<%BANNER%>

Jackson County Floridan ( March 20, 2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
March 20, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01041

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
March 20, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01041

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text



Pope Francis: Protect
the poor, the Earth

IUA P I forming more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online







i ORIDAN
;ORI Si


Chemical weapons'
possibly used in Syria
~ 5-~-~eSI3 Th.3~t


Vol. 90 No. 67


/IMarimatn


Man charged with 2 counts of child abuse


Spankings lead to injuries, DCF investigation


From staff reports
Police say a Marianna man
turned himself in on charges of
child abuse after two children in
his care sustained injuries that
prompted an investigation by
Florida Department of Children


and Families. 6-year-old boy.
On Feb. 15, the Marianna Po- She said they were just leaving
lice Department report that they the doctor, who found injuries
received a call from a DCF inves- on the child's buttocks that were
tigator who advised that she was indicative of a severe beating
going to meet with a "Child Pro- with a thin, blunt object.
tection" interviewer at her office, The interview resulted in the
to conduct an interview with a discovery that not only did the


boy have injuries due to a beat-
ing, but his 3-year-
old sister also had
injuries on her
buttocks.
In court docu-
ments, three
separate spank-
Simpson ing incidents are
described by the
investigating officer.


On Feb. 13, defendant Teddy
Maurice Simpson, 24, repeatedly
struck the 3-year-old girl on her
buttocks with a wooden back-
scratcher. He struck her again
on again on Feb. 14, this time for
defecating in her pants.
That same day, Simpson re-
peatedly struck the girl's brother,
See ABUSE, Page 9A


COOKIE SALES GOING STRONG


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
cout Leader Kristie Barnes keeps an eye on things as Rebecca Barnes and Taylor Walden try to
slow down Lacie Chesson's Girl Scout cookie stocking and Jessica Wyrosdick and Emily Barnes
get ready to go looking for more customers, Saturday in Marianna.The group, from Girl Scout
Troop 76 in the Alford/Cottondale area, estimated they had sold 2,857 boxes so far.


Marianna

Loud music

complaint

leads to child

abuse charge
From staff reports
Local police say a loud music
complaint over the weekend led to
a child abuse charge for a Marianna
woman.
Around 11:51 p.m. on March 16,
officers with the
Marianna Police De-
partment responded
to 2922 Albert St.,
Apt. A, in reference
to a complaint of
loud music.
Campbell Officers say they
tried to make con-
tact with the tenant, later identified
as Michelle Annette Campbell, who
was seated on a couch just inside
the door of the apartment.
While speaking with Campbell,
officers report that she was inco-
herent, slurring "senseless com-
ments" towards them.
Police say she tried to slam the
door shut from the couch, but was
unsuccessful. Inside the home, of-
ficers could see. an infant.
Due to alcoholic beverage bottles
on the front porch, officers believed
Campbell to possibly be under the
See CHARGE, Page 9A


2 Fit 2 Squeal


Paint-n-Pork Fest race welcomes walkers, runners of all ages


From staff reports
Mouth-watering food is
a cornerstone of the an-
nual Paint-n-Pork Fest.
Who can resist the occa-
sional pig-out on scrump-
tious barbecue with all the
trimmings?
But all those trimmings
can make it tough to keep
trim. No need to worry.
For those who like to stay
fit and have fun doing it,
a day-two event offers a
great way to work off some
festive overindulgences.
The 2 Fit2 Squeal 5K/10K
Walk/Run will ready-set-
go early in the morning
on April 20, just two hours
before the festival gates
open for the.second day of
Paint-n-Pork. Newthis year
is the 10K portion, added
in honor of the festival's
10-year anniversary.
The night before the
race, pre-registration will
be open 5:30-8 p.m. at the
Main Stage in Citizens
Lodge, Park, while race-
day registration is 6:40-
7:40 a.m. Saturday. 2 Fit 2
)CLASSIFIEDS...7B ) E


MS K S. EP/:'_. OPIDN
Festivities at the 10th annual Paint-n-Pork Fest will include the 2 Fit 2 Squeal 5K/10K. The
race/walk is set for Saturday, April 20 at Citizens Lodge Park in Marianna.
-


: ,- a '; :,'2


Squeal starts at 8 a.m.
All ages and fitness
levels are welcome to
:NTERTAINMENT...6B


participate, with awards first-, second- and third-
going to overall winners place finishers (male and
(male and female) and female) in the following


LOCAL...3A


) OBITUARIES...9A


) STATE...5


A Southern Traditon
SUBMITTEDILUJSTRATION
age groups: Up to 14, 15-
19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34,
35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54,
55-59, 60-64, 65-69 and
70-Up.
Entry fees (same for 5K
and 10K) are $17 before
April 15 and $22 after April
16.
Entry forms are available
on the Paint-n-Pork web-
site, www.mariannaarts
festival.com.
Leashed pets and
strollers are allowed and a
post-run yoga cool-down
is planned for prior to the
10 a.m. awards ceremony
Keep up with rac-
ers by visiting www.face
book.com/MariannaArts
A SPORTS...1B


Festival and clicking on the
"2 Fit 2 Squeal (aka Smil-
ing Pig) 5K walk-run & 10K
run" event page.
2 Fit 2 Squeal is spon-
sored by Jackson Hospi-
tal. For more information,
contact Margo Lamb at
482-7721 or email: walk-
run@mariannaartsfestival.
com.
The 10th annual Paint-
N-Pork Fest, April 19-20
at Citizens Lodge Park in
Marianna, features a vari-
ety of family friendly activ-
ities: An art contest/show,
a car and tractor show,
steak cook-off, food ven-
dors, children's activities
and live entertainment,
including headliner Street
Comer Symphony. More
than a dozen pro barbe-
cue teams are expected to
enter competitions sanc-
tioned by the Florida BBQ
Association. Daily admis-
sion is $3 per person.
Details of all festival
activities, plus contest
rules and entry forms are
available online at www.
mariannaartsfestival.com.
a NATION.,.8A


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint



Hl 1 1 1
7 65161 80050 9


Follow us




Facebook Twitter


W I II,
TEAM RARibMIlER
Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan

1T- (850) 482.30511


II


I


r~-~i~r;,w;~P~.~?%T-";~
~,;~: r~t~-fl~~7IC^"








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


". High: 64
-. Lo%: 36


. LoUh: 37'


S Hihb: 71
- Lo": 38


'C"


High- 66'
Low 50-


Thursday
Sunny & Cooler.


. High -71
Low -49"


Saturday
Scattered Showers.
Possible Storms.


t,


High- 72
Low 55'


Friday
Scattered Showers.
Possible Storms.


High 66'
Low 45'


Sunday
Clearing and Cool.


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.92"
2.33"
3.53"


Year to date
Normal YTD
Normal for year


S High: 71
'id Low: 38 -.



- ... High: 70
[jUtow: 45


17.- 1
13.94"
59.26"


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


2:52 AM
5:21 PM
2:57 AM
5:16 AM
5:50 AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
48.78 ft.
11.92 ft.
10.78 ft.
8.60 ft.


4:16
1:12
4:49
7:42
8:15


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7-High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme

0 1 2 3 4 5


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:44 AM
Sunset 6:53 PM
Moonrise 12:49 PM
Moonset 7:48 AM


Apr. Mar. Mar. Apr.
10 19 27 3


FLORIDA'S REAL

PANHANDLE CO

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9 "

ISTFHO H


-ar, -fo smfti R
-a

U::::.I .] ri -, .. -- ._ :.h i

..'j:{hd jaw S-, 3-L.. s .j 33S7i f0 I0^


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher -Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.rm.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon. Tuesday to,
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna. FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
"The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference.based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax. mail. or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement.
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of go:.d quh.j; and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


TODAY
Marianna High School Project Graduation
2013 Annual Strawberry Sale Pick-up 7 a.m.
at Eastside Baptist Church, 4785 Highway 90 in
Marianna. Fresh Plant City strawberries are $16 per
12 pint flat. Call 209-5704.
) 24th annual Alzheimer's Conference 8 a.m.
to 3:15 p.m. at the Dothan Civic Center, 126 N. Saint
Andrews St. in Dothan, Ala. The presenter will be
Jolene Brackey, author of Creating Moments of Joy.
Registration fee is $65 for those wanting continuing
education units and $25 for those who do not want
CEU's. Lunch will be provided. Call 334-556-2205.
)"5 Steps to Rapid Employment" Workshop
9 a.m. to noon at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 U.S. 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
n AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Jackson County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620
during business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for
an appointment.
) Gigantic Book Sale 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library, Marianna Branch at
2929 Green St. Large groups of children's, fiction
and nonfiction books including biographies, myster-
ies, adventures, travelogues, cookbooks, etc. Large
and small print :".:l : i ni prices beginning at 50
cents. Donations accepted. Call 482-9631.
Jackson County Tourist Development Council
Meeting -10 a.m. at The Russ House, 4318 Lafay-
ette St. in Marianna. Call 482-8060.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p:m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Internet/Email Part 1 Noon to 3 p.m. at the'
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway
90, Marianna. Learn basic use of the Internet, how
to send/receive emails and how to protect your
computer. Call 526-0139.
) Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees Regular
Monthly Finance Committee and Board Meet-
ings 5 p.m. in the classroom of the Hospital. Call
718-2629.

THURSDAY, MARCH 21
Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting 7 a.m. at
the Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Grill in downtown
Marianna. Call 482-2290.
)"International Chat n' Sip" 8:30-10 a.m.
at the Jackson County Public Library, Marianna
Branch located at 2929 Green St. The public is
invited to -r'p I-, relaxed environment for the


exchange of language, culture and ideas among
local and international communities. Light refresh-
ments will be served. Call 482-9124.
) Gigantic Book Sale 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library, Marianna Branch at
2929 Green St. Large groups of children's, fiction
and nonfiction books including biographies, myster--
ies, adventures, travelogues, cookbooks, etc. Large
and small print books with prices beginning at 50
cents. Donations accepted. Call 482-9631.
n Caregiver Support Group Meeting -11 a.m.
to noon in the First Presbyterian Church Social
Hall, 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Open to all
family caregivers providing care to loved ones or
friends. Confidential group, facilitated by a profes-
sional group counselor. Coffee, water, light snacks
provided.
) Covenant Hospice Garden Gala Committee
Monthly Planning Meeting Noon at the Cov-
enant Hospice Branch, 4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E in
Marianna. Lunch will be provided. Call 482-8520.
> Job Club Noon to 3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills; get job search assis-
*tande. Call 526-0139.
) Employability Workshop, "Top 10 Job Search
Tips" 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 U.S. 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
Panhandle Public Library Cooperative System
Administrative Board Meeting 4 p.m. at 2862
Madison St. in Marianna. Call 482-9296.
Marianna/FPU Public Information Forum
- 4-6:30 p.m. at the McLane Center, 4291 Clay St.
in Marianna. The City of Marianna encourages all
city residents to attend an informational session
about the April 9 Florida Public Utilities purchase
referendum. Additional sessions are scheduled. Call
482-4353.
n AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation 4-7 p.m. at the Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for an
appointment.
Jackson County NAACP Meeting 5:30 p.m.
in the St. James A.M.E. Church basement, 2891
Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.
n Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group
- 5:30 p.m.at Jackson Hospital in the Cafeteria
Board Room. Free to attend. Curriculum developed
by ex-smokers for those who want to become ex-
smokers themselves. Call 718-2545.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901


Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Atten-
dance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking; papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, MARCH 22
> Folk Life Days 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Pan-
handle Pioneer Settlement located inside Sam
Atkins Park off of U.S. 20 in Blountstown. Admission
is $3. There will be various home life and life on the
farm demonstrations, music, donkeys and hayrides.
Call 674-2777.
) Small Business Seminar "What the Veterans'
Business Outreach Center Can Do for You"
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in Room M-108 of the
Chipola Business and Technology building. Seminar
is free. The seminar will help create, develop and
retrain veteran-owned business enterprises. Call
718-2441 or email seversone@chipola.edu.
) Knitters Nook 10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
a Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting Ceremony
11:30 a.m. at Jackson County Habitat for Human-
ity Restore, 4736 U.S. 90 in Marianna. Lunch will be
provided by First Commerce Credit Union. A silent
auction will begin at the Grand Opening Ceremony
and end at 12 noon on Saturday, March 23.
) Money Sense Class-Noon to 4 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Mar4-
anna. Money Sense is a class that covers different
topics in money management to empower people
to take charge of their finances and create their own
wealth. Call 526-0139.
') Music in Our Schools Month Performance 2
p.m. at Riverside Elementary School in the Multi-
Purpose Room. The Music Department, underthe
direction of Flora Davis, will iiihlliu t r i, sound of
nearly 700 students. Music in Our Schools Month is
a month-long event during March that aims to draw
attention to the significance of music education
in schools and community and is recognized and
sponsored by the National Association for Music
Education. Parents and guests are invited to attend.
) Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser for Bascom
School Renovation Project 4-7 p.m. at Bascom
Town Hall. $6 per plate, dine in or carry out. Menu
will include spaghetti, green salad, bread and des-
sert. For reservations and orders call 569-1128.
a Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, -I :.ii: in..
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856, 573-1131.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for March 18, the lat-
est available report: One drunk
pedestrian, two suspicious per-
sons, one information report,
one physical disturbance call,
one report of power lines down,
three traffic stops, one civil dis-
pute, one trespass, one follow-
up investigation, one animal
complaint (dog), one assisting
motorist/pedestrian, one retail
theft/shoplifting, three public
service calls and one 911 hang-
up -_ l

Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's


Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following inci-
dents for March 18, the latest
available report: One escape,
one hospice death, three aban-
doned vehicles, two suspicious
vehicles, two suspicious inci-
dents, one suspicious person,
one information report, one re-
-- .. port of highway
obstruction, two
burglary calls,
;CRIME two distur-
'- ....-- bance/physical
reports, one
disturbance/verbal, 22 medi-
cal calls, one traffic crash, two
burglary alarms, 29 traffic stops,
one larceny, two serving pa-
pers/expartee, one civil dispute,
one assault, one report of fraud,
three assisting motorist/pedes-
trian, two assist other agencies,
three public service calls, seven


finger printing, three criminal
registrations, one welfare check,
two transports and two threats/
harassment calls.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Antonio Cardoza, 53, 3233
Bobkat Road, Marianna; driv-
ing while license suspended or
revoked.
) Saafir Seifullah, 22, 185
Fiddler Ridge, Fayetteville, CA;
fleeing and attempting to elude.
) Anthony Holden, 24, 2920
Harrison St., Marianna; failure
to appear (trespassing after
warning).
) Phillip Lewis, 29, 122 N.
Calhoun St., Quincy; violation


of county probation (posses-
sion of marijuana less than 20
grams.
))John Doughtery, 46, 3902
Commercial Blvd., Har-
risonville, MO; disorderly
intoxication.
A Christian Birkla, 22, tran-
sient at large; carrying a con-
cealed weapon.
A Austin Lassiter, 31, transient
at large; retail theft and resist-
ing without violence.
) Juan Canales, 26, unknown
Marianna address; driving with
no valid driver license.

Jail Population: 203

To report' D r s5ail rr:meS top:CrS
at 525-5M0'0 a !sea :a,/ encirclement
agency.
so reo;r a m/iidife :isat on. cal 1-822-
404-F//CC (3922).


M RAHAL MILLER
.Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna. FL

S(850) 482-3051


.- Hieb: 67
aL~-L .' Low: 35
S--I Higfr: 8 6
'L-,x Low: 42


PRECIPITATION


4;.


~~~1~1-'~----- -'--


Si 2A WEDNESDAY. MARCH 20. 2013


" '


16'


VIREM-up JU-


~p~ ,


-rr









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Chipola dean presents at nursing conference


Special to the Floridan

Dr. Vickie Stephens, dean
of the Chipola College
School of Health Sciences,
served as a presenter and
panelist at the thirteenth
annual Community Col-
lege Baccalaureate Asso-
ciation Conference in Dal-
las, March 8-10.
Stephens served on a
panel which provided
an overview and histori-
cal review of the creation
of baccalaureate nurs-
ing programs in Florida.
Stephens also presented
a plenary session high-
lighting the benefits of


an online RN to BSN
program.
The theme of the confer-
ence was Alternative Path-
ways to the Baccalaureate.
Health educators from
Australia, China, Den-
mark, Sweden and numer-
ous members from states
in the United States were
in attendance.
Dr. Stephens said, "The
state of Florida is known
as a trend-setter in the
academic circles of com-
munity colleges making
bachelors' degrees acces-
sible and affordable to fu-
ture students. Many states
continue to work through


political issues related
to community colleges
offering baccalaureate
degrees."
In 2011, the Institute of
Medicine recommended
that 80 percent of Regis-
tered Nurses be baccalau-
reate prepared by the year
2020. The Florida college
system has accepted the
challenge by implement-
ingo post licensure RN to
BSN programs across the
state. Currently, there are
14 Florida State Com-
munity Colleges offering
this option. The attain-
ment of the BSN offers
advances in employment,


clinical teaching opportu-
nities and advancement
of the professional nursing
practice.
Chipola offers the RN-
BSN degree with all up-
per level classes offered
in an online format. The
college accepts RN-BSN
students each semester
and they may complete
the online courses in one
year or choose to individ-
ualize their educational
plans to fit their schedules.
Chipola's RN-BSN pro-
gram is now in the can-
didacy status for NLNAC
Accreditation.
To learn more about the


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Dr. Vickie Stephens, dean of the Chipola College School of
Health Sciences, served as a presenter and panelist at a recent
nursing conference.
prgfram requirements, go online to www.chipola.
call 718-2278, 718-2316 or edu.


PITTMAN'S SANDMANN' IS GRAND CHAMP


SUBMITTED PHOTO
filton Pittman's steer "Sandman" was chosen as Grand Champion at the 77th Annual.
Tri-States Junior Beef Expo held recently in Dothan, Ala. The expo was sponsored
Sby the Dothan Area Chamber Of Commerce and was Pittman's final show for the
season. Pittman placed first in Junior Showmanship and the steer was Middle Weight
Champion as well. His sister Mary Katherine's steer was Grand Steer for 2012. Pittman is in
the fifth grade at Dayspring Christian Academy and is a member Dayspring Eagles 4-H. He is
the son of Jeff and Ginger Pittman.

Local Briefs


Bridge Club
winners named
The Marianna Duplicate
Bridge Club announces
winners for the game
played March 11:
) First Place: Doug-
las Parker and Kurt
Opfermann
) Second Place: Mary
Lou Miller and Sharon
Morgan
) Third Place: Frances
Subalesky and Zillah
Fossum
) Fourth Place: John Selfe
and Martha Brennari
) Fifth Place: Elaine Yost
and Libby Hutto
) Sixth Place: Hollie
Gunderson and James
Gunderson
) Seventh Place: Ida Deal
Knowles and Sara Lewis
) Eighth Place: Betty
Joyce Hand and Kitty


The following marriages
and divorces were re-
corded in Jackson County
during the week of March
11-15:


Myers
The Marianna Bridge
Club is sanctioned by the
American Contract Bridge
League. The game is held
every Monday at 1 p.m.
at St. Luke's Episcopal
Church, 4362 Lafayette St.
in Marianna. Anyone is
welcome to come and play
or observe.
For more information
and partners, call Libby
Hutto at 526-3162.'

Is there a patriot
in your past?
If one of your direct
ancestors fought in the
Revolutionary War and
you are at least 19 years of
age, then you are eligible
to be a member of the
Sons of the American
Revolution.
The William Dunaway


) Timothy Lee Cobb and
Rebecca Renee Keel.
) Terrence Renard Wood
and Kristy Anita Gilbert.
a Jason Preston Phillips


and AlainaI
Marriages Danivor
SBenjamin Joseph Black- Divo
burn and Susan Danielle Lacost
Saunders: vs. Billy Jac
Jasma Unshay Peter- ) Starla
son and Laura Katherine land vs. J
Booth. Strickland.


ilanne Kiley.


a Suzanne Gay
k Gay.
Leeann Strick-
Jimmy Michael


Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@
jcfloridan.com, mail them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna,
FL 32447 or bring them by our offices at 4403
Constitution Lane in Marianna.
*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties.
Include child's full name, parents'name(s) and city
of residence. This is a free service. All entries subject
to editing.


Increase Your Refund...
Sell Your Gold at...




nJEWELERSR

Paid on Site
4432 Lafayette Street 526-5488 www.smithandsmithonline.-nom


Chapter represents
Jackson County. Registrar
Larry Clere will help in the
preparation of your appli-
cation. The chapter meets
on the first Thursday of
each month at 6 p.m.
at Jim's Buffet & Grill in
Marianna and each meet-
ing includes an interesting
speaker..
For more information,


contact president, Lionel
Young at 579-4647 or
captyoung@earthlink.
net; registrar Larry Clere
at 593-5715 or klrwud@
directv.net; or committee
on membership chairman
Larry Kinsolving at 482-
6301 or elianna@embarq-
mail.com.

Special to the Floridan


Florida Lottery

Mon. (E) 3/18 5-0-4 0.7-8-4 12-20-25 26-30


Mon (M)


1-8-6 550-2


Tue. (E) 3/19 9-8 3 3.7.3.5 Notavailable
Tue (M) 7.3-0 7-8-2-5


Wed. (E)
Wed. (M)


3/13 7-8-9 2.92-2 8.21-25.3035
2.2-3 4.1-1 4


Thurs (E) 3/14 4 7-4 71.76 7.11.13-1634


Thurs (M)


1.4-9 4 1-6.4


Fri (E) 3/15 14-7 8-2-4-7 17.18-27-29-30


Fri (M)
Sat. (E) 3/16
Sat (M)


657 596.1
4-4-6 8-03-4 5-8-2024-25
1.5.8 9-58-1


(E) 3/17 3-2-6 0-6-1-5 1-6-11-21-31
(M) 21-7 3.5-2.9
E = Evening drawing, M = Midday drawing


I POWEBAL*


Saturday


3/16 3-7-2144-50


Wednesday 3/13 5-9-28-3238 PB 29
0q I l


Saturday 3/16
Wednesday 3/13


1-6-24-27-33-53
15-30-34-44-47-49


xtra5
extra 5


For lottery information. call 850-487-7777 or 900-737-7777


Master Gardener
of the Year Named


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Rob Trawick, Jackson County Extension Services
horticulture agent, presents a certificate of appreciation
to Master Gardener of the Year Vicki Fuqua, acknowledging
her exemplary hard work and service. For more information
about the Master Gardeners, call 482-9620.


GAS WATCH
Gas pncPes are going up Here are
the lear t e.perF nve pljace-: ici uy
gas in .Jcl_.r. n l ountr, j ,I
Tuesday y .3trlrn,(,rn

1. $3.58. McCoy's Food Mart.
2823 Jefferson St., Marianna
2. $3.58, Murphy Oil. 2255 U.S.
71 S., Marianna
3. $3.59, Mobil Food Mart. 2999
Jefferson St., Marianna
4. $3.59. Pilot. 2209 U.S. 71,
Marianna
5. $3.59. Tom Thumb. 3008 A
Jefferson St., Marianna
6. $3.61 BP Station. 5184 U.S.
231 S.. Campbellton
7. $3.63, Loves Travel Center.
2510 U.S. 231. Cottondale
8. $3.65. BP-Steel City, 2184
U.S. 231 S., Alford
it l'u u 1-:e J ,er i,,:e
i,-,:'n j: tih FI,.- I,3 n n I r.. nI
ji ,3,.;':rt '. i',j, n l :.rn


Companion Animal Medicine & Surgery


We Appreciate the Citizens of
Jackson County and your support.
2909 Jefferson Street 850-482-3520





121.
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.
PAT FURR
Sunny South Properties
4630 Hwy. 90, Marianna, FL
Business: 850.526.2891 YOUR
Cell: 850.209.8071 success is
furrl9@embarqmail.com my business!




ESTELLE BUSH
June 10, 1910 to Your absences a silent griefof
sunshine and perfect peace.
March 20, 2006 Youlea beautiful memory
Your love Is still our guide
| Anp though we may not see you,
You are always at our side.
For you are In our thoughts everyday
We still hear your laughter
and feel your gentle touch
from your tiny soft hands.
For beyond your final hour your love
continues to see us through
SThe joys and memories will not deport.
For your love continues as
a living presence.
Everyday your love shows us the way
to serve and to persevere
For we know that you are soaring on
wings God has blessed you with.
Our hearts are broken and we will
never be the some.
We love you Mom!!
In loving memory, Your children: Homer Jr.,
Nettie, Gussie, Helen, Frances, Alma,
Lossie, Mary, Delores L


Marriage, Divorce Report


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 2013 3AF


LOCAL













Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Scripps Howard

News Service


Base closings



popular, except



close to home

F aced with a costly excess of military bases and fa-

cilities and a protective Congress' refusal to close
any of them, the Reagan administration came up
with a plan that was eventually enshrined in the 1990
Defense Base Realignment and Closure Commission
Act.
Under BRAC, as it came to be known, an independent
panel appointed by the president studied the existing
stock of military bases and drew up a list of those that
should be closed or consolidated.
Once the list was finalized, it was submitted to Con-
gress, which then had 45 days to vote yea or nay on the
entire package. There would be no-piecemeal politick-
ing of the kind that had frustrated earlier attempts at
streamlining the defense establishment.
Rather surprisingly, it worked -- perhaps too well. In.
five rounds of BRAC from 1989 to 2005, 350 installa-
tions were closed, leaving many communities without
a major employer and often facilities that could not
easily be converted to civilian use.
The last commission called for another round of
closures in 2015 and then every eight years after that.
Then-Defense Secretary Leon Panetta recommended
two additional rounds of closings, but the House
Armed Services Committee voted to cut off any more
rounds after 2015.
As far as is known, at least publicly, there is no plan-
ning for a 2015 BRAC, although the Pentagon has said it
would like to do one then and another in 2017.
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has yet to speak out
on it. But, given the difficulty he had getting confirmed,
it seems unlikely that he would want to pick this par-
ticular fight with the lawmakers so soon after taking
'office.
The Congress-watching newspaper Politico offered a
story headlined "Wary Congress Launches Pre-emptive
BRAC Strike." Lawmakers with defense installations
that might be at risk are lining up to block any further
Closures, even though the Army plans to inactivate six
brigade combat teams and the Navy, for cost reasons,
may have to keep a carrier fleet or two in port.
House Armed Services Committee Chairman Buck
McKeon, R-Calif., said, with some understatement, "I
expect strong bipartisan opposition to any request for
a BRAC round from the administration."
That's why the savvy voter will take a certain skepti-
cism toward all this tough congressional talk about
spending cuts. There are spending cuts and spending.
cuts and some aren't cuts at all, particularly if it's a mili-
tary base in the district of a powerful lawmaker.
Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service,
http://www.scrippsnews.com

Contact your representatives

Florida Legislature

B State Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 5
District Office:
Administration Building, Room 186
Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701
Coley I 850-718-0047
www.MyFloridaHouse.gov

State Sen. Don Gaetz, R-District 1
District Office:
4300 Legendary Drive
Suite 230
Destin, FL 32541
850-897-5747
Gaetz 866-450-4366 (toll free)
www.FLSenate.gov

U.S. Congress
U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland II, R-2
1229 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515

@Rep_Southerland
www.Southerland.House.gov
Southerland
SU.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla.
716 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
202-224-5274
@SenBillNelson
www.BillNelson.Senate.gov
* Nelson


SU.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.
317 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
202-224-3041
@MarcoRubio
www.Rubio.Senate.gov
Rubio

Letters to te Esitor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor,
P.O. Box 520, Marianna FL, 32447orfaxing
to 850-482-4478 or send e-mail to editorial@
jcfloridan.com. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure
to include your full address and telephone
number. These will only be used to verify
the letter and will not be printed. For more
information call 850-526-3614.


--- 7


Arctic development calls for UN role


S(( A hat about
the rest
Softhe
North?" McGeorge
Bundy, president of
the Ford Foundation,
asked back in the 1970s
while considering yet
one more grant to help
the troubled Native
Americans of Alaska. The
initial reaction of a young
staffer asked to research
the question was that the
boss was making some
strange reference to the
Civil War.
Instead, Bundy was
referring to the Arctic
Circle, asking whether
geographic unity and
climate uniformity was
reflected in similarity
of challenges to public
policies. He spotted an
important point.
On Tuesday, an election
in Greenland, a semi-
autonomous territory
of Denmark, drew
exceptional international
attention. Voters elected
the centrist pro-mining
Siumut Party, whose
leader, Aleqa Hammond,
likely will be Greenland's
first female prime
minister. Hammond
favors controversial
uranium mining. The
melting of polar ice
is making enormous
deposits of natural gas,
iron, oil, uranium and
other vital minerals
accessible.


China is emerging
as a major investor in
economic resources.
In the
election, a
prominent
issue has
been a
$2.3 billion
Arthur mining
Cyr project
proposed
by London
Mining PLC. China would
be a major beneficiary of
the production.
The U.S. government
seems largely disengaged.
Revealingly, serious
environmental debate
between President Barack
Obama and former
Gov. Mitt Romney in
the recent presidential
contest focused primarily
on domestic concerns.
Obama's often soaring
rhetoric regarding the
global environment
contrasts with absence of
action.
Other nations are
showing forceful
leadership. The Russian
Geographical Society
has been paramount,
and in 2010 hosted two
international conferences
on the Arctic. Over 400
scientists and other
scholars, business
executives, government
representatives, investors
and lawyers were brought
together.
Historically, Britain has


led in global geography,
but now Russia is
spearheading organizing
a region where its stake is
vital. Others are joining
China and Russia in
aggressively seeking to
develop the wealth under
land and sea.
Serious conflicts over
territorial jurisdiction will
escalate as more northern
territories are freed
from the ice and snow.
Disputes have aligned
Russia against Canada
and Denmark regarding
control of the Lomonosov
Ridge, most of which is in
international waters.
Other nations involved
in such disagreements
include Finland, Iceland,
Sweden and the United
States. Under the
1982 United Nations
Convention on the Law
of the Sea, a nation can
claim resources beyond a
200-mile limit if a direct
continuous continental
shelf can be established.
Meanwhile, the UN 0
continues to experience
frustration in achieving
the exceptionally
ambitious Millennium
Development Goals. The
goals aim to cut world
poverty in half while
achieving universal
primary education,
fighting dangerous
diseases, empowering
women, and improving
water quality


and sanitation.
Some progress has
been made, but the
declared goals remain
largely distant. The
Group of Eight industrial
nations has fallen short
in a collective pledge
to increase official
development assistance,
in particular regarding
Africa. Established
government foreign aid
prograins are politically
weak.
UN Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon should
lead regarding orderly
development of the
Arctic. The potential of
private investment to help
the poor through jobs as
well as philanthropy is
generally ignored at the
UN. Polar policies are
unavoidably global in
impact. Ban is from South
Korea, a nation uniquely
spanning the global rich-
poor divide. International
law provides a foundation
for orderly resources
development.
Bundy would approve
this approach. By the
way, indigenous peoples
around the north share
remarkably similar
problems resulting from
poverty.
Arthur I. Cyr is Clausen
Distinguished Professor at
Carthage College in Kenosha,
Wis., and author of "After the Cold
War." Email acyr@carthage.edu.
Distributed by Scripps Howard
News Service, www.shns.com.


Nursing homes need advocates like this


heldon Kanars is
a consummate
volunteer. Kanars,
of Port St. Lucie, Fla.,
is a mediator in small
claims court. He has
worked with guardians
ad litem and has been a
victim's advocate in the
state attorney's office.
He's been associated with
many more organizations
in his retirement.
By no stretch of the
imagination could he be
called a quitter. Yet new
rules in the state ombuds-
man program, in which
Kanars played an impor-
tant volunteer role, have
effectively turned him
into one.
Kanars, 79, claims he
was forced to step down
from his job advocating
for residents of nursing
homes and assisted living
facilities after more than
10 years. While his work
record, by all accounts,
has been exemplary, it's
Kanars' criticism of new
industry-friendly rules
that seems to have forced
his ouster.
Ombudsman program
spokeswoman Laura Leite
put it a little differently
"The primary con-
cern of the Florida Long
Term Care Ombudsman
program," Leite said,
"is to ensure the dig-
nity and care for those in
long-term care facilities.
Volunteers may decide
to pursue other interests.
On Feb. 18, Mr. Kanars
forwarded his letter of
resignation. ... Mr. Kanars'
years of dedicated advo-
cacy are greatly appreci-
ated, and the program
wishes him the best in his
continuing efforts to give


back to his community."
Kanars claims the state
ombuds-
man
himself
suggested
that they
part ways
Antho y before he
Antwiy submitted
Westury the letter.
This story
is one of
overbearing influence
by a powerful statewide
lobbying group that's
eroding a program always
intended to be an inde-
pendent watchdog.
The former state
ombudsman, Brian Lee,
was relieved of his du-
ties as soon as Gov. Rick
Scott came to power
in 2011. Lee had an-
gered the nursing home
industry in many ways
and, after pressure from
industry insiders, was
replaced with the more
industry-friendly Jim
Crochet, the current state
ombudsman.
Kanars said that during
Lee's tenure, the program
ran as intended by the
Older Americans Act.
Ombudsmen are empow-
ered to assess nursing
homes and assisted living
facilities and may speak
with residents to hear
their concerns about liv-
ing conditions.
In the past, ombuds-
men were free to go into
kitchens, residents' rooms
or other areas if they felt
that was warranted for
residents' welfare. Not
anymore.
At recent ombudsmen
meetings on the Treasure
Coast, volunteers were
strongly advised to leave


nursing home inspections
to the Agency for Health
Care Administration
(AHCA), which already
makes periodic surprise
inspections of facilities.
Ombudsmen are to
keep talking with resi-
dents but, Crochet told
a group recently, they
should use only their "five
senses to determine if
there may be a problem"
elsewhere in a home.
To Kanars, that's unac-
ceptable and could let
some operators get away
with less than optimum
care. He recalled one as-
sessment visit in which a
resident casually admit-
ted his toilet had been
broken for months. The
man was using a plas-
tic bucket in his room
instead. Only because
Kanars had been invited
to the man's room did he
discover the problem.
AHCA inspects nursing
homes only once a year;
for assisted living facilities
it's even less frequently.
Kanars maintains that
in many cases, nursing
home residents simply
can't articulate their
concerns. He spoke about
a recent visit to a "mem-
ory center" at one Home
where none of a group of
patients with dementia
was able to speak one
word to him. "How am I
able to assess what's go-
ing on if I'm restricted to
talking to them?" Kanars
asked in frustration.
Despite the new pro-
cedures, Kanars took it
upon himself to advise
other ombudsmen to still
press for more access to
all areas of a home dur-
ing their assessments.


That email got him into
trouble, Kanars believes.
Kanars has served as the
Treasure Coast represen-
tative on the statewide
ombudsman program
for several years. He was
named state Ombudsman
of the Year twice.
"Residents and om-
budsmen lost an ex-
emplary advocate and
leader," former boss Lee
said of Kanars' removal.
"He is dedicated and
compassionate and able
to bring people to the
table to negotiate for
quality resident out-
comes. He's the kind of
volunteer everyone looks
to for direction."
Kanars is joining the
steady stream of able
former healthcare profes-
sionals who've departed
over the past year or
so. As he noted, only a
handful of experienced
volunteers are left.
Kanars said his experi-
ence with the ombuds-
man program hasn't
deterred him from
volunteering for other or-
ganizations, but he fears
the loss of people of his
caliber will have only one
effect: less oversight for
some of the most helpless
people in our society.
We can and should do
a lot better for them. The
ombudsman program
worked well under Lee. It
was a failure for only one
group those making
large profits.
Shameful.

Anthony Westbury is a colum-
nist for Scripps Treasure Coast
Newspapers. Contact anthony.
westbury@scripps.com
or TCPalmWestbury on Twitter.







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PRECARIOUS


PERCH


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chris Obert, steadying himself with
convenient tree branch, talks
with Ilisha Brown as he watches a
Cottondale baseball game from his
precarious perch atop a stairway railing.


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20.2013 5AF


Ala., Ga. residents indicted



in Florida gambling case


The Associated Press

MONTGOMERY, Ala. An Ala-
bama man is in jail and his Georgia
business partners are being sought
on charges accusing them of operat-
ing illegal gambling establishments
in Florida under the guise of helping
veterans.
For years, Samuel Keeble was
known in central Alabama for oper-
ating a small convenience store in
Camp Hill, not far from his home in
Dadeville.
Keeble is now under indictment
for racketeering and multiple other
felonies along with his business
partners, Diane and Gary Davis of
Hogansville, Ga. They are accused of
running three illegal gambling busi-
nesses in northeast Florida one in
Jacksonville and two in Yulee, north
of Jacksonville.
Keeble and the Davises operated
"Internet cafes" that purported to
give money to aid needy veterans
when patrons bought time on video-
style slot machines. Upon entering,
patrons signed a registration form
that claimed they were "not gam-
bling," investigators said. The in-
dictments were revealed in the joint
Florida state and federal bust of Al-
lied Veterans of the World, an opera-
tion that portrayed itself as a charity
helping veterans.
So far, 57 people have been
charged in what officials called a


"sophisticated racketeering and
money laundering scheme." About
60 locations were closed across Flor-
ida that officials said were affiliated
with Allied Veterans and supplied it
with proceeds.
Florida Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll
resigned last week in the wake of an
investigation. Carroll had provided
public-relations representation to
the operation before her election,
but she has not been charged.
Investigators tracked money trans-
fers across several states. Authori-
ties said they showed $194 million,
which was hidden through opera-
tors such as Keeble and the Davises.
From 2008 through last year, the in-
vestigation revealed that less than 2
percent of the $300 million in gam-
bling center proceeds was given to
charity, while much went into the
owners' pockets.
Court records list the Davises and
Keeble as owners of MSG Business
Center, which sent direct deposits
on a weekly basis to the Allied Veter-
ans of the World's bank accounts. A
contracted payroll company issued
checks back to affiliates.
Dadeville police Sgt. Jonathan
Floyd, accompanied by U.S. Secret
Service agents, arrested Keeble, 58,
at his home on March 12. Floyd said
that Keeble denied wrongdoing and
said his business was legal.
"He seemed surprised. He said he
thought we had the wrong person. It


was a case of mistaken identity. But
it wasn't," Floyd said.
Keeble is being held without bail
as he awaits an extradition hearing.
If he is extradited, he will be moved
to the Seminole County, Fla., jail
to await trial on federal and state
charges.
Those charges include racketeer-
ing; conspiracy; manufacture, sale,
possession of slot machines; keep-
ing gambling houses; and money
laundering. Officials said the three
operations owned by Keeble and the
Davises were closed, and the equip-
ment was confiscated. Records
showed they had been in operation
since June 2007.
Awoman who answered the phone
at Keeble's residence Tuesday and
identified herself as Mrs. Keeble de-
clined comment. Jail officials did not
know if Keeble had hired an attorney.
Keeble has no criminal history.
Diane and Gary Davis have not yet
been arrested. Davis identifies him-
self as a musician and songwriter on
his personal website. Court records
list the couple as owners of a second
location in Jacksonville that was not
part of their operations with Keeble.
The Seminole County Sheriff's Of-
.fice reported that the items seized in
the investigation include more than
400 computers and servers, 1,169
boxes of paper records and 59 ve-
hicles. Digital forensic specialists are
reviewing 470 computer hard drives.


State Briefs


Senators reveal
Medicaid expansion
TALLAHASSEE A
Republican lawmaker will
present his alternative
Medicaid expansion plan
to the Senate Appropria-
tions Committee.
Sen. Joe Negron on
Thursday plans to propose
using federal funds under
the Affordable Care Act to
give residents vouchers to
pay for private insurance,
He wants Florida Healthy
Kids to oversee the plan,
saying they have a good
track record with the state.
Enrollment could begin in
October.
Sen. Aaron Bean's plan
would pass upthe free
federal dollarsto fund
Medicaid expansion and
instead use state funds
to help residents pay for
a basic insurance plan.'
Bean will present his
proposal Wednesday to a
health policy committee.
Both plans would
require residents to pay
premiums and co-pays.
A House panel also
voted against Medicaid
expansion, but an alter-
native plan is still in the
works.

Man gets 20 years for
fatal drug shooting
DELTONA A central
Florida man has been
sentenced to 20 years in
prison for fatally shooting
his drug dealer.
AVolusia County judge
sentenced 35-year-old
Frank Soto on Monday. He
had pleaded no contest
to manslaughter with a
firearm as part of a deal
with prosecutors. He had
been charged with sec-
ond-degree murder, which
would have meant a life
sentence.
Soto said in court that
38-year-old Wesley Hall
had come to his Deltona
home in May 2011 to col-
lect $1,200 he owed Hall
for painkillers. Soto shot
Hall with a.22-caliber pis-
tol and then drove Hall's


body to the woods in the
dead man's van and set it
on fire.
The Daytona Beach
News-Journal reports that
Soto initially claimed he
was acting in self-defense,
but prosecutors say Soto
didn't even wait for Hall to
get out of his van before
shooting him.

Date set for hearing
on Anthony's story
TAMPA The judge in
Casey Anthony's bank-
ruptcy case has set a
date to hear whether her
trustee can sell the rights
to her story so she can pay
her debts.
The hearing was set for
April 9 ifi federal court in
Tampa.
Trustee Stephen
Meininger asked Judge K.
Rodney May for permis-
sion to sell the "exclusive
worldwide rights" of
Anthony's life story in a
motion filed this week.
The 26-year-old Anthony
has never told her story.
Anthony was acquitted
of murder in the death
her 2-year-old daughter,
Caylee.
During a meeting with.
creditors in her bankrupt-
cy case March 4 in Tampa,
Anthony said she was
unemployed and hasn't
received any money to tell
her story.

Scott will,
reimburse donation
TALLAHASSEE Flori-
da Gov. Rick Scott says he
will write a $2,000 per-
sonal check to reimburse
campaign donations
received from those linked
to a gambling scandal.
Scott said Tuesday he
will donate the money
to the Florida Veterans
Foundation.
The governor an-
nounced his decision a
week after more than 50
people were arrested in a
scandal involving Allied
Veterans of the World. The
organization ran nearly 50


Internet parlors in Florida
with computerized slot
machine-style games.
Investigators said the
charity gave about $6 mil-
lion to veterans and much
of the $300 million went to
charity leaders.
Those linked to the
scandal have donated
more than $1 million to
Florida politicians and
political parties. Scott
received four checks.
The Republican Party
of Florida announced
Friday it would donate
$300,000 to the veterans
foundation.

Woman charged with
husband's death
NAPLES A Collier
County woman has been
charged with second-de-
gree murder in connection
with her husband's death.
A sheriff's office state-
ment-says 68-year-old
Helen Hope Johns was
booked Tuesday morning
as authorities continue to
investigate the death of
72-year-old Jack Johns.
Authorities say deputies
were called to the couple's
home late Monday night
at the request of a con-
cered relative. When they


arrived they found the
Jack Johns dead inside the
home. He had been shot.
No further informa-
tion has been released. It
wasn't immediately known
if Helen Johns has an
attorney.

Legoland Florida to
announce expansion
WINTER HAVEN The
world's largest Legoland
theme park will expand
this summer to include
a new ride and interac-
tive play area based on
the company's popular
Legends of Chima product
line.
During a news confer-
ence Tuesday, Legoland
Florida officials an-
nounced that the new
section will include an
interactive water ride
called The Quest for Chi, a
Lego-building challenge, a
4-D movie and a meet-
and-greet with costumed
characters.
"This is the first time a
theme park has invested
in a major expansion
concurrently with the
rollout of a new brand and
product line, and it was
an easy decision based on
how well LEGO Legends of


Chima has been received
by children and those who
are young at heart around
the world,"'said Legloland
Florida General Manager
Adrian Jones in a news
release.
According to Lego's web-
site, the Chima storyline
is about a pristine, natural
paradise that has become
a battle ground for eight
animal tribes.
"Best friends are now
enemies. The animals
fight for control of a natu-
ral resource called CHI, a
powerful element that is
both a source of life and
potential destruction," the
website reads.
The Lego-building chal-
lenge will revolve around
"Speedorz" chariots,
which are the vehicles
used by the animal tribes.
The park will also offer
a full "Legends of Chima"
product line at its stores.
Since opening in Oc-
tober 2011, the location '
has added hotels, a Star
Wars-themed area and a
water park.
Legoland Florida is
based on the building-
block toys and has rides
and attractions geared
toward ages 2 to 12. The
Winter Haven location


is one of five Lego-based
theme parks in the world,
and the company's largest.
From wire reports




-


JCFLORIDAN.CO l


4OPhilip







Carat The FIVE C's
Color
Clarity
Cut
CONFIDENCE

Marianna's Most
Trusted Jeweler
Est. 1971

w atson
GEMOLOGISTS
850.482.4037
watsonjewelers.com


S in Women's Health

Today's moms, wives, and grandmothers have a lot on their plate. At Jackson Hospital,
our .v'omer's services are designed to keep you as healthy as possible. From obstetrics to
gynecolog/, our physicians and nursing team work together to ensure you are well cared
for We offer many surgeries in our outpatient setting so that today's busy women have
the care they need as well a. con'en~ence.


For a physician referral or more information about
our surgical services please call 850.526.2200


A Jackson
U IHospital


d250 Hc.:ptal Dra Mariannaj Florlda 32-A.6 850 526 22r% ,w.vw.jacksonhosp.com Growi/ng a Heak!hier Communimty.


ew York Fashio
NOW OPEN
Best prices on suits, jeans, t-shirts, ho
hats, shoes, women's clothes and morel'.
COIUPON -
la I "c Bu One suit.
Everything J Get Shirt & Tie

5O/% FREE
2 JOFFI -323
%ith Ehis ad 850-372-35

W. Central Ave Blountstown, FL (nextto
S Hrs: 10:00AM-6:00PM Mon-Sat

Suit Zone
- -------- 221 N. Tyndall Pa
Buy One Suit. I Calloway, FL
Bet Shirt & Tie 850-215-5949
FREE Hrs: 10:OOAM-6:0
-.Mon-Sot


Traditiona l InnrpigPceedCis
Late, Col GE Memry Fam..
Reguar Fat Bds &Adjutabl Bed


LOC L & S'ATE









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


UCF attack plotter wanted to 'give them hell'


The Associated Press

ORLANDO -The former
student behind an aborted
attack plot at a Florida
university was working off
a checklist that included
plans to get drunk, pull a
fire alarm and then "give
them hell," authorities said
Tuesday.
James Oliver Seevakuma-
ran was crossing items off
his list ahead ofhis planned
attack on classmates with
guns and homemade ex-
plosives, University of
Central Florida Police
Chief Richard Beary said at
a news conference.
The list found along with
his dead body early Mon-
day included drinking at a
bar near campus and pull-
ing the fire alarm which
investigators believe was
meant to flush out victims.
Beary says the final item
was "give them hell."
Instead, Seevakumaran
shot and killed himself as
police officers arrived in
response to the fire alarm
and a 911 call from a
roommate. Beary says au-
thorities confirmed he had
gone earlier to the bar and
drank.
At the time of the attack,
packages were waiting for


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Various police agencies are seen during an investigation at the University of Central Florida on
Monday in Orlando.


Seevakumaran at a cam-
pus mailroom containing
two 22-round magazines
and a sling for his rifle and
a firearms training DVD,
officials said Tuesday.
Investigators have also
said that they found an
assault rifle, handgun,
high capacity ammuni-
tion drums, hundreds of
bullets and four makeshift
'explosives in a backpack
near his body.
Beary said authorities


aren't aware of a motive or
significant circumstance
that led Seevakumaran
to plan for an attack. The
chief said no written ex-
planation was left.
More details emerged
Tuesday about Seevaku-
maran's solitary lifestyle.
Seevakumaran's family
said he was a loner who
didn't have a history of
violence in a brief state-
ment released by authori-.
ties. Beary told the news


conference that he acted
alone and didn't have any
friends.
"He didn't like to talk to
people," Beary said.
The roommate who
called 911 said Seevaku-
maran rarely left the dorm
apartment, according to
a dispatcher's notes. The
caller also said Seevaku-
maran had pulled a gun on
him.
In an interview with stu-
dent publication Knightly


No assault weapons ban: Not even in Dems' bill


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON All but ending
chances for an assault weapons ban,
Democratic leaders said Tuesday the
firearms legislation the Senate will
debate next month won't include
the provision that gun-control ad-
vocates pressed for after an assault-
type weapon was used in the New-
town school shootings in December.
Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-
Nev., said.he wanted to bring a gun
bill to the full Senate that would
have enough support to overcome
any GOP attempts to prevent debate
from even starting. He expressed
concern that including the assault
weapons provision might effectively
block passage of any bill at all.
Instead, the sponsor of the provi-
sion, Sen. Dianne Feinstein of Cali-
fornia, said she will offer her ban
on the military-style firearms as an
amendment. But Feinstein is all but
certain to need 60 votes from the
100-member Senate to prevail, and
she faces solid Republican opposi-
tion as well as likely defections from
some Democrats.
"I very much regret it," Feinstein,
D-Calif., told reporters of Reid's de-
cision. "I tried my best."
Reid said that "using the most op-
timistic numbers," there were less
than 40 votes for Feinstein's ban.


That is far less than the 60 needed to
begin considering legislation.
"I'm not going to try to put some-
thing on the floor that won't succeed.
I want something that will succeed. I
think the worst of all worlds would
be to bring to something to the floor
and it dies there," Reid said.
Feinstein, an author of the 1994 as-
sault weapons ban that expired after
a decade, said that Reid told her of
the decision on Monday.
There are 53 Democrats in the
Senate, plus two independents who
usually vote with them.
An assault-type weapon was used
in the December massacre at an ele-
mentary school in Newtown, Conn.,
that revived gun control as a top is-
sue in Washington. Banning those
firearms was among the propos-
als President Barack Obama made
in January in response to those
slaying.
The assault weapons ban was the
most controversial of the major
proposals to restrict guns that have
been advanced by Obama and Sen-
ate Democrats. Because of that, it
had been expected that the assault
weapons measure would be left out
of the initial package the Senate con-
siders, with Democrits hoping the
Senate could therefore amass the
strongest possible vote for the over-
all legislation.


Having a separate vote on as-
sault weapons might free moderate
Democratic senators facing re-elec-
tion next year in Republican-lean-
ing states to vote against the assault
weapons measure, but then support
the remaining overall package of gun
curbs.
Gun control supporters consider
a strong Senate vote important be-
cause the Republican-run House
has shown little enthusiasm for most
of Obama's proposals.
Feinstein said Reid told her there
will be two votes.
Onewould be on her assault weap-
ons ban, which also includes a ban
on ammunition magazines that
carry more than 10 rounds of am-
munition. The second would just
be on prohibiting the high-capacity
magazine clips.
Many Democrats think the ban on
large-capacity magazines has a bet-
ter chance of getting 60 votes than
the assault weapons ban.
The Senate Judiciary Commit-
tee has approved four gun control
measures this month, including
Feinstein's barring assault weapons
and high capacity magazines. The
others would expand required fed-
eral background checks for firearms
buyers, increase federal penalties
for illegal gun trafficking and boost
school safety money.


News, Arabo "BK" Ba-
bakhani identified him-
self as the roommate who
called 911. He said he
slammed the door on Se-
evakumaran after seeing
the gun and hid behind
furniture.
Babakhani said Seeva-
kumaran avoided eye con-
tact, never had visitors to
the dorm and never was
seen talking to anyone on
a cellphone.
"Instead of walking by
me, sometimes he'll walk
around me," the room-
mate said in an interview
posted on the Knightly
News website. "The only
time he made solid eye
contact with me is when
he was pointing the gun at
me."
Babakhani didn't re-
spond to messages left by
The Associated Press. AP
reporters have knocked
on the doors of his mother
and sister's homes, but no
one answered.
Freshman mechanical


Buy One
at regular price

Get One
For a e i


engineer student Spen-
cer Renfrow said when he
would see Seevakumaran
in the dorm's hallways and
elevator, he would wave
and Seevakumaran would
wave back.
"Everything would seem
fine," Renfrow said.
The business major, who
held a job at an on-cam-
pus sushi restaurant, had
never been seen by univer-
sity counselors and had no
disciplinary problems with
other students, said uni-
versity spokesman Grant
Heston. Heston said that
the school had been in the
process of removing Se-
evakumaran from the dor-
mitory because he hadn't
enrolled for the current
semester. He had attended
the university from 2010
through the fall semester.
Some 500 students were
evacuated from the dorm
just after midnight Mon-
day, and morning class-
es were canceled at the
51,000-student campus.


E20:74 Hwy 1 aianFLe8r...... S


.BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL,
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT



(5568


Sheriff says missing Mo. mom staged disappearance


The Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo. To
law enforcement agen-
cies, the disappearance of
a.Missouri woman and her
young daughter for four
days had all the markings
of an abduction: a cryp-
tic text message asking
for help, a phone call that
sounded like it was being
read from a script, an ex-
husband with a history of
domestic violence.
Instead, Rachel Koech-
ner told investigators Mon-
day night that she slipped
away with Devon Sandner,
the ex-husband who's the
father of her 4-year-old
daughter, last week as part


of a plan she devised a day
earlier. Koechner, Sand-
ner and their child were
found Monday in a home
in Linn County about 100
miles northeast of Kansas
City after someone saw
them getting gas in near-
by Brookfield and called
police.
"Her family has such a
strong hatred for her ex-
husband, and his fam-
ily has a strong hatred
for her. They just want-
ed to be together," said
Chariton County Sher-
iff Chris Hughes, whose
department is leading
the case.
Koechner was staying
at her mother's house


in Rothville in northern
Chariton County when she
disappeared.
Hughes said she left
Thursday with Sandner
and their daughter. They
spent most of the time
they were missing at a
low-rate suburban Kansas
City motel, where Koech-
ner, 28, and Sandner, 37,
smoked synthetic mari-
judna and laid low while
law enforcement agen-
cies frantically searched


for them. Empty wrappers
that had contained the dr-
tificial pot were found in
Sandner's vehicle, and it
appeared the couple had
smoked the substance with
their daughter nearby, the
sheriff said.
Koechner's sister, Bran-
di Koechner, said family
members are relieved that
the mother and daughter
have.been found safe, but
they are stunned by Rachel
Koechner's actions.


CHIPOIA

COMMUNITY

BANK
Marianna's Only Locally Owned Community Bank


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTiUNrnY


4701 Highway 90

Marianna, FL 32446


Phone: 850-526-7144

Fax: 850-526-7166

chipolacommunitybank.com


Member
FDMI


.-FASW


"-6A + WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 2013


STATE & NATION





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Blackwell Angus Boneless Beef $ 83
Rump Roast.................. l...b.
//--
Family Pack$ 66
Lean Ground Chuck...........
Hillshire Farm Honey or Brown Sugar
Spiral Sliced Ham.............2


Cook's Low Salt 1 3
Shank Portion Ham... b.
Butt Portion.... $126 lb.
Carolina Pride
Smoked Picnic 3 '
Shoulder .................... lb.
Royal $199
Smoked Sausage..........oz.


Blue Ribbon
Ham Steaks...................
Zeigler's
Red Hots......................


Hot, Honey or Tequila
Tyson Wings..


i lb.

v 24 oz.


Lime $554
................... $32 oz.


Ball Park
Jumbo Franks


.Bryan
Regular, Thick or Garlic
Bologna

990.
f 12 oz.,


Down Home Buffalo Style
Boneless Wings
$476
2 lb. bag


* A IA


Taco Bell, 12 oz. $ 58 Hungry Jack, 16 oz. 67
Salsa.... .............. Mashed Potatoes... 67


F SPI


ORPKOFHWE


WEDNESDAY. MARCH 20, 2013 7A-


148
| 16 oz.







-8A WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20,2013


NOTION


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
A sign telling residents about a memorial service is posted at the Convention Center in Hawthorne, Nev., near the Hawthorne
Army Depot oh Tuesday where seven Marines were killed and several others seriously injured in a training accident Monday.


Pentagon bans 60mm mortar round


The Associated Press

HAWTHORNE, Nev.
- A mortar shell explosion
killed seven Marines and
injured a half-dozen more
during mountain warfare
training in Nevada's high
desert, prompting the Pen-
tagon to immediately halt
the use of the weapons
until an investigation can
determine their safety, of-
ficials said Tuesday.
The explosion occurred
Monday night at the Haw-
thorne Army Depot, a
facility, used by troops
heading overseas, during
an exercise involving the
2nd Marine Expeditionary
Force from Camp Lejeune,
N.C. Several Marines from
the unit were injured in the
blast, authorities said.
The mortar round ex-
,


ploded in.its firing tube
during the exercise, said
Brigadier General Jim
Lukeman at a news confer-
ence at Camp Lejeune. He
said investigators are try-
Sing to determine the cause
of the malfunction.
The Pentagon expanded
a temporary ban to pro-
hibit the military from
firing any 60mm mortar
rounds until the results of
the investigation. The Ma-
rine Corps said Tuesday a
"blanket suspension" of
60mm mortars and firing
tubes is in effect.
The Pentagon earlier had
suspended use of all high-
explosive and illumination
mortar rounds that were
in the same manufactur-
ing lots as ones fired in
Nevada
It was not immediately


clear whether more than
a single round exploded, a
Marine Corps official said,
speaking on condition of
anonymity because the of-
ficial wasn't authorized to
speak about an ongoing
investigation.
Eight men under the age
of 30 were taken to Renown
Regional Medical Center in
Reno with injuries, such as
penetrating trauma, frac-.
tures and vascular injuries.
One of them died, five were
in serious condition, one in
was fair condition and an-
other was discharged, said
spokesman Mark Earnest.
The identities of those
killed won't be released
until 24 hours after their
families are notified.
"We send our prayers and
condolences to the fami-
lies of Marines involved in


this tragic incident," said
the force's commander,
Maj. Gen. Raymond C: Fox.
"We mourn their loss, and,
it is with heavy hearts we
remember their courage
and sacrifice."'
The rescue was compli- 4
cated by the remoteness
of the site, which is favored
because the harsh geogra-
phy simulates conditions
in Afghanistan.
The 60mm mortar is a
weapon that tradition-
ally requires three to four
Marines to operate, but
it's common during train-
ing for others to observe
nearby. The firing tube is
supported in a tripod-like
design' and fires roughly
a 3-pound shell, some 14
inches in length and a bit
larger than 2 inches in
diameter.


NYC bill would hide tobacco from public


The Associated Press

NEW YORK Walk into
any convenience store or
gas station in the country,
and chances are the ciga-
rettes will be in roughly
Sthe same spot: at eye lev-
el, right behind the cash
register.
That's no coincidence.
Tobacco companies have
worked hard, and paid
handsomely, to ensure that
cigarette displays occupy
the retail equivalent of
prime real estate. In 2010
alone, the industry made
$370 million in payments to
retailers to help lock down
prime shelving space, ac-
cording to a report last
year by the Federal Trade
Commission. It spent an
additional $107 million on
in-store advertising.
"Every consumer-prod-
uct goods manufacturer
in the country, wants to be
there," said Kurt M. Ribisl,
a professor at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina who
studies tobacco marketing.
"People making chips and
Doritos and Pepsi all of
these companies want that
space. But the tobacco in-
dustry wins."
Now, that supremacy
could be in jeopardy in one
of the nation's biggest ciga-
rette markets.
NewYork City Mayor Mi-
chael Bloomberg proposed
a bill this week that would
force retailers to keep ciga-
rettes out of public view
until a customer asks for a
pack.
The rule would effec-
tively require merchants to
keep tobacco products in
closed cabinets or drawers,
rather than on the colorful
displays, dubbed "power
walls," that are familiar just


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com



Defiant teen gets


life sentences in


Ohio shooting


The Associated Press

CHARDON, Ohio -
Wearing a T-shirt with
"killer" scrawled across
it, a teenager cursed and
gestured obscenely as
he was given three life
sentences Tuesday for
shooting to death three
students in an Ohio high
school cafeteria.
T.J. Lane, 18, had plead-
ed guilty last month to
shooting at students in
February 2012 at Char-
don High School, east of
Cleveland. Investigators
have said he admitted to
the shooting but said he
didn't know why he did it.
Before the case went to
adult court last year, a ju-
venile court judge ruled
that Lane was mentally
competent to stand trial
despite evidence he suf-
fers from hallucinations,
psychosis and fantasies.
Lane was defiant during
the sentencing, smiling
and smirking throughout,
including while four rela-
tives of victims spoke.
After he came in, he
calmly unbuttoned his
blue dress shirt to reveal
the T-shirt reading "killer,"
which the prosecutor not-
ed was similar to one he
wore during the shooting.
At one point, he swiv-
eled around in his chair
toward the gallery where
his own family members
and those of the slain


teenagers were sitting and
spoke suddenly, surpris-
ing even his
lawyer.
"The
hand that
pulled the
trigger that
killed your
sons now
Lane mastur-
bates to the
memory," he said, then
cursed at and raised his
middle finger toward the
victims' relatives:
A statement released
later to local media by the
court on the judge's behalf
said that he wasn't aware
of the shirt and that if he
had noticed it he would
have halted the proceed-
ings and ordered Lane to
wear proper attire.
A student who was
wounded in the ram-
page dismissed Lane's
outburst.
"He said it like a scared
little boy and couldn't talk
slow enough that anyone
could understand him,"
said Nate Mueller, who
was nicked in the ear in
the shooting.
Dina Parmertor, mother
of victim Daniel, called
Lane "a pathetic excuse
for a human being" and
wished upon him "an ex-
tremely, slow torturous
death." She said she has
nightmares and her fami-
ly has been physically sick
over the crimes.


FIRSl BAPTIST
F jsam asl, [, [:J rs


SUNDAY:
Sunday Schoo: 9:30 AM
Morning Worship: 10:45 AM
E ening Worship: 6:00 PM


WEDNESDAY:
Fellowship Supper: 4:15 PM
Children's Choir. 4:45 PM
Bible Study: 6:00 PM


wivw.fbc marianna.org





INSURANCE AGENCY


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cigarette packs are displayed at a smoke shop in New York. A new anti-smoking proposal
would make New York the first city in the nation to keep tobacco products out of sight in retail
stores.


about everywhere in the
U.S.
A second bill would take
aim at the system of dis-
counts and incentives
that manufacturers have
long used to woo retail
customers and keep mer-
chants happy. It would ban
coupons and buy-one-
get-one-free promotions
for tobacco products, and
eliminate deep discounts
by creating a price floor for
each pack.
It is too early to tell
whether either measure
will survive the legisla-
tive process or an almost-
certain court challenge.
Tobacco companies and
convenience store owners
have assailed both propos-
als as unfair and maybe un-
constitutional. An industry
lawsuit 'forced the New
York village of Haverstraw
to quickly rescind a similar
ban enacted last April. The
city of Providence, R.I., was
sued over an anti-coupon
ordinance, much like the
one proposed in NewYork.
Even more unclear is
whether the policy would
actually lead to fewer peo-
ple smoking.


A number of nations, in-
'cluding Ireland, Canada
and Australia, have re-
stricted retail tobacco dis-
plays, but most experts say
the policies haven't been in
place long enough to know
whether they have had a
strong impact.
Big immediate drops
in sales are unlikely, said
Ribisl, who favors tighter
restriction on tobacco
marketing. But he predict-
ed that the display rules
- and especially the new
prohibitions on discounts
and coupons might lead
to a modest reduction in
smoking rates over time.
An FTC report last year.
said the industry gave
$6.49 billion worth of price
discounts to cigarette re-


tailers and wholesalers in
2010.
"When you stop dis-
counting and multipack
specials, you are now
thwarting the tobacco in-
dustry's ability to prey on
low-income smokers," Ri-
bisl said.
Scientists at the non-
profit research firm RTI
International recently
published the results of
an experiment in which
they had 1,200 young peo-
ple take virtual shopping
trips through computer-
ized convenience stories.
It found that kids were
less likely to make fantasy
purchases of cigarettes
in shops where tobacco
products were hidden in
cabinets.


COMERFORD VAULT

MEMORIAL SERVICE
Let us help you
with a memorial
of BEAUTY and
DURABILITY)


SAll Work & Material Guaranteed

Burial Vaults, Mausoleums,
Benches, Markers
and All Cemetery Supplies




Pete Comerford Owner & Operator
593-6828 1-800-369-6828
comerfordvaultmemorial@hotmail.com
Hwy. 90 W Sneads, FL


rie g
Ist A no






Marianna, Flor I I tida 24


850526487

HoursM-F :00 m--600 p







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www,.jcfloridan.com


Obituaries


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332
www.jamensandskesfuneraLhome.com

William C.
Campbell

William Carl Campbell,
83, of Marianna, died Sun-
day, March 17, 2013, at
Jackson Hospital.
A native of College Park,
GA, Mr. Campbell had re-
sided in Jackson County
since 1972. He was a veter-
an of the U. S. Navy and a
retired veteran of the U. S.
Air Force. He'was a former
employee of Marianna
Housing Authority and
past Treasure of the Full
Gospel Businessmen Fel-
lowship.
He was preceded in
death by his wife, Myrtle
Louise Campbell, and his
parents, Carl A. and Hen-
rietta Cody Campbell.
Survivors include his
daughter, Tammy Taylor
and husband, Tim, of Ma-
rianna; two sons, William
Larry Campbell of Jackson-
ville, Anthony Carl Camp-
bell of Marianna; five
grandchildren, Loren,
Megan, Christopher, Jere-
my and Chase; three.great
grandchildren, Amya,
Chloe Ann and Railyn; one
brother, Jerry Campbell
and wife, Beatrice, of Win-
ter Haven, FL.; two sisters,
Frankie Summers of Winter
Haven, FL and Marilyn
Parkman and husband,
Troy, of Fredericksburg,
VA.
Funeral services will be
at 2 p.m. Thursday, March
21, 2013, at James & Sikes
Funeral Home Maddox
Chapel with Dr. Charlie
Fowler officiating. Inter-
ment will follow 'at
Pinecrest Memorial Gar-
dens with military honors
provided by the U.S. Air
Force Honor Guards.
The family will receive
friends Thursday, March
21, 2013, at 1 p.m. until fu-
neral time at Maddox
Chapel.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at http
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com.

Culley's Funeral Home
1737 Riggins Road,
Tallahassee, Fl 32308
850-877-8191





-.


Wag-



Linzey R.
Faison

Linzey R. Faison, 68,
passed on Sunday, March
17, 2013, at his home on
Lake Talquin in Quincy, Fl.
He was born in Bonifay,'
Fl, February 26, 1945, to
Wren and Eunice Faison
and grew up in Vermo, Fl.
He received his nursing ed-
ucation at Tallahassee
Community College, Uni-
versity of West Florida and
Florida State University. He
was an employee of Florida
State Hospital for 33 years


Charge
From Page 1A

influence of alcohol.
Law enforcement officers
continued their attempt to
identify Campbell. They
say at one point she had
trouble walking across the
room and appeared unsta-
ble as she collapsed into a
chair.
While checking on the


until his retirement from
the State of Florida in 1997.
He then continued his
work in private practice as
a psychiatric/mental
health nurse practitioner
until his retirement in De-
cember 2012. He is sur-
vived by his wife, Karin
Faison of Quincy, Fl;
daughter, Tara Whittington
and granddaughter, Grace
Whitungion. of Panarna
City, Fl; brother, Lancey
Faison of McClenney, Fl;
and former wife and family
friend, Eloise Faison of
Chattahoochee, Fl.
A Memorial Service will
be held at Sneads Assembly
of God 2062 River Road
32460 on Thursday, March
21 at 6:00 p.m. CST. Memo-
rial Contributions may be
made to a charity of your
choice.

Searcy Funeral Home
and Crematory
1301 Neil Metcalf Road
334-393-2273

Nell Hardwick

Nell Hardwick of Pana-
ma City Beach, FL passed
away Saturday, March 16,
2013 in Bay Medical Cen-
ter. She was 91.
Graveside services will be
held at 2:00 P.M., Wednes-
day, March 20th at
Meadowlawn Cemetery
with Ken Mitchell officiat-
ing. Burial will follow with
Searcy Funeral Home and
Crematory directing.
Mrs. Hardwick was pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band, Rev. John Hardwick.
Survivors include her
daughter, Suzanne Wilson,
Panama City Beach, FL;
grandson, Scott Wilson
(Camy) Greenhead, FL; five
great-grandchildren, Tiffa-
ny Grimsley (Garrett) Ma-
rianna, FL; Brooke and
Heather Wilson, Marianna,
FL; Jon and Wyatt Wilson,
Greenhead, FL; one great-
great-granddaughter, Ga-
briella Grimsley, Marianna,
FL.

Marianna Chapell
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850-526-5059

Frances M.
Hewett

Mrs. Frances M. Hewett
age 93 of Bascom passed
away on Tuesday, March
19, 2013 in the Seminole
County Nursing Home in
Donaldsonville, GA.
Services for Mrs. Hewett
will be at 1:30 P.M. on
Thursday, March 21, 2013
in the Circle Hill Baptist
Church with Pastor John
Holley and Brother Mon-
roe Campbell officiating.
Interment will follow in the
Circle Hill Baptist Church
Cemetery.
A time of remembrance
will be held from 12:00
P.M. until time of service.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements.
Expressions of sympathy
maybe submitted online at
www.mariananchapelfh.com.


Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
www.artisticdesignsunltd.com
850-372-4456


subject's welfare, officers
discovered another young
child in the home., That
child, also Campbell's,
advised officers that her
mother had grabbed her,
leaving marks and causing
physical pain.
Campbell, 31, was placed
under arrest and charged
with child abuse. She was
transported to the Jackson
County Correctional Fa-
cility to await her first ap-
pearance in court.


- n,--' or, so -s .I r -. : IT ,
tSvF 'WEVE BLEE .N-*i "aUL -
)OT.4N oPASS. O fo tA m
I OPP3.i i : I *r '_.-- -B W ^ ^'
AMC RCAf? TO CO--. T.E S C OF
TOUR U00 S Rs -l I YOUR N'G. bl y
oMfc TNHS- Nt i TS oi 0 ru t

THA, HAS.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, a Syrian victim who suffered-an alleged chemical attack at
Khan al-Assal village according to SANA, receives treatment by doctors at a hospital in Aleppo, Syria on Tuesday.



Syria and rebels trade



chemical weapons charges


The Associated Press

DAMASCUS, Syria Syria's gov-
ernment and rebels traded accusa-
tions Tuesday of a chemical attack
on a northern village for the first
time in the civil war, although the
U.S. said there was no evidence it
had happened.
The use of such weapons would be
a nightmare scenario in the 2-year-
old conflict that has killed an esti-
mated 70,000 people, and the com-
peting claims showed willingness
by both sides to go to new levels to
seek support from world powers.
One of the international commu-
nity's biggest concerns is that Syria's
arsenal of,chemical weapons could
be used by one side or the other, or
could fall into the hands of foreign
jihadi fighters among the rebels or
the Lebanese militant group Hez-
bollah, which is allied with the re-
gime of President Bashar Assad.
President Barack Obama has
declared the use, deployment or
transfer of the weapons would be
a "red line" for possible military in-
tervention by the U.S. in the Syrian
conflict.
The accusations emerged only a
few hours after the Syrian opposi-
tion elected a prime minister to
head an interim government that
would rule areas seized by rebel
forces from the Assad regime.


The state-run SANA news agency
said "a missile containing a chemi-
cal substance" was fired at the vil-
lage of Khan al-Assal in Aleppo
province by "terrorists" the term
it uses for rebels. Deputy Foreign
Minister Faysal Mekdad said 31
people were killed.
SANA added that more than 100
others were wounded, some of them
critically, and it published pictures
showing casualties, including chil-
dren, on stretchers in what appears
to be a hospital ward. None showed
signs of physical injuries.
"It is another crime to be added
to the record of armed terrorist
groups that are supported by some
Arab countries and Western coun-
tries," Mekdad told reporters in
Damascus.
To back up its claims of a chemical
attack by the rebels, SANA pointed
to videos posted onYouTube several
months ago that purported to show
regime opponents experimenting
with poisons on mice and rabbits.
The origin of the videos was not
known.
The rebels quickly denied using
chemical weapons and accused re-
gime forces of doing so.
Maj. Gen. Adnan Sillu, who was
previously among those in charge
of Syria's chemical weapons train-
ing program before he defected to
Turkey last year, accused the Assad


government of firing a chemical
weapon. "Only the regime has long
range missiles capable of han-
dling chemical agents," he said in
comments to Arab broadcaster Al
Arabiya.
The head of Syria's maih oppo-
sition group, the Syrian National
Council, said the group was still in-
vestigating the attack.
The Britain-based Syrian Obser-
vatory for Human Rights, which
relies on a network of activists in
the country, said a rocket attack
on Khan al-Assal killed at least 26
people. The group's director, Rami
Abdul-Rahman, said he had no in-
formation that chemical weapons
were involved and said the rocket
landed near a military installation.
The village lies just west of the city
of Aleppo and had seen fierce fight-
ing for weeks before rebels took
over a sprawling government com-
plex there last month. The facility
included several military posts and
a police academy that Assad's forces
have turned into a military lase that
regularly shells nearby villages.
The Aleppo Media Center, affili-
ated with the rebels, said there were
cases of "suffocation and poison"
among civilians in Khan al-Assal
after a missile was fired at the area.
It said in a statement the cases were
"most likely" caused by regime forc-
es' use of "poisonous gases."


Abuse victims want pope to open Argentina files


The Associated Press

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina A
Roman Catholic activist group said
Tuesday that Pope Francis was slow
as head of the Argentine church to
act against sexual abuse by clergy
and urged him to apologize for what
it called church protection for two
priests later convicted of sexually
assaulting children.
A lawyer for some of the victims,
meanwhile, said the future pope,
Jorge Mario Bergoglio, had not met
with or helped-victims, and charged
that mid-level church officials who
covered up the problem haven't lost
their jobs.
The Buenos Aires archbishop's of-
fice didn't immediately comment
on the complaints, which came as
Francis was being installed as pope
in a Vatican ceremony seen around
the world.
The U.S.-based Bishop Account-
ability group cited the cases of two
priests: Father Julio Cesar Grassi,



Abuse
From Page 1A

6, on his buttocks, also with a wood-
en backscratcher, for not bringing
home a note from his teacher.
Spankings on both children result-
ed in "significant minor injury to the
skin," according to the affidavit.
For the girl, the culmination of
two beatings caused swelling on the
injured area, the top layers of skin
eventually peeling away leaving the
pink dermal layer exposed. Days of
discomfort followed for the child.
The boy's single beating left him


who ran the "Happy Children" foun-
dation and was convicted of pedo-
philia in 2008, and Father Napoleon
Sasso, convicted in 2007 of abusing
gifls at a soup kitchen in suburban
Buenos Aires, where he was as-
signed after being accused of pedo-
philia elsewhere.
Grassi is currently free pending
appeal, thanks partly to a court fil-
ing on his behalf by the Argentine
church, which was headed by Ber-
goglio as archbishop of Buenos Ai-
res. Bergoglio oversaw Argentina's
bishops conference when Sasso
was assigned to the soup kitchen at
a chapel, said the victims attorney,
Ernesto Moreau.
Bishop Accountability co-director
Anne Doyle said those events show
Bergoglio was behind the curve in
the Catholic Church's global strug-
gle to deal with sex abuse by its
priests, which erupted in 2002 after
thousands of cases became public
in the United States and around the
world.


with raised whelps and a bleeding
laceration. The resulting pain and
discomfort, even two days after
the spanking, prevented the child
from being able to sit down com-
fortably in class, which is ulti-
mately what led to the incident's
discovering.
Over the following next few weeks,
multiple investigatory interviews
were conducted with school em-
ployees, many family members and
the primary suspect: Simpson.
Also interviewed by the police was
Simpson's 14-year-old sister. She
confirmed the events and said she
saw Simpson spank the children, on
their bare bottoms with the wooden


"We would be alarmed if the Arch-
bishop Bergoglio had done this in
the '60s or '70s. That would be sad
and disturbing," Doyle told The As-
sociated Press. "But the fact that he
did this just five years ago, when
other bishops in other countries
were meeting victims and imple-
menting tough reporting laws, it
puts him behind some of his Ameri-
can counterparts, that's for sure."
The group said that to send a mes-
sage of zero tolerance in the church
around the world, the new pope
should tell the Buenos Aires arch-
diocese to release the complete files
on the Grassi and Sasso cases, pub-
licly identify any other priests who
are "credibly accused" of sex abuse
and endorse mandatory reporting
by church officials to law enforce-
ment of suspected abuse.
The pope himself should admit
that he was wrong to defend abusive
priests, apologize to the victims of
Grassi and Sasso, and offer to meet
with the victims, the group said.


backscratcher, all three times.
In a Feb. 20 police interview, Simp-
son reportedly denied spanking the
two kids, but on Feb. 25, he returned
to the police department of his own
volition and admitted injuring the
children while spanking them.
Police say Simpson, just prior to
the injuries being discovered, had
been helping his mother babysit the
children in his residence.
On Friday, March 15, after what
an MPD press release described as
"much family turmoil," Simpson
turned himself in at the Marianna
Police Department.
He is being charged with two
counts of child abuse.


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
(1 ,,:." Ir at Alirm l Pr 5i(
Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90
850-482-5041 W


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964 L


~


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20.2013 9Ar


FROM THE FRONT & WORD






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


110A WEDNESDAY. MARCH 20. 2013


World Briefs

Cypriot lawmakers
reject deposits bill
NICOSIA, Cyprus
- Cypriot lawmakers on
Tuesday rejected a critical
draft bill that would have
seized part of people's
bank deposits in order to
qualify for a vital interna-
tional bailout, with not a
single vote in favor.
The rejection leaves .
Cyprus's bailout in ques-
tion. Without external
funds, the country's
banks face collapse and
the government could go
bankrupt. Nicosia will now
have to come up with an
alternative plan to raise
the money: the govern-
ment could try to offer
a compromise bill that
would be more palatable
to lawmakers.
The bill, which had been
amended Tuesday morn-
ing to shield small deposit
holders from the deposit
tax, was rejected with
36 votes against and 19
abstentions.
t
Bombings kill 65 on
eve of anniversary
BAGHDAD Insurgents
sent a bloody message
on the eve of the 10th an-
niversary of the U.S.-led
invasion, carrying out a
wave of bombings across
the country Tuesday that
killed at least 65 people in
the deadliest day in Iraq
this year.'
The nearly 20 attacks,
most of them.in and
around Baghdad, dem-
onstrated in stark terms
how dangerously divided
Iraq remains more than a
year after American troops
withdrew. More-than 240
people were reported
wounded.
It was Iraq's bloodiest
day since Sept. 9, when
an onslaught of bombings
and shootings killed 92.

Congo warlord still
at US Embassy
KIGALI, Rwanda
-Wanted on an interna-
tional warrant for alleged
war crimes, Congolese
warlord Bosco Ntaganda
lived openly in Congo for
years, playing tennis at ex-
clusive clubs and dining at
lakeside restaurants in full
view of foreign diplomats
and U.N. peacekeepers.
That all ended when the
39-year-old known as "The
Terminator" turned him-
self in Monday to the U.S.
Embassy in Rwanda and
asked to be handed over to
the International Criminal
Court a surprise move
that followed a split in
Ntaganda's rebel group
and apparent loss of sup-
port from his backersin
the Rwandan government.
"My best guess is that his
options came down to go
to The Hague or be killed,"
Tony Gambino, the former
director of USAID in
Congo, said of the about-
face by Ntaganda, one of
Africa's most-wanted men.

American named
Syrian prime minister
ISTANBUL The man
chosen to head the Syrian
opposition's new interim
government is a Syrian-
born American citizen
who has spent decades in
the United States working
for technology companies
and advocating for various
Muslim causes.
Members of the opposi-
tion Syrian National Coali-
tion elected Ghassan Hitto
in a vote early Tuesday to
head an administration
they hope will provide an
alternative to President
Bashar Assad's regime and


help coordinate the fight
against his forces.

From wire reports


Pope Francis:


Protect the poor


and the Earth


The Associated Press

VATICAN CITY After
a week marked by acts of
simplicity and openness,
Pope Francis finally let his
words do the talking as he
officially began his stew-
ardship of the Catholic
Church on Tuesday.
"Please," he implored
the tens of thousands,
both poor and power-
ful, gathered outside
St. Peter's Basilica. "Let
us be protectors of
creation, protectors of
God's plan inscribed in
nature, protectors of
one another and of the
environment."
It was a inessage Pope
Francis has hinted at, but
now he made it clear, as
he urged the economic,
political and religious
leaders arrayed before
him not to allow "omens of
destruction and death to
accompany the advance
of this world."
On a day of warm, blue
skies, the 76-year- oldpope
thrilled the crowd as he ar-
rived in the sun-drenched
piazza in an open-airjeep,
shouting "Ciao!" to well-
wishers and kissing babies
handed up to him.
At one point, as he
neared a group of peo-
ple in wheelchairs, he
signaled for the jeep to
stop, hopped off and ap-


preached a disabled man
held up to the' barricade
by his family, blessing him
and then kissing him on
his forehead.
It was a gesture from a
man whose short papacy
so far has been defined
by such spontaneous for-
ays into the crowd, which
seem to surprise and con-
cern his security guards.
"I like him because he
loves the poor," said 7-
year-old Pietro Loretti,
who came from his home
in Barletta in southern
Italy to attend the Mass.
Another child, 9-year-old
Benedetta Vergetti from
Cervetri near Rome, also
skipped school to attend.
"I like him because he's
sweet like my dad," she
said.
The Argentine native is
the first pope from Latin
America and the first
named for the 13th-cen-
tury friar St. Francis of
Assisi, whose life's work
was to care for nature,
the poor and the most
disadvantaged.
In Buenos Aires, thou-
sands of people packed
the central Plaza de Mayo
square to watch the cere-
mony on giant TV screens,
erupting in joy when
Francis called them from
Rome, his words broad-
cast over loudspeakers.
"I want to ask a favor,"


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pope Francis waves to crowds as he arrives to his inauguration Mass in St. Peter's Square at
the Vatican on Tuesday.


Francis told them in Span-
ish. "I want to ask you to
walk together, and take
care of one another. ...
And don't forget that this
bishop who is far away
loves you very much. Pray
for me."
Back in Rome, Francis
was interrupted by ap-
plause as he declared his
role as the leader of the
world's 1.2 billion Catho-
lics was to open his arms
to "the whole of human-
ity, especially the poor-
est, the weakest, the least
important, those whom
Matthew lists in the final
judgment on love: the
hungry, the thirsty, the
stranger, the naked, the


sick and those in prison."
"Today, amid so much
darkness we need to see
the light of hope and to
be men and women who
bring hope to others," he
said. "To protect creation,
to protect every man and
every woman, to look
upon them with tender-
ness and love, is to open
up a horizon of hope. It
is to let a-shaft of light
break through the heavy
clouds."
After the celebrations
die down, Francis has his
work cut out as he con-
fronts a church in crisis.
Retired Pope Benedict
XVI spent his eight-year
papacy trying to reverse


Michigan woman convicted


of murdering grandson


The Associated Press

PONTIAC, Mich. A
suburban Detroit grand-
mother was convicted
Tuesday of second-degree
murder for killing her teen-
age grandson last spring,
as jurors rejected her claim
that she shot him six times
in self-defense.
Sandra Layne, 75, cried
quietly when she heard
the verdict, which was de-
livered during the first full
day of jury deliberations.,
She was also convicted of
using a firearm during a
felony and likely faces at
least 14 years in prison.
Defense attorney Jerome
Sabbota said after the
hearing that Layne was
"devastated" by the ver-
dict. But Jonathan Hoff-
man's mother, Jennifer
Hoffman, said her mother
was a "monster" who de-
serves to go to prison.
"I'm glad she's put. away
and can't do harm to any-
one else," Jennifer Hoff-
man said outside court.
"He was a great kid and
didn't deserve this."
As Layne was being led
out of court, some fam-
ily members sitting with
her 87-year-old husband
waved in a show of sup-
port, but her view was
blocked by a deputy.
Layne fired 10 shots at
her 17-year-old grandson,
striking him six times over
a six-minute span dur-
ing an argument at their
West Bloomfield Town-
ship home last May. She
never disputed that she
killed her grandson, but
she testified that she did
so because he had hit her
and she feared for her
safety.
The Oakland County
jury had a choice of first-
degree murder or lesser
charges, or it could have
acquittedherbased onher
argument of self-defense.


Ellen Marsh
CRS, REALTOR c I
SMAIE. BOL.ML FASTER
Sunny South Properties
4630 Hwy 90 Marianna, FL 32446

850-209-1090


I.


The evidence in
a recording of Hoi


desp
call t
inwh
plead
help,
as
shots
fired.


cluded
ffman's
ierate
to 911
dich he
Is for
even
more
are

M y


grandma shot me. I'm go-
ing to die. Help. I got shot
again," he told the dis-
patcher as he gasped for
air.
Jurors declined to com-
ment following the verdict,
but they told the prosecu-
tor and Layne's attorneys
during a private meeting
that the 911 call was criti-
cal to their decision, ac-
cording to one of the pros-
ecutors, Paul'Walton.
"They said they played
it over and over and over
again" in the jury room,
Walton said. "One of the
big things they said is
when you hear the shots
on the (call) there's no
struggle."
In his closing argument,
Walton told jurors that
Layne never rushed out
of the West Bloomfield
Township home, despite
claiming to be afraid of
her grandson,. and never
called for an ambulance to
help him after the shoot-
ing. She said she shot him
after Hoffman struck her
during a heated argument
about money and a plan
to flee Michigan because
of a failed drug test.
"I wanted him to pay
attention to me. He had


A Southern
'A .,7 r .J .. ". '-- F .I-;., .


to listen. It wasn't a con-
versation. It was arguing.
Swearing," Layne said
in tearful testimony last
week, explaining why she
pulled out a gun..
Sabbota asked jurors to
view the incident through
the eyes of a woman in
her 70s. He said Layne
was taking care of a teen
who had used drugs and
brought strangers to the
home. Hoffman's parents
were living in Arizona dur-
ing his senior year of high
school. They had their
hands full with a daughter
being treated for a brain
tumor.
"Her adrenalin is pump-
ing. You're not calm," Sab-
bota said in his- closing
remarks. "Boom, boom,
boom you pull the
trigger."
r. ^


the decline of Christianity
in Europe, without much
success. While growing
in Africa and Asia, the
Catholic Church has been
stained in Europe, Aus-
tralia and the Americas
by sex abuse scandals.
Closer to home, Francis
is facing serious manage-
ment shortcomings in a
Vatican bureaucracy in
dire need of reform.
Francis hasn't indicated
how he might tackle those
greater problems, focus-
ing instead on messages
and gestures that signal a
total shift in priority and
personality from his
German theologian
predecessor.


l. .f .. 2 -. f s .
2 8 M i f


lW IIIV I. ILa JLU IIUI.
850.482.6855


Oral & Facial

Surgery Center

of Marianna
Barrett R. Tolley, D.D.S. -
Juan F. SamaniegO, JD,.


f'TERVICES WE PROVIDE:


Dental Implants
Dentoalveolar Surgery
Anesthesia
Cosmetic Facial Surgery


Head & Neck Pathology,;.
Cleft Lip & Palate
Maxillofacial Trauma/
Reconstruction


Tradition


s~p~gsrrra~rlCm~'


-Z ;T~-L'


WORLD & NATION


Layne

















SPORTS
BRIEFS


igh School
-Baseball
Thursday- Walton
at Graceville, 6 p.m.;
Marianna at Chipley.
6:30 p.m.; Bethlehem at
Malone. 6 p.m.: Sneads
at Wewahitchka. 6.30
p.m.; Cottondale at Altha.
6p.m.
Friday- Pensacola
Catholic at Marianna. 7
p.m;


Softball
Thursday- Graceville at
Sneads. 6 p.m.. Bethle-
hem at Malone. 5 p.m.:
Vernon at Cottondale, 6
p.m.
Friday- Pensacola
Catholic at Marianna. 6
p.m.

Chipola Baseball
The Indians continue
Panhandle Confer-
ence play today with
the second of a three-
game series against the
Tallahassee Eagles in
Marianna at 5 p.m., with
the series finale coming
Friday in Tallahassee at
4p.m.
Chipola will then begin
the first of another three-
game set with Northwest
Florida State on Saturday
at home at 1 p.m.

Chipola Softball
The Lady-Indians will
open Panhandle Confer-
ence play Saturday with
a home doubleheader
against Northwest
Florida State at 1 p.m.
and 3 p.m.

Panhandle
Seminole Club
Golf Tournament
The 2013 Panhandle
Seminole Club's Annual
Scholarship Golf Tourna-
ment will be held April
5 at Indian Springs Golf
Club in Marianna. This
tournament, along with
another fundraiser, has
helped provide $40.000
over the past 10 years to
deserving local students
and helped further their
education.
Registration and warm-
up will begin atinoon
with the shotgun start at
1 p.m. for this four-man
scramble event. Cash
prizes will be awarded
to the first, second. *
and third-place teams.
Additional prizes will be
given for longest drive,
straightest drive, closest
to the pin, and so on.
The greens fee contri-
bution of $65 will entitle
each golfer to a fantastic
afternoon of golf on a
championship course
(to help a very worthy
cause), followed by a
great meal.
Scholarship (hole) and
prize sponsorships are
also available for this
event. For more inlorma-
tion. call Roy Baker at
850-526-4005 or 209-
1326. or George Sweeney
at 850-482-5526.



Send all sports items
to edrtorial@lcflordan.
corn, or fax them to 850-
482-4478. The mailing
address for the paper is
Jackson County Floridan
P.O. Box 520 Marianna,
FL32447.


CC Women's Basketball


Big game by Brooks lifts


Lady Indians to win


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent jcfloridan.com
The Chipola Lady Indians passed
their first test at the NJCAA Women's
National Championship tournament
Monday night, rolling past the South-
western Illinois Blue Storm 78-62
thanks to a dominant performance
from leading scorer Rayven Brooks.
The 5-foot-ll sophomore, posted


29 points, 11 rebounds, five assists,
four steals, and two blocked shots in
a sensational all-around performance,
while also knocking in 6-of-9 from the
three-point line.
Brooks scored 16 of her points in a
first half that featured a 22-11 burst
over the final 10 minutes by the Lady

See INDIANS, Page 2B


MARK SKINNER/THE FLORIDAN
Chipola's Jasmine
Crawford shoots for
two during the State
Junior College Basketball
Tournament in Marianna.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
GRACEVILLE-The Gracev-
ille Tigers made it three dis-
trict wins in a row, as well as
two straight over Cottondale,
with a 10-4 home victory
over the Hornets on Tuesday
afternoon.
It was the second win over
Cottondale in the last week,
with the Tigers also topping
the Hornets on March 13 by
the same score.
In that game, the Tigers
jumped out' to a 7-0 early
lead, but it was the Hornets
who got off to an auspicious
start Tuesday with a lead-
off home run by Ryan Mor-
rissey off of GHS ace Jared
Padgett,
However, Graceville an-
swered with two runs in the
bottom of the first when


Padgett tied the game with
an RBI single and then stole
second and third and scored
when the throw to third got
into left field.
Morrissey walked and
scored on a wild pitch to tie
it back up in the third, but
the Tigers came back with
two runs in the bottom of
the inning on an RBI double
by Padgett and an RBI single
by Hudson Forsyth to make
it 4-2.
An RBI sacrifice fly by Clay
Jenkins in the fourth scored
Eli Miller to make it 5-2
Graceville, and Tyler Werten-
berger added an RBI single in
the fifth to increase the mar-
gin to four runs.
The game started to get out
of hand in the bottom of the
sixth, with the Tigers push-
ing across four more runs,


as Cottondale reliever Justin
Lipford hit two batters and
walked two to force in the
first run.
Austin Jackson came on in
relief for the Hornets, but a
passed ball on his first pitch
allowed Denny Elligson to
score, and Ethan Walker fol-
lowed with an RBI single to
left field to score Brandon
Pippin to make it 9-2.
An RBI groundout by Mill-
er scored Jarrett Brogdon
for the final run of the
inning.
Cottondale got two more
runs in the top of the seventh
when Morrissey was hit by a
pitch and scored on an error,
and Willie Pippin hit an RBI
single to right field for the
game's final run.

See TIGERS, Page 2B


GHS SOFTBALL


Graceville's Taylor
McDaniel tries
to get a Vernon
runner stealing home
Monday night. The Lady
Tigers lost to Vernon
11-1.


MARK SYJKNE/iTHE Flr :DOi


CC Softball


Chipola

softball stays

hot, sweeps

LB Wallace

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Chipola Lady Indians con-
tinue to pile up the wins, as they
swept another doubleheader
Tuesday afternoon on the road
against LB Wallace, winning by
scores of 4-1 and 22-3.
Chipola won the first game in
extra innings thanks to a three-
run home run by Katie Harrison
in the top of the ninth innings.
The Lady Indians trailed 1-
0 through four innings before
Harrison tied it up with an RBI
sacrifice fly in the fifth to score
Kristen Allen.
Chipola threatened again in the
sixth when Megan Borak, Lind-
say Wurm, and Allen all reached
on hits to load the bases with one
out.
But a ground ball by Stephanie
Garrels resulted in a force out at
home plate, and Hayley Parker
lined out to shortstop to end the
threat.
In the top of the ninth, the Lady
Indians put together a two-out
rally, with Parker singling and
Mya Anderson drawing a walk
from LB Wallace starter Kaitlynn
Wiggins to bring up Harrison,
who took a 1-1 pitch over the
left field fence for the go-ahead
runs.
EvaVoortman came back to the

See CHIPOLA, Page 2B

Malone Softball


MARK SKINNER/THE FLORIDAN
Angelica Livingston.gets an out
at first for Malone Monday night
during a game against Cottondale.

Malone rallies

byCHS inthe

7th inning
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

COTTONDALE The Malone
Lady Tigers used a five-run rally
in the seventh inning to beat the
Cottondale Lady Hornets 6-2 on
Monday night and earn their
second straight win.
The game was scoreless
through three innings before
Malone got on the board in the
top of the fourth with an RBI
double by Jennifer Hewett to
score Jakivia Hearns.
The Lady Hornets responded
with a run in the bottom of the
inning when pinch-runner Lily
Festa stole second base, went to
third on an error, and scored on
a passed ball.
Cottondale surged ahead in the
bottom of the fifth when Kayla
Latham drew a lead-off walk off
of Malone starter Sara Newsom,
moved to second on a sacrifice
bunt by Deunna Gonzalez, stole
third base, and then scored on
another passed ball to make it
2-1.
Malone had a great chance
to tie it back up in the sixth,
with Hearns bunting for a hit
with one out and then heading
to third after Newsom bunted
and reached on an error at
first.

See MALONE, P.:- 2B


NBA
Pacers p!. 3..y to beat
struggling Magic 95-73.

Page 2B


Inside Tomorrow's Jackson County Honaan.
---- #MEIICA I PIIMIIe IPOIC PUSIIuIII----

ATHLON SPORTS
Exclusive on-on-oe intre views Arth today's top sports superstars Check
Feature -trLonr tial cul to rhe nearly o wrry we love sports? Theyre here, too
Previews of it'e top events on the sports calendar O- course.
- --c I -* . .-* Cc '. .- A .: I - ..U--- a --un ".-- o - *--.1-'.*.--. .
-----------
-- --'-- S


igerBASEBAJo




Tigers on top


MARK SKINNER/THE FLORIDAN
Graceville's Denny Elligson tags Cottondale's Wesley Spooner after catching him in a rundown Tuesday
afternoon.


Tigers take 3rd straight in district


r ---- p-----qs~lCPm~ ~3~--c~- --s~---L---.----4--P~ -- _L -- C I







12B WEDNESDAY. MARCH 20.2013


SPORTS


NBA


Path to 33 might not be daunting for Heat


The Associated Press

LeBron James and the Miami Heat
are about to play another game in
Cleveland.
Yawn.
That's what a 23-game winning
streak will do for a team.
It mites even the LeBron-Goes-
'Home-Again hype.
SSomeday the Heat will lose an-
other basketball game. Maybe
.;even Wednesday, when the reign-
Ing NBA champions drop by James'
old neighborhood to take on
,James' old team, which happens
"to be decimated by injuries right
now.
Still, could happen. Almost did
in Boston on Monday night, save
for James' game-winning jump-
er in the final seconds after Mi-
Sami rallied from 17- and 13-point
deficits to squeak past the Celtics
105-103.
But given how they wrapped up
their latest "W" and what lies ahead,
it may no longer be farfetched to
think that the record of 33 straight
victories set by the 1971-72 Los
Angeles Lakers is within Miami's
grasp.
"It means a lot," James said af-
"ter the Boston game. "I know the
"history of the game. To be sitting
'in second place right now ... for
us to be there and doing it in the
"way we want to'do it, it means a
lot."
It also means a lot that Miami
'won't be visiting many playoff-
bound teams any time soon. Five
of their next six games are against
'teams with the worst records this
'season.
So, grab some popcorn and some
pop and settle in to watch where
this remarkable run ends up.
Here's a breakdown of the poten-
tial Road to 34:
At Cleveland (22-45)
Heat victory odds: Excellent.
Detroit (23-46), Friday.
Heat victory odds: Excellent.
Charlotte (15-52), Sunday.
Heat victory odds: Above


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat's LeBron James (right) and Boston Celtics' Jeff Green (8) watch James'
go-ahead jumper with 10.5 seconds left in an NBA game in Boston, Monday, March
18,2013. James made the shot to lead Miami to its 23rd consecutivevictory, 105-
103 over the Celtics.


excellent.
-At Orlando (18-49), March25.
Heat victory odds: Average.
-At Chicago (36-30), March 27.
Heat victory odds: Fair.
-At New Orleans (22-46), March
29.
Heat victory odds: Excellent.
At San Antonio (51-16), March
31.
Heat victory odds: Poor.
NewYork (39-26), April 2.
Heat victory-odds: Good.
-At Charlotte (15-52), April 5.
Heat victory odds: Excellent.


Philadelphia (26-40), April 6.
Heat victory odds: Excellent.
Milwaukee (33-32), April 9.
It's very likely that the Bucks and
Heat will play in the first round
of the East playoffs. But before
that, if Miami is really going for
No. 34 on this night, how fitting
would it be that the Bucks are the
opponent?
Jan. 9, 1972. The Bucks beat the
Lakers 120-104, snapping that 33-
game win streak. Does history re-
peat itself on April 9?
Stay tuned.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Orlando Magic's Kyle O'Quinn (2) and Indiana Pacers' Roy
Hibbert (55) reach for a rebound during the first half of an NBA
game on Tuesday.


Pacers pull away to


beat struggling Magic


The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Paul
George scored 19 points
and Tyler Hansbrough had
14 points and 14 rebounds,
leading the Indiana Pacers
to a 95-73 rout of the strug-
gling Orlando Magic on
Tuesday night.
The Pacers improved to
27-8 at home despite play-
ingwithout second-leading
scorer David West because
of a sprained lower back.
Maurice Harkless and
Arron Afflalo each had 10
points for the Magic, who
lost their fourth straight on
a night they shot just 31.8
percent from the field and
coach Jacque Vaughn was
ejected in a flurry of four
technical fouls with 4:47
left in the third quarter.
The Central Division-
leading Pacers closed the
first quarter on a 12-0 run
to take a 19-12 lead, led
42-29 at the half, and 62-
44 in the third quarter af-
ter the technicals. Orlando
couldn't get closer than 12
the rest of the way.
How miserable was it?


Indiana started the game
by missing its first six 3-
point attempts, but Or-
lando missed its final 11
shots in the first quarter
and barely avoided match-
ing the franchise's all-time
low scoring total in the
first half needing a tip-
in with 29.1 seconds left in
the second quarter to top
the 27 points they scored at
Houston on Jan. 24, 2005.
There were air balls,
missed dunks, missed la-
yups even shots off. the
side of the backboard.
, But the worst part came
during a third quarter in
which the Magic looked
completely inept.
Twice, Orlando was
called for fouls underneath
on made baskets. The first
came on George Hill's 3-
pointer with 7:16 to go. Roy
Hibbert completed the rare
four-point play by making
the free throw.
Sixty-nine seconds later,
it happened again. This
time, Lance Stephenson
made a 19-footjumper and
Hansbrough completed
the three-point play.


Malone
From Page 1B
But Lady Hornets pitcher
Kelsie Obert gof out of the
jam by striking out Shey-
anna Chambliss and get-
ting Hewett to foul out to
end the inning.


Tigers
SFrom Page 1B
Graceville finished with
six hits as a team, with
Padgett going 2-for-3 with
a double, two RBI, and a
run, and Wertenberger 2-
for-4 with an RBI.
Jenkins walked twice,
scored two runs, and had
San RBI, and Pippin walked
Three times and scored two
runs.
Forsyth was 1-for-2 with
a walk and an RBI, and
Walker was 1-for-3 with a
walk and an RBI.
The Hornets had five hits
altogether, with Morrissey
leading the way by going
2-for-2 with a home run,
a walk, an RBI, and three


Chambliss came on in
relief of Newsom to start
the bottom of the sixth and
retired the Lady Hornets
in order to set the table for
Malone's seventh-inning
rally.
Angelica Livingston was
hit by a pitch to start the
inning, and Tierra Brooks


runs, while Willie Pippin
was 1-for-4 with an RBI,
andWesley Spooner was 1-
for-4 with a double.
Spooner started on the
mound for Cottondale and
took the loss, lasting four
innings and giving up four
earned runs on three hits
and six walks.
Padgett got the win for
GHS, going five innings
and allowing an earned run
on four hits and six walks
with eight.strikeouts.
Jenkins pitched the final
two innings out of the bull-
pen, giving up one hit, two
walks, and striking out 4.
Graceville improved to 4-
6 overall and 3-4 in District
3-1A competition, while
Cottondale fell to 5-8 and
2-5 in league play.


reached on another er-
ror after a sacrifice bunt
attempt, with Sabra Cul-
lifer bunting for a hit to
load the bases with no
outs.
Obert then walked Ni-
cole Westbrook to force in
the tying run before ral-
lying, to strike out Karrie


Chipola
From Page 1B
the circle in the bot-
tom of the ninth to fin-
ish what she started,
retiring the LB Wallace
side in order to end the
game.
Voortman went all nine
innings and allowed
just one earned .run on
five hits and a walk with'
eight strikeouts to get the
win.
Wiggins also went the
distance and gave up four
earned runs on eight hits
and five walks with six
strikeouts.
Harrison led Chipola
offensively, going 1-
for-2 with two walks,


Shack for the first out.
But Hearns came
through with a two-RBI
single through the middle
of the infield to put Malo-
ne up 4-2.
Three batters later,
Hewett .came up with her
second run-scoring dou-
ble of the game, stroking


a run, and four RBI,
with Allen getting two
hits.
The second game of the
doubleheader was far less
competitive, with Chipo-
la racking up 24 hits as
a team and hitting four
home runs to overwhelm
LB Wallace.
The Lady Indians got
four runs in the first in-
ning with Anderson and
Parker both going deep,
Anderson with a solo shot
and Parker a three-run
blast.
Harrison added her
second three-run hom-
er of the day in the
fourth inning to make it
7-0.
LB Wallace got -a run
back in the bottom of the


a two-run double to the
right centerfield gap to
make it 6-2.
Obert struck out Liv-
ingston to mercifully
bring the inning to an
end.
In the bottom of the sev-
enth, Latham fouled out to
start the inning, and Gon-


fourth, but Chipola ex-
ploded for 15 runs in the
top of the fifth to put the
game away.
The Lady Indians col-
lected 11 hits in the in-
ning, with Wurm pro-
viding the big hit with
a gland slam for the
final four runs of the
inning.
Wurm finished 3-for-5
with two runs and five
RBI, while Parker was 2-
for-5 with three runs, and
four RBI, and Harrison
was 2-for-3 with two runs
and three RBI.
Garrels went 3-for-4
with a walk, two runs,
and two RBI, Katie God-
frey was 2-for-2 with two
runs and two RBI, Ander-
son was 2-for-4 with three


zalez reached on an error.
But Chambliss struck
out Cameron McKinney
for the second out, and
Brooks scooped up a bunt
by Obert and fired it to
third for the final out.
Malone improved to 3-3
with the win, while Cot-
tondale fell to 5-5.


runs, and two RBI, and
Allen was 2-for-3 with a
walk, two runs, and an
RBI.
Seay and Alyssa Hath-
coat also had two hits for
Chipola.
Rosanne deVries started
in the circle and got the
win for the Lady Indians,
going four innings and
giving up two hits and six
walks with three strike-
outs, with Kaitlin Hussey
giving up an earned run
on two hits and a walk in
an inning.
Chipola (26-3) has now
won 14 straight games
and will next open up
Panhandle Conference
play Saturday against
Northwest Florida State
at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.


Indians
From Page 1B
Indians to take a 40-25
lead at the break.
Brooks made three
triples during the run,
with the last putting
the Lady Indians up 34-
.19 with five minutes -to
halftime.
A three by Kristine
Brance to start the second
half increased the margin
to 18, with a jumper by
:'reyvonna Brooks and two
free throws by Lashonda
Littleton establishing a 47-
25 Chipola lead with 17:36
:.to play.
Back-to-back threes by


Rayven Brooks gave the
Lady Indians a 57-32 lead
with 12:27 remaining, and
the Blue Storm never got
closer than the final mar-
gin after that.
Brance and Littleton also
finished with 13 points
for Chipola with each
shooting 5-of-ll from
the field, while Treyvonna
Brooks added 11 points
and eight rebounds, and
Jasmine Crawford scored
eight.
Southwestern Illinois
star Janelle Cannon, who
came into the game as the
nation's leading scorer at
25 points per game, fin-
ished with 26 points on
8-of-16 shooting, with


Danielle Duncan scoring
16 points, and Breanna
Baker 14.
With the win, Chipola
(26-6) advanced to today's
second round to take on
College of Southern Idaho
at 3 p.m.
If the Lady Indians win


again, they'll play again
Thursday against the win-
ner of Central Arizona vs.
Crowder.
Chipola will need to
win four more games
in four consecutive
days to win the national
championship.


S OPEN FOR LUNCH

CHECK OUT OUR
SPECIALS AND
MENU ONLINE
850-482-3333
Dn c2915 Jefferson St.
Dominos.com r









$59.

Check and Service
Important step in ensuring that your unit
is working at its peak efficiency;
saving you energy, money and concern!






482-8802
www.woodallstotalcomfort.com
Offer good through April 30, 2013
FL# CAC058636


i;_____


~







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


ACC


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
North Carolina State head coach Mark Gottfried reacts
during the second half of a NCAA game against Miami in the
semifinals of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament on
Saturday, March 16, 2013.



ACC coaches not


pleased withjust


4 tourney teams


The Associated Press

Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence coaches are still
reeling from the league's
poor representation in the
NCAA tournament.
They're using words like
disappointed, fair, respect
and perception describ-
ing how they feel about the
ACC having just four teams
in the tournament and no
No. 1 seed.
Miami became the first
team to win the ACC regu-
lar-season crown outright
along with the tournament
championship yet fail. to
get a No. 1 seed.
The Hurricanes ended up
with a No. 2, as did Duke,
which looked destined for
a No. 1 before an early ACC
tournament exit. North
Carolina and North Caro-
lina State ended up as No.
8 seeds, while Virginia and
Maryland both fell on the
wrong side of the bubble
and will play in the NIT.
That all came despite the
Blue Devils standing at No.
1, the Hurricanes at No. 4
and the Tar Heels at No. 17
in the RPI. And it was one
reason why UNC coach'
Roy Williams called Sun-
day's selections broadcast
"a confusing show, and I'm
still confused."
"I was disappointed for
our league," Williams said
Tuesday. "I didn't think it
was necessarily fair for our
league. But ... it is what it is
sb we've got to go play."
It marked the second
time in three years that the
ACC got just four bids and
fourth time in the eight
seasons since the league's
expansion to 12 teams in
2006. The league has got-
ten as many as seven teams
twice, in 2007 and 2009.
"I think it's a really good
conference and I was just
hoping it would garner a
little more respect than
that," Virginia coach Tony
Bennett said after learning
his Cavaliers would head
to the NIT.
Miami (27-6) beat North
Carolina in Sunday's ACC
final to pair its first regu-
lar-season crown with the
first tournament title. And
going back to the start of
NCAA seeding in 1979,
only one team Georgia
Tech in 1985 had failed
to earn a No. 1 after win-
ning at least a share of the
regular-season crown to go
with the tournament title,
according to STATS IC.
But the Hurricanes end-
ed up with a No. 2 (East
Region) just like that Mark


Price-led Yellow Jackets
team.
Mike Bobinski, who
chaired the selection com-
mittee, said Gonzaga edged
out Miami for a No. 1 seed.
But while senior Reggie
Johnson said after the UNC
win that Miami deserved a
No; 1, coach Jim Larrana-
ga and other players said
they weren't worried about
it.
"It doesn't matter to us,"
senior guard Durand Scott
said. "I want them to give
whatwe deserve-nothing
less and nothing more." '
Duke (27-5) looked set
to earn a No. 1 after Ryan
Kelly returned from a two-
month absence due to a
foot injury. The Blue.Devils
were 18-0 with Kelly and
9-4 without him before the
ACC tournament but fell
flat in a quarterfinal exit to
Maryland. The Blue Devils
ended up as a No. 2 to top
NCAA overall seed Louis-
ville in the Midwest.
The Tar'Heels (24-10) won
eight of 10 after switching
to a four-guard lineup to
reach the ACC final. But
they ended up as the No.
8 in the South Region with
a trip to Kansas City, Mo.,
where Williams coached
Kansas during several Big
12 tournaments.
If they can beat Villanova
on Friday, the Tar Heels
could face the top-seed-
ed Jayhawks in the third
round.
As for N.C. State (24-10),
the preseasonACC favorite
earned the No. 5 seed in
the ACC tournament and
reached the semifinals to
return to the NCAAs for the
second straight year. The
Wolfpack earned the No. 8
in the East and could have
a third-round matchup
with top-seeded Indiana.
Virgiria (21-11) had wins
against Duke and North
Carolina, bu't losses to
Old Dominion, Delaware
and Boston College un-
dermined that good work.
Maryland (22-12) beat
Duke twice yet lost four
of six entering the ACC
tournament.
"The perception of our
league just wasn't great,"
Terrapins coach Mark Tur-
geon said. "Our league was
much better than last year.
... (TheACC) had some bad
losses early and itjust stuck
with us. And teams like us
and Virginia just didn't get
it done on the road. If we
just would have won on the
road a little bit more I think
both of us would have got-
ten in. But we didn't."


Wanna quit smoking??
Have a loved one
who wants to quit?? I
LET US HELP YOU
REACH YOUR GOAL!

VAPOR TECH INC.

A HEALTHIER LIFESTYLE


www.vaportechinc.org
vaportechinc@ymail.com
Monday-Saturday 9oam6pm
4944 B Molloy Plaza, Marinna
(850) 482-0036


Free flora ndnrinem

Ovr 95 fl rs to
whose from!


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY. MARCH 20, 2013 3BF


March Madness


America starts filling out brackets


The Associated Press

Professor Michael Maga-
zine is upending the logical
world of math with a good
dose of March Madness.
Magazine teaches a new
class called Bracketology
at University of Cincin-
nati, the home of the 10th-
seeded Bearcats, where
33 business students are
spending the semester try-
ing to make sense out of
what can feel nonsensical
at times the art of filling
out an NCAA tournament
bracket.
"The life lesson is that
we make a lot of deci-
sions that are the right
decisions," Magazine says,
"but the outcomes don't
always come out the way
we planned."
And that's why picking
the NCAA tournament is
so much fun.
Magazine says that, yes,
he's among the millions of
Americans who take part
in the country's largest of-
fice pool where all you
need is-a pen, a copy of the
bracket and $10 or $20 to
get in on the action.
Real basketball knowl-
edge? That's optional.
Some people pick their
favorite mascot, others go
based on color, still oth-
ers just throw darts at a
board.
"I always tell people to
ignore where they went
to school," Magazine says.
"But it's hard to do."
He teaches the course
with a Cincinnati alum,
Paul Bessire, who owns
predictionmachine.com,
a program that runs thou-
sands of simulations to.
forecast likely winners of
games. Armed with that,
along with some mathe-
matical models, Magazine
and Bessire hold three ses-
sions- handicapping, as-
sembling brackets, filling
out the brackets and see-
ing how everyone did.
"It's a pass-fail class,"
Magazine says.
Good thing because
when it comes to March
Madness, the numbers get
a little crazy.
According to the website
bookofodds.com, if you
fill out your bracket by
picking the better-seeded
team in every game, the
odds of that bracket being
perfect are more than 35


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In this March 31,2011 photo, Jefferson High School librarian Diana Inch displays her winning
NCAA tournament bracket from Yahoo.com's online contest in Jefferson, Ore.


billion-1. Or, to put it an-
other way, you have an 18
times better chance of be-
ing killed by a waterspout
this year.
There are more than
9.2 quintillion combina-
tions (a 9, followed by 18
zeroes), and even-if you
eliminate all those that
have a No. 16 seed win-
ning even a single game
- which has never hap-
pened you're still talk-
ing about enough paper to
build a trail from the Earth
to the moon more than 1
million times.
Oh, and about eliminat-
ing those No. 16 seeds:
Might think twice about
that.
This has been the most
unpredictable college
basketball season anyone
can remember, including
one stretch where the No.
1 team in The Associated
Press Top 25 changed for
five straight weeks.
Even in seasons that
have seemed more "pre-
dictable," the NCAA tour-
nament has become in-
creasingly unstable over
recent years. Butler, en-
rollment 4,500, has made
the Final Four twice in the
last three years. In 2011,1
little-known and even
less-heralded VCU trans-
formed itself from a No. 11
seed that barely got into
the tournament into a Fi-
nal Four team. Last year,
two No. 15 teams won on
the first Friday of the tour-
nament. After the second


upset, ESPN reported
none of its 6.45 million
bracket entries were per-
fect anymore.
"We messed up some
brackets! We messed up
some brackets!" senior
Kyle O'Quinn exclaimed
last year after he led 15th-
seeded Norfolk to an 86-84
upset over Missouri.
Tom DeRosa, a former
algebra teacher who now
runs a website that pro-
vides teachers with every-
day lessons for their own
classes, says there is no
mathematically surefire
way to figure out which 15
or 16 might break through


Broker/Owner
(850) 209-4705 cell
C21SunnySo@aol.com


SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.


this year. But you can't
completely ignore them,
either.
"You look at the num-
bers and, yeah, it's a pretty
good bet a 1, 2 or 3 seed
is going to win the whole
tournament," says DeR-
osa, whose March Mad-
ness lesson is being taught
across America this week.
"If you're raking a brack-
et and you don't have any
'l's in the Final Four or
anywhere near -the Final
Four, you're probably not
going to win your pool.
But things get a lot more
nuanced the more you
read."


Ih,0 Hwy 9) *
(850) 526-2891
(850) 526-2891


Century 21
Sunny South
Properties


THE MOST ADVANCED HEART CENTER IN THE REGION. PERIOD.


FRONT END & TIRE SERVICE
"NotJust A Front End Shop"
We can take care of ALL YOUR AUTO NEEDS!
2984 Dekle Street COBB'S 1 4167 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32448 (2 Bldgs Down from COBBS 1)
850-526-4706 COBB'S 2 Marianna, FL 32448
80 850-482-2028
Hours: Monday-Friday 7:00AM 5:00PM
WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS!!







-14B WEDNESDAY. MARCH 20.2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Baseball


Dominicans beat Netherlands, reach WBC final


TheAssociated Press

SAN FRANCISCO After two
World Baseball Classics domi-
nated by Japan, this one is com-
ing down to a pair of proud Ca-
ribbean nations.
When the undefeated Domini-
can Republic plays Puerto Rico on
Tuesday night in a rematch only
three days after they last met in
Miami, two island countries with
years of baseball success will give
the world another version of a
Caribbean championship.
"Whoever wins the Classic is re-
ally the Caribbeans," Dominican
manager Tony Pena said after his
team's 4-1 win against the Neth-
erlands on Monday. "It could be
Puerto Rico or the Dominican
Republic, but it will belong to the
Caribbeans."
Tuesday's winner will earn the
distinction of world champion
for the first time in the three-
event history of the WBC.
Fernando Rodney surprised
his teammates in the middle of
the game when he pulled out a
lucky plantain, sent from a fam-
ily member back home in the
Dominican just in time for Mon-
day's semifinal.
The quirky Tampa Bay -closer
sure found the perfect motiva-
tional prop.
Late lineup addition Moises Si-
erra hit a tying RBI double in the
fifth and Jose Reyes added a go-
ahead single two batters later as
the spirited Dominicans reached
the WBC final and avenged an
early exit at the hands of the
Dutch in the last Classic four
years ago.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dominican Republic's Moises Sierra (14) celebrates after scoring during
the fifth inning of a semifinal in the World Baseball Classic against the
Netherlands in San Francisco on Monday.


The banana will be around for
another day.
"Keep it, why not?" winning
pitcher EdinsonVolquez said. "It's
like we have this one mission as a
team, winning and winning."
Edwin Encamacion had an RBI
single as the undefeated Domini-
cans survived a rocky start from
Volquez, who benefited from Si-
erra's catch over the left-field wall
in foul territory to end a first-in-
ning threat.
The Dominican Republic and
Puerto Rico will play for a third
time this tournament after the
Dominicans (7-0) won Saturday
in Miami before each club flew
West.
One will get to throw quite a
party.
Puerto Rico eliminated two-
time defending Classic cham-
pion Japan 3-1 on Sunday night.
Rodney finished Monday's game
for his sixth save as dozens of


seagulls swirled right above the
field.
"The platano said, 'If you keep
me close to you, you're going to
get the win,'" Rodney joked after
briefly putting it on display dur-
ing pregame introductions.
Players rushed out of the dug-
out as fans chanted "Domini-
cana! Dominicana!"
This time, the Dominicans
didn't let the Netherlands inter-
fere with their road to the WBC
championship.,
They were still fuming four
years after the Netherlands beat
them twice in the 2009 WBC's
first round for a stunning early
exit. They were a pair of one-run
games played in San Juan, Puerto
Rico, including an 11-inning vic-
tory in an elimination contest.
"We kept it in the past," Volquez
said. "We're/just focused on our
game."
And Pena certainly didn't mind


Rodney's spontaneous dugout
contribution.
"In a game like this, you have
to have a little bit of fun and find
a way to loosen up," the skipper
said. "I'm glad he did it."
Former Oakland and San
Francisco shortstop Miguel Te-
jada earned a start at third base
and singled twice and scored a
run. He drew cheers from the
Bay Area fans during pregame
introductions.
Andruw Jones hit a two-out
single in the fourth for the first
Dutch hit against Volquez, who
yielded. Wladimir Balentien's
first-inning RBI groundout be-
fore settling in to earn the win.
Carlos Santana hit a one-out
double in the fifth and Sierra fol-
lowed with an RBI double as the
Dominicans tied the game at 1
and later chased Netherlands
starter Diegomar Markwell.
The Dutch lefty, who came in at
a 2-0 with a 0.90 ERA in his two
previous WBC outings, didn't
allow a runner past first base
through four innings. But his
Pitch count quickly Went up in a
four-run fifth as the Dominicans
tagged him for five hits, so that
was it considering theWBC pitch
limit is 95.
Tom Stuifbergen replaced
Markwell with two outs in the
fifth and threw a wild pitch on his
first offering to Robinson Cano,
allowing Reyes to score from
third for an insurance run.
Cano batting 15 for 29 (.517)
this tournament with two home
runs, six RBIs, five runs scored
and two doubles went 1 for 2
with two intentional walks.


The second baseman and Yan-
kees star made a pretty stop on
Roger Bemadina's sharp ground-
er in the sixth in which he lunged
left then spun and threw to
first.
Now, Netherlands manager
Hensley Meulens will head back
to the Arizona desert for his other
gig: hitting coach of the defend-
ing World Series champion San
Francisco Giants. The Dutch-
born Meulens' mother is Domin-
ican, so he had fans on both sides
for this one.
About half of the Dutch roster
is from Holland and the others
from his native island of Cura-
cao. He warned his team that
the Dominicans had all the big
names and the major league ex-
perience, but not to jet it affect
the Dutch doing what got them
this far: playing solid, fundamen-
tal baseball.
"I'm proud of our guys," Meu-
lens said, "I thanked them for
playing with a lot of heart."
This game drew only 27,527,
compared to 33,363 a night ear-
lier as Japan went down to the
surprising Puerto Ricans.
While hardly as festive with-
out the favored Japanese, some
sections of fans stayed on their
feet and danced to music and
the beat of drums and horns.
One man cheered "Let's go Gi-
ants!" in the top of the fourth
inning.
Volquez, the Dominican right-
hander, had a pair of walks and
a wild pitch with two mound
visits by Santana, the catcher
- through the first two batters of
the game.


Women's College Basketball

Top teams could be forced to play on the road


The Associated Press

Notre Dame coach Muf-
fet McGraw wasn't thrilled
when the NCAA women's
tournament bracket was
released Monday.
Her No. 1-seeded Irish
were the latest among the
nation's top teams to be
put on course for an early
round game on an op-
ponent's home court. It's
something that's been hap-
pening frequently since
tournament switched to
predetermined sites a de-
cade ago.
,"I'm very disappointed
that a No. 1 seed wasn't
protected,' McGraw said.
"It makes the regular sea-
son seem like it doesn't
matter. We earned the right
to be a No. 1 seed. The way
they had the designated
sites is not a fair way to do
it ... the top 16 teams need
to host. We need to go back
to the way that it was done
before. But we've got to
be able to win, no matter
where we're playing."
This year five of the top
12 seeds could potentially
play a true road game in
the second round. There
isn't much that can be done
to fix it for now, as women's
basketball attendance isn't
strong enough to support
a move-to neutral courts.
That means the Irish,
Kentucky, California, Penn
State and North Carolina
could face home teams
with a berth in the regional
semifinals on the line.
Notre Dame was hoping
to be sent to Columbus,
Ohio the only one of the
16 sites that doesn't have a
host team playing. Instead
they will have to travel to
Iowa City where a tough
second round matchup
with host Iowa could be
looming.
"We tried to avoid it
several different times by
putting them on a neutral
court, but we just couldn't
get the bracket to work,"
said St. John's associate
vice president for athletics
Kathy Meehan, who is on
the selection committee.
"You want to protect the
No. 1 seed as much as you
can.
The Irish are the only No.
1 seed that isn't hosting the
first two rounds. They had
played at home in three of
the previous four NCAA
tournaments. Theywanted
to host this year but, due to
circumstances outside the
_women's basketball office,


they missed the deadline
to apply.
All top 16 teams hosted
the first couple of rounds
in the past, but that was
ditched in 2003 and there
are no plans to go back to
it.
"It's completely our fault
that we're not hosting,"
McGraw said. "We could
have. You have to play
good teams and so we'll
start out with a neutral
game and see where we'go
from there."
If the NCAA tournament
somehow did go back to
that system they would
lose some really good sites.
Gonzaga has been one of
the most exciting places
the past few seasons draw-
ing huge crowds. Sixth-
seeded Delaware is hosting
for the first time this year
and both sessions have
been sold out for weeks.
"I've been in every situa-
tion, they'll be a lot of pres-
sure on the host team play-
ing on their home court to
advance," said North Caro-
lina coach Sylvia Hatchell,
who could face Delaware
in the second round. "I
tell my team the ball's the
same size, rim's the same
size, the court's similar.
You just have to go out and
win."
Cal coach Lindsay Got-
tlieb didn't .seem to mind
having to travel to Lub-
bock to potentially face
Texas Tech in the second
round. The Red Raiders are
14-3 at home this season,
including wins against
tournament teams Kansas,
Oklahoma State and West
Virginia.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In this March 4,2013 photo, Notre Dame guard Skylar Diggins
(4) celebrates a steal and the subsequent Connecticut foul
during the third overtime of' a game on Monday, March 4,
2013.


"I'm pretty cognizant of
the issues that face wom-
en's basketball," she said.
"We're in a position now
where we need to play at
home sites in the first two
rounds.
"That's part of the reason
we played-a tough non-
conference road schedule
to prepare us for this."
Over the past decade,
one of the top 12 teams
has been forced to play an
opponent on their home
court 21 times according
to STATS. The higher seed
has prevailed in 13 of those
matchups, including going
3-1 last season. In compar-
ison, over the same span
higher seeds that didn't
have to play true road
games were 80-19, STATS
said.
Third-seeded Penn State
will travel to LSU for the
second straight year and
could meet the host team
in the second round. Last
year the Nittany Lions


were a four seed and beat
the No. 5 Tigers by 10. They
also as a six-seed lost to
No. 3 DePaul at home in
2011.


47 Field s .,
A Fence138. 95


6 1/2 Metal $459:
T2ll T-Post
Also Available:
Wood Fence Poet,
15.5 ga. BarbWiLre !
SOther Fencing SuppUes
Ill l M I I| I [ 3 ]
S850. 482- 513


State Farm
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710 "'"URaNC


Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc
Linda J Pforte, Agent
2919 Penn Avenue, Suite B,
Marianna, FL 32448-2716
Bus 850-482-3425 Fax 850-482-6823
Toll Free 1-877-364-6007
linda.pforte.bxrs@statefarm.com
Good Neighbor Since 1986


SATURDAY

'^ E^APR(L 27

7a.m. p.m.

Houston County Farm Center

s33 $s28
ceSinsidel0'xlO' outside 10'x20'
8' TABLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR RENT


SELL YOUR ITEMS


TO HUNDREDS!


Individuals & Businesses Welcome
MAIL YARD SALE SPACE RESERVATION AND PAYMENT TO:
Dothan Eagle Afn: NIE Yard Sale P.O. Box 1968, Dothan, AL 36302
OR DROP OFF AT: 227 North Oates Street, Dothan, AL
Name:


Address:


City:I


State: Zip: Phone:
Email address:
What type of items for sale:_
Number of inside spaces needed('33 ea) _Number of outside spaces needed('28 eo)

Number of tables needed('10 ea)


My payment of is enclosed
Card number:


Please charge my credit card

exp.


vM, ulu -,


ror more
information call:
334-702-6099I
"d& AM,


NOT TO BE SOLD BY VENDOR:
firearms, = e ,.iMii.o'.cna'eI materiaJ. iob.acodrudn
paraphernalia firdA or dnnk. o r any rth gr. that the Eventsr
Manarg ent desrr inapropriate for sale on Lth da, of the event. sponsored by
Sp,: suhjea to DOTHANEAGL
prxwak berefi;t N *spapcr In Education


I-- 4


1 -~~~-- _1_1 __


"WE TRAILER YOUR NEEDS"

Sales & Service
From Utility to
Goose Neck Eauipment







f Truck Trailer & Rental

85O0482.s^444
2163 Post Oak Lane, Ma7lanna
Behind Ruby Tuesday







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Golf


THE ASCIATED PRESS FILE
In this March 24, 2010 photo, Arnold Palmer hits a shot from
the second tee during the Pro-Am round of the Arnold Palmer
Invitational golf tournament at Bay Hill in Orlando, Fla.




ItS good to




be the king


The Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. Ar-
nold Palmer bought Bay
Hill Club & Lodge because
he loved the golf course
and wanted it for his own,
not having any idea where

lead.
N o w
his -name
adorns a
PGA Tour
Doug event that
Frguson has been
a staple of
the Florida
Swing for 35 years. It's also
carried by two hospitals
that specialize in children
one named after his late
wife, Winnie, and where
more than 93,000 babies
have been born since 2006.
Oh, and he's having din-
ner with Kate Up.ton this
week.
"Did you see this?" Palm-
er said, holding up the
Sports Illustrated swimsuit
issue with Upton on the
cover. "She's coming here.
Did you know that?"
He put it back on his
desk, gave it one last look,
and then grabbed a stack
of papers to place over the
magazine.
"I better cover this up,"
he said.
He grinned. The man is
simply timeless.
How a supermodel
wound up at Bay Hill ex-
plains so much about the
83-year-old Palmer, who
built his kingdom by being
a man of the people.
The manager for Upton
is Lisa Benson, whose fa-
ther is from Punxsutawney
and used -to regularly play
golf with Palmer at Latrobe
Country Club. She was
looking for a job at IMG,
which, in addition to man-
aging sports and entertain-
ment, also represents top
models. Her father talked
to Palmer, who talked to
IMG to arrange an inter-
view. She got the job and
years later connected with
Upton.
Upton grew up in Mel-
bourne on the central
coast of Florida, and her
parents were huge Palmer
fans. Given the back story,
Upton thought it would
be a great idea to come to
Bay Hill, meet with Palmer
and see the work he is do-
ing with the hospitals. She
also plans to take part in a
social media campaign in-
volving the "Arnold Palm-
er" tea drink.
So in a roundabout way, a
casual round of golf leads to
dinner with a supermodel?
"That's been a fun
deal," Palmer said when
he finished telling the
story.
There have been thou-
sands of casual rounds'
like that for Palmer, whose
passion for golf never dies.
There have been more
friends than he can count.
There are probably more
stories like this, all because
he takes an interest in
people.
"It's easy," Palmer said.
"And I love it."
Brad Faxon surely had
Palmer in mind when he
said years after a golf trip,
"I wish we had more guys


on tour who liked meeting
people."
Palmer is one of those
guys. Always has been. And
that's why so many people
want to meet the King.
A staff member came into
the room and mentioned
two men who were outside
the office and wanted to say
hello. One was Seth Jones,
the editor of Golfdom mag-
azine who recently inter-
viewed Palmer for a project
he was working on.
"Well, bring him in,"
Palmer said, rising from
behind his desk with a
broadening smile. Dressed
in slacks and d pink shirt,
Palmer made sure the two
men met everyone in the
room and made small talk
for a few minutes before
closing with that power-
ful handshake and a smile.
"Nice to see you guys," he
told them.
He sat back down at his
desk and picked up a sheet
of paper. It was a letter
to David Frost, who won
the Toshiba Classic on the
Champions Tour the day
before.
"Congratulations on your
strong performance in the
Toshiba Classic," he said,
reading the letter aloud.
"He's playing pretty good."
He reached for a black
pen and signed his name,
as famous as any signature
in sports.
The other letter on his
'desk was for Kevin Streel-
man, who won the Tampa
Bay Championship for his
first PGA Tour title in 153
tries. Palmer watched most
of the back nine on televi-
sion and was impressed
with what he/saw. He had
this letter placed in Streel-
man's locker downstairs.
Talk about a tradition like
no other. For years, Palmer
has written a note of con-
gratulations to the winners
on every tour every week.
Palmerlooked down this
desk and found two index
cards that had been marked
up, and then started rat-
tling off numbers. The 443
beds in the Arnold Palmer
Hospital for Children and
the Winnie Palmer Hospi-
tal for Women and Babies.
The 13,000 babies born
last year alone. The only
high-level trauma center
in central Florida dedicat-
ed to children. More than
3,500 employees and 450
doctors employed by both
hospitals.
"That's just a few of the
things that we are push-
ing," Palmer said. "It's a
big deal. We'd like to be the
No. 1 children's hospital in
the world for children and
women.
He rapped the wooden
desk for luck.
TheArnold Palmer Invita-
tional starts this week with
one of the strongest fields
among PGA Tour events
this year. Tiger Woods is the
defending champion and a
seven-time winner, with a
chance to go back to No. 1
in the world with another
victory. Brandt Snedeker
is playing for the first time
since his win at Pebble
Beach, missing the next
five weeks with a rib injury.
Masters champion Bubba
Watson will be there, too.


Tennis



Nadal buoyed by comeback


The Associated Press

INDIAN WELLS, Calif.
- Rafael Nadal arrived at
Indian Wells not believing
he could win the tourna-
ment. A week later, the
crystal trophy awarded to
the champion was on the
table next to him.
Nadal has been busy
picking up trophies since
he returned from a left
knee injury in early Febru-
ary. The Spaniard has won
three tournaments, in-
cluding two on his favor-
ite clay surface, and been
runner-up in another after
missing seven months.
"I did much more than
what I dreamed," he said
after rallying to beat Juan
Martin del Potro in three
sets at the BNP Paribas
Open on Sunday, his first
hard-court tournament
title since October 2010.
"Coming back is certain-
ly something amazing for
me, totally unexpected,
and I received more sup-
port than ever from the
crowd every place that I
played."
Nadal is cresting now
after last summer's low
point, when injury forced
him to miss the London
Olympics. He couldn't
practice because of tendi-
nitis in his knee and vari-
ous treatments yielded


Rafael Nadal, of Spain, poses with the BNP Paribas Open
trophy after defeating Juan Martin del Potro, of Argentina, in
their match at the BNP Paribas Open on Sunday.


little success.
"When you feel that you
are doing everything and
the results are not be-
ing very satisfactory, you
go down a little bit. The
doubt when and where
you will be able to be back
on a tennis tournament
is hard," he said. "When
you are there and wake
up every morning and
test yourself and the test is
negative, it's not the right
feeling, that's not nice."
Nadal tapes his leg just
below his left knee dur-
ing matches, and he's tak-
ing things day by day. He
withdrew from this week's


tournament near Miami
- where he pulled out of
his semifinal last year be-
cause of his knee on the
advice of doctors.
He was told to go home
and rest, and work on
strengthening his quadri-
ceps. He said he takes anti-
inflammatories nightly
because of his knee, and
hopes he can play without
them shortly.
He won't return to the
ATP Tour until mid-April
on clay in Monte Carlo.
Nadal moved up one
spot to No. 4 in this week's
rankings, and Del Potro
thinks he can consistently


challenge the big three of
Novak Djokovic, Roger
Federer and Andy Murray
soon. Nadal beat Federer
in straight sets at Indian
Wells.
"Rafa can do everything.
Not many. players can do
that," Del Potro said. "He's
very strong mentally. His
game is very good, very
strong, very solid. He has
big talent, as well. It's
amazing how fast he's re-
covered the level."
Nadal was consumed by
nerves in closing out his
semifinal win over Top-10
opponent Tomas Berdych,
who lost 6-4, 7-5. Being
away from competition for
so long eroded his skill at
managing the big points.
"Even if you practiced a
lot at home, that was not
my case, you need to com-
pete to feel 100 percent
ready," he said. "You need
to compete to feel quick,
recover the right vision of
the points and the nice re-
action in every moment."
Nadal said his Indian
Wells victory was the most
emotional of his come-
back tournaments. He col-
lapsed on his back when
Del Potro's last shot sailed
wide. He got up, hugged
Del Potro, dashed over to
his team in the stands for
hugs. Then he fell to his
knees on the court.


Legal

Olnio AG could target football coach, host of party


The Associated Press Joel Walker said.
The older girl was
COLUMBUS, Ohio charged with aggravated
The head football coach at menacing for a tweet
Steubenville High School that threatened homicide
and the owners'of a house and said "you ripped my
where an infamous 12- family apart," according
minute video was filmed to the attorney general's
could be investigated as office. A Facebook post-
Ohio prosecutors look ing from the younger girl
into how adults respond- threatened the accuser
ed to allegations of rape with bodily harm, leading
last year. to a menacing charge, the
One day after a judge office said.
convicted two high "These arrests, I hope,
school football players will end the harassment of
of raping the 16-year-old the victim," DeWine said.
girl in August, Steuben- "We are simply not going
ville's top official said to tolerate this. Enough is
she welcomed a new, enough."
wide-ranging probe into The case brought in-
possible wrongdoing ternational attention to
connected with the the small city of 18,000
rape. and led to allegations of
The announcement a cover-up to protect the
of the guilty verdict was Steubenville High School
barely an hour old Sunday football team.
when state Attbrney Gen- According to trial, tes-
eral Mike DeWine said he timony, one of the two
was continuing his inves- football players said the
tigation and would con- coach knew about what
sider charges against any- happened and "took care
one who failed to speak of it."
up after the summertime The video, passed
attack. That group could around widely online,
include other teens, par- depicted a student joking
ents, school officials about the attack. "She is
and coaches for the high so raped right now," the
school's beloved football boy says.
team, which has won nine Investigators inter-
state championships. viewed the owners of a
I Authoritiesalsosaidthey Steubenville house where
won't put up with people the video was filmed,
harassing the accuser which was'also the same
and took action Monday place a photograph was
to prove it, arresting two taken of the girl being
girls suspected of threat- carried by her ankles and
ening her well-being in wrists, DeWine's office
Facebook and Twitter confirmed Monday. That
comments Sunday. The picture, Exhibit No. 1 at
Jefferson County girls, the trial, generated inter-
ages 15 and 16, were being national outrage. There is
held in juvenile detention, no phone listing for the
Steubenville police Capt. "home.


Voe et eta


Numerous students, in- reference to her uncon-
cluding defendant Tren- scious state. The girl, who
ton Mays, referred to acknowledged drinking,
the girl as "dead" in text testified she had no
messages the night of memory of the
the attacks, apparently in assaults.


Debbie Rtoney Smith

850-209-8039 cell
CALL OR TEXT!
eFI dboLrcron,mthearql.cm


SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.


Century 21
Sunny South
Properties
-r63 Ho',,, '9
Marijrr FL


2 & 3 BEDROOM MODELS
AVAILABLE.

$80,000- $130,000
Price Range

Owner Financing
Available to
Qualified Buyers


Vstsa-g urd.om tc


-I
Emai -homes sqa edelomncm


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 2013 5B F










168 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20. 2013


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
rr'~ PTUPo TP3 IT'5 SITUPO NOT TO 6E
J5T s~rH AEo UPAND 60 OR AMT'ALK
ADE-Tru lTTLE 1 HER.T' REAUY TUPiP-
D-.iAIE.D 6i (Jt'SJUST RLAN ~TUPID


BORN LOSER BYARTAND CHIP SANSOM
F REPUIT O k AA PENW- |OU J W, I OFTEN SPEND
PINCH\iG A5RI. 5 is M ONE, QUITE FRE! i
UMbSEERVED. -J IR _


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR
F-1( 'HAT UAPPEEPD ? ?


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
eooo JOB, OOPl BUT ONe MY BEHAVIOR?
4 THESE DAYS, YOUR nBEH L T ARE YOU
OIS CANA T ET YOU INT A MESS )TAUN' ABOU
YOU CAN'T GET OUT OFr 7<^ ?UZ?__A \'VS


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER
p


"I hooked a real big one but it kept
swimming around the boat"


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


ACROSS
1 Dandies
5 Rock
hound's
find
10Tribal
advisers
12 Free
tickets
13"Will it play
in -?"
14 Fruit stand
buys
15 Prefix for
"dynamic"
16Beat the
field
18- deplume
19"Kubla
Khan"
locale
22Singing
chipmunk
25 Cool shoe
29 Serves
dinner
30 Like a judge
32 Keep
subscribing
33Change
a bill
34 Jockeys
37 Boxer's
weapons
38 Corned
beef
sandwich
40Thud


43 "Nature"
channel
44"Ferando"
band
48 How-to
book
50Kind of
detector
52 Dismal
53 Scientist's
idea
54 Like an old
piano
55Inventory
wd.

DOWN
1 Run away
from
2 Nose
stimulus
3 Bleached
one's hair
4 Delhi
address
5 Come
unzipped
6 NFL
broadcaster
7 Nobel Prize
city
8 View as
9 Dangerous
curve,
10 Smog
monitoring
grp.
11 Hewn


Answer to Previous Puzzle


WIOO:Sb FEIE L I
YO DAb LEA I t
tOPIENIDOiOR NIJ
TAP LAGO
AIU RIAS P ET
UR.E Hj NIDJER
DANA F!OIE ET
IIL E!S S'E|A D01
KIN OLIS Lt
EV EIR WiRE
FIR l,DIAY EL II
AINNiO l CE"MiAK
LI.EiU PAN Tie
LEST E VA A'T
12Bamboo 36Long
eater sandwi
17U.S. 39Cellar,
alliance briefly
20 Grab the 40 South E
phone paradii
21 Risky 41 Familia
22 Kenya's auth.
loc. 42Subato
23 Lascivious particle
glance 45"Who's
24-,vidi, Who"
vici entries
26 Bossed 46Cause
around yawn
27 Vigoda and 47 day
Fortas 48 Co.
-28 Pre-Easter honcho
period 49Alcott(
31 Hwys. 51 Unit of
35 Email resistai
option


ch

Seas
se
tr
mic
e


to
now
os
girl
nce


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


3-20 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"F RWCP NHZFOB VOAUMPZP, SIX FT

F GWIRE GMWWNP, F U.WIRE VRUVAN

BZ'PPX FX FO V BVZEPO."

ZIXM NXWIX


Previous Solution: "You punch me, I punch back. I do not believe it's good for
one's self-respect to be a punching bag." Ed Koch
.TODAY'S CLUE: d slenba H
@2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-20


Dear Annie: I am a teen-
ager in the northwest.
Recently, I contracted a
kidney infection that was
painful and needed treat-
ment. I didn't know what
I had and wasn't familiar
with the symptoms, so the
only thing I said to my par-
ents was that I didn't feel
well. After a few days, it got
so bad that I had to go to
the emergency room. I was
given a prescription and
healed, but the hospital
bill was $600.
When the bill came, my
mother read me the riot act
for costing her so much.
She told me I should have
said something earlier and
saved them some money.
That was true, and I apolo-
gized. But the impression I
got is that my health is not
worth that much money to
her.
I've never had a good re-
lationship with my mother,
but this stung. Why would
she insinuate such a thing?


In this deal, South was
in five diamonds. What
did he do after West led
the spade king: ace, seven,
four?
West's two-diamond
overcall was a Michaels
Cue-Bid, promising at
least 5-5 in the majors.
After East jumped to four
hearts, South, unsure who
could make what, sensibly
rebid five diamonds. Then
East, eying the vulnerabil-
ity, passed.
South had three losers
(two spades and one club)
and only 10 winners (one
spade, seven diamonds
and two clubs). But he had
a huge advantage, know-
ing that East had started
with a singleton spade


What should I do?
NOT AS PRETTY AS A
PENNY
Dear Penny: We don't
think your mother meant
to imply that your health is
not worth $600. Have you
ever seen a parent yell at
a toddler for running into
the street? It's not out of an-
ger. It's because they were
worried to death by what
might have happened. We
think this was your moth-
er's reaction. Please forgive
her outburst.

Dear Annie: I was married
for 47 years to a man who
did not want me making
friends outside his family.
When he died, I tried
volunteering in order to
make friends, but I guess
I am programmed to push
people away. I correspond
via email with a few folks,
but no one wants to take
the friendship further.
I let my son have my
house and moved back to


North 03-20-13
A A652
8 874
Q98
S10 6 3
West East
SKQJ109 *7
SAJ 10 65 K Q 9 32
S3 74


472


S QJ 9 8 4


South
S843
--
A K J 6 5 2
SAK 5
Dealer South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
i* 2+ Pass 47
5* Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: K

and could not reach his
partner's hand.


my hometown into a re-
tirement place that my son
convinced me would be
beneficial. But they sold
him a bill of goods about
the activities here. There
are none. No one wants to
be friends. They say good
morning,' but even my in-
vites go unanswered.
I would like to move, but
I can't afford it, and no one
will help me pack up. Peo-
ple are full of suggestions
- go to the mall, go to
church. I'll be 70 soon, and
I feel life isn't worth living
if I have to be alone.
FLORIDA
Dear Florida: You sound
terribly depressed, and
this may be part of the
reason you have trouble
making friends. People are
attracted to those who are
upbeat and energetic, and
those traits are difficult for
you to display when you
feel so low. Talk to
your doctor about an
antidepressant.


At trick two, declarer
started a partial elimina-
tion and endplay by ruff-
ing a heart in his hand. He
returned to dummy with a
trump to the eight, ruffed
a heart high, played a
diamond to the nine, and
ruffed the last heart. Then
South cashed his top clubs
and played a third club.
East won but had no
answer. Whether he led
a heart or a club, South
would sluff a spade loser
from his hand and ruff on
the board. Declarer would
take one spade, eight dia-
monds and two'clubs.
I am not saying West's
two-diamond overcall was
wrong, but be aware of the
risk.


I m No r0 tpo 1.
YF tFn.BppB


Horoscope

PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Be careful with
whom you have a serious
discussion. There's no
-point in crossing swords
with someone who you
know has a bad temper.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) If you don't want
to be disappointed, don't
allow your expectations
to exceed reality. It's OK to
expect a lot from yourself.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20)- When working with
others, your tolerance
could be put to the test, so
try to stay calm.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Having an abundance
of energy might cause you
to take on far more than
is feasible, but you should
take things one step at a
time.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- It wouldn't hurt to be
more thick-skinned than
usual, especially if you
find yourself working with
someone who tries your
patience.
LEO (July 23-Aug.22)
- Goals that are impor-
tant to you might not hold
the same weight with your
co-workers.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Relationships should
be pleasant, as long as you
don't impose your will on
your companions.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-0ct.23)
- Although you can be a
good worker, you can also
lose steam easily. Should
your interest wane you
could walk off the job.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -As long as both you
and your mate are think-
ing "we" instead of"I,"
you'll remain in harmony
with each other.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) A heavier
workload than usual might
be dumped in your lap. As
long as you tackle it with
determination, you'll end
up feeling proud.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Even though you'll
have no trouble protecting
your interests, you're not
likely to be as conscien-
tious about the concerns
of others.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Timing is generally
important in fulfilling your
objectives, and today will
be no different.


;








www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, March 20, 2013- 7 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Pubkcation Policy Errors and Omssions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertio. Adustrnent for errors is tIrtead to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages ansing out of erors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
acualy occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
sucft advertisement Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


0 e~n l~.S ~I~e S --S S S. S.*


9 ANNOUNCEMENTrS.



Key West Flordia
April 23-29,2013
Washington DC/Patriotic Tour
June 27-July 2,2013
Ride The Rails (West Virginia)
July 22-26, 2013
Best of China (Beijing City)
October 15-23 2013


$ FINANCIAL






Be your own boss and partner with the
world's largest commercial
cleaning franchise. $20K!
equipment, supplies, training and $5,000.
in monthly customer included..
1-888-273-5264
www.janiking.com
Restaurant For Sale with Lounge and Oyster
Bar. Seats approx 200. Currently doing Good
Business." Owner looking to retire. Financing
available with down payment $250,000.
Price NEGI Call 334-684-1700 between 8am-
2pm. Home 850-956-2709 from 3pm-7pm


G.M. Properties of PC
Beach 800-239-2059
Fully Furnished Condos
& Townhouses
near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt. '
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $250 nt.
Portside Resort starting @ $125.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
www.amproperties.com


(S) MERCHANDISE

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

3-pc. San Lucas Harness smooth rich faux
leather upholstery, plush comfortable design.
dark brown. 3 yrs old from Ashley Furn, Store
$700. OBO 334-671-1778 706-718-7905

(j ) PETS & ANIMALS

Free Cat: F/Calico, very sweet. 850-482-2994
FREE: Kittens to loving home, multi-colorl-F &
1-M! 850-272-4908.

AKC Brittany Spaniels Orange/White. 4 males
and 4 females. Excellent hunting blood line.
(Nolan's Last Bullett). Tails docked and dew
claws have been removed. Will be Ready on
March 29th. Call (229) 724-8839 if interested.



y German Shepherd pups
$750. AKC reg. 6 weeks.
first shots, health certified.
German bloodlines. 7 males,
1 female. 850-768-9,182 or
850-849-3707.
Lab pups: Cute & Cuddly! Yellow & Chocolate.
No papers, but parents on premises. 6 weeks
old. 488-5000 or 488-3979.


LOST DOGS- Due to a
break in at our home, two
Welsh Corgis are missing.
Both are male, 3 years old,
Q they answer to Freddie
and Eddie, both are were
wearing plain leather collars. They are my
wife's rehab and recovery dogs....please if
found call Corey at 334-726-6500 night or
day....reward for safe return.
.S Miniature Australian
Shepherd Puppies
Beautifully marked red
S merles, blue merle,
black tri and red tri.
Males and Female. $400. $600. NSDR &
ASDR. Call or text for more information.
33.4-550-9895
Pre-Spoiled Adorable AKC CH Sable Sheltie
Puppies for sale to approved homes. Males are
$450 and Females are $500. 334-718-6840 or
tinkersshelties@yahoo.com
( ') FARMER'S MAORiT.


GRASS & MILK FED BEEF!!
Freezer Ready Esto meat.
GREAT QUALITY!!
Quarters and Halves. USDA Inspected
ESTO MEATS CALL 850-263-7777



Frozen Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
850-573-6594 4128 Hwy231


Bahia seed for sale 4-
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L.................................


Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
r i Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418
Quality Coastal Hay; Large Rolls
Fertilized & Weed Control
no 850-209-9145 44

Cattle: 30 bred cows 3 to 7 years old and
50 bred heifers for sale. Most are Angus and
Brangus cross with a few Charolais cross.
Fnr mnrn infnrmal-ion crall 334.3n0.-92


Sudoku


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Level: g Tl
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to Tuesday's puzzle
1 31297 4685
6 4 8 1 5 2 7 9 3
76498152793
5 9 3 8 6 42 1
3 7 4 2 1 9 5 8 1 46
2 9 6 7 1 8 5 3 4
8 1 5 4 6 3 2 7 9
4 8!3 51 29 1 6 7
9 6 7 84! 1 3 5 2
5 21 6,3|7 9 418


3/20/13


Buying Pine /Hardwood in
Your area,
No tact to small /Custom Thiing
Call Pea River Timber
- 334-389-2003 .


READ


the classified for



JOB OPPORTUNITIES

t}) EMPLOYMENT
ISAION &MI NTENA NC -


iniMWV Xgr& (LLC
Operations &
Maintenance Manager
PurEnergy Operating Services
has a full time position for an Operations
and Maintenance Manager at a 14
Megawatt Bio-mass Power Plant located
in North Florida.
Excellent benefit package.
Pay determined by experience.
Biomass Power plant experience is
ruired. For further inormatio





AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-
MINDED, NEWSPAPER CARRIERS

COTTONDALE
Earn an average of

$850
per month
Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus
BE YOUR OWN BOSS 1 A.M. to 6 AM.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.
Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL


* 9


a c a n AFast, easy, no pressure
Place al A d 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


4 1 7

6 3

2 3 8




3. 1 4-
81 3_





7 6

.1 5

4 2 7


03 ISRES










8 B Wednesday, March 20. 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www..ICFLORIDAN.com


IVA Jackson
,. Hcsp;p,.

Jackson Hospital, a 100-bed acute
care hospital located in Marianna,
Florida, has an immediate need for
the following positions:

Director of Marketing/Public
Relations/Physician Recruitment
Previous healthcare marketing
preferred.

Physician Office Manager
Previous physician office management
required.

Join our team by faxing your resume to:
Human Resources of Jackson
Hospital 4250 Hospital Drive,
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 718-2626 phone or
(850) 718-2679 fax

EOE
--GENERALEMPLOYMENT


BE YOUR.
OWN BOSS

These days being retired doesn't mean
sitting at home doing nothing.

A newspaper route is the perfect way to
supplement your income with only a small
investment of time and big returns in
community service to your own neighbors.

Come by and inquire today about a
newspaper route in your neighborhood.

JACon .Lane Marian, FL 3 6

FLORIDAN
4403 Constitution Lane Marianna, FL 32446


U ~~~i;~~


m;`I~


ASSISTANT FIRECHIEF
Associate's degree in fire
science or a closely related
field is required. Bachelor's
Degree in Business
Administration, Public
Administration or Fire Service administra-
tion or a related field from an accredited
four-year college or university is preferred.
Three years experience in fire suppression,
prevention and training is required.
Certification as a Florida Fire Inspector.
$36,52686/yr.
Special Requirements: Valid Florida's
driver's license prior to employment
Certification as a Paramedic, by the
Emergency Medical Division of the Florida
Department of Professional Regulations.
Certification in Fire Fighting Standards.
CUSTODIAN
Some experience in custodial work; or
any equivalent combination of training and
experience which provides the required
knowledge, skills and abilities. Light
maintenance required. $15,946.95/yr.

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES TECHNICIAN
Minimum Training and Experience
Education and Experience:
Graduation from high school and some
experience driving a vehicle with a manual
transmission, pulling and backing trailers.
Two years experience in buildingA.rades,
landscaping, recreation or maintenance
work; or arn equivalent combination of
training and experience, which provides the
required knowledge, skills and abilities.
$20,591.00/yr.
Special Requirements: Must have a valid
Florida driver's license, CDL preferred.
Must ibe able to work a flexible schedule to
accommodate seasonal hours at the Blue
Springs Recreational Park (Requires
weekend supervision of seasonal
employees). Must be able to obtain and
maintain a certification from the Florida
Department of Corrections to work state
inmates within one year ofemployment.
LIFEGUARDS
Blue Springs summer employment.
Opening mid-May. Must be certified by the
American Red Cross in Life Guarding. Fee
reimbursed upon successful completion of
training. Lifeguard exp. Preferred. Exp. in
cash register operation, funds balancing
and working with the public is desired.
Must be able to work varied schedule; from
10:30 am To 6pm Tues. to Sat., & 12:30pm
to 6pm on Sun. Later hours for special
events. Salary $8.75 to $9.75 per hour
depending on exp.
Deadline Date: March 25, 2013
Applications accepted at Jackson County
BOCC, Human Resources Dept.,
2864 Madison St., Marianna FL 32448.
www.jacksoncountyfl.net/,
EOE/AA/Vet Pref/ADA/ Drug-Free Workplace
r9 -


ESHENr fACION IS


EDUCATION.
& INSTRUCTION


LOOK
FOLLOW YOUR PASSION! Become a Daycare
Director 6 wk. Homestudy Course $300.
Call Mrs. Alaina 334-714-4942 9am 5pm


r


I


--


WI I i EDUCATION
I SH & INSTRUCTION

Enrolling Now!
Training in
FOR TIS ElectricalTrades,
FORTIS 1 Medical
COLLEGE Assisting,Pharmacy
Technology and More!
Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 for consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu
RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CHIPOLA APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND 1 BEDROOM
APTS. SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE ON
ALL UNITS. UNITS SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR
HANDICAPPED OR DISABLED. FOR RENTAL
INFORMATION CALL (850) 526-4407
TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

-- S

COTTONDALE VILLA
APARTMENTS
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR 1 & 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS RENTAL
Assistance Available to Quailified Appliants
CALL: (850) 352-2281
TDD USERS 1-800-548-2456
Office Opened Tuesday & Thursday
EQUAL HOUSING 3111 Willow St
OPPORTUNITY Cottondale, FL 32431

EUAL HOUSMG OaTUNrr

GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have.very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL. Call 850-482-4663

EQUAL HOUWNGOP5TOTVy


2/2 3136'Aycock Rd. 900 sq. ft. washer/dryer,
flat screen TV's $650. mo. $650. dep. utilities,
dish, garbage water & sewage w/pool
(Appointment Only) 850-352-2951850-573-1864

I 1BR/1BA, nice clean apt. in town screened
porch, large yard $450. mo.
No pets. 850-557-2000 for more info.
A 2/1 Upstairs apart Clean, No pets, Washer
supplied. $475 mo. & 2/1 Mobile Hm.
priv. drive, sun deck $400. mo.
+ 850-718-5089/482-4172/624-7407 4




Uli i]tjt1v k


COTTONDALE VI
Now accepting!
1, 2,3 bedroom un
No apple
We pay water, se
4052 Old Co
Mariann
(850) 526-40(
"This institu
opportui
and er




1 & 2BR Apart
2 & 3BR Mobile I
Lot rent incd
850-557-3432
Austin Tyli
Quality Hom.
4 850- 526-3355
"Property Manageme

2 & 3 bedroom mobi
$500 and up. H20, gi
http:// www.char
850-
2 & 3BR Mobile H
NO PETS CH&A
Roomate situa
850-258-1594
| 2&3 BR
)in Marianna & Si
2BR 1 BA MH'S in AlfM
850-579-8882/850-:
mI 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mc
on quiet lot in Sr

For Rent Green
Cottondale, st
Water/sewer/gal
S850-
Mobile Homes for R
Grand Ridge & Sn
garbage.$360. M
'L R!
r REAL I

U-Lok-lt Warehouses I
building, Well and spe
1/ mile north of Hwy 9
$75,000. Call 850-482-







SRE





Xtreme
Boats
wv


BUSINESS&
YSER VICE DIRECTORe o
'SERVICE DIRECTORY 4'


Call 526-3614 to place yQouf,


Clay O'Neal's "KB"
Land Clearing, Inc. RMPLeioM
ALTHA, FL mIJVnr
850-762-9402 M THOI
Cell 850-832-5055 a8I HreHE



For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Bonded References Available
850-526-2336



[ "Beautification of Your Home'
Catpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
wisam j.I85159-9T


......----,-. -I


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
[:1,ES :-1


Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Now serving Jackson Co.
FREE ESTIMATES 334-798-0687


Lawn Care &
Outdoor Property
S^ Maintenance
Free Estimates
Call Woody 850-526-2030


5 OF:6I : ore.)... P
7 G*Groominojr (78
_ApFpoitmen C'nly
Ss UnnGroomer6,jivylecIt,
SLisa Shores & Tammy Marzabano
sr.s Us UnrinS atwndogaln.ud,.nrt
for .fislw & tU bot'wur o a .,.cZ.rt $04 i


ThATI' CLassifiEd




PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LubtST MAulpCii uo PirARliL BUILD. il I NamT FULOIIA
.. ..Beus %MI M
HAVE
OVER
DIFFERENT SIZES!
YOU CANCHOOSE
COLOR & STYLE!
BUL.O ITE M-74 850 8974
2919 )ry orth Panama ity, F


This NMon's Special
$31 9500oo
35 Years in Business


You CALL... WE COME TO YOU!
RED'S MOBILE
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE.
S850-209-9713
EDWARD MAGGI, OWNER

Your Business



Balk5 |l


In The Classifieds


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAN
jcfloridan.com


lmonsrer"

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


i- '


/


)xTE*, I)


'3


rr


wood, Marianna, &
arting @ $375/mo.
rb./ lawn maintincl.
593-4700 4p


ent 2/1 Located between
eads. Includes water &
o .) 850-573-0308 4
RESIDENTIAL
ESTATE FOR SALE

for Sale 30x80 Metal
etic plus other buildings.
0 on Hwy 71.
8333 or 850-573-8894







CREATION ';




Packages From
$4,995
All Welded
'All Aluminum Boats
ww.xtremeindustries.com
Bo3if37F


LLAGE APARTMENTS
g applications for
its. Rental assistance.
iication fee.
rer, and trash service.
ttondale Road,
la, FL 32448
2, TDD/TTY 711.
motion is an equal
lity provider,
nployer."




ments in Marianna
Homes Rent to Own
uded. For details
or 850-814-6515 4
er & Associates *
es & Apartments
or austintylerco.com
nt Is Our ONLY Business"

lie Homes in Cottondale.
garbage, sewer included.
loscountryliving.com.
209-8847 .
iomes in Cottondale.
$325- $500/Month
tion also available.
I Leave Message
Mobile Homes
leads (850)209-8595
ord, $380 mo. $380. dep.
209-1664/850-573-1851
bile Home (by itself)
leads. 850-209-8595


7


I


I


--


m


_1 - ---- -


11


'K' -**-


i f 'i











www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Triton'07 188SF Fish and Ski: Mercury Optimax
150HP, 24 volt trolling motor, trailer included,
garage kept, like new conditions, less than
150 hours, $19,000. Call 334-685-3921


Fifth Wheel: 1994 American Star 36 ft Fifth
Wheel. $8,500 OBO. 334-477-2046.

(~) TRANSPORTATION


Chevrolet 1967 Camaro SS/RS: restored on
original solid body, vin#124377L123529, custom
built big block 454, cranberry red, new cranber-
ry interior, to many restoration items too
mention. Priced at $24,500. See pics and info at
dkestate.wordpress.com. Doug 334-237-1916



$0 Down/lst Payment, Tax, Tag & title
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
n Repos, Slow Credit,
-0 Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade Anything!
RIDE TODAY! Steve Pope 334-803-9550
FREE $25. gas giveaway with pruchase
BMW 2005 X3 white with tan interior, 165,000
miles, V6, auto, excellent condition, full sun-
roof. $10,000, 850-263-4913
CHEVY 1995 CAPRICE-Clean, runs great, cold
air, fully loaded $3,800 OBO 334-355-1085
Chevy 2010 Impala, Great family car with great
fuel mileage, fully loaded. $300 down $300 per
month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.
Chevy 2012 Malibu, like new! $200 down, $249
per month. Call Steve 791-8243
Rl Corvette Z06 50th
n Anniversary Edition
Metallic Blue 6 speed, 405
Ex cellent Condition
S 19.995. 334-475-3735
after 6PM
Cutlass Olds 1994 Ciera 4-dr. GREAT cond ,
needs nothing above average $2500. OBO
Dodge Dakota 1996 very good truck,
cold AC new tires $2500. OBO
4 WANTED TO BUY Dodge Dakota
quad cab 1996-2002 334-702-9566
Ford 1985 Mustang White, good condition, all
original parts. 90,951 miles. Call 334-494-0837
or email bccolwell2@aol.com
FORD 2007 EXPLORER XLT "IRONMAN -
SILVER, 37,000 MILES. SHbWROOM QUALITY,
NEW CONDITION, CAN BE SEEN AT LEMON
LOT, 166 WESTGATE PARKWAY, DOTHAN, AL
AFTER 2-24-2013. PHONE 334-699-1666
Honda 2007 CRV EX, Super Sharp! Must sell,
$200 down, $269 per month. Call Steve 791-
8243.
Honda 2008 Fit, low miles, under warranty,
must sell! $200 down, $209 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 714-0028.
Hyundai 2009 Elantra, sunroof, loaded Must
Sell! $200 down, $199 per month. Call Ron Ellis
714-0028.
Mazda 2010 6 S Touring
21,000 miles. 4 cyl.
Silver with gray leather
interior. One owner,
non-smoker, garage kept.
Beautiful inside and out. $14,900. 334-806-6004.
Mitsubishi 2012 Galant, Like new! Must sell!
$200 down, $259 per month. Call Ron Ellis 334-
714-0028.
Nissan 2010 Sentra, Navigation, Leather, Sun
roof, Must sell! $200 down, $249 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Toyota 2010 Yaris 4 dr. Sedan A/C,
stero system, 82K miles, good on gas
$10,500. 850-592-2937
Toyota 2011 Yaris: silver with black interior, 4
door sedan, bucket seats, one owner, automat-
ic, 5980 miles, 40MPG Hwy, $13,995. Call or
Text 334-618-6588 LIKE NEW!! "
Toyota 2012 Corolla, Great gas saver, fully
loaded, low miles, very nice car. $200 down,
$250 per month. Call Steve Hatcher 791-8243.


2011 Harley Davidson
Super Glide Custom
cool blue pearl & vivid
black, garage kept,
10K mi. full factory
warranty. Driving lights,
passenger back rest, luggage rack, quick
release windshield, anit-theft system with
/pager, cruise pegs, oil pressure gauge,
dust cover included
$12,900 334-598-0061 or 334-432-4372
Absolutely Pristine-
You will not be disappointed *


Harley Davidson 2000 Ultra Classic Tour Glide:
loaded plus extras, blue and silver, only 8500
miles, new tires. $8,300. Call 334-585-5396
Harley-Davidson 2003 Fat Boy 2003 100th An-
niversary Edition Harley Davidson Fat Boy.
STurquoise and navy with gold inlay custom
paint $8,000 in chrome added to the bike. Al-
so comes with the original tank and fender,
which is gray blue, motorcycle lift, touring bag,
custom cleaning kit, many extras and special
tools! Call 334-494-0837 or email
bccolwell2@aol.com
Harley-Davidson 2003 Fat Boy black 100th An-
niversary, FLSTFI, 12,800 miles, $5,300 Serious
buyers!KELLER9944@GMAILCOM, 334-232-3388
Harley Davidson 2007 Heritage Softtail Classic
exc. cond, new tires, new battery,
lots of chrome $12,500.
334-712-0493 or w-334-793-8028
Honda 2005 VT 1100C
Shadow Spirit: black and
chrome. good condition,
like new, 3400 miles, one
owner, clean title never
wrecked, new tires.
Asking $6,300. Call 334-596-1171
Suzuki 1988 650CC Savage/Boulevard:
completely rebuilt engine, bored .20 over, new
brakes, clutch and more. 24 inch seat height,
weigth 3501bs. Very Nice. $2500. 850-722-8962.


Chevrolet 2004 Tahoe LT 1 OWNER, DARK
GREEN, 5.3 V8, 2WD, AUTO TRANS, ALL PWR,
FULLY. LOADED, LEATHER, ON-STAR, XM RADIO,
TOW PACKAGE(REAR A/C, 3RD ROW SEATS,
LIKE NEW. ALL MAINTAINANCE RECORDS. ASK-
ING $9,750, 334-347-0600 AFTER 6 PM
Lincoln 2006 Navigator,
Loaded with all options,
asking $14,000.
334-618-2695.



4000 Ford Tractor good condition, new engine
$4,250. 334-791-0700
.o Chevrolet 1988 Silverado .
SBlue &, white, 2 door,
350 V8. Runs good.
3.500.
Call 334-794-6579

Chevrolet 2005 Silverado Ext Cab 1500: blue,
automatic V6 4.3, 6Y2ft bed with Rhino liner,
good condition, one owner, low mileage with'
only 43k, $10,200. NEG. Call 334-596-4782 -
Chevrolet Silverado LS,
step side, ext cab, 4
door, V-8, automatic,
loaded, tool box, side
steps, 134,850 miles, like
new, $9995. Call 334-790-7959.
Dodge 2000 Dakota RT: black, fully loaded, 5.9
liter 360 Magnum, Bridgestone tires, beautiful
and rare truck, pampered and well kept, runs
and drives excellent & clean carfax available.
Serious inquiries only. $7,200. Call 334-585-0121
Please leave a message.
Ford 2003 Ranger Edge ext. cab good condition
89K miles, $5,900. 334-446-0044 Susan
Ford 2010 F250 Super Duty Super Cab Lariat:
white, fully loaded, 4X4, low miles, excellent
condition $37,500. Call 334-685-2318
GMC 1986 2500 Series: 4 door, 2 seater but no
back seat, 8 cyl, 91k miles, one owner, garage
kept, very good condition. $3,800. Call 334-792-
3756
International 1995 4900: Flat Bed Truck, DT466,
AC, 125k miles. $6,000. Call 334-897-6346 or
334-406-7200
John Deere 1981 Backhoe and Gooseneck
20ft Trailer: $6,000. Call 334-714-0586
KMC 4-Row Planters, good cond. with 3 sets of
seed plates, $1600. 2-Row Cultivator w/ vine
cutters $375.'Massy Ferguson 2-RoW bottom
plow $350. 334-791-4742
Massey Ferguson Tractor md#1215 w/MF220 \
5 ft. mower, good cond. $6700. 334-797-8523.
Nissan 2000 Frontier ext. cab 2-wheel drive,
auto, 104K miles, $5500. OBO 334-726-1215.
Toyota 1994Tacoma 4-wheel drive as whole or
parts. 334-689-9436.



1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
S'a'uH "s 24 Twow 7.iWga
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!


Jackson County Floridan *


WANTD AUOS


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664

Got a Clunker
SWe'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325 & t Complete Cars
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285
5, v 0 l n lUI ll Un a n i a lm

a* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
: Running or not!
334-7949576 or344-791-4714


SWE PAY CaSH

FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-493-6226


(X"M


LEGALS


LF160064

SECTION 00010
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
JACKSON COUNTY
AGRICULTURAL CENTER WATER SYSTEM
IMPROVEMENTS
WELLS 1& 2
This project includes constructing two 4-inch
production wells with chlorination system
hydropneumatic tank and controls .The CON-
TRACTOR shall provide all materials, equip-
ment and labor to complete the project.
Plans and specifications can be obtained at
Preble-Rish, Inc., 20684 Central Avenue East,
Blountstown, Florida 32424, (850) 674.3300.
Cost for Plans and Specifications will be
$100.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks
should be made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC.
Bids will be received until 2:00 p.m. (CST) on
April 1, 2013 at the Jackson County Board of
County Commissioners Purchasing, 2864
Madison Street, Marianna, Florida 32448 and
will be opened and publicly read at 10:00 a.m.
(CST) on April 2, 2013 at the Jackson County
Board of County Commissioners, 2864 Madison
Street, Marianna, Florida 32448. All Bids shall
be submitted in a sealed envelope clearly
marked "Sealed Bid Jackson County Agricul-
tural Center Water System Improvements -
Wells 1 & 2." A Bid Bond in the amount of 5%
of the Bid shall accompany the Bid. The Jack-
son County Board of County Commissioners
(hereinafter referred to as "County" or "OWN-
ER") reserves the right to reject any and all
bids. The County also.reserves the right to re-
ject CONTRACTORs who in the County's opin-
ion are not qualified to perform the work based
on the pre-qualification package. All Bids shall
be firm for a period of 90 days after opening.
This includes material prices. The bid must
conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes,
on public entity crimes.


Wednesday, March 20, 2013- 9B


'~ .p,


I II


A i yu L S" F bi. p i-od.Sf.
X^^^^SwIwy


Amplifier Fender Bassman, $400, 850-573-5352
Auto Battery Charger NEW $100, 850-482-2636
Baby Clothes -boys 12-18 mo. $30 bx 693-3260
Camcorder, Sony, digital $300. 850-482-7665
Computer Chair- Black, $35, 850-482-2636
Computer Chair: blk leather $55. 850-482-2994
Daybed $100, 850-482-2862


Dolls Porcelain w/stand, $9/ea, 850-482-7665
Dryer: gas, works good. $50. 850-209-1361
Free Monkey Grass Dig yourself, 850-482-3240
Guitar Alvarez 70's 12 string $150. 850-482-6022
Guitar Dean Elec.& acoustic $200. 850-482-6022.
Jeff Gordon Collection. $5.+up. 850-557-0778
Kitchen Cabinet wood $50. 850-557-9687.


Mattress -Cal King Memory, $500, 850-482-2862
Push mower. Antique $99. 850-592-8769
Riding Mower JD STZ 38 $350. 12.5hp687-2070
Roto Tiller -Honda Rear Tine,$375, 850-573-5352
Sewing Machine w/Cabinet $35, 850-209-1361
Table w/4 chairs glass/wd $60. 850-557-9687
Tires (4) Used, P225/70R16 $80, 850-482-2636


Tires (4) used P275/55R20 $60. 850-557-0778

Treadmll Spacesaver, $35, 850-209-1361

Trolling motor -foot control, $300, 850-272-5305

VHS Tapes Bob Ross, etc. $50, 850-482-2862

Wedding gown, new, sz 16, $500 850-693-3260.

Window 29x30 Dbl Pane, $100, 850-482-2636


Everybody's talking about what's in the classified.
IOy. AO O aiO


CLASSIFIED


CALL FOR TOP PRICE

FOR JUNK VEHICLES


A mandatory pre-bid conference shall be held
at the Jackson County Board of County Com-
missioners, 2864 Madison Street, Marianna,
Florida 32448at 9:00 a.m. CST, March 22, 2013.
Points of contact for this project are Travis Jus-
tice, P.E. and Eric Pitts, Preble-Rish, Inc. Con-
sulting Engineers at 850.522.0644 or Fax
850.522.1011, or by email at justicet@preble-ris
h.com or pittse@preble-rish.com, respectively.
All BIDDERs shall comply with all applicable
state and local laws concerning licensing, reg-
istration, and regulations of contractors doing
business in Florida.
The County shall award the contract to the
lowest responsive and responsible BIDDER;
provided however, the County reserves the
right to award the contract to a BIDDER who is
not the lowest responsive and responsible BID-
DER if the County determines in its reasonable
discretion that another bid offers the County a
better value based upon the reliability, quality
of service, or product of such other BIDDER.
March 13th, and 20th, 2013

LF160043
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
DIVISION: PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN RANDAL CRAWFORD
Deceased.
FILE NO.: 10 PR 234

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JOHN RAN-
DAL CRAWFORD, deceased, whose date of
death was on ,and whose social security num-
ber is XXX-XX-5218, is pending in the Four-
teenth Judicial Circuit Court for Jackson Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Division; the address of
which is Post Office Drawer 510, Marianna, FL
32447, file number 10 PR 234. The names
and addresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against de-
cedent's estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SOFILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
March 22, 2013.
Personal Representative:
SHARON MARGARET LEWIS
155 Clara Street
Cowarts, Alabama 36321
Attorney for Personal Representative:
James J. Goodman, Jr
Florida Bar No. 0071877
Jeff Goodman P.A.
935 Main Street, Chipley, FL 32428
850-638-9722


I






110B + WEDNESDAY. MARCH 20.2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


NFI


I Owners pass two rule changes


Commissioner Roger Goodell (center) Speaks during a news
conference at the Arizona Biltmore on Monday.



NFLtopay42



million for



using retired



players images


The Associated Press

PHOENIX NFL own-
ers approved two rule
changes Tuesday to en-
hance player safety. They
might not vote on a pro-
posal to ban offensive
players from using the
crown of their helmets
against defenders.
The owners outlawed
peel-back blocks any-
where on the field; pre-
viously, they were illegal
only inside the tackle box.
A player makes a peel-
back block when he is
moving toward his goal
line, approaches an oppo-
nent from behind or the
side, and makes contact
below the waist.
The penalty will be 15
yards.
Also banned is overload-
ing a formation while at-
tempting to block a field
goal or extra point. Defen-
sive teams can now have
only six or less players on
each side of the snapper
at the line of scrimmage.
Players not on the line
can't push teammates
on the line into blockers,
either.
The alignment viola-
tion is a 5-yard penalty.
The pushing penalty is
15 yards for unnecessary
roughness.
' But the potential change
that has drawn the most
attention yes, even
more than eliminating the
infamous tuck rule, which
seems to be a foregone
conclusion is prohibit-
ing ball carriers outside
the tackle box from low-
ering their helmets and
making contact with de-
fenders with the crown.
New York Giants owner
John Mara, a member of
the competition commit-
tee that has recommend-
ed the change, expressed
doubt Tuesday that the
proposal would be voted
on before Wednesday,
when the owners meet-
ings conclude. He also
said there was "a chance"
it could be tabled until the
May meetings in Boston.
"There was a spirited
discussion," Mara said.
"We'll have more discus-
sion today."
Many coaches have
said they are concerned
about officiating such a
new rule.
"In all fairness it's go-
ing to be tough on the
officials, it's going to be
tough to make that de-
termination at'live speed
with one look," said John
Harbaugh of the Super
Bowl champion Balti-
more Ravens.
Harbaugh noted that in
the competition commit-
tee's examination of one
week of play last season,
it found five instances
where a ball carrier was
not protecting the ball or
himself and lowered his
helmet to make contact
with a defender.
Dean Blandino, recent-
ly promoted to vice presi-


The Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS The
NFL has agreed to pay $42
million as part of a settle-
ment with a group of retired
players who challenged
the league over using their
names and images without
their consent.
The league will use the
money to fund a "common
good" trust over the next
eight years that will help re-
tired players with an array
of issues including medical
expenses, housing and ca-
reer transition. The settle-
ment also establishes a li-
censing agency for retired
players to ensure they are
compensated for the use of
their identities in promo-
tional materials.
"We look forward to
building an unprecedent-
ed new relationship with
retired players that 'will
benefit everybody, espe-
cially those who need extra
medical or financial assis-
tance," NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell said Mon-
day in a statement issued
by the league.
The settlement could im-
prove the frosty relation-
ship between the NFL and
many of its retired players
who have felt left behind
as the league has exploded
in popularity over the last
decade. Former stars like
Mike Ditka, Jim Brown and
others have lobbied hard
for more help dealing with
retired players' mounting
financial difficulties and
medical expenses, and fot
a bigger role in negotia-
tions of labor agreements.
Brown called the settle-
ment a "landmark for those
who really need it."
"We were able to finalize
this agreement and for the
first time in history retired
players will be represented
at the table," Brown said at
a press conference inArizo-
na, where owners are hold-
ing meetings this week.
HallofFamerElvinBethea
and five other retired play-
ers filed the federal class-
action lawsuit in Minne-
apolis in 2009 accusing the
NFL of blatantly exploiting
retired players' identities in
films, highlight reels and
memorabilia to market the
league's "glory days."
"The retired players who
created these glory days,
however, have gone almost
completely uncompensat-
ed for this use of their iden-
tities," the plaintiffs said.
"Notably, while exploiting
the identities of retired
players for commercial
gain, the NFL prohibits re-
tired NFL players from us-
ing their own identities as
players to promote them-
selves commercially."
The Common Good fund
will be administered by a
group of retired players ap-
proved by the court, a sig-
nificant legitimization of a
group as a whole that for
years has felt like it was on
the outside looking in. And
the licensing agency will
for the first time market
retired players' publicity
rights in conjunction with
the NFL, thereby making it
easier for retired players to
work with potential spon-
sors and advertisers.
"There's now going to
be a voice for the retired
Jplavers," said Charles Zim-


merman, an attorney for
the plaintiffs. "That's very
important."
The other players listed
in the suit are Jim Marshall,
Ed White, Joe Senser, Fred
Dryer and Dan Pastorini.
In the past, if Marshall was
approached by a company
looking to pay him to use
footage of him as a player in
a commercial or advertise-
ment, the company would
have to go to the NFL for
approval, to the Minnesota
Vikings for more approval
and to any player featured
in that footage for more
approval.
The new licensing agen-
cy, which will be overseen
by a board of retired play-
ers, will streamline that
process.
"This creates essentially
a one-stop shopping for
whoever wants to tap into
this marketplace," said
Dan Gustafson, an attor-,
ney for the retired players.
"The agency will have the
ability to make that deal on
behalf. And it's up to board
of directors of players to
determine how to do that."
The settlement only cov-
ers those players Who are
currently retired, but Gus-
tafson said players. who
do retire in the future will
have the chance to utilize
the newly formed licens-
ing agency. The NFL will
also pay another $8 million
in assorted costs associ-
ated with the settlement,
including money needed
to help set up the licensing
agency and pay attorneys.
The lawsuit was simi-
lar to one filed by former
UCLA basketball player
Ed O'Bannon against the
NCAA. O'Bannon is seek-
ing unspecified' damages
for the use of former play-
ers'. likenesses in video
games and other material.
NFL players have already
been down that road, with
a group of more than 2,000
retirees getting a $26.25
million settlement from the
NFLPA over the use of their
likenesses in video games,
trading cards and other
sports products. The re-
tirees sued in 2007, accus-
ing the union of failing to
actively pursue marketing
deals for such products.


Food will be provided and geta SNEAK PEEK
of the NEW RENOVATIONS at Hatton House!

plerwflaw^w ^Wr


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
San Francisco 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh (left) walks with his brother John Harbaugh, coach
of the Baltimore Ravens, at the NFL football annual meetings on Tuesday.


dent of officiating, noted
that five in 16 games was
significant enough to con-
sider banning the act.
Added Rams coach Jeff
Fisher, co-chairman of the
competition committee:
"We want to make a se-
rious attempt to get the
shoulder back into the
game. We are not saying
the ball carrier cannot
get small. We are not say-
ing the ball carrier can-
not protect the football,
because if he is going to
go down to cover the foot-
ball, if the shoulder goes
down, we know the head
goes down, we under-
stand that.
"Protecting the football
is OK, providing you do
not strike with the crown
of your helmet, and that
is what we are.trying to
differentiate."
Blandino added that the
league wants flags thrown
only on the obvious calls.
He also said in cases


where a player is not pe-
nalized, he could still be
subject to a fine if video
review after the game de-
termines he made contact
with the crown.
The penalty will be a
spot foul for 15 yards.
New senior director of
officiating Alberto Riv-
eron said if the offensive
and defensive player are
both committing the foul,
it would be an offsetting
penalty and the down
replayed.
Riveron said the key to


officiating the play is in
showing the officials more
plays that are legal.
"That will be a great
way to train because as
we know it, most of the
shots we have seen are
legal, most of the contact
is legal," he said. "We are
trying to get that one in-
dividual situation where
the head is lowered and
you can see on the field,
you can see a player put
his head down and the
contact is with the crown
and you can see it."


ED MCCOY-
850-573-6198 cell
emccoy02@yahoo.com
Century 21
SunnC Sourn
ProDertE s
1. .-46r 0 Hyv 90o m
SMARTER BOLDER. FASTER. M3rJanna FL
www.emccoyrealty.com


Abre y oulofok in
for a place of worsh. p .




We,



,ME


If you are an area church that would like to
be featured in this year's edition contact the
advertising department of the Jackson County
Floridan at (850) 526-3614
or e-mail salesjcfloridan.com.

Deadline for advertising is April 12, 2013.


4---


- ---


. %A : --:"' .. I'-".
;.. ,'." ^.^1


51-.