<%BANNER%>

Jackson County Floridan ( March 5, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958

Material Information

Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: March 5, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01031

Related Items

Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958

Material Information

Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: March 5, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01031

Related Items

Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text



Ctn 2 JobSeq 70 PkgScq 003
,*********ORIGIN MIXED ADC 325
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


)licans unveil government funding measure 6A


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online







FLORIDAN


SVol.90 No.56


Police: Suspected meth ringleader arrested


Staff Report


Eight people were arrest-
ed on various charges after
the Jackson County Drug
Task Force raided a sus-
pected meth house near
Graceville.
Authorities say the raid.
was part of an ongoing in-
vestigation that led to the
arrest of 55-year-old Rudy
Rodriguez, described in
a JCDTF press release as
the head of a suspected
methamphetamine distri-
bution ring in the county.
He is charged with pos-


Rodriguez Aviles


session and sale of a con-
trolled substance and
with possession of drug
paraphernalia. His bond
was set at $32,500 at his
first court appearance on
the charges.
Investigators say a series
of undercover drug buys


Rodgers Wise


were made at a residence
south of Graceville and
that the operation led of-
ficers to seek and obtain
a warrant for the arrest of
Rodriguez. The officers
also obtained a warrant
to search his residence at
4848 Highway 77 in the


E.Johnson S.Johnson

Graceville area.
When officers arrived to
execute the warrant there,
they found Eric and Shelia
Johnson in the home. The
two told officers they were
living there temporarily,
watching it for Rodriguez,
who rented the dwelling.


King Griffin


The Johnsons had three
minor children living
there, officials indicated
in a complaint regarding
the arrest of the Johnson
couple. The two adults
were charged with child
abuse because, according
to the JCDTF press release,


the home and surrounding
property "were found to be
in deplorable conditions
unsuitable for the children"
who were living there. The
release went on to say
that officers found drug
paraphernalia throughout
the house. Scales, smok-
ing pipes, packaging ma-
terials "and other items
consistent with metham-
phetamine use and...dis-
tribution were also locat-
ed, along with a quantity of
methamphetamine," the

S ee ARREST, Page 5A


CAR SHOW'COOKS UP' THE CLASSICS


~ ''
'"'";~*;'.:",tir~I?!.
''i~7~)lj~j~
r~c,-*B~,
'"~~
~... .~


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
'Cooking Up A Kitchen' Car Show attendees could get a close look at cars ranging from a vintage Model A to modern classics Saturday.


I _


St. Patrick's Day celebration adds truck pull


Follow us





Facebook Twitter


Washington
County


Task force


raid nets


four, yields


drugs, guns

Staff Report

The Washington County Drug
Task Force has arrested four
men in a weekend raid that
yielded crack cocaine and mari-
juana, along with several fire-
arms a-rid some ammunition,-,
a large amount
of cash and a
supply of razor
blades.
Authorities
with the agency
said investiga-
Thompson tors found indi-
vidually packaged
crack cocaine,
traditional pow-
der cocaine and
marijuana when
they executed a
search warrant at
5677 Highway 79
A. Brown in south Washing-
ton County.
Olajuwon Az-
abram Thomp-
son, 19, of
Vernon, is charged
in the case with
possession of drug
Peterson paraphernalia
and possession of.
marijuana.
Arthur Clyo
Brown, 61, also,
of Vernon, is
charged with pos-
session: of drug
paraphernalia,
S.Brown, possession of co-
caine, possession
of marijuana within
1,000 feet of a place of
worship, simple possession
of marijuana, possession of a
weapon by a convicted felon,
and possession of a weapon
during the commission of a
felony.
Dextrel Pontez Peterson, 26, of
Ebro, is charged with possession
of marijuana.
Steverson Bernard Brown,
47, of Vernon, is charged with
possession of. drug parapher-
nalia, possession of cocaine,
possession of a weapon by a
convicted felon, possession of
a weapon during the commis-
sion of a felony, possession of
marijuana within 1;000 feet of
a place of worship and simple
possession of marijuana.


Gusting winds 'and frigid weather didn't keep a crowd from
gathering.at Dayspring Christian Academy for its "Cooking
Up A Kitch6n" Car Show Saturday.
The event featured.over 40 cars ranging from a 1930 Ford Model
A to a 2011 Mustang and was the first big fundraiser for the school's
campaign to build a new kitchen and a cafeteria, said Dayspring
Administrator Lori Gregg.
The Dayspring Parents' Committee had smaller fundraisers
previously.
The school has a kitchen and cafeteria now, but lunch times have
to be staggered.for the 140 students and hot lunches have to be
brought in by outside caterers.
The plarfned'cafeteria and kitchen would allow for an in-school
hot lunch program and the space would also serve as a multipur-
pose room and chapel.
The area that had been used as a chapel was converted into class-
rooms, Gregg added.
Right now, the school has students ranging from three-year-olds
to eighth-graders and is planning to expand next year to have 9th
and 10th grades. This is the school's 20th year of operation.

INSIDE
) See more event photo;-, 5A


John Wynn takes a close look at the engine of Mike Calhoun's 1957
Apache Saturday.


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
An extra element has been
added to the upcoming St. Pat-
rick's Day celebration in Mari-
anna. Set for March 16 from 2-
6 p.m., the party will include a
truck pull, in which 10-member
teams will grab a thick, heavy
rope and pull a big pink fire truck
20 to 25'feet. The team that fin-
ishes with the fastest time wins
a trophy and/or other prizes.
The decision to include a truck
pull this year came last Friday,
according to Marianna Main
Street Director Charlotte Brun-
ner. The teams won't be pulling
just any old fire truck -- this one
has a special new purpose after
being taken out of fire service.


Each team will pay a $50 entry
fee. All the money raised'will go
to the newly formed local chap-
ter of the Guardians of the Rib-
bon/Pink Heals, a cancer sup-
port organization. The group
leases the fire truck for $1 a year
from its founders and uses it as
.a showpiece to increase can-
cer awareness and in efforts to
raise money to financially help
women who have been diag-
nosed with cancer. The group
does not take an administrative
fee or financially benefit in any
other way from such fundrais-
ers, according to Lori Meadows,
who organized the chapter with
husband Phillip Meadows. The

See TRUCK, Page 5A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Members of the Tindall Titans pose for a photo after their victory in
last year's St. Patrick's Day Festival fire truck pull. The team, which was
sponsored by Marianna's Tindall Construction, was victorious over 10
other teams in the competition. They were pulling a 23,000-pound pink
fire truck named Chase that was brought from Jacksonville. This year's
pull will be using a pink fire truck belonging to the new Jackson County
chapter of Pink Heals. It will be unveiled at the festival.


) CLASSIFIEDS...4B


> ENTERTAINMENT...3B


) LOCAL...3A


> OBITUARIES...5A


)'STATE...4A


> SPORTS...1B


)> WEATHER...2A


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
.Recycled Newsprint


r;~ ,
:;ls


'Tigers explode past
Atomics, 15-2 IB


O H n o I ~.n I \ ~ ii u ii r o


o~nnH~


7 65161 80050 911 11


INSIDE SUNDAY, MARCH 17"









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN e www.jcfloridan.com


High 600
Low -330


Tuesday
Sunny & Much Colder.



JHigh-690
Low 42o


Thursday-
Partly Cloudy & Mild.


High 650
Low 36"


Wednesday .
Mostly Sunny & Mild.



High 700
Low- 450


Friday
Partly Cloudy & Mild.


TIDES ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


1:46 AM
4:48 AM
1:51AM
3:02 AM
3:36AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
57.67 ft.
19.88 ft.
16.04 ft.
12.88 ft.


3:25
8:36
3:58
4:31
5:04


Flood Stage
66.0'ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme

0 1 2 3


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:03 AM
Sunset 5:43 PM,
Moonrise 12:57 PM
Moonset 11:38 AM


Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar.
11 19 27 4


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
f is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.,
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


COXLmImmirity iCalendar


TODAY
a Chipola Regional Workforce
Development Consortium Meet-
ing Conference Call-9:30 a.m.
Call 718-0456 ext. 101 for additional
information.
n Free Vision Screening and
Hearing Impaired Phone Services
Screening/Phone Distribution-10
a.m.-1p.m. at the Jackson County
Senior Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive,
Marianna. Event hosted by the
Jackson County Senior Citizens. Call
482-5028.
n Optimist Club of Jackson County
Meeting Noon at Jim's Buffet &
Grill in Marianna.
SOrientation Noon-3 p.m. at
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
Highway 90, Marianna. Learn about
and register for free services. Call
526-0139.
) Sewing Circle -1 p.m. at Jackson
County Senior Citizens, 2931 Optimist
Drive in Marianna. Call 482-5028.
) Employability Workshop, What
Employers are Looking For-2:30
p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna.
Call718-0326.
a Jackson County School Board
Special Meeting-4 p.m. at 2903
Jefferson St., Marianna in the Board
Room. The purpose of the meeting
.is for the presentations by the food
service management companies who
have submitted bids for the upcoming
contract period. Call 482-1200.
) Chipola College Community
Chorus-6-7:30 p.m. in the Center
for the Arts atChipola College. Sing-
ers, aged High School and above are
welcome to sing with the Community
Chorus and will perform on the April
'16 Chipola Ensemble Concert. Call
718-2376 or heidebrechtd@chipola.
edu.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6
5 Steps to Rapid Employment
Workshop-9 a.m.-Noon. at Marianna
One Stop Career Center. Call 718-
0326.
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volun-
teers Free Tax Return Preparation
-9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Jackson County Ag-
riculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
for an appointment.


n Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting Noon-i p.m. in the
AA room of First United Method-
ist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in
Marianna.
) Basic Computer Class Part
1-Noon-3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90,
Marianna. Learn basic components
and use of a computer. Call 526-0139.

THURSDAY, MARCH 7
n Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting
7a.m. at the Gazebo Coffee Shoppe
& Grill indowntown Marianna. Call
482-2290.
n Panhandle Row Crop Short
Course-7:15 a.m. at the Jackson
County Agriculture Conference
Center, 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue, -
Marianna. There is no registration fee,
however please pre-register by calling
482-9620. Tooics'will focus on peanut
and cotton production. Program will
conclude with a sponsored lunch.
D "International Chat n' Sip"-
8:30-10 am. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch, 2929
Green St. in Marianna. The public is
invited to enjoy this relaxed environ-
ment for the exchange of language,
culture and ideas among local and
international communities. Light re-
freshments will be served. No charge.
Call 482-9124.
n East Jackson County Economic
Development Council to Recognize
March Business of the Month-10
a.m. at Peoples South Bank, 8146
Highway 90, Sneads. The public is
invited to attend. .
) Job Club Noon-3 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center,
4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn .
job seeking/retention skills; get job
search assistance. Call 526-0139.
n Employability Workshop, Com-
mon Job Search Mistakes to
Avoid-2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One
Stop Career Center, 4636 Highway 90,
Marianna. Call 718-0326.
n Ribbon Cutting-3 p.m. at Simply
You Med Spa, 4321 Lafayette St. in
Marianna. Everyone is invited to help
the Jackson County Chamber of Com-
merce welcome this new business to
the Jackson County community.
n)) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide
Volunteers Free Tax Return
Preparation-4-7 p.m. at the Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-
9620 during business hours of 8:30
a.m.-4:30 p.m. for an appointment.


n Quit Smoking Now Class/Sup-
port Group-5:30 p.m.at Jackson
Hospital in the Cafeteria Board Room.
Free to attend. Curriculum developed
by ex-smokers for those who want to
become ex-smokers themselves. Call
718-2545.
a VFW & Ladies Auxiliary Meeting
-6 p.m. at 2830 Wynn St. in Mari-
anna. Covered-dish supper followed
by a 7 p.m. business meeting. Call
372-2500.
n The William Dunaway Chapter,
Florida Society, Sons of the Ameri-
can Revolution Meeting-6:30 p.m.
at Jim's Buffet and Grill. Dutch treat
meal. The program "Historical Flags"
will be presented by President Lionel
Young, displaying and explaining
his extensive collection of flags. Call
594-6664.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Closed
discussion, 8-9 p.m., First United
Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia
St., Marianna, in the AA room At-
tendance limited to persons with a
desire to stop drinking; papers will not
be signed.

FRIDAY, MARCH 8
a Knitters Nook-lO a.m. at the
Jacksorn County Public Library, Mari-
anna Branch. New and experienced
knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
n Money Sense Class-Noon-4 p.m.
at the Goodwill Career Training Center,
4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Money
Sense is a class that covers different
topics in money management to em-
power people to take charge of their
finances and create their own wealth.
Call 526-0139.
D Deadline to enter the Little Miss,
Teen, Junior and Miss Sneads
Pageants-3 p.m. Applications
are available for pick up at Sneads
Elementary and Sneads High School.
Call 482-9004 ext. 229.
) Better Breathers Club Meet-
ing-2-3 p.m. in the Hudnall Building
Community Room, Jackson Hospital
campus. The program, presented by
Mason Brock from Florida Public Utili-
ties will be "Conserving Your Energy"':
Bring a friend or caregiver. No cost to
attend and light refreshments will be
served. Call 718-2849.
n Black History 365 Talent Show-
6 p.m. at the Grand Ridge School Old
Gym. This event is sponsored by the
Grand Ridge School's Black History
Committee in conjunction with the
Jackson County Youth Council. Tickets
are $5 each, children 12 and under


admitted free. Lynwood "Funnyman"
Williams will be the MC. If interested in
performing call 693-3145.
) Celebrate Recovery -7 p.m.
at Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts,
habits and hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m.
Child care available. Call 209-7856,
573-1131.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, MARCH 9
) Household Hazardous Waste
Amnesty Day Event-8 a~m.-Noon.
at the Jackson County Recycling Facil-
ity, 3530 Wiley Drive, Marianna. Event
sponsored by the Jackson County
Board of County Commissioners.
No gas cylinders or explosives. Call
718-0437.
) Citizen's Field Football, Inc.
Rack of Ribs Fundraiser-0l a.m. at
McDaniel's Grocery Store, Hwy. 90,
Sneads. Donations of $20 for a whole
rack and $10 for a half rack. Proceeds
will be used to purchase new weight
lifting equipment for Sneads High
Football. Contact citifield.inc@gmail.
com.
n Troop 76 Girl Scouts of Alford
and Cottondale Cookie Sale-10
a.m.-3 p.m. at the Dollar General in
Alford. Cookies are $3.50 per box.
nAlford Community Health Clinic
Hours 10 a.m. until last patient is
seen, at 1770 Carolina St. in Alford.
The free clinic for income-eligible
patients without medical insurance
treats short-term illnesses and
chronic conditions. Appointments
available (call 263-7106 or 209-5501);
walk-ins welcome. Sign in before
noon..
n The Durden, Dudley and Eden-
field Family Reunion-Noon at the
Grand Ridge Community Center,
located behind City Hall. Bring a dish
to go with fish. Call 592-2571.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 4:30-5:30 p.m. in the
AA room of First United Method-
ist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in
Marianna.
a Miss Heart of Relay for Life
Pageant-6 p.m. at the Graceville
Civic Center. Entry fee of $50. Pro-
ceeds to be donated to the MHOUSA
Relay for Life Team. Register online at
www.missheartoftheusa.com/gracev-
ille or call 326-6735.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar. Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447Z
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 ConstitUtion Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundupl


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for March 3, the
latest available report: One
accident, one abandoned
vehicle, one suspicious ve-
hicle, two suspicious persons,
one highway obstruction, one
burglary, one drug offense, 12
traffic stops, one found/aban-
doned property report, one
follow-up investigation, two
juvenile complaints, and one
open door/window.


Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County
Sheriff's Office and county fire/
rescue reported the following
incidents for March 3, the latest
available report: Five


abandoned vehicles, two
suspicious vehicles, one suspi-
cious person, one report of


TIME
,4 lc'A~


illness, two
physical
disturbances,
two wood-
land fire calls,
22 medical
calls, one
traffic crash,


three burglar alarms, one
report of shooting in the area,
21 traffic stops, one larceny
complaint, one follow-up inves-
tigation, one juvenile com-
plaint, one suicide attempt, one
animal complaint, four assists
of other agencies, two welfare
checks, and one threat/harass-
ment complaint/.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were


booked into the county jail
during the latest reporting
periods:
) Willie Holden, 62, 5904 Fort
Road, Greenwood, driving
under the influence.
n David Saunders, 25, 2959
Woodrow St., Marianna, driving
under the influence.
n James Wilson, 54, 2085
Highway 73 South, Marianna,
fugitive from justice, violation
of state probation.
n Spencer Trawick, 39, 2485
Highway 71, Marianna, battery-
domestic violence.
n Jeremy Smith, 23, 838 Faith .
Ave., Graceville, battery-domes-
tic violence.
) Benjamin Whitten, 25, 4134
Tulsa Lane, Greenwood,
introduction of contraband
(alcohol and marijuana), pos-
session of marijuana-less than
20 grams.
n Tremon Spencer, 23, 3104


Gilmore Road, Marianna,
introduction of contraband
(marijuana), possession of
marijuana -less than 20
grams.
) John Simpson, 63, 3943
Highway 90, Marianna, driving
under the influence, posses-
sion of marijuana-less than 20
grams.
) Jesse Hill, 36, 4852 Cutler
St., Orlando, hold for Orange
Co.
n Robert Miller, 31, 3204 Paulk
Road, Marianna, hold for Leon
Co.
) Eldridge Cross, 69, 2123
Church St., Marianna, sen-
tenced to 10 days in county
jail.
Jail Population: 196
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call 1-888-
404-FWCC (3922).


.-,OR -.N-C ,


nFLoRIDA'S

PANHANDLE

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 0.9* "


72A TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 2013


WAME-UP CALL


We*aer o loolk







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com LOCAL TUESDAY, MARCH 5,2013 3AF


The winners in the Bears/Wolves Class were from left: 1st p
Roney and 3rd place, Austin Kent.


Pack 300 comp
added a custom paint jot
Special to the Floridan Each Scout raced their
car down a timed track
On a recent rainy Satur- competing against the
day morning, Scouts from other Scouts. There were
the local Pack 300 gath- also prizes awarded for
ered inside St. Luke's Epis- the Scouts that showed
copal Church in Marianna the greatest amount of
to compete in the annual craftsmanship and that
Pinewood Derby races. demonstrated good
Each Scout hand built a sportsmanship. Pack 300
model race car from an would like to thank Fathe
official Pinewood kit. After Norman Bray for allowing
the car was shaped and the use of the building to
finished out, each Scout hold the event.


WESHLEY SELECTED AS

HONOREE TO
A -T r A C l-0 A 0 1T 1 T 'IT 1 /A / T AA r


J-

---
-
llA
~L~ib:. .g~SiL -j~ & Ij~Md~~p_~y~W~*IC~ TS~-
ik h


SNEADS FFA HOLDS FACULTY i


lOVE: Colton Fenton took home the prize for "Best In Show".
FT: Kyle Roney won the medal for "Sportsmanship".



DEAKFAST DURING FFA EK
:____"__,_'_______,_-__.,__


I iL M I nLi, i


I ______ ,____:-.
', "a-l' ',' ; : F" "k:


..., .... .




j? ,^J
I^Hi^^l^^


T orrian Weshley ]
Sof being selected,
SPeople to Peopli
This program was s
Dwight Eisenhower
sador, Weshley has
on June 16 toWashi
engage with other S
across the country
ous government off
Weshley is a fifth I
Ridge Elementary S
Ararat A.M.E. Churn
Choir of Jackson Co
William Gilbert and


LEFT:
n Monday, Feb.18, the Sneads FFA of
pancake breakfast for the faculty ant
Qrhnnl All nf the ctaff ttondlorl qs lA


Steve Benton, superi
breakfast Was-held tc
faculty of Sneads Hig
Week. Pictured from
SUBMITTED PHOTO County Schools and
been given the honor High School. RIGHT:
s an honoree to the, faculty in recognition
nbassador Program. Ashleigh Tharpe, Gec
ed in 1956 by President
a Student Ambas- aria
opportunity to travel M aria lln
on, D.C., where he will Special tothe Floridan
lent Ambassadors from
hey interact with vari- The Marianna Duplicate
Bridge Club announces
ls. winners for the game
le student at Grand played Feb. 25.
)ol, a member of Mt. )) First Place: Janet
Synder and Bob Snyder
nd the Boys to.Men Second Place: Linda
ty. His parents are Hodges and Bobbie
alondaWeshlev of Fenster


U I


;ia Pevy and'laylor Heed.
S Marianna's Most
i Cn b, Trusted Jeweler
Bridge Club results st.1971
Watts and Judy Duell and play or observe. lAW atson
:ied with Mary Lou Miller For more information JEWELERS
md Sharon Morgan and and partners please 8 s5MOLO. Srs
Armin Kunkler and Lois call Libby Hutto at 850.482.4037
Stanwaity. 526-3162. jewelers.
The Marianna.
Bridge Club is sanctioned
3y the American Contract
Bridge League. The bridge
game is held weekly,
every Monday at 12:30
Dm at Rt TI .lo's EniCennal









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Work continues, future uncertain for sinkhole site


IHtASlUlCI UEDPRESS
Demolition experts watch as an excavator checks the sink-
hole in the bedroom, from the home of Jeff Bush, during
demolition, Monday, March 4 in Seffner, Fla.


The Associated Press

SEFFNER, Fla. -Aback-
hoe chipped away Monday
at the remains of a house
where a sinkhole opened
up and swallowed a man,
but there was little certain-
ty as to what would come
next for the site of the freak
geological incident.
Though thousands of
sinkholes erupt in Florida
each year, most are small,
few affect homes, and
even fewer cause deaths.
The sinkhole in the Tampa'
suburb of Seffner, however,
was different.
Crews still were working
to remove enough of the


home to see more clearly
inside the hole and deter-
mine what steps would
come after the property
is razed. There has been
no definitive word as to
whether the hole will be
filled or whether the prop-
erty could be built on
again. But some experts
say the fact that the sink-
hole claimed a life that
of Jeff Bush, 37,- and that
his body is expected to
remain below the surface
make rebuilding less likely.
"It's kind of a bad omen,"
said Dave Arnold, a hydro-
geologist who has surveyed
sinkholes for the South-
west Florida Water Man-


agement District. "This is
an even worse omen with
someone buried under
there."
Arnold and other experts
expect that once the house
if destroyed, crews will
work to fill in the hole and
the lot will likely remain
empty. Depending on the
circumstances, past Flor-
ida sinkholes have been
handled in varied ways.
In Maitland, Fla., a sink-
hole 325 feet across was
discovered in the 1960s
as Interstate 4 was built.
The highway was diverted
around the area, but in
2008 workers began a $9
million project to fill and


stabilize the sinkhole in
preparation for a planned
expansion of the roadway.
Engineers say a road can
be put over it now without
any problems.
In Winter Park, Fla., a
sinkhole in 1981 swallowed
several sports cars, parts
of two businesses, the
deep end of an Olympic-
size swimming pool and
a three-bedroom house.
It stretched about 350 feet
across and caused $2 mil-
lion in damages. The area
became a temporary tour-
ist attraction, but most of
it was ultimately deserted,
filled with water and be-
came a lake.


USDA announces lending rates for March


Special to the Floridan

The U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Commod-
ity Credit Corporation
announced interest rates
for March. The CCC bor-
rowing rate-based charge
for March is 0.125 percent,
unchanged from 0.125 in
February. For 1996 and
subsequent crop year
commodity and market-
ing assistance loans, the
interest rate for loans dis-
bursed during March is
1.125 percent, unchanged
from 1.125 in February.
Interest rates for Farm
Storage Facility Loans
approved for March are


as follows, 1.375 percent
with seven-year loan
terms, up from 1.250 in
February; 2.000 percent
with 10-year loan terms,
up from 1.875 in February
and 2.250 percent with 12-
year loan terms, up from
2.125 percent in February.
The interest rate for Sugar
Storage Facility Loans for
March is 2.500 percent, up
from 2.375 in February.
The maximum discount
rate, applicable for March
for the Tobacco Transi-
tion Payment Program is 5
percent, unchanged from
February. This is based on
the 3.250 percent prime
rate plus 2 percent, round-


ed to the nearest whole
number.
Past monthly releases
announcing interest rates
charged by CCC on com-
modity and marketing as-
sistance loans disbursed
for that particular month
reflect the interest rate
the U.S. Treasury charged
CCC for that month. This
was the interest rate spec-
ified by CCC since Jan.
1, 1982, but the process
of establishing the inter-
est rate was changed by
a provision of the Federal
Agriculture Improvement
and Reform Act of 1996,
the Act, enacted on April
4, 1996.


Section 163 of the Act
requires that monthly in-
terest rates applicable to
commodity and market-
ing assistance loans are to
be 100 basis points or
1 percent greater than
the rate determined under
the applicable interest rate
formula in effect on Oct. 1,
1995. This formula result-
ed in a rate equivalent to
the amount the U.S. Trea-
sury charged CCC for bor-
rowing, for the month.
Further program in-
formation is available
from USDA Farm Ser-
vice Agency's Financial
Management Division at
202-772-6041.


12 charged with manslaughter in FAMU death


The Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla.
- Twelve former Flor-
ida A&M University
band members were
charged Monday with
manslaughter in the 2011
hazing death of a drum
major.
Ten of the band mem-
bers had been charged
last May with third-de-
gree felony hazing for the
death of 26-year-old Rob-
ert Champion, but the
state attorney's office said


they are adding the charge
of manslaughter for each
defendant. They also have
charge two additional
defendants with man-
slaughter, though they
have yet to be arrested.
The second-degree
manslaughter charge an-
nounced during an after-
noon status hearing car-
ries a penalty of up to 15
years in prison.
Champion died in
Orlando in November
2011 after he collapsed
following what pros-


ecutors say was a savage
beating during a hazing
ritual. It happened on
a bus parked in a hotel
parking lot after Florida
A&M played Bethune-
Cookman in their
annual rivalry football
game.
Authorities said Cham-
pion had bruises on his
chest, arms, shoulder
and back and died of
internal, bleeding. Wit-
nesses- told emergency
dispatchers that the
drum major was vomit-


ing before he was found
unresponsive aboard the
bus.
Christopher Chest-
nut, an attorney for
Champion's parents, said
Pam and Robert Champi-
on, Sr. were pleased with
Ashton's decision to up-
grade the charges.
"These charges are com-
mensurate with the acts
committed," Chestnut
said. "It sends the right
message regarding zero-
tolerance of hazing in the
FAMU band."


TROOP 34 BOY


SCOUTS HOLD


ORIENTATION


SUBMITTED PHOTO
T roop 34 Boy Scouts of Marianna re-
cently held a Boy Scout Orientation
and Lock-In for upcoming Cub Scouts
and new recruits at Damascus Freewill Bap-
tist Church. The Scouts were treated to games
and activities that introduced them to the
exciting world of Scouting. They finished the
overnight Lock-in with a clean-up service
project. Pictured front row from left: Clayton
Williams, Cole Burdeshaw, Jonathan Tread-
way, Bobby Holmes, Seth Hamm and Cam-
eron Corder. Back row: Gage Sellars, Caleb
Oswald, Connor Oswald, Owen Gilley, Jared
Roney and Ethan Corder.


I D"OTHAN EAGLE

Dot h .an Civic Center


Entrance Weather
Proof


Harris Gulf Eagle New Life
Security Supply Surface


Storm Shelters of
Northwest Florida


Window
World
Empire Reality
& M4 Builders
Affordable Solar
Hot Water and
Power
All Pro
Siding


Oriental
Imports
Luxury Thompson
Sheets Chiropractic
Pittsburgh Ram Jack
Paints Solutions


Louver
Shop


Re
Bath


Delivery
Entrance


Granite
Trans-
formation


Geothe-
mal
Solutions
Liberty
Tax
Service


Geordan
Builders
Ansley's
Building
Materials


OPEN OPEN

Carpet
Land


My
Outdoor
Rooms


PC's

Nursery


Affordable

Screens


Bama Best
Concrete
Decor
Southeast
Roofing
Alabama
Foundation
Specialists
Culligan
Water


Bondy's
! Ford


Sears
Home St<


Rainbow
Vacuums

Advocare
Nutrition

OPEN
Safelawn
Organics


Cook's
Pest
Control
Parrot
Structural
Service


Alabama
Landscape
Creations


Safe
Trust
Security


Stokes
Flooring


Window
Pros


OPEN


Wiregrass
International


Cabinet
Creations


Kitchen
Craft

Bath
Fitters


Allscreen
Screen
Masters


~4A TUESDAY. MARCH 5. 2013


LOCAL & STATE











JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


A lTCHEN' CAR S.HOOW


PHTO, .r,',ti 'ri, T'll fJP 'l Ilr 't
ix-year-old Stephen Hill tabove.i
peeks around a big trucks big tire
while playing at the car show Satur-
day at Dayspring Christian Academy.


I.


'.4
(K-


Chris Bokenfohr (left) from Enter-
prise, Ala., cleans the engine of his
318 BIM\V Saturday at the Dayspring


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332

Ardry
Haddock

ArdryHaddock, 89, ofMa-
rianna went home to be
with her Lord, where her
husband is waiting, Sun-
day, March 3, 2013 at Jack-
son Hospital.
Mrs. Haddock was a na-
tive and life long resident
of Jackson County, where
she was a homemaker and
loved working in her
daylillies. She was a life-
time member of Alford
Baptist Church.
She is predeceased by
her parents, Zoa Blanche
and Tally Kent; one daugh-
ter Brenda Haddock.
Survivors include one
son, William Olen Had-
dock, Jr. of Panama City;
two daughters, Audry Ann
and husband, Donald
Brannon of Sneads, Bar-
bara Haddock of Marianna;
one brother, Bobby Gene
Kent of Marianna; Doris
Glick of Pace; five grand-
children, five great-grand-
children and six great-
great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be
Wednesday, March 6, 2013
at Alford Baptist Church
with Revs. Bob Johnsoh
and Darren Tucker officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in the


Alford Cemetery with
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel di-
recting.
The family will receive
friends from 6-8 p.m. Tues-
day, March 5, 2013 at
James & Sikes jvladdox
Chapel.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com
Brown Funeral Home
1068 Main Street
Chipley, FL 32428
850-638-4010
www.brownfh.net

Shirley May
Pearce

Shirley May Pearce, 88,
of Marianna, Fla., formerly
of Bureau, passed away
Sunday, Feb. 17,.2013, at
Washington Rehab and
Nursing Center in Chipley,
Fla.
She was born May 10,
1924, in Hehnepin, IL to
Alfred and Julia (Henning)
Morine. She grew up in
Hennepin and graduated
from Hennepin High
School. She also graduated
from Brown Business Col-
lege. Shirley worked for
Victory House iri Seneca,
and for the Boy Scouts of
America diiring World War
II. Shirley married Franklin
Pearce on March 19, 1946,
at the Methodist Church in
Hennepin.
She was a librarian in Bu-
reau. Shirley was a Cub
Scout Den Mother and


started a troop in Bureau.
Shirley was seamstress and
made all her family's cloth-
ing. She and her husband
were native to Illinois and
moved to Marianna, Fla., in
1995 from Live Oak, Fla.
She also started a library at
Washington Rehab and
Nursing Center where she
resided in Chipley, Fla.
Shirley taught Sunday
school at her nursing home
and was president of the
residents association. Shir-
ley also received the Hall of
Fame award at her nursing
home. She was a longtime
member of the Bureau
Congregational Church
and the Grace United
Methodist Church in Ma-
rianna, Fla.
Shirley is survived by her
children, Bruce A. (Caro-
line) Pearce of Metamora,
Carol Susan Labrecque of
Seffner, Fla., and Nancy L.
(David) Sandham of Ma-
rianna, Fla. Also surviving
are three grandchildren,
Robert Labrecque, Christo-
pher Pearce and Michael
Pearce; and three great-
grandchildren. Surviving as
well are three sisters, Mar-
jorie (the late Bill) Bruer of
Washington, Ill., Patricia
(the late Edwin) Hank of
Lacon and Nellie Ruth (Da-
vid) Newburn of Bureau
Junction; and one brother,
John (Patricia) Morine of
Buda. Also surviving are
numerous nieces and
nephews.
Mrs. Pearce was preced-
ed in death by her parents,
her husband, and one


grandson in infancy, Micah
Pearce.
Funeral services were
held at the Bureau Congre-
gational Church in Bureau
Junction IL, Pastor Jack
Stites officiating. Burial fol-
lowed in the Riverside
Cemetery in Hennepin, IL.
There will be a memorial
service at Grace United
Methodist Church in Ma-
rianna, Fla., on Wednesday
March 6th at 2:00 p.m. to
honor Shirley.
Memorials may be direct-
ed to Grace United Meth-
odist Church in Marianna,
Fla or Bureau Congrega-
tional Church in Bureau
Junction, IL.
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com

Cecylia P.
Sznura

Funeral Mass for Cecylia
P. Sznura will be 2 p.m.
Tuesday, March 5, 2013 at
St. Anne's Catholic Church.
Burial will follow in
Pinecrest Memorial Gar-
dens.


Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
www.artisticdesignsunltd.com
850-372-4456


'COOKIN UP


Truck
From Page 1A
couple owns the truck,
having purchased it from
Chipola College after the
aging unit was taken out
of service. Mr. Meadows
is retired Jackson County
Fire Rescue firefighter/
EMT and is an adjunct
instructor at Chipola,
teaching minimum fire
standards at the school.
Mrs. Meadows said
Monday that the chapter
has already arranged to
help its first family, just
weeks after getting orga-
nized. It will soon pay a
February power bill for
a woman who was diag-
nosed with brain cancer a
short time ago.
The truck is nicknamed
"Connie" in honor of the
late Connie Haile, a lo-
cal woman who died
of cancer last year and
had been a Pink Heals
advocate. Rahal-Miller
Nissan has repainted it,
donating supplies and la-
bor for the cause, and the
truck will debut its new
-color a t the St. Patrick's
Day event shortly before
the teams pull it down
the race course around 4
p.m.
The St. Patrick's Day cel-
ebration will take place
in and around Madison
Street Park in Marianna.
Events include the 2 p.m.
Shamrock Shuffle '5K
Run/Walk, which is spon-
sored by Guardians of the
Ribbon, Signature Health
Care at the Courtyard and
Main Street Marianna,
as well as a one-mile fun
run. The big race costs
$20 to enter, with all pro-
ceeds going to help the
Guardians assist local fe-


Arrests
From Page 1A
release stated. In addi-
tion to the child abuse
charge,.the Johnsons were
also charged with main-
taining a dwelling for the
purpose of using, keep-
ing and selling controlled
substances.
Two others living in the
home, Howard Griffin and
Laura King (also known as
Laura Yingst), were also
arrested on the same
charges .as the Johnson
couple.
Griffin is also wanted
in Geneva County on a
charge not specified in
the local press release,
authorities stated. King/
Yingst faces some addi-
tional charges from an-
other incident.
As part of the overall
investigation into Rodri-
guez and his suspected
dealings, authorities also
arrested his girlfriend,
identified as Amanda S.
Rodgers, 28. Ms. Rodg-
ers was arrested with Ro-
driguez at a residence on
Satellite Road south of
Graceville, picked up on
the same day as the indi-
viduals who were living
temporarily in th6 Rodri-
guez dwelling on Highway
77. Authorities said the
Satellite Road home was
a secondary residence for
Rodriguez. He, Rodgers
and a man named Abran
.Pineda Aviles were there
together when the search
warrant was served on
that residence. Aviles,
47, and Rodgers were
both charged with pos-
session of a controlled
substance (methamphet-
amine), and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Authorities said that, in
addition, Rodgers was
wanted by authorities in
Houston County, Ala., on
a warrant for charges un-
specified in the local press
release.
The Jackson DTF press
release also disclosed the
arrest of a man who at-
tempted to enter the Sat-
ellite Road residence dur-


male cancer victims and
their families.
Registration for all the
events begins at 12:30
p.m., or potential partici-
pants can call 526-2000 or
573-0229 to pre-register
or for.more information.
Music will be provided
by Big Poppa and the
Shuffle Brothers Band of
Tallahassee. The group
performed here during
last year's summer con-
cert series, and features
pop music from the 1950s
and 1960s.
Food and arts and crafts
vendors can call 718-0122
to reserve booth space,
at $25 without electric
service or $35 with elec-
tric. Vendor fees will go to
Main Street Marianna.
There will be a bouncy-
slide for the entertain-
ment of children in the
crowd.
Brunner suggests that
adults bring lawn chairs
and other creature com-
forts to fully enjoy the day.
And there will be green
beer this year, she said.
Brunner's hoping that
local business will chal-
lenge each other for
bragging rights as well
as trophies and prizes
in the truck pull; even if
they don't win the over-
all race, she points out,
a bank team, car dealer
team, or downtown re-
tail merchant could
still gain satisfaction from
beating the time achieved
by their competitors in
the same business field
and, in the friendly com-
petition, also help lo-
cal families challenged
by the financial stresses
that come along with the
physical and emotional
struggles of dealing with
cancer.


, iW LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS?VISIT
WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
Quality Service at Affordable Prices
Come Visit us at 3424 West Highway 90

Z 850-482-5041


ing the execution of the
search warrant. Authori-
ties'say they stopped Brian
ThomasWise as he tried to
enter, and discovered that
his driver's license had
been suspended. He was
arrested on that account,
and then, investigators al-
lege, he was found to be
in possession of metham-
phetamine. As a result, he
was charged additionally
with possession of a con-
trolled substance-meth-
amphetamine. Authori-
ties further stated that
the investigation yielded
information related to a
separate matter and led
to additional charges be-
ing leveled against Laura
King/Yingst. During the
course of the investiga-
tion leading to her arrest
in the most recent events,
she was also identified as a
suspect in an incident that
had allegedly occurred in
November of last year at
a residence of Rodriguez.
Because of that, she was
additionally charged with
conspiracy to commit
armed robbery, false im-
prisonment and aggravat-
ed assault. Authorities say
she allegedly used a ham-
mer to assault a man who
had been brought there
by two other individuals
who intended to rob the
victim. Authorities say
King assaulted the man
with the hammer and
held him down against his
will when he tried to leave
the situation. The two in-
dividuals who allegedly
brought the victim there
were identified by au-
thorities as Tika Gilbert
and Chris Craig. Both had
already been charged for
their alleged part in the
November 2012 incident,
authorities advised in the
recent press release.
Authorities said in the
press release that "Rodri-
guez and his organization
have been substantial
suppliers ofmethamphet-
amine to our area for some
time" and that additional
defendants ad charges are
pending in the case as the
investigation continues to
progress.


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


.~~~~~~1~'~"1-~~11111_1^___11_


TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 2013 5AF


LOCAL


I I
\^


r "~1"











JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN e. www.jcfloridan.com


Republicans unveil government funding measure


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Re-
publicans controlling the
House moved Monday to
give the Pentagon more
money for military readi-
ness while easing the pain
felt by such agencies as the
FBI and the Border Patrol
from the across-the-board
spending cuts that are just
starting to take effect.
The effort is part of a
huge spending measure
that would fund day-to-
day federal operations
through September and
head off a potential gov-
ernment shutdown later
this month.
The measure would leave
in place automatic cuts of 5
percent to domestic agen-
cies and 7.8 percent to the
Pentagon ordered by Presi-
dent Barack Obama Friday
night after months of bat-
tling with Republicans over
the budget. But the House
Republicans' legislation.
would .award the Defense
and Veterans Affairs de-
partments their detailed
2013 budgets while other
agencies would be frozen
at 2012 levels and then


President Barack Obama welcomes his new Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, (right) as he
speaks to members of the media at the start of a cabinet meeting in the Cabinet Room of the
White House in Washington, Monday, March 4. (From left) are, Education Secretary Arne Dun-
can, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Obama and Hagel.


bear the across-the-board
cuts.
The impact of the new
cuts was proving slow to
reach the broader public
as Obama convened the
first Cabinet meeting of
his second term to discuss
next steps.
The Pentagon did say it
would furlough thousands
of military school teach-


ers around the world and
close commissaries .an
extra day each week. And
Homeland Security Secre-
tary Janet Napolitano said
the spending cuts were
causing delays in customs
lines at airports including
Los Angeles International
and O'Hare International
in Chicago.
Obama said he was con-


tinuing to seek out Repub-
lican partners to reach a
deal to ease or head off the
cuts, but there was no sign
that a breakthrough was in
the works to reverse them.
The new GOP fund-
ing measure is set to ad-
vance through the House
on Wednesday. It's aimed
at preventing a govern-
ment shutdown when a


six-month spending bill
passed last September
runs out March 27.
The latest measure
would provide an increase
for military operations
and maintenance efforts
as well as veterans' health
programs but would
put most the rest of the
government on budget
autopilot.
After accounting for the
across-the-board cuts,
domestic agencies would
face reductions exceed-
ing 5 percent when com-
pared with last year. But
Republicans would carve
out a host of exemptions
seeking to protect certain
functions,. including fed-
eral prisons and fire-fight-
ing efforts in the West, and
to provide new funding for
embassy security and
modernizing the U.S. nu-
clear arsenal. The FBI and
the Border Patrol would be
able to maintain current
staffing levels and would
not have to furlough
employees.
The legislation would
provide about $2 billion
more than the current
level to increase security at
1


U.S. embassies and diplo-
matic missions worldwide.
Last September, a terrorist
attack on the U.S. diplo-
matic mission in Benghazi,
Libya, killed Ambassador
Chris Stevens and three
other Americans.
A project to repair the
Capitol Dome in Wash-
ington could stay on track,
and NASA would be pro-
tected from the harshest
effects of the automatic,
cuts, known in Washington
as a sequester.
The across-the-board
cuts would carve $85 bil-
lion in spending from the
government's $3.6 tril-
lion budget for this year,
concentrating the cuts in
the approximately $1 tril-
lion allocated to the day-
to-day agency operating
budgets set by Congress
each year. Those so-called
discretionary accounts
received big boosts in the
first two years of Obama's
presidency when Demo-
crats controlled Congress
but have borne the brunt
of the cuts approved as
Obama and Republicans
have grappled over the
budget.


Woman dies

after nurse

refuses to

perform CPR
The Associated Press

BAKERSFIELD, Calif.
- A nurse's refusal to give
CPR to a dying 87-year-
old woman at a California
independent living home
despite desperate pleas
from a 911 dispatcher
has prompted outrage
and spawned a criminal
investigation.
The harrowing 7-minute,
16-second call also raised
concerns about the nature
of seniors' living arrange-
ments at a time when their
numbers are growing in
the U.S., and there are calls
for legislation to prevent a
repeat of what happened
Feb. 26 at the Glenwood
Gardens in Bakersfield.
Loraine Bayless collapsed
in the dining room of the
retirement home that of-
fers many levels of care.
She lived in the indepen-
dent living building, which
state officials said is like a
senior apartment complex
and doesn't operate under
licensing oversight.
"This is a wakeup call,"
said Assemblywoman
Mariko Yamada, chair
of the California Assem-
bly Aging and Long-term
Care Committee. "I'm
sorry it took a tragedy like
this to bring it to our
attention."
Yamada cautioned that
while it's not yet known
whether intervention
would have saved the
woman's life, "we want to
investigate because it has
caused a lot of concern
and alarm."
Independent living facili-
ties "should not have a pol-
icy that says you can stand
there and watch somebody
die," said Pat McGinnis,
founder of California Ad-
vocates for Nursing Home
Reform, a consumer advo-
cacy group. "How a nurse
can do that is beyond
comprehension."
In all her years of advo-
cating for the elderly, Mc-
Ginnis said: "This was so
horrifying. I've never seen
this. happen before."
State officials did not
know Monday whether
the woman who talked to
the 911 dispatcher actu-
ally was a nurse, or just
identified herself as one
during the call. She said
one of the 'home's policies
prevented her from doing
CPR, according to an audio
recording of the call.


~JCVLORIDT'J.~COIV


Middle East is new global travel crossroads


The Associated Press

DUBAI, United Arab
Emirates It's 1 a.m. and
the sprawling airport in
this desert city is bustling.
Enough languages fill the
air to make a United Na-
tions translator's head
spin.
Thousands of fliers arrive
every hour from China,
Australia, India and nearly
everywhere else on the
planet. Few venture out-
side the terminal, which
spans the length of 24
football fields. They come
instead to catch connect-
ing flights to somewhere
else.
If it weren't for three
ambitious and rapidly
expanding government-
owned airlines Emirates
Airline, Etihad Airways
and Qatar Airways they
might have never come to
the Middle East.
For generations, interna-
tional fliers have stopped
.over in London, Paris and
Amsterdam. Now, they in-
creasingly switch planes
in Dubai, Doha and Abu
Dhabi, making this re-
gion the new crossroads of
global travel. The switch is
driven by both the airports
and airlines, all backed
by governments that see
aviation as the way to
make their countries big-
ger players in the global
economy.
Passengers are won over
by their fancy new planes
and top-notch service. But
the real key to'the airlines'
incredible growth is geog-
raphy. Their hubs in Qatar
and the United Arab Emir-
ates are an eight-hour
flight away from two-
thirds of the world's popu-
lation, including a grow-
ing middle class in India,
China and Southeast Asia
that is eager to travel.
In the past five years, the


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sunday, Feb. 10 photo, passengers wait to board an Emirates Airbus A380 aircraft
parked at the new Concourse A of Dubai airport in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.


annual number of pas-
sengers traveling through
Dubai International Air-
port home to Emirates
- has jumped from 28.8
million to 51 million, a 77
percent increase. The air-
port now sees more pas-
sengers than New York's
John E Kennedy Interna-
tional Airport.
"Everybody accepts that
the balance of global eco-
nomic power is shifting to
the east. The geographic
position of the Gulf hubs
makes them much more
relevant today," says Wil-
lie Walsh, CEO of Interna-
tional Airlines Group, the
parent company of British
Airways and Iberia.
Persian Gulf carriers are
already chipping away
at some U.S. and Euro-
pean airlines' most lucra-
tive business: long-haul
international flights. But
it's what's ahead that re-
ally has other airlines
worried.
Gulf carriers hold one-
third of the orders for the
Boeing 777 and Airbus
A380 two of the world's
largest and farthest-flying
jets. That's enough planes


Of Helping the World Hear Better!



lJO IAt Beltone we offer: |
FREE Hearing Screenings
FREE Lifetime Instrument Care


* Beltone Ranked #1 in patient care
* Experienced, Professionally
Trained Consultants


senone
P ro n i s e The Promise of natural hearing,, has arrived,
Self-adjusting hearing aids respond to multiple
# V 3 surroundings, automatically


Beltone Welcomes Bill Fletcher to
the Marianna Location!

S^f Beltone
Allen Barnes Hclpin he world hear better Bill Fletcher
www.Beltone.com ...-...:-....
Chipley, FL Marianna, FL
1611 Main St. Suite 4 3025 Sixth St.
(Shoppes at Chipley, next to Wal-Mart) (In Feitz Foot Clinic)
850-387-4931 850-387-4931
Monday-Friday Wednesdays & Fridays
Benelils 0o hearing inslrumenis very by lype and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy ol hearing
evaluation and properlit. Ntil o be combined with others offers or previous purchases. Limi led lime only.


'to put 70,000 passengers
in the air at any given
moment.
"They're being very
aggressive," says Adam
Weissenberg, who heads
the travel and hospitality
consulting group at De-
loitte. "These airlines are
not going away."
Modern day air routes
can be traced to the post-
World War II era when
airlines such as Pan Am
and British Airways built
the first global networks.
Flights from New York
would cross the Atlantic,
stop in Europe's capital
cities to refuel and then
head on to Africa, India
and eventually Asia. Two
generations later, those
routes mostly remain.
The Gulf carriers are try-
ing to change that. And
they have a lot going for
them.


Their hubs are in warm
climates with little air-
travel congestion and


cheap, non-union work-
ers. That means runways
never shut down because
of snow, planes don't circle
waiting for their turn 'to
land and flights aren't can-
celed by labor strikes as
they often are in Europe.
"These .guys are making
the connection as seam-
less as possible," says
John' Thomas of L.E.K.
Consulting.
Top-paying passengers
are given over-the-top
service that bolsters the
airlines' reputations. On
some Emirates .planes,
first-class passengers get
private suites with doors,
a 23-inch television,
minibar and a phone to
call flight attendants. If
that's not enough, a "Do
Not Disturb" sign can be
switched on.


ROLL IN THE



DOUGH


WIN $100!!

Sign up for EZ Pay and
be entered to win a $100
Visa card


Here is how it works:
* Daily & Sunday subscribers will
save .79 cents each month \
using EZ Pay. (Regular
monthly subscription is $1 123)
* Give us checking account or debit
card information to set up a monthly charge.
* The first month needs to be paid in advance to
setup EZ Pay.
* Each month on your expiration day, your account
will be charged $10.94.
* You can stop at any time by calling
customer service. -


I ~ DISCOUNT 1
IKELSON DRUGS!


JeffersonS*MaDRUGSIanna,
3008 Jefferson St. Maiann, F


1__11__1__1__1_1~----_11__1_---1__


--


~6A B TUESDAY. MARCH 5. 2013


fC;


1
r


NATION & WORLD


r
FLORIDAN .u
_:
a ~r
i -
O:~fl $r ~glaci~lLils- ~ 1~1

""'"


1






- -- u .-1~


t '. .: .L :


Sports
Briefs

JUCO State Tournament
The Chipola men's and
women's basketball teams
will compete in the FCSAA
state tournament this week at
the Milton H. Johnson Health
Center.
The Lady Indians will open
up Wednesday against Florida
State College pf Jacksonville
at 6 p.m., while the Chipola
men will play Thursday
against Polk State at 6 p.m.
The men's and women's
semifinal rounds will be Fri-
day, with the Chipola women
set to play at 6 p.m. if they
win Wednesday, and the men
to follow at 8 p.m. should
they win Thursday.
The championship games
will be Saturday, with the
women's title game at 5 p.m.
and the men's at 7:30 p.m.
High School Baseball
Tuesday- Sneads at Cotton-
dale, 6 p.m.
Thursday- Poplar Springs at
Malone, 1 p.m.; Cottondale
atVernon, 6 p.m.; Marianna
at Bay,4 p.m., and 6:30 p.m.;
Graceville atWewahitchka, 4
p.m., and 6 p.m.
Friday-Vernon at Gracev-
ille, 4 p.m., and 6 p.m.: Mari-
anna at Pensacola Catholic,
4 p.m., and 7 p.m.; Malone at
Central. 6 p.m.
High School Softball
Tuesday- Liberty Counry at
Marianna, 4 p.m., and 6 p.m.:
Graceville at Vernon, 6 p.m.:
Wewahitchka at Cottondale,
6 p.m.
Thursday- Blountstown at
Sneads, 4 p.m., and 6 p.m.:
Laurel Hill at Malone. 5 p.m.;
Dothan High at Nlarianna, 4
p.m., and 6 p.m.: Corondale
at Ponce de Leon, 6 p.m.
Fridav-Cottondale at
Gracevile, 6 p.m.: Altha at
Sneads, 4 p.m., and 6 p.m.:
Marianna at Walton, 6 p.m.;
Malone at Central, 6 p.m.;
Chipola Baseball
The Indians will be home
for the weekend for three
games against Gordon Col-
lege starting Friday at 5 p.m.,
followed by a doubleheader
Saturday starting at noon.
Chipola Softball
The Lad\ Indians will beat
home this week for double-
headers against LB Wallace
on Tuesday at p.m. and 6
p.m., and Wednesday against
Lake Michigan at 3 p.m. and
5 p.m.
Chipola wvill host Middle
Georgia March 10 at 2 p.m.
and 4 p.m.
MHS Softball Golf
Tournament
The Marianna High School
softball team golf tourna-
ment will be held March 9-10
at Caverns Golf Course. \ith
format a three-man scramble
at $85 per player.
Lunch will be provided on
Sunda.. For more informa-
tion, contact Scott Wiggins at
573-7506 or Brian McKeithan
at 482-4257.
Altrusa Golf Tournament
The 20th Annual Altrusa
Golf Tournament will be held
March 15 at indian Springs
Golf Course, with registration
at noon and a 1 p.m. shotgun
start.
Format will be four-person
scramble, modified handicap.
18 holes at $65 per person.
For more information, con-,
tact Jay James at 526-3197 or
209-3068, or Kathy Milton at
482-7788 or 209-8013.
Panhandle Seminole
Club Golf Tournament
The 2013 Panhandle Semi-
nole Club's ,nnua] Scholar-
ship Golf Tournament will be
held April 5 at Indian Springs


Golf Club in Marianna. This
tournament, along with an-
other fundraiser, has helped
provide $40,000 over the past
10 years to deserving local
students and helped further
their education., '<
Registration and warm-up
will begin at noon with the
shotgun start at 1 p.m. for this
four-man scramble event.
Cash prizes \-ill be awarded
to the firs, second, and third
place teams. Additional
prizes will be given for lon-
gest drive, straightest drive,
closest to the pin, and so
on.


Chipola Baseball


Indians complete perfect weekend


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Indians added
two more wins Saturday and
Sunday to complete a perfect
weekend and run their winning
streak up to four games.
After opening up the weekend
with a 13-1 win over Grand Rap-
ids on Friday, the Indians came
back Saturday to beat St. Johns
River 2-0 and then topped Grand
Rapids again 9-1 on Sunday.
The victories improved the In-
dians to 16-9 on the season.
In Saturday's win over St. Johns
River, Chipola got an outstand-
ing start from freshman pitcher


Michael Mader, who went seven
innings and allowed just four
hits and no walks, while striking
out eight.
Taylor Lewis came on for the
eighth and ninth innings to
close it out and earn the save,
giving up just two hits and no
walks and struck out four.
The Indians got a run in the
first inning and another in the
fourth, with Bert Givens and
Chase Rivett each getting a hit
and scoring a run for Chipola,
while Luis Tunon was 1-for-3
with an RBI.
In Sunday's win over Grand

See PERFECT, Page 2B


I 'n; i
MARKISKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola's Cameron Gibson catches a fly ball to the outfield Saturday.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Kourtnie Richardson catches a pop fly during Cottondale's game against Graceville
Monday night.



Malone Baseball

Tigers explode past Atomics,


BYDUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Malone Tigers coasted
to an easy district victory over
the Poplar Springs Atomics on
Friday on the road, winning
15-2 in the Tigers' District 1-1A
debut.
With the win, Malone im-
proved to 4-2 on the season.
The Tigers rolled up 16 hits
on the day as a team, with
Cody Henson and BT Johnson
picking up three apiece to lead
the team.

See MALONE, Page 2B


Malone's Scott Stephens slides for second during a rece
Altha.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Trae' Pringley of Marianna High is Mikayla Moore of Holmes County
the reigning champion from the High holds the women's title from
2012 Chipola 3-point contest. He the 2012 Chipola 3-point contest.
is pictured here with Appreciation She is pictured with Appreciation
Club officer Judge Colby Peel. Club officer Bill Davis.


SPECIALTY F

Chipola Colle
the 10th annua
3-Point Shootot
State Junior Coll
Tournament or
and Thursday in
Johnson Health I
The girls' first
held during hal
1 p.m. and 3 p
Wednesday, witl
onship round at
The boys will f(
schedule on T

SeeSHOO


Lively seventh earns

Cottondale district win
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

COTTONDALE The Cottondale Lady
Hornets rallied for two runs in the bottom of
the seventh inning to take a 9-8 victory over
the Graceville Lady Tigers in a thrilling dis-
trict matchup Monday night.
Kayla Latham hit an RBI double to left
field to score Laken Wamble to tie it in the
seventh, and Wamble came around to score
the winning run off of a Graceville error on
a Kourtnie Richardson ground ball to third
base.
Kelsie Obert started in the circle and went
the distance to get the win for CHS, giving
up eight hits, five walks, and striking out 10
batters.
The win improved the Lady Hornets to 2-2
overall and 2-1 in District 3-1A competition.
"It was a big win for us," Cottondale coach
Mike Melvin said after the game. "We had
some errors in some bad situations and
Graceville had a couple of hard hit balls on
us, but Kelsie did a good job of staying in
there and finishing it out for us."
Obert got some great support from her of-
fense, as the Lady Hornets compiled 11 hits
as a team and made.it 22 total runs over the
last two district games for what appears to
be a CHS offense much-improved from last
year's struggles.
"We're getting better every game and that's
all you can ask," Melvin said of his team's of-
fense. "Our hitters did a great job in some
pressure situations tonight."
Haley Boggs and Richardson each had
three hits to lead the Lady Hornets, with
Morgan McGinty coming through with a big
performance, finishing 2-for-3 with a home
run and three RBI.

See HORNETS, Page 2B

____-~-----=;.----=-;;-==-=--=-=-
Chipola Softball


15-2 Lady Indians

get two more

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Lady Indians soft-
ball team finished its weekend
Saturday with a pair of victories,
topping St. Johns River 9-5 and
State College of Florida 4-2.
The Lady Indians have now
r u won three straight and 14 of their
nu last 15 games to improve to 16-3
MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN on the season.
nt game against In Saturday's first game, Chipo-
la jumped out to a big early lead
with three runs in the first and
the second inning before having
to hold off a St. Johns River rally.
St. Johns River scored three
)to liit runs third inning and added an-
otout other in the fourth to make it 6-
4, but Chipola got a run back irn
FLORIDAN the top of the fifth when Hayley
Parker walkedd and scored on an
ge will host RBI groundout by Kristen Allen.
I High School An RBI single by Micheal Bur-
ut during the ton to score Kaylynn Sloat got a
ege Basketball run back for St. Johns River in
n Wednesday the bottom of the fifth, but the
the Milton H. Lady Indians later added two
Center. insurance runs in seventh on an
round will be RBI triple by Parker and an RBI
lftimes of the groundout by Alyssa Hathcoat.
.m. games on Chipola relief pitcher Kaitlin
h the champi- Hussey came back out for the
6 p.m. bottom of the seventh and, af-
ollow the same ter giving up a lead-off single
thursday with to Katelynn Stoll, retired three
)TOUT, Page 2B See CHIPOLA,,Page 2BL


4$f


COTTONDALE SOFTBALL



Hornets rally late, beat GHS


3-Point Challenge

Local players to compete at Sho4










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN s www.jcfloridan.com


NASCOAR


NRA title sponsor



for Cup race in Texas


The Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas -
The National Rifle Associ-
ation is taking its relation-
ship with racing to a new
level as the title sponsor
of a NASCAR Sprint Cup
Series race.
The deal with Texas Mo-
tor Speedway comes at
a time when the NRA is
involved in a renewed de-
bate on gun violence in
the wake of the December
shooting at Sandy Hook
Elementary School in
Newtown, Conn.
"It's not about politics.
It's about sports market-
ing," TMS president Eddie
Gossage said Monday af-
ter the announcement of
the one-year agreement
with the NRA that in-
cludes a renewal option.
The April 13 race at
Texas, the first scheduled
night race in the Cup Se-
ries this season, will be
known as the NRA 500.
This is not the NRA's first
title sponsorship in NAS-
CAR. The group sponsored
the second-tier Nation-
wide race last September
at Atlanta, which like Tex-
as is owned by Speedway
Motorsports Inc.
"They saw it was obvi-
ously a very attractive
sports marketing oppor-
tunity and seized it. That's


Chipola
From Page 1B
St. Johns hitters in a row,
including back to back
strikeouts of Lydia Hough
and Burton to end the
game.
Rosanne de Vries started
in the circle for Chipola
and got the win, going four
innings and allowing four
earned runs on three hits
and four walks, with one
strikeout.
Hussey got the save for
three scoreless innings, al-
lowing three hits, a walk,
and striking out four.
Mya Anderson led the
Lady Indians offensively,
going 3-for-4 with a run
and an RBI, while Parker
was 2-for-3 with a walk,
two runs, and two RBI, and
Hathcoat was 2-for-4 with


what it's all about," Gos-
sage said. "It's about put-
ting on one of the great
sporting events in Amer-
ica. I know in Atlanta last
year they saluted a lot
of the people that make
America free. They are
going to salute American
freedoms and American
families with this race.
That's their plan so it
seemed to be a good fit."
NASCAR said in a state-
ment Monday that "race
entitlement partnerships"
are agreements directly
between the track and the
sponsor though NASCAR
reserves the right to ap-
prove or disapprove those
sponsorships.
"The race sponsor for
Texas Motor Speedway's
April event falls within the
guidelines for approval
for that event," NASCAR's
statement said.
Wayne LaPierre, the
NRA's executive vice pres-
ident and CEO, expressed
his excitement about the
deal in a video message
played during the track's
media day. Gossage said
LaPierre wasn't able to at-
tend because of a sched-
uling conflict.
"The NRA 500 is the lat-
est announcement in the
long history of a growing
partnership between the
NRA, Speedway Motor-


a run and an RBI.
Stephanie Garrels was 1-
for-3 with a walk, two runs
and an RBI, with Allen and'
Katie Harrison each going
1-for-4 with a run and a
walk.
In the second game
against State College of
Florida, the Lady Indians
had to rally from behind
after giving up two runs in
the third inning to fall be-
hind 2-1.
Chipola came back with
a two-out rally in the top of
the fifth, with Megan Borak
and Hathcoat starting it off
with a pair of singles, with
Borak later scoring on a
passed ball, and Hathcoat
coming around behind
her after an errant throw
to third by State College of
Florida catcher Kat Penn
to give the Lady Indians
the 3-2 lead.


sports and the NASCAR
community," LaPierre
said. "NRA members and
NASCAR fans love their
country and everything
that is good and right
about America. We salute
our flag, volunteer in our
churches and communi-
ties, cherish our families
and we love racing. On
April 13, we'll all come
together at Texas Motor
Speedway."
The sponsorship does
seem like a natural. It's
been a tradition at TMS
that the winner of the Cup
race gets to fire off a six-
shooter in victory lane.
And the winner of the pole
gets a rifle as a prize.
At the Cup season-open-
ing Daytona 500, Michael
Waltrip drove a Toyota
with a paint scheme sup-
porting a relief fund for
victims of the Sandy Hook
shootings.
The Newtown-embla-
zoned car of Swan Racing
was unveiled by NASCAR
chairman Brian France in
a news conference at Day-
tona, part of a one-race
arrangement for the team.
France and his wife an-
nounced they would do-
nate $50f000 to the Sandy
Hook School Support
Fund, which the NAS-
CAR Foundation would
match.


An RBI single by Garrels
scored Allen for the final
run on the inning and the
game.
Karissa Childs came on
in relief of Chipola starter
Eva Voortman in the sev-
enth inning to close it out
and retired the side in or-
der to earn the save.
Voortman got the win by
going six innings and al-
lowing one earned run on
a walk and five hits with
four strikeouts.
Hathcoat led Chipola
with two hits and a run,
while Garrels and Ander-
son each had a hit and an
RBI.
Paige Matthews took
the loss for State College
of Florida, going all seven
innings arid allowing four
earned ruhs on seven
hits, no walks, and 10
strikeouts.


Hornets
From Page 1B
McGinty's two-run
shot to left field in the
second inning put the
Lady Hornets up 2-0,
with a two-run single by
Deunna Gonzalez mak-
ing it 4-0.
Graceville fought back
with five runs in the top
of the third, with Madi-
son McDaniel coming
through with a bases-
loaded triple to cut the
lead to one, and Erin
Rosa tying the game
shortly thereafter with
an RBI single to right
field.
A bases loaded walk
to Dominique Robin-
son forced Rosa home
to give the Lady Tigers a
5-4 lead, and they con-
tinued to build on the
lead with three runs in
the fourth.
Cristina Ramirez hit
an RBI double td score
Angela Clark for the
first run of the inning,
with McDaniel follow-
ing with an RBI double
of her own to make it
7-4.
An RBI groundout for
Rosa scored McDaniel
for the final run of the


Malone
From Page 1B
Henson was 3-for-4 with
a double, three runs, and
two RBI, while Johnson
was 3-for-3 with a pair of
runs.
Hunter Eddins was 2-for-
3 with a triple and two runs,
with Robert Orshall going
2-for-5 with two runs, Aus-
tin Lockhart 2-for-4 with a
run and two RBI, and Brett
Henry 2-for-4 with two


Perfect
From Page 1B
Rapids, the Indians ex-
ploded for eight runs in
the second inning to blow
the game open early.
An Ian Rice RBI single to
score Givens gave Chipola
its first run of the inning,
with Rice later coming
around to score on an RBI
hit by Josh Barber to make
it 3-0.
Chase Nyman and
Christian Correa also
added RBI singles, and
Rice finished off the scoi;-
ing with a two-RBI dou-
ble to score Nyman and


inning and the final
run that the Lady Tigers
would score.
The Lady Hornets
started chipping away
at the lead in the bot-
tom of the fourth, with
Richardson leading off
the inning with a single
and scoring on a ground
ball by Lily Festa.
An error on a ground
ball by Connor Melvin
allowed Gonzalez to
score, and McGinty sin-
gled up the middle to
bring Melvin home and
trim the Graceville lead
to 8-7.
Cottondale had an op-
portunity to put more
runs on the board in the
bottom of the sixth after
back to back one-out
singles by Melvin and
Boggs, but McGinty hit
a sharp line drive right
back at Taylor McDan-
iel and the Lady Tigers
pitcher immediately
went to first for the in-
ning-ending double
play.
After Obert retired the
Lady Tigers in the top
of the seventh, Cotton-
dale's hitters went back
at it in the bottom of the
inning, with Wamble
drawing a lead-off walk
to set up Latham's op-


runs and two RBI.
Eric Purdue also was 1-
for,- with a run and two
RBI, and Scott Stephens
had a hit and an RBI.
Jonathan Sikes started
on the mound for the Ti-
gers and got the victory,
going three innings and al-
lowing one earned run on
two hits, a walk, and five
strikeouts.
Henry pitched two score-
less innings of relief, giving
up two hits and no walks
and striking out three,


Givens to make it 8-0.
Rice drove in his fourth
run of the day in the sixth
inning with an RBI sac-
rifice fly to left field that
scored Nyman to make it
9-0.
Rice finished 2-for-3
with a run and four RBI,
with Nyman going 2-for-3
with a walk, two runs, and
an RBI, and Barber 2-for-3
with a walk, a run, and anr
RBI.
Correa had a hit, a run,


posite field hit to tie the
game.
It was Latham's lone
hit of the game, while
Wamble walked twice
and scored twice.
Gonzalez was 1-for-2
with a walk, an RBI, and
a run, with Connor Mel-
vin going 1-for-2 with a
walk and a run.
Madison McDaniel
had a big night for the
GHS offense, going 3-
for-5 with a triple, a
double, four RBI, and a
run, while Ramirez was
2-for-3 with a double,
a walk, an RBI, and two
runs, and Rosa was 1-
for-3 with two RBI and
a run.
Rosa started the game
in the circle for the Lady
Tigers and was relieved
after an inning and 1/3
by Taylor McDaniel,
who finished out the
game and gave up sev-
en hits, two walks, and
struck out three.
Taylor McDaniel also
went 1-for-3 with a walk
and a run at the plate.
Cottondale will next
host Wewahitchka .to-
day at 4 p.m., and 6
p.m., while Graceville
will travel to Vernon to
take on the Lady Yellow-
jackets at 6 p.m.


while Orshall also pitched
a clean inning of relief, al-
lowing a walk, no hits, and
striking out two.
Malone was scheduled to
take on Ponce de Leon on
the road Monday evening
before returning home
Thursday for a home re-
match with the Atomics at
1 p.m.
The Tigers will finish the
week out with another dis-
trict game Friday against
the Central Jaguars in
Milton.


and an RBI, and Givens
walked three times, scored
a run, and had an RBI.
Shane Crouse started
on the mound for Chipola
and got the win, going 3
1/3 innings and allow-
ing no runs on two hits, a
walk, and a strikeout.
Mikel Belcher also
pitched 2 2/3 scoreless
innings of relief, giv-
ing up no hits and two
walks, and striking out
four.


Shootout
From Page 1B
with preliminaries at 1
p.m. and 3 p.m. and the fi-
nals at 6 p.m.
. All boys and girls high
school teams from the
Chipola district were in-
vited to send their best
three-point shooters to the
competition.
Players will have one
minute to shoot a total of
15 shots from. three spots
on the three-point line.
The winners will have
their names engraved on
a trophy in the Milton H.
Johnson Health Center
and on a traveling cham-
pionship trophy which will
be housed in their respec-
tive school's trophy cases
during the coming year.


Trae' Pririgley of Mari-
anna High is the reigning
champion in the boys di-
vision and Mikayla Moore
of Holmes County High
holds the girls title from
last year's contests.
The 1 p.m. girls round
will include: Shanice Mack
of Graceville, a 5-foot-2 se-
nior averaging 8.5 points;
Curteeona Brelove of
Malone, a 6-foot-2 junior
averaging 23 points; Sha-
niah Spellman of Marinna,
a 5-foot-6 junior averaging
nine points; Jasmine Bels-
er of Chipley, a 5-foot-5 se-
nior averaging 12.8 points;
and Aaliyah Williams of
Sneads, a 5-foot-4 sopho-
more averaging 7.3 points;
The 3 p.m. girls round
will include: Kelli McIn-
tosh of Poplar Springs, a
5-foot-5 junior averaging


12 points; Ashley Harper
of Ponce De Leon, a 5-
foot-10 senior averag-
ing 13.5 points; Summer
Potter of Bethlehem, a 5-
foot-4 senior averaging 12
points; Ashtin McMullian
of Blountstown, a 5-foot-9
junior averaging six points;
and Mikayla Moore of Hol-
mes County, a 5-foot-8 se-
nior averaging 12 points.
The boys contest opens
during halftime of the 1
p.m. game Thursday and
includes: Taylor Rousseau
of Graceville, a 6-foot se-
nior averaging 12 points;
Chai Baker of Malone, a
6-foot-3 junior averag-
ing 23 points; Jeremy
Wert of Sneads, a 6-foot-3
sophomore averaging 12.9
points; Ryan Foor of Chi-
pley, a 5-foot-11 freshman
averaging 13 points; Zack


Gibson ofVernon, a 5-foot-
10 sophomore averaging
12 points; and Keyman
Borders of Marianna, a 5-
foot-10 senior averaging
10 points.
First round competition
continues at halftime of
the 3 p.m. game with Aus-
tin Boyd of Bethlehem, a 6-
foot-7 senior averaging 13
points; Kent Rogers of Al-
tha, a 5-foot-10 junior av-
eraging 17.5 points; Dimitri
Simmons of Blountstown,
a 5-foot-l10 junior aver-
aging 14.2 points; Cason
Moore of Holmes County,
a 6-foot-3 sophomore av-
eraging 10 points; Nick
Dahl of Poplar Springs, a
6-foot-2 senior' averaging
15 points; and Alex Price
of Ponce De Leon, a 6-foot
senior averaging 10 points
per game.


SBEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


w York Fa
"I: .NOW OPEN
s prices on suits, jeans, t-shirts, ho
$s, shoes, women's clothes and r
COUPON Buy One Suit.
Everything 0 et Shirt & Tie


250%F FREE

with this ad 80-3725

OW. Central Ave Blountstown, FL (ne
Hrs: 10:00AM-6:00PM MonS

Suit Zone:


Buy One Suit.,
Get Shirt & Tie

FREE


221 N. Tyndal
Collowa'
850-215-
Hrs: 10:00AN
Mon-S


LOCAL NEWS, YOUR WAY.
WEEKNIGHTS AT 5:00, 6:00, & 10:00


1_______1_________1___I_____________


~


_ I_


m


~2B TUESDAY. MARCH 5, 2013


SPORTS











JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BORN LOSER BYARTAND CHIP SANSOM
oNTAT IS5 OW WE'RE GOING' RA NVE QUESTIOM,CRIEF, WqRE Y.EN iTIFTRERE AREQUESTIOS
TO PROCEE WIT> OUR NREW eE "ATEROtNEOFm( \FMCut'U5, 'S A
~AFKETMING STIATEG.'. NAY f P KRETORICAL QUESlION-KEENPYOUR.
S I "' t r\ UT
-F SRU



s Vk


I5 THERE '- LIKE: THOU SHALT OR: THOU SHALT
REALLY' THERE NOT HAVE ANY TEACH- NOT, WHEN TAKING
A LIST OF SHOULD ING EXPERIENCE ATTENDANCE, SAY To
COtAND- BE. WHATSOEVER! A STUDENT "ARE YOU
MENTS FOF i REALLY IN SIXTH
SUBSTITUTE YEAH' GRADE? YOU LOOK
TEACHERS!? M 6 So YOUNG!"






SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI

We SuoLP -- ONe 0Go01 tING L
GeT a carL.. agouT CaTs Is r Tes1- ) oN
IT aVga-rne T-etseLves /o ( 'F


...BECAUSE
SOME
PEOPLE
ARE JUST POOR
SMALL CHAD.
FOR
THEIR o
AGE, o
OKAY?
r -


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
WIZER. 5ETTLE "rDIC UR- I WHAT' COME
S1 C ION n ELL ME 0 nI.INi O I POHWE''iO
.... 1 C'N '-C 'c .i CHARGED BY OTTA \
., TH ALLEN C.- -'ELP ,HIM ,

-':'c^"'|',1 t:. '

'^'
"^ _, __ ___ -



ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER

Ar. .7
AWIZER e -h I "'- S -
RACE TO '
.IZE ,
ATTEMPT ""
TE N..O- /
DINOSAURS', L | ." '1 -. If I
FROM '.
5TAMPEDIHG. ; ,
INTO THE
CITY OF _..
OO...- - -- -- -


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRYWRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


35 Lajg, ngSL ock Internatona Inc, Dis by Universal UChck tor UFS 2013

"Why don't we just call it even and I'll
cancel my next four trips."


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ.


ACROSS
1 ER
workers
4 Sauna site
7 Deadly
snakes
11 Large cask
12Shape up
14Mouritain
refrain
15 Uplifting
17 April
forecast
18 Flower
parts
19Insincerely
21 Hairy
insect
22 Teachers'
org.
23 Zeroes
26 Heated, as
water
29 Sheriff
Taylor's
kid
30Cicero's
garb
31 Bird beak
33JAMA
readers
34Adds
sound
effects
35Chianti,
e.g.
36 Different
ones


Answer to Previous Puzzle

00 LODE L A
A|C'H HUBS ON(
TTA ATLANTI
H KEAS L

LLEY NI O ISES
AR KIEP I BA
N SEES CAG
SEDDIED DRYE

A URN EE
KS RUSE SLA
EE AFAR D


38 Center
39 Have
40 Bankroll
41 Some com-
positions
44 African
scavengers
48 Highly
valued
49 Kind of
mind
(hyph.)
51 Like the
Kalahari
52 Director
Ephron
53 Architect
I.M.
54 Docs
prescribe
them
55 Chill (out)
56IRS info

DOWN
1 Motorist
nos.
2 In the
altogether
3 Save a
coupon
4 Fads and
crazes
5 Composure
6 Singer
Miller
7 Antenna


8 Injury
result
9 Silvers or
Donahue
10 PlayStation
brand
13Yuletide
drinks
16 Aesop
story
20 Sci-fi
princess
23- de
guerre
24 Salon
creation
25 Roster
26 Short
haircuts
27 Oklahoma
town


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


3-5 @ 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"EMNZGE ZEEGNUOP'R WGTLBGLJ DR

KJNAJEU. OJ DR DT ZP YDJF UOJ

LNJGUJRU WDYDTL GZJNDEGT KNMRJ

RUPWDRU." UMZZP WJJ SMTJR


Previous Solution: "The best index to a person's character is ... how he treats
people who can't do him any good." Abigail Van Buren
TODAY'S CLUE: M sfenbaj
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-5


ENTERTANIVIENT


Snne's Mailbox


Dear Annie: I'm a junior in high school.
I thought everything would happen this
year the great friends, the boyfriend,
etc. On all of the TV shows, the juniors
are having boys over, getting drunk, going
on dates, having sex and so much more.
I know my life isn't a TV show, but I'm no
different than last year.
I want a boyfriend. I want to party. I
want to have my first kiss. I want to be
a teenager. But I feel as distant from my
friends as ever. And there is a boy I re-
ally like who is sweet, kind, smart and
nonjudgmental, but I'm not allowed to
date. I know that being a teenager means
disobeying my parents, and though that
seems like the worst thing I could ever do,
I'm slipping.
I don't know what to do. My grades and
alcohol and this boy and drugs are all
lurking in my mind. I'm tired of being this
perfect little angel. I know I'm only 16, but
what do I do?
-TROUBLED IN HIGH SCHOOL


Bridge

Virginia Gildersleeve was the only American woman
at the 1945 San Francisco conference that created the
United Nations. She said, "The ability to think straight,
some knowledge of the past, some vision of the future,
some skill to do useful service, some urge to fit that ser-
vice into the well-being of the community these are
the most vital things education must try to produce."
At the bridge table, it is important to think straight, to
remember the past bids and plays, and to have some
idea of what you plan to do. In this deal, how should
South play in two spades? West leads the club ace,
cashes the club king, and plays another club.
South, with five top losers (two hearts, one diamond
and two clubs), needs to find the spade queen to get
home.
Declarer must remember that neither opponent
could open the bidding. And South has already seen
seven points from West. However, before guessing
how to play the trump suit, declarer should explore
for more data. He should play on the red suits to learn
who holds those honors. Then he will be sure to know
who has the spade queen.
At trick four, South leads a heart. Let's assume East
takes that trick and shifts to a low diamond. Declar-
er wins with his king and plays another heart. East
wins and cashes his diamond ace. Who has the spade
queen?
Since East has produced 11 points, it must be West.
Remember the passes as well as the bids, and count
those high-card points.


Dear Troubled: Don't believe everything
you see on TV Those programs are an
enhanced version of what the produc-
ers and writers think is exciting to watch.
Seeing kids fall apart is interesting like
watching a train wreck. Most high school
juniors are hot out partying, drinking,
having sex and doing drugs. They are go-
ing to school, studying and working at
part-time jobs. And the smart ones are
also listening to their parents because
they recognize that they have a future to
consider.
Talk to your parents about dating -
most kids are allowed to do so at 16. You
also can discuss these issues with your
school counselor, favorite teachers and
other adults you respect and trust. We to-
tally understand that you hoped your life
would suddenly become 'amazing, but
please don't be foolish enough to mess up
the good things you have by letting your
hormones run away with your common


28 Lairs
30 Excites
(2 wvds.)
32 Wager
34 Moist
35 Roomier
37 Caches
38Appliance
brand
40 Question
starter
41 Party tray
cheese
42 Dry
43 Piped up
45 Enjoys a
siesta
46 Snake eyes
47Scrape
50 Fall mo.


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


North 03-05-13
4 A 9 5 4
SQJ 10 9
*643
883
West East
4 ?6 ?32
S8643 VAK7
S972 *A85
SAK96 *7542
South
4 K J108
~V52
KQJ10
S QJ 10

Dealer: West
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
Pass Pass Pass
1* Pass 1Y Pass
1I Pass 24 All pass


Opening lead: A


1~~1----~^-----~-~11~___~-~~---


TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 2013 3BF


Horoscope
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Nothing worth brag-
ging about is likely to be
accomplished if you are
too wishy-washy.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Don't get so carried
away by how well others
are doing that you forget to
concentrate on furthering
your own abilities.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Just because a cer-
tain tactic works well for a
friend doesn't necessarily
mean that it will for you.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) Steer clear of any
involvement in which you
have no say in the deci-
sion-making. Plans made
entirelyby others might not
be best for your interests.
CANCER (June 21-July22)
It won't take you long
to lose points with others
if you don't hold yourself
accountable for your mis-
takes. Don't past blame.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -
Wasted time will become
a critical factor in hamper-
ing your productivity. The
chances for accomplishing
your aims could be lost.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
If you and your mate are
facing a difficult decision,
try to work it out yourselves
instead of discussing it with
outsiders, or in-laws.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
In order to spare the feel-
ings of another, you might
rework the facts. Sadly,
when the truth comes out,
it will only anger the per-
son whom you wanted to
help.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) When it comes to
people who helped you ac-
quire something that you
badly wanted, of course
you should share the
rewards.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) There is a
chance that one of your
well-intentioned gestures
might produce some unin-
tended effects, others may
not see your true motives.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Don't let friends talk
you into doing things that
you know you shouldn't,
this could cause you much
guilt later.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) A lot of disappoint-
ment is possible if you
base your expectations on
unrealistic premises.











4 B Tuesday, March 5, 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.jTCFLORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors s limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors In advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.
I I I


reuruua


Two Side-by-Side Cemetery Plots C3 and C4
@ Garden of Memory. Plots in Garden Cross
Section. Asking $1300. Each Contact:
Alex Leath 205-972-1237 or leath@bellsouth.net

S.$.


Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
1-888-273-5264
Eosazs a a


Restaurant For Sale with Lounge and Oyster
Bar. Seats approx 200. Currently doing Good
Business." Owner looking to retire. Financing
available with down payment. $250,000.
Price NEG! Call 334-684-1700 between 8am-
2pm. Home 850-956-2709 from 3pm-7pm


Baby Clothes-girl 0-12 mo. $30 bx, 850-693-3260
Battery Charaer -on wheels. $100. 850-482-2636


Computer chair No tear 6


ANTIQUES: Antique side board ($1,500)
Antique side board with hutch ($1,800),
Victorian sofa ($300), 334-714-8929

BUSINESS 4 SALE! Drapery and Sewing
Business- Commercial straight stitch machine,
commercial hemmer, 4'x8' table, + 2000 yds of
drapery/upholstery fabric, comforter shells,
pillow shells, trim, thread, racks, shelving, etc.,
$12,000 OBO, 334-701-9546

TV Sanyo 50" Flat Screen, $500, 850-557-1454


** GUN SHOW .*
iMarch 2nd & 3rd
National Peanut Festival Building *
Hwy 231 S. Dothan, Alabama

Sat. 9-5 Sun. 10-4
Call 334-279-9895

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.


Lab pups: Cute & Cuddly! Yellow & Chocolate.
No papers, but parents on premises. 6 weeks
old. 488-5000 or 488-3979.


`~" '" ~ ~ -"


Mirror w/shelves: $50.850-693-3260.
Panasonic stereo $25, 850-482-7090
Porch Glider Swing $100; 850-693-0521


COMPUTER SPEAKERS (2), $20, 850-482-7090 Remington 1100- 12 gauge, $425, 850-573-5135


Exercise Stepper $30. 850-482-8347.
Free Firewood: cut and haul $0.'850-762-3824


Guitar Alvarez 70's 12 string $150. 850-482-6022


Guitar Dean Elec. w/ case $250. 850-482-6022.
Infant Car Seat $30, 850-693-3260
Mens Sneakers new, Sz 9.5, $30, 850-482-2636


Sleep Apea Machine: $500. 850-592-2440
Tires Set 4, P225/70R16, $80, 850-482-2636
Wedding gown, new, sz 16, $300 850-693-3260.
Window 29x30 Dbl Pane, $100, 850-482-2636
Yamaha speakers $100, 850-482-7090


Bloodhound Pups
Taking deposits for regis-
tered /registerable pups.
Litter includes black/tans
& reds (5 males/5 female).
Both parents are regis-
tered and on site. Born on
January 23, 2013. Will be ready for new homes
onMarch 6, 2013. $650. For more info. or to set
appointment for viewing call 334-726-2561.


Golden Retriever Puppies for sale.
Pups are 13 weeks old. These are pick of the
litter puppies that we have now decided to sell.
Great dispositions. $400. For more information
and pictures call 334-482-3810 or 334-562-9497.
I nratedr near the Trno area.


Reg. Toy/Mini Chocolate, Parti
colors & solids Schnauzers, Male
& Female, S/W, $500.-$600.
www.lovemyschnauzers.com
334-889-9024




Demo Salvage Concrete
for Sale & Delivery, great for erosion
control behind dams & gullies
334-347-7466 or 334-726-2561


Frozen Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
850-573-6594 4128 Hwy 231

..--- --------....................
Bahia.seed for sale -
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
... or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102

Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418


Sudoku


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Level: i l_ 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9: For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Friday's puzzle
421836795
72849 3 5 1 9 24 6 853
8- J9 6 4i 5 7 2 3 1

1695736812479




578643912
3 1 2 7 8 9 546


3/5/13


Sheltered Coastal Bermuda Hay
Baled with JD568 in Columbia, AL $55
Call 334-790-4439 or 334-618-1962


Cow-Calf pairs for Sale $1600. each
43 / 886003334-726-4661


Wanted to Rent: Farm Land or Pasture in Ma-
rianna or West of Marianna; Call 850-718-1859

NEED TO

PLACE AN AD?

t's simple, call one of our friendly

Classified representatives

and they will be glad to assist you,







Opelika-Auburn News has an
immediate opening for a
Production Director.
The primary role of this position is to
oversee the production operations at
the Opelika/Auburn, Alabama facility
of 0&DS. A major requirement of this
position is to grow a profitable
commercial printing and distribution
operation at the Opelika-Auburn News.

This position is also responsible for
promoting and championing safety
as a condition of employment while
ensuring that all safety policies are
followed and all OSHA guidelines are
met.

The successful candidate must be
able to bridge communication between
the production staff and other stake
holders.

This position is responsible for
commercial printing goals, proper
scheduling of all product production
and high quality of each product.
Must have working knowledge of all
production equipment. 10 years
newspaper/commercial management
required. 4 year degree preferred.
Pre-employment drug and background
screening required. EOE/M/F/D/V;
Please apply at
www.worldmediaenterprise.com

World Media Enterprises Inc.
BH1 MEDIA GROUP / A BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY COMPANY


Place an Ad


Fast, easy, no pressure
24 hours a day, 7 days a week!


F Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


1-


7 3 8

92 5

57 9
-6 8


4 7

5 6

8 64 9

4 72

21 86
-5_ -_ ----- -_


'13P~~


,


.....,--------- .------.T--~-, .. .. .


I"I I'


-~--- 1. -I.------------- -- -- --------------------------









www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Tuesday, March 5, 2013- 5 B


I GENRAL MPLOYENT


BE YOUR
OWN BOSS


These days being retired doesn't mean
sitting at home doing nothing.

A newspaper route is the perfect way to
supplement your income with only a small
investment of time and big returns in
community service to your own neighbors.

Come by and inquire today about a
newspaper route in your neighborhood.

I s ,'i. CC, JNTY

FLORIDAN
4403 Constitution Lane Marianna, FL 32446
EDUCATION
(C ) & INSTRUCTION


Classes Forming Now
for Medical Assisting,
FO R TI$ Electrical Trades and
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

'-I. RESIDENTIAL
(1__) REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
HANDICAPPED ACCESSLBLE


CHIPOLA APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND 1 BEDROOM
APTS. SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE ON
ALL UNITS. UNITS SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR
HANDICAPPED OR DISABLED. FOR RENTAL
INFORMATION CALL (850) 526-4407
TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY





COTTONDALE VILLAGE APARTMENTS
Now accepting applications for 1, 2, 3 bedroom units.
Rental assistance. No application fee.
We pay water, sewer, and trash service.
4052 Old Cottondale Road,
Marianna, FL 32448.
(850) 526-4062, TDD/TTY 711.
"This institution is an equal
opportunity provider, w. ..
and employer."


1 & 2BR Apartments in Marianna
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
a 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4w
2BR/1BA Hou-se Hwy 90
Grand Ridge $425. Mo. + $425. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
3/2 hardwood floors, CH&A
2940 Dogwood St. close to Riverside school.
$875. mo. 718-6541

3BR 2BA House in Dogwood Hts, W/D, pets
welcome, fenced yard, storage shed. $800 +
dep 850-557-2198 ask for Marcus
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
4 850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"


2/2 Mobile Home $450 + deposit, appliances,
washer & dryer, water/garbage & sewer
included 850-482-4455
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
4 850-209-8847 4


2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message


2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes i
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595


2BR 1 BA MH'S in Alford, $380 mo. $380. dep.
850-579-8882/850-209-1664850-573-1851
:LE liOLES FORlRENT

S 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595



For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maint.incl.
*850-593-4700 4


RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Eufaula two acres with older model, two bed-
room, one bath single wide trailer With front
deck, a back porch, small garage, and lean to
for boat. Located in the White Oaks area; a
mille from White Oaks park and boat launch
ramp. Great for beginner home, just starting a
family, college student, or just a fishing get
away. $35,000 or best offer. 334-733-6625

U-Lok-lt Warehouses for Sale 30x80 Metal
building. Well and spetic plus other buildings.
114 mile north of Hwy 90 on Hwy 71.
$75,000. Call 850-482-8333 or 850-573-8894

R CREATION


4-Wheeler: 2011 Polaris Sportsman 800 EFI, 4x4,
91 miles, adult owned $5,500. Call 334-796-8136

Fifth Wheel: 1994 American Star 36 ft Fifth
Wheel. $8,500 OBO. 334-477-2046.

Winnebago 1995 33 ft. Vectra CH&A, auto
leveling, Q-bed, new tires & batteries, new frig,
7.5 onan, Lg. awning and more!
$23,000 OBO 334-585-6689.

__ TRANSPORTATION


Chevrolet 1967 Camaro SS/RS: restored on
original solid body, vin#124377L123529, custom
built big block 454, cranberry red, new cranber-
ry interior, to many restoration items too
mention. Appraised value $30,000.
Priced at $26,500. See pics and info at
dkestate.wordpress.com. Doug 334-237-1916


: O Down/ist Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade Anything!
BRING IN YOUR W2 OR LAST PAY STUB!!
RIDE TODAY! Steve Pope 334-803-9550
L................................
Chevy 2012 Malibu, like new! $200 down, $249
per month. Call Steve 791-8243
Dodge 2000 Dakota SLT
Club Cab, V-6, 98,000
miles, clean. $5450, Call
334 790-7959.
Ford 1985 Mustang White, good condition, all
original parts. 90,951 miles. Call 334-494-0837
or email bccolwell2@aol.com
FORD 2007 EXPLORER XLT "IRONMAN -
SILVER, 37,000 MILES. SHOWROOM QUALITY,
NEW CONDITION, CAN BE SEEN AT LEMON
LOT, 166 WESTGATE PARKWAY, DOTHAN, AL
AFTIER 2-24-2013. PHONE 334-699-1666
Honda 1992 Accord: 4 door, cold AC, nice car,
champagne, fully loaded. $3395.
Call 334-792-8018
Honda 2007 CRV EX, Super Sharp! Must sell,
$200 down, $269 per-month. Call Steve 791-
8243.
1011W 7 Honda 2008 Accord EXL:
'i 4 doors. I owner, white, 75k
F miles. sliding moon roof,
power driver seat, 5 Disc
CD changer, leather;
keyless entry, power windows.
$14,000. Call 334-493-7700
Honda 2008 Fit, low miles, under warranty,
must sell! $200 down, $209 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 714-0028.
Honda 2009 Fit Sport Silver, only 16900 miles,
garage kept, like new condition, alloy wheels,
great oas mileage. $13.600. Call 334-446-0681.


. Mercury 1999 Grand Mar-
quis GS, loaded, leather,
new fires, 106,000 miles,
like new, $4500. Call 334-
790-7959.


75" HONDA 2012 ACCORD
COUPE V6 WITH AUTO-
MATIC TRANSMISSION.
SUNROOF, NAVIGATION,
HEATED LEATHER SEATS FULLY LOADED. NO
ACCIDENTS NOR HAS IT BEEN SMOKED IN.
HAVE CARFAX TO SHOW AS WELL. APPROX.
6,000 MILES AND IM ASKING $27,000. CAR LIST-
ED $32,800, NEW. CALL 334-268-3900.
Hyundai 2009 Elantra, sunroof, loaded Must
Sell! $200 down, $199 per month. Call Ron Ellis
714-0028.
M3azda 2010 6 S Touring
21,000 miles. 4 cyl.
Silver with gray leather
interior. One owner,
non-smoker, garage kept.
Beautiful inside and out. $14,900. 334-806-6004.
Toyota 2010 Yarif 4 dr. Sedan A/C,
stero system, 82K miles, good on gas $10,500.
850-592-2937
Toyota 2011 Camry SE, 4dr., auto, pwr pkg.,
white, 10,000 miles odm, show room condition
with extended warranty. $18,500. 850-569-2215,
850-718-5461 or 850-718-7105.
I onORCYCLE


r 1994 FXSTC Softail Custom
Harley Davidson
Excellent condition and
kept in the garage. Must
see to appreciate. Price is
Slixed. Mileage 23,000. Call
day time 334-828-1536 and nioht 334-791-9855


2010 Ningbo Dongfang
250cc motorcycle. Rode
only 6 times. Never tag-
ged. Asking $250. Please
call 334-393-7034 after
5pm and leave message.


2011 Harley Davidson
Super Glide Custom
A cool blue pearl & vivid
black, garage kept,
10K mi. full factory
warranty. Driving lights,
passenger back rest, luggage rack, quick
release windshield, anit-theft system with
/pager, cruise pegs, oil pressure gauge,
dust cover included
,o $12,900 334-598-0061 or 334-432-4372
Absolutely Pristine-
You will not be disappointed *
Harley-Davidson 2003 FatBoy 2003 100th An-
niversary Edition Harley Davidson Fat Boy.
Turquoise and navy with gold inlay custom
paint. $8,000 in chrome added to the bike. Al-
so comes with the original tank and fender,
which is gray blue, motorcycle lift, touring bag,
custom cleaning kit, many extras and special
tools! Call 334-494-0837 or email
bccolwell2@aol.com
Harley-Davidson 2003 Fat Boy black 100th An-
niversary, FLSTFI, 12,800 miles, $5,300 Serious
buyers!KELLER9944@GMAIL.COM, 334-232-3388
Suzuki 1988 650CC Savage/Boulevard:
completely rebuilt engine, bored 2000th, new
brakes, clutch and more. 24 inch seat height,
weigth 3501bs. Very Nice. $2900. 850-722-8962.

GMC 2001 Yukon SLT: Fully loaded, white and
silver, 201k miles, runs great $6,000. Call 334-
796-8136
Lexus 2002 RX300 white & silver with tan int.
sunroof, tinted windows, 6 disc cd changer,
new tires, exc. cond. 135K mi.
$9,900. 334-797-9290
Lincoln 2006 Navigator,
Loaded with all options,
asking $14,000.
334-618-2695.


l Chevrolet 1988 Silverado.
S J '8 j Blue & white. 2 door,
350 V8. Runs good.
$3.500.
Call 334-794-6579


Chevrolet 1998 Silverado Ext Cab: green, 3
doors, 350 V8, cold AC and runs great. $5,200.
NEG. Call 334-718-9617


Chevrolet Silverado LS,
step side, ext cab, 4
door, V-8, automatic,
loaded, tool box, side
steps, 134,850 miles, like
new, $9995. Call 334-790-7959.
Dodge 2011 Ram 2500 crew cab, 4x4 LWB,
Black & Pearl, 6.7 liter Cummins Diesel,
navigation, leather, back up camera, sirius
radio, remote start, all the extras 18K miles
$43,500. 334-793-6281.
Ford 2004 Super Duty 4dr. 4 wheel drive, F-550
with hydraulic, 2 bale bed, exc. cond. 160K
miles $22,500. 334-347-7466 or 334-797-7289.
John Deere 1981 Backhoe and Gooseneck
20ft Trailer. $6,000. Call 334-714-0586
KMC 4-Row Planters, good cond. with 3 sets of
seed plates, $1600. 2-Row. Cultivator w/ vine
cutters $375. Massy Ferguson 2-Row bottom
plow $350. 334-791-4742
Nissan 2000 Frontier ext. cab 2-wheel drive,'
auto, 104K miles, $5500. OBO 334-726-1215.


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
*Wraese "a 24 odTdm
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING s) 334-792-8664

Got a Clunker
We'llbe your Junker!.
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325 & Complete Cars :
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285
S..........................E......
r -------------------------- ------
S* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not !
334-794-9576 or 344-791-4714

WE PAY CaSH
FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-493-6226


SNiff O-t8areat Del

in the Classifieds.

Shoppers with a nose for bargains head straight for the
Classifieds. In the Classifieds, you can tack down deals
on everything from cars to canine companions. It's easy
to place an ad or find the items you want, and it's used
by hundreds of area shoppers every day,

o60 wi h your Istincts andl S the Classi lles today.

JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN
(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


SINESS &",



VICE DIRECT(


Call 5268361A 1rZ


BUSINESSES
& SERVICES


Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Now serving Jackson Co.
FREE ESTIMATES 4 334-798-0687




"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
Wiffl n, Jr.n' [(8 ,)69I29
BULLDOZIaN


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc.
ALTHA, FL
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055


WE OFER COMPIErE

AWtROADBW UI
20 YEAS MME.
MRSmitMan.


I O FEI NGTEEPANIG


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


Lawn Care &
Outdoor Property
Maintenance
) Free Estimates
Call Woody 850-526-2030





7r Groonmle b0
Appointmet Only
Oroomere,/tylIst
Lisa 5horee & Tammy Martabano
Siit U5 Oline i t ooel n dnt
for pcEng & to bok your appoinGmn today



For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Bonded References Available
850-526-2336


This Month's Special
I12x20
$319500
I- 35 Years in Business
WE MOVE PIMBlYIA S


B&B Professional Auto Detailing
Now offering mobile wash inside
and outside, oil change & vacuum
Detailing now for the low price of $50.
(850) 573-5509
Just give us a call and we'll come to you!
All services performed on site.
IT'S AS EASY AS I 2 3
1.CALL 2.PLACEYOURAD 3. GET RESULTS


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAN%

jcfloridan.com



monster"

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES


.... .. .. ..- - . .. --I ... .. ... ....


I


I TREE SERVICE I


I


~F~gg~





~-~-


16B TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


acco signs NFLs richest contract
Flacco signs NFL's richest contract


The Associated Press

OWINGS MILLS, Md.
Joe Flacco knows his
stature as the highest-paid
player in NFL history may
not last for long, and he's
OK with it.
What matters most to
the Super Bowl MVP is
that the Baltimore Ravens
were willing to pay him
that kind of money in the
first place.
Flacco signed his new
contract Monday worth
$120.6 million over six
years. He will receive a
$29 million signing bonus,
$52 million in guaranteed
money and $51 million
over the first two years of
the deal.
The former first-round
draft pick out of Delaware
is the first starting quar-
terback in NFL history to
make the playoffs in each
of his first five seasons.
He's led the Ravens to nine
wins over that span, tying
Tom Brady for most among
quarterbacks in the first
five years of a career.
Flacco threw 11 touch-
down passes and no inter-
ceptions during the recent
postseason and led Balti-
more to a 34-31 Super Bowl
win over San Francisco.
And it all made the Ra-
-vens willing to pay him
more money than Aaron
Rodgers, Peyton Manning,
Drew Brees or any other of
the great quarterbacks in
the game today.
"When guys that are
drafted in the first round,
when guys that win foot-
ball games for you, quar-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco speaks at a news conference at the team's practice facility in Owings Mills, Md., Mon-
day. Flacco agreed to a contract that will make him the richest quarterback in NFL history after leading the Ravens to a Super
Bowl XLVII victory over the San Francisco 49ers.


terbacks like that, when
the time comes up for
those guys to get paid, they
usually become the high-
est paid guy in the league,"
Flacco said. "I'm sure in
a couple of months from
now, someone is going to
sign a deal, and you guys
are going to be talking to
them about how they are
the highest paid guy in
NFL history. That's just the
name of the game.
"I know that this isn't
going to hold up for that
long, but that's not a pri-
~prity of mine to be the


highest-paid guy. The pri-
ority of mine was to get
that respect that I felt,
that I feel now from this
organization."
Flacco is the quarterback,
the Ravens have .longed to
have for years, and they
weren't about to let him
get away.
"We just returned from
the (scouting) combine,
and I remember the days
of going there and study-
ing and hoping that one
of the quarterbacks could
be our guy. ... We've been
out in that desert before,"


Ravens general manager
Ozzie Newsome said.
"That all changed when
we drafted Joe in 2008, and
now we've secured him
for many more years. He's
a significant reason we've
been to the playoffs five
years in a row, played in
three' AFC championship
games, and now, we are
Super Bowl champs with
Joe as MVP."
Flacco's performance
this past offseason almost
certainly helped him re-
ceive his record-breaking
contract. But the quarter-


back thought he was good
enough to receive all that
money before he threw
three touchdown passes
against the 49ers.
"Listen, winning the
Super Bowl, winning the
Super Bowl MVP doesn't
make me as valuable as
I am," hesaid. "I think I
bring to the table what I
bring to the table. I think
I'm an asset to this team,
and I'm worth what I'm
worth. The fact that we
won the Super Bowl just
comes with that. If we
didn't win the Super Bowl


this year, I still think I'm
worth'the same, and I still
think I'm the same'per-
son to this organization. It
may not be seen that way,
but that's the bottom line.
I still think I give the team
the best chance to twin
moving forward."
By signing Monday, Flac-
co avoided receiving the
franchise tag, which would ,
have hindered the Ravens'
salary cap in 2013.
"I know we have a lot of
good players on the team,
and I love to play with
those guys, so hopefully
it works out very good for
the organization and we
can keep as many people
as we need," he said.
Flacco turned down a
contract before the 2012
season that would have
paid him roughly $15 mil-
lion a year. His decision
turned out to be a wise
one.
"I thought I was worth
more and didn't really see
any circumstances where
I wouldn't end up getting
paid more than what they
were willing to give me at
that point," Flacco said.
That assessment was as
precise as one of his many
sharp spirals in the Super
Bowl.
"The real risk is that I
could get hurt," he said.
"I always kind of had faith
that we were going to get
something done here no
matter what. I didn't know
if we were going to go win
the Super Bowl and all of
that, so that Iind of helped
the situation out, I think, a
little bit."


College Basketball


Gonzaga isNo. 1 in AP poll for 1st time


The Associated Press

SPOKANE, Wash. -The
to-do list for the Gonzaga
basketball team got shorter
Monday: For the first time,
the Zags were ranked No.
1 in The Associated Press
Top 25 poll.
Sweet, but it may get
bumpier from there.
Next: Avoiding the pot-
holes that have stopped
every other No. 1 this sea-
son, then finding a way to
the Final Four.
"It's an honor that people.
would think this highly of
all of us in the program,"
coach Mark Few said in a
prepared statement Mon-
day afternoon. "It's great
for the program, great for
the school, great for the city
of Spokane and the region
and the entire Northwest.
"We still have a lot more
to accomplish starting this
weekend in Las Vegas and
moving forward to the
NCAA tournament," said
Few, who reportedly went
fishing on Monday. "We're
looking forward to the rest
of the season and making
it last as long as we can."
The fact that Few would


skip perhaps the biggest
day in program history
to go fishing says much
about the priorities of the
coach who helped build
and has sustained Gonza-
ga's success. Few has re-
peatedly said he enjoys the
balance between work and
family time that Gonzaga
provides, a major reason
he has not left for a bigger
program.
Students celebrated
the No. 1 ranking on the
downtown campus Mon-
day, and the food services
department wheeled out
a 20-foot cake that said
"Congratulations Zags."
Staying No. 1 has been
tough this season, with
Gonzaga the fifth school to
hold the spot after replac-
ing Indiana this week. The
others were Duke, Louis-
ville and Michigan.
"We don't believe there is
any jinx," assistant coach
Tommy Lloyd said earlier
Monday. "Obviously, it's a
dream for us, the ultimate
accomplishment."
Gonzaga, a small Jesuit
school in Spokane, is where
crooner Bing Crosby went
and where John Stockton


threaded pinpoint passes.
It has the best record in
Division I at 29-2 follow-
ing weekend wins against
BYU and Portland. The
Hoosiers, beaten by Min-
nesota last week, dropped
to No. 2.
"We're not necessarily in
pursuit of a ranking," Lloyd
said. "We're trying to get to
the NCAA tournament.
When that's over, as coach-
es we can look back and re-
alize what an accomplish-
ment it is and how difficult
it is."
The Zags are the 57th
school to be ranked No. 1
since the AP poll began in
January 1949. The school
is considered a mid-major
and reached No. 2 for the
first time last week. Now it
will play for the first time at
No. 1 on Saturday night in
the West Coast Conference
semifinals.
The school received 51
first-place votes from the
65-member national me-
dia panel, 44 more than In-
diana. Duke, winners over
Miami after a loss to Vir-
ginia, remained third with
five first-place votes.
Kansas and Georgetown


both jumped two spots f-l'NOW OFFERN'G' 6

two first-place votes. Mi-
ami, Michigan, Louisville,
Kansas State and Michigan
State rounded out the top
10.. ni yrfi


MADNESS


M IN MARCH


MARIANNA

MARIANNA


FCSAA State JUCO Basketball Tournament
Milton H. Johnson Health Center
Chipola College

March 6 -9


~N S 'IGURNAMENT


i-Final
March 8
)p.m.


Florida State College @ Jax W OMI
vs. Chipola -
Wednesday, March 6 6:00 p.m. Semi
Friday,
Palm Beach 6:0(
vs. Northwest Florida ~
Wednesday, March 6 8:00 p.m.


St. Petersburg
vs. Hillsborough
Wednesday, March 6 1:00 p.m.

Gulf Coast
vs. Santa Fe
Wednesday, March 6 3:00 p.m.


Sem
Friday
1:0


Polk
vs. Chipola
Thursday, March 7 6:00 p.m.

Brevard
vs. Santa Fe
Thursday, March 7 8:00 p.m.


Northwest Florida
vs. Palm Beach
Thursday, March 7 3:00 p.m.

College of Central Florida
vs. State College of Florida
Thursday, March 7 1:00 p.m.


Championship
Saturday, March 9
5:00 p.m.


li-Final
,March 8
0 p.m.


MENSS TOURNAMENT

Semi-Final
Friday, March 8
8:00 p.m.

Chamninnnhin


Serm
Friday.
3:0
I


Saturday, March 9
7:30 p.m.

i-Final
,March 8
0 p.m.


Phone: 850-718-2270 Website: www.chipola.edu
Tournament Sponsors:
Waste Management, Florida Lottely, and First Commerce Credit Union
Funded in part by the Jackson County Tourist Development Council


4


Relish what's coming!

(Look for it right here March 6th)



The Breakfast Issue


Easter Brunch Menu ~ h


Breakfast for Dinner


Gouda Waffles e


Cinnamon Secrets

NOW AVAILABLE!
Relish monthly iPad editions!



FLORIDAN relish


_11__111_11_1111_1___~__1__


I


I


L