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Jackson County Floridan ( March 15, 2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
March 15, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01038

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title:
Sunday Floridan
Portion of title:
Floridan
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Jackson County Floridan
Publisher:
Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Marianna Fla
Creation Date:
March 15, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates:
30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note:
"Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID:
UF00028304:01038

Related Items

Preceded by:
Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by:
Marianna Floridan

Full Text









bring more than 17.000 readers daily in print and online


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Vol. 90 No. 64


Community icon Queen Brown dies at 86


MARK SKlIINER/FLORIDAN
Queen Brown points out some of the
photos of her family members in her
soon-to-be-released memoir.


From staff reports

Queen Brown died Tuesday
morning, three days after her
86th birthday. A woman of quiet
strength and considerable in-
fluence, she earned that power
over a lifetime of service to her
church, the young people who
surrounded her and to the cause
of equal rights arid fair play.
Brown was a person to see if
you wanted to get something
Done.
Leon Kelly put it simply. "She
was a living legend," he said.
"She was always looking out for
her fellow man. I first met her
when I was going to school with
her son, and she always led us in


the right direction, to be positive
role models and she was a pretty
powerful role model herself."
Always active in community
affairs, often behind the scenes
but in the forefront when nec-
essary, Brown was instrumental
in trying to get young people
to work hard, get all the educa-
tion they could, and to make
their lives shining examples that
could inspire others to follow the
same positive path.
She started at home. She and
her siblings helped make sure
that as the younger members of
the family came of age, all were
able to go to college. A member
of the Northwest Florida FAMU
Alumni Association, Brown


worked in various efforts to es-
tablish or sustain scholarships
for many other young people
through decades of dedication
to the cause of education. Brown
was a big supporter of the Boys
to Men Choir here and many
other youth-oriented programs.
Her reach extended into the
day-to-day lives of people of
all ages as well. Elmore Bryant,
Marianna's first black mayor,
counts Brown as a key supporter
in his political days, and said
she has encouraged many other
minority candidates and office
holders through the years. It was
a fortunate person who had her
See QUEEN, Page 7A


EDUCATION IN THE FIELD


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
A after a morning full of lessons on the latest techniques and research results for cattle and pasture
management, the crowd of approximately 100 cattlemen and 20 staff retired to the main building
t the North Florida Research and Education Center's Beef Research Unit for a barbecue lunch
Thursday during Beef/Forage Field Day. After lunch the crowd returned to the center's fields to learn
about winter forage.


Model T rolls to a stop on U.S. 90


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Lee Wolf had to pull his 1920
Ford Model T touring car over on
U.S. 90 Thursday morning dur-
ing his 400-mile trip from Mount
Dora back home to Crestview.
Wolf said he was grateful to have
made it to U.S. 90 before the
car started giving him trouble.
He'd started his trek back home
around 2 a.m., traveling rural
routes most of the way.
He had to have the antique
towed the rest of the way home,
an estimated 100 miles. But Wolf
was taking it all in stride. "That's
all part of it when you drive this
old stuff," Wolf said. He said he
was grateful for the help he re-
ceived from two passers-by that
morning. Lloyd Buckhalter, see-
ing the car in distress, stopped to
help Wolf look the car over, and
the two determined that it had


Model T owner Lee Wolf had to have his antique car towed 100 miles to
his home in Crestview, Thursday after the 1920 Touring Car developed
transmission trouble that forced him to end his road trip shortly after he
motored through Grand Ridge on US. 90.
transmission trouble. lard, of Cottondale, hooked
Another passer-by, Tim Bal- Wolf up with a local tow service.


Carlos Mayo, of Mays Towing in
Cypress, was summoned to take
the car on to Crestview. Wolf
rode along with Mayo, and said
he has spare parts at home that
should get his car roadworthy
once again.
Wolf has three Model T's and
two Model As. He bought this
one about 15 years ago, and en-
joys restoring the old vehicles to
their former glory.
He wasn't too aggravated with
the Model T. After all, he said, it
had taken him without incident
to the touring event in Mt. Dora,
and on the roughly 100-mile-a-
day trip back. He has it outfitted
to handle most minor trouble,
having affixed an after-market
tool box and fuel containers on
the driver's side running board-
the objects weren't in his way
there, since the driver's side of
See MODEL T. Page 7A


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna City commissioners,
(from top) Rico Williams, John
Roberts, James Wise, Travis
Ephriam and Paul Donofro Jr.
listen as a settlement agreement
between the city and Florida
Public Utilities is discussed
Wednesday, March 13, in
Marianna.


Power


forward

City commission
moves ahead with
utilities plan
BY ANGIE COOK
acook@jcfloridan.com
MARIANNA, Fla. The on-
going dispute between the city
of Marianna and its electric
power provider, Florida Public;
Utilities, is one step closer to a
resolution.
During a special meeting on
Wednesday, city commission-
ers Rico Williams, John Rob-
erts, James Wise, Travis Ephri-
am and Paul Donofro Jr. voted
unanimously to execute a set-
tlement agreement between
the municipality and FPU.
City Manager Jim Dean re-
called a scene from early 2010,
when irate citizens filled the
city hall meeting room to air
concerns to municipal officials
about rising utility costs. That,
he said, sparked a years-long
endeavor to bring rate relief
to city residents. Since then,
the battle between the city
and FPU has made its way into
circuit court and the state Su-
preme Court, where two cases
remain active.
The settlement, if agreed to
by both parties, will resolve
current legal disputes and lay
out steps required for the city
to purchase FPU facilities in-
side the city limits and set up its
own electric utilities service.
Terms of the plan, which
was presented in draft form
Wednesday, include the city's
purchase of FPU-owned distri-
bution system property for $4.5
million and a 15-year commit-
ment by the city to pay FPU an
annual fee of $900,000 for the
company to operate and main-
tain that system.
Several other stipulations
were outlined in the settle-
ment, which Dean said he ex-
pected would be made final by
the end of the week.
But even if both parties come
to terms and settle lingering le-
gal disputes, the city's move to
become an electric power pro-
vider is still up in the air.
That issue, according to city
charter rules, requires voter
approval.
A referendum on the April 9
ballot will ask city of Marianna
residents to decide if their mu-
nicipality should set up its own
electric service, and purchase
facilities currently owned by
FPU to do so.
To help Marianna voters un-
derstand the referendum issue,
city officials plan to announce
a series of public meetings
aimed at informing the public.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


Today



f ^"~
i


Cool Start. Sunny & Warm.

Justin Kiefer / WMBB


High 740
Low 46


*.
-" -- igh: 7
'.- .--"'L_ : 41







SLo%: 52


I. U


4
' l / .
_: :"' High: 74 { n '' *
S -Lo: 48 High: 74
S- Low: 46



fo .


-" '. High -78'
S .-- Low 52'
i/t\-C\


Saturday
Sunny & Warm.


High- 780
Low 55'


Monday
Partly Cloudy & Warm.


High 79'
Low 56


Sunday
Sunny & Warm.



"S High-740
- Low 460


Tuesday
Possible Showers.


PRECIPITATION


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


0.00"
1.32"
2.60"


ei r v', dil'
N'nal '1 TD
Normal lor year


16 SmI

59.2O"


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Low 10:06 PM High
Low 12:36 PM High
Low 10:10 PM High
Low 11:21 PM High
Low 11:55 PM High


Reading
50.35 ft.
12.73 ft.
11.22 ft.
10.17 ft.


- 11:54 AM
- 7:30 AM
- 12:27 PM
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Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme

0 1 2 3 4


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:51 AM
Sunset 6:49 PM
Moonrise 8:59 AM
Moonset 10:44 PM


Apr. Mar. Mar. Apr.
10 19 27 3


FLORIDA'S REAL -

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MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9 F

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JACKSON COUNTY

IFLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager- Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
SMailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
.You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
Jis published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
-at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
SHome delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
:for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
S$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
.year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and,
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
Snot acceptable.

HOWTO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax. mail. or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement.
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please cal 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


S.'.- i y Calendar
I .


TODAY
n Preschool and Early Head Start registration
for the 2013-14 school year 8:30 a.m. to noon
at the Old Marianna High School Gym, 2979 Daniels
St. Parents must bring their child's birth certificate,
social security card and proof of family income. Ap-
plications are available at school sites or the Early
Childhood Programs Office. Bring completed forms
to registration. Call 482-1266.
) Gigantic Book Sale 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library, Marianna Branch
at 2929 Green Street. Large groups of children's,
fiction and non-fiction books including biographies,
mysteries, adventures, travelogues, cookbooks, etc.
Large and -rrnll print books with prices beginning
at 50 cents. Donations accepted. Call 482-9631.
Knitters Nook -10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) First Federal Bank SBA Lending Lunch and
Learn 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Russ House, 4318
Lafayette St. in Marianna. Topics such as SBA
Financing Programs and Lower Down Payment Flex-
Loiii,, .,lli be discussed. Lunch will be served. RSVP
by March 8 to 547-7512.
) Customer Service Skills Noon to 4 p.m. at
the Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway
90, Marianna. Call 526-0139.
a Chipola College Theatre Production, "Hair-
spray" 7 p.m., Center for the Arts. Center for the
Arts, March 13-16 at 7 p.m. and March 17 at2 p.rh.
in the Center for the Arts. Purchase tickets online at
www.chipola.edu or at the door 30 minutes before
show time. Contact Charles Sirmon at 850-718-
2227 or email sirmonc@chipola.edu.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Deadline to Place Orders for the Marianna
High School Project Graduation 2013 Straw-
berry Sale To place orders for fresh Plant City
strawberries contact any MHS senior or parent.
$16 per 12 pint flat. Strawberries can be picked '
up beginning at 7 a.m. Wednesday, March 20 at
Eastside Ejpt i:t Church, 4785 U.S. 90 in Marianna.
Call 209-5704.

SATURDAY, MARCH 16
Gigantic Book Sale 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library, Marianna Branch
at 2929 Green Street. Large groups of children's,
fiction and non-fiction books including biographies,
mysteries, adventures, travelogues, cookbooks, etc.
Large and small print books with prices beginning


at 50 cents. Donations accepted. Call 482-9631.
) Troop 76 Girl Scouts of Alford and Cottondale
Cookie Sale 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Save-A-Lot
at Oak Station in Marianna. Cookies are $3.50 per
box.
) Owens Family Reunion Noon at the Cypress
Park located on U.S. 90 in Cypress. Everyone
should bring a well filled basket of food. Call 526-
4570.
) Shamrock Shuffle 5K Run and Walk Fundrais-
er 2 p.m. at Madison Street Park. Event spon-
sored by Guardians of the F'ibbl-nr .l.:i: :on County
Chapter, Signature Healthcare at the Courtyard
and Main Street Marianna. Entry fee is $20. Call
573-0229.
) Irene V. Blaine Memorial Scholarship Fund-
raiser Program 3 p.m. at Prayer Temple, 3341
Plantation Circle in Marianna. The program theme
is "Come Meet Tiny Tot." The program will include
skits, solos, readings and an inspirational.mes-
sage. Guest speaker will be Elder Glenis D. Smith of
Bascom. Refreshments will be served. The public is
invited. Call 526-4572.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
* Annual Marianna High School Campus Beauty
Pageant 6 p.m. in the Marianna High School
Auditorium. The pageant is sponsored by the MHS
Varsity Cheer Squad. Admission is $5.
) Chipola College Theatre Production,"Hair-
spray" 7 p.m., Center for the Arts. Center for the
Arts, March 13-16 at 7 p.m. and March 17 at 2 p.m.
in the Center for the Arts. Purchase tickets online at
www.chipola.edu or at the door 30 minutes before
show time. For information, contact Charles Sirmon
at 850-718-2227 or email sirmonc@chipola.edu.
) Shane Owens, Live in Concert 8 p.m. at the
American Legion Hall, Highway 20 in Blountstown.
Tickets are $10 each. All proceeds will benefit the
American Legion. Call 850-643-7781.

SUNDAY, MARCH 17
Chipola College Theatre Production of
"Hairspray" 2 p.m. Center for the Arts. Purchase
tickets online at www.chipola.edu or at the door 30
minutes before show time. For information, contact
Charles Sirmon at 718-2227 or email sirmonc@
chipola.edu.
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story :.uildinl behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.

MONDAY, MARCH 18
)"5 Steps to Rapid Employment" Workshop
-9 a.m. to noon at the Marianna One Stop Career


Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326
for more information.
) Chipola Chapter, NSDAR Meeting 11 a.m. at
Beef O'Brady's located on Highway 71. Dutch treat
lunch. Beekeeper Sonja Guthrie, member of the Fort
San Luis Chapter, NSDAR in Tallahassee will present
the program. All interested persons are invited to
attend, no reservations are needed. Call 209-4066
or contact bluespringscar@yahoo.com.
n Employability Workshop, "Using Local Labor
Market Information" 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna
One Stop Career Center, 4636 U.S. 90, Marianna.
Call 718-0326.
) Jackson County Development Council, Inc.
Board of Directors Meeting 5 p.m. in the up-
stairs conference room located in the Nearing Court
Office Building, 2840 Jefferson St. in Marianna. The
public is invited to attend.
) Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees Quarterly
Joint Conference Committee Meeting 5:30
p.m. in the classroom of the Hospital. Call 718-2629.
Jackson County Quilter's Guild Meeting
- 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 U.S. 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings
are fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects,
lessons, help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
) The Capt. Luke Lott's Calhoun Guards, Camp
2212 Sons of Confederate Veterans Monthly
Meeting 6 p.m. at the Altha Diner, 25563 North.
Main St. in Altha. Call 592-3293.
) Alford Community Organization Meeting 6
p.m. in the Alford Community Center. New members
from Alford, surrounding :':.rrinin.iries invited to
join. Call 579-4482,638-4900 or 579-5173.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, MARCH 19
a Chipola Regional Arts Association Meet-
ing 11:30 a.m. EST at the Liberty County Civic
Center. The public is rn it-. to attend. There will be
a catered lunch available for $8-$10. Lunch at 11:30
a.m. followed by the program at 12 noon. RSVP by
Sunday, March 10. C 1i 718-2277
Optimist Club of Jackson County Meeting
- Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna.
n First Federal Bank Investment Lunch and
Learn Seminar Noon to 1 p.m. at PAEC Confer-
ence Room, 753 West Blvd. in Chipley. Griggs Espy
of Espy Financial Services will discuss various top-
ics. Lunch will be served. C jl 547-7512.
) Orientation Noon to 3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
) Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 1:ptl .,:t Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar. Jackson County Floridan. P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447.
e-mail -I j,: v :-.,r. .: :on, fax 850'482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police.Depart-
ment listed the following inci-
dents for March
'- 13, the latest
available report:
'CR'1ME iTwo accidents,
'CRIv one suspicious
incident, one
suspicious
person, two burglar alarms, 22
traffic stops, one assault, one
assist of another agency, one
public service call, one welfare
check and one threat/harass-
ment complaint.


Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following inci-
dents for March 13, the latest.
available report: One drunk
driver, two hospice deaths, one
reckless driver, one suspicious
vehicle, one suspicious inci-
dent, two suspicious persons,
two highway obstructions, one
burglary, one residential fire
call, one drug offense, 13 medi-
cal calls, three traffic crashes,
five burglar alarms, eight traffic
stops, two larceny complaints,


two criminal mischief com-
plaints, two civil disputes, one
trespass complaint, one assault,
one animal complaint, one
fraud complaint, three assists of
other agencies, one child abuse
complaint, one public service
call, two criminal registrations,
two transports and one Baker
Act transport.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
D Elijah Johnson, 26, 5590


Hartsfield Road, Greenwood,
possession of controlled sub-
stance with intent to sell within
100 feet of a church.
) Vanessa Williams, 25, 4144
Eagle Drive, Marianna, posses-
sion of cocaine.
) Troy Gatman, 32, 5420
Thomas Drive, Graceville,
dealing in stolen property, hold
for Washington and Holmes
counties.

Jail Population: 203
To report a crome. cal CrirneStoppers
at 52H-5005 cr a rocal ian enforcemerrt
age- cy. reort a di r !dle violation, cali
1-818-404-F/WCC (3922).


~_.___1___.111~~11____~.~__1-1~111111_


T72A FRIDAY., MARCH 15. 2013


Vnum-UP CILuICL


-- ~i~







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN wwvi.jcflondan.com


Country Bumpkins 4-H


team takes first-place


Special to the Floridan

The Country Bump-
kins 4-H livestock judging
team, under the leadership
of Terri Hardin, finished
the year with another big
win on March 6 at the West
Florida Livestock Show in
Quincy. Several surround-
ing counties were invited
to the Quincy show, includ-
ing local Jackson County
FFA and 4-H programs.
Our local Country Bump-
kins 4-H team competed
against five other junior
teams and won the cov-
eted first place award. The
team members are Eliza-
beth Halling, Faith Hardin,
Myra Miles, Josie Scott and
JaDee Barber
The Country Bumpkins
judging team had an un-


believable year, with many
admirable accomplish-
ments. In addition to the
recent first place award in
Quincy, the team took first
place at the Panhandle
Youth Expo in Septem-
ber, the North Florida
Fair in Tallahassee last
November and the Jackson
County Fed Steer Show last
month
Throughout the season,
there were several high
individual scores from
Jackson County teams.
In Quincy on March 6,
Country Bumpkins 4-H
member Faith Hardin took
second high individual
score. Taking first place
at that competition was
Tyler Lawrence and third
high individual went to
Hunter Tyus, both with


the Jackson County 4-H
program. Overall, Jackson
County performed very
well with their livestock
judging teams in Quincy
this month.
4-H is the youth develop-
ment program of the Flor-
ida Cooperative Extension
Service and the Univer-
sity of Florida's Institute
of Food and Agricultural
Sciences. 4-H is open to
all youth between the
ages of 5-18 regardless of
gender, race, creed, color,
religion or disability. The
focus of 4-H is to pro-
vide young people
with opportunities to de-
velop life skills through
participation in commu-
nity clubs, project clubs,
day camps, residential
camps, school enrichment


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Country Bumpkins 4-H livestock judging team pose with their First Place ribbons and plaque.
From left: Josie Scott, Elizabeth Halling, Faith Hardin and Myra Miles. Not shown is JaDee
Barber.

programs and competi- in your community, con- mation about the Country
tive events. For more in- tact the Jackson County Bumpkins Club, please
formation about joining 4-H Agent Ben Knowles at contact club leader Terri
4-H or starting a 4-H club 482-9620. For more infor- Hardin at 272-3728.


VIVIAN FORD MEMORIAL


SCHOLARSHIP LUNCHEON


SUBMITTED PHOTO

The Third Annual Vivian Ford Memorial Scholarship Luncheon
was held Wednesday, March 6. FFA members from Sneads,
Marianna, Graceville, Grand Ridge, Malone, Cottondale and Al-
tha gathered at the Jackson County Ag Center in Marianna to prepare
over 550 plates which were delivered out into the surrounding com-
munity. Each plate consisted of a smoked pork chop, baked beans,
corn on the cob, bread and a dessert. The purpose of the luncheon
was to raise money for the Vivian Ford Memorial Agriculture Schol-
arship. Special thanks to everyone who cooked, prepared and pur-
chased plates; donated to the scholarship; donated supplies, paper
ware, food and other essentials in preparing the plates. The majority
of the plates were purchased by Jackson County School Board em-
ployees, school administrations and teachers in Jackson County and
few by people in the community. Pictured are FFA members
assembling lunch plates.




Emerald Coast Hospice memorial

service scheduled for tomorrow


Special to the Floridan

Emerald Coast Hospice
will be hosting their an-
nual memorial service for
the Marianna office to-
morrow at 10 a.m. in the
community room at the
Hudnall Building, located
next to Jackson Hospi-


tal. The memorial service
is to honor the patients
that passed away in 2012.
The service will provide
an opportunity for fami-
lies to pay tribute to loved
ones and reunite with
Hospice staff for encour-
agement and support.
Light refreshments will


be provided. For addi-
tional information please
contact the Marianna of-
fice at 526-3577. Emerald
Coast Hospice is a not-
for profit organization
serving patients in the
Jackson, Calhoun, Holmes,
and Washington County
areas.


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xtra 3


Marianna Woman's Club announces

new Chipola student scholarships

Floridan publisher speaks, new member joins


Special to the Floridan

Valeria Roberts, Publish-
er of the Jackson County
Floridan spoke at the
luncheon meeting of the
Marianna Woman's Club
on March 7. Roberts told
the group about the work-
ings of The Floridan, how
the news is assimilated
for printing and how cir-
culation is handled. She
reported that 1600 miles
were traveled each day by
circulation personnel as
they deliver the papers.
Roberts told club mem-
bers that there are 5,000
papers distributed each
day the paper is printed.
A question and answer
period followed Roberts'
presentation.
In addition to Roberts'
presentation at the meet-
ing, the Marianna Wom-
an's Club was pleased to
announce that through
the generosity of several
club members and com-
munity support at the
Kirby Holt fundraiser, the
Club will be able to help
seven young Chipola
scholars with their college
expenses in the Fall 2013
Semester and/or Spring
2014 Semester. Club
members Elaine Ander-
son, Charlotte Hunter and
Pat Hart and husband Jim
made personal donations
to make these additional
scholarships possible. The
$500 one year scholarship
recipients will be select-
ed from those students
who submit their appli-
cation by April 30, have
a grade point average of
3.0 and have met all the
requirements outlined in
the Chipola Foundation
application for scholar-
ships. The Club is very
pleased to be able to as-
sist seven additional stu-
dents with their college
expenses. The Debi Davis
Memorial Merit Scholar-
ship will also be awarded
to a deserving student
who has maintained a 3.5


GAS WATCH
Gas prices are going up. Here are
the least expensive places to buy
gas in Jackson County. as of
Wednesday afternoon.

L $3.59, McCoy's Food Mart,
2823 Jefferson St., Marianna
2. $3.59, Mobil Food Mart,
2999 Jefferson St., Marianna
3. $3.59, Tom Thumb, 3008 A
Jefferson St., Marianna
4. $3.61, BP Station, 5184 US.
231 S., Campbellton
5. $3.65, Chevron, 4153
Lafayette St., Marianna
6. $3.65, Chipola Mart, 4195,
Lafayette St., Marianna
7. $3.65, Dar-Bee's Quick Stop,
6189 U.S. 90, Cypress
8. $3.65, Greens BP, 2846 Hwy.
71, Marianna
9.$3.65, KMEE II, 5392 10th St,
Malone
Ifyou seea o,'s'r '!-ce.
contac t fe Fio,- da1r'sS,:
at edltorf'air p.j f, -'s1 co07.


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Marianna Woman's Club President Chris Sharkey, (left)
welcomes Valeria Roberts, Publisher of the Jackson County
Floridan.


Marianna Woman's Club Third Vice President, Norma Hussey
on right is shown welcoming new member Dottie Rehberg
into membership of the Marianna Woman's Club.


Members announcing the new scholarships are (from left)
Elaine Anderson, Charlotte Hunter, Chris Sharkey, club
president and Pat Hart. Acknowledging the donations on the
far right is Pat Crisp, Education Department Chairman. This
department is responsible for scholarship selections.


grade point average. The
applications for all schol-
arships must be secured
from the Chipola Founda-
tion Office and the dead-


line for both is a postmark
by April 30.
Also at the meeting, Dot-
tie Rehberg was welcomed
as a new member.


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Sell Your Gold at.,.




JEWELERS

Paid on Site
4432 Lafayette Street 526-5488 www.smithandsmnthonine corn


Wed.
Thurs.
Thurs.
Fri.
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Sat
Sat
Sun.
Sun.


aatru ay


Wednesday 3/13 15-30-34-44-47-49 xtra 5
For lottery information, call 850-487-7777 or 900-737-7777


FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 2013 3AF


LOCRI








l4A FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 2013


RELIGION


JACKSON COUNT-Y FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Spring 2013 Preview Day at BCF

Special to the Fioridan


On March 8, over 140
prospective students and
guests converged on the
Graceville campus of The
Baptist College of Florida
to get a glimpse of what
college life is like for BCF
students. Some were visit-
ing for the very first time,
and one family drove over
450 miles from Fort Pierce,
just to be a part of the
activities of the day.
Early that morning, BCF
students and members
of the Missouri volunteer
group decorated tables,
greeted visitors, hung
welcome banners, blew
up balloons and compiled
information bags to pro-
vide to potential students
as they arrived.
Excitement was in the
air as registration began
inside the newly reno-
vated Wellness Center at
9 a.m. Visitors were given
a warm-hearted welcome
and invited to explore
all of the various exhibit
displays put together by
faculty, students and staff
members. The exhibits
offered guests informa-
tion on degree programs,
housing, campus activi-
ties, mission opportuni-
ties, intramural sports,'
campus ministries,
financial aid, computer
access and all of the sup-
port resources available
to students attending BCE
Professors were avail-
able to answer questions
about specific classes and
course requirements and a
photo-booth was set up in
the Wellness Center
where visitors could take
fun photos with Izzy,
BCF's Eagle Mascot, or
with their family and
friends to remember the
special day.
Prospective students
had the opportunity to
visit one of four classroom
events: Music and wor-,
ship, theology and mis-
sions, Christian counsel-
ing and teacher education,


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Prospective students enjoying a time of food and fellowship around the gazebo at The Baptist
College of Florida.


or participate in a finan-
cial aid seminar led by the
BCF Financial Aid Office
and Business Affairs.
Guests were then invited
to the R. G. Lee Chapel for
a time of worship. Mem-
bers of the BCF Music
and Worship Division
delighted worshippers
with an inspirational hour
of musical praise and wor-
ship led by BCF student
Shawn Smith. The College
Choir, Orchestra, Praise
Team, and Male Chorale
performed special music
before an encouraging
word of welcome from
BCF President Thomas A.
Kinchen.
"God has a plan for each
.and every person," stated
Kinchen. "If His plan for
you includes attending
BCF, and we pray that it
does, we'll do everything
we can to get you here."
Kinchen acknowledged
that we may not always
know exactly what God
is doing in us or through
us, "but God knows where
we are and what He wants
to do in the lives of those
who are following Him."
After a time of worship,
campus visitors enjoyed
lunch and fellowship
around the gazebo in the
warm sunshine, listening
to the soothing sound of
the BCF Jazz Band, led by
Professor Ron Branning.
BCF Resident Directors,
Dormitory RD's, then led


BCF President Thomas A. Kinchen enjoys visiting with
prospective students and poses for a picture with Izzy, BCF's
Eagle Mascot.


students on tours of the
housing facilities while
BCF Admissions Coun-
selors Barol Bailey and
Samantha Farm guided
groups on a walking tour
around the campus. Fol-
lowing the tours, everyone
gathered one last time for
a challenge game led by
Baptist Collegiate Min-
istries Director Ashley
Fredryk and a drawing
for two $500 scholarships
which were awarded to
Leah Alligood from New
Port Richie and Jordan
Johnson from Pensacola.


Around 30 prospective
students submitted their
applications to BCF on
Preview Day and had their
application fee waived.
Find BCF on Facebook
and browse through the
photo booth pictures and
make plans to attend Fall
2013 Preview Day Nov. 1.
For more information
on visiting The Baptist
College of Florida or be-
coming a student, please
contact the Admissions
Office at 800-328-2660 or
visit www.baptistcollege.
edu.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Big Lots Assistant Manager, Keith Rhodes on left and Store
Manager, Clay New donated blankets to Faith Baptist Church
for their senior's ministry.



Blanket ministry to


benefit local seniors


Special to the Floridan

Local nursing homes
are filled with senior
citizens who do not have
the means, family sup-
port or mobility to buy
extra comfort items such
as snacks, new socks or
body wash, much less a
new throw or blanket.
For the past few years
Faith Baptist Church in
Marianna has adopted
seniors residing at the
Marianna Health and-
Rehabilitation Center.
Ester Sapp, a member
of Faith Baptist Church
was moved with compas-
sion for nursing home
residents and coordi-
nated the ministry. The
entire church is involved
and donates blankets
and other items on the
senior's wish lists to sup-
port the effort. Pastor
Tim Sanders says, "The
Bible teaches us that if
we visit people less
fortunate than we are,


it's as if we've visited
Jesus Christ himself, Mat-
thew 25:40. This year
our goal is to gift each
and every resident at
the Center, about 200,
with a blanket for
Christmas."
Community aware-
ness and involvement is
also essential to enhance
nursing home ministries
and bring the physical
and spiritual needs of our
nursing home senior to
light. Big Lots in Mari-
anna wanted to help
with the ministry and
recently donated 15
blankets for seniors.
Faith Baptist Church is
grateful for the assistance
of Big Lots and with this
generous donation is
well on their way to
making Christmas a little
brighter for seniors this
year.
For more informa-
tion about activities and
services at Faith Baptist
Church call 482-2869.


SWere h I nLinda Pfore Insurance Agency Inc Sa
FST "ARM- 2919 PennAvenue
cCo SuteB .food stores
I IY'SMarianna, FL 32448-2716
INSUANC E, 850-482-3425 (850) 526-4700
Pc inda.p.Oak Station Shopping Center
linda.pforte.bxrs@statefarm.com Open Daily from 8am 8pm


Vann Funeral Home iKEO SCNT i ri
4265 Saint Andrews Street KELSON Go rgs i

Phone: (850) 482-3300 w," n u u YWvRwa..S..
Fax: (850) 482-5363 e ?4 ot," 1-888-767-4275
Concern for the living, 3008 Jefferson Street 482-3420
reverence for the dead. Marianna, Florida 2163 Post Oak Ln Marianna
2 ":2839 www.tropictrailer.com


YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Marianna Church of the Nazarene
2987 N Madison St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-5787

EPISCOPAL
St. Luke's Episcopal Church
4362 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 482-2431
parishoffice@stlukesmarianna.org
www.stlukesmarianna.org

FULL GOSPEL
Christian Center Church
4791 Sheffield Dr P.O. Box 450
Marianna, FL 32447
526-4476 or 526-4475
jack@cccmarianna.org
Country Gospel Community Church
Compass Lake in the Hills
650 Apalachicola Ave
Alford, FL 32420 (850) 579-4172
Resurrection Life Christian
Fellowship International
2933 Madison Street
Marianna, FL 5226-2617
New Beginnings Worship Center
1165 Highway 69
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5791 www.nbworship.com
New Beginning Outreach Ministries, Inc.
2254 Magnolia Dr.
Cottondale, FL 32431 (850) 352-4733
Evangel Worship Center
2645 Pebble Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2232
New Life Family Church
4208 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2132
The Bridge Church
2515 Commercial Park Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 209-2733

HOLINESS
Emmanuel Holiness Church
2505 Sandridge Church Rd
Sneads. FL 32460 593-5167
Hickory Level Community Church
1221 Dipper Rd
Marianna, FL 32448
482-4696 or 482-2885
Oak Ridge Freewill Holiness Church
2958 Milton Ave
Marianna. FL 573-7684
Sneads Community Church
1948 Desoto Ave P.O. Box 1349
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5650

LATTER-DAY SAINTS
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints
3141 College St
Marianna. FL 32446 482-8159

LUTHERAN
Ascension Lutheran Church
3975 W. Hwy 90
Marianna, FL 482-4691
I


METHODIST
Bascom United Methodist Church
4942 Basswood Pd P.O. Box 67
Bascom, FL 32423 594-5755
Cypress United Methodist Church
6267 Cemetery Ave
Cypress, FL 32432 263-4220
First United Methodist Church
1111 8" Ave
Graceville, FL 263-3342
First United Methodist Church
2901 Caledonia St
Marianna, FL 482-4502
Grace United Methodist
4203 W. Kelson Ave
Marianna, FL 482-4753
Grapd Ridge United Methodist Church
6911 Iowa Street
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
Greenwood Chapel AME
5426 Fort Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-1112
Greenwood United Methodist
4220 Bryan St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-5755
Henshaw Chapel AME Church
2370 Glastel St, P.O. Box 535
Cottondale, FL 32431 875-2610
Jerusalem AME Church
2055 Hwy 73
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5085
Kynesville United Methodist
2875 Kynesville Rd
Marianna. FL 32448 482-4672
McChapel AME Church
4963 Old U.S. Rd
Mananna, FL 569-2184
Mt. Shiloh AME Church
6702 Biscayne Road
Bascom, FL 32423 569-1044
New Bethel Christian Methodist
Episcopal Church
2487 Highway 1
Campbellton. FL 32426 263-4647
Pope Chapel African Methodist
Episcopal Church
4898 Blue Springs Rd. P.O. Box 6000
Mananna, FL 32447 482-2900
Shady Grove United
Methodist Church
7305 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge. FL 32442 592-9277
Sneads First United Methodist Church
8042 Church St. P.O. Box 642
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6481
fumc@embarqmail.com
Friendship Christian Methodist
Episcopal (CME) Church
5411 Avery Rd. P.O.Box 302
Campbellton. FL 32426 263-1111
1st United Methodist Church
of Cottondale
P.O. Box 458
Cottondale. FL 32431 352-4426


Salem AME Church
5729 Browntown Rd, P.O. Box 354
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3344
Springfield AME Church
4194 Union Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4252
St. James AME Church
2891 Orange St, P.O. Box 806
Marianna, FL 32447 526-3440
St. Paul AME Church
5180 Hwy 273, P.O. Box 40
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-0333
Snow Hill AME Church
5395 Snow Hill Rd, P.O. Box 174
Malone, FL 32445 569-5315
Mt. Olive AME Church
2135 Fairview Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-7917
Bethlehem AME Church
3100 Lovewood Rd, P.O. Box 752
Cottondale, FL 32431
352-2111 or 352-4721
Greater St. Luke AME Church
5255 11th Ave, P.O. Box 176
Malone, FL 32445 569-5188
NON-DENOMINATIONAL
Believers Outreach Ministry
3471 Hwy 90 W
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4926
Cypress Creek Community Church
1772 Macedonia Road, PO Box 496
Alford, FL 32420 638-0360
Ever Increasing Word of Faith
Ministries
3749 Skyview Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-4704
Heaven's Garden Worship Center
3115 Main Street
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 579-9936 www.aidaspina.org
Faith Cornerstone Church Ministries
5460 Collins Chapel Rd
Malone. FL 32445 569-5600
Foundation Temple Apostolic
Faith Church
3341 Tendell Rd
Cottondale. FL 32431 352-3884
Glass Community Church
4005 Veteran's Road
Cottondale. FL 32431
(850) 272-7205 (850) 263-6715
Haven of Rest
Church of Restoration
Worship Center
2251 Haven of Rest Road
Cottondale. FL 32431
Keeping it Real Help Ministry
3297 Caverns Road
Maranna. FL 32446 557-4800
Love and Restoration Ministries
2990 Hentage Rd
FMaanna.,FL 32448 526-2730
Mill Springs Christian Chapel
1345 M'ii Springs Rd. P.O. Box 83
Grana Ridge. FL 32442 526-2519


Rivertown Community Church
(Meets at the new Marianna High School)
3546 Caverns Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2477
Rocky Creek Tabernacle
1890 Delta Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 272-0917
St Andrews (FC) Church Ministries
978 Hwy 71-S
Marianna, FL 32448 569-5600
Sunrise Worship Center
2957 Hall St, Marianna, FL 482-8158
PENTECOSTAL
Apostolic Life Church
4070 Old Cottondale Rd
Marianna, FL 482-8720
pastorbiggs@embarqmail.com
Apostolic Revival Center
of Marianna
3001 Hwy 71 N, P.O. Box 634
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3162
Christian Covenant Life Center
2011 Finley Ave.
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 592-4737
Shady Grove Pentecostal Holiness
7541 Shady Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-6203
Sneads Pentecostal Holiness Church
2036 Gloster Ave
Sneads, FL 32460
593-4487 or 593-6949
Praise Life Ministries
7360 Hwy 90, P.O. Box 177
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4166


Prayer Temple Church Of Prayer
For All People
3341 Plantation Circle
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3343
United Pentecostal Deliverance
5255 10th Ave
Malone, FL 32445 569-5989
PRESBYTERIAN
First Presbyterian Church
Presbyterian Church (USA)
2898 Jefferson St
Marianna, FL 32446
S526-2430 www.firstpresmarianna.org
fpcmarianna@embarqmail.com or
firstpresmarianna@earthlink.net -
RESTORATIONIST
Church of Jesus Christ of Marianna
4060 Thomasville Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2282
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
Emmanuel SDA Church
4531 Basswood Rd.
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3200
Marianna Seventh Day Adventist
4878 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2487
WESLEYAN
Salem Wesleyan Church
2764 Salem Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 (850) 593-6679
irquomai@gmail.com


Make, A Difference





Recyc^wl











JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


RELIGION


FRIDAY. MARCH 15.2013 5AF


Religion Calendar


FRIDAY, MARCH 15
nJoey Hagan Memorial Fish
Fry-6-8 p.m. at Salem Freewill
Baptist Church. The menu
will include fried catfish fillet,
smoked chicken, baked beans,
cheese grits, hush puppies.
dessert and beverage. Proceeds
will benefit an area :1m, ii r.i
was recently involved in a tragic
automobile accident. Donations
accepted. Call 579-4194.
) Youth Activity Night 6
p.m. at Marianna Church of
God. Ages: 12-19. Call 482-
6264.
)The Fishers of Men Gospel
Singers First Anniversary
Celebration-7 p.m. at Founda-
tion Temple Apostolic Faith
Church. Everyone is invited.
Event is free, offering will be
received. Call 693-3530.
n 20th Annual Church An-
niversary Program-7 p.m.
at New Beginning Outreach
Ministries. Guest speaker will
be Superintendent Delano
Reed of the Miracle Restoration
Church of God in Christ. The
theme "Church on Fire" will be
discussed by Pastor Dr. Debra
Davis of God's D.A.R.E. in Mari-
anna and the congregation of
God's D.A.R.E. will be in charge
of praise and worship. Everyone
is welcome to attend.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome
hurts, habits and hang-ups in
a safe environment," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center with
praise and live worship music,
testimonies and fellowship. Din-
ner: 6 p.m. Child care available.
Call 209-7856,573-1131.
) Annual Anniversary Ser-
vices for Bishop Earnest and
Pastor Betty Freeman-7 p.m.
at United Pentecostal Deliver-
ance Church. All are invited to
attend. Call 569-5989.
) Pulse 7-10 p.m. at
Cypress Grove Assembly of
God Church in Grand Ridge.
Youth outreach program open
to all teens in grades 6-12;
shoot pool, play Xbox and other
games, listen to music, more.
Activities are free; low-cost
snacks for sale. Transportation
available (limited area); call
381-2549. 6

SATURDAY, MARCH 16
D Free clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.


)The Fishers of Men Gospel
Singers First Anniversary
Celebration-5 p.m. at Founda-
tion Temple Apostolic Faith
Church. Everyone is invited.
Event is free. offering will be
received. Call 693-3530.
a Choir Anniversary Celebra-
tion with Gospel Singing-
6:30 p.m. at Magnolia A.M.E.
Church. All choirs, groups,
soloists, praise dancers and in-
strumental soloists are invited
to attend and help celebrate
this occasion. Call 352-4162.
) Annual Anniversary Ser-
vices for Bishop Earnest and
Pastor Betty Freeman-7 p.m.
at United Pentecostal Deliver-
ance Church. All are invited to
attend. Call 569-5989.

SUNDAY, MARCH 17
n Family and Friends Day-11
a.m. at Bethlehem A.M.E.
Church. Speaker will be Minis-
ter Stephen Andrews. Lunch will
be served following the service.
Call 352-4896 or 482-5355.
) Women's Day-11 a.m. at
McChapel AME Church. Pastor
Horace Dozier of New Canaan
Baptist Church in Havana will
be the guest speaker. Everyone
is invited to attend. Call 569-
2084.
n 20th Annual Church An-
niversary Program-11 a.m.
at New Beginning Outreach
Ministries. Speaker of the
hour will be The Reverend Carl
Bailey of Jacob City. The 3 p.m.
service guest speaker will be
Bishop Marquez Alexander
and the congregation of Vic-
tory Temple will be in charge of
praise and worship. Lunch will
be served following the 11 a.m.
service. Everyone is welcome
to attend.
) Family and Friends Day-
11 a.m. and 3 p.m. at Mt. Olive
A.M.E. Church, 6280 Highway
81 in Ponce de Leon. Speaker
for the 11 a.m. service will be
Elder Adrian D. Abner of City
of Truth Ministries Church of
Christ Written in Heaven in
Quitman, GA,and the guest
choir will be made up of family
and friends. Speaker for the
3 p.m. service will be Brother
Benjamin Jackson of St. Paul
M.B.C. in Jacksonville and guest
choir will,be St. Luke A.M.E.
Church Choir of Vernon. Call
352-1256.
) 20th Anniversary and
Appreciation Celebration
of Pastor Reverend Riley


J. Henderson-11 a.m. at St.
Luke M.B.C. Minister James
Rhynes will be Acting Pastor for
the Day. Guest speaker will be
The Reverend Obadiah White,
Pastor of the St. Mary M.B.C.
in Jacob City and music will be
provided by The New Begin-
nings Choir. The theme will be
"God's Anointed Shepherd,
Standing Firm on the Word':
Anniversary feast will follow the
service. Everyone is invited. Call
526-4070.
) Annual Anniversary Ser-
vices for Bishop Earnest and
Pastor Betty Freeman-2 p.m.
at United Pentecostal Deliver-
ance Church. All are invited to
attend. Call 569-5989.
)The Gospels of the Sac-
rifices Program-3 p.m. at
Henshaw Chapel A.M.E. Church.
Speakers will be The Reverend
Henry E. Taylor, The Reverend
Obadiah White, The Reverend
Freddie Roulhac and The Rever-
end Linda F. Edwards-Ellis. Call
352-4394.

MONDAY, MARCH 18
n Easter Celebration Ser-
vice-10 a.m. at the Baptist
College of Florida, 5400 College
Dr. in Graceville in the chapel.
Everyone is welcome to attend.
Call 263-3261.

TUESDAY, MARCH 19
a St. Anne Thrift Store-9
a.m.-l p.m. at 4285 2nd Ave.
See the spring, summer attire.
Call 482-3734.
D Easter Celebration Ser-
vice-10 a.m. at the Baptist
College of Florida, 5400 College
Dr. in Graceville in the chapel.
Everyone is welcome to attend.
Call 263-3261.
) Lenten Luncheon-12-
12:50 p.m. at Marianna First
Presbyterian Church. The menu
will include soup, sandwiches,
dessert and beverages. Interim
Pastor Ted Land will lead a
devotional based on the words
and work of German Lutheran
Pastor Dietrich Bonheoffer.
Everyone is invited. Call 526-
2430.
i Dare to Live Healed Heal-
ing School Class 7 p.m. in
the Bascom Town Hall at 4969
Basswood Road. Free classes
taught by Jacquelyn McGriff.
Call 276-6024.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20
n Easter Celebration Ser-


vice-10 a.m. at the Baptist
College of Florida, 5400 College
Dr. in Graceville in the chapel.
Everyone is welcome to attend.
Call 263-3261.
) Lenton Service-6 p.m. at
Ascension Lutheran Church.
Call 482-4691.
) Wednesday Night Live
Bible Study "Surprise by
Hope"-6 p.m. at Marianna
First United Methodist Church
in the youth building. The
teacher will be Rbert Farnell,
an outstanding Bible Scholar.
This study will be held each
Wednesday through April 17.
Dinner will be served at 5 p.m.
for $5 per person, reservations
no later than Monday. Call
482-4502.

THURSDAY, MARCH 21
a Free clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.
)St. Anne Thrift Store-9
a.m.-1 p.m. at 4285 2nd Ave.
See the spring, summer attire.
Call 482-3734.
))Easter Drama/Musical
"The Promise"-7 p.m. at the
Baptist College of Florida, 5400
College Dr. in Graceville in the
Wellness Center. Everyone is
welcome to attend. Tickets
are $5 per person and can be
purchased in the BCF Business
Office by calling 263-3261ext.
418 or visit www.baptistcollege.
edu.

FRIDAY, MARCH 22
n Youth Activity Night 6
p.m. at Marianna Church of
God. Ages: 12-19. Call 482-
6264.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome
hurts, habits and hang-ups in
a safe environment," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center with
praise and live worship music,
testimonies and fellowship. Din-
ner: 6 p.m. Child care available.
Call 209-7856,573-1131.
) Pulse 7-10 p.m. at Cypress
Grove Assembly of God Church
in Grand Ridge. Youth outreach
program open to all teens in
grades 6-12; shoot pool, play
Xbox and other games, listen to
music, more. Activities are free;
low-cost snacks for sale. Trans-
portation available (limited
area); call 381-2549.

SATURDAY, MARCH 23


) Free clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.

SUNDAY, MARCH 24
) Palm Parade and Con-
temporary Service-8:30
a.m. at Marianna First United
Methodist Church, followed
by Sunday school for all ages
at 9:45 a.m. Palm Parade and
Traditional Service will be held
at 11 a.m. Everyone is welcome.
Call 482-4502.
))Third Annual Family and
Friends Day-11 a.m. at St.
Mary M.B.C. Guest speaker
will be Minister Eddie Hadley
from Jacob Chapel Baptist
Church in Tallahassee. Call
482-5335.
) Annual Friends and Family
Day-2:30 p.m. at Magnolia
A.M.E. Church, with host church
and congregation, St. Michael
M.B.C. Everyone is welcome to
attend. Call 352-4749.
)The Passion of the Christ"
Movie-5-7:30 p.m. at Mari-
anna First United Methodist
Church. Everyone is welcome to
attend. Call 482-4502.
))Seder Passover Service-
6 p.m. at Bethlehem Baptist
Church. Everyone is invited to
attend and learn about the
history behind the Lord's
Supper and communion. Call
718-7648.

MONDAY, MARCH 25.
)Holy Week Service-7
a.m. at Marianna First United
Methodist Church. Speaker
will be The Reverend Norman
Bray. Continental breakfast will
follow at 7:30 a.m. in the Wesley
Center. Call 482-4502.

TUESDAY, MARCH 26
))Holy Week Service-7 a.m. at
Marianna First United Method-
ist Church. Speaker will be The
Reverend Dr. Ted Land. Conti-
nental breakfast will follow at
7:30 a.m. in the Wesley Center.
Call 482-4502.
) St. Anne Thrift Store-9
a.m.-l p.m. at 4285 2nd Ave.
See the spring, summer attire.
Call 482-3734.
) Lenten Luncheon-Noon-
12:50 p.m. at Marianna First
Presbyterian Church. The
menu will include soup, sand-
wiches, dessert and beverages.
Interim Pastor Ted Land will
lead a devotional based on the


words and work of German
Lutheran Pastor Dietrich
Bonheoffer. Everyone is invited.
Call 526-2430.
Dare to Live Healed -
Healing School Class 7
p.m. in the Bascom Town Hall
at 4969 Basswood Road. Free
classes taught by Jacquelyn
McGriff. Call 276-6024.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27
Holy Week Service-7 a.m.
at Marianna First United
Methodist Church. Speaker
will be The Reverend Dr. Ron
Martin. Continental breakfast
will follow at 7:30 a.m. in
the Wesley Center. Call 482-
4502.
) Wednesday Night Live
Bible Study "Surprise by
Hope"-6 p.m. at Marianna
First United Methodist Church
in the youth building. The
teacher will be Robert Farnell,
an outstanding Bible Scholar.
This study will be held each
Wednesday through April 17.
Dinner will be served at 5 p.m.
for $5 per person, reservations
no later than Monday. Call
482-4502.

THURSDAY, MARCH 28
a Holy Week Service-7
a.m. at Marianna First United
Methodist Church. Speaker will
be The Reverend Connie Farnell.
Continental breakfast will fol-
low at 7:30 a.m. in the Wesley
Center. Call 482-4502.
) Free clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.
) St. Anne Thrift Store-9
a.m.-1p.m. at 4285 2nd Ave.
See the spring, summer attire.
Call 482-3734.
) Maundy Thursday Ser-
vice-6 p.m. at Marianna First
United Methodist Church. Call
482-4502.
) Holy Thursday-7 p.m. at
St. Anne Catholic Church. Call
482-3734.
) Maundy Thursday Service-
7 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran
Church. Call 482-4691.


Special event announcements
for Jackson County churches are
published, free of charge, each
Friday in the Floridan's "Religion
Calendar." Submission deadline:
Noon, Tuesday. Erhail items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com, subject
line: Religion Calendar.


TIS IRECOR ISMD OSIL yTEE UIESSWHNORG ALLO U oATTNDWOSHP ERICS


l eisoIure a ad uaResad Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc
STATE FARM 2919 Penn Avenue
1MCCO sSuite
Marianna, FL 32448-2716
INANCE 850-482-3425
mL mB-Ti cCE a linda.pforte.bxrs@statefarm.com


(850) 526-4700
Oak Station Shopping Center
Open Daily from 8am 8pm


Vann Funeral Home ...SCOUNT.
4265 Saint Andrews Street KELSON DI DRUGS
Marianna, FL 32446 "W W p
Phone: (850) 482-3300
Fax: (850) 482-5363 At T ) "
Concern for the living, 3008 Jefferson Street
reverence for the dead. Marianna, Florida
C- Bnn. C, L, C j.71 FD 1dn, D ALnIr. .2D.
L II C.Vji n L].NC/Den s LVjnn, LP.N.C ____ i ____ y i W ISPf y ____


Srailer
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1-888-767-4275
482-3420
2163 Post Oak Ln Marianna
www.tropictrailer.com


YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Marlanna Church of the Nazarene
2987 N Madison St
.Marianna, FL 32446 482-5787

EPISCOPAL
St. Luke's Episcopal Church
4362 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 482-2431
parishoffice@stlukesmarianna.org
www.stlukesmarianna.org

FULL GOSPEL
Christian Center Church
4791 Sheffield Dr P.O. Box 450
Marianna, FL 32447
526-4476 or 526-4475
jack@cccmarianna.org
Country Gospel Community Church
Compass Lake in the Hills
650 Apalachicola Ave
Alford, FL 32420 (850) 579-4172
Resurrection Life Christian
Fellowship International
2933 Madison Street
Marianna, FL 526-2617
New Beginnings Worship Center
1165 Highway 69
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5791 www.nbworship.com
New Beginning Outreach Ministries, Inc.
2254 Magnolia Dr.
Cottondale, FL 32431 (850) 352-4733
Evangel Worship Center
2645 Pebble Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2232
New Life Family Church
4208 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2132
The Bridge Church
2515 Commercial Park Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 209-2733

HOLINESS
Emmanuel Holiness Church
2505 Sandridge Church Rd
Sneads. FL 32460 593-5167
Hickory Level Community Church
1221 Dipper Rd
Marianna, FL 32448
482-4696 or 482-2885
Oak Ridge Freewill Holiness Church
2958 Milton Ave
Mananna. FL 573-7684
Sneads Community Church
1948 Desoto Ave P.O. Box 1349
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5650

LATTER-DAY SAINTS
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints
3141 College St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-8159

LUTHERAN
Ascension Lutheran Church
3975 W. Hwy 90
Maranna, FL 482-4691


METHODIST ,
Bascom United Methodist Church
4942 Basswodd Rd P.O. Box 67
Bascom, FL 32423 594-5755
Cypress United Methodist Church
6267 Cemetery Ave
Cypress, FL 32432 263-4220
First United Methodist Church
1111 8 Ave
Graceville, FL 263-3342
First United Methodist Church
2901 Caledonia St
Marianna, FL 482-4502
Grace United Methodist
4203 W. Kelson Ave
Marianna, FL 482-4753
Grand Ridge United Methodist Church
6911 Iowa Street
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
Greenwood Chapel AME
5426 Fort Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-1112
Greenwood United Methodist
4220 Bryan St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-5755
Henshaw Chapel AME Church
2370 Glastel St, P.O. Box 535
Cottondale, FL 32431 875-2610
Jerusalem AME Church
2055 Hwy 73
Marianna. FL 32448 482-5085
Kynesville United Methodist
2875 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4672
McChapel AME Church
4963 Old U.S. Rd
Marianna, FL* 569-2184
Mt. Shiloh AME Church
6702 Biscayne Road
Bascom, FL 32423 569-1044
New Bethel Christian Methodist
Episcopal Church
2487 Highway 1
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-4647
Pope Chapel African Methodist
Episcopal Church
4898 Blue Springs Rd. P.O. Box 6000
Marianna. FL 32447 482-2900
Shady Grove United
Methodist Church
7305 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge. FL 32442 592-9277
Sneads First United Methodist Church
8042 Church St. P.O. Box 642
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6481
fumc@embarnmaii.com
Friendship Christian Methodist
Episcopal (CME) Church
5411 Avery Rd. P.O.Box 302
Campbellton. FL 32426 263-1111
1st United Methodist Church
of Cottondale
P.O. Box A58
Cottondale. FL 32431 352-4426


Salem AME Church
5729 Browntown Rd, P.O. Box 354
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3344
Springfield AME Church
4194 Union Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4252
St. James AME Church
2891 Orange St, P.O. Box 806
Marianna, FL 32447 526-3440
St. Paul AME Church
5180 Hwy 273, P.O. Box 40
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-0333
Snow Hill AME Church
5395 Snow Hill Rd, P.O. Box 174
Malone, FL 32445 569-5315
Mt. Olive AME Church
2135 Fairview Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-7917
Bethlehem AME Church
3100 Lovewood Rd, P.O. Box 752
Cottondale, FL 32431
352-2111 or 352-4721
Greater St. Luke AME Church
5255 11th Ave, P.O. Box 176
Malone, FL32445 569-5188
NON-DENOMINATIONAL
Believers Outreach Ministry
3471 Hwy 90 W
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4926
Cypress Creek Community Church
1772 Macedonia Road, PO Box 496
Alford, FL 32420 638-0360
Ever Increasing Word of Faith
Ministries
3749 Skyview Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-4704
Heaven's Garden Worship Center
3115 Main Street
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 579-9936 www.aidaspina.org
Faith Cornerstone Church Ministries
5460 Collins Chapel Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-5600
Foundation Temple Apostolic
Faith Church
3341 Tendell Rd
Cottondale. FL 32431 352-3884
Glass Community Church
4005 Veteran's Road
Cottondale. FL 32431
(850) 272-7205 (850) 263-6715
Haven of Rest
Church of Restoration
Worship Center
2261 Haven of Rest Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
Keeping It Real Help Ministry
3297 Caverns Road
Marianna. FL 32446 557-4800
Love and Restoration Ministries
2990 Heritage Rd
Marianna. FL 32448 526-2730
Mill Springs Christian Chapel
1345 Mill Springs Rd. P.O. Box 83
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 526-2519


Rivertown Community Church
(Meets at the new Marianna High School)
3546 Caverns Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 482-2477
Rocky Creek Tabernacle
1890 Delta Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 272-0917
St Andrews (FC) Church Ministries
978 Hwy 71 S
Marianna, FL 32448 569-5600
Sunrise Worship Center
2957 Hall St, Marianna, FL 482-8158
PENTECOSTAL
Apostolic Life Church
4070 Old Cottondale Rd
Marianna, FL 482-8720
pastorbiggs@embarqmail.com
Apostolic Revival Center
of Marianna
3001 Hwy 71 N, P.O. Box 634
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3162
Christian Covenant Life Center
2011 Finley Ave.
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 592-4737
Shady Grove Pentecostal Holiness
7541 Shady Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-6203
Sneads Pentecostal Holiness Church
2036 Gloster Ave
Sneads, FL 32460
593-4487 or 593-6949
Praise Life Ministries
7360 Hwy 90, P.O. Box 177
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4166


Prayer Temple Church Of Prayer
For All People
3341 Plantation Circle
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3343
United Pentecostal Deliverance
5255 10th Ave
Malone, FL 32445 569-5989
PRESBYTERIAN
SFirst Presbyterian Church
Presbyterian Church (USA)
2898 Jefferson St
Marianna, FL 32446
526-2430 www.firstpresmarianna.org
fpcmarianna@embarqmail.com or
firstpresmarianna@earthlink.net
RESTORATIONIST
Church of Jesus Christ of Marianna
4060 Thomasville Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2282
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
Emmanuel SDA Church
4531 Basswood Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3200
Marianna Seventh Day Adventist
4878 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2487
WESLEYAN
Salem Wesleyan Church
2764 Salem Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 (850) 593-6679
irquomai@gmail.com


I









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com

Due n- .4" ". -* efs


From Consumer Reports



Shopsmart finds bargain cleaners


By the editors of Consumer Reports
The best cleaning products
don't necessarily cost a for-
tune. ShopSmart, the shop-
ping magazine from the publisher
of Consumer Reports, recently
identified 12 cleaning products that
work as well or even better than
their expensive counterparts, ac-
cording to tests.
"It's important to have the right
tools for cleaning," said Lisa
Lee Freeman, editor-in-chief of
ShopSmart. "We've found some
great products that worked
well and they don't cost a lot of
money."
Here are some of ShopSmart's
picks for the best bargain cleaners:
) Cleanser. Comet with Bleach,
$1.25, can be used to tackle many
jobs. This disinfectant even did
great in ShopSmart's tough toilet
bowl cleaner tests.
) All-Purpose: Original Pine-Sol,
$2.48, beat out 18 pricier cleaners
and left no streaks.
) Laundry Uquid: Up & Up HE
Fresh Breeze (Target), $13 (11 cents
per load), works in regular and HE
washers and did great on grass,
chocolate and other stains.
) Stain Sticek CVS Total Home
Instant Stain Remover On The Go,
$1.99, performed as well as Tide fo
Go in tests. Like Tide, the only stain
it couldn't lick was lipstick.


Testing the TV gadgets
ShopSmart gathered more than
a dozen cleaning products hawked
on TV infomericals and put these
products to the test in real homes,
swabbing floors, dusting cobwebs
and cleaning dirty bathroom grout
and backyard grills. Some did OK,
but most were letdowns. Below are
four products that were downright
duds.
) Deluxe Hi-Reach Cleaning Kit
($37 plus S&H). This kit is equipped
with multiple dusting heads, a light
bulb changer and a squeegee. The
flexible dusting head is supposed
to help users get to hard-to-reach
places with ease. ShopSmart testers
got to some hard-to reach spots
with this product, but "flexible" is
an understatement it's too bendy,
and the dusting attachment broke
after bending one too many times.
) Grill Daddy Grill Cleaner ($14.95
plus S&H). Although it claims to be
a "revolutionary grill-cleaning tool"
that cleans with the power of steam,
it didn't leave grills spotless in tests,
and one ShopSmart tester's hand
got hot. Instead, use a clean spray
bottle filled with water and a grill
brush for cheaper, better results.
) Grout Bully ($20 plus S&H). This
product says it will clean and renew
grout on contact, plus remove mold
and eliminate mildew. In tests, it
wias a messy, time-consuming job,
leaving the grout looking like it


was painted on. It initially hid
- but didn't eliminate mold and
mildew.
) The Original Smart Mop ($19.99
plus S&H). Claiming to cut clean-
ing time in half and never allowing
a user's hands to touch dirty water,
this mop cleaned floors fine. How-
ever, twisting the pole to wring it
out often loosened a screw, which
fell off, and the handle came apart
too.

Five safety musts
No matter what products and
tools are used to clean, it's impor-
tant to always take caution. Here
are ShopSmart's five cleaning safety
musts:
n Never mix bleach with ammo-
nia, vinegar or other acids. Those
combos can produce deadly gases.
) Always wear gloves to protect
skin.
) Store safely. Keep all cleaners,
including homemade ones, well-
labeled. Store them away from kids
and pets.
) When working with chemical
cleaners, check warning labels,
open windows and doors, and keep
kids and pets far away from where
you are cleaning.
Try a cleaner in a hidden spot
before using it on a surface for the
first time to make sure the product
doesn't cause any discoloration or
damage.


Successful Business


The importance of lifestyle businesses


ST Te who is different from
me does not impoverish
H me he enriches me.
Our unity is constituted in some-
thing higher than ourselves in
Man ... For no man seeks to hear
his own echo, or to find his reflec-
tion in the glass." Antoine De
Saint-Exupery
Too often we make the mistake
of seeing entrepreneurs like Don-
ald Trump and Steve Jobs as the
examples that all businesses should
follow. However, the great major-
ity of firms in this country are not
truly entrepreneurial but more what
I call "lifestyle businesses." These
lifestyle businesses add so much to
our economy and the welfare of so
many employees.
To me, an entrepreneurial busi-
ness is innovative and fast-grow-
ing, with revenues increasing by
20 percent or more a year. Lifestyle
businesses, however, either do not
choose to grow or cannot for what-
ever reason and are comfortable
simply providing a secure job for
themselves and their staff.
I have been head of the entrepre-
neurship program at FSU for more
than 20 years, and throughout my
tenure, we have always emphasized
entrepreneurship because it is what
we felt would be most beneficial to
our students. However, while this
business model is great for college


students to study, it does not fit the
majority of businesses in this coun-
2 try. It is not a true
comparison in terms
of what they do, how
they operate or even
how they measure
1 their success.
Jerry For example, I am
Osteryoung working with a family
bakery. I consider this
a lifestyle business
because, at the end of the day, they
just want to keep the business afloat
so that the family members who
work there will get paid. They do not
want to grow very much but want to
keep things going simply to ensure
they have a job and a viable source
of income.
The knowledge and skills neces-
sary to be successful in a lifestyle
business are so different from those
required of an entrepreneur. Entre-
preneurs need to understand con-
cepts like venture capital and equity
funding, but lifestyle businesses do
not, and that is okay.
This disparity became clear to me
while teaching entrepreneurship
courses at an all-female prison.
It was obvious that these inmates
were not identifying with these en-
trepreneurial concepts at all. Their
goals for their lives after release in-
volve being able to provide a living
for themselves and their families,


and pushing entrepreneurial values
was like trying to put a square peg in
a round hole.
After having this epiphany, I have
changed my approach and I am
now teaching these ladies how to
start and successfully run their
own lifestyle businesses. They can
now clearly visualize starting home
or pool cleaning businesses, for
example.
Now I am not saying either type
of business is better than the other.
What I am trying to get across is
that lifestyle businesses are not
businesses that failed to reach
entrepreneurial success, but rather
businesses that are comfortable in
their own shoes.
Not everyone has the desire to be
an entrepreneur. We need to recog-
nize the difference between these
types of businesses and appreciate
the contributions each makes to our
country and our economy.
You can do this!

Jerry Osteryoung is a consultant to businesses;
She has directly assisted over 3,000 firms. He is
the Jim Moran Professor of Entrepreneu'rship,,
Emeritus and Professor of Finance, Emeritus at
Florida State University. He was the founding
Executive Director of The Jim Moran Institute
and served in that position from 1995 through
2008. His newest book co-authored with Tim
O'Brien,"If You Have Employees, You Really Need
This Book," is a bestseller on Amazon.com. He
can be reached by email at jerry.osteryoung@
gmail.com.


Former lieutenant gov. must testify in taping case


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -A judge told law-
yers Thursday that former Lt. Gov.
Jennifer Carroll can provide infor-
mation in a case against an ex-em-
ployee charged with illegally releas-
ing taped conversations from the
lieutenant governor's office.
Circuit Judge Frank Sheffield re-
leased Carroll from his order giving
her some protection from answering
questions from defense attorneys.
"That was because you were con-
cerned about them asking questions
that would somehow impinge upon
her office as lieutenant governor of
the state of Florida," he told prose-
cutor John Hutchins. "Well, she's not


anymore. So she's subject to (ques-
tioning) the same as anybody else."
The defendant, Carletha Cole, was
arrested in 2011 and accused of giv-
ing a reporter a surreptitiously re-
corded conversation between Cole
and Carroll's chief of staff. She was
later fired.
Carroll stepped down Tuesday in
the wake of an investigation into
an alleged gambling operation that
netted nearly 60 arrests. Carroll pro-
vided public relations work to the
company before being elected.
The recording at the center of the
criminal case was placed on the
website of The Florida Times- Union.
On it John Konkus, the chief of staff
for Carroll, can be heard saying that


Steve MacNamara, Gov. Rick Scott's
former chief of staff, is afraid of Car-
roll. Konkus also complained that
Scott "is not leading."
Cole's attorneys have asserted that
their client was being set up because
she witnessed unprofessional be-
havior by Carroll and other employ-
ees, including walking in on Carroll
and a female aide in a "compromis-
ing position." Carroll has denied the
allegations.
It is against Florida law to record
someone without consent, but there
have been questions about record-
ings made in public buildings. Cole
is charged with a third-degree felony
and faces a maximum five-year sen-
tence if convicted.


Dr. Albritton opens
vitamin boutique
Dr. Robin Albritton an-
nounces the opening of a
vitamin boutique inside
his practice of Chipola
Surgical &
Medical
Special-
i ties-Family
l Medicine,
located at
4295 Third
Albritton Ave. in
Marianna.
"The medical-class
vitamin supplement
products complement
other wellness services
- healthy lifestyles,
weight management and
nutritional counseling
services offered in my
practice of Family Medi-
cine," says Dr. Albritton.
Dr. Albritton is board-
certified in Family Medi-
cine, received his medical
degree from The Florida
State University, and
completed his residency
at Tallahassee Memorial
Family Practice Residen-
cy Program. When he
decided to go to medical
school, his goal was to
one day return to Jackson
County to care for fami-
lies in his community.
For the last three years
he has been doing just
that: Caring for patients
13 years of age to seniors
who have a wide range of
health needs including
diabetes, blood pressure
problems, colds, flu, al-
lergies, wellness checks
and more. For more
information, contact Dr.
Albritton's office at his,
office, 482-0017.

Rep. Fasano feted for
government work
TALLAHASSEE -Vet-
eran state legislator Mike
Fasano was honored
Thursday by the First


Amendment Foundation
for his efforts improv-
ing transparency in
government.
Foundation President
Barbara Petersen praised
Fasano's long record of
ensuring the legislative
process remains open
and accessible while
representing the people's
interests, most notably in
the 2012 session.
"He has consistently
dedicated his time and
effort to making sure that
the average Floridian has
a voice in the process,"
Petersen said. "Rep.
Fasano has continually
proven himself a friend
of the people, not just his
constituents, but those
encountering roadblocks
as they try to manage
the maze of government
bureaucracy."
A 54-year-old maverick
Republican from New
Port Richey, Fasano was
elected to the House over
a write-in candidate last
November
From staff, wire reports


l4Philip








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James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332
www.jamesandsikesfuneraihormes.com


t .




LI X




Johnnie
Daniels

Johnnie Perdue Daniels,
86, of Sneads, passed away
Wednesday, March 13,
2013, at the home of her
daughter, surrounded by
family.
She was born November
24, 1926, in Crenshaw
County, Alabama to Min-
nie Lee and John Austin
Perdue. Johnnie had lived
in Jackson County for the
past 63 years the last 48 of
those being spent in
Sneads. She graduated
from Highland Home High
School in Crenshaw Coun-
ty in 1945 and married
James Franklin Daniels on
December 23rd of that
same year.
She was a homemaker,
devoted wife, and loving
mother, grandmother and
great-grandmother.
Johnnie's family was the
joy of her life and she de-
lighted in spending time
with them. She also en-
joyed cooking and working
outside in her yard and
flowers. She was a member
of the First Baptist Church
of Sneads, where she
taught a pre-school Sunday
school class for many
years.
Johnnie was preceded in
death by her husband of 51
years, Frank Daniels; her
parents, Minnie Lee and


John Perdue; a sister, Ber
nice Perdue; and a brother
in-law, Joe Moses.
Survivors include on
daughter, Sherry Faircloti
of Sneads; one grand
daughter, Nicole Traftor
and husband Josh of Talla-
hassee; two great-
grandchildren, Madisor
and Jonathan Trafton ol
Tallahassee; one brother
Jerry Perdue and wife Shei-
la of Honoraville, Alabama
one sister, Opal Moses ol
Montgomery, Alabama,
and several nieces and
nephews.
The funeral will be at 10
am Saturday, March 16,
2013 at the First Baptist
Church of Sneads with the
Revs. Robert Johns and
Matt Basford officiating.
Burial will follow at 4 pm in
the Spring Creek Baptist
Church Cemetery in
Honoraville, Alabama with
James and Sikes Funeral
Home, Maddox Chapel of
Marianna directing.
The family will receive
friends from 5-7 pm at the
First Baptist Church of
Sneads, Friday, March 15,
2013.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com

Alton Price
Kent

Alton Price Kent, 67, of
Chattahoochee, died
Thursday, March 14, 2013,
at his residence.
Mr. Kent lived most of
his life in Jackson County,
where he enjoyed his wood
working and fishing. He
was a member df Provi-
dence Baptist Church.
He is preceded in death
by one daughter, Mary
Anne Kent; one grandchild,
Mark Capps; his parents
Annie Fennell and Alton E.


- Kent.
He is survived by his
wife, Bett Kent of
e Chattahoochee; five
1 daughters, Ruthie David-
- son and husband, Brian of
a Dothan, AL, Susan Capps
- and husband, Greg of
- Lilbum, GA, Cyndi Brewer
i of Atlanta, GA, Tracy Clark
f and husband, Tim, Trisha
, V. idh.m-, and husband,
Colt both of Tallahassee;
;one son, Troy Rowell and
f wife, Rachel of Cartersville,.
GA; nine grandchildren,
Grant Capps, Whitney Da-
vidson, Bailey Davidson,
Jon Rowell, Caleb Rowell,
Eli Rowell, Jacob Clark,
Alex Williams and Abbigail
Williams.
Funeral services will be 3
p.m. Sunday, March 17,
20f3 at Providence Baptist
Church with Rev. Willie
Butler officiating. Burial
will follow in Wester Ceme-
tery with James & Sikes Fu-
neral Home Maddox Chap-
el directing.
The family will receive
friends one hour prior to
services at the church.,
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com

Virginia Miller

Virginia Miller, 85, of Ma-
rianna, died Thursday,
March 14, 2013, at Signa-
ture Health Care at The
Courtyard.
She was a native of Hart-
ford AL, but has lived in
Jackson County since 1951.
Mrs. Miller was a longtime
member of the First United
Methodist Church in Ma-
rianna and apast member
of the Garden Club and
Red Hats organization. She
enjoyed being with family.
Virginia was preceded in
death by her husband,
Horace M. Miller; parents,


Lelia Stewart and Elder
Leon Dowling.
She is survived by two
sons, James Miller and
wife, Jill, of Malone; Steve
Miller and wife, Susan, of
Marianna; one daughter,
Ann Miller of Marianna; six
grandchildren and 13 great
grandchildren.
Funeral services will be 2
p.m. Saturday, March 16,
2013 at James & Sikes Fu-
neral Home Maddox Chap-
el with Rev. Connie Farnell
officiating. Burial will fol-
low in Riverside Cemetery
with James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel di-
recting.
The family will receive
friends one hour prior to
services.
In lieu of flowers those
wishing can make dona-
tions to the Jackson Hospi-
tal Foundation P.O. Box
1608 Marianna, Fl 32447.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
wwwv.jamesandsikesfuneralhornes.com

James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com

Kathryn
Elizabeth
Patrick

Kathryn Elizabeth Patrick
visitation will be Friday,
March 15 from 5-7pm at
James & Sikes Maddox
Chapel.
Funeral service will be
Saturday, March 16 at
10am at the Ryals Family
Methodist Church in
Dellwood. Burial will follow
in the church cemetery.


Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
www.artisticdesignsunltd.com
850-372-4456


journalist charged
with conspiracy
SAN FRANCISCO
Federal authorities
on Thursday charged a
journalist with conspiring
with the notorious hack-
ing group "Anonymous"
to deface a story on the
Los Angeles Times' web-
site a little more than two
years ago.
The federal indictment
handed down in Sacra-
mento accuses Matthew
Keys of being a "recently
terminated employee" of
the Tribune Co. who gave
hackers the information
they needed to login to
the publisher's computer
system. A hacker identi-
fied only as "Sharpie" in
the indictment is alleged
to have used the informa-
tion to alter a headline on
a Times story to include
a reference to a hacking
group.

Report: Chilling
forecast on NW quake
SALEM, Ore.- More
than 10,000 people could
die when not if- a
monster earthquake and
tsunami occur just off the
Pacific Northwest coast,
researchers told Oregon
legislators Thursday.
Coastal towns would
be inundated. Schools,
buildings and bridges
would collapse, and eco-
nomic damage could hit
$32 billion.
These findings were


Model T
From Page 1A

the Model T touring car
does not cone equipped
with a driver's side door.
He has to get in on the
passenger side, anyway.


published in a chilling
new report by the Oregon
Seismic Safety Policy
Advisory Commission,a
group of more than 150
volunteer experts.
In 2011, the Legislature
authorized the study of
what would happen if a
quake and tsunami such
as the one that devas-
tated Japan hit the Pacific
Northwest.
The Cascadia Sub-
duction Zone, just off
the regional coastline,
produced a mega-quake
in,the year 1700. Seismic
experts say another mon-
ster quake and tsunami
are overdue.
"This earthquake will
hit us again," Kent Yu, an
engineer and chairman of
the commission, told law-
makers. "It's just a matter
of how soon."

Report NC base MWc
er may dateol948
RALEIGH, N.C. -
Drinking water contami-
nation at North Carolina's
sprawling Camp Lejeune
military base could
date to 1948, five years
earlier than researchers
had reported previously, a
federal report indicates.
The Agency for Toxic
Substances and Disease
Registry plans to release a
report Friday on the con-
tamination that has led
to a long-running dispute
between former residents
and the Marines Corps.
From wire reports


The fuel containers are
necessary because the
1920 Model T didn't come
equipped with a gas tank.
It was obvious Thursday
why the tool box came
in handy. Wolf and the
stranger who stopped to
help put it to good use in
analyzing the problem.


Queen
From Page 1A
support, he said.
"We go back from the ear-
ly days of civil rights, anc
she's been a strong sup-
porter and member of the
Golden Heritage NAACP
division," Bryant said. "Or
the political side, she was
such a strong supporter ol
me in my aspirations. She
was like a big sister hold-
ing your hand. She was a
warrior, Marianna's Harriet
Tubman. She loved it when
I called her that. She will
be greatly missed by this
community, and by a dis-
tinguished line of brothers
and sisters-lawyers doc-
tors, you name it. She was
willing to confront issues,
to organize on things that
needed attention, and she
taught another generation.
It is a real, real loss, and I'm
glad that I did get to go see
her a couple of weeks ago
for one last time."
In one of her more recent
high-profile community
efforts, Brown led a suc-
cessful charge in 2009 to
convince CSX and the city
of Marianna to improve,
the area .around the old
railroad trestle at Borden
Street, rather than close
the road as was originally
planned. A member of the
West End Association, a
community action group
which had identified this
as a priority matter, she
became the organization's
"drum major" in that drive
to sway the powers that be,
Leon Kelly said.
Seeing the importance of
Borden as a critical access
point to the south side of
U.S. 90 in Marianna, both
for motorists and pedestri-
ans, Brown led two march-
es to highlight the issue
and worked in other ways
to make officials think
twice. Her work led to a
change of plan.
The trestle had initially
been assumed to be in
such disrepair that it con-


stituted a potential safety
hazard. Rather than mak-
ing expensive repairs
to the trestle, officials
planned to simply close
-Borden Street. But Brown
I pushed for an analysis of
- the trestle, and ultimately
e wanted it improved. The
Analysis proved that the
i trestle's base structure was
Sound and the road was
f not closed. The trestle it-
self was not significantly
rehabbed, but improve-
ments were made to the
Landscape near it.
SA small park with 'trees
and seating was added to
the area to create an ero-
sion control element and
also to beautify the area
and give pedestrians a
place to rest and relax on
their journey to and from
the north side of U.S. 90.
Brown was also known
for and proud of her roots
in the school system and
always maintained ties to
it in one way or another.
Brown was a teacher at
Union Grove School for
many years and was the
girls' basketball coach
there for a time as well.
When former Union Grove
students began making, ef-
forts a few years ago to re-
habilitate their old school,
which had been closed for
decades, Brown was there
to champion and support
the project, both finan-
cially and in spirit with en-
couragement through the
ongoing process.
Bettye Worlds Dickens
said Brown and memories
of her are on the minds of
everyone involved in the
Union Grove reunion and
school renovation. Dick-
ens said her presence will
surely be felt strongly on
March 30, the date of the
reunion committee's 2nd
annual Renovation Fund-
raiser and Fun Day. It was
an event Brown believed in
S'.vlehearTedhl. Dickens
said, and something she
was proud to see her for-
mer students and their up-
per and lower classmates


Sembark upon.
"She was our girls' bas-
3 ketball coach at one time
3 and she taught my brother
Edward Worlds," Dick-
1 ens said. "She just loved
f her students. We have lost
someone very dear, some-
one precious. She was al-
ways so encouraging. She
was one of the speakers at
our first Whole School re-
union, in 1996, and it was
an honor for us to have her
there. We don't have many
of those special people
left."
After her many years at
Union Grove, Brown even-
tually became the Title 1
Coordinator for the Jack-
son County school system.
In that role, she took it on
herself to mentor Arlene
Smith, who had taught
with Brown at Union Grove
and was later asked to take
over a Title 1 reading pro-
gram at Golson Elemen-
tary School.
"When my principal
asked me to take this over,
I asked myself, 'Can I do
this?,'" Smith recalled. "She
made me feel that I could,
and she made sure I had
what I needed to make it
a success. When she found
out I was taking it, she gave
me all kinds of help. She
had materials and proce-
dures to recommend-one
thing she told me was to
make sure that, whatever
I wanted to do, I take it to
the principal to keep the
leadership aware of what
I was doing. It was really
valuable advice, and she
offered so much positive
support.
The relationship between
Smith and Brown didn't
stop at the schoolroom
door. Smith's husband, the
late Rev. H.L. Smith, pas-
tored Brown's beloved St.
James AME Church. One of
Brown's most well-known
attributes is her enthusi-
astic support of whatever
pastor at a given time was
at the helm of "the excit-
ing and dynamic St. James
AME," an approximation


of the phrase Brown was
- known to use almost am
,time she was called upon
,to introduce a program or
Sa person at a church-re
I lated gathering.
S Her current pastor, the
Rev. Ron Mizer, described
Brown as a staunch sup-
porter, and "a community
Person who believed in
fighting for the rights of
the middle class." She will
Sbe greatly missed, he said.
Betty Ellis is'a fellow
member of St. James AME.
She said Brown's absence
will be felt for a long time
to come. "It will be a big
gap left in our congrega-
tion," Ellis said. "She was
a leader, a go-getter. What-
ever she set out to do, she
always made sure that it
got done to her standard."
Brown, for example, .was
a major contributor to an
extensivee written history
of the church which was
published a few years ago.
Ellis said Brown was also
active in another organiza-
tion they shared member-
ship in. "We were also both
members of the Zeta Phi
Beta's graduate sorority
chapter here, and I guess
I must have known her
at least 40 years. She was
always very friendly and
helpful, and she always
took an active role in what-
ever was going on. She was
a part of everything, she
loved helping young peo-
ple, and would do what-
ever she could for you. She
was a joyful person to be
around."
Brown through the years
held offices in statewide
AME organizations, Ellis
said, and enjoyed repre-
senting her church at state
gatherings.
Smith said Brown was
one of the most organized
people she's ever met,
and that, if she was put in
charge of something it was
a guaranteed success. She
delegated responsibilities,
matching people and their
best abilities to various
matching tasks, she moni-


s tored and drove progress
y she saw that the task was
i accomplished. "If she was
r in charge, you might as
- well put your foot on it (as
a done deal)," Smith said.
SIn the case of fundrais-
I ers, Smith said, Brown was
Always willing to reach
Into her own pocket if an
Effort didn't meet financial
f goal on its own. Because
I her projects were so suc-
cessful, that didn't happen
Many times but Brown
would make up the differ-
ence if it did.
She also taught Mrs.
SSmith how to manage such
programs. "I -told her re-
peatedly, 'I've learned so
much from you,' Smith
recalled. "She. knew a lot
and she shared a lot. I'm
going to miss her so very
much."
And Smith said Brown
didn't stop being her friend
after her husband moved
on from St. James to be-
come an elder elsewhere.
Until Brown's health be-
gan to gradually fail in re-
cent weeks, the two women
always had Sunday lunch
at a local steakhouse, a
ritual that lasted for years.
It was so entrenched that,
if Smith got inside the
building before Brown on
a given Sunday, the restau-
rant staff wanted to know
where Ms. Brown was,
Smith recalled.
When Smith fell ill in a
battle with breast cancer
five or six years ago, Brown
called her every morning,
brought dinners for them
to share, came to see her
and offer reassurance in
the hospital when she was
there for treatment.
When Brown became
weak and ill in her own
time, Smith said she never
complained. The most she
ever said about her condi-
tion was, on rare occasion,
to comment that her legs
were hurting badly. She
never talked about dying,
Smith said, but from time
to time in conversation
used the phrase "When I


, .get to heaven" as they dis-
s cussed matters of faith and
; the hereafter.
S Johnnie and Leola Spei-
Sghts were Brown's neigh-
bors for many years. They
remember her as a caring
member of the community
who made sure her ailing
neighbors had food and
care if they were ill.
"She saw about people,"
Mr. Speights said. "She
cared about everybody."
Brown was a teacher in
the elementary grades at
Union Grove when Mrs.
Speights was in high school
there. "She was always in-
volved in the extracurricu-
lar activities there, always
involved in the crowning of
Miss Union Grove, and she
was homeroom teacher to
one particular class that
finished at Union Grove
when a motto that was
about success," Mrs. Spei-
ghts recalled. "I think every
one of them was destined
for success, and I think a
large part of that was be-
cause of her leadership.
Principals, lawyers, many
people in leadership roles
came out of that class. Any-
time she attempted to do
something, it was a huge
success. If she was a chair-
person over a program, it
was always over the top.
She could somehow reach
out and touch, and change
and make things happen.
Our young people were
blessed to have her be-
hind them, caring and be-
ing a part of their lives and
futures."
Most who knew her agree
that her first name was an
appropriate one. Around
here and beyond, she was
royalty.


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Obituaries


Nation Briefs


_~_________II_ ~____________1~ -FI---rrn~~


LOCAL & NATION







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


18A FPIDA'. MARCH 15 2013


Latin America sees change under region's 1st pope


The -sscate Pr e Fss

MEXICO CITY The fa-
mous words uttered to an-
nounce that a leader of the
Catholic Church has been
chosen now have special
resonance for Latin Amer-
ica, which had felt nege,':t-
ed by the Vatican and has
finally produced the New
World's first pope.
"'Habemus Papam.' We
have a pope," said Tom
Quigle%. former pi lii, ad-
viser on Latin American
and Caribbean affairs at
the U.S. Conference of
Catholic PRlhip "Thlh villI
instill a sense of pride and
happiness and will have a
very positive effect."
The selection of for-
mer Argentine Cardinal
Jorge Bergoglio as pope
is already energizing the
world's most Catholic con-
tinent, which has been
rapidly losing its faithful.
Many hope Pope Francis
will bring a familiar cul-
tural warmth, while push-
ing the church to address a
divisive gap between rich
and poor in the region. He
is also seen as someone
who could bridge Latin
America's left-right politi-
cal split as a conservative
devoted to fighting poverty
and not afraid to speak out
against the hierarchy.
But first, the papacy of
Francis is being seen as
an overdue acknowledge-
ment of the home of 40
percent of the world's 1.2
billion Catholics that felt
distant from former Pope
Benedict XVI.
"It's a recognition of the
millions of Spanish-speak-
ing faithful who belong to
the church," said Salvador-
an President Mario Funes.


Almost e'.eerLthirng about
Pope Francis suggests a
shift from Benedict, his
reserved academic pre-
decessor, who put his fo-
cus on saving Europe and
was criticized for waiting
seven years before visiting
Spanish-speal.ing Latin
America on a trip last year
to Mexico and Cuba.
The new pope picked a
name that has never been
used, an apparent refer-
ence to a humble friar who
dedicated his life to help-
ing the poor. He comes
from an order, the Jesuits,
that had never produced
a pope. He considers so-
cial outreach, rather than
doctrinal battles, to be the
essential business of the
church.
"For me it's a sign from
God, who is inviting us
to commit ourselves to a
continental mission," said
Bishop Eugenio Lira, sec-
retary-general of the Mexi-
can Conference of Bish-
ops. "He will imprint his
Latin American personal-
ity ... He knows the joys,
the pains, the problems
and the opportunities of
the people of Latin Amer-
ica and the Caribbean and
that will create a very close
relationship."
Latin America, with
roughly 600 million peo-
ple, is home to some of the
world's poorest and most
violent countries, with or-
ganized crime and drug
trafficking causing a spike
in killings through the re-
gion in recent years. It re-
mains one of the most un-
equal regions in the world,
according to* the World
Bank, though the gap has
been closing in recent
years and more people


have move into the middle
class.
Francis was unafraid to
challenge the Argentine
government for being too
liberal or to label fellow
church members as hypo-
crites for forgetting that
Jesus Christ bathed lepers
and ate with prostitutes.
"His discourse is very
close to the social doctrine
of the church," said Elio
Masferrer, a religion expert
at Mexico's National Insti-
tute of Anthropology and
History. "That includes
the criticism that in this
time there are sectors of
the clergy who behave like
aristocrats, like princes of
the church."
But one of his main chal-
lenges will be to woo back
the followers the church
has lost to Protestant evan-
gelicals or just to secular-
ism, with some of the big-
gest drain occurring in the
poorest communities.
Perhaps nowhere in Lat-
in America has the church
been losing ground faster
than in Brazil.
The nation still has more
Catholics than any other
- 124 million people self-
identified as following the
faith in the 2010 Census,
65 percent of the popula-
tion. However, just a de-
cade earlier 74 percent of
Brazilians were Catholic,
and in 1970 that figure was
92 percent.
The Pentecostal church-
es expanded rapidly in
poor areas in Brazil, offer-
ing the downtrodden real-
life guidance on employ-
ment and education, while
the Catholic church was
perceived to have largely
abandoned poor urban


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Members of the curia enter in procession through the main aisle of the Metropolitan Cathedral
to celebrate a Thanksgiving Mass in honor of Pope Francis in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Thursday.


areas in cities like Rio de
Janeiro and Sao Paulo.
In the slums of those
two cities, one would be
hard pressed to locate a
Catholic house of worship,
whereas raucous Pentecos-
tal churches holding daily
services are numerous.
Yet in recent years, even


the Pentecostals are losing
steam in Brazil.
"The biggest challenge
facing the church in Latin
America isn't the growth
of the Pentecostals, but
the abandonment of a
considerable amount of
Catholics,and others to ag-
nosticism," said Fernando


Altemeyer, a theologian at
the Catholic University of
Sao Paulo.
The church under Fran-
cis also must recover
from the financial and
sexual abuse scandals that
marked Benedict's eight-
year papacy before he re-
signed last month.


Online war erupts in

Kenya after peaceful vote


The Associated Press

NAIROBI, Kenya Trib-
al lines are being drawn.
over who won Kenya's
presidential election. But
unlike the bloody violence
that scarred the country
five years ago, this time the
only fighting is online.
Machete strikes and
bows and arrows are being
replaced by bitter Tweets
and angry status updates.
The exchange of barbs
between supporters of
Deputy Prime Minister
Uhuru Kenyatta who
was named the winner of
the March 4 election with
50.07 percent of the vote
- and his closest competi-
tor, Prime Minister Raila
Odinga, has degenerated
into expletive-filled fights
in social media that have
the government worried.
The Ministry of Informa-
tion and Communications
said this week that it has
been unable to contain
"the ugly messages of hate
and negative ethnicity"
online. It said many of the
messages qualify as hate
speech.
Some officials worry that
the virtual feuding could


trigger real-life fighting.
"The outrage is becom-
ing wider and the tension
is palpable. It's going to
erode all our efforts of
building national cohe-
sion," Milly Lwanga, vice
chair of the government-
funded National Cohesion
and Integration Commis-
sion, told The Associated
Press on Thursday. "The
buildup of tension, it's like
a room where gas is leaking
slowly and then eventually
there will be something
small to ignite it and peo-
ple will wonder where the
explosion came from."
No major 'violence has
been reported, but the in-
teractions are ugly online.
One popular online fo-
rum in Kenya, mashada.
com, was taken offline
before the election, pre-
sumably because of hate-
filled postings on the site.
A Facebook group called
Stop Raila Odinga Now has
more than 20,000 mem-
bers. One recent comment
was addressed to Luos and
Kambas, another ethnic
group: "All your provinces
do is give this nation vio-
lence, war, thieves, mad
people and whores."


Physicists say they
found a Higgs boson
GENEtV It helps
solve one of the most
fundamental riddles of
the universe: how the Big
Bang created something
out of nothing 13.7 billion
years ago.
In what could go down
as one of the great Eu-
reka! moments in physics
- and win somebody the
Nobel Prize scientists
said Thursday that after a
half-century quest, they
are confident they have
found a Higgs boson, the
elusive subatomic speck
sometimes called the "God
particle."
The existence of the
particle was theorized in
1964 by the British physi-
cist Peter Higgs to explain
why matter has mass.
Scientists believe the
particle acts like molas-
ses or snow: \1tc n other


pass through it, they stick
together, slow down and
form atoms.
Scientists at CERN, the
Geneva-based European
Organization for Nuclear
Research, announced in
July th at they had found
something that looked like
the Higgs boson, but they
weren't certain, and they
needed to go through the
data and rule out the pos-
sibility it wasn't something
else.
On Thursday, they said
they believe they got it
right.
"To me it is clear that
we are dealing with a
Higgs boson, though we
still have a on-:n% v.a'. to
go to know what kind of
Higgs boson it is." said
Joe Incandela, a physicist
who heads one of the two
main teams at CERN, each
involving about 3,000
scientists.


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Sports Briefs

High School Baseball
Frday Marianna at
Sneads, 4 and 6:30 p.m.;
Poplar Springs at Cottondale,
.4 p.m.; Malone at Cottondale,
6 p.m.;Ponce de Leon at
Graceville, 6 p.m.
Saturday Malone vs.
Munroe in Cottondale, noon;
Marianna at Blountstown, 4
p.m.

High School Softball
Friday- Graceville at
Malone,6p.m.; Marianna at
Pensacola Catholic, 6 p.m.

Chipola Baseball
The Indians will be on the
road through Saturday for
games against LSU-Eunice.

Chipola Softball
The Lady Indians will return
home Sunday for a double-
header against Georgia
Perimeter at 1 and 3 p.m.

Altrusa golf tournament
The 20th annual Altrusa
golf tournament will be held
Friday at Indian Springs Golf .
Course, with registration at
noon and a 1 p.m. shotgun
start.
Format will be four-person
scramble, modified handicap,
18 holes at $65 per person.
For more information, con-
tact Jay James at 526-3197 or
209-3068, or Kathy Milton at
482-1788 or 209-8013.

AAU basketball tryouts
The Harambee Dragons
AAU basketball team will hold
tryouts Sunday at Marianna
Middle School.
Boys tryouts will be at 2 p.m.
for ages 11-12, at3 p.m. for
ages 13-14 and at 5 p.m. for
ages 15-19. Girls tryouts for
ages t3-19 will be at 4 p.m.

Panhandle Seminole
Club golf tournament
The 2013 Panhandle Semh.i-.-
nole Club's Annual Scholar-
ship GolfTournament will be
held April 5 at Indian Springs
Golf Club in M arianna. This
tournament, along with an-
other fundraiser, has helped
provide $40,000 over the past
10 years to deserving local
students and helped further
their education.
Registration and warm-up
will begin at noon with the
shotgun start at 1 p.m. for this
four-man scramble event.
Cash prizes will be awarded to
the first-, second- and third-
place teams. Additional prizes
will be given for longest drive,
straightest drive, closest to the
pin, and so on.
The greens fee contribution
of $65 will entitle each golfer
to a fantastic afternoon of golf
on a championship course
(to help a very worthy cause),
followed by a great meal.
Scholarship (hole) and
prize sponsorships are also
available for this event. For
more information, call Roy
Baker at 850-526-4005 or 209-
1326 or George Sweeney at
850-482-5526.

Sports items
Send all sports items to editorial@
jcfloridan.com, or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address for the paper
is Jackson County Floridan P.O. Box 520
Marianna,fL32447.


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Sneads Baseball


Pirates smoke Holmes


County in6innings


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcftoridan.com

The Sneads Pirates continued their hot
streak Wednesday night at home with a
15-5 victory over the Holmes County
Blue Devils in six innings.
The win was the seventh in a row for
the Pirates after a season-opening loss
to the Liberty County Bulldogs, who
they were scheduled to play in a rematch
Thursday night in Bristol.
Brandon Moats started on the mound
for Sneads and went the distance to earn
the victory.
He got loads of early run support, with
the Pirates posting 10 runs in the first


HIGH SCHOOL SOFTBALL





Lady Pirates





blank CHS


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Emily Glover catches fly ball in the outfield for Sneads during a game against Cottondale on
Thursday night.


Avriett strong

on the mound

for Sneads

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

SNEADS The Sneads
Lady Pirates notched their
second win of the week
Thursday night at home,
taking a 10-0 win over the


Cottondale Lady Hornets
in six innings to sweep the
season series.
The Lady Pirates (8-2,
4-1 in District 3-1A) got a
dominant pitching perfor-
mance from Amber Avriett,
who limited the Lady Hor-
nets to just one hit and one
walk and struck out seven
to get the win.
Cottondale's Kelsie Obert
was pretty good in defeat,
allowing two earned runs
on six hits and two walks


with 11 strikeouts, but her
defense had a tough night,
committing five costly er-
rors that led to eight un-
earned runs for the Lady
Pirates.
Sneads took advantage
with runs in the first and
third innings, two more
in the fifth, and then
six in the sixth to end
the game on the mercy
rule.

See SNEADS, Page 2B


inning to jump out to a 10-0 lead through
one.
Sneads added another run in the fourth
inning, but the Blue Devils finally broke
through against Moats with five runs in
the top of the fifth thanks to three infield
hits and two SHS errors to make it 11-5.
But the Pirates were finally able to put
the game away for good in the bottom
of the sixth with four more runs, with a
three-run double by Trent Clark bring-
ing home the final three runs to end the
game on the mercy rule.
"We played pretty good except for
(the fifth inning)," Sneads coach
See PIRATES, Page 2B


Chipola Softball


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola's Lindsay Wurm catches a
pop fly during a game last week.


Lady


Indians


dominant

Chipola wins 10th in
a row with shutout

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chip ola Lady Indians made
it 10 wins in a row Thursday af-
ternoon with an 8-0 road victory
over Darton in five innings.
With the win, the Lady Indians
improved to 22-3 on the season.
Sophomore pitcher Eva Voort-
man was dominant in the circle
for Chipola, starting and pitch-
ing a five-inning no-hit shutout,
giving up just three walks to go
with eight strikeouts.
Jenny Willis took the loss for
Darton, giving up eight earned
runs on 10 hits and one walk
with four strikeouts.
Chipola scored four runs in
the first inning thanks to a pair
of two-run home runs by Katie
Harrison and Hayley Parker, and
then added another run in the
fourth on an RBI sacrifice fly by
Kristen Allen to score Megan Bo-
rak and make it 5-0.
The Lady Indians put the game
away in the top of the fifth when,
Mya Anderson and Harrison
both singled to start the inning
and set up Parker's second home
run of the game, a three-run shot
to make it 8-0.
Voortman retired the Dar-
ton College side in order in the
See DOMINANT, Page 2B


Chipola Women's Basketball

Franklin finalist for coaching award


WBCA list announced
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@'jcforidan.com

First-year Chipola Lady Indians bas-
ketball coach Greg Franklin has been
named a finalist for the Women's Basket-
ball Coaches Association Community
College National Coach of the Year.
The list was announced Wednesday
and also includes Kate Lynch of Com-
munity College of Rhode Island, Brett
Vana of Louisburg College, Misty Opat
of Rocky Valley College, Cindy Stein of
Illinois Central College, Karen Wiley of
Kishwaukee College, Benjamin Conrad
of Johnson County Community Col-
lege, and Jeff Allen of Collin County
Community College.


Franklin has led the Lady Indians to
a 25-6 record in his first season on the
job, a third-place finish in the Panhan-
dle Conference, runner-up in the FC-
SAA State Tournament, and a berth in
next week's NJCAA Wofmen'\ National
Championship tournament in Salina,
Kan.
Chipola lost to Gulf Coast State 61-53
in the finals of the state tournament but
was selected as one of the four teams
to receive at-large bids to the national
tournament.
The Lady Indians will open up at na-
tionals Monday against Southwestern
Illinois (25-5) at 8:30 p.m.
The winner of the WBCA Coach of
the Year will be named during the third
annual WBCA Awards Show on April 8
in New Orleans, site of the 2013 NCAA
Women's Final Four. L
t


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Sneads' Cade Hall heads home during a recent game
against Graceville.


SA


Chipola Head Women's Basketball Coach Greg Franklin talks to the Lady Indians during a game
earlier in the season.


Chipola Softball








-2B FRIDAY, MARCH 15.2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


The Associated Press

The NHL map is finally
in order with Detroit and
Columbus heading east,
and Winnipeg moving
west.
"We're thrilled, abso-
lutely thrilled," Blue Jack-
ets executive John David-
son said on a telephone
conference call Thursday,
shortly after the realign-
ment plan was approved
in a vote by the league's
board of governors. "We
tend to use the (term)
common sense around
here. This seems to make
a lot of common sense."
The new format goes
into effect next season,
and will feature two
eight-team divisions
in the Eastern Confer-
ence, including the Red
Wings and Blue Jackets.
The Jets will now be part
of a Western Conference
that's made up of two
seven-team divisions.
It's a plan that Com-
missioner Gary Bettman
called "fan-friendly," be-
cause it aligns teams by
divisions that are mostly
in the same time zones.
And Bettman noted it will
re-establish numerous ri-
valries by geography and
tradition.
Detroit returns .to the
East in a yet-to-be named
division that will feature
three other Original Six
franchises, Toronto, Bos-
ton and Montreal. And
Winnipeg is now part of a
central-based division af-
ter having spent the past
two years playing in the
Southeast.
"We think this is a
common sense practi-
cal realignment," Bett-
man said.
Without providing de-
tails, Bettman said the
vote conducted by email
was not unanimous,
but "well in excess" of
the two-thirds majority
required.
The new format also
creates changes in de-
termining the 16-team
playoff field. The top
three teams in each di-
vision will qualify for the
postseason. The next
two teams with the best
records in each con-
ference will then earn
wild-card berths.
That will make it more
difficult for teams to
qualify in the East, be-
cause it will have two


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denny Hamlin greets fans during driver introductions for the race Sunday in Las Vegas.



Hamlin won't appeal



fine for criticizing car


The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Denny Hamlin and NAS-
CAR settled their censor-
ship flap Thursday when
he announced he would
not appeal the $25,000 fine
levied against him for criti-
,cizing the new Gen-6 car.
But Hamlin held his
ground on refusing to pay
the fine. NASCAR said the
fine will be settled per the
rule book, which allows
the sanctioning body to
garnish the money from a
driver's race,winnings.
"Dragging myself,
my team and NASCAR
through the mud for the
next 2 weeks would not be
good for anyone," Ham-
lin posted on Twitter. "I
firmly believe I am in the'
right on this issue and will
stand behind my decision
not to pay. I understand
NASCAR will do what they
feel is necessary based on
Smy decision.",



Sneads
SFrom Page 1B
"I think both pitchers
pitched well," Lady Pirates
coach Kelvin Johnson said
after the game. "I just think
our defense probably
played a little better, and
our girls at the top of the
lineup did a pretty good
job."
BrookWilliams and Cam-
bridge Chason did the big
,,damage for the Lady Pi-
Srates lineup, with Williams
finishing 3-for-3 with two
doubles, an RBI, and four
:runs, while Chason was
2-for-3 with a double and
four RBI.



Pirates
From Page 1B
Mark Guerra said after the
game. "We hit the ball well.
Their pitcher walked five
(in the first inning) and
there were a couple of plays
that weren't made and we
Just basically took advan-
tage of the mistakes."
Despite the sloppy fifth
inning, the coach said he
.was mostly satisfied with
the way his team played


Dominant
From Page 1B
bottom of the fifth to end
the game on the mercy
rule.
Parker finished 2-for-3
with two home runs, two
runs and five RBIs, with
Harrison going 2-for-2
with a walk, a run and two
RBIs.
Anderson was 2-for-3
with two runs and Bo-
rak was 2-for-3 with a
run.
Jasmine Tanksley also
had a hit and scored a
run.
The win marked the sixth
shutout during the Lady
Indians' win streak, with
all six coming in the last
seven games.
During that span, Chipo-
la has outscored oppo-
nents by a combined score
of72-3.
I The Lady Indians will


NASCAR does have the
option to suspend Hamlin
until he pays the fine, but
said in its statement it con-
siders the matter closed.
The backlash against
NASCAR was fast and fu-
rious when Hamlin was
fined last week for criticiz-
ing the car after his third-
place run at Phoenix. It
was the second race for the
new car, and Hamlin said,
"I don't want to be the pes-
simist, but it did not race
as good as our generation
five cars. This is more like
what the generation five
was af the beginning."
Informed of the fine
during a test at Las Vegas,
Hamlin angrily said he
would be suspended be-
/ fore he'd pay the $25,000.
Upon learning he could
appeal the fine, he an-
nounced his intention to
do so aAd Joe Gibbs Rac-
ing indicated it backed its
driver.
The issue is a sensitive


Williams singled and
scored on a passed ball
for Sneads' first run, and
scored again in the second
inning when she reached
on an error and scored on
another to make it 2-0.
In the fifth, Alex Maphis
led off with a single and
scored on a double to the
left centerfield gap byWil-
lams, who later scored her
third run on an RBI single
to centerfield by Chason.
Mallory McDaniel led
off the bottom of the sixth
with her second walk of the
game, with pinch-runner
Mica Williams scoring the
fifth run of the game on a
dropped ball in left field.
Another error allowed


Wednesday, as well as how
it has played since that
opening loss to Liberty.
"We played well overall
and we didn't make any
mistakes except for that
one inning," Guerra said.
"The pitching was good,
the guys hit the ball well
and were pretty disciplined
at the plate. We're just kind
of building a little bit each
game and trying to get a
little better than the last
game.
"Right now, the guys are


try to make it 12 straight
wins when they return
home Sunday for a dou-


one for NASCAR, which
spent the last year devel-
oping the Gen-6 car with
heavy input from the man-
ufacturers' to improve the
on-track product. Driv-
ers have been asked to be
careful in how they pub-
licly, discuss the car, and
NASCAR has put together
a big marketing effort in an
attempt to avoid the poor
reception the previous
model received.
Fans never warmed up
to the "Car of Tomorrow"
in part because drivers
panned it from the very
beginning. Kyle Busch
won the debut race in the
"Car of Tomorrow" and
then criticized it in Victory
Lane.
Fans even those who
don't root for Hamlin
- rallied to his defense.
At the track and on Twit-
ter, fans complained that
NASCAR had violated
Hamlin's right to free
speech.


Brandy Strickland to score,
with another double by
Brooke Williams and Alay-
nah Weiss getting hit by a
pitch loading the bases for
Shelbi Byler, who was also
hit by Obert to force in an-
other run and make it 7-0.
That brought up Chason
and she ended the game
with a shot to the right
centerfield gap to clear the
bases and end the game on
the 10-run rule.
Sneads will return to ac-
tion Saturday in a tourna-
ment at Port St. Joe, play-
ing Bay High at 11 a.m. and
Madison County at 1 p.m.
The Lady Hornets (5-4)
host Malone on Monday at
6 p.m.


playing well. We're try-
ing to take it day-by-day,
pitch-by-pitch, and in-
ning-by-inning to see what
we can do."
The Pirates are also atop
the District 3-1A standings
with a record of 4-0, but
they will finish this week
out with more.non-league
games, with Thursday's
game against Liberty
County to be followed by a
county matchup with Mar-
ianna tonight in Sneads at
6:30 p.m.


bleheader against Geor-
gia Perimeter at 1 and 3
p.m.


NHL map takes shape after


realignment approved


More clubs than the
West competing for eight
berths.
The NHL Players' As-
sociation had already
signed off on the realign-
ment format, which will
be in place for at least
three seasons.
The Atlanta Thrashers'
relocation to Winnipeg
two years ago helped
precipitate the need for
realignment.
All three teams making
the switch will benefit,
because they will no lon-
ger have to make extend-
ed road trips outside of
their time zones.
"As much as we enjoyed
those trips down south, I
think our team and our
coaches are very pleased
to know we're going to
be playing in a Central
time zone," Jets chairman
Mark Chipman said. "I
think it's very exciting for
us as an organization and
our fans to be geographi-
cally located where we
ought to be."
The Dallas Stars, Colo-
rado Avalanche and Min-
nesota Wild should also
benefit from the change.
They will now be in a di-
vision mostly made up
of teams that play in the
same Central time zone.
Stars CEO Jim Lites said
the'switch from the Pacif-
ic Division will benefit his
players and fans.
Lites said TV ratings
dropped by as much as
60 percent because of the
later start times when the
Stars played against their
division rivals on the West


Spaces are onl


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Coast. He also noted that
the team lost between
seven and 10 practice
days a season because of
travel.
"No one is a bigger bert-
eficiary in this than the
Dallas Stars," Lites said.
It's no different for
Columbus.
"I've done a lot of town
hall conferences with
our fans here, and 99.999
(percent) of our fans real-
ly wanted to desperately
be in the East," Davidson
said. "So when you get out
the ledger sheet and you
go pros and cons, I don't
think there is anything on
the negative side. This is
all positive."
All teams will play
each other both home
and away at least once
each season. And teams
will play division ri-
vals at least four times a
season.
With Detroit and To-
ronto set to be in the
same division, it revived
questions of whether
the two will meet in the
league's annual Winter
Classic next season. The
two were supposed to
play at Michigan Stadium
on Jan. 1 this season, be-
fore that game was wiped
out as a result of the NHL
lockout.
Bettman hinted of that
being a possibility.
"We think the notion of
having Toronto play De-
troit at the 'Big House' is
a good thing to do," Bet-
tman said. "Beyond that,
you'll just have to wait
and see."


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORT'S


FRIDAY. MARCH 15, 2013 + 3BF


College Basketball Conference Tournament Roundup


Hanlan scores record


ACC
GREENSBORO, N.C.
Olivier Hanlan set an
Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence tournament record
for freshmen with 41
points and Boston College
beat Georgia Tech 84-64
on Thursday in the first
round.
The ACC's rookie of
the year had the high-
est-scoring game in the
tournament by any player
regardless of class since
1970 and broke the old
mark of 40 set two years
ago by North Carolina's
Harrison Barnes.
He was 14 of 18, made
his final 12 shots and was
a one-man show in bring-
ing the eighth-seeded
Eagles (16-16) back from
an early 15-0 deficit and
into today's first quarter-
final against No. 9 Miami,
the tournament's top seed.
Marcus Georges-Hunt
had 21 points and 11
rebounds to lead the
ninth-seeded Yellow Jack-
ets (16-15), who have lost
five of seven and now are
likely left to hope for an
invitation to the NIT.
Hanlan's eight 3-point-
ers one shy of a tourna-
ment record matched
the second most by any
player in the history of the
event.
He scored 25 points
during the 37-10 run that
flipped BC's 14-point defi-
cit into a 13-point lead,
51-38 with 14:41 remain-
ing, and put the Eagles
well on their way to just
their second ACC tourna-
ment victory since 2009.
Joe Rahon had 15 points
and Anderson added 11
points including a be-
hind-the-back drive down
the lane and past Robert
Carter Jr. for a dunk that
would have been the
signature highlight in any
other game.
Patrick Heckmann
finished with 10 points
and Eddie Odio had 10
rebounds for BC. Mfon
Udofia had 10 points for
Georgia Tech.
NC State 80
Virginia Tech 63
Richard Howell scored
22 points with 12 re-
bounds while Lorenzo
Brown led the defensive
effort on league player
of the year Erick Gveen
to help North Carolina
State beat Virginia Tech in
Thursday's first round of
the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence tournament.
CJ. Leslie scored 15
points for the fifth-seeded
Wolfpack (23-9), who shot
52.8 percent (28 of 53)
and took control with an
11-0 second-half run. N.C.
State led by 17 points after
that spurt and never let
the 12th-seeded Hokies
(13-19) get the margin un-
der double figures again.
Brown had nine points,
12 assists and seven
rebounds, but did his best
work as a nagging defense
presence against Green
- the nation's leading
scorer at 25.4 points per
game. Green finished with.
15 on 5-for-19 shooting for
one more frustrating ACC
tournament performance
in the senior's final game.
The Wolfpack advanced
to today's quarterfinals
to face fourth-seeded
Virginia.
N.C. State led just 48-42
before freshman T.J. War-
ren started the decisive
run with a 3-pointer,
then Brown found Howell
ahead in transition for a
slam. After another basket
from Warren, Brown found
Howell in the lane for a
score, then found Purvis
for a transition layup that
made it 59-42 with about
12 minutes left.


Virginia Tech got no
closer than 10 again.
SEC
LSU 68, Georgia 63
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
T Shavon Coleman scored
24 points, and the LSU
Tigers held off Georgia on
Thursday to give first-
year coach Johnny Jones
a win in his Southeastern


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boston College's Olivier Hanlan (21) chases a loose ball against
Georgia Tech during the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament
in Greensboro, N.C., on Thursday.


41, BC
and No. 5 Georgetown
advanced to the Big East
tournament semifinals, re-
covering from a mid-game
hiccup to beat Cincinnati
on Thursday.
Market Starks had 14
points and D'Vauntes
Smith-Rivera added 13
off the bench, including a
tiebreaking 3-pointer that
sparked a game-turning
run for the top-seeded
Hoyas (25-5).
Georgetown plays No. 5
seed Syracuse in today's
quarterfinals.
Cashmere Wright scored
14 points on 4-of-5 shoot-
ing from 3-point range
to lead the ninth-seeded
Bearcats (22-11).
No. 19 Syracuse 62
No. 17 Pittsburgh 59
NEWYORK James
Southerland had a second
straight great effort from
3-point range and Michael
Carter-Williams scored
Syracuse's last seven
points as the 19th-ranked
Orange held off No. 17
Pittsburgh on Thursday in
the quarterfinals of the Big
East tournament.
Southerland had 20
points as he did in the win
over Seton Hall and again
almost all the points came
from beyond the 3-point
arc.
Carter-Williams had 11
points and seven assists
for the fifth-seeded Or-
ange (25-8).


Conference tournament
debut. ,
LSU, which started
league play by losing its
first four games, now has
won three of four. The
Tigers (19-11) will play No.
13 Florida in the
quarterfinals today.
Georgia (15-17) has lost
two straight. The Bulldogs
trailed by as much as 23
before whittling away
LSU's lead. They used a
12-3 run to pull within 66-
63 with 28.5 seconds left.
Andre Stringer hit two free
throws to finish off the win
after Kentavious Caldwell-
Pope hit off the rim from
25 feet away.
Caldwell-Pope had 25 of
his career-high 32 points


4 BIG ,
DAYS! -!op*. ai9 Ck s

March 14th, AVING
15th, 16th, 18th TIS A GRAND SALE!
T14 Ir rAV I A-A ,'


FRIDAY, SATURDAY
AND MONDAY
LIMITED QUANTITIES
Hurry For
Best Selection!


BRIN YOUTRCK
AND SAVEj
EVNMOE


4 PC. BEDROOM
SUITE
Dresser, Headboard,
Mirror & Night Stand.
Compare at $539

SALE 299


ROPER
WASHER
Extra Large capa :ry
Normal, Genilie
Perma Pres:
Compare $399
SALE$258
WHIRLPOOL
HEAVY DUTY
WASHER
2 Speed, 5 Cycle, 3 Low
Size Settings, 4 Temp
Settings Compare S38
SALE 238
BRAND SOURCE
A.V.B.
3,a "-=<: .c'Ae- =-ce "c-c


SHOP &
COMPARE
0


BUNK BEDS
Compare at $148

SALE 96 EA.


RECLINER!
ALL SALE
PRICED TC
MOVE


GLASS
DINETTE TABLE
With four chairs.
Compare at $249
$.. )QQ


NEW 2 PIECE
LIVINGROOM SUITE
.Sofa & Loveseat.
Choice of patterns.
Compare at $1188
SALE 398


EVR ITE NEEYDPRMN
REUC~ED.W'E O OMOVETIS:
MERCHANDSE O AKERO O
S T E EWME CH NDS E. iM


FRIGIDAIRE 18.2 CU. FT.
REFRIGERATOR FREEZER
2 Door, No Frost.
Compare at $448
SALE 345


AMANA
DRYER
Auto Dry Cycle
Compare $399
SALE 248

FRIGIDAIRE
16.5 CU. FT.
NO FROST
ad REFRIGERATOR
Compare S359
SALE 295

FRIGIDAIRE FREEZER
7 CU. FT. CHEST
No FrostCompareS398. SALE 178
" FRONT LOAD WASHER
$388
FRONT LOAD DRYER
$299


SOME ONE ANDTWO OF A KIND* NEW IN CARTON
FLOOR MODELS* CLOSEOUTS SCRATCH & DENT
USED & REPOS


L...-


routs Ga Tech


PAC-12
No. 21 UCLA 80
Arizona St. 75
LAS VEGAS Shabazz
Muhammad scored 12 of
his 16 points in the second
half, Travis Wear hit a
jumper with 11 seconds
left and No. 21 UCLA ral-
lied from a 15-point deficit
to beat Arizona State in
the quarterfinals of the
Pac-12 tournament on
Thursday.
UCLA rallied behind
Muhammad, who scored
10 points during a 17-4
second-half run. Wear
hit a long jumper to put
the Bruins up 78-75 and
Arizona State's Jonathan
Gilling missed a 3-pointer
in the corner to help
UCLA avoid becoming the
second straight No. 1 seed
to lose its opener.
Larry Drew II had 20
points and Wear finished
with 15 to send the Bruins
into the semifinals against
No. 18 Arizona or


Colorado tonight.
BIG 12
Iowa State 73
Oklahoma 66
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
- Melvin Ejim had a
double-double and Will
Clyburn fueled a 12-0
second-half run, help-
ing Iowa State survive an
uncharacteristic 3-point
drought to beat Oklahoma
on Thursday and end a
seven-year losing streak in
the Big 12 tournament.
Today, the fifth-seeded
Cyclones (22-10) will meet
either top-seeded Kansas
or No. 9 seed Texas Tech.
Ejim had 23 points and
12 rebounds, Clyburn had
17 points, and Georges
Niang and Chris Babb
each had 10.
Oklahoma (20-10) was
led by Romero Osby's 18
points. Cameron Clark
had 17.

From wire reports


OUODA MORRIS PAT FURR CLARICE BOYTTE
(850) 209-4705 (850) 209-8071 (850) 573.1572
Broker/Owner Furrl9@msn.com
C21 sunnyso@aol.com




DEBBIE RONEY SMITH ED MCCOY BEVERLY THOMAS
(850)209.8039 (850) 573-6198 (850) 209-5211
debbieroneysmth www.emccoyrealty.com
@embarqmail.com emccoy0l@yahoo.com


' *- .~


&ice
Bring us the best price you can find for any
merchandise we carry if we don't beat it, we'll
give you the item free." __


FRIGIDAIRE
DISHWASHER
Under Counter, Heavy Duty, regular
wash & dry cycle. Choice of colors
& features. Compare at $590.
. SALE 219


4)


FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC RANGE
See Through Oven Door, 30 inch, plug in, plug out
burners. Compare $450.00
SALE319


NEW FRIGIDAIRE
REFRIGERATOR/FREEZER
26.0 Cu. Ft. Side-By-Side, Cubed & Crushed Ice &
Water Thru Door with filter. Was $999".
SALE$59990












KING'S URNITI
KING'S FURNITI


S


APPLIANCES
2821 Ross Clark Circle, S.W. (Across From Eye Center South)
OPEN MONDAY FRIDAY 9:00 A.M. TIL 6:00 P.M. 793 3 45
SATURDAY 9:00 A.M. TIL 6:00 PM. CLOSED SUNDAY "
ALL PICTURES SIMILAR TO ILLUSTRATIONS


U-


in the second half trying
to bring Georgia back. He
also had 13 rebounds.
BIG EAST
No. 5 Georgetown 62
Cincinnati 43
NEWYORK-- Otto
Porter Jr. scored 18 points


Buy One
at regular price

Get One
For 9t%%t


2074 Hwy.71 Mariann ,FLo85


IIlI I


-G.FR T APLINCS


SALE a
FRIGIDAIRE
CHEST FREEZER
14.8 Cu. Ft.
SALE319



,








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
MY- PARENTS i.r NT7'' 71 WB HERE'S ONE T16 mnR> cEUmIAR>
I CI'T. AMBTIONS MR E...- FOR 9A- HAE B SAMUUq
TMAnD IT! I EEN HAD 6REAT iNTEKTO& OFENNDIN6
A&I TON FOR WELF.. iUP A6 A STUPID.........







BORN LOSER BYART AND CHIP SANSOM
50lTItE5 I SELi^",, 'KE TO CANt RE p ZAOEMR' OU DON'T ) AiaV A FOR.,
( MEMOR~ t55UPtP6ING.. 1 'RER l PUTT T KE TTO UCL TE t.
TE FORD I
i.




_/ I


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
.H ATs\--- -How BECAUSE
THAT? ITS THE COME INSTEAD OF
NEW CHEEZ IT'S COATING THE
DOODLE NOT OUTSIDE
PROTOTYPE ORANGE'?WITH CHEESE
S I INVENTED! POWDER. I
PUT THE CHEESE
S1ON THE INSIDE


TRY IT'
iOKAY

P" T'
CRTO chi_


IS THE
TEXTURE
SOKAY?
ALL I
4N AD WAS
COTTAGE
-C CHEESE.
'


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES
SOM .DAYS YOU'gl THE HAMMER. 5OMe
\ DAYS YOU'RE THE NAIl-. AND THEN
GACOP OM DAYS
^ ,- *1 / TH HIAMMf
n T^ /J KEEP5 M 16IN6
"] THE MAIL
U ANP HITTING
-. // .* YOUR THUM9l


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
7HOW'S 5IT F, I I-- Y oOP ,--7
SOINe oveW EED S/'.Of. ( bANYj KTHERI


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"I just found out your lawyer specializes
in real estate law."


ACROSS 37Joule
1 Not pass fraction
6 Mahogany 38Winding
and teak curve
11Arm ofthe 39Kind of
Mediterra- sugar
nean 40 Half a fly?
13Topknotted 41 Mai -
doll (rum drink)
14 End a 42 Strain, as
layoff an engine
15 Montana's 44 Spooks
capital 47 Hedged
16Attorney's 51New York
deg. baseball
17Commer- player
cials 52 Have
18"Doctor rapport
Who" 53Young girl
network 54 Like a
21 Oozy monarch
23 Fabric
meas. DOWN
26Baseball 1 Distant
stat 21865
27Jai fielder
28 Shiny wrap 3 Oh, gross!
29Hockey 30h osss!
29 Hockey 4 Sedaka or
buff Diamond
(2 wds.) 5 Lenin's
31 Delicate inspiration
purple (2 wds.)
32Wing
33What .6 Full of
3Maceth dandelions
Macbeth 7 They give a
didhoot
35Adult, hoot
almost 8 Unbar, in
36 Rack and- poetry


Answer to Previous Puzzle

HE YEB SMTMA LSO
O VA RU S!E RAC K
LEMMINGS A IRS
E'N S I GNSAB RE
NAYS TIDE
ACRID CCOiM A
AIR.A1 E S AUqNA S H
HO P I A R IiA GiA I
ML AL EQ UOTE
MOP E:DIO U R
QOM EG A HAG GL E
LOA D PLIATEA SI
AiCH E SAiRI DR S
S HADOEXIEC SIE E


9 Tumult
10Bounding
main
12 Interstellar
cloud
13 Uniform
fabric
18Scold
19 Pickling
solutions
20 Film
festival city
22 Diner
bottle -
23 Sure!
(2 wds.)
24 Loons, e.g.
25 Heavy
hammer
28 Groovy
30 Kesey or
Russell


31 Steer
34 Rudder
control
36 Employee's
hope
39 Ahoy, -!
41 Reproving
clucks
43 Freighter
hazard
44 Locker
locale
45 Yes, in
Yokohama
46 Switch
positions
48Mr. Ham-
marskjold
49 Depot info
50 Pa.
neighbor


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


3-15 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"RZM G JK JNSJRT E FNN SWFK J LJ K'T
SFNN-DKPZVLFH. WDT XDFST JVF
YVFEER LMGW NDCF RZMVT."
AZA WZYF

Previous Solution: "From here on out, there's just reality. I think that's what
maturity is: a stoic response to endless reality." Carrie Fisher
TODAY'S CLUE: j slenba d
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-15


Horoscope
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Even though you're
aware of the right course
of action to follow, you
might lack the courage to
take it.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Don't prolong the
agony of an overdue bill;
it only gets more pro-
nounced with time.
TAURUS (April 20-,May
20) At times, you can be
opinionated and reluctant
to change your mind.
But it could be worse to
change your opinion for
the wrong reasons.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) Although your
material aspects look very
encouraging, you might
not make the most of your
opportunities.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) To be successful,
you must be hopeful and
secure in your situation.
Try not to be influenced by
the opinions of another.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
-When you spot a quick
victory, you're likely to
handle yourself extremely
well. Conversely, when
tenacity is required, you
might buckle under and
make a poor showing.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Instead of telling
a friend about the things
that could go wrong with
his or her idea, you'should
be supportive.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Commercial dealings
could be somewhat dif-
ficult for you. In certain
situations you should do
well, but be prepared for a
few failures as well.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -When it comes to
an important negotiation,
you need to know exactly
what you're agreeing to.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Doing business
with friends can be more
frustrating and less profit-
able than dealing with
strangers.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -There's a chance
you could get drawn into
a situation that includes
someone you personally
dislike. Do your best to
hide your feelings.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -You're inclined to
be helpful to another, pro-
vided the initiative to do
so originates with you.


e's a ilbox


Dear Annie: My family is very con-
servative, and they are rather religious
Christians. For the past seven years, I
have known that I am gay. I tried dating
boys to please my parents, but it just
didn't feel right. During my senior year of
high school, I went out with a few girls,
but I was still very much in the closet.
Now that I'm in college, however, I'm out
and proud. I have a girlfriend, and things
are going well for us. We are talking about
moving in together.
I came out to my mother and sisters
because I knew they would accept it
eventually, although they were disap-
pointed. But the rest of the family is
a different story. I want to bring my
girlfriend home to meet my folks. I want
to be honest about our relationship, but
I am crossing a generational, religious
and moral line. My grandmother believes
lesbians are going to hell.
I don't intend to rub it in their faces.
But it feels like a burden to lie about it. I
know they love me and would continue


Bridge


In a bridge contract, having no entry results
in an exit with a minus score. And sometimes
you need to use a defender for an entrance.
How does that apply in this deal? South is in
four spades, and West leads the diamond 10.
When East opened one diamond, South just
closed his eyes and blasted into four spades,
hoping that if his partner had a weak hand,
the penalty conceded would be less than his
opponents could have obtained in their best
contract.
If West had been psychic, he would have led
either the club 10 (immediately giving the de-
fenders three clubs and one heart) or the heart
nine (East wins with his ace and returns the suit
to kill the dummy). But since East had opened
one diamond, selecting that suit was normal.
The original South won trick one with dum-
my's ace and discarded a heart from his hand.
Then he called for a low heart. East went in
with the ace and led the diamond king. Now
declarer had to go down two.
South should have left the diamond ace on
the board and ruffed the first trick in his hand.
Then he draws trumps and plays on hearts. East
may duck the first round and take the second,
but then he must put declarer into the dummy.
The contract makes with an overtrick instead
of going down two.


to love me. I have not changed who I am.
But I'm afraid they will treat me differ-
ently, and I'm worried about how they
will treat my girlfriend.
So please, how do I come out.to the rest
of my family?
-THE LWORD

Dear L Word: You already know that
your family will love you regardless, and
that is the most important thing. They
may treat you differently at the begin-
ning, but that is not unusual, and over
time, their behavior will normalize.
(They may even already suspect you are
gay.)
But we don't recommend you intro-
duce a girlfriend on the same trip where
you come out to the relatives. That may
be more than any of you can handle, and
it is unfair to your girlfriend to put her in
the middle of the drama.
We suggest you contact PFLAG (pflag.
org) for suggestions on the best way to
approach this.


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK











THAT A BABY BY PAUL TRAP


North 03-15-13
4 4
V K J1052
A874
SK63
West East
4 7 5 3 2 # 6
S97 VA863
S10 9 6 3 K QJ 52
SQ 109 A J 7
South
SA K Q J 10 9 8
T Q4
-
,8542

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1
4 Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: + 10


Il '1


--148B FRIDAY. MARCH 15. 2013










www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Friday, March 15, 2013- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Pocy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages ansing out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the slace
adualy occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-nsertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval: Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


Foreadlnescalltol-freervistwa.c


f A) ANNOUNCEMENTS
Movi
AUCTI *NSLS411

l1th ANNUAL SPRING AUCTION Yard S&
Farm Ag & Construction Sat March
baby items
Sat., March 23, 2013 at 9am abytem
Iron City, GA t
Satu
SHwy 84 W -6 miles East of 73 S. to Fil
Donalsonville, GA Yard Sale
DeMott Auction Co., Inc. Sat March
229-985-4565 800-985-5699 Mower, 1
STerry DeMott, Sr 229-891-1832 ec
Call today to be included in this auction!
GA # 002554 i
IN ..>.......GO RN 24 .......... Iv X

Two Side-by-Side Cemetery Plots C3 and C4
@ Garden of Memory. Plots in Garden Cross
Section. Asking $1300. Each Contact:
Alex Leath 205-972-1237 or leath@bellsouth.net

2937 Noland St Sat 16th. 8-12 baby clothes, Be your
books, toys, wall pictures, H/H and more !! WO
4055 Bryan St. main street through Greenwood .
Fri. 15th & Sat. 16th. 8-? NO EARLY BIRDS !!! equipmer
in mi
GARAGE SALE: Fri & Sat (8am-2pm)
3821 Thompson Rd. S. of Marianna. Clothes,
H/H items, electronics, jewelry, i
dining table w/chairs, couch sets, dressers W


(AD ETTESAE


ng Sale -Everything Must Go!
15 Park Place Rd. Marianna.
Sat March 16th (7am-?)


ale 2007 Ohara Avenue. Sneads.
16th (8am-lpm)Furniture, dishes,
i, books and lots of odds and ends.
YARD SALE: 2487 Lark Ln.
irday March 16th (7am-2pm)
Ilmore to Riverbend. Follow signs.
2569 Augustus Dr. Look for Signs.
16th (7am-until) John Deer Riding
2ft trailer, 4K generator, medical
luipment and much more!

FINANCIAL
?IES PORUITE


Moving Sale 2926 Sylvia Drive. off Wynn St
Sat March 16th (7am-until) king bed, sofa bed,
sleigh bed, table and chairs, desk, side board
serving table, hutch, printer, cameras & H/H.


Ab Stepper: $20. Call 850-557-2846
Auto Battery Charger NEW $100, 850-482-2636
Baby Clothes -boys 12-18 mo. $30 bx 693-3260
Boat Seats Fiberglass, $30, 850-209-0377
Camcorder, Sony, digital $300. 850-482-7665
Camera Olympus 600UZ, $149, 850-482-7665
Clock Budlight Beer, $150, 850-209-0377
Computer Chair- Black, $35.,850-482-2636
Computer Chair: blk leather $55. 850-482-2994
Computer Chair: green fabric $45. 850-482-2994
Couch & matching Chair $250. 850-482-4579


a o 1 850 482 5 0 2


niniD q Room Table 6 cha 2


Dolls Porcelain w/stand. $9/ea. 850-482-7665


Dryer: gas, works good. $50. 850-209-1361
Dryer large capacity. $125, 850-263-7363
Entertainment Center $375, 850-482-7502
Free Monkey Grass Dig yourself, 850-482-3240


Sudoku


Garden Composter Pivot, $45. 850-482-7502
Guitar Alvarez 70's 12 string $150. 850-482-6022
Guitar Dean Elec.& acoustic $200. 850-482-6022.
Kitchen Cabinet wood $50. 850-557-9687.
Riding Mower JD STZ 38 $350. 12.5hp687-2070


Sewing Machine Kenmore, $50, 850-209-6527.


Sewing Machine -Portable, $50, 850-594-3000
Sewing Machine w/Cabinet $35, 850-209-1361
Stove glass cooktop, $250, 850-263-7363


Table w/4 chairs glass/wd $60. 850-557-9687


Tires (4) Used, P225/70R16 $80,850-482-2636


Trailer Hitch NEW cond. $29. 850-482-7665
Treadmill Spacesaver, $35, 850-209-1361
Washer super capacity GE, $200, 850-263-7363


Wedding gown, new, sz 16, $500 850-693-3260.


Window 29x30 Dbl Pane, $100, 850-482-2636
Yard Bench w/angels, $75, 850-594-3000


13 4_

9 3




7 2 5 _6

8 2

3 4 7

7 6 8 5 1

4 9

5 8 _
2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserve


Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
1-888-273-5264
Restaurant For Sale with Lounge and Oyster
Bar. Seats approx 200. Currently doing Good
Business." Owner looking to retire. Financing
available with down payment $250,000.
Price NEG! Call 334-684-1700 between 8am-
2pm. Home 850-956-2709 from 3pm-7pm

!i) MERCHANDISE

Wanted: OlJ Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

3-pc. San Lucas Harness smooth rich faux
leather upholstery, plush comfortable design.
dark brown. 3 yrs old from Ashley Furn, Store
$700. OBO 334-671-1778 706-718-7905

( ) PETS & ANIMALS


FREE: Kittens to loving home. multi-colorl-F &
1-M 850-272-4908.




Lab pups: Cute & Cuddly! Yellow & Chocolate.
No papers, but parents on premises. 6 weeks
old. 488-5000 or 488-3979.
J7 Miniature Australian
r Shepherd Puppies
q Smerles, blue merle.
black tri and red tri.
Males and Female. $400. $600. NSDR &
ASDR. Call or text for more information.
334-550-9895
Pre-Spoiled Adorable AKC CH Sable Sheltie
Puppies for sale to approved homes. Males are
$450 and Females are $500. 334-718-6840 or
tinkersshelties@yahoo.com

(P) FARMER'S MARKET
,t
FRESH"PRODUCE


850-573-6594


Frozen Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
, 4128 Hwy231


Level: H 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Thursday's puzzle


red.


3/15/13


Sace an A Fast, easy, no pressure
P lace an A1 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


own boss and partner with the
rlid's largest commercial
meaning franchise. $20K!
nt, supplies, training and $5,000.
monthly customer included.
1-888-273-5264
ww.janiking.com


138526947
795 4 8 1 97286 3






3 21 3J5 4 7 591
589 76J231 14
495 687132
371254698
82 6931475


0J I B 1


Bahia seed for sale 4-
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L ................................
Large rolls of Hay for Sale
C Bahia & Coastal
I Daytime 334-585-3039,
After 5pm & weekends 585-5418

Quality Coastal Hay; Large Rolls
Fertiized & Weed Control
I 850-209-9145 ,


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinning
Cal Pea River Timber
S334-389-2003

(I!) EMPLOYMENT



AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-
MINDED, NEWSPAPER CARRIERS


COTTONDALE
Earn an average of

$850
per month

Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus

BE YOUR OWN BOSS 1 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL





Jackson

Jackson Hospital, a 100-bed acute
care hospital located in Marianna,
Florida, has an immediate need for
the following positions:

Director of Marketing/Public
Relations/Physician Recruitment
Previous healthcare marketing
preferred.

Physician Office Manager
Previous physician office management
required.

Join our team by faxing your resume to:
Human Resources of Jackson
Hospital 4250 Hospital Drive,
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 718-2626 phone or
(850) 718-2679 fax

EOE


I :


A i u O F r by g


. .... . ...... ..... 1 .. .. .. . .


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- -- - - - ---~---pl`^~----^I~~-~~-~~^-~^-"


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6 B Friday, March 15,2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSTFIEDS


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Opelika-Auburn News has an
immediate opening for a
Production Director.
The primary role of this position is to
oversee the production operations at
the Opelika/Auburn, Alabama facility
of O&DS. A major requirement of this
position is to grow a profitable
commercial printing and distribution
operation at the Opelika-Auburn News.

This position is also responsible for
promoting and championing safety
as a condition of employment while
ensuring that all safety policies are
followed and all OSHA guidelines are
met

The successful candidate must be
able to bridge communication between
the production staff and other stake
holders.

This position is responsible for
commercial printing goals, proper
scheduling of all product production
and high quality of each product.
Must have working knowledge of all
production equipment. 10 years
newspaper/commercial management
required. 4 year degree preferred.

Pre-employment drug and background
screening required. EOE/M/F/D/V;

Please apply at
www.worldmediaenterprise.com

World Media Enterprises Inc.
BH MEDIA GROUP / A BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY COMPANY


GN AEP Y I hN


ASSISTANT FIRE CHIEF
Interim position
Associate's degree in fire
science or a closely related
field is required. Bachelor's
Degree in Business
Administration, Public
Administration or Fire Service administra-
tion or a related field from an accredited
four-year college or university is preferred.
Three years experience in fire suppression,
prevention and training is required.
Certification as a Florida Fire Inspector.
$36,526.86/yr.
Special Requirements: Valid Florida's
driver's license prior to employment.
Certification as a Paramedic, by the
Emergency Medical Division of the Florida
Department of Professional Regulations.
Certification in Fire Fighting Standards.

CUSTODIAN
Some experience in custodial work; or
any equivalent combination of training and
experience which provides the required
knowledge, skills and abilities. Light
maintenance required. $15,946.95/yr.

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES TECHNICIAN
Minimum Training and Experience
Education and Experience:
Graduation from high school and some
experience driving a vehicle with a manual
transmission, pulling and backing trailers.
Two years experience in building trades,
landscaping, recreation or maintenance
work; or an equivalent combination of
training and experience, which provides the
required knowledge, skills and abilities.
$20,591.00/yr.
Special Requirements: Must have a valid
Florida driver's license, CDL preferred.
Must be able to work a flexible schedule to
accommodate seasonal hours at the Blue
Springs Recreational Park (Requires
weekend'supervision of seasonal
employees). Must be able to obtain and
maintain a certification from the Florida
Department of tCorrections to work state
inmates within one year of employment.

LIFEGUARDS
Blue Springs summer employment.
Opening mid-May. Must be certified by the
American Red Cross in Life Guarding. Fee
reimbursed upon successful completion of
training. Lifeguard exp. Preferred. Exp. in
cash register operation, funds balancing
and working with the public is desired.
Must be able to work varied schedule;, from
10:30 am To 6pnr Tues. to Sat, & 12:30pm
to 6pm on Sun. Later hours for special
events. Salary $8.75 to $9.75 per hour
depending on exp.
Deadline Date: March 25,2013
Applications accepted at Jackson County
BOCC, Human Resources Dept,
2864 Madison St, Marianna FL 32448
www.jacksoncountyfl.net/
EOE/AA/Vet Pref/ADA/ Drug-Free Workplace


BE YOUR
OWN BOSS


These days being retired doesn't mean
sitting at home doing nothing.

A newspaper route is the perfect way to
supplement your income with only a small
investment of time and big returns in
community service to your own neighbors.

Come by and inquire today about a
newspaper route in your neighborhood.

JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
4403 Constitution Lane Marianna, FL 32446
a EDUCATION -
& INSTRUCTION


LOOK
FOLLOW YOUR PASSION! Become a Daycare
Director 6 wk. Homestudy Course $300.
Call Mrs. Alaina 334-714-4942 9am 5pm


classes Forming Now
for Medical Assisting,
FOR TIS Electrical Trades and
R TIS 1 More!
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

(^ RESIDENTIALL
J REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


CHIPOLA APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND 1 BEDROOM
APTS. SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE ON
ALL UNITS. UNITS SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR
HANDICAPPED OR DISABLED. FOR RENTAL
INFORMATION CALL (850) 526-4407
TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY




A-O -V- E-R I IS- Il-N-
ant idea-' tha'1SEL-LS.




US




.. ._ .-... :. .

KA -BUSINESSES"
('& SERVICES


Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Now serving Jackson Co.
FREE ESTIMATES ,* 334-798-0687



B&B Professional Auto Detailing
Now offering mobile wash inside
and outside, oil change & vacuum
Detailing now for the low price of $50.
(850) 573-5509
Just give us a call and we'll come to you!
All services performed on site.












SClIy O'Neal's IEs
Land Cle"i, Inc. dUSPmi s
IcALTHAu FL BNIM wlE
Land Clearing, Inc. MUMPU)
850-762-9402
Cell 8SO-832-5055o
NO O I INGTR-LTIING


GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
SWide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers.* Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL Call 850-482-4663




2/2 3136 Aycock Rd. 900 sq. ft washer/dryer,
flat screen TV's $650. mo. $650. dep. utilities,
dish, garbage water & sewage w/pool
(Appointment Only) 850-352-2951 850-573-1864


4 1BR/1BA, nice dean apt. in town screened
porch, large yard $450. mo.
No pets. 850-557-2000 for more info.
A 2/1 Upstairs apart Clean, No pets, Washer
supplied. $475 mo. & 2/1 Mobile Hm.
priv. drive, sun deck $400. mo.
4 850-718-5089/482-4172/624-7407 4

COTTONDALE VILLAGE APARTMENTS
Now accepting applications for
1, 2,3 bedroom units. Rental assistance.
No application fee.
We pay water, sewer, and trash service.
4052 Old Cottondale Road,
Marianna, FL 32448.
(850) 526-4062, TDD/TTY 711.
"This institution is an equal
opportunity provider,
and employer."

.H US ESUSNFURN o ISHDY


1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4-


SG.M. Properties of PC
Beach 800-239-2059
SFully Furnished Condos
.. -- & Townhouses
near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front-starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $250 nt.
Portside Resort starting @ $125.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
www.gmproperties.com


* 3/1.5 Brick Home on private lot 10 min. Ma-
rianna & Wal-mart, new carpet, tile & paint,
appl. included $650. mo. + dep. 850-209-1294.
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
S850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
S850-209-8847 4
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595
2BR 1 BA MH'S in Alford, $380 mo. $380. dep.
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2BR/2BA Newly remodeled in quiet area.
Very clean. Water, sewage, garbage and yard
care provided. No smokers, no pets.
500+ deposit. Call 850-718-8158.
m+ 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile 1Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maint.incl.
-1 850-593-4700 4
Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 Located between
Grand Ridge & Sneads. Includes water &
garbage. $360. Mo 850-573-0308 4m

7 "" RESIDENTIAL
UfJ REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

U-Lok-lt Warehouses for Sale 30x80 Metal
building. Well and spetic plus other buildings.
/4 mile north of Hwy 90 on Hwy 71.
$75,000. Call 850-482-8333 or 850-573-8894




DB _881


a I


SilN E Your guide to greatlocal
II b businesses & services



IICE DIRECTORY:

Call 526-3614 to place your dac


Lawn Care &
Outdoor Property
Maintenance
4 Free Estimates
Call Woody 850-526-2030



5 a5260SUDP
MPr. ,, Grooming j (7857)
Appoine m6ri, Only
GroomerelStylists
Lisa chores & Tammy Martabano
isr. s On at vmw.dginuds.ne5


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME



"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
ls'iflan H Log, r. 850569290


Got Stumps?
CA.LLI
HILLS TREE SEICE



You CALL... WE COME To You!
RED'S MOBILE
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE,
850-209-97131
EDWARD MAGGI, OWNER

II I

This Month's Special
s12x20
31 9500
35 Years in Business
7 WE MMr Patu BMs.


BESTWAY
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LAPsTs MiFan CP OF PMLE BuilrMss N'11. FL'HRONA
WE ,,Er
I HAVE ?;E I
DIFFERENT SIZES!
YOU CAN CHOOSE
^ '" a COLOR & STYLE!
BUILT ON-SITE. 850.-7478974
2919 Hwy 31 North Panama City, FL


Find jobs


fast and



easy!


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDANi

jcfloridan.com


monster

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


MANUFACTURING & OPER"A"TIONS-. ,GENE-RALl EMPLOYMENTID]F:L' : HNIPEACSBEO E UNFURNISHED


I
























| `. RECREATION


Cheenow 2007 15ft. Camo paint finish, motor
guide troll motor, galvanized trailer
$800. 334-701-2106.



Xtrenme Packages From
Extreme $4,995
All Welded
Boats All Aluminum Boats
www.xtremeindustries.com


Triton '07 188SF Fish and Ski: Mercury Optimax
150HP, 24 volt trolling motor, trailer included,
garage kept, like new conditions, less than
150 hours, $19,000. Call 334-685-3921


Fifth Wheel: 1994 American Star 36 ft Fifth
Wheel. $8,500 OBO. 334-477-2046.

(fiS TRANSPORTATION


Chevrolet 1967 Camaro SS/RS: restored on
original solid body, vin#124377L123529, custom
built big block 454, cranberry red, new cranber-
ry interior, to many restoration items too
mention. Priced at $24,500. See pics and info at
dkestate.wordpress.com. Doug 334-237-1916


r .................................eI
$0 Down/ist Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade Anything!
BRING IN YOUR W2 OR LAST PAY STUB!!
RIDE TODAY! Steve Pope 334-803-9550
BMW 2005 X3 white with tan interior, 165,000
miles, V6, auto, excellent condition, full sun-
roof. $10,000, 850-263-4913
CHEVY 1995 CAPRICE-Clean, runs great, cold
air, fully loaded $3,800 OBO 334-355-1085
Chevy 2012 Malibu, like new! $200 down, $249
per month. Call Steve 791-8243
Ford 1985 Mustang White, good condition, all
original parts. 90,951 miles. Call 334-494-0837
or email bccolwell2@aol.com
FORD 2007 EXPLORER XLT "IRONMAN -
SILVER, 37,000 MILES. SHOWROOM QUALITY,
NEW CONDITION, CAN BE SEEN AT LEMON
LOT, 166 WESTGATE PARKWAY, DOTHAN, AL
AFTER 2-24-2013. PHONE 334-699-1666
Honda 1992 Accord: 4 door, cold AC, nice car,
champagne, fully loaded. $3395.
Call 334-792-8018.
Honda 2007 Accord: EXL-V6, FSBO (MPG 20/29)
4 DR, one owner with leather heated front
seats, loaded with options including power
moonroof. Excellent condition, 77,400 miles.
$13,900. Call 794-2210 or 714-4107 for more de-
tails.
Honda 2007 CRV EX, Super Sharp! Must sell,
$200 down, $269 per month. Call Steve 791-
8243.
Honda 2008 Fit, low miles, under warranty,
must sell! $200 down, $209 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 714-0028.


Hyundai 2009 Elantra, sunroof, loaded Must
Sell! $200 down, $199 per month. Call Ron Ellis
714-0028.


Mazda 2010 6 S Touring
21,000 miles. 4 cyl.
Silver with gray leather
interior. One owner,
non-smoker, garage kept
Beautiful inside and out. 14.900. 334-806-6004
Toyota 2010 Yaris 4 dr. Sedan A/C,
stereo system, 82K miles, good on gas
S10.500. 850-592-2937
Toyota 2011 Yaris: silver with black interior, 4
door sedan, bucket seats, one ownei, automat-
ic, 5980 miles, 40MPG Hwy, $13,995. Call or
Text 334-618-6588 LIKE NEW !!


1994 FXSTC Softail Custom
Harley Davidson
Excellent condition and
kept in the garage. Must
see to appreciate. Price is
fixed. Mileage 23,000. Call
day time 334-828-1536 and night 334-791-9855
2005 VT 1100C Shadow
Spirit: black and chrome,
good condition, like new,
3400 miles, one owner,
clean title never wrecked,
new tires. Asking $6,300.


2010 Ningbo Dongfang
250cc motorcycle. Rode
only 6 times. Never tag-
ged. Asking $250. Please
call 334-393-7034 after
5pm and leave message.


S 2011 Harley Davidson
Super Glide Custom
cool blue pearl & vivid
black, garage kept,
10K mi. full factory
warranty. Driving lights,
passenger back rest, luggage rack, quick
release windshield, anit-theft system with
/pager, cruise pegs, oil pressure gauge,
dust cover included
1* $12,900 334-598-0061 or 334-432-4372
Absolutely Pristine-
You will not be disappointed -
Harley Davidson 2000 Ultra Classic Tour Glide:
loaded plus extras, blue and silver, only 8500
miles, new tires. $8,300. Call 334-585-5396
Harley-Davidson 2003 Fat Boy 2003 100th An-
niversary Edition Harley Davidson Fat Boy.
Turquoise and navy with gold inlay custom
paint. $8,000 in chrome added to the bike. Al-
so comes with the original tank and fender,
which is gray blue, motorcycle lift, touring bag,
custom cleaning kit, many extras and special
tools! Call 334-494-0837 or email
bccolwell2@aol.com
Harley-Davidson 2003 Fat Boy black 100th An-
niversary, FLSTFI, 12,800 miles, $5,300 Serious
buyers!KELLER9944@GMAIL.COM, 334-232-3388
Suzuki 1988 650CC Savage/Boulevard:
completely rebuilt engine, bored .20 over, new
brakes, clutch and more 24 inch seat height,
weigth 3501bs. Very Nice. $2500. 850-722-8962.


Chevrolet 2004 Tahoe LT 1 OWNER, DARK
GREEN, 5.3 V8, 2WD, AUTO TRANS, ALL PWR,
FULLY LOADED, LEATHER, ON-STAR, XM RADIO,
TOW PACKAGE, REAR A/C, 3RD ROW SEATS,
LIKE NEW. ALL MAINTAINANCE RECORDS. ASK-
ING $9,750, 334-347-0600 AFTER 6 PM
S "~---- Lincoln 2006 Navigator,
asking $14,000.
:334-618-2695.


4000 Ford Tractor good condition, new engine
$4,250. 334-791-0700
,- :'-, -. Chevrolet 1988 Silverado .
f_--, Blue & white. 2 door.
350 V8. Runs good.
$3.500.
SCall 334-794-6579


Jackson County Floridan *


Chevrolet 2005 Silverado Ext Cab 1500: blue,
automatic V6 43, 6'/ft bed with Rhino liner,
good condition, one owner, low mileage with
only 43k, $10,200. NEG. Call 334-596-4782 -
chevrolet Silverado LS,
step side, ext cab, 4
door, V-8, automatic,
loaded, tool box, side
steps, 134,850 miles, like
new. $9995. Call 334-790-7959.
Ford 2003 Ranger Edge ext cab good condition
89K miles, $5,900. 334-446-0044 Susan
Ford 2010 F250 Super Duty Super Cab Lariat:
white, fully loaded, 4X4, low miles, excellent
condition $37,500. Call 334-685-2318
International 1995 4900: Flat Bed Truck, DT466,
AC, 125k miles. $6,000. Call 334-897-6346 or
334-406-7200
John Deere 1981 Backhoe and Gooseneck
20ft Trailer. $6,000. Call 334-714-0586
KMC 4-Row Planters, good cond. with 3 sets of
seed plates, $1600. 2-Row Cultivator w/ vine
cutters $375. Massy Ferguson 2-Row bottom
plow $350. 334-791-4742


Massey Ferguson Tractor md#1215 w/MF220 \
5 ft mower good cond $6700. 334-7 .


.... ...... t."/ . ...... r .. ... .. . .. .. ...
Nissan 2000 Frontier ext. tab 2-wheel drive,
auto, 104K miles, $5500. OBO 334-726-1215.
Toyota 1994 Tacoma 4-wheel drive as whole or
parts. 334-689-9436.


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
arem's4 24 orTw 7enmg
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624 .


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664

_. Got a Clunker
r We'll beyour Junker!
F" n Eiip We buy wrecked cars -
'HP and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price! _
CL $325 &t Complete Cars
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285
--
-!.. 2-0-0- 0- - M- M - 0 2-0- 0 0 a- M a - - 0 - a 0 M N
S* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
S Running or not .
S 334794-9576 or 344-791-4714


WE PAY CaSH

FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-493-6226


(CAf)


LEGALS


LF160074
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
PROJECT NAME: Annual Unit Price Contract for
Paving and Miscellaneous Bid No. 1213-Eng 10

Sealed bids, submitted in triplicate, will be re-
ceived by the Board of County Commissioners
of Jackson County, Florida (Owner), until 2:00
p.m. (Central Time) April 11, 2013 at the County
Engineering (County Engineer, Larry Alvarez),
2828 Owens Street, Marianna, FL 32446 for the
construction of the following described Proj-
ect:
Annual Unit Price Contract for Paving and Mis-


Friday, March 15, 2013-


7BF


NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the
provisions of Florida Statutes Section 336.09(2)
and a resolution of the Board of County Com-
missioners of Jackson County, Florida, dated
March 12, 2013, a public hearing will be held on
March 26,2013, at 6:15 PM in the County Com-
mission meeting room in the County Commis-
sioners Administration Building, 2864 Madison
Street, Marianna, Florida, 32448, to consider
the advisability of closing and abandoning cer-
tain road, described as:
That portion of Evergreen Lane lying within the
South 100 feet of the North 1 of the SE 1/4 of
Section 1, T4N, R10W.
PLEASE GOVERN YOURSELVES ACCORDINGLY.
DATED THIS March 12, 2013.


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: /s/ Chuck Lockey
HON. CHUCK LOCKEY, Chairman


CLASSIFIED


CALL FOR TOP PRICE

FOR JUNK VEHICLES


Clean Out Your Kitchen



and Turn Extra Appliances



Into Cash.




Those appliances might be wasting your valuable cabinet

space, but chances are someone out there would love them. By

using the Classifieds, you'll make it easier for them to find,

and easier for you to sell. So try it today!




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN


(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


Swww.j *o V-ELKI )JA-*--


cellaneous Work
The Work includes all the items listed and all
items need to complete the work on a unit
price basis to the FDOT and County Standards
including mobilization, pavement preparation,
sweeping, water, general conditions, mainte-
nance of traffic, and stormwater pollution pre-
vention, along with all the items listed in the
Proposal Form. Any Work needed to complete
the Work Items that are not listed are intended
to be included in the items that are listed in the
Proposal Form.
A Pre-Bid Meeting will Not be held
The deadline for receipt of questions will be
April 8,2013 at 2:00 PM Central Time. Ques-
tions must be submitted in writing to the Coun-
ty Engineer (email lalvarez@jacksoncountyfl.c.
om: fax (850) 482-9063) with a copy to the
Jeannie Bean e-maill jbean@jacksoncountyfl.co
m).
Bids will be opened and recorded at 2:10 PM
(or immediately thereafter) on April 11, 2013 at
the Jackson County Board of County Commis-
sioners Board Room at 2864 Madison Street
Bids may be submitted to the County Engineer
at the Board Room from 1:50 PM until 2:10 PM
Central Time.
Bid documents will be open for public inspec-
tion after noon on March 21, 2013 at the Road
and Bridge office at 2828 Owens Street Bid
documents must be obtained from:
County Engineer
Attn: Larry Alvarez
2828 Owens Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 482-9677
upon payment of $ no charge per set which
amount constitutes the cost of reproduction
and handling. This payment will not be refund-
ed.
The Owner reserves the right to waive any in-
formality or to reject any or all bids. Each Bid-
der must deposit with his/her bid, security in
the amount, form and subject to the conditions
provided in the Information for Bidders.
Sureties used for obtaining bonds must appear
as acceptable according to the Department of
Treasury Circular 570.
No bid may be withdrawn for a period of sixty
days after the scheduled closing time for re-
ceipt of bids.
To the extent applicable to this project, atten-
tion of Bidders is particularly called to the re-
quirements as to conditions of employment to
be observed and minimum wage rates to be
paid under the Contract, Section 3, Segregated
Facilities, Section 109 Executive Order 11246,
and all applicable laws and regulations of the
Federal government and State of Florida, and
bonding and insurance requirements.
IN PARTICULAR, BIDDERS SHOULD NOTE THE
REQUIRED ATTACHMENTS AND CERTIFICA-
TIONS TO BE EXECUTED AND SUBMITTED WITH
THE FORM OF BID PROPOSAL.
DATE: 03/14/2013
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE/FAIR HOUSING
JURISDICTION
LF160072
NOTICE OF MEETING AND OF
ATTORNEY-CLIENT SESSION
The public is hereby notified that the Board of
County Commissioners 6f Jackson County,
Florida, intends to bold an attorney-client ses-
sion (which shall commence with an open ses-
sion, but which will then be closed to the public
for a meeting estimated to last no longer than
one hour) in accordance with the provisions of
Florida Stat. Section 286.011, to discuss settle-
ment negotiations or litigation strategy. The
meeting will commence in open session at the
Board's Commission meeting room, 2864 Madi-
son Street, in the City of Marianna, Florida, on
March 26, 2013, at5:30 PM Central Time. The
Board anticipates that the meeting will be at-
tended by all members of the Board, by County
Administrator Ted Lakey, by an,official court
reporter, and by Board attorney Frank A. Baker.
DATED this March 12, 2013.
'BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
By:
/s/ Chuck Lockey
Hon. Chuck Lockey, Chairman
RETURN PROOF OF PUBLICATION AND BILL TO:
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
JACKSON COUNTY
2864 Madison Street
Marianna, Florida 32448
LF160074
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO REGISTER
FICTITIOUS NAME

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned,
under the provisions of Chapter 90-267 (Section
865.09) Florida Statutes, will register with the
Division of Corporations, Florida Department of
State, the fictitious name to-wit: MARIANNA
HEALTH & REHABILITATION CENTER under
which the following Florida municipal corpora-
tjon is engaged in business at 4295 5th Avenue,
Marianna, Florida 32446
That the party interested in said business is as
follows:
CITY OF MARIANNA, a Florida municipal corpo-
ration
Pdst Office Box 936
Marianna, Florida 32447
Attorney for Entity Giving Notice:
BONDURANT & FUQUA, P.A.
4450 Lafayette Street
Post Office Box 1508
Marianna, Florida 32447
(850) 526-2263
By:/s/Frank E. Bondurant
Frank E. Bondurant
For the Firm
FLORIDA BAR NO. 0520330
LF160073
NOTICE OF HEARING TO ABANDON
PUBLIC ROADS


JCFLORIDAN


i 0 1










SPOIRr


-18B FRlDA 'MARCH15.2013


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Golf



Copperhead has some bite at Tampa Bay


PALM H"J ;BOF: De-
fending champion Luke
Donald was angry about
three bogeys over the
last four holes that ru-
ined a great round Thurs-
day in the Tampa Bay
Championship.
Considering the condi-
tions, it still wasn't bad.
With surprisingly cold
conditions on a typically
tough course at Innis-
brook, only 11 of 78 play-
ers managed to break par
among those who started
early and faced tempera-
tures in the low 50s with a
brisk wind making it feel
even worse.
Brendan Steele's worst
swing led to a birdie early
in his crowd, which shifted
momentum in his favor on
his way to a 3-under 68. He
was tied for the lead with
Tag Ridings, who birdied
his last two holes for a 68.
Vijay Singh, the subject
of an anti-doping inves-
tigation for admitting he
took deer antler spray that
is said to contain a growth
hormone, was in the group
at 69 that included KJ.
Choi, Chez Reavie, Dicky
Pride and Peter Tomasulo.
Nick Watney was among
those who joined Donald
at 70.
"It felt more like a ma-
jor championship today,"
Steele said. "Usually the
head at the U.S. Open is
a few under after the first
round at least, even if the
winning score ends up be-
ing over par. To see it only
be 3 under at this point
is really a testament to
how good the golf course
is and how difficult the
conditions are. Put that
combo together and it's
not a course that you fake
it around. It's not a course
you can get away with bad
shots."
Donald, despite missing


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Luke Donald tees off on the sixth hole during the first round of the Tampa Bay Championship
on Thursday in Palm Harbor.


three birdie putts inside
12 feet, was at 4 under
when he made bogey on
the sixth hole because of
a tee shot, was stuck near
the back lip of a bunker on
the par-3 eighth and then
caught a flier out of the
rough on the ninth hole
and sent the ball over the
green and into a bad sec-
tion of a bunker that didn't
have much sand.
"At one point I felt I
should have been 5 or 6
under," Donald said. "To
walk off with a 70 and play
like that is hard to take. It
was shame to cough up a
couple of shots. Fifteen of
those holes, I played really
solid golf."
Some of the early start-
ers arrived in darkness, the
temperatures cool and the
wind already blowing.
This hasn't been the best
weather on the PGA Tour
this year. Already there
was such high wind at Ka-
palua that the tournament
didn't start until the fourth
'day. Fog wiped out an en-
tire day in San Diego. Snow
put the Match Play Cham-
pionship one day behind.
And temperatures were in
the 40s early Sunday when


S .LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT
\J) WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


the tour first arrived in "I had a short rain vest
Florida. that really wasn't warm


enough,? Ridings said.
"But I got it done on the
first couple of holes, and
after about six holes I was
OK."
Temperatures were
warmer in the afternoon
for late starters such as
Adam Scott, Geoff Ogiliy
and Matt Kuchar teed off.
Steele thought he might
be in trouble early on his
third hole, the par-4 12th,
with has a large pond in
the middle of the hole. He
worried about having too
much club, eased off it and
hit a hook that he figured
was going into the water. It
stopped 10 feet short, and
from there he hit wedge to
6 feet for birdie.
'All of a sudden you got
from struggling, and may-
be making a 5, to making


a three," Steele said. "It
turned out pretty good."
Singh was in front until
he took bogey on the 13th
hole. When he finished his
round, he declined com-
ment to a PGA Tour official
and everyone else.
Ryo Ishikawa holed an
18-foot birdie putt on the
last hole for a 71 and was
in the group with Sergio
Garcia, Charlie Wi and
John Senden.
John Daly had a 72.

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