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Jackson County Floridan ( March 8, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958

Material Information

Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: March 8, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01034

Related Items

Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958

Material Information

Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: March 8, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01034

Related Items

Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text



*******.**ORIGIN MIXED ADC 325
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
GPO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


Don't forget to

Spring Forward


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online .-~...

i ,/: ,iK' I i .... Daylight
SUNT-Y Sa Sings

White House: US can OA I Time starts
defend against r | LJA 1A March 9
NKorean attack 8A


~ .3Ki$~ 4~ ~ 2:


A.


Vol.90 No.59


iSSIglIeU Lo Iis ULcase.
The positive test results consti-
tuted a violation of the terms of
his conditional release/pre-trial
intervention, which included a
standard no-drug rule applied
to all defendants in such inter-
vention programs, Goodson
said.
Thomas had been granted the
conditional release and pre-trial
intervention late last year after
being charged with driving with-
out a valid driver's license and
with operating an unregistered
vehicle, according to court doc-
uments. The violation charge he
now also additionally faces is a
See PLAYER, Page 7A


Mistor
Christopher
Thomas looks
for someone
to pass to
at a recent
Chipola game.
Thomas is out
of the JUCO
tournament
that is
now under
way due to
his arrest
Wednesday.


QUEEN OF THE THREE-POINTER


Ti A Thile Malone's
\1\ \ Curteeona Brelove
V V provided some
stiff competition, Aaliyah
Williams fromSneads out
shot her and 8 other players
from Jackson and surround-
ing counties to win the 2013
women's 3-point shootout at
Chipola. The annual event
was held at the halftime of the
Chipola College game against
Florida State College Wednes-
day night at the JUCO State
Basketball Tournament.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


Sodexo in line to remain food vendor for county schools


BY ANGIE COOK
acook@jcfloridan.com
Proposals from Sodexo and
Chartwells, the two food service
vendors vying for the contract
to provide nearly 900,000 meals
annually to students in Jackson
County public schools, were
reviewed by school officials
Thursday.
A three-member committee,
consisting of Assistant Super-
intendent Larry Moore, board
attorney Frank Bondurant and
finance director Kathy Sneads,
was joined by Superintendent
Steve Benton at a public meet-
ing in the offices of the Jackson
County School Board.
The committee evaluated the
two companies' proposals based


ANGIECOOK/FLORIDAN
At the offices of the Jackson County School Board, from left, Assistant Superintendent Larry Moore,
Superintendent Steve Benton, board attorney Frank Bondurant and finance director Kathy.Sneads review bids
for the district food service contract Thursday in Marianna.
on criteria such as per-meal- of Agriculture and Consumer panies scored favorably, which
cost, presentation, manage- Services, nutritional analysis of gives current vendor Sodexo a
ment/staff and, with assistance sample menus.
from the Florida Department Across the board, both com- See LUNCH, Page 7A


Player sits out JUCO tourney in jail
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER Goodson, the probation officer
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com Goodson th p b i ofie.


CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


> ENTERTAINMENT...4B


>> LOCAL...3A


> OBITUARIES...7A


> STATE...7A


> SPORTS...1B


> WEATHER...2A


.3 1.


This Newspaper @
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7 6 5 1 6 1 8 0 0 5 9

~ I & ~ 3


Take it on the Run -



Email Alerts, MobileAlerts: and SS Feeds subscriptions are FREE
Home Delivery plus Unlimited Online $11.23 per mo


Chris Thomas-will not play
in the JUCO state tournament
with his Chipola College team-
mates this week. He's sitting out
at least part of the tournament
in jail.
A key guard on
the team, Thomas
was granted no
bond in his first
court appearance
this !week after
Thomas testing positive
for marijuana in
a standard drug test given as a
matter of course to defendants
who are on conditional re-
lease in a pre-trial intervention
program, according to Stacey


Woman


jailed for


stabbing


husband
Staff Report
An Alford woman stabbed her
husband in the head with a short-
bladed kitchen knife during an
argument that turned physical
late Wednesday afternoon, lo-
cal authorities say.
Her husband was
takenbyhelicopter
to an area hospital
for treatment. She
was taken to jail.
Lisa Ann Ab-
Abbott bott, 52, has been
charged in the
case with aggravated& battery
with a deadly weapon. Her bail
was set at $25,000 on the local
charge, but she was placed on
hold for Washington County in
a separate matter and could not
bond out.
According to a press release
from the Jackson County Sheriff's
Office, Keith Allen Abbot came
to the Jackson County Fire Res-
cue Station in Alford around 5:15
p.m., bleeding heavily. When he
arrived, the entire Alford crew
was on an emergency call and a
county team stationed in Mari-
anna was summoned there to
help. Putting a helicopter team
on standby, the responders de-
termined that Mr. Abbott had
suffered a major injury and
needed Air Heart transport. He
was taken to a Bay County hospi-
tal for treatment. He appeared to
have been stabbed near his right
ear, according to Major Donnie
Branch of the Jackson County
Sheriff's Office.
Branch said Mr. Abbott was
listed as improving Thursday,
awake'and talking that morning.
Authorities say the incident
happened at the couple's home,
2426 Park Ave. in Alford.



Chipley


man dies


in single


car wreck

From local reports

A Chipley man died early
Thursday at Jackson Hospital af-
ter a traffic crash on Rushin Road
in Jackson County.
Victim Eddie L. Mosley Jr., 45,
was the only occupant of the ve-
hicle he was driving when the ac-
cident occurred around 7:40 a.m.
According to Florida Highway
Patrol reports, Mosley was driv-
ing a 2005 Mitsubishi four-door
car. The vehicle drifted onto the
south shoulder of the road, trav-
elled through a ditch and struck
a utility pole. The car contin-
ued moving, crossed both travel
lanes and entered the north
shoulder, where it collided with
the ditch embankment. He was
pronounced dead at the hospital
shortly after transport.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


' ,


Low 48


Saturday
Mostly Sunny & Warmer.



"i. High- 750
I Low -520


Monday
Mild Breezy. Possible
Storms.


'\ High- 750
S Low 530


Sunday
Partly Cloudy & Warm.



S',_ High 690
1 *' Low 450


Tuesday
Slight chance of rain. Mild.


TIDES ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna-
Caryville


4:18AM
8:07 AM
4:23 AM
5:34AM
6:08 AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
52.77 ft.
16.63 ft.
12.69 ft.
14.24 ft.


7:05
2:59
7:38
8:11
8:44


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3 4 ":'
________*: **AS s^ ^ ^ ^


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 5:59 AM
Sunset 5:45 PM
Moonrise 3:32 AM
Moonset 2:48 PM


.Mar. Mar. Mar. Apr.
11 19 27 3


FLORIDA'S "'REAL

PANHANDLE CJCNTRY

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 1o00.9m

L IS F H! iO"AT IAD


..i, i'ON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com
CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
forthree months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due t6 the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This.
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
News of general interest free of charge.'
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
To reserve food or arts and crafts
booth space at the March 16 St.
Patrick's Day celebration in Marian-
na, call 718-1022. The phone number
was incorrectly stated in a Tuesday-
edition story about the event:


ccL ,, ,"" -",.


FRIDAY, MARCH 8
a Knitters Nook-lO a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced- rlntter jre welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Money Sense Class-12-4 p.m. at the Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90,'Marianna.
Money Sense is a class that covers different topics
in money management to empower people to
take charge of their finances and create their own
wealth. Call 526-0139.
) Deadline to enter the Little Miss, Teen, Junior
and Miss Sneads Pageants-3 p.m., pp': ,tiori:,
are available for pick up at Sneads Elementary and
Sneads High School. Call 482-9004 ext. 229.
i) Better Breathers Club Meeting-2-3 p.m. in the
Hudnall Building Community Room, Jackson Hos-
pital campus. The program, presented by Mason
Brock from Florida Public Utilities will be "Conserv-
ing Your Energy". Bring a friend or caregiver. No cost
to attend and light refreshments will be served. Call
718-2849.
a Black History 365 Talent Show-6 p.m. at
the Grand Ridge School Old Gym. This event is
sponsored by the Grand Ridge School's Black
History Committee in conjunction with the Jackson
County Youth Council. Tickets are $5 each, children
12 and under jjnittl~rl free. Lynwood "Funnyman"
Williams will be the MC. I Irtre- tr,- in performing
call 693-3145..
n Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble HlII PF:,jd in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups.' Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, MARCH 9
Household Hazardous Waste Amnesty Day
Event-8 a.m.-12 p.m. at the Jackson County Re-
cycling Facility, 3530 Wiley Drive, Marianna. Event
sponsored by the Jackson County Board of County
Commissioners. No gas cylinders or explosives.
Call 718-0437.
Citizen's Field Football, Inc. Rack of Ribs
Fundraiser-lO a.m. at McDaniel's Grocery Store,
Hwy. 90, Sneads. Donations of $20 for a whole rack
and $10 for a half rack. Proceeds will be used to
purchase new weight lifting equipment for Sneads
High Football. Contact citifield.inc@gmail.com.
) Troop 76 Girl Scouts of Alford and Cottondale
Cookie Sale-lO a.m.-3 p.m. at the Dollar General


in Alford. Cookies are $3.50 per box.
) Alford Community Health Clinic Hours -10
a.m. until last patient is seen, at 1770 Carolina St. in
Alford. The free clinic for income-eligible patients
without medical insurance treats short-term
illnesses and chronic conditions. Appointments
available (call 263-7106 or 209-5501); walk-ins
welcome. Sign in before noon.
) The Durden, Dudley and Edenfield Family
Reunion-12 noon at the Grand Ridge Community
Center, located behind City Hall. Bring a dish to go
with fish. Call 592-2571.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
* Miss Heart of Relayfor Life Pageant-6 p.m.
at the Graceville Civic Center. Entry fee of $50. Pro-
ceeds to be donated to the MHOUSA Relay for Life
Team. Register online at www.missheartoftheusa.'.
com/graceville or call 326-6735.

SUNDAY, MARCH 10
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in
Sthe board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, MARCH 11
n Preschool and Early Head Start registration
for the 2013-2014 school year-8:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
at the Old Marianna High School Gym, 2979 Daniels
St. Parents must bring their child's birth, certificate,
social security card and proof of family income. Ap-
plications are available at school sites or the Early
Childhood Programs Office. Bring completed forms
to registration. Call 482-1266.
))Area Agency on Aging for North Florida, Aging
and Disability Resource Center Local Coalition
Work Group-10-11 a.m. EST at 2414 Mahan Drive
in Tallahassee. The purpose of the meeting will be to
discuss collaborative efforts of the ADRC with the
community. Meeting is open to the public. Call 850-
488-0055 or contact burnsl@elderaffairs.org.
) Marianna Lions Club Meeting Noon at Jim's
Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2005.
) Employability Workshop, Completing Applica-
tions-2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
n Jackson County Quilter's Guild Meeting


- 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 US 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings are
fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects,
lessons, help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
b City of Cottondale Regular Commission
Meeting-6 p.m. at the Cottondale City Hall. Call
352-4361.
) Chipola Beekeepers Meeting 6-8 p.m. at the
Jackson County Extension Office in Marianna. Bring
a dish for the potluck supper. Call 573-7063.
a Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of FirstUnited Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, MARCH 12
n Preschool and Early Head Start registration
for the 2013-2014 school year-8:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
at the Old Marianna High School Gym, 2979 Daniels
St. Parents must bring their child's birth certificate,
social security card and proof of family income. Ap-
plications are available at school sites or the Early
Childhood Programs Office. Bring completed forms
to registration. Call 482-1266.
n Republican Club of West Florida Meeting
Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna. Call
352-4984. Chipola College Instructors John
Gardner and Chase Vlieg will be the guest speakers.
Jim Fowler will also make a special appearance via
SKYPE. Call 352-4984.
) Optimist Club of Jackson County Board
Meeting Noon at Chipola Community Bank in
Marianna.
n Orientation 12-3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
a Sewing Circle -I p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
Employability Workshop, Employability
Skills-2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
) Tools to Quit Tobacco Session-4-6 p.m. at
Jackson Hospital in the Cafeteria Board Room. Free
nicotine patches and/or gum for program partici-
pants. Call 482-6500.
Autism Support Group Meeting 6 p.m. in the
First Presbyterian'Church Fellowship Hall, Clinton
Street entrance, Marianna. Family members,,
caregivers and service providers welcome. Call
526-2430.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email etlitorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
...... .----


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for March 6, the lat-
est available report: One accident, two sus-
picious incidents, one suspicious person,
one highway obstruction, three burglar-
ies, one physical disturbance, one verbal
disturbance, eight traffic stops, two larceny
complaints, one trespass complaint, two
follow-up investigations, two animal com-
plaints, three assists of other agencies and
four public service calls.


Jackson County Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following
incidents for March 6, the latest available
report: Three abandoned vehicles, five sus-
picious vehicles, two suspicious incidents,
two suspicious persons, one arrest in spe-


*- ';'': ;.'a '^ ,. .

cial duty detail, one escort, two burglaries,
one physical disturbance, one woodland
fire, one drug offense, 25
S medical calls, one traffic
Crash, one burglar alarm,
one report of shooting in
CRM E the area, 14 traffic stops,
two larceny complaints,
two trespass complaints,
two follow-up investigations, two juvenile
complaints, one suicide attempt, two re-
ports of stabbings, two animal complaints,
one sex offense, five assists of other agen-
cies, seven criminal registrations, three
transports, and one threat/harassment
complaint.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
periods:


) Richard Dimock, 48, 2031 Brookside
Drive, Mt. Dora, burglary of a dwelling.
) Michael Edenfield, 53, 4473 Colonel St.,
Marianna, driving under the influence.
) Oscar Lopez, 29, Lafayette St. (no nu-
meric address provided), Marianna, loiter-
ing and prowling, disorderly intoxication.
) Sean Connors, 41, 4367 Kent Drive
(Apt. 10A), Marianna, possession of
child pornography, distribution of child
pornography.
) Robert Scott, 19, 2962 Hillcrest Drive,
Marianna, grand theft, dealing in stolen
property, violation of state probation.
) Chris Thomas, 19, 4704 Longhouse
Court, Marianna, violation of conditional
release.
) Lisa Abbott, 52, 2426 Park Ave., Alford,
aggravated battery with a deadly weapon.
Jail Population: 198
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000 or a
local law enforcement agencyTo report a wildlife violation,
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


MG-(UL-L.0


"12A + FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 2013


i; High --71


rl ( r:l.blJx


'Jw 'o 7v ir


WHIE-UP CRLL







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Troop 3 Boy Scout Johnson earns Eagle Scout rank


Special to the Floridan

Chaison Johnson, 18-
year-old son of Dwanna
Davis and the late Antho-
ny Johnson, was honored
on Feb. 23 during a special
Eagle Scout Court of Honor
ceremony held at the First
United Methodist Church
in Marianna. Johnson was
awarded the rank of Eagle
Scout in recognition of his
successful completion of
all requirements for scout-
ing's highest rank.
'Johnson is a senior at
Sneads High School and
will graduate this year. He
is active in the Sneads Pi-
rate Pride Band, playing
the trombone and bari-
tone. After graduation he
plans to continue his edu-
cation at Chipola College
to become a high school
or middle school math and
music teacher.
Johnson has been a Boy
Scout in Troop 3 since he
was 10 years old, hold-
ing the positions of Troop
Guide, Quartermaster and
Assistant Senior Patrol
Leader. He has participated
in the high adventure trips
to the Appalachian Trail, is
a member of the Order of
the Arrow and completed
both Woodlore and the
National Youth Leader-
ship Training program.
He 'plans to stay active in
scouting by becoming an
Assistant Scoutmaster for
Troop 3:


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Troop 3 Assistant Scoutmaster Mike Suggs (center) and,
Committee Member Ernie Lafferty (left) present Eagle Scout
Chaison Johnson with a letter and certificate of achievement
from the Boy Scouts National Council.


Welcome and introduc-
tion was given by Troop
3 Scoutmaster Bill Klein-
hans. The presentation of
the colors was made by the
Honor Guard members
Daniel Tillman, Jacob Laf-
ferty, Noah McArthur and
Keary Nichols. The Pledge
of Allegiance was led by
Senior Patrol Leader Levin
Berry and the invoca-
tion was given by Michael
Edenfield.
Troop 3 Advancement
Coordinator Barry Till-
man discussed Johnson's
achievement of Eagle
Scout rank, which included
his attainment of 23 merit
badges. Johnson was ap-
plauded for his admirable
leadership skills, as he led
all of.his Troop members
to receive Honor Campers


awardsat summer camp,
win knot tying contests of
skill and earn various oth-
er accolades throughout
his years of scouting.
Troop 3 Assistant Scout-
master Jason Whiddon
gave the "Eagle Charge",
after Johnson was escorted
to the front of the room
by another Troop 3 Eagle
Scout, Skylar Suggs. Whid-
don described the red,
white and blue colors of
the Eagle badge and the
qualities they represent,
along with the scout law,
which states that a scout is
trustworthy, loyal, helpful,
friendly, courteous, kind,
obedient, cheerful, thrifty,
brave, clean and reverent.
Assistant Scoutmaster
Mike Suggs and Com-
mittee Member Ernie


Eagle Scout Chaison Johnson receives the flag flown at the
Florida Capitol in his honor from his mother, Dwanna Davis.


L.afferty presented John-
son with a certificate and
letter of achievement from
the Boy Scouts National
Council, while Commit-
tee Member David McAr-
thur read and presented
him invitation from the
National Eagle Scout
Association. Johnson's
mother was escorted to
the podium for her pre-
sentation of the Eagle
Scout Award to her son.
After she pinned Johnson's
Eagle Scout badge on his
uniform shirt, Troop 3
Committee Member Andy
Campbell read "It's Only a
Pin", which led to a reflec-
tion of Johnson's many
wonderful years in the
scouting program. Com-
mittee Member Estelle
Whiddon presented the
Eagle Scout neckerchief to
'Johnson and read a letter
sent to him by President


Barack Obama.
Johnson's mother pre-
sented him with a United
States flag that was flown
at the Florida Capitol on
Dec. 13, 2012, in honor. of
his attainment of the rank
of Eagle Scout on that day.
State Senator Bill Montford
provided the assistance in
having the flag flown and
ultimately presented to
Chaison.
Johnson had several spe-
cial gift presentations to
make to leaders and indi-
viduals who touched and
influenced his life and his
journey to becoming an
Eagle Scout. He presented
Scoutmaster Bill Klein-
hans, Assistant Scout-
master Jason Whiddon,
and Committee Member
Estelle Whiddon with en-
graved hatchets in expres-
sion of his appreciation
for their guidance and


friendship for many years.
A' mentor's pin was pre-
sented to Troop 3 Treasurer
Andy Campbell for his sup-
port and encouragement.
A geranium plant was giv-
en to Committee Member
Jacquelyn McArthur for her
documentation of John-
son's scouting activities
with pictures and news-
paper clippings. Johnson
.gave special recognition to
Darren Branch for having
started him in Cub Scouts
many years, ago. Johnson
acknowledged that with-
out his friend Darren, he
would .never have known
about scouting nor gotten
involved in the program
that he continues to love
to this day.
Following the benedic-
tion given by Michael
Edenfield, scouts, lead-
ers, family members and
friends enjoyed a recep-
tion and time together to
view all of Johnson's many
awards from, throughout
the years. Scouts' helped
serve a special cake, fruit
trays, vegetable trays and
dip, sandwiches and cas-
seroles to guests and also
assisted with clean up
duties.
The Marianna Optimist
Club is the chartering or-
ganization for Troop 3 Boy
Scouts. For more infor-
mation about Boy Scouts,
please call Scout Master
.Bill Kleinhans at 526-2897
or 209-1778.


Science anda Dem' Bones


As part of Mendy Bannerman's focus on the human skeleton,
longtime orthopedic surgeon Dr. Steven Surgnier recently
visited Golson Elementary School's first- and second-grade
science classes. Dr. Surgnier utilized the class skeleton "Mr.
Bannerbones", to discuss the bones of study, the importance
of calcium, bone injuries and orthopedic surgeries.
Additionally, Dr. Surgnier applied and removed casts on
employees for the students to experience first-hand, how
broken bones are repaired. Bannerman's class appreciates
Dr. Surgnier for donating his time and expertise and Brooke
Donaldson and Jackson Hospital for donating the casting
supplies and resources. Pictured (from front) are: Fidel
Lopez, Clark Hatcher, Cason Hatcher, Taryn Geffrard, Blanca
Avellaneda, Destanee Carter, George Bowers and Dr. Steven
Surgnier.

Florida Lottery


SUBMITTED PHOTO


Household Hazardous Waste
wii A ii.Wd:dy~ -3/ -02-14 8


Amnesty Day is tomorrow


Special to the Floridan

The Jackson County Board of
County Commissioners is sponsor-
ing Household Hazardous Waste
Amnesty Day tomorrow from 8 a.m.
to noon at the Jackson County Recy-
cling Facility located in Marianna's
Industrial Park at 3530 Wiley Drive.
The purpose of this project is to col-
lect, recycle, treat and properly dis-
pose 'of household hazardous waste.
Examples of household hazardous


waste 'include: Pesticides, engine
degreasers, stale gasoline, paint
and paint thinners, batteries, sol-
vents, anti-freeze, insecticides, used
oil, brake fluid and pool chemicals.
Computer CPU's, monitors, key-
boards, printers and scanners will
also be accepted. This service is be-
ing provided to households and local
governments only. No commercial/
industrial businesses will be allowed
to participate. Conditionally'exempt
small quantity generators (small


businesses, schools, growers, etc.)
will be accepted at a reduced rate.
No gas cylinders or explosives will be
accepted. Remember to: Follow the
manufacturer's handling instruc-
tions and use caution when trans-
porting hazardous materials to the
collection site, do not mix chemicals
or allow skin contact. For additional
information or to schedule a drop
off time contact Chuck Hatcher,
Director of Parks and Recycling at
718-0437.


BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


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GAS WATCH
Gas prices are going up. Here are
the least expensive places to buy
gas in Jackson County, as of
Thursday afternoon.
1. $3.59, McCoy's Food Mart,
2823 Jefferson St., Marianna
2. $3.62, Kmee II, 5392 10th St.,
Malone
3. $3.68, Travel Center, 2112 U.S.
71 S., Marianna
4. $3.69, A&S Food, 4255 South
St., Marianna
5. $3.69, BP Steel City, 2184
U.S.231 S., Alford
6. $3.69, Dixie Food & Gas, 1757
U.S. 231 S., Alford
7. $3.69, Loves Travel Center,
2510 U.S. 231, Cottondale
8. $3.69, Murphy Oil, 2255 U.S.
71 S., Marianna
If.you see a lower price.
contact the Floridan newsroom
at editoriai@icfloridan.com.


221 N. Tyndall P<
Calloway, F
850-215-594
Hrs: 10:00AM-6:
Mon-Sat


Rotate & Radiator 6 rake
Satance Service Service


$24 95 $3995 .$124 95



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SCREEN ENCLOSURES'


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FRIDAY. MARCH 8, 2013 36hT


DEBORAH BUCKHALTER/FLORIDAN
Brian Draper, a forensic digital communications examiner with
the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, works from a
mobile FDLE crime lab Wednesday at Southside Apartments,
where a man was arrested on child pornography charges.


LOCAL









:RIDAY, MARCH 8,2013 RELIGION JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcflorid



PINEY GROVE BAPTIST ENJOYS VALENTINE BANQUET


(; \
'ii


SEFT: Piney Grove Baptist Church in Cottondale held their Valentine Banquet on Sunday, Feb. 17. The young ladies of the Youth Class
helped cook and serve the dinner under the supervision of Cheryl Elligson, pastor's wife and April Phillips, youth minister's wife. The
south Class also decorated the Fellowship Hall for this special occasion. Pastor, Dr. Richard Elligson presented a devotional on the real
meaning of love. Everyone in attendance had a wonderful time of good food and fellowship. Piney Grove Baptist Church is located at 2136
Piney Grove Road in Cottondale. For additional information regarding church services and activities, call 352-3800. Pictured (from left) are
members of the Youth Class who served guests during the Valentine Banquet: Precious, Jasmine, Dee-Dee, Lindsey and Alexis. RIGHT:
Members of Piney Grove Baptist Church Youth Class who helped prepare food and decorate for the Valentine Banquet are (from left): Baylen,
Ariel and Ashley.


Baptist College of Florida



Briant to speak in Chapel


Special to the Floridan
.
Wayne Briant, pastor of Southside Bap-
tist Church in Sarasota will be the guest
speaker in the R. G. Lee Chapel March
11-13, at The Baptist College of Florida in
Graceville. Services will be held each day
beginning at 10 a.m.
Known for his evangelical preaching
and heart for the lost, it is no surprise that
Southside Baptist Church where Briant is
pastor has'been recognized three times
by The Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary as being in the top one-half of
one percent of churches in the Southern
Baptist Convention in evangelistic effec-
tiveness. Reaching the lost and hurting
throughout the community has been a


focal point and mandate for the church
under Briant's leadership. During Briant's
22 years of service, more than 1,350 peo-
ple have been baptized into the member-
ship of Southside.
In addition to Southside, Briant has
served churches in Florida, the Pacific
Northwest and Oklahoma. He has held
senior leadership positions within the
Southern Baptist Convention, Florida
Baptist Convention and currently serves
as the Chair of the Board of Trustees for
The Baptist College of Florida.
Briant and his wife Ruthi have four
adult children and two grandchildren. For
more information on the chapel speakers
or schedule, call 800-328-2660 ext. 446 or
visit baptistcollege.edu.


Dr. Wayne.
Briant, pastor
. of Southside
Baptist Church in
Sarasota and BCF
Trustee Chair will
speak in chapel
March 11-13 at 10
a.m.


SUBMITTED PHOTO


THS IRCTRYISMDEPOSILEY HEEUSNESE WO6NCUAGEL *~ oATTNDWRSIP6' V:I:CES


JAMES & SIKES MARIANNA OFFICE
Funeral Home, Maddox Chapel SUPPLY COMPANY
Office Outfitters
482-2332 4423 Costittin Le Marianna
Serving Jackson County Families 482-
Since 1931 482-4404


CHIPOLA PROPANE
GAS COMPANY f
LP & Natural Gas Appliance I
4055CdaeRd. Hwy20W Hwy Hwy. 90, Marianna
S26-2651 6744040 593-6070 526-3456
Marianna Blountstown Sneads www.hopkinscars.com


M-Ed" r Walmart
l dE. qu p ave money. Live better.
Store SUPER CENTER
4422 LAFAYEnE ST. MKEY GILMOREa STORE MANAGER
DOWNTOWN MARIANNA STORE #1375 2800 WY
850-482-4035 (850)-526-5744 MARIANNA, FL.

West Florida Electric
SA Touchtone Enery* Cooperative t

CPA'S (800) 342-7400
4243 W. Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL. www. westflorida. coop
526-3910 Graceville Sneads Bonifay


mERLE nORmAn"
C 0 S M E T I C S
& Day Spa

GOLD MEDALLION"
4551 LAFAYETE STREET'
MARIANNA, FL 482-2294


UssAso TE
STORE 526-3210
We Service
What We Sell!


1001 USES
MOBILE HOME & RV PARTS
CARPORTS
Serving the Tritate Area Since 1978

(850)526-3797


RoadMart ire & Service Center
24-HR Road Service
Biges restoN-
4710 Hwy 90E
,IJ-f, mal- a
J, 850-526-1950


Yo

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Alford First Assembly of God
1782 Tennessee St P.O. Box 228
Alford, FL 32420 579-5103
mbarfield@embarqmail.com
Bascom Assembly of God
5516 Hummingbird Rd
Bascom, FL 32423 272-7775
Shugroad@ embargmail.com
Cypress Grove Assembly of God
3250 Cypress Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4451
cppressgrovechurch.org
Cords Of Love Assembly Of God
2060 Bethelehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 272-0254
Eastside Assembly of God Church
4723 Hatton St Marianna, FL
lop4664@yahoo.com 526-2422
El Bethel Assembly of God
2503 El Bethel Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 593-6044
First Assembly of God
5565 Brown St
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3351
First Assembly of God Church
4186 Lafayette St
Marianna FL 32446
482-2800 www.rriaiannafirst.org
First Assembly of God Church
of Cottondale
2636 Milton St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4626
Faith Haven Assembly of God
7135 Hwy 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 4 592-8205
Pilgrim Rest Assembly of God
3347 Pilgrim Rest Church Road
Marianna, FL 32448 579-2300
Welcome Assembly of God
6784 Messer Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5077
Welcomehometom @yahoo.com

BAPTIST
Alford Baptist Church
1764 Carolina St P.O. Box 6
Alford, FL 32420 579-2192
Bethel Missionary Baptist Church
2137 McLeod St
Cypress, FL 592-4108
Bethel Star Missionary Baptist Church
4134 Lincoln Ave
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4866
Bethlehem Baptist Church
2300 Bethlehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-9940


ur Guide To Local Houses Of Worship
Circle Hill Baptist Church First Freewill Baptist Church New Easter Missionary Baptist Church Trinity Baptist Church
7170 Circle Hill Rd 7970 Davis St 977 Hope Ave 3023 Penn. Ave -
Sneads, FL 32460 592-2327 Sneads, FL 32460 593-5400 Graceville, FL 32440 658-8344 Marianna, FL 482-3705
www.TrinitvMarianna.com


Collins Chapel Baptist Church
5005 3rd Ave (5499 Collins Chapel Rd)
Malone, FL 32445 569-5644
Crossroads Baptist Church
Southern Baptist
3276 Main St P.O. Box 386
Cottondale Fl. 32431 352-2636
Damacus Freewill Baptist
3700 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5878
Dellwood Baptist Church
5512 Blue Springs Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-6954
Eastside Baptist Church
4785 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 526-2004
www.eastsidebaptistchurch.com
Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church
3360 Gardenview Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4223
Everlena Missionary Baptist
5309 Ellaville Rdi
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3900
First Baptist Church
3172 Main St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4586
First Baptist Church
5366 Ninth St P.O. Box 98
Malone, FL 32445 569-2426
Faith Baptist Church
2494 Hwy 71 South
Marianna, FL 482-2869
First Baptist Church
8010 Pope St P.O. Box 246
Sneads, FL 32460
First Baptist Church of Bascom
4951 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 97
Bascom, FL 32423 569-2699
First Baptist Church of Campbellton
2405 Hwy 2
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3183
First Baptist Church Southern Baptist
987 8th Ave P.O. Box 565
Graceville FL 32440 263-3323
fbcgraceville@bellsouth.net
www.fbcgraceville.org
First Baptist Marianna
2897 Green St Marianna, FL 32446
526-4200 www.fbcmarianna.org
First Freewill Baptist Church of Malone
5440 10th Street (Hwy 71 N.)
P.O. Box 385
Malone FL 32445 850-569-2786


Fredsi Bats Chrc f aln


Friendship Baptist Church of Malone
5507 Friendship Church Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-2379
Grand Ridge Baptist Church
2093 Porter Ave P.O. Box 380
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4846
grandridgebc@embarqmail.com
Greater Buckhorn Missionary
Baptist Church
4691 Hwy 162
Marianna, FL 32446 594-5761
Greenwood Baptist Church
4156 Bryan St P.O. Box 249
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3883
Hasty Pond Baptist Church
4895 Hasty Pond Rd, Marianna, FL
Heaven's Way Biker Church
A Ministry of Alford Baptist Church
3924 Woodrest Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 334-806-4258
Holly Grove Free Will Baptist Church
2699 Highway 73S
Marianna, FL 32448 482-3489
Inwood Baptist Church
2012 Inwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 593-5328
Liberty Hill Missionary Baptist Church
5239 Liberty Hill Road
Bascom, FL 32426 569-5949
Little Zion Missionary Baptist Church
3181 Little Zion Rd P.O. Box 190
Sn'eads, FL 32460 592-1614
Lovedale Baptist Church
6595 Lovedale Rd Bascom, FL 32423
592-5415 or 592-2134
Marvin Chapel Free Will Baptist Church
2041 Hope School Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5375
www.marvinchapelfwb.com
Midway Freewill Baptist Church
1600 Church St
6158 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 592-8999
Mount Olive Baptist
6045 Hwy 2
Bascom FL 32423 569-5080
Mt. Tabor Missionary Baptist Church
3695 Popular Springs Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 594-4161
Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church
5382 Old US Road
Malone, FL 32445 569-2049 -


New.Galilee Missionary Baptist Church
2155 Highway 73 South P.O. Box 234
Marianna, FL 32447 482-5499
New Hoskie Baptist.Church
4252 Allen St
Greenwood, FL 32443* 594-7243
New Hope Freewill Baptist
Sweet Pond Rd
Dellwood, FL 592-1234
New Hope Missionary Baptist
3996 Wintergreen Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-8802
New Mount Olive Missionary Baptist
2870 Barnes St P.O. Box 312
Marianna, FL 32447 482-7595
New Salem Baptist Church
3478 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 579-4343
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
6687 Brushy Pond Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5696
Pine Ridge Baptist Church
3064 Pine Ridge Church Rd
Alford, FL 32420
Piney Grove Baptist Church
2136 Piney-Grove Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3800
Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church
5481 Pleasant Ridge Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 263-8007
Providence Baptist Church
6940 Providence Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5481
pbch@embarqmail.com
Rocky Creek Baptist Church
5458 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-7508
Salem Free Will Baptist
2555 Kynesville Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4194
www.salemfreewillbaptist.com
Shady Grove Baptist Church
7304 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge FL 32442 592-6952
St. Luke Missionary Baptist Church
2871 Orange Street
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2591
St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church
1935 Jacob Road
Cottondale, FL 32431 263-4097
St. Peter Missionary Baptist
7889 McKeown Mill Rd
P.O. Box 326 593-3363


Union Hill
3115 Union Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-5711
Victory Baptist Church
2271 River Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6699
www.victorybaptistfl.com
White Pond Baptist Church
P.O. Box 458 Mill Pond Rd
Alford, FL 32420 352-4715

CATHOLIC
St. Anne Catholic Church
3009 5th St P.O. Box 1547
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3734
www.stanne@stannemar.ptdiocese.org
www.stannemarianna.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Caverns Rd. Church of Christ
4448 River Rd
Marianna, FL 482-2605

CHURCH OF GOD
Grand Ridge Church of God
2232 Porter Ave Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5301 or 592-2814
Marianna Church of God
(All services interpreted for the
hearing impaired.)
2791 Jefferson St, Marianna, FL 32446
482-4264 mariannacog.com

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST
Glorious Gospel
Church of God in Christ
4255 Clay St Marianna, FL 32448
594-1096 or 557-4019
Miracle Restoration Center
2997 Hall Street
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2335
Refuge Tabernacle
Church of God in Christ
2820 Chipola Street
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2607
The New Zion Temple
Church of God In Christ
1022 Washington Ave
Graceville, FL 32440
Victory Tabernacle
Church of God In Christ
6752 Highway 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 209-7711


-l4A F


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


REIaJGION


FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 2013 5AE


Anmazixng Grace



Why the disenchantment with marriage?


hen I was in col-
/ lege in the 1950s
V the most popular
course offering was called
Marriage and the Family.
It routinely attracted a
majority of female stu-
dents along with a minor-
ity of males who figured it
would be a great occasion
to meet girls.
In those days it was not
cynical to suspect that
some women chose col-
lege as an opportunity to
meet a man they might
want to marry.
It was a good bet. Within
a couple of years after
graduation the majority
of my classmates were
wed. Even before they


graduated many couples
on campus were going
steady, girls
'. proudly
wearing
the rings
or pins of
their future
David husbands.
Yount Since
those times
the bottom
has dropped out of mar-
riage. Even as recently as
1980 nearly 80 percent of
all Americans were wed,
but in 2011, according to
the U.S. Census Bureau,
only 51 percent of Ameri-
cans were married and
increasingly choose to
have one child or none.


Among today's Ameri-
cans who have never wed,
61 percent claim they
would like to be married
eventually, according to a
2010 Pew Research Center
survey. Only 12 percent
say they do not want to
marry, with 27 percent
undecided.
Disenchantrment with
marriage reigns. Among
divorced adults fewer than
one-third say they would
consider marrying again.
Only 8 percent of widowed
men and women wan
to locate a new spouse.
Of never-married men
aged 30 to 50 more than a
quarter profess no interest
in finding a mate.


The decline in wedlock
is reflected in the age
of first-time marriages.
Americans who marry
do so later than ever,
extending their single
lives throughout their 20s
before tying the knot. TV
ads for dating services
such as Christian Mingle
increasingly cater to older
singles.
Marriage is in decline
because it has lost its
allure. D'Vera Cohn of
Pew Research writes of
contemporary Americans
that "about half or more
think there is no differ-
ence in being married
or single in the ease of
having a fulfilling sex life,


being financially secure,
finding happiness, getting
ahead in a career, or hav-
ing social status ... When
it comes to getting ahead
in a career, being single
wins out 24 percent to 14
percent."
In the 1950s it was
assumed that marriage
meant having children.
Today, when Americans
wed with that intention,
the burdens, of married life
only increase. Marriage
today requires two pay-
checks. Saving enough to
send more than one child
to college has become
prohibitive. For mothers,
staying home even briefly
with a newborn is a


financial burden. America
not only lacks subsidized
day car, but is among the
least generous nations
in the world in providing
paid maternity leave.
When God created men
and women to be com-
panions he proclaimed
that it is not good for men
and women to be alone.
But nowadays marriage
is no longer the favored
alternative to the single
life that it once was.


David Yount is the author of 14
books, including "Making a Success
of Marriage'" Rowman & Littlefield.
He answers readers at P.O. Box
2758, Woodbridge, VA 22193 and
dyount31@verizon.net.


VMarianna First United Methodist Church



Holy Week Services are planned


Special to the Floridan

Marianna First United
Methodist Church has
planned a full week of
services and activities for
HolyWeek beginning Palm
Sunday, ,March 24. There
are services and activities
planned for all ages, from
children to adults. The
schedule is as follows:

Palm Sunday,
March 24
8:30 a.m.: Contempo-
raryWorship Service
n 11 a.m.: Traditional
Worship Service
) 5-7:30 p.m.: Show time
for "The Passion of the


FRIDAY, MARCH 8
n Youth Activity Night 6 p.m. at
Marianna Church of Gdd. Ages: 12-19. Call
482-6264.
a Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen
meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups in a safe environment," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center with praise and
live worship music, testimonies and fellow-


Christ" Movie ,

Monday, March 25
n 7 a.m.: Speaker The
Rev. Norman Bray
7:30 a.m.: Continental
Breakfast, Wesley Center'

Tuesday, March 26
n 7 a.m.: Speaker The
Rev. Dr. Ted Land
a 7:30 a.m.: Continental
Breakfast, Wesley Center

Wednesday, March 27
n 7 a.m.: Speaker The
Rev. Dr. Ron Martin
7:30 a.m.: Continental
Breakfast, Wesley Center
) NO WNL


Thursday, March 28

7 a.m.: Speaker The
Rev. Connie Farnell
n 7:30 a.m.: Continental
Breakfast, Wesley Center
6 p.m.: Maundy Thurs-
day Service
Good Friday, March 29
n 7 a.m.: Speaker The
Rev. Bill Elwell
n 7:30 a.m.: Continental
Breakfast, Wesley Center

Easter Sunday,
March 31
8 a.m.: Decorate the
Floral Cross, Wesley
Center
n 8:30 a.m.: Contempo-


Religion Calendar
ship. Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available.
Call 209-7856, 573-1131.
n Pulse 7-10 p.m. at Cypress Grove
Assembly of God Church in Grand Ridge.
Youth outreach program open to all teens
in grades 6-12; shoot pool, play Xbox and
other games, listen to music, more. Ac-
tivities are free; low-cost snacks for sale.
Transportation available. Call 381-2549.


rary Worship Service
9:45 a.m.: Lawn Par-
ty with refreshments,
Courtyard
9:55 a.m.: Children's
Egg Hunt, Courtyard
10:05 a.m.: Easter Bon-
net Parade
)10:45 a.m.: Decorate the
Floral Cross, Sanctuary
11 a.m.: Traditional
Worship Service
Marianna First United
Methodist Church is lo-
cated at- 2901 Caledonia
St. in Marianna. For addi-
tional information regard-
ing Holy Week services
and other church activi-
ties, call 482-4502.


SATURDAY, MARCH 9
Free clothing giveaway 9 a.m.
to noon at Mother Agnes' Closet, 2856
Orange St. in Marianna.
n Boys to Men Choir of Jackson County
Choir Practice 10 a.m. at Pope Chapel
A.M.E. Church. Practice will be every
Saturday after March. The choir is open to
all males ages 3-26. Call 209-5449.


St. Luke's Episcopal Church

will celebrate 175 years


Special to the Floridan

On March 10 St. Luke's
Episcopal Church will be-
gin a year long celebration
of its 175 years.
The church, founded on
March 8, 1838, is located
at 4362 Lafayette Street in
Marianna. It is surrounded
by an interesting histor-
ic churchyard and cem-
etery that is the resting
place of two veterans of
The War of 1812 and more
than sixty veterans of our
country's wars since that
time.
The first to be buried
there were. George Mon-
roe White in 1845 and
his sister, Ella in 1849.
George was four and Ella
was two. Little Ella's tomb
stone has a sweet bunch
of roses carved at the top.
These precious children
of Thomas M. and Martha
Jane White were buried
in the churchyard before
the first of the four church
buildings was begun at the
site in 1850.
There are three Milton


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Rev. M. Eugene Carpenter
will lead the service on March
10 to begin the celebration of
175 years.
. graves with older dates but
those remains were moved
to Marianna from Georgia
in 1927.
The Rev. M. Eugene Car-
penter, rector from 1991
to 2001, will return to lead
the 10:30 a.m. service.
There will be no 7:30 a.m.
service, no breakfast and
no Sunday school on this
day. All are invited to help
celebrate at a covered-dish
luncheon in MacKinnon
Hall after the 10:30 ser-'
vice. For more informa-
tion, contact the church at
482-2431 or parishoffice@
stlukesmarianna.org.


II~)~ SI g1 A A *


Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc

Suite B
OSTATE FARM 2919 Penn Avenue

Marianna, FL 32448-2716
NUAN CE 850-482-3425
a linda.pforte.bxrs@statefarm.com


Sa^y
food stores

(850) 526-4700
Oak Station Shopping Center
Open Daily from 8am 8pm


Vann Funeral Home
4265 Saint Andrews Street
Marianna, FL 32446
Phone: (850) 482-3300
Fax: (850) 482-5363
Concern for the living,
reverence for the dead.
C. B.Vamn LF.DJG C.Van Mr, lF.ID./Adrn D. Ahnr. LED.
Lula CVann. L.P.N.CIDoris U.Vann. L IP.NC.


KIELSON dISCOUNr

At' 7e Door"
3008 Jefferson Street
Marianna, Florida
5Z6-2839


1-488-787-4275
482-3420
2163 Post Oak Ln Marianna
www.tropictrailer.com


YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Marianna Church of the Nazarene
2987 N Madison St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-5787

EPISCOPAL.
St. L'uke's Episcopal Church
4362 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 482-2431
parishoffice@stlukesmarianna.org
www.stlukesniarianna.org

FULL GOSPEL
Christian Center Church
4791 Sheffield Dr P.O. Box 450
Marianna, FL 32447
526-4476 or 526-4475-
jack@cccmarianna.org
Country Gospel Community Church
Compass Lake in the Hills
650 Apalachicola Ave
Alford, FL 32420 (850) 579-4172
Resurrection Life Christian
Fellowship International
2933 Madison Street
Marianna, FL* 526-2617
New Beginnings Worship Center
1165 Highway 69
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5791 www.nbworship.com
New Beginning Outreach Ministries, Inc.
2254 Magnolia Dr.
Cottondale, EL 32431 (850) 352-4733
Evangel Worship Center
2645 Pebble Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2232
New Life Family Church
4208 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2132
The Bridge Church
2515 Commercial Park Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 209-2733

HOLINESS
Emmanuel Holiness Church
2505 Sandridge Church' Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5167
Hickory Level Community Church
1221 Dipper Rd
Marianna, FL 32448
482-4696 or 482-2885
Oak Ridge Freewill Holiness Church
2958 Milton Ave
Marianna, FL 573-7684
Sneads Community Church
1948 Desoto Ave P.O. Box 1349
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5650

LATTER-DAY SAINTS
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints
T 3141 College St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-8159

LUTHERAN
Ascension Lutheran Church
3975 W. Hwy 90
Marianna, FL 482-4691


METHODIST
Bascom United Methodist Church
4942 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 67
Bascom, FL 32423 594-5755
Cypress United Methodist Church
6267 Cemetery Ave
Cypress, FL 32432 263-4220
First United Methodist Church
1111 8'" Ave
Graceville, FL 263-3342
First United Methodist Church
2901 Caledonia St
Marianna, FL*. 482-4502
Grace United Methodist
4203 W. Kelson Ave .
Marianna, FL 482-4753
Grand Ridge United Methodist Church
6911 Iowa Street
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
Greenwood Chapel AME
5426 Fort Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-1112
.Greenwood United Methodist
4220 Bryan St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-5755
Henshaw Chapel AME Church
2370 Glastell St, P.O. Box 535
Cottondale, FL 32431 875-2610
Jerusalem AME Church
2055 Hwy 73
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5085
Kynesville United Methodist
2875 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-4672
McChapel AME Church
4963 Old U.S. Rd
Marianna, FL 569-2184
Mt. Shiloh AME Church
6702 Biscayne Road
Bascom, FL 32423 569-1044
New Bethel Christian Methodist
Episcopal Church
2487 Highway 1
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-4647
Pope Chapel African Methodist
Episcopal Church
4898 Blue Springs Rd, P.O. Box 6000
Marianna, FL 32447 482-2900
Shady Grove United
Methodist Church
7305 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-9277
Sneads First United Methodist Church
8042 Church St, P.O. Box 642
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6481
fumc@embarqmail.com
Friendship Christian Methodist
Episcopal (CME) Church
5411 Avery Rd, P.O.Box 302
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-1111
1st United Methodist Church
of Cottondale
P.O. Box 458
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4426


Salem AME Church
5729 Browntown Rd, P.O. Box 354
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3344
Springfield AME Church
4194 Union Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4252
St. James AME Church
2891 Orange St, P.O. Box 806
Marianna, FL 32447 526-3440
St. Paul AME Church
5180 Hwy 273, P.O. Box 40
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-0333
Snow Hill AME Church
5395 Snow Hill Rd, P.O. Box 174
Malone, FL 32445 569-5315
Mt. Olive AME Church
.2135 Fairview Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-7917
Bethlehem AME Church
3100 Lovewood Rd, P.O. Box 752
Cottondale, FL 32431
352-2111 or 352-4721
Greater St. Luke AME Church
5255 11th Ave, P.O. Box 176
Malone, FL 32445 569-5188
NON-DENOMINATIONAL
Believers Outreach Ministry
3471 Hwy 90'W
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4926
Cypress Creek Community Church
1772 Macedonia Road, PO Box 496
Alford, FL 32420 638-0360
Ever Increasing Word of Faith
Ministries
3749 Skyview Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-4704
Heaven's Garden Worship Center
3115 Main Street
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 579-9936 www.aidaspina.org
Faith Cornerstone Church Ministries
5460 Collins Chapel Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-5600
Foundation Temple Apostolic
Faith Church
3341 Tendell Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3884
Glass Community Church
4005 Veteran's Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 272-7205 (850) 263-6715
Haven of Rest
Church of Restoration
Worship Center
2261 Haven of Rest Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
Keeping It Real Help Ministry
3297 Caverns Road
Marianna, FL 32446 557-4800
Love and Restoration Ministries
2990 Heritage Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2730
Mill Springs Christian Chapel
1345 Mill Springs Rd, P.O. Box 83
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 526-2519


Rivertown Community Church
(Meets at the new Marianna High School)
3546 Caverns Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 482-2477
Rocky Creek Tabernacle
1890 Delta Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 272-0917
St Andrews (FC) Church Ministries
978 Hwy 71 S
Marianna, FL 32448 569-5600
Sunrise Worship Center
2957 Hall St, Marianna, FL 482-8158
PENTECOSTAL
Apostolic Life Church
4070 Old Cottondale Rd
Marianna, FL 482-8720
pastorbiggs@embarqmail.com
Apostolic Revival Center
of Marianna
3001 Hwy 71 N, P.O. Box 634
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3162
Christian Covenant Life Center
2011 Finley Ave.
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 592-4737
Shady Grove Pentecostal Holiness
7541 Shady Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-6203
Sneads Pentecostal Holiness Church
2036 Gloster Ave
Sneads, FL 32460
593-4487 or 593-6949
PrBise Life Ministries
7360 Hwy 90, P.O. Box 177
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4166


Prayer.Temple Church Of Prayer
For All People
3341 Plantation Circle
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3343 -
United Pentecostal Deliverance
5255 10th Ave
Malone, FL 3244S 569-5989
PRESBYTERIAN
First Presbyterian Church
Presbyterian Church (USA)
2898 Jefferson St
Marianna, FL 32446
526-2430 www.firstpresmarianna.org
fpcmarianna@embarqmail.com or
firstpresmarianna@earthlink.net
RESTORATIONIST
Church of Jesus Christ of Marianna
4060 Thomasville Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2282
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
,Emmanuel SDA Church
4531 Basswood Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3200
Marianna Seventh Day Adventist
4878 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2487
WESLEYAN
Salem Wesleyan Church
2764 Salem Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 (850) 593-6679
irquomai@gmail.com







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SHC at the Courtyard named one


of nation's 'Best Nursing Homes'


Special to the Floridan

Signature Healthcare at The
Courtyard has been designated
one of the nation's "Best Nursing
Homes" by U.S. News & World Re-
port, according to a new report
released this week by the national
news magazine.
SHC at The Courtyard was one of
several homes operated by Louis-
ville, Ky., based Signature Healthcare
that were named to the list, which is
compiled using data published in


January by the Centers for Medicare
& Medicaid Services.
U.S. News has awarded the 'Best
Nursing Home' distinction to homes
that earned an overall rating of five
stars, the highest rating CMS awards
nursing homes. Under the five-star
rating system, nursing homes are
assessed in three main categories:
Health inspections, quality mea-
sures and staffing. The overall rating
combines scores received in each of
the three categories.
More than half of Signature's


facilities now have a four or five-star
ranking from CMS. The company
has more than doubled its number
of four and five-star buildings, from
15 in January 2009, which is roughly
when CMS launched the Nursing
Home Compare ratings system, to
37 currently, more than 50 percent
of its nursing homes.
"This is a big win for everyone to
celebrate, our leaders, our stake-
holders, our families and our com-
munities," said Signature President
and CEO Joe Steier.


From Consumer Reports


Advances in car entertainment systems


Consumer Reports Editors

Connect with your car
If you haven't ventured into a
showroom in a few years, get
ready to be wowed; Today's cars
offer a dazzling range of electronic
entertainment possibilities.
Forget what a DJ wants to play;
there are now multiple ways to
connect a portable music player or
smartphone to your car and listen
to your favorite tunes. By linking
a smartphone to a modern info-
tainment system, you can stream
Internet radio stations, perform
Web searches and check local gas
prices, weather forecasts and more,
right from your driver's seat.
You can have the car read text
messages to you. With an integrat-
ed system, you can even look up
local restaurants, make an online
reservation and get turn-by-turn
directions to get there. And many
of those functions can be now be
controlled simply by speaking
commands.
Yes, the controls for many of
these advanced systems are com-
plicated and distracting to use. But
the best designs offer an unprec-
edented level of versatility and
convenience that is changing how
we live with our cars.
Many paths for music
Most new cars come with one
or more ways to link a portable
music device so you can listen to
your selections through the car's
audio system. Mini jack and USB


ports can be found even in budget
models just plug in, select "aux"
in the audio controls and you're
in business. With a USB port, you'
can often operate your device with
the car's radio controls and see the
song, album and artist informa,
tion in its display. You can also play
music stored on a flash drive.
Most new cars come with a
Bluetooth system that allows you to
wirelessly connect a phone. It lets
you dial by voice and talk hands-
free, and it also streams music
stored on the phone or received
through a data connection (think
Aha or Pandora).
There's an app for that
The next step up is a full info-
tainment system that typically
integrates a car's audio, navigation,
communication and climate sys-
tems. It usually includes an in-dash
display and is controlled through
a touch screen or a multifunction
controller (or both), hard keys and/
or voice commands.
The latest trend is for automakers
to integrate apps into these systems
that let you access various content
from your smartphone. Toyota's En-
tune system, for example, lets you
stream Pandora and iHeartRadio
stations, perform Bing destination
searches, make restaurant reserva-
tions through OpenTable, search
for and buy movie tickets, and
check traffic, weather, fuel prices,
stocks and sports scores.
To reduce driver distraction,
some functions are deactivated
while the vehicle is moving. And


though there can still be features
that take your eyes off the road,
using an in-car system is easier
than trying to operate the small
buttons of a portable device while
you drive.
That said, some systems are
easier to use than others. Consum-
er Reports has found Cadillac's CUE
and the MyFord/MyLincoln Touch
systems to be particularly frus-
trating. Common gripes include
complicated menus and touch
screens that are slow to respond.
On the plus side, Chrysler's Ucon-
nect Touch system provides simple,
clear menus while retaining easy-
to-use push buttons and knobs for
frequent tasks.
Navigating the GPS maze
Should you get a built-in naviga-
tion system? Autpmaker systems
have larger screens and often allow
programming by voice. But they
can be pricey. Some start at about
$650, but others may come in an
options package costing $2,000
or more. You can also get a good
portable-GPS device with the same
basic functionality for about $100.
Overall, Consumer Reports has
been impressed with the con-
venience of today's systems, but
would like to see automakers make
them more intuitive to use, with
simpler interfaces and greater use
of voice controls.
And keep in mind that this tech-
nology is evolving rapidly, so check
automakers' websites to see what's
available on any car that sparks
your interest.


Donna R.
Fowler,
DNP, joins
Dr. Murali
Krishna's
Marianna
practice
of Chipola
Surgical
& Medical
Specialties
- Internal
Medicine.'


Donna Fowler, DNP, joins

local medical practice


Special to the Floridari

Jackson Hospital is
pleased to announce the
expansion of Chipola Sur-
gical & Medical Specialties-
Internal Medicine with the
addition of provider Don-
na R. Fowler, DNIP NP-C,
FNP-BC and ARNP.
Fowler is a doctorate-
level Family Nurse Prac-
titioner whose scope is
prevention of disease and
perpetuation of wellness
for Adults.
She received her doc-
torate in Nursing Practice
from Florida State Univer-
sity, where she previously
received a Post-Master's
Education Certificate. Be-
fore that, she graduated
from Jacksonville State
University, Ala., with a
Master's of Science degree
in Nursing and Communi-
ty Health with a concentra-
tion in Women & Cardiac
Disease.
Her 21-year nursing
career has provided her
experience in a variety
of clinical and facility set-
tings. Beyond her profes-
sional accomplishments,
she served as a Nurse Prac-
titioner volunteer for un-
insured and low-income
adults in Panama City
and currently serves as


Associate Professor for
Gulf Coast Community
College, where she was
named Professor of the
Year 2011.
. Fowler is a self-ascribed
dog lover, having currently
five dogs, four of whom
she rescued. She is an ex-
pert canine fly ball handler
and trainer and also loves
agility with her dogs. She,
her husband Chuck Thiele
and their five dogs will per-
manently reside in Jackson,
County in March, where
her husband has worked
with Northwest Florida
Farm Credit for the past
three years. Fowler grew
up in a small faring town
in Missouri and enjoys the
beauty and community of
Marianna.
Dr. Fowler looks 'for-
ward to serving patients at
Chipola Surgical & Medi-
cal Specialties Internal
Medicine and livifig in
Marianna. She invites ev-
eryone to give her a call at
526-3314, or stop by and
say hello at 2946 Jefferson
St., Marianna. If you would
like more information
about Dr. Fowler or have
her speak at your civic
group, please call Rosie
Smith at 718-2696 or e-mail
her at rsmith@jackhosp.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Pirates made it
three straight district wins to
start the season Tuesday night,
taking an 8-4 road victory over
the Cottondale Hornets.
Brandon Moats pitched six no-
hit innings for the Pirates before
being relieved in the seventh,
finishing up at 6 2 / 3 innings with
two earned runs, two hits, three
walks and six strikeouts to get
the win, while also driving in two
runs at the plate.
Sneads got single runs in the
first, second and fourth innings
before adding two in the fifth
and three in the sixth to take an
8-0 lead.
The Hornets got four runs in
the bottom of the seventh and
forced the Pirates to make two
pitching changes, but ultimately


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Miss Florida International Charity Newsome, a student at Chipola College,
recently addressed students in the Chipola Honors program. Newsome's
pageant service campaign, "Read Every Day" provides books for first grad-
ers in Marianna, Chipley and Vernon. She also volunteers at local schools to help with
their reading programs. Chipola Honors Program students recently raised $200 to help
Newsome pay for books. Pictured from left are: Reid Davis, CarlyWilson, Miss Florida
International Charity Newsom, Lawrence Raines and Katelynn Lewis. Newsome will
compete in the Miss International pageant in Chicago, IL this summer.


Lunch
From Page 1A

slight edge over its chal-
lenger, Chartwells.
The similarities were
evident not only in the
committee members'
scoring, but in the com-
ments of several involved
in the process so far.
Agriculture depart-
ment dietician Rick Parks,
who provided nutritional
analysis by phone during
Thursday's committee
meeting commented, "It's
a toss-up, really."
'A bird in the hand..."
is how Bondurant put it,
while reflecting on per-
sonnel considerations,
and taking into account
the school board's nearly
10-year relationship with
Sodexo.


OH~1meS


Drugs tak


left in arm

Staff report

Officers with the
Bonifay Police Depart-
ment, at approximately
5 p.m. Tuesday, March 5,
responded to the Medi-
cine Shoppe Pharmacy
on West US
90, after
receiving a
call about
an armed
robbery
at the
Clemmons location.
Police
dispatch personnel
advised officers that the
suspect fled in a white
SUM traveling west in the
eastbound lane of US 90.
As the patrol officer
arrived at the Medicine
Shoppe, a fireman with
Bonifay Fire and Rescue
reported to dispatch that
a vehicle matching the
description was traveling
east on Brock Avenue at a
high rate of speed.
BPD reports that
employees at the store
said the suspect had
a long gun, possibly a
semi-automatic rifle,
in his possession while
committing the robbery.
The suspect is alleged to
have obtained two types
of controlled substances:
Alprazolam (Xanax) and
hydrocodone (Lortab).
Officials say no cash
was taken during the
incident.
Based on information


And just two days prior,
at a special meeting, dur-
ing which company rep-
resentatives made pre-
* sentations to the school
board, Kenny Griffin said
he'd visited several facili-
ties, some run by Chart-
wells, some by Sodexo,
and found the food to be
t much the same wherever
he went. "It comes down
to people," he said.
Sodexo's 99.52 evalua-
tion score from the com-
Smittee, compared to
Chartwells' 93.06, means
the group will recom-
mend the school board
again award the food ser-
vice contract to the. cur-
rent vendor.
The Jackson County
School Board will consid-
er the recommendation
and make a decision dur-
ing its March 19 meeting.


;Co y e 5 w


m, cash


ed robbery
gathered during the in-
vestigation, a Suspect was
identified as Clayton Kyle
Clemmons, white male,
age 41, of Bonifay.
Deputies with the
Holmes County Sheriff's
Office made contact with

dence on Chance Road,
just outside the cify limits
of Bonifay. The suspect
was taken into custody by
deputies and the stolen
medication was recov-
ered, along with several
firearms, at least one of
which believed to be
the weapon used in the
armed robbery.
Clemmons was trans-
ported to Doctor's
Memorial Hospital for
evaluation before being
booked into the Holmes
County Jail.
He was charged with
armed robbery and
resisting without vio-
lence; his bond was set at
$81,500.
In a BPD press release,
Chief Chris Wells thanked
those who helped bring
the case to a close:
"The quick response of
all involved and almost
immediate identification
of the suspect helped
prevent a bad situa-
tion from getting out of
control. I greatly appreci-
ate all of the assistance
rendered by the Holmes
County Sheriff's Office,
Holmes County EMS and
Bonifay Fire Rescue in
today's events."


Local credit union supports

Chipola basketball tourney


FCCU to
host halftime
entertainment
at championship
game
From staff reports

First Commerce Credit
Union is showing its lo-
cal support for the Florida
Colleges Activities Associ-
ation Men's and Women's
State Basketball Tourna-
ment to be held at the
Milton H. Johnson Health
Center at Chipola College
this week.
As the title sponsor of
the Women's Tourna-
ment, FCCU Jackson
County Executive Chuck
Hudson ,welcomed play-
ers and started the-first
game of the tournament
with tip-off.
"First Commerce is
proud to support the col-
lege and activities that
bring the community to-
gether," said Hudson.
During the women's
championship game
on Saturday, spectators


Player
From Page 1A

misdemeanor offense.
Listed on the Chipola
roster as Mistor Chris-
topher Thomas, No. 2,
the 19-year-old has been
among the leading scor-
ers for Chipola in his
freshman season with
the team. He lives in the
Chipola dorm and hails
from Denver, Colo.
Chipola president Dr.
Gene Prough issued a
brief e-mailed statement
on the matter Thursday.
"Chipola College is in
the business of providing
opportunities for young
people;" his statement
read. "In return, we expect
student-athletes to be ac-
countable, to conduct
themselves responsibly
and to make good choic-
es. Due to the choices this
young man has made, it is
our understanding that he
will not play in the state


Jackson County Vault & Monument
Quality Service at Affordable Prie
Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90
850-482-5041 g


can register at the FCCU
table to participate in a
half-time shoot out for a
chance to win $50. There
will also be coloring
sheets and activities for
children at the table. The
FCCU Kids Club mascot
Sammy Squirrel will be at
center court to challenge
two 'spectators to a half-.
court shot.
"This tournament is the
premier sporting event
in the five-county area
served by Chipola Col-
lege and we couldn't run a
smooth tournament with-
out the support of our lo-
cal businesses like First
Commerce Credit Union,"
said Bryan Craven, direc-
tor of public relations at
Chipola College.
Sixteen men's and wom-
en's basketball teams from
across Florida are par-
ticipating in the four-day
tournament that began
Wednesday and culmi-
nates with the champi-
onship game tomorrow.
Thousands of fans, col-
lege coaches, recruiters,
and community members
are expected to attend.


tournament."
Prough did not com-
ment on the player's
future with the team, a
member of his staff cit-
ing the fact that the case is
still ongoing.
Chipola men's basket-
ball coach Patrick Blake
likewise had no comment
on that score, saying only
that iihomas would not
be playing in the tourna-
ment. As for the absence
of Thomas and the impact
that might have on the
team's tournament play,
Blake found a positive
note. "It just gives other
guys more of an opportu-
nity to play and make an
impact on the team," he
said Thursday. "Nothing
changes with us; the guys
(are) going to have to do a
little more; just right now,
he's not going to be avail-
able to play. Our focus is
on playing Polk tonight."
Jackson County Sports Editor
Dustin Kent contributed to this
report


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Brandon Moats pitches for Sneads
during the game in Cottondale
Tuesday.
Trent dark came in and record-
ed the final out on a ground ball
to first to end the game.
"We just kind of let it slip there
at the end with 'our focus," Pi-
rates coach Mark Guerra said of


Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850-526-5059

Liddie
Jeanetta
Harris

Liddie Jeanetta Harris
age 82 of Grand Ridge
passed away on Wednes-
day, March 6, 2013 in the
Southeast Alabama Medi-
cal Center.
Mrs. Harris was born in
Geneva County, Alabama
to the late Wiley and Millie
Bateman Deese and had
spent most of her life in
Jackson County where she
was a member of the Cy-
press Grove Assembly of
God Church. She was re-
tired from the Florida State
Hospital after serving sev-
eral years as a Psyche Aide.
In her free time Mrs. Harris
enjoyed spending time vis-
iting with her family and
friends and loved puzzles
and word find.
She was preceded in
death.by her parents, hus-
band J.T. Harris and a son
Edward Harris.
Mrs. Harris is survived by
two daughters Jeanette
Middleton and husband
Earl of Grand Ridge,
Elouise Hamm and hus-
band 'Gill of Dellwood, a
host of brothers and sis-
ters, grandchildren Sheila
Mottor and husband Don-
ald, Cynthia Childs, Eric
Middleton and wife Sue,
Corwin Hamm and wife Li-
sa, Christopher Hamm and
wife Amy, 16 great grand-
children, and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Services for Mrs. Harris
will be held at 10:00 A.M.
on Saturday, March 9, 2013
in the Marianna Chapel
Furieral Home with Rev.
Wayne Fussell officiating.
Interment will follow in the
Cypress Community Cem-
etery. A time of remem-
brance will be held on Fri-
day,. March 8, 2013 in the
Marianna Chapel Funeral
Home from 6:00PM to
8:00PM.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements.
Expressions .of sympathy
may be submitted online at
www.mariannachapelfh.com
Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850-526-5059


Katrine

M. Weeks

Mrs. Katrine "Kate" M.
Weeks age 61 of Marianna,
passed away on Wednes-
day, March 06, 2013 in Tal-
lahassee Memorial Hospi-
tal.
Mrs. Weeks was a native
of Marianna born on De-
cember 11, 1951 to the late
M.J. and Rosie Anderson
Moats. She was a dedicated
mother and grandmother
who loved her family dear-
ly. Mrs. Weeks also enjoyed
shopping and cleaning
houses.
She was preceded in
death by her parents, 3
brothers; John Henry
Moats, James Ray Moats
and Alec Jr. Moats.
Mrs. Weeks is survived
by her husband of 46 years,
Coy Weeks of Cypress, FL',
two sons Willie Weeks and
wife Jill of Grand Ridge and
William Weeks and wife
Frankie of Sneads, three
daughters Saddle Weeks,
Deronda Weeks and Teresa
Weeks all of Cypress, four
brothers Roy Jack Moats
and wife Betty of
Crawfordville, Kenneth
Wayne Moats and wife Sara
of Grangerburg, AL, Wil-
liam Moats and wife Clar-
ice of Marianna and An-
drew Moats of Marianna,
two sisters Virginia i
Chambliss and husband
Danny of Cottondale and


Minnie Mae Barile and
husband Don of Kentucky,
18 grandchildren and 9
great grandchildren.
A celebration of life for
Mrs. Weeks will be held at
3:30 PM on Saturday,
March 9, 2013 in the Ma-
rianna Chapel Funeral
Home with Pastor Frances
Dudley officiating.
A time of remembrance
will be held from 2:00 P.M.
until time of service.
In lieu of flowers contri-
butions can be made to
Tyndall Federal Credit Un-
ion in memory of Mrs.
Weeks to account number
1979548.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements.
Expressions of sympathy
may be submitted online at
www.mariannachapelfh.com
Lanier-Andler
Funeral Home
Sneads, Florida
850-593-9900












JohnM.
Whiddon

John M. : (Mickey)
Whiddon, age 46, of
Chattahoochee, FL., passed
away Wednesday, February
27, 2013, in Tallahassee, FL.
Mickey was born on De-
cember 22, 1966, in
Chattahoochee, FL. He
graduated 'from
Chattahoochee High
School in 1984, and lived
his entire life in
Chattahoochee. Despite
Mickey's physical disabili-
ties, he enjoyed life to the
fullest and has been an in-
spiration to family and
friends throughout his life.
Mickey has now been re-
stored to his former glory
and is dancing in heaven
with his favorite angels;
Momma, Daddy and Sissy.
Mickey was preceded in
death by his parents, Ches-
ter and Johnnie Whiddon
and a sister, LeAnn Jones.
He is survived by two
brothers, Pete. Whiddon
and his wife Linda' of
Chattahoochee; Marty
Whiddon and his wife
Wanda of Felda, FL. and
one sister, Jennifer
Roberson and her husband
Brian of Chattahoochee.
He was also survived by
several nieces and neph-
ews as well as many special
friends.
A Memorial Service will
be' held on March 9, 2013,
at 1:00 PM EST, at the
Booster Club Pavilion L S
59 overlooking Lake Semi-
note.
In lieu of flowers, contri-
butions may be sewt to the
Darrell Gwynn Foundation,
4850 SW 52nd St., Davie,
Florida 33314, or to email,
darrellqwynnfoundation
.org/contactus.htm
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332

Janice A.
Zimmerle

Janice A. Zimmerle, 68,
of Marianna died Thurs-
day, March 7, 2013 at Jack-
son Hospital.
Funeral Arrangements
will be announced by
fames & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel.


FlOliStS

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
ww'w.artisticdesignsunltd.com
850-372-4456


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


the loss, allowing six earned runs
on nine hits, three walks, and
two strikeouts in six innings.
I thought Austin threw real
well considering he hasiYt
thrown in over a year," Hornets
coach Greg Ohler said of his
starter after the game. I knew
Sneads was going to hit, but we
had talked to our pitchers about
cutting down on walks because
that's what has killed us lately
and he only walked three.
I think we gave them a few
runs they shouldrft have scored
and there were breaks that didn't
go our way, but I was glad to see
the guys dig down and rally in
the seventh a little. That showed
some prideand guts."
The Hornets fell to 2-4 with
the loss and 1-2 in District 3-1A
competition, while the Pirates
improved to 4-1 overall and 3-0
in league play. L


"obviously th4ey're confemme champions and have had a
great year, so it will beo tough battlefor us rightfi-om the
start."
Patrick Blake,
on Polk State


~1 -------~1-1111----11----~___1____1_11111


'!


LOWIL & STATE


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The No. 12 Chipola Indians will
open up play in the meiYs FCSAA
state tournament today when
they take on Polk State at 6 p.m.
in the quarterfinals at the Milton
H. Johnson Health Center.
The Indians (25-4) come in as
the runner-up from the Panhan-
dle Conference, while the Eagles
(22-8) are the champions of the
Suncoast Conference.
The game is a rematch of a Dec.
8 contest in Gainesville won by
Chipola 78-46, with the Indians
jumping out to a 41-25 halftime
lead and cruising in the second
half to the easy win.
; Polk State has gone 15-4 since
that loss and Indians coach
Patrick Blake said he expected a


Chipola's Torian Graham takes a shot
during a game earlier in the season.


Sports Items
Send all sports items to edito-
rial@jcfloridan.com, or fax them
to,850-482-4478. The mailing
address for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan P.O. Box 520
Marianna, FL32447.







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


White House: US can defend against NKorea attack


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
U.S. is fully capable of
defending itself against
a North Korean ballistic
missile attack, the White
House said Thursday, after
Pyongyang threatened a
pre-emptive nuclear strike
on the United States.
The threat from the
North Koreans came ahead
of a unanimous vote in the
U.N. Security Council ap-
proving its toughest sanc-
tions yet on the North in
response to an atomic test
last month.
North Korea has escalat-
ed its bellicose statements
this week as the tightening
ofU.N. sanctions loomed.
It '"h. also threatened to
scrap the cease-fire that
ended the 1950-53 Korean
War.
"I can tell you that the
United States is fully ca-
pable of defending against
any North Korean ballistic
missile attack," said White
House spokesman Jay
Carney.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this undated photo released by the South Korean Defense
Ministry on Thursday, Feb. 14, a South Korean sea-to-land
cruise missile is fired from a submarine during a drill at an
undisclosed location in South Korea.


North Korea has now
conducted three nuclear
tests, although experts
doubt it has mastered how
to mount a nuclear war-
head on a ballistic missile
capable of reaching the
mainland United States.
The top U.S. envoy on
North Korea, Glyn Davies,
cautioned. Pyongyang not
to miscalculate, saying the
U.S. will take necessary
steps to defend itself and


its allies, including South
Korea, where it bases near-
ly 30,000 U.S. forces.
The U.S. also provides
what it calls a "nuclear
umbrella" security guar-
antee to both South Ko-
rea and Japan, neighbors
of North Korea which do
not have atomic weap-
ons, and missile defense
capabilities.
"We take all North Ko-
rean threats seriously


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif..
Thursday, March 7. Zuckerberg on Thursday unveiled a new look for the social network's News
Feed, the place where its 1 billion users congregate to see what's happening with their friends,
Family and favorite businesses.


Facebook to bring a more


personal touch to News Feed


The Associated Press

MENLO PARK, Calif.
- Facebook has rede-
signed the main attraction
of its social network to ad-
dress complaints that its
website has turned into a
jumble of monotonous
musings and random
photos.
In an attempt to breathe
new life into Facebook's
News Feed, the company
will introduce new con-
trols that allow people to
sort streams of photos and
other material into orga-
nized sections.
With the makeover un-
veiled Thursday, Facebook
CEO Mark Zuckerberg
hopes to turn the News
Feed into something more
like a newspaper tailored
to the particular interests
of each of the social net-
work's more than 1 billion
worldwide users.
Although Zuckerberg
didn't say it, the overhaul
also appears to be aimed
at carving out more space
to show larger and more
dynamic ads within the
News Feed as Facebook
seeks to boost its revenue
and stock price.
Previous tweaks to the
News Feed have triggered
howls of protest among
Facebook's users. Hoping
to minimize the grousing
this time around, Face-
book intends to roll out the
changes in phases. It will
probably be six months
to a year before everyone


who accesses Facebookl
on a personal computer
sees the revamped News
Feed, the company said:
The facelift is likely to be
more jarring for those who
only visit Facebook on a
PC because it incorporates
some features already de-
ployed in the social net-
work's mobile applications
for smartphohes and tab-
let computers.
"They needed to freshen
things up," said Brian Blau,
research director of con-
sumer technologies for
Gartner Inc. "This should
bring a lot of cooler things"
into the News Feed.
The new features will
enable users to choose
to see streams of content
that may feature nothing
but photos or posts from
their closest friends, fam-
Sily members or favorite
businesses. Or they can
just peruse content about
music, or sports, as if they
were grabbing a section of
a newspaper. Other'news-
paper-like changes will
include lists of events that
users' social circles have
flagged for the upcoming
weekend and other sum-
maries meant to resemble
a table of contents.
By adding more per-
sonal touches, Facebook
is acknowledging that the
computer-generated for-
mulas that it has been us-
ing to determine the con-
tent shown to each user
have become less effective
as the social circles within


its nenvork ha'e widened
to include a more diverse
array of information.
"This gives people more
power to dig deeper into
the topics they care about,"
Zuckerberg said while dis-
cussing the makeover at
Facebook's Menlo Park,
Calif. headquarters.
Facebook still intends
to rely on algorithms to
select some material to
feature on the main part
of the News Feed, much
like newspaper editors de-
termine what goes on the
front page.
More space on the News
Feed's front page and other
sections space will be de-
voted to pictures and vid-
eo in recognition of how
dominant those visual el-
ements have become on
Facebook as smartphones
and tablet computers
equipped with high-qual-
ity cameras have made it
easier to share snapshots
and clips.
About 50 percent o, the
posts on News Feed in-
clude a photo or video
now, up from 25. percent in
late 2011, Zuckerberg said.
Bigger pictures also
will give advertisers a
larger canvass to make
their marketing pitches.
Facebook is hoping mar-
keters will seize the op-
portiunity to develop more
creative ways to entice
and intrigue customers so
advertising can become a
more acceptable fixture on
the social network.


enough to ensure that we
have the correct defense
posture to deal with any
contingencies that might
arise," Davies told report-
ers after testifying before
the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee.
Thursday's statement out
of Pyongyang appeared to
be the most specific open
threat of a nuclear strike
by any country against an-
other, but the Senate pan-
el's chairman, Sen. Robert
Menendez, D-N.J., said
the threat was "absurd"
and one that if carried out
would be suicide for North
Korea.
Davies reiterated that the
U.S. will not accept North
Korea as a nuclear-armed
state although after
conducting three nuclear
tests it is already assumed
to be capable of making
at least a crude atomic
bomb.
Davies, however, faced
Republican skepticism
about the effectiveness
of Obama administration
policy toward North Korea,


which has taken strides
in the past year toward its
goal of having a nuclear
weapon that can target the
U.S. In December, it con-
ducted its first successful
launch of a three-stage,
long-range rocket. Its Feb.
12 nuclear test could help
it miniaturize a warhead.
The Foreign Relations
Committee's top Repub-
lican, Sen. Bob Corker of
Tennessee, drew a com-
parison to U.S. policy on
Iran, where the U.S. has
warned it could resort to
military action to prevent
Tehran from acquiring a
nuclear weapon.
North Korea is "equally
nutty" and with a worse
human rights record, and
"way past any red line we
would accept in Iran," he
said.
Corker concluded that
Davies' hope that the dual-
trackU.S. policyofpressure
and engagement would
eventually work in get-
ting Pyongyang to change
its ways was a "highly
aspirational statement


I I S


Obama presses on with



GOP charm offensive


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Punctuated with the
sounds of ringing phones
and clinking chiria, Presi-
dent Barack Obama's new
legislative diplomacy has
Republicans wondering
what took so long.
Obama pressed ahead
Thursday with his bipar-
tisan political outreach,
eliciting a cautious
welcome in a capital that
has been riven by gridlock
and partisanship over
how to lower deficits and
stabilize the nation's debt.
Obama had the Repub-
lican House Budget Com-
mittee chairman, Paul
Ryan, and the commit-
tee's top Democrat, Chris
Van Hollen, to lunch at
the White House, a day af-
ter he dined with a dozen
Republican senators in
what the White House
said was an effort to find
common ground with
rank-and-file lawmakers.
Few were willing to
guarantee that the
engagement would
yield results. Previous
presidents have tried to
develop relationships
with members of Con-
gress with varying degrees
of success, though some
of the biggest pieces of
legislation, such as the
1964 Civil Rights Act and
a Social Security deal in
1983 required cross-party
efforts by Presidents Lyn-
don Johnson and Ronald
Reagan.
"We're not naive about
the challenges that we
still face; they exist,"
White House spokesman
Jay Carney said. "And
there are differences."
Obama has negoti-
ated directly in the past
with House Speaker
John Boehner in hopes
of finding a large deficit
reduction deal, but those
efforts have faltered as
the president pursued
deals with tax increases
that Republicans oppose.
Most recently, neither
side worked hard to
avoid $85 billion in auto-
matic spending cuts and
instead devolved into


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis.
arrives at the West Wing of the White House in Washington,
Thursday.


partisan finger-pointing
over which side was more
to blame.
Boehner said Obama's
new approach represent-
ed a 180-degree turn. "He
is going to, after being in
office now over four years,
he is actually going to sit
down and talk to mem-
bers," Boehner said. "I
think it is a sign, a hopeful
sign, and I'm hopeful that
something will come out
of it. But if the president
continues to insist on tax
hikes, I don't think we're
going to get very far."
Carney argued that
Obama's new talks with
congressional Republi-
cans did not signal a shift
as much as an attempt to
seize an opportunity after
automatic spending cuts
kicked in last Saturday
but months before anoth-
er fiscal deadline looms.


But in briefing reporters
Thursday, Carney notice-
ably dialed back his criti-
cism of Republicans and
emphasized the "com-
mon ground" that existed
between the parties.
"The fact is, this should
have been happening
all along," said Sen. Bob
Corker, R-Tenn., one of
the dozen Republicans
who joined Obama for
dinner Wednesday
night at a hotel a few
blocks from the White
House.

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Senate confirms Brennan for CIA


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Senate confirmed John
Brennan to be CIA direc-
tor Thursday after the
Obama administration
bowed to demands from
Republicans blocking the
nomination and stated
explicitly there are limits
on the president's power
to use drones against U.S.
terror suspects on Ameri-
can soil.
J The vote was 63-34 and


came just hours after Re-
publican Sen. Rand Paul of
Kentucky, a possible 2016
presidential candidate,
held the floor past mid-
night in an old-style fili-
buster of the nomination
to extract an answer from
the administration.
Still, Brennan won
some GOP support. Thir-
teen Republicans voted
with 49 Democrats and
one independent to give
Brennan, who has been
President Barack Obama's


top counterterrorism ad-
viser, the top job at the
nation's spy agency. He will
replace Michael Morell,
the CIA's deputy director
who has been acting direc-
tor since David Petraeus
resigned in November
after acknowledging
an affair with his
biographer.
The confirmation vote
came moments after
Democrats prevailed in a
vote ending the filibuster,
81-16.


that does not seem to be
based on reality."
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-
Fla., also drew a compari-
son with Iran and said
he did not believe North
Korea's leader, Kim Jong
Un, could be persuaded to
disarm. The best the U.S.
could hope for was to de-
lay the development of the
North's weapons and its
ability to strike the West,
he said.
"They're convinced the
only way they are ever go-
ing to accomplish what
they want is by having a
nuclear program and be-
ing able to hold the world
hostage with it," Rubio told
the hearing.
The new U.N. sanctions,
which were drafted by the
U.S. and the North's chief
ally and benefactor, Chi-
na, should makd it more
difficult for Pyongyang
to finance and obtain ma-
terial for its nuclear and
ballistic missile programs,
and for the reclusive na-
tion's ruling elite to acquire
luxury goods.


18A + FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 2013


NATION















Sports Briefs
High School baseball
Friday Vernon at Gracev-
ille, 4 and 6 p.m.; Marianna at
Pensacola Catholic, 4 and 7
p.m.; Malone at Central, 6 p.m.

High School softball
Friday Cottondale at
Graceville, 6 p.m.; Altha at
Sneads, 4 and 6 p.m.; Mari-
anna at Walton, 6 p.m.; Malone
at Central, 6 p.m.;

Chipola baseball
The Indians will be home for
the weekend for three games
against Gordon College start-
ing Friday at 5 p.m., followed
by a doubleheader Saturday
starting at noon.

Chipola softball
The Lady Indians will host
Middle Georgia Sunday at 2
and4 p.m.

MHS softball
golf tournament
The Marianna High School
softball team golf tournament
will be held March 9-10 at Cav-
erns Golf Course, with format
a three-man scramble at $85
per player.
Lunch will be provided on
Sunday. For more information,
call ScottWiggins at 573-
7506 or Brian McKeithan at
482-4257.

Altrusa golf tournament

golf tournament will be held
March 15 at Indian Springs
Golf Course, with registration
at noon and a I p.m. shotgun
start.
Format will be four-person
scramble, modified handicap,
18 holes at $65 per person.
For more information, call
Jay James at 526-3197 or
209-3068, or Kathy Milton at
482-7788 or209-8013.

Panhandle Seminole Club
golf tournament
The 2013 PaiThdndl Se nt:
nole Club's annual scholarship
golf tournament will be held
April 5 at Indian Springs Golf
Club in Marianna.This tour-
nament, along with another
fundraiser, has helped provide
$40,000 over the past 10 years
to deserving local students
and helped further their
education.
Registration and warm-up
will begin at noon with the
shotgun start at 1 p.m. for this
four-man scramble event.
Cash prizes will be awarded to
the first-, second- and third-
place teams. Additional prizes
will be given for longest drive,
straightest drive, closest to the
pin;,and so on.
The greens fee contribution
of.$65 will entitle each golfer
to a fantastic afternoon of golf
on a championship course (to
help a very worthy cause), fol-
lowed by a great meal.
Scholarship (hole) and
prize sponsorships are also
available for this event. For
more information, call Roy
Baker at 850-526-4005 or 209-
1326, or George Sweeney at
850-482-5526.

Sports items
Send all sports items to editorial@
jcfloridan.com,or fax them to 850-482-
4478 The mailing addressfor the paper
is Jackson County Floridan P.O. Box 520
Marianna, FL 32447.


Chipola Men's Basketball



Indians crush Eagles


Team plays again at 8 p.m.
tonight in semifinals

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Indians cruised past the
Polk State Eagles 70-47 Thursday night
in first round action,in the FCSAA State
Tournament at the Milton H. Johnson
Health Center, advancing to tonight's
semifinal round.
With the win, the Indians move on, to
play the winner of Thursday's quarterfinal
nightcap between Santa Fe and Brevard
at 8 p.m. for a spot in Saturday night's
championship game.
On Thursday, it was Torian Graham and
Carlos Morris who led the way for Chipo-
la, with Graham scoring 14 of his game-
high 18 points in the first half, and Morris
taking over in the second half to score 12
of his 15.


Graham helped the Indians break open
a tight game early with a 16-4 run to
close the half, scoring seven points dur-
ing the run and hitting a buzzer-beating
three-pointer at the end of the half to give
Chipola a 38-23 edge.
A coast to coast layup by Graham early
in the second half pushed the lead to 20
at 45-25, with Morris later adding a three-
pointer and a short floater in the lane to
make it 54-31 with 10:02 to play.
The Indians continued to pull away,
getting a pair of buckets by Earl Watson,
a jumper by Graham, and a driving finish
by Morris to complete a 15-4 run and go
ahead 62-34.
Cinmeon Bowers added 12 points and
eight rebounds for Chipola, with Watson
scoring eight points, and Demone Har-
rison seven.
Ismaila Dauda posted a double-double
for Polk with 12 points and 11 rebounds

See INDIANS, Page 2B


The Indian's Cinmeon Bowers attempts a shot
against Polk Thursday night during the JUCO state
basketball tournament at Chipola.,


LADY INDIANS IN ACTION


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
hipola's Jasmine Crawford heads for an opening during the JUCO state basketball tournament on
Wednesday night. The Lady Indians will be playing in a semifinal game against Northwest Florida
State at 6 p.m. tonight.



eFCM Basketball Tburnarent



Raiders roll to state semifinals


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Opening up the FCSAA state
tournament with a first-round
matchup with the No. 16 team
in America in Palm Beach
State wasn't much of a reward
for No. 3 Northwest Florida
State winning the Panhandle
Conference.
However, the Raiders still
managed to pass their first test
of the postseason Thursday
afternoon with a hard-fought


72-64 win over the Panthers to
advance to the semifinals and
get a measure of redemp-
tion for a Dec. 9 loss to Palm
Beach.
The Raiders again faced an
early deficit Thursday as the
Panthers staked claimto a22-15
lead in the first half after a pair
of threes by .Jonathan Holton
and a bucket by Demetric Aus-
tin with 6:46 on the clock.
But Northwest fought back
to take a 29-27 halftime lead
thanks to 18 combined points


from the starting backcourt of
Chris Jones and Shykeem Jack-
son, with the latter knocking
in three triples and scoring 11
of his 19 points in the first 20
minutes.
Jackson continued his hot
shooting in the second half,
making two more from long
distance to put the Raiders
up 40-32, and a driving layup
by Lamin Fulton later put the
Raiders up 11 with 11:53 to
play.
The Panthers fought back,


cutting the lead to 58-54 with
3:15 remaining after a three-
point play by Holton.
The margin was cut to two at
60-58 after a reverse layup by
Austin with 2:16 left, but Jones
answered with a huge 3-pointer
on the Raiders' next posses-
sion to push the lead back to
five.
From that point on, North-
west closed it out on the free-
throw line, making 9-of-16 over

See RAIDERS, Page 2B


Second-half surge lifts Patriots past Manatees


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
The Patriots' Amdy Fall attempts a shot Thursday during a
JUCO game against State College of Florida.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

It wasn't as easy as one might have expected, but the
Central Florida Patriots used a second-half surge to
take a 90-77 victory over the State College of Florida
Manatees on Thursday afternoon in the FSCAA state
tourney at the Milton H. Johnson Health Center.
The Patriots came in as one of the favorites to make
a run at a state title with 27 wins and a No. 8 nation-
al ranking, but the Manatees, who had just six wins
coming into the tournament, stayed with the Patriots
through the first 30 minutes of action.
But a 12-2 run helped break the game open for the
Patriots, who outscored the Manatees 28-19 over the
final 10 minutes.
After a corner three by Will Saunders and a layup by
Rodell Wigginton put Central Florida up 74-60 with
6:50 to play, the Manatees never got closer than 12 the
rest of the way.
Wigginton led Central Florida with 20 points on 7-of-
14 shooting, while Jordan Parks added 14 points and


nine rebounds, and Eugene McCrory 13 and 10.
Jeremiah Eason also scored 12 points for the Patriots
and Rasham Suarez had 11.
Central Florida overcame a pair of outstanding of-
fensive performances by the Manatees' Isaiah Williams
and Obinna Oleka, with Williams scoring 31 points on
9-of-13 from three, and Oleka posting 29 points and 12
rebounds.
The Manatees made 13-of-29 threes, but that wasn't
enough tg overcome 33 percent shooting overall, 19
turnovers, and 51-40 rebounding margin in Central
Florida's favor.
State College led by as much as 10 in the first half
thanks to the shooting exhibition by Williams, who
made seven triples, and scored 24 points in the
half.
But the Patriots fought their way back in front, with a
three-point play by Jordan Parks capping an 11-0 run
to make it 36-30 with 4:49 to half.
By halftime, the lead was 42-39 for the Patriots.
Central Florida will next play Friday in the semifinals
against Northwest Florida State. L








12B FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 2013


SPORTS


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Northwest Florida's Arthur Edwards and Telvin Wilkerson both try to grab a loose ball Thursday
during a JUCO tournament matchup against Palm Beach State.


Raiders
From Page 1B
the final 1:26 as the Pan-
' others struggled to convert
at the other end to get
closer.
A three by Grant White
cut it to 69-63 with 29.7
seconds left and gave the
Panthers a spark of hope,
but that proved to be brief
after Jones made two free
throws and the Raiders


got another defensive stop
with 17.7 seconds left.
Jones finished with 26t
points on 7-of-19 from the
field and 2-of-7 from three,
and the two-time Panhan-
dle Conference Player of
thd Year converted just 10-
of-18 from the free-throw
line, with his team also
making barely better than
50 percent at 20-of-38.
But the Raiders will be
satisfied to simply survive
and advance on to today's


semifinal round to take
on the Central Florida Pa-
.triots, who defeated State
College of Florida 90-77 in
Thursday's first quarterfi-
nal game.
The Panthers, who were
led by Holton's 19 points,
18 rebounds and three
blocked shots, had their
season end with a record
of 29-3.
Northwest Florida State
(26-2) will tip with Central
Florida at 3 p.m.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Miami has one more chance


to clinch ACC outright


The Associated Press

CORAL GABLES The Miami Hurri-
canes' finale in the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference race will determine whether
their late-season losses are remembered
as a mere stumble or an epic collapse.
That sounds like a lot of pressure.
"We just want to try to keep it as an-
other game," senior Kenny Kadji said
Thursday.
"It's going to be an emotionally
tense moment," senior Julian Gamble
conceded.
"Wait a minute," coaoh Jim Larranaga
said. "I just think it's college basketball."
*Larranaga wants to avoid making too
much of the No. 6-ranked Hurricanes'
recent slump. After winning their first
.13 league games, they've lost three of
the past four, including consecutive'


Indians
From Page 1B
with Bernard Samuel adding 11 points
but shooting just 4-of-15 from the field
and 1-of-8 from three.
The Eagles struggled mightily from
the floor, making just 29.2 percent


defeats when they had a chance to
clinch the ACC title outright.
They still have one more shot when
they play host to Clemson on Saturday
afternoon. And they could back into the
.outright title if second-place Duke loses
Saturday night at North Carolina.
Larranaga said the Hurricanes should
be thrilled with their situation. After
all, he said, they're already assured
of at least a title share, and they've
clinched the No. 1 seeding in the ACC
tournament.
"We have one game remaining," he
said. "If someone asked you before the
conference race began, would you like .
to be a game up on Duke and two games
up on North Carolina and sitting in first
place with a home game to close out the
regular season, I think everybody would
say yes, that would be a fantastic year."


(19-of-65) and converting only 2-of-16
.from the three-point line.
Chipola countered by making 43.5
percent and 7-of-19 from three,
while also out-rebounding the Eagles
48-36.
The Indians led virtually wire to wire,
trailing only briefly 3-2 in the opening
moments of the game.


Lady Raiders win easily


Victory sets up
showdown with
Chipola today

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Northwest Florida
State Lady Raiders cruised
to an 83-66 win over Palm
Beach State on Wednes-
day night in first round
action of the FSCAA state
tournament at the Mil-
ton H. Johnson Health
Center.
The Lady Raiders got a
balanced offensive attack
with six players scoring in
double figures led by Ta-
varsha Scott's 18 to go with
11 rebounds, and they shot
48.6 percent from the field
as a team.
Rudiane Eduardo add-
ed :16 points for North-


West, with Jatoria Carter
adding'12 and Kiani Park-
er, Luiana Livulo, and Car-
la Batchelor all scoring 10
each.
Annessa De La Cruz
scored 18 points to. lead
"the. Panthers, with Laquan-
dra Brazil scoring 17, Lex-
us Love 14 and Sharneka
McCatty 10.
The game was competi-
tive in the first half, with
the Lady Raiders leading
by just four at 40-36 at
halftime.
But Northwest dominat-
ed the second half 43-30
and went up by as many as
18 points.
Palm Beach shot only
35.5 percent from the field
and turned it over 21 times
but knocked in 10-of-25
3-pointers to stay in the
game.
The Panthers' season


The Lady Raiders' Tarvarsha Scott attempts a shot Wednesday
night against Palm Beach.


ends at 19-10, while the
Lady Raiders (25-3) move
on to Friday's semifinal
round to take on Pan-
handle Conference rival
Chipola (24-5) for the
fourth time this season.
Northwest won two out
of three regular season


matchups with the Lady
Indians, taking both by a
point, with Chipola win-
ning by three in Marianna
on Jan. 26.
The game will tip at 6
p.m. with the winner to ad-
vance to Saturday night's
championship game.


Lady Indians sweep doubleheader


Source: Rivera plans

to retire after 2013


The Associated Press

NEWYORK- The great
Mariano Rivera is getting
set to close his career.
The New York Yan-
kees' reliever plans to
announce this weekend
that he will retire after
the 2013 season, a person
familiar with the decision
told The Associated Press
on Thursday.
The person spoke to
the AP on condition of
anonymity because there
was no official statement.
A news conference was
called for Saturday at the
Yankees' spring training
complex in Tampa.
The. 43-year-old closer
is baseball's saves leader
with 608.
He is regarded as one
of the best clutch pitch-
ers in history, posting
a *record 42 postsea-
soh saves with an 0.70
ERA while helping the


Yankees win five World
Series championships.
"Greatest closer of all
time. No question in my
mind," Yankees manager
Joe Girardi said. "I've had
the thrill of catching him.
I was there when he really
burst onto the scene as a
dominant setup man and
then to see what he did as
a closer has been a thrill
for me."
"It's really hard to imag-
ine that anyone could do
the job he did," he said.
Rivera missed most
of last season after he
tore a ligament in his
right knee while catch-
ing fly balls during bat-
ting practice. The right-
hander was hurt May 3
and had surgery the next
month.
Rivera, returned home
to Panama this week for a
personal matter, and was
expected to rejoin the
team Saturday.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Lady Indi-
ans made it five wins in
a row with a dominating
doubleheader sweep of
Lake Michigan College on
Wednesday afternoon at
home, winning by scores
of 12-0 and 11-0, both in
five innings.
In the first game, the
Lady Indians jumped out
quick with seven first in-
ning runs, including a
3-run home run by Mya
Anderson, and then add-
ed three more runs in the
third inning and two in the
fourth.
EvaVoortman started and
got the win for four nearly
perfect innings, with a hit
batter in the fourth giv-
ing Lake Michigan its only
base-runner of the game.
Voortman allowed no
hits or walks and struck
out 11, with Kaitlin Hussey
pitching a perfect fifth in-
ning to close it out.


Anderson finished 1-for-
2 with a run and three RBI,
while Megan Borak was 2-
for-3 with a run and two
RBIs, Hayley Parker was 2-
for-3 with two runs and an
RBI and Alyssa Hathcoat
was l-for-2 with a walk, a
run, and an RBI.
The second game was
nearly as easy for the Lady
Indians, who this time
scored four runs in the first
inning and then added
six in the fourth to blow


it open.
Katie Harrison provided
the big first-inning shot in
the first inning, hitting a
three-run home run of her
own, and finished 2-for-2
with two runs and three
RBI.
Anderson was also 2-
for-2 with two runs and
an RBI, while Borak was
2-for-3 with a run and an
RBI and Kristen Allen was
1-for-2 with a run and two
RBIs.


Chipola's
Olivia
Vaughn
holds onto
third after
dodging
a tag by
a Lake
Michigan
player
Wednesday.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


Jasmine Tanksley was 1-
for-1 with a walk, a run and
an RBI.
Hussey got the start this
time and went three in-
nings to get the win, allow-
ing two hits, no walks and
struck out three.
Rosanne de Vries pitched
the final two innings and
allowed no hits or walks
and struck out four.
. With ,the wins, the Lady
Indians improved to 18-3
on the season.


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Olymipics



Wrestling leader puts case to IOC's Rogge


The Associated Press

LAUSANNE, Switzer-
land The acting head of
wrestling's world body met
with IOC President Jacques
Rogge on Thursday, prom-
ising to fight to retain the
sport's Olympic status and
apologizing for the pro-
test by wrestlers who have
returned their medals.
Nenad Lalovic, interim
FILA president, said Rog-
ge outlined the difficult
task wrestling faces in a
race among eight sports
seeking one vacancy on
the program for the 2020
Games.
"He said that every-
body has to earn their
place," Lalovic said after
the 40-minute meeting
at International Olympic
Committee headquarters.
"I don't see any other
way" but hard work, the
Serbian official acknowl-
edged, in persuading the
IOC to reverse last month's
surprise recommendation
by the executive board to
cut wrestling from the 2020
program.
Lalovic also apologized
to Rogge for the wrestlers
who have sent back their
Olympic medals to the IOC
in anger.
"I was the first to say
that, 'I'm very sorry that
it happens,'" Lalovic said.
"I strongly believe it is not


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge leaves a press conference after the last day of the executive board's
meeting in Lausanne, Switzerland on Feb. 13. Rogge says he will meet with the head of wrestling's governing body to discuss
ways the sport can fight to save its place in the 2020 Olympics.


good for wrestling. This is
not something that is go-
ing to help us."
Earlier Thursday, An-
drzej Supron of Poland
pledged to return his silver
medal in the Greco-Ro-
man lightweight division
won at the 1980 Moscow
Olympics.
Sagid Murtazaliyev of
Russia and Valentin Yor-


danov of Bulgaria have
said they would return
gold medals, while two-
time Olympic champion
Armen Nazaryan of Bul-
garia has gone on a hunger
strike.
"Of course, we can't con-
trol individual activities
and we can't'stop them,"
Lalovic said.
The IOC board will meet


on May29 in St. Petersburg,
Russia, to recommend a
short list of sports to be
considered for inclusion
in 2020. The final decision
will be made by the full
IOC membership at their
assembly in September in
Buenos Aires, Argentina.
A combined baseball-
softball bid, roller sports,
sport climbing, squash,


wakeboarding and the
martial arts of karate and
wushu are the other sports
vying for 2020 inclusion.
The IOC described the
meeting with Lalovic as
"productive."
"A wide range of topics
was discussed and theIOC
looks forward to continued
collaboration with FILA in
the coming months and


in the run-up to the Rio
2016 Olympic Games," the
Olympic body said.
FILAis seeking to harness
global support for its cam-
paign, which has brought
together the United States,
Russia and Iran in a rare
show of unity.
FILA has appealed for
wrestlers to stop their
protests through a mes-
sage from Russian great
Alexander Karelin, newly
recruited to its athletes
committee.
"We would like to request
each of you to redirect your
passions," the message on
the FILA website stated.
"We appreciate your te-
nacity and understand
that complacency is not in
your DNA.
"Nonetheless, returning
your gold medal is coun-
terproductive. Before the
practice 'escalates, we urge
you to keep your Olympic
medals and celebrate your
achievement."
Karelin's appointment is
among a slate of modern-
izing changes FILA made
since being rocked by the
Feb. 12 decision. Its presi-
dent, Swiss businessman
Raphael Martinetti, re-
signed within days.
"We were sleeping on our
ears," said Lalovic, who will
be a candidate in a presi-
dential election scheduled
in the coming weeks.


SColtege Basketball


Best team in tournament history? Best player?


The Associated Press

Indiana was the NCAA's
last undefeated men's team
Sin 1976,~Torth Carolinahad
Michael Jordan and James
Worthy while winning the
national championship
in 1982, a decade before
Duke won the tournament
on the back of Christian
Laettner's buzzer-beating
basket.
So which is the best
team in NCAA tournament
history? .
Or is it 6ne of Kentucky's
squads the 34-win team
in 1996, or the freshman-
filled one that won a record
38 games last season?
All are among are some of
the top vote-getters so far
as part of the NCAA's cel-,
ebration of the 75th anni-
versary of March Madness.
The celebration includes
an effort to determine the
best team, most memo-
rable moment and best
players, all.decided upon
by fans voting at www.
ncaa.com/MarchMad-
ness through March 24.
Early results from nearly
two months of voting were
released Thursday.
Laettner's big shot in
1992, for an NCAA regional
final overtime victory over
Kentucky, is among the
memorable moments get-
ting the most votes among
35 under consideration.
Others include North
Carolina State's victory
over Houston in 1983, and
Earvin "Magic" Johnson
leading Michigan State
over an undefeated Indi-
ana State team with Larry
Bird in 1979.
All those players are get-
ting plenty of votes among
75 that made the ballot, a
list filled with names like
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar,
Wilt Chamberlain, Patrick
Ewing, Jordan, Bill Rus-
sell, Isiah Thomas and Bill
Walton.
Dan Gavitt, NCAA vice
president of men's basket-
ball championships, said
the group is pleased with
voter turnout and fasci-
nated by the early results.
The original lists were
compiled and researched
by the NCAA's basket-
ball and statistics staffs,
which consulted with the
NCAA's media partners
and selected members of
the U.S. Basketball Writers
Association.
Fans can get plenty
of help in making their
choices. For each of the 25
nominated teams, there'


is a description and other didates, including those
information from that par- classic clips of Magic vs.
ticular season, along with Bird and North Caro-
a video clip. lina State coach Jim Val-
There are also vid- vano running around the
eo highlights for all 35 court after the Wolfpack's
memorable moment can- championship victory 30


years ago.
The final results the
top 15 players, along
with/the top team and
most memorable mo-
ment will'be revealed
April 5.


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FRIGIDAIRE

18 CU..FTti

REFRIERATO


FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 2013 3B--


SPORTS








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BORN LOSER BYARTAND CHIPSANSOM
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3-8 LaughingStock heernal nc, Ois0 by Unversal UCIck lor UFS, 2013

"You're not even half as good as my
last driving instructor!"


ACROSS
1 Roast beef
au -
4 "The
Voice" host
8 Gear tooth
11 Muslim
mystic
12Sandwich
cookie
13Pi follower
14 Slow run
15 Making
less
17 Procedures
19 Major
no-no
20 Raised
railways
21 Happy
sighs
22Subatomic
particle
25 Foresight
28 Attempt
29 Did laps
31 October's
stone
33 Exasperate
35 Scholarly
org.
37 Festive
night
38 Beauty
parlors
40 Host
42 Joule
fraction


43 Spiral
molecule
44Juanita's
friend
47 Aromatic
51 Voice
boxes
53 Mortarboard
wearer
54- Baba
55 Nerd
56 Nile
goddess
57"- My
Party"
58 Catch
sight of
59 Underwater
shocker

DOWN
1 Courtroom
dozen
2 Alien crafts
3 Tot minder
4 Campus
buildings
5 Greek war
god
6 Pioneered
7 Teenagers
8 Baby's bed
9 Cry of woe
(2 wds.)
10 Disco
dancer
(hyph.)


Answer to Previous Puzzle


11 Ave.
crossers
16 Timex rival
18 Moose kin
21 Zeroes in
on
22 Game
period:
Abbr.
23 "The Haj"
author
24 Jean Auel
heroine
25 UPS trucks
26 Oil cartel
27 Pew locale
30 Robin
appendage
32"Annabel

34 Poem of
lament


36 Nashville st
39Juice
source
41 Stewart's
"- May"
43 Like
twilight
44Jai -
45 Fountain
order-
46 Purple
flower
47 Steal a
glance
48 Gaelic
language
49 Hammer
target
50 NFL events
52 Ballot
' marks


3-8 2013 UFS, Dist..by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"VL VRHME NWA IDDGH FNMEN M'A

ARU RX TIDV VL DFO ENMCANDDA,

VRHMEWC IDDGH PRIMSA MO GNS

AWIJSHG HDMC." I WL ENWICSH


Previous Solution: "Life, like poker, has an element of risk. It shouldn't be
avoided. It should be faced." Edward Norton
TODAY'SCLUE: sienb an
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-8


Horoscope
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Associates will be
more inclined to accept
your political or philo-
sophical concepts if you
don't present them in a
heavy-handed manner.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Difficult develop-
ments aren't likely to
intimidate you, and you'll
have no trouble handling
them competently.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Although your
mate's point of view may
be on the somber side,
you'll see only the positive
aspect of things.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) Even if you feel you
deserve far better, try to be
grateful for what you get.
Keep your expectations
within reasonable bounds.*
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Guard against incli-
nations to speculate in
unfamiliar areas. It's never
a good day to gamble on
things.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Although you'll have a
great deal of compassion
for others, you aren't likely
to know how to express it.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Do not expect to
get more labor out of
co-workers than you're
prepared to giye yourself.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Be generous with those
who need it, but be careful
not to be manipulated by
someone who's asking for
something that he or she
doesn't deserve.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Putting forth maxi-
mum effort is admirable,
but don't be so determined
to achieve your objective
that you end up doing
everything the hard way.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Usually, you're
fairly optimistic about
most everything in life,
but you could step out
of character and be a
defeatist.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Problems of all
sorts, even social ones,
cannot be resolved if
you deny their existence.
Instead of burying them,
deal with them.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -Anybody who can-
not help you attain your
objective should not be
involved in your endeavor.


,.. ,Annie's 7 ..
'"k I'l-'T^


Dear Annie: Two years ago, I married
my best friend. I've been with her for 10
years. She has two teenage children from
a previous marriage. When we all moved
in together nine years ago, there were
a few struggles, but I felt they were not
unusual and we could overcome them.
But now it's worse. I believe part of the
problem is that my wife does not provide
any structure in the children's lives. She
would rather be a friend than a parent,
and as a result, they do not respect either
of us. My wife is defensive when it comes
to criticism or suggestions about her
kids. She always takes their side.
Last week, my 17-year-old stepson
asked for an expensive item. When he
heard me say "no," he flipped out. He
was full of rage, and it is obvious that
he has pent-up anger toward me. I have
raised this kid for half of his life and have
provided for him when his own father
wouldn't. I don't have the finances to
provide luxury items, and while this
has caused tension in the past, I don't
deserve to be spoken to. that way and
said so.


Bridge

In today's deal,'there are two roads that the declarer
might take and many players would not even see
one of them, ending up down one in their contract.
South is in three no-trump. West leads the spade three.
What are the two roads, which should declarer choose,
and why?
South starts with seven top tricks: two spades, three
diamonds and two clubs. Assuming he can collect, five
diamond tricks, he will be home. If that suit is break-
ing 2-2 or 3-1, it does not matter what he does. So he
should consider a 4-0 split.
Getting that far, some declarers, after winning the
first trick, say, on the board, would immediately cash
the diamond king. Here, they would then fail and com-
plain about their bad luck.
However, there is a second way to play diamonds suc-
cessfully, when West has jack-fourth. South can cash
his ace first, then twice lead through West to pick up
his nine and jack. But why should declarer play West
for the diamonds rather than East?
The signpost is West's opening lead. Assuming it was
an honest fourth-highest, West began with exactly four
spades. (He led the three and South holds the two.) If
West is also void in diamonds, he would have at least
five cards in clubs or hearts and presumably would
have led that suit, not spades.
Use one piece of evidence to help with another.


I gave him an ultimatum: I told him
to say everything he needs to in order
to clear the air, and after that, he will
no longer be allowed in our home. He
should live with his father.
My wife has essentially told me that I'm
the bad guy here. Am I wrong to believe
in old-fashioned discipline? I fear that
when I need her the most, my wife won't
be by my side. I refuse to be treated like
this, but I'm also scared of losing what
I love the most. Is our marriage already
over?
TRYING TO BE A STEPDAD
Dear Trying: We understand your
frustration and agree that your wife
should be dealing with this in a more
effective manner. But you cannot give
ultimatums to your wife's children unless
she backs you up. You are overstepping
your authority. If she is forced to choose
between you and her children, you will
lose. Teenagers have their own category
of parenting requirements. Please check
out the National Stepfamily Resource
Center (stepfamilies.info) for informa-
tion and suggestions.


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


THAT A BABY BY PAUL TRAP


North 03-08-13
4 K6
SQ744
SKQ85
49542
West East
SQ 10 8 3 4 J 9 74
SK92 YAJ10 6
*J932 -
7 6 4QJ1083
South
SA52
V853
4 A 10 7 6 4
,AK

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1NT Pass 3NT All pass

Opening lead: 3


l4B + FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 2013


ENTERTAINIVIENT


.I_
~s~z,








CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jacksdn County Floridan e


Thes das bigreirday March' 8,203-5n


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKET PLACE


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or.(800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWWJCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Pubial;on r Pcri;c y Ernor a nd Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. ni p uoblc ion hal il tno i; .be iab le f l ure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or error i n rlt jlin , ,,pt Ict om te a. s .Tr, of the r, I r e i f Ic ralr day's
ns rrionr, Adjustrnt err fc.r irs Is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the erro r :,:urr ed Te adv -rt:is r ~lrJ1'e th.l the publisher shall not be liable for damages arsr., o,u ij.,of o I -, a.v.,fri s E ,nis bey nd tre m ',u'tpr P31Icr ire space
ac dually oCcuplte Dy rrati [ono ,r, 1 ,jtme iA,'rr ri, -ni r e lrr i e ror c.,,ij ., whether .iucr error li d1,,,' o~ncl ,e f i, 1 i, r.pb l.r.,r .: Enplo or ohe r.,i e sha-n di re i o r r n ll 13I ,, fto r n,lr.ti:.ron rr rtI r',n a b-i r-derln r n te -. tr- .ro i r,am nl p aI d ,r
aucn averse rr,inl Dsrilay 4-j are in pujari e rari ,oion h l ai ]in l.rjing ,S jlJec(i I, a ,dir.r i l i.ni.r I r.- i .rvei ..r rnel. .ncI n I ,r c la y all ad, u ijr,3e r t he approp ,aclb .:1,i i,,(villi .

F or ea n at f o i w


f ) AN NOAUNCEMENTS

Two Side-by-Side Cemetery Plots C3 and C4
@ Garden of Memory. Plots in Garden Cross
Section. Asking $1300. Each Contact:
Alex Leath 205-972-1237 or leath@bellsouth.net

2919 Greens St. corner of Broad St. Sat, 9th. 7-2
office furniture & sofa's, bedding, dishes,
linens, home goods, electronics, TV, clothes,
,some antiques framed art work and more !
4160 Willow Pond Rd. (off Thompson Rd.)
Sat. 9th. 7-? rims for toyota truck, H/H,
Lots of misc. items
8043 Joseph St. off Gloster Ave. Sneads
Sat. 9th. 7-? too many items to list,
something for everyone.
ESTATE SALE: 4280 Cedar St. Mariann a
Sat. March 2nd (10am-until) Washer/dryer,
coffee table, end tables, bed, recliner, couch,
gas heater, rocking chair & lamps,
Huge Yard Sale 2465 Hwy 73 S. "down the lane"
Fri, Wat & Sun (8-4) 2 mi S. from Mccoys. Look
for Signs. Storage sheds and houses, displays,
furniture, clothing, shoes, bedding and toys.




BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
(14) Town Homes for Sale
1 block off circle,
great income & fully occupied.
Owner Finance
with good down payment
s 386-312-6363 41


Ab Lounger 2: $20. Call 850-557-2846
Baby Clothes -girl 0-12 mo. $30 bx, 850-693-3260
Bed: Qn, dresser, end table. $325. 850-482-7502
Camcorder, Sony, digital $300. 850-482-7665
Computer Chair No tears, $50, 850-482-2636
Computer desk: Ig. wood $75. 850-482-7502
COMPUTER SPEAKERS (2), $20, 850-482-7090
Exercise Stepper $30. 850-482-8347.
Freezer 5 cu. ft chest $50. 850-482-7502
,Garden composter. rubber $50. 850-482-7502
Guitar Alvarez 70's 12 string $150. 850-482-6022
Guitar Dean Elec.& acoustic $225. 850-482-6022.


Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
1-888-273-5264
Restaurant For Sale with Lounge and Oyster
Bar. Seats approx 200. Currently doing Good
Business.". Owner looking to retire. Financing
available with down payment. $250,000.
Price NEG! Call 334-684-1700 between 8am-
2pm. Home 850-956-2709 from 3pm-7pm

(f) MERCHANDISE


BUSINESS 4 SALE! Drapery and Sewing
Business- Commercial straight stitch machine,
commercial hemmer, 4'x8' table, +2000 yds of
drapery/upholstery fabric, comforter shells,
pillow shells, trim, thread, racks, shelving, etc.,
$12,000 OBO, 334-701,9546

TV Sanyo 50" Flat Screen, $500, 850-557-1454


** GUN SHOW f*
March 2nd & 3rd
National Peanut Festival Building *
Hwy 231 S. Dothan, Alabama
Over 275 Tables *
Sat. 9-5 0 Sun. 10-4
Call 334-279-9895


GUN's Ithaca M37 3" 12ga. 28" ventev rib bar-
rel gold inlaid NRA 84 of 650 $1000. & Sig Sauer
P-229 40 cal. stainless $700. 334-477-3994.


Hutch: wood w/glass doors. $65. 850-482-7502
Infant Car Seat $30. 850-693-3260
Mens Sneakers new, Sz 9.5, $30, 850-482-2636
Mirror w/shelves: $50. 850-693-3260.
Panasonic stereo $25, 850-482-7090
Porch Glider Swing $100; 850-693-0521
Projector screen: Optima 80" $95. 334-465-0238
Remington 1100- 12 gauge, $425, 850-573-5135
Sleep Apea Machine: $500. 850-592-2440
Sofa & love seat: Leather $200. 850-762-4038
Wedding gown, new, sz 16, $300 850-693-3260.
Yamaha speakers $100, 850-482-7090


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
(of) PETS & ANIMALS


Free Kittens: to good home (2) 850-557-2846

Big Puppy Sale! Chihuahua, Shih-Tzu mix
puppies and Morkies. Now taking deposit on
Papilrions. 334T71848 6 _.pIu n 1sw.rr.com
Bloodhound Pups
Taking deposits for regis-
I tered /registerable pups.
Litter includes black/tans
& reds (5 males/5 female).
Both parents are regis-
tered and on site. .Born on
January 23, 2013. Will be ready for new homes
on March 6, 2013. $650. For more info. or to set
appointment for viewing cal11334-726-2561.



Lab pups: Cute & Cuddly! Yellow & Chocolate.
No papers, but parents on premises. 6 weeks
old. 488-5000 or 488-3979.
S Miniature Australian
Shepherd Puppies
Beautifully marked red
merles, blue merle.
black tri and red tri.
Males and Female. $400. $600. NSDR &
ASDR. Call or text for more information.
334-550-9895
Reg. Toy/Mini Chocolate, Parti
colors & solids Schnauzers, Male
& Female, S/W, S500.-$600.
www.lovemyschnauzers.com
t 334-889-9024

t.~) FARMER'S MARKET


Demo --Salvage Concrete
for Sale & Delivery, great for erosion
control behind dams & gullies
334-347-7466 or 334-726-2561



Frozen Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
850L-573-6594 4128 Hwy231


Sudoku


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Level: nf2][-3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Thursday's puzzle
6581694372
137258649
492637518


875326491
964815723
543982167
286741935


3/8/13


o- Bahia seed for sale' c
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
S experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L................................
SB Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
W -ae -- after 5pm & weekends 585-5418
Quality Coastal Hay; Large Rolls
Fertiized & Weed Control
,, 850-209-9145 -4








No tract to small / CustoThinni
IC Pea River Timber
334-389-2003
Wanted to Rent: Farm Land or Pasture in Ma-
rianna or West of Marianna; Call 850-718-1859
(W ) EMPLOYMENT


Management
Now hiring for Subway in Chattahoochee
Florida. Please Call 850-638-9808 for more info.



AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS- '


COTTONDALE

Earn an average of


per month

Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus

BE YOUR OWN BOSS 3 A.M, to 6 AM,
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL



GIVE US A RINGE..


Call today to place

your item in the

classified.


(850) 526.3614

(800) 779-2557




rP T T
'0 # 1 JJ JJ)./


,Place an Ad


Fast, easy, no pressure
24 hours a day, 7 days a week!


Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


2 1

74 6

.9 3 89


7 2 8 9

3 7

5 1 63

17 59
S_ 2 _5 8


9 6


',,. \.\ \


AICEI AN AD


. Ab Lounger 2: $20. Call 850-557-2846 '-
Baby Clothes-girl 0-12 mo. $30 bx, 850-693-3260
Battery Charger -on wheels. $100, 850-482-263.6
Bed: On. dresser, end table. $325.850-482-7502
Camcorder. Sony, digital $300.850-482-7665
' nAkMNiitar f^hair M^+QII-C- ftCft Q[;n-^Q1_1C'>C


Infant Car Seat $30.850-693-3260_____'
Mens Sneakers new. Sz 9.5. $30, 850-482-2636
Mirror w/shelves: $50.850-693-3260.____-_
Panasonic stereo $25,850-482-7090______
Porch Glider Swing $100: 850-693-0521_____
Projector screen: Optima 80" $95.334-465-0238
Remington 1100- 12 gauge. $425.850-573-5135
Sleep Apea Machine: $500.850-592-2440
Sofa & love seat: Leather $200.850-762-4038
Tires Set 4. P225/70R16. $80.850-482-2636
Wedding gown. new. sz 16. $300 850-693-3260.
Window 29x30 Dbl Pane. $100. 850-482-2636
Yamaha speakers- $100,850-482-7090


*^ Bahia seed for sale *<-
Excellent germination wjth over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
1......-...........................J
^*3--, Large rolls of Hay for Sale
,'^s-' Bahia & Coastal
?'" 1--'- after 5pm & weekends 585-5418


- -- --------







C T A QCTT1t'TTT Cw


Opielika-Auburn News has an
immediate opening for a
Production Director.
The primary role of this position is to
oversee the production operations at
the Opelika/Auburn, Alabama facility
of O&DS. A major requirement of this
position is to grow a profitable
commercial printing and distribution
operation at the Opelika-Auburn News.

This position is also responsible for
promoting and championing safety
as a condition of employment while
ensuring that all safety policies are
followed and all OSHA guidelines are
met.,

The successful candidate must be
able to bridge communication between
the production staff and other stake
holders.

This position is responsible for
commercial printing goals, proper
scheduling of all product production
and high quality of each product.
Must have working knowledge of all
production equipment. 10 years
newspaper/commercial management
required. 4 year degree preferred.

Pre-employment drug and background
screening required. EOE/M/F/D/V;

Please apply at
www.worldmediaenterprise.com

World Media Enterprises Inc.
BH MEDIA GROUP I A BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY COMPANY



CHIPOLA NURSING PAVILION
AND RETIREMENT CENTER
Marianna, FL
is accepting applications for the
following position:

RN Staff Development
Coordinator/Risk Manager

If interested apply in person at
4294 Third Avenue, Marianna, FL.
GENERALI-"-PLOYMEN


BE YOUR
OWN BOSS

These days being retired doesn't mean
sitting at home doing nothing.'

A newspaper route is the perfect way to
supplement your income'with only a small
investment of time and big returns in
community service to your own neighbors.

Come by and inquire today about a
newspaper route in your neighborhood.

JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
4403 Constitution Lane Marianna, FL 32446
Night Tine Dispatcher
Contract position, located in our
Graceville office.
Part-Time 20 hrs wk. working nights and
weekend and some holidays.
Good clerical and computer
skills necessary.
si Send Resume to:
West Florida Electric Cooperative,
ATTN: Personnel Department
P.O. Box 127 Graceville, F 32440
850-263-3231
DRUG FREE WORKPLACE &
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
I U


FARMERS FURNITURE MARIANNA
We are looking for a SALES ASSIOCATE
High school diploma or equivalent
Some sales experience.
Please apply in person at 4230-A
Lafayette St Marianna. EOE
PRESIDENTIAL
1AL ESTATE FOR RENT

CHIPOLA APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND 1 BEDROOM
APTS. SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE ON
ALL UNITS. UNITS SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR
HANDICAPPED OR DISABLED. FOR RENTAL
INFORMATION CALL (850) 526-4407
TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9;00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY



2/2 3136 Aycock Rd. 900 sq. ft.washer/dryer,
flat screen TV's $650. mo. $650. dep. utilities,
dish, garbage water & sewage w/pool
(Appointment Only) 850-352-2951 850-573-1864

4 1BR/1BA, nice clean apt. in town screened
porch, large yard $450. mo.
No pets. 850-557-2000 for more info.
2/1 Upstairs apart Clean, No pets, Washer
supplied. $475 mo. & 2/1 Mobile Hm.
priv. drive, sun deck $400. mo.
4 850-718-5089/482-4172/624-7407
COITONDALE VILLAGE APARTMENTS
Now accepting applications for 1, 2, 3 bedroom units.
Rental assistance. No application fee.
We pay water, sewer, and trash service.
4052 Old Cottondale Road,
Marianna, FL 32448.
(850) 526-4062, TDD/TTY 711.
"This institution is an equal 1 a a
opportunity provider, mu,. ..om.
and employer."
S ] I1
1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
1* 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
2BR/IBA House Hwy 90
Grand Ridge $425. Mo. + $425. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
3/1.5 on private lot 2 min. from Marianna
& Wal-mart, new carpet, tile & paint, appl. in-
cluded $650. mo. + dep. 850-209-1294. No Pets
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 or austintvlerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountryliving.com.
S850-209-8847 4.
2 &3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message












& SERVICES,


Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Now serving Jackson Co.
FREE ESTIMATES 334-798-0687


B&B Professional Auto Detailing
Now offering mobile wash inside
and outside,, oil change & vacuum
Detailing now for the low price of $50.
(850) 573-5509
Just give us a call and we'll come to you!
All services performed on site.











lo O'Neal's I l


Land Clearing, Inc. DEanl ,POWDuo Dl
ALTHA, FL SBWC m NM
850-762-9402 SBMO
Cell 850-832-5055
NOW OFFERINGTREE LANING!I Jl


VAlil


Bi s G.M. Properties of PC
Beach 800-239-2059
Fully Furnished Condos
& Townhouses
near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $250 nt.
Portside Resort starting @ $125.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
www.gmproperties.com


K'lCall 526VA3614 to sell
-Y{ u ''tmI h



C-a$-M dtdy


Clean Out Your Garage

and Turn the Items You've

Forgotten Into Cash.


That old collection of clutter might not mean much to you
anymore, but chances are someone out there would love it. By
using the Classifieds, you'll make it easier for them to find,
and easier for you to sell. So try it today!



JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN

(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


Lawn C
Outdoor
Mainte
) Free E
Call Woody 850-5



; 52 6o Y
- F i Groo
Carpe Appoint

or pricing & to boo


HAPPY
HOME REI
WE'LL BEAT ANY I
Big Or Small Jobs W


"Beautification of Yo
Carpentry/Painting Ir
Furniture Repair & R
General Repairs *
milamM loni.(5)


:are & Got
Property CALL
nance HILL'TREEE I
estimates
526-2030 S_ V

[:L3-:L;You CALL... WE COME To You!
SUDS n RED'S MOBILE
ming y (7837) SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE-,,
ment Only 85O0209-9,70-13- e




This Month's Special
www.iogslneuiit.nc

?AIR s312x2 0
PRICE!! 35 Years in Business
WELCOME 7r We Mo, PoRuNar u BUnm


our Home BESTWAY "
hefin i shing LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN NORTH FLORIDA
:Insuredhn Been si BesiinsSitne199
Insured I 7 HAVE K
OVER
DIFFERENT SIZES!
YOU CAN CHOOSE
COLOR & STYLE!
1 BLTONST 850-747.8974
2919 Hwy 231 North Panama City, FL


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
jcfloridan.com


mons erI

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


,,,Il-~R1-~ll -L I


I


J i -^.. .I . I. . -- .. - -------------


i


j


ww












DECLASSIFIED


-T~'T ~n~


Jackson County Floridan *


Friday, March 8, 201i- 7 B


2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595
2BR 1 BA MH'S in Afford, $380 mo. $380. dep.
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2BR/2BA Newly remodeled in quiet area.
Very clean. Water, sewage, garbage and yard
care provided. No smokers, no pets. $500 +
deposit. Call 850-718-8158.
I.L0


4 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595


For Rent Greehwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maintincl.
4 850-593-4700 4

RESIDENTIAL
( REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Eufaula two acres with older model, two bed-
room, one bath single wide trailer With front
deck, a back porch, small garage, and lean to
for boat. Located in the White Oaks area; a
mile from White Oaks park and boat launch
ramp. Great for beginner home, just starting a
family, college student, or just a fishing get
away. $35,000 or best offer. 334-733-6625.


[0- .1






U-Lok-lt Warehouses for Sale 30x80 Metal
building. Well and spetic plus other buildings.
14 mile north of Hwy 90 on Hwy 71.
$75,000. Call 850-482-8333 or 850-573-8894

RECREATION



FATOY IRCT


Extreme
Boats


Packages From
$4,995
All Welded
All Aluminum Boats
wwvxtremeindustrie.r.nm


Fifth Wheel: 1994 American Star 36 ft Fifth
Wheel. $8,500 OBO. 334-477-2046.


Winnebago 1995 33 ft. Vectra CH&A, auto
leveling, Q-bed, new tires & batteries, new frig,
7.5 onan,. Lg. awning and more !
$23,000 OBO 334-585-6689.

A- -V- -R-T-I-S-I-N-G
" i'e"a" tzhat SELLS.


(1) TRANSPORTATION


r-----.........................
$0 Down/Ist Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade Anything!
BRING IN YOUR W2 OR LAST PAY STUB!!
RIDE TODAY! Steve Pope 334-803-9550
L........................... ... m
Chevrolet 1967 Camaro SS/RS: restored on
original solid body, vin#124377L123529, custom
built big block 454, cranberry red, new cranber-
ry interior, to many restoration items too
mention. Priced at $24,500. See pics and info at
dkestate.wordpress.com. Doug 334-237-1916
Chevy 2012 Malibu, like new! $200 down, $249'
per month. Call Steve 791-8243
Ford 1985 Mustang White, good condition, all
original parts. 90,951 miles. Call 334-494-0837
or e-mail bccolwell2@aol.com
Ford 1994 Explorer Sport, V-6, 5 speed, cold air,
runs great, $1400 3 34-687-4353, 334-695-4294
FORD 2007 EXPLORER XLT "IRONMAN -
SILVER, 37,000 MILES. SHOWROOM QUALITY,
NEW CONDITION, CAN BE SEEN AT LEMON
LOT, 166 WESTGATE PARKWAY, DOTHAN, AL
AFTER 2-24-2013. PHONE 334-699-1666
Honda 1992 Accord: 4 door, cold AC, nice car,
champagne, fully loaded. $3395.
Call 334-792-8018
Honda 2007 Accord EX L-V6, 4 DR, one owner
'well maintained. Leather seats w/ heated front
seats. All power including front seats,
also remote trunk and window opener,
HomeLink, power moonroof w/ tilt feature.
Carbon Bronze pearl with ivory interior; looks.
and drives like new. 77,400 miles. $14,200. Call
794-2210 or 714-4107 for more details.
Honda 2007 CRV EX, Super Sharp! Must sell,
$200 down, $269 per month. Call Steve 791-
8243.
Honda 2008 Fit, low miles, under warranty,
must sell! $200 down, $209 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 714-0028.
: HONDA 2012 ACCORD
COUPE V6 WITH AUTO-
MATIC TRANSMISSION.
SUNROOF, NAVIGATION,
HEATED LEATHER SEATS FULLY LOADED. NO
ACCIDENTS NOR HASIT BEEN SMOKED IN.
HAVE CARFAX TO SHOW AS WELL. APPROX.
6,000 MILES AND IM ASKING $27,000. CAR LIST-
ED $32,800, NEW. CALL 334-268-3900.
Hyundai 2009 Elantra, sunroof, loaded Must
Sell! $200 down, $199 per month. Call Ron Ellis
714-0028.
Mazda 2010 6 S Touring
21,000 miles. 4 cyl.
y Silver with gray leather
interior. One owner,
non-smoker, garage kept.
Beautiful inside and out. $14,900. 334-806-6004.
Toyota 2010 Yaris 4 dr. Sedan A/C,
stero system, 82K miles, good on gas
$10,500. 850-592-2937


1 1994 FXSTC Softail Custom
Harley Davidson
Excellent condition and
kept in the garage. Must
see to appreciate. Price is
fixed. Mileage 23,000. Call


1 2010 Ningbo Dongfang
250cc motorcycle. Rode
only 6 times. Never tag-
ged. Asking $250. Please
call 334-393-7034 after
I I 5pm and leave message.


2011 Harley Davidson
Super Glide Custom
cool blue pearl & vivid
black, garage kept,
10K mi. full factory
warranty. Driving lights,
passenger back rest, luggage rack, quick
release windshield, anit-theft system with
/pager, cruise pegs, oil pressure gauge,
dust cover included
4 $12,900 334-598-0061 or 334-432-4372
Absolutely Pristine-
You will not be disappointed *
Harley-Davidson 2003 Fat Boy 2003 100th An-
niversary Edition Harley Davidson Fat Boy.
Turquoise and navy with gold inlay custom
paint. $8,000 in chrome added to the bike. Al-
so comes with the original tank and fender,
which is gray blue, motorcycle lift, touring bag,
custom cleaning kit, many extras and special
tools! Call 334-494-0837 or email
bccolwell2@aol.com
Harley-Davidson 2003 Fat Boy black 100th An-
niversary, FLSTFI, 12,800 miles, $5,300 Serious
buyers!KELLER9944@GMAIL.COM, 334-232-3388
Suzuki 1988 650C Savage/Boulevard:
completely rebuilt engine, bored 2000th, new
brakes, clutch and more 24 inch seat height,
weigth 3501bs. Very Nice. $2900. 850-722-8962.


Lexus 2002 RX300 white & silver with tan int.
sunroof, tinted windows, 6 disc cd changer,
new tires, exc. cond. 135K mi.
$9,900. 334-797-9290
----- Lincoln 2006 Navigator,
Loaded with all options,
asking $14,000.
334-618-2695.


Chevrolet 1988 Silverado .
,A I- Blue & white, 2 door,
350 VS. Runs good.
.$3.500.
SCall 334-794-6579

Chevrolet Silverado IS,
step side, ext cab, 4
door, V-8, automatic,
loaded, tool box, side
steps, 134,850 miles, like
new, $9995. Call 334-790-7959.
Dodge.2011 Ram 2500 crew cab, 4x4 LWB,
Black & Pearl, 6.7 liter Cummins Diesel,
navigation, leather, back up camera, sirius
radio, remote start, all the extras 18K miles
$43,500. 334-793-6281.
Ford 2004 Super Duty 4dr. 4 wheel drive, F-550
with hydraulic, 2 bale bed, exc. cond. 160K
miles $22,500. 334-347-7466 or 334-797-7289.
Ford 2010 F250 Super Duty Super Cab Lariat:
white, fully loaded, 4X4, low miles, excellent
condition $37,500. Call 334-685-2318
John Deere 1981 Backhoe and Gooseneck
0Oft Trailer: S6.000. Call 334-714-0586


-3M
KMC 4-Row Planters, good cond. with 3 sets of
seed plates, $1600. 2-Row Cultivator w/ vine
cutters $375. Massy Ferguson 2-Row bottom
plow $350. 334-791-4742
Massey Ferguson Tractor md#1215 w/MF220 \
5 ft. mower, good cond. $6700. 334-797-8523.
Nissan 2000 Frontier ext. cab 2-wheel drive,
auto, 104K miles, $5500. OBO 334-726-1215.


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
"?s4909 M24 Towin, 7 gw"9
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

CALL FOR TOP PRICE

FOR JUNK VEHICLES
I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664

. Got a Clunker
,-. We'll be your Junker!
= eWe buy wrecked cars -
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"" fair and honest price! t
$325 & Conmplete Cars *
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7 DAYS A WEEK
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* 18B FRIDAY, MARCH 8.2013
9


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Atlanta Falcons



Financing terms reached for new stadium
The Associated Press though several members Authority and themayor's
-" A. attended the announce- office, among others.
IIR-if 111 uie nil Pa J D idcpnt


ATLANTA Atlanta's
mayor and Falcons owner
Arthur Blank have agreed
to financing terms for a
new $1 billion, retractable-
roof stadium to replace the
20-year-old Georgia Dome
and keep the team's home
games in the city's down-
town, the two men said
Thursday.
Mayor Kasim Reed said
the city would provide
$200 million of construc-
tion costs through bonds
backed by the city's ho-
tel-motel tax. The Falcons
franchise, otned by Home
Depot co-founder Arthur
Blank, would provide $800
million and be respon-
sible for construction cost
overruns.
The Falcons would pay
for up to $50 million in
infrastructure costs not
included in the construc-


tion budget and help retire
the last few years of debt on
the Georgia Dome, which
was publicly financed
entirely using the hotel-
motel tax.
Also, Blank's private
foundation and the city


each would spend $15 mil-
lion on surrounding neigh-
borhood development.
Blank who has built
his football franchise into
a perennial playoff con-
tender still must nego-
tiate a detailed lease and


operating agreement with
the Georgia World Con-
gress Center. That's the
state agency that owns the
existing dome and would
own the replacement. Reed
also must get the blessing
of the Atlanta City Council,


meant in lthe mayor oUIIIe,
as did Georgia Gov. Nathan
Deal.
Officials said the deal
presumes the stadium
would be built immedi-
ately south of the existing
Georgia Dome, though that
is contingent on securing
adjacent property that is
not yet publicly owned. A
secondary site is available
several blocks north of the
current stadium.
The Georgia Dome
would be demolished
after the new stadium
opens.
The Thursday announce-
ment, which took on a cel-
ebratory tone at City Hall,
comes after months of pri-
vate negotiations and
several years of planning
and studies involving
the 'governor's office, the
World Congress Center


ulty t ULUUnc u IreOsenlt
Ceasar C. Mitchell said he
was encouraged by the
mayor's announcement,
and he promised pub-
lic hearings in the near
future.
Deal praised the agree-
ment as well. At one time,
the governor was the fo-
cal point of negotiations,
when Blank sought $300
million in state debt to
$700 million from him.
Deal never publicly en-
dorsed or rejected that
split, but it became clear
that the General Assembly
was unwilling to raise the
state's debt limit to accom-
modate the bond sale.
So now the city is left to
sell the bonds using the
tourism tax a move
authorized by the leg-
islature to pay back
investors.


Ham fined $25kNAS for critg nw re

Hamlin fined 825k for criticizing new race car


The Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Denny
Hamlin was fined $25,000.
by NASCAR on Thursday
for criticizing the new
Gen-6 race car after last
week's race at. Phoenix,
and the furious driver said
he won't pay.
Hamlin compared the
new race car unfavorably
to last year's car after his
third-place finish, anger-
ing NASCAR officials who
are concerned about the
Gen-6 car's public percep-
tion. Although Hamlin's
brief comments were bare-
ly noticed last weekend,
NASCAR leveled a signifi-
cant fine against him be-
fore Thursday's open test
of the new car at Las Vegas
Motor Speedway.
"Ultimately, I'm not OK
with it," Hamlin said out-
side his hauler after the


morning test. "This is the
most upset and angry I've
been in a really, really long
time about anything that
relates to NASCAR.
"The truth is what the
Truth is, and I don't believe
in this," Hamlin added.
"I'm never going to believe
in it. And so as far as I'm
concerned, I'm not going
to pay the fine. If they sus-
pend me, they suspend me
at this point."
Hamlin might not have a
choice: According to NAS-
CAR rules, unpaid fines
may be deducted from a
driver's purse or point fund
earnings.
NASCAR vice president
of competition Robin
Pemberton said Hamlin is
allowed to appeal his fine,
and NASCAR' apparently
isn't in a rush to collect
it. Section 12 of the NAS-
CAR rule book states fines


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denny Hamlin (right) meets with crew, chief Darian Grubb
in the team garage during practice for a race Saturday in
Avondale, Ariz.


must be paid "prompt-
ly," but gives no specific
time frame, and says un-
paid fines "may result in
suspension."
"We give them quite a bit
of latitude, but you can't
slam the racing," Pember-
ton said. "You can't slam
the product.'That's where
it crosses a line."


SHamlin ran well last Sun-
day in the second race for
NASCAR's new Gen-6 race
car. He was asked on pit
road after how he liked
the car, and said: "I don't
want-to be the pessimist,
but it did not race as good
as our generation five cars.
This is more like what the
generation five was at


the beginning."
NASCAR deemed Ham-
lin's remarks as detrimen-
tal to stock car racing,
saying that while drivers,
get "ample leeway in voic-
ing their opinions when it
comes to a wide range of
aspects about the sport,
the sanctioning body will
'not tolerate publicly made
comments by its drivers
that denigrate the racing
product."
That didn't help Hamlin's
bewilderment at his fine
in a sport known for frank
talk about every aspect of
competition.
"It's an opinion. It's not
even a bad one," Ham-
lin said Thursday. "I don't
want to make things worse
than they already are, and
this is something that was
absolutely nothing that got
blown into something, and
it's just going to be worse


Poll


for them, so just let them
deal with it."
The Gen-6 car was devel-
oped by NASCAR last year
with heavy input from the
manufacturers to improve
the on-track product. Driv-
ers have been asked to be
careful in how they pub-
licly discuss the car, and
NASCAR has put together a
tremendous marketing ef-
fort in an attempt to avoid
the poor reception the
previous model received.
Fans never warmed up
to the "Car of Tomorrow"
in part because drivers
panned it from the very
beginning. Kyle Busch
won the debut race in the
"Car of Tomorrow" and
blasted it in Victory Lane,
and the car never. stood a
chance after that. Ham-
lin's comments came af-
ter the second race of this
season.


Woods tie
The Associated Press

DORAL Tiger Woods
was on his game, and so
were most of the world best
golfers Thursday in the
Cadillac Championship.
Except for the world's No.
1 player.
Woods made nine bird-
ies on the Blue Monster at
Doral for a 6-under 66 that
put him in a five-way share
of the lead with Masters
champion Bubba Watson,
former U.S. Open cham-
pion Graeme McDowell,
Sergio Garcia and Freddie
Jacobson.
This World Golf Champi-
onship lived up to its name
with Phil Mickelson, Steve
Stricker and Hunter Ma-
har among those one shot
behind.
But it was another rough
day for Rory McIlroy.
He hit only three fair-
ways and made six bogeys
that kept him at par or
worse on a perfect day for
scoring. Despite making a
15-foot eagle putt on the
par-5 first hole, and lac-
ing a 5-iron over the water
for another eagle attempt
on the par-5 eighth that
narrowly missed, the best
he could manage was a
73.
McIlroy has yet to break
par this year.
"It was a bit of a struggle,
to be honest," McIlroy said
to Sky Sports. "Hit some
good shots. Hit some not-
so-good shots. As I've
been saying all week, this
is a work in progress and
I'm working at it and I'm
staying patient."
He declined to speak
to reporters, grabbing a
quick lunch and smiling
at screaming fans who
wanted, his autograph as
he headed to the practice
range.
McIlroy played alongside
jWoods and Luke Donald


.d for lead at Doral-asMcIlroy struggles
wedge that stopped 2 feet 12 feet.
from the hole. Watson played in the
"It was certainly a day group with Mickelson
that could have been a and Stricker, antl they
little lower." said Woods. were a collective 16-under


Tiger Woods tees off at the 12th hole during the Cadillac
Championship in Doral on Thursday.


- Nos. 1, 2 and 3 in the
world and while this
essentially is a home
game for Woods having
won three times at Doral,
the occasional shouts
of "You're the real No. 1,
Tiger" rang true.
Coming off a pedestrian
performance a week ago at
the Honda Classic, Woods
looked sharp in most
aspects of his game, ex-
cept for a few lapses with
his chipping. He wasted
two early birdies with a
three-putt bogey on the
13th hole and a delicate


flop shot that he flubbed
on the 14th, leading to
another bogey. His chip
up .the slope on the third
didn't reach the green for
another bogey.
That's all that was
wrong.
He holed two long birdie
putts, including a sliding,
slippery putt from about
40 feet on the par-3 fourth
hole, and missed four rea-
sonable chances inside 15
feet. His final birdie was
on the par-5 eighth, when
he had to lay up from a
fairway bunker and hit a


who was selected for ran-
dom drug testing after his
round.
Just about everyone
could say that in these
conditions.
Garcia and McDowell
were in the same group.
Not only did they have bo-
gey-free rounds, both bird-
ied the same four holes. Ja-
cobson made two eagles in
a span of three holes, both
times hitting a 5-wood
onto the green to just over


par.
Stricker.had a chance to
tie for the lead except he
missed a 4-foot birdie putt
on the final hole. Mickel-
son, as usual, kept it en'-
tertaining. He pulled his
tee shot on the 17th hole
and his ball stopped roll-
ing after it traveled some
450 yards. He purposely
took a free drop on the cart
path to avoid the rough,
and chipped that to about
5 feet for birdie.


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FLORIDAN


fl K9k*40A L U -srPrlrLr


Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank (left) and Falcons President and CEO Rich McKay speak
during a news conference Thursday at which government and team officials announced that
financing terms have been reached for the Falcons' proposal to build a new $1 billion stadium,


p )* .
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