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Jackson County Floridan ( March 28, 2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
March 28, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01047

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
March 28, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01047

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text

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Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


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Ex-Fla. GOPr
chair Greer
gets 11/2
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4A


Vol.90 No.73





State officials tour Dozier


V F" V 5 :0 "

.. ..... ..... 1

H ,., ), b t l IFIW LL / II'AIJ
State Attorney Glenn Hess. University of South Florida Professor Erin Kimmerle and U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson address the media during a
large press conference at the site of a Dozier School for Boys graveyard Wednesday morning. BACKGROUND: Graves are marked in the
known cemetery at Dozier.


If funding found,

search for graves

to resume in April
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
] uo hr -.ilt. I1' lI, i idin ,.: m
Two faded, red-tinged handprints on a wall in the
notorious "White House" at Dozier School for Boys
caused a stir in the press corps Wednesday when, for
the first time in years, the squalid so-called punish-
ment building was unsealed to allow people inside.
On another wall in the same small cell, something
reddish-colored had dripped down the dingy white
walls in ragged streams to the dirty floor below. The
long-dried stains drew speculation.


Some members

ONLINE
) For more
photos of the
Dozier tour, visit
www.jcfloridan.
cnOm


of the press wondered if it was
blood. So did Department of,
Juvenile Justice Secretary Wans-
ley Walters. It was the first time
she'd been in the building, hav-
ing come-to the campus along
with U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, State
Attorney Glenn Hess and oth-


ers who had been invited to tour
the White House and to see the known cemetery at
Dozier that day.
The walk-through was arranged shortly after Ne son
had learned of a potential funding source that could
potentially further an extensive search for graves and
bodies onthe Dozier campus, a project being carried
out by University of South Florida assistant professor
and lead USF researcher Erin Kimmerle. If funding
See DOZIER, Page 5A


Following a visit to the Dozier School for Boys graveyard, U.S. Sen. Bill
Nelson traveled to the now-closed Dozier campus and toured the school's
old so-called "White House" building with the media.


~"~h.


:~ 2 __~~:


Speculation
arose about
handprints
and stains on
a wall found
in one room
of the "White
House"at the
now-closed
Dozier School
for Boys.


County files

to intervene

in exhumation

request
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
Sdbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Jackson County Commission-
ers have appointed historian Dale
Cox to help county attorney Frank
Baker as he represents the county's
interests in court as Circuit Judge
Bill Wright decides
whether to allow
the exhumation of
human remains on
the campus of the
old Dozier School
for Boys. Attorney
Cox General Pam Bondi
and Medical Exam-
iner Michael Hunter petitioned the
court for the exhumation order.
On Wednesday afternoon, Baker
filed a motion on behalf of the
county, asking that the local gov-
ernment be accepted as an inter-
vener in the case so that it would
have standing and input into the
matter as Wright considers the
Bondi/Hunter petitions.
The court has not yet ruled on
Baker's motion or on the exhuma-
tion order itself.
Baker said he expects the judge,
to hold a,,n e.Ld- motion hearing in
which all vested parties will be able
to have input. County commis-
sioners on Tuesday said they want-
ed Cox to be available to give Baker
the information he has gathered in
researching Dozier records, and to
help him as the matter proceeds in
court if the county is accepted as
an intervening parry.
The appointment of Cox as an
assistant to Baker came at a county
commission meeting Tuesday,
just'after Cox had presented the
county board with several requests
for action that would support his
individual opposition to the ex-
humation. The disinterment is
being called for in part because
questions linger about how many
people are buried there, and about
who is buried where. The graves
are unmarked by name and there
are areas near the cemetery and
perhaps elsewhere on the campus
where a University of South Flor-
ida research team suspects that


See INTERVENE, Page 5A


City electric service focus of Marianna meetings


BY ANGIE COOK
acook@jcfloridan.com

A series of question-and-answer ses-
sions regarding Marianna's upcoming
electric power referendum continues to-
day. In the April 9 election, Marianna resi-
dents will decide the fate of their planned
municipal power service, letting city offi-
cials know if they can move forward with
purchasing electric distribution equip-
ment from Florida Public Utilities.
If the referendum passes, the city an-
ticipates eventual rate reductions for its
citizens.
Public outcry over electric rates in 2010,
according to City Manager Jim Dean, was
the impetus for the multi-year endeavor,
which has now reached a point in the
process that requires approval by voters.
The complexity of the process, which


involves a settlement agreement between
the city and FPU, an initial distribution
system purchase costing $1.5 million, a
15-year contract with, FPU to maintain
the system, and more, is the reason Dean
has availed himself to the public via the
informational meetings.
Marianna resident Chad Taylor was
in the audience at Tuesday's session. He
says he's made up his mind on which way
to vote.
"I think the referendum on the ninth is
going to be important, Taylor said.
"What worries me is that there's a mood
in this country that government is bad,
but I believe government and private
enterprise work best when they work to-
gether. I think Marianna will be a very re-
sponsible owner of the infrastructure."
See ELECTRIC, Page 5A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
In the McLane Community Center last week, a member of the audience talks about issues
surrounding an electric utility referendum that will be on the ballot for Marianna voters in
April.


> CLASSIFIEDS...4B


SENTER- lfrI.Er T...3B


> LOCAL..3A


> OBITUARIES...5A


> STATE...4A


> SPORTS...1B


) NASCAR...6B


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"12A THURSDAY, MARCH 28,2013


Weather Outlook


h i -gh: 71
w.-*Low 37 High: 71 1
o. w: 37 : ." ,


Today


Mostly Sunny.

Elissia Wilson / WMI


High 690
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Low 46


Friday
Mostly Sunny.



SHigh- 750
Low 52'


Sunday
Isolated Thunderstorms.


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t'^~


High 75
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Saturday
Mostly Sunny.


TIDES ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
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RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


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High
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Flood Stage
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it 1 " "" o ,


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THE SUN AND MOON


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Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr.
10 18 25 3


FLORIDA'S REAL

PANHANDLE ownM

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9

TENLEAERDTES,


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL32446
Office Hour:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
a Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting 7 a.m. at
the Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Grill in downtown
Marianna. Call 482-2290.
n Job Club Noon to 3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center,,'4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn job
seeking/retention skills; get job search assistance.
Call 526-0139.
) Employability Workshop, "Mock Interview-
ing" 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 U.S. 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
Marianna/FPU Public Information Forum
4-6:30 p.m. at the Marianna City Hall Commis-
sion Room, located at 2898 Green St. The city of
Marianna encourages all city residents to attend
an informational session about the April 9 Florida
Public Utilities purchase referendum. Additional
sessions are scheduled. Call 482-4353.
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation 4-7 p.m: at the Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for an
appointment.
Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group
5:30 p.m.at Jackson Hospital in the Cafeteria
Board Room. Free to attend. Curriculum developed
by ex-smokers for those who want to become ex-
smokers themselves. Call 718-2545.
) Low Country Boil 6 p.m. at the Marianna
Elks Club #1516,4707 U.S. 90. $10 per person. The
public is.welcome to attend. Call 482-2832.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, MARCH 29
K Knitters Nook 10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
)i Local Author, Wendy Ammons, Book Signing
3-5 p.m. at Chipola River Book and Tea; 4402
Lafayette Street in downtown Marianna. Ammons
grew up in Jackson County. She will be signing her
two books, "The Plan" and "The Lesson."
) Senior Singles Get-Together 6 p.m. at
Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Deli, downtown Marianna.
Single seniors age 50 and older are encouraged
to get acquainted, form friendships. Games, foqd,
prizes and a guest speaker are planned. No charge;
donations accepted (proceeds fund charitable
endeavors of Marianna's Gathering Place Founda-
tion). Call 526-4561.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, MARCH 30
Grand Ridge First Annual Spring Festival and
Egg Hunt 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at John Thomas Porter
Park, behind Grand Ridge School. There will be


arts/crafts and food vendors, live bunny photos and
coloring contest with prizes. Easter egg hunts at 10
a.m. and 12:30 p.m. to include golden eggs with $25
gift cards. Call 573-6750.
n Union Grove Alumni Association's Old School
Fundraiser 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Union Grove
Community Center, the former Union Grove School,
4517 Basswood Road, Greenwood. Chicken or fish
dinners will be available for $6.
) Partners for Pets Putting for Pets Easter
Fundraiser 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Kindel Lanes, 3679
U.S. 90 in Marianna. All proceeds from Putt-Putt
games played will benefit the Partners for Pets
shelter. Call 482-4570.
) Easter Egg Hunt Noon at the Marianna Moose
Lodge located on U.S. 90 next to the Budget Inn.
There will.be prize eggs, pictures with the Easter
Bunny, hot dogs, chips and drinks. All children are
welcome to attend.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SUNDAY, MARCH 31
D Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
6:30 p.m: at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in
the board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, APRIL 1
Marianna/FPU Public Information Forum
4-6:30 p.m. at the Marianna City Hall Commis-
sion Room, located at 2898 Green St. The city of
Marianna encourages all city residents to attend
an informational session about the April 9 Florida
Public Utilities purchase referendum. Additional
sessions are scheduled. Call 482-4353.
) Jackson County Quilter's Guild Meeting
5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 U.S. 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings
are fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects,
lessons, help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
Central Jackson Relay for Life Committee
Meeting 6 p.m. at Milk & Honey Frozen Yogurt,
4767 U.S. 90 in Marianna. Meetings are planned for
the first Monday of each month prior to the April
event. Volunteers needed. Contact angelapark-
er30@gmail.com or 573-5353.
) City of Jacob Regular Monthly Meeting 6
p.m. at the Jacob City Hall..The public is welcome to
attend. Call 263-6636.
n Model Approach to Partnership in Parenting
Course 6-9 p.m. at 4403 Jackson Street, Mari-
anna. Course is free and is designed to promote
partnerships in parenting and help the licensing
agency and prospective foster and adopting par-
ents mutually decide on the best parenting path for
their family. Course is a requirement by the State
of Florida for those interested in becoming a foster
parent or adopting. Call,522-4485, ext. 8404 or
kpeek@lmccares.org.
) Woodmen of the World Lodge 65 Monthly
Meeting 6:30 .m..at the Dellwood Volunteer Fire
Department. A business meeting will be held. All


members are invited to attend, bring a friend and
your favorite soup and sandwich. Call 482-5255.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m: in the AA room of First United Methodist'
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, APRIL 2
n East Jackson County Economic Development
Council Business of the Month Recognition
-10 a.m. at Blondie's Food and Fuel, corner of U.S.
90 and U.S. 69 in Grand Ridge. The public is invited
to attend.
n Optimist Club of Jackson County Meeting
Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna.
Orientation Noon to 3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
Marianna/FPU Public Information Forum
4-6:30 p.m. at the Marianna City Hall Commis-
sion Room, located at 2898 Green St. The city of
Marianna encourages all city residents to attend
an informational session about the April 9 Florida
.Public Utilities purchase referendum. Additional
sessions are scheduled. Call 482-4353:
SChipola College Community Chorus 6-7:30
p.m. in the Center for the Arts at Chipola College.
Singers, aged high school and older are welcome to
sing with the Community Chorus and will perform
at the April 16 Chipola Ensemble Concert. Call 718-
2376 or heidebrechtd@chipola.edu.
Marianna City Commission Regular Meeting
6:30 p.m. at the Marianna City Hall Commission
Room, 2898 Green St. Call 482-4353.
a Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3
n AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Jackson County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620
during business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for
an appointment.
) Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida
Board of Directors Meeting 11 a.m. at the De-
partment of Children and Families, 2505 W. 15th St.
in Panama City. This meeting is open to the public.
Conference call number 1-888-670-3525, guest
code 4998489399.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
Basic Computer Class Part 1- Noon to 3 p.m.
at the Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 U.S.
90, Marianna. Learn basic components and use of a
computer. No cost to attend. Call 526-0139.

THURSDAY, APRIL 4
"International Chat n' Sip" 8:30-10 a.m.
at the Jackson County Public Library, Marianna
Branch, 2929 Green St. The public is invited to
enjoy a relaxed environment for the exchange of
language, culture and ideas among our local and
international communities. Call 482-9124.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police Depart-
ment listed the following inci-
dents for March 26, the latest
available report: One accident,
one abandoned
'- .- __vehicle, one sus-
-. -.' picious person,
CR- ME two escorts,
C_ M one burglary,
one physical
disturbance,
two burglar alarms, two traffic
stops, one trespass complaint,
one illegally parked vehicle,
one assist of another agency
and one threat/harassment
complaint.


Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following inci-
dents for March 26, the latest
available report: Two accidents,
three abandoned vehicles,
one reckless driver, two sus-
picious vehicles, one suspi-
cious incident, two suspicious
persons, three escorts, one
report of mental illness, three
physical disturbances, two
verbal disturbances, one fire,'
one drug offense, eight medi-
cal calls, one traffic crash, three
burglar alarms, two fire alarms,
15 traffic stops, one larceny


complaint, one civil dispute,
two trespass complaints, one
found or abandoned property
report, two noise disturbances,
one animal complaint, one sex
offense, two assists of motor-
ists or pedestrians, two assists
of other agencies, one welfare
check, three transports, two
threat/harassment complaints
and one report of counterfeit
money.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Lea Farmer, 33, 6235


Birchwood Road, Marianna,
violation of community control.
) Melissa Hayes, 33, 2600
Highway 2, Bonifay, hold for
Holmes Co.
) Mario Zetino-Retana, 27, 955
Airport Road, Destin, no valid
driver's license.
) Ethan Herbert, 34, 3960
Mance Newton Road, Midland,
Ala., fleeing and attempting
to elude, driving while license
suspended or revoked, resisting
with violence.

Jail Population: 206
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


BB




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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Marianna Woman's Club sales event April 6


Special to the Floridan

The Marianna Woman's Club's
fall yard sale was so successful the
Board of Directors decided to hold
another sales event on Saturday,
April 6. All types of donated items
have been pouring into the club-
house, including furniture, house-
hold goods and decorative pieces.
Some nice women's clothing has
been donated as well. Doors will
open at 7 a.m. at the clubhouse.
During the annual spring sale
the public will be able to buy tick-
ets for the opportunity to enter a
drawing for a hand-crafted bird-
house created by Jackson County
artist, Lanet James. The birdhouse
will be on display in the club-
house. Tickets are $1.00 each or
six for $5.00. Tickets are also avail-
able at Michael's Toggery in down-
town Marianna. Proceeds from the
event and the opportunity draw-
ing will be used for a variety of club
projects.
Founded on November 4, 1919,
the Marianna Woman's Club is the


I' '
,',





SUBMITTED PHOTO'
Immediate Past President Ellie Green (left)and current Vice President Jan
Quigley survey the number of items donated for this year's sale.
oldest service organization in Jack- the corner of Caledonia and Clinton
son County. The club is a member Streets.
of the Florida Federation of Wom- For more information, contact
en's Clubs and the General Federa- President Chris Sharkey, Marianna
tion of Women's Clubs; The historic Woman's Club, PO Box 734, Mari-
clubhouse, circa 1864, is located on anna, Florida 32447.


Study finds hospice care brings savings to Medicare


Special to the Floridan

On average, Covenant Hospice
serves 6,000 patients and families
annually. Multiply that by an aver-
age-Medicare cost savings when
hospice services are used of $2,000
per patient nets an average of $12
million cost savings to Medicare
from Covenant Hospice alone in
one year.
A study from Duke University
published in the October '07 is-
sue of the journal Social Science
& Medicine shows hospice care in
America saves money for Medicare
and brings quality care to patients
and their families. Study highlights
were:
) Hospice reduced Medicare costs
by an average of $2,000 per hospice
patient.
) Increasing the length of hos-
pice use by just three days would
increase savings due to hospice


by nearly 10 percent, from around
$2,000 to $2,200 per hospice user.
) Medicare costs would be re-
duced for seven out of 10 hospide
recipients if hospice has been used
for a longer period of time, the study
found.
New research published in the
March issue of NHPCO, Health Af-
fairs found that hospice enrollment
saves money for Medicare and im-
proves care quality for Medicare
beneficiaries.
Study authors suggest that invest-
ment in the Medicare Hospice Ben-
efit translates into savings overall
for the Medicare system. "If 1,000
additional beneficiaries enrolled in
hospice 15-30 days prior to death,
Medicare could save more than $6.4
million," they note. Furthermore,
the authors write, "In addition, re-
ductions in the use of hospital ser-
vices at the end of life both contrib-
ute to these savings and potentially


improve quality of care and patients'
quality of life."
"We know that hospice care ad-
dresses so many critical issues in-
volving quality of care at the end
of life and that hospice brings dig-
nity and compassion when they
are needed most. The new study
reaffirms other reasons why hos-
pice is the best solution for caring
for the dying in a way that provides
patient-centered care and is cost
effective for the Medicare system,"
said J. Donald Schumacher,
president and CEO of the Na-
tional Hospice and Palliative Care
Organization.
The Mt. Sinai study builds on the
valuable work of the 2007 Duke Uni-
versity study by providing further
proof that hospice care saves the
federal Medicare system money.
For additional information re-
garding Covenant Hospice services,
call 482-8520 or 1-888-817-2191.


Local :..:


Huang addresses
Optimist Club
Dr. Paul Huang was
the6'uest speaker at the


50th wedding anniversary.
Dr. Huang shared some
interesting information
about China. According
to Huang. there are seven


the meeting enjoyed Dr.
Huang's informative pre-
sentation and slide show
of China.


March meeting of the major groups in China Earth Day at the
Optimist Club of Jackson which has 1.37 billion library is April 13
County. Dr. Huang is a people and they export
retired professor from $2.7 trillion of goods per The Artist Guild of
Chipola College and he is year. The main method of Northwest Florida and
past president of the Opti- travel is the Bullet Train, the Jackson County
mist Club of Marianna. which travels at a speed of Public Library will be
Huang and his wife Tama 300 mph, and the average .sponsoring Plein Aire
have been in the United annual salary is $2,500. Painting/Earth Day at the
States for 45 years, They Club members who library on Saturday, April
recently celebrated their were in attendance at 13, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the
Marianna Branch of the
library located at 2929

Morn f ri Sa 2r 9at 111922-r 35 -
Men (El ~:.' S, 2 6 9-1-9-3 11 14 'r.35 22wI E^S


Mon r il)


,,.4: c4. 2.


4 14 .


Wed IE) 3'2- 0II 9.3.3 riNt ~ai1ble


Wed (li


6-7 5 5-0 2 6


Thurs IEI i 21 4 4 4 0 3 09' 1 6 10-21 i'


Thurs (Md)


9-0 1 6l6I-


Fr, iEl ?. ? 711 j0-5 5-.- -9-


Fri I'MI


2 2 36 3.7


Sat (E) 3/23 30i5 7.6.5.4 2.19.203',0.34


Sat M.lI
Sun lE'
Sun rM)l


:. '24 6hf,.- :3..6 51 .16 2 _'7
-0.1.. 3---6-64
2EE*4 .1764~-


E ; enmrig dr.wingM. M = hMildd3, lrawJng

Saturday 3 23 1. 29 315"-5 FP'E.71I
Wednesday 3/27 Not avaJjiabl PB...
n6 n6


Saturday 3.23
Wednesday 3:27


6-t1 -1 l,2.-3 5-. 3
Not available


For lolery iniormation. call 850.48;'--'7 7 :r 0-737.77;7


1 BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
471 1 Highway 90 East Marianna, kL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


Green Street. Everyone is
invited to visit with artists
or create an art form of
their own in the open air
outside of the library. This
event will also include
sidewalk chalk art, com-
munity canvas paint-
ing and the sale of art
supplies.
For additional informa-
tion regarding this event,
call 482-9631 or email
abryan@jacksoncountyfl.
com.


From submitted reports


GAS WATCH
Gas prices are going up. Here are
the least expensive places to buy
gas in Jackson County, as of
Wednesday afternoon.
1. $3.52, Murphy Oil, 2255 U.S.
71 S., Marianna
2. $3.54, Pilot,2209 U.S. 71,
Marianna
3. $3.55, BP-Steel City, 2184
U.S. 231 S., Alford
4. $3.55, Loves Travel Center,
2510 U.S. 231, Cottondale
5. $3.55, Mobil Food Mart, 2999
Jefferson St., Marianna
6. $3.56, BP Station, 5184 U.S.
231 S., Campbellton
7. $3.56, Kmee II, 5392 10th St.,
Malone
8. $3.58, McCoy's Food Mart,
2823 Jefferson St., Marianna


If you see a lower price,
contact the Floridan newsroom
at editorial@jcfloridan.com.


Cottondale


Elementary School


releases honor rolls


Specialto the Floridan

Cottondale Elementary
School has released its
honor rolls for the third
nine-week term.
First Grade
p A Honor Roll Kenlee
Ammons, Justin Barnes,
Terry Brooks, Kyler Bryant,
Wade Chesson, Conner
Clunan, Jessie Crisp, Tina
Deese, Brad Edenfield,
Caleb. Goodwin, Jacob
Goodwin, Tucker Hinson,
Adrianna Johnson, Mataia
Keene, Jesse May, Gracie
Ray, Jeremy Scurlock, Jus-
tin Self, Rylan Shouppe,
Devin Tharp and Alexis
Witt.
)A/B Honor Roll-Tatum
Barrick, Reina Bragg, Han-
nah ,Brannon, Slade Buck-
alew, Harmany Capps, Do-
ris Carnley, Mayken Carter,
Greyson Chambliss,- Pat-
rick Coulliette, Joy Cutchin,
Kaylee Deese, Jordan Drew,
Lucas Edenfield, Tee-Jay
Franke, Joseph Haddock,
Julissa Harris, Joseph La
Sala, Alyson McCarta, Brad
Monday, Dawson Powell,
Maria Rostro-Medley and
Caleb Williams.
Second Grade
A Honor Roll Mi-
chael Anderson, Kate Ball,
Madison Capps, Charlie
Cutchins, Katherin Dunn,
Evan Gayhart,. 'A'lexis
Goodwin, Jasmine Hall,
Farynn McAlpin, Jaran Pat-
terson and Haven White.
) A/B Honor Roll Paige
Bass, Karlee Blevins, Hayes
Braxton, Mackinze Cas-
satt, Jamie Champion,
Kadence Corbin, Earnest
Cummings, Mackayla
Deese, Noah Ellis, Andrin-
ya Gillette, Jayson Harris,
Zanya Henderson, Ariana
Jenkins, Jasmine Johnson,
Kordale Kimbril, Lina La-
bay, Anthony Land, Gary
Lyon, Skyler Mauldin,
Mark May, Malachi Perry,
Dakota Quick, Catalynnia
Randall, Ashlynn Shaw,


Savanna Sheffield, Jed
Shouppe, Jemari Tripp and
Rylin Youmans.
Third Grade
) A Honor Roll Jay
Crisp, Ashley Hicks, Heav-
en Land, Layne Mitchell,
Luke Ohler, Nina Rodman
and Joshua Scurlock.
) A/B Honor Roll Kloee
Athey, Shyanne Bryant,
Ty Burkett, Sara Castle-
berry, Blayne Deese, Jacob
Edenfield, Chloe Herring,
Sydney Justice, Jersie Mc-
Ginty, Amy Oxendine,
Brenna Perry, Savanna
Powell, Jordan Self, Jovan
Shannon, Damian St Fleur,
Tyler Werts and Desiree
Wetherbee.
Fourth Grade
) A Honor Roll Em-
ily Chambliss, Hannah
Chambliss, Kylie Harvey
and Patrick Lewis.
S) A/B Honor Roll Lane
Anderson, Samuel Barnes,
Briana -Barton, Mason
Braxton, Mianna Coving-
ton, Caitlin Cummings,
Briana Davis, Taylor Du-
mas, Grace Forrest, Gavin
Gray, Addie Griffin, Kirsten
Haggerty, Dillon Jones,
Vallari Joyner, Hanna Mc-
Clain, Ethan Parris, Eva
Pullin, Jaden Sanders, Josie
Scott, Trinity Sherrod and
Johnathan Tripp.
Fifth Grade
) A Honor Roll -
Qui'Darius Henderson,
McKenna Morrison, Kyra
Patterson and Cameron
Syfrett.
) A/B Honor Roll Au-
bree Barfield, Trevor
Bengry, Jordan Braxton,
Dashayla Brown, Avery
Burkett, Christian Chase,
Emily Davis, Cody Foran,
Michael Heafner, Nathan
Huskey, Dalton Jones, Kay-
la Kesner, Kasey Lathan,
Cheyenne Quick, Avery
Roland, Valerie Sampson,
Morgan Seale, Kayla Shep-
herd, Kalina Torres and
JoshuaWesley.


Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.
com, mail them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
or bring them by our offices at 4403 Constitution
Lane in Marianna.
*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include
child's full name, parents'name(s) and.city of residence.
This is a free service. All entries subject to editing.
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THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013 3AF


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LOCAL







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Ex-Florida GOP chair gets 1% years for stealing


The Associated Press

ORLANDO The for-
mer chairman of the Re-
publican Party of Florida
was sentenced Wednes-
day to one-and-a-half
years in prison for stealing
$125,000 in party funds,
marking. the fall of a man
who once was one of the
most powerful political
figures in the state.
Jim Greer, 50, was sen-
tenced in an Orlando
courtroom, more than a
month after he pleaded
guilty to four counts of
theft and a single count
of money laundering. The
guilty pleas in February
ended Greer's trial before
it started.
Circuit Judge Marc Lubet
handed down a sentence
Wednesday that was less
severe than the three-
and-a-half years in prison
requested by prosecutors.
Lubet explained that he
went with a more lenient
sentence because Greer
had already paid $65,000
in restitution to the Repub-
lican Party of Florida and
because Greer's former


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former Florida GOP chairman Jim Greer (right) arrives at the
Orange County Courthouse, with his wife Lisa, for a sentencing
hearing on Wednesday in Orlando.


right-hand man, Delmar
Johnson, had committed
the same crimes but hadn't
been charged.
Johnson had beensched-
uled to be prosecutors' star
witness and was granted
immunity in exchange for
-his testimony. He didn't re-
turn a phone call seeking
comment on Wednesday.
"I feel that this crime de-
serves prison," Lubet told


Greer. "You egregiously
violated a position of
trust."
After the hearing, Greer
was led from the court-
room in handcuffs. His
attorney, Damon Chase,
said Greer had entered the
guilty pleas to avoid the
risk of a jury convicting
him and getting a lengthy
prison sentence.
"Mr. Greer did fall on his


sword for this one," Chase
said. "He did what he felt
was best for his family. He
feels good about it ... Next
year, he will be spending
time with his family and
everything will be fine."
An attorney for the Re-
publican Party of Florida
said he received a $65,000
wire transfer representing
Greer's restitution from
Jacksonville attorney Hank
Coxe on Monday. Stephen
Dobson said he didn't
know how Greer came up
with the money, given that
the'former chairman has
reported being financially
strapped since his arrest
in 2010. Chase refused to
answer questions about
where the money came
from and Coxe didn't re-
turn a phone call and email
Wednesday afternoon.
Greer also has agreed to
drop a civil lawsuit against
the Republican Party of
Florida. The lawsuit ac-
cused the party of failing
to pay him a severance.
"Eighteen months in
prison for somebody like
Jim Greer," Dobson said.
"I don't think anybody


thought a couple.of years
ago that he'd go to prison
like this."
The trial had threatened
to expose the underbelly of
Florida's dominant politi-
cal party and its formerly
high-spending ways. Some
of Florida's most powerful
politicians were scheduled
as witnesses, including
former Gov. Charlie Crist,
former U.S. Sen. George
LeMieux, former Florida
Attorney General Bill Mc-
Collum and several state
House and state Senate
leaders.
Topics covered in pretrial
depositions included al-
legations of prostitutes at
a state GOP fundraiser in
the Bahamas, the drinking
habits of Crist and intra-
party strife.
Prosecutors said Greer
funneled almost $200,000
to a company he had
formed with Johnson. He
kept $125,000 of the money
funneled tq Victory Strate-
gies for himself.
Greer was vice mayor
of the small central Flor-
ida town of Oviedo when
Crist surprisingly picked


Thousands of fans flock to Blue Angels' practice


The Associated Press

PENSACOLA NAVAL AIR,
STATION Nearly 8,000
fans packed a morning
practice session of the
U.S. Navy Blue Angels on
Wednesday, and many
worried it would be the last
time they'd see the elite
flight demonstration team
for quite a while.
Federal budget cuts
could end the team's 2013
season before it really
starts. The team flew at an
air show in Key West ear-
lier this month, but most
shows scheduled through
mid-June have been can-
celed because of uncer-
tainty about finances. The
team hasn't scheduled any
more of its popular week-
day practice sessions be-
yond March. Thousands of
fans usually gather outside
the National Museum of
Naval Aviation each Tues-
day, Wednesday and some-
times Thursday mornings
from March to October to
watch the team. perform
routine maneuvers.
Fans who gathered in the
cold early Wednesday said
they were worried that


IHEASSOCIATEDPRESS
In this photo provided by the Florida Keys News Bureau, the
U.S. Navy's Blue Angels perform their precision aerobatics over
the Florida Keys during the Southernmost Air Spectacular at
Naval Air Station Key West on March 24.


day's practice could be one
of the team's last perfor-
mances of the year.
"I heard on the news
last night that this might
be their last flight, or one
of their last flights, and
I thought this would be
a good time to come out
here and watch them," said
Laurie Jensen of Fairhope,
Ala., who brought her
three young kids to see the


hourlong session.
The Air Force's Thun-
derbirds and the Army's
Golden Knights skydir-
ers have canceled their
performances because of
the budget cuts, but the
Navy has waited to offi-
cially cancel the Blue An-
gels' shows. But many of
the air shows where the
team is scheduled to ap-
pear have been called off


completely because of the
uncertainty.
Lt. Katie Kelly, spokes-
woman for the Blue An-
gels, said Wednesday that
there still was no official
word on future practices
or shows. She said the
team did plan to appear at
the Naval Academy gradu-
ation in late May.
Howard Litvack of Nash-
ville, Tenn., was among
the thousands of fans who
clapped and snapped pic-
tures of the sixjetsWednes-
day. Litvack said he hopes
the season isn't cancelled.
"Look at all the people
here," he said. "There is a
reason for that people
love it."
Tom Vander Laan of
Grand Rapids, Mich.,
brought his young grand-
children to the show while
vacationing in the area.
"We've been here prob-
ably four other times, but
we've never seen such a
large crowd," he said. We
were surprised when we
got here that the'bleachers
were full already."
After the practice, the pi-
lots signed autographs and
posed for pictures with


fans. Thursday's practice
session is the last sched-
uled for 2013 so far.
Melissa Conner, of Pop-
ular Bluff, Mo., came to
Wednesday's session with
her children. "The Blue
Angels have been always
been a part of my life, and
I cannot imagine them
not being able to do their
shows," she said.


him to be the state party
chairman after he led
local efforts to help Crist
get elected governor in
2006. He previously was
the president and CEO of
a company that provides
training to the hospitality
industry on how to comply
with alcohol laws.
The plea arrangement
was reached at the last
minute. Jury selection
was set to begin early last
month, but neither Greer
nor prosecutors had ap-
peared in the courtroom
an hour after the trial was
supposed to start.
Until he entered his
guilty pleas, Greer had
contended that party lead-
ers knew about the finan-
cial arrangement that gave
Greer's company a cut of
party money.


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Abortion bills clear Florida House panels


'The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Bills seeking t
ban sex- and race-selective abortion
and to require that babies survivin
botched abortions receive medics
care cleared House subcommittee
on Wednesday as the hot-button is
sue resurfaced during a legislative
session that's been largely bereft c
battles over social issues.
The legislation (HB845) that dre%
the most push back from abortion
rights supporters would prohib:
abortions motivated by the gende
or race of an unborn child. Its spon
sor, Rep. Charles Van Zani, said th
U.S. has become a "safe haven" fo
people around the world wantin
to terminate pregnancies for those
reasons, but he didn't have any num
bers on how many such abortion
are done.
"Race-selection abortion is race


based violence and that must
Stopp" the Keystone Heights Re-
o publican said before his bill
is cleared the House Criminal justice
g Subcommittee.
al The measure would require abor-
's tion providers to sign an affidavit
s- stating they had no knowledge the
e procedure was being done based
Af on the unborn child's sex or race.
Providers would be slapped with a
w $10,000 fine for failing to report such
i- abortions. Van Zant and other sup-
it porters said it's aimed at curbing a
*r form of discrimination that snuffs
i- out a potential life.
e An exasperated Rep. Irv Slosberg,
ir D-Bpca Raton, said the bill amount-
g ed to another rendition of "conser-
e vative story time."
- "This is just another attempt to
.s chip away at access by calling into
question every woman who makes
- a deeply personal medical decision,"


he said.
The bill also has sexist and racist
overtones, Slosberg said.
"It's basically implying by statute
that women and minority babies are
considered less desirable, second-
class citizens," he said.
Missy Wesolowski with Planned
Parenthood called the bill a "danger-
ous intrusion" in the doctor-patient
relationship by turning doctors into
investigators and their patients into
suspects.
"At the same time, it insults women
of color by calling into question their
ability to make decisions about their
own bodies," she said.
Another bill (HB1129) that drew
less resistance would require that
medical care be given to newborns,
likely to be premature, who survive
botched abortions. The care would
be given at a hospital and not at the
abortion clinic.


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STIJTE








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850-526-5059

Fred Chris
SMartin

Mr. Fred Chris Martin
age 83 of Marianna passed
away on Tuesday, March
26, 2013 in the Signature
Healthcare at the Court-
yard.
Mr. Martin was born in
Gretna, Nebraska in 1929
and had served his country
in the United States Army.
He moved to Jacksoh
County in 1987 and was a
member of the First Baptist
Church of Malone. Mr.
Martin loved his communi-
ty and had a great passion
for helping others. He also
enjoyed carpentry, farming
and fishing.
He was preceded in
death by his parents Willis
and Kathryn Fleck Martin,
a son Kenneth Martin, a
daughter Terri Lea Martin
and a sister Blanche Root.
Mr. Martin is survived by
his wife Hoovie Miller of
Marianna, son Steven L.
Martin of Lincoln, Nebras-
ka, daughters Beverly A.
Martin King Solver and
husband Doug of Tabor,
Iowa and Jody L. Martin
Von Rentzell and husband
Eric of Ashland, Nebraska,
two step daughters Marsha
Jan Home and husband
Bill of Marianna and Deli-
lah Winchester and hus-
band Sid of Belmont, North
Carolina, one brother Ken-
neth Martin and wife


Evelyn of Springfield, Ne-
braska, sister Bernice
Loreson and husband Bob
of Waverly, Nebraska, 13
grandchildren, 10 great
grandchildren and numer-
ous foster children.
Services for Mr. Martin
will be held from the grave-
side on Friday, March 29,
2013 at 2:00 P.M. in
Pinecrest Memorial Gar-
dens with Rev. James Rich
officiating.
Military honors will be
given by Fort Rucker Hon-
or Guard.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home are in charge of
arrangements.
Expressions of sympathy
may be submitted online at
www.mariannachapelfh.com.
Greg Hancock
Funeral Chapel
142 Southland Road
Americus, GA 31709
(229)-924-9888
ghfci@bellsouth.net

Donald Ray
Miles

Donald Ray Miles, age
73, of 136 Sylvan Dr., died
at Phoebe Putney Memori-
al Hospital in Albany early
Sunday, March 24, 2013.
A native of Cottondale,
Florida, he was born Feb-
ruary 18, 1940 to the late
Lemmie Martin Miles and
Ressie Jones Miles.
A visitation and time of
reflection will be held
Thursday, March 28, 2013,
from 5:00 until 7:00 PM at
Greg Hancock Funeral
Chapel.
The family has requested
casual attire for the visita-


tion and time of reflection.
The family also has re-
quested in lieu of flowers
that memorials be made to
The American Lung Associ-
ation, 6852 Belfort Oaks
Place, Jacksonville, FL
32216-6241.
Mr. Miles was a graduate
of Cottondale High School
in the year of 1958. He was
an avid reader, golfer, and
handyman. He enjoyed the
outdoors as well as working
in the yard and fishing. Mr.
Miles was the production
manager for Davidson
Rubber/Textron for almost
35 years until he retired in
August of 1998.
Survivors include his
wife, Judith Miles of
Americus; two daughters
and son-in-law, JoAnn and
Dale Carr of Albany and Ja-
net Miles of Americus;
three sisters, Eliza Ann
Tippen of Jackson County,
FL., Patsy Newsome of Ma-
rianna, FL., and Mabelle
Grantham of Blountstown,
FL.; one brother, A.C. Miles
of Jackson County, FL; and
his loving dog, Max. He
was preceded in death by
one sister, Melba, and five
brothers, R.L., B.H., Adell,
Odell, and Artis.
Greg Hancock Funeral
Chapel is in charge of these
arrangements. You may
sign the guest book and
share your special thoughts
and memories by visiting
www.gregbancockfuneralchapel.com.


Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
www.artisticdesignsunltd.com
850-372-4456


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A boost for gay marriage:
Justices question US law
WASHINGTON Concluding two days
of intense debate, the Supreme Court
signaled Wednesday it could give a boost
to same-sex marriage by striking down
the federal law that denies legally mar-
ried gay spouses a wide range 'of benefits
offered to other couples.


As the court wrapped up its remarkable
arguments over gay marriage in America,
a majority of the justices indicated they
will invalidate part of the federal De-
fense of Marriage Act if they can get
past procedural problems similar to
those that appeared to mark Tuesday's
case over California's ban on same-sex
marriage.
From wire reports


Electric
From Page 1A
Taylor, a customer of city water and
sewer services since 1995 and a close
follower of the FPU issue, maythink it's
a good idea for the city to form its own
electric utility service, but not all of his
fellow audience members, particularly-
those employed by FPU, were of the
same mind.
Knowing the history of the legal battles
between the city and FPU, Taylor posed
a pointed question Tuesday night: "Do
you consider (the city) to be in an adver-
sarial relationship with (FPU)?"
Dean said no and that sentiment was


Intervene
From Page 1A
unmarked and long-forgotten graves are
located.
Cox has been an outspoken critic of re-
cent ongoing efforts to have the bodies
exhumed and the continued effort to de-
termine whether more bodies are buried
there than are currently known. Cox said
he believes there is a "wealth of informa-
tion" about the cemetery available in
existing record, which, he commented,
shows that "52 people, 'a peacock and
two dogs are buried out there."
The research team has assembled- a
list of the known buried from the Doz-
ier records, with causes of death that
range from causes such as fire, disease,
blunt force trauma to the head, gunshot
wound during an escape attempt, and
more. But the team also believes that
there are enough inaccuracies to war-,
rant a look underground.
Cox said Tuesday that he believes the
record is accurate and that the state
will be wasting taxpayer money if it fol-
lows through with plans to dig further in
search of more bodies. Cox and others
have expressed concern that the county
may be called upon to pay for a portion
of the proposed exhumation.
On Wednesday, that question came up
when U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson visited the
Dozier campus, along with Florida De-
partment of Juvenile Justice Secretary
Wansley Walters, State Attorney Glenn
Hess and' a corps of reporters invited
from around the state and nation.
Nelson was asked to make a com-
mitment. that the county would not be
held responsible for any of the costs. He
wouldn't do that,\ but pointed out that a


FROM THE FRONT & NATION


potential federal funding source and a
Florida legislative appropriation are be-
ing sought to carry that burden.
Cox also said he wants the county to
pressure state Medical Examiner-Mi-
chael Hunter to account for any public
funds he has already expended in pursu-
ing the exhumation or in other activities
related to the Dozier probe. He said he
also wants the county to draw up and
sign a resolution opposing the exhuma-
tion of the entire cemetery. He said he
sees the exhumation effort as an expen-
sive and unnecessary exercise in satis-
fying "public curiosity" rather than the
"public interest."
In addition to his concern over the
cost, Cox also said he believes that fami-
lies of Dozier's dead have the right to say
whether they want their relatives' re-
mains disturbed and that they should be
contacted before this is done. He wants
the county to support'that restriction.
According to the researcher leading
the Dozier study, which has been under-
way in some form since last year, several
families of boys known to be buried there
have been contacted and have expressed
a desire for the exhumation to proceed.
Others have not yet been located, how-
ever, and at least one family has not yet
responded.
Saying he wanted the board to support
his "one-man petition" opposing the ex-
humation, Cox had called for the county
to enter the matter as an intervener, a
step Baker did subsequently take on the
order of the county commission the next
day.
Commissioners took no action on the
request for support of the Cox petition
and did not act on his request related to
Hunter's expenditures or on the family
notification issue he raised.


Dozier
From Page 1A

can be secured, and perhaps
even without a significant influx
of additional dollars, she expects
to start working on the site again
in April. She has at least a year
to be on site, and the state has,
suspended its plan to sell the
property.
The study has been ongoing
since last year, when Kimmerle
began looking into reports from
families who had young boys liv-
ing at Dozier decades ago, boys
who died or disappeared there
under circumstances mysterious
or unknown to their loved ones.
The desire to know led one man,
Glen Varnados, to help fund
the beginning of Kimmerle's re-
search into Dozier. Varnados do-,
nated money for the project in
part to help resolve the death of
his uncle, who had died there as
a youngster under circumstanc-
es the family found mysterious.
Varnados also hired a lobbyist to
convince state legislators to set
money aside for the project, as
well.
The decision to study perhaps
also gained momentum from
the stories told by former resi-
dents of the juvenile detention
center, accounts of merciless
beatings they said they endured
or witnessed, rumors thaf some
juveniles had died and/or suf-
fered sexual abuse at the hands
of Dozier staff through the years,
and whispers that there might
be a second graveyard on the
campus.
Kimmerle launched a research
project that brought her, her
students and assistants to the
Dozier campus.to look through
campus documents, interview
former Dozier residents and
staff, and to review old files from
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement, an agency that
had done its own research into
such allegations years earlier.
The records search led Kimmerle
to conclude that there were mul-
tiple inconsistencies about vari-
ous matters, and that the cam-
pus needed further exploration
if the truth was to be found.


2 -





MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Graffiti scrawled on this wall and window of the Dozier "White House"
contains dates ranging from the late 1930s to the 1960s.


Kimmerle and her team also
used ground-penetrating radar
to determine if there might be
unmarked graves on campus,
and she believes there are an es-
timated 50 bodies there, almost
20 more than were previously re-
ported in some reports. She also
learned that the crosses erected
in the marked graveyard do not
necessarily line up strictly with
the bodies under the ground.
That graveyard had been marked
with crosses, but not with names.
A team of Boy Scouts took on the
cross project as a memorial ef-
fort years ago and the crosses
were more a symbolic gesture
than an attempt to accurately
place the crosses.
And Kimmerle's team has
marked four areas which are
suspected to be grave shafts out-
side the'marked cemetery area,
but suspect there may be many
more. Coffin hardware, indica-
tions of human remains and
other signs were found to signal
the need for further exploration
of those marked spots and other
areas around the cemetery. Kim-
merle said she stopped marking
once she realized that an exhu-
mation order would be sought
by the Attorney General. If it is
granted, she said, the exhuma-
tions will begin in Boot Hill and
work will continue at the marked'
sites to determine if bodies are in
those areas. Those would also be


exhumed. The larger search area
includes a wooded area outside
the cemetery field where trees
will have to be removed for fur-
ther exploration.
Briefed on all these matters
well before her visit to the Dozier
campus Wednesday, the infor-
mation wasn't lost on Walters as
she stood looking at the stains
in what had previously been a
holding cell at Dozier.
While Walters and reporters
looked at the walls, members of
Walters' staff scrambled to find
out if a previous Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement inves-
tigation might offer more infor-
mation about the stains.
In a few minutes, they
came back with an answer
FDLE had determined
that, at one point in the school's
history, that room had been used
to store paint and that the sub-
stance on the wall was believed
to be paint.-
But based on the stories that
have come to light in recent
work done by Kimmerle's team,
and by her own recollection of
stories heard through the years,
Walters was not convinced that
the substance was paint. She
said she wants further study on
those stains.
The uncertainty and lingering
suspicion about the stains are
only a small part of the uncer-
tainty and lingering suspicion


over what went on at Dozier over
the years in certain decades.
Just as Walters believes another
test of the stains could provide a
fresh, reliable answer as to its na-
ture, she, Nelson, Kimmerle and
others have indicated they think
exhumation and bodyidentifica-
tion efforts are the best hope for
bringing definitive answers to
the families who have lingering
questions about Dozier's young
boys.
Attorney General Pam Bondi
and, in conjunction, Medical
Examiner Dr. Michael Hunter
have asked the circuit court to
issue an order that would give
Hunter permission to exhume
the bodies in the cemetery and
anywhere else evidence of bod-
ies might be found on the Dozier
campus. The case is assigned to
Judge Bill Wright, who has not
yet ruled on the matter.
The death record at Dozier
only goes back to 1914 and the
last entry was made in 1952. The
institution was opened in 1900.
The facility was segregated for
years, ahd some people believe
that, in addition to the "Boot
Hill" cemetery location explored
Wednesday, there maybe at least
one more referred to anecdotally
as "Cedar Hill," and that there
are possibly other spots where
bodies were buried.
One of the most prevalent and
consistent stories that has fueled
public concern about Dozier's
past involves witness accounts
of a standard method of pun-
ishment at the White House
building. Researchers have been
repeatedly told that boys were
taken to the White House for se-
vere punishment. People say the
bbys were made to expose their
buttocks, lie face down on a bed
and hold the head-stead bars
while someone struck them re-
peatedly with extreme force, us-
ing a leather strop. If a boy cried
out, he was beaten more, the
stories go. Men in their 60s and
older have said their trauma over
the Dozier experience as chil-
dren still persists in their lives
today and marred their spirits in
devastating ways.
As Walters kept looking around
the cell, she called Dozier "a
haunted place," with a dark


History in the Department of Ju-
venile Justice. She said that clos-
ing Dozier was one of her first
priorities when she was appoint-
ed to lead DJJ in 2008. She said
she had felt for some time that
the facility did not well repre-
sent the mission of DJJ, and that
it was that belief that led her to
pursue its closure, although of-
ficials at the time pointed more
to the age of the buildings and
the campus infrastructure
as reasons for its shut-down.
Nelson expressed similar
thoughts, and said it is critical
for Kimmerle's work to continue
so that families have an oppor-
tunity to learn more about the
fates of their relatives who died
at Dozier. Kimmerle has permis-
sion already to keep exploring
the area for at least another year,
and is applying for a grant to help
fund it through a program that
Nelson learned about recently.
The $ 3 million fund, within the
budget of the Justice Depart-
ment, can be tapped for use in
DNA identification of missing
persons and, due to the need to
put names to the remains, this
would appear to be a qualified
use of the funds.
Nelson also said that both
the. Florida Senate and House
of Representatives are moving
potential legislation that could
earmark up to $200,000 for Kim-
merle's work at Dozier.
The professor said Wednes-
day it would take that estimated
amount to carry out the work as-
sociated with physical exhuma-
tion and some other stages of
related work.
IfWright rules to grant permis-
sion to exhume the bodies, it
may still prove difficult to fill in
all the blanks for the families of
Dozier's dead. Whether Kimmer-
le's work and the findings of Dr.
Michael Hunter would result in
evidence of criminal behavior
is an unknown. Whether a per-
son suspected of such could be
prosecuted is also an unknown,
given the thne that has passed,
the incomplete record, and the
difficulty of assembling enough
evidence to proceed.
No matter, Nelson said; the ex-
humation is a necessary process
in pursuit of justice.


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
Q l,/ity Seriked il Aftfnr,!,hl it
Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90

3 850-482.5041


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


1~111111.~1;111~1~11~11_1_1_1111_11_11_ -.--


THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013 5AF


later echoed by FPU representatives
in the audience, with both parties ex-
pressing their desire to do
what's best for the citizens
of Marianna.
Residents interested in
learning more about is-
sues related to the April 9
referendum are welcome
Taylor today, any time between 4
and 6:30 p.m., in the City
Commission Room of City Hall on Green
Street. Additional information sessions
are scheduled:
) Marianna City Hall Commission
Room, 4-6:30 p.m. on April 1, 2 and 8.
a McLane Center, 4291 Clay St. in Mar-
ianna, 4-6:30 p.m. on April 4.








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Briefs

Cyprus cash
withdrawals capped
NICOSIA, Cyprus Cyr-
plots will only be allowed
to withdraw 300 euros
($383) in cash each day
when the country's banks
open for the first time in
more than a week Thurs-
day, the state news agency
says.
Credit or debit card
payments abroad will be
capped at 5,000 euros a
day, while no checks will
be cashed, although they
can be deposited in bank
accounts, the agency said
Wednesday.
Meanwhile, armed
police officers guarded
several trucks carrying
containers arriving at the
country's Central Bank
in Nicosia. A helicopter
hovered overhead.
Banks have been shut
across the country since
March 16 to prevent a run
on deposits while politi-
cians worked out a new
plan'to secure an interna-
tional bailout.

Sri Lankan grave
dates back 25 years
MATALE, Sri Lanka
-A judge announced
Wednesday that more
than 150 human skulls
and bones recovered from
a mass grave were buried
there about 25 years ago,
strengthening suspicion
that they belonged to
suspected Marxist rebels
killed at the time.
Magistrate Chathurika
de Silva told a court in the
central town of Matale
that tests show the skeletal
remains found inside the
premises of a government
hospital dated to between
1987 and 1990. During
that period, thousands of
men and women sus-
pected of having ties to the
rebels disappeared after
being arrested by security
forces.
De Silva did not explain
tAe cause of death but
declared the mass grave a
crime scene.
Workers found human
remains while doing
construction on part of the
hospital land last Decem-
ber. The skeletons had
been buried in neat rows,
five or six stacked on top
of one another totaling
154.
Claims were made
initially that the bodies
belonged to those killed in
an epidemic in the 1940s
or a mudslide. However,
hospital authorities did
not have any records
off bodies buried on the
premises.
The Marxist group
People's Liberation Front,
which led two uprisings,
claimed that the bodies
may belong to.comrades
killed by security forces.
The bodies of many young
men and women arrested
by paramilitaries were
found burning by the
roadside or floating in riv-
ers at the time.
The Marxists were
mostly Sinhalese, the
country's majority ethnic
community.
Sri Lankai forces are
also accused of killing
scores of civilians and
captured rebels at the end
of a quarter-century civil
war with ethnic minority
Tamil separatists.

Bomb explodes near
Acropolis in Athens
ATHENS, Greece -A
bomb exploded outside a
ship owner's house near
the Acropolis in central
Athens on Wednesday
night, causing damage but


no injuries, police said.
The explosion near the
country's most famous
monument occurred at
about 8:30 p.m., following
a warning call to a Greek
newspaper.
Police spokesman Pan-
agiotis Papapetropoulos
said officers were able be-
fore the blast to evacuate
one or two people from
the building and to seal
off the area of the major
tourist site.
There was no claim of re- I
sponsibility for the attack.


J From wire reports


Egypt


Court challenges Morsi over top prosecutor


The Associated Press


CAIRO An Egyptian
appeals court on Wednes-
day annulled a presiden-
tial decree appointing the
top prosecutor in a new
challenge by the judi-
ciary to Islamist President
Mohammed Morsi that
throws the country's legal
system into confusion.
The unprecedented ver-
dict against the decree,
which Morsi issued in
November, brought to the
surface howEgypt's stormy
post-revolution transition
has profoundly snarled
the lines of authority and
law, leaving unclear the
boundaries between pow-
ers of the president and
the judiciary and who has
the ultimate say in inter-
preting a deeply disputed
constitution.
It also opens a new
phase in the political fight
between Morsi and his Is-
lamist backers on one side
and his mainly liberal and
secular opponents, a fight
that the judiciary has re-
peatedly been dragged
into the past year.
Morsi supporters say the
judiciary remains in the
control of supporters of


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In October 2012, Egyptian Prosecutor General Abdel-Meguid
Mahmoud (center) addressed supporters, judges, lawyers
and media in a downtown courthouse defying a presidential
decision to remove him from his post in Cairo.


the regime of ousted lead-
er Hosni Mubarak, warn-
ing that they are seeking
to derail the country's
democratic transition and
undermine the president's
authority.
Morsi's opponents say
the elected president has
continuously defied legal
norms to force through
his agenda and trampled
on the judiciary's inde-
pendence in a bid to con-
solidate his power. The
courts are the sole branch
of government not under
the dominance of Morsi's
Islamist allies, although he
does have some backers.


Most legal experts ar-
gued that the decision is
effective immediately and
that the top prosecutor
must be removed. If not,
the current prosecutor
has no powers to issue ar-
rest warrants or refer cas-
es to court, bringing the
country's legal system to
a halt, said constitutional
law professor Mohammed
Hassanein Abdel-Al.
"It is unprecedented
in the history of Egypt to
question the legitimacy of
the top prosecutor," Ab-
del-Al said. "The president
must correct the course."
A presidential spokes-


man said he would not
comment on court rulings.
But Morsi's supporters in-
sisted the verdict violates
the constitution and is
likely to be shot down on
appeal.
"This is an invalid rul-
ing. It violates the consti-
tution," said Abdel-Mo-
neim Abdel-Maksoud,
the legal adviser of the
Muslim Brotherhood, the
group from which Morsi
hails.
The dispute is rooted in
a series of controversial
decrees Morsi issued in
November that sparked
widespread protests. In
them, he decreed that the
prosecutor general could
serve in office for only four
years, with immediate ef-
fect on the post's holder
at the time Abdel-Meguid
Mahmoud, in place since
2006. Morsi replaced Mah-
moud with Talaat Abdul-
lah, a career judge, and
swiftly swore him in.
At the same time, Morsi
decreed that the judiciary
could not reverse his de-
cisions. The decrees were
largely aimed at prevent-
ing.the courts from block-
ing the drafting a new
constitution by a body


dominated by Morsi's al-
lies. The' Islamist-backed
charter was then rushed
through a public referen-
dum in December.
Many Egyptians, includ-
ing revolutionary activists,
had wanted Mahmoud's
ouster, since he was seen
as a diehard supporter of
Mubarak. But Morsi's de-
crees and his unilateral
naming of a replacement
prompted public outrage
and criticism, including
by many in the judiciary,
that he was neutralizing
the courts in a power grab.
Morsi later lifted the de-
crees, but their results re-
mained in place.
The question remained
unresolved over which
has precedence Morsi's
decrees or rulings by the
courts.
Wednesday's ruling
deepens, the dispute over
this question.
The Cairo appeals court,
a unit specializing in com-
plaints by judges and law-
yers, ruled in a case filed
by the sacked prosecutor,
Mahmoud. It said that
Morsi's decree appointing
Abdullah "is considered
void and all that came of
it."


NKorea says it cut last military hotline


The Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea
- Raising tensions with
South Korea yet again,
North Korea cut its last
military hotline with
Seoul on Wednesday, say-
ing there was no need to
continue military com-
munications between the
countries in a situation
"where a war may break
out at any moment."
The hotline a dedicat-
ed telephone link between
the two militaries was
used mainly to arrange for
South Koreans who work
at an industrial complex
in the North to cross the
heavily armed border.
When the connection was
last severed in 2009, some
workers were stranded in
the North.
Normal direct telephone
communications do not
exist between the two
countries.
The shutdown of the ho-
tline is the latest of many
threats and provocative
actions from North Ko-
rea, which is angry over
U.S.-South Korean mili-
tary drills and recent U.N.
sanctions punishing it for
its Feb. 12 nuclear test.
A senior North Korean
military official informed
the South that all regu-
lar military dialogue and
communications chan-
nels would remain cut
until South Korea halts its
"hostile acts" against the
North.
North Korea recently
also cut a Red Cross hot-
line with South Korea and
another with the U.S.-led
U.N. command at the bor-
der between the Koreas.
The link severed


Wednesday has been es-
sential in operating the
last major symbol of in-
ter-Korean cooperation:
an industrial complex in
the North that employs
hundreds of workers from
the South. It was used to
arrange for cross-border
shipments and for work-
ers going north and re-
turning to South Korea.
There was no immedi-
ate word about the impact
on South Korean workers
who were at the Kaesong
industrial complex.
Outside North Korea,
Pyongyang's actions are
seen in part as an effort to
spur dormant diplomatic
talks to wrest outside aid,
and to strengthen internal
loyalty to young leader
Kim Jbng Un and build up
his military credentials.
North Korea's action
was announced in a mes-
sage that its chief delegate
to inter-Korean military
talks sent to his South Ko-
rean counterpart.
"Under the situation-
where a war may break
out any moment, there is
no need to keep North-
South military com-
munications," he said.
"North-South military
communications will be
cut off."
Seoul's Unification Min-
istry, which is in charge of
relations with the North,
called the move an "un-
helpful measure for the
safe operation of the Kae-
song complex."
The Unification Ministry
said only three telephone
hotlines remain between
the North and South, and
those are used only for
exchanging information
about air traffic.


South Korean officials
said about 750 South Ko-
reans were in Kaesong on
Wednesday, and that the
two Koreas had normal i
communications earlier
in the day over the hot-
line when South Korean
workers traveled back and
forth to the factory park as
scheduled.
Workers at Kaesong
could be contacted direct-
ly by phone from South
Korea on Wednesday.
Kaesong is operated in
North Korea with South
Korean money and know-
how and a mostly North
Korean work force. It pro-
vides badly needed hard
currency in North Korea.


ArZy ou lookin3




fo lc owrhp



i~ b~o~ ~VV97 OWe


If you are an area church that would like to
be featured in this year's edition contact the
advertising department of the Jackson County
Floridan at (850) 526-3614
or email salesjcfloridan.com.

Deadline for advertising is April 12, 2013.


Mattress









SALE9
Tradtionl InerspingPockted oils


THIS MORNING @ SAM
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-16A o THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013


I


WORLD




















High School Baseball
Thursday Central at Malone,
6 p.m.
Friday Graceville.at Malone,
6 p.m.


High School Softball
Thursday Malone at Bethle-
hem, 5 p.m.

Chipola Baseball
The Indians will play the first
of another three-game set with
Pensacola State on Friday at
home ait 2 p ni.. with the second
game coming Saturday in Pen-
sacola at 1 p.m.

Chipola Softball
The Lady Indians will lace
Pensacola State today at 4 and
6p.m.

Panhandle Seminole
Club Golf Tournament
The 2013 Panhandle Seminole
Club's annual scholarship golf
tournament will be held April
5 at Indian Springs Golf Club
in Marianna. This tournament.
along with another fundraiser
has helped provide $40.000
over the past 10 years to deserv-
ing local students and helped
further their education.
Registration and warm-up will
begin at noon with the shotgun
start at 1 p.m. for this four-man
scramble event Cash prizes
will be awarded to the first-,
second-, and third-place teams
Additional prizes will be given for
longest drive, straightest drive,
closest to the pin. and so on.
The greens fee contribution of
$65 will entitle each golfer to a
fantastic afternoon of goli or a
championship course (to help a
very worthy cause') followed by
a great meal.
Scholarship (hole) and prize
sponsorships are also available
for this event. For more informa-
tion. call Roy Bajer at :50-52'6-
-4005 or 209-1-326. or George
Sweeney at 850-432-5526.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to edito-
rial@ricfloridan.com. or la, them
to 850-432-4478. The mailing
address for the papet is Jackson
County Floridan PO. Bo\, 520
Marianna, FL 32447.


Chipola College Softball


Lady Indians earn



split with Gulf Coast


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Mya Anderson knocks in a tie breaking run for Chipola during
their game against Gulf Coast Tuesday afternoon.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

-The Chipola Lady Indians came out
with a split in a home doubleheader
against the Gulf Coast Lady Commo-
dores on Tuesday night, winning the
first game 6-2 before getting ham-


mered 15-0 in the second.
The day got off to a good start with
a solid victory in the first matchup, as
the Lady Indians used a four-run fifth
inning to bust open a 2-2 game and
rode a strong Eva Voortman pitching

See SPLIT, Page 2B


CHIPOLA COLLEGE BASEBALL





No sweep for you


Masonia massive in Raiders' win


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Northwest Florida
State Raiders avoided a three-
game sweep at the hands of
Chipola onWednesday night,
beating the Indians 12-4 at
Chipola Field in the third and
final game of the series.
The Raiders battered the
Indians' pitching staff for 13
hits, with sophomore short-
stop Nick Masonia having a
monster day with four hits,
including two doubles, a
triple, a three-run home run
and eight RBIs.
With Northwest leading
1-0 in the top of the second
inning and the bases loaded,
Masonia delivered a three-
RBI triple to the left-center-
field gap to put the Raiders
up 4-0.
Masonia struck again in the
sixth when Chipola coach Jeff
Johnson brought in reliever
'Sfiane" Crouse to replace
starter Tim Holmes with two
on and two out, taking the
second pitch he saw over the
center-field fence to make it
a 7-1 Raiders lead.
The Indians cut the margin
.in half in the bottom of the
seventh, taking advantage
Sof a pair of Northwest errors
to plate three runs, with Bert


Givens adding an RBI single
to score Luis Tunon to make
it 7-4.
Masonia came through
with an RBI double in the
eighth to increase the margin
back to four, and added yet
another RBI double in the
ninth as the Raiders contin-,
ued to pour it on.
Jordan .Desguin also
contributed, a two-RBI
double in the ninth, with
Madera doubling to score
Masonia to cap off a four-run
inning.
Northwest reliever Michael
Royal finished off 'Chipola
with a 1-2-3 bottom of the
ninth, giving the Raiders just
their second Panhandle Con-
ference win of the season,
improving to 2-7 in league
play.
Chipola fell to 3-3 in
the conference and 25-14
overall.
Holmes took the loss for the
Indians, going 5 2/3 innings
and giving up six earned runs
on seven hits, a walk and six
strikeouts.
Kyle McDorman started
.and got the win for the Raid-
ers, allowing two earned runs
on two hits, three walks and
five strikeouts, with Royal

See SWEEP, Page 2B


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola's Josh Barber throws to first Wednesday during a game against the
Northwest Florida Raiders.


Sneads Softball,


Red-hot Lady Pirates wallop Wewa


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Lady Pirates soft-
ball team made it nine wins in
a row Tuesday night in Wewahi-
tchka, routing the Lady Gators
9-1 to pick up their ninth district
win of the season.
The game was scoreless
through three innings before


the Lady Pirates scored a pair
of runs in the top of the fourth
with Alaynah Weiss reaching on
an error, Shelbi Byler on a single,
and both scoring on RBI ground-
outs by Cambridge Chason and
Brandy Strickland.
Sneads scored three more in
the fifth with Weiss stroking a
two-RBI triple to score Brandi
Walden and Alex Maphis, and


Byler adding an RBI double off
the left -ield fence to score Weiss
and make it 5-0.
Wewahitchka got on the board
with a run in the bottom of the
inning, but the Lady Pirates
cushioned their advantage in the
seventh with four more runs.
"Chason' contributed two of

See PIRATES, Page 2B


TIGERS CAN'T KEEP UP WITH WEWA


MARK SKINNER/FLOUIDAN
G raceville's Brandon Pippin tags a Wewa player caught in a rundown between
third base and home plate Tuesday night. The Tigers lost to Wewahitchka
14-1.
-.:-- ...- ::-' 3 -.:-":-. :2 -,T ;- ': -. 9--_ -.- : :


Sneads JV Softball


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Sneads Lady Pirates junior varsity softball team went 11-0 during
the 2013 season. Team member are (back row, left to right).head coach
Shawn Graham, Kaylee Messer, Kasey Grover, Kaitlin Bohannon, Cara Pyke,
Mikayla Durden, coach Dan Grover,(front row) Erin Smith, Britney Fuder,
Lauren Stewart, Aaliyah Williams, Mikayla Hatcher and Kaylee Cain.

JV Lady Pirates put finishing

touches on perfect season


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Lady Pirates ju-
nior varsity squad recently
completed a perfect season,
finishing the year with a mark
of 11-0.
It was a dominant season for
the Lady Pirates, who under
head coach Shawn Graham
outscored their opponents 89-
15 for the year.
Graham said that while he
believed at the start of the sea-!
son that he had a very talented
team, not even he could've pre-
dicted an 11-0 finish.
"Seeing how far the girls came
from the first game of the sea-
son to the last was amazing,"
he said. "I told them (before
the year) that they were good
enough to have a great season,
but never did I think we would
go undefeated. The way they
came together was amazing."
7-


The Lady Pirates did it with
depth and balance, with seven
different players batting .350 or
better, led by freshman leadoff
hitter Kaylee Cain's .555 average
and .670 on-base percentage.
"We would've suffered with-
out (Cain's) on-base percent-
age and the way she led off for
us and her presence in cen-
ter-field," Graham said. "There
were a lot of games she took
over throwing people out at see-
ond or third base or even home.
She was a great defensive pres-
ence and all you can ask for out
of a leadoff hitter."
Mikayla Hatcher, Kasey Gro-
ver, Cara Pyke, Lauren Stewart,
Kaylee Messer and Mikayla Dur-
den were the other six Sneads
hitters to bat .350 or better'dur-
ing the season.
The freshman Durden also led
the Lady Pirates in the circle,

See PERFECT, Page 2BL


- ..,. _. -










-2B THURSDAY. MARCH 28,2013


SPORTS


College Basketball


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami head coach Jim Larranaga keeps an eye on his team during practice for a regional semifinal game in the NCAA tournament
on Wednesday in Washington. Miami will face Marquette on Thursday.

Homecoming for Larranaga as Miami faces Marquette


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Jim
Larranaga smiled and
raised both hands to ac-
knowledge the fans in green
- those from both Miami
and George Mason as
he walked onto the court
where he become part of
a national sensation seven
years ago.
He signed autographs,
posed for pictures and was
about to turn his attention
to practice when he spot-
ted two special people: La-
mar Butler and Tony Skinn,
starters from the 2006 GMU
team. Larranaga hugged
them both and reminisced


about "you guys running
over to our section" of fans
at the final whistle to cel-
ebrate the win over Con-
necticut that sent the mid-
major Patriots to the Final
Four.
"This is not just any other
arena," the coach said.
No,.it's not. This is theVer-
izon Center, where Larrana-
ga convinced his players
that the CAA on their jerseys
stood for "Connecticut As-
sassin Association" instead
of the Colonial Athletic As-
sociation. It's where it be-
came believable again that
an out-of-the-blue school
could advance to college
basketball's biggest stage,


Perfect
From Page 1B
tallying 55 innings for the season and
posting a 1.36 ERA with 62 strike-
outs. Graham said that while Durden
didn't necessarily overpower hitters
with her pace, her poise and com-
mand gave her an edge over all of her
opponents in 2013.
"She's not overly fast, but she hits
her spots and she never gets rattled,"
the coach said. "To look at her, you
wouldn't be able to tell if we had two


paving the way for similar
runs by Virginia Common-
wealth and Butler. And, on
Wednesday, it's where Lar-
ranaga gathered his players
in a circle at midcourt after
warmups and told them:
"You know why they call
it the Sweet 16? It's sweet!
Let's go."
Yep, still the same ol'
Larranaga.
"To them I'm kind of
wacky, you know?" he said.
"I say a lot of things to them
and initially they don't.un-
derstand. I use quotes and
our thought of the day. I ask
them to explain it, they have
Sno idea, and I have to then
educate them of what we're


outs in the bottom of the fifth with
the bases loaded or if we were score-
less in the first inning. She's just very
composed."
With seven of the nine players on
the roster being freshmen, the suc-
cess of the JV team has to be viewed
as an encouraging sign for the future
of a Sneads varsity program that is al-
ready among the best and most con-.
sistent in the Panhandle.
"With the season we've had and the
talent we've got coming up, me and
(SHS varsity coach Kelvin Johnson)
both are very positive about our fu-


trying to get across. Coming
into this building, to them
it's just another venue, but
to me and my staff, it's not."
He's now in a different
league now, leading Atlan-
tic Coast Conference cham-
pion and second-seed
Miami (29-6) against third-
seeded Marquette (25-8) in
Thursday's East Regional
semifinals, but no one else
goes viral quite like this:
Larranaga's version of the
Ali Shuffle, meant to dem-
onstrate the Hurricanes'
fighting mentality, became
an Internet must-see after
he performed it for his play-
ers following Sunday night's
win over Illinois.


ture," he said. "We've got to say thank
you to the people who help the kids
get to the point they're at now. They
came in and had some tools already
to work with. It was just my job to
sharpen them up a little bit and get
them to play as a team.
"But girls like Cain and Grover and
Durden, somewhere along the way
someone really worked with them,
whether it's parents or travel ball or
the (Grand Ridge) middle school that
seems to feed us so many good ath-
letes. We're very appreciative of the
work they've put in with these girls."


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Major League Baseball


Wainwright, Cards


strike $97.5M deal
The Associated Press

AdamWainwright and the Cardinals have agreed to a
new contract that guarantees the Cardinals' ace an ad-
ditional $97.5 million over five years through 2018.
Wainwright had been eligible to become a free agent
after the World Series.
The new agreement, first reported by foxsports.com,
was confirmed by a person familiar with the negotia-
tions who spoke on condition of anonymity because it
had not yet been announced. The Cardinals scheduled
a news conference for Thursday at their spring train-
ing camp in Jupiter, Fla.
A 31-year-old right-hander, Wainwright was 14-13
with a 3.94 ERA last year after missing the Cardinals'
World Series championship season in 2011 because of
elbow surgery. Wainwright was 20-11 with a 2.42 ERA
in 2010 and was an NLAll-Star.


Sweep
From Page 1B
going 2 2/3 and surren-
dering two earned runs
on a hit and two walks
with two strikeouts.
On top of Masonia's
mountainous offensive
contribution, the Raiders
also got three hits, three


Pirates
From Page 1B
them with a two-RBI
double.
The Lady Pirates fin-
ished with nine hits on the
night, with Byler, Maphis
and Brooke Williams all
picking up two, with Cha-
son, Strickland and Weiss
getting the others.
Williams started in the
circle for Sneads and went


runs and two RBIs from
Desguin, while Ben Craft
was 2-for-4 with a walk
and two runs, and Kevin
Knapp was 1-for-4 with
a walk, an RBI and three
runs.
The Indians had just
three hits as a team, with
Chase .Rivett and Giv-
ens each getting an RBI
single.


all seven innings to earn
the win, allowing just four
hits and three walks and
striking out five.
Sneads is now 16-2 on
the season and 9-1 in Dis-
trict 3-1A competition.
The Lady Pirates have
the rest of the week off be-
fore a return match with
Wewahitchka on Monday
in Sneads at 5 p.m., fol-
lowed by another home
district matchup with Ver-
non on Tuesday at 6 p.m.


Split
From Page 1B
performance to victory.
The sophomore Voort-
man went all seven innings
in the circle and allowed
just two unearned runs on
three hits and a walk with
four strikeouts.
Chipola committed four
errors for the game, with
defensive miscues in the
top of the fifth opening the
door for the Lady Com-
modores to score two runs
and tie the game.
But the Lady Indians
took charge in the bottom
of the inning to post four
runs to go ahead.for good.
Chipola had 10 hits in
the game to just three for
Northwest, with Chan-
dler Seay leading the way
with three hits and a run
scored.
Kristen Allen had a big
day at the plate, going 2-


for-3 with a home run, two
RBIs and two runs, while
Mya Anderson was 1-for-3
with a run and two RBIs.
Katie Harrison and Jas-
mine Tanskley each had a
hit and an RBI, and Steph-
anie Garrels and Alyssa
Hathcoat both picked up a
hit and scored a run..
The second game wasn't
nearly as kind to the Lady
Indians, who allowed 15
Gulf Coast hits and com-
mitted five more errors in
the blowout loss.
The game was scoreless
through three innings,
but Brittany Wylie got the
Lady Commodores on the
board with a solo home
run in the top of the fourth
off Chipola starter Karissa
Childs.
Two Chipola errors in the
fifth opened the door for a
three-run inning for Gulf
Coast, with Emily Sanders
adding a two-run homer to
make it 4-0.


Rosanne de Vries came
on in relief of Childs to
start the sixth, but the
Lady Commodores scored
two more runs on four hits
with a two-RBI single by
Mackenzie Arlt increasing
the lead to 6-0.
The game got out of hand
for Chipola in the seventh!
inning, with Gulf Coast
pushing across nine runs
.on five hits and an error.
A hit batter and a walk
by de Vries with the bases
loaded forced in the first
two runs of the inning,
with an error allowing two
more runs to cross to make
it 10-0.
Two walks and a run
later, Kaitlin Hussey came
on to replace de Vries and
gave up a two-RBI double
to Wylie and an RBI single
to Anna Martin to make it
14-0.
Childs took the loss for
Chipola, giving up two
earned runs on six hits


and four strikeouts in five
innings, while de Vries al-
lowed five earned runs on
six hits and three walks
with two strikeouts in 1 2/3
innings.
Paige Caraway started
in the circle for Gulf Coast
and went all seven innings
to get the win, allowing
eight hits, no walks and
striking out nine.
Garrels had three of the
nine Chipola hits, while
Sanders went 3-foi-4 with
a walk, two runs and three
RBIs to lead the Lady Com-
modores, and Katie Gard-
ner was 3-for-5 with two
runs. Wylie was ,2-for-5
with two runs and three
RBIs. Floor van Dijk and
Martin each had two hits,
a run and an RBI.
With the win, Gulf Coast
improved to 4-2 in the
Panhandle Conference
and 34-10 overall, while
Chipola fell to 28-5 overall
and 2-2 in league play. .


TR RH Ai-I MRIIIillR

EVROLET BUICK CADILLAC- GIMC. NISSIN

4204 Lafayette St Marianna, FL (850) 482-3051 _


Three on a 3trin5
Thursday, April 11, 2013
7 p.m. Chipola Center for the Arts
Chipola College Marianna, FL
Jerry Ryan, Bobby Horton, and Brad Ryan will perform all kinds of music -
classic old standards, country, bluegrass, and folk mixed with comedy and
humor suitable for the entire family. This group has evolved over 40 years
into a well timed, musically interesting, and funny performance!
iI ll.l Tickets available online at www.chipola.edu
Adults $14 Child $10
Box Office sales Apr. 4, Apr. 8-10 from 2-5 p.m.
For more information, call (850) 718-2277.


-----------------------------------


~ I -


...











JACKSON COUNTYFLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
FARL~.E 3.UCK tOUT W ITR OU" ROW NOI'YOU FIRD OUT-DI
CRE.FlT CARK A> E 0WT ON 'A tOU FD TRE. RECE.1PT5
6G SROP6ING SPREE! |

u O IBoI




BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
HERE'S THE ISSUE: ... BUT WATERMELON NAME ME 0.
LEMON JELLY BEANS JELLY BEANS TASTE ARTIFICIAL F
TASTE LIKE LEMONS. NlOTHING LIKE FLAVOR. TH
LIME JELLY BEANS WATERMELONS! TASTES LES
TASTE LIKE LIES. NOT EVEN CLOSE. THE REAL
r^ J^ 1-tl II [-; \' -- I '^ ^ ---


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
02013 RIOk Somoski DiSI by Unrr salUdIcX
yI .ISlsH I COULD -LIST\ I/TSOU C 1F \ -
SPIN arouNP LiKe woNDes ou CUsr GO ReaLL ?
w NMa N aND TURN INTo a FasT eNouGH.


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY
S SEE. SIXPEOPtE"LIKED"Y I I WHAT?
LIKF" OF THE WEAT-IR! "DISLIKE:'


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BEN
HE DINOSAUR BUSINESS STARTED,
'" ) "'f BECAUSE I COULDN'T REMEMBER
-- { THE LAST TIME ANYONE CAME TO I
t E I- R.ME FOR ADVICE OR HELP!






3-28


SOME. 7ROL ISTR1YIM
TO SPOILIT FOR ME6.
I'M WOT C1OU)TO LETHIM!!


'3


SOF- ST WORE O TRE NUcBE
OFF TAE F-CE OF TRE CNARD!





- o


THAT'S V ATLAST
A GOOD THATPROVES
ATTITUDE.! ITS DJOTJST
WANTED EFFORT


IT A.s As5 i I ..50 I DEVISED A PLAN
NO ONE EEN' TO REMIND EVERYONE IN
, EIIEMP.EED MOO HOW IMPORTANT I AM IN
' I M ERE I KEEPING EVERYONE SAFE!.
rz- fYOU KNOW_.
A LITTLE DEMON-
S' STATION OF MY
SPECIAL POWERS!


i }..zr


THAT A BABY BY PAUL TRAP
NowJ PLEASE
BE GqulET-
BED- Jo- .

(T"AW oL'ro'yv




~~E4


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


3-28 Lagh ngStvock Irn1natinal rc Dis by Un veal UC:Ck for UFS, 201!
"Someone stole two million dollars' worth
of government toilet seats. The estimated
street value is $1,200."


ACROSS
1 Obscures
6 Inched
along
11 Swindler
12 Bizarre
13 Flinch
1514-line
poem
16Choir
selections
18 Mimic
19"Exodus"
name
21 Profile
22 Detective
Charlie
23 Pet lovers'
grp.
25 Speedo-
meter stat
28 Flowerpot
spot
30 Cloudy
region
31 Pique
32 Yvette's
date
33 Albuquer-
que hrs.
35 Lowest
ebb
37Air-pump
means.
38 Meat
turner
40Dalai -


41 Environ-
mental
prefix
42 Sixth
sense
43 Place
46 More
repulsive
48 Shark
domains
50 Most
up-to-date
54 Bob
Cratchit's
job
55 Meeting
location
56Caravan
halts
57 Sidled past

DOWN
1 DVD player
precursor
2 Before
3 Gold Medal
org.
4 Coiling
around
5 Slalom
need
6 Murmurs
sweetly
7 Seek office
8 Vulcan's
forge
9 Warm-up


Answer to Previous Puzzle


10 Pierre's
noggin
14 Big black
dogs
15 Painter's
garb
17 Purse item
19Throat
clearers
20 Diameter
halves
22Show
approval
24 Novelist
Rand
25 Golden-
touch king
26 Fuss with
makeup
27 Zeus'
spouse


29911
responder
34 Glasses
36 Warned
39 Elbow
grease
43 Not much,
to Pedro
44NCAA
Bruins:
45 Ball props
46Calligraphy
fluids
47 Icicle site
49"We not
amused"
51 MIT grad
52 Take legal
action
53 Turner or
Koppel


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QullDriverBooks.com


3-28 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
Sby Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"E FXJP HRFWEMU RTXNH CXBPM
TPORNAP HZPD RLP R OXMAHRMH
AH N KD RM K DXN' LP RFCORDA
FPRLMEMU." BRLEX FXYPG

Previous Solution: "Be good to people. Being good to people is a wonderful
legacy to leave behind." Taylor Swift
TODAY'SCL E: d slenbbaA
@201,3 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-28


Horoscope
ARIES (March 21-April
19) You won't be de-
prived of rightful rewards
or acknowledgement.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Simply by adding a
new twist to an old routine,
you can make things fresh.
Don't hesitate to use your
imagination to brighten
your world.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Be alert for a rewarding
opportunity to develop
in a commercial involve-
ment. It's likely to be fleet-
ing, so be ready to jump on
anything that's different.
CANCER(June 21-July 22)
-As long as there is parity
between you and the other
party, a friendly agreement,
will have excellent chances
for success.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -
Being extremely inventive
and resourceful, you could
come up with a much bet-
ter method for doing a re-
petitive task.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
A well-calculated risk is
likely to work out just as
you envision it. However,
be careful not to press your
luck.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
An unusual day is in the
making for you. It might in-
volve something from the
past reaching a successful
conclusion at last.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) If a presentation is
required in a group en-
deavor, you're the person
to do it. You'll excel at mak-
ing everyone's case.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Conditions,
in general are extremely
encouraging where your
material interests are con-
cerned. Gains can be gen-
erated from several unex-
pected sources.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Advancement of
your personal interests, is
a strong possibility. Even
if your tactics mystify oth-
ers, the results will be
gratifying.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Usually, it'isn't wise
to be impulsive, but today
your. inspirational flashes
are likely to be quite good.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) An interesting new
acquaintance could enter
your life. This new friend is
likely to be introduced by
an old pal.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: I have a wonderful husband
and a problem that started when we
married last year.
We had a destination wedding. My hus-
band's stepfather paid for the immediate
family to stay at a beautiful rental house.
My brother's ex, "Martha," surprised us
by coming, and she brought her daugh-
ter, along with a friend and her 3-year-
old. The next day, Martha and her friend
had to check out of their hotel hours
before the wedding and simply assumed
They would hang around the rental house
until then. This was not OK.
Martha never asks permission. She and
her friend left the toddler at the house
while they went to get food and then
came back with nothing for the child,
so she went into the kitchen and made
him a sandwich from our supplies. I can
understand my mother-in-law being
upset, but she overreacted and blew up
at Martha. They argued, and Martha left
and didn't attend the wedding.
Although my mom understands how
Martha can annoy people, she shut her-
self off from then on. She didn't help me
into my dress, paid no attention during


.the wedding and spoke to no one. After
the wedding, we had a small reception at
the house, and she locked herself in our
room. I was devastated.
My husband's mother apologized pro-
fusely to my mother after the incident,
but Mom refuses to get over it. She won't
come to family gatherings when my
in-laws are present. She missed our son's
first birthday party.
I have tried to broker truce, and I've
told my mother I will no longer listen
when she says negative things about my
mother-in-law. The end result is that she
avoids the subject. Please help. *
STRESSED NEWLYWED

Dear Stressed: Your mother is being
childish and purposely hanging onto this
grudge. We think she is jealous of your
in-laws and hopes her petulance will
make you more attentive. It's working.
You are expending a great deal of energy
on this situation. Stop. Tell Mom thq sub-
ject is closed and if she chooses to lose
out on family time, that is her decision,
and you will no longer try to convince
her otherwise.


Bridge


If you go down in a contract, especially one
for 12 tricks that you should have made, you
will probably wish you had chosen to visit a
different building. Let's see if you made a good
choice to come to this bridge.game when you
reach six spades in this deal. After West leads
the diamond king, what should you do?
North's bidding was optimistic, despite the
known nine-card-or-better spade fit.
You have at least one spade loser and a po-
tential loser in hearts. You must get lucky in
spades, and it looks as though you also need
the heart finesse to win. However, a quick peek
at the diagram shows that it is losing. There is a
solution, which is hard to spot if you have not
seen the theme before.
The best play is to ruff a diamond in your
hand at trick two. Then cash the spade ace,
play a club to the queen, ruff another diamond,
return to dummy with a club, trump the last di-
amond, and cash the club ace. With the minors
eliminated, exit with a trump.
Here, East wins and must play a heart away
from the queen. But if East had the last club,
you would ruff and still have the heart finesse
available.


- r


North 03-28-13
J 10 3
VAJ2
A852
KQ3
West East
464 4KQ
S10 9 7 V Q 6 5 3
* KQJ9 10 764
7 6 5 2 S984
South
A9 8 7 5 2
V K84
*3
SA J 10

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South
South West North East
14 Pass 2 Pass
2 Pass 4 NT Pass
5 V Pass 64 All pass

Opening lead: K


111


THURSDAY, MARCH 28,2013 3BF


ENTE BTfINMENT








4B Thursday, March 28, 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLAC


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or,(800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
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Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their'ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or 'r a typo.gra, c ph.cr or r E jr, -. putl;:.-ci;.:i eacejl ic. tr.e ier of inie cost -i r.ie ad foi me fist a.r-
Insertion. Adjustment for errprs is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall r.ol t aiae or aT..r daea, a3s.r~g ,.-.uI f e. -. r, rtierrE~nt bec.-nd i n am3'run pa.. h-.r [rhe spac
actually occupied by that portion of theadvertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publishers employees or otnermie. an,. more rsr,atii be no liaD1,il, ir n.:rn- ,ni er, n of any ad ert.'emnr,! be yond tni arrouunl paid lor
such advertisement. DisplayAds are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, c.ncci or ciass.y jll ards murder the aporirpr.ile. cla fr..ai.or

F orIdeadlinecalolfeoviiwwjo


Key West Fordia
April 23-29, 2013 -
Washington DC/Patriotic Tour
June 27-July 2, 2013
Ride The Rails (West Virginia)
July 22-26, 2013
Best of China (Beijing City)
October 15-23 2013




HUGE Yard Sale, Sat 8-12, 2810 Mcpherson St.
Next door to Master's Academy. Furniture,
quality clothing, shoes, glassware, H/H items,
books, and lots more. Rain or Shine.

... .








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Equipment, training and 60K
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AC: Complete package unit $500. 850-272-8470
Barbies,collectables in box. $ 100. 850-592-2881
Battery charger: 200 amps $100. 850-482-2636
Camera Olympus 600UZ, $149,850-482-7665


(if)MERCHANDISE
SS..,.. .. :

Wedding Gown: Size 5/6, floor length, candle-
light dress and veil made with antique lace and
beading. Strapless with a built in corset, but
can be worn with crossing straps (included) for
more modest look. Original cost of both veil
and dress were $1025 asking $575. Has been
cleaned and is in perfect condition. Will gladly
email pictures. 334-692-3536, Rachel

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Brunswick Pool Table: Beautiful, Traditional
Ball & Claw, Bar Size Table with Custom Tan
Felt; dark mahogany wood; with 6 pool sticks
of different weights, caulk; a wooden stick/
accessory holder that is round and sits on the
floor; a ball set; both racks (8 ball & regular);
several felt brushes, etc. Original Price was
around $3,000. Selling for $700, 334-685-2898
Hydraulic styling chairs (3) w/ chrome $400.
ea. (2) platform dryer chairs w/ Venus hair
dryers $300. ea. Lg. Plants, dumb cane, peace
lily & Chinese evergreen $20-S40.334-268-0119
Manitowac 2501b Ice Machine $1350. Delfield
Commercial 2dr. stainless steel freezer $2500.
Solid oak kitchen tbl. 8 chairs $875. Whirlpool
stainless fride lyr. warr. $750. 334-714-6305

PETS & ANIMALS

CFA Registered (3) Persian Himalayan
Blue Point Kittens. Born 1-16 and ready
for their new homes. $250. $350.
Call 334-774-2700 After lOam
FREE: Kittens to loving home. multi-colorl-F &
1-M 850-272-4908 or 850-482-5880
I I.


AKC Brittany Spaniels Orange/White. 4 males
and 4 females. Excellent hunting blood line.
(Nolan's Last Bullett). Tails docked and dew
claws have been removed. Will be Ready on
March 29th. Call (229) 724-8839 if interested.
4 AKC Rottweiler puppies (6) 2-F- 4-M
Ready April 3rd, deposit to hold.
| $500. 334-794-2291


Guitar Alvarez 70's 12 string $150. 850-482-6022
Guitar Dean Elec.& acoustic $200. 850-482-6022.
Prom Dress: size 6 $175. 850-482-2636
Window: New 29x30 White $100. 850-482-2636


SUPER PUPPET SALE! Chihuahua,
SShih-Tzu mix puppies and Morkles.
Now taking deposit on Papillions.
334-718-4886 plynn@sw.rr.com




GRASS & MILK FED BEEF!!
Freezer Ready Esto meat
GREAT QUALITY!!
Quarters and Halves. USDA Inspected
ESTO MEATS- CALL 650-263-7777

FREHPODUCE


850-573-6594


Frozen Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
4 4128 Hwy 231


r................................ i
:- Bahia seed for sale 4-
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
S experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L................................j
-S Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418

Quality Coastal Hay; Large Rolls
Fertiized & Weed Control
.,o 850-209-9145 4,


Cattle: 30 bred cows 3 to 7 years old and
50 bred heifers for sale. Most are Angus and
IBrangus cross with a few Charolais cross.
For more information call 334-303-9285.


m


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
N trac to small / CusoTflhinng
Call Pea River Timber
.4 334-389-2003
C ._ ----'--,. N - M -


Spdoku


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


level: f -2] 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Wednesday's puzzle

8 4 3 9 6 7 2 1 5
196253748
725841963
564732891
987614532
3 1 2 5 8 9 6 7 4
2 7 1,3 9 8 4 5 6
45 9 1 2 6 3. 8 7
638475129


3/28/13


( )MILOYMENT




ICE RIVER
ISS_ N ,S:
www.icerversprings.com
Ice River Springs takes great pride in
producing the highest quality spring water
in North America from our protected natural
springs. We are currently requesting
applicants for the following position in our
Marianna Florida facility:
Industrial Maintenance
Technician
We Offer:
Excellent Wages
Biweekly bonuses
Monthly efficiency bonuses
Company Benefits
Clean & Safe Work Environment
Blow molding or bottling experience
preferred and prior industrial.
Maintenance experience.
Qualified candidates are invited to submit
their resum6's to:
hrmarianna@iceriversprings.com
We thank all applicants; however only those
selected for an Interview will be contacted.
Ice River Springs is an
equal opportunity employer.

RA N O A


AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-
MINDED, NEWSPAPER CARRIERS

COTTONDALE
Earn an average of

$850
per month

Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus

BE YOUR OWN BOSS 1 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL




SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELOR
We are looking for a counselor who wants to
make a difference in the lives of our clients.
Counselor duties include providing
substance abuse treatment including
psychosocial evaluation, treatment
planning, individual, and group counseling.
CARE is one of Florida's leading substance
abuse agencies, and we have been providing
services to our community for over 35 years
and we have an opening at our Jackson
County office. Potential counselors must
have strong counseling skills, and the ability
to communicate and document substance
abuse treatment modalities.
Bachelors Degree required, Masters Degree
preferred. Salary range $26,893 $34.406
D.O.E. + FULL BENEFITS PACKAGE
(including 15 days vacation, 15 day sick
leave, 10 paid holidays, health & dental
insurance, retirement program with 401K
option and more).
Send resume and cover letter to CARE,
Attn: Delbert Horton, 4000 E. 3rd St.,
Panama City, Fla. 32404
EEO/DFWP/Drug Screening.


p 1 A Fast, easy, no pressure
P le an A d 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


7 4 6 5


--- --- -
9 5 2

4 9 3 2




9 4 8 1 5
------ -
2 3 8

3 6 1 14

-9- -


___


PILACEO ANAi


AdetsPor-CO TF"frFE yvstn w~clrdncm e iefrdtis


www..TCFLORIDAN.com


5









www.JCFLORIDAN.com -


TRINITY SERVICES
GROUP, INC.


Food Production Worker
For Gadsden Correctional Facility in Tallahassee. 1 year
food service experience. Will coordinate, instruct and
direct inmates in the production and serving of meals
and participate in the preparation of large volume
cooking in corrections institution setting.

Call Trinity Services Group at
850-875-9701 x 2260 or email resume to:
23097Gadsden@trinityservicesgroup.com
Must be able to successfully pass o background check, DFW E/EOE

GENERAL EMPLOYMENTz "


BE YOUR
OWN BOSS

These days being retired doesn't mean
sitting at home doing nothing.

A newspaper route is the perfect way to
supplement your income with only a small
investment of time and big returns in
community service to your own neighbors.

Come by and inquire today about a
newspaper route in your neighborhood.



F CORiIDAN
4403 Constitution Lane Marianna, FL 32446


[89)


EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


LOOK
FOLLOW YOUR PASSION! Become a Daycare
Director 6 wk. Homestudy Course $300.
Call Mrs. Alaina 334-714-4942 9am 5pm


Enrolling Now!
'Training in
FOR TIS ElectricalTrades,
FRiTIS Medical .
COLLEGE Assisting,Pharmacy
Technology and More!
Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 for consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

C/N. RESIDENTIAL
SILlJ REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


COTTONDALE VILLA
APARTMENTS
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR 1 & 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS RENTAL
Assistance Available to Quailified Appliants
CALL: (850) 352-2281
TDD USERS 1-800-548-2456
Office Opened Tuesday & Thursday
EQUAL HOUSING 3111 Willow St.
OPPORTUNITY Cottondale, FL 32431

,oUAtZ HO6,SIG 0ORTUrM-


GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL Call 850-482-4663

EQUAL HOUSING OP UWflY


2/2 3136 Aycock Rd. 900 sq. ft. washer/dryer,
flat screen TV's $650. mo. $650. dep. utilities,
dish, garbage water & sewage w/pool
(Appointment Only) 850-352-2951850-573-1864


4 1BR/1BA, nice clean apt in town screened
porch, large yard $450. mo.
No pets. 850-557-2000 for more info.

NicN i


1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
a 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
= 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Large 2BR Cottage Home Completely Updated
with family room. 5 minutes from town off 73
North. Big fenced yard and all electric. $550.
Mo + Dep. Call 765-425-5288

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
850-209-8847 4
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

S2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595 i




mO 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 Located between
Grand Ridge & Sneads. Includes water &
garbage. $360. Mo n 850-573-0308 4
S" RESIDENTIAL
Vl REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Poultry Farm for Sale 4 houses, Poultry farm
and'5000 sf residence, 2 car garage, 64 acre,
U.S. Hwy. frontage, huge barn, generator, Trac-
tor, farming equipment, $1,100,000 for more in-
fo. Kaan 334-596-8311

|^Q RECREATION


SEagle 2010 190 Yamaha
150 G3 bassboat
4-stroke warr 2014
a LI' Humminbird 788ci, 2
6 chairs, 2 butt seats, galv
trailer, hydraulic steering, many extras,
$18,500. Call 334-616-1918 or 334-355-0326
FACOR DIEC


Xtreme
Boats
wv


Packages From
$4,995
All Welded
All Aluminum Boats
ew.wtremeindustries.com


. 0...0 ... . .. . . .

Triton '07188SF Fish and Ski: Mercury Optimax
150HP, 24 volt trolling motor, trailer included,
garage kept, like new conditions, less than
150 hours, $19,000. Call 334-685-3921

Fleetwood 1997 35ft Bounder: 1 slide-out, back-
up camera, leveling jacks, generator, low miles
39k, run goods, new tires. $17,500. OBO
Call 850-482-7554. or 850-209-3495


5 4


BUSINESSES
& SERVICES


Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Senior Citizens Discount
FREE ESTIMATES 334-798-0687













ClEay O'Neal's EKE EPIN
Land Clearing Inc. gSe iufm ;

850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055 2eWoE




NEW& USED TIRE
NEW TIRES BELBW RETAIL PBICESI I
TRIPLE 850.526.1700
T-- -, Hours: Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 7-1
J 2978 Pierce Street
'(behind Tim's Florist)


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


Jackson County Floridan *


(S) TRANSFPORTATION-'


BMW 1995, leather int. good gas mil. green in
color, 4-door $3,200. firm 334-793-2347
BMW 2005 X3 white with tan interior, 165,000
miles, V6, auto, excellent condition, full sun-
roof. $10,000, 850-263-4913
CHEVY 1995 CAPRICE-Clean, runs great, cold
air, fully loaded $3,800 OBO 334-355-1085
Chevy 2010 Impala, Great family car with great
fuel mileage, fully loaded. $300 down $300 per
month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.
i Corvette 2003 Z06 50th
-Anniversary Edition
Metallic Blue 6 speed, 405
hp. 40.500 miles, Excellent
Condition $19,195.
334-475-3735 after 6PM
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
GOT BAD CREDIT?
Pass Repo pass bankruptcy slow credit ok
$0 Down/ist Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull or Drag will trade
RIDE TODAY! FREE $25. gas giveaway
Call Steve Pope 334-803-9550
.Ford 1985 Mustang White, good condition, all
original parts. 90,951 miles. Call 334-494-0837
or email bccolwell2@aol.com
Mitsubishi 2004 Eclipse De-
pendable, one owner, great
gas mileage, sunroof, few mi-
nor blemishes, 120,000 mi,
Automatic. Asking $6,000.
Will take best offer. Call Jen-
nifer at 334-791-0143
Mitsubishi 2012 Galant, Like new! Must sell!
$200 down, $259 per month. Call Ron Ellis 334-
714-0028.
Nissan 2010 Sentra, Navigation, Leather, Sun
roof, Must sell! $200 down, $249 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Toyota 2011 Yaris: silver with black interior, 4
door sedan, bucket seats, one owner, automat-
ic, 5980 miles, 40MPG Hwy, $13,995. Call or
Text 334-618-6588 LIKE NEW !!
Toyota 2012 Corolla, Great gas saver, fully
loaded, low miles, very nice car. $200 down,
$250 per month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.

Harley Davidson 2000 Ultra Classic Tour Glide:
loaded plus extras, blue and silver, only 8500
miles, new tires. $8,300. Call 334-585-5396
Harley-Davidson 2003 Fat Boy 2003 100th An-
niversary Edition Harley Davidson Fat Boy.
Turquoise and navy with gold inlay custom
paint. $8,000 in chrome added to the bike. Al-
so comes with the original tank and fender,
which is gray blue, motorcycle lift, touring bag,
custom cleaning kit, many extras and special
tools! Call 334-494-0837 or email
bccolwell2@aol.com
Harley Davidson 2006 Soft tail Standard:
4600 miles, vinson/haines pipes, 250 rear
wheel, bronze pearl, lots of chrome, 25K
invested. Asking $10,000. Firm. 334-793-3611
Harley Davidson 2007 Heritage Softtail Classic
exc. cond, new tires, new battery,
lots of chrome $12,500.
334-712-0493 or w-334-793-8028
Harley Davidson 2008 Sportster XL1200: 6740
miles, with trailer. $5,000. OBO. Call 850-258-
3148
SHonda 2005 VTX 1300-R
Nicest one in Alabama,
SToo much chrome to list.
.. $9,500. Ken 334-693-9360


Lawn Care &
Outdoor Property
Maintenance
I* Free Estimates
Call Woody 850-526-2030


Chad O's Lawn F/X
SCommercial& Residential I
Spring Clean-up &
Monthly Maintenance
Full Lawn Care Service /
G Free Estimates
Family Owned & Operated
Chad Oliver | 850-573-7279
HOMEI MPRO: I h Vl I

HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME



"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured


Thursday, March 28, 2013- 5 B


Honda 2005 VT 1100C
Shadow Spirit: black and
chrome, good condition,
like new, 3400 miles, one
owner, clean title never
wrecked, new tires.
Asking $6,300. Call 334-596-1171

4000 Ford Tractor good condition, new engine
$4,250. 334-791-0700
Chevrolet Silverado IS,
step side, ext cab, 4
door, V-8, automatic,
loaded, tool box, side
steps, 134,850 miles, like
new, $9995. Call 334-790-7959.
Dodge 2000 Dakota RT: black, fully loaded, 5.9
liter 360 Magnum, Bridgestone tires, beautiful
and rare truck, pampered and well kept, runs
and drives excellent & clean carfax available.
Serious!inquiries only. $7,200. Call 334-585-0121
Please leave a message.
Ford 2003 Ranger Edge ext cab good condition
89K miles, $5,900. 334-446-0044 Susan
Ford 2010 F250 Super Duty Super Cab Lariat:
white, full loaded, 4X4, low miles, excellent
condition $37,500. Call 334-685-2318
GMC 1986 2500 Series: 4 door, 2 sweater but no
back seat, 8 cyl, 91k miles, one owner, garage
kept, very good condition. $3,800. Call 334-792-
3756
International 1995 4900: Flat Bed Truck, DT466,
AC, 125k miles. $6,000. Call 334-897-6346 or
334-406-7200
John Deere 1981 Backhoe and Gooseneck
20ft Trailer: $6,000. Call 334-714-0586
Massey Ferguson Tractor md#1215 w/MF220 \
5 ft. mowet, good cond. $6700. 334-797-8523.
Nissan 2000 Frontier ext. cab 2-wheel drive,
auto, 104K miles, $5500. OBO 334-726-1215.
Toyota 1994 Tacoma 4-wheel drive as whole or
parts. 334-689-9436.


s CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664

Got a Clunker
: We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325 & Complete Cars
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285


Sell Your
.0.


In The Classifieds


You CALL... WE COME TO You!
RED'S MOBILE
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE
.. 850-209-9713 '
EDWARD, MAGGI, OWNER

SELFST;OAlGE


BESTWAY
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
La-EST MAinCTIIuRE or PORTAKuE BulDkINGS II NnOITI FrIRAI

HAVE
OVER
DIFFERENT SIZES!
YOU CAN CHOOSE
COLOR & STYLE.
BUIL N1'iTEP 850-747-8974


nw 26o Pa C


iri I Grooming by (T
A .m* m Appointment Only
Groomere/Styliete
Lisa Shores & Tammy Martabano
"o Y' ViOft u5 OM-nline at ogntn tnt
fr pncin & to hool your appointunntr oyf


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAN-

jcfloridan.com



-monsrer

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


CLASSIFIED


r-


L-








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


QUESTIONS & ATTITUDE
Compelling questions ...
and maybe a few actual answers


SPEED FREAKS
A couple of questions we
just had to ask ourselvesO U B LE S


News-Journal/NIGEL COOK
When Tony has this look on his
face, the best advice is turn
and go the other way;
In terms of the angry
Tony Stewart, where does his,
Sunday blowup rank?
GODSPEAK: 'Smoke' lost
his cool but didn't completely
blow a gasket because he
didn't trail a line of oil into the
garage area.
KEN'S CALL: He usually
only gets that mad when the
kid at the White Castle drive-
thru says, "Sorry, sir, but it'll be
a few minutes on your bag of
burgers'

Anyone to blame
at Fontana, or just old-
fashioned racin' deals?
GODSPEAK: It sure looked#
ilie two guys racing for the
win, and Stewart's po'st-ra,:e
tantrum shows he is sill very
passionate about the sport.
KEN'S CALL: Good ol' give
and tal'e But by now no traci,
owner should leave any wall
without a SAFER barrier.

ONLINE EXTRAS

Snews-journalonline.
com/nascar

facebook.com/
nascardaytona

@nascardaytona

D'. vi h ioe quei lii n or com-
-i;eni: j-,:,ul I 1, Ji, t P
This Week? Contact Godwin
Kelly at'godwin.kelly@news-jrnl.
corn :,r i Wv ilii t iaern.w;iiii;4
news-irnri ,:n


WHAT'S ON TAP?
SPRINT CUP
APRIL 7: STP Gas Booster
500, Martinsville Speedway
APRIL 13: N lRA 500 Teas
Motor Speedway
NATIONWIDE
APRIL 12: 0 Reilly Auto Parts
300, Te-as Motor Speedway
APRIL 26: ToyotaCare 250,
Richmond International
Raceway


It lo6ks as if the "new" Joey Logano has become a
lightning rod (or punching bag?) among his fellow Sprint Ci
competitors. The Ford driver has a running feud with forme
Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Denny Hamlin, and on Sunday
he made a new steering-wheel enemy in Tony Stewart.
Logano and Hamlin tangled at Phoenix and Bristol and
then again on the final lap of Sunday's race in Fontana, Cal
Naturally, they crashed and Hamlin got the worst of it. Harr
finished 25th and was airlifted to the hospital, complaining
lower back pain. Logano limped across the line third.
After emerging from his car, Logano was bull-rushed by
Tony Stewart, who was upset at Logano for throwing a bloc
on the final restart. Logano was standing next to his
car when Stewart thrust himself into the crowd
around Logano and tried to throw a punch
at the 22-year-old driver.
Stewart gave a profanity-laced
interview to Fox, and Logano said he
was just colng what he ri-eed i:, do
in order to win the race.
This rrear: mrore trout ,ule ior
Logano. Stewart mjrade thl :ubtllE IhreI
via his pLblic relation_ teajn. For i u,
that has been complaFining about how "
everybody el:.e ii driving here rand then
(for) him t:, d:o Ihat I a; aJ double standard.
He makes the ,:hO:l:'e. He malis r he
decision to run u d':Iowrn there.
and when v':,u run.
driverdon trher, .
then you t.j)e
responsibility 1 ',r
what happer.ns
after that.'


Kyle keeps climbing
up The wins have slowed, but the goal is still the same for
*r Kyle Busch. The 27-year-old driver swept the Nationwide
, Series and Cup races at Auto Club Speedway and moved
two steps closer to his goal of 200 national series
victories.
if. Right now, the count is 24 Cup, 54 Nationwide and 30
ilin Camping World Truck Series victories -108 total. He tops
of the chart in all-time Nationwide wins and continues to gap
Mark Martin's 49-victory effort.
"You work hard, and you give it all you can," Busch said,
k adding at the end of the.race he "got up on that wheel" to
catch and pass Sam Hornish Jr. in the Nationwide race in
California.

Finch powerhouse
Car owner James Finch has used three
drivers in five Cup races this season'in his No.
51 Chevy and linds htini.elfi in a strange position
ninth in ther owner poinr i
Fir':nh vily.: ill: Panjra ia Cit' Fla. home,
has errplo:yed the -r',:ies :i dJrver. AJ
Allmerndnger. Au.uiln Dill:rnand Pe:anr Smith,
whO hoa :,-:,wred Ithe teanm'. ':nlv I-p. 10 tnish this

0( ,'ourse. I will be diiCiult Ic keep this
niomentum going., since Phoenix
PRacing i: a tiny operation,
btl as i last i t shows
there is still a place
tfor a one-horse
,)peration in the
Cup Seriles.


Tony may be wearnig 3 hsh.
ing logo, but h es, now on
the huntfo-r punl v drivers
News-Journal PETER BAUER


'GODWIN'S EARLY MARTINSVILLE PICKS


Godwin Kelly is the Davioyia
Beach r lews,.ournal's motor
sports editor and ha.;: covered
rJASCAR lr 30 years Reji:h hini
at gudwin.kellyi'rnew-lrrinl.:omn


WINNER: Clint Bowyer
REST OF THE TOP FIVE: Brad
'.eselowskil. Jinlmie Johnson, Jeft
Gordon, Ryan Nlewman
DARK HORSE: Kurl Busch
BIGGEST DISAPPOINTMENT:


Danica Patrick
FIRST ONE OUT: Joey Logano
DON'T BE SURPRISED IF: There is
excessive beating and banging on
NASCAR's slowest track. Several
scores will be 'etiled


,...--..- / r)
rI :.uurn.il DAVID MASSEY
It's hard toc tell Joey's mad lace Irom his deer-in-
the-headlights look.

What were the odds that it'd be Joey Logano
coming to NASCAR's rescue?
There are some things Vegas doesn't bother
pulling on the board. This is one of 'em Nobody
('JOBOD'r) could've suspected it'd be Joey
Logano who'd get everyone (EVERYONE) talking
about racing again Monday morning at work.
And I mean everyone from Ed in maintenance,
who runs your weei iy race pool, to Agnes in
accounts payable, who doesn't know Matt
Kenseth from a monkey wrench.

Do we choose sides
or just enjoy the spectacle?
For now, it might be best to continue sorting
it out and wondering where it'll go ne,.t We
have, after all, now introduced the two elements
no one at a racetrack: wants to see: A hospital
airlift and an angry Tony Stewart OK. we take
back hall ol Ih3t There are few thing; more
enjoyable than. an angry Tony Stewart.

Now what?
Not many years ago, everything NASCAR
touched turned into some sort of payoff whether
it was inlenlhnal or not. But nothing is easy or
automatic anymore, so it's no surprise that Ihi:
all happened or the cusp of the oft-wee' for
Easter This is the type of thing IlASCAR and the :
networks could milk heavily through the week, but
instead we're getting Easter, which will certainly put
everyone at peace, right? Right?

NASCAR for The Daytona Beach '"
News-Journal for 27 years. Reach .
him at ken.willis@news-jrnl.com ;



FEUD OF THE WEEK





a .


LOGANO STEWART
Joey Logano vs. Tony Stewart: Stewart rushed
to Logano's car after the California race to relate
his feelings about a blocking incident, then threw
a punch

Godwin Kelly gives his take: "It sure looks like
Stewart is at lighting weight Logano better watch
out."


SPRINT CUP
POINTS STANDINGS
matterr Auto Club. Race 5 of 36)


Driver
Dale Earnhardt Jr.
Brad Keselows i
Jimmie Johnson
Carl Edwards
Greg Biffle
Kyle Busch
Kasey Kahne
Paul Menard
Joey Logano
Denny Hamlin'
Matt Kenseth
Ricky Stenhouse Jr.
Kurt Busch
Clint Bowyer
Kevin Harvick
Jamie McMurray
Aric Almirola
Jeff Gordon
Martin Truex Jr.
Ryan Newman
Casey Mears
Tony Stewart
Marcos Ambrose
Jeff Burton
Mark Martin


Pnts
199
-12
-16
-35
-35
36
-40
-45
-53
-54
-58
-60
-62
-62
-69
-74
-74
-76
-77
-78
-81
-91
-92
-94
-97


16B ,, THURSDAY. MARCH 28, 2013


AUTO RACING