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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01021
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text

.'i 2 JobScq 73 PkgScq 003
I OR IGCIN MIX1E Al:C 325
LItBRARY OF'O F'LORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX1 117007
CAINESVILLE FL 3261 -7007


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online






FLORIDAN


Vol.90 No.46


River drops, roads


reopen after flooding

Emergency Management warns more rain in forecast
Staff report Service in Tallahassee show the Chipola ,.k


Those near the Chipola River are still dry-
ing out after minor flooding that occurred
late last week and over the weekend.
Jackson County Emergency Manage-
ment says they could be in for more.
As of Monday afternoon, water that had
been standing on Marianna's Citizens Park
was almost back to the riverbanks.
Readings from the National Weather


crested Friday morning at 20.07 feet, well
below the 23.66-foot crest recorded in
March 2009.
But JCEM issued a statement on Mon-
day about the possibility of additional
flooding.
More rain is expected through the week
and Sunday-Tuesday forecast models
See ROADS, Page 9A


FLORIDAN FILE
Assistant Road Supervisor Randy Edenfield (right) and Charles Rogers inspect a wooden
bridge as flood waters rise at New Bridge Road on Feb. 12 in Malone.


VIHS TEACHER RElMEMBERED


MARK SKINNER/THE FLORIDAN
The flags at Marianna High School fly at half staff Monday in memory of longtime faculty member John Summers.


Summers'


death


stuns community


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
The death of longtime
Marianna High School
teacher John Summers was
'an apparent suicide, ac-
cording to Capt. Bill Bry-
ant of the Marianna Police
Department.
A friend who had talked
to Summers by phone on
Saturday became worried


about his state of mind and
went to check on him Sun-


day just after
noon, Bryant
said.
The friend
discovered
that the door
to the home
was unlocked
and found


Summers fully clothed in
the wet bathtub of his resi-


dence on Decatur Street.
There was no gunshot
wound, Bryant said, but he
would not speak further on
the cause of death and said
Early Monday that an au-
topsy was pending.
Bryant said Summers left
notes in his home, some of
which directed his relatives
as to the disposal of his be-
longings. Bryant would not
speak further on the cir-


cumstahces of the scene.
Summers' death came
shortly after the Department
of Children and Families
initiated an investigation
of Summers and his deal-
ings with students. Jackson
County Sheriff Lou Roberts
confirmed Monday that
DCF had been at Marianna
High School on Friday to
See TEACHER, Page 9A


Task Force



Eleven



facing



drug



charges

Staff Report
A series of investigations into the sale of
illegal drugs has resulted in the arrests of
several local people, and warrants have
been issued for five more in cases led by the
Jackson County Drug Task Force.
On Thursday, Chad T.Brown of Marianna
was arrested on an outstanding warrant
for the sale of a controlled substance-co-
caine. On Friday, the task force arrested
Marianna resident Kenny Lee Thomas on
two warrants accusing him of the sale of a
controlled substance-cocaine, and of being
a principle to the sale of a controlled sub-
stance-cocaine. The warrants were issued
"as the result of ongoing investigations in-
volving Thomas, and Brown and their drug
enterprise in Marianna," according to a
press release from the task force.
See ARRESTS, Page 9A

I HK1 ,mKl


Brown
rIM


Snomas
n1 rjH


Davis


Lovett Kuster
I &LL I I 0


INSIDE
) Traffic stops
nets three on
drug charges.
9A


jones


)>CLASSIFIEDS...7A

This Newspaper @
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint



7 651'61 80050 9


4 COMICS...6A


) NATION...1OA


> OBITUARIES...9A


> STATE...4A


> SPORTS...5A


> WORLD...1OA


Follow us




Facebook Twitter


iL


~i n.


Summers








1 2A TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 19. 2013


Weather Outlook


'', High 620
SLow -38


Wednesday
Sunny & cool



A,., High 77
-- ;a Low -600


Friday
Scattered storms


. High- 710
Low 56'


Thursday
Partly cloudy & mild



A.,/ High- 740
S Low- 53


Saturday
Scattered storms.


TIDES ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


3:01 AM High
4:47 AM High
3:06 AM High
4:17 AM High
4:51 AM High


Reading
53.44 ft.
18.42 ft.
15.70 ft.
12.74 ft.


4:22 PM
8:38 PM
4:55 PM
5:38 PM
6:01 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3 ."' 7


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:18 AM
5:32 PM
12:16 PM
7:20 PM


Mar. Feb. Feb. Mar.
11 17 25 4


FLORIDA'S IREAL

PANHANDLE JZI

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 10o0.9P

L O iO WEERS


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one'year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly.accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
Annual Fed Cattle Show and Sale
9:30 a.m. at the Jackson County Ag
Center, Highway 90 West.A Livestock
Judging Contest for FFAand 4-H
members will begin at 9:30 a.m. the
Steer Show at 2 p.m. with the Show-
manship Contest to follow. Steers
will be sold to the public at auction.
Registration for steer buyers at 6:30
p.m. followed by the auction at 7 p.m.
This event is hosted by the Jackson
County Cattlemen's Association. Call
482-9620.
) Optimist Club of Jackson County
Meeting Noon at Jim's Buffet &
Grill in Marianna.
) Orientation Noon-3 p.m. at
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
Highway 90, Marianna. Learn about
and register for free services. Call
526-0139.
) Sewing Circle -1 p.m. at Jackson
County Senior Citizens, 2931 Optimist
Drive in Marianna. Call 482-5028.
) Employability Workshop, Job
Search Tips 2:30 p.m. at Mari-
anna One Stop Career Center. Call
718-0326.
) Jackson County School Board
Regular Monthly Board Meeting
4 p.m. at the School Board meeting
room, 2903 Jefferson Street, Mari-
anna. Meeting is open to the public
and agenda is posted at www.jcsb.org.
Call 482-1200.
) Town of Grand Ridge Public
Workshop 6 p.m. at the Grand
Ridge Town Hall. The purpose of this
workshop is to review the Request for
Proposals received for Solid Waste
Collection and Disposal Services for
the Town of Grand Ridge. Call 592-
4621.
) Chipola College Community
Chorus 6-7:30 p.m. in the Center
for the Arts at Chipola College. Sing-
ers, aged high school and above are
welcome to sing with the community
chorus and will perform on the April
16 Chipola Ensemble Concert. Call
718-2376 or heidebrechtd@chipola.
edu.
) Disabled American Veterans
Meeting 7 p.m. at the DAV Chapter
22 house, 3083 DAV Lane, Marianna.
Call 482-5143.


) Chipola College District Board of
Trustees Regular Meeting -7 p.m.
in the Public Service Building.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20
USDA Food Giveaway 8 a.m.
at Eldercare Services, 4297 Liddon
Street in Marianna. Call 482-3220.
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volun-
teers Free Tax Return Preparation
-9 a.m.-I p.m. at Jackson County Ag-
riculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
for an appointment.
) Jackson County Tourist Devel-
opment Meeting 10 a.m. at the
Russ House, 4318 Lafayette Street,
Marianna. Call 482-8060.
n Heart Month Lunch and Learn
Noon-1 p.m. in the Hudnall Building
Community Room. Cost is $5 to cover
lunch. The program will be presented
by Dr. Robin Albritton of Chipola
Surgical & Medical Specialties-Family
Medicine in Marianna. Call 718-2601
to make a reservation.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 12-1 p.m. in the AA room
of First United Methodist Church,
2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Internet/E-Mail Partl Noon-3
p.m. at the Goodwill Career Training
Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna.
Learn basic use of the internet, how
to send/receive emails, and how to
protect your computer. Call 526-0139.

THURSDAY, FEB. 21
Beef Conference and Trade Show
- 7:30 a.m. at the Jackson County
Agriculture Conference Center. The
program will conclude with lunch,
followed by an optional Cool Season
Forage Tour at the North Florida Re-
search and Education Center. Fee for
this event is $5. Call 482-9620.
" "International Chat 'n' Sip"
- 8:30-10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch.
Enjoy this relaxed environment for
the exchange of language, culture and
ideas among local and international


communities. Light refreshments will
be served. The public is invited. Call
482-9124.
) Caregiver Support Group Meet-
ing -11 a.m. to noon in the First
Presbyterian Church Social Hall, 4437
Clinton St. in Marianna. Open to all
family caregivers providing care to
loved ones or friends. Confidential
group, facilitated by a professional
group counselor. Coffee, water, light
snacks provided.
) Job Club Noon-3 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center,
4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills; get job
search assistance. Call 526-0139.
) Marianna Kiwanis Club Meet-
ing Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill,
4329 Lafayette St., Marianna. Call
482-2290.
) Chipola Healthy Start Board of
Directors Meeting 2 p.m. at the
Holmes County Chamber of Com-
merce, Bonifay. Call 482-1236, ext.
304.
) Employability Workshop, Manag-
ing Stress 2:30 p.m. at Marianna
One Stop Career Center. Call 718-
0326.
Marianna Lions Pancake Supper
4-7 p.m. at Jim's Buffet & Grill. The
proceeds will benefit the Lions, Jesse
Hoy Chipola College Scholarship and
local Lion's Sight Projects. Tickets
are $5 and are available from any
Marianna Lion and Jim's Buffet & Grill.
Tickets will also be available at the
door. Call 482-2523.
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volun-
teers Free Tax Return Preparation
- 4-7 p.m. at the Jackson County Ag-
riculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
for an appointment.
n Jackson County NAACP Meeting
- 5:30 p.m. in the St. James A.M.E.
Church basement, 2891 Orange St. in
Marianna. Call 569-1294.
) Quit Smoking Now Class/Sup-
port Group 5:30 p.m. at Jackson
Hospital in the Cafeteria Board Room.
Free to attend. Curriculum developed
by ex-smokers for those who want to
become ex-smokers themselves. Call
718-2545.
) NAACP Meeting 6 p.m. at St.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan,
P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447, email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane.


James A.M.E. Church.All are welcome.
Call 407-385-9235.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed
discussion, 8-9 p.m., First United
Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia
St., Marianna, in theAA room. At-
tendance limited to persons with a
desire to stop drinking; papers will not
be signed.

FRIDAY, FEB. 22
SKnitters Nook 10 a.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library, Mari-
anna Branch. New and experienced
knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Money Sense and Financial
Literacy Class Noon-4 p.m. at
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
Highway 90, Marianna. Money Sense
is a class that covers different topics
in money management to empower
people to take charge of their finances
and create their own wealth. Call
526-0139.


CORRECTIONS
The dates for upcoming
Black History Month cele-
brations at Chipola College
and at Grand Ridge School
were stated incorrectly in
a story that ran in the Sun-
day edition. Both events
are actually scheduled for
Feb. 22. The Chipola event
will be held from 6 to 8
p.m. in the'Chipola Col-
lege Cultural Center. It is
sponsored by the Chipola
College Black Student
Union. There is a keynote
speaker, and dinner will be
served. Call 718-2319 for
more information.
At Grand Ridge School, a
Black History Month Talent
Show is set for 6 p.m. in
the school's old gym. It is
sponsored by Grand Ridge
School's Black History
Committee in conjunction
with the Jackson County
Youth Council. Tickets are
$5. Call 693-3145 for more
information.


Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Feb. 17, the latest
available report: One drunk pe-
destrian, one dead person (nat-
ural causes), one stolen vehicle,
one highway obstruction, one
report of mental illness, one
verbal disturbance, two burglar
alarms, nine traffic stops, one
larceny complaint, one found/
abandoned property report,
one juvenile complaint and one
assist of another agency.

JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following inci-
dents for Feb. 17 the latest
available report: One drunk
pedestrian, four abandoned
vehicles, four reckless drivers,
six suspicious vehicles, one.
suspicious incident, one arrest
associated with special duty,
one physical disturbance, three


verbal disturbances, one wood-
land fire, one drug offense, 16
medical calls,
four burglar
--. ,- - alarms, 30
_. __ traffic stops,
R'IME three larceny
....... complaints,
one trespass
complaint, one follow-up
investigation, one assault, one
suicide attempt, two animal
complaints, four assists of
motorists or pedestrians,
one assist of another agency,
two public service calls, two
welfare checks, one transport,
one open door or window,
one threat or harassment
complaint.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Dennis Edwards, 49, 2942
West Manor, Marianna, pos-
session of controlled substance
(methamphetamine), posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia


(felony), possession of prescrip-
tion pills without prescription,
violation of probation (curfew
violation), attaching unas-
signed tag.
) Kenny Thomas, 35, 2818
Borden St., Marianna, sale of
cocaine, principle to sale of
cocaine.
) Barry Parrish, 34, 16442 SW
Pear St., Blountstown, hold for
Liberty Co., resisting officer
with violence, battery on a law
enforcement officer, throwing a
deadly missile, fleeing/attempt-
ing to eluded (aggravated),
possession of a weapon during
a criminal offense, possession
of burglary tools, possession of
a controlled substance, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
prohibited use of blue lights,
felon in possession of a firearm.
) Gary Tollar, 24, 8001A McK-
eown Mill Road, Sneads, sale of
cocaine-three counts.
) Cole Padgett, 30, 2938 Sylvia
Drive, Marianna, violation of
court order.
) Fred Hardrick Jr., 38, 1501
Santa Anita Drive, Lynn Haven,
possession of cocaine, driv-


ing while license suspended
or revoked, possession of drug
paraphernalia, giving false
name, tampering with evi-
dence, resisting arrest without
violence, violation of state
probation.
) Buddy Wyatt, 31, 5155 Lynch
Drive, Marianna, burglary of a
conveyance-two counts, grand
theft.
) Victor Cruz, 32, 3180 Clair-
mont Drive (Apt. .604), Atlanta,
Ga., no valid driver's license.
) Robert Maldon, 30, H16
Hillside MHP Troy, Ala., driving
under the influence.
) Nija Gamble, 22, 1013, Man-
hattan Boulevard (Apt. 261),
Lynn Haven, hold for Okaloosa
Co.
) Charles Harrell, 63, 5756
Hwy 90, Marianna, misuse of
911.

JAIL POPULATION: 212

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call 1-888-
404-FWCC (3922).


Ready when

you are: www.

jcfloridan.com

,__


---------------~


~2~----" ----


Wake-up Call


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com








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SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Members of the Chipola Area Board of Realtors with sales totaling between $1 million and $2 million were
recognized with the Gold Club award at Friday night's banquet. Scott Harris, ERA Chipola Realty; Sheila
Barbee, ERA Chipola Realty; Gina Stuart, ERA Chipola Realty; Ginger Green, ERA Chipola Realty; Tracey
Kent, Southern WayRealty; Wanda Owens, Southern Way Realty; Seamus O'Neill', Southern Way Realty; Jim Palmer,
ERA Chipola Realty and Dennis Mundy, Mundy's Realty. Not pictured are Wanda Raney, Southern Way Realty and
Joann Walsingham, ERA Chipola Realty.


2012 President Jim Gibbs passes the gavel to 2013 President
Cresh Harrison at the Chipola Area Board of Realtors Awards
Banquet Friday night.


The Platinum Club recognized members with $2,000,001 to
$4,000,000 in sales. From left: MaxWells, Progressive Realty;
Robby Roberts, Prudential Jim Roberts Realty; Debbie Roney
Smith, Century 21 Sunny South Properties; Ed McCoy, Century 21
Sunny South Properties and Bettie Slay, Bettie's Country Realty. Not
pictured are Team Mary Powell-Kristin Kent, The Hatcher Agency and
DanaWood, Elite Realty.


Jim Roberts talks about what the real estate business was like
when the Chipola Area Board of Realtors was founded in 1977.


4OPhilip








Carat The FIVE C's
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A r Brief
Four stabbed
with pocket knife
ORLANDO -Two
men have been arrested
in connection with a
quadruple stabbing in
Orlando.
Police say the victims
were taken to a local
hospital early Monday
morning with non-life
threatening injuries.
A police statement
says 19-year-old Joel
Garcia Jr. is being
charged with attempted
murder and 20-year-
old Wilfredo Caussade
with resisting an officer
and tampering with
evidence. Both have
been transported to the
Orange County Jail and
could face additional
charges.

FWC expands
opportunities
TALLAHASSEE -
State wildlife officials
are expanding hunting
opportunities on private
and public lands.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission announced
Monday the openings on
lands that include nearly
6 million acres of its
public-hunting wild-
life management area
system.
The rules also allow
for the use of air guns
to take rabbits and gray
squirrels.

FHP wants to raise
awareness about
hit-and-runs
ORLANDO The
Florida Highway Patrol
is trying to raise aware-
ness.about hit-and-run
crashes.
.According to FHP, law
enforcement officers
statewide investigated
nearly 77,000 hit-and-
run crashes last year.
Officials say those
crashes injured 17,000
-people and killed 168.
At a news conference
Monday in Orlando, rep-
resentatives from FHP
law enforcement officials
and families of victims
involved in hit-and-run
crashes will launch a
campaign to raise aware-
ness about the conse-
quences of these kinds of
traffic accidents.

From wire reports


t^^Xil^:l. ._ "




BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.


Beltone' romise, .



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\ PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


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491 Beltone d 4IN
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aI Hi, K 1611 Main St Suile 4
Shoppes at Chiplay,
f Io e1 next to Wal-mart
S I H hthe iwtrldh arbetter. Marianna, FL
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SAS: BC-H IS In Feltz Foot Clinic
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I~IWI*-XII----- ..I. ...~.- -i -- (-- -I~.--- -I. -


*rp~


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY19, 2013 + 3AF


8:
'


IN OUR AREA









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN o www.jcfloridan.com


New winner for state's
Python Challenge
M IAM1NI There's a new
ilinig snake in the state's
'Py1thon challenge. "
lihe Florida Fissh and
Vildlife Conserva;tion Com-
mission said Sunday that
Blake Russ of Fruitland Park
should have won $1,000 for
hugging the longest Bur-
mese python. Russ com-
peted with hunters holding
special permits for harvest-
ing pythons.
Ruben Ramirez of Miami
was given the prize Saturday
For a snake more than 10
Feet long. Wildlife officials
say Ramirez, who won the
competition for most snakes
caught with 18, will keep his
prize moneV. Russ will get
$1,000 of his own for a snake
more than 11 feet long.
University of Florida pro-
lessor Frank Mazzotti says
the mix-up was his mistake.
Unlike other snakes killed
in the hunt, Russ' snake
was released with a tracking
device.

State reports record
number of visitors
TALLAHASSEE Florida's
tourism marketing corpora-
tion is reporting a record
89.3 million visitors came to
the state in 2012.
Officials said Monday that
the number of visitors in
Florida last year represented
an increase of 2.3 percent
over 2011 when 87.3 million
people visited.
VISIT FLORIDA- the
state's quasi-public market-
ing arm estimated in its
annual report that 10.2 mil-
lion overseas visitors and 3.6
million Canadians came to
the Sunshine State in 2012.
The firms said tourism- and
recreation-related taxable
sales' increased 6.9 percent.

Florida Lottery breaks
Scratch-Off record
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Lottery says Scratch-
Off ticket sales have set a
new record.
The Florida Lottery an-
nounced Monday that sales
for the week ending Feb. 17
exceeded $64.7 million. That
breaks last week's record of
$63 million, making it the
highest single-week Scratch-
Off ticket sales ever achieved
in the Lottery's quarter-cen-
tury existence.
Florida Lottery Secretary
Cynthia O'Connell said
she's "thrilled to see players'
overwhelming response" to
the games. Their mission is -
to "maximize revenue for
education and record high
sales ensure that Florida's"
education system continues
to receive these benefits."

Fla. base marks
anniversary of crash
FORT WALTON BEACH -
A military base in the Florida
Panhandle is remembering
four airmen killed when
their reconnaissance plane
crashed in Africa last year.
The four airmen were
members of the Air Force
1st Special Operations Wing.
They were based at Hurlburt
Field.
Monday marked the first
anniversary of the crash
near the only U.S. base in
Africa. Military officials say
the crew had been returning
from a mission in support of
the Afghanistan war.


From wire reports
r 1"aa


Obama wraps up Florida vacation


The Associated Press

PALM CITY President
Barack Obama hit the
links with a comparatively
low-key group of partners
on Monday, the third and
final day of a Florida golf
vacation.
Obama played at the
Floridian yacht and golf
club, where he spent Presi-
dents Day weekend, with
departing U.S. Trade Rep-
resentative Ron Kirk, the.
president's Chicago pal
Eric Whitaker and White
House aide Marvin Nich-
olson, the White House
said.
Tiger Woods was 'part
of Sunday's presidential
foursome.
Obama was returning
home late Monday, with
days to go before a March
1 deadline to stop billions
of dollars in spending cuts
that could potentially crip-
ple the government from
kicking in.
With his wife and daugh-
ters away on an annual
ski trip, Obama arranged
a post-State of the Union,


ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
President Barack Obama played golf Sunday with Tiger Woods at the Floridian, a secluded
and exclusive yacht and golf club on Florida's Treasure Coast where Obama spent. the long
Presidents Day weekend. ,


mini-vacation for himself
to the exclusive club alohg
Florida's Treasure Coast.
The Floridian is owned by
Houston businessman Jim


Crane, who also owns the
Houston Astros baseball
team and has donated,
money to Obama's politi-
cal campaigns.


Crane and .Kirk also
played golf with the presi-,
dent on Saturday and Sun-
day. Obama also got some.
instruction from Butch


Legislature appeals redistricting ruling
The Associated Press ers of Florida, Common emerged in connection Supreme Court's ruling in
Cause, Natioial Council with the lawsuit, as well the Senate case.
TALLAHASSEE The of La Raza and several as a similar challenge to That's because the Flor-
Republican-dominated individual plaintiffs. The a new congressional map, ida Constitution requires.
Legislature has asked the justices ordered the plain- includes emails showing the justices to automati-
Florida Supreme Court tiffs to respond by Feb. 28 top GOP officials met in cally review only legisla-
to throw out a legal chal- and gave the Legislature late 2010 to brainstorm tive maps, which is the
lenge to its 2012 redis- until March 5 to reply. redistricting with political crux of the Legislature's


tricting plan for the state
Senate.
The high court put the
case on a fast track Mon-
day, setting tight dead-
lines for additional fil-
ings. Former Justice Raoul
Cantero submitted the
petition on behalf of the
House and Senate on Fri-
day. Cantero argued that
only the Supreme Court
can decide legislative re-
districting cases and that
the justices already have
done so.
He's asking the high
court to order a trial judge
to dismiss a challenge to
the Senate map lodged by
the League ofWomenVot-


Circuit Judge Terry Lew-
is rejected the Legisla-
ture's claim last month in
Taflahassee and ordered
the case to proceed. Lewis
wrote that the Legisla-
ture's argument "flies in
the face of case law." He
cited prior Supreme Court
and appellate rulings that
said trial courts have ju-
risdiction over redistrict-
ing challenges.
The pending lawsuit al-
leges the Senate map vio-
lates an anti-gerryman-
dering amendment to the
Florida Constitution by
favoring incumbents and
the GOP.
Information that has


consultants and legislative
staffers involved in the re-
mapping process that's
done every 10 years.
The state's "Fair Dis-
tricts" amendment also
requires that redistricting
maps protect the ability
of minorities to elect can-
didates of their choice
and follow city and coun-.
ty or natural boundaries
whenever possible.
A similar amendment
imposes the same re-
quirements on congres-
sional redistricting. The
challenge to the map law-
makers drew for Florida's
27 congressional districts
will not be affected by the


appeal.
"The constitution's ex-
press grant of jurisdic-
tion to this court removes
such cases from the juris-
diction of circuit courts,"
Cantero wrote.


rr~3CaaCllfis-1Rl~jqlCl"r~~


Bennett: State needs 'Plan B'


for FCAT replacement option


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A
"Plan B" is needed in
case the anticipated re-
placement for the Flor-
ida Comprehensive As-
sessment Test, or FCAT,
Fails to materialize or is
delayed, the state's new
education commissioner
said Monday.
The State Board of Edu-
cation also received a let-.
ter frotn Gov.,Rick Scott
pitching his proposal to
give all teachers a $2,500
pay raise. At least one
member, though, said
she'd prefer to see raises
awarded on merit rather
than across the board.
Education Commis-
sioner Tony Bennett told
the board that within the
next couple months he'll
present a contingency
plan in case the FCAT re-
placement is sidelined or
delayed by problems that


have begun to emerge.
"That is a risk, which is
why I believe it's always
good management to
have a Plan B," said Ben-
nett, the former Indiana
superintendent of public
instruction, at his first
board meeting Monday
in Orlando. "This is not
your normal, standard
adoption activity."
The new test is being
developed by a 23-state
consortium known as
the Partnership for As-
sessment of Readiness
for Colleges or Careers,
or PARCC. The new test
is being designed in con-
junction with the adop-
tion of Common Core
State Standards by Flori-
da and 44 other states.
Another consortium
known as Smarter Bal-
ance is developing an
exam geared more toward
instructional purposes
than accountability such


as grading schools and
evaluating teacher per-
formance, the focus of
PARCC.
Florida's goal is to have
the new standards and
tests fully in place within
the next 18 months, but
that schedule -may be
overly optimistic.
Bennett -said there
are "complexities" with
PARCC including the
adoption of a common
scoring system and costs.
He noted that many
states currently spend
far less than Florida on
testing.
"We're going to get to a
point where some states
are going to have to take
a look and ask 'Will our
legislature appropriate
the amount of money
to assess our children?'"
Bennett said.
He said states also may
not agree on how high
to set passing grades.


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IIarmon, Woods' former
swing coach.
The White House barred
media coverage of the
president's vacation, but
released the names of his
golf partners daily.
March 1 is the start date
for $85 billion in across-
the-board spending cuts,
known in Washington as
"the sequester," that would
drain the money from the
Pentagon and other do-
mestic agencies over the
next seven months. The
White House has warned
that thousands of FBI
agents, prosecutors, food
safety inspectors, air traffic
controllers and other fed-
eral workers would either
be laid off or furloughed.
Obama has called on
Congress to pass a smaller
package of spending cuts
and measures to close tax
loopholes to buy time to
negotiate a broader agree-
ment. Republicans so far
have rejected that idea.
This Friday, Obama is
meeting with Japanese
Prime Minister Shinzo
Abe.

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STATE



















Malone ready for rematch with Chipley


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

One year ago, the Chipley
Tigers traveled to Malone's
gym and ended its season
with a 73-63 victory en
route to a 1A state champi-
onship two wins later.
In tonight's 1A Regional
Semifinal game, a more ex-
perienced and dominant
Malone squad will look
to return the favor when
Chipley returns to town
for a highly-anticipated
matchup at 7 p.m.
Malone (24-2) comes into
the game as the District 1
champions after topping
the Paxton Bobcats 75-62
on Feb. 9, while Chipley
(22-5) is on the road after
being upset 50-46 by Hol-
mes County in the District
2 championship game.
The loss for Chipley
means that tonight's
matchup comes one round
earlier than many expect-
ed before the postseason,
but Malone coach Steven
Welch said that won't take
anything away from the
intensity of the game's
atmosphere.
"I would say both teams
will have a ton of energy
and the gym will be packed
and very loud," Welch said.
"I think it will be a matter
of who can control their
emotions early. You want
to.play emotional, but you
don't want it to get out of
hand. I would think the
kids will probably be fa-
tigued after the first quar-
ter just from the 10-day
layoff and the adrenaline
rush wearing off."
Both teams have a good
deal of experience in big
games, with Chipley's Ty-
rome Sharpe and Kobe
McCrary both starting for
the Tigers' state title team
last year, and junior guard
Logan Justice being a rota-
tion player on that squad,
while Malone brought


Anthony Speights takes a three point shot at a recent Malone game.


back its top four scorers
from last year's team and
has seven seniors in the
rotation, including three
starters.
For the returning Malo-
ne players, this game rep-
resents the culmination
of a year's worth of work
and preparation, as the Ti-
gers veterans have waited


patiently for an opportu-
nity to redeem themselves
after last year's season-
ending loss.
"It's something we've
talked about from the
first day of school, really,"
Welch said. "We wanted to
get back to this same spot.
We've had a good year
and it's been a successful


season. Nowwe're here and
in as good a shape as you
can be in. We couldn't be
in a better position. We've
done what we needed to
do to get here; now we've
got to work to prevent the
same result as last year."
This will be the second
matchup between the
teams this season, with


Malone taking a 77-64 win
in a Dec. 22 game in Grand
Ridge.
However, tonight's game
will see one of the two's
season come to an end,
and the intensity level
should go up a notch,
though Welch said that it's
important that his play-
ers to approach this game
the same way they did the
first.
"I hope they manage (the
emotions) and keep them-
selves playing at an even
keel for 32 minutes," Welch
said, "We have to relax and
play our game. It can't be
about how bad we want
to win. We can't play last
year's game again. That's
water under the bridge. We
just have to focus on win-
ning this game and beating
this team play by play. We
have to make sure we play
every possession like we
don't want to go home."
Malone returns its two
stars in junior guard Chai
Baker (21 points and eight
rebounds per game) and
senior center, Ty Baker
(15.1 points and 10 re-
bounds), while Chipley
lost its dynamic guard duo
of last season in Alex Ham-
ilton and Cameron Dozier
to graduation.
However, a new and
equally dangerous duo has
emerged for CHS this sea-
son in 6-foot-3 freshman
Trent Forrest and the 6-
foot sophomore Sharpe.
Taking on a bigger role
in his second year on
varsity, Sharpe is averag-
ing 17.5 points per game
as the team's starting
point guard, and even
posted a 51-point game
against Mosley earlier this
season.
Forrest has emerged as
one of the most highly-
touted freshman players
in the state and is averag-
ing 22.7 points per game,
topping the 30-point


mark on six different oc-
casions, including against
Malone when he put in
35.
"(The first matchup this
season) just illustrates the
fact that they've got weap-
ons just like we do," Welch
said of Chipley. "Basket-
ball is a game of numbers
and we've got a number
in mind that we want to
keep them to as a team.
But (Forrest and Sharpe)
can get that number by
themselves. They're both
capable of getting in the
high 20s and 30s on the
same night, so we have to
be disciplined on them.
They play beyond their
years. They're very impres-
sive players."
Malone has been pretty
explosive as well this sea-
son, averaging 78.8 points
per game Chipley av-
erages 68.1 and top-
ping the 80-point mark 11
times.
But Welch said his team's
ultimate success or failure
will come from its perfor-
mance at the other end of
the court.
"I think we've shown we
can score the basketball,"
he said. "The difference
is those games where we
play our game on offense
and we defend and re-
bound like we want to that
we get a lot of separation
on people. When we're
not as good as we need
to be defensively, that's
when we let people hang
around.
"If this is one of those
nights where we're re-
ally clicking defensively
and rebounding well, I
like our chances. Our de-
fensive intensity is the
key."
The game will tip at 7
p.m. with the winner to
take on the winner of Hol-
mes County vs. Paxton
on Saturday night in the
regional final,


Hornets hope to keep


it rolling against Bucks


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

After turning their season around
with an impressive district tourna-
ment run, the Cottondale Hornets
will try to keep the momentum going
tonight when they host the Bozeman
Bucks in the 1A Regional Semifinals at
7 p.m.
Cottondale (13-14) ended the regu-
lar season on about as bad of a note as
possible, losing its final eight games to
fall four games under .500.
But the Hornets rallied as hosts of the
District 3 tournament, beatingVernon
59-49 and then taking back to back
wins at the buzzer over Graceville in
double overtime in the semifinals and
Sneads in the championship game.
To keep their unlikely run going, the
Hornets will have to top a Bozeman
(19-8) team that went 3-1 against Dis-
trict 3 clubs Vernon and Wewahitchka,
and played District 4 powerhouse West
Gadsden tough in their last two meet-
ings, leading the state's No. 3 team at
halftime in the district title game.
'As you would expect, they're a tough
bunch like they always are," Hornets
coach Chris Obert said of the Bucks.
"They play hard and compete, and
they have a point guard that is one of
the better players we've faced all year.
They're very fundamentally sound in
what they do. Coach (Michael) Mem-
men does a good job coaching them
up and getting them ready. It's going to
be a tough playoff battle. We're expect-
ing nothing less."
The point guard the coach referenced
is 5-foot-10 senior Herbie Harrell, who
Obert said poses several significant
challenges for his team defensively.
"He handles the ball really well and
makes good decisions," the coach
said. "He's real crafty, he goes left and
right equally well, he shoots mid-
range pull-ups and threes, and he's got
a good body on him. He's a physical
guard who can do some stuff."
The Hornets have their own pair of
perimeter stars capable of having big
nights in senior point guard DJ Roul-
hac and senior wing player Jerodd
Blount.
The 6-foot-3 Blount is averaging
,'" , ,. '.,t. ., J 'li.. .', .oiF;^ ;- .., : , lr ^- .. v ., : .; .. ;,. ,..


24.5 points per game this season while
making a team-best 61 three-pointers,
with the 6-foot Roulhac putting in 16
points and four assists per game and
has knocked down 32 triples of his
own.
But Cottondale has had a tough time
finding offense anywhere else this sea-
son, and the Hornets had to rely heav-
ily on their defense in the district tour-
nament, holding Sneads and Vernon
under 50 points and keeping Gracev-
ille to 40 in regulation.
Obert said that while the team is
riding high off of the league cham-
pionship, his players know how
small the margin of error can be for
them.
"We've got some confidence, but I
don't feel they're overconfident," he
said. "They know that we're not the
most talented group, so in order for
us to have a chance to win, we've got
to really play hard and play tough
and play with a lot of energy and ef-
fort. If we're not ready to play, we're
not going to be successful and they
understand that. I think we'll be ready
to play. We just have to execute and
not let our emotions get the best of
US."
The Hornets will also be happy to be
at home where they have been a differ-
ent team this season, picking up nine
of their 13 wins, including an 80-79
win over third-ranked West Gadsden,
while losing by just one to fifth-ranked
Chipley.
"Playing at home is an advantage,
but it's not going to win us or lose us
the game," Obert said. "We're still go-
ing to have to put together a good
game to win. I think playing at home
will help, but you can't just sit back
and say,'we're at home, so we'll be OK.'
It doesn't work like that.
"Bozeman doesn't care where this
game is being played. They don't care
if it's home, road, or neutral court.
They're going to play us hard re-
gardless. We have to match that in-
tensity and effort and make some
plays."
The winner of the game will advance
to Saturday night's regional final game
against the winner ofWest Gadsden vs.
Sneads.


Pirates in for huge test with Panthers


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Pirates will
face the monumental task
of taking a road win ovei
West Gadsden tonightwhen
they travel to Greensboro
to take on the Panthers in
the 1A Regional Semifinals
at 7 p.m.
Sneads (14-13) was forced
to open the playoffs on the
road after suffering a one-
point loss to Cottondale in
the District 3 championship
game, while West Gadsden
(22-8) comes in as the Dis-
trict 4 champs thanks to a
54-40 win over Bozeman.
The Jaguars took a 64-50
win over the Pirates in the
teams' previous meeting
Dec. 20 in Grand Ridge, and
if Sneads is going to turn the
tables in the rematch, it will
have to do so without one
of its key pieces in leading
scorer Darius Williams.
The 6-foot-3 junior trans-
ferred to Florida High just
last week, leaving the Pi-
rates to prepare for their
biggest game of the sea-
son without arguably their
most important player at
both ends of the court.
But Sneads coach Kelvin
Johnson said that his team
isn't making excuses and
that his players have moved
on and are ready to play.
"We had a really good
week of practice last week,
maybe our best week all
year," the coach said. "(The
players) have handled this
pretty well. It didn't seem
to bother them. There had
been speculation and ru-
mors floating around for
a while. Our thing is if he
doesn't want to be here, it's
time for us to move on."
While the Pirates won't
have Williams, they will
have senior point guard
Devin Hayes and sopho-
more forward Alfonso
Brown, two keystarters who
didn't play in the first game
against West Gadsden.


Sneads' Alfonso Brown takes a shot against Cottondale during
the district championship game.


The addition of two solid
ball-handlers could prove
especially important for
the Pirates against the Pan-
thers' swarming defensive
pressure.
t "It will really help us hav-
ing Devin and Alfonso just
Sto help us get the ball up
the court against their pres-
Ssure," Johnson said. "We
didn't do a good job against
their pressure the first time
and threw the ball away a
bunch. But we've gotten a
lot better since then at han-
dling pressure."
But it will take more
than simply avoiding big
Mistakes to beat a team
the quality of West Gads-
den, a team that returns
several key players off of
last year's state runner-up
squad, including leading
scorer Brandon Shingles
(19 points per game) and
leading rebounder and shot
blocker Marquis Brown
(10.7 rebounds, four blocks
per game).
"They really don't have a
weakness," Johnson said of
the Panthers. "They're big,
fast and shoot the ball well.
They're sort of like Malone
in that sense. We've got to
Shave a good offensive night


in order to be competitive.
We need a big night out of
Alfonso, Devin and Jeremy
Wert. We need some big
production out of those
guys."
Making things more dif-
ficult for the Pirates is the
venue, as the Panthers have
lost just one true home
game the past two seasons,
a 47-44 loss this year to 6A
Leon on Dec. 13.
"It's a hard place to win no
matter how good your team
is," Johnson said of West
Gadsden's home gym. "It's
just a hostile environment
over there. I really don't
think my kids have been in
that kind of environment
all year. It's just a different
atmosphere over there.
"But there's really not a lot
of pressure on us this game.
We're not supposed to win
this ballgame. They're the
state runner-ups and a
great team having a great
season. We've got noth-
ing to lose. We'll go over
there and give it our best
shot."
The winner will advance
to Saturday night's region-
al final game to take on
the winner of Cottondale
vs. Bozeman. k


I


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EVERYT'IIXM 1
A REFLECTION O) ME!


A 0 1s-* '-r- AJo


SFoa-Tc





HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


2.19 0 LaughingStoch International Inc. D, by Universal UCltck r UFS, 2013

"This is the only one we have in your size."


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Droplet
5 Good
buddy
8 Adages
12Ranch
measure
13 Mature
14Charles
Lamb
15 Charitable
gift
17 Snake eyes
18 Curtain
hanger
19 Be against
21 The March
King
24 Feta source
25 Disapproving
26Buck
30 Excuse me!
32 Pond carp
33 Small
branch
37 Kind of
camp
38Spinning
stat
39Trucker's
rig
40 Clutches
43Cleaning
cloth
44 Bangkok
resident
46 Revival
shouts


48 Slight injury
(hyph.)
50Rural
power org.
51 Askew
52 News
feature
57 Landlord's
fee
58 Monastic
title
59Vacuum
part
60 "Fish
Magic"
artist
61 Cloud's
place
62 Bone below
the elbow

DOWN
1 Wretched
2 Environ-
mental
prefix
3 Son of Val
and Aleta
4 Kind souls
5 Settled
6 Back then
7 Late night
Jay
8 Harbors
9 Bauxite
giant
10 Actress
Dianne -


Answer to Previous Puzzle


SEPT C(


RI Bi
BIASTTElNI
UTIEI


EPA EAI
LN SQ





21 Wild guess
22 Job safety
E PCAoEpAut






org.
23 Luau
strummers
27 Slimy
vegetable
28 Prunes a
hedge
29 Hobble
31 Computer
memory
unit
34 Wolf
lead-in
35 Somalian
supermodel


A]S PJHLE W
36 Band
bookings
41 Carnival
city
42 Squirrel
away
44 Bath item
45 "Stormy
Weather"
singer
47- Plcchu
48Tree part
49 Does in
50 Busboy's
load
53 Sitcom
planet
54 Yahoo!
rival
55 Nine-digit ID
56 Hot brew '


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


2-19 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
"V JWP LXEE VL WEE VP NTPU ...
UEWRPXNN, ETSX, BTM, M
KPFWAAVPXNN. XWJF NTPU, MTK'GX
LXEEVPU W NLTGM WPR WJLVPU."
AWLLV AWUX

Previous Solution: The ship of democracy, which has weathered all storms,
may sink through the mutiny of those on board." Grover Cleveland
TODAYSCLUE: slenbt
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-19


Horoscopes
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) The secret to your
success will be to treat life
as a game, even those as-
pects of it that have'been
tough or boring.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) When looking for
the bluebird of happiness,
you shouldn't go searching
outside your immediate
surroundings.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- You rarely have a diffi-
cult time knowing what to
say to friends. Even though
you're likely to be sur-
rounded by a larger crowd
today, you'll still find a way
to charm everybody.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Conditions in general
are usually favorable for
you, and today will be no
exception.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Your natural ability to
spread some sunshine and
lift the thoughts of others
will contribute greatly to
your popularity.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Lucky you, because an
effective ally who does nice
things without drawing at-
tention to it will single you
out for special attention.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
-You could be quite fortu-
nate, not-necessarily in the
usual material ways, but in
something that won't rust
and can't be stolen.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
As long as you don't es-
tablish too many objec-
tives or excessively focus
on one thing, you should
be able to concentrate on a
meaningful project.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-0ct.23)-
Provided you have the will
to win and never underes-
timate the opposition, you
shouldn't have any trouble
bettering yourself and
ousting all competitors.
Keep plugging away.
SCORPIO (Oct.24-Nov.22)
A number of unantici-
pated changes could occur
in an area of importance.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Your quick wit
and delightful charm
are two of your best
assets.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) The extra funds you'll
need in order to!do some-
thing special will manifest
as soon as the assets you've
been putting away begin to
appreciate.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: Several years ago, I stayed
with my aunt and uncle for a week. My
aunt sent me down to the basement to
tell my uncle to come upstairs for dinner.
When I turned the corner, I caught him
pulling up his pants in front of the com-
puter screen. He asked me not to tell my
aunt, and I didn't.
During my time there, he did several
other things that made me uncomfort-
able. He asked me personal questions
about women's bodies, and one time
when I was alone with him, he hugged
me from behind, pushing himself against
me. Eventually, I told my parents about it.
Although they believed me, I don't think
they ever said anything to my aunt and
uncle. So I made my own rules about how
close to get to him when we visited.
The reason I'm writing is because I have
two younger sisters, both teenagers, and
I have noticed my uncle looking at them
when we visit. Even more troubling, my
uncle has two young granddaughters
who visit on a regular basis. While I don't
like to think he'd do anything to them,
my aunt and uncle often baby-sit for the


,Bridge


Whenever you are on defense and the dummy has
come down, ask yourself from where you might get
the winners that you need to defeat the contract.
In this deal, East-West need six tricks to beat two
spades. When West leads the heart king and East sig-
nals enthusiastically with the 10, West can see five
winners: one spade, three hearts and one club. But
from where is the sixth winner coming?
Soiuth's two-spade overcall was part of the Cappel-
letti convention, showing spades and either minor.
West should realize that it is unlikely his side will
get two diamond tricks. South must have some-
thing for his vulnerable overcall. And if that is the
case, West probably needs to take two trump tricks,
which will be possible if East began with exactly four
hearts. (East won't have five, because he would have
transferred out of one no-trump.)
After the king and queen of hearts, West can play a
heart to East's ace. Then leading the last heart pro-
motes a second trump trick for West. (If South ruffs
low, West overruffs; if South ruffs high, West dis-
cards.) But will East know to play the last heart?
Probably not; he is highly likely to shift to a dia-
mond. To save East from himself, West should cash
the diamond ace before playing the third heart. This
ace denies the king; with the ace and king of dia-
monds, West would cash the king first, not the ace.


girls, so he has regular opportunities to be
alone with them.
The situation worries me, but I don't
know what to do. I'm pretty sure neither
my aunt nor my adult cousins have any
idea what's going on. My parents aren't
eager to create a rift, and the grandkids
really love their grandpa. But I would
feel awful if I later learned he had abused
these kids.
If my parents don't address the sit-
uation, should I tell my aunt? My
cousins?
DON'TWANT IT TO HAPPEN AGAIN

Dear Don't Want: That hug from behind
was a type of molestation. Your uncle
isn't likely to change his behavior on his
own, so it is important that the relatives
be informed and the younger children
protected. Tell your parents that if they
are unwilling to handle this, you will talk
to your sisters and adult cousins. Your
cousins may not believe that their father
would harm their kids, and they may be
angry with you, but they should know
nonetheless.


North 02-19-13
4854
S763
S94
4AK763
West East
A 10 9 032
9KQ2 VA1054
AA532 *876
4 QJ4 10 952
South
4 KQJ76
VJ98
KQJ10
48

Dealer: West
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1NT Pass Pass
2 Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: V K


ENTERTINIVIENT


..AND SHE

NAILS IT!
*3T WP "^^



-, BJ






www.JCFLORIDAN.comi


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


TuesdayF February 19, 2013- 7 A


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




MARKETPLACE


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482r4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publicalton shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out ofr ,.r: ;r, ad -i.; rrn,,l.: b..L ...j i.,e J, r,n. pid if.. Ih i, L.3,:e
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability : ..!..:onr, ,.i .., ..i:n .n,.'.'. r..r.V ,.;a rru-L.-. p..n l:.
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.




ANNLOUNCEMENTS E MPLi VAK


Garden of Memory Cemetery Chapel of
Memories, companion Mausoleum, crypt
B65-66 w/ two O/C & two plaques I have the
quit deed Asking $2385. for property. Contact
Mark E. Holton major U.S. Army retired
pedi.carei,_hotmail.com for more information.

W -
Lost: Custom made exotic wood Walking Stick
Winn-Dixie parking Reward. 850-579-2263


FINANCIAL


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
(14) Town Homes for Sale
1 block off circle,
great income & fully occupied.
Owner Finance
with good down payment
#. 386-312-6363 4

(W} MERCHANDISE


Coin Collections Wanted!! Paying Top
Dollar $$$ Call Mathew 985-516-0379


FIREWOOD for Sale! Good Pricesl
You Cut or We Cut! Delivery Available in
Certain Areas. Call for More Info!
Tree clearing and clean-up available also.
Priced According to Load Size.
334-735-2957 or 334-372-5107


Mattress/boxsprings/frame: Queen size. Clean.
$50.270-222-0915



A* GUN SHOW **
March 2nd & 3rd
National Peanut Festival Building *
Hwy 231 S. Dothan, Alabama
Over 275 Tables *
Sat. 9-5 Sun. 10-4
Call 334-279-9895


Amish Fireplace -small heater,$75,850-482-3537
Baby Clothes-girl 0-12 mo. $30 bx, 850-693-3260
Bed: full, mattress and rails. $150. 850-693-3260
Brake Fluid -4, gallon cont., $10 ea,850-209-3665
Buffet server: Mahogany $300. 850-693-0521
Chair -oversized,multicolors,$150,850-482-3537
Charger: 2/40/200 amp. $100. 850-482-2636
China cabinet: Mahogany. $300. 850-693-0521
Electric Stove: 40" Fridgeaire $250. 482-2006
Infant Car Seat $30 850-693-3260


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Two Side-by-Side Cemetery Plots C3 and C4
@ Garden of Memory. Plots in Garden Cross
Section. $1300 each Sell for $1795 each
through Cemetery ManagementContact:
Alex Leath 205-972-1237 or leath@bellsouth.net


I IOSI


Bloodhound Pups
Taking deposits for regis-
tered /registerable pups.
Litter includes black/tans
& reds (5 males/5 female).
Both parents are regis-
tered and on site. Born on
January 23, 2013. Will be ready for new homes
on March 6, 2013. $650. For more info. or to set
appointment for viewing call 334-726-2561.
CKC Daschund puppies. One chocolate-
tan/male, one silver dapple/female. Born 6 Jan
avail 24 Feb. Must love doxies. Call (334)403-
8376. $450. Can email and FaceTime photos.
CKC Reg. Golden Retriever 2-M $350.
3-F $300., 10 wks old, S/W, Parents on site
Call 334-648-1287 or 334-791-9831.
Found: Rat Terrier (maybe Chihuahua, too)
Female black/tan/white, near intersection of
Birchwood Rd & Co. Rd. 275 (aka Alliance Road
or Cypress Hwy), Marianna, FL, 850-762-3944



Reg. Toy/Mini Chocolate, Parti
colors & solids Schnauzers, Male
& Female, S/W, $500.-$600.
www.lovemyschnauzers.com
334-889-9024
Valentines Babies are Ready! LC Chihuahua
Shih-Tzu mixes, taking dep. on Morldes
334-718-4886_plynn@sw.rr.com

3) FARMER'S MARKET


CaselH 70 XT Loader: 79HP,
448 hours, reg. bucket and
grapple bucket. Must see to
appreciate the condition.
j' $19,500.00 Call 334-894-2315



* U tmW tm!1E~


Mirror w/shelves: $50. 850-693-3260.
Pool Table: w/acc $200. OBO 850-272-8191
Sewing Machine Singer 534. $50, 850-693-0521
Sign Stakes 75+, $25 for all, 850-209-3665
Table side table, carvings, $100, 850-482-3537
Wedding gown, new, sz 16, $300 850-693-3260.
Weights/Orbital/Boxflex $500. 850-592-8891
Window dbl pane,29Vzx30 $100. 850-482-2636
Windows.Transom 14x73, $45. 850-482-2636


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed-by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Demo Salvage Concrete
for Sale & Delivery, great for erosion
control behind dams & gullies
334-347-7466 or 334-726-2561
FE PR U


g-iii


S ine Ripe Tomatoes


Home Grown Greens
Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern



r ........................
Bahia seed for sale 4-
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
S experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L.>.....*........................
Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418

Sheltered Coastal Bermuda Hay
Baled with JD568 in Columbia, AL $55
Call 334-790-4439 or 334-618-1962


Cow-Calf pairs for Sale $1600. each
4 334-886-9003 / 334-726-4661



Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
S*334-389-2003 J
Wanted to Rent: Farm Land or Pasture in Ma-
rianna or West of Marianna; Call 850-718-1859


Level: g. 7F

Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Friday's puzzle

4 5 2 1 7 9 8 3 6


3 1 8 5 6 2 7 4 9
263 9 1 7485


1 54 39 38 5 6 2 7
536728194
7 8 1 4 9 3 5 6 2
9214 6 5 1 3 7 8
9246513786!.


2/19/13


1 inl rIVti'-L'" I IVIr-I' I






McLANE,
Truck Driver
McLane Company, one of the largest
grocery wholesale companies in the nation,
is looking for Truck Drivers to join our
Dothan, Alabama Team.
Our Truck Drivers are responsible for
transporting customer orders to retail
locations in the Alabama, South Georgia and
Gulf Coast areas. Our drivers enjoy
excellent home time, team delivery routes,
top driver wages, excellent benefits and a
very lucrative 401k retirement plan.
The ideal driver applicant will hold a Class
"A" CDL, a minimum of two years driving
experience, good MVR record, knowledge of
DOT rules and able to pass a DOT physical
and drug screen. Route delivery experience
is preferred, but not required.
If you meet these qualifications and wish to
apply for a driving position with us, please
stop by our main lobby Monday through
Friday between the hours of 8am and 4pm
to complete an employment application.
McLane Southeast Dothan
100 McLane Parkway
Cottonwood, AL 36320
Phone: (334) 678-2707
Fax: (334) 678-2754
E-mail: ronald.paulk mclaneco.com
(Take Highway 231 south to the Florida
state line. Turn left onto State Line Road.
McLane is 1 mile down on right.)
E.O.E.






McLANE.
Distribution Center
Supervisor


McLane Company, one of the largest
grocery wholesale companies in the nation,
is looking for a Distribution Center
Supervisor to join our Dothan, AL Team.
This position reports directly to the
Distribution Center Manager and is
responsible for the day to day operations
of a fast paced department staffed with
approximately 25+ employees.
Responsibilities include meeting daily
production standards; employee relations,
staffing, meeting order quality standards,
daily housekeeping and misc. reporting.
The ideal candidate will possess a
bachelor's degree and at least two to four
years hands on experience in the functional
areas listed above. Must also possess
excellent communication and computer
skills. Experience in the distribution
industry is preferred, but not required.
McLane Company offers an excellent salary,
annual bonus plan and benefits that include
medical, dental, vision, life, STD, LTD, and
401k. If you are interested in applying for
this position, you may stop by our main
lobby Monday through Friday between the
hours of 8am and 4pm or forward your
resume and salary history to:
McLane Southeast Dothan
Attn: Human Resources
100 McLane Parkway
Cottonwood, AL 36320
Phone: (334) 678-2707
Fax: (334) 678-2754
E-mail: ronald.paulk@mclaneco.com
(Take Highway 231 south to the Florida
state line. Turn left onto State Line Road.
McLane is 1 mile down on right.)
E.O.E.


( 1) EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


Classes Forming Now
for Medical Assisting,
DFOR TIS Electrical Trades and
FORTIS More!
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

( ) RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Orchard Pointe Apartments
Now accepting applications for 1 BR Apts.
Call or come by to pick up
application
4445 Orchard Pointe Dr.
Marianna. Call 850-482-4259 .


(S)


(Q)


PETS & ANIMALS


7

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I







n A Tuesday( 1 Februar~. 19) 201~ n :19l lllt il~r~l


2BR/1BA House Hwy 90
Grand Ridge $425. Mo. + $425. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
3/2 hardwood floors, CH&A
2940 Dogwood St. close to Riverside school.
$875. mo. 718-6541

3BR 2BA House In Dogwood Hts, W/D, pets
welcome, fenced yard, storage shed. $800 +
dep 850-557-2198 ask for Marcus

Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
*l 850- 526-3355 4-
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountryliving.com.
850-209-8847 4m
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

.* 2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595

2BR 1.5BA at Millpond $495 + dep. very nice,
water/sewer/lawn maintenance included,
access to pond, No pets 850-209-3970
2BR 1 BA MH'S in Alford, $380 mo. $380. dep.
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851

w 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot.in Sneads. 850-209-8595

RESIDENTIAL
L J REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Eufaula two acres with older model, two bed-
room, one bath single wide trailer With front
deck, a back porch, small garage, and lean to
for boat. Located in the White Oaks area; a
mile from White Oaks park and boat launch
ramp. Great for beginner home, just starting a
family, college student, or just a fishing get
away. $35,000 or best offer. 334-733-6625

Va RECREATION


4-Wheeler: 2011 Polaris Sportsman 800 EFI, 4x4,
91 miles, adult owned $5,500. Call 334-796-8136
Honda 2007 Foreman ATV ; 2-wheel & 4-wheel
Drive. Electric wench, 190 hours on it; $4800
Firm; 334-596-9966
MEI E T"


Xtreme

Boats
XMY


Packages From
$4,995
All Welded
All Aluminum Boats


i1 o--
o .... .. ,, ,

:' o: I0 0 'I :

"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured




For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Bonded References Available

850-526-2336




Clay 0Neal's MET
Land Clearing, inc. alNmm,Pomx8
ALTHA, PL A UEP.m
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055 20YEADBM |
F E T L IN


Winnebago 1995 33 ft. Vectra CH&A, auto
leveling, Q-bed, new tires & batteries, new frig,
7.5 onan, Lg. awning and more !
$23,000 OBO 334-585-6689.

TRANSPORTATION


Spyder 1979 Fiat 2000 Classic Italian Sports
Car,Restored, Asking $13,479, Serious inquiries
only, 850-526-4394


BMW 2012 X5: X drive 3.5d. 11000 miles. All
wheel drive sports package twin turbo diesel,
30 mpg on road, double sunroof, all options,
five passenger black with cinnamon interior.
Transferable warranty to 50k, & maintenance
included. $55,000. Call 229-220-1537
Chevrolet 2004 Impala,
S$4999.00 Call 334-714-
2700.



S .' .- ., Dodge 2000 Dakota SLT
SClub Cab, V-6, 98,000
miles, clean. $5450, Call
334-790-7959.

a MFord 2000 Mustang, New
paint sharp car.
$5999.00. Call 334-714'
2700.


f Honda 2000 Accord,
B' $4999.00 Call
ej' 334-714-2700.


PI Honda 2008 Accord EXL:
4 doors, 1 owner, white, 75k
Smiles, sliding moon roof,
power driver seat, 5 Disc
CD changer, leather,
keyless entry, power windows.
$14,500. Call 334-493-7700
Honda 2009 Fit Sport Silver, only 16900 miles,
garage kept, like new condition, alloy wheels,
great gas mileage. $13,600. Call 334-446-0681.
---s' HONDA 2012 ACCORD
8B, i COUPE V6 WITH AUTO-
NMATIC TRANSMISSION.
S- SUNROOF, NAVIGATION,
HEATED LEATHER SEATS FULLY LOADED. NO
ACCIDENTS NOR HAS IT BEEN SMOKED IN.
HAVE CARFAX TO SHOW AS WELL. APPROX.
6,000 MILES AND IM ASKING $27,000. CAR LIST-
ED $32,800, NEW. CALL 334-268-3900.
: .* Mercury 1999 Grand Mar-
quis GS, loaded, leather,
new tires, 106,000 miles,
like new, $4500. Call 334-
790-7959.
SNissan 2004 Altima, Low
Miles, NADA Retail:
$8950.00, $7999.00. Call
334-714-2700.


Toyota 2000 Camry,
Clean vehicle, $4999.00.
.... ...: .. EI Call 334-714-2700.


Toyota 2011 Camry SE, 4dr., auto, pwr pkg.,
white, 10,000 miles odm, show room condition
with extended warranty. $18,500. 850-569-2215,
850-718-5461 or 850-718-7105.


GMC 2001 Yukon SLT: Fully loaded, white and
silver, 201k miles, runs great $6,000. Call 334-
796-8136
Lexus 2002 RX300 white & silver with tan int.
sunroof, tinted windows, 6 disc cd changer,
new tires, exc. cond. 135K mi.
$9,900. 334-797-9290


SChevrolet 1998 Silverado
Ext Cab: green, 3 doors,
5 351) V8, cold AC and runs
great. $5,500. NEG. Call
334-718-9617
Dodge 1996 2500 with Cummings Engine:
standard cab with long bed, good tires, clean
cab, 230k miles, $3,600. Call 850-482-8818
Dodge 1998 Dakota Ext
,. Cab: power steering, cold
AC. 160k miles, blue,
$2.500. OBO
Call 334-798-1768 or 334-
691-7111

Dodge 2011 Ram 2500 crew cab, 4x4 LWB,
Black & Pearl, 6.7 liter Cummins Diesel,
navigation, leather, back up camera, sirius
radio, remote start, all the extras 18K miles
$43,500. 334-793-6281.
Ford 2003 Ranger P/U XLT 6 cyl. 26K actual
miles, extra clean $8000. 334-897-5648.
Ford 2004 Super Duty 4dr. 4 wheel drive, F-550
with hydraulic, 2 bale bed, exc. cond. 160K
miles $22,500. 334-347-7466 or 334-797-7289.
Massey Ferguson 1010 small tractor
3 cyl. diesel also comes with a 4 ft. bush hog
& box bladb $3000. 334-798-1221.
WATD*UO


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664

CASH Guaranteed
Highest prices paid for Junk,
old Farming Equipment,
Tractors, Semi Junk Cars
Nothing to big,
nothing to small
So call a Cash Cow Now!






) 33-435-5015 or 334- 596-9270
We pay finders fee of $25. & up
For your Convience FREE Pick up!
ROLL TIDE !!!!

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LEGALS


LF160038
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-390-CA
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BILLY W. GRICE; EDNA M. GRICE; HIS WIFE;
JOHN DOE AND MARY DOE;
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in
the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
Jackson County, Florida, I will sell the property
situate in Jackson County, Florida, described
as:
PARCEL 1
A LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND IN JACKSON COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE


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, n n ' I


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SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE
SE 1/4 OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 NORTH,
RANGE 9 WEST AND RUN THENCE NORTH 88
DEGREES 19 FEET 22 INCHES EAST 146.87 FEET
TO THE WEST SIDE OF NINTH STREET; THENCE
NORTH 02 DEGREES 20 FEET 30 INCHES EAST
ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF NINTH STREET
1005.13 FEET TO THE STARTING POINT; THENCE
NORTH 02 DEGREES 20 FEET 30 INCHES EAST
ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF NINTH STREET 100
FEET; THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 39 FEET 30
INCHES WEST 190.0 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 02
DEGREES 20 FEET 30 INCHES WEST 100 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES 39 FEET 30 INCHES
EAST 190.0 FEET TO THE STARTING POINT. SAID
PARCEL BEING IN THE NE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 NORTH, RANGE 9
WEST.
PARCEL 2
A LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND IN JACKSON COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE
SE 1/4 OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 NORTH,
RANGE 9 WEST AND THENCE N88 DEGREES 19
FEET 22 INCHES E, 146.87 FEET TO THE WEST
SIDE OF NINTH STREET; THENCE N2 DEGREES
20 FEET 30 INCHES E, ALONG THE WEST SIDE
OF NINTH STREET 905.13 FEET TO THE START-
ING POINT; THENCE N2 DEGREES 20 FEET 30 IN-
CHES E, ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF NINTH
STREET 100.00 FEET; THENCE N87 DEGREES 39
FEET 30 INCHES W, 190.00 FEET; THENCE S2 DE-
GREES 20 FEET 30 INCHES W, 100.00 FEET;
THENCE 587 DEGREES 39 FEET 30 INCHES E,
190.00 FEET TO THE STARTING POINT. SAID
PARCEL BEING IN THE NE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 NORTH, RANGE 9
WEST
PARCEL 3
A LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND IN JACKSON COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE
SE 1/4 OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 NORTH,
RANGE 9 WEST AND THENCE N88 DEGREES 19
FEET 22 INCHES E, 146.87 FEET TO THE WEST
SIDE OF NINTH STREET; THENCE N2 DEGREES
20 FEET 30 INCHES E, ALONG THE WEST SIDE
OF NINTH STREET 805.13 FEET TO THE START-
ING POINT; THENCE N2 DEGREES 20 FEET 30 IN-
CHES E, ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF NINTH
STREET 100.00 FEET; THENCE N87 DEGREES 39
FEET 30 INCHES W, 190.00 FEET; THENCE S2 DE-,
GREES 20 FEET 30 INCHES W, 100.00 FEET;
THENCE S87 DEGREES 39 FEET 30 INCHES E,
190.00 FEET TO THE STARTING POINT. SAID
PARCEL BEING IN THE NE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 NORTH, RANGE 9
WEST
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
for cash, At the North Door of the Jackson
County Courthouse at 11:00 a.m., on March 14,
2013.
DATED THIS 11 DAY OF FEB, 2013.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the
11 day of FEB, 2013.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Zoe Hatcher
Deputy Clerk
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Attorneys for Plaintiff j
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact Court Administration at P.O.
Box826, Marianna, Florida, 32447. Phone num-:
ber 850-718-0026, Email: ADARequest@judl4.flc
ourts. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-
8771 at least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately upon receiv-
ing this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance js less than 7 days; if
you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.

LF160040
INVITATION TO BID
Notice is given hereby that Jackson County
Board of County Commissioners
Will accept sealed bids, submitted in duplicate,
for the furnishing of all labor, materials, equip-
ment and services in accordance with the
Plans, Specifications and Contract Documents
prepared by BTK Engineering Services, Inc.,
and described in general as:
BID#: 1213-22
BID NAME: Jackson County Library Stem Wall
Repair 2828 Green St. Marianna FI.
MANDATORY CONTRACTORS MEETING 8:30
AM C.T. March 7th 2013 at the Main Library
2828 Green St. Marianna Fl. 32446.
SEALED BIDS: are due March 14th 2013 2:00PM
CT at the Jackson County Purchasing Depart-
ment 2864 Madison St. Marianna FI, 32448
BID OPENING March 15th 2013 10:00AM CT.
Bid opening to be held in the Commission
Board Room 2864 Madison St. Marianna Fl.
32448AllII interested parties are invited to at-
tend.
The envelope containing the Bid must be
sealed, addressed to Jackson County Board of
County Commissioners and designated Project
1213-22 "Jackson County Library Stem Wall Re-
pair".
Proposed Contract Documents may be exam-
ined at the office of Pamela Pichard: on line at
our web page www.jacksoncountyfl.net click
of purchasing the current bids.
Jackson County Board of County Commission-
ers Attn: Pamela Pichard, Administrative Serv-
ices Director 2864 Madison Street Marianna,
Florida 32448 (850-482-9633)
Bona fide general contract bidders may secure
copies of the proposed Contract Documents
from the office of the Pamela Plchard on the
following basis: no partial sets will be Issued.
The Owner reserves the right to waive any
informalities or to reject any or all bids.
Bidder must deposit with his or her bid, securi-
ty in the amount of five percent (5%) of the


base bid. No bids shall be withdrawn for a peri-
od of ten days after the date set for opening
thereof.
Dale Rabon Guthrie
Clerk of Courts
Chuck Lockey
Commission Chairman
EEO STATEMENT
Jackson County is committed to assuring equal
opportunity in the award of contracts and,
therefore; complies with all laws prohibiting
discrimination on the basis of race, color, reli-
gion, national origin, age and sex.


DECLASSIFIED


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850.482.2332

Bernard
Franklin Hill

Bernard Franklin "Bud-
dy" Hill, 76, of Grand
Ridge, Florida, joined his
father, mother and daugh-
ter in heaven with our Lord
Jesus Christ, on February
15,2013.
He was an exceptional
mechanic and a southern
gentleman hobby farmer
with an incredible "green
thumb." He loved his fam-
ily, the soil, driving his
tractor, growing things,
and all of God's creatures.
Born in Chattahoochee, He
was a former resident of
Jacksonville and had resid-
ed in Grand Ridge for the
past 15 years. Mr. Hill was a
USAF reserve veteran.
He deeply loved his
home, his family, and his
friends, and he was deeply
loved in return. He will be
greatly missed by those re-
maining, until the time
they join him with our Lord
in heaven. *
He is preceded in death
by his father, Bernard
"Bunk" Hill, his mother,
Ocy J. Hill, and his daugh-
ter, Julie Lorraine Hill-
Stringer.
He is survived by his
daughter, M. Renee Hill;
his son, Kenneth W. Hill;
his granddaughters,
Shawna D. Risso and Tiffa-
ny R. Jernigan; his sister
Jeanette Savalonis, and


Teacher
From Page 1A
interview students about
concerns that had been
called in to the DCF
registry.
He said Monday that he
hadn't yet read some of the
material that his office had
received from DCF related
to those talks and so could
not provide any more spe-
cific information.
He did comment that an
investigator with his de-
partment had read the file
and suggested that DCF's
initial work did not result
in findings that created
cause for immediate ac-
tion related to the safety of
students. Roberts also said
two of his deputies who
serve as school resource
officers at MHS had sat in
on the DCF interviews and
that they heard nothing in
those sessions that would
indicate any action of a
criminal nature on Sum-
mers' part.
Despite Summers' death,
Roberts said his office ex-
pects to launch a frll in-
vestigation into the mat-
ter today. The goal is to
try to determine whether
anything inappropriate
had occurred or passed
between Summers and
any of his students so that
measures could be taken,
if needed, to assist any af-
fected student and to re-
solve the matter.
Summers, 61, hadworked
at Marianna High School
since August of 1984. He
taught social studies, Lat-
in 1 and 2 and advanced
placement American his-
tory, and he was the year-
book sponsor. He would
have turned 62 in March.
News of his death
prompted an informal can-
dlelight vigil on the MHS
campus Sunday night.
On social networking
sites, some current and
former students expressed
their dismay over the loss
of Summers.
On Twitter, some shared
their reactions using the
"#RIPSummers" hashtag.
Joe Oswald, of the MHS
class of 1988, posted com-
ments about Summers on
Facebook. He wrote:
"Here's some of what
John Summers taught me:
1) How to make speaking
a dead language fun and


Obituaries

many extended family
members and friends.
Graveside funeral serv-
ices will be at 2 pm, CST,
Thursday, February 21,
2013 at Shady Grove Ceme-
'tery with Rev. Jack Howell
officiating, James & Sikes
Funeral Home Sneads
Chapel directing.
The family will receive
friends from 4 to 6 pm
Wednesday, February 20,
2013 at James & Sikes Fu-
neral Home Sneads Chap-
el.
Expressions of Sympathy
may be made online at http
www.jamesandsikesfuneral
homes.com

Lanier-Andler
Funeral Home
Sneads, FL
850-593-9900

Earle Ross

Mr. Earle Ross, age 82, a
resident of Jackson County,
Florida since 1966, passed
away at his home in
Dellwood, Florida, Friday,
February 15, 2013, after a
lengthy illness.
He was surrounded by
his loving wife and family.
He was born in Louisville,
Kentucky and had retired
as an Electrician with the
Georgia Pacific Paper Mill,
and was also a U. S. Air
Force Veteran serving dur-
ing the Korean Conflict.
He was a past member of
Sneads American Legion
Post 241, and present
member Ensley Masonic
Lodge 278, past President
of the Electricians Union in
Cedar Springs, Georgia,
and also loved to canoe in
all the wilderness areas he


could find.
Earle is survived by his
wife, Iris A. Ross of
Dellwood, Florida; his
daughter, Karen B. Hansen
and her husband David of
Jacksonville, Florida and
his son, Earle A. Ross of
Dellwood, Florida. He is
.also survived by two grand-
children, Earle Rufus Ross
and Carianne Ross and six
great grandchildren.
A Memorial/Visitation
Service is going to take
place at Lanier-Andler Fu-
neral Home Chapel, Wed-
nesday, February 20, 2013,
at 2:00 PM CST.
The family welcomes
house plants if you wish
but for those wanting to
give memorials, please do
so to the Covenant Hos-
pice, 4215 Kelson Avenue,
Suite E, Marianna, Florida
32446.
Lanier-Andler Funeral
Home of Sneads, Florida is
in charge of arrangements.
Ph 850-593-9900.


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com

John E.
Summers, Jr.

John E. Summers, Jr., 61,
of Marianna, died Sunday,
February 17, 2013, at his
residence.
Funeral Arrangements
will be announced by
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel.


"He was a wonderful man and he was my
friend... It's sadfor me, now, that I didn't
have that one more moment with him."
SReme HopkMns
former co-worker of Marianna High School teacher John Summers,
who died over the weekend


engaging and if you can
make that fun and engag-
ing you can make almost
anything fun and engag-
ing. This is reflected in
the work I do today with
Cub Scouts maybe at
the next Den meeting we'll
play some Rota.
2) How to properly frame
a photograph and capture
candid shots as a result
198 of my photos are in
our 1988 senior yearbook
that I'm extremely proud
of. This is reflected in every
photo I've taken of myfam-
ily and friends ever since
then and has enabled me
to not just capture faces
but the emotions and feel-
ings felt in a moment as
well. This is just two from a
much longer list. You'll be
missed, Mr. Summers."
Chris Parish from the
MHS Class of 1988 posted
this remark to his Facebook
page late Sunday, with the
help of Google Translate,
in a nod to Summers as a
teacher of Latin:
"Ego miserable vale Mr
Aestivorum (Summers).
Vos erant doctor magnus.
Vestra praeterita et prae-
sentia alumni carebitis te
ducente. Di lovis Olympi
months iter facientem vigi-
lare in posterum. Requies-
cant in pace."
Translated, it says, rough-
ly: "I sadly (say) farewell
Mr. Summers (Summers).
You were a great teacher.
Your past and present stu-
dents will miss your lead-
ership. The gods of Mount
Olympus, Zeus (are) going
to watch in the future. Rest
in peace."
Former MHS co-worker
Renee Hopkins held Sum-
mers in high regard. A for-
mer librarian at MHS and
now a librarian at Chipola
College, Hopkins said she
considers him one of the
school's greatest assets.
"He was a wonder-
ful man and he was my
friend," Hopkins said. "He
had a true love of teach-
ing. He loved knowledge
and he loved offering that
knowledge to students.
"He lived and breathed


Marianna High School. He
expected the best from his
students and he provided
them with the materials
they needed to do their
best. His yearbooks won
all kind of awards through
the years, and I .think that
was really something for
a school of that size. He
worked very hard on the
yearbook and he was truly
dedicated to the education
of his students.
"I was at the school two
weeks ago for an English
class, to meet with a dual-
enrolled group, and, as a
rule, I would stop in and
see him if I was on cam-
pus. But I looked into his
classroom that day and
everyone was listening
intently. The entire class
was engaged, and I knew
he had a true educational
moment going. So I didn't
stop. I didn't want to inter-
rupt that. It's sad for me,
now, that I didn't have that
one more moment with
him."
On Summers' faculty
page of the MHS website,
he had posted a message
to parents at some un-
known point in his career.
He gave them tips about
how to ensure their stu-
dents success.
Summers encouraged
them to have their children
in school every day and to
make sure they study regu-
larly, not just the night be-
fore an exam.
On the home page of the
school's website, someone
had posted a picture of
Summers and a note say-
ing he would be missed,
referring to him as "Mr.
MHS."
Jackson County School
Superintendent Steve Ben-
ton and Marianna High
School Principal Sarieta
Russ could not be immedi-
ately reached for informa-
tion about how the school
will proceed with Sum-
mers' classes and other
responsibilities.
In Summers' remem-
brance, MHS flew its flags
at half staff for a time fol-
lowing his death.


Drug task force nets



three in traffic stops


Staff Report

Traffic- stops conducted
by the Jackson County
Drug Task Force last week
resulted in the arrests of
three area residents on
drug charges.
In a press release about
the arrests, the task force
indicated that they were
related to two separate
investigations into the
manufacture and pos-
session of methamphet-
amine and listed chemi-
cals often used to make
the drug.
The arrest of Zachery
Scott Outler, 29, of Foun-
tain, came lastWednesday
when officers pulled over a
silver Toyota on Interstate
10 near the Penn Avenue
interchange, according to
a press release from the
task force. Officers iden-
tified Outler as the back
seat passenger during the
stop, and say he "had been
in possession of meth-
amphetamine and drug
paraphernalia commonly
used to smoke metham-
phetamine." Officials say
he tried to conceal the
methamphetamine and
paraphernalia inside the
car. He was arrested and
charged with possession
of a controlled substance-
methamphetamine and
with possession of drug
paraphernalia.


Arrests
From Page 1A

Officers also arrested
Gary M. Tollar of Sneads
on three warrants for
the sale of a controlled
substance-cocaine.
Three of the men
charged in the round of
investigations were al-
ready in jail on pending
cases. They include Jamar
Ramon White of Sneads,
now newly charged with
three counts of the sale of
a controlled substance-
marijuana; Gary Jerome
Davis Jr., newly charged


Roads
From Page 1A

from the NWS indicate a
possibility of 5-6 inches of
rainfall.
That could lead to more
flooding issues, especially
along the Chipola River
and those areas that are
already saturated due to
the previous week's rain.
The forecast is subject
to change, according to
JCEM, which provided
the information as a pre-


Outler

In a separate
tion the same
rolet Cavalier
over on Bl
Road near Po
Road. Officer
the driver of
Bobby Dear
and his passe
cy NeSmith C
Sneads.
During the
nine was depl
the exterior o
alerted to the
cotics, officik
a result, a s
car was con
ficers report
"items cons
the manufact
amphetaminei
with ammu
concealed w
"were within
access to Du
"posed a th
enforcement.
Offices lear
the stop tha
was on proba
session of m
amine, accord
release. The
alerted Duna'


tion officer
and, after
the traffic
Sstop was
d done, met
Sws the proba-
ue Springs The probation officer
Dunaway Croft at the resi-
dence Du-
te investiga- naway andCroftshare on
day, a Chev- Sand Ridge Church Road
wras pulled near Sneads.
ue Springs The probation officer
plar Springs inspected the home and
rs identified found a glass pipe "con-
Sthat car as sistent with the use of
SoDunaway methamphetamine," ac-
ger as Tra- cording to the release.
roft, both of Following that discovery,
the task force obtained
stop, a ca- a search warrant for the
oyed tosniff home and, according to
f the car and therelease, found chemi-
odorof ar- calls, drug paraphernalia
als said. As and ammunition in the
each of the dwelling when they ex-
ducted. Of- ecuted the warrant.
ted finding Dunaway was arrested
istent with and charged with theat-
ure ofmeth- tempted manufacture of
e," along methamphetamine, pos-
nition and session of listed chemi-
eapons that cals, carrying a concealed
Immediate weapon, possession of
away" and ammunitionby aconvict-
reat to law ed felon, and violation of
" state probation.
rned during Croft was arrested on
at Dunaway charges of attempted
tion for pos- manufacture of metham-
aethamphet- phetamine, possession of
rding to the listed chemicals, and be-
task force ing a felon in possession
way's proba- of ammunition.


with one count of the sale
of a controlled substance-
cocaine; and Henry John-
son of Sneads, newly
charged with three counts
of the sale of a controlled
substance-methamphet-
amine.
Outstanding warrants
exist for the arrests of Jer-
rell Lovett of Marianna,
wanted on two counts of
the sale of a controlled
substance-cocaine; Ste-
ven Kuster of Sneads,
wanted on one count of
the sale of a controlled
substance-methamphet-
amine; Harry McCalister
,III of Sneads, wanted on
two counts of the sale of


cautionary note for those
living in areas prone to
flooding or that have
flooded in the past.
Those living near the
river are asked to con-
tinue to monitor forecasts
and news outlets for fur-
ther information as it be-
comes available.
The Jackson County
Road and Bridge Depart-
ment announced on
Monday the reopening
of area roads that were
closed or obstructed by
water due to last week's
heavy rains.


a controlled substance
cocaine; Michael T. Bell
of Marianna, wanted on
one count of the sale of
a controlled substance-
cocaine, and one count
of the sale of a controlled
substance-marijuana;
and Antoinette Jones
of Marianna, wanted
on one count of traf-
ficking in a controlled
substance-Hydrocodone.
Anyone with informa-
tion on the whereabouts
of the five wanted in-
dividuals is asked to
call the Jackson County
Sheriff's Office at 482-
9648 or CrimeStoppers at
526-5000.


Five previously closed
roadways are now open.
Those reopened
roadways include the
following:
a New Bridge Road
(from Old US Road to
Pleasant Ridge Road).
n Bumpnose Road (by
White Pond Road).
n Baker Creek Road (at
Christoff Ferry Road).
) Ulyss Road (from Sell-
ers Road to Pleasant Ridge
Road).
n St. Phillips Road (from
Highway 2 to Holyneck
Road).


What

makes a

curious

reader?



You do.


Read to your child today and inspire a lifelong love of reading.


m
LIMIIAHYOf
CONGRESS


www.read.gov


Jackson County Vault & Monuments

Come Visit us at our NEW LOCATION
3424 West Highway 90 (3/10Wmle west from our previous location)
i 850-482-041 I


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY19, 2013 9A E


LOCAL / FROM THE FRONT








JACKSON COUNTY FLO'RIDAN o www.jcfloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Syrian Kurdish refugees makes traditional bread in a tent in the Dumiz refugee camp in northern Iraq. Syrian Kurds who fled
their country's civil war have mixed feelings about a future without Bashar Assad.


Refugee feelings mixed on Syria


The Associated Press

DOMIZ REFUGEE CAMP,
Iraq (AP) Syrian Kurds
who fled their country's
civil war have mixed feel-
ings about a future with-
out Bashar Assad: They
hope to win a measure of
autonomy after the fall of
the regime, but fear chaos
and the rise of Islamists
could instead make their
lives worse.
More than 81,000 Syrian
Kurds have found refuge
in northern Iraq's autono-
mous Kurdish region in
recent months and hun-
dreds more arrive every
day. Few seem in a rush to
go home.
The Kurdistan Regional
Government allows Kurds
from Syria to work and
move freely in the three
provinces of northern Iraq
it controls. Some 30,000
refugees still live in a camp
of tents and cinderblock
shacks near the Syrian
border, while the rest have


found jobs and homes in
towns across the autono-
mous region.
Even those struggling
with the hardships of
camp life say they prefer to
stay in Iraq after the fall of
the regime, until they have
a better idea how Islamists
and other groups in the
Sunni Arab-dominated
Syrian opposition will deal
with Kurds, Syria's largest
ethnic minority.
"If the Muslim Brother-
hood takes over and there
are problems in the fu-
ture, we want to stay here,"
said Faroush Fattah, a 28-
year-old laborer from the
northeastern Syrian town
of Qamishli who arrived
in the Domiz camp three
months ago.
The refugees' ambiva-
lence about the upheaval
in Syria is shared by Iraqi
Kurdish leaders, who have
carved out an increasingly
prosperous quasi-state in
the autonomous region,
aided by an oil-fueled eco-


nomic boom.
Kurdish autonomy in
post-Assad Syria, similar
to the Iraqi model, could
strengthen long-standing
Kurdish demands for an
independent homeland
for the more than 25 mil-
lion Kurds in parts of Tur-
key, Iran, Syria and Iraq.
But the emergence of
yet another autonomous
Kurdish region would like-
ly spook Turkey, a regional
power that is key to plans
by Iraq's Kurds to export
their oil riches directly, if
necessary without permis-
sion from the central Iraqi
government.
Turkey is home to an es-
timated 15 million Kurds,
some with self-rule aspi-
rations, and has been bat-
tling Kurdish insurgents
for nearly three decades.
Adding to Turkey's con-
cerns, the dominant Kurd-
ish faction in Syria, the
Democratic Union Party,
or PYD, is seen as an off-
shoot of the Kurdistan


Workers' Party, or PKK, the
leader of the armed rebel-
lion in Turkey.
The president of Iraq's
Kurdish region, Massoud
Barzani, has tried to ex-
ert influence over Syrian
Kurdish groups. Last year,
he helped form an umbrel-
la group of Syrian Kurdish
groups that includes the
PYD and smaller factions
loyal to him.
"Barzani has some sway
over Syrian Kurds," said
Washington-based Turkey
expert Soner Cagaptay. "He
has been reaching out to a
spectrum of Syrian Kurds,
including the PYD, to stop
the hostile rhetoric and at-
titude toward Turkey"
Falah Mustafa, in charge
of the Barzani govern-
ment's foreign relations,
said Iraqi Kurds want to
make sure their Syrian
counterparts are, united
when negotiating their
role in a post-Assad Syria
with the Sunni Arab-led
opposition.


Obama offering


immigration


plan as backup


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
White House is downplay-
ing its draft immigration
proposal as merely a back-
up plan if lawmakers don't
come up with an overhaul
of their own. It won't be
necessary, Republican and
Democratic lawmakers
alike are telling the Obama
administration.
White House chief of
staff Denis McDonough
said Sunday that President
Barack Obama wants to
"be prepared" in case the
small bipartisan group of
senators fails to devise a
plan for the estimated 11
million illegal immigrants
in the United States. In re-
sponse, lawmakers assured
the White House they are
working on their own plan
-and warned that Obama
would be heading toward
failure if the White House
gets ahead of them.
"We will be prepared
with our own plan if these
ongoing talks between Re-
publicans and Democrats
up on Capitol Hill break
down," McDonough said,
adding he's optimistic they
would not crumble.
But he was equally real-
istic about the fierce parti-
sanship on Capitol Hill.
"Well, let's make sure
that it doesn't have to be
proposed," McDonough
said of the president's
pitch, first reported on
USA Today's website late
Saturday.
Even so, the administra-
tion is moving forward on
its own immigration agen-
da should one of Obama's


top priorities get derailed.
The administration's
proposal would create a
visa for those in the coun-
try illegally and. allow
them to become legal per-
manent residents within
eight years. The proposal
also requires businesses
to know the immigration
status of their workers
and adds more funding for
border security.
It drew immediate criti-
cism from Sen. Marco Ru-
bio, R-Fla., one of the eight
lawmakers searching for a
comprehensive plan.
"If actually proposed,
the president's bill would
be dead on arrival in
Congress, leaving us with
unsecured borders and a
broken legal immigration
system for years to come,"
said Rubio, who has been
a leading GOP spokesman
on immigration.
Many of the details in
the administration's draft
proposal follow the broad
principles that Obama
previously outlined. But
the fact the administration
is writing its own alterna-
tive signaled Obama wants
to address immigration
sooner rather than later
and perhaps was looking
to nudge lawmakers to
move more quickly.
The tactic could compli-
cate the administration's
work with Congress.
David Axelrod, who was
a senior adviser to Obama's
re-election campaign, ac-
knowledged Monday that
it likely was a mistake for
news of the Obama im-
migration plan to be made
public.


Coast Guard: Cause of cruise ship engine-room fire was a leak


The Associated Press

ATLANTA A leak in a
fuel oil return line caused
the engine-room fire that
disabled a Carnival cruise
ship at sea, leaving 4,200
people without power or
working toilets for fire
days, a Coast Guard official
said Monday.
Cmdr. Teresa Hatfield
addressed the finding in
a conference call with
reporters and estimated
that the investigation of the
disabled ship, the Carnival
Triumph, would take six
months.
Hatfield said the
Bahamas where the ship
is registered, or flagged -
is leading the investigation,
with the Coast Guard and
National Transportation
Safety Board representing


U.S. interests in the
probe. The vessel was in
international waters at the
time of the incident.
She said investigators
have been with the ship
since it arrived Thursday
in Mobile. Since then,
she said, interviews have
been conducted with
passengers and crew and
forensic analysis has been
performed on the ship.
She said the crew
responded appropriately
to the fire. "They did a very
good job," she said.
In an email after
Monday's conference call,
Coast Guard spokesman
Carlos Diaz described the
oil return line that leaked
as stretching from the
ship's No. 6 engine to the
fuel tank.
A Carnival Cruise Lines


I'



THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carnival Triumph is towed into Mobile Bay near Dauphin Island,
Ala. on Feb. 14.A leak in a fuel oil return line caused the engine-
room fire that disabled the ship.


spokesman said in an email
Monday that the company
agrees with the Coast
Guard's findings about the
fire source.
Andrew Coggins, a
former Navy commander
who was a chief engineer


and is now a professor at
Pace University in New
York and an expert on the
cruise industry, said the
fire could potentially have
been serious.
"The problem is the oil's
under pressure," he said.


Russians investigating adoptee's death


The Associated Press

DALLAS Russian au-
thorities have blamed "in-
human treatment" for the
death of a 3-year-old boy
adopted by an. American
family, but Texas officials
say they are still investigat-
ing claims that the child
was abused before his
death.
Russia's Investigative
Committee said Monday
that it had questions about
the death of an adoptee
authorities identified as
Maxim Kuzmin. The com-
mittee is the country's top
investigative agency.
Texas Child Protective
Services spokesman Pat-
rick Crimmins confirmed
the agency had received
a report on Jan. 21 of the
death of a 3-year-old
named Max Shatto, and
that the Ector County Sher-
iff's Office in West Texas
was investigating.
Crimmins said CPS had
received allegations of
physical abuse and ne-
glect, but had not deter-
mined whether those alle-
gations were true. Sgt. Gary
jDuesler, spokesman for the


Ector County Sheriff's Of-
fice, said no arrests have
been made and authori-
ties are waiting for autopsy
results.
An obituary for Max
Shatto published Jan. 26 by
the Midland Reporter-Tele-
gram says he was born on
Jan. 9, 2010, in the town of
Pskov, near Russia's west-
ern border with Estonia.
The boy lived with a family
in Gardendale, about 350
miles west of Dallas, before
his death on Jan. 21, ac-
cording to the obituary.
The boy's listed adoptive
parents, Alan and Laura
Shatto, did not return a
phone message Monday.
The death comes weeks
after Russia announced it
was banning all American
adoptions in retaliation
for a new U.S. law target-
ing alleged Russian hu-
man-rights violators. The
ban also reflects lingering
resentment over the 60,000
Russian children adopted
by Americans in the past
two decades, of which at
least 19 have died.
Russian Foreign Ministry
official Konstantin Dolgov
said in a statement that


the boy's death was "yet
another case of inhuman
treatment of a Russian
child adopted by American
parents."
Duesler said he could not
immediately confirm or
deny Russian allegations
of abuse. Most U.S. govern-
ment offices were closed
Monday in observance of a
federal holiday.
Dolgov also accused the
U.S. Department of State
of not helping Russian
consular officials investi-
gate the death. A State De-
partment official said the
government is aware of the
case and "takes very seri-


ously the welfare of chil-
dren, particularly children
who have been adopted
from other countries."
"We will continue to as-
sist the Russian Embassy
and consulate officials in
making contact with the
appropriate authorities
in Texas," said the State
Department official, who
spoke on condition of ano-
nymity because the per-
son was not authorized to
speak on the record about
the matter.
Crimmins said the Rus-
sian consulate had con-
tacted Child Protective
Services.


"What happens in the case
of a fuel oil leak where
you have a fire like that is
it leaks in such a way that
it sprays out in a mist. In
the engine room you ha.e
many hot surfaces, so once
the mist hits a hot surface it
will flash into flame."
If the crew hadn't
reacted quickly and the
fire suppression system
hadn't, worked properly,
he said, "the fire from the
engine room would have
eventually burned through
to other parts of the ship."
Engine room fires that can't
be suppressed generally
result in the loss of the
entire ship, he said.


The Triumph left
Galveston, Texas, on Feb.
7 for a four-day trip to
Mexico. The fire paralyzed
the ship early Feb. 10,
leaving it adrift in the Gulf
of Mexico until tugboats
towed it to Mobile.
Passengers described
harsh conditions on board:
overflowing toilets, long
lines for food, foul odors
and tent cities for sleeping
on deck.
Hatfieldsaidinvestigators
from the Coast Guard and
NTSB would stay with the
ship until about the end
of the week, then continue
work at their respective
offices.


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