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Jackson County Floridan ( March 22, 2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
March 22, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01043

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
March 22, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01043

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text





Peace is possible, Obama
insists in Middle East 8A


Chipola's Lady Indians
tourney run ends 1B


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


* ;' "* ::. ... '





OF FLORIDA HISTORY
117007
'ILLE FL 32611-7007


,,#i


~9l
-'1


Vol.90 No.69



Weekend plan Watch the weather


Storms possible Saturday, Sunday


From.staff reports

The Jackson County _Emer-
gency Management Agency is-
sued a warning Thursday about
the possibility of severe weath-
er coming through our area
this weekend.
A strong storm system is ex-


pected to move eastward across
the central plains on Friday
evening. As the systeri ad-
vances eastward, a warm front
will lift quickly northward
across the Gulf Coast states,
leading to a widespread area of
showers and thunderstorms by
Saturday morning.


JCEM says that while the
potential for severe weather
Saturday morning will be low,
the threat is predicted to in-
crease by the afternoon, as the
warm front moves further
inland.
By mid-morning Sunday, the
threat for severe weather (and
storms) will come to an end, as
a cold front sweeps across the
region.


With these storms comes a
chance for isolated tornadoes
(especially Saturday afternoon
and evening), damaging winds
and large hail.
Emergency Management also
reports that the system appears
to have better potential for
severe weather than previ-
ous storm systems this spring,
but despite the potential for
heavy rainfall, the overall


duration of the system (ex-
pected to be around 24
hours) decreases the threat
for a sustained heavy rainfall
event.
Locally heavy rainfall is possi-
ble with widespread 2-inch rain-
fall amounts and isolated 4-inch
maximum totals.
Jackson County Emergency
management will continue to
closely monitor the system.


BATLI.NG TO THE BRINK





Rock'em, sock'em i. -


I1


Veronica Peacock from Cottondale High
School test TIFTI's grabbing ability before
the start of the competition.


S1PHOTOS BY MARK KINNER/FLORIDAN
Twisted Metal from Holmes County High School and Megatron from Ponce De Leon square off over a ping-pong ball Thursday morning.


Robotics competition draws area high-schoolers


BY MARK SKINNER
mskinner@jcfloridan.com
A small army of robots descended on
the old Marianna High School gym Thurs-
day morning, ready to do battle with each
other, and the occasional stray cellphone
and Wi-Fi signal.
It wasn't a dramatic pre-enactment of
the Terminator, but the annual robotics
competition organized by the Chipola
Regional Workforce Development Board.
This year's event featured 14 teams, rep-
resenting Cottondale and Marianna high
schools, as well five other schools in the
surrounding Chipola Workforce region.


Each team had to build a radio-con-
trolled robot, with only a.general idea of
what task it would be expected to per-
form, and then customize it when they
got to the event. According to Workforce
Executive Director Richard Williams, the
robots that are brought to the compe-
tition are often very different from the
robots that finish the event.
This year the robots were placed in a
fenced-off area with ping-pong and ten-
nis balls, as well as a football and tiny soc-
cer ball. Teams were scored by how many
of the different balls their robot could
move from one section to another. For


more points the robots could pick up a
ball and drop it in a plastic pipe.
Some of the robotic creations sinl-
ply pushed the balls, while'others were
equipped with a cranes, grippers or lifts
that hopefully could pick up them up. But
the seemingly simple task often proved
difficult.
In addition to the pressure of making
last-minute modifications to their robots,
the students had to deal with some un-
invited guests: stray cellphone and Wi-Fi
signals that interfered with the robot's re-
mote control systems and sent them off
in unintended directions.


Wendy Singleton from Cottondale High
School tests "Sheila's" remote control before
the competition.

INSIDE
See more photo of the robotics
competition. 7A


Winners at this year's competition
included:
Robotics Competition Winners
First Place: Tech No Logic, Holmes
County High School
Second Place: Wolverines, Chipley High
School
SThird Place: The Avengers, Cottondale
High School

See ROBOTICS, Page 7A


National Poison Prevention Week March 17-23

Regional center answers questions for free


From staff reports

The Florida/USVI Poison In-
formation Center Jacksonville
joins poison centers around the
nation in celebrating National
Poison Prevention Week from
March 17-23.
Since 1962, the President of the
United States has proclaimed the
third week of March as National
Poison Prevention Week to raise


SCLA'-.' FIEl:;...5-7B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7 651 1 8110 0 9
S65161 80050


awareness about the dangers
of poisoning. On average, the
nation's 57 poison centers re-
ceive one call concerning a sus-
pected or actual human poison
exposure every 12.7 seconds.
Centers aim to safeguard
Americans' health and well-be-
ing through poison prevention
and free, confidential, expert
medical services.
"Our health professionals


) ENTERTAINMENT...4B


> LOCAL...3A


respond to calls 24.hours a day,
seven days a week to those who
have been exposed to a poison.
We also provide free informa-
tion to the community about
how poisonings occur and ways
to prevent them. Prevention is
the best possible medicine,"
said Debi Forrest, RN, CSPI,
education coordinator.

See POISON, Page 7A
0 OBITUARIES...7A.


..__ -.. -- .' --* --. r- -' -.'* .. r .. ..- .- -_ -.-


Follow us





Facebook Twitter


Springtime Poison

Prevention Tips
Cleaning agents, insecticides, gardening
supplies, plants
Common household cleaning products are the No. 1 cause of
accidental poisoning in children.
Many chemicals used to control insects, rodents and weeds
are as toxic to humans as they are to their intended vic-
tims. When ingested or inhaled in very small amounts, most
are capable of producing illness.

See TIPS, Page 7A


> STATE...7A


> SPORTS...1B


) NATION...8A


Take it on the Run -



Email Alerts, Mobile Alerts and RSS Feeds subscriptions are FREE
Home Delivery plus Unlimited Online $11.23 per mo


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12 A FRIDAY, MARCH 22. 2013


Weather Outlook


Partly Cloudy. Mild. Possible Shower.
Today
Justin Kiefer/ VMBB


'A N Hih 67 -
~a~, .,' Low 57


High 760
Low 610

Saturday
Scattered Showers & Storms.


1"0~1


High 66.
Low 42


Monday
Sunny & Much Cooler.


',* High- 82
Low 47"


Sunday
Clearing. Breezy. Very Warm.



-' High 67'
j Low- 420


Tuesday
Mostly Sunny & Mild.


WAKE-UP CALL




' i High: 65
Low: %6


Low: 60


PRECIPITATION


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe.
Destin
Pensacola


0.00"
2.34"
3.91"


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


)ear t,:, JdAle
N.mr Idl ITD
Normal for year


4:00AM
7:56 PM
4:05 AM
5:16AM
5:50 AM


High
High
High
High
High


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


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H igh : 65 "La w"
.,1 Fh ni. a mu $ ,, ,- -i--
Lo: 57 High: 67
', Low::56

'7 r " ' : '- 'c '
High: 67 -
>-- Low: 57 -' '

-^ V s s ".'- .. .. .. .' :' '_. -$ -.,
', -- .. '-- L o : s 57 .' "--.
;. Hgh:-68 .. : :
j Lovi: 60 .. -

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54.2 '
59.26,


6:36 PM
2:37 PM
7:09 PM
7:42 PM
8:15 PM


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme


0 1 2 3 4 5.


THE SUN AND MOON


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Reading
50.30 ft.
Missing
10.84 ft.
9.01 ft.
\


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:42 AM
6:54 PM
3:25 AM
9:22 PM


Apr. Mar. Mar. Apr.
10 19 27 3


FLORIDA'S RE

PANHANDLE JACUNTR

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9
I STEF R OU]oi R UDIISiJj I


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JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

SCirculation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and.7 a.m. to 11a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly acceptor
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Fi.:ri.jn ..ill publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


TODAY
Folk Life Days 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Pan-
handle Pioneer Settlement located inside Sam
Atkins Park off of Hwy. 20 in Blountstown. Admis-
sion is $3. There will be various home life and life
on the farm demonstrations, music, donkeys and
hayrides. Call 674-2777.
) Small Business Seminar "What the Veterans'
Business Outreach Center Can Do for You"
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in Room M-108 of the
Chipola Business and Technology building.Semi-
nar is free. The seminar will help create, develop
and re-train veteran-owned business enterprises.
Call 718-2441 or email seversone@chipola.edu.
) Knitters Nook -10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting Cer-
emony -11:30 a.m. at Jackson County Habitat for
Humanity Restore; 4736 Highway 90 in Marianna.
Lunch will be provided by First Commerce Credit
Union. A silent auction will begin at the Grand
Opening Ceremony and end at 12 noon on
Saturday, March 23.
) Money Sense Class Noon-4 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway
90, Marianna. Money Sense is a class that covers
different topics in money management to empower
people to take charge of their finances and create
their own wealth. Call 526-0139.
Music in Our Schools Month Performance
2 p.m. at Riverside Elementary School in the
Multi-Purpose Room.The Music Department,
under the direction of Flora Davis, will highlight
the sound of nearly 700 students. Music in Our
Schools Month is a month-long event during March
that aims to draw attention to the significance of
music education in schools and community and is
recognized and sponsored by the National Associa-
tion for Music Education. Parents and guests are
invited to attend.
) Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser for Bascom
School Renovation Project 4-7 p.m. at Bascom
Town Hall. $6 per plate, dine in or carry ou4. Menu
Swill include spaghetti, green salad, bread AId des-
sert. For reservations and orders call 569-1128.
Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Wor-
ship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna.
Adult, teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits
and hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child c ar.- ,. iii. ,iile
Call 209-7856, 573-1131.


Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United '.Im,-.i:d: I
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, MARCH 23
a Jackson County Master Gardeners Sixth
Annual Plant Sale and Garden Fair -7 a.m. to
2 p.m. at the Jackson County Extension Service,
2741 Pennsylvania Ave., Marianna. Call 209-5942.
Folk Life Days 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Pan-
handle Pioneer Settlement located inside Sam
Atkins Park off of Hwy. 20 in Blountstown. Admis-
sion is $3. There will be various home life and life
on the farm demonstrations, music, donkeys and
hayrides. Call 674-2777
) Alford Community Health Clinic Hours 10
a.m. until last patient is seen, at 1770 Carolina St.-in
Alford. The free clinic for income-eligible patients
without medical insurance treats short-term
In Ir,, -.: jnj chronic conditions. Appointments
available (call 263-7106 or 209-5501,. i11 -n:
welcome. Sign in before noon.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SUNDAY, MARCH 24
13th Annual Miss Tri-City Pageant 2 p.m.
in the Blountstown Middle School Auditorium
(former high school). Admission fee is $5.Benefit-
ting Special Olympics of Florida/Jackson County.
Call 762-4561 or 209-0641; or email misstricity@
yahoo.com.
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
, (in one-story building behind 4351W. Lafayette
St.). Attendance limited to persons with a desire to
stop drinking.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in the
board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.


MONDAY, MARCH 25
"5 Steps to Rapid Employment"Workshop
-9 a.m. to noon at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
) Marianna Lions Club Meeting Noon at Jim's
Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2005.


Employability Workshop, 12 Keys to Success
- 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
a Marianna/FPU Public Information Forum
-J4-6:30 p.m. at the Marianna City Hall Commis-
sion Room, located at 2898 Green St. The city of
Marianna encourages all city residents to attend
an informational session jl:.iut i 'e April 9 Florida
Public Utilities purchase referendum. Additional
sessions are scheduled. Call 482-4353.
) Jackson County Quilter's Guild Meeting
- 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 US'90 West, Marianna. Business meetings are
fourth Mondays; other Monays are for projects,
lessons, help. Al quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
) Model Approach to Partnership in Parenting
Course 6-9 p.m. at 4403 Jackson Street, Mari-
anna. Course is free and is designed to promote
partnerships in parenting and help the licensing
agency and prospective foster and adopting par-
ents mutually decide on the best parenting path for
their family. Course is a requirement by the state
of Florida for those interested in becoming a foster
parent or adopting. Call 522-4485, ext. 8404 or
kpeek@lmccares.org.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, MARCH 26
) Orientation -12-3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
Sewing.Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County
Senior Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna.
Call 482-5028.
) Employability Workshop, Job Search Eti-
quette 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop
Career Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call
718-0326.
Marianna/FPU Public Information Forum
S- 4-6:30 p.m. at the Marianna City Hall Commis-
sion Room, located at 2898 Green St. The City of
Marianna encourages all city residents to attend
an informational session about the April 9 Florida
Public Utilities purchase referendum. Additional
sessions are scheduled. Call 482-4353.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring item's to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police Depart-
ment listed the following inci-
dents for March 20, the latest
available report: One reckless
driver, one suspicious vehicle,
one funeral escort, two distur-
bances (verbal), one fire/police
response, one burglary alarm,
two traffic stops, one criminal
mischief, two trespass reports,
one obscene/threatening call,
one juvenile complaint, one
assault, one fight in progress,
one assist other agency, one
public service call and one
finger printing.

Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following


incidents for March 20, the
latest available report: One
accident with
injury, two
abandoned
vehicles, oie CRIME
reckless driver, -___
three suspi-
cious vehicles, one suspicious
person, five information
reports, two funeral escorts,
two mental illness calls, one
disturbance (physical), two
disturbance (verbal) calls, one
hitchhiker/pedestrian, one fire
(single residence), 17 medical
calls, one traffic crash, five bur-
glary alarms, one panic alarm,
16 traffic stops, one larceny,
one criminal mischief, four
calls to serve papers/ex partee,
one civil dispute, three follow-
up investigations, one juvenile
complaint, one assault, one
assisting motorist/pedestrian,
four assist other agencies, one


child abuse report, one public
service call, eight criminal reg-
istrttions, one welfare check,
one patrol request, one open
door/window, one report of
threat/harassment and one 911
hang-up call.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were
booked into the county jail
during the latest reporting
periods:
) Kentreal Johnson, 27, 583
3rd St. Chipley; driving while
license suspended or revoked.
) Joseph Goodman, 23, 2784B
Goodman Hill Road, Chipley;
hold for Washington County.
) Daniel Loomis, 37, 9812
Western Road, Fountain; bat-
tery domestic violence, hold
for DOC.
) Christopher Bullard, 31,


4548 Bellamy Bridge Road,
Marianna; violation of
injunction.
) Elmore Horton, 19, 13618
Carrington Place Drive,
Alexander, AL; possession of
controlled substance (Xanax),
possession of marijuana less
than 20 grams, possession of
drug paraphernalia.
) Ryan Clowers, 18, 12401
Packer Drive, Alexander, AR;
possession of marijuana less
than 20 grams.
) Jacob Tipton, 18, 33 Bradley
St. Bryant, AR; possession of
marijuana less than 20 grams.
) Devlin Lee, 19, 2108 Blue
Pond Lane, Grand Ridge;
battery domestic violence.

Jail Population: 199
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


*


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Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan .
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL. .% Curtis Rogers
T Kendall Jhn Bryan & Team Sales! Nick-Spina
-3 0 5 a I T e s Team Sales e m=S Team Salei i-lnventory Mngr. Team Sales


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Troop 3 prepares for hiking and camping adventure

Special to the Floridan


Troop 3 Boy Scouts
held their weekly meet-
ing on March 18 at the
Scout Hut at Wynn Street
Park. Scouts and leaders
focused primarily on the
final preparations for their
big hiking and camp-
ing adventure planned
for March 23-25, at Pine
Mountain, GA. Troop 3
Boy Scouts will enjoy three
days of hiking the beauti-
ful trails, camping and
using the skills they have
learned throughout their
training as scouts. Troop.
3 Leader Estelle Whiddon
gave a helpful demonstra-
tion to the scouts on how
to pack their backpacks
"in the most efficient
way. Whiddon discussed
the list of needed essen-
tials for the trip, while
emphasizing a key goal
for the weight on their
backs to be as light as pos-
sible. Using a scale, she
showed how even minor
changes in the items they


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
From left: Assistant Scoutmaster Chaison Johnson, Senior Patrol Leader Levin Berry and Troop
3 Leader Andy Campbell help prepare scouts for their exciting hiking and camping adventure
in Pine Mountain, GA.


carry can be beneficial
and make the long hike
easier for the scouts.
Scouts will meet on the
Friday night before their
departure early Saturday
morning, in order to check


their supplies and
go over final details of
their trip. Scouts are ex-
cited about this adventure
together, which will also
be good preparation for
another upcoming trip to


the Appalachian Trail for
Troop 3 Boy Scouts this
summer.
The Marianna
Optimist Club is the
chartering organization
for Troop 3 Boy Scouts.


Troop 3 Leader Estelle Whiddon shows the scouts the proper
way to pack lightly for their upcoming hiking and camping
trip at Pine Mountain, GA.


For more information
about Boy Scouts, please


call Scout Master Bill
Kleinhans at 526-2897.


Two-Toe Tom



Pageant is set


Special to the Floridan

The 2013 Esto Two-Toe
Tom Festival Pageant will
be held Friday, April 5 and
Saturday, April 6 begin-
ning at 6:30 p.m. each eve-
ning at the Graceville Civ-
ic Center in Graceville.
Friday's Pageant will in-
clude the following divi-
sions: Tiny Baby Miss, 0-9
months; Baby Miss, 10-12
months; Toddler Miss, 13-
23 months; Tiny Miss, 2-3
years; Future Little Miss,
4-5 years; Little Miss, 6-
7 years; Baby Mister, 0-3
months; Toddler Mister,
4-5 years and Little Mis-
ter, 6-7 years.
Divisions for Saturday's
Pageant will include: Petit
Miss, 8-9 years; Miss Pre-
teen, 10-11 years; Young
Jr. Miss, 12-13 years; Ju-


nior Miss, 14-15 years;
Teen Miss, 16-17 years
and Miss, 18-20 years.
The Pageant entry fee is
$50, with all proceeds go-
ing to the Two-Toe Tom
Festival celebration. Con-
testants may participate
in photogenic for an ad-
ditional $10. Pageant ap-
plications may be picked
up at Bush Paint & Supply,
971 6th Ave. in Gracev-
ille or at Esto Town Hall
at 3312 2nd Ave. South
in Esto. The Two-Toe.
Tom Pageant is an open
pageant.
Door admission is $5
per person and children
three years and under
will be admitted for free.
For additional informa-
tion contact Teresa Bush
at 263-4744 or Darlene
Madden at 263-6521.


Tue (Ii1


7.3 73 5


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SUBMITTED PHOTO
r. Steven Spence has successfully
earned his Board Certification in
Hospice and Palliative Medicine
from the American Board of Internal Medi-


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health care by certifying internists and sub-


,.,.,S ., specialists who demonstrate the knowledge,
3.. 1 1i4; i skills and attitudes essential for excellent


patient care. Board Certification demon-


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met the highest standards of internal medi-
cine and its subspecialties. Board Certifica-
tion is voluntary and includes an exam
that tests a physician's ability to diagnose
and treat patients with a broad range of
conditions. Dr. Spence practices Internal
Medicine at Internal Medicine Associates
in Marianna, while also serving as the
Medical Director of Covenant Hospice in
Marianna.


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1:


erald Holley
recently
retired as
Board Attorney for
the Chipola Col-
lege District Board
of Trustees after
25 years of service.
Chipola president
Dr. Gene Prough,
left, presents a
plaque of apprecia-
tion to Holley.


JFLO FI A SJ ChNI


SUBMITTED PHOTP


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FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 3A -


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-
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6-'5.7 5.9-1 I


LOCAL'












JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


St. Luke's Episcopal Church begins birthday celebration


Special to the Floridan

Parishioners at St. Luke's Epis-
copal Church in Marianna had
reason to celebrate on Sunday,
March 10. It was St. Luke's 175th
birthday. Former rector, The
Reverend M. Eugene Carpenter,
returned to lead the 10:30 a.m.
service. Father Carpenter has
served for the last twelve years
in Goldsboro, N.C. His wife
Judy, was welcomed back to
the adult choir. Ash Lanier
played the traditional spiritual,
"Were You, There" as a prelude
to the service. The St. Luke's
Children's Choir followed with
"How Majestic Is Thy Name"
to the delight of the capacity
congregation.
A covered dish luncheon
was held in MacKinnon Hall
after the service. The sunny
weather allowed tables to be
placed on the patio to accom-
modate the over-flow crowd.
Father Norman Bray proposed
a toast and led the singing of


Father Gene Carpenter, rector of St.
Father Norman Bray (center) Luke's Episcopal in Marianna from
congratulates cake contest winners 1991 to 2001.
Melissa Saunders (left) and Ann sixty-six year old steeple. All
Mathis. '..- T, -


SUBMITTED PHOTO
St. Luke's parishioners celebrate the beginning of the 175th birthday year
with a covered dish luncheon.


"Happy Birthday" to St. Luke's.
After lunch the entries in the
"Best Cake" competition were
judged with the "Best of Show"
ribbon going to Melissa Saun-
ders and the cake made by Ann
Mathis receiving blue ribbon for


"Best Tasting" cake.
St. Luke's Marianna was
organized on March 7, 1838 as
the result of a visit from Bishop
Jackson Kemper, Missionary
Bishop of Missouri and Indiana
to the Florida Territory. It was


adopted as a station on July 3,
1838 by the Board of Missions at
their meeting in New York City.
Many events are being sched-
uled to mark the entire anni-
versary year. A pictorial DVD
of church history is planned by
the archives committee with
the thought of making it avail-
able to raise funds to give some
much needed TLC to St. Luke's


pictures of at. LuKe s events are
welcome. The pictures may be
scanned and sent to St. Luke's at
parishoffice@stlukemarianna.
org or taken to the parish office
to be scanned while you wait.
Please identify the pictures by
year and subjects if possible.
For information about the DVD
project contact Mary Robbins
at 209-4066 or snoopyxii60@
hotmail.com.


i'-- i Baptist College of .


Professor to judge competition


Special to the Floridan

In the midst of all of the
rehearsals, performances,
classes, andprivatelessons,
Music Professors at The
Baptist College of Florida
are often requested to lend
their expertise in judging
local and state competi-
tions as they encourage
the next generation of mu-
sicians. This spring, BCF
Professor of Piano Angela
Glover will be judging
during the National Guild
Piano Competition.
Decidedly qualified,
Glover received her Bach:
elor's degree from Peabody
Conservatory of Music in
1978 and continued her
education at Florida State
University where she re-
ceived her Master's and
Doctorate degree. Glover
has been a part of the BCF
faculty for over 24 years


BCF Professor of Piano
Angela Glover will be judging
during the National Guild
Piano Competition.

teaching private piano
lessons, piano classes and
sight singing..
Glover has. repeatedly
been a requested judge for
several other competitions
including the Montgomery
Symphony Piano competi-
tion and the National Fed-
eration of Piano Teachers
competition. This will be


the first time Glover has
judged for The National
Guild Piano Competition
which is a division of the
American College of Musi-
cians founded.in 1929 by
Dr. Irl Allison. The Guild
has grown to more than
850 national and interna-
tional audition centers in
which thousands of stu-
dents enroll in each year
for the purpose of en-
couraging the study and
enjoyment of piano.
In awarding students of
all levels, the Piano Guild
judges in the areas of ac-
curacy, continuity, phras-
ing, pedaling, dynamics,
rhythm, tempo, tone,
interpretation, style and
technique.
For information about
the music programs of-
fered through The Bap-
tist College of Florida call
800-328-2660 ext. 427.


nAmazing Grrace.


There's no room at the inn


In the world today, by some. esti-
mates, more than 15 million persons
are exiled from their own countries
through no fault of their own. They are
called refugees. In addition, according*
to some tallies, 26.4 mil-
lion persons are dis-
'. -' placed within their own
S. homelands.
SThe Economist reports
that the reluctance to ac-
David cept refugees is growing.
YOunt Syrians who have fled
their nation's civil war
are not entirely welcome
in neighboring countries. They live in
camps or cramped rooms and are not
allowed to work for wages. Instead, they
survive with only minimal health care,
education and other services provided
by international humanitarian agencies
and the host nations.
Many refugees are people without a
country. Three-quarters of those who
have registered with the United Nations
High Commissioner for Refugees have
lived in exile for five years or more.
Some rich nations provide resettle-
ment programs for refugees, but the


total served is only a small portion of
the world's refugee populations.
Largely due to geography, over 80
percent of refugees flee to poor coun-
tries that are already hard-pressed to
provide for their own citizens. As a
consequence, development agencies
increasingly provide assistance to the
host countries as well as directly to the
refugees within their borders.
David Apollo Kasungu, Uganda's com-
missioner for refugees, argues that poor
nations should offer citizenship to long-
term refugees, allowing them to work,
pay taxes and receive social services.
The world's great religions all cherish
histories of exile, notably the Jews' so-
journs in Egypt and Babylon, then their
dispersion around the world.
Christianity celebrates the birth of
Jesus in a Bethlehem stable. When, as
an infant, his parents took him to Egypt
to protect his young life, he became a
refugee himself.

David Yount is the author of 14 books on faith,
spirituality, and confident living, including "The Future
of Christian Faith in America", Augsburg. He answers
readers at P.O. Box 2758, Woodbridge, VA 22193 and
dyount31@verizon.net.


TisiI iRE ITO IS MADE 3OSSIBLEBY THESEBUS INESSES WHO E EAL OF *~AT WRSHIP SERVICE


JAMES & SIKES MARIANNA OFFICE Watson
Funeral Home, Maddox Chapel SUPPLY COMPANY Med E iUlp
482.2332 Office Outfitters Stor e
482- 2 4423 Constitution Lane, Marianna 4422 LAFAYETTE ST.
Serving Jackson County Families 40 DOWNTOWN MARIANNA
Since 1931 4 44 4850-482-4035


CHIPOLA PROPANE i (IM S (ig I3
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LP & Natural Gas Appliance CPA'S
4055OlC'daleRd. Hwy20W Hwy90 Hwy. 90, Marianna 4243 W. Lafayette St.
526-2651 674-4040 593-6070 526-3456 Marianna, FL.
Marianna Blountstown Sneads www.hopkinscars.com 526-3910
Mariana BlouistLzz.nead


Yo

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Alford First Assembly of God
1782 Tennessee St P.O. Box 228
Alford, FL 32420 579-5103
mbarfield@embarqmail.com
Bascom Assembly of God
5516 Hummingbird Rd
Bascom, FL 32423 272-7775
Shugroad@embargmail.com
Cypress Grove Assembly of God
3250 Cypress Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4451
cppressgrovechurch.org
Cords Of Love Assembly Of God
2060 Bethelehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 272-0254
Eastside Assembly of God Church
4723 Hatton St Marianna, FL
lop4664@yahoo.com 526-2422
El Bethel Assembly of God
2503 El Bethel Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 593-6044
First Assembly of God
5565 Brown St
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3351
First Assembly of God Church
4186 Lafayette St
Marianna FL 32446
482-2800 www.mariannafirst.org
First Assembly of God Church
of Cottondale
2636 Milton St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4626
Faith Haven Assembly of God
7135 Hwy 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-8205
Pilgrim Rest Assembly of God
3347 Pilgrim Rest Church Road
Marianna, FL 32448 579-2300
Welcome Assembly of God
6784 Messer Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5077
Welcomehometom@yahoo.com

BAPTIST
Alford Baptist Church
1764 Carolina St P.O. Box 6
Alford, FL 32420 579-2192
Bethel Missionary Baptist Church
2137 McLeod St
Cypress, FL 592-4108
Bethel Star Missionary Baptist Church
4134 Lincoln Ave
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4866
Bethlehem Baptist Church
2300 Bethlehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-9940


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SUPER CENTER
MICKEY GILMORE STORE MANAGER
STORE #1375 2800 HWY 71 S.
(850)-526-5744 MARIANNA, FL.

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A Touchstone Energy" Cooperative ?(ca
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(800) 342-7400
www. westflorida. coop
Graceville Sneads Bonifay


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4551'LAFAYETTE STREET (850) 526'3797
MARIANNA, FL 482-2294


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VSsW s c MSTOR TeE 6 024-HR Road Service
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ur Guide To Local Houses Of Worship
Circle Hill Baptist Church First Freewill Baptist Church New Easter Missionary Baptist Church Trinity Baptist Church
7170 Circle Hill Rd 7970 Davis St 977 Hope Ave 3023Penn. Ave
Sneads, FL 32460 592-2327 Sneads, FL 32460 593-5400 Graceville, FL 32440 658-8344 Marianna, FL 482-3705


Collins Chapel Baptist Church
5005 3rd Ave (5499 Collins Chapel Rd)
Malone, FL 32445 569-5644
Crossroads Baptist Church
Southern Baptist
3276 Main St P.O. Box 386
Cottondale Fl. 32431 352-2636
Damacus Freewill Baptist
3700 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5878
Dellwood Baptist Church
5512 Blue Springs Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-6954
Eastside Baptist Church
4785 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 526-2004
www.eastsidebaptistchurch.com
Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church
3360 Gardenview Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4223
Everlena Missionary Baptist
5309 Ellaville Rd
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3900
First Baptist Church
3172 Main St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4586
First Baptist Church
5366 Ninth St P.O. Box 98
Malone, FL 32445 569-2426
Faith Baptist Church
2494 Hwy 71 South
Marianna, FL 482-2869
First Baptist Church
8010 Pope St P.O. Box 246
Sneads, FL 32460
First Baptist Church of Bascom
4951 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 97
Bascom, FL 32423 569-2699
First Baptist Church of Campbellton
2405 Hwy 2
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3183
First Baptist Church Southern Baptist
987 8th Ave P.O. Box 565
Graceville FL 32440 263-3323
fbcgraceville@bellsouth.net
www.fbcgraceville.org
First Baptist Marianna
2897 Green St Marianna, FL 32446
526-4200 www.fbcmarianna.org
First Freewill Baptist Church of Malone
5440 10th Street (Hwy 71 N.)
P.O. Box 385
Malone FL 32445 850-569-2786


Friendship Baptist Church of Malone
5507 Friendship Church Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-2379
Grand Ridge Baptist Church
2093 Porter Ave P.O. Box 380
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4846
grandridgebc@embarqmail.com
Greater Buckhorn Missionary
Baptist Church
4691 Hwy 162
Marianna, FL 32446 594-5761
Greenwood Baptist Church
4156 Bryan St P.O. Box 249
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3883
Hasty Pond Baptist Church
4895 Hasty Pond Rd, Marianna, FL
Heaven's Way Biker Church
A Ministry of Alford Baptist Church
3924 Woodrest Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 334-806-4258
Holly Grove Free Will Baptist Church
2699 Highway 73S
Marianna, FL 32448 482-3489
Inwood Baptist Church
2012 Inwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 593-5328
Liberty Hill Missionary Baptist Church
5239 Liberty Hill Road
Bascom, FL 32426 569-5949
Little Zion Missionary Baptist Church
3181 Little Zion Rd P.O. Box 190
Sneads, FL 32460 592-1614
Lovedale Baptist Church
6595 Lovedale Rd Bascom, FL 32423
592-5415 or 592-2134
Marvin Chapel Free Will Baptist Church
2041 Hope School Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5375
www.marvinchapelfwb.com
Midway Freewill Baptist Church
1600 Church St
6158 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 592-8999
Mount Olive Baptist
6045 Hwy 2
Bascom FL 32423 569-5080
Mt. Tabor Missionary Baptist Church
3695 Popular Springs Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 594-4161
Mt. ion Missionary Baptist Church
5382 Old US Road
Malone, FL 32445 569-2049


New Galilee Missionary Baptist Church
2155 Highway 73 South P.O. Box 234
Marianna, FL 32447 482-5499
New Hoskie Baptist Church
4252 Allen St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-7243
New Hope Freewill Baptist
Sweet Pond Rd
Dellwood, FL 592-1234
New Hope Missionary Baptist
3996 Wintergreen Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-8802
New Mount Olive Missionary Baptist
2870 Barnes St P.O. Box 312
Marianna, FL 32447 482-7595
New Salem Baptist Church
3478 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 579-4343
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
6687 Brushy Pond Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5696
Pine Ridge Baptist Church
3064 Pine Ridge Church Rd
Alford, FL 32420
Piney Grove Baptist Church
2136 Piney Grove Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3800
Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church
5481 Pleasant Ridge Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 263-8007
Providence Baptist Church
6940 Providence Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5481
pbch@embarqmail.com
Rocky Creek Baptist Church
5458 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-7508
Salem Free Will Baptist
2555 Kynesville Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4194
www.salemfreewillbaptist.com
Shady Grove Baptist Church
7304 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge FL 32442 592-6952
St. Luke Missionary Baptist Church
2871 Orange Street
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2591
St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church
1935 Jacob Road
Cottondale, FL 32431 263-4097
St. Peter Missionary Baptist
7889 McKeown Mill Rd
P.O. Box 326 593-3363


www. rinnyMarianna.com
Union Hill
3115 Union Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-5711
Victory Baptist Church
2271 River Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6699
www.victorybaptistfl.com
White Pond Baptist Church
P.O. Box 458 Mill Pond Rd
Alford, FL 32420 352-4715

CATHOLIC
St. Anne Catholic Church
3009 5th St P.O. Box 1547
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3734
www.stanne@stannemar.ptdiocese.org
www.stannemarianna.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Caverns Rd. Church of Christ
4448 River Rd
Marianna, FL 482-2605

CHURCH OF GOD
Grand Ridge Church of God
2232 Porter Ave Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5301 or 592-2814
Marianna Church of God
(All services interpreted for the
hearing impaired.)
2791 Jefferson St, Marianna, FL 32446
482-4264 mariannacog.com

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST
Glorious Gospel
Church of God in Christ
4255 Clay St Marianna, FL 32448
594-1096 or 557-4019
Miracle Restoration Center
2997 Hall Street
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2335
Refuge Tabernacle
Church of God in Christ
2820 Chipola Street
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2607
The New Zion Temple
Church of God In Christ
1022 Washington Ave
Graceville, FL 32440
Victory Tabernacle
Church of God In Christ
6752 Highway 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 209-7711


--------------------------------------- -- ----


1


-14A FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013


RELIGION












JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


RELIGION


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 5AF


Calendar


FRIDAY
MARCH 22
Youth Activity Night 6 p.m. at Marianna
Church of God. Ages: 12-19. Call 482-6264.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups in a safe
environment," 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship Center
with praise and live worship music, testimonies
and fellowship. Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care
available. Call 209-7856, 573-1131.
) Pulse -7-10 p.m. at Cypress Grove Assembly
of God Church in Grand Ridge. Youth outreach
program open to all teens in grades 6-12; shoot
pool, play Xbox and other games, listen to music,
more. Activities are free: low-cost snacks for
sale. Transportation available (limited area); call
381-2549.


SATURDAY
MARCH 23
Free clothing giveaway 9 a.m. to noon
at Mother Agnes' Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.
) Annual Women Day 10 a.m. at St. Mary
M.B.C. in Blountstown. Theme will be Women,
Stirring up the Gifts of God, 2 Timothy 1:6. Work-
shop facilitator will be Minister Deidre Bivens of
On the Move Ministries in Chipley. Lunch will be
served. Everyone is welcome.
) Annual Pre-Easter Egg Hunt 10:45 a.m.
at the New Mount Olive M.B.C., sponsored by
the Senior Usher Board. Everyone is invited. Call
526-3992.


SUNDAY
MARCH 24
Palm Parade and Contemporary Service
- 8:30 a.m. at Marianna First United Methodist
Church, followed by Sunday school for all ages
at 9:45 a.m. Palm Parade and Traditional Service
will be held at 11 a.m. Children are invited to
join the Palm Parade in both worship services.
Everyone is welcome. Call 482-4502.
) Third Annual Family and Friends Day -11
a.m. at St. Mary M.B.C. Guest speaker will be
Minister Eddie Hadley from Jacob Chapel Baptist
Church in Tallahassee. Call 482-5335.
) Annual Women Day 11 a.m. at St. Mary
M.B.C. in Blountstown. Colors are white with blue
or silver accessories. Speaker will be Minister
Susan Williams of St. John M.B.C. in Panama
City. Lunch will be served. At 3 p.m. service the
speaker will be Pastor Shirley Jenkins of New
Life Christian Center in Port St. Joe. Everyone is
welcome to attend.
) Annual Friends and Family Day 2:30 p.m.
at Magnolia A.M.E. Church, with host church and
congregation, St. Michael M.B.C. Everyone is
welcome. Call 352-4749.
The Lighthouse Children's Home in Concert
-11 a.m. at Hickory Grove Freewill Baptist
Church. Everyone is invited to hear this group
sing and give testimonies. Call 569-2471.
Pastor's Appreciation Program -11 a.m. at
Bethel Star M.B.C. The Reverend Carlos Thomas
of The Potters House in Panama City will be
speaker of the hour. Refreshments will be served


following the service. The Reverend Melvin Riley
of Shiloh M.B.C. in Midland City, AL will be the
speaker of the hour in the 3 p.m. service. Theme
for the day is "Walking in the Likeness of God."
) Family and Friends Day 11 a.m. at Magnolia
A.M.E. Church. Guest speaker will be Minister
Michael McClendon from Quincy. Lunch will be
served following the service. Call 352-4162.
) "The Passion of the Christ" Movie 5-7:30
p.m. at Marianna First United Methodist Church
in the Wesley Center. Everyone is welcome. Call
482-4502.
) Seder Passover Service 6 p.m. at Bethle-
hem Baptist Church. Everyone is invited to attend
and learn about the history behind the Lord's
Supper and communion. Call 718-7648.


MONDAY
MARCH 25
a Holy Week Service 7-8 a.m. at Marianna
First United Methodist Church in the Sanctuary.
Speaker will be The Reverend Norman Bray. Con-
tinental breakfast will follow in the Wesley Center.
Everyone is invited to attend. Gall 482-4502.
) Revival Service, "God Quest, the Search
for Truth" 7-9 p.m. at Rocky Creek Baptist
Church. Guest speaker will be Greg Roberts.
Everyone is invited. Call 643-7711.


TUESDAY
MARCH 26
Holy Week Service 7-8 a.m. at Marianna
First United Methodist Church in the Sanctuary.
Speaker will be The Reverend Dr. Ted Land. Con-
tinental breakfast will follow in the Wesley Center.
Everyone is invited to attend. Call 482-4502.
) St.Anne Thrift Store 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at 4285
2nd Ave. See the spring, summer attire. Call
482-3734,
) Lenten Luncheon 12-12:50 p.m: at Mari-
anna First Presbyterian Church. The menu will
include soup, sandwiches, dessert and bever-
ages. Interim Pastor Ted Land will lead a devo-
tional based on the words and work of German
Lutheran Pastor Dietrich Bonheoffer. Everyone is
invited. Call 526-2430.,
Dare to Live Healed Healing School Class
-7 p.m. in the Bascom Town Hall at 4969 Bass-
wood Road. Free classes taught by Jacquelyn
McGriff. Call 276-6024.
) Revival Service, "God Quest, the Search for
Truth" 7-9 p.m. at Rocky Creek Baptist Church.
Guest speaker will be Greg Roberts. Everyone is
invited to attend. Call 643-7711.


WEDNESDAY
MARCH 27
S)Holy Week Service 7-8 a.m. at Marianna
First United Methodist Church in the Sanctuary.
Speaker will be The Reverend Dr. Ron Martin.
Continental breakfast will follow in the Wesley
Center. Everyone is invited to attend. No WNL.
Call 482-4502.
Revival Service, "God Quest, the Search
for Truth" 7-9 p.m. at Rocky Creek Baptist
Church. Guest speaker will be Greg Roberts.
Everyone is invited. Call 643-7711.


THURSDAY
MARCH 28
) Holy Week Service 7-8 a.m. at Marianna
First United Methodist Church in the Sanctuary.
Speaker will be The Reverend Connie Farnell.
Continental breakfast will follow in the Wesley
Center. Everyone is invited to attend. Call 482-
4502.
) Free clothing giveaway 9 a.m. to noon
at Mother Agnes' Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.
) St. Anne Thrift Store 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at 4285
2nd Ave. See the spring, summer attire. Call
482-3734.
) Maundy Thursday Service 6 p.m. at
Marianna First United Methodist Church in the
Sanctuary.Call 482-4502.
) Holy Thursday 7 p.m. at St. Anne Catholic
Church. Call 482-3734.
) Maundy Thursday Service 7 p.m. at
Ascension Lutheran Church. Call 482-4691.
) Revival Service, "God Quest, the Search
for Truth" 7-9 p.m. at Rocky Creek Baptist
Church. Guest speaker will be Greg Roberts.
Everyone is invited. Call 643-7711.


FRIDAY
MARCH 29
Holy Week Service 7-8 a.m. at Marianna
First United Methodist Church in the Sanctuary.
Speaker will be The Reverend Bill Elwell. Conti-
nental breakfast will follow in the Wesley Center.
Everyone is invited to attend. Also, the Sanctuary
will be open 12 noon-3 p.m. for those wishing to
pray. Call 482-4502.
) Good Friday,"Veneration of the Cross" 6
p.m. at St. Anne Catholic Church. Call 482-3734.
) Good Friday Service 7 p.m. at Ascension
Lutheran Church. Call 482-4691.
) Impact Church "Launch Conference"-7
p.m. at the Graceville Civic Center. Speakers will
be Apostle Mark Pickett of Impact Church and
Apostle Mark T. Jones, Sr. of Center for Mani-
festation, Tampa. Call 372-2883 or visit www.
impactchurchfl.org.
) Easter Musical "The King Is Coming"- 7
p.m. at Welcome Assembly of God presented by
the Sanctuary Choir. Everyone is welcome. Call
592-5077.
) Revival Service, "God Quest, the Search
for Truth" 7-9 p.m. at Rocky Creek Baptist
Church. Guest speaker will be Greg Roberts.
Refreshments/finger foods will follow the service
in the fellowship hall. Everyone is invited. Call
643-7711.


SATURDAY
MARCH 30
Altha Church of God Inaugural Easter 5K
and Kid's Fun Run-8 a.m. at Altha Area Recre-
ational Park. $25 for Adult 5K and $15 for Kid's
Fun Run. Medals and awards ceremony will follow
the race. Proceeds will benefit the Altha Church
of God Youth Group to help fund community
outreach projects. Call 272-2851 or 272-7676.
) Impact Church "Launch Conference" 6


p.m. at the Graceville Civic Center. Speakers will
be Apostle Mark Picket of Impact Church and
Apostle Mark T Jones, Sr. of Center for Mani-
festation, Tampa. Call 372-2883 or visit www.
impactchurchfl.org.
) Easter Program, "It All Happened in the
City" 7 p.m. at Damascus Freewill Baptist
Church. Everyone is invited to attend this Easter
program presented by the youth of the Church.


SUNDAY
MARCH 31
n Easter Sunrise Service 6:30 a.m. at Ascen-
sion Luther Church. Easter breakfast will follow
at 8:30 a.m. and the Easter Celebration Service
at 11 a.m. Call 482-4691.
) Easter Sunrise Service 6:30 a.m. at Beth-
lehem Baptist Church. At 11a.m. there will be an
Easter Cantata "It's Not Just a Story", presented
by the adult choir. At 7 p.m. the children will pres-
ent an Easter Program. Everyone is invited. Call
718-7648.
) Eastbr Sunrise Service -.6:30 a.m. at Rocky
Creek Baptist Church, followed by a covered dish
breakfast at 8 a.m., everyone isasked to bring a
breakfast dish to share. At 10:30 a.m. there will
be an Easter Musical. Everyone is invited. Call
643-7711.
) Easter Sunrise Service and Breakfast -
6:30 a.m. at Welcome Assembly of God, followed
by the Easter Musical "The King is Coming" at 10
a.m. presented by the Sanctuary Choir. Everyone
is welcome. Call 592-5077.
Easter Services at Marianna First United
Methodist Church 8 a.m. Decorate the floral
cross in the courtyard; 8:30 a.m. Contemporary
Worship Service in the Wesley Center; 9:45 a.m.
Easter lawn party in the courtyard with fellow-
ship, refreshments, music, a puppet show; 9:55
a.m. Easter egg hunt in the courtyard; 10:05 a.m.
Easter bonnet parade to support missions and 11
a.m. worship service in the Sanctuary. Everyone
is invited. Call 482-4502.
) Easter Sunday Mass 8:30 a.m. at St. Anne
Catholic Church. Call 482-3734.
Easter Program, "It All Happened in the
City" 5:30 p.m. at Damascus Freewill Baptist
Church. Everyone is invited to tend this Easter
program presented by the youth of the Church.

Special event announcements for Jackson County
churches are published, free of charge, each Friday in
the Floridan's "Religion Calendar." Submission dead-
line: Noon, Tuesday. Email items to editorial@jcfloridan.
com, subject line: Religion Calendar.


TISRI SW To ATTNDWRSI*SR IC


LWe re Your Honling Headquazlersl


AM A MCCOv'S"


Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc
S'Tr FA"M 2919 Penn Avenue
Suite 8
SMarianna, FL 32448-2716
INURANCE 850-482-3425
linda.pforte.bxrs@statefarm.com


(850) 526-4700
Oak Station Shopping Center
Open Daily from 8am 8pm


Vann Funeral Home
4265 Saint Andrews Street
Marianna, FL 32446
Phone: (850) 482-3300
Fax: (850) 482-5363
Concern for the living,
reverence for the dead.
C. B.VannLF. D.IC C.VnJr.Lr.D Adnan DAbnCr, LD.
Lula C.VanU L.PN.C.IDoris LVann LI'N C. ,


Tropic
Trailer .
T.RLrER YOUITOREEDS"m
1-888-767-4275
482-3420
2163 Post Oak Ln Marianna
www.tropictrailer.comr


YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Marianna Church of the Nazarene
2987 N Madison St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-5787

EPISCOPAL
St. Luke's Episcopal Church
4362 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 482-2431
parishoffice@stlukesmarianna.org
www.stlukesmarianna.org

FULL GOSPEL
Christian Center Church
4791 Sheffield Dr P.O. Box 450
Marianna, FL 32447
526-4476 or 526-4475
jack@cccmarianna.org
Country Gospel Community Church,
Compass Lake in the Hills
650 Apalachicola Ave
Alford, FL 32420 (850) 579-4172
Resurrection Life Christian
Fellowship International
2933 Madison Street
Marianna, FL* 526-2617
New Beginnings Worship Center
1165 Highway 69
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5791 www.nbworship.com
New Beginning Outreach Ministries, Inc.
2254 Magnolia Dr.'
Cottondale, FL 32431 (850) 352-4733
Evangel Worship Center
2645 Pebble Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2232
New Life Family Church
4208 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2132
The Bridge Church
2515 Commercial Park Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 209-2733

HOLINESS
Emmanuel Holiness Church
2505 Sandridge Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5167
Hickory Level Community Church
1221 Dipper Rd
Marianna, FL 32448
482-4696 or 482-2885
Oak Ridge Freewill Holiness Church
2958 Milton Ave
Marianna, FL 573-7684"
Sneads Community Church
1948 Desoto Ave P:O. Box 1349
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5650

LATTER-DAY SAINTS
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints
3141 College St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-8159

LUTHERAN
Ascension Lutheran Church
3975 W. Hwy 90
Marianna, FL 482-4691


METHODIST
Bascom United Methodist Church
4942 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 67
Bascom, FL 32423 594-5755
Cypress United Methodist Church
6267 Cemetery Ave
Cypress, FL 32432 263-4220
First United Methodist Church
1111 8" Ave
Graceville, FL 263-3342
First United Methodist Church
2901 Caledonia St
Marianna, FL 482-4502
Grace United Methodist
4203 W. Kelson Ave
Marianna, FL 482-4753
Grand Ridge United Methodist Church
6911 iowa Street
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
Greenwood Chapel AME
5426 Fort Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-1112
Greenwood United Methodist
4220 Bryan St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-5755
Henshaw Chapel AME Church
2370 Glastel St, P.O. Box 535
Cottondale, FL 32431 875-2610
Jerusalem AME Church
2055 Hwy 73
-Marianna, FL 32448 482-5085
Kynesville United Methodist
2875 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4672
McChapel AME Church
4963 Old U.S. Rd
Marianna, FL 569-2184
Mt. Shiloh AME Church
6702 Biscayne Road
Bascom, FL 32423 569-1044
New Bethel Christian Methodist
Episcopal Church
2487 Highway 1
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-4647
Pope Chapel African Methodist
Episcopal Church
4898 Blue Springs Rd, P.O. Box 6000
Marianna, FL 32447 482-2900
Shady Grove United
Methodist Church
7305 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-9277
Sneads First United Methodist Church
8042 Church St, P.O. Box 642
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6481
fumc@embarqmail.com
Friendship Christian Methodist
Episcopal (CME) Church
5411 Avery Rd, P.O.Box 302
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-1111
1st United Methodist Church
of Cottondale
P.O. Box 458
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4426


Salem AME Church
5729 Browntown Rd, P.O. Box 354
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3344.
Springfield AME Church
4194 Union Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4252
St. James AME Church
2891 Orange St, P.O. Box 806
Marianna, FL 32447 526-3440
St. Paul AME Church
5180 Hwy 273, P.O. Box 40
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-0333
Snow Hill AME Church
5395 Snow Hill Rd, P.O. Box 174
Malone, FL 32445 569-5315
Mt. Olive AME Church
2135 Fairview Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-7917
Bethlehem AME Church
3100 Lovewood Rd, P.O. Box 752
Cottondale, FL 32431
352-2111 or 352-4721
Greater St. Luke AME Church
5255 11th Ave, P.O. Box 176
Malone, FL 32445* 569-5188
NON-DENOMINATIONAL
Believers Outreach Ministry
3471 Hwy 90 W
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4926
Cypress Creek Community Church
1772 Macedonia Road, PO Box 496
Alford, FL 32420 638-0360
Ever Increasing Word of Faith
Ministries
3749 Skyview Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-4704
Heaven's Garden Worship Center
3115 Main Street
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 579-9936 www.aidaspina.org
Faith Cornerstone Church Ministries
5460 Collins Chapel Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-5600
Foundation Temple Apostolic
Faith Church
3341 Tendell Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3884
Glass Community Church
4005 Veteran's Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 272-7205 (850) 263-6715
Haven of Rest
Church of Restoration
Worship Center
2261 Haven of Rest Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
Keeping It Real Help Ministry
3297 Caverns Road
Marianna, FL 32446 557-4800
Love and Restoration Ministries
2990 Heritage Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2730
Mill Springs Christian Chapel
1345 Mill Springs Rd, P.O. Box 83
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 526-2519


Rivertown Community Church
(Meets at the new Marianna High School)
3546 Caverns Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 482-2477
Rocky Creek Tabernacle
1890 Delta Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 272-0917
St Andrews (FC) Church Ministries
978 Hwy 71 S
Marianna, FL 32448 569-5600
Sunrise Worship Center
2957 Hall St, Marianna, FL 482-8158
PENTECOSTAL
Apostolic Life Church
4070 Old Cottondale Rd
Marianna, FL 482-8720
pastorbiggs@embarqmail.com
Apostolic Revival Center
of Marianna
3001 Hwy 71 N, P.O. Box 634
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3162
Christian Covenant Life Center
2011 Finley Ave.
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 592-4737
Shady Grove Pentecostal Holiness
7541 Shady Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-6203
Sneads Pentecostal Holiness Church
2036 Gloster Ave
Sneads, FL 32460
593-4487 or 593-6949
Praise Life Ministries
7360 Hwy 90, P.O. Box 177
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4166


Prayer Temple Church Of Prayer
SFor All People
3341 Plantation Circle
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3343
United Pentecostal Deliverance
5255 10th Ave
Malone, FL 32445 569-5989
PRESBYTERIAN
First Presbyterian Church
Presbyterian Church (USA)
2898 Jefferson St
Marianna, FL 32446
526-2430 n www.firstpresmarianna.org
fpcmarianna@embarqmail.com or
firstpresmarianna@earthlink.net
RESTORATIONIST
Church of Jesus Christ of Marianna
4060 Thomasville Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2282
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
Emmanuel SDA Church
4531 Basswood Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3200
Marianna Seventh Day Adventist
4878 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2487
WESLEYAN
Salem Wesleyan Church
2764 Salem Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 (850) 593-6679
irquomai@gmail.com


J CFLORI DAN.MCOI M


j








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-16A FRIDAY, MARCH 22.2013


Consumer Reports


CR reveals the



best and worst



used cars,SUVs


From Consumer Reports"

As owners hold on
to their vehicles
A longer, fewer late-
model used cars are avail-
able for sale, resulting in a
limited supply and higher
prices. To help Americans
choose the best used car
for their money, Con-
sumer Reports compiled a
Best and Worst Used Cars
list for model years 2003
through 2012.
Consumer Reports high-
lighted the best sedans,
SUVs and small cars avail-
able in four price ranges:
from $10,000 up to $25,000.
Each performed well in its
tests when new and had
above-average reliability
for the model years shown,
based on Consumer Re-
ports' Annual Auto Survey.
All models came standard
with electronic stabil-
ity control (ESC), a proven
lifesaver during the years
indicated.
THE BEST CARS
In the $10,000 to $15,000
price range, the following
cars made Consumer Re-
ports' list of the best used
cars:
) Small cars: Honda Fit
2011 andMazda3 2011.The
Fit is an excellent choice
among hatchbacks. It has
amazing space utilization;
responsive, agile handling;
and a superefficient four-
cylinder engine that re-
turns 30 mpg overall with
an automatic transmis-
sion. For a bit more refine-
ment, look for a Mazda3
hatchback or sedan.
) Sedans: Honda Accord
(V-6) 2006-2007 and Acura
TL2005-2006.TheAccordis
an excellent choice among
used cars. Its smooth V-6
engine is economical and
strong, the ride is comfort-
able and compliant, and
reliability is excellent. The
four-cylinder version is
nice but didn't get ESC un-
til 2008. A more luxurious
option is the Acura TL.
) Small SUVs: Toyota
RAV4 (four-cylinder)
2006-2008 and Honda
CR-V 2005-2007. The 2006.
RAV4 gained more inte-
rior room, a V-6, and an
optional third-row seat.
The four-cylinder's nimble
handling, very good 23
mpg overall and versatile
cabin propelled it to the
top of Consumer Reports'


small-SUV Ratings. The
CR-V is a sportier, if some-
what noisier, alternative.
) Midsized/large SUVs.
Toyota Highlander (V-6)
2004-2007 and Infiniti FX
2003-2004. The Highlander
is quiet and comfortable.
Testers got 19 mpg overall
with the V-6. The interior is
roomy and the controls are
easyto use. Athird-rowseat
was optional, and a hybrid
version was added in 2006.
The Infiniti FX is a sportier
two-row alternative.
In the $15,000-$20,000
price range, the following
cars made the list of the
best used cars:
) Small cars. Toyota Prius
2010-2011 and Hyundai
Elantra (sedan) 2011-2012.
At 44 mpg overall, the
Prius delivers the best
gas mileage of any
non-plug-in, five-pas-
senger vehicle. The 2010
redesign brought more
room, better brakes and
sound but not agile -
handling. For a more en-
joyable driving experience,
look for a Hyundai Elantra
sedan.
) Sedans. Toyota Camry
(four-cylinder) 2010-2012
and Infiniti M 2006-2007.
Expect impressive 26 to 27
mpg overall with the four-
cylinder Camry in addi-
tion to a roomy cabin and
superb reliability. If a pow-
erful engine and luxurious
interior are your passion,
opt for the Infiniti M with
the V-6.
) SUVs. Honda Pilot
2007-2008 and Mazda CX-
9 2009. The Pilot combines
a roomy cabin, good driv-
ing dynamics, seating for
eight and respectable fuel
economy in a package that
isn't too big to fit in your
garage. But road noise is
a bit pronounced. The
Mazda CX-9 is a more ag-
ile alternative with an even
roomier third-row seat.
THE WORST CARS
The Consumer Reports
worst used cars list in-
cludes 2003 to 2012 mod-
els that have had multiple
years ofmuch-worse-than-
average overall reliabil-
ity, according to Consumer
Reports' Annual Auto Sur-
vey. Among the 20 models
that made the list are the
BMW 7 Series, the Ford
Explorer (V-6, 4WD), the
Kia Sorento (V-6), and the
Mini Cooper S.


First Federal welcomes Krumfolz to the team


Special to the Floridan

First Federal Bank
of Florda recently an-
nounced that Stephen
Krumfolz has accepted a
commercial lender and
SBA lending specialist
position. Stephen will be
working at the Marianna
branch at 2914 Green St.
and will be partnering
with other First Federal


commercial lenders to
assist with small business
loans.
Krumfolz previ-
ously worked for First
Peoples Bank as a senior
vice president, senior
lending officer and SBA
lending manager han-
dling SBA loan requests.
He has been in the finan-
cial services arena for over
24 years. Krumfolz at-


tended Indian River State
College and majored in
banking. He said, "I
am excited about the
opportunity."
Krumfolz enjoys travel-
ing and playing tourna-
ment and recreational
golf. For over 18 years,
Krumfolz has been ac-
tively involved with the
Port St. Lucie Rotary Club,
where he served as past


president, treasurer and
Paul Harris Fellow. In 2000
and 2012 Krumfolz was
honored with the Rotar-
ian of the Year award. He
also initiated the annual
Rotary golf tournament
fundraiser.
Founded in 1962, First
Federal has 18 branches,
including locations in
Bonifay, Chipley, Live Oak
and Marianna.


Telecommuting has advantages for staff, employers


n the 12 years I have
been writing this
column, I cannot
remember a time when
I commented on the
decision of an individual
business owner. However,
I just have to say some-
thing about Yahoo CEO
Marissa Mayer's recent
decision to eliminate all
telecommuting.
Mayer said she saw no
benefit in this type of
working arrangement and
wanted each person to
be present in the office
every day. She felt the
face-to-face interaction
would generate greater
innovation than if they
were working remotely
and that productivity and
control would be better
as well.
Around the time of May-
er's announcement, a new
study came out showing
that, on average, employ-
ees working remotely put
in six more hours than
their counterparts at the
office.


These two situations
seem to be at odds. You
might
wonder
if Mayer
S would have
had a
different
opinion
had she
Jerry seen the
Osteryoung results of
this study.
When the head of Yahoo
unilaterally eliminates
telecommuting, it
changes the culture of the
organization and sends a
burning message that she
does not trust the staff to
be effective.
Telecommuting does
have its limitations
and isn't suitable in all
cases. Take, for example,
ajob where a significant
amount of collaboration
is required. Clearly,
telecommuting would
not be the best answer in
this situation, but if your
employees work indepen-
dently, there is no reason


they cannot work from
home.
In limited doses, tele-
commuting works well
and is also a great motiva-
tor for many workers. I
think good management
is the key to getting the
most out of this working
arrangement. Staff want
to add value to the com-
pany and fulfill their boss'
expectations.
Bosses who really un-
derstand telecommuting
can overcome most of the
problems. As the saying
goes, you do not want to
"throw the baby out with
the bathwater." If some
element of the process
does not work, change the
process until it fits.
As businesses expand,
the need to find workers
with specific skills will be
critical. Asking a family
to pick up and move for
a job is a tough barrier.
Often, an offer is turned
down simply because the
potential employee could
or would not move his or


her family. Telecommut-
ing is a solution in some
of these cases.
As the economy im-
proves, dictating the
terms of the working
environment for new
employees especially
younger ones just won't
work. That is, when it
becomes a seller's market
for employees, there will
be even greater incentive
to allow and encourage
telecommuting.
Bottom line: telecom-
muting will become more
prevalent going forward,
and you need to prepare
for it.
You can do this!
Jerry Osteryoung is a consultant
to businesses he has directly
assisted over 3,000 firms. He is the
Jim Moran Professor of Entrepre-
neurship, Emeritus and Professor
of Finance, Emeritus at Florida
State University. He was the found-
ing Executive Director of The Jim
Moran Institute and served in that
position from 1995 through 2008.
His newest book co-authored with
Tim O'Brien, "If You Have Employ-
ees, You Really Need This Book:' is
an Amazon.com bestseller.


DEAR BRUCE: I am 68,
married and still working
full time. I have a ques-
tion on term insurance. I
had a $50,000 full-life pol-
icy since I was a kid, and
(perhaps foolishly) I let
it lapse a year ago. I hear
many ads for term insur-
ance at reasonable rates
but can't tell if they're
legit or rip-offs. The one
company I'm looking into
seems like a good route to
go, but I want to get your
wise input before doing
anything.
JIM IN WISCONSIN

DEAR JIM:You men-.
tioned that you had a pol-
icy since you were a kid
and that you let it lapse
a year ago. After 60 years
of paying into the policy,
was it not paid up? Are
you certain it has lapsed?
My first inclination would
be to check and make
sure. If it was a whole


life policy, there ought
to be some value, maybe
enough to
continue
I .I to feed the
_ premi-
ums even
though you
neglected
to.
Bruce In the
Williams absence of
that, at age
68, a term
policy may be expensive.
If you're a smoker, it's
going to cost you a ton of
money. And if you have
other health concerns,
companies may not
insure you at all.
You mentioned one life
insurance company (I
have removed its name)
that advertises, and it is
certainly legitimate. You
can inquire of several
companies, including
the one you mentioned,
and find out exactly how


Did you know?

Tax tips for household employers
The ASsociJ.ted FrE'.n

NANNY TAX: If you hire a nanny, housekeeper. gardener or other household employees, you could be responsible for
paying those workers' federal and state payroll ta.,es, lust like any other business owner.

THE THRESHOLD: A key factor is whether you pay each of your employees $1.800 or more a year in wages. If you do.
you're on the hook lor their payroll taxes.

KEY DISTINCTION: You're not'responsible for payroll taxes if you hire independent contractors, only household
employees. They typically work in and around a home, at the direction and control of the person who lives there.


much the premium would williams.com or to Smart Money,
be. P.O. Box 7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions of general interest will
Send questions to bruce@bruce- be answered in future columns.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Obituary

Heritage Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
247 N. Tyndall Parkway
Panama City, FL 32404


Reoicsh Cmpetition


Margaret Ann
Brown

Margaret Ann Brown, 76
of Greenwood, died Wed-
nesday March 13, 2013, at
her home, surrounded by
her loving family.
She is survived by her
children; Danny, Susan,
Leroy, Leonard, Doris, Bet-
ty, Danell, Joe and Francis;
her siblings; Robert, Leroy,
J.M. Wilburn, and Tommy;
20 grandchildren and 27
great-grandchildren. She
was preceded in death by
her husband; Billy Ray
Brown; her son; Dick; her
parents; Charles and Rosie
Burkett; her brothers Elton
and Tavy ; and her sisters;
Dot and Edna Mae.

A graveside service will
be held at 19:00 a.m. Satur-
day, MarcH 23, 2013, at
Brown Cemetery in
Youngstown, FL, with Rev.
David Gurganus officiating.

Those wishing to extend
a word of condolence may
do so at www.heritageflflc.com

Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
www.artisticdesignsunltd.com
850-372-4456


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
People gather around the ring to watch Marianna High School's Digital Fear (left) square off against Bethlehem High School's Behemoth in the opening
minutes of the Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board Robotics Competition Thursday.


Robotics
From Page 1A
Fourth Place: Bulldogs,
Liberty County High
School
Log Book Winners
First Place: Tech No Log-
ic, Holmes County
Second Place: Missing


Assignments, Holmes
County High School
Third Place: Metallic
Defenders, Chipley High
School
Tech N' Logic also won
the high-score award. TIF-
TI from Cottondale won
the sportsmanship award
and Subject to 'Change
from Bethlehem High
School took home the most


This robot, built by the Bulldogs of Liberty County High
School, was able to pick up the tiny soccer ball on its section
of the course.


Poison
From Page 1A

The latest report from
the American Association
of Poison Control Cen-
ters (AAPCC) reveals that
in 2011, U.S. poison cen-
ters answered more than
3.6 million calls, includ-
ing nearly 2.4 million calls
about human exposures to
poisons.
About 73 percent of all
calls to poison centers
originated from a residence
but over 93 percent of ex-
posures actually occurred
at a residence. Almost 70
percent of the people who
called with poison emer-
gencies were treated at
home following the advice
of poison center experts,
saving millions of dollars
in medical expenses. A re-
cent-report released by the
Lewin Group revealed that
the poison center system
saves over $1.8 billion per
year in medical costs and
productivity. For every
dollar spent, the poison
center system saves callers
$13.39.
Last year, the three poi-
son centers in Florida re-
sponded to almost 150,000
calls, and approximately
45,000 calls involved chil-
dren younger than 6.
If you suspect a poison-
ing has occurred, or if you
have questions concerning
poisonings, immediately
call the Poison Center Help
Line toll free, 24 hours a
day at 1-800-222-1222 and
a health care professional
will assist you. The Center
advises not wasting time
searching the Internet; in-
stead, call the Help Line for
the right answer the first
time.
For a host of information
about poison prevention,
visit Florida/USVI Poison
Information Center Jack-
sonville at www.fpicjax.
org.







,' .
S~rIs-CoQNRiAN-OM


iMHS W2s" To'u 67I:T


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Students make their way around the track at Marianna High
School during the "Kick Butts" walkathon against tobacco
use Wednesday. Ninety-five students in SWAT (Students
Working Against Tobacco) and TOP (Teen Outreach Program),
as well as students in physical education classes, participated
in the daylong event. The awareness walkathon was part of a
nationwide "Kick Butts Day." Similar events have been held in
Jackson County, but this was the first at MHS.


Southbound 1-75 near Tampa reopens after crash


WESLEY CHAPEL
One of the Interstate
75 southbound lanes in
Pasco County reopened
Thursday evening follow-
ing a fiery crash between
a tractor trailer carrying .
mail and a dump truck,
Sthe Florida Highway


Tips
From Page 1A
Prevention is the key to
avoiding accidental expo-
sure. Keep all chemicals
and cleaning products out
of the reach of children.
Avoid using products that
require leaving powder or
pellets in areas where pets
or children may have ac-
cess to them (kitchen, ga-
rage, yard).
Children should be kept
out of the area when in-
secticides and garden


Patrol reported.
Crews repaired the
damaged asphalt on one
lane, and the second
lane was expected to be
finished later Thursday,
FHP spokesman Steve
Gaskins said. North-
bound traffic remained


chemicals are being
sprayed. Read and follow
the instructions on the
label carefully, and always
store products in their
original containers.
Food
Food poisoning is Inost
commonly caused by con-
tamination of the food
with bacteria from the
improper storage of food,
thawing foods at room
temperature or contact
with dirty utensils, work
areas or unwashed hands.
Symptoms are usually


open throughout the
day.
No one was seriously
injured in the morning
crash. Both drivers got
out of their vehicles and
were taken to hospitals
for observation.
From wire reports


limited to vomiting and/
or diarrhea and generally
occur within six-to-eight
hours of ingestion' (pos-
sibly longer). If vomiting
and/or diarrhea occur, flu-
ids are often recommend-
ed to prevent dehydration.
Mild food poisoning may
be managed at home, but
more severe cases often
require medical attention.
Food safety
) Countertops, uten-
sils and hands should be
washed with warm, soapy
water prior to and after


Lawmakers set


to OK Everglades


restoration plan


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -Af-
ter initial skirmishes
between environmental
groups and sugar farmers
over its wording, the Flor-
ida Legislature is moving
ahead with a new plan to
help pay for Everglades
restoration.
The House gave tenta-
tive approval to the
measure on Friday and
an identical version is
moving through the
Senate.
Rep. Matt Caldwell,
R-Lehigh Acres, called
the bill a peace treaty that
has been accepted by the
all sides in a dispute that
has been fought over the
last two decades.
"While it's not exactly
what everyone wanted
to get, it is something
everyone can agree to,"
Caldwell said.
The legislation will keep
intact an existing tax on
farmers who work within
a region of the northern
Everglades although it
calls for the tax rate to
decrease starting in 2027.
The money from the
tax will be used for
water quality restoration
projects that are part of
an $880 million plan that
was negotiated between


food preparation.
n Thaw meat and poul-
try in the refrigerator, not
at room temperature.
) Avoid leaving perish-
able food out of the refrig-
erator for more than two
hours.
) Do not use canned
foods with bulging lids,
cracks or dents.
) Thoroughly cook all
meat, poultry, seafood and
eggs.
) Keep picnic foods in an
ice chest or cooler, out of
direct sunlight, until serv-
ing time.


Gov. Rick Scott and the
federal government.
Both the House bill
(HB 7065) and the Senate
measure (SB 768) call for
spending $32 million a
year for the next 10 years
in an effort to reduce
the amount of phos-
phorus that enters the
Everglades.
"It extends the funding
and it creates a reliable
source for Everglades
cleanup," said Eric Drap-
er, executive director of
Audubon of Florida.
There have been legal
battles over the famed
River of Grass since the.
late '80s as well as fights
over proposed constitu-
tional amendments.
Voters back in 1996
defeated a proposal
to place a penny per
pound fee on raw sugar
grown in the northern
Everglades, but voters
approved a measure that
said that those who cause
water pollution in the
Everglades are primarily
responsible for paying to
clean it up.
Lawmakers passed a
measure in 2003 that
laid out a schedule for
how long that farmers
would have to pay taxes
for associated restoration
efforts.


Easter egg dyes
Some Easter egg dyes are
made with potentially poi-
sonous ingredients. When
buying a kit for dying
eggs, choose one labeled
"NON-TOXIC."
Children often mistake
the colored tablets or liq-
uid dyes as candy or fla-
vored drinks.
Regardless of whether
the dyes are toxic, always
supervise children when
dying eggs.
Source: Florida/USVI
Poison Information Center -
Jacksonville


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
Qua 411. SeftfiY at Nwyiiji/rfH- ftfwS
Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90
S8850.482-8041


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


I


-1--~111-----~-----~-


LOCAL & STATE


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 7A










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


'Peace is possible, Obama insists in Middle East


JERUSALEM Insisting
"peace is possible," Presi-
dent Barack Obama on
Thursday prodded both
Israelis and Palestinians
to return to long-stalled
negotiations with few, if
any, pre-conditions, soft-
ening his earlier demands
that Israel stop building
settlements in disputed
territory.
The president made his
appeal just hours after
rockets fired from Hamas-
controlled Gaza landed in
a southern Israeli border
town, a fresh reminder of
the severe security risks
and tensions that have
stymied peace efforts for
decades.
Obama, on his second
day in the Middle East,
shuttled between Jerusa-
lem and Ramallah, reach-
ing out to the public as
well as political leaders. He
offered no new policies or
plans for reopening peace
talks but urged both sides
to "think anew" about the
intractable conflict and
break out of the "formu-
las and habits that have
blocked progress for so
long."
'"Peace is possible,"
Obama declared during
an impassioned speech to
young people in Jerusalem.
"I'm not-saying it's guaran-
teed. I can't even say that it
is more likely than not. But
it is possible."
The deep disputes divid-
ing the Israelis and Pal-
estinians have remained
much the same over the
years, and include decid-
ing the status of Jerusa-
lem, defining borders and
resolving refugee issues.
Palestinians have been
particularly incensed over
Israeli settlements in dis-
puted territories, and the
Israelis' continued con-
struction has also drawn
the condemnation of the
United States and other
nations.
Further' settlement ac-
tivity is "counterproduc-
tive to the cause of peace,"
Obama said. But in a nota-
ble shift, he did not repeat
his administration's previ-
ous demands that Israel
halt construction. Instead
he urged the Palestinians
to stop using the disagree-
ment as an "excuse" to
avoid talks.
"If the expectation is that
we can only have direct ne-
gotiationswhen everything
is settled ahead of time,
then there is no point for
negotiations," Obama said
during a joint news con-
ference with Palestinian
Authority President Mah-
moud Abbas in Ramallah.
"I think it is important to


ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTO
President Barack Obama looks into the crowd and tries to hear
a person yelling at him during his speech at the International
Convention Center in Jerusalem on Thursday.


work through this process
even if there are irritants
on both sides."
Abbas said Palestinians
remain committed to seek-
ing peace with Israelis, but
he made clear that settle-
ment construction had
made his people distrust-
ful of Israel's intentions.
"This is very danger-
ous that people and the
new generation reaches
the conviction that it's no
more possible to believe in
the two-state solution," he
said.
Obama has sided with
the Palestinians on the
settlement issue during
his first four years in of-
fice. However, when Israel
reluctantly declared a 10-
month moratorium on
construction, the Palestin-
ians balked at returning to
negotiations until shortly
before the suspension ex-
pired and talks foundered
shortly thereafter.
The Palestinians want
a state in the West Bank,
Gaza and East Jerusalem
- territories Israel cap-.
tured in the 1967 war -
but indicate they are ready
for minor adjustments to
accommodate some set-
tlements closest to Israel.
Since 1967, Israel has built
dozens of settlements in
the West Bank and East
Jerusalem that are now
home to 560,000 Israelis -
an increase of 60,000 since
Obama became president
four years ago.
Upon his return to Israel,
the president told Israelis
that in the search for peace
they have "true partners"
in Abbas and Salam Fayy-
ad, the Palestinian prime
minister.
Obama is spending the
majority of his four-day
Mideast trip in Israel,
where the politicians and
public have been skeptical
of his commitment to their
security. The president has
sought to calm their con-
cerns throughout his visit,
reminding an audience of
Israeli university students
Thursday that the U.S. is


their country's best friend
and most important ally.
"You are not alone,"
Obama declared as the
crowd erupted in thunder-
ous applause.
Still, he nudged Israel
to take steps to reverse
an "undertow" of inter-
national isolation that is
worsened by its failure
to make peace with the
Palestinians. In a region
roiled by political un-
rest, Obama said the days
when the Israelis can seek
protection from a hand-
ful of autocratic leaders
in other nations are over,
and he urged them to seek
common ground with the
Arab people, not just their
governments.


Hours before Obama
arrived in the West Bank,
militants in the Gaza Strip
launched at least two rock-
ets at the southern Israeli
town of Sderot, causing
damage but no injuries, ac-
cording to Israeli officials.
As a presidential candidate
in 2008, Obama visited the
border town, which is fre-
quently targeted in rocket
attacks.
A small, murky, al-Qaida-
inspired group calling it-
self the Mujahideen Shura
Council in the Environs of
Jerusalem claimed respon-
sibility for the rocket fire.
In a statement emailed to
The Associated Press, it
said it was sending a mes-
sage to "Osama's soldiers"
to protest the visit by,"the
Roman dog Obama" and
to continue its campaign
of holy war.
Over the past decade,
Gaza militants have fired
thousands of rockets and
mortar shells at Israel,
prompting Israel, with
considerable U.S. assis-
tance, to develop its Iron
Dome missile defense sys-
tem, which it credits with
intercepting many rockets.
The president closed
his five-hour trip to the
West Bank with a visit to a
U.S. government-funded
youth center, where he

, H


cheered a performance by
a dance troupe and held a
private roundtable discus-
sion with a small group of
young Palestinian men.
He recalled the conversa-
tion later in his Jerusalem
speech, saying that if "any
Israeli parent sat down
with those kids, they'd say,
'I want these kids to suc-
ceed; I want them to pros-
per.' I believe that's what
Israeli parents would want
for these kids if they had a
chance to listen to them
and talk to them."
While Obama was wel-
comed warmly in Israel,
where U.S. and Israeli
flags dotted the roadsides,
Palestinians showed little
excitement over Obama's
shorter stop in the West
Bank. Protesters defaced
and burned posters of
Obama in an expression
of dissatisfaction with U.S.
policy in the region. Sev-
eral dozen demonstrators
also gathered in downtown
Ramallah during Obama's
meetings, protesting what
is perceived in the Pales-
tinian territories to be a
strong U.S. bias in favor of
Israel.
The president opened
the second day of his
trip at Jerusalem's Israel
Museum, a stop aimed
at highlighting both the


'Jewish people's ancient
connection to the land that
is now Israel and the small
nation's thriving modern
economy.
The president and Israeli
Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu viewed the
Dead Sea Scrolls, the an-
cient Hebrew texts. It was a
symbolic visit for Obama,
who has battled against a
perception in Israel that
he sees the Holocaust, not
historical ties to the region,
as the rationale for the ex-
istence of the Jewish state.
The president has repeat-
edly sought to correct that
impression.
As he viewed the ancient
scrolls displayed in a dimly
lit room, Obama marveled
at how the Hebrew lan-
guage had changed so little
that Netanyahu could read
some of the writings. The
two then toured a technol-
ogy exhibit at the museum
featuring several modern
Israeli inventions, includ-
ing an electric vehicle bat-
tery, a technology Obama
has promoted in the U.S.
Obama was awarded Is-
rael's Medal of Distinction
Thursday night during a
lavish dinner. He is the
first sitting U.S president
to receive Israel's highest
civilian honor.
From wire reports


Alcatraz marks 50 years since closure


ALCATRAZ ISLAND,
Calif. The black-and-
white photographs show a
line of prisoners some
with heads bowed, others
with eyes staring forlornly
at the camera as a
guard leads them to a boat
for their final trip off The
Rock.
The striking images were
taken on March 21, 1963,
the day the infamous
prison on Alcatraz Island
in San Francisco Bay was
closed after holding the
likes of gangsters Al Ca-
pone and Mickey Cohen.


Swarms df reporters
chronicled the single-file
line of departing inmates.
On Thursday, however,
the National Park Service
unveiled an exhibit of
newly discovered photos
that depict new details
about the final hours of
Alcatraz.
Alcatraz started as a
fortress and became an
Army disciplinary bar-
racks before the Bureau of
Prisons tookit over in 1934
to house America's most
notorious criminals.
From wire reports


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NATION















Sports Briefs

High School baseball
.Fiday Pensacola Catholic
at Marianna, 7 p.m.

High School softball
Friday Pensadola Catholic
at Marianna, 6.p.m.

Chipola baseball
The Indians will play their
three-ganie series finale
against Tallahassee today in
Tallahassee at 4 p.m.
Chipola will then begin the
first of another three-game
set with Northwest Florida
State on Saturday at home at
1 p.m.

Chipola softball
The Lady Indians will open
Panhandle Conference play
Saturday with a home dou-
bleheader against Northwest
Florida State at 1 and 3 p.m.

AAU basketball
The Harambee Dragons
AALU Basketball team will
have practice Saturday at
Nlarianna Middle School.
Boys (ages 11-12) will go
at 2 p.m., followed by boys
(.13-14) at 3 p.m., girls (13-191
at 4 p.m., and boys (15-19) at
5p.m.

Panhandle Seminole
club golf tournament
The 2013 Panhandle Semi-
noleClub's annual scholar-
ship golf tournament will be
held April 5 at Indian Springs
Golf Club in Marianna. This
tournament, along with an-
other fundraiser, has helped
provide $40,000 over the past
10 years to deserving local
students and helped further
their education.
Registration and warm-
up will begin at noon with
the shotgun start at 1 p.m.
for this four-man sraunble
event. Cash prizes will be
awarded to the first-, second-
and third-place teams.. d-
ditional prizes will be gi'en
for longest drive, straightest
drive, closest to the pin, and
so on.
The greens fee contribu-
tion of $65 will entitle each
golfer to a fantastic afternoon
of golf on a championship
course (to help a very worthy
cause), followed by a great
meal. .
Scholarship (hole) and '-',
prize sponsorships are also
available for this event. For
more informatiorr, call Roy
Baker at 850-526-4005 or
209-1326 or George Sweeney
at 850-482-5526.

Sports items
Send all sports items to edi-
torial@'jcfloridan.com, or fax
them to 850-482-4478. The
mailing address for the paper
is lackson County Floridan
P.O. Box 520 Nlarianna, FL
32447.


..1pol Wits
M~r ji^


Chipola Women's Basketball

Lady Indians'




tourney run ends


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola's Rahni Bell shoots a 3-pointer during the state
tournament.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Lady Indians had their
season come to an end Thursday night
in Salina, Kan., falling to the Central
Arizona Vaqueras 84-67 in the NJCAA
Women's National Championship
tournament.
Chipola's season ends with a record
of 27-7 and after a pair of national
tourney wins over Southwestern Il-
linois on Monday and College of


Southern Idaho onWednesday.
A third win would have put the Lady
Indians into the national semifinals,
but the Vaqueras proved too big and
too tough on the interior, out-re-
bounding Chipola 51-28 and leading
for the game's final 35 minutes.
Joymesia Howard had 24 points and
11 ,rebounds to lead Central Arizona,
with Brea Edwards scoring 23 points,
and Ijeoma Uchendu adding 17 points,
See ENDS, Page 2B


CHIPOLA I BSEBaIIl





Series is all level


S Neiker Navarro handles a ground ball for Chipola on Wednesday night.


Eagles even with
Indians after 11-2 victory


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloriflan.com


The Tallahassee Eagles leveled their se-
ries with the Chipola Indians onWednes-
day night in Marianna, winning the sec-
ond of the three-game set 11-2 thanks to
12 hits and a solid combined pitching ef-
fort from Jared Stanley and Victor Cole.


The Indians won the first game of the
series 13-6 on Monday in Tallahassee,
but the Eagles returned the favor with a
road win of their own Wednesday, getting
four runs in the fifth inning and five in the
ninth to blow the game open.
Trent Higginbothem went 3-for-5 with
two runs and five RBIs, including a three-
run home run in the fifth inning that put
the Eagles up 5-0..
Higginbothem added an RBI single in
the ninth to score Anthony Torres to put
TCC up 7-2, later scoring on an RBI base
hit by John Price to make it 9-2.


An RBI single by James Abbatinozzi and
an RBI double by Matt Bdhnick put the
Eagles up by nine runs, and Victor Cole
came back to the mound in the bottom of
the ninth to close it out for TCC.
Cole allowed the first two Chipola bat-
ters to reach, with Brett Moore walking
and Bert Givens doubling to put runners
on second and third with no outs.
But Cameron Gibson struck out look-
ing, Moore was tagged out at third after a
ground ball to the pitcher by Ian Rice, and
See SERIES, Page 2B


High School Basketball


Gulf Coast one step closer to title


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Gulf Coast State Lady Commodores moved one
step closer to a national championship Thursday af-
ternoon in Salina, Kan., beating Shelton State 72-61 to
advance to the semifinals of the NJCAA Women's Na-
tional Championship tournament.
With the win, the Lady Commodores (29-4) move on
to play top-seeded and defending national champion
TrinityValley (34-1) today at 6 p.m. for a spot in Satur-
day night's championship game.
Thursday's game was tight early on, with Gulf Coast
leading by just a point at the halftime break.
But the Lady Commodores took charge early in the
second half and turned a 33-32 edge into a 56-44 lead
with 10 minutes left to play.
Shelton State answered with a 9-0 spurt of its own to
cut the margin back to three at 56-53.
But, the Lady Commodores were able to pull
away late, with a three-pointer by Tamara Tay-
lor making it 66-58 Gulf Coast with three minutes
remaining.
Dominique Henley answered with a three for Shel-
ton State to cut it back to five with 2:32 left, but an
offensive rebound and put-back by Mar'Lisa Brax-
ton pushed it back to seven, and another buck-
et by Braxton following a Shelton State turnover
made it 70-61 Gulf Coast with just over a minute to
play.
See STEP, Page 2B
-t -, . -


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Tamara Taylor takes the ball for Gulf Coast during the State
JUCO Tournament at Chipola.
.: .. -- _


NWF moves to semis

with another OT win
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Northwest Florida State Raiders won their second
straight overtime game Thursday afternoon in Hutchin-
son, Kan., beating Iowa Western 87-81 to advance to
the semifinals of the NJCAA National Championship
tournament.
Northwest (29-3) needed a miraculous 20-point
comeback in the final three minutes Wednesday to
beat New Mexico 88-87 in overtime to stay alive in the
tournament, finishing regulation on a 23-3 run.
The situation was never quite so dire Thursday after-
noon, but the finish was nearly as dramatic, with the
teams trading big shots over the final five minutes and
overtime.
A three by Devin Brooks gave IowaWestern a 66-63 lead
with 4:42 in the regulation, but a pair of free throws by
Chris Jones and a bucket by Tevin Glass gave the Raiders
the lead moments later.
A driving banker by Brooks made it 70-69 Iowa West-
ern, and Brooks scored on a breakout after a long North-
west miss to make it 72-70 Reivers with 37.2 seconds to
play.
The Raiders tied it back up when Elgin Cook rebound-
ed his own miss and put it in while being fouled with
18.6 seconds on the clock.
But Cook missed the free throw to leave the game tied,
and the Reivers were unable to convert on their last
possession.
See NWF, Page 2BL
- t:;


_____1__1___11_____1~1_11111_1_11~~1_1_ 111~11111_11_1_1_ -_---


___~11____-_-~111___1__1~----^-1_1_1111 -~--_1 1 1__1_~~11__1111_1___ll.








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Cottondale Softball



Lady Hornets lose 3rd in a row


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Cottondale Lady
Hornets suffered their third
straight loss Tuesday night
in Wewahitchka, falling to
the Lady Gators 2-0 to drop
to 5-6 on the season.
It was also the third con-
secutive District 3-1A de-
feat for the Lady Hornets,
who are now 4-5 in league
competition after a 4-2
start.
For the third straight
game, the Cottondale
lineup struggled to gener-
ate much offense, getting
held to four hits as a team
and getting shut out for the
third time in the last five
outings.
In the past three games,
the Lady Hornets have
only scored a total of two
runs.
Offense has been an is-
sue for CHS all season, and
coach Mike Melvin said
that his team will have to
make major strides there
in order to take the next
step.
"We're just not hitting
the ball when we need to,"
he said. "We left runners
in scoring position and
couldn't put together hits
consistently to bring them
in."
Cottondale had a pair
of golden opportunities


-~ -f

- s'- -
--r ~ -- gr,,


Lilly Festa lays down a bunt for the Lady Hornets at a recent game.


to gets runs across in the
third and fifth innings
with runners at second
and third, but left them
stranded each time.
Senior pitcher Kelsie
Obert kept the Lady Hor-
nets in the game with an-
other solid outing in the
circle, allowing just four
hits and four walks with 11
strikeouts.
Wewahitchka got runs


MARK SKINNER/tLORIDAN


in the third and fourth in- .win these games, but you
nings, and that proved can't win if you can't score.
to be enough to get the We've got to find a way to
victory, generate some runs."
."Kelsie is doing a great. Obert, Connor Melvin,
job in the circle,'but we're Kourtnie Richardson, and
still struggling at the Kayla Latham had the only
plate," Melvin said. "We've hits for the Lady Hornets
just got to keep getting on Tuesday.
swings in at practice and CHS was scheduled to
maybe we can break out.of host Vernon on Thursday
this slump. Kelsie is pitch- night in another big dis-
ing well enough for us to trict contest."


Lady Tigers shut down by Paxton


BY.DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Malone Lady Ti-
-gers had their two-game
winning streak snapped
Tuesday night in Paxton,
falling to the Lady Bobcats
-2-1.
Paxton led 1-0 after
pushing a run across in
the bottom of the first, but
Malone tied the game up
in the top of the fifth when
Angelica Livingston drew
a lead-off walk, moved to
second on a passed ball,
.and to third on a sacrifice.
?bunt by Tierra Brooks, andi


then scored on a squeeze
bunt by Sabra Cullifer.
But the Lady Bobcats im-
mediately had the answer
in the bottom of.the fifth,
getting a hit batter, walk,
and then consecutive
passed balls to allow for
the go-ahead run.
Malone had one last
chance in the top of the
seventh and got a lead-
off runner when Jennifer
Hewett reached on an er-
ror, but Hewett was then
caught stealing at second
base for the first out.
Livingston then tried to
bunt her way on and was


thrown out, and Brooks
was struck out by Paxton
pitcher Sidney Beck to end
the game.
Beck went the distance
to get the win for the Lady
Bobcats, allowing no hits
and two walks and striking
out seven.
Malone had just four
base-runners all night.
"It was a tough one.
We just couldn't score or
get in any kind of offen-
sive rhythm," Lady Tigers
coach Preston Roberts
said after the garhe. "We're
really not hitting the ball
that well right now. Paxton


made. the fewest mistakes
and had the fewest errors.
We made some errors at
the wrong time."
Sheyanna Chambliss
started and pitched well
for Malone despite taking
the loss, going five innings
and allowing just two runs
on three hits, three walks,
and four strikeouts:
Sara Newsom pitched
a perfect sixth inning of
relief.
Malone (3-4 overall, 1-4
in District 1-1A) will next
play host to Bethlehem
today at 5 p.m. ii a key
district game.


-r aLady Commodores play- Taylor and Roshinha Rosa- Brianna Lancaster scored
ers in double digit scoring, rio eachscoring 14 andJes- 10 points to lead Shel-
Sfinishing with 14 points, sica Morton 13 to go with ton State, who came into
From Page lBwhile Necole Sterling led nine rebounds and three the season undefeated at
Braxton was one of five the team with 16, with steals. 33-0.



Rose takes lead Bay Hill; Woods 4 back


The Associated Press

ORLANDO -Justin Rose
started out as another guy
in Tiger Woods' group
Thursday at Bay Hill. He
wound up in the lead.
Rose put on a clinic with
the putter and ran off
four straight birdies late
in his round for a 7-un-
der 65, giving him a two-
shot lead after the open-
ing round of the Arnold


NWF
From Page 1B
.In the overtime, a three-
point play by Glass put
Northwest up 77-75 with
3:27 to play, and a driving
bucket 1y Jones made it
a four-point lead for the
Raiders with three minutes
on the clock.
A triple by Telvin Wilker-
son made it 82-76 Raiders,
but Brooks answered right
back with a three to cut the
margin in half with just un-
der two minutes to play.
Cook put Northwest
back up five at 84-79 with
a beautiful baseline move
to free himself for a two-
handed dunk, and Cook
made two free throws with
*23.7 seconds remaining to
make it 86-81.
The freshman All Pan-
handle Conference for-
ward Cook finished with
22 points, 12 rebounds and
four assists to continue his
brilliant run in the nation-
al tournament, tallying
20-plus points for the third
Straight game.


Palmer Invitational.
Woods had two sloppy
bogeys from greenside
bunkers and didn't hit it
as well as he did when he
won Doral two weeks ago.
But he made enough key
par saves and manhan-
dled the par 5s to scratch
out a 69, a reasonable
start as he tries to win Bay
Hill for the eighth time
and return to No. 1 in the
world.


It was only the sixth time
in 31 rounds at Bay Hill
that Rose broke 70.
"If you had said I would
shoot a 65 on the range
this morning, I would have
probably'said, 'How many
holes have I played?' And
that didn't change much,"
Rose said. "The first five,
six holes out there were a
grind."
John Huh had a chance
to catch him late in the


Glass added 20 points 11-of-28 threes for the
and 15 rebounds, and game, with the Raiders fin-
Jones scored 19 points. ishingjust 3-of-22.
Brooks led four Iowa Northwest will play
Western players in double Vincennes tonight at 6
figures with 29 points on 5- p.m. for a spot in Sat-
of-8 from the 3-point line. urday's national tile
The Reivers made game.

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afternoon but needing a
birdie on the final hole, he
found a fairway bunker on
No. 9 and took bogey for a
67. John Rollins and Brad
Fritsch were at 68.
Rose and Woods played
in the morning, the tough-
er side of the draw because
of chilly temperatures and
a strong breeze.


Ends
From Page 1B
12 rebounds, eight assists
and five steals.
The Vaqueras punished
Chipola inside, shooting
54.7 percent from the
field as a team and mak-
ing 23-of-30 from the free
throw line.
The Lady Indians con-
verted just 33.8 percent
(22-of-65) from the field
and finished 7-of-26 from
the three-point line.
Kristine Brance had 23
points and made 4-of-8
threes to lead Chipola,
with Jasmine Craw-
ford adding 12 points
and. Lashonda Littleton
scored 10.
But it was a struggle all
night for sophomore for-
ward Rayven Brooks, as
the Lady Indians' leading
scorer was in foul trouble
all night, ending up with
just three points on 0-of-
7 shooting before fouling
out late in the second
half.
Despite missing their
best player, the Lady In-
dians hung around for
most of the game, rally-
ing back from a deficit as
high as 18 points in the
first half to get to within
six with a 7-0 run to start



Series
From Page 1B
Chase Nyman flew out
to right field to end the
game.
Cole went 4 1/3 innings
out of the bullpen and al-
lowed no runs on three
hits and four walks with
eight strikeouts, while
starter Jared Stanley went
4 2/3 innings and gave up
two earned runs on two
hits and,two walks with
one strikeout.
Michael Mader started
and took the loss for the
Indians, giving up five
earned runs on seven hits
and four walks with three
strikeouts in five innings.
The Chipola offense
could only put together
five hits total, with Gib-
son going 2-for-5 with


the second half.
Trailing 47-34 at the
break, Chipola reeled off
seven quick points on a
driving bucket by Brance,
a steal and two from Lit-
tleton, and a three-point-
er from Brance to make
it 47-41 just two minutes
into the second half.
But as they did all
night, the Vaqueras had
the answer to the Chipo-
la surge, answering with
a 7-0 spurt of their own,
with a three by Jamie Roe
and a two from Edwards
after a turnover push-
ing the margin back to
54-41.
A steal and bucket by
Jade Givens and ariother
triple from Brance got
Chipola to within seven
at 66-59 with 9:46 to play,
but .a put-back by How-
ard, a three by Uchendu,
and another bucket in-
side by Howard increased
the Central Arizona lead
to 14 with seven minutes
to play.
The Lady Indians never
got closer than 10 the rest
of the way.
Central Arizona (31-
1) advances to today's
semifinal round to face
the winner of Thursday
night's late game be-
tween Northwest Florida
State and Hutchinson.


a two-RBI single in the
bottom of the fifth.
Givens also had two
hits for the Indians, who
fell to 1-1 in Panhandle
Conference play and
23-12 overall.
Clay Fenwick was 3-
for-3 with two runs and
an RBI for TCC. Price and
Abbatinozii both added
two hits, and Bahnick a
hit and two RBI.
The Eagles improved
to 30-5 overall and 4-1 in
league play with the win,
and will host the series
final today at 4 p.m.


March Specials
S Mufflers & Exhaust


j I AieN TIRe 4 SERVICE


EZ PAY PAYS!


i-


-2B FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013


SPORTS








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 + 3BF


Huge deficits not derailing Heat


The Associated Press

MIAMI For the Miami
Heat, it has been anything
but an ordinary path along
the way to this extraor-
dinary 24-game winning
streak.
There have been blow-
outs, buzzer-beaters and
now a pair of huge second-
half rallies. Or, as Dwyane
Wade would call it all...
"Fun," the Heat guard
said.
These days, everything
even huge deficits
seems like fun for the
reigning NBA champions,
who haven't lost a game
in nearly two months.
And this week has brought
perhaps the two most
scintillating additions to
the league's second-lon-
gest winning streak ever,
now nine shy of matching
the Los Angeles Lakers of
1971-72 for the top spot on
that list.
They were down by 17 in
Boston on Monday, then
trailed by 27 in Cleveland
on Wednesday. Somehow,
someway, the streak lived
on both times, and Miami
now has a chance at con-
secutive win No. 25 on Fri-
day night when they play
host to the Detroit Pistons
- a team that has lost nine
in a row.
"Faith," said Heat for-
ward Shane Battier, whose
3-pointers helped spark
the comeback in Cleve-
land. "We have a lot of
faith in each other,. a lot
of faith of what we can do.
When we give the effort
and the concentration, we
can do some pretty amaz-
ing things. We don't want
to keep proving that. We'll
take a more consistent ef-
fort versus turning the jets
on when we have to, but
I'm proud of the resolve of
this team."
Apparently, so are those
1971-72 Lakers. At least,
some of them are.
Heat President Pat Riley
played for that 33-in-a-row
club, so it's a safe bet that
he's thrilled to see history.
possibly repeating itself
with him being part of it
again. And on Thursday,
NBA legend Jerry West -
another part of that Lakers
team made clear that
he's enjoying watching this
Heat run as well.
"It may not end," West
said. "That's why I think it's
so remarkable."
During this stretch of 24
straight victories', the Heat
have not trailed at any
point in the second half on
10 occasions. In 13 of their
previous 14 games before
the trip to Boston, they
never faced even a double-
digit deficit, the lone ex-
ception being when they
,trailed the NewYork Knicks
uby 16 points at Madison
,Square Garden before pull-
ing off a comeback.
In their past 11 games
before Boston, Miami's
fourth-quarter deficits
- combined were 22
points. Against the Celtics
and Cavs alone, the com-
bined Heat deficits in the
fourth quarter were, again,
22 points.
So dizzying was the
comeback that, when it
was over, Wade wasn't sure
about the streak's length.
"What are we at, 24
games?" Wade asked. "You
start losing count."
And it remains anyone's
guess when the Heat will
lose another game.
The end sure looked like
it arrived on Wednesday,
when the Heat trailed 67-
40 at Cleveland in the third
quarter. A tad over 12 min-
utes basically, the length
of one NBA quarter lat-
er, a 45-12 run had given
Miami an 85-79 lead.
Afterward, Heat coach


Erik Spoelstra revealed the
not-very-elaborate strat-
egy behind the comeback:
Make shots at one end, get
stops at the other.
"That's part of their
greatness," Spoelstra said.
"Great competitors mak-
ing big shots like that,
that's just us stepping back
and letting them do their
thing."


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat's LeBron James (6) shoots over Cleveland
Cavaliers' Daniel Gibson (1) during the fourth quarter of a
game Wednesday in Cleveland. James scored a team-high 25
points in Miami's 98-95 win.


* Spoelstra did more step-
ping back after that come-
back in Cleveland.
Not only did Miami get
Thursday off from prac-
tice, but the Heat also will
not hold their customary
game-day shootaround
Friday morning, likely opt-
ing instead for an after-
noon walkthrough before
the game against the Pis-
tons a game that, late
Thursday, was added to
NBA TV's broadcast sched-
ule because of the interest
in the streak.


With 18 games in March,
Spoelstra was concerned
about how to get through


Buy One
a. t regular price

Get One
For ~~1f h


the rigors of such a jam-
packed month. The team
has largely given up prac-
tices in recent weeks,
opting instead for rest,
with shootarounds being
the primary method of
gameplanning.
Given how Miami was
able to rally against both
Boston and Cleveland- at
the end of a road trip, no
less it seems like Heat
legs are fairly fresh right
now.
"Every team is going to
give us a good shot, no
matter their record, no
matter who's out on the
floor," said James, who had
a triple-double in Cleve-
land, surely to the dismay
of his former hometown
fans. "We're going to get
their best and we should
enjoy that. We should em-
brace that."
James found a way to de-
liver when Miami needed
him most on Wednesday.
He didn't have a great
shooting night and still
wound up with 19 points,
10 rebounds, seven assists,
three steals and two blocks
in the second half alone
against the Cavs. Other
than the reigning MVP,
only three players in the
league have put up those
stats in a full game this
season.
"Us as a team," James
said, "we can make a
run."


I size


SALE


Hanley Ramirez expected

to be- out for 8 weeks


The Associated Press
TUCSON, Ariz. -
Dodgers shortstop Han-
ley Ramirez is scheduled
to undergo surgery Friday
on his right thumb and is
expected to be sidelined
for eight weeks, leaving
Los Angeles to look for
alternatives at shortstop
until he's ready tdoplay.
An MRI indicated that
Ramirez has a torn liga-
ment in his thumb, the
team said Thursday. Dr.
Steve Shin, a sports-med-
icine hand specialist, is
scheduled to perform the
surgery in Los Angeles.
Ramirez was injured
Tuesday night while
playing for the Domini-
can Republic in its vic-
tory over Puerto Rico in
the World Baseball Clas-
sic championship game
in San Francisco.
Dodgers general man-
ager Ned, Colletti said
Ramirez could stat rehab


in about three weeks.
Colletti ruled out an
immediate trade to ad-
dress the temporary loss
of Ramirez.
"Not as of now," Colletti
said.
Dee Gordon and Luis
Cruz appear to be the
leading candidates to
be the opening day
shortstop.
It looked as though
Gordon was headed f6
Triple-A Albuquerque.
Gordon, who appeared
in 87 games last season,
was the Dodgers' start-
ing shortstop last sea-
son until he underwent
surgery on July 6 for a
similar injury to his right
thumb.
Cruz, a former short-
stop, has been playing
third base during the
spring. He was pro-
jected to be at third for
the opener against the
San Francisco Giants at
Dodger Stadium.


'Diabetic Fo are
S-thi Meleare roved
Sy :iabtlic hoes Avalable
ii? i ' .-


*i


* Saturday 9 til 6,


* Monday 9 til 6


KN 'I I lA A 9I
281Rs CakCrdS .* Dt n* 79*345,"ou Fmiy wnd&Opeatd*toe orOvr 6 eas"


MATTRESS

SALE
Twin ..... $59.95 ea. piece
Full ...... $69.95 ea. piece
Queen.... $79.95 ea. piece
King .....$89.95 ea. piece

FRIGIDAIRE
ELECTRIC RANGE
Plug in, plug out burner, See
Through Oven Door
Was $449.


SALE

$299


TAPPAN 30"
ELECTRIC RANGE
Self Cleaning Oven.
Was $549

SALE $295


FRIGIDAIRE
14.8 CU. FT.
CHEST FREEZER
Adjustable Temperature
7 Controls. Was $399.
SALE
$319
9 CU. FT. CHEST
SALE s198


FRIGIDAIRE FRONT
LOAD WASHER
3.5 Cu. Ft. Capacity, 4 Temp.
Was $699
SALE *365
,. 11", .


FRIGIDAIRE DRYER
SALE $288
Other Dryers Starting at $198


FRIGIDAIRE
26 CU. FT.
REFRIGERATOR/
FREEZER
Stainless Steel,
Water & crushed & cubed ice
through door. Was $1099

SALE $598


I. I


FRIGIDAIRE
ELECTRIC 18 CU. FT.
REFRIGERATOR/
FREEZER
New in carton. 2 door, no frost.
Was $629

SALE

$409


ALL RECLINERS
SALE
PRICED --.
TO
MOVE .


'' II-


4-PIECE

BEDROOM SUITE
Headboard, Dresser, Mirror
& Chest. Regular $429.

SALE $299


1 1


2-PIECE LIVING
ROOM SUITE
-SOFA &
LOVESEAT

Was $998.

SALE 398


ALL
DISHWASHERS
SALE PRICED


Starting at

$219


Some One & Two Of A Kind Some Floor Models & Demos Scratch & Dent



(Across From Eye Center South)
LARGEST SELECTION OF APPLIANCES & FURNITURE IN THE WIREGRASS!
Y F :LO','P&0 ;- S F, O.- 6 'S D D, ... S-
Yt.!d tT ltt .ri ,,: ", F f:D 0 46 Y*. r ,, r ,. i ,


Loaw ]fice policy


334-793-3045
Bring us the best you can find for any merchandise vie
care, if vwe don't beat it, ve'l gi.'e you the item FREE!


BIG DAYS! Friday 9 til 6,


4-PIECE GLASS BUNK BEDS
DINETTE TABLE Regular $399
with 4 chairs in box. Was $299


- - I I --


I I =I1


~'~iiS~rc












JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
WCELA, TObM \ KG
WE ARE L 1O Nb IV i^ ^ (


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE


tELLO, IS THIS CHIEF
METEOROLOGIST
WINK SUMMERS?
WINK! NUMBER ONE
FAN NATE WRIGHT HERE!

/l'


CONGRATULATIONS ON
GETTING YOUR. OLD
JOB BACK; WINK'
I'VE WATCHED YoU
EVERY NIGHT THIS
WEEK, AND YOUR.
FORECASTS HAVE BEEN
AWESOME


1 1


)UP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
2 2013 Rc SrR oskiDasl by UnversalUnck
Ae LeaReo IN stusToRY
CLass TrPaq T-ar Tue.- T
ANCIENT PoMaN INFAr-TRY l. .ie\e IT
WIas NeapRL uNBeTaB Le.. ,--


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


,AUD 15 THAT... IT 1!
A TAhTALIZI O TASTE OF
IMMORTALITY!





C-


MAYBE YOU'VE HAD 8bOA&H
RESVERATROL FOR OOW!


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
MARK MY WORDS, OOP, ONE DAY YOURb --
COMPULSION TO PROVOKE THE DINOS
15 GONNA GET OUTTA CONTROL, AND) I1
i.L OF MOO WILL BE AT RISK r L _
a^s- r-woo/R wie *-s s


THAT A BABY BY PAUL TRAP
0A4 BoY! Hwc Fw
CoAE TE FoRST DREXEL
-^E L UPSETS DUKE!
L-ET'oS SE. ,,oa e '-Y
oc>\tsc=// \^- = I \ Q-'


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER
-^---' '~
| m0.
0r7 -


3-2 Lau- ngSl, k Ir.enacna D he, lS; Un.ve-sal UC hck Ic US 20 i

"Now that you've cut off my electricity,
how do you expect me to find
my checkbook in the dark?"


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Meadow
rodent
5 Dress
bottom
8 Sierra
Madre gold
11 Assumed
name
13Famous
Khan
14 Hardly any
15Turn loose
(2 wds,)
16 optimistic
18 Place of
exile
20 Speech
problems
21 Like the flu
23 Barbecue
extra
24 Fly catcher
25 Superman's
attire
27 Charles
Lamb
31 Paycheck
abbr.
32 Bond's
alma mater
33 Monthly
expense
34 "Et tu"
time
36 Southern
and Blyth
38 Dye vessel


39 Windshield
option
40 "Da"
opposite
41 Traveler's
refuge
42 So far
44Thick
46 Metal grate
49 Harp kin
50 Land
52 Fencing
needs
56 Ms.
Thurman
of films
57 Pester
58Well site
59 Hosp.
employee
60 Bad-mouth
61 Rustic road

DOWN
1 Comic
strip prince
2 Yea, to a
Smatador
3 Found a
perch
4 Gung-ho
5 Merry
sound
(hyph.)
6 Kind of trip
7 Tree for
autumn
color


Answer to Previous Puzzle


10 Birds ofD

E V

CHOM PS
RO UIS T
ALL SE
WI EDIS L
preyV

17 Alpine peAM
MIDST







19 Obvious
8 Switch
positions
9 Enlist
again
(hyph.)
10 Birds of
prey
12 Comfort
17 Alpine peak
19 Obvious
21"Aida"
composer
22 "Peer Gynt'
creator
23 Famous
Teddy
24 Iota
26 Polo heed
28 Denims
29 Foolish
30 Memo abbr
35 Panache


YIUICLCIA
H|U|R'RAIYR
A RIGrY LE
LUTE
IL DULL
ES' E MAEE

IDEALS
I I D EY L

46Od RD Ima
OSE
AGENDA
EATTE
FREOIN
37Sound
system
43 Veldt
grazer
45 herpa's
home
46 Old Roman
province
k 47Mounties
48 Persia,
today
49 Chair parts
51 Moo goo
pan
53NASA
counterpart
54 One, to
Fritz
55 Weather-
vane dir.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


3-22 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"XHLCR ECSGLHM CHL SNR XHLCR

YLGCOML ND RVLKH RLGV'SKWOL,

:RVLF CHL XHLCR YLGCOML ND RVLKH

TCMMKNS." PCHRVC XHCVCP


Previous Solution: "I want to give back ... I want to set up orphanages for
underprivileged and abused children." Lindsay Lohan
TODAY'SCLUE: A slenbe
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-22


Horoscopes

ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- As long as you don't ex-
pect Rome to be built in a
day, your chances for get-
ting much of your work
completed are excellent.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Friends can ask favors
of you that they dare not
ask of others. They know
you're the kind of person
who'll help out in any way
you can.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Your popularity is trend-
ing upward. Even those
who have treated you shab-
bily in the past are likely to
suddenly shower you with
friendship.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- You should focus your
attention and efforts on
meaningful objectives.
LEO (July 23-Aug..22) -
Regardless of what is going
on in your life, maintain a
philosophical outlook.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Some significant ben-
efits might come your way,
but they won't be of your
own making.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- If you need to make a
difficult decision, seek a
friend who has previously
offered you wise advice.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.22)
- Adequate help will man-
ifest for a difficult develop-
ment that you thought you
would have to manage on
your own. Take advantage
of it.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Being bold and
enterprising could cause
others to think that you're
taking huge, unwise risks.
However, you'll be aware
of your limitations and will
act accordingly.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) The nearer you get
to fulfilling your expecta-
tions, the luckier you'll
become.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Your best asset will
your ability to improve
upon the ideas of others.
Good or bad, you'll be able
to make your co-workers
schemes better.
PISCES (Feb.20-March20)
- Conditions continue to
look extremely impressive
where your financial inter-
ests are concerned. Keep
searching for new ways to
add to your income. Lady
Luck will help.


* g*:"^ "9?11 ;,


Dear Annie: I grew up with a sister who
had substance abuse problems. While
I studied hard, "Carla" dropped out of
school and led a life of partying. My
parents always made sure she was well
provided for. Every time they gave her
something expensive, my mother would
say, "Don't worry, you will get the same in
my will."
Then one day, my parents told me
they had signed over the family home
to Carla. She told them I had agreed to
it, but I never discussed it with her. But
when I said this to my parents, they
yelled and screamed and called me a
liar. They said it didn't matter anyway
because they would make it up to me in
the will. They then told me the value of
the house for the sake of the will, which
was a quarter bf its actual worth. I sug-
gested they get the house appraised, and
they became angry. They also lied to our
relatives about what happened, although
when my parents die, it will be obvious
that I received nothing from them.


Bridge


In bridge, it is a "rule" that if you bid a suit on
the first round of the auction and partner does
not raise your suit, then, if you rebid it in on the
second round, you are indicating at least a six-
card suit. You do your utmost not to rebid in a
five-card suit. W
However, these days experts permit a rebid in
a five-card suit by responder if opener reverses
on round two. V
What is a reverse? Assuming the auction is *
uncontested, opener bids first one suit, then &
a second suit, and if responder wishes to give
preference to opener's first-bid suit, he must
go to the three-level three clubs in the given
sequence. After a one-over-one response, a re-
verse shows a very strong hand; usually 18 to 20
high-card points.
Here, when North rebid two; South continued
with two no-trump to show his spade stoppers;
and North raised to game.
West led the spade queen. What did South
do?
Declarer had seven top tricks: two spades,
four diamonds and one club. Realizing that he
did not have time to play on clubs, South went
after two heart tricks. So, he played a heart to.
dummy's 10. When West proved to have the
jack, declarer took nine tricks.


Annie, I have been a good son to my
parents for my entire life. How can they
do this to me? This hurts so much that it's
the first thing I think of when I wake up
in the morning. I am ready to walk away
from my family. I deserve better.
Left-Out Son

Dear Left Out: You do deserve bet-
ter, but your parents feel so guilty and
obligated toward Carla that they give
her everything in a misguided attempt
to protect her from herself. You cannot
fix this. But you can forgive them and
move forward. Accept that you are not
likely to get an equitable share of their
estate. If there is a specific item that you
would like to have, it's OK to ask your
parents whether you can have it now,
and tell them that you do not expect any-
thing more. Once the inheritance is off
the table, you will be able to have a rela-
tionship with your parents based on who
they are and not on what you deserve to
get as a reward for being a good son.


North \03-22-13
# 63
V K Q 1074
SK85
752
est East
QJ10 9 8752
J952 YA63
743 1092
J9 K Q 10
South
A AK4
Y8
AQJ6
4A8643

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 Pass 1V Pass
2 Pass 2 Pass
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

Opening lead: 4 Q


---------------------


-14B + FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT








www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Friday, March 22, 2013- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850).526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors Is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.
Fo edlnscaltllfe o iitw wjclrda.o


(r ANNOUNCEMENTS



Key West Flordia
April 23-29, 2013
Washington DC/Patriotic Tour
June 27-July 2,2013
Ride The Rails (West Virginia)
July 22-26, 2013
Best of China (Beijing City)
October 15-23 2013



GARAGE SALE: Fri & Sat (8am-2pm)
3821 Thompson Rd. S. of Marianna. Clothes,
H/H items, electronics, jewelry,
dining table w/chairs, couch sets, dressers
MOVING SALE 2131 Aaron Ave. Grand
Ridge Fri. 22, Sat 23 & Sun 24th 8-? dishes,
H/H, bed rm & living rm furn. patio furn,
tools, 2-grill. For directions 850-592-1224.
This and That Yard Sale Sat March 23rd
(8am-12) Parish Hall of St. Luke Episcopal
Church 4362 Lafayette St. Marianna Florida

S$) FINANCIAL.
BUSINESSO O I


Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com
Restaurant For Sale with Lounge and Oyster
Bar. Seats approx 200. Currently doing Good
Business." Owner looking to retire. Financing
available with down payment. $250,000.
Price NEG! Call 334-684-1700 between 8am-
2pm. Home 850-956-2709 from 3pm-7pm

() MERCHANDISE

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671 1440.

3-pc. San Lucas Harness smooth rich faux
leather upholstery, plush comfortable design.
dark brown. 3 yrs old from Ashley Furn, Store
$700. OBO 334-671-1778 706-718-7905

l) PETS & ANIMALS

CFA Registered (3) Persian Himalayan
Blue Point Kittens. Born 1-16 and ready
for their new homes. $250. $350.
Call 334-774-2700 After 10am
Free Cat: F/Calico, very sweet. 850-482-2994

AKC Brittany Spaniels Orange/White. 4 males
and 4 females. Excellent hunting blood line.
(Nolan's Last Bullett). Tails docked and dew
claws have been removed. Will be Ready on
March 29th. Call (229) 724-8839 if interested.
I= AKC Rottweiler puppie (6) 2-F 4-M
Ready April 3rd, deposit to hold.
$500.334-794-2291
S German Shepherd pups
S5$750. AKC reg. 6 weekS.
first shots, health certified,
1 5- German bloodlines. 7 males.
S1 emale. 850-768-9182 or
8'50 849-.3707.
Lab pups: Cute & Cuddly! Yellow & Chocolate.
No papers, but parents on premises. 6 weeks
old. 488-5000 or 488-3979.
SUPER PUPPET SALE! Chihuahua,
Shih-Tzu mix puppies and Morides.
Now taking deposit on Papilions.
334-718-4886 plynn sw.rr.com


LOST DOGS- Due to a
S break in at our home, two
S Welsh Corgis are missing.
Both are male, 3 years old,
G they answer to Freddie
and Eddie, both are were
wearing plain leather collars. They are my
wife's rehab and recovery dogs....please if
found call Corey at 334-726-6500 night or
day.....reward for safe return.
SS Miniature Australian
Shepherd Puppies
Beautifully marked red
merles, blue merle,
black tri and red tri.
Males and Female. $400. $600. NSDR &
ASDR. Call or text for more information.
334-550-9895
Toy Australian Shepherds $500 Only 3 red tri
males available. Reg, 1st shots, wormed.
Facebook, Blondie's Mini Aussie Ranch. 229-
891-3530
( 1 FARMER'S MARKET


GRASS & MILK FED BEEF!!
Freezer Ready Esto meat.
GREAT QUALITY!!
Quarters and Halves. USDA Inspected
ESTO MEATS CALL 850-263-777T



Frozen Green
Peanuts
We also have
S shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
850-573-6594_ 4128 Hwy 231


Bahia seed for sale 4-
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
S or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
Large rolls of Hay for Sale
SBahia & Coastal
f Daytime 334-585-3039,
After 5pm & weekends 585-5418
Quality Coastal Hay; Large Rolls
Fertlized & Weed Control
850-2d9-9145 4-

Cattle: 30 bred cows 3 to 7 years old and
50 bred heifers for sale. Most are Angus and
Brangus cross with a few Charolais cross.
For more information call 334-303-9285.


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to snmal / Custom Thinning
all Pea River Timber
S334-389-2003

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!

i(*) EMPLOYMENT



AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-
MINDED, NEWSPAPER CARRIERS

COTTONDALE
Earn an average of

$850
per month

Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus
BE YOUR OWN BOSS- 1 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.
Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL
#


Amplifier Fender Bassman, $400, 850-573-5352


Barbies.collectables in box. $ 100. 850-592-2881


Camera Olympus 600UZ, $149, 850-482-7665
Daybed- $100, 850-482-2862
Dolls Porcelain w/stand, $9/ea. 850-482-7665
FREE: Kittens to loving home. multi-colorl-F &
1-M 850-272-4908.
Guitar Alvarez 70's 12 string $150. 850-482-6022
Guitar Dean Elec.& acoustic $200. 850-482-6022.


I GENRAL MPLOYENT


BE YOUR
OWN BOSS

These days being retired doesn't mean
sitting at home doing nothing.

A newspaper route is the perfect way to
supplement your income with only a small
investment of time and big returns in
community service to your own neighbors.

Come by and inquire today about a
newspaper route in your neighborhood.


FLORIDAN
4403 Constitution Lane Marianna, FL 32446


NEED TO

PLACE AN AD?

It's simple, call one of our friendly

Classified representatives

and they will be glad to assist you.


Jeff Gordon Collection. $5.+up. 850-557-0778
Mattress -Cal King Memory, $500, 850-482-2862
Push mower. Antique $99. 850-592-8769
Queen Mattress Set $100. 850-693-0521
Roto Tiller -Honda Rear Tine,$375, 850-573-5352
Tires (4) used P275/55R20 $60. 850-557-0778
Trolling motor -foot control, $300, 850-272-5305
VHS Tapes Bob Ross, etc. $50, 850-482-2862


Sudoku
"!t


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Level: F2[3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit.
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to Thursday's puzzle
369124785
254876931
78 1 5 3 9 4 6 2
495681273
8 3 2 7 4 5 6 1 9
'617392548
9 4 6 2 1 3 8 5 7
573968124


3/22/13


I'\\\
-sir ~ i /


Place an Ad


Fast, easy, no pressure
24 hours a day, 7 days a week!


B Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


- ----- -- -
7 2

658

63 8

7 3 6

68 57

1 7 4

5 34



8 2 3
-- -
_ _Ja9 __
O 2___ 3


m mIB IBI


Ldj-"-c^t^^-#


I- --- -- II II~-- ---- 1_ ~_1_1_111_ --~__l____i_---m~----------------_-_I--~I;


- -










6 B Friday. March 22. 2013 Jackson Count Floridan
j~f3S3S3ESESSHW-.


ASSISTANT FIRE CHIEF
Interim position
Associate's degree in fire
science or a closely related
field is required. Bachelor's
Degree in Business
Administration, Public
Administration or Fire Service administra-
tion or a related field from an accredited
four-year college or university is preferred.
Three years experience in fire suppression,
prevention and training is required.
Certification as a Florida Fire Inspector.
$36,526.86/yr.
Special Requirements: Valid Florida's
driver's license prior to employment.
Certification as a Paramedic, by the
Emergency Medical Division of the Florida
Department of Professional Regulations.
Certification in Fire Fighting Standards.

CUSTODIAN
Some experience in custodial work; or
any equivalent combination of training and
experience which provides the required
knowledge, skills and abilities. Light
maintenance required. $15,946.95/yr.

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES TECHNICIAN
Minimum Training and Experience
Education and Experience:
Graduation from high school and some
experience driving a vehicle with a manual
transmission, pulling and backing trailers.
Two years experience in building trades,
landscaping, recreation or maintenance
work; or an equivalent combination of
training and experience, which provides the
required knowledge, skills and abilities.
$20,591.00/yr.
Special Requirements: Must have a valid
Florida driver's license, CDL preferred.
Must be'able to work a flexible schedule to
accommodate seasonal hours at the Blue
Springs Recreational Park (Requires
weekend supervision of seasonal
employees). Must be able to obtain and
maintain a certification from the Florida
Department of Corrections to work state
inmates within one year of employment.

LIFEGUARDS
Blue Springs summer employment.
Opening mid-May. Must be certified by the
American Red Cross in Life Guarding. Fee
reimbursed upon successful completion of
training. Lifeguard exp. Preferred. Exp. in
cash register operation, funds balancing
and working with the public is desired.
Must be able to work varied schedule; from
10:30 am To 6pm Tues. to Sat., & 12:30pm
to 6pm on Sun. Later hours for special
events. Salary $8.75 to $9.75 per hour
depending on exp.

Deadline Date: March 25, 2013

Applications accepted at Jackson County
BOCC, Human Resources Dept.,
2864 Madison St, Marianna FL 32448.
1www.jacksoncountyfl.net/
EOE/AA/Vet Pref/ADA/ Drug-Free Workplace


EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


LOOK
FOLLOW YOUR PASSION! Become a Daycare
Director 6 wk. Homestudy Course $300.
Call Mrs. Alaina 334-714-4942 9am 5pm


Enrolling Now!
STraining in
FORTIT ElectricalTrades,
Fr TIIS Medical
COLLEGE Assisting,Pharmacy
Technology and More!
Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 for consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

i RESIDENTIAL
lI)L REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


COTTONDALE VILLA
APARTMENTS
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR 1 & 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS RENTAL
Assistance Available to Quailified Appliants
CALL: (850) 352-2281
TDD USERS 1-800-548-2456
Office Opened Tuesday & Thursday
EQUAL HOUSING 3111 Willow St.
OPPORTUNITY Cottondale, FL 32431

EQUAL 0W 0ANO O lTTI


mfeed a Mew omere?
Check out the Clagsifiedr



7 1 .

HE


G.M. Properties of PC
Beach 800-239-2059
Fully Furnished Condos
& Townhouses
near Pier Park.


2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $250 nt.
Portside Resort starting @ $125.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
www.gmproperties.com


GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL. Call 850-482-4663

tr I
P EQUAL TlOuESNC. OTOIUNISH


2/2 3136 Aycock Rd. 900 sq. ft washer/dryer,
flat screen TV's $650. mo. $650. dep. utilities,
dish, garbage water & sewage w/pool
(Appointment Only) 850-352-2951 850-573-1864


4 1BR/1BA, nice clean apt in town screened
porch, large yard $450. mo.
No pets. 850-557-2000 for more info.
Ar 2/1 Upstairs apart Clean, No pets, Washer
supplied. $475 mo. & 2/1 Mobile Hm.
priv. drive, sun deck $400. mo.
n 850-718-5089/482-4172/624-7407 4




1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4,
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
4 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Large 2BR Cottage Home Completely Updated
with family room. minutes from town off 73
North. Big fenced yard and all electric. $550.
Mo + Dep. Call 765-425-5288

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountryliving.com.
850-209-8847 4
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 LeAve Message

2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595

I 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maintincl.
4850-593-4700 4
Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 Located between
Grand Ridge & Sneads. Includes water &
garbage. $360. Mo 850-573-0308 4

IT'S AS EASY AS
1. CALL
2. PLACE YOUR AD
3. GET RESULTS


r.. .


SBUSINERVS
& SERVICE


BES HE3RDEN


Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washirg Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Now serving Jackson Co.
FREE ESTIMATES 4 334-798-0687


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME


Clay O'Neal's L R
Land Clearing, Inc. AmmONas Dm
ALTHA, PL Aw 4omiE
850.-67-902 -S4XFWSWHO
Cell 850-832-5055 loYSF


'' RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Poultry Farm for Sale 4 houses, Poultry farm
and 5000 sf residence, 2 car garage, 64 acre,
U.S. Hwy. frontage, huge barn, generator, Trac-
tor, farming equipment, $1,100,000 for more in-
fo. Kaan 334-596-8311




:ri i *I *, = I
VA NO T


RECREATION


X atreme Packages From
eme V$4,995
Uw c All Welded
Boats All Aluminum Boats
www.xtremeindustries.com


Triton '07 188SF Fish and Ski: Mercury Optimax
150HP, 24 volt trolling motor, trailer included,
garage kept, like new conditions, less than
150 hours, $19,000. Call 334-685-3921

Fifth Wheel: 1994 American Star 36 ft Fifth
Wheel. $8,500 OBO. 334-477-2046.

(r) -TRANSPORTATION


Chevrolet 1967 Camaro SS/RS: restored on
original solid body, vin#124377L123529, custom
built big block 454, cranberry red, new cranber-
ry interior, to many restoration items too
mention. Priced at $24,500. See pics and info at
dkestate.wordpress.com. Doug 334-237-1916


$0 Down/lst Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
ok Repos, Slow Credit,
4 Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade Anything!
RIDE TODAY! Steve Pope 334-803-9550
FREE $25. gas giveaway with pruchase
BMW 1995, leather int. good gas mil. green in
color, 4-door $3,200. firm 334-793-2347
BMW 2005 X3 white with tan interior, 165,000
miles, V6, auto, excellent condition, full sun-
roof. $10,000, 850-263-4913
CHEVY 1995 CAPRICE-Clean, runs great, cold
air, fully loaded $3,800 OBO 334-355-1085
Chevy 2010 Impala, Great family car with great
fuel mileage, fully loaded. $300 down $300 per
month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.
Chevy 2012 Malibu, like new! $200 down, $249
per month. Call Steve 791-8243
---...ii --. Corvette 2003 Z06 50th
S; ." -. Anniversary Edition
niMetallic Blu 6 speed, 405
Shp. 40.500 miles, Excellent
Condition $19,995. 334-
475-3735 after 6PM
FORD 2007 EXPLORER XLT "IRONMAN -
SILVER, 37,000 MILES. SHOWROOM QUALITY,
NEW CONDITION, CAN BE SEEN AT LEMON
LOT, 166 WESTGATE PARKWAY, DOTHAN, AL
AFTER 2-24-2013. PHONE 334-699-1666


CLASSIFIED


Your guide to great local
Sf businesses & services ,




'IRVICE DIRECTORY 1

Call 526-3614 to place your a


SES
;ES


Lawn Care &
Outdoor Property
Maintenance
s Free Estimates
ftll lirAdl.. ORn cI-C InnA


You CALL... WE COME To You!
RED'S MOBILE
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE,,..
850-209-9713 :
EDWARD MAGGI, OWNER


taii woooyU oIoPu-uA wJIM
I Cill VU U y (8 0305I -3 71



This Mon(hs Special B )

$31i9500 PORTABLE BUILDINGS
35 Years in Business LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS I NonTH FL[RIDA
ft-. i.-h., InesSilica q 199
ft W e M O v P iJlM a :I B u r j' b ,. W ,
OVER
DIFFERENT SIZES!
5 526 6S U DS YOU CAN CHOOSE
t.1 F llf COLOR & STYLE!
'.C"*ri*r.ormog Sy 8 7(7837)78W
...... .. F pO"a"'menr 3nly '--- 'O---S 0,747-6974
r-: roomers/stylists 2 919 Hwy 231 North Panama City, FL
SLisa 5hores &Tammy Martabano
vP0 o ast C ww.imdogeinude.neit
for pricing O book your appointment today1


"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
7c,-7'


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAN

jcfloridan.com



monster

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


www.'.JCF[ORID N.com

Cutlass Olds 1994 Ciera 4-dr. GREAT cond!
needs nothing above average $2500. OBO
Dodge Dakota 1996 very good truck,
cold AC new tires $2500. OBO
-. WANTED TO BUY Dodge Dakota
quad cab 1996-2002 334-702-9566
Ford 1985 Mustang White, good condition, all
original parts. 90,951 miles. Call 334-494-0837
or email bccolwell2@aol.com
Honda 2007 CRV EX, Super Sharp! Must sell,
$200 down, $269 per month. Call Steve 791-
8243.
Honda 2008 Fit, low miles, under warranty,
must sell! $200 down, $209 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 714-0028.
Hyundai 2009 Elantra, sunroof, loaded Must
Sell! $200 down, $199 per month. Call Ron Ellis
714-0028.
Mazda 2010 6 S Touring
21,000 miles. 4 cyl.
Silver with gray leather
interior. One owner,
S non-smoker, garage kept.
Beautiful inside and out. $14,900. 334-806-6004.
Mitsubishi 2012 Galant, Like new! Must sell!
$200 down, $259 per month. Call Ron Ellis 334-
714-0028.
Nissan 2010 Sentra, Navigation, Leather, Sun
roof, Must sell! $200 down, $249 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Toyota 2010 Yaris 4 dr. Sedan A/C,
stero system, 82K miles, good on gas
$10,500. 850-592-2937
Toyota 2011 Yaris: silver with black interior, 4
door sedan, bucket seats, one owner, automat-
ic, 5980 miles, 40MPG Hwy, $13,995. Call or
Text 334-618-6588 LIKE NEW!!
Toyota 2012 Corolla, Great gas saver, fully
loaded, low miles, very nice car. $200 down,
$250 per month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.


2011 Harley Davidson
4 :Super Glide Custom
black, garage kept,
S10K mi. full factory
warranty. Driving lights,
passenger back rest, luggage rack, quick
release windshield, anit-theft system with
/pager, cruise pegs, oil pressure gauge,
dust cover included
$12,900 334-598-0061 or 334-432-4372
Absolutely Pristine-
You will not be disappointed *
Harley Davidson 2000 Ultra Classic Tour Glide:
loaded plus extras, blue and silver, only 8500
miles, new tires. $8,300. Call 334-585-5396
Harley-Davidson 2003 Fat Boy 2003 100th An-
niversary Edition Harley Davidson Fat Boy.
Turquoise and navy with gold inlay custom
paint. $8,000 in chrome added to the bike. Al-
so comes with the original tank and fender,
which is gray blue, motorcycle lift, touring bag,
custom cleaning kit, many extras and special
tools! Call 334-494-0837 or email
bccolwell2@aol.com
Harley Davidson 2007 Heritage Softtail Classic
exc. cond, new tires, new battery,
lots of chrome $12,500.
334-712-0493 or w-334-793-8028
Harley Davidson 2008 Sportster XL1200: 6740
miles, with trailer. $5,000. OBO. Call 850-258-
3148
S Honda 2005 VT 1100C
V,' Shadow Spirit: black and
.r -' chr,:,m-. good condition,
l hie new. 3400 miles, one
owner, clean title never
wrecked, new tires.
Asking $6,300. Call 334-596-1171
Suzuki 1988 650CC Savage/Boulevard:
completely rebuilt engine, bored .20 over, new
brakes, clutch and more .24 inch seat height,
weigth 3501bs. Very Nice. $2500. 850-722-8962.


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-a- mome


11


-


11


CLEANING & HOUSEKEEPINGI~r r




Call Debrafor a quote(


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wwwJCFLORIDANcom


Chevrolet 2004 Tahoe LT 1 OWNER, DARK
GREEN, 5.3 V8, 2WD, AUTO TRANS, ALL PWR,
FULLY LOADED, LEATHER, ON-STAR, XM RADIO,
TOW PACKAGE, REAR A/C, 3RD ROW SEATS,
LIKE NEW. ALL MAINTAINANCE RECORDS. ASK-
ING $9,750, 334-347-0600 AFTER 6 PM
Lincoln 2006 Navigator,
Loaded with all options,
asking $14,000..
334-618-2695.


4000 Ford Tractor good condition, new engine
$4,250. 334-791-0700


Chevrolet 2005 Silverado Ext Cab 1500: blue,
automatic V6 4.3, 6ft bed with Rhino liner,
good condition, one owner, low mileage with
only 43k, $10,200. NEG. Call 334-596-4782 -


Chevrolet Silverado LS,
step side, ext cab, 4
door, V-8, automatic,
loaded, tool box, side
steps, 134,850 miles, like
new. $9995. Call 334-790-7959.


Dodge 2000 Dakota RT: black, fully loaded, 5.9
liter 360 Magnum, Bridgestone tires, beautiful
and rare truck, pampered and well kept, runs
and drives excellent & clean carfax available.
Serious inquiries only. $7,200. Call 334-585-0121
Please leave a message.
Ford 2003 Ranger Edge ext cab good condition
89K miles, $5,900. 334-446-0044 Susan
Ford 2010 F250 Super Duty Super Cab Lariat:
white, fully loaded, 4X4, low miles, excellent
condition $37,500. Call 334-685-2318
GMC 1986 2500 Series: 4 door, 2 seater but no
back seat, 8 cyl, 91k miles, one owner, garage
kept, very good condition. $3,800. Call 334-792-
3756
International 1995 4900: Flat Bed Truck, DT466,
AC, 125k miles. $6,000. Call 334-897-6346 or
334-406-7200
John Deere 1981 Backhoe and Gooseneck
20ft Trailer: $6,000. Call 334-714-0586
Massey Ferguson Tractor md#1215 w/MF220 \
5 ft. mower, good cond. $6700. 334-797-8523.
Nissan 2000 Frontier ext cab 2-wheel drive,
auto, 104K miles, $5500. 080 334-726-1215.
Toyota 1994 Tacoma 4-wheel drive as whole or
parts. 334-689-9436.
Two Row Covington Plnters good condition,
$700; KMC 4-Row Planters, good cond. with 3
sets of seed plates, $1,600. 334-791-4742


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
9v4M 's 24 6 Aw 7"(&f
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


,a


CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING ) 334-792-8664
r ---------------------------------
S* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
334-794-9576 or 344-7914714


(~)


LEGALS


LF160074
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
PROJECT NAME: Annual Unit Price Contract for
Paving and Miscellaneous Bid No. 1213-Eng 10
Sealed bids, submitted in triplicate, will be re-
ceived by the Board of County Commissioners
of Jackson County, Florida (Owner), until 2:00
p.m. (Central Time) April 11, 2013 at the County
Engineering (County Engineer, Larry Alvarez),
2828 Owens Street, Marianna, FL 32446 for the
construction of the following described Proj-
ect:
Annual Unit Price Contract for Paving and Mis-
-cellaneous Work
The Work includes all the items listed and all
items need to complete the work on a unit
price basis to the FDOT and County Standards
including mobilization, pavement preparation,
sweeping, water, general conditions, mainte-
nance of traffic, and stormwater pollution pre-
vention, along with all the items listed in the
Proposal Form. Any Work needed to complete
the Work Items that are not listed are intended
to be included in the items that are listed in the
Proposal Form.
A Pre-Bid Meeting will Not be held
The deadline for receipt of questions will be
April 8, 2013 at 2:00 PM Central Time. Ques-
tions must be submitted in writing to the Coun-
ty Engineer e-maill lalvarez@jacksoncountyfl.c
om: fax (850) 482-9063) with a copy to the
Jeannie Bean (email jbean@jacksoncountyfl.co
m).
Bids will be opened and recorded at 2:10 PM
(or immediately thereafter) on April 11, 2013 at
the Jackson County Board of County Commis-
sioners Board Room at 2864 Madison Street.
Bids may be submitted to the County Engineer
at the Board Room from 1:50 PM until 2:10 PM
Central Time.
Bid documents will be open for public inspec-
tion after noon on March 21, 2013 at the Road
and Bridge office at 2828 Owens Street. Bid
documents must be obtained from:
County Engineer
Attn: Larry Alvarez
2828 Owens Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 482-9677
upon payment of $ no charge per set which
amount constitutes the cost of reproduction
and handling. This payment will not be refund-
ed.
The Owner reserves the right to waive any in-
formality or to reject any or all bids. Each Bid-
der must deposit with his/her bid, security in
the amount, form and subject to the conditions
provided in the Information for Bidders.
Sureties used for obtaining bonds must appear
as acceptable according to the Department of
Treasury Circular 570.
No bid may be withdrawn for a period of sixty
days after the scheduled closing time for re-
ceipt of bids.
To the extent applicable to this project, atten-
tion of Bidders is particularly called to the re-
quirements as to conditions of employment to
be observed and minimum wage rates to be
paid under the Contract, Section 3, Segregated
Facilities, Section 109 Executive Order 11246,
and all applicable laws and regulations of the
Federal government and State of Florida, and
bonding and insurance requirements.


IN PARTICULAR, BIDDERS SHOULD NOTE THE
REQUIRED ATTACHMENTS AND CERTIFICA-
TIONS TO BE EXECUTED AND SUBMITTED WITH
THE FORM OF BID PROPOSAL.
DATE: 03/14/2013
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE/FAIR HOUSING
JURISDICTION
LF160079
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND
FOR JACKSON COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2012CA 000411
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, acting through
the United States Department of Agriculture,
Rural Development, f/k/a Farmers Home Ad-
Tninistration, a/k/a Rural Housing Service,
Plaintiff,
vs.
j, a single person; FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK
OF ATLANTA; and JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA,
Defendants.


Jackson County Floridan *


ILGANOICS I


NOTICE OF SALE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure en-
tered on January 24, 2013, by the above enti-
tled Court in the above styled cause, the under-
signed Clerk of Court or any of his duly author-
ized deputies, will sell the property situated in
JACKSON County, Florida, described as:
Lot 10, HUNTERS TRACE SUBDIVISION, PHASE I,
as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 42, of the Pub-
lic Records of Jackson County, Florida at public
outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash
on April 4, 2013, at the front lobby of the north
side of the Jackson County Courthouse 4445
Lafayette Street, Marianna, FL 32446, begin-
ning at 11:00 A.M., subject to all ad valorem
taxes and assessments for the real property
described above.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE.


Friday, March 22, 2013-7 B
Friday, March 22, 2013- 7 B


REQUESTS FOR ACCOMMODATIONS BY PER-
SONS WITH DISABILITIES
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator, Bay Coun-
ty Courthouse, P.O. box 1089, Panama City,
Florida 32402, (850)747-5338, at least 7 days be-
fore your scheduled court appearance, or im-
mediately upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-
paired, call 711.
DATED on January 1, 2013.
DALE R. GUTHRIE
Clerk of Circuit Court
P.O. Box 510
Marianna, FL 32446
BY:Renee Laramore
Deputy Clerk


U' U


Extra


Income


Needed?





Earn $800 to $1,000 per month as an


independent contractor for the Dothan Eagle







Early morning hours required


Dependable transportation &


backup transportation required


Current automobile insurance required


Current driver's license required


Good record keeping skills highly recommended





Routes maybe available


in the following areas:




Enterprise & Elba areas call


Roger 334-393-9702




Ozark, Clio, Brundidge & Troy areas call

Blair 334-712-7945




Malvern, Hartford & Geneva areas call

Ehrike 334-702-6021




Webb & Columbia area call

Ivory 334-702-6026




Dothan area call


Jennie 334-712-7914,


CLASSIFIED


. w. r ul







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NCAA Tournament Roundup



Marquette escapes Davidson in tourney


The Associated Press

LEXINGTON, Ky.
-Vander Blue's layup
with one second left
capped Marquette's rally
from a nine-point deficit
and gave the third-seeded
Golden Eagles a 59-58
victory over Davidson
Thursday in the NCAA
tournament.
Blue and Jamil Wil-
son made consecutive
3-pointers to bring
Marquette within 58-
57 with 11 seconds left.
The Golden Eagles then
caught a huge break when
De'Mon Brooks' long
inbounds pass went out of
bounds at midcourt with
5.5 seconds left, providing
another opportunity.
Blue took full advan-
tage after gettingWilson's
inbounds pass, driving
left and finding room for
the winning basket. He
then sealed Marquette's
improbable win by steal-
ing Davidson's last-ditch
inbounds pass at mid-
court to set off a celebra-
tion among players and
Golden Eagles fans at
Rupp Arena.
Blue scored seven of
Marquette's final 11 points
to finish with 16. Wilson
added 14 points as the
Golden Eagles (24-8) won
for the fifth time in six
games and advanced to
face Butler in Saturday's
third-round game.
Jake Cohen's 20 points
led Davidson (26-8), who.
seemed in control leading
49-40 with 6/2 minutes left
before Marquette rallied.
Oregon 68
Oklahoma St. 55
SAN JOSE, Calif. Da-
myean Dotson scored 17
points and Arsalan Kazemi
added 11 points and 17
rebounds to help 12th-
seeded Oregon extend a
run that began in the Pac-
12 tournament by beating
fifth-seeded Oklahoma
in the second round of


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Marquette guard Vander Blue (13) scores the winning basket against Davidson forward Jake
Cohen (15) in the final second of their NCAA tournament game Thursday in Lexington, Ky.
Marquette won 59-58.


the NCAA tournament on
Thursday.
Dominic Artis scored 13
points and helped frus-
trate Oklahoma State star
freshman Marcus Smart
on the defensive end to
give the Ducks (27-8) their
first tournament win in six
years.
Smart came into the
game with the hype of
a top NBA prospect but
was held to 14 points on
5 for 13 shooting for the
Cowboys (24-9).
Gonzaga 64
Southern 58
SALT LAKE CITY-A
March Madness warm-up
turned into a great escape
for Gonzaga.
The Zags got pushed
to the limit by Southern
on Thursday, pulling out
a victory in the closing
minutes to avoid becom-
ing the first No. 1 seed to
lose to'a 16 in the NCAA
tournament..
Kelly Olynyk led the Zags
(32-2) with 21 points. They
play No. 9 Wichita State on
Saturday.


But it was a pair of 3-
pointers one by Gary
Bell Jr., the next by Kevin
Pagnos that staked the
Bulldogs to a 62-58 lead
onlynmoments after the
game was tied at 56 with
3:45 left.
Derick Beltran had 21
points to lead Southern
(23-10).
Memphis 54
Saint Mary's 52
AUBURN HILLS, Mich.
- Matthew Dellavedova's
3-pointer from the right
wing sailed long as time
expired, allowing sixth-
seeded Memphis to hold
on for a win over 11th-
seeded Saint Mary's on
Thursday.
The Tigers (31-4) led
by 15 in the first half but
nearly gave the game
away in the final sec-
onds. With Saint Mary's
(28-7) down five, Eividas
Petrulis banked in a 3-
pointer with 3.1 seconds
to play.
Memphis then lost the
ball when Jordan Giusti
deflected the inbound


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la-Th~'~r$


If you are an area church that would like to
be featured in this year's edition contact the
advertising department of the Jackson County
Floridan at (850) 526-3614
or email salesjcfloridan.com.

Deadline for advertising is April 12, 2013.


pass off Joe Jackson of the
Tigers and out of bounds.
Dellavedova, the career
leader in scoring for the
Gaels, was able to get a
shot off from in front of
his team's bench, but it
was well long, missing
everything.
Wichita State 73
Pittsburgh 55
SALT LAKE CITY- Mal-
colm Armstead scored 22
points, Cleanthony Early
added 21 and ninth-seed-
ed Wichita State defeated
eighth-seeded Pittsburgh
on Thursday in the sec-
ond round of the NCAA
tournament.
Freshman Steven Adams
led Pitt (24-9) with 13
points and 11 rebounds.
Call Hall added 11 points
for the Shockers (27-8),
who face the winner of the
No. 1-ranked Gonzaga-
Southern game.
The Shockers forced Pitt
into 15 turnovers and held
the Panthers to 35 percent
shooting, including 1 of 17


from 3-point range.
Pitt's leading scorer, Tray
Woodall, missed his first
four shots and finished
with two points. He shot 1
of 12, including 0 of 5 from
beyond the arc, with five
turnovers.
Butler 68
Bucknell 56
LEXINGTON, Ky.
- Andrew Smith had a
double-double including a
career-high 16 rebounds,
Roosevelt Jones added 14,
points and Butler made
its free throws down the
stretch to hold off upset-
minded Bucknell in the
second round of the NCAA
tournament on Thursday.
After trailing for most
of the game, 11th-seeded
Bucknell got back into it
with a 19-2 second-half
run. But after Joe Will-
man's jumper cut Butler's
lead to 43-42 with 6:56
left, the Bison (28-6) went
almost five minutes with-
out scoring. Butler went
18-of-20 at the line in the
last 4:43.
Willman scored a
career-high 20 points for
Bucknell, but the Bison
couldn't overcome an off
day by two-time Patriot
League Player of the Year
Mike Muscala. Bucknell's
all-time leading scorer
had nine points, only the
second time this season
he'd failed to reach double
figures.
Michigan State 65
Valparaiso 54
AUBURN HILLS, Mich.
- Derrick Nix had 23
points and a career-high
15 rebounds to help power
third-seeded Michigan
State past 14th-seeded
Valparaiso on Thursday.
The Spartans went on a
26-5 run in the first half to
take control.
Michigan State (26-8)
will play the winner of
the Memphis-St. Mary's


game on Saturday when
Spartans coach Tom Izzo
will be shooting for a spot
in the round of 16 for the
fifth time in six years.
The Crusaders (26-8)
were no match for Michi-
gan State in their first
NCAA tournament in nine
years, just as they weren't
as a first-round loser
in 2000 to the eventual
champion Spartans.
Valpo had enough size to
match up, but didn't have
enough strength.
Saint Louis 64
New Mexico State 44
SAN JOSE, Calif.
Dwayne Evans scored
24 points, Cody Ellis
added 12 points and
fourth-seeded Saint Louis
overwhelmed New Mexico
State in the second round
of the NCAA tournament
Thursday.
Playing through the
death of Rick Majerus in
December, Saint Louis
reached another mark
for its late coach. The
Billikens (28-6) eclipsed
the 1988-89 team's
school record of 27
victories.
Evans shot 11 of 16 and
finished a point shy of his
career best to propel Saint
Louis past 7-foot-5 New
Mexico State freshman
Sim Bhullar. The Billik-
ens held Bhullar to four
points, 11 rebounds and
three blocks.
Bandja Sy had 17 points
and nine rebounds for
the 13th-seeded Aggies
(24-11), who shot just 28
percent.


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18B FRIDAY, MARCH 22. 2013


SPORTS


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