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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01028
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text




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Vol. 90 No.53





County looks to buy land, voting tools
0Y


Parcel would expand Road and Bridge Department


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Jackson County commis-
sioners may buy a three-acre
parcel of land across from the
Road and Bridge Departinent
on Owens Road. On Tuesday,
the board authorized County
Administrator Ted Lakey to
negotiate on a price for
land and present the figure
for approval at the earliest
oppQrtunity.
At least part of the parcel
may be used for parking; the
county is planning to bring in
a new 13,000-square-foot pre-
fab metal maintenance shop
and set it down in the area
that staff now uses for parking
in the Road and Bridge yard.
The county is currently bid-
ding the shop, and has not yet
reviewed the offers.
Road and Bridge Superin-
tendent Al Green has several
changes in mind, if the board
does ultimately elect to go for-
ward with the new building.
He'll close the old tire shop
and move those functions
inside the new space. The
county's insurance company
has strongly suggested that
the old tire shop needs to be
vacated.
The county recently bought
a two-post lift that will allow
mechanics to lift all four ve-
hicle tires off the ground at
once. Before, they had to work
piecemeal with a lesser lift.
That piece of equipment 'will
move into the new mainte-
nance shop, placed strategi-
cally so that both the mechan-
ics and tire crews can access it
easily.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Jackson County commissioners are considering the purchase of this house and land for an expansion of
the Road and Bridge Department.


He'll also move the me-
chanics into the new space
and let the county's sign man
move into the old mechanics'
shop. Currently, he has to use
the Road and Bridge break
room to build his signs. The
old shop will also house traf-
fic barricades and possibly
other supplies that have been
crammed into available space
throughout the department's
complex.
Having a new shop would
help the county in various


other ways, Green said.
For instance, it would al-
low the department to better
track inventory as it moves in
and out of the shop, because
they will now be:in a central
location for check-in and
checkout. Currently they're
scattered ih several different
places. The department is al-
ready working toward better
tracking in another way as
well. The department is now


record of the materials as they
change hands in daily use, he
said.
And Green said that perhaps
the biggest benefit of a new
shop is enhanced safety.
"The whole idea is to have
a better facility that is safer
to work in," Green said. "It
gives us a better opportunity
to manage and control inven-
tory and supplies, but really,
improving the workspace for


testing a new software com- employees is another major
puter system that will keep a purpose."


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Assistant Supervisor of Elections Vicki
Farris runs test ballots through one of the
county's 11-year-old M100 voting machines
on Wednesday.

New machines

would cost,

$5,500 each
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Jackson County commissioners will
have a workshop session with county
Supervisor of Elections Sylvia Stephens
next month to talk about whether
they'll buy some new optical scan vote-
counting equipment she wants, and to
discuss how they'll pay for it if they do
approve the purchase. The meeting is
set for Tuesday, March 26, at 5 p.m.
Stephens wants to replace the M100
tabulators she's been using for the past
decade with 23 new DS 200s at $5,500

See MACHINES, Page 13A


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A gazebo at Citizens Lodge Park is surrounded
by several yards of flood water on Wednesday in
Marianna.


WNW'


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN

Birdwatcher Mark Hebb scans the water-inundated surface
of Citizens Lodge Park for some unfamiliar birds he had
seen earlier on Wednesday afternoon in Marianna. After
rising steadily for several days, the nearby Chipola River was
predicted to crest at 22.5 feet today. Skies are expected to remain
clear of rain until Tuesday when there is a chance of scattered
showers.


First Friday


State DOC


Secretary to


speak about


department
From staff reports
At this week's First Friday Power
Breakfast hosted by the Jackson County
Chamber of Commerce,
the featured speaker is
Florida Department of
Corrections Secretary
S Michael "Mike" Crews.
A DOC spokesper-
son sgd the secretary's
Crews speech on Friday will
include an overview of
the department and details of its tran-
sitional programs for inmates.
The Transition from Prison to Com-
munity Initiative, according to the DOC
website, is an evidence-based initia-
tive that aims to manage transition and
reentry for community safety and re-
duced victimization.
Appointed by Gov. Rick Scott as DOC
secretary on Dec. 17, 2012, Crews served
as DOC's deputy secretary since 2011.
He has nearly 30 years of experience in
corrections and law enforcement.

See FRIDAY, Page 13A


> CLASSIFIEDS...11A


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l2A + THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013


Today

-A41


Partly Cloudy & Mild.

Justin Kiefer / WMBB


High 650
Low 35


WAiKE-UP CALL


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com






.. 64
.... I. "M. LL

":. ....6- 5 ,-


High 60
Low -350


Friday
Sunny & Cooler.


tr),


High 48
Low 30


Saturday
Cloudy & Cold.
Possible Shower.


.,A, High- 600
S.- Low 42


Monday
NMostly Sunny & Warmer.


24 hours 0.00" Year to date 15 -4.,
Month to date 12.68" Normal YTD 10 0-
Normal MTD 4.99" Normal for year 59.2b"


TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


7:14 PM
11:55 PM
7:19 PM
8:36 PM
9:04 PM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
67.22 ft.
22.21 ft.
22.02 ft.
15.19 ft.


11:06 AM
5:09 PM
11:39 AM
12:12 PM
12:45 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3 4'.

THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:08 AM
Sunset 5:39 PM
Moonrise 8:47 PM Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar.
Moonset 8:13 AM 11 19 27 4


FLORIDA'S REAl.

PANHANDLE J uN

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9'

ISTENsOHYEA


.JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
a Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting 7 a.m. at
the Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Deli in downtown
Marianna. Call 482-2290.
n Job Club Noon to 3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills; get job search assis-
tance. Call 526-0139.
D U.S. Rep. Southerland Staff Office Hours
2-4 p.m. at Marianna City Hall, 2898 Greet
St., Marianna. Constituents invited to meet with'
Southerland's staff to provide input on legislation,
ask questions or request assistance with a
federal agency. Contact 850-785-0812 or Melissa.
Thompson@mail.house.gov.
7 Employability Workshop, Mock Interviewing
2:30 p.m. at Marianna One Stop Career Center.
Call 718-0326.
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation 4-7 p.m. at the Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. for an
appointment.
7 Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Group
5:30 p.m. at Jackson Hospital in the Cafeteria
Board Room. Free to attend. Curriculum developed
by ex-smokers for those who want to become
ex-smokers themselves. Call 718-2545.
) 5th "Annual Classic Southern Desserts"
fundraiser for the Jackson County Public
Library 6-8 p.m. at the Agricultural Complex on
Pennsylvania Avenue in Marianna, with a silent auc-
tion beginning at 5:30 p.m. This event is sponsored
by the Jackson County Library Board. Southern
desserts will be served and entertainment for a $10
donation. Call 592-6676.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, MARCH 1
a Jackson County Chamber of Commerce
First Friday Power Breakfast 7-8:45 a.m. at
the Jackson County Agricultural Complex, 2741
Pennsylvania Ave., Marianna. Featured speaker:
Michael D. Crews, Secretary, Florida Department of
Corrections. Call 482-8060.
) Marianna Garden Club Tree Sale 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. in front of Farmer's Furniture, Highway 90 West
in Marianna. Proceeds from this tree sale will be
used to promote gardening and fund beautification
projects in Marianna. Bare root dogwood and crape
myrtle will be available for $1 each. To reserve large
orders, call 482-3466.
n Knitters Nook -10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Local Author, Dale Cox Book Signing 3-5
p.m. at Chipola River Book and Tea, 4402 Lafayette
St., in downtown Marianna. Cox will be signing his
newest book "The Scott Massacre of 1817." Cox is a
native of Jackson County.
n Book Signing by Local Author S.M. Donaldson
- 4-7 p.m. at Bistro Palms in Marianna. Donaldson


will be signing copies of her book Sam's Choice.
Copies will also be available for sale.
Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856, 573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Deadline to order F.M.Golson Elementary
School Yearbooks for $25. Cash accepted or make
checks payable to F.M. Golson Elementary. Call
482-9607.

SATURDAY, MARCH 2
n Yard Sale and Bake Sale 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
5052 Highway 90, Marianna. Proceeds benefiting
Relay for Life. Call 718-5502..
) Marianna Garden Club Tree Sale,- 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. or until all trees are sold, in front of Farmer's
Furniture, Highway 90 West in Marianna. Proceeds
from this tree sale will be used to promote garden-
ing and fund beautification projects in Marianna.
Bare root dogwood and crape myrtle will be
available for $1 each. To reserve large orders call
482-3466.
) Panhandle Horse Expo 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the
Jackson County Agriculture Center, 3691 Highway
90 West, Marianna. Event will feature presenta-
tions on horse health, weeds and poisonous plants
and pasture management. Program will include a
hamburger lunch. $5 per person registration fee.
Pre-register online through Evenbrite at http://www.
eventbrite.com/event/5384280528. Call 482-9620.
)"Cooking Up A Kitchen" Car Show 10 a.m.
at Dayspring Christian Academy. Registration from
10 a.m. to noon with awards at 2 p.m. Donation of
$15 to enter and sponsor trophies to the Top 25 and
Best of Show. Free hotdog meal tickets to regis-
trants, 2 per entry. Proceeds benefiting the Kitchen
Fund for DCA. Call 527-5104.
7 Meet Local First Time Author, D.J. Phillabaum
-10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Jackson County Public
Library, Marianna Branch. Phillabaum's first fiction
book tells of the reminiscing of Jeanie Ashford's
life of jealousy, hurt, hard work, demoralization
and love. She will have her book "Once and Forever
Love" available for sale and signing at this event.
Call 482-9631.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 CaledoniaSt. in Marianna.
) Little Miss, Junior Miss and Miss Grand Ridge
Pageants 6 p.m. in the Grand Ridge School
Old Gym. Admission is $5 per person. All reign-
ing queens in attendance will be recognized. Call
209-7977.

SUNDAY, MARCH 3
7 Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in


the board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Dr., Graceville.

MONDAY, MARCH 4
7 5 Steps to Rapid Employment Workshop 9
a.m. to noon at Marianna One Stop Career Center.
Call 718-0326.
n Rich Dixon to speak at Jackson County ARC,
Inc. 1 p.m. at 2973 Pennsylvania Ave., Marianna.
Dixon and wife, Becky tour the country sharing his
story of hope, overcoming adversity and accom-
plishing dreams. He will be sharing his challenges
of being paralyzed and in a wheelchair. Everyone is
invited to attend. Call 526-7333.
) Genealogy Series II Class 2:30-4:30 p.m.
at the Jackson County Public Library, Marianna
Branch. Class is free. Discover proper research
techniques, learn tips and tricks to help in your
research journey and begin discovering your family
roots. Students must know computer basics, how
to use the Internet and have an interest in family
history. Students will need to bring a flash drive to
use in class. Call 482-9631.
) Employability Workshop: "Effective Network-
ing" 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna. Call 718-0326.
Jackson County Quilter's Guild Meeting
5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 US 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings are
fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects,
lessons, help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
) Central Jackson Relay for Life Committee
Meeting 6 p.m. at Milk & Honey Frozen Yogurt,
4767 Highway 90 in Marianna. Meetings are
planned for the first Monday of each month prior
to the April event. Volunteers needed. Contact
angelaparker30@gmail.com or 573-5353.

TUESDAY, MARCH 5
Chipola Regional Workforce Development
Consortium Meeting Conference Call 9(30
a.m. Call 718-0456 ext. 101 for additional informa-
tion.
D Free Vision Screening and Hearing Impaired
Phone Services Screening/Phone Distribution
-10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Dr., Marianna. Event hosted
by the Jackson County Senior Citizens. Call 482-
5028.
) Orientation Noon to 3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
) Sewing Circle -1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Dr., in Marianna. Call 482-
5028.
) Employability Workshop: "What Employers
are Looking For" 2:30 p.m. at the Marianna One
Stop Career Center, 4636 Highway 90, Marianna.
Call 718-0326.
n Jackson County School Board Special Meet-
ing 4 p.m. at 2903 Jefferson St., Marianna in the
Board Room. The purpose of the meeting is for the
presentations by the food service management
companies who have submitted bids for the upcom-
ing contract period. Call 482-1200.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Feb. 26, the latest
available report: One missing
adult, one abandoned vehicle,
two susDicious vehicles, one
suspicious
3, incident, one
report of mental
rC' E illness, six traf-
S fic stops, one
criminal mis-
chief complaint, one obscene/
threatening phone call, three
follow-up investigations, two
juvenile complaints, one fight
in progress reported, one noise
disturbance, one public service
call and one welfare check.


Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following incidents
for Feb. 26, the latest available
report: One drunk driver, two
accidents, one hospice death,
one stolen tag, nine abandoned
vehicle reports, two suspicious
vehicles, one suspicious inci-
dent, one suspicious person,
one arrest during special duty.
detail, one escort, one highway
obstruction, three burglaries,
one physical disturbance, three
verbal disturbances, two drug
offenses, 12 medical calls,
four burglar alarms, two fire
alarms, four traffic stops,
one larceny complaint, one


accidental shooting, two tres-
pass complaints, two assaults,
one noise disturbance, one ani-
mal complaint, one retail theft,
eight assists of other agencies,
three public service calls, three
transports and one threat/
harassment complaint.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Angela Anderson, 39, 6149
Alabama Highway 87, Troy, Ala.,
violation of state probation.
) Ladarius Pittman, 23, 5542
Prairieview Road, Greenwood,
violation of county probation.
a Terrance Williams, 20, P.O.


Box 6458 Marianna, sentenced
to six months in the county jail.
) Buddy Wyatt, 31, 5155 Lynch
Drive, Marianna, uttering a
forged instrument-two counts.
) Amy Pringle, 34, 1133 Beck
Ave. (Apt. 10), Panama City,
violation of county probation.
) James Caswell, 32, 6209 East
Highway 98, Panama City, viola-
tion of state probation.
) Angela Russ, 42, 744 South
Duval St., Quincy, obtaining a
controlled substance by fraud-
two counts.

Jail Population: 210

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


Weather Outlook


' High 520
1, Low -29'


Sunday
Sunny & Cool.


J C FLO R I DA N..COI d


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


1IIlUt lSDI)AY, I- IUUAIY 2., 2013 3AF


SUBMITTED PH010
Cast members of the Chipola College Theatre musical
"Hairspray" are shown.



Tickets on sale



for Chipola's



'Hairspray'


Special to the Floridan

Tickets are now on sale
for the Chipola College
Theatre musical, "Hair-
spray," which opens March
13. Tickets are available
online at www.chipola.edu
and in the Center for the
Arts Box Office through
March 12, Monday through
Thursday from 2-5 p.m.,
and March 13-17, from 6-7,
p.m.
Cast members are: Odra
Chapman as Tracy Turn-
blad, Trey McKay as Corny
Collins, Kayla Todd as Am-
berVon Tussle, Aaron Black
as Brad Dancer, Gracie
Wallace as Tammy Danc-
er, Austin Pettis as Fender
Dancer, Piper Williams as
Brenda Dancer, Terrence
Shanks as Sketch Dancer,
Cayce Griffin as Shelley
Dancer, Tyler Landry as
IQ Dancer, Shayli Tharp as
Lou Ann Dancer, Colton
Day as Link Larkin, Mer-
edith Moreau as Prudy'
Pingleton, Charles Sirmon
as Edna Turnblad, Mer-
edith Saunders as Penny
Pingleton, Meghan Bas-
ford as Velma Von Tussle,
Chris Manasco as Wilbur
Turnblad, Nick Melvin' as
Seaweed J. Stubbs, Or-
lando Riley as Duane,


Clyde Declonet as Gilbert,
Brienne Beechum as Lor-
raine, Matt West as Mr.
Pinky, Evie Saliba as Little
Inez, Courtney Bass as
gym teacher, Rachel West
as matron, Brittney Hol-
mes as Motormouth May-
belle Seaweed's mother
and Nadine Long as guard.
The Dynamites Female
singing trio in "Welcome
to the 60's" includes Patrea
Clark, Adajah Swilley and
Melanie Henderson.
Citizens of Baltimore
include: Elyn Sapp, Julie
Wells, Amberly Corbin,
Amber Saye, Kiara Samp-
son, Aiden Rollis, Grace
Wester, Olivia Wester, Faith
Long, Deanna Bailey, Shel-
by Jainer, Rhonda Stone,
Maddie Craven, Tanaish
Tookes, Felicia Gibson and
Rolli Barteles.
"Hairspray," written
by Mark O'Donnell and
Thomas Meehan, with
music by Marc Shaiman
and lyrics by Scott Witt-
man and Marc Shaiman,
is the winner of eight Tony
Awards, including best
musical.
For more information,
contact Charles Sirmon,
director of theatre, at
sirmonc@chipola.edu or
call 718-2277.'


Apalachicola River Community of


Indians plan conference for March 16


Special to the Floridan

The Apalathicola River Commu-
nity of Indians Community Confer-
ence will be held Saturday, March 16
at the WT Neal Civic Center, 17773
N.E. Peat St., Blountstown. There
will be an American Indian Geneal-
ogyWorkslop from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
followed by the Indian Community
Conference from 6-10 p.m. A free
meal will be served at 6 p.m.
Some of the issues to be ad-
dressed at the conference will be the


petition for federal acknowledge-
ment by the Muscogee Nation of
Florida; the Poarch Band of Creek
Indians recent development of a
facility in Gretna and the expan-
sion of their casino development in
Wetumpka, AL; the site of Hickory
Grounds and the ensuing contro-
versy; continuing research of the
Scott Town and Scotts Ferry Indian
settlements of Jackson and Calhoun
counties; and the recent expansion
of traditional Creek religion in the
Florida Panhandle among others.


Copies of the recently published
book "The Indians of North Flori-
da,"'a legal and social history of the
Indian families of the Apalachicola,
will be available for half price to
community members, or is avail-
able on amazon.com.
More information about the
community and-the annual com-
munity conference are available at
northfloridaindians.org. To get an
agenda, please contact Christopher
Scott Sewell at 918-402-3666 or at
chickeetrash@yahoo.com.


.- .. .r..a ..!.e. .l ..r . -- - -
..... RLWL.4 .e I r'


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Bev Kilmer presented the program for the January meeting for Altrusa International of Marianna. Kilmer is founder and CEO
of Freedom Speaks Inc., which is dedicated to seeing that the rights as provided by the First Amendment of the United States
Constitution are protected for all citizens, but especially those in the education system including but not limited to: students,
teachers, principals and administrators. Freedom Speaks is dedicated to religious freedom, religious rights, free speech and
fighting against religious discrimination. Freedom Speaks empowers parents to demand that school officials respect their
children's religious and First Amendment Rights. Freedom Speaks Foundation takes a very offensive and pro-active approach
to seeing that your First Amendment Rights as provided by the United States Constitution are protected. Kilmer is now
committing her life to seeing that no one is prohibited from exercising their rights to free speech and religious freedom. For
more information go to the Freedom Speaks website at www.freesomspeaks.us. Pictured (from left) are Carolyn Glass, club
president, Bev Kilmer and Gina Stuart, program sponsor.

Retired Judge Addresses Optimist Club


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Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com,
mail them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them
by our offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include child's full
name, parents'name(s) and city of residence.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Woodrow "Woody" Hatcher, retired Jackson County judge, was the guest speaker recently at a meeting of the Marianna
Optimist Club. Judge Hatcher related to the membership his experiences coming in as a new county judge 36 years ago and
his experiences transitioning out some 36 years later. He told the group he worked hard daily to make sure his decisions and
interactions with people were always fair and consistent. His retirement also marks the end of an era, in that he was the last
judge in the state who was not a lawyer and member of the Florida Bar Association. Pictured (from left) are club program
chairman Ken Stoutamire, Judge Hatcher and club president Lowell Centers.


' GAS WATCH
Gas prices are going up. Here are
the least expensive places to buy
gas in Jackson County, as of
Wednesday afternoon.
1. $3.73, Pilot, 2209 U.S.71,
Marianna
2. $3.73, Travel Center, 2112 U.S.
71 S., Marianna
3. $3.74, BP Station, 5184 U.S.
231 S., Campbellton
4. $3.78, McCoy's Food Mart,
2823 Jefferson St., Marianna
5. $3.79, BP Steel City, 2184
U.S. 231 S., Alford
6. $3.79, Dixie Food & Gas, 1757
U.S.. 231 S., Alford
7. $3.79, RMEE II, 5392 10th St.,
Malone
8. $3.79, Loves Travel Center,
2510 U.S. 231, Cottondale
If you see a lower price,
contact the Floridan newsroom
at editorial@icfloridan.com.


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Milton H. Johnson Health Center
Chipola College
March 6-9, 2013
March 6, 7 and 8 at 1 p.m., 3 p.m., 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Finals on March 9 Women at 5 p.m. and Men at 7:30 p.m.
Phone: 850-718-2270 Wcbsitc: www.chipola.edu


Tue;
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PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
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LOCAL






JACKSON COUNTY I I.ORIDAN www.jclloridalI.corl-


Latest Jackson County Road Closures
From the Jackson County Road and Bridge Department.
the latest road closures and obstruc(ions, as of Wednes-
day, Feb. 27
Closed
a Aycock Road (north erd)
a Baker Creek Road (frdm Bumpnose Ro4d to bridge)
a Barron Road (at Dpnfbrd'Bay Road a'hd Highway 273
end), .
a Benchoff Road (between' itCounty IRod arid Doe
Run Road). ' .
6 Bumpnose Road (ff~rnBa'ke f.Crek tp'Highway 162) -
a Cardinal Roacd(middle section)-
a Davenport Road (from railroad to mile north)
a Emily Road (off Highway 7?): ..
a Gemini Loop (west'f Williams Road)
a Gum Creek Road (off.Earjson Road). .
*a Hickshill Road (betwer Everglade Road and Reddick
Mill Road)
a Iron Bridge Road (from Dry Creek Road to Maddox
Road)
a New Bridge Road (from Old US to Pleasant Ridge)
a Old U.S. Road (from 1US90 to WatsonStreet)
a Parrot Road (off'Pearit Rad) Access Smokey
Road
a Penny Road (east ofr mokey Road).
a Pooser Road (off High ay 73).
aTobacco Road (middle.s ioh) .
a White Pond Road. .
WoMtetK roadi
Use extreme cauti n hor-Wihe pogsi b s an altemate
route. :' : .

,a Birrhwod oaRoad(ne C .
a Black oad -
a Braswell Roaa(wst l ."
aBumpriose' 6 ad bfbff-yLaniibtb s-



a IronBridge.Road (b^y ^j t4WI (driet
ouri Road) ;
a Hcksfll Road --


a Leo-Road
'a Lovewod- aditpast a t
S77) -
a LaRibu Road .-;:
Mission Road (dfr t '.
a Napier Trail T .rl t
a Old Spanish T-i04S
a Old Spanish,.Tri
'.' OldFSpanish Tralp (Jv
SRive.Rep (at
*.t...:flfl4, R~it ...&IJO/ A
: Sandtidge G"urch


HaSRoseRty a PondRo(-


Iron Brildg 6R(odt(
: MIcKeown MR~lfROai ,S
aOldSp nish








Man accused of
uig stolen checks
K SatelliteRbttloI
04V 6 Veteranft Rdmt(frq
Road) i



Man accused of

using stolen checks


From staff reports
A Marianna man is ac-
cused of passing two stolen
checks to area merchants
earlier this month.
According to a press re-
lease from the Jackson
County Sheriffs Office,
Buddy Randall Wyatt, 31,
is charged with two counts
of uttering a forged instru-
ment in the case.
The victim contacted
authorities on Feb. 12
to report the theft of her
checkbook, and advis-
ing that someone had
written two checks on
her account. One was for


State
Body found
following house fire
LAKE WALES Authori-
ties say one person was
found dead following a
central Florida house fire.
Polk County Fire and
Rescue reports that the
Lake Wales home was fully
engulfed in flames when
firefighters arrived early
Wednesday morning. It
took about two hours
to get the blaze under
control.
The Ledger reports that
rescuers found books,
magazines, purses, cloth-
ing and more stacked in
layers throughout the
1,200-square-foot house.
The victim's name wasn't
released. The cause of
the fire remains under
investigation.


$279.95 and the other was
for $95. In-
vestigators
determined
that Wyatt
had pre-
sented both
the checks
W6ya r for goods or
services re-
ceived on Feb. 6. On Feb.
26, a warrant forWyatt's ar-
rest was issued, and he was
taken into custody at his
residence on Lynch Drive.
Anyone with information
in this case is asked to call
the sheriff's office at 482-
9624 or CrimeStoppers at
526-5000.


Briefs
Man fires shots Inside
Largo office building
LARGO Largo police
say a man walked into the
lobby of an office, pulled
a gun from his waistband
and fired several rounds
into windows and doors
before shooting himself in
the stomach.
Police say they don't
think 52-year-old Fred Mi-
chael Sumner aimed any
of his shots Wednesday
at people. Witnesses told
officers that he aimed at
lobby doors and windows.
He then shot himself in
what police characterized
as an attempted suicide.
Sumner was hospitalized
but his condition wasn't
immediately available.
From wire reports


FIRST OF 13 DuLi 1

STRUCTURES DEMO i


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Tim Hayes with Hayes Land Clearing uses an excavator to sort debris as he demolishes
a house on the corner of Decatur and Spring streets on Wednesday in Marianna. The
dwelling is the first of 13 on a list of dilapidated structures the city has marked for
demolition.


JACKSON COUNTY 2012

EAGLE SCOUTS HONORED


SUBMITTED PHOTO
rom left: Jackson County 2012 Eagle
Scouts Skylar Suggs, Troop 3; Samuel
Barnes, Troop 33; Chaison Johnson,
Troop 3 and Hunter Hutton, Troop 170, are
shown at the Volunteer and Eagle Scout
banquet in Dothan, Ala., as they receive
well-deserved recognition for their
achievements in Scouting. At this year's
annual Volunteer Recognition and Eagle
Scouts Banquet recently held in Dothan,
Ala., Jackson County was well represented
with the honoring of four local Eagle Scouts
of 2012. Chaison A. Johnson, M. Skylar
Suggs, Hunter G. Hutton and SamuelW.
Barnes were recognized for their hard work,
perseverance and admirable achievement
of earning the highest rank attainable in the
Boy Scout program. Each of these scouts
had to complete a minimum of 11 required
merit badges, 10 elective badges and a
council-approved service project to benefit
and impact his community. The awards
banquet honored volunteers and Eagle
Scouts from the 11-county Alabama-Florida
Council. Many heartfelt congratulations
are extended to Chaison, Skylar, Hunter
and Samuel, as they continue to serve their
communities, country and world, making
us all extremely proud of them.


Rev. Brad McClain Schedule: lusic L ith Jeff Keeman
Sunday: 6:00 pm Monday: 6:00 pm Tuesday: 6:00 pm
"Meet Jesus at the Cross Road"
Call First United Methodist Church at 850-482-4502 for more information.


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"-4A THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28,2013


LOCAL & STATE







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.corn


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Neil Heslin, the father of a 6-year-old boy who was slain in the Sandy Hook massacre in
Newtown, Conn., on Dec. 14, holds a picture of himself with his son Jesse and wipes his eye while
testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee
on the Assault Weapons Ban of 2013.


Father of Newtown victim:


Ban all assault weapons


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON After weeks of argu-
ing constitutional fine points and citing
rival statistics, senators wrangling over
gun control saw and heard the anguish of
a bereft father.
Neil Heslin, whose 6-year-old son, Jes-
se, was among those cut down at a Con-
necticut elementary school in December,
asked the Senate Judiciary Committee on
Wednesday to ban assault weapons like
the one that killed his child.
"I'm not here for the sympathy or the
pat on the back," Heslin, a 50-year-old
construction worker, told the senators,
weeping openly during much of his
hushed 11-minute testimony. "I'm here
to speak up for my son."
At his side were photos: of his son as
a baby, of them both taken on Father's
Day, six months before Jesse was among
20 first-graders and six administrators
killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School
in Newtown, Conn. That massacre has
hoisted gun control to a primary politi-
cal issue this year, though the outcome
remains uncertain.
The hearing's focus was legislation by
Sen. Dianie Feinstein, D-Calif., to ban
assault weapons and ammunition maga-
zines carrying more than 10 rounds. A
Bushmaster assault weapon was used at
Newtown by the attacker, Adam Lanza,


whose body was found with 30-round
magazines.
Feinstein said such a firearm "tears peo-
ples' bodies apart. I don't know why as a
matter of public policy we can't say they
don't belong."'
Republicans had several answers. They
argued her proposal would violate the
Second Amendment's right to bear arms
and take firearms from law-abiding
citizens, and said current laws aimed at
keeping guns from criminals are not fully
enforced.
"The best way to prevent crazy people"
from getting firearms is to better enforce
the existing federal background check
system, said Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.
That system is designed to prevent
criminals, people with mental problems
and others from obtaining guns. It only
applies to weapons sold by federally li-
censed dealers, and expanding that sys-
tem to nearly all gun transactions is the
central proposal in President Barack
Obama's package of gun restrictions he
unveiled last month, along with bans
on assault weapons and large-capacity
magazines.
As if to underscore the hurdles Obama's
plan faces on Capitol Hill, House Judicia-
ry Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte,
R-Va., told reporters Wednesday that he
opposed universal background checks
like the president wants.


A troubled grandmother, a


birthday and 2 dead boys


The Associated Press

NORTH STONINGTON,
Conn. Debra Denison's
struggles with mental ill-
ness were well known in
her family, and when she
wanted to pick up her
grandsons from day care
to mark the older boy's
birthday, mother Brenda
Perry hesitated.
Denison not only want-
ed to pick up 2-year-old
Alton and 6-month-old
Ashton, but she also want-
ed to do it alone, the boys'
great-grandmother said.
Perry told her mother the
boys were too much for
her to handle, but Deni-
son insisted.
"Shewas apparentlyvery
convincing," said Marcia
White, the boys' great-
grandmother on their fa-
ther's side. So Perry asked
her to take along another
relative. She didn't and
now a family and a town
are wondering whether
anything could have pre-
vented what came next.
Denison left a suicide
note, drove alone to the
day care, picked up the
boys, took them to a near-
by lake and apparently
used her husband's gun
to fatally shoot them and
herself, authorities and
relatives said Wednesday.
The bodies were found
Tuesday night, about two
hours after a frantic search
began.
State police had not offi-
cially determined they all
died because of the gun-
fire, but autopsies were
planned.
Denison, 47, also had a
13-year-old son who was
not with her Tuesday after-
noon and was unharmed.
In her suicide note, she
said in part that God was
watching over him on
Tuesday, White said. What
exactly she meant by that,
and her motive for the


killings and suicide, re-
main unclear.
But state property tax
records revealed finan-
cial difficulties, including
a lien put on their home
last month. And the boys'
parents told WVIT-TV that
Denison had "split per-
sonalities," while WFSB-
TV reported that family
members described her as
having bipolar disorder.
"She would go along and
have seasons where every-
thing was A OK, and other
times when she would be
depressed, running to the
doctor and getting pre-
scriptions," said White,
the grandmother of the
boys' father, Jeremy Perry.
The parents are reeling
with grief, she said, on
what should have been a
happy day of looking over
snapshots of their young-
er son's birthday.
"They have a strong
faith in God, and they're
just clinging to each other
and God," she said.
Nothing seemed amiss
when Denison collected
the boys from Kidds & Co.,
where she had been before
and was on a list of people
authorized to pick up the
children. Their mother
had told staff members
the grandmother would
be picking up the children,
and Denison was friendly
and talkative when she ar-
rived, according to direc-
tor Nikki Salaun.
The staff described the
boys as very happy chil-
dren. Alton had been
sent to the day care Tues-
day with mini-cupcakes
to share in honor of his
birthday; he was nick-
named "the greeter" at the
center because he always
went to see visitors at the
door, while other children
hung back.
In a Facebook post-
ing Monday, the mother
had written: "So excited


making mini cupcakes
and play dough for Altons
day tomorrow can't be-
lieve 2 years old already.
So blessed".
Salaun and center co-
owner Christine Hare said
that they keep going over
the pickup in their minds,
but that there is noth-
ing they could have done
differently.
"Brenda obviously put
her on the list thinkingshe
would be OK," Hare said.
"We go with the parents.
We can't override their
wishes. Obviously, if she
had come here obviously
distraught, we would have
intervened."
The bodies of Denison
and the boys were found
in a car parked near Lake
of Isles in Preston, in the
southeastern corner of
Connecticut. It's a town
over from the day care
center in North Ston-
ington,, a bedroom and
farming community just
a few miles away from
one of the world's largest
casinos.


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Ohio students commemorate

classmates slain by teen last year


The Associated Press

CHARDON, Ohio One
day after a teen gun-
man pleaded guilty in the
deadly school shooting,
students marked the one-
year anniversary Wednes-
day with hugs, supportive
messages and a somber
march through town. ,
The march by Chardon
High School students,
walking arm-in-arm in the
damp cold from the school
to the town square, was an
emotional highlight during
the day's commemoration.
Photos of the three slain
students were displayed,
onlookers applauded
marchers and firefighters
hung a large American flag
from an aerial ladder.
The march ended at the
courthouse where the
shooter, T.J. Lane, 18, had
pleaded guilty Tuesday
to all charges. Lane could
face life in prison at his
sentencing March 19.
The observance honored
Daniel Parmertor and De-
metrius Hewlin, both 16,
and Russell King Jr., 17,
who were killed in the Feb.
27, 2012, rampage. Three
others were injured.
Students arriving for
classes passed an out-
door school sign with the
names of the victims and
the message: "2-27 A Day
of Remembrance." Across
the street, a heart-shaped
sign in the school colors of
red and black had the mes-
sage: "One Heartbeat."
In Columbus, the Ohio
House observed a moment
of silence. Rep. John Patter-
son, who represents Char-
don, said he planned to in-
T troduce a bill to designate
,highways in the names of
the three victims.
Patterson told his col-
leagues that they couldn't
control tragedies or fully


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chardon High School students march to the square in
Chardon, Ohio on Wednesday for a memorial ceremony for
three classmates who died in a school shooting rampage one


year ago.
prevent them. And the Jef-
ferson Democrat encour-
aged parents to tell their
children they love them.
The day's activities in
/Chardon highlighted the
anniversary but served to


keep students busy with
projects, including writing
messages of support, art-
work, memorial wreaths
and making security blan-
kets for future victims of
tragedies.


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-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY28, 2013 5AF


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jclloridan.com


,THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pope Benedict XVI greets the Catholic masses in St. Peter's Square Wednesday for the last
time before retiring, making several rounds of the square as crowds cheered wildly.


Pope recalls difficulties,


'joy' in final audience


The Associated Press

VATICAN CITY Pope Benedict XVI
bid an emotional farewell Wednesday to
his flock on the eve of his retirement, re-
calling in his final speech as pontiff mo-
ments of "joy and light" during his pa-
pacy but also times of difficulty when "it
seemed like the Lord was sleeping."
An estimated 150,000 people flooded St.
Peter's Square for Benedict's last general
audience, eager to show their support
and bear witness to the final hours of a
papacy that will go down in history as the
first one in 600 years to end in resignation
rather than death.
Benedict clearly enjoyed the occasion,
taking a long victorylap around the square
in an open-sided car and stopping to kiss
and bless half a dozen babies and infants
handed to him by his secretary. Seventy
cardinals, some tearful, sat in solemn
attendance then gave him a standing
ovation at the end of his speech.
Benedict then made a quick exit, forgo-
ing the typical meet-and-greet session
that follows the audience as if to not pro-
long the goodbye.
Given the historic moment, Benedict
also eschewed his typical professorial
Wednesday catechism lesson and instead
gave a personal, heartfelt final address,
explaining once again why he was retiring
but assuring his flock of 1.2 billion that he
was not abandoning them.
"To love the church means also to have
the courage to make difficult, painful de-
cisions, always keeping the good of the
church in mind, not oneself," Benedict


said to thundering applause.
He noted that a pontiff has no privacy
- neither as pope, nor in his future role
as emeritus pope: "He belongs always
and forever to everyone, to the whole
church."
During his eight years as pope, Bene-
dict said he had had "moments of joy and
light, but also moments that haven't been
easy ... moments of turbulent seas and
rough winds, as has occurred in the his-
tory of the church when it seemed like the
Lord was sleeping."
But he said he never felt alone, that God
always guided him, and he thanked his
cardinals and colleagues for their support
and for "understanding and respecting
this important decision."
The pope's tenure has been beset by
the clerical sex abuse scandal, discord
over everything from priestly celibacy to
women's ordination, and most recently
the betrayal by his own butler who stole
his private papers and leaked them to a
journaist.
Under a bright sun and blue skies, the
square was overflowing with pilgrims and
curiosity-seekers. Those who couldn't
get in picked spots along the main bou-
levard leading to the square to watch the
event on giant TV screens. About 50,000
tickets were requested for Benedict's final
master class. In the end, the Vatican esti-
mated that 150,000 people fTockedto the
farewell.
"It's.difficult the emotion is so big,"
said Jan Marie, a 53-year-old Roman in
his first years as a seminarian. "We came
to support the pope's decision."


Syrian army clashes
with rebels around Aleppo
BEIRUT Syrian warplanes carried
out airstrikes on rebels trying to storm
a police academy outside Aleppo on
Wednesday, activists said, while jihadi
fighters battled government troops along
a key supply road leading to the south-
eastern part of the city, activists said.
The latest fighting came as the new
U.S. secretary of state said Washington is
looking for more concrete ways to help
the rebels in their fight to oust President
Bashar Assad.
Aleppo, Syria's largest city and former
commercial capital, became a key front
in the country's civil war after rebels
launched an offensive there in July 2012.
In months of street fighting, opposition


fighters have slowly expanded the turf
under their control, although the combat
has left much of the city in ruins.
The police academy has recently
emerged as a new front in the fight for
the city, which is considered a major
prize in the conflict. Activists say the
government has turned the facility into a
military base, using it to shell opposition
areas in the countryside as well as rebel-
held neighborhoods inside the city.
The Britain-based Syrian Observatory
for Human Rights said clashes raged
Wednesday around the complex.
"The rebels are still trying to storm the
school, but they can't because the regime
is carrying out airstrikes and bombarding
rebel forces," Observatory director Rami
Abdul-Rahman said.
From wire reports


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Iraq

PM warns Syria war could spread


The Associated Press
BAGHDAD Iraq's
prime minister warned
Wednesday that a victory
for rebels in the Syrian
civil war would create a
new extremist haven and
destabilize the wider Mid-
dle East, sparking sectar-
ian wars in his own coun-
try and in Lebanon.
Nouri al-Maliki stopped
short of voicing outright
support for Syrian Presi-
dent Bashar Assad's em-
battled regime. But his
comments in a wide-rang-
ing interview with The As-
sociated Press marked one
of his strongest warnings
yet about the turmoil that
the collapse of the Syrian
government could create.
The prime minister's
remarks reflect fears by
many Shiite Muslims in
Iraq and elsewhere that
Sunni Muslims would
come to dominate Syria
should Assad be toppled,
and his' statements could
provide a measure of
moral support for those
fighting to keep Assad in
power.
"If the world does not
agree to support a peace-
ful solution through dia-
logue ... then I see no light
at the end of the tunnel,"
al-Maliki said in his office
in a Saddam Hussein-era
palace inside Baghdad's
heavily guarded Green
Zone.
"Neither the opposition
nor the regime can finish
each other off," he contin-
ued. "The most dangerous
thing in this process is that
if the opposition is victori-
ous, there will be a civil
war in Lebanon, divisions
in Jordan and a sectarian
war in Iraq."
The Iraqi leader's com-
ments come as his gov-
ernment confronts grow-
ing tensions of its own
between the Shiite ma-
jority and an increasingly
restive Sunni minority
nearly a decade after the
U.S.-led invasion of Iraq.
The war in Syria has
sectarian overtones, with


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki speaks during an
interview with The Associated Press in Baghdad, Iraq, on
Wednesday.


predominantly Sunni
rebels fighting a regime
dominated by Alawites,
an offshoot of Shiite Is-
lam. Rebel groups have
increasingly embraced
radical Islamic ideologies,
and some of their greatest
battlefield successes have
been carried out by Jabhat
al-Nusra, an al-Qaida-af-
filiated group which the
U.S. has designated as a
terrorist organization.
Assad's main allies are
Shiite Iran and the Shiite
militant group Hezbollah
in Lebanon.
Hezbollah leader Sheik
Hassan Nasrallah also
warned Wednesday
against sectarian infight-
ing in Lebanon related to
the Syrian civil war.


a


"There are some who
are working night and day
and pushing the country
toward civil and religious
strife, and specifically
Sunni-Shiite strife," Nas-
rallah said on the group's
Al-Manar TV. If this were
to happen, he said, it
would "destroy everyone
and burn down the entire
country."
Nasrallah denied ac-
cusations by the Syrian
opposition that members
of the group were fight-
ing alongside forces loyal
to the Assad regime, and
reiterated that some Shi-
ites in villages along the
Lebanese-Syrian border,
have taken up arms in
self-defense against Sunni
gunmen.


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16A + THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 28, 2013


WORLD


Ll


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Sports Briefs

High School Baseball
Thursday- Graceville at Chipley, 4
p.m., and 6 p.m.; Cottondale at Betl
hem, 5 p.m.
Friday- Graceville at Sneads, 4 p.rr
and 6 p.m.; Altha at Cottondale. 6
p.m.. Mananna at Walton, 4 p.m an
6.30 p.m.. Malone at Poplar Springs
1:30 p.m (varsity) and 3:30 p.m.
(junior varsity)

High School Softball
Thursday- Sneads at Cottondale.
p.m.. and 6 p.m; North Florida Chris
tian at Marianna, 5:30 p.m.; Gracevil
at Wewahitchka. 6 p.m.
Friday- Marianna at Sneads. 4 p.m
and 6 p.m.; Altha at Cottondale, 6 p I

Chipola Baseball
The Indians will finish the week
with four games over the weekend ai
Chipola Field. starting Friday against
Grand Rapids at 2 p.m.
On Saturday, Chipola will play two
games against St. Johns River at 11
a.m and Grand Rapids at 5 p.m., ant
then come back Sunday to take on S
Johns River again at 1 p.m.

Chipola Softball
The Lady Indians will head to
SHanceville, Ala., on the weekend for s
games.
On Friday. Chipola plays at 1 p.m.,
3 p.m., and 5 p.m., against Central
Alabama. Gadsden State, and Snead
State, and then at 10 a.m.. noon, and
p.m. on Saturday against Georgia Pe
rimeter, Southern Union, and Calhou

Marianna Youth
Baseball-Softball
Marianna Recreation Department
will hold registration for baseball and
softball for the 2013 season through
today from 8 a.m .to 4 p.m. for boys
and girls ages 5-15 at the Marianna
Educational and Recreational Expo in
Marianna.
Registration fee is $40. except for
Machine Pitch Baseball and 8U girls
softball, which is $35 each.
For more information; call 850-482
S6228.

MHS Softball
Golf Tournament
The Mananna High School softball
team golf tournament will be held
March 9-10 at Caverns Golf Course.
with format a three-man scramble at
$85 per player.
Lunch will be provided on Sunday.
For more information, contact Scott
Wiggins at 573-7506 or Brian McKei-
than at 482-4257.

Altrnsa
Golf Tournament
The 20th Annual Altrusa Golf Tour-
nament will be held March 15 at Indial
Springs Golf Course. with registration
at noon and a 1 p.m. shotgun start.
Format will be four-person scramble
modified handicap. 18 holes at $65 p(
person.
For more information, contact Jay
James at 526-3197 or 209-3068, or
Kathy Milton at 482-7788 or 209-801.

Panhandle Seminole Club
Golf Tournament
The 2013 Panhandle Seminole
Club's Annual Scholarship Golf Tourna
ment will be held April 5 at Indian
Springs Golf Club in Marianna. This
tournament, along with another fund-
raiser, has helped provide $40.000
over the past 10 years to deserving
local students and helped further their
education.
Registration and warm-up will begin
at noon with the shotgun start at 1
p.m. for this four-man scramble event
Cash prizes will be awarded to the firs
second, and third place teams. Ad-
ditional prizes will be given for longest
drive, straightest drive, closest to the
pin, and so on.
The greens fee contribution of $65
will entitle each golfer to a fantastic
afternoon of golf on a championship
course (to help a very worthy cause).
followed by a great meal.
Scholarship (hole) and prize spon-
sorships are also available for this
event. For more Information, call Roy
Baker at 850-526-4005 or 209-1326


or George Sweeney at 850-482-5526.

Sports Items
Send all'sports items to editorial@
jcfloridan.com, or lax them to 850-
482-4478 The mailing address for the
paper is Jackson County Floridan P.O.
Bo. 520 Marianna, FL 32447.


Chipola College Women's Basketball


Lady Indians resting, refocusing for state


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The No. 10 Chipola Lady
Indians ended their regular
season on. a disappointing
note Saturday in Panama
City, suffering their worst
loss of the season 92-59 to
the Gulf Coast State Lady
Commodores.
With the FCSAA state tour-
nament starting next week,
the Lady Indians are us-
ing their off week to try to
regroup and recapture the
form that led them to being'
one of the top 10 teams in
the country for the majority
of the season.
First-year coach Greg
Franklin said that after a
Sunday practice, he decided


to give his players three days
off before returning to the
court today with hopefully
a renewed 'energy after last
weekend's brutal season
finale.
"We need to get our minds
refocused and get excited
about playing basketball
again," the coach said. "The
season can be physically,
mentally, and emotionally
taxing on your team even
when you're playing nine or
10 kids, but especially when
you're playing seven. We've
had some tough situations
where it's tough on you emo-
tionally, so it's good to have a
little bit of time to get away."
The Lady Indians had pre-
viously lost heartbreaking
road games to Tallahassee by


two and twice to Northwest
Florida State in Niceville by
a point, the last of which
came on controversial foul
call in the waning seconds of
overtime.
But Saturday's loss came
as a bit of a shock, not the re-
sult itself, but the margin of
defeat, which was 23 points
greater than Chipola's previ-
ous biggest loss of 10 points
to Florida State College of
Jacksonville on Nov. 30.
"I can't explain it," Franklin
said of the loss to Gulf Coast.
"It looked like we weren't
engaged. We were a step
behind all night, and I'm
not sure what to attribute
it to. Maybe it was me not

See INDIANS, Page 8A


MARK SKINNER/IHE FLORIDAN
Treyvonna Brooks makes a pass at a recent
Chipola game.


Chipola Colege
Baselbal


.
. .. .
MARK SKINNER/THE FLORIDAN
Chipola's Luis Tunon fields the ball during a
game against Wallace Wednesday.


Indians win


wild one


over Wallace
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Indians took a dramatic
10-9 victory over Wallace State-Dothan
on Wednesday evening at Chipola Field,
getting a walk-off RBI double by Clayte
Rooks in the bottom of the 10th inning.
The win improved the Indians to 13-9
on the season.
Chipola won the game after giving up
a 7-0 lead early in the game, as Wallace
State came back to take the lead on an
RBI double byJon Floyd in the top of the
eighth inning.
But the Indians tied it back up on a
Chase Nyman solo home run in the bot-
tom of the eighth to send it into extra
innings, and the Marianna native Rooks
ended it in the 10th with a hit to score
Cameron Gibson for the winning run.
Rooks was one of four Chipola players

See BASEBALL, Page 8A


Hope School


celebrates


4th state title
e
y
SPECIALTY FLORIDAN

The Hope School Falcons won a fourth
state championship and second in a row
on Saturday in Gainesville.
e Previous titles were won in 2007 and
t 2009.
1 The Falcons played several teams this
e year including teams from Sunland, Bay
County, Ft. Walton, and Pensacola.
e Concluding homecoming week at
Hope with the theme, "Bring the Gold
back for Mrs. Mac," the team, skills
e team, coaches, parents, and volunteers
t traveled to Gainesville on Friday to
S compete in Florida Special Olympics
S state basketball games.
g The Falcons played the Leon County
Godby Cougars on Friday and won 44-
32, and then played the Cougars again
Saturday and took a 40-27 victory to
make the Falcons the gold medal win-
ners for their division and the reigning
t state champions.
The Falcons cheerleaders also made
the trip to Gainesville with their spon-
sors and parents.
The individual skills team members
were: Chris Moreno (gold), Matthew

SSee HOPE, Page 8A L
1 '. .* :- *" '. ,-* '- '; r *' -&


t, BYDUSTINKENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Holmes County Blue
Devils have their first ever
boys basketball state title
after taking a 59-40 victory
over the West Gadsden
Panthers on Wednesday
afternoon in the 1A state
final in Lakeland.
Blue Devils star post
player Chris Walker had 30
points, 15 rebounds, and
seven blocked shots to cap
off a brilliant postseason
run to endi an equally-bril-
liant high school career.
The 6-foot-l0 University
ofFloridacommitmentwas
named the tournament's
Most Valuable Player and
averaged 25 points, 14 re-
bounds, and 10 blocked
shots in the two games in
Lakeland, and also aver-
, ,_. "' I '", ,


aged 28 points per game
for his four playoff games.
The win was the 10',
straight to end the season
for the Blue Devils, who
finish the year with a re-
cord of 20-8.
Holmes County got off
to a fast start Wednesday,
with Walker scoring eight
early points, and Ty Russ
hitting a three-pointer to
put the Blue Devils up 15-
7 with 2:47 left in the first
quarter.
Consecutive threes by
Charis Fitzgerald got the
Panthers back to within
two, but Walker's three-
point play gave him 11 in
the first period and put his
team up 18-13 at the end of
the quarter.
Walker added a dunk
in transition off of a West
Gadsden turnover and a


pretty driving finish in thE
lane to make it 22-15, bu
picked up his second fou
soon after and went to the
bench.
He came back briefly late
in the period, but the Pan
otherss were able to take ad
vantage ofWalker's absence
to cut the margin to a point
at 25-24 at halftime thanks
to a pair of buckets by Mar-
quis Brown and a driving
layup by Fitzgerald.
Walker picked up his
third foul midway through
the third period and again
had to sit, but this time his
teammates rallied without
him and extended the lead
to double digits.
Jonathan Williams hit a
three-pointer to start the
second half for Holmes

See CHAMPS, Page 8A


PREP BASIKETBALL




First time for




everything


SCOTTWHEELER/THE LEDGE
Holmes County players celebrate after beating West Gadsden in the 1A state final during th
2013 FHSAA Boys Basketball Finals at The Lakeland Center in Lakeland, FL on Wednesda)
February 27,2013. Holmes County defeated West Gadsden 59-40.

Walker lifts Blue Devils to 1A state championship


_N


i


oI~
b~v







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Golf


McIlroy, Woods start their road to the Masters


The Associated Press

PALM BEACH GAR-
DENS, Fla. This is not
the rivalry anyone had in
mind when Tiger Woods
and Rory McIlroy began
the year.
They made their debut
in Abu Dhabi last month
and both missed the cut.
The next time they played
in the same tournament
-was last week in the Match


Play Championship, and
both were eliminated in
the first round.
The difference is that
Woods returned to Tor-
rey Pines the week after
missing the cut. He left
little reason for anyone to
doubt his game when he
built a lead that reached
eight shots until the day
dragged on and he won
by four for his 75th career
win on the PGA Tour.


Mcllroy knew starting
the year there would at-
tention on his change
from Titleist to Nike, and
it only intensified with
two bad results.
But the start.of the Flor-
ida swing is no time to
panic, and McIlroy sure
didn't sound worried at
the Honda Classic.
"It's fine," he said. "I
knew coming into (the
year), it was going to be a


bit of a process and I knew
there was going to be
comments if it didn't hap-
pen for me right away,"
McIlroy said. "I'm only
two tournaments into
the season. I've still 20 to
go. So it's not like I'm in
any rush. It's not like I'm
pushing for answers. Ev-
erything is there. It's just
a matter of putting it all
together."
McIlroy put it together


much sooner a year ago.
He was runner-up in
Abu Dhabi, tied for fifth in
Dubai, lost in the final of
the Match Play Champi-
onship and then won the
Honda Classic, making
one clutch par save after
another to hold off a late
rally by Woods. McIlroy
went to No. 1 by winning
at PGA National, and he
has been atop the world
ranking since winning the


PGA Championship.
How much longer he
stays there depends on
his game and that of
Woods, who is No. 2 and
making up ground.
They are the featured
players as the Florida
swing gets under way
Thursday in the Honda
Classic, a tournament
that has been rejuvenated
in recent years with a cou-
ple of significant moves.


Baseball
From Page 7A

with two hits on the day,
along with Nyman, Bert
Givens, and Christian Cor-
rea, while Gibson was 1-
for-4 with a grand slam,
two walks, three runs, and
four RBI.
Givens also homered for
Chipola, hitting a two-run
shot in the second inning.
Shane Crouse pitched a
scoreless top of'the 10"' to
get the win for the Indians,


Indians
From Page 7A

preparing them well
enough, or maybe we got a
little worn down from play-
ing short-handed all year."
The Lady Indians have
had a short bench all sea-
son, rotating only six or
seven players all season,
with keyplayers like Rayven
Brooks, Kristine Brance,
and Lashonda Littleton be-
ing asked to play nearly 40
minutes per game much of
the year.
Franklin said that the
extended minutes does
have a cumulative effect
on a team that he has to be


giving up a hit arid a walk
and striking out three.
After the game, Chipola
coach.Jeff Johnson said he
was happy to get the win
but a bit frustrated that
late-game heroics were
needed after getting such a
big early lead.
"We had a lead and just
walked some guys, and
they got some hits, and we
kicked a ball or two," he
said. "You look up and it's a
tie game, and then they're
ahead. Thank goodness
our guys kept their com-


mindful of.
"When you've got seven
kids and they're all log-
ging about 35 minutes per
game,.you get a lot of aches
and bumps and bruises
and it's tough on them, es-
pecially playing in a league
like ours," he said. "If we
were playing in some other
leagues, it may be different,
but we're playing in a. Big
East of SEC type of league
in terms of wear and tear,
so it's pretty tough.
"I think we fell off a little
bit in our practice habits
and weren't as sharp as we
needed to be. But the play-
ers came back Sunday and
responded well and I wvas
pleased with that. I think


posure and got it back."
Chipola scored five runs
in the first inning and two
more in the second, but
Wallace State came back
with three in the top of the
second.
The Indians led 8-3
through five innings, but
Wallace State stormed
back with a five-run sixth
to tie the game when Floyd
was issued a bases loaded
walk to score Alex Gay.
In the 10"', Gibson got
a lead-off walk Wallace
State pitcher Trevor How-


this group with some time
off will respond well. These
off days will be really good
for us."
The coach said that when
his team does return to
practice there will be an
emphasis on getting back
to focusing on fundamen-
tals at both ends of the
court before eventually
turning their attention to
Chipola's opening round
opponent in the state tour-
nament Florida State Col-
lege of Jacksonville.
The teams face off
Wednesday at Chipola in
a rematch of the Nov. 30
game that FSCJ won 76-
66 to deal the Lady Indi-
ans their first loss of the


ard, and then advanced to
second with one out on an
errant pickoff attempt by
Howard,
Gibson then stole third
base and came home to
score when Rooks took a
1-1 pitch to right field to
end it.
Howard took the loss for
Wallace State for an inning
and 1/3 of relief.
Jake Brown led Wallace
State with four hits and
two runs, while Floyd was
2-for-4 with two walks and
two RBI.


season.
Chipola was without
Littleton in that game,
though, and Franklin said
that his team will go into
the game confident that it
will come out with a win.
"(FSCJ) is a good basket-
ball teari and very capable,
but I just feel like our kids
will be ready to match
anybody's talent," he said.
"There's no doubt in my
mind with these kids and
how resilient they are and
how much character they
have. I know they'll come
in Wednesday ready to
fight. Every shot is not go-
ing to go in, but they're go-
ing to compete. I do know
that."


Champs

From Page 7A

County and Clayton Keen
added another triple with
1:50 left in the quarter to
make it a 10-point lead.
A pair of free throws by
Jacky Miles gave the Blue
Devils their largest lead
to that point at 38-25 with
1:28 left in the period,
and Holmes County led
38-27 going into the final
quarter.
A three by Kurston Hin-
son briefly brought the
Panthers back to within
single digits at 38-30, but
Walker answered with
a three-point play and
Miles added a bucket of
his own to push the lead
back to 13 with 4:43 to
play.
Two more buckets by
Walker made it 51-36
with 2:30 remaining, and
the All American put the
exclamation point on the
win in the final minute by
catching a lob from Miles
from just over half-court
and slamming it down
with two hands to make
it 58-40.
Walker had 13 points
in the fourth quarter,
matching the Panthers'
output for the period as
a team.
Miles scored all nine of
his points in the second
half, with Keen also scor-
ing all seven of his points


after the break.
Williams contributed
seven points as well, and
Russ scored six.
The Blue Devils shot
50 percent from the field
as a team (17-of-34) and
knocked in 22-of-31 free
throws.
The numbers weren't
nearly as pretty for the
Panthers, who' struggled
mightily on offense after
cruising to 76 points on
50 percent shooting in
their 25-point semifinal
win over Union County
on Tuesday.
OnWednesday, the Pan-
thers made just 31.8 per-
cent from the field (14-of-
44) and only 4-of-18 from
the three-point line.
Senior shooting guard
Brandon Shingles, who
scored 24 points on 9-of-
18 shooting and 6-of-14
from three against Union
County, was held to two
points and missed all
eight shots he attempted,
including six from long
distance.
Brown led the Panthers
with 25 points on Tues-
day but was limited to
eight points Wednesday
on 4-of-9.
Fitzgerald topped West
Gadsden with 14 points
but didn't score in the
second half.
Hinson added nine
points for the Jaguars.
West Gadsden's season
ends with a record 'of
25-9.


MARKl SINNLRt/H Mi -LURIUAN
The Hope School Falcons beat the Leon County Godby Cougars 40-27 on Feb. 23 to bring home their fourth state
championship.


Hope
From Page 7A
Watford (silver), Mikal
Watson (silver), Matthew
Williams (bronze), JD
Richards (4h"), and Andrew
Bonifay (5th).
Members of the gold
medal basketball team
are: JalisaWilson, Bertram
Williams, Chad Griffin,


Billy Lollie, JJ Barkley, Trey
Stuart, Jordan Clemmons,
Alex Lockhart, and Jamal
McGriff.
Coaches for the basket-
ball team are: Head Coach
Don Holland and Assis-
tant Coach Jimmy Martin.
Chaperones and Skills
team coaches were: Jean
Melvin, Cindy Blackmon,
and Dr. Millicent Brax-
ton, along with honor-
ary coach Mrs. Macaluso


(Principal).
Cheerleader sponsors
are: Karen Parrish, Juna
Sims, and Kayla Todd.
Several parents, grand-
parents, siblings, and
friends also made the
trip to support all of the
Falcons.
"I am very proud of our
kids," coach Holland said.
"They played in a higher
division and stepped up
to the challenge. They


played hard and showed
their Hope School pride
and they brought home
the gold. I want to thank
all Hope School students,
faculty, and staff for their
support. We couldn't do
all of this without their
support."
A celebration is being
held on Friday at 10 a.m.
in the Hope School caf-
eteria. Everyone is invited
to attend.


EVROLET BUICK CADILLAC MC NISSA
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18A THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013


SPORTS







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPOrTS


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013 9AF


NFL


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
San Francisco 49ers quarterback Alex Smith (11) passes
against the Seattle Seahawks during the second quarter of a
game on Oct. 18,2012 in San Francisco.



49ers to send



Smith to KC


The Associated Press

.SAN FRANCISCO Alex
Smith quietly stayed be-
hind the scenes after losing
his job and watched from
the sideline as San Fran-
cisco returned to the Super
Bowl for the first time in 18
years. Yet the No. 1 overall
draft pick from 2005 did
make one thing known:
The veteran quarterback
still considers himself a
starter.
And he hoped to get that
chance again. Now, he ap-
pears to have it.
The Kansas City Chiefs
have agreed to acquire
Smith from the 49ers in
the first major acquisition
since Andy Reid took over
as the team's new coach in
earlyJanuary, a person with
knowledge of the trade told
The Associated Press on
Wednesday.
The person spoke on
condition of anonymity
because the deal cannot
become official until March
12, when the NFL's new
business year begins. An-
other person familiar with
the swap said the 49ers will
get a second-round pick in
April's draft, No. 34 overall,
and a conditional pick in
the 2014 draft.
After spending his first
eight up-and-down years
with the 49ers, Smith will
get a new start. The Chiefs
will get-the proven play-
caller they hope can help
turn things around under
a new coach much the way
Smith did under Jim Har-
baugh in San Francisco.
"You never know' when
your opportunity's going
to come," Smith said late
in the season. "The good
ones are ready when they
do come."
Moving Smith was hardly
unexpected. He realized
it once Colin Kaepernick
emerged as a capable
starter over the season's fi-
nal two months, and Smith
all but said goodbye with
his first pro team when he
played briefly in the regu-
lar-season finale against
Arizona to cheers of "Let's
Go, Alex!" and "Alex! Alex!"
from the Candlestick Park
crowd.
With Smith now headed
for Kansas City, Matt Cassel
is likely headed out of town.
And Reid will enter his first
draft as Chiefs coach in
April no longer needing to
search for a quarterback.
The Chiefs' problems at
quarterback are the single
biggest reason they went 2-


14 last season and secured
the No. 1 pick in the draft
for the first time in fran-
chise history.
Even memorable names
such as Steve Bono, Elvis
Grbac, Damon Huard, Ty-
ler Thigpen and Tyler Palko
haven't fared well with this
franchise. And then there's
Cassel.
He was acquired by re-
cently fired general man-
ager Scott Pioli, and has
two years left on a $63 mil-
lion, six-year deal. He will
likely be cut once Smith is
acquired.
Cassel was benched last
season in favor of Brady
Quinn, who also is a free
agent after going 1-7 as the
starter.
If Smith can bring the
steady form that defined
his last two years, the
Chiefs might be able to
establish a much-needed
consistency under center.
They also found them-
selves a team-first player
who led the 49ers through
workouts during the 2011
lockout.
Under the three-year
contract he signed last
March, Smith is guaran-
teed $1 million from the
49ers, and that would have
become $8.5 million guar-
anteed his 2013 salary
- if he was still on their
roster April 1.
Smith thrived under 49ers
coach and former NFL
quarterback Harbaugh in
one-plus season as the
starter. Then, just like that,
it all changed after he sus-
tained a concussion.
LastweekattheNFLcom-
bine, Harbaugh praised
Smith and reiterated just
how strong San Francisco
was with Colin Kaepernick
as the starter and someone
with Smith's credentials at.
backup.
Yet everyone knew it
was.likely the 49ers would
do their best to improve
Smith's situation consider-
ing all he did for the fran-
chise for nearly the past
decade.
"Alex is really playing
the best football of his ca-
reer the last two years,"
Harbaugh said. "We think
we got the best quarter-
back situation in the Na-'
tional Football' League,
feel strongly about that.
Again, that'll be a process
that plays out. Alex Smith
continuing to be a 49er or
if a trade occurs in the next
weeks or months. Those
are the two possibilities,
most likely possibilities."


Prosecutor drops drug



case against Bears' Webb


The Associated Press

MOUND CITY, Ill. -A
prosecutor said Wednes-
day he will not pursue
marijuana possession
charges against Chicago
Bears offensive lineman
J'Marcus Webb, who was
charged after a traffic stop
in southern Illinois over
the weekend.
Pulaski County State's
Attorney Grayson Gile
said the pot charges
related to Webb's arrest
Sunday night have been
dropped, the (Carbon-
dale) Southern Illinoisan
(http://bit.ly/WrZ97g)
reported. Gile told the
newspaper the case lends
itself to a "fair and equi-
table" resolution.
Authorities said a depu-
ty stopped the 24-year-old
Webb for speeding on
Interstate 57 in Pulaski
County, in far southern
Illinois along the Ohio
River. Webb was freed
Monday on bond.
Sheriff Randy Kern
and Gile did not return
repeated telephone mes-
sages left Wednesday by
The Associated Press.
Online court records
show the alleged traffic-
related offenses but not
the drug-related charges
or whether Webb has an
attorney. The county's cir-
cuit clerk's office declined
to provide details when
reached by phone.
Bears spokesman Mike
Corbo said the franchise


was aware of the matter
and was seeking specifics
about it. NFL spokesman
Greg Aiello said the league
would look into it.
A seventh-round draft
pick out of West Texas
A&M in 2010, the 6-foot-
7,330-pound Webb has
started at left tackle each
of the past two seasons
after playing right tackle
as a rookie.
He's entering the final
year of his rookie con-
tract, and the Bears have-
a new head coach in Marc
Trestman, whose main
task is to get the most out
of quarterback Jay Cutler.
A big part of that is fixing
the offensive line, which
has ranked among the
league's worst in recent
seasons and has offered
little protection to Cutler.
The line could be in for
some changes, through
free agency, the draft or
trades.
Webb does not have a
listed home telephone
number.

Jaguars release OT
Whimper, QB Wilson,
DB King
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
- The Jacksonville Jag-
uars have released offen-
sive tackle Guy Whimper,
quarterback John Parker
Wilson and defensive
back Brandon King.
Whimper started 22
games over the last three
seasons for the Jaguars,


including 15 in 2011 and
six last season. Most of his
work came at right tackle,
where he was supplanted
in the lineup last season
by Cam Bradfield last
year.
Wilson spent most of
last season on Jackson-
ville's practice squad. He
was active for one game,
Oct. 28 at Green Bay, but
did not play. The former
Alabama starter has not
played in a regular-season
game in his three seasons.
King spent the final
seven weeks of last season
on Jacksonville's practice
squad.

Giants, tackle Will
Beatty agree to
5-year deal
EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J.- The New York
Giants have agreed to a
five-year deal with left
tackle Will Beatty, who
could have become a free
agent.
The deal gives the Gi-
ants some continuity on
the offensive line. Beatty
is entering his fifth season
with the Giants. He played
in all 16 games last season
after missing much of
training camp with a sore
back.
Beatty was a second-
round pick in 2009 from
Connecticut. He has
played in 50 games with
the Giants. He's made four
starts at left tackle, four at
right tackle and one as an


extra tight end.
He missed the Giants'
Super Bowl championship
during the 2011 season,
when he had a detached
retina that required sur-
gery and sideliAed him for
the last part of the regular
season and the playoffs.

Ex-NFL, WVU
QB White
on comeback trail
MORGANTOWN, W.Va.
- Former Miami Dol-
phins and West Virginia
quarterback Pat White
wants to return to the
NFL.
White's father, Bo, said
Wednesday his son is
going to work out as part
of West Virginia's pro day
in Morgantown on March
14.
Bo White says Pat has
been in San Diego the
past few weeks working
with personal quarter-
backs coach George Whit-
field, whose clients have
included NFL quarter-
backs Ben Roethlisberger,
Cam Newton and Andrew -
Luck.
The Dolphins selected
White in the second
round of the NFL draft
in 2009. He played in' 13
games before being re-
leased in September 2010.
,The mobile White went
34-8 as a starter at West
Virginia, becoming the
first quarterback to start
four bowl victories in col-
lege football history.


Olympics


Pistorius lawyers name substance found


The Associated Press

JOHANNESBURG -
The substance found in
Oscar Pistorius' bedroom
after the shooting death
of his girlfriend was iden-
tified by his representa-
tives Wednesday as Testis
compositum an herbal
remedy they said is used
for "muscle recovery."
A product by that name
also is sold as a sexual
enhancer.
Testis compositum is
marketed by some on-
line retailers in both oral
and injectable forms as a
testosterone booster and
sexual performance aid
that contains the testicles,
heart and embryo of pigs,
among other ingredients.
Some online retailers also
say it can be used to treat
fatigue.
At the Paralympian's
bail hearing last week in
the shooting death of Re-
eva Steenkamp, police
said they found needles
in Pistorius' bedroom
along with the substance,
which a detective initially
named in court as testos-
terone. Prosecutors later
withdrew that statement
identifying the substance
and said it had been sent
for lab tests and couldn't
be named until those tests
were completed.
Pistorius spokeswoman


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Olympic athlete, Oscar Pistorius, in court in Pretoria, South
Africa, for his bail hearing on Feb. 22 charged with the
shooting death of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp.


Lunice Johnston said in
an email to The Associat-
ed Press that the athlete's
lawyers had confirmed
that the substance is Testis
compositum.
In the email, Johnston
wrote that the product
was being used "in aid of
muscle recovery." She did
not say whether the sub-
stance was the same as
the product that is sold as
a sex enhancer.
In court, Pistorius de-
fense lawyer Barry Roux
said the substance was
not banned by sports
authorities.
The World Anti-Doping
Agency said its science
department had already
been made aware of the
substance and that it
wasn't banned.


"It would appear to be a
homeopathic treatment,
and these treatments are
not prohibited by the list,"
WADA said in a statement
to the AP
Arne Ljungqvist, chair-
man of the International
Olympic Committee's
medical commission, told
the AP he had not heard
of the product but that it
sounded like "a real cock-
tail, all. pointing in the
same direction, namely
having something to do
with testosterone."
"This sounds to me like
something that needs to be
analyzed in order to make
sure what it is," Ljungqvist
said in a phone interview.
"You cannot ban some-
thing simply on claims
and names. It needs to


be looked into. Even say-
ing that it is testosterone
boosting, it could contain
some precursors. It needs
to have some analysis."
Pieter Van Der Merwe,
director of South Africa's
Doping Control Labora-
tory in Bloemfontein,
declined to comment on
whether a sample from
Pistorius had been sent to
that laboratory for testing.
Pistorius was charged
with premeditated mur-
der in the Valentine's Day
shooting death of Steen-
kamp. He says he shot her
by accident after mistak-
ing her for an intruder in
his home. Prosecutors
allege he intended to kill
her.


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?'








110A THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
OU PROB BL o W YOU'RE. RECALLL- YOU = EAN YOU'RE
WPN\T tY AICE, RIGT. GO6NG TO ESE UPON US?


LATELY.


I'VE HAD BIRD BUILD
NESTS ON MY HOUSE
S I) BEFORE, BUT THI 19
'RlPDIULU0 06








OF COURSE NOT! I AEAT
OU WERE R\GIT A OOUT 'E.
NOT WANT\N& 'OUR ,
A c\t'CEA!


OUCH. MAYBE SHE
S SHOULD BE
POW.
NO, I'VE GOT
ANOTHER
NAME FOR
HER


ANP TH~ NEXT THING
WNlJ, MY It
SMART PHONfE 0
SHAP MY 1
.POVP6 OF h
ATTORN Y! I

.4,. 2,e; g


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
IM R16HT -- e
HER, WIZER .'. *-
\ (WHAT DO YOU
S 7WANT? L.
ALLEY -
8 OOP" i


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK
I oa LA I I IwA l A LA :i F 1 r.-k i T r L i ,OF tMT 4 &
f it -Ak'JE ,_.-* AJI rf7)$ Ih T T U pP (ARS Tw j p LtaTF N j 1.FT
S FlESH AujPSC'ME P 1t 4 If4 ".T- Hmti41T"
wu ^ TTW &WeEsm n .
4rE L STkxitC a.746 s IfltXo a


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


www.CoComics.com kitncarlyle@comcast.net















2 2-cl
-- -
a-`-?-








2013 UFS, Inc.
Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS


S 2-28 0 LnughingSlock Intornallonal InDc. Os by unovoe l UCIck Ior UFS, 2013
"Rapid pulse, sweating, shallow breathing ...
According to the computer, you've
got gallstones."


ACROSS 41 Yoko -
1 Intuitions 42 "Scream"
6 Predicaments director
11 Run off to Craven
wed 43 Blue
12 Actress 46 Gazed at
Dern 48 Did a chore
13 Makes 50 Free from
fun of liability
15Small fowl 54Blacktops
16 High 55 Military
standards chaplain
18Sault 56 Frozen rain
Marie 57 Merlin of
19Winner's the NFL
take
21 Cassius DOWN
Clay 1 Zoo doc
22 Farm 2 Percent
structure ending
23 Med. 3 Glamorous
staffers wrap
25 Candle 4 Greek
drippings vowel
28 Fridge 5 Kind of
maker pearl
30Ventilate 6 "Gil -
31"Ben-- -
31 "Ben- 7 John, in
32 Moon Glasgow
buggy 8 Brownie
33 SNL" morsels
network 9 "Heck!"
35 Game 10 identical
37Crumpet 14Whiskery
37Crumpet animal
companion 15Thin
38 Voyage
40 Bohemian pancakes


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Answer to Previous Puzzle


17 "Scarface"
actor
(2 wds.)
19 Singer
Mann
20 Camel kin
22 Pretzel
topping
24Tijuana
Mrs.
25 Question
of location
26 Em,Bee
and Polly
27 Cavity
detector
(hyph.)
29 Formic
acid
producer
34Worry


36 equity
(2 wds.)
39Jab
43 Cosmetic
target
44 Ph.D. exam
45 Intertwined
46 For fear
that
47 World's
fair
49 Before
marriage
51 JAMA
subscribers
52 Before, in
combos
53 Countdown
start


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2-28 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS,


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebnty Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

"NCK JCT'L YSEH LC GKIIHV LC OH

S XCHL; SJCMHGDHTDH WG HTCKRY

GKIIHVWTR ICV STNCTH."
ACYT DWSVJW


Previous Solution: "What parent has it easy? I just never make the difficulty of
it an obstacle. I just do it." Marlee Matlin
TODAYSCLUE: 7slenbe
@2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-28


Horoscope
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Even though any
rewards you reap will be
due more to the efforts
of others than your own,
your prospects look good.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Don't attempt to
take on more than you
can manage, but don't idle
your time away, either.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -When working on
something you deem to
be a labor of love, positive
results are inevitable.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) Seek out activities
devoid of competition that
bring you together with
friends.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-This could be a good
time to invite friends over
to your place for a little
tete-a-tete. These get-to-
gethers will turn out great.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
-You're likely to be
exceptionally competent
with projects that are
more mental than physical
in nature.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Material increases are
indicated if you operate
along traditional lines.
However, the picture could
change if you decide to
take a risk on something.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
23) Although you have
excellent leadership
qualities, they will remain
dormant unless there is
something specific that
you decide to do.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -You could find your-
self involved in something
that affects others more
than you. Rather than get
deeply drawn in, keep a
safe distance.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -You have a
wonderful faculty of be-
ing able to enjoy yourself
regardless of the hand that
is dealt you. You'll capital-
ize on this.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Even though you
might not be aware of it,
you are apt to be the cen-
ter of attention in at least
one gathering.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) One of your best
assets is being able to
make friends with people
from all walks of life. This
wonderful quality will be
in good working order.


AInnie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: I recently obtained proof of
what I had long suspected: My husband
of more than 40 years has been seeing
prostitutes and having affairs for the past
20 years. During this time, he was always
considerate and loving to me. When I
confronted him with the evidence, he
finally confessed. We went to a counselor,
but after a single half-hour session, he
wouldn't go back.
Aside from dealing with the shock and
humiliation of the betrayal, I have two
problems: First, I cannot forgive myself
for not taking a firm stand when I first
suspected his cheating. I put it out of
my mind and continued as before. The
second problem is that I cannot erase
images of his affairs.
My counselor, along with some books
I have read, says to reestablish our close,
loving relationship and let the past go.
So I made the effort, and our marriage
now seems fine. We are happy with each
other, but I still suffer, with the mental


Bridge


Bridge declarers with high-card strength
often put together tricks with finesses. There is
rarely a deal without at least one finesse. How-
ever, occasionally a suit combination comes
along that looks like a finesse, but isn't. Which
applies in this deal?
South is in three no-trump. West leads the
heart queen. What should declarer do? Would
the best line change if South's clubs were Q-J-
9-2? When in no-trump, always start by count-
ing your top tricks, your instant winners. Here
South has seven: four spades, two hearts and
one club. So, if he can rake in three club tricks,
he will make his contract.
Any declarer who thinks that club suit is a
finessing combination will take the first trick
with his heart king and run the club queen.
However, when East turns up with four clubs,
three no-trump must fail.
Instead, South should play a low club to
dummy's ace and return a club toward his
queen-jack. East will probably play low. Then
declarer, after winning with his club queen,
returns to dummy with a spade and leads
another club to gain that third club trick.
Interestingly, that is still the right approach
even with ace-fourth opposite queen-jack-
nine-fourth. Running the queen loses when
East has a singleton king. Lead toward the
hand with the two honors.


images. I fear-that I have demeaned
myself by reestablishing an intimate
relationship with him. I wonder whether
I might regain my self-esteem by telling
him our marriage is over.
I know there are other women in this
situation, but I haven't been able to find
a support group. Please help me.
CALIFORNIA

Dear California: You must decide wheth-
er you are truly ready to leave your mar-
riage. Forty years is a long time. But your
husband's track record doesn't inspire
confidence in his future fidelity, and his
unwillingness to commit to counsel-
ing indicates that he wants things to be
exactly as they were before. See your doc-
tor and get checked for sexually trans-
mitted diseases, and then find another
counselor. The one you are seeing is not
helping you. You can find online support
by typing "infidelity support group" into
your search engine.


ENTERTAINMENT


North
SQ 109
EA53
* J74
4A653
East


4652 4843
QJ10 9 8 7 6 4
*A 85 3 K 109
SK8 K 10 9 4
South
4 AKJ7
SK2
Q62
4QJ72

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1NT Pass 3 NT All pass


Opening lead: V Q


02-28-13









www.JCFLORIDAN.comi


CLASSIFIED


F1
Jaickson County Floridan lThursday, IFebruary 28, 2013- 11 A


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED



MARKETPLACE


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publloation Policy EITror and Omissions' Advilrtieur s lloulld chock their ad the first day. This publlcalion shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for' a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of tile ad wherein th error occurred. The advertiser agrees that tha publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by tlt portion of the advelltisemen In which the error occurred. whether such error Is due to noglgonce of tile publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-Insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not garh(tood position. All advertising Is subject to approval, Right is reserved to edit. reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


40ANNIRC5IOUNCMENTS111 GNI IIIA


Garden of Memory Cemetery Chapel of
Memories, companion Mausoleum, crypt
865-66 w/ two O/C & two plaques I have the
quit deed Asking $2385. for property. Contact
Mark E. Holton major U.S. Army retired
pedi.care@hotmall.com for more information.
Two Side-by-Side Cemetery Plots C3 and C4
@ Garden of Memory. Plots in Garden Cross
Section. Asking $1300. Each Contact:
Alex Leath 205-972-1237 or leath@bellsouth.net

ESTATE SALE: Thurs, Fri & Sat 8-3
4271 Lafayette St. Antiques, furniture,
glassware, primitives, tools, etc.
Hwy 276 to Kynesville Rd. 2293 Bethlehem Rd.
Fri. 1st 8-5 and Sat. 8-5 & Sun. 12-5
Much Fabric, quilt top kits, ladies L & XL
clothes, console sewing machine, electric heat-
er, books & quilting books, outside wood furni-
ture O-sz air mattress, ashtray collection ,
Mission Fund Rasing Sale: River Gate
Plaza Fri 1st & Sat. 2nd. 8-? H/H, toys, clothes,
baby items, small furn & bake sale.


Yard Sale 3284 Caverns Rd
(Corner of Berkshire)
Sat. March 2nd (8am-12pm)
Some furniture!

$) FINANCIALL


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
(14) Town Homes for Sale
1 block off circle,
great income & fully occupied.
Owner Finance
with good down payment
4 386-312-6363 4


Janitorial Business for sale
Equipment, training and 60K
annual gross $19,500
1-888-273-5264


Restaurant For Sale with Lounge and Oyster
Bar. Seats approx 200. Currently doing Good
Business." Owner looking to retire. Financing
available with down payment $250,000.
Price NEG! Call 334-684-1700 between 8am-
2pm. Home 850-956-2709 from 3pm-7pm

1) MERCHANDISE


SCoin Collections Wanted!! Paying Top
Dollar $$$$ Call Mathew 985-516-0379


Battery charger 2/40/200 $100. 850-482-2636
Floor mats: 4 heavy duty $50. 850-272-7424
Free Firewood: cut and haul $0. 850-762-3824
Howard Coat of Arms. $25. 850-272-7424
Pastry case: 17% x 15% x 11 $75. 850-272-7424


** GUN SHOW a
March 2nd & 3rd
National Peanut Festival Building *
Hwy 231 S. Dothan, Alabama
Over 275 Tables *
Sat. 9-5 Sun. 10-4
Call 334-279-9895


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Grand Piano Steinway LR black
M series, original owner, mint
cond. $20,000 334-794-9955



New in box (NBF)
n Browning A-Bolt, 30-06Call
334-405-3879, $650


PETS & ANIMALS


reel'


Bloodhound Pups
onTaking deposits for regis-
tered /registerable pups.
appLitter includes black/tans
&n reds (5 males/5 female).
S Both parents are regis-
Std ered and on site. Born on
January 23, 2013. Will be ready for new homes
on March 6, 2013. $650. For more info. or to set
appointment for viewing call 334-726-2561.



Golden Retriever Puppies for sale.
Pups are 13 weeks old. These are pick of the
litter puppies that we have now decided to sell.
Great dispositions. $400. For more information
and pictures call 334-482-3810 or 334-562-9497.
Located near the Troy area.
Lab pups: Cute & Cuddly! Yellow & Chocolate.
No papers, but parents on premises. 6 weeks
old. 488-5000 or 488-3979.
Miniature Australian
Shepherd Puppies
Beautifully marked red
merles, blue merle,
black tri and red tri.
Males and Female. $400. $600. NSDR &
ASDR. Call or text for more information.
334-550-9895
A am Reg. Toy/Mini Chocolate, Parti
colors & solids Schnauzers, Male
& Female, S/W, $500.-$600.
www.lovemyschnauzers.com
334-889-9024


Valentines Babies are Ready! LC Chihuahua
Shih-Tzu mixes, taking dep. on Morkies
334-718-4886 plynn@sw.rr.com


Recliner/rocker: Tan suede. $75. 850-272-7424
Sofa: Leather, off-white 7', $100. 850-482-7507
TV: 50" Sanyo flat screen $500. 850-557-1454
Window: 2 transom 14x73 $45 ea. 850-482-2636
Window: dbl pane,29%x304 $100. 850-482-2636


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


AWI


FARMERS MARKET


Demo Salvage Concrete
for Sale & Delivery, great for erosion
control behind dams & gullies
334-347-7466 or 334-726-2561



Frozen Green
Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
850-573-6594 4128 Hwy 231


-0 Bahia seed for-sale --
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L................................
IT'S AS EASY
AS 1 2 3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS

HAY& GAI


Sheltered Coastal Bermuda Hay
Baled with JD568 in Columbia, AL $55
Call 334-790-4439 or 334-618-1962


Cow-Calf pairs for Sale $1600. each
4 334-886-9003 / 334-726-4661


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Cstom Thinning
ill Pea River Timber
334-389-2003


Wanted to Rent: Farm Land or Pasture in Ma-
rianna or West of Marianna; Call 850-718-1859

0l0) EMPLOYMENT


Agricultural Assistant
Must have valid driver's license & ability
to pass pesticide applicator's licensure
test. Part of the Farm team will operate
tractors for planting, tillage, mowing;
supervise inmates; other duties.
Applications received at the North Florida
Research Center, 3925 Hwy. 71,
Marianna, FL (located 1 mile south of
Greenwood on Hwy 71).

EDUCATION
SO & INSTRUCTION


Classes Forming Now
for Medical Assisting,
FOR T S Electrical Trades and
M ore! '
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu


Level: 2 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Wednesday's puzzle

8 -1 5 946 327
4 6 927 31 5 8
372851964

1 8 6 3 2 5 4 7 9
294768513
7532 4 19 6 8 2


2/28/13


.{-J REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


CHIPOLA APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND 1 BEDROOM
APTS. SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE ON
ALL UNITS. UNITS SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR
HANDICAPPED OR DISABLED. FOR RENTAL
INFORMATION CALL (850) 526-4407
TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY




COTTONDALE VILLAGE APARTMENTS
Now accepting applications for 1, 2, 3 bedroom units.
Rental assistance. No application fee.
We pay water, sewer, and trash service.
4052 Old Cottondale Road,
Marianna, FL 32448.
(850) 526-4062, TDD/TTY 711.
"This institution is an equal
opportunity provider, w.. .
and employer."


2BR/1BA House Hwy 90
Grand Ridge $425. Mo. + $425. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
3/1 4457 Fairfax Rd. Safe neighborhood,
$550/mo + dep. 850-482-8196/209-1301
3/2 hardwood floors, CH&A
2940 Dogwood St close to Riverside school.
$875. mo. 718-6541'
3BR/2BA 4195 Bowers St Marianna.
Quiet neighborhood. $650. Mo. + $650. Dep.
Call for appointment 904-214-6980


3BR 2BA House in Dogwood Hts, W/D, pets
welcome, fenced yard, storage shed. $800 +
dep 850-557-2198 ask for Marcus
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 or austintylerco.com
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
4 850-209-8847 4.
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

L 2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595
2BR 1 BA MH'S i-i Alford, $380 mo. $380. dep.
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
n 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595






Opelika-Auburn News has an
immediate opening for a
Production Director.

The primary role of this position is to
oversee the production operations at
the Opelika/Auburn, Alabama facility
of O&DS. A major requirement of this
position is to grow a profitable
commercial printing and distribution
operation at the Opelika-Auburn News.

This position is also responsible for
promoting and championing safety
as a condition of employment while
ensuring that all safety policies are
followed and all OSHA guidelines are
met.

The successful candidate must be
able to bridge communication between
the production staff and other stake
holders.

This position is responsible for
commercial printing goals, proper
scheduling of all product production
and high quality of each product.
Must have working knowledge of all
production equipment. 10 years
newspaper/commercial management
required. 4 year degree preferred.

Pre-employment drug and background
screening required. EOE/M/F/D/V;

Please apply at
www.worldmediaenterprise.com

,, World Media Enterprises Inc.
it lInf tA GRin P ,* A O f RKSitilf Ii HAHAWAY COMPANY

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12 A Thursday. February 28. 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


"I\^ .RESIDENTIAL
AITo REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


For Rent Greenwood, Marlanna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb. lawn maint.incl.
S 850-593-4700 4

RESIDENTIAL
r REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Eufaula two acres with older model, two bed-
room, one bath single wide trailer With front
deck, a back porch, small garage, and lean to
for boat. Located in the White Oaks area; a
mile from White Oaks park and boat launch
ramp. Great for beginner home, just starting a
family, college student, or just a fishing get
away. $35,000 or best offer. 334-733-6625


U-Lok-lt Warehouses for Sale 30x80 Metal
building. Well and spetic plus other buildings.
1/ mile north of Hwy 90 on Hwy 71.
$75,000. Call 850-482-8333 or 850-573-8894

RECREATION


4-Wheeler: 2011 Polaris Sportsman 800 EFI, 4x4,
91 miles, adult owned $5,500. Call 334-796-8136


ICO9nD9.


Xtreme

Boats

wI


packages From
$4,995
'All Welded
All Aluminum Boats
uw.xtrepmindrstriaescnm


Fifth Wheel: 1994 American Star 36 ft Fifth
Wheel. $8,500 OBO. 334-477-204


Winnebago 1995 33 ft. Vectra CH&A, auto
leveling, Q-bed, new tires & batteries, new frig,
7.5 onan, Lg. awning and more !
$23,000 OBO 334-585-6689.

(a ) TRANSPORTATION


Chevrolet 1967 Camaro SS/RS: restored on
original solid body, vin#124377L123529, custom
built big block 454, cranberry red, new cranber-
ry interior, to many restoration items too
mention. Appraised value $30,000.
Priced at $26,500. See pics and info at
dkestate.wordpress.com. Doug 334-237-1916


r .................................I
$0 Down/lst Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade Anything!
BRING IN YOUR W2 OR LAST PAY STUB!!
RIDE TODAY! Steve Pope 334-803-9550
L................................1
Chevrolet 2004 Impala,
$4999.00 Call 334-714-
2700.



Chevy 2012 Malibu, like new! $200 down, $249
per month. Call Steve 791-8243
Dpodge 2000 Dakota SLT
-Club Cab, V-6, 98,000
miles, clean. $5450, Call
334-790-7959.


Ford 2000 Mustang, New
paint sharp car.
$5999.00. Call 334-714-
2700.


FORD 2007 EXPLORER XLT "IRONMAN -
SILVER, 37,000 MILES. SHOWROOM QUALITY,
NEW CONDITION, CAN BE SEEN AT LEMON
LOT, 166 WESTGATE PARKWAY, DOTHAN, AL
AFTER 2-24-2013. PHONE 334-699-1666
Honda 1992 Accord: 4 door, cold AC, nice car,
champagne, fully loaded. $3395.
Call 334-792-8018
Honda 2000 Accord,
$4999.00 Call
334-714-2700.


Honda 2007 CRV EX, Super Sharp! Must sell,
$200 down, $269 per month. Call Steve 791-
8243.
Honda 2008 Accord EXL:
4 doors, 1 owner, white, 75k
miles, siding moon roof,
power driver seat, 5 Disc
CD changer, leather,
keyless entry, power windows.
$14,000. Call 334-493-7700
Honda 2008 Fit, low miles, under warranty,
must sell! $200 down, $209 per month. Call Ron
Ellis 714-0028.
Honda 2009 Fit Sport Silver, only 16900 miles,
garage kept, like new condition, alloy wheels,
great gas mileage. $13,600. Call 334-446-0681.
.- HONDA 2012 ACCORD
COUPE V6 WITH AUTO-
MATIC TRANSMISSION.
SUNROOF, NAVIGATION,
HEATED LEATHER SEATS FULLY LOADED. NO
ACCIDENTS NOR HAS IT BEEN SMOKED IN.
HAVE CARFAX TO SHOW AS WELL. APPROX.
6,000 MILES AND IM ASKING $27,000. CAR LIST-
ED $32,800, NEW. CALL 334-268-3900.
Hyundai 2009 Elantra, sunroof, loaded Must
Sell! $200 down, $199 per month. Call Ron Ellis
714-0028.
Mazda 2010 6 S Touring
21,000 miles. 4 cyl.
Silver with gray leather
interior. One owner,
non-smoker, garage kept.
Beautiful inside and out. $14,900. 334-806-6004.
M Mercury 1999 Grand Mar-
quis GS, loaded, leather,
new tires, 106,000-miles,
S like new, $4500. Call 334-
790-7959.


Nissan 2004 Altima, Low
Miles, NADA Retail:
$8950.00, $7999.00. Call
334-714-2700.


Toyota 2000 Camry,
Clean vehicle, $4999.00.
Call 334-714-2700.


Toyota 2010 Yarif 4 dr. Sedan A/C,
stero system, 82K miles, good on gas $10,500.
850-592-2937
Toyota 2011 Camry SE, 4dr., auto, pwr pkg.,
white, 10,000 miles odm, show room condition
with extended warranty. $18,500. 850-569-2215,
850-718-5461 or 850-718-7105.


r 1994 FXSTC Softail Custom
S Harley Davidson
S Excellent condition and
kept in the garage. Must
see to appreciate. Price is
Sfixied. Mileage 23,000. Call
day time 334-828-1536 and night 334-791-9855
./l 2010 Ningbo Dongfang
250cc motorcycle. Rode
only 6 limes. Never tag-
Sge d. Asking $250. Please
c all 334.393-7034 after
) 5pm and leave message.


S2011 Harley Davidson
A Super Glide Custom
cooIl blue pearl & vivid

warranty. Driving lights,
passenger back rest, luggage rack, quick
release windshield, anit-theft system with
/pager, cruise pegs, oil pressure gauge,
dust cover included
*1 $12,900 334-598-0061 or 334-432-4372
Absolutely Pristine-
You will not be disappointed *
Harley-Davidson 2003 Fat Boy black 100th An-
niversary,'FLSTFI, 12,800 miles, $5,300 Serious
buyers!KELLER9944@GMAIL.COM, 334-232-3388
Suzuki 1988 650CC Savage/Boulevard:
completely rebuilt engine, bored 2000th, new
brakes, clutch and more .24 inch seat height,
weigth 3501bs. Very Nice. $2900. 850-722-8962.


GMC 2001 Yukon SLT: Fully loaded, white and
silver, 201k miles, runs great $6,000. Call 334-
796-8136
Lexus 2002 RX300 white & silver with tan int.
sunroof, tinted windows, 6 disc cd changer,
new tires, exc. cond. 135K mi.







so^Vso. Chevrolet 1988 Silverado .
Bluincoln 206 Navigator,
350Loaded with all options,
asking $14,000.
Call 334-618-269579





hevrolet 1998 Sverad Ext Cab: green, 3rado.
Blue & white, 2 door,
350 V8. Runs good.

Call 334-794-6579

Chevrolet 1998 Silverado Ext Cab: green, 3
doors, 350 V8, cold AC and runs great. $5,200.
NEG. Call 334-718-9617
Dodge 1998 Dakota Ext
Cab: power steering, cold
AC, 160k.miles, blue,
$2.500. OBO.
SCall 334-798-1768 or 334-
691-7111

Dodge 2011 Ram 2500 crew cab, 4x4 LWB,
Black & Pearl, 6.7 liter Cummins Diesel,
navigation, leather, back up camera, sirius
radio, remote start, all the extras 18K miles
$43,500. 334-793-6281.
Ford 2004 Super Duty 4dr. 4 wheel drive, F-550
with hydraulic, 2 bale bed, exc. cond. 160K
miles $22,500. 334-347-7466 or 334-797-7289.


KMC 4-Row Planters, good cond. with 3 sets of
seed plates, $1600.2-Row Cultivator w/ vine
cutters $375. Massy Ferguson 2-Row bottom
plow $350. 334-791-4742



1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
'4 ier' 24 To7w .w
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624



3 ,jt CALL FOR TOP PRICE

FOR JUNK VEHICLES

I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING ,4 334-792-8664


SGot a Clunker
SWe'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325 &t Complete Cars
SCALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285


S* We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not !
S334-7949576 or 34417914714


r WE PAY CaH

FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-493-6226


(~)


LEGALS


I LGA NOICSI


LF160053"
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 32-2010-CA-00581

WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LILLIE F. ADDINGTON, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated Novem-
ber 26, 2012 and entered in Case NO. 32-2010-
CA-00581 of the Circuit Court of the FOUR-
TEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for JACKSON
County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA, is the Plaintiff and LILLIE F. ADDINGTON;
EARL FORD; TENANT #1 N/K/A MICHAEL
GRIMSLEY are the Defendants, The Clerk of the
Court will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash at NORTH DOOR JACKSON COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, MARIANNA, FLORIDA at
11:00AM, on the 4th day of April, 2013, the fol-
lowing described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment:
PARCEL 4: COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING CON-
CRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF'SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 5
NORTH, RANGE 9 WEST OF JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 52
MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF
SOUTHWEST 1/4, 393.89 FEET AND CALL THIS
THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 28 SECONDS
WEST, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, 155.96 FEET
TO AN EXISTING CONCRETE MONUMENT,
THENCE DEPARTING SAID SOUTH LINE ON A
BEARING OF NORTH 26 DEGREES 47 MINUTES
48 SECONDS WEST, 570.81 FEET, THENCE
NORTH 41 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 52 SECONDS
EAST, 211.17 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES
28 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST, 80.0 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 23
SECONDS EAST, 334.80 FEET, THENCE NORTH
69 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST,
ALONG THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF A 50 FOOT IN-
GRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT,
399.83 FEET TO A POINT BEING ON THE EAST-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF BELAIRE DRIVE,
THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 52
SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE, 25.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 69 DE-
GREES 58 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, ALONG
THE CENTERLINE OF SAID EASEMENT, 398.06
FEET, THENCE SOUTH 62 DEGREES 01 MINUTE
17 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID CENTERLINE,
60.0 FEET TO THE RADIUS POINT OF A 60.0
FOOT CUL-DE-SAC OF SAID EASEMENT,
THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 42
SECONDS WEST, 60.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01
DEGREE 33 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST, 853.23
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT TO ROAD RIGHT OF WAY ALONG THE
NORTHERLY LINE THEREOF FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS EASEMENT.
TOGETHER WITH A PERPETUAL NONEXCLUSIVE
EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILIT-
IES OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DE-
SCRIBED PROPERTY:

COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST COR-
NER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTH-
WEST 1/4 OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH,
RANGE 9 WEST OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORI-
DA; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 38 MI-
NUTES 14 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST
LINE OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SOUTHWEST
1/4, A DISTANCE OF 1353.04 FEET TO AN EXIST-
ING IRON ROD MARKING THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SOUTHWEST
1/4; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 58 MINUTES
34 SECONDS WEST, 126.16 FEET TO A SET IRON
ROD (PSM NO 6111); THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 78 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 34 SECONDS
WEST, 102.91 FEET TO AN EXISTING CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 78 DE-
GREES 58 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST, 467.21


FEET TO AN EXISTING IRON ROD (PSM NO.
4927) MARKING A POINT ON THE EASTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF BELAIRE DRIVE (A 60
FOOT EXISTING DIRT ROAD); THENCE SOUTH 19
DEGREES 58 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 415.02 FEET
TO A SET IRON ROD (PSM NO. 6111) AND CALL
THIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
SOUTH 69 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 37 SECONDS
EAST, 407.59 FEET TO A SET IRON ROD (PSM
NO. 6111) MARKING A POINT ON A 60 FOOT
CUL-DE-SAC AND CALL THIS THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE EASTERLY, SOUTHERLY AND
WESTERLY ALONG SAID CUL-DE-SAC THROUGH
A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 310 DEGREES 10 MI-
NUTES 15 SECONDS, HAVING A RADIUS OF 60.0
FEET FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 324.76 FEET TO
AN EXISTING IRON ROD (PSM NO. 6111);
THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 37
SECONDS WEST, 399.83 FEET TO AN EXISTING
IRON ROD (PSM NO. 6111) MARKING A POINT
ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF FORESAID
BELAIRE DRIVE; THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 58
MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY, 50.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING.
A/K/A 5841 ELF LANE, GREENWOOD, FL 32443
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on February 20, 2013.
Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Cour
By: /s/Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
Publish in Jackson County Floridian
Invoice To: Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F10046085 WELLSLPS-FHA---Team 1 -
F10046085
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.
ADA Coordinator
P.O. Box 1089
Panama City, Florida 32402
Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717
Hearing Impaired: Dial 711
Email: ADARequest@judl4.flcourts.org


LEGA-LNOTICESB


LF160032

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
DIVISION: PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF FREDDY DARYL
FOWLER a/k/a FRED D. FOWLER, Deceased
FILE NO. :13-PR-29
The administration of the estate of FREDDY
DARYL FOWLER, deceased, whose date of
death was on January 7, 2013, and whose social
security number is XXX-XX-8266, is pending in
the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit Court for JACK-
SON County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is PO Drawer 510, Marianna,
Florida 32, file number 13 CP 29. The names
and addresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other-persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against de-
cedent's estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
February, 24,2013.
Personal Representative:
LINDA H. ELLIS
1266 Fairway
Chipley, Florida 32428
Attorney for Personal Representative:
James J. Goodman, Jr.
Jeff Goodman P.A.
935 Main Street, Chipley, FL 32428
850-638-9722
Florida Bar No. 0071877


Ca 3614'.. to6- .'
Ca l 5^2-361 4 t pl ief


Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Now serving Jackson Co.
FREE ESTIMATES ,* 334-798-0687




"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpcntry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs. Insured





Clay O'Neal's WEOR
Land Clearing, Inc. M POMME
ALTHA, FL BM OY
850-762-902
Cell 850-832-5055 20 Y WtPi


Got Stumps?
CALL
HLSTREE E,ICE





M PHGroomlng by
Appointment Only
lua 5horee & Tammy MartOaano
, ''i ,, ",. ; , ;,'. ...


For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Bonded References Available

850-526-2336


S(850) 573-5509
'This Month's Special
12%20
31 9500
35 Years in Business




B&Bd Profe sional Auto Detailins
Now offering mobile wash inside
and outside, oil change & vacuum
Detailing now for the low price of $50.
(850) 573-5509
Just give is a call al wll cI yo!
All services


NEED TO PLACE AN AD?

It's simple, call one of our friendly

Classified representatives

and they will be glad to assist you.


AUOSFO | ALWNTDUTSlEGANOICE


I









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Obituary
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, F1 32446
850.482.2332


Otis D.
Traynom


Otis "Doc" Traynom, 93,
went to be with the Lord on
Tuesday, February 26,
2013, at his residence. Otis
was a wonderful husband,
father, and grandfather. He
loved his family very much
and delighted with the "lit-
tle ones". He also loved
Chipola College and being
involved as a volunteer
with the sports programs.
He is survived by his wife
of 49 years, Joyce Traynom,
three sons Jimmy Traynom
and wife Stephanie of Gulf
Breeze, Bob Traynom of
Texas, Richard Traynom
and wife Evelyn of Marian-
na, ten grandchildren and
nine great grandchildren.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, two sisters
and his son, Steve Traynom
of Tampa.
Otis served in the U.S. Na-
vy, worked for Chemstrand
/Monsanto in Pensacola,
Shelby County Safety Di-
rector of Memphis, Jackson
County Sherriff Dept. and
volunteer trainer and bus
driver for many years at
Chipola College.
The family wishes to
thank Julie Harris and Dr.
Joe Gay and his entire staff,
Emerald Coast Hospice,
and his very special sitter,
daughter-in-law, Evelyn
Traynom, and Cathy Baxley
and Shirley McKay.
Funeral services will be 2
p.m. Saturday, March 2,
2013 at First United Meth-
odist Church with Rev.
Connie Farnell officiating.
Entombment will follow in
Pinecrest Memorial Gar-
dens with James & Sikes
Funeral Home Maddox
Chapel directing.
The family will receive
friends one hour prior to
services at the church.
In lieu of flowers, memori-
als can be made to the
Chipola College Founda-
tion, First United Method-
ist Church of Marianna, or
Hospice.
.Expressions of sympathy
maybe made online at
vww.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com

Florists

Artistic Designs Unlimited Inc.
www.artisticdesignsunltd.com
850-372-4456


Machines
From Page 1A

per unit. Assistant Supervisor of
Elections Vicki Farris brought
her request to the board Tuesday.
Stephens would have 14 of the
units stationed at precincts, three
would be devoted to early voting
sites, two to counting absentees,
and the other four would be back-
ups in the event of problems with
the other units.
According to Farris, the new
equipment uses more up-to-date
technology than the old. For in-
stance, ballot results are stored
on a jump drive rather than on
old-style memory cards like those
installed in the M100s. The screen
that voters would see on the DS
200 is also much larger than the
one available on the M100, she
pointed out.
Overall, the main problem is that
the old machines are reaching the
end of their useful life span, elec-
tion officials said. They've had to
replace the motherboard in one
unit and batteries and scanner
bars in others. Those failing parts
were discovered in the course of
testing the equipment prior to
various elections. Farris said it's
time to replace them all.
"The M100 has served us well
over a decade; it has counted


Friday
From Page 1A
Beginning his career with DOC
in the '80s as a correctional of-
ficer and a probation and parole
officer, Crews went on to serve
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement, from 1986-2011, in


thousands and thousands of
votes, but it's time to replace,"
Farris said. "We want to be proac-
tive, rather than reactive. We want
to do something about it before
something does go wrong."
The M100's were priced at
$5,500 each, but because they
were mandatory upgrades at the
time, the county only had to pay a
$1,960 share of the total cost.
The upgrade Stephens is now
seeking isn't mandatory al-
though some election officials
predict that the M100s will be
phased out by 2016, so the county
will have to find a way to pay the
$122,580 asking price for the 23
new units if it goes forward with
Stephens' plan. The elections of-
fice does not have a reserve fund
set aside for the equipment.
The equipment vendor that
currently does business with the
county, Election Systems and
Software, had provided the old
units, and has informally offered
the new tabulators for approxi-
mately $5,500 each as well. It is
the sole-source for those particu-
lar models although other com-
panies make similar products.
Farris said some staff members
have seen the new equipment in
operation, touring Marion County
election headquarters while there
for a recent elections workshop.
The elections office is hop-
ing the county will approve the


various capacities: director of the
professionalism program, chief of
bureau standards and director of
Florida's Criminal Justice Execu-
tive Institute/Leadership Center.
At the time of Crews' appoint-
ment to secretary of DOC, Scott
was quoted as saying, "Through-
out Michael's impressive ca-
reer, he has demonstrated an


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
One of the M100's PC format memory cards is seen next to a pen to indicate
its size. The county is discussing the purchase of new voting machines that
use smaller jump drives.


expenditure in time to put them
on line for the 2014 election year
cycle.
"We would like to implement
it in a non-presidential year so
that we have time to train poll


excellent understanding of law
enforcement and a willingness to
serve the citizens of Florida. I am
confident Michael will lead the
Department of Corrections with
integrity, leadership, and with an
understanding of our ultimate
goal to keep Floridians safe."
The Jackson County native is the
son of longtime Jackson County


workers, set up and use it first in
what is usually a less hectic elec-
tion year," Farris said.
To see the difference in the two
machines, visit www.essvote.
com.


Clerk of Courts Daun Crews and
the late Christine Crews. He and
his wife of 26 years, Teri, have two
daughters, Jennie and Kelly.
First Friday is 7-8:45 a.m. tomor-
row at the Jackson County Exten-
sion Center, 2741 Pennsylvania
Ave., in Marianna. For more, call
the chamber at 482-8060 or visit
www.jacksoncounty.com.


As cuts loom, is government shutdown next?


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON With big,
automatic budget cuts about to
kick in, House Republicans are
turning to mapping strategy for
the next showdown just a month
away, when a government shut-
down instead of just a slowdown
will be at stake.
Both topics are sure to come
up at the White House meeting
Friday between President Barack
Obama and top congressional
leaders, including Republican
House Speaker John Boehner.
A breakthrough on replacing or
easing the imminent across-the-
board spending cuts still seems
unlikely at the first face-to-face
discussion between Obama and
Republican leaders this year.
To no one's surprise, even as a
dysfunctional Washington ap-
pears incapable of averting a
crisis over economy-rattling
spending cuts, it may be lurching
toward another over a possible
shutdown.
Republicans are planning for a
vote next week on a bill to fund
the day-to-day operations of the
government through the Sept.


30 end of the 2013 fiscal year
- while keeping in place the new
$85 billion in cuts of 5 percent to
domestic agencies and 8 percent
to the military.
The need to keep the govern-
ment's doors open and lights on
- or else suffer the first govern-
ment shutdown since 1996 re-
quires the GOP-dominated House
and the Democratic-controlled
Senate to agree. Right now they
hardly see eye to eye.
The House GOP plan, unveiled
to the rank and file on Wednes-
day, would award the Pentagon
and the Veterans Administration
with their line-by-line budgets,
for a more-targeted rather than
indiscriminate batch of military
cuts, but would deny domestic
agencies the same treatment.
And that has whipped up oppo-
sition from veteran Democratic
-senators on the Appropriations
Committee. Domestic agencies
would see their budgets frozen
almost exactly as they are, which
would mean no money for new
initiatives such as cybersecu-
rity or for routine increases for
programs such as low-income
housing.


"We're not going to do that,"
said Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa.
"Of course not."
Any agreement needs to pass
.through a gantlet of House tea
party conservatives intent on pre-
serving the across-the-board cuts
and Senate Democrats pressing
for action on domestic initiatives,
even at the risk of creating a foot-
tall catchall spending bill.
There's also this: GOP leaders
have calculated that the automat-
ic cuts arriving on Friday need to
be in place in order for them to be
able to muster support from con-
servatives for the catchall spend-
ing bill to keep the government
running. That's because many
staunch conservatives want to
preserve the cuts even as defense
hawks and others fret about the
harm that might do to the mili-
tary and the economy. If the au-
tomatic cuts are dealt with before
the government-wide funding bill
gets a vote, there could be a con-
servative revolt.
"The overall sequester levels
must hold," said Rep. Tom Mc-
Clintock, R-Calif.
Little to no progress has been
made so far between House and


Senate leaders and the White
House, and given the hard feel-
ings engulfingWashington, there's
no guarantee that this problem
can be solved, even though the
stakes a shutdown of non-es-
sential government programs
after March 27 carry more risk
than the across-the-board cuts
looming on Friday.
The funding plan for the rest of
the fiscal year will be a main topic
at the White House meeting on
Friday, the March 1 deadline day
for averting the across-the-board
cuts.
Obama, speaking to a group of
business executives Wednesday
night, said the cuts would be a
"tumble downward" for the econ-
omy, though he acknowledged it
could takes weeks before many
Americans feel the full impact of
the budget shrinking.
The warring sides in Washing-
ton have spent this week assign-
ing blame rather than seeking a
bipartisan way out. In a glimpse
of the state of debate on Wednes-
day, Republicans and the White
House bickered over whether the
cuts would be under way by the
time Friday's meeting started.


Midwest snowstorm brings deaths, travel problems, power losses


The Associated Press

MILWAUKEE A Mid-
west snowstorm packing
heavy snow and ,strong
winds left six people dead
in Kansas, hundreds of ve-
hicles crashed or stranded
in Wisconsin, and tens of
thousands of utility cus-
tomers without power in
Michigan.
"It's the heaviest snow
we've received all winter
long, as far as the largest
quantity and it's wet," said
Mark Rupnik, a sheriff's
lieutenant in Sheboy-
gan County, Wis., where
residents were hit with 15
inches of wet snow over
two days Tuesday and
Wednesday. "This is our
big storm for the year, I
hope."
The storm hit a wide
swath of the U.S. with
wind gusts of 40 to 50 mph
and wet snow. It started in
Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas
and Missouri on Monday
night and headed through
Colorado, Iowa, northern
Illinois, Wisconsin and
Michigan on Tuesday into
Wednesday, according


PHOTOS BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fog shrouds work crews repairing down power lines Wednesday at 8 mile and Five points, in
Southfield, Mich.


to Bob McMahon, a me-
teorologist with the Na-
tional Weather Seririce in
Wisconsin.
Kansas has been patticu-
larly pummeled with snow
lately, receiving more than
2 feet of snow in some
places over the last week
or so. As of Wednesday
morning, 10,000 Kansas


customers in mostly east- poisoning in Kansas City,
ern counties were still Kan., a woman died in
without power, though southwest Kansas while
company officials expect- shoveling snow, and an-
ed all service to be restored other Kansas City resident
by the end of the day. was killed while walking in.
Kansas Gov. Sam Brown- the snow.
back on Wednesday said At a Macy's in north-
two people died in traffic east Kansas, 3 to 4 feet of
crashes, two siblings died heavy snow on the store's
from carbon monoxide roof caused an evacuation


Brandon Rink, 6, watches as his mother Susan holds a ladder
as his father David pushes the head of their giant snowman
into place Wednesday on Glen Leven Road in Ann Arbor, Mich.


Wednesday morning be-
cause of safety concerns.
More than 50,000 homes
and businesses in Michi-
gan lost electrical service
at one point Wednesday
after a storm knocked
down power lines and tree
branches. About 40,000 re-
mained without power as
of Wednesday afternoon,
with Washtenaw County
hardest hit.
The utilities said crews
would work around the
clock to restore power.


The National Weather
Service said Muskegon,
Mich., was reported to
have 9 inches of snow as
of Wednesday morning.
Authorities said weather
might be a factor in crash-
es that killed motorists
in Sanilac and Monroe
counties.
In Wisconsin, more than
440 stranded vehicles and
crashes were reported in
Milwaukee, Sheboygan,'
Kenosha, Ozaukee and
Washington counties.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Sprint Cup Leaders
Through Feb. 24
Points
1, Jimmie Johnson, 47.2, Dale
Earnhardt Jr., 42. 3, Mark Martin,
41. 4, Brad Keselowski, 41.,5, Ryan
Newman, 40.6, Greg Biffle, 38.
7, Danica Patrick, 37. 8, Michael
McDowell, 35.9, JJ. Yeley, 34. 10,
Clint Bowyer, 34.
11, Ricky Stenbouse Jr., 32.
12, Aric Almlrola, 31.13, Denny
Hamlin, 31.14, Bobby Labonte, 29.
15, David Reutlmann, 28.16, Dave
Blaney, 27.17, Marcos Ambrose,
26.18, Joey Logano, 26.19, Jeff
Gordon, 25. 20, Paul Menard, 24.
Money
1, Jimmie Johnson, $1,565,300.
2, Dale Earnhardt Jr., $1,151,339.
3, Mark Martin, $851,538.4,
Brad Keselowski, $707,855.5,
Matt Kenseth, $595,606.6, Ryan
Newman, $572,771. 7, Greg
BIffle, $562,989.8, Kevin Harvick,
$551,493.9, Kyle Busch, $416,635.
10, Regan Smith, $411,822.11,
Aric Almirola, $406,349.12, Joey
Logano, $400,422.13, Jeff Gordon,
$397,324.14, Martin Truex Jr,
$384,639.15, Kasey Kahne,
$382,843.16, Marcos Ambrose,
$382,577.17, Kurt Busch, $377,759.
18, Carl Edwards, $376,189.19,
Ricky Stenhouse Jr., $373,399.20,
Tony Stewart, $373,229.


Sprint Cup
schedule
x-non-polnts race
Feb. 16 x-The Sprint Unlimited
(Kevin Harvick)
Feb.21 x-Budwelser Duel 1
(Kevin Harvick)
Feb. 21 x-Budweiser Duel 2
(Kyle Busch)
Feb. 24 Daytona 500 (Jimmie
Johnson)
March 3 Subway Fresh Fit 500;
Avondale, Ariz.
March 10 Kobalt Tools.400,
Las Vegas
March 17 Food City 500,
Bristol, Tenn.
March 24 Auto Club 400,
Fontana, Calif.
SApril 7 STP Gas Booster 500,
Ridgeway, Va.
April 13 Texas 500, Fort Worth,
Texas
April 21- STP 400, Kansas City,
Kan.
April 27 Toyota Owners 400,
Richmond, Va.
May5 Aaron's 499, Talladega,
Ala.
May 11 Bojangles' Southern
500, Darlington, S.C.
May 18 x-Sprint Showdown,
Concord, N.C.
May 18 x-NASCAR Sprint All-
Star Race,'Conbord, N.C.
May 26 Coca-Cola 600, Con-
cord, N.C.
June 2 Dover 400, Dover, Del.
June 9 Pocono 400, Long
Pond, Pa.
June 16 Quicken Loans 400,
Brooklyn, Mich.
June 23 Toyota/Save Mart 350,
Sonoma, Calif.
June 29 Quaker State 400,
Sparta, Ky.
July Coke Zero 400 powered
by Coca-Cola, Daytona Beach, Fla.
July 14 New Hampshire 300,
Loudon, N.H.
July 28 Crown Royal Presents
The Your Hero's Name Here 400 at
The Brickyard, Indianapolis
Aug. 4 Pennsylvania 400, Long
Pond, Pa.
Aug. 11.- Cheez-1t 355 atThe
Glen, Watkidns Glen, N.Y.
Aug. 18 Pure Michigan 400,
Brooklyn, Mich.
Aug.24 Irwin Tools Night Race,
Bristol, Tenn.
Sept 1 AdvoCare 500 at
Atlanta, Hampton, Ga.
Sept 7 Federated Auto Parts
400, Richmond, Va.
Sept 15 GEICO 400, Joliet, Ill.
Sept.22 Sylvania 300, Loudon,
N;H.
Sept.29 AAA 400, Dover, Del.
Oct 6 Hollywood Casino 400.
Kansas City, Kan.
Oct 12 Bank of America 500,
Concord, N.C.
Oct 20 Camping World RV
Sales 500, Talladega, Ala.
Oct 27 Goody's Fast Relief 500,
Ridgeway, Va.
Nov. 3 AAA Texas 500, Fort
Worth, Texas
Nov. 10 AdvoCare 500, Avon-
dale, Ariz.
Nov. 17 Ford EcoBoost'400,
Homestead, Fla.

Nationwide
Series schedule
and standings
Feb. 23 DRIVE4COPD 300 (Tony
Stewart)
March 2 -. Dollar General 200,
Avondale, Ariz.
March 9 -Sam's Town 300, Las
.Vegas
March 16 Jeff Foxworthy's Grit
Chips 300. Bristol, Tenn.
March 23 Royal Purple 300.
Fontana. Calif.
April 12 O'Rellly Auto Parts
300. Fort Worth. Texas
April 26 ToyotaCare 250.
Richmond, Va.
May 4 AARON'S 312, Talladega,
Ala.
May 10 Darlington 200. Dar-
lIngton, S.C.
May 25 History 300, Concord,
N.C.
June 1 5-Hour Energy 200,
Dover, Del.
June 8 DuPont Pioneer 250,
Newton. Iowa
June 15 Alliance Truck Parts
250. Brooklyn, Mlch
June 22 Road America 200.
Elkhart Lake. Wls.
June 28 Feed The Children 300,
Sparta, Ky.
July 5 SUBWAY Jalapeno 250.
Daytona Beach, Fla.
July 13 F.W. Webb 200, Loudon.
N.H.
July21 STP 300, Joliet, III.
July 27 Indiana 250. Speedway.
Ind.
Aug. 3 U.S. Cellular 250.
Newton, Iowa
Aug, 10 ZIPPO 200, Watkins
Glen, N.Y.
Aug. 17 Nationwide Children's
Hospital 200. Lexington. Ohio
Aug. 23 Food City 250, Bristol,
Tenn.
Aug. 31 Atlanta 300, Hampton,
Ga.,
Sept 6 Virginia 529 College
Savings 250, Richmond, Va.
Sept. 14 Dollar General 300.
Joliet, IlI.
Sept 21 Kentucky 300, Sparta,
KY.
Sept 28 Dover 200, Dover, Del.


Oct.5 Kansas Lottery 300,
Kansas City, Kan.
Oct 11 Dollar General 300,
Concord, N.C.
Nov. 2 O'Reilly Auto Parts
.Challenge, Fort Worth, Texas
Nov. 9 Great Clips 200, Avon-
dale, Ariz.
Nov. 16 Ford EcoBoost 300,
Homestead, Fla.
Driver Standings
Through Feb. 23
1. Sam Hornlsh Jr., 42.
2. Alex Bowman, 41.
3. Parker Kllgerman, 40.
4. Brian Scott, 39.
5. Justin Allgaler, 38.
6. Eric McClure, 37.
7. Robert Richardson Jr., 35.
8. Travis Pastrana, 34.
9. Nelson Piquet Jr., 33.
10. Kyle Larson, 32.
11. Regan Smith, 32.
12. Elllott Sadler, 30.
13. Mike Harmon, 28.
14. Joe Nemechek, 26.
15. Brian Vickers, 26.


Lowe's extends with Johnson through 2015

The Associated Press m. W, wir -a'm-,am


CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Jimmie Johnson's second
Daytona 500 victory came
with another big prize a
two-year contract exten-
sion from primary spon-
sor Lowe's.
Lowe's Companies Inc.
said Wednesday it has
re-upped with Hendrick
Motorsports through the
2015 NASCAR season,
making the announce-
ment to 1,700 store man-
agers at its national sales
meeting. The extension
is concurrent with John-
son's contract, which also
runs through 2015 with
Hendrick.
Lowe's and Hendrick
first teamed in 2001 when
Johnson was hired to drive
for the new No. 48 team.
Now in its 12th season, it's
the most successful team
over the last decade in
NASCAR.
Johnson has won a se-
ries-best 61 races since his
2002 rookie year, has five
Sprint Cup titles and has
never finished lower than
sixth in the standings.
"It has been a great ride
with Jimmie since he
started in the Cup Series
12 years ago," said Tom
Lamb, Lowe's chief mar-
keting officer. "We are
proud to sponsor one of
the most elite teams and
drivers in racing and have
a five-time champion car-
ry the Lowe's brand each
week."
Johnson's second Day-


ItHEAS lUUIAITD PUEtSS
Jimmie Johnson kisses his daughter Genevieve Marie in Victory Lane after winning the Daytona 500 on Sunday at Daytona
International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla.


tona 500 win on Sunday
came in his 400th career
start. He joined Hendrick
teammate Jeff Gordon as
just the second driver to
have the same primary
sponsor for each of their
first 400 Cup starts.
"Lowe's believed in me
before I had any success,"
said Johnson. "They are
all I've ever known in my


Sprint Cup career, and
their support of me and
the No. 48 team is sec-
ond to none in the sport.
We've been together for
this crazy ride, and I'm so
happy we're continuing
it together. They truly are
family, and I'm proud to
represent them."
Johnson and crew chief
Chad Knaus have been


together with Lowe's
since the No. 48 team was
formed, and have won at
least one Sprint Cup race
in 12 consecutive seasons.
The five championships
trail only first-ballot Hall
of Fame drivers Dale Earn-
hardt and Richard Petty,
who each won seven.
"We caught lightning in
a bottle with this combi-


nation," said team owner
Rick Hendrick. "Jimmie
and Chad have been suc-
cessful because they al-
ways have a plan and do a
great job executing. Lowe's
is the same way as a spon-
sor. The partnership has
been incredible, and we're
looking forward to work-
ing together for many
more years."


Allmendinger gets back in a Cup car at Phoenix


The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. A.J. All-
mendinger will make his NAS-
CAR season debut this Sunday at
Phoenix International Raceway.
Allmendinger, who didn't have
a ride for the season-open-
ing Daytona 500, will drive for
Phoenix Racing in the No. 51
Guy Roofing Chevrolet. It will be
Allmendinger's fifth race with
Phoenix Racing, which gave him
a chance last year after NASCAR
reinstated him following his sus-
pension for failing a drug test.
"It's been a few months since
I've been in a stock car," said
Allmendinger. "I haven't been
in one of the Gen-6 cars yet, so
I think it will take a little time
to get acclimated to it. Phoenix
International Raceway is a great
place for me to get back behind
the wheel. I've always enjoyed
the race track. It will definitely
feel different, but I'll be ready to
go."
Allmendinger has eight previ-
ous Cup starts at Phoenix, where
he has two top-10 finishes. He's
also won one pole and started on
the front row three times.
"It definitely helps to go to a
track that I enjoy already," he
said. "Of all the tracks we go to,
this is one of the most technical
and challenging. It takes finesse
and you have to hit your marks
nearly perfect every time."
Allmendinger watched Phoenix
Racing's run in the Daytona 500.
Regan Smith drove the car Sun-
day to a seventh-place finish.
"I was really impressed with
their run last week at Daytona,"


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A.J. Allmendinger looks on following qualifying for the the Sprint Cup Series
race on MIay 5,2012 at the Talladega Superspeedway in Talladega, Ala.


Allmendinger said. "It showed
that they're putting together
solid equipment and have a good
feel for the new car. I think for
the first 30 to 45 minutes I'll have
to ease into it and get used to the
new car, but after that, I'll be up
to speed and ready to go."

Fans injured at NASCAR
race explore legal options
ORLANDO, Fla. -Three fans
injured last weekend during a
NASCAR race the day before the
Daytona 500 have hired a lawyer,
but some experts say they could
face tough obstacles in winning
damages.
Matt Morgan, the lawyer for the
fans, said Tuesday that his clients
are exploring a possible lawsuit.
He said any potential action
would focus on the safety fence
used on the track at Daytona


International Speedway.
Morgan says he hopes some-
thing can be worked out with
NASCAR to avoid a lawsuit.
Some experts say there could
be grounds for a lawsuit, and
that courts have looked past
liability waivers written on the
backs of sporting event tickets.
Others maintain a ticket is a legal
contract that could be hard to
overcome in a suit.

RPM's Annett out indefi-
nitely with sternum injury
CHARLOTTE, N.C. NAS-
CAR driver Michael Annett has
a fracture and dislocation of his
sternum that will require surgery.
Aric Almirola will replace him in
the Nationwide Series this week-
end at Phoenix.
Annett was injured in a wreck
during the Nationwide'Series


race Saturday at Daytona. He
spent one night in the hospital,
but was seen Tuesday by two dif-
ferent doctors in North Carolina
who diagnosed the injury.
Annett will not be able to com-
pete for an indefinite amount of
time. Almirola will drive the No.
43 Pilot Flying J Ford, and Rich-
ard Petty Motorsports will evalu-
ate its options moving forward.
Annett was injured in an ac-
cident that stopped the race for
nearly 20 minutes. It was before
the last-lap accident in which
debris from a car injured more
than two dozen fans.

$1 million bonus offered in
NASCAR's All-Star race
CONCORD, N.C. NASCAR's
All-Star race format has been
changed again, but this time to
discourage drivers from riding
around at the back of the field.
Charlotte Motor Speedway
owner Bruton Smith has posted
a $1 million bonus as incentive
to a driver who wins all five race
segments. The overall winner of
the Sprint All-Star race gets a $1
million payout.
The race will again be four
20-lap segments, followed by a
10-lap dash for the cash. Last
year, the top four starting spots
in the final sprint went to the
winners of each segment. It left
little incentive for the drivers to
race after they won a segment,
and they instead just rode at the
back.
Jimmie Johnson won a middle
segment, saved his car, and then
cruised to the win.


2961 Penn. Ave., Marianna, FL (850) 526-3511

www.mariannatoyota.com 1-800-423-8002


-114A THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 28, 2013


"


NASCAR