving, they've .paid it
through their wounds and
sacrifices on the battlefield
and they're paying it now
as they try to recover from
those wounds."
Economists generally
agree that projected long-
term debt increases stem-
ming largely from the
growth in federal health
care programspose threat
to the country's economic
competitiveness. Address-
ing the threat means deci-
sions for lawmakers and
pain for many constituents
in the decades ahead.
But the veterans' groups
point out that their mem-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former Marine Corps Cpl. Marshall Archer (left),a veterans' liaison for the city of Portland, Maine, speaks to a man on a street
in Portland. Veterans groups are rallying to fight any proposal to change disability payments as the federal government
attempts to address its long-term debt problem. .


bers bore the burden of a
decade.of war in Iraq and
Afghanistan. In the past
month, they've held news
conferences on Capitol
Hill and raised the issue in
meetings with lawmakers
and their staffs. They'll be
closely watching the un-
veiling of the president's
budget next month to see
whether he continues to
recommend the change.
Obama and others sup-
port changirig the benefit
calculations to a variation
of the Consumer Price
Index, a measure called
"chained CPI." The con-
ventional CPI measures
changes in retail prices
of a constant marketbas-
ket of goods and services.
Chained CPI considers
changes in the quantity of


goods purchased as well as
the prices of those goods.
If the price of steak goes
up, for example, many
consumers will buy more
chicken, a cheaper alter-
native to steak, rather than
buying less steak or going
without meat.
Supporters argue that
chained CPI is a truer in-
dication of inflation be-
cause it measures changes
in consumer behavior. It
also tends to be less than
the conventional CPI,
which would impact how
cost-of-living raises are
computed.
Under tlhe current in-
flation update, monthly
disability and pension
payments increased 1.7
percent this year. Un-
der chained CPI, those


payments would have
increased 1.4 percent.
The Congressional Bud-
get Office projects that
moving to chained CPI
would trim the deficit by
nearly $340 billion over the
next decade. About two-
thirds of the deficit clos-
ing would come from less
spending and the other
third would come from ad-
ditional revenue because
of adjustments that tax
brackets would undergo.
Isabel Sawhill, a senior
fellow in economic studies'
at The Brookings Institu-
tion, a Washington-based
think tank, said she un-
derstands why veterans,
senior citizens and others
have come out against the
change, but she believes
it's necessary.


"We are in an era where
benefits are going to be
reduced and revenues are
going to rise. There's just
no way around that. We're
on an unsustainable fis-
cal course," Sawhill said.
"Dealing with it is going to
be painful, and the Ameri-
can public has not yet ac-
cepted that. As long as
every group keeps saying,
'I need a carve-out, I need
an exception,' this is not
going to work."
Sawhill argued that mak-
ing changes now will ac-
tually make it easier for
veterans in the long run.
"The longer we wait to
make these changes, the
worse the hole we'll be in
and the more draconian
the cuts will have to be,"
she said.


People watch a TV news report showing North Korean army soldiers, at Seoul Railway Station
in Seoul, South Korea, on Saturday.


be limited to a local war,
but develop into an all-out
war, a nuclear war," the
statement said.
Hours after the state-
ment, Pyongyang threat-
ened to shut down the
jointly run Kaesong indus-
trial park, expressing anger
over reports suggesting the
complex remained open
because it was a source of
hard currency for the im-
poverished North.
"If the puppet group
seeks to tarnish the im-
age of the DPRK even a
bit, while speaking of the
zone whose operation
has been barely main-
Stained, we will shut down
the zone without mercy,"
an spokesman for the
North's office controlling


Kaesong said..
South Korea's Unification
Ministry responded by
calling the North Korean
threat "unhelpful" to the
countries' already frayed
relations and vowed to en-
sure the safety of hundreds
of South Korean managers
who cross the border to


their jobs in Kaesong.
South Korean Defense
Ministry spokesman Kim
Min-seok said the coun-
try's military remains
mindful of the possibility
that increasing North Ko-
rean drills near the border
could lead to an actual
provocation.


.Paid on Site
4432 Lafayette Street 526-5488 www smithandsmithonline.com


COMERFORD VAULT

MEMORIAL SERVICE


Let us help you
with a memorial
of BEAUTY and
DURABILITY)
4


.'m


All Work & Material Guaranteed

Burial Vaults, Mausoleums,
Benches, Markers
and All Cemetery Supplies


Pete Comerford Owner & Operator
593-6828 1-800-369-6828
comerfordvaultmemorial @hotmail.com
Hwy. 90 W Sneads, FL


"' -


The Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea -
North Korea warned Seoul
on Saturday that the Kore-
an Peninsula had entered
"a state of war" and threat-
ened to shut down a bor-
der factory complex that's.
the last major symbol of
inter-Korean cooperation.
Analysts say a full-scale
conflict is extremely un-
,likely, noting that the
Korean Peninsula has re-
mained in a technical state
of war for 60 years. But the
North's continued threats
toward Seoul and Wash-
ington, including a vow
to launch a nuclear strike,
have raised worries that a
misjudgment between the
sides could lead to a clash.
North Korea's threats
are seen as efforts to pro-
voke the new government
in Seoul, led by President
Park Geun-hye, to change
its policies toward Pyong-
yang, and to win diplo-
matic talks with Washing-
ton that could get it more
aid. North Korea's moves
are also seen as ways to
build domestic unity as
young leader Kim Jong Un
strengthens his military


VU I I ICLI ICLI II I CL
Barrect R. Tolley, D.D.S. .
Juan F. Samaniego, .DMri S ;-.
.. .. ,

S WE PROVIDE:
plants Head S Neck Parnology
'olar Surgery Cleft Lip & Palate
ia Maxillofacial Trauma/
Facial Surgery Reconstruction

Diplomate'. American Board
of Oral & Maxullofacial Surgery '. <' i
lit!*"~ *-iri-~i t r- ^'


credentials.
On Thursday, U.S. mili-
tary officials revealed that
two B-2 stealth bombers
dropped dummy muni-
tions on an uninhabited
South Korean island as
part of annual defense
drills that Pyongyang sees
as rehearsals for invasion.
Hours later, Kim' ordered
his generals to put rockets
on standby and threatened
to strike American targets
if provoked.
North Korea said Satur-
day that it would deal with
South Korea according to
"wartime regulations" and
would retaliate against any
provocations by the Unit-
ed States and South Korea
without notice.
"Now that the revolu-
tionary armed forces of
the DPRK have entered
into an actual military ac-
tion, the inter-Korean re-
lations have naturally en-
tered the state of war," said
the statement, which was
carried by Pyongyang's
official Koreah Central
News Agency, referring to
the North's official name,
the Democratic People's
Republic of Korea.
Provocations "will not


-w


N. Korea says it is


in a 'state ofwar'


with S. Korea


Increase Your Refund...
Sell Your Gold at...


Oral & Facial

Surgery Center

Onf Mnrilnnn


Dr. Batts,
Pastor of the Welcome Assembly of God,
Invites you to attend their revival with
THE SHEPHERDS











Friday, April 5th-Sunday Morning, April 7th
Friday & Saturday Evening Services 6:30pm
Sunday Morning Services 10:30AM
The Shepherds are a family affair with group members: Quint & Debra
Shepherd, son Jonathan, twin daughters Haley and Hope, and Debra's
sister Sheri Haynes. Some of the songs made popular include "A Friend
Sof God", "A Black Heart", "On My Knees", "Move On Mountain") and their
signature song "There's A Miracle in the Making".
Welcome Assembly of God Church
Dellwood Community at 6794 Messer Road
If you need more information, call (850) 592-5077 during our
office hours: Monday-Thursday 8:00 am-12 noon.


0 o -Mrinn
DR ARET .TOLY SSCAE
423 AFAYET SRET ARIANNA, F J344
PHON (80) 56-003 AX (50)526060


M"


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 1UAF


NATION & WORLD










.. -" ._. ..U- S




2013


Player of the Year


Curteeona Brelove

Malone


Zay Henderson
Graceville


%ll :\.
""N0 ^T
2' ^
*ilbl ^ ff


Tasherica McMillon
Sneads


Shaniah Spellman
Marianna


Angelica Livingston
Malone


Breanna Dallas,
Malone


Brianna Johnson
Marianna


Logan Neel
Sneads


Brooklyn Brown
Cottondale


Khadejah Ward
Cottondale


Tessa Shack (Malone), Shanice Mack (Graceille). Jakeena
Borders (Cottondale). Tierra Brooks (Malone). Danielle Holden
(Marianna), Aaliyah Williams (Sneads). Latia Bass (Marianna),
Tsara Peace (Cottondale), Chasity McGriff (Sneads). Madison
McDaniel (Graceville)


EWr~p~~f4i*- MF 'MkV --1 -1


BOB KORNEGAY
Backyard 'wilderness'
serves its purpose.
See more on page 3B.


J.ACKSON COUNTY'S
NW & USED TRU CK CENTER
3 &T? 4 -


ll COLEY
IAus TAM L
-: .. -~-. _, .


41


I







12B SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN o www.jcfloridan.com


High School Baseball
.:. . '. ..: '. '- "


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


Malone's Hunter Eddins catches a throw to second as Graceville's Jarrett Brogdon slides in Friday afternoon.



Malone wins with walk-off


BY DUSTIN KENT
akent@jcfloridan.com

MALONE -Austin Lock-
hart delivered an RBI single
to left field in the bottom of
the seventh inning to score
Jay Henson and give the
Malone Tigers a walk-off 3-
2 victory over Graceville on
Friday afternoon.
The win improved Malo-
ne to 10-5 on the season,
while GHS fell to 3-10.
It was at times a sloppy
game, with both teams
having some shaky de-
fensive moments, and
Malpne's pitching staff is-
suing 10 walks despite
pickifig up the win.
Malone also managed to
squeeze just a single run
out of consecutive innings
with the bases loaded in
the second and third'iri-
nings, leaving coach Max
Harkrider still frustrated
even in victory.
"We're just not consistent
at all, whether it's at the
plate, defensively, or on
the mound," he said. "The
inconsistency is a problem
for us. But any time you
can win it in the bottom
of the seventh, that can


do nothing but help you.
Some guys stepped up and
Austin Lockhart did what
a senior is supposed to do
and got the big hit."
Eric Perdue got the vic-
tory for Malone, pitching
2 1/3 innings of relief and
allowing no runs on two
walks and striking out two.
Clay Jenkins got the loss
for Graceville, coming on
in relief of starter Denny
Elligson in the sixth in-
ning and retiring Malone
in order before giving up
the winning run in the
seventh.
Harrison Floyd got the
Malone rally started with
a lead-off walk, with Hunt-
er Eddins laying down a
textbook sacrifice bunt to
move the pinch-runner
Henson to second.
That brought up Lockart,
who lifted a Jenkins offer-
ing over the shortstop's
head into left field to al-
low Henson to round third
base,and beat the throw to
home plate.
Lockhart had two of his
team's five hits, finishing 2-
for-3 with an RBI and a run,
while Jonathan Sikes and
Scott Stephens were both


1-for-2 with two walks and
Perdue was 1-for-3.
Jared Padgett had the
only hit for Graceville, a
lead-off triple in the third
inning, while also walking
twice and scoring a run.
Padgett walked in the
top of the first inning and
scored on an RBI ground-
out by Brandon Pippin to
make it 1-0 GHS.
Malone tied it up in the
bottom of the inning when
Eddins walked, moved over
to second on a sacrifice
bunt by Lockhart, moved
to third on a GHS error, and
scored on an RBI sacrifice
fly by Antwain Johnson.
The home Tigers moved
ahead in the third when
Lockhart led off with an in-
field single and eventually
scored on a passed ball to
make it 2-1.
Graceville tied it back up
in the top of the fifth when
Robert Orshall, on in re-
lief of Malone starter BT
Johnson, hit the first two
batters of the inning and
Ricky Kerr scored on an
RBI groundout by Ethan
Walker.
After Orshall walked Jar-
rett Brogdon to load-the


bases, Malone brought
Perdue on to pitch and the
junior right-hander struck
out Tyler Wertenberger to
limit the damage to just
the one run.
In the sixth, Perdue is-
sued a one-out walk to
Padgett, but a Hudson
Forsyth pop out to second
base resulted in a double
play when Padgett was
caught drifting too far off
the bag at first base.
GHS had another oppor-
tunity in the seventh when
Pippin reached on an error
and Walker walked to put
runners at first and second
with two outs for Brogdon.
But Orshall saved the
Tigers from a seventh-in-
ning deficit by making an
outstanding catch moving
to his right on a hard hit
ball by Brogdon to deep
right centerfield for the fi-
nal out.
Brogdon walked three
times on the day, while
Wertenberger walked
twice.
Graceville will next
play at Altha on Tuesday,
while Malone is also on
the road Tuesday against
Bethlehem.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Malone Lady Tigers
dropped their fifth district
game of the season Thurs-
day night at home, falling
to the Central Lady Jaguars
19-7.
The Lady Jaguars busted
open a 1-1 game after the
first inning with a seven-
run second inning, and
then put the game away
late with six more runs in
the sixth.
Central improved to 6-1
in District 1-1A competi-
tion with the victory, while
Malone fell to 2-5 in league
play and 4-5 overall.
Sara Newsom started
in the circle for the Lady
Tigers and took the loss,
allowing nine runs in two
innings, with Sheyanna
Chambliss going the final
five innings and allowing
10 runs.
Jakivia Hearns led the
Malone offense with two
hits.
"They just jumped on
us early," Malone coach
Preston Roberts said of the
Lady Jaguars. "We had a lot
of careless errors. We prob-
ably had at least 15 errors
(for the game). That comes
from not practicing that
much over spring break.
I don't think we'll ever
have a spring break game
again. We were just never
focused."
Malone also was with-
out starting senior catch-
er Tierra Brooks and her
absence was felt, though
the coach said that was


Malone's
Shawnteria
Nicole
Westbrook
picks up a
ball in the
outfield
during
Thursday's
game against
Central.


only one of a great many
reasons why his team lost
Thursday.
"As a team, we just had
way too many errors. We
scored enough runs. Seven
runs is our goal usually,"
Roberts said. "We just gave
up too many. They had at
least 12 unearned runs.
But I've got to give Cen-
tral credit; they can hit the
ball. Even their smaller
hitters can drive the ball,
and they're very aggressive
when it comes to base-
running. I think them and
Poplar Springs are the two
best teams in the district."
Malone will next play two
more district games this
week, first going to Beth-
lehem on Tuesday before


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
returning home Thursday need to win those games,"
to host Paxton." Roberts said. "But we've
"Needless to say, we just got to get better."














A y l 2


-"p-
/














MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola's Josh Barber gets a lead off of second base
Thursday.



Pirates rally
..













Pirates rally


past Indians


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@fcfloridan.com

The Pensacola State Pi-
rates scored two runs in
the eighth inning and two
more in the ninth to rally
past the Chipola Indians
for their first Panhandle
Conference victory Fri-
day afternoon at Chipola
Field.
The Indians led 3-1
through seven 'innings,
but Pensacola tied the
game up when Taylor
Eads doubled and scored
on a wild throw after a
Xander Helton single,
and then Helton later
came around to score on
a wild pitch by Chipola
reliever Taylor Lewis.
Chipola took the lead
4-3 in the bottom of the
eighth when Christian
Correa was hit by a pitch
from Pensacola reliever
Toby Thomas with the
bases loaded to bring
Chase Nyman to the
plate.
The Pirates brought in
Will Gerdes to replace
Thomas with the bases
still loaded and no one
out, and he got Ian Rice
to. ground into a 6-2-3
double play, and then got
Josh Barber to foul out to
end the inning.
The missed opportu-
nity proved costly for the
Indians, as Pensacola
took advantage in the
ninth with an RBI dou-
ble by Hayden Kelly to
score Benny Siegel to tie
the game, with Thom-
as coming home after
Daniel Mars misplayed
the ball in centerfield
to put the Pirates ahead
5-4.
In the bottom of the
ninth, Gerdes had no
trouble getting through
the Indians' order, retir-
ing Neiker Navarro, Mars
and Bert Givens with just


11 total pitches to end
the game.
Gerdes earned the vic-
tory for two perfect in-
nings of relief, while Lew-
is took the loss, giving up
one earned run on eight
hits and two walks with
nine strikeouts in five in-
nings out of the bullpen.
PrestonJohnson started
the game for Chipola and
got a no-decision after
lasting four innings and
allowing one earned run
on four hits and no walks
with three strikeouts.
Jacob Milliman got the
nod for Pensacola and
gave up four earned runs
on nine hits and a walk
with six strikeouts in sev-
en innings.
Helton, Kelly and
Thomas led the Pirates
offensivelywith three hits
each and a run scored,
with Kelly adding an RBI,
Sand Eads going 2-for-5
with a run.
Mars, Nyman, and Bar-
ber all had two hits to lead
the Indians, with Givens
adding a hit, a run, and
an RBI, Rice a hit and a
run, and Cameron Gib-
son a hit and a walk.
Givens tied the game
at 1-1 in the third in-
ning with an RBI triple to
score Barber, who led off
the inning with a double,
and an RBI bunt single
by Nyman brought Giv-
ens home to put Chipola
ahead.
An RBI single by Mars in
the seventh scored Rice
to make it 3-1 Indians.
Pensacola State out-hit
Chipola 12-10 for the day,
with the Indians com-
mitting three defensive
errors to none for the
Pirates.
With the win, the Pi-
rates improved to 1-6 in
Panhandle Conference
play, while the Indians
fell to 3-4.


iLadyTigers get routed by Central

Lady Tigers get routed by Central


I ." II WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COMF,: I'f l -' .-T

1 WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


Chipola 7 --











JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Outdoors



Backyard 'wilderness



serves its purpose


Given my druthers,
I would spend the
vast majority of my
time in remote faraway
places. I have often
dreamed of a modern
Thoreau-like existence, a
latter-day Walden Pond
lifestyle where my contact
with civilization depends
solely on the great books
on a hand-hewn shelf in
some rustic deep-woods
dwelling.
I am even fortunate
enough to lead such a
blessed life from time to
time, though it is never
for more than a few days
or a few hours. Despite its
brevity, I always cherish
my limited time "away
from it all", ever thankful
there are still a few places
out there human intru-
sion has not permanently
ruined. It is rare and
beautiful respite, this time
spent in equally rare and
beautiful retreats.
But it's never enough.
Not even close. The brief
rat-race pit stops, wonder-
ful as they are, do little
more than whet my appe-
tite for "deliberate" living. I
often return home brood-
ing and fretting, counting
the days or weeks that
must pass before I may
visit those favored locales
again.
I have found, however, a
method of coping, a way
Sof somehow keeping in
touch with the unspoiled
vastness I miss so much.
It is a ritual I simply must
perform at least a few
moments every day I'm
home.
Behind my house,
composing roughly half
of my small-town sub-
urban "estate," is a tiny
woodlot. Stepping out my
back door and walking a


BobKornegay
Outdoors Columnist
few dozen paces south, I
am there. If I do not look
back from whence I came,
I can forget for a time the
house, the mowed lawn,
the accursed for-years-
unused swimming pool I
have always despised.
Here in the pines,
broomsedge and varied
hardwood scrub is a little
piece of coastal plain wild-
ness. I keep it that way,
unkempt and as primitive
as possible. The wildlife
inhabitants appreciate it,
though I'm uncertain I can
say the same for neighbors
and rubbernecking pass-
ersby. I stand here in the
middle of this thuinbnail
plot of habitat and view
on a miniscule scale what
I might see elsewhere, in
vast places far removed.
Just over there, for in-
stance, an eastern box tur-
tle plucks newly opening
blossoms from a black-
berry cane, too impatient,
or perhaps merely too
hungry, to wait on ripened
fruits. He is undisturbed
by the Northern cardinals,
the pine siskins, and the
house finches picking up
grass seeds and chatter-
ing a few feet away. At the
same time, in a brushpile,
a pair of Carolina wrens
is busy fledging a trio of
youngsters reluctant to try
their wings and leave the
nest.
The big gray rat snake
that lives on the property
begins to prowl, leaving


a distinct serpentine
trail behind as he moves
silently over the dew-
washed pine needles. Last
week, the mockingbird
parents would have at-
tacked. Today, though,
they pay him little mind.
Their babies can fly now
and the snake poses little
threat. It is now the nest-
ing Eastern bluebirds that
must beware.
At my feet, the broad-
headed skinks wriggle
through the carpet of
dead leaves and naturally
composted topsoil. Their
stubby legs carry them
in search of insects and
other creepy-crawly prey.
Likewise, the fence swifts
and Carolina anoles dart
around tree trunks and
hide in green vegetation,
performing their own
"lizardly" rituals.
I move a bit too sud-
denly and spook the
cottontail rabbit that sat
watching me from a few
feet away. He still thinks I
haven't yet seen him. The
gray squirrel in the sweet
gum boughs above my
head knows I see him and
doesn't care. He scolds me
incessantly.
Reluctantly, I turn and
Sretrace my steps. In sec-
onds, I'm back in'"civiliza-
, tion." But I can handle it
now, the writing deadlines
and all the other aggravat-
ing chores of day-to-day
living. Ten minutes in my
backyard "wilderness" and
everything seems some-
how better.
Nope, it's not the Chatta-
hoochee National Forest,
Saint Vincerit Island, or
some remote palmetto
hammock. Not by a long
shot.
It'll do, though. For
now.


The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. A
deal to loan Mark Martin
to Joe Gibbs Racing as a
replacement driver for in-
jured Denny Hamlin fell
apart Friday, when Michael
Waltrip Racing said Martin
will fulfill his commitment
to their team.
The announcement from
MWR came roughly 24
hours after JGR said Mar-
tin will take over the No.
11 Toyota next weekend at
Martinsville and drive the
car until Hamlin returns
from a fractured vertebra
in his lower back. Hamlin
is expected to miss at least
five races.
It means Martin can now
only drive Hamlin's car at
Martinsville, a track not on
his schedule. Brian Vick-
ers, who drives for JGR in
the Nationwide Series,
was scheduled to drive
Martin's car for MWR at
Martinsville.
MWR said Martin will re-
turn to his regular car after
Martinsville and "resume
his previously scheduled
run of events with MWR"
for the rest of the season.
"I think it is great that a
driver of Mark's caliber is
available to support our
fellow Toyota team during
this difficult time for them.
We wish Denny a speedy
recovery" said MWR
founder and cb-owner
Michael Waltrip. "Mark is
a big part of our organiza-
tion and is committed to
our sponsors, especially
Aaron's and Toyota. We
have a lot of goals yet to
reach this year and we are
T very focused on accom-
plishing them."
It's believed a deal be-
'tween the teams to swap
-Martin for Vickers in the
SSprint Cup Series races had


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Tony Stewart (right) and Mark Martin take part in the drivers'
introductory lap before the NASCAR race in Fontana, Calif., on


March 24.

been completed, but JGR
prematurely announced it
before MWR sponsor Aar-
on's had given its approval.
No reason has been given
why Aaron's didn't approve
the swap.
MWR has been eyeing
Vickers as a potential re-
placement for Martin in
the No. 55 Toyota, and
Vickers is scheduled to
run nine races for Martin
this year. Because Vick-
ers is seen as an option
for that ride, MWR was in
favor of loaning Martin to
the Gibbs camp to get an
extended look at Vickers in
its equipment.
Instead, JGR must now
put together a Plan B. The
team made no immedi-
ate announcement as to
who will drive for Hamlin
beyond Martinsville, but
JGR President J.D. Gibbs
said Thursday the orga-
nization preferred just
one driver for consistency
sake.
Vickers had the commit-
ment to MWR for the first
race, and Elliott Sadler,
the second driver in JGR's


Nationwide Series camp,
already has commitments
to drive the Cup races at
Kansas and Talladega in a
fourth car for JGR.
It means Vickers will like-
ly get the nod for Hamlin's
car after Martinsville.


SPORTS


MONDAY NIGHT ROLLERS
MARCH 25
TEAM STANDINGS
W-L
1) I Don't Know 49-31
2) Mary's Day Care 43-37
3) Adam's Funeral Home 42.5-37.5
4) Monday Nite Special 41.5-38.5
5) Marianna Office Supply 35.5-44.5
6) 2 Men & A Lady 28.5-51.5
a High Team Hdcp. Game: I Don't Know 767
a High Team Hdcp. Series: I Don't Know 2085
a High Game: Linda Mathis: 185, Jason Townsell 268
a High Series: Linda Mathis: 503, Jason Townsell 716
TUESDAY MORNING COFFEE LEAGUE
MARCH 26
TEAM STANDINGS
W-L
1) Down Home Dental Center 72-48
2) Kindel Awards 71-49
3) Family Dentistry 64.5-55.5
4) Champion Tile 62-58
5) Jim's Buffet & Grill 59.5-60.5
6) Pacers 52-68
7) James & Sikes 52-68
8) Marianna Animal Hospital 47-73
a High Team Hdcp. Game: Marianna Animal Hospital
935
D High Team Hdcp. Series: Kindel Awards 2667
n High Game: LuAnn: 191, Don Foley 206
a High Series: LuAnn: 544, Lynn 600
TUESDAY NIGHT MIXED LEAGUE
MARCH 26
TEAM STANDINGS


1) Kindel Pro Shop
2) We're Back Again
3) Lu's Crew
4) X-Men
5) All Day
6) Shelton Trucking
7) James Gang
8) D and D
9) Marianna Metal


W-L
83.5-36.5
71-49
71-49
70.5-49.5
70.5-49.5
67-53
54-66
53-67
49.5-70.5


Fishing

LAKE SEMINOLE
Bass fishing is good. Stained water
has dissipated on the main lake, but the
best fishing is still in the creeks. Flip-
ping and pitching jigs along grass edges
is a good recommended technique
right now. Worm fishing arid crankbait
fishing are said to be fair late in the day.
In the main lake, on points, slow-rolling
spinnerbaits can pay off. Up the rivers,
Texas-rigged worms fished in bank-side
cover are recommended. Lizards fished
on Carolina-rigs may occasionally work
on the ledges.
Crappies are fair to good at shallow
to mid-range depths in brush and/or
emergent vegetation. Rocky cover or
rip-rap is also good target structure. Jigs
and minnows can produce equally well
right now.
Bream fishing is fair. Crickets and red
wigglers are good bait choices.
Catfish are reported as fair and there
is sporadic hybrid activity.


LAKE EUFAULA
Bass fishing is good. Jerkbaits,
Carolina-rigged lizards and small
crankbaits are producing, especially in
upriver areas.
Target shallow grass and mid-depth
brushpiles.
In shallow brush, single-blade char-
treuse/white spinnerbaits are paying
off. Texas-rigged lizards are report-
edly doing well, as are jig-and-trailer
combos. Small crankbaits are working
moderately well on bass holding in
shallow water. If fish get finicky, try a
trick worm on a lightly weighted Texas-
rig fished with spinning tackle.
Crappies are good right now. Fish


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 e 3BF

10) Oak Creek Honey 43.5-76.5
11) Backwoods Bowlers 42.5-77.5
11) El-Rio 39-81
a High Team Hdcp. Game: We're Back 977
a High Team Hdcp. Series Kindel Pro Shop 2817
a High Game: Nichole Townsell: 217, Jason Kindelspire:
276
a High Series: LuAnn: 579, Jason Kindelspire: 760
WEDNESDAY NIGHT MIXED
MARCH 27
TEAM STANDINGS
W-L
1) Marianna Metal 74-46
2) Big Lots 71-49
3) Try Hards 66-54
4) Adventure Drive 65-55
5) Perfections Detailing 63-57
6) 2 Pair of Nuts 63-57
7) Fireballs 58-58
8) Harley's Hawgs 57-63
9) Hollis Body Shop 57-63
10) EJ Sound Machine 54.5-65.5
11) Smith's Supermarket 50-70
12) Mr. Bingo 41.5-78.5
) High Team Hdcp. Game: Big Lots 1004
) High Team Hdcp. Series: Big Lots 2841
a High Game: Amie Kain 225, Jason Kindelspire 256
a High Series: Amie Kain 560, Jason Kindelspire 713
)*Special Pickups* David Swanger 4-7-10
CHIPOLA MEN'S LEAGUE
MARCH 21
TEAM STANDINGS
W-L
1) Kindel Lanes 2 30-14
2) Ricoh 27-17
3) Perfections Detail 27-17
4) Man On 26-18
5) 3 Aces & A Deuce 24-20
6) Remedials 23-21
7) X Men 20-24
8) Ouzts Again 20-24
9) The Posse 16-28
10) The Wolf Pack 7-37
a High Team Hdcp. Game: Man On 994
a High Team Hdcp. Series: Man On 2900
a High Game: Al Pumphrey 259
a High Series: Jack Townsell 712


Report
shallow up the creeks with minnows
and jigs and troll jigs along the drop-
offs and creek channels for the best
results.
Catfish are fair to good, particularly
late in the afternoon on flats adjacent
to the river channel.
, Hybrids are generally slow, but some
catches are reportedin scattered
locations.
Bream activity is slowly increasing.


LAKE ANDREWS/
CHATTAHOOCHEE RIVER
Stripers, hybrids and white bass are
schooling near the Andrews Dam. They
are active at present and may be caught
on a variety of baits. Fresh live shad
is a good choice as are small crayfish.
Crayfish are an especially good choice
for bank fishermen. Pearl-colored or
white Shad Bodies fished on 12-ounce
lead-heads are said to be the best baits
for stripers in the tailwaters.
Largemouths are reasonably active up
the creeks north of the dam and several
nice bass have come from the tailwa-
ters recently. Tailwater largemouths are
best targeted with live shiners. Lightly
weighted Texas-rig lizards may produce
up the creeks right now.
Shellcrackers and bluegills are still
moderately active up the creeks, but
there has been a slow-down over the
past few days.
Crappies remain reasonably active,
but have slowed somewhat over recent
days.
Generation schedules, pool levels, and other such
information for area waterways may be obtained by
calling toll-free 1-888-771-4601. Follow the recorded
instructions and access the touch-tone for the
Apalachicola River System.


Cowboys, Romo agree on extension


The Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas -
Tony Romo has a chance
to start for the Dallas Cow-
boys longer than Roger
Staubach or Troy Aikman.
The question is whether
he will ever match their
Super Bowl pedigrees.
Romo and the Cow-
boys agreed to a six-year
contract extension worth
$108 million Friday, with
about half of that guar-
anteed to make him the
highest-paid player in
franchise history.
The agreement, re-
ported on the team's
website, will lower the
quarterback's salary
cap number for 2013 by
about $5 million, givifig


IL Specials
Mufflers & Exhaust


aI rei rTJiJ PleWiCs


the team more room to
sign free agents and draft
picks.
Romo, who turns 33
next month and was
entering the final year
of his contract, gets $55
million guaranteed.,
Romo could be with
Dallas through 2019,
giving him a chance to
be the starter longer
than the 11 seasons of
Aikman and seven of
Staubach.
Aikman and Staubach
won five Super Bowls


between them, while
Romo has just one playoff
win in six full seasons.


Grand Opening _
"April 6'" & 7'h
North Florida Wild West Shbow
Located ata2134 Hwy 231 S Cotlondale, FL
beside Steel Cliy Tire & Repair

We willbe having Gunfight Shows,
Country Music Card Sharks,
Pony Rides, Train Rides,
Reenactments andmore!
SAlsoour Haunted House willbe open both daysl
We are not responsible for accidents or injuries
Ihis n That Shop will be open both days!
or m -ore info call
850-557-9928
if


Deal for Martin to replace



Hamlin falls through


_~_1_1_1111_1111111ilil __1_11_1_11_14_111_111111_111__111









4B SUNDAY. MARCH 31, 2013 JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


TIHIIE U IL


I Waco Gift Shop
: I r ,1 : ,, o482-5781


-I


WE HAVE A
FREE
S CARF \\
WAITING FOR YOUI x-_____a
i l. --


FREE SCARF FRIDAY!! .
v it s, ~I- V Y y I'nl l ', in i
FREE Fashion carf
.W eh'a ''un t -'"i tit. % u i 'fi l i t e"u'l
,^'f :l :: r I-(11 ,il rtlT' l (' hll'. III''I '.I "'.
ll l C onr l I, :.:i.ilr i. ] .1 ,: ,,I ,Tli .- ,.:.i I r l LT+I I.', I1'r.


SFacebook
4432 Lafayette Street 526-5488
www.smithandsmithonline.com


ourmtIo..Jelr


-%1wAd 4s Yght m&


planning a wedding
is no small feat, as
couples are faced with
many decisions seemingly .
from the moment they get
engaged right up until they
walk down the aisle as man .
and wife.
One of the biggest decisions
a couple will make is where to
host the reception. Couples .
must consider a variety of
factors when looking for the
right banquet hall to host their
reception.
The wedding is a
celebration, and the banquet
hall is where the couple and -
their guests will let their hair -
down and hopefully enjoy .
a festive and memorable
night. Because the reception
is typically the most lengthy portion of a couple's wedding day, it's
important to find a place where everyone can be comfortable and
enjoy themselves.
The following are a few tips for couples looking to find the ideal
banquet hall to host their wedding reception.

ASK AROUND
Word-of-mouth is a great way to find the right banquet hall. Ask
friends or family members who got hitched in the same town where
your ceremony will be if they can recommend a reception site.
These friends or family members can provide a behind-the-scenes
look at a reception hall, from how accommodating the staff was to
how flexible the banquet hall was with regard to pricing to how open
the staff was to suggestions.
Wedding planningisn'teasy,soiffriends,familymembersorcoworkers
recommend a hassle-free banquet hall, that recommendation can
remove a lot of the stress from planning a wedding.

CONSIDER THE SIZE OF THE FACILITY
Some couples prefer an intimate affair with relatively few guests,
while others will desire a large wedding party with lots of guests.


at THE GATHERING PLACE
LET Us MAKE YOUR EVENT

Weddings *Receptions
Private Parties Wedding Rentals
G(om/Lete' & fent &Blanners^

S-. 4105 LAFAYETTE ST.
C.utLL GAYLE AT:
850-209-2576

SLIKE Us
ON FACEBOOK


A Day to
1. ,Remember!



For all i/our Diamond Needs
ome in .anrd -see our 5-le,-:,, .:n .*.I 'eddn b iands

Satson
eamtoteors
\ watsonjewelers.com
S I ... r .. .- inn 4 4


-;. -;:.: -. -W M 0
.. ... ... .. ..... . .= .. .. . ...+ : . . . % .- I.. + . _ "m- i --S :.:': --: ,: :- -7 .-: I -
dl, 1


*.I-*


-- :.w, e mC*-- -~P-~ ,mOm ,


7-


m "A


S Ji 4It









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 5B


IFIIMATIE




GUIIIIDIE



i Lh :.


k/eddU
S?^ '


' kAltl {oyor ouA

\ *51~ _/ i


ui


S bi A .

Couples can find a banquet hall
that's capable of catering to
small or large wedding parties,
but find one that fits your party
specifically.
If your Wedding party is small,
then avoid a larger facility that
will appear empty. If the party
is large, make sure there's
adequate room so guests won't
feel like they're sitting on top of
one another during dinner and
dessert.


Tents Serving Platters
Dance Floor & Utensils
PA Systems Easels
STables Fern Stands
SChairs Fountains
SArches Candles (Metal)
SBookstands Gazebos
Punch Bowls Screens (Lattice)
Coffee Makers Kneeling Bench
SChaffers Candelabras
North Florida ReWtal CCnter, lc.
S.2890 Noland St. t'
Marianna, FL
850-526-7368
^ l .T '" -.. ^ -i,'^ ^;-:..'*
~*B ', 1 ^- -p


DON'T DOWNPLAY DECOR
A banquet hall with an
; attractive decor is not only
aesthetically appealing but
can appeal to a couple's
finances as well. Such a hall
likely won't need any additional
decorations, while a banquet
hall that's unadorned and lacks embellishments will, and those
decorations can dip into a couple's overall wedding budget.
Compare the costs of the more decorated banquet hall with the one
that's more plain in appearance, factoring in the cost to decorate the
latter, and you might just realize the one with more aesthetic appeal is
more affordable in the long run.

PRIORITIZE PRIVACY
Few couples would be open to strangers having easy access to their
wedding reception. When shopping for a banquet hall, look for one
that gives you and your guests all the privacy you need.
Many couples have taken to hosting the entire ceremony at a hotel,
which may handle the bulk of the planning and remove the hassle of
transportation for out-of-town guests. However, couples considering a
hotel should look for one that can promise privacy from other guests
at the hotel who aren't there for the wedding.
The reception room should be secluded from the rest of the hotel so
other guests walking by aren't tempted to walk in on the festivities. The
banquet hall is where couples can expect to spend most of their time
on their wedding day, so couples should exercise their due diligence
to ensure they find an inviting and festive facility.


SnT
We are a full-service
salon offering anything
you desire for your
bridal party on your
special day! Call us for
your free consultation
loday to get you set up
in advance! L


L-INNACLE


LACE,


YOUR OUTDOOR DESTINATION FOR:




PINNALEPLACE UTDOORGMAIL.COM
Mee4?.j ^M/


PINNACLEPLACEOUTDOORS@GMAIL.COM


irq
-"-a
.*AWN.


woo,
:"r


LLC


! ,
/ .



I

i
{








L
-.-. -- -^ A J


=:---


I, ~,,,,


''~'''~
;a.


r


aE AIr

Ayyi^M -











-16B SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


Sports Briefs-

High School baseball
Tuesday Ponce de Leon at
Sneads, 5 p.m.; Vernon at Cot-
tondale, 6 p.m.; Bay at Marian-
na, 6 p.m.; Graceville at Altha,
6 p.m.; Malone at Bethlehem,
6 p.m.
Thursday Paxton at
Malone, 5 p.m.; Bethlehem at
Cottondale, 5 p.m.; Vernon at
Sneads, 5 p.m.
Friday Walton at Marianna,
6:30 p.m.; Cottondale at Ponce
de Leon, 6 p.m.,
Saturday Wakulla at Mari-
anna, 3 p.m.

High School softball
Monday -Wewahitchka at
Sneads, 5 p.m.; Graceville at
Ponce de Leon, 6p.m.; Mari-
anna at Dothan, 6 p.m.
Tuesday Sneads at North
Florida Chn;tian, 3 p.m.;
Nlarianna at Godby, 5 p.m.;
Graceville at Altha, 6 p.m.;
Malone at Bethlehem, 5 p.m.
Thursday Vernon at
Sneads, 6 p.m.; Paxton at
Malone, 5 p.m.; Marianna at
North Florida Christian, 3:30
p.m.
Friday Walton at Marianna,
6 p.m.; Baker at Sneads, 6 p.m.;
Cottondale at Altha, 5:30 p.m.

Chipola baseball
The Indians will wrap up a
three-game series with Pen-
sacola State with a home game
Monday at 5 p.m. before start-
ing another three-game set
with Gulf Coast on Wednesday
in Panama City at 5 p.m.
Chipola returns home to
take on the Commodores on
Friday at 2 p.m., and will finish
the series Saturday at 1 p.m. at
Chipola Field.

Chipola softball
The Lady Indians will host a
doubleheader with Tallahassee
on Wednesday at 3 and 5 p.m.
and will finish the week with
a home doubleheader against
Darton on Saturday at 2 and
4 p.m. and on Sunday against
Georgia Perimeter in Dun-
wood;y, Ga.

Panhandle Seminole
Club golf tournament
The 2013 Panhandle Semi-
nole Clubs annual scholarship
golf tournament will be held
Friday at Indian Springs Golf
Club in Nlarianna. This tour-
nament, along with another
fundraiser, has helped provide
$40,000 over the past 10 years
to deserving local students
and 'helped further their
education.
Registration and warm-up
will begin at noon with the
shotgun start at 1 p.m. for this
four-man scramble event.
Cash prizes will be awarded to
the first-, second- and third-
place teams. Additional prizes
will be given for longest drive,
straightest drive, closest to the
pin, and so on.
The greens fee contribution
of $65 will entitle each golfer
to a fantastic afternoon of golf
on a championship course Ito
help a very worthy cause, fol-
lowed by a great meal.
Scholarship (hole) and
pi i7e spn--orships are also
.'. ,ati ..- 1 ,i .rir e.ent. For
mote nmftormailon, call Roy
Baker at 850-526-4005 or 209-
1326, or George Sweeney at
850-482-5526.

Sports Items
enrid 311 .pi rt. Iterm to edtloridl'1
icll)ridarln coin, Or la, them to i50-48a -
44:5 Thre r firing addr.,s for the paper
i: a,: :K;.or ,:,urirty Flordrn PO Bo, 520
1j3rianri FL ~2-14:


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Co~~-.-- ~


,. .' -- r -- -.--"

F. !=' -" '~- ---'-- :-- -' -. -~- 7.,.---_. ,
.-
-- -c ; -


THEASSOCIATED PESS
Florida's Scottie Wilbekin (5) Will Yeguete (15), Casey Prather (24) and Mike Rosario (3) react as Florida Gulf Coast's Sherwood Brown (25) leaves the
floor after a regional semifinal game in the NCAA tournament on Saturday in Arlington, Texas. Florida won 62-50.



Gators looking to reach Final Four


Florida faces Michigan
in South Regional final

The Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas Trey
Burke was a 16-month-old
toddler the last time Michigan
was still playing this late in the
NCAA tournament.
That regional final 19 years
ago, a loss that ended the Fab
Five era, was played in a build-
ing that no longer exists. Where
Reunion Arena once stood near
downtown Dallas is now a va-
cant lot about 20 minutes from
where the Wolverines finally get
another chance to get back to
the Final Four.
"It's definitely crazy," Burke
said Saturday. "Just to get this
program moving back in the
right direction means a lot to
us."
No. 4 seed Michigan (29-7)
plays SEC regular-season cham-
pion and No. 3 seed Florida (29-
7) for the South Regional title on
the raised court at ultramodern
Cowboys Stadium on Sunday.
The Wolverines advanced
largely because of Burke, the
sophomore and Big Ten play-
er of the year who scored 23
points all, after halftime
as they overcame a 14-point
deficit against top seed Kansas.
They forced overtime when
Burke hit a long game-tying 3-
pointer with 4.2 seconds left
in regulation and won 87-85 in
overtime.


"Yeah, I was surprised at how
far I was," Burke admitted af-
ter seeing multiple replays of
the shot that may just become
known as the Fab 3.
,Burke also had 10 assists,
making him the first player to
have 20 points and 10 assists
in the NCAA round of 16 since
1997. The last to do it? A Provi-
dence player known as "Billy
The Kid" aka Florida coach
Billy Donovan, who will be on
the opposite bench when his
Gators play in their third con-
secutive regional final.
"It's funny, my wife says to me
this morning, she asked me the
same question, she said, 'Who
was the player?'," said Donovan,
admitting that he already knew
and remembered his numbers
(26 points, 10 assists vs. Ala-
bama). "And I said Magic John-
son. And she said, 'No, you.' I
said I'm glad I'm comparing
myself to Magic Johnson, that's
great."
Florida has been to this point
each of the last two years, but
they haven't been further since
winning consecutive national
championships under Dono-
van in 2006 and 2007.
In both of those regional final
losses to Louisville last year
and in overtime to Butler in
2011 -the Gators had 11-point
leads in the second half. This is
now the last chance for fourth-
year Florida seniors Kenny
Boynton and Erik Murphy to
get a title of thejr owp.
"Game to game, it's a differ-


ent feeling," Boynton said. "You
think about it before the game.
Once the game starts, you try to
do everything in your control
individually and as a team to
change the outcome. Up to this
point, our team does a great job
preparing the right way."
After falling behind 15-4 early
against Florida Gulf Coast, the
high-flying No. 15 seed every-
body knows now after an un-.
precedented run to the NCAA
round of 16, the Gators recov-
ered with a 16-0 run late in the
first half to go ahead to stay in a
62-50 victory.
While Florida is loaded with
seniors and NCAA tournament
experience, the Wolverines
have three freshmen in their
starting lineup. Junior guard
Tim Hardaway Jr., one of three
sons of former NBA players on;
Michigan's roster, is the only
starter older than Burke.
. All that youth never kept
them from starting the season.
with the goal of competing fora
national championship.
"A lot of people doubted us, a
lot of people thought we were
too young, not tough enough.
And I think we've proved peo-
ple wrong over the last couple
of weeks," Burke said. "I think
we understood we have what
it takes to be a young team
that can go far in this tourna-
ment. ... Being young isn't an
excuse."
Michigan hasn't been to the
Final Four since consecutive
national championship game


appearances in 1992 and 1993
by the Fab Five Chris Webber,
Jalen Rose, Juwan Howard, Ray
Jackson and Jimmy King as
freshmen and sophomores.
Webber was gone before that
1994 regional final loss to Ar-
kansas in Dallas, and Rose and
Howard followed him to the
NBA after that.
This is the most successful
Michigan season since then,
though there is no sense of sat-
isfaction yet.
. "You're not the team until
you're the team. And the only
way you can be the team is that
you win that championship,"
said sixth-year Michigan coach
John Beilein, who took West
Virginia to a regional final eight
years ago. "We want to make
sure that they never get satis-
fied that this great season that
we have. We're trying to get one
more (win) every game."
Donovan, in his 17th season
with the Gators, also talked
about the uniqueness of this
particular season and this
game.
Not the last two trips to re-
gional final games that were
lost. Even with so many of the
same players.
"I'm not sure what we take
from those situations that
could really help us get pre-
pared for Michigan. I think this
game stands on itself," Dono-
van said. "It's got its own sepa-
rate identity as itself. It's in the
moment. It's now, it's here, it's
present."


FGCU's NCAA run ends


The Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas Florida Gulf
Coast had already captured the at-
tention of a nation, the No. 15 seed
that busted brackets and brought a
high-flying act from "Dunk City" to
the NCAA tournament.
So when the journey ended with a
62-50 loss to that bigger school from
Florida just before midnight Friday,
the Eagles had still left their mark on
March.
"We made history," point guard
Brett Comer' said. "We did some-
thing nobody in the nation thought


we could do."
For a few minutes at least in its last
game, the first No. 15 seed to make it
to the NCAA round of 16 looked as if
it might even go further.
The Eagles were hitting 3-point-
ers, had a highlight alley-oop and
made a behind-the-back pass in an
early 11-0 run that put them ahead
of Florida, the No. 3 seed getting an
all-too-close look at what everybody
has enjoyed watching.
But Michael Frazier's only two
baskets of the night were a pair of 3-
pointers that got the Gators on their
own run.


FILE EARLY TO FOIL IDENTITY THIEVES
In recent years, any number of scam artists have
used stolen Social Security numbers to file fraudulent
tax returns, claiming refunds to which they are of
course not entitled. Only when the victims, the true
owners of those identification numbers, file their returns
and claim a refund that gets rejected, do they discover
that their identities have been stolen. The ruse involves
billions of dollars.

Now the Internal Revenue Service says it is aware of
the problem and is taking steps designed to detect these
fake refunds. These measures may cause all refunds to
be slowed this year.

Meanwhile, it's smart to file your tax return as early
as possible, before the thieves do. If you are hacked,
your refund may eventually make its way to you, but it
will take lots of time and great effort to convince the IRS.

Hurry! If you haven't filed yet, come see us at
CARR RIGGS & INGRAM, LLC
4267 Lafayette St., Marianna, FL 32446
(850) 526-3207


N~.I I,7~ -- -


2 & 3 BEDROOM MODELS
AVAILABLE

$80,000- $130,000
Price Range

Owner Financing
Available to
Qualified Buyers



V i -. ,t .... ....n .. .








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Dear Annie: I took a job at a local
bookstore after my position as a special
ed teacher was downsized. Now I have a
"special ed" problem at work.
A woman comes in here once a week
with her son, a mentally challenged
adult. The son is big and heavy, and his
mother is tiny and fragile. Every time
they are here, the son has a meltdown.
Today, he threw himself on the floor,
blocking the checkout area, and wouldn't
get up.
I'm used to dealing with special needs
kids in a school, but not adults in a retail
establishment. Would it be wrong to tell
his mother we cannot accommodate her
son in our store the next time they show
up? I realize if we bar him, it makes us
look mean, but we have a business to
run.
A member of our staff suggested to the
boss that we make them leave, but I ad-
vised against it. If we can't get him to go
voluntarily, we would have to physically
escort him to the sidewalk, and he would
probably struggle. If he gets hurt in the
process; we'd be sued. I also advised
againstcalling the police, because things
could get even more physically rough.
I suggested to the boss that we wait for
the next time they come to the store and
politely refuse entry. Do you have any
suggestions on how to deal with these
adults when they are on outings?
NEWYORK PROBLEM
Dear New York:We contacted the medi-
cal director of the National Alliance on
Mental Illness (NAMI), who said you're
to be commended for your sensitivity in
not letting a meltdown escalate into a
physical confrontation. What's important
is to focus on behavior. If customers can-
not behave appropriately, store owners
are within their rights to use discretion in
asking them to leave or to not come back
in the future.
In this case, the request can be raised
gently with the mother the next time she
and her son come into the store. To avoid
discriminating against a medical condi-


Bridge

Timing is everything. And it applies to many
bridge deals, not just for declarer but also for the
defenders. In today's deal, who should come out
ahead in four hearts after West leads his fourth-
highest club?
South opened with a textbook weak two-bid:
a six-card suit containing two of the top three
or three of the top five honors, and 6 to 10 high-
card points. North jumped to game, hoping his
side would not immediately lose four black-suit
tricks.
Note West's lead. Fourth-highest applies not
only in no-trump but also in a trump contract
when you have at least one honor in that suit.
South has four potentiallosers: one spade, one
heart and two clubs. If either major-suit finesse
wins, he is safe. Or if he can draw trumps, he
might be able to discard his low spade on dum-
my's fourth diamond.
East, though, should wonder where the de-
fenders can get four tricks. He should hope for
two club winners. He can see a trump trick. So
his side must take one spade. West will not have
the ace and king, because then he would have
led the spade ace, not the low club. If West has
the spade ace, there will be no problems. But if
he has the king, there isn't a moment to lose.
East must win with his club ace and shift to the
spade eight (high denying an honor in the suit).
Then the contract must fail. No other defense
works.
Leading back partner's suit is usually right
in no-trump, but much less often in a trump
contract.


tion, the store owner should state that
they are welcome to return when they
are able to properly manage the son's
behavior. The mother may need to talk to
her son's doctor about his treatment plan
in order to address behavior issues.
It is also possible that the mother
cannot leave the son at home alone and
has no one to help her in caregiving.
Although it's not your role to be a social
worker, simple compassion can go a long
way in helping the situation, including
asking whether they have anyone else in
the neighborhood or community to help
them.

Dear Annie: A family member recently
had a going-away party for their son
two days before he was to leave for boot
camp. Many of us. gave him gifts. The kid
decided the night before leaving that he
had changed his mind and wasn't going
after all. Should he return the gifts and
money? Most of us think he should, but
no one wants to be the one to tell him.
CALIFORNIA
Dear California: Yes, all gifts and money
should be returned as soon as possible.
(The same applies to canceled weddings
and other gift-giving occasions.) While
it is not appropriate to call up the young
man and insist that he return the pres-
ents, someone who is close to him or his
parents can mention that it is expected.

Dear Annie: Please tell "George" to ap-
preciate his nosy neighbor. Years ago, I
had one of those. She noticed everything
and would alert us to any strange activity
in the neighborhood.
When I got divorced, her kitchen
became a place to unwind. She always
had a pot of coffee going. She passed on,
but I know she is watching out for her
neighbors in heaven.
SECURE IN CALIFORNIA
Dear Secure: Thank you for a sweet
story.

Happy Easter to our readers.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"TN OGNO LZ J EZH SNL, URJ EZH

NKPT SKL. GE NKPT SKL TKO UNNL

JTN ZLAB SKL SKON, TN MZRAO TKYN

OZLN LZ ANDD." P.D. ANMGD



Previous Solution: "Unless there is a Good Friday in your life, there can be no
Easter Sunday." Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen
TODAY'S CLUE: A slenb A
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-30


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"H LZZB HMS FKI TZMWR HXW IZZM

GHXCWS, NAC KC KI XWTHXEHNBW FZJ

THMR LZZBI FHUW TZMWR CZ GHXC


LX Z T ."


- WSOHX OAWIC


Annie's Mailbox


"Oklahoma!" The Rodg-
ers and Hammerstein hit
debuted on this day in
1943.


Horoscopes

ARIES (March 21-April
19) -Your perceptions
should be accurate, so
trust them.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Be wary of those
offering incentives or
rewards; they may not
have your best interests
at heart.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-You might believe that
you're the one who is do-
ing the lion's share of the
work in a joint effort, but
you're wrong. Stop whin-
ing and buckle down.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) The key to success
is to attempt only what
you are well equipped to
handle.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- It's good to think of
your abilities as extraor-
dinary, if there's some
basis for it.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Whatever you do,
don't involve outsiders
in a sensitive domes-
tic matter. They might
mean well, but their
input could compound
matters.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
23) Boasting or exag-
gerating could lead to an
embarrassing situation.
There is a strong possibil-
ity that you could tell a
fish story to a guy who
has a ruler in his pocket.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Be certain that
you have your head on
straight when it comes to
your financial dealings.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21)- Carefully
examine the motives of
someone making a
grandiose problem. There
might not only be strings
attached, there could be
chains.
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19) Your self-
discipline could be too
lax for your own good.
Your chart indicates
that you're ignoring
several undeveloped
opportunities.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) It behooves you
to be as straightforward
as you can in a sensi-
tive conversation with
a friend. Honesty is the
best policy as long as
you're kind as well.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Success will be de-
nied you if you insist on
nourishing self-doubts.
If you don't think like a
winner, you won't act like
one, and the results will
loudly reflect it.


World
Liamanac
Today is the 90th day of
2013 and the 12th day of
spring.
TODAY'S HISTORY: In
1889, the Eiffel Tower was
dedicated in a ceremony
in Paris.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS:
Joseph Haydn (1732-
1809), composer; Cesar
Chavez (1927-1993), labor
leader; Gordie Howe
(1928-), hockey player;
Liz Claiborne (1929-
2007), fashion designer;
Herb Alpert (1935-),
musician; Christopher
Walken (1943-), actor; Al
Gore (1948-), former U.S.
vice president/senator;
Ewan McGregor (1971-),
actor; Jessica Szohr (1985-
), actress.
TODAY'S QUOTE: "We
Americans write our own
history. And the chapters
of which we're proud-
est are the ones where
we had the courage to
change." Al Gore
TODAY'S NUMBER: 2,212
Broadway performanc-
es in the 15-year run of


2013 UFS, Dist.'by Universal Uclick for UFS


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Witnessed
4 Kind of
pilot
8 Police
dept. alert
11 Pantyhose
color
13Jai -
14 Hawaii's
Mauna -
15 Schedule
16 Made an
impolite
noise
18Elvis'
hometown
20 Make an
appearance
21 Peace
gesture
22 Hair goop
24 Fast sleds
27 Harbinger
30 Comparable
31 Sugar
source
32 Lout
34 Plead
35 Labyrinth
36To be, to
Brutus
37Appetizing
39Parish
donation
40 Furry
friend


TC8 D UIpar




predces-IG
EA0URGE




BLUsors
RIEL
ES DRUM
A4H ORO
R ARGOT
ADV I L
ENEPOOL
MEN NOG
UT STE
38 DVD player

predeeonoun
sors
39 Make lace
41 Leans over
42 Oft-
misused
pronoun
43 Untold
centuries
44 "Shake
-'!"
46Gance or
Ferrara
47Taboo
(hyph.)
48 Sufficient
50 A little bit
51 Actress
Mendes
52 Square
root of IX


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
S ONCE I HAD CONTROL OF THE *E 7 THE I WAS OIN6 TO SHOW
DINOSAURS, I WAS G6016 O HAVE 'n MY POWERS OVER THE BEASTS
THEM CHARGE TOWARD MOO JUT BY STEPPING IN AND STOPPING
0ONG6 ENOUGH TO SCARE EVERYONE r THEM AT THE LAST MOMENT!


Previous Solution: "He died not for men, but for each man. If each man had
been the only man made, He would have done no less." C.S. Lewis
TODAY'S CLUE: M slenbe p
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 4-1


Entertainment Brief

Rapper Lil Wayne says he's an epileptic
NEWYORK LilWayne says he's an epileptic
and has had seizures for years.
In an interview with Los Angeles-based radio
station Power 106 on Thursday, the 30-year-old
rapper said epilepsy caused his most recent health
scare earlier this month when he was rushed to a
hospital.
Wayne said he had three back-to-back
seizures.
The Grammy winner says: "I've had a bunch of
seizures, y'all just never hear about them."
The Associated Press

NEA Crossword Puzzle

ACROSS 39Tech talk Answer to Previous Puzzle
1 ER practice 41 Wedding
4 List rental BOBEAMT ZAP
shortener 42Next year's AGO WAl F L0 BO3
7 Tobacco grads NEE ALDA OR BS
.wad 43 Rounded DE LRA I LED U R EY
11 Rope-a- handle TIA
dope boxer 45Excedrin YEGG RUDER
12 Fringe rival DAP MDS AEG I
13Argue for 48Penniless SlUAVE SAL E SA
14 Halite 49 A species N ERT L 0SS
(2 wds.) shares it ENS E TAP
16Churchill (2 wds.) KN I IT REABSO R B
successor 52Portend INC ITCHB A R
17 Bell 53 Famous
-sounds last word DUES CHO IRA
18 Jigglethe 54 Eggy drink S R HIE1R TIEN
camera 55 Husky's 9 Disney CEO 33 Coached
19 Laugh tow Bob 35 Solidify
syllable 56 Destroy 10 Fox's abode 38 Popcorn
20Aunt or completely 12 Numb, as a buy
bro. 57Sault foot 40 Invitation
21 Cake at Marie 15 Actress Itrs.
teatime Madeline 42A singing
24 Back out DOWN 18 Gentle bear Jackson
27 Sighs of 1 Drag race 20Balance 43- -Aid
distress participant 21 Show 44Twig
28 Deep-dish 2 Sit down distress juncture
desserts quickly 22 Meat 46Charged
30Percussion 3 Paddy crop market buy particles
instrument 4 Wipeout 23Fjordport 47Plunder
32 Roll of data 24 Posterior 48 "Nova"
cloth 5 Util. bill 25 Hot rum channel
34 Hot soak 6 Popular mixture 49 Comedy bit
36 Pizarro's pet 26 Franc's 50 Nonflying
quest 7 Crushed replacement bird
37Type of 8 Karachi 29 Alpine goat 51 Size above
pigeon language 31Bon med.
(witticism)
Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


North 03-30-13
SQJ 109
A63
*AKQJ
774
West East
SK62' 8743
5 2 K4
8 863 1075
4KJ952 4A1063
South
SA5
Q QJ10987
*942
SQ8

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both

South West North East
2V Pass 4V Allpass


Opening lead: 5


Answer to Previous Puzzle


41 Flying
mammal
42 Sport
45 Flammable
gas
49 Dairy cow
53 Poetic
black
54 Dollar bill
55 Eager
56 Gambler's
town
57 Flavor
enhancer
58 Lectern's
place
59 Moo
DOWN
1 Equinox
mo.
2 Freedom
org.
3 Stole
4 Nevada
lake
5QB
Manning
6 Cul-de- -
7 Muscle
spasm
8 Dog food
brand
9 Verse
10 Directed
12 Lopsided


CPR RE
ALI SafAIRd
ROICIKISIA
PEALS
CPOE A USI






23OH r Pto t






25Banjos' kinB
byteE
B29 0Pinch ofLT
BODE A|

17Stanford
rival
19 Guitarist
Paul
22 DNA
component
23 Prior to
24Chem
room
25 Banjos' kin
26 Prefix with
byte
27 Misty
28 Off'course
29 Pinch of
salt
31 Haul
33 Doctor's
payment
35 Ostrichlike
bird
36 This or that


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 + 7B F


IENT3Im- N NT





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


.. . ,, . . ... ...
lU U/''.I r *J < ^ \^ ^ < \rj 1r
AJ, ^^^J.>^ Jil;- -^^u ^^^ ^- ^'


V(FI


dgeme


Charge Offs?


SvLate Payments?
iiV.-CoI .ons?
..C a ll...i o n s ?

'$High ebt?

VLack of Credit?

yLimited Job Time?

/ODivorce?

N/Low Income?


*For qualified buyers
with approved credit
on select Vehidc
"'


apranna, rl riufal~
0-526-34


- 8B SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


r .~~..
"'
.~.
;~-k4;.
: I'


''dic~Fm,,
8'?"..


*ii^'


Iosu-1







www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Sunday, March 31, 2013- B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED



MARKETPLACE


/ ANNOUNCEMENTS



Key West Flordia
April 23-29,2013
Washington DC/Patriotic Tour
June 27-July 2, 2013
Ride The Rails (West Virginia)
July 22-26,2013
Best of China (Beijing City)
October 15-23 2013
For moreinfrain;cl eit tne


sr


FINANCIAL


BUIN S I"P T N


Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest.commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com

Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
504-915-1474

(1) MERCHANDISE


Wedding Gown: Size 5/6, floor length, candle-
light dress and veil made with antique lace and
beading. Strapless with a built in corset, but
can be worn with crossing straps (included) for
more modest look. Original cost of both veil
and dress were $1025 asking $575. Has been
cleaned and is in perfect condition. Will gladly
email pictures. 334-692-3536, Rachel

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
SDiamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Alabama 1992 National Championship artist
proof, signed coach Stallings & Daniel Moore
"The Tradition Continues" 23"x 29"
exc. cond $900.334-655-2727.
Brunswick Pool Table: Beautiful, Traditional
Ball & Claw, Bar Size Table with Custom Tan
Felt; dark mahogany wood; with 6 pool sticks
of different weights, caulk; a wooden stick/
accessory holder that is round'and sits on the
floor; a ball set; both racks (8 ball & regular);
several felt brushes, etc. Original Price was
around $3,000. Selling for $700, 334-685-2898
* Hydraulic styling chairs (3) w/ chrome $400;
ea. (2) platform dryer chairs w/ Venus hair
dryers $300. ea. Lg. Plants, dumb cane, peace
lily & Chinese evergreen $20-$40. 334-268-0119
Tow Dolly: pull behind, good condition, new tie
down straps $600. Call 334-618-2516 or 850-569-
2750

Piano used: in fairly good condition. Asking
S500. Cill tb5i'11 526-3474 in evenings.
fmrelvin123,''gmjail.co'm


JREE2


FREE ADS


AC: Complete package unit $500. 850-272-8470
Battery charger: 200 amps $100. 850-482-2636
Ent. Center wood, shel-l $100. 850-596-2969.
Glock-35: 40 al. S500. Call 850-592-7265
Laptop: HP G61, 3GB mrem $350. 850-693 5098
Prom Dress: size 6 $175. 850-482-2636
Push Mower- go gas required.$99. 850-592-8769
Stove & Oven Hctpoint $125. 850-209-6977.
Table & Chairs w -4 chairs $200. S50-569-2969
Washer & Dryer likablee $-JC4. 850-569-2969
Window: N %.a 2 ,-"1 WlA hitr 10)ll l'l-.42-.)i2 3


(.) PETS & ANIMALS


FREE: 2 kittens 6 weeks old. Need good home
850-482-5880 or 850-272-4908.
FREE: Kittens to loving home. multi-colorl-F &
1-M 850-272-4908 or 850-482-5880

AKC Brittany Spaniels Orange/White. 4 males
and 4 females. Excellent hunting blood line.
(Nolan's Last Bullett). Tails docked and dew
claws have been removed. Will be Ready on
March 29th. Call (229) 724-8839 if interested.
German Shepherd Puppies: -AKC registered,
first shots,, mother has German bloodlines.
Black and tan, black and silver. 5 males, 1
female.7 wks old. 850-768-9182 or 850-849-3707.
Reg. English Bulldog puppies UGA blood line
both dam and sire, shot records up to date
$1200. 229-237-2935
SUPER PUPPET SALE! Chihuahua,
Shih-Tzu mix puppies and Morkies.
Now taking deposit on Papillions.
334-718-4886 plynn@sw.rr.com
(U) FARMER'S MARKET



GRASS & MILK FED BEEF!!'
Freezer Ready Esto meat.
GREAT QUALITY!!
Quarters and Halves. USDA Inspected
ESTO MEATS CALL 850-263-7777

F H 0oR I


850-573-6594


Frozen Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
4 4128 Hwy231


r................................1
S IBahia seed for sale -
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L.............. ... ..7...............


Cattle: 30 bred cows 3 to 7 years.old and
50 bred heifers for sale. Most are Angus and
Brangus cross with a few Charolais cross.
For more information call 334-303-9285.


/Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
Notract to small / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
334-389-2003 4


fip'$ EMPLOYMENT
EDUCATIONAL & TRAINING


CHIPOLA COLLEGE
is accepting applications for
the following positions:


WELDING INSTRUCTOR
CAREER COACH WELDING PROGRAM
Minimum qualifications and job duties are
available at www.chipola.edu/personnel/jobs
APPLICATION DEADLINE IS
OPEN UNTIL FILLED.
To obtain an application, contact
Human Resources at pippenw@,chipola.edu
or at (850)718-2269. Candidates may be
subject to background investigations.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


ICE RIVER
SPRINGS.
www.iceriversprngs.com
Ice River Springs takes great pride in
producing the highest quality spring water
in North America from our protected natural
springs. We are currently requesting
applicants for the following position in our
Marianna Florida facility:
Industrial Maintenance
Technician
We Offer:
Excellent Wages
Biweekly bonuses
Monthly efficiency bonuses
Company Benefits
Clean & Safe Work Environment
Blow molding or bottling experience
preferred and prior industrial
Maintenance experience.
Qualified candidates are invited to submit
their resume's tq:
hrmarianna@iceriversprngs.com
We thank all applicants; however only those
selected for an interview will be contacted.
Ice River Springs is an
equal opportunity employer.



AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-
SMINDED, NEWSPAPER CARRIERS


COTTONDALE
Earn an average of

$850
per month

Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus

BE YOUR OWN BOSS 1 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL



RE A D


the classified for



JOB OPPORTUNITIES


Sudoku


Level: 2 [-i
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to last Sunday's puzzle

4 8 9 5 2 1 6 3 7
1 5 3 9 7 42 8


237486195
612874359
8 75 63 921 4
3 914 1 52 7 8 6
7 6 8 9 1 3 5 4 2
92[1745863
5 43 2 68 971
1T 121 1 1T


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


River Valley Rehabilitation
Center Is now hiring:
RN'S & LPN'S
7a-7p & 7p-7a SHIFT
C.N.A'S
3-11 SHIFT
$1.00 SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL
FOOD SERVICE AIDE
5a-1:30p/lla-8p SHIFT
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
8a-5p shift FT
Taking applications for C.N.A Classes for
April Deadline for Application April 1st,
Class starting April 8th.
Great Pay and Benefits Health,
Vision & Dental
Please Apply at:
River Valley Rehabilitation Center
17884 NE Crozier Street
Blountstown, Fl. 32424
Ph: (850) 674-5464
Fax: 674-9384
Email: rvhrc@southernltc.com
Drug Free Workplace- Safe Minimal Lifting
Environment An EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D


President/CEO
Jackson County Chamber of Commerce
The Jackson County Chamber is accepting
applications for the position of President/
CEO. Min.3-5 yrs leadership experience with
bachelors degree or equivalent education or
business experience required. Prefer some
experience with a non-profit, a Chamber, or
membership organization led by a board of
directors. Proven skills needed in public
relations, public speaking, marketing,
e-communications, business operations,
planning, and P&L management. Must be
able to interact effectively with entrepre-
neurs, business owners, executives, elected
officials, civic leaders and volunteers. Must
be able to self-relocate to Jack.-son County.
Position closes April 15th. Submit resume
to jcchambersearch L gmail.com.
Network Specialist
looking for experienced Net-work Specialist
for installing Lg. commercial printers &AMFP's
Benefits. Salary Negotiabjle
Send Resume to: The Doth n Eagle
Box EE 22.7 N. Oates St. Dothan, AL 3633
Driver/Assistant needed to do groceries/
errands light housekeeping. 850-482-4896

& INSTRUCTION
BaiNmTLCT1

LOOK
FOLLOW YOUR PASSION! Become a Daycare .
Director 6 wk. Homestudy Course $300.
Call Mrs. Alaina 334-714-4942 9am 5pm


Enrolling Now!
i > .Training in
FOR TI S ElectricalTrades,
FOR IS Medical
COLLEGE Assisting,Pharmacy
Technology and More!
Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 for consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


COTTONDALE VILLA
APARTMENTS
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR 1 & 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS RENTAL
Assistance Available to Quailified Appliants .
CALL: (850) 352-2281
TDD USERS 1-800-548-2456
Office Opened Tuesday & Thursday
EQUAL HOUSING 3111 Willow St.
OPPORTUNITY Cottondale, FL 32431




GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL Call 850-482-4663


*Brlr l*1 i ,^^ "'^

2/2 3136 Aycock Rd. 900 sq. ft. washer/dryer,
flat screen TV's $650. mo. $650. dep. utilities,


dish, garbage water & sewage w/pool
(Appointment Only) 850-352-2951 850-573-1864


4 1BR/1BA, nice clean apt. in town screened
porch, large yard $450. mo.
No pets. 850-557-2000 for more info.


314 2 7

4 8 3

7 1 3 9
2---- _---- ---9

4

5 8 7 2

5

9 6 1 2

5 3 4

4 1 139


VVIIIUUVV. VVI.-


3/31/13












10 B Sunday, March 31, 2013 Jackson County Floridan


Look! Amazing Low Rents $230.
Willow Bend Apartsments 1BR & 2BR Villas
for immediate move in. Small pets welcome.
Call 850-593-5137 or make an
appointment to se e your new home. 1g q
Barrier Free. *This institution is an
equal housing provider *


1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4=

3/3 with CH&A Alford Fl $695 mo. + dep.
850-579-4317 or 850-866-1965
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Large 2BR Cottage Home Completely Updated
with family room. 5 minutes from town off 73
North. Big fenced yard and all electric. $550.
Mo + Dep. Call 765-425-5288


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountryliving.com.
850-209-8847_4
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595




2BR/2BA Newly remodeled in quiet area.
Very clean. Water, sewage, garbage and yard
care provided. No smokers, no pets.
500 + deposit. Call 850-718-8158.

4 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 Located between
Grand Ridge & Sneads. Includes water &
garbage. $360. Mo 4 850-573-0308 4

RESIDENTIAL
_1 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Poultry Farm for Sale 4 houses, Poultry farm
and 5000 sf residence, 2 car garage, 64 acre,
U.S. Hwy. frontage, huge barn, generator, Trac-
tor, farming equipment, $1,100,000 for more in-
fo. Kaan 334-596-8311


RECREATION


a Eagle 2010 190 Yamaha
150 G3 bassboat
4-stroke warr 2014
.-..Humminbird 788ci, 2
l chairs, 2 butt seats, galv
trailer, hydraulic steering, many extras,
$18,500. Call 334-616-1918 or 334-355-0326

IFCO DIE


Extreme

Boat


Packages From
w $4,995
S All WeldedBoats
s All Aluminum Boats


Triton '07 188SFFish and Ski: Mercury Optimax
150HP, 24 volt trolling motor, trailer included,
garage kept, like new conditions, less than
150 hours, $19,000. Call 334-685-3921


Fleetwood 1997 35ft Bounder: 1 slide-out, back-
up camera, leveling jacks, generator, low miles
39k, run goods, new tires. $17,500. OBO
Call 850-482-7554 or 850-209-3495

S TRANSPORTATION
"0.. "


BMW 1995, leather int. good gas mil. green in
color, 4-door $3,200. firm 334-793-2347
BMW 2005 X3 white with tan interior, 165,000
miles, V6, auto, excellent condition, full sun-
roof. $10,000, 850-263-4913
CHEVY 1995 CAPRICE-Clean, runs great, cold
air; fully loaded $3,800 OBO 334-355-1085
Chevy 2010 Impala, Great family car with great
fuel mileage, fully loaded. $300 down $300 per
month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.
m t re2w0 4,3 C o rv e tte 2 0 03 Z 0 6 5 0th
S.. -- i Anniversary Edition
"e .- & Metallic Blue 6 speed, 405
; ,, hp, 40,500 miles, Excellent
Condition $19,195.
334-475-3735 after 6PM

DO YOU NEED VEHICLE?
GOT BAD CREDIT?
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy slow credit ok
$0 Down/ist Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull or Drag will trade
RIDE TODAY! FREE $25. gas giveaway
Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550

Ford 1985 Mustang White, good condition, all
original parts. 90,951 miles. Call 334-494-0837
or email bccolwell2@aol.com
Mitsubishi 2004 Eclipse De-
pendable, one owner, great
gas mileage, sunroof, few mi-
nor blemishes, 120,000 mi,
Automatic. Asking $6,000.
Will take best offer. Call Jen-
nifer at 334-791-0143
Mitsubishi 2012 Galant, Like new! Must sell!
$200 down, $259 per month. Call Ron Ellis 334-
714-0028.
Nissan 2010 Sentra, Navigation, Leather, Sun
roof, Must sell! $200 down, $249 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Toyota 2011 Yaris: silver with black interior, 4
door sedan, bucket seats, one owner, automat-
ic, 5980 miles, 40MPG Hwy, $13,995. Call or
Text 334-618-6588 LIKE NEW !!
Toyota 2012 Corolla, Great gas saver, fully
loaded, low miles, very nice car. $200 down,
J$250 per month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.


CLASSIFIED


,, s *", S 2012 Harley Road King
BIa,,k. Only 1400 mi. 6 spd
S 10- c:i 1600cc, security sys-
St-m, ABS brakes, cruise,
ba,: k rest with luggage
S- rack. Bought last fall, still
under warranty. 2 helmets included. Wireless/
Bluetooth/ FM radio intercom system. (approx
$600 value) Adult owned, title in hand. $16,500
obo. 334-794-9388 or pwt.1202@yahoo.com
Harley Davidson 2000 Ultra Classic Tour Glide:
loaded plus extras, blue and silver, only 8500
miles, new tires. $8,300. Call 334-585-5396
Harley-Davidson 2003 Fat Boy 2003 100th An-
niversary Edition Harley Davidson Fat Boy.
Turquoise and navy with gold inlay custom
paint. $8,000 in chrome added to the bike. Al-
so comes with the original tank and fender,
which is gray blue, motorcycle lift, touring bag,
custom cleaning kit, many extras and special
tools! Call 334-494-0837 or email
bccolwell2@aol.com
Harley Davidson 2006 Soft tail Standard:
4600 miles, vinson/haines pipes, 250 rear
wheel, bronze pearl, lots of chrome, 25K
invested. Asking $10,000. Firm. 334-793-3611
Harley Davidson 2007 Heritage Softtail Classic
exc. cond, new tires, new battery,
lots of chrome $12,500.
334-712-0493 or w-334-793-8028
SHonda 2005 VT 1100C
Shadow Spirit: black and
"" "= c. hro:nme, good condition,
i.ke n et, 3400 miles, one
% owner. ocean title never
wrecked, new tires.
Asking $6,300. Call 334-596-1171
Honda 2005 VTX 1300-R
Nicest one in Alabama,
Too much chrome to list.'
$9,500. Ken 334-693-9360




4x4. Excellent condition.
Garage kept since pur-
chase. Fully loaded 4x4.
105,00 miles. Must see to
appreciate. Black with grey interior. $7,200.
Phone 850-956-2623


4000 Ford Tractor good condition, new engine
$4,250. 334-791-0700
Dodge 2000 Dakota RT: black, fully loaded, 5.9
liter 360 Magnum, Bridgestone tires, beautiful
and rare truck, pampered and well kept, runs
and drives excellent & clean carfax available.
Serious inquiries only. $7,200. Call 334-585-0121
Please leave a message.
Ford 2003 Ranger Edge ext. cab good condition
89K miles, $5,900. 334-446-0044 Susan
Ford 2010 F250 Super Duty Super Cab Lariat:
white, fully loaded, 4X4, low miles, excellent
condition $37,500. Call 334-685-2318
GMC 1986 2500 Series: 4 door, 2 seater but no
back seat, 8 cyl,.91k miles, one owner, garage
kept, very good condition. $3,800. Call 334-792-
3756
International 1995 4900: Flat Bed Truck, DT466,
AC, 125k miles. $6,000. Call 334-897-6346 or
334-406-7200
Massey Ferguson Tractor md#1215 w/MF220 \
5 ft. mower, good cond. $6700. 334-797-8523.
Toyota 1994 Tacoma 4-wheel drive as whole or
parts. 334-689-9436.



1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
"^Ow 's 24 Hour Towi0g
ALTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


'3


CALL FOR TOP PRICE

FOR JUNK VEHICLES


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


WANTED AUTSEL


Got a Clunker
b We'll beyour Junker!
S... We buy wrecked cars
"and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325 & Complete Cars
SCALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285
.---- -- - - - ---
S* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
334-794-9576 or 344-791-4714
L ---- -- --


fjjI-m


LEGALS,


LF160084 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
Residential and Commercial
Solid Waste Services
TOWN OF ALFORD
Purpose: To provide service solid waste collec-
tion and disposal services to the residences
and businesses within the limits of the Town of
Alford

Advertising: Pursuant to the City Code, the
City shall advertise in a newspaper of general
circulation, published within the local area, an
invitation for the submission of proposals. A
copy of the advertisement and information
package may be provided to known and recog-
nized vendors presumed capable of providing
the services unique to this process.

Submission of Proposals: Proposals shall be
submitted in an envelope addressed to: Town
of Alford, PO Box 128, Alford, FL, 32420 or may
be hand-delivered to: 1768 Georgia St., Alford,
FL. The name and address of the Proposer and
the notation "Solid Waste Services" shall be
written on the outside of the envelope.

General Information: The Town of Alford finds
it advantageous to contract operation of solid
waste collection and disposal services, and,
therefore, solicits requests for proposals to
provide full service residential and commercial
refuse collection and disposal service. The fol-
lowing general information applies:

a. The franchise agreement will include every
right and privilege appertaining thereto, to op-
erate and maintain a solid waste collection re-
moval and disposal service upon, over, and
across the present and future streets, alleys,
bridges, easements, and other public places
within the limits of the franchise area for the
purposes of collecting, removing and disposing
of the solid waste generated by the citizens,
residents, inhabitants, business enterprises,
and other entities therein, and franchisee shall
be granted title to all such solid waste generat-
ed within said boundaries, insofar as the City
can establish its legal right to make such grant
or title.

b. The franchise agreement shall cover all the
geographical areas depicted on the official
land use map adopted by the City at the time
of franchise award. The limits of the geograph-
ical area are subject to expansion or reduction
of municipal boundaries and no vested rights
in'a specific area shall be guaranteed.

Scope of Service Delivery: The Franchisee shall
be responsible for collection and disposal of
solid waste from each residential and commer-
cial unit within the contracted area. Scope of
service information is as follows:

a. Residential Service shall be delivered
"curbside" between the hours of 6:00 a.m. and
6:00 p.m., Monday through Saturday. Service
for handicapped patrons shall be delivered
"backdoor." No service will be permitted on
Sunday. Residential carts are to be included.
Yard Waste is not included.

b'Commercial Service shall be delivered be-
tween the hours of 6:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.,
Monday through Saturday. No service will be
permitted on Sunday.

c. Disposal Requirements All refuse collected
by the Franchisee shall be deposited at a facili-
ty legally permitted to accept municipal solid


waste.


Number of Units: The City states that there are
approximately 220 residential units, 10 com-
mercial units, and 3 Town facilities.

Invoicing and Collection: The City will invoice
and collect for residential and commercial
services provided.

Collection Vehicles: Only packer-type vehicles
in good working order will be utilized. Vehicles
must be manufactured and designed to provide
refuse collection services and travel over the
highways of the State of Florida. A list of vehi-
cles to be utilized must be submitted for City
approval.

Insurance Requirements: The Franchisee shall
be required to provide and maintain public lia-
bility and property damage insurance with
bodily injury and property damage limits of lia-
bility of not less than, but not limited to, the
amounts specified in the "Draft Solid Waste
Services Agreement." The policy shall name
the City as "additional insured" and shall in-
sure that the City will be provided thirty (30)
days notice prior to decrease or cancellation of
coverage. The Franchisee must comply with all
provisions of applicable workers' compensa-
tion insurance laws.

Performance Bond: Franchisee shall furnish
proof of ability to obtain a performance bond
approved by the City in the amount of
$150,000.00 for the faithful performance of this
agreement and all its obligations arising here-
under, made payable in favor of the City, or in
lieu thereof, pay to the City the sum of one
hundred percent (100%) of the annual revenue
of the Franchise. A surety company licensed to
do business in Florida shall execute said bond.

Proposal Bond: Franchisee must furnish a
bond or certified check, payable to the City, in
an amount equal to five percent (5%) of the an-
nual contract amount at the time a Proposal is
submitted.

Name, Address and Legal Status of the
Proposer: The Proposal must be signed in ink
and the address of the Proposer given.
The legal status of the Proposer, whether cor-
poration, partnership, or individual shall also
be stated in the Proposal. The Proposal must
include proof that the Proposer has been in ex-
istence as a solid waste services provider fbr a
minimum of five (5) years. The Proposer must
provide proof that it is licensed to do business
and is in good standing under the laws df the
State of Florida. The Proposer must provide
references from at least three (3) municipal or
county customers.

Award of Proposal:

a. The franchise will be awarded to the best re-
sponsible Proposer who's Proposal, conform-
ing to the invitation to propose, is the most ad-
vantageous to the City, prices and all other fac-
tors considered.

b. A written award of acceptance mailed or
otherwise furnished to the successful Proposer
shall be the basis to formalize a franchise
agreement.

Rejection of Proposals: The City reserves the
right to reject any and/or all proposals when-
ever it is deemed in the best interest of the
City.
PROPOSALS WILL BE ACCEPTED NO LATER
THAN 3:00 P.M. ON April 9,2013. LATE PRO-
POSALS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED.

Please contact George Gay, Mayor at
850-573-0188 or SilvestraTharp, Town Clerk
at 850-579-4684 if additional information is
required.
LF160080
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2010-528-CA
Judge John L. Fishel, II

RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES T. ADAMS, BRAD REARDIN, et al.,


m m U^ FJD Your guide to great i
;. E E M businesses & service,





RVICE DIRECTORY


oca .
S


Call 526-3614 to place your ad.


', ~BUSINESSES
& SERVICES



Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Senior Citizens Discount
FREE ESTIMATES # 334-798-0687










Inc sinosad Car




Clay O'Neal's EWawRa
LandClearing, Inc. DaJOUhN, PoDIW;
ALTHA, FL sM ROAD 81T1
850-762 9402 SBMWINSoSv
Cell 850-832-5055





NEW& USED TIRES
NEW TIRES BELOW RETAIL PRICES!
rRIP., 850.526.1700
-' Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
2978 Pierce Street
a (behind Tim's Florist)


S I S OFE IE


ir


Lawn Care &
Outdoor Property


j Maintenance
4 Free Estimates
Call Woody 850-526-2030


Chad O's Lawn F/X
Commercial & Residential
SSpring Cleon-up &
Monthly Maintenance
Full Lawn Care Service
Free Estimates
Family Owned & Operated
Chad Oliver | 850-573-7279



HAPPY

HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME




"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
|^M Iii>* Ill ^*l i^B


You CALL... WE COME To You!
RED'S MOBILE
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE-
850-209-9713
EDWARD MAGGI, OWNER


This Month's Special
I 211
P $319500
35 Years in Business




BEST WAY
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN ORTH FLORIDA
Been in Business Since 1989
WE 80
HAVE II
OVER
DIFFERENT SIZES!
YOU CAN CHOOSE
J--I-T COLOR & STYLE!
BUIlT-ON-SITF- 850-747-8974
2919 Hwy 231 North Panama City, FL




(5 62656UPS
M Fi Grooming by (737)
Appointment Only
Groomers/Stylists
Lisa Shores & Tammy Martabano
ic -c:06i ~s .c~ 7CF-rn ~


0


_ ILA SEI CES-']


rr


ww.xtremeindus m


irA\ A :


Wl









www..TCFIORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Sunday, March 31, 2013- 1 B


Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 28,
2013 (the "Judgment"), and the Order Granting
Plaintiff's Motion to Cancel and Reschedule
Foreclosure Sale dated March 11, 2013, entered
in Case No. 2010-528-CA of the Circuit Court of
the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Jack-
son County, Florida, in which TD BANK, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION, is Plaintiff, and JAMES
T. ADAMS, BRAD REARDIN, UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JAMES T. ADAMS a/k/a CAMILLE ADAMS,
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRAD REARDIN a/k/a
TAMMI J. REARDIN, and PALISADES COLLEC-
TION LLC, are Defendants.

The Clerk of Court will sell the Property as de-
fined in the Judgment and as set forth below at
a public sale on May 9, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. to the
"highest bidder," for cash in the front lobby of
the Jackson County Courthouse, 4445 Lafayette
Street, Marianna, Florida, 32446, in accordance
with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes.
The "highest bidder" for purposes of this No-
tice of Sale, is defined as the party who bids
the largest amount of money to purchase the
Property (as defined below) and who com-
pletes the sale in a timely fashion, as herein-
after set out. The one who bids the largest
amount of money to purchase the Property (as
defined below) shall be permitted to complete
the sale by delivering to the Clerk, the balance
of such bid, over and above the deposit, by 3:00
p.m. on the'day of the sale.
The following property located in Jackson
County, Florida, is the subject of this Notice of
Sale:

A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 34,
TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 10 WEST, JACK-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE
AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION
34; THENCE SOUTH 89044'13" WEST, 828.02
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00048'34" WEST, 544.50
FEET; THENCE NORTH 89044'52" EAST, 800.00
FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
COUNTY ROAD NO. 167 (A 100 FOOT RIGHT OF
WAY); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
LINE, SOUTH 00003'20" WEST, 1853.48 FEET TO
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF A PARCEL OF
LAND DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK
1019, PAGE 345 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG
SAID LINE, THE FOLLOWING (4) COURSES;
SOUTH 0148'59" WEST 98.63 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 0114'30" WEST, 578.35 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 0536'25" EAST, 128.03 FEET TO THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID DESCRIBED PAR-
CEL; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY LINE, SOUTH 00"14'13" WEST, 587.84 FEET
FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTIN-
UE ALONG SAID LINE, SOUTH 00014'13" WEST,
520.34 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID LINE,
NORTH 89"22'52" WEST, 847.26 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 00014'13" EAST, 514.49 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 89046'35" EAST, 847.24 FEET TO THE ,
POINT OF BEGINNING.

together with all existing or subsequently
erected or affixed buildings, improvements,
and fixtures (the "Property").
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date'of the Lis Pendens, must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.

DATED on March 19, 2013.

DALE RABON GUTHRIE
Clerk of Circuit Court

By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk

LF160080

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
DIVISION: CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 32-2010-CA-000341

CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JENNA LEIGH CHASON A/K/A JENNA LEIGH
HERNDON, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February
21, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 32-2010-CA-
000341 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH
Judicial Circuit in and for JACKSON County,
Florida wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, Nation-
val Association, successor by merger to Chase
Home Finance LLC1, is the Plaintiff and JENNA
LEIGH CHASON A/K/A JENNA LEIGH HERNDON;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JENNA LEIGH
CHASON A/K/A JENNA LEIGH HERNDON N/K/A
THOMAS HERNDON; CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY
SERVICES, INC. F/K/A COMMERCIAL CREDIT
CONSUMER SERVICES,INC.; TENANT #1 N/K/A
LUANNE ARNOLD are the Defendants, The Clerk
of the Court will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at NORTH DOOR JACKSON
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, MARIANNA, FLORIDA
at 11:00AM, on the 18th day of April, 2013, the
following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE
NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 13
WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN
SOUTH 88 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 27 SECONDS
WEST 131.74 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DE-
GREES 24 MINUTES.49 SECONDS WEST 200
FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 49 MI-
NUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 142.68 FEET TO THE
EAST LINE OF SECTION 10, THENCE RUN NORTH
00 DEGREE 16 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID LINE 199.42 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT RIGHT OF
WAY OF CLIFF ROAD AND HEISLER ROAD
A/K/A 5095 CLIFF ROAD, GRACEVILLE, FL 32440

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on March 11, 2013.

Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court


By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk

*** See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or im-
mediately upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appearance is less
than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.

ADA Coordinator
P.O. Box 1089
Panama City, Florida 32402
Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717
Hearing Impaired: Dial 711
Email: ADARequest@judl4.flcourts.org


LF160082

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE: Estate of ROBERT L HEWETT, deceased.
PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 13-67 PR

NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The Administration of the estate of Robert L.
Hewett, deceased, whose date of death was
February 25, 2013, and whose social security
number is XXX-XX-0476, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Jackson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 4445 Lafay-
ette Street, Marianna, FL 32446. The estate is
testate and the date of the decedent's Will is
July 9, 2009. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.

Any interested person on whom a copy of the
notice of administration is served must object
to the validity of the will (or any codicil), quali-
fications of the personal representative, venue,
or jurisdiction of the court, by filing a petition
or other pleading requesting relief in accord-
ance with the Florida Probate Rules, WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THE NOTICE ON THE OBJECTING PER-
SON, OR THOSE OBJECTIONS ARE FOREVER
BARRED.

Any persontentitled fo exempt property is re-
quired to file a petition for determination of ex-
empt property WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY
LAW OR THE RIGHT TO EXEMPT PROPERTY IS
DEEMED WAIVED. Any person entitled to elec-
tive share is required to file an election to take
elective share WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY
LAW.

All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON '
THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against de-
cedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALIS CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publication of this notice is
March 24, 2013.

Attorney For Personal Representative:
Frank A. Baker, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 0209791
4431 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
(850)526-3633

Personal Representative:
/s/ Roger Rumney
5143 Nadine Street
Orlando, FL 32807
LF160081

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 32-2011-CA-000471

PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANTHONY F. ALGARIN et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated Novem-
ber 15, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 32-2011-
CA-000471 of the Circuit Court of the FOUR-
TEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for JACKSON
County, Florida wherein PHH MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION, is the Plaintiff and ANTHONY F.
ALGARIN; BLONDELL MURRAY; are the Defend-
ants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at NORTH
DOOR JACKSON COUNTY COURTHOUSE, MA-
RIANNA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 18th day
of April, 2013, the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 3, BLOCK B, OF WILDWOOD ESTATES SUB-
DIVISION, THIS TRACT IS LOCATED IN THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF
SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 10
WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 2860 WILDWOOD CIRCLE, MARIANNA, FL
32446.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on March 12, 2013.

Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk

**See Amnericans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or im-
mediately upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appearance is less
than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.

ADA Coordinator
P.O. Box 1089
Panama City, Florida 32402


Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717
Hearing Impaired: Dial 711
Email: ADARequest@judl4.flcourts.org
LF160085 STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION
NOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCY ACTION
The Florida Department of Environmental
Protection (FDEP) gives notice that it proposes
to issue a Site Rehabilitation Completion Order
with Conditions with institutional controls for a
contaminated site. Dipika Patel is seeking this
order in reference to FDEP Facility No. 32
8509527, which encompasses the property lo-
cated at 4201 Bryan Street, Greenwood, Jack-
son County, Florida 32443, and intends to re-
strict exposure to contamination through the
proposed implementation of an Institutional
Control, which includes restricting land use,
appropriate handling of excavated soils, and
recordation of a restrictive covenant to ensure
the preservation of the restrictions. Complete
copies of the No Further Action Proposal, the


draft restrictive covenant, and the FDEP's pre-
liminary evaluation are available for public in-
spection during normal business hours 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, ex-
cept legal holidays, at FDEP, Northwest Dis-
trict, 160 W. Government Street, Suite 308, Pen-
sacola, Florida 32502-5750. Local governments
with jurisdiction over the property subject to
the Institutional Control, real property
owners) of the property subject to the Institu-
tional Control, and residents of any property
subject to the Institutional Control have 30
days from publication of this notice to provide
comments to the FDEP. Such comments must
be sent to the attention of Ms. Dominique Har-
ding, FDEP, Northwest District, 160 W. Govern-
ment Street, Suite 308, Pensacola, Florida
32502-5750, dominique.harding@dep.state.fl.us

BUY IT!

SELL IT! FIND IT!







Tim Sapp
Broker/Owner
850-209-3595
Call Us For All Your
Real Estate Needs
J-,'C. .



I n ',,- ,- -, - -r i, -'i 1-h - I gi t I. BRs, a r iels
% .
''





.,, ,' .. .


newer roof, newer heo water heater, fireplace with gas fire logs or use
natural wood. Large great room for entertaining. Two car garage. The
seller has applied for short sale Offers will have to have final approval
from the seller's lender. Bring all offers! MLS# RD248097A $99,900






spacious laundry, nicely painted, clean and attractive, with a big deck for
entertaining. Large yard with outside building and concrete driveway. Seller
will allow $2000 toward buyers closing costs, or upgrades. Comes with an
assumable Termite Bond, Make your appt. today!! MLS# 247570 $114,900

L%1. ASI 'R'
a ," ,,'"' "',, '" ,,


boat house. Separate storage building with enclosed utility room and boat
storage. Boat ramp. This lake is great for fishing, skiing, and all types of
water sports! Close to Panama City beaches and mall. A great buy! Enjoy
this summer at the lake! Bring all offers. MLS RD248113A $179,500


, ,


workshop/hobby room/possible guest house, small detached maircave. Property
is partially fenced, with some cross-fencing. Great for horses or livestock Many
fruit trees, etc. Just 20 mmn. to Dothan, AL. About 15 min. to [-10 and to Marianna,
FL A great buy at just $79900. Make an appt today! MLS# RD248125A $79,900
-".i n S< 1 1

', attn, ccI, 9"
illlir ii i ll-I]
i ll 1 I I ll.
fenced, 4 wells, of which 2 are solar powered. Approx. 30 acres
in clear pasture and the balance in pine trees with pasture.
Borders Wright's Creek in Holmes County.. Make an appointment
today. Bring all offers! MLS# RD248137A $419,000

r h.IR I r ll .. .....f II I 1

I l ,,, h I l


storage building, lots of shade, new roof, large laundry
room, nice sized bedrooms, big family room, large Florida
room. MOTIVATED SELLER! MLS# RD246786A $89,000


-, ... .. ...



lacuzzi tub, security system, built in Vault, built 0i gen. system, screened in tiled porch,
Gun range, fenced property, 2 ponds, a hunters paradise Rm.for horses, livestock, in-
ground irrigation sy este eel barn, walking or riding trials. Make an appt today. Bring
all offers. MLS# RD247922A $299,000
L


| 0n l .g:r: I Irn T,,: rIee

barn with storage buildings, fenced and cross fenced,
two fish ponds and a 2BR/1BA farm house. This is a
working cattle farm. MLS# RD247991A $450,000
,- r *" ll I l l ill

S "h l paved
l ,corner
with e3R/.5BA, large living room, newer appliances, Walk-in closets.
New paint. 5 year old metal roof. Detached storage building, Fenced
and gated back yard. Central Heat and Air heat pump. Terminix
Termite Bond assumable. Show anytime MLS# 247817 $39,900


. .



with the nfiliShed basement Very chose ta McCormick Lake andall tie amenties associated
w Compass Lake In TheHilis Assc MAKE AN APPT TODAY! MLS RW248024A $59,900






metal roof with a 4 car carport, needs new flooringI Seller will allow
4000.00 towards buyers closing costs or updates with accepted offer.
MUST SEE, PRICED TO SELL MLSg RD248039A $102,900
I






i . ... . , .. . , ',


,Plenty of
surronddbL andi quiet is what
S i. find in his country
381/R/]BA, brick
S updated and modern
,, Id gmatrom addloa
I,, ,,autdful !oodwork and
l ,--kshop with
t 0I II-, 5m ln
. I l I i ,.L. l Plentyof
r. i i. . g. ... i lig . [ r i c a S i 29,000s

b n :r hunters Dradlse
lodge faith 3BRi2BA
among Ig oaks back
t rd. Ig scored front

e bldg, seasonal pond
surrounded by fod plots Near Lake Seminole approx miles ime 1-10 exchange
: I' City 45
$, I 239.900





,;I'or as a short sale andl ' Aliso lhere isa
I and garage sltting l o n larce[that is
being short sale applied for an addillonal p 'p S32.875


SUNNY SOUTH PROPERTIES
4630 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446
(850) 526-2891
Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER


Oudia Morris
REALTOR
Broker/Owner
850-209-4705


MARIANNA Great
S.. : 1, .-.i ,iIIi location,
iiJi. , tlb rei: kidney
0.% .'I 11 f o .1 fenced
i ., 'ii h l 'lll
MS 247970 S139,900.
CHIPLEY You won't
bolipev the beauty and all
Ihe extras surrounding
lhII,.. luse. Call today.
MM S '47499 $129,000.

DELLWOOD -
S .~. W,, l ii. try home
i -, ~.' .rc a quiet and


MLS 248022 $121,500.
MARIANNA
h, ..I V ,7 II ,T r I ri af id



MLS246073 $10,000.,
S MALONE Large
i... rt..iln style home
,,r ln..r., 4 bedrooms and
miT.,Ih b ore!

MLS248035 $39,900.
MARIANNA
Large home with great
potential, split bedroom
di'llll and located close
i,., h.,vn on 1.06 acres.
MS 248063 45,000
MARIANNA
S1l'' . h'r... Villrh many

5' illiiiiiii liuied in
. "~ ~ l' ll l i lllllrll u massive

S jll 'II I ,,, l. , 1, Hills.
MIS247964 $124,500.
lNMARIANNA Very

ijlk ,,- ll home in
Ilni alh lr;h point.
',,r. ll ,II.ll l h menifies.
MIS248099 $85,000


Ed McCoy, Realtor
Cell.(850) 573.6198
www.emccoyrealty.com
emccoy02@yahoo.com


MARIANNA W I
lM...Ti ll hl lInlr .1i Idl
Ah.l '.ll lll l .. I .l h.il- .l ll,
,li od ,,m d i ,llhl- ,li' 1,,li

MIS247592 $109,000.
BLOUNTSTOWN Blick
.. . i. I. i, lorge utllty
S... ... I Ill o h, new 30
. o.. gange, new
. r eo r 0carport
S rmustsee!!
ML 2475P* s 09900

CHIPLEY Enjoy the
S ". .. .id quiet. Custom built
-, "i~ l ,, ''/2BA and lots o
Il l" En closed backporch,
II I' ,, n, storage shed end
Driveway, all located on
MLS248146 S149,900.
SCOTrONDALE fell but
-:~i hr r o rnoo

94mm oe

MIS247876 S131,900.

p'nlt,-, rd tIriTv," rceives
l l a ending

~.~ lroker/
ers; for

S l SNEADS Homewith o
lot to offer inside, fireplace, some
In.-. 1l1. and fresh point Exterior
*I,, i, ,,,e moela l 0rpod, storage
I. 1.1.... specious workshop end

ML5247911 S121,000.

.- CHIPLEY Fresh

.... i .i. I,,.i' e f. mily room
l,, l4,,6ln ce, corport,
,, I2480 o 9_ dog pens.

M1S248153 SI14,500.

CHIPLEY nioy

pi r i i'- 1,,11, Ihl l' lll, hl e with
...... "i -- il '!"'. located

MLS248046 $64,900.


: ~ ~ _V1_I____I___ ______








CT A COTT-T


I1


SUNNY SOUTH PROPERTIES
4630 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446
(850) 526-2891
Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER


Pat Furr
Realtor
850.209.8071
furrl9@msn.com


PRICE REDUCTION Bring all
offers!! Terrific 3BR/2BAb home
situated in Sneods on foul loIs,
which includes separate garage,
several workshops & storage
units. In 2009/2010 this
home was updated w/new
architectural shingled roof, 2.5
ton Heat Pump System & water heather. Three of the lots face the proved access road
and the fourth lot is located behind the house with city water & sewage, electrical
pole and separate access, many possibilities, call today for a showing.
MLS# 247224 $123,000.
PRICE REDUCEDII Great location
for this beautiful 3BR/2BA
energy efficient, all brick home
in lovely Greenfield Subdivision
with underground utilities. This
home features toy/coffered
vaulted ceilings in living room
and master bedroom, crown
molding, 2 central HVAC units, 2 hot water heaters, stainless steel appliances,
hardwood & tile flooring. The bathrooms have cultured marble countertops
& the master both has a Jacuzzi & separate shower. Easy to show, moke your
appointment today! MLS# 247865 $223,000.
Ontanding C-Culast o llt
4BR/2BA Oovid Duloney home
siduroed on very attraoive
1.55 hillside acres in Greenfiold
Subdivision w/underground
utilities. The Home exterior
i feolures brick & hardboard
w/slylish shake shingles,
architectural shingled roof, full length covered screened back porch that overlooks
a fabulous 18'x36' freeform shaped, shotcrete & tiled swimming pool w/all
around privacy fencing. This home offers split bedroom design, neutral colors, open
loor plan w/pillared archway, open kitchen, spacious rooms w/walk'n closets &
plentiful storage areas! MLS# 247344 $289,000.i



I nra .l,.


MARIANNA Home in the
county with 4BR and special
features inside and outside that
wil maze you. All located on
2.5 acres..
MLS# 247928 $130,000.

GRACEVILLE Beautiful
updated home with original
pine floors, 5 bedrooms, 'newer
appliances, lighting, ceiling teas
and much more. Call for further
details.
MLS# 247494 $130,000.
FOUNTAIN Well maintained
double wide mobile home on
2.46 acres. Fenced and cross
fenced, workshop with electric
and a carport, shed and different
.fruit trees through out.
S MLS# 245904 $68,900.
k MARIANNA Great lot located
S.in on all adult community to
an build and enjoy your retirement.
S- Lovely homes already in the
..7 ,"6*._ . area.
1 247136 $22,500.


Debbie Roney Smith,
Realtor
850-209-8039
debbieroneysmith@ *
embarqmail.com


Quarity custom boilt family
home on 1.69 AC, 5/3 2,912
SF H/C LG open oor plan
master bdr & bath + 1 odd'
bdrm & 1 full bu on Ist floor.
2nd floor 3/1 TpIt bdrm, LG
family an H/C storage Tm.
Custom features include crown
molding, recess lighting, gas FP + MORE MLS# 248106
." .z CCory 2BR/2BA horne located


MLS# 248108 $110,000


on paved road dose drive to
lwy 231. Fenced shaded back
yard, aseend back porch. 1
car garage, gas fireplace, asphalt
drivewoy, storage bldg w/
elect. Metal roo new in 2009.
Over 1 acre.


Looking for a Quiet
Neighborhood? Located on
a Dead End paved road? Nice
3/2 with Large Living room
with caledral ceiling & lots
of windows? 12x6 finished
workshop? I have one listed on
Parkplace Rd in Maaronna fo
$125,000. MLS# 247074
I .V Large custom 3BR/3BA
2,800 SF H/C brick home on 23
acres. Beautiful park like setting
with 2 acres MOL in pecan hees.
2440 woahlop, greenhouse
and other out building .
MLS# 247191j.. 9375,000.


BRENDA

MORGAN
Realtor


850-557-4799
Brenda.Morgan
@Century21.com


308 E Minnesola Ave .n Bonhfao, FL
'"li I[ :A 1',, ,i l ,,,, ',,, `. "r i,-,-
rILn luid lu'l. turd und prulu Ut uu. HuMr.
needs some repairs and TLC. MLS# 247814 $45,000
Three acres in Cypress located
0.6 mile East of Darbees. Look
for sign aod follow driveway up
the hill beside double wide.
After driveway tums to right,
property will be on the left.
MLS# 247713 N $10,000.
PLEASE ALLOW, ME TO SERVE YOUR.REAL ESTATE NEEDS


Indian Springs

REAL ESTATE


E8


CALLING ALL HANDYMAN
CONTRACTORS This home
is walking for your remodel
Located in the City Limts
of Gracevlle 3BR/1BA home
with over 1800 sI, on a
corner lot. This home will
be a perfect rental properly
priced for a QUICK sale' For
more information call Boday[
CALL STACY BORGES
(850) 573-1990


ENTER YOUR DREAM HOME
Eeanuoe Hmne saying on 4
acres wth a privacy songl
Perlect or Entenminmg mh over
100 asq Spaious ktrc'n
ih brelakinI bar 8& Eecrolux
ouch sreen cook top The living
im boasted a hray eling that i
12 n hsgh, wih bulR in book
sbalvars Crown Molding on tho 9
3 bolth home has a sple odroomn
The Master Suae ha a largea athioom vu garden tub and Freach Sliding dors leaden to pool area Arirns

ofs torage! Calltoday or ourexcluswe showed g' MLS 1246860. sC.LL "- C O 'n E 1 i)! S7i -9ul

INCOME PRODUCING
Located at 2350 Hwy
73 South, this is
currently a day care.
The building is 1430
sq ft and is great
Shwy frontage. CALL
CRESH HARRISON
850-482-1700

BRICK HOME IN
MARIANNA This
House is just waiting
Sfor you to cal it your
homell 3BR/1.5BA
r T.' !m i Approx 1100 st.
Located on 1.15
acres, Large oak
trees in the yard,
relax on the front
porch with plenty of space for kids in the yard! Large open kitchen and
-1 car attached carport. This home is new on the market to call today
for the price. CALL CRESH HARRISON OR STACY BORGES
WATERFRONT home
located on Merortts
MII PondI!I Coly
2BR/IBA home with
1080 sq overlooking
lake! Large backyard
with deck perfect for
relaxing! Kitchen and
brths have had some'
Supdatesl Living room
... ... ..-." ..si and Master bedroom
overlook the water'
Replace in living room! Private driveway to home! This home is priced to
SELL and will no lstst long! don't miss ot on this great opportunity! Call
today for your personal showing! MLS#243509. CALL CRESH 850-573-1990


GREAT
OFFICE-
SPACE
CALL CRESH
HARRISON at
850-482-1700

GREAT COUNTRY
HOME IN GRACEVILLE.
3 Bedrooms 1.5
Bath Brick house
with just under 1300
sq ftl Located on 2
acres on Hwy 77 with
workshop! Open floor
plan with breakfast
bar in kitchen. Tile
floDring and carpeting. Built in entertainment center in the family room.
Attached 1 car garage. Rome needs some updates but would make the
perfect home or rental! CALL CRESH HARRISON OR STACY BORGES FOR
MORE INFORMATION
NEW LISTING IN
MARIANNAI Nice 3
Bedroom 1.5 Bath Brick
home Located at a dead




MORE NF IAT I ON

MALONEDWMHO ON1ACE

w center island Covere hon It
porh w additional 'deck area
for entertaining Oversized 2
| Icar carport on a slib. There
is also aWMH Oi ACRSood
Bcaurdl 12.5 ro lth Oraed
Nursery! Magnificet kithen

w center iolant Covepred Fpronts


S aroh woaddiop el decl crea
acar calport on a inab. Ther
UTCI' BOORGEU U-57-tHHO9


GRET OPPORTU inl IN MALONEl
LOaend nm 11h St s Ltr U 3 o
w7nctrlleThtHairBMasnrse-s
S.tid P1.1 MI LIaldq R-m
S .rnM 5 ,ls as a A1iu-
N e -oe %a d JUd wg A
Oi iwmd nrc 'a tperos rci cue
Ar.! rfEs' HARIISOI OR ETA,
BonmES TrO MnE[ i'leP Uiio


ONL 2GBEAT OPPOR IrTIY TO



NWOWH I BEIlTIGFL 7.22
ACRE HOME SITE. Located
m F1101 0Wil n 10.6"Acres Marianna off ol HRy 90,
.0Ages S,10 pss r 3 .P0 yale county Seling that
boasts several Large Oak
Tres. Propery1 ii s partially
enrceu Beautiful hiOlop
perfect eo s your dream
home! Pried to SELL.
Ofelay.....MLS #248506
CALL CRESH lHARCISO OR
STACe oncOES FOR MORE
GREAT PLACE FOR YOUR
ROME OR OFFIcE GrOrt 3
bedroomilT 5 blO Wollh lust
under 1400 ut II! Located
Eraonleeny aend next door
to ho Cstncer Center In
some updales buL can be
'.the p de t pla e for yourI




rCALL vRLSa IARRlOWR il

o1nST rue-e l S aiR MOREs
S no p H ei Lnea'd in aurd Cma
(2l S. asre [ 1 aar5a0 bCp p
: a sth a pd~a seins Lag baDen
& hmhn( UnlU Some Mndom We
.S" '.' > "* .- ,niowi' LSf24755 kLtBl EgiSH


IA ND FOR SALE

ZONED MIXUSE


Helpingpeople realize hemir dream
of oswning eal/ estate


=..:' .. -,.:-*


Marianna -MUST SEE this recently renovated,
like new, move in ready home. Tray ceiling in
dining living area. Nice chandelier & ceiling
fan. New stain-master carpet. Kitchen has
new refrigerator, custom maple cabinets,
dish washer stove and microwave. Concrete
drive on paved street. Would quality for
USDA financing. $74,900. MLS #247456

..... ..... .... .. .. .. ..


Attractive and well-maintained, brick,
4BR/2BA home on one landscaped acre.
Eat in kitchen and separate dining room.
Enclosed porch, storage building, one-car
carport. Want a horse? Additional 3 acres
(has possible pond site) could be purchased.
Must See! Call Ora today. $147,500.
MLS #247968






n.-..... CS .


Blountstown Business opportunity on
Highway 20, road to the beach. Metal building
has approx. 3,100 sq ft. H/C and 7,500 sq
ft under roof. Roll-up door 10x12, 3 offices,
three /2 baths, 8 hold rooms, and workshop/
mechanics room. Fenced back lot on corner of
two paved streets. $375,000. MLS #247989


Well-maintained
2 BR, 2 BA

mobile home in
a country setting. The master bedroom has
a walk-in closet. All appliances included.
Most of property is chain-link fenced, .7 ac
lot is cross fenced with large garden space.
Open shed 18x15, storage bldg. 12x8. Front
and. back porch. Reduced to $35,900. Will
consider offers! MLS #247915.








............. '. ." .-. .:-., ...-..
Sf .." .-








,' .,, -- .-
r ''


S67,500 1, '



Marianna Approximately 2 acre lot with
149' on north Jefferson zoned mixed used.
Could be residential, apartments/duplex
or business. City utilities. Two bedroom, old
house being sold "AS IS". MLS #247182


Ann Jones,
Owner/Broker,
REALTOR

850-209-9077


4438 LAFAYETTE STREET, MARIANNA, FL
850-482-0045
www.RealFloridaProperty.com

Commercial Building -
on Jeffeison St on- I...
from the County :
House and one blo
Lafayette Street (H
Metal Roof was add
years ago.Window ...,
updated within tl- -
10 years. 3 Office r.
Reception Area, i -
work room, One side of
the building available for working and has a roll up door for deliveries
TWO Existing Signs already in place. 2 parcels- Vacant lot and Commercial
Building MLS 246871

Commercial -






much potential! Everything
eautfu-Buiding formerly








who would like to live in a historic home or would like to have a home and
business. MLS 247757









Electrrcriy and a Well. ack
p nfr r. I.... .o ,















4 insulated pane to kee i







economical for heating and cooling hardwood floos throughout. This home
has character tohat vres t charm! MLS Pro tyo
b. ... .., -, I .
much potential! Everything
















hyouneed for a business. MLS 247646


















Residential -
H Acreswith. ; '1.- .'*
hi ome o .fr i -
beaui f,, I ,














Tore Patro
.... ... .1. ..... .....,

































home in Grace.... le.....- I










Thrs wemlel m i ,,'i. .
h is ar.e n .1d as
Sins nt ee to h beautiful
22 omckl o the t hing a ctoong H rdo b wood flOoEI toghouis i home avt










hausiness. MLS 247 l



The A .io me s ... r
wasIc ompletly IT,
timb inid-,-. r :m
on ,- I'"e I'"; ,
Electricity and a b ell. Back
of property is ordered by Railroad. Property is located between existing















businesses and ready for you to bring your business. MLS 247962









Residential -
home I ro ,i il.






home in e ia e












Aif ortodable lm .
efrom Chiplte ..l ..




Rbeasidetiful -
The large ..... i I..
has a bulo .. ,11 ,,1



























obdiBusionesses oi
perfect to, I I ,T , ..
relaxing loe ho .... I""
















4 insulated panelro s to keep it





ecnmical for heating and cooking. Hardwood floors throughout. This homeYouhaveto
has character that gives it oharm! MLS 248150

























RAlordabllle -ome
alreadyben.I ea ..... n- -























Sedroom 1 hat.

Act h lare for' i
he.3 par e .s.... ..
things weth the beautiful
home. MLS 247640



6 Acres with a r ,, O E ,, I .






















wood inside on i

fenced black l ,,, ,
in Cotondale ty I .... ,..
Morabuyer! MI J4 J




Character gives t22 m0 "'
home in GraevTlle ,,.









































MLS 24777


THEY'RE ALL IN THE CLASSIFIED


NEW ON NIARKET MFOR 9$777,M


id I