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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01019
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text


Chlipol
to rv ; *


FLOOD W


TERS


.I'


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


RIGHT:
Unperturbed
by chilly
and windy
weather,
an egret
surveys the
suddenly
sodden
landscape
of Citizens
Lodge from
its perch
Thursday
afternoon.


New group aims to

harness the healing

power of pink


BYANGIECOOK
acook@jcfloridan.com
A Cottondale couple
is getting ready to turn
heads with a new pink fire
truck.
Philip Meadows, a re-
tired firefighter and in-
structor at Chipola Col-
lege, and his wife Lori
Meadows, former chair of
Central Jackson Relay for
Life, have organized a lo-
cal chapter of Guardians
of the Ribbon/Pink Heals,
the national organization
known for its advocacy
for cancer sufferers and
its colorful police cars and
fire trucks.
In fact, it was a local ap-
pearance by the Jackson-
ville chapter's Pink Heals
fire truck that sparked the
idea for the new chapter,
and led to the creation of
its own rolling ambassa-
dor, "Connie."
Lori Meadows, in a
phone interview Thurs-
day, said the goal of the
Guardians of the Ribbon/


) CLASSIFIEDS...5B


Pink Heals Jackson Coun-
ty Chapter, a nonprofit
organization, is to raise
funds that will support
local women battling any
type of cancer. And it's a
topic she saysis dear to
her heart.
Meadows' father passed
away from cancer and her
mother is a breast cancer
survivor, which gives her
a lot of experience car-
ing for those battling the
disease. It also means she
knows about, the finan-
cial problems that can
accompany the medical
problems.
When her mother was
diagnosed, Meadows said,
money was tight. And the
search for financial assis-
tance, while trying to deal
with the illness, was an
unwelcome burden.
That additional struggle
- of putting gas in the car,
paying the light bill, buy-
ing groceries is where
Meadows hopes the new
See PINK, Page 7A


) ENTERTAINMENT...4B


OP: Fast rising
water from the
Chipola River
was flowing into the
park at Citizens Lodge
on Thursday putting
trails, benches and
picnic tables under
water. According to
the National Weather
Service measuring
station located on
Highway 90 in
Marianna, the river
was at 19.76 feet
above flood stage at
2 p.m. Thursday and
is predicted to crest
at 20.4 feet at noon
today. BOTTOM: A
walking-trail bench
and exercise stop at
Citizens Lodge are
transformed into
islands by rising river
water on Thursday.
According to Jackson
County Emergency
Management, the
water will be receding
over the weekend in
areas with minor and
moderate flooding.
However, areas locat-
ed along creeks and
rivers should keep
an eye on conditions
because of water that
has not reached the
county yet.


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
The Jackson County Sheriff's Department detours traffic away from the Marianna
Walmart on Thursday night after a bomb threat was called in at 5:21 p.m. The store was
evacuated. Units from Jackson County Fire Rescue and Emergency Management also
responded to the scene. A sniffer dog was en route from Bay County t6 search the store for
explosives, but further details were unavailable at press time.


) LOCAL...3A


> OBITUARIES...7A


) STATE...8A


) SPORTS...1B


> RELIGIQN...4A


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint



7 65161 80050 9


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('n 2 JobSe 73 PkgScq 003
113RARY O, ORIGIN MI.NED ADC 325
I'O 13OX 112/007, F10RID IffsTORY
L AINESVIILLE FL >3261.-700


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online






FLORIDAN


/


Vol. 90 No.42


MALNN LMR EAUAE


MARIANNA WALMARTEVACUATED

AFTER BOMB THREAT







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


High 520
Low -28


Saturday
Sunny, breezy & cold.


/L
-


High 65
Low -490


Monday
Mostly sunny & mild.


Sunday
Stays cold.


High 68%
Low 430


Tuesday
Scattered showers & storms.


. f igh 66
Lo w:38




\ighl 67'.,
l U f *^ L36

S Lo%,: 40


PRECIPITA TION


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MID
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0 .' "'
2.60"


Ye.ii in Ijre
Norni.d VYTD
Normal for year


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


11:49 PM
12:35 PM
11:54 PM
1:05 AM
1:39 AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
63.24 ft.
19.80 ft.
19.74 ft.
14.81 ft.


- 12:52 PM
- 7:26 AM
- 1:25 PM
- 1:58 PM
- 2:31 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3 4 .


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:21 AM
Sunset. 5:29 PM
Moonrise 9:24 AM
Moonset 11:01 PM


Mar. Feb. Feb. Mar.
11 17 25 4


FLORIDA'S hREAL

PANHANDLE JRY

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9 "

LIE o "s1EAS


tn Ulam TO
Saitoen 0C
-U, EFD Q hT


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ingwhich expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
notacceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free'of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT '
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
Small business seminar "Business Plans"
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Chipola College in
Room M-108 of the Business and Technology
building. The seminar will help participants discover
which business type is best suited for their person-
ality, and how to create a working business model to
obtain financing and create a successful business.
Call 718-2441 or email seversone@chipola.edu.
n Knitters Nook 10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Money Sense, Financial Literacy Noon to
4 p.m. at Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
Highway 90, Marianna. Money Sense isa class that
covers different topics in money management to
empower people to take charge of their finances
and create their own wealth. Call 526-0139.
) Chipola Area Board of Realtors Awards Ban-
quet 5:30 p.m. at St. Luke's Church in Marianna.
Cocktail Hour is 5:30-6:30 p.m. followed by supper
at 7 p.m. Download the awards packet from www.
ChipolaAreaBoardofRealtors.com, or call 526-4030.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups:' Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
Deadline for Jackson County students to en-
ter the Optimist Club of Jackson County Essay
Contest. The topic is "How Can i Help My Friends
Realize Their Value?" Call 526-9561.

SATURDAY, FEB. 16
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
n Tripp Family Reunion Meeting 5 p.m. at St.
Matthew Missionary Baptist Church. This meeting is
to complete the committees and programs for the
family reunion of the late Robert "Jake" Trip and the
late Trussie Lee Tripp. Call 326-5683.

SUNDAY, FEB. 17
n Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.


n Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in
the board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, FEB. 18
Chipola Chapter, NSDAR Meeting -11 a.m. at
Beef O'Brady's. Speaker: Chris Moore of the Navy
Coastal Systems Lab. Children and grandchildren
who are out of school for Presidents' Day and
interested members of the public are welcome to
attend this Dutch treat lunch. Hostesses are Ruth
Yirnol.'iring nd Barbara Revell. Call 638-1947 or
cdjordan@bellsouth.net.
n Employability Workshop, Surviving a Layoff
2:30 p.m. at Marianna One Stop Career Center.
Call 718-0326.
a Genealogy Series II Class 2:30-4:30 p.m.
at the Jackson County Public Library, Marianna
Branch. Class is free. Discover proper research
techniques, learn tips and tricks to help in your
research journey and begin discovering your family
roots. Students must know computer basics, how
to use the Internet and have an interest in family
history. Students will need to bring a flash drive to
use in class. Call 482-9631.
a Jackson County.Quilter's Guild Meeting
5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 US 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings are
fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects,
lessons, help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
n Beekeeping in the Panhandle 6-8 p.m. at
the Jackson County Agriculture Conference Center.
This interactive video short course will cover topics
of: Queen and package bee production, bee nutri-
tion and immunity, disease and pest management
and the history and theory of honey production.
Course to be held on Monday, Feb. 18 and 25, Mar. 4
and 11. Cost of the course is $25 or. $40 per family.
Call 482-9620.
) Capt. Luke Lott's Calhoun Guards, Camp 2212
Sons of Confederate Veterans Monthly Meeting
6 p.m. at the Altha Diner on Highway 71 in down
town Altha. Call 592-3293:
) Alford Community Organization Meeting 6
p.m. in the Alford Community Center. New members
from Alford, surrounding communities invited to
join. Call 579-4482,638-4900 or 579-5173.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, FEB. 19
n Annual Fed Cattle Show and Sale 9:30


a.m. at the Jackson County Ag Center, Highway
90 West. A Livestock Judging Contest for FFA and
4-H members will begin at 9:30 a.m. The Steer
Show at 2 p.m. with the Showmanship Contest to
follow. Steers will be sold to the public at auction.
Registration for steer buyers at 6:30 p.m. followed
by the auction at 7 p.m. This event is hosted by
the Jackson County Cattlemen's Association. Call
482-9620.
a Optimist Club of Jackson County Meeting
- Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna.
n Orientation Noon to 3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
n Employability Workshop, Job Search Tips
- 2:30 p.m. at Marianna One Stop Career Center.
Call 718-0326.
n Jackson County School Board Regular Month-
ly Board Meeting 4 p.m. at the School Board
meeting room, 2903 Jefferson Street, Marianna.
Meeting is open to the public and agenda is posted
at www.jcsb.org. Call 482-1200.
) Chipola College Community Chorus 6-7:30
p.m. in the Center for the Arts at Chipola College.
Singers, aged high school and above are welcome
to sing with the community chorus and will perform
on the April 16 Chipola Ensemble Concert. Call 718-
2376 or heidebrechtd@chipola.edu.
) Disabled American Veterans Meeting 7
p.m. at the DAV Chapter 22 house, 3083 DAV Lane,
Marianna. Call 482-5143.
) Chipola College District Board of Trustees
Regular Meeting 7 p.m. in the Public Service
Building.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20
AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation -9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Jackson County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620
during business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for
an appointment.
) Heart Month Lunch and Learn Noon to 1 p.m.
in the Hudnall Building Community Room. Cost is
$5 to cover lunch. The program will be presented
by Dr. Robin Albritton of Chipola Surgical & Medical
Specialties-Family Medicine in Marianna. Call 718-
2601to make a reservation.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. 'Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Feb. 13, the latest
available report: One accident
(no injury), two suspicious ve-.
hides, three in-
_- _- 2:' formation calls,
'-, two highway
---- obstructions,
'CRIME one sickness/
subject down,
one mentally ill
- violent, one burglary, one bur-
glary alarm, eight traffic stops,
one report of criminal mischief,
one juvenile-related complaint,
one animal-related complaint
(dog), one call to assist an-
other agency and one report of
threats/harassment.


Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following inci-
dents for Feb. 13, the latest
available report: Three aban-
doned vehicles, one reckless
driver, four suspicious vehicles,
one suspicious person, one
highway obstruction, two
burglary calls, one disturbance
(physical), 19 medical calls,
two burglary alarms, one fire
alarm, eight traffic stops, one
serving papers/ex parte, one
trespassing call, one juvenile-
related complaint, two animal-
related complaints (one cow,
one dog), one fraud, two calls
to assist motorists/pedestri-
ans, one report of child abuse,
one criminal registration call,


one transport and one patrol
request.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following.persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Robert Harris, 26, 2532 Cy-
press Grove Road, Grand Ridge;
contempt of court.
) Teresa Rice, 39, 7843 Keev-
ers Road, Sneads; violation of
county probation.
) Treneshia Joiner, 33, 4367
Kent Drive, Apt. ID, Marianna;
battery on a law enforcement
officer (two counts), resisting
arrest with violence.
) Bobby Dunaway, 42, 3088
Sandridge Church Road,
Sneads; possession of chemi-
cals, attempted manufacture


of meth, felon in possession of
ammunition, engaging.in crim-
inal offense while possessing a
concealed weapon, violation of
state probation.
) Tracy Croft, 43, 3088 San-
dridge Church Road, Sneads;
possession of listed chemicals,
attempted manufacture of
meth, felon in possession of
ammunition.
) Zackery Outler, 29, 22026
Oak Tree Lane, Fountain; pos-
session of meth, possession of
drug paraphernalia.
) Robert Beasley, 22, 4495 Te-
resa Lane, Marianna; violation
of conditional release.

Jail population: 204
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
S1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
S4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL.
si(850) 482-3051


R c .


Pitleam'saies


Weather Outlook


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---


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"12A FRIDAY, FEBRUARY15, 2013


WAICE-UP CRLL


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Hispanic, women farmers deadline for claims nearing


Special to the-Floridan

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vil-
sack has reminded Hispanic and
women farmers and ranchers
who allege discrimination by the
USDA in past decades that there
are 45 dAys remaining in the fil-
ing period closing March 25.
"Hispanic and women farm-
ers who believe they have faced
discriminatory practices in the
past from the USDA have 45
days left to file a claim in order
to have a chance to receive a
cash payment or loan forgive-
ness," Vilsack says. "USDA urges
potential claimants to contact
the Claims Administrator for in-
formation and mail their claim
packages on or before March


25, 2013."
The process, offers a volun-
tary alternative to litigation for
each Hispanic or female farmer
and rancher who can prove that
USDA denied his or her applica-
tion for loan or loan servicing
assistance for discriminatory
reasons for certain time periods
between 1981 and 2000. As an-
nounced in February 2011, the
voluntary claims process will
make available at least $1.33
billion for cash awards and tax
relief payments, plus up to $160
million in farm debt relief, to
eligible Hispanic and women
farmers and ranchers. There are
no filing fees to participate in the
program.
The Department will


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Chipola College Theatre is in rehearsal for the hit musical
"Hairspray" which opens March 13. Pictured are Meredith
Saunders of Chipley (left) as Penny Pingleton and Odra
Chapman of Greensboro as Tracy Turnblad.


'Hairspray'in the


air at CRAA meeting


Special to the Floridan

Chipola Theatre will
present highlights from
the upcoming musical
"Hairspray" at the Chipola
Regional Arts Association
meeting Tuesday, Feb. 19,
at Jim's Buffet and Grill in
Marianna.
The public is invited to
attend the Dutch-treat
buffet luncheon which be-
,gins at 11:30 a.m. and the
program at noon. During
the program, there will be
a drawing for free tickets
to this historically sold
out musical' series which
opens March 13.
CRAA recently awarded
mini-grants to district'
teachers. Last year, half
of the grant applications
were not funded, but
many supporters stepped


forward and contributed
to the program and all of
this year's applications
were funded. CRAA is now
seeking talented music, art
and theatre students from
Washington County to ap-
ply for their rotating schol-
arship program.
The Partner in the Arts
campaign has just been
launched to support next
year's CRAA programs.
Contributors to this cam-
paign riot only have the op-
portunity to help support
the arts in the community,
but are also recognized on
the Artist Series programs
with sold out performanc-
es at the new Center for the
Arts.
For information on the
CRAA meeting, contact
Daniel Powell at powelld@
chipola.edu or 718-2257.


continue reaching out to poten-
tial Hispanic and female claim-
ants around the country to get
the word out to individuals who
may be eligible for this program
so they have the opportunity to
participate.
Call center representatives can
be reached at 1-888-508-4429.
Claimants may register for a
claims package by calling the
number or visiting the website at
www.farmerclaims.gov or may
download the forms from the
website. All those interested in
learning more or receiving infor-
mation about the claims process
and claims packages are encour-
aged to attend meetings in your
communities about the claims
process and contact the website


at any time or call center tele-
phone number Monday through
Friday 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST. The
claims period is for Sept. 24,
2012 through March 25, 2013.
Independent legal services
companies will administer the
claims process and adjudicate
the claims. Although there are
no filing fees to participate and a
lawyer is not required to partici-
pate in the claims process, per-
sons seeking legal advice may
contact a lawyer or other legal
services provider.
Under Vilsack's leadership,
USDA has instituted a com-
prehensive plan to strengthen
the Department as a model
service provider and to ensure
that every farmer and rancher


is treated equally and fairly as
part of "a new era of civil rights"
at USDA. In February 2010, the
Secretary announced the Pig-
ford II settlement with African
American farmers, and in Oc-
tober 2010, he announced the
Keepseagle settlement with Na-
tive American farmers. Both of
those settlements have since
received court approval. Unlike
the cases brought by African
American and Native American
farmers, the cases filed by His-
panic and women farmers over a
decade ago were not certified as
class actions. The claims process
provides a voluntary alternative
to continuing litigation for His-
panic and female farmers and
ranchers who want to use it.


S--LA HOSTS


LT ,. SCIENCES CAREER" FAIR


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Chipola College School of Health Sciences recently held a career fair for associate
degree nursing students. Pictured (from left): Nursing student Ashley Uhrick of Altha,
nursing student Brett Floyd of Marianna, Emerald Coast Hospice representative
Cecily Smith and nursing studentAngie Martin. Ten health care agencies attended,
including: Bonifay Nursing & Rehab Center, Chipola Nursing Pavilion,'Covenant Hospice,
Emerald Coast Hospice, Florida State Hospital, Flowers Hospital, Gentiva Home Health,
Jackson Hospital, Signature Healthcare and Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare. More than
100 students attended the annual event to discuss employment opportunities.

Chipola Law Enforcement Grads


Florida Lottery
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Wednesday 213 12.23-25 273-) FPB

'Saturday 2-9 1'-22.36.42.44-52 .ra3


Wednesday 2:13


5-1225 :29 33 34


For lottery information. call 850 418 o.'7 r 9007 37 -


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Fourteen candidates recently completed the Basic Recruit
Law Enforcement Academy at Chipola College. Graduates
are (front row from left): Michael Carpenter of Grand Ridge,
Jessica Weathersbee of Marianna, Jeremy Anderson of
Cottondale, Matthew Grigsby of Marianna, Tykeyan Poole of
Greenwood, Erika Whitfield of Blountstown and Tylei Weeks
of Sneads. And (back row): Jarrod Taylor of Bristol, Zachary
Whitfield of Altha, Beau McCorvey of Wewahitchka, Landon
Dunham of Sneads, William Hall of Chipley, Gregory M4Kenzie
of Blountstown and Thomas Layfield of Port St. Joe. Chipola's
next Law Enforcement Academy begins March 13. Classes meet
weeknights from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m: For information, call Steven
Stewart, Chipola Law Enforcement Coordinator, at 718-2286.


SGAS WATCH
, G.I r,; ,,.:.:I jrt :,rng up. Here are
It le I : pt i: p.- n places to buy
ia. ,rI i ij: : ,: i r i. ,:,,.nty, as of

1. $3.49. Mobil Food Mart, 2999
Jefferson St., Marianna
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Baptist College of Fla. prepares for Preview Day


Special to the Floridan

One of the most excit-
ing days in the life of an
institution is the open
house when prospective
students and their fami-
lies visit the campus. At
The Baptist College of
Florida in Graceville, the
open house scheduled for
Friday, March 8 is called
Preview Day and will truly
be a campus-wide "pre-
view" event. The Music
and Worship Division will
lead worship and provide
entertainment through-
out the day. Student Ser-
vices will offer tours of the
dorms and campus facili-
ties and welcome visitors
to the campus. The faculty
and staff will set up booths
and disseminate informa-
tion about each of the de-
gree programs and cam-
pus activities. Guests will
also have the opportunity
to enjoy lunch provided
by the cafeteria staff and


The BCF Eagle Mascot enjoys the photo booth with prospective
students during Fall Preview Day.


Prospective students participate in outside activities with curre


every office on campus is
open to the public.
During Preview Day pro-
spective students and their
families are invited to at-
tend and experience first-
hand the impact that the
college has on the lives of
its students. Registration


begins at 9 a.m. in front of
the Student Center where
prospective students are
able to explore the cam-
pus, meet professors, and
visit exhibit booths with
information on intramu-
rals, collegiate sports,
housing, financial aid,


heartfelt welcome.
Throughout the day,
visitors are able to tour the
campus and dorms, in-
SUBMITTED PHOTOS teract with BCF students,
ent BCF students. attend a financial aid sem-
library resources, com- inar, and apply for admis-
puter access, and mis- sion. Prospective students
sion opportunities. After who attend Preview Day
visiting a class in session, will automatically be en-
visitors will join BCF Presi- tered into a drawing for
dent Thomas A. Kinchen one of two $500 scholar-
in the R. G. Lee Chapel ships and students who
for a time of student-led turn in a completed appli-
praise and worship and a cation form will have the


normal $25 application fee
waived.
Preview Day is the per-
fect time for future stu-
dents to experience the
college in person, as well
as determine if BCF is the
place where God would
have them continue their
education.
To register for Preview
Day, call the Admissions
Office at 800-328-2660 ext.
460 or register online at
www.baptistcollege.edu.


SEBTS President Danny Akin gives sermon at BCF


Special to the Floridan

Faculty and students at The
Baptist College of Florida in
Graceville were truly blessed and
challenged by Danny Akin, presi-
dent of Southeastern Baptist
Theological Seminary in Wake
Forest, N.C., as he spoke in the
R. G. Lee Chapel on Monday, Jan.
28.
Akin began his sermon by rais-
ing the question, "Have you ever
wanted to be a part of something
bigger than yourself?" He went
on to explain that there are 7,000
people groups which totals about
half of the world's population
that are not only lost, but do not
have access to the gospel. Akin
stressed that when it comes to
evangelism, we should not only
focus on those who are lost, but
those who do not have access to
the gospel. According to Akin,
there are people in the world who
have never even heard the name
of Jesus. He dared BCF students


to pray, "Lord, why shouldn't I
go?" rather than, "Lord, should
I go?" when presented with op-
portunities to reach the nations
with the gospel.
Preaching from the book of
Jonah, Akin highlighted the
fact that Jonah preferred com-
fort over reaching the people of
Nineveh. He encouraged stu-
dents to not serve God only when
it's convenient or comfortable,
but go wherever He leads. Akin
closed his sermon by challeng-
ing students with the question,
"Are you more concerned about
your comfort or the conversion
.of others?"
After chapel, there was a spe-
cial luncheon held in the Well-
ness Center where BCF juniors
and seniors who were interested
in attending SEBTS received
information packets and were
given the opportunity to meet
with Akin and ask questions re-
garding the seminary and degree
programs.


Akin earned his Bachelor of
Arts in Biblical Studies from The
Criswell College, a Master of Di-
vinity from Southwestern Bap-
tist Theological Seminary, and a
Doctor of Philosophy from the
University of Texas at Arling-
ton. Akin has served in senior
administrative and leadership
positions at 'Criswell College,
The Southern Baptist Theo-
logical Seminary, and currently
as President of SEBTS. He has
ministered on the mission field
in Arizona, Australia, Thailand,
Paraguay, India, 'Kenya, and
Asia, as well as authored many
published articles and books in-
cluding Five Who Changed the
World, A Theology for the
Church, Discovering the Bibli-
cal Jesus, and Epistles of John,
appearing in the New American
Commentary.
For more information on the
spring 2013 chapel speakers, call
800-328-2660 ext. 446 or visit
baptistcollege.edu.


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ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Alford First Assembly of God
1782 Tennessee St P.O. Box 228
Alford, FL 32420 579-5103
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Bascom Assembly of God
5516 Hummingbird Rd.
Bascom, FL 32423 272-7775
Shugroad@embargmail.com
Cypress Grove Assembly of God
3250 Cypress Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4451
cppressgrovechurch.org
Cords Of Love Assembly Of God
2060 Bethelehem Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 272-0254
Eastside Assembly of God Church
4723 Hatton St Marianna, FL
lop4664@yahoo.com 526-2422
El Bethel Assembly of God
2503 El Bethel Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 593-6044
First Assembly of God
5565 Brown St
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3351
First Assembly of God Church
4186 Lafayette St
Marianna FL 32446
482-2800 www.mariannafirst.org
First Assembly of God Church
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2636 Milton St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4626
Faith Haven Assembly of God
7135 Hwy 90
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-8205
Pilgrim Rest Assembly of God
3347 Pilgrim Rest Church Road
Marianna, FL 32448 579-2300
Welcome Assembly of God
6784 Messer Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5077
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BAPTIST
Alford Baptist Church
1764 Carolina St P.O. Box 6
Alford, FL 32420 579-2192
Bethel Star Missionary
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ir Guide To Local Houses Of Worship
Bethlehem Baptist Church First Baptist Church of Bascom Little Zion Missionary Pine Ridge Baptist Church
2300 Bethlehem Rd 4951 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 97 Baptist Church 3064 Pine Ridge Church Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-9940 Bascom, FL 32423 569-2699 3181 Little Zion Rd P.O. Box 190 Alford, FL 32420
Sna cd FL 32460 q 592Q-1R614i


Bethel Missionary Baptist Church
2137 McLeod St
Cypress, FL 592-4108
Circle Hill Baptist Church
7170 Circle Hill Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 592-2327
Collins Chapel Baptist Church
5005 3rd Ave (5499 Collins Chapel Rd)
Malone, FL 32445 569-5644
Damacus Freewill Baptist
3700 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5878
Dellwood Baptist Church
5512 Blue Springs Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-6954
Faith Baptist Church
2494 Hwy 71 South
Marianna, FL '482-2869 ,
First Baptist Church
Southern Baptist
987 8th Ave P.O. Box 565
Graceville FL 32440 263-3323
fbcgraceville@bellsouth.net
www.fbcgraceville.org
First Baptist Church
3172 Main St
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4586
First Baptist Marianna
2897 Green St
Marianna, FL 32446 526-4200
www.fbcmarianna.org
First Baptist Church
8010 Pope St P.O. Box 246
Sneads, FL'32460 (850) 593-6999
Crossroads Baptist Church
Southern Baptist
3276 Main St P.O. Box 386
Cottondale FI. 32431 352-2636
Eastside Baptist Church
4785 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 526-2004
www.eastsidebaptistchurch.com
Ebenezer Missionary
Baptist Church
3360 Gardenview Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4223
Everlena Missionary Baptist
5309 Ellaville Rd
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-3900


First Baptist Church
8010 Pope St P.O. Box 246
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6991
First Baptist Church
5366 Ninth St P.O. Box 98
Malone, FI 32445 569-2426
First Freewill Baptist Church
of Malone
5440 10th Street (Hwy 71 N.)
P.O. Box 385
Malone FL 32445 850-569-2786
First Freewill Baptist Church
7970 Davis St
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5400
Friendship Baptist Church
of Malone
5507 Friendship Church'Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-2379
Grand Ridge Baptist Church
2093 Porter Ave P.O. Box 380
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4846
grandridgebc@embarqmail.com
Greater Buckhorn Missionary
Baptist Church
4691 Hwy 162,
Marianna; FL 32446 594-5761
Greenwood Baptist Church
4156 Bryan St P.O. Box 249
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3883
Hasty Pond Baptist Church
4895 Hasty Pond Rd, Marianna, FL
Heaven's Way Biker Church
A Ministry of Alford Baptist Church
3924 Woodrest Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 334-806-4258
Holly Grove Free Will
Baptist Church
2699 Highway 73S
Marianna, FL 32448 482-3489
Inwood Baptist Church
2012 Inwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 593-5328
Liberty Hill Missionary
Baptist Church
5239 Liberty Hill Road
Bascom, FL 32426 569-5949
i


Lovedale Baptist Church
6595 Lovedale Rd Bascom, FL 32423
592-5415 or 592-2134
Marvin Chapel Free Will
Baptist Church
2041 Hope School Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5375
www.marvinchapelfwb.com
Midway Freewill Baptist Church
1600 Church St
6158 Rocky Creek Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 592-8999
Mount Olive Baptist
6045 Hwy 2
Bascom FL 32423 569-5080
Mt. Tabor Missionary Baptist Church
3695 Popular Springs Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 594-4161
Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church
5382 Old US Road
Malone, FL 32445 569-2049
New Easter Missionary
Baptist Church
977 Hope Ave
Graceville, FL 32440 658-8344
New Galilee Missionary
Baptist Church
2155 Highway 73 South P.O. Box 234
Marianna, FL 32447 482-5499
New Hoskie Baptist Church
4252 Allen St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-7243
New Hope Freewill Baptist
Sweet Pond Rd
Dellwood, FL 592-1234
New Hope Missionary Baptist
3996 Wintergreen Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 592-8802
New Mount Olive
Missionary Baptist
2870 Barnes St P.O. Box 312
Marianna, FL 32447 482-7595
New Salem Baptist Church
3478 Kynesville Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 579-4343
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
6687 Brushy Pond Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5696


Piney Grove Baptist Church
2136 Piney Grove Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3800
Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church
5481 Pleasant Ridge Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 263-8007
Providence Baptist Church
6940 Providence Church Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-5481
pbch@embarqmail.com
Rocky Creek Baptist Church
5458 Rocky Creek Rd
Matianna, FL 32448 526-7508
Salem Free Will Baptist
2555 Kynesville Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 579-4194
www.salemfreewillbaptist.com
Shady Grove Baptist Church
7304 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge FL 32442 592-6952
St. Luke Missionary
Baptist Church
2871 Orange Street
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2591
St. Peter Missionary Baptist
7889 McKeown Mill Rd
P.O. Box 326 593-3363
Trinity Baptist Church
3023 Penn. Ave
Marianna, FL 482-3705
www.TrinityMarianna.conr
Union Hill
3115 Union Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-5711
Victory Baptist Church
2271 River Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6699
www.victorybaptistfl.com
White Pond Baptist Church
P.O. Box 458 Mill Pond Rd
Alford, FL 32420 352-4715

CATHOLIC
St. Anne Catholic Church
3009 5th St P.O. Box 1547
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3734
www.stanne @stannemar.ptdiocese.org
www.stannemarianna.org


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Southeastern
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speaks in
the R. G. Lee
Chapel at
The Baptist
College of
Florida.


SUBMITTED PHOTO


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Scouting struggles with ban on gay members


Under the pressure of
declining member-
ship, reduced corporate
contributions, and fewer public
schools in which to conduct
their activities, the Boy Scouts
of America are considering
lifting their traditional ban on
accepting youth members
and adult volunteers who are
gay.
A vote by the organization's
National Executive Board,
scheduled for Feb. 8, was post-
poned until the Scouts' annual
meeting in May, when 1,400
members of Scouting's national
council will debate whether
to allow local groups to set
their own recruitment policies.
Membership in Boy Scouts has
shrunk by about one-third


since 1999.
A recent nationwide poll con-
ducted by Quinnipiac University
found 55 percent
S of respondents
'* -y approve of lifting
the ban to include
gays. President
Barack Obama, ex
David officio honorary
Yount president of the
_O__M Scouts, supports
gay membership
in Scouting. Gay activists are
expected to oppose a merely
selective opening of the mem-
bership to gays in favor of a total
lifting of the ban.
Jennifer Tyrell, a lesbian from
Ohio who was forced out as a
den leader, recently delivered
to Scouting executives more


than 1.4 million signatures on
petitions seeking an end to the
ban. Although the Supreme
Court in 2000 upheld the Scouts'
right to exclude gays, many
public school districts are now
reluctant to offer meeting space
to the Scouts because BSA
gives the appearance of being
discriminatory. Scouts continue
to hold their activities on church
property, however.
More than 70 percent of all
troops nationwide are spdn-
sored by a 'church group,
although individual Scouts are
not required to be members of
the sponsoring denomination.
Catholic, Methodist, Lutheran
and Baptist churches have
been long affiliated with the
Boy Scouts of American. The


Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-
day Saints was the first church
sponsor of Scouting and today
contributes the most Scouts
(420,977) of any officially char-
tered organization in the U.S.
Scouting's ban on gay member-
ship reflects the organization's
opposition to homosexual
behavior.
Its "Youth Leadership" policy,
adopted in 2004, reads, in part:
"Scouts are expected to take
up leadership positions. In the
unlikely event that an older
boy were to hold himself out as
homosexual, he would not be
able to continue in a youth lead-
ership position." The Scouts'
fixation on sexuality probably
stems in part from sex-abuse
cases involving Scout leaders


that resulted in convictions and
financial settlements.
In 2012, the Scouts were
forced by court order to release
over 20,000 pages documenting
1,200 alleged dhild sexual abuse
cases that occurred between
1965 and 1985. It is important to
clarify that these adult offenders
were not homosexuals they
were pedophiles.
Since 2003 new adult volun-
teers to Scouting have been
required to pass a criminal
background check.


David Yount is the author of 14 books on
faith, spirituality, and confident living,
including "Celebrating the Single Life':
Praeger. He answers readers at P.O. Box
2758, Woodbridge, VA 22193 and dyount31
@ verizon.net.


On Religion


Benedict XVI retires on his own terms


In the spring of 2009, Pope Benedict
XVI stopped in Aquila, Italy, to pray
at the shrine of St. Celestine V.
The pope left his pallium a wool
garment that resembles a yoke, symbol-
izing bonds between a shepherd and his
flock on this medieval pope's tomb.
Then, 15 months later, he visited a ca-
thedral outside Rome to pray before the
.relics, once again, of St. CelestineV Few
noticed Benedict's actions.
So who was this saint? He was the
elderly priest who, "somewhat against
his will," was elected pope in 1294,
observed theologian Scott Hahn of
Franciscan University of Steubenville,
Ohio. Before long, Pope Celestine V is-
sued a decree allowing occupants of St.
Peter's throne to step down a step he
then proceeded to take.
Looking back, it appears Benedict's
visit to shrines honoring this particular
pope were "probably more than pious
acts," noted Hahn, on his Facebook
page. "More likely, they were profound
and symbolic gestures of a very person-
al nature, which conveyed a message
that a pope can hardly deliver any other
way."
This was a message consistent with
the 86-year-old pope's stunning an-
nouncement this week days before
the start of Lent that he would
end his eight-year papacy on Feb. 28.


Although it has been seven centuries
since the voluntary resignation of a
pope, this option remains
in canon law and was
affirmed by Pope Paul VI
in 1975 and the Pope John
Paul II in 1996.,
Benedict said he was
L : thinking about the future
Sof the papacy, not the past:
Terry "In today's world, subject
lWattingly to so many rapid changes
and shaken by questions
of deep relevance for the life of faith, in
order to govern the bark of Saint Peter
and proclaim the Gospel, both strength
of mind and body are necessary,
strength which in the last few months
has deteriorated in me to the extent that
I have had to recognize my incapacity to
adequately fulfill the ministry entrusted
to me."
The Vatican Press Office noted that
these words were consistent with his
thoughts in the 2010 book, "Light of
the World." While it would be wrong to
flee in times of trouble, Benedict said:
"When a pope realizes clearly that he
is no longer physically, mentally and
spiritually capable of carrying out his
role, then there is legally the possibility,
and also the obligation, to resign."
Vatican leaders are planning.for the
election of a pope by Easter.


BCF announces Honor's Recital


Special to the Floridan

The Music and Worship
Division at The Baptist
College of Florida BCF
in Graceville is excited to
announce a special Hon-
or's Recital scheduled for
Feb.21 at 6:30 p.m. in the
R.G. Lee Chapel.
In order to expose new
music students and pro-
spective music students
as to what to expect as
they begin their musical
education and training at
BCF, this unique evening
recital will feature the tal-
ent of upper level BCF
vocal and instrumental
students.
The BCF music faculty
is currently compiling a
list of upper level students
who they believe represent
the highest standards of
educational excellence.
According to BCF Mu-
sic and Worship Division
Chair Bill Davis, it will be
an extraordinary night of
performing arts and musi-
cal expressions.
Although it is intended
for incoming music stu-
dents, everyone is invited


SUBMITTED PHOTO
BCF Sophomore Spencer Higgins performed during the Fall
Honor's Recital.


to attend the free musical
event of vocal and instru-
mental performances by
BCF students.
For more information


about the Honor's Recital,
please call the Music and
Worship Division at 800-
328-2660 ext. 427 or visit
www.baptistcollege.edu.


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Visit www.jcfloridan.com AND click Church Directory

YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP


CHURCH OF CHRIST
Caverns Rd. Church of Christ
4448 River Rd
Marianna, FL 482-2605
CHURCH OF GOD,
Glorious Gospel Church of God in Christ
4255 Clay St Marianna, FL 32448
594-1096 or 557-4919
Grand Ridge Church of God -
2232 Porter Ave Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5301 or 592-2814
Marianna Church of God
(All services interpreted for the
hearing impaired.)
2791 Jefferson St, Marianna, FL 32446
482-4264 mariannacog.com
The New Zion Temple
Church of God In Christ
1022 Washington Ave
Graceville, FL 32440
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Marianna Church of the Nazarene
2987 N Madison St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-5787
EPISCOPAL'
St. Luke's Episcopal Church
4362 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 482-2431
parishoffice@stlukesmarianna.org
www.stlukesmarianna.org
FULL GOSPEL
Christian Center Church
4791 Sheffield Dr P.O. Box 450
Marianna, FL 32447
526-4476 or 526-4475
jack@cccmarianna.org
Country Gospel Community Church
Compass Lake in the Hills
650 Apalachicola Ave
Alford, FL 32420 (850) 579-4172
Resurrection Life Christian
Fellowship International
2933 Madison Street
Marianna, FL 526-2617
New Beginnings Worship Center
1165 Highway 69
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
592-5791 www.nbworship.com
New Beginning Outreach
Ministries, Inc.
2254 Magnolia Dr.
Cottondale, FL 32431 (850) 352-4733
Evangel Worship Center
2645 Pebble Hill Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2232
New Life Family Church
4208 Lafayette St
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2132
The Bridge Church
2515 Commercial Park Dr
Marianna, FL 32448 209-2733


HOLINESS
Emmanuel Holiness Church
2505 Sandridge Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5167
Hickory Level Community Church
1221 Dipper Rd
Marianna, FL 32448
482-4696 or 482-2885
Oak Ridge Freewill
Holiness Church
2958 Milton Ave
Marianna, FL 573-7684
Sneads Community Church
1948 Desoto Ave P.O. Box 1349
Sneads, FL 32460 593-5650

LATTER-DAY SAINTS
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints
3141 College St
Marianna, FL 32446 482-8159

LUTHERAN
Ascension Lutheran Church
3975 W. Hwy 90
Marianna, FL 482-4691

METHODIST
Bascom United Methodist Church
4942 Basswood Rd P.O. Box 67
Bascom, FL 32423 594-5755
Cypress United Methodist Church
6267 Cemetery Ave
Cypress, FL 32432 263-4220
First United Methodist Church
1111 8" Ave
Graceville, FL 263-3342
First United Methodist Church
2901 Caledonia St
Marianna, FL 482-4502
Grace United Methodist
4203 W. Kelson Ave
Marianna, FL 482-4753
Grand Ridge United
Methodist Church
6911 Iowa Street
Grand Ridge, FL 32442
Greenwood Chapel AME
5426 Fort Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-1112
Greenwood United Methodist
4220 Bryan St
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-5755
Henshaw Chapel AME Church
2370 Glastel St, P.O. Box 535
Cottondale, FL 32431 875-2610
Jerusalem AME Church
2055 Hwy 73
Marianna, FL 32448 482-5085
Kynesville United Methodist
2875 Kynesville Rd
Marianna. FL 32448 482-4672


NON-DENOMINATIONAL
Believers Outreach Ministry
3471 Hwy 90 W
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4926
Cypress Creek Community Church
1772 Macedonia Road, PO Box 496
Alford, FL 32420 638-0360
Ever Increasing Word of Faith
Ministries
3749 Skyview Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 526-4704
Heaven's Garden Worship Center
3115 Main Street
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 579-9936 www.aidaspina.org
Faith Cornerstone Church
Ministries
5460 Collins Chapel Rd
Malone, FL 32445 569-5600
Foundation Temple Apostolic
Faith Church
3341 Tendell Rd
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-3884
Glass Community Church
4005 Veteran's Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
(850) 272-7205 (850) 263-6715
Haven of Rest
Church of Restoration
Worship Center
2261 Haven of Rest Road
Cottondale, FL 32431
Keeping It Real Help Ministry
3297 Caverns Road
Marianna, FL 32446 557-4800
Love and Restoration Ministries
2990 Heritage Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 526-2730
Mill Springs Christian Chapel
1345 Mill Springs Rd, P.O. Box 83
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 526-2519
Rivertown Community Church
(Meets at the new Marianna High School)
3546 Caverns Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 482-2477
Rocky Creek Tabernacle
1890 Delta Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 *272-0917
St Andrews (FC) Church Ministries
978 Hwy 71 S
Marlanna, FL 32448 569-5600
Sunrise Worship Center
2957 Hall St, Marianna, FL 482-8158

PENTECOSTAL
Apostolic Life Church
4070 Old Cottondale Rd
Marianna, FL 482-8720
pastorbiggs @ embarqmail.Qom


Apostolic Revival Center
of Marianna
3001 Hwy 71 N, P.O. Box 634
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3162
Christian Covenant Life Center
2011 Finley Ave.
Grand Ridge, FL 32448 592-4737
Shady Grove Pentecostal Holiness
7541 Shady Grove Rd
Grand Ridge, FL'32442 592-6203
Sneads Pentecostal Holiness
Church
2036 Gloster Ave
Sneads, FL 32460
593-4487 or 593-6949
Praise Life Ministries,
7360 Hwy 90, P.O. Box 177
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-4166
Prayer Temple Church Of Prayer
For All People
3341 Plantation Circle
Marianna, FL 32446 482-3343
United Pentecostal Deliverance
5255 10th Ave
Malone, FL 32445 569-5989

PRESBYTERIAN
First Presbyterian Church
Presbyterian Church (USA)
2898 Jefferson St
Marianna, FL 32446
526-2430 www.firstpresmarianna.org
fpcmarianna@embarqmail.com or
firstpresmarianna@earthlink.net

RESTORATIONIST
Church of Jesus Christ of
Marianna
4060 Thomasville Lane
Marianna, FL 32448 482-2282

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
Emmanuel SDA Church
4531 Basswood Rd
Greenwood, FL 32443 594-3200

Marianna Seventh Day Adventist
4878 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 32446 526-2487

WESLEYAN
Salem Wesleyan Church
2764 Salem Church Rd
Sneads, FL 32460 (850) 593-6679
irquomai@gmail.com


McChapel AME Church
4963 Old U.S. Rd
Marianna, FL 569-2184
Mt. Shiloh AME Church
6702 Biscayne Road
Bascom, FL 32423 569-1044
New Bethel Christian Methodist
Episcopal Church
2487 Highway 1
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-4647
Pope Chapel African Methodist
Episcopal Church
4898 Blue Springs Rd, P.O. Box 6000
Marianna, FL 32447 482-2900
Shady Grove United
Methodist Church
7305 Birchwood Rd
Grand Ridge, FL 32442 592-9277
Sneads First United
Methodist Church
8042 Church St, P.O. Box 642
Sneads, FL 32460 593-6481
fumc@embarqmail.com
Friendship Christian Methodist
Episcopal (CME) Church
5411 Avery Rd, P.O.Box 302
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-1111
1st United Methodist Church
of Cottondale
P.O. Box 458
Cottondale, FL 32431 352-4426
Salem AME Church
5729 Browntown Rd, P.O. Box 354
Graceville, FL 32440 263-3344
Springfield AME Church
4194 Union Rd
Marianna, FL 32446 352-4252
St. James AME Church
2891 Orange St, P.O. Box 806
Marianna, FL 32447 526-3440
St. Paul AME Church
5180 Hwy 273, P.O. Box 40
Campbellton, FL 32426 263-0333
Snow Hill AME Church
5395 Snow Hill Rd, P.O. Box 174
Malone, FL 32445 569-5315
Mt. Olive AME Church
2135 Fairview Rd
Marianna, FL 32448 482-7917
Bethlehem AME Church
3100 Lovewood Rd, P.O. Box 752
Cottondale, FL 32431
352-2111 or 352-4721
Greater St. Luke AME Church
5255 11th Ave, P.O. Box 176
Malone, FL 32445 569-5188


~___1__~_~1_1______~=__~_=_____==_=__=1


_______11_1_11_____1_,


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2013 5AF


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


RELIGION






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


JCSO Honor Guard receives donation
Special to the Floridan -- -

The Jackson County Sheriff's Office es-
tablished its first ever honor guard team in
2010. The team was established to render
military honors to fallen officers, assist our
military with providing honors to fallen ac-
tive duty military personnel and veterans,
and provide honOrary services for the citi-
zens of Jackson County.
With these services, the team attempts to
provide families of the fallen with closure
and peace during their time of grief by leav-
ing a lasting impression and memory of
their loved one.
The team currently consists of six members
of the Jackson County Sheriff's Department ,, -
who volunteer their services for these func- re.:,,/ ., ..-
tions and training during their free time. The "
team has been funded by individual spon- 7 nC Ui r
sorship and fundraisers; it does not utilize -TC-l
money from the department's budget.
On Feb. 1, the Honor Guard received a
generous contribution from the First Fed- -..
eral Bank for the amount of $1,000 at the
Jackson County Sheriff's Office. Jackson
County Sheriff Lou Roberts and the Honor
Guard team extend their gratitude to the
First Federal Bank and its administration for SUBMITTED PHOTO
the contribution. The money will help with Garrett Grimsley and Don Nowell of First Federal Bank present the JCSO Honor Guard with a generous
the team's uniforms, equipment and train- contribution. From left: Deputy Ronnie Furniss, Sgt. Rick Kerr, Jackson County Sheriff Lou Roberts, Garrett
ing expenses. Grimsley and Don Nowell.

Religion Calendar


Local Brief

Golson Elementary
yearbook sale Mar. 1
EM. Golson Elementa-
ry School yearbooks are
now on sale. March 1 is
the deadline to purchase
a yearbook for $25 each.
March 1-15, the price
for each yearbook will
increase to $35. Cash
is accepted or make
checks payable to EM.
Golson Elementary. For
additional information
contact Janie Nolen at
482-9607.
Special to the Floridan







J CFLOFRIDAN rCO M


|40Philip


TODAY
Joey Hagan Memorial Fish
Fry 6-8 p.m. at Salem Free-
will Baptist Church. Menu: Fried
catfish fillet, smoked chicken,
cheese grits, baked beans, cole
slaw, hush puppies, beverage
and dessert. Proceeds go to an
area family who has a serious
need. Donations accepted. Call
579-4194.
) Youth Activity Night 6
p.m. at Marianna Church of
God. Ages: 12-19. Call 482-
6264.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome
hurts, habits and hang-ups in
a safe environment," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center with
praise and live worship music,
testimonies and fellowship. Din-
ner: 6 p.m. Child care available.
Call 209-7856,573-1131.
) Pulse 7-10 p.m. at Cypress.
Grove Assembly of God Church
in Grand Ridge. Youth outreach
program open to all teens in
grades 6-12; shoot pool, play
Xbox and other games, listen to
music, more. Activities are free;
low-cost snacks for sale. Trans-
portation available (limited
area); call 381-2549.

SATURDAY, FEB. 16
a Free clothing giveaway -,9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.
) Valentine Party 5 p.m.
at Holly Grove F.W.B. Church
Fellowship Hall. Program will
feature the Gospel Tones, Terry
and Pam Mayo. A free supper
will be served. Call 482-4476.
) Gospel Program to Support
the Pensacola-Marianna
District Ministers Spouses
Alliance 6 p.m. at Mt.
Olive A.M.E. Church. All choirs,
groups, soloists and praise
dancers are welcome. Call
693-6361.
) The Chuck Wagon Gang
in Concert 6:30 p.m. at
Friendship Baptist Church. Call
718-7869.

SUNDAY, FEB. 17
Revival Service 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. at Welcome
Assembly of God Church. Guest
speaker: Tim Collins. Everyone
is invited. Call 718-8361.
)),Black History Month
Program -11 a.m. at Bethel


Baptist Church. Guest speaker:
The Rev. Mark Dudley of Pleas-
ant Hill Baptist Church in Grand
Ridge. Everyone is invited. Call
592-4057.
) Black History Month Pro-
gram -11 a.m. at the Sneads
Community Church. Call
593-6245.
) Red and White Program 3
p.m. at St. Mark A.M.E. Church
in Noma. Guest speaker: The
* Rev. Bernard Hudson of St.
' John A.M.E. Church Stateline.
Everyone is welcome. Call
718-6518.
) Black History Month Pro-
gram 3 p.m. at New Hoskie
Baptist Church. Guest speaker
will be Evangelist Dianna
Hunger-Fagg and music by The
Hunter Sisters. Everyone is
welcome. Call 594-5053.

MONDAY, FEB. 18
a Revival Service 6:30 p.m.
at Welcome Assembly of God
Church. Guest speaker: Tim
Collins. Everyone is invited. Call
718-8361.

TUESDAY, FEB. 19
Bag Sale 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at St. Anne Catholic Church
Thrift Store. All clothes that will
fit in brown paper bag for $4.
Call 482-3734.
) Revival Service 6:30 p.m.
at Welcome Assembly of God
Church. Guest speaker: Tim
Collins. Everyone is invited. Call
718-8361.
) Dare to Live Healed Heal-
ing School Class 7 p.m. in
the Bascom Town Hall at 4969
Basswood Road. Free classes
taught by Jacquelyn McGriff.
Call 276-6024.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20
n Revival Service 6:30 p.m.
at Welcome Assembly of God
Church. Guest speaker: Tim
Collins. Everyone is invited. Call
718-8361.
) Lighthouse District Church
of God in Christ District
Meeting 7 p.m. at Victory
Tabernacle Church of God in
Christ. Call 526-1841.

THURSDAY, FEB. 21
n Free clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.


) Bag Sale 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at St. Anne Catholic Church
Thrift Store. All clothes that will
fit in brown paper bag for $4.
Call 482-3734.
) Baptist College of Florida
Honor's Recital 6:30 p.m.
in the R. G. Lee Chapel. This
recital will feature upper level
BCF vocal and instrumental
students. Everyone is invited to
attend this free event. Call 800-
328-2660 ext. 427 or visit www.
baptistcollege.edu.
) Lighthouse District Church
of God in Christ District
Meeting 7 p.m. at Victory
Tabernacle Church of God in
Christ. Call 526-1841.

FRIDAY, FEB. 22
n Youth Activity Night 6
p.m. at Marianna Church of
God. Ages: 12-19. Call 482-
6264.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome
hurts, habits and hang-ups in
a safe environment," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center with
praise and live worship music,
testimonies and fellowship. Din-
ner: 6 p.m. Child care available.
Call 209-7856,573-1131.
) Lighthouse District Church
of God in Christ District
Meeting 6 p.m. at Victory
Tabernacle Church of God in
Christ. Call 526-1841.
) Pulse 7-10 p.m. at Cypress
Grove Assembly of God Church
in Grand Ridge. Youth outreach
program open to all teens in
grades 6-12; shoot pool, play
Xbox and other games, listen to
music, more. Activities are free;
low-cost snacks for sale. Trans-
portation available (limited
area); call 381-2549.

SATURDAY, FEB. 23
F February Birth Month
Babies of McChapel Prayer
Breakfast 8:30 a.m. at Mc-
Chapel A.M.E. Church. Guest
Speaker: SisterWinnie Edwards
of Greenwood Chapel A.M.E.
Church. Everyone born in the
month of February and others
are invited. Call 594-6654.
) Free clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.
) Lighthouse District Church
of God in Christ District
Meeting -11 a.m. at Victory


Fundraiser for public library set


Special to the Floridan

The Jackson County Li-
brary Board will sponsor
the Fifth "Annual Clas-
sic Southern Desserts"
fundraiser for the Jackson
County Public Library. The
event will be held Thurs-
day, Feb. 28 6-8 p.m. at
the Agricultural Complex
on Pennsylvania Avenue
in Marianna, with a silent
auction to begin at 5:30
p.m.
Due to budget cuts and
other economic stresses,
the library is in need of
monies to continue oper-
ating and providing ser-
vices and programs for the
community. Various deli-
cious Southern desserts
will be served and there
will be superb entertain-
ment for a $10 donation. A
table for eight guests may
be purchased and reserved
for $80. The silent auction
_consists of donated items


from community vendors
- and residents along with
delectable deserts.


Le
wit)
of
DI


For additional informa-
tion, contact Glenda Sue
Bradley at 592-6676.


COMERFORD VA1

MEMORIAL SERVE
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h a memorial
BEAUTY and
DURABILITY


All Work & Material

Burial Vaults, M;
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Tabernacle Church of God in
Christ. Call 526-1841.
) Deadline to place Boston
butt order Rocky Creek
Baptist Church. Tickets are $25,
and pick-up will be Saturday,
March 2 at the church from 10
a.m. to l.m. Proceeds from
this sale will go toward the
Rocky Creek Baptist Church
Building Fund. Call 693-4912
after 3:30 p.m.

SUNDAY, FEB. 24
n Deacon Joseph Curry
Preaches First Sermon 3
p.m. at Liberty Hill M.B.C. Call
569-5949.

TUESDAY, FEB. 26
D Bag Sale 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at St. Anne Catholic Church
Thrift Store. All clothes that will
fit in brown paper bag for $4.
Call 482-3734.
) Dare to Live Healed Heal-
ing School Class 7 p.m. in
the Bascom Town Hall at 4969
Basswood Road. Free classes
taught by Jacquelyn McGriff.
Call 276-6024.


THURSDAY, FEB. 28
n Free clothing giveaway 9
a.m. to noon at Mother Agnes'
Closet, 2856 Orange St. in
Marianna.
) Bag Sale 9 a.m. to1 p.m.
at St. Anne Catholic Church
Thrift Store. All clothes that will
fit in brown paper bag for $4.
Call 482-3734.
Special event announcements for
Jackson County churches are pub-
lished, free of charge, each Friday in
the Floridan's "Religion Calendar.:
Submission deadline: Noon,
Tuesday. Email items to editorial@
jcfloridan.com,


Carat The FIVE C's
Color
Clarity
Cut
CONFIDENCE

Marianna's Most
Trusted Jeweler
Est. 1971 !-(

w atson
JEW IE RS
GEMOLOGISTS
850.482.4037
watsonjewelers.com


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given to all property owners, taxpayers and citizens of the City of
Marianna, Florida that the Marianna City Commission will meet in public session at
6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, March 5, 2013 in the Commission Chambers at City Hall with
the following proposals to be considered for adoption:

1. Whether the Commission should adopt the following ordinance entitled:

ORDINANCE #1012 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MARIANNA, FLORIDA
ENACTED PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF FLORIDA STATUTES, SECTION
171.044 PROVIDING FOR THE ANNEXATION INTO THE CORPORATE LIMITS
OF THE CITY OF MARIANNA CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE
STATE OF FLORIDA BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT
TRUST FUND, WHICH CONSISTS OF PROPERTY CONTIGUOUS TO THE
EXISITNG CORPORATE LIMITS OF THE CITY OF MARIANNA; PROVIDING
FOR PUBLICATION OF THE ORDINANCE IN A NEWSPAPER OF GENERAL
CIRCULATION WITHIN THE CITY; PROVIDING FOR THE FILING OF A
CERTIFIED COPY OF THE ORDINANCE AS ADOPTED WITH THE CLERK OF
THE CIRCUIT COURT AND WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
\ .
The parcel (commonly known as "Sunland Center") totaling approximately 517.82
acres is located on the vest side of SR71 North in unincorporated Jackson County.
















.. *

<---















2. Such other matters as may come before the Commission.

Complete legal description by metes and bounds of both parties, and both ordinances
are on file with the City Clerk and may be obtained or inspected from the office of the
City Clerk in City Hall located at 2898 Green Street, Marianna, Florida during regular
business hours. All persons owning land, having an interest in the above proposed
ordinance, or being otherwise affected are invited to attend and be heard.

Kay Dennis
Municipal Development Director


Pete Comerford Owner & Ope
593-6828 1-800-369-6828
comerfordvaultmemorial @ hotm
Hwy. 90 W Sneads, FL


-16A FRIDAY, FEBRUARY15,2013


LOCAL







FROM THE FRONT & BUSINESS


Obituaries

James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850.482.2332

Troy L. Ham

Troy L. "Skeeter" Ham,
76, of Malone, died Wed-
nesday, February 13, 2013,
at Marianna Health and
Rehab.
Mr. Ham was born in Ma-
lone on July 3, 1936 and
spent most of his life in
Jackson County. He
worked for Ham Peanut
Co. for more than 25 years,
and was a member of
Friendship Baptist Church.
He was predeceased by
his parents, Bessie Howard
and William Edward Ham;
two step-mothers, Ger-
trude Bradberry and Joyce
Ham; one son, Michael
Wayne Ham.
Survivors include, three
sons, Steve Ham and wife,
Darlene of Gordon Al, Rob-
ert Ham of Greenwood, La-
mar Ham and wife, Marie
of Bascom; three daugh-
ters, Elaine Bevis and hus-
band, Lewis of Simsboro
La, Cathy Hutchinson and
husband, Roger of Georgia,
Vicki Riddle and husband,
Wade of Georgia; two
brothers, Ed Ham and wife,
Becky of Malone, Eddie
Chaney of Malone; three
sisters, Sue Watford of
Quincy, Brenda Lewis and
husband, Wayne of Colum-
bia Al, Pat Williams and
husband, David of Blakely
Ga,; 18 grandchildren and
27 great- grandchildren.
Funeral services will be 2
p.m. Saturday, February
16, 2013 at First Baptist
Church of Malone with
Rev. John Smith officiating.
Burial will follow in Ham
Family Cemetery with
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel di-
recting.
The family will receive
friends from 6-8 p.m. Fri-
day, February 15, 2013 at
James & Sikes Maddox
Chapel.
The family would like to
thank the staff of Marianna
Health and Rehab; Cove-
nant Hospice. Flowers will
be accepted or donations
may be made to Covenant
Hospice 4215 Kelson Ave.
Suite E. Marianna Fl, 32446
Expressions of Sympathy
maybe made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850.482.2332

Mildred
Louise
Roberts

Mildred Louise Roberts,
77, of Sneads, died Wed-
nesday, February 13, 2013,
at her residence.
Mrs. Roberts was born in
Jackson County where she
lived most of her life, and
was a homemaker.
She is survived by two
daughters, Kathy Cook and
husband, Herman of
Valrico Fl, Ernestine Marie
Haynes and husband, Den-
nis of Mulberry Fl,; three
brothers, Jay Davis Jr., Bob-
by Davis and James Sim-
mons; six sisters, Carrie
Spears, Irene Riddles, Lois
Dudley, Elizabeth Sligh,
Mary Bailey and Rosalie
Pitts; two grandchildren,
Elizabeth Cook and Shawn
Haynes
Funeral services will be 2
p.m. Saturday February 16,
2013 at James & Sikes Fu-
neral Home Maddox Chap-
el. Burial will follow in
Pope Cemetery with James
& Sikes Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel directing.
The family will receive
friends one hour prior to
services at James & Sikes
Maddox Chapel.
Expressions of Sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com


Be on guard to ensure financial independence


Special to the Flordan

February is National Senior In-
dependence Month, which pro-
vides an excellent opportunity
for Florida's seniors to evaluate
their finances to ensure they have
made the best financial decisions
to suit their needs today and pro-
tect themselves from fraud.
We all would like to maintain
our physical independence and,
most assuredly, our financial in-
-dependence as we age. Unfor-
tunately, older adults are often
targeted by scam artists offering
fraudulent investment deals and
phony requests for charitable
contributions. Alerts on these
and other scams can be found
on the Department of Financial


Services' On Guard for Seniors
website along with online videos,
information and tips to help se-
niors, their families and caregiv-
ers steer clear of financial fraud.
The On Guard for Seniors web-
site provides detailed informa-
tion on annuities, reverse mort-
gages, long-term care insurance
and identity theft to help seniors
learn more about these topics,
potential pitfalls and how to pro-
tect themselves. Also, On Guard
for Seniors provides educational
videos and explanations of how
some popular insurance and fi-
nancial products work.
SIt is important to remember
that scam artists are smart and
can leave even the most confident
person in a daze at the end of a


conversation, while extracting
valuable information dtiring the
conversation. Scam artists will try
to get personal information from
you by asking genuine questions
about your family, health, hob-
bies, political views or prior em-
ployers. Before making a financial
decision, take the time to stop
and think about your immediate
and future financial needs.
Below are some tips to help you
break away from a potential bad
offer:
) End the conversation: Simply
tell the person, "I am sorry, I am
not interested."
) Turn the tables and ask ques-
tions: Before you give out infor-
mation about yourself or sign on
the dotted line, isk, "Are you a


licensed broker? Is that invest-
ment registered?" Check out the
seller and the investment.
) Avoid making a financial de-
cision before checking out an
agent or company: Scam art-
ists will create business names
and associations that appear
to be part of larger, well-known
advocacy groups or agencies.
Always make sure you are work-
ing with a licensed agent and/or
company.
To learn more about how se-
niors can protect themselves
from falling victim to financial
exploitation, visit www.MY-
FloridaCFO.com/OnGuard or
call the department's Consumer
Helpline at 1-877-My-FL-CFO or
1-877-693-5236.


Oversold cancer screenings you should avoid

Oversold cancer screenings you should avoid


consumer Reports recently
shone a light on oversold
cancer screenings that
might confuse rather than clarify.
The report evaluates 11 cancer
screenings, finding that eight
should be avoided.
. The report, available online
at ConsumerReports.org and
wherever magazines are sold,
notes that the ratings are for
people who are not at high risk
and without signs or symptoms
of cancer.
. Screening tests for cervical,
colon and breast cancers are the
most effective tests available,
according to Consumer Reports'
first ratings of cancer-screening
tests. But most people shouldn't
waste their time on screenings
for bladder, lung, oral, ovarian,
prostate, pancreatic, skin and
testicular cancers. The ratings
are based mainly on evidence-
based reviews from the U.S.
Preventive Services Task Force,
an independent group supported
by the Department of Health and
Human Services.
Research suggests that even
doctors don't always agree on
"which screenings are neces-
sary. In fact, when Consumer


Reports sought information on
the percentages of patients who
are screened for colon cancer, it
found striking variations in the
states of Massachusetts, Minne-
sota and Wisconsin. In Mas-
sachusetts, for example, where
there are 150 medical groups,
the lowest group rate for colon
cancer screening was 47 percent
while the highest was just about
double that figure (95 percent).
Get these screenings
Consumer Reports recom-
mends three screenings. The
highlights below represent a brief
synopsis of the report.
The screening for cervical can-
cer gets Consumer Reports' high-
est score, and is recommended
for women age 21 to 65. Women
under 21 should skip the screen-
ing,,a Pap smear, because the
cancer is uncommon before then
and the tests are not accurate for
this age group.
The screenings for colon cancer
gets Consumer Reports' top score
for people ages 50 to 75. How-
ever, screening is less valuable
for people 76 to 85. Colon cancer
screening receives a low score
for people 86 and older and the


lowest possible score for people
49 and younger. Younger people
should consider testing only if
they are at high risk because the
cancer is uncommon before age
50.
The screening for breast cancer
gets Consumer Reports' second-
highest score for women 50 to
74. But women in their 40s or
those 75 and older should talk
with their doctor to see whether
the benefits outweigh the harm
based on their risk factors.
Avoid these screenings
Consumer Reports high-
lighted eight cancer screenings
that people at low risk should
avoid, including the following
three screenings which received
Consumer Reports' lowest rating.
More ratings and greater detail,
such as which individuals are at
high risk and might need a given
test, are available in the report.
The screening for ovarian can-
cer gets Consumer Reports' low-
est Rating for women of all ages,
because the screening tests are
not very effective. Women don't
need to be tested unless they are
at high risk. There are two tests:
a transvaginal ultrasound or the


CA-125 blood test, which mea-
sures a protein possibly associ-
ated with ovarian cancer.
The screening for pancreatic
cancer gets Consumer Reports'
lowest Rating for adults of all
ages. People don't need the test
(genetic tests or imaging tests of
the abdomen) unless they are at
high risk, because no test is likely
to detect the disease at a curable
stage.
The screening for testicular
cancer gets Consumer Reports'
lowest rating for men of all ages.
Most men don't need the screen-
ing, a physical exam, unless they
are at high risk, because most
cancers found without screening
are curable.
Questions you should ask
Consumer Reports' recom-
mends that patients ask their
doctors a series of questions'
before undergoing any cancer
screening, such as the following:
If the test results are positive, will
it save my life? Am I at higher
risk for cancer than the average
person, and if so, why? How often
does it provide falsely reassuring
results? Are any other tests just
as good?


. .




MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Work had started Thursday on "Connie" the fire truck's new pink paint job at Rahal-Miller Nissan in Marianna. The truck, named in honor of the late Connie
Haile, will be used by newly-formed Guardians of the Ribbon/Pink Heals Jackson County Chapter, to raise awareness of the group's cause, which is raising
money to help local cancer patients. Her new color will be revealed March 16, during the city's St. Patrick's Day celebration.


Pink
From Page 1A

Pink Heals chapter will be able to lend a hand,
leaving patients and their families able to fo-
cus on health.
And that's where, as a beacon for the cause,
"Connie" the fire truck comes in.
The vehicle now sits at Rahal-Miller Nis-
san, awaiting a shiny new coat of pink paint.
The business has donated supplies and labor
to help give a new look to the truck named
in honor of the late Connie Haile, who suc-
cumbed to cancer last year.


Known to many in Marianna, the former
Waco Drugs employee was also a Pink Heals
advocate, which how "Connie" the fire truck
got her name.
The newly adorned truck will be revealed on
March 16, during Marianna's St. Patrick's Day
festivities at Madison Street Park.
The day's events will include a 2 p.m. Sham-
rock Shuffle 5K Run/Walk, a fundraiser spon-
sored by Guardians of the Ribbon Jackson
County Chapter, Signature Healthcare at the
Courtyard and Main Street Marianna.
After the race, "Connie" will make her
debut.
SEntry fee for the Shamrock Shuffle is $15
before March 1 and $20 after. The first 100


participants will be guaranteed a Shamrock
Shuffle T-shirt.
The board of directors of the local Pink Heals
chapter includes President Philip Meadows,
Vice President Joshua Williams; Treasurer
Lori Meadows and board members Nakeya
"Nicky" Lovett, Ricky Winget, Darren Tucker
and Whitney Thomas.
For more information about the Guardians
of the Ribbon/Pink Heals Jackson County
Chapter, including how to apply for assistance
or how help the group through sponsorship
or other ways, call 850-573-0229.
Oh, and what's Meadows' favorite thing
about the group, aside from the snazzy ride?
"All the money we raise stays local."


./ \ LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT

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Quality Service at Affordable Prices
Come Visit us at our NEW LOCATION
3424 West Highway 90 .3 10r mie nIst-lir our previous location '
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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2013 AF


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


YUMMY


ASSEMBLY LINE


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
he Marianna Middle School cafeteria
was full.of activity Wednesday night as
members of the MMS and Marianna
High School volleyball teams worked on
coating 346 pounds of strawberries in white
or dark chocolate for aValentine's Day
fundraiser. The twice-a-year event raises
money to purchase uniforms and equipment
for the teams. From left, Azaria Marlowe,
Megan Tillman, Angelica Godwin and Skylar
Yon were dipping, and occasionally eating,
strawberries as they got a batch ready to be
handed off to another group of players in
charge of boxing up the Valentine's Day treats.



Two men charged with

dealing in stolen property


From staff reports

The Washington County
Sheriff's Office reports the
arrest of two men, both
charged with dealing in
stolen property.
In late January, WCSO
responded to a report of
a stolen four-wheeler at a
residence on Redbug Lane.
As a result of the subse-
quent investigation into
the theft, arrests were made
and the property, valued at
$3,000, was recovered.
Arrested were Christo-
pher Aaron Crunkelton,


Mayor's push for bilingual city is rebuffed


The Associated Press

DORAL In many parts
of Miami, Spanish is used
as frequently or more
often than English.
That's certainly case in
the neighboring suburb
of Doral, where an influx
of immigrants from Latin
America have transformed
an idle community near
the city's airport into
flourishing neighborhood
with cafeterias and busi-
nesses echoing the tastes
and sounds of home.
Enter anyrestauranthere
and customers are usually
greeted first in Spanish.
Some complain it can be
hard to find anyone who
speaks perfect English.
But when Doral's mayor
tried to make Spanish the
official second language
on Wednesday, he was re-
buffed by every council
member and numerous
constituents. And it wasn't
from the small group of
non-Hispanic residents
who live here. It was
largely from immigrants
themselves.
"Our parents and some
of us that are up here came
from Latin America and
other countries knowing
that the United States has
English as the language,"
Councilwoman Ana Maria
Rodriguez said. "We came
here knowing we had to
adapt to the language of
this country."
Nationwide, the Latino
population has ballooned
and the number of Span-
ish-language services has
grown as a result. An esti-
mated 34.5 million people
in the United States speak
Spanish at home about
10 percent of the popula-
tion and everyone from
small businesses and re-
tail chains to politicians
have taken note. When
Florida Sen. Marco Rubio
delivered the Republican
response to the presi-
dent's State of the Union
address on Tuesday, he
gave speeches in both
languages.
But few cities have re-
sponded by declaring


themselves officially bilin-
gual. Far more states, and
politicians, have adopted
English-only policies.
That has been reaffirmed
in the recent immigration
reform debate, with both
Democrats and Repub-.
licans supporting Eng-
lish as a requirement for
citizenship.
"Real reform means es-
tablishing a responsible
pathway to earned citizen-
ship, a path that includes
passing a background
check, paying taxes and
a meaningful penalty,
learning English, and go-
ing to the back of the line
behind the folks trying to
come here legally," Presi-
dent Barack Obama said
Tuesday.
The United States has
never declared English
as its official language,
though more than two
dozen states have taken
that step. Only one state
- Hawaii has adopted
a second official language,
naturally Hawaiian. Along
the U.S.-Mexico border,
there is sporadic use of
Spanish and English for
public affairs, but no state
is considered officially bi-
lingual. One Texas city, El
Cenizo, adopted Spanish
as its official language in
2006.
"With growing ethnic
and racial diversity, we
see more cases of people
making suggestions about
what should be the lan-
guage of their local gov-
ernment," said Nestor
Rodriguez, a sociology
professor at the University
of Texas at Austin. "These
issues are always emo-'
tional and very symbolic.
It's about who we are as
people and who we are as
a country."
Florida itself is an inter-
esting case study: Miami-
Dade County declared
itself bilingual 40 years
ago after a wave of Cu-
ban exiles fled island and
settled in South Florida.
That ordinance was later
overturned, but the rejec-
tion was thrown out in
1993. The state voted to


make English the official
language in 1988.
In Doral, nearly 80 per-
cent of the population
is Hispanic and almost
90 percent speak a lan-
guage other than English
at home. The city is af-
fectionately known as
"Doralzuela" because of
its large number of Ven-
ezuelan residents.
Doral Mayor Luigi Boria,
elected earlier this year, is
a Venezuelan immigrant
whose first language was
Italian. He is an elegant,
graying man who owns
a successful computer
technology business and
speaks a halting English.
He says he is still learning
the language.
"Bueno, I think we have
more than 80 percent of
the population that al-
ready speak English and
Spanish," he said in a tele-
phone interview before
Wednesday's vote. "I think
what I'm doing is formal-
izing or regulating some-
thing that is already taking
place."
He shared his own im-
migration story in intro-
ducing the resolution.
"It reminds me 23 years
ago when I came to this
country and I barely speak
English and I made myway
up," he told the audience
of about 50 residents.
The resolution was
largely symbolic; English
would have remained the
main language. But Bo-
ria argued that adopting
Spanish as an official sec-
ond language would help
attract more business
from Latin America and in
turn create jobs. He noted
Spanish has been used in
Florida since St. Augustine
was founded in 1565 40
years before Jamestown,
Va., the first permanent
English settlement in the
Americas.
"In Spanish, 'San Agus-
tin,'" he said, pronounc-
ing the city's name in
Spanish.
The four city council-
members, all Hispanic
women whose families
are from Mexico or Cuba,


said they appreciated the
spirit of the resolution but
did not see its use. They
highlighted the sizable
number of Asian and Por-
tuguese-speaking Brazil-
ian immigrants in Doral
as well.
Members of the audi-
ence who showed up dur-
ing public comments were
equally divided between
support and opposition.
"I learned the language,
English," said Jaime Topp,
a Cuban immigrant said.
"That is the language of
the United States."
He added that his wife,
who doesn't speak Span-
ish, sometimes has trou-
ble in Doral.
"There's times where she
can't communicate," he
said. "It's not right."
Ana Paola Cano, 30, who
recently emigrated from
Colombia, said she liked
the resolution. She speaks
English but felt more com-
fortable talking in Span-
ish, so the city clerk pro-
vided a translation as
she did at several points in
the meeting, highlighting
the need for dual language
services.
"It doesn't mean I don't
believe we all need to
learn English," she said.
"It's a nice welcome to
those of us who are re-
cently arrived."
The measure was tabled
but may be modified and
brought before the council
again at its next meeting.
On Thursday, Boria
vowed to continue work-
ing on the measure.
"I still believe it's good
for the city," he said. "It
will bring more business
and investment and'that
will create more jobs in
the city. At the end of the
day English will always be
the first official language."

Theonly
cure for


is you.
9.


Stafford


-30, of Chipley and Joseph
Wayne Stafford,, 21, of
Vernon.
Crunkelton was charged
with two counts of dealing
in stolen property. Staf-
ford was charged with one
count of dealing in stolen
property.


Chipley man arrested on

sexual battery charges
From staff reports sexual battery on a victim
under 12
The Washington County years of age
Sheriff's Office reports the and lewd
arrest of a Chipley man on and lascivi-
sexual battery charges. ous molesta-
WCSO was alerted to the *.0- tion on a vic-
suspected sexual battery tim less than
involving a child on Mon- Varnes .16 years of
ad FePhb 11


UL..y, U ...
Arrested was 19-year- If con
old Zachary Lee Varnes of carry a
Chipley. datory
Varnes was charged with prison.


age.
evicted, the charges
minimum, man-
sentence of life in


. : -o* We.st'' " o'r"a' "c/"" V " re i

j. "s ' ouI 'I W/hsfe:hI
FiBJ ID OTHER: ,,


Newspaper hi Eueation, Southern Mobile Media


JACKSORN COUNTY

FLORIDAN-


4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL 32448
850-526-3614 www.JCFloridan.com


R~


~"~"Y~"""s~R""#"A~~::~~~:~S~7~1W:k'


18A o FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 15. 2013


LOCAL & STATE














Sports Briefs CIPOIA COLLEGE BRSKEITBA.LL
Sports Briefs


High School Boys
Basketball
The 1A state playoffs will begin
Tuesday, with Malone, Cottondale,
and Sneads all playing regional
semifinal games.
Malone and Cottondale will be
at home, with the Tigers hosting
Chipley, and the Hornets hosting
the Bozeman Bucks, both at 7
p.m.
Sneads will go on the road
to take on the West Gadsden
Panthers, with the winner of that
game to play the winner of Cot-
tondale vs. Bozeman.
The winner of Malone vs.
Chipley will take on the winner of
Holmes County vs. Paxton.
The regional final round will be
Feb. 23.

Chipola Baseball
The Indians host Middle
Georgia today at 2 p.m. and again
Saturday at 11a.m.The Indians
then play San Jacinto on Saturday
at 2 p.m. and again Sunday at 1
p.m.

Chipola Softball
The Lady Indians will head to
Aiken. S C on the weekend to play
today against Alben Tech at noon
and USC-Lancaster at 4 p.m., and
then again Saturday against Pitt
Community College at 10 a.m..
Florence Darlington at noon. and
Georgia Military at 4 p.m.
The Lady Indians will come
back Sunday to take on Santa Fe
Community College in Gainesville
at noon and 2 p.m.

High School Baseball
Friday- Malone at Graceville. 4
pm and 6 pm : Liberty County
at Sneads. 5 30 p.m.. and 7 30
p.m.

High School Softball
Friday- Port St Joe at Man-
anna. 4 p m.. and 6 p.m.. Arnold
at Graceville. 4 p.m.. and 6 p m.:
Sneads at Blountstown, 4- p.m.
and 6 p.m.

Marianria Youth
Baseball-Softball
Marianna Recreation Depart-
ment will hold registration for
baseball and softball for the 2013
season through Feb. 28 from 8
a.m .to 4 p.m. for boys and girls
ages 5-15 at the Marianna Edu-
cational and Recreational Ep.po in
Marianna.
Registration fee is $40. except
for Machine Pitch Baseball and
8U girls softball. which 13 $35
each.
For more information, call 850-
482-6228.

MHS Softball Golf
Tournament
The Marianna High School soft-
ball team golf tournament will be
held March 9-10 at Caverns Golf
Course. with format a three-man
scramble at $85 per player.
Lunch will be provided on Sun-
day. For more information, con-
tact Scott Wiggins at 573-7506 or
Brian McKeithan at -82-4257.

Altrusa Golf
Tournament
The 20" Annual Altrusa Golf
Tournament will be held March
15 at Indian Springs Golf Course.
with registration at noon and a 1
p.m shotgun start.
Format will be four-person
scramble. modified handicap, 18
holes at $65 per person.
For more information con-
tact Jay James at 526-3197 or
209-3068, or Kathy Milton at
482-7788 or 209-8013.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to editor
rlal'i'jcfloridan.com. or lfa them
to 850-482-4478 The mailing
address for the paper is Jacksorn
County Floridan PO Box 520 .
Marianna. FL 32447


Raiders edge Indians


in defensive struggle


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The No. 7 Northwest
Florida State Raiders all
but wrapped up their
second straight Panhan-
dle Conference champi-
onshipWednesdaynight
in Niceville, edging by


the No. 12 Chipola Indi-
ans 64-62.
With the win, the
Raiders (23-2 overall,
9-1 in the Panhandle),
won the season series
with Chipola (24-3, 7-
3) 2-1 and moved two
games clear of the sec-
ond-place Indians in the


league standings with
two games to play.
Michael Chandler
gave the Raiders a big
lift off the bench with
16 points, six rebounds,
and four blocked shots
to help Northwest

See INDIANS, Page 2B


Tough loss


Lady Indians

fall in OT, 74-73


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Jatoria Carter made a free
throw with two seconds left
in overtime after a contro-
versial foul call to lift the No.
8 Northwest Florida State
Lady Raiders to a 74-73 vic-
tory over the No. 6 Chipola
Lady Indians on Wednesday
night in Niceville.
With the win, the Lady
Raiders (22-3 overall, 7-3 in
the Panhandle Conference)
forced a three-way tie atop
the league standings with
Chipola (22-4, 7-3) and Gulf
Coast State.
Northwest overcame a 12-
-point deficit with 10 minutes
to go in regulation to force
overtime, and then ben-
efited from a strange call in
the final seconds that nearly
caused the Chipola bench to
come unglued.
Trailing 73-71 with 11 sec-
onds on the clock, the Lady
Indians got a tying basket
from Jasmine Crawford,
who drove down the right
side of the lane and finished
to even the game up with
three seconds to play.
Crawford then picked up
the LadyRaiders' point guard
Carter trying to get open
on the ensuing inbounds
play and was whistled for
'a foul for holding with two
seconds to play, though on
replay there appeared to be
minimal contact.
Carter stepped to the line
for two shots, made the first,
and then missed the second,
with Tarvarsha Scott grab-
bing the offensive rebound
and running the clock out.
After the game, Chipola
coach Greg Franklin said.he
I)


Chipola's Rayven Brooks shoots for two against Tallahassee
Saturday.


was disappointed to see the
game end the way it did.
"I've coached basketball
for 21 years and I've never
had a game situation that
was handled as badly as that
one, and I'm not talking in
terms of players and coach-
es," he said. "I'll just say that
the players and the coaches
handled themselves the way
they were supposed to. The
rest of the game was not
managed well."
Scott finished with 20
points and 16 rebounds to


lead the Lady Raiders, with
Carla Batchelor also add-
ing a double-double with 15
points and 14 rebounds, and
Luiana Livulo posting 16
points and eight rebounds.
The Lady Raiders led the
game 28-27 at halftime, but
the Lady Indians used a 16-4
run early in the second half
to move in front, getting a
three from Kristine Brance
to start the run and another
triple from Rahni Bell to cap

See CHIPOLA, Page 2B


MA SINNIt/1 IL LURIUAN
Chipola's Kruize Pinkins tries to get a two point shot past
Tallahassee Saturday


-" ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Hg School_11_1111__11_


High School
Softball


Lady


Bulldogs


look to stay


undefeated

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Lady Bulldogs soft-
ball team will look to go to 2-0 today
when its hosts the Port St. Joe Lady
Sharks at 6 p.m.
Marianna opened its season a week
ago with an 8-2 home victory over
Godby, but had a scheduled game
against Arnold on Tuesday rained
out, the second game that has been
moved due to weather this season.
' Lady Bulldogs coach Scott Wiggins
said it has been frustrating not being
able to play more than once so far
this year.
"It should really be our fourth
game, but the weather hasn't coop-
erated," he said. "The kids and I are
just excited about playing. We've
been practicing now for about five
weeks, so we're ready to start playing
some ballgames."
In Marianna's lone game thus far,
Wakulla transfer Taylor Hussey start-
ed in the circle and went the distance
to get the victory in her first outing as
a Lady Bulldog.
"Taylor pitched very well," Wig-
gins said. "She did a great job as far
as throwing strikes and not walking
people, the defense played well, and
we hit the ball pretty well. It was just
a very good team win."
Another MHS pitcher will make
another big debut today when fresh-
man Kayleigh Temples makes her
first start as a varsity player against
Port St. Joe.
S"I think she's real excited about it
and we're real excited for her to have
the opportunity to start her first var-
sity game," Wiggins said. "But we're
expecting big things out of all of our
pitchers this year. I feel like we could
start anyone of the three in any game
and do well."

See BULLDOGS, Page 2B


MARK SKINNER/THE FLORIDAN
Chipola's Hayley Parker scoops up the ball
for a throw to third last week.


BY DUSTIN KENT'
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Lady Indians
will look to continue their
hot streak this weekend when
they travel to Aiken, S.C. for a
busy weekend that includes
seven games in three days.
Chipola (9-2) will take on
Aiken Tech today at noon be-
fore finishing the day against
USC-Lancaster at 4 p.m., and
then play three games Satur-
day against Pitt Community
College at 10 a.m., Florence
Darlington at noon, and
Georgia Military at 4 p.m.
The Lady Indians will come
back to their home state Sun-
day to take on Santa Fe Com-


munity College for a double-
header at noon and 2 p.m. in
Gainesville.
Chipola is currently riding
a seven-game winning streak
after a 2-2 start to the season,
winning those games by a to-
tal tally of 44-10.
It has been mostly pitch-
ing thus far that has paved
the way for the Lady Indians'
success, as they are posting
a team Earned Run Average
of 2.18 and limiting'oppos-
ing hitters to a .245 batting
average.
Sophomore All-American
Eva Voortman is leading the
Chipola staff with a 0.55 ERA
in four appearances, winning
both of her decisions to go


with a save and 12 strikeouts
to one walk.
Rosanne de Vries leads the
team with four wins in five
starts, posting a 2.33 ERA with
15 strikeouts and 10 walks,
while redshirt freshman Ka-
rissa Childs is 1-2 with a 3.27
ERA to go with 10 strikeouts
and five walks in a team-high
25 2/3 innings.
Offensively, the Lady Indi-
ans are being led by sopho-
more Stephanie Garrels, who
is batting .516 with a .605 on-
base percentage and 13 runs,
with Jasmine Tanksley (.406),
Alyssa Hathcoat (.400), and
Lindsay Wurm (.400) giving

See SOFTBALL, Page 2B


FALLEN OLYMPIAN
The'Blade Runner' Oscar
Pistorius is charged with
murdering his girlfriend in
South Africa.

Page 8B


1 V


Chipola Softball


Red-hot Lady Indians set for busy weekend


_~11~1111_~1111_1~_11_1111111_


rPs~ss~n~oll~ar~ae~j~aF~:~~c~r?,~:~s~:~


r~;l



I







72B FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Hockey



No decision yet on NHL players in Olympics


The Associated Press

NEWYORK A decision
on whether NHL players
will head to the 2014 Sochi
Olympics isn't likely this
week.
Discussions were set for
Thursday and Friday be-
tween the NHL, the NHL
players' association, and
officials from the Interna-
tional Ice Hockey Federa-
tion and the International
Olympic Committee to see
if it makes sense for North
American professional
hockey players to go to the
Olympics for a fifth straight
time.
"I don't expect any reso-
lution or decisions this
week," NHL Deputy Com-
missioner Bill Daly told
The Associated Press in an
email on Thursday.
The Sochi Games are one


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chicago Blackhawks' Patrick Kane celebrates his game-tying goal against the Vancouver
Canucks during the third period of an NHL hockey game in Vancouver, B.C., on Feb. 1.


year away. While a final
decision isn't required this
week, one will have to be
reached in the near future.
It is believed hockey fed-


erations will need to know
by May what players will be
available for their teams.
The current discussions
are being held between


NHL Commissioner Gary
Bettman, NHLPA executive
director Donald Fehr, IIHL
President Rene Fasel and
officials from the IOC.


After enduring a long
lockout that produced a
shortened regular season
this year, the NHL is weigh-
ing whether it is worth
shutting down the game
for more than two weeks
next season to allow its
players to go to Russia for
the Olympics.
The time difference
will force the games to be
played at off hours in North
America, and the NHL
would like to receive con-
cessions from the IOC that
haven't been made before.
In return for sending its
players to the Sochi Olym-
pics, the NHL is trying to
acquire video, photograph
and Web site rights for the
games. The IIHF and the
IOC retain those exclusive
rights now.
The NHL began send-
ing its players to the 1998


Games in Nagano, Japan,
and continued through the
2010 Vancouver Games.
Even though the NHL got
great exposure by having
its players take part in an
Olympics in North Amer-
ica, disrupting the season
does come with a cost.
The stopping of the sea-
son, the potential injury
risk to players, and no tan-
gible upside for the NHL are
all factors that create doubt
whether the investment is
good for the league. .
One topic that isn't on
the agenda during this
week's meetings is NHL
realignment.
The relocation of the At-
lanta Thrashers to Winni-
peg before last season has
created travel troubles for
the Jets and their Southeast
Division rivals that need to
be resolved.


Softball
From Page 1B

Chipola four total players
batting .400 or better.
Power numbers are down
thus far for the Lady Indi-
ans, who have hit just five


Bulldogs

From Page 1B

The coach said that ju-
nior Breanna Willis will
also likely get a chance to
pitch tonight and may start
in Monday's home game
against Munroe.
Wiggins said that much
of the early season would
be spent trying to work out
the order of the rotation by


home runs in 11 games af-
ter hitting 40 in 59 games
last season.
Freshman Katie Harrison
has three of the team's five
home runs, and also has
the team lead with a .792
slugging percentage and
.nine RBI.


giving each pitcher plenty
of opportunity to show
what they can do.
"We'll just play it by ear,
but we're going to pitch all
of them here to start," he
said. "I don't want to over-
do it in the beginning, but
they'll all get the chance'
to start and as the season
progresses I!m sure we'll
have a one, a two, and a
three depending on how
they pitch."
Port St. Joe should be a


Sophomores Mya An-
derson and Hayley Parker
have the two other Chipola
homers, with Anderson
driving in eight runs and
Parker seven.
Chipola will return home
March 5 for a doublehead-
er against LB Wallace.


good early test for Mari-
anna, as the Lady Sharks
are coming off of an excel-
lent 2012 season in which
they finished 24-61 and
advancing to the 1A state
semifinals.
"They're going to be
a pretty good ball team
again," Wiggins said of the
Lady Sharks. "They lost
a few senior leaders, but
they've got their pitcher
back this year and they'll
have a good team."


MLB


Hunter upbeat while joining Tigers


The Associated Press

LAKELAND, Fla. To-
rii Hunter's plan this sea-
son seems pretty obvious:
Detroit's new right fielder
is going to try to smile his
way to the World Series.
"You don't want to look
back on your career and
say, 'I didn't have enough
fun,'" Hunter said Thurs-
day at the Tigers' spring
training complex.
The 37-year-old Hunt-
er is already living up to
his reputation as one of
the game's most engag-
ing people. Detroit starts
full-squad workouts Fri-
day, but Hunter was in the


clubhouse a day earlier,
laughing it up with ace Jus-
tin Verlander as if the two
had grown up together.
Nearby, designated hitter
Victor Martinez was talk-
ing to reporters but the
hooting and hollering in
the background was hard
to ignore.
"When I first came up
with the Indians, I used
to play against (Hunter)
in Minnesota," Martinez
said. "He told me one
thing when I was a rookie,
and I have never forgot:
'Don't ever lose your smile.
No matter what happens,
just keep smiling and keep
enjoying the game.'"


Hunter played 10 sea-
sons with the Twins and
five with the Los Angeles
Angels, but he's never been
to theWorld Series. Detroit
needed a right fielder, and
he signed a two-year deal
with the Tigers in Novem-
ber pretty early in the
free agent period.
Detroit has won two AL
Central titles in a row and
went to the World Series
last year, where the Tigers
lost to the San Francisco
Giants. Now Hunter joins
a clubhouse full of confi-
dent stars,, led by a man-
ager who knows how to
avoid drama even where
the scrutiny intensifies.


Indians
From Page 1B
overcome a sub-part offen-
sive night for All-American
point guard Chris Jones.
The sophomore Jones
came in averaging 23
points per game for the
season but was held to 12
points on 5-of-15 shooting
and turned the ball over six
times Wednesday.
It was a struggle on of-
fense most of the game
for the Raiders, who were
missing second-leading
scorer Elgin Cook, who was
out due to injury, shooting
just 42 percent from the
field for the game and 6-
of-20 from the three-point
line.
Fortunately for the Raid-
ers, their defense was
much better than their
offense, as they limited
an Indians team that was
also missing a key player
in point guard Terel Hall
due to injury to 37 percent


Chipola
From Page 1B

it off and make it a 45-36
Chipola lead with 12:05 on
the clock.
A three by Crawford
made it 50-38 Lady Indi-
ans with 10:05 to play, but
Northwest stormed back
with a 10-2 run to cut the
margin to four with 5:39
remaining.
An offensive rebound
and put-back by Batchelor
cut the Chipola lead to 61-
60 with 1:36 to play, with
Lashonda Littleton answer-
ing with two free throws
for the Lady Indians, and
Carter driving to the hoop
on Northwest's next pos-
session to make it 63-62.
The Lady Raiders got it
back with a chance to take
the lead, and Kiani Parker
drew a foul with 10 seconds
to play, but made only 1-of-
2 to tie the game.
Scott scored the first
points of regulation and
Carter followed with a
three-pointer to make it
68-64 Northwest.
A straightaway bank shot
Jon a drive by Carter gave


from the field and 4-of-23
from the three-point line.
Chipola also missed 12
free throws and had 20
turnovers in a game that
Indians coach Patrick
Blake said represented a
missed opportunity for his
team.
"I thought we did a great
job defensively to hold
them to 64 points on their
home floor, but if you hold
a team to 64 points you've
got to find a way to score
at least 65 offensively," he
said. "I told the guys that
this was a great opportu-
nity that we had that we
didn't take advantage of.
But there will be more op-
portunities the rest of the
way, so we've got to move
on from this and make
sure when the next oppor-
tunity arises that we take
full advantage of it."
Wednesday's game was
perhaps, the most compet-
itive of the three matchups
this season from start to
finish, with the first game


the Lady Raiders a five-
point lead with 1:04 left
in the overtime, but four
straight missed free throws
for Northwest and a clutch
three-pointer by Brance
kept it a 72-70 game with
just under 20 seconds on
the clock.
A free throw by Crawford
cut it to two with 11 seconds
to go, and the Lady Raid-
ers turned the ball over on
the ensuing inbounds play
to give it back to Chipola
to set up Crawford's tying
drive.
Despite the disputed foul
call at the end of overtime,
Franklin said that his team
had opportunities well be-
fore then to put the game
away and couldn't do it.
"We had some situations
where we missed a couple
of box outs and missed
some things in transition
that hurt us. If you're go-
ing to finish games on the
road, you can't miss box
outs and turn the ball over
as many times as we did,"
he said. "But I thought our
kids played extremely hard.
I was very proud of the kids
that they kept fighting'and
kept pushing regardless of
the situation."


a 15-point victory for the
Raiders and the second
decided by a big late rally
by Chipola.
In the third matchup,
neither team was able to
get much separation the
whole night, with the big-
gest lead being six points
for each side.
The Indians led 57-51 af-
ter back to back dunks by
Earl Watson with 7:07 to
play, but Chipola was un-
able to convert a field goal
the rest of the game and
made just 5-of-ll from
the free throw line over the
same span.
Northwest Florida State
took advantage of the stag-
nant Chipola offense with a
12-1 run over the next 4:14
ofthe game, with Shykeem
Jackson and Jones knock-
ing in back to back threes
to put the Raiders up 62-58
with 3:27 to play.
A pair of free throws by
Kruize Pinkins got Chipola
back to within two at 64-
62 with 52 seconds to play,


With a win, the Lady In-
dians could've put them-
selves in the driver's seat
to win the conference title
and take the top seed from
the Panhandle into the
state tournament.
However, the loss means
-that the only way Chipola
can get the top seed now
is to win out and have


and the Indians got the
ball back after a defensive
stop with 21 seconds on
the clock.
But instead of going for
the tie, Chipola tried to
force up a three on the
ensuing possession, with
Demetrious Floyd missing
a tough contested three.
However, the Indians
corralled the rebound and
got timeout with two sec-
onds left to set up another
final play.
The call out of the time-
out seemed to work to per-
fection, with Pinkins catch-
ing the ball just outside the
paint and appearing to
have a clear path for a ty-
ing layup, but Jones made
a game-saving defensive
play by stripping Pinkins
of the ball from behind as
time expired.
Beyond the last sequence
of plays, Blake said he was
disappointed that'his team
let it come down to that fi-
nal moment.
"We put ourselves in


Northwest Florida State
lose to either fourth-place
Tallahassee or last-second
Pensacola State, the latter
of which still hasn't won a
conference game.
"It's disappointing, but
it's not the end-all," Frank-
lin said. "These kids played
great basketball (Wednes-
day). I'm still proud of


11E te gefetds!t





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position to win late in the
game when we were up
57-51," he said. "But on
our next five possessions
we missed a layup, missed
free throws, and had back
to back turnovers where we
really could've stretched it
out and put it away.
"When you're playing a
great team, especially on
their home floor, those are
the plays you have to finish
to come away with a win.
Unfortunately, we were not
able to make those plays at
the end."
Floyd and Pinkins each
led the Indians with 14
points, with Pinkins add-
ing 12 rebounds, while
Cinmeon Bowers and Car-
los Morris scored 12 each,
and Morris led the team
with seven assists.

.Hall questionable for
Pensacola
Chipola's sophomore
point guard Terel Hall will
have an MRI on Monday
on a knee that caused him


them and proud of the
effort they gave and the
character they showed
despite all the things that
went on. They showed
a high level of character
and resiliency."
The Lady Indians will
next play host to Pen-
sacola State on Tuesday
night at 5:30 p.m.


to miss Wednesday's game
and will be questionable
for the Indians' next game
against Pensacola State on
Tuesday.
Chipola can clinch a
state tournament berth
with one win in its last two
games, but Blake said that
wouldn't factor into his de-
cision in when to play his
team's assist leader.
"If he's able to go, then
we're going to play him,"
the coach said. "But we're
also not going to risk hurt-
ing him further. We hope
to.have him back for Pen-
sacola, but it's a day by day
thing. We're not going to
rush him back. We want to
make sure he's 100 percent
when he plays again."



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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY15, 201.3 3BF


Danica talks dating driver Ricky Stenhouse Jr.


The Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.
Danica Patrick slid
into her chair at NASCAR
media day Thursday and
promptly informed her
audience it would be race
questions only.
Yeah, right. The ensuing
20-plus minutes consisted
mostly of questions about
her relationship with fel-
low driver Ricky Stenhouse
Jr., and Patrick dutifully
answered them all. She
and Stenhouse better get
used to this, at least in the
early going.
Patrick and Stenhouse
confirmed in January they
are dating, and the duo will
be competing against each
their r this year for Sprint
Cup rookie of the year.
"Initially, it was a little bit
of a mental hurdle of like,
'We compete against each
other,' Patrick said of the
relationship, which she lik-
ened to Romeo and Juliet.
"It's like the Capulets and
Montagues with (me in)
Chevy and (him in) Ford,
this just doesn't work. But
you can't tell your heart
who to like or not like. And
so in the end, it ended up
being something that I just
didn't think was a big deal
at all."
The two spent the last
two seasons racing in the
Nationwide Series and Pat-
rick leaned on Stenhouse,
the two-time Nationwide
champion, for friendship
and advice after her move
to NASCAR. She said the
relationship grew deeper,
and they went public after
she filed for divorce in early
January from her husband,
Paul Hospenthal. She and
Hospenthal announced in
November they were split-
ting up after seven years of
marriage.
.The 30-year-old Patrick
rarely talked about her
personal life while married
to Hospenthal, but she was
open Thursday about the
r25-year-old Stenhouse.
"I'm just relaxed," Patrick
said. "I feel happy. I feel
like I am enjoying my life.
It makes me smile to talk
about him. I feel like I'm on
'The Bachelorette.'"
Stenhouse was equally
as open, saying "she's hot!"
when asked what attracted
him to Patrick before add-
ing "she loves to cook, and
I love to eat." He admitted
he'd never heard of the
Capulets and Montagues,
and refused to say who he
would push on the last lap
of a race at Daytona if Pat-
rickwas battling for the win
with one of his Roush Fen-
way Racing teammates.
"I'm going three-wide,"
he smiled. "There's enough
room at Daytona."
Although the two did not
publicly interact Thursday,
they are clearly content
with their relationship. And
because Patrick, who leads
all celebrities with 12 Super
Bowl ads, is used to being
under the media spotlight
Stenhouse said he can lean
Son his girlfriend for guid-
ance as he finds himself
suddenly scrutinized.
"I'm fine. The headlines
don't say anything about
me," he said. "I'm taking
,this seriously. But if I win a
brace, it might be 'Danica's
boyfriend won a race.'"
-.. -The relationship is fod-
der for endless jokes and
razzing from fellow com-
petitors, and most were
eager to dive into the topic
Thursday.
"Pat on the back for him,"
said Ty Dillon.
"We can come. up with
plenty of jokes and how
humorous it could be on
the track and what each of
them are thinking we'll
all be watching with great
curiosity, for sure," said
Jimmie Johnson.


But if the two have an in-
cident on the track? "That
would be one heck of a
show," Johnson said. "I'm
sure ratings would go up
quite a bit. You never know.
Danica has shown she can
get quite upset at times, so
there could be something
going on."


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Danica Patrick (left) talks with Ricky Stenhouse Jr., as they wait on pit road during qualifying for a Nationwide series race on Nov. 3 atTexas Motor Speedway
in Fort Worth, Texas.


Patrick was ready for all
the ribbing, and even joked
about what would happen
if Stenhouse wrecked her
on the track.
"He better have a really
good, 'I'm sorry,'" Patrick
said with a wink.
The duo is moiing for-
ward with their relation-
ship, with Patrick saying
she planned to cook for
Stenhouse on Valentine's
Day and she packed an
entire suitcase full of gifts
for her boyfriend (he got
her "fancy playing cards",
he said). She also told re-


porters how after so many
months of hanging out
with Stenhouse, she had
to push him to ask her out
on an official date an
account Stenhouse con-
firmed' before sheepishly
admitting he couldn't re-
member what restaurant
they went to for the date.
Defending Sprint Cup
champion Brad Keselows-
ki cautioned that things
could get sticky with the
happy couple.
"It's difficult because
there's that part of you that
thinks, Ah, this is a little


hokie. Can we just focus
on the on-track part?'"
he said. "But you have to
understand that as a race
car driver, you make life
decisions that put you in
a position of danger all the
time, 24-7, and that inher-
ently makes you a unique
person and the decisions
you make in your men-
tal process to get there
unique. And whatever out-
side influences you have
are going to affect how you
perform.
"So it makes it a story
because there's no way for


it not to affect their per-
formance. It ties back in. I
think it's not really much
of a story that their dating
as it is as much of a story if
they were to break up. That
would be incredible to
watch, to be quite honest
with you. There's so many
different ways that could
go. I mean, imagine if they
were to break up and then
wreck each other for like.
the next six races because
they were mad?"
Stenhouse dismissed
Keselowski's take, "coming
from a guy who has never


had a girlfriend?"
Johnson had a recom-
mendation: Patrick and
Stenhouse need to keep
their relationship from
spilling onto the track.
"If it does, it's going to
impact their lifestyle and
their job," Johnson said.
"We're paid to go on the
racetrack and race. So if
they're ,handling things
differently on the track
because of their personal
relationship, it's going to
affect their jobs; their own-
ers aren't going to be happy
or their sponsors."


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oil'







-l4B FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2013


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


600D 6RIEF!
STANDING IN FRONT
OF ALLTHEE APDCTS'
DES6K 0AAK'E5 YO
FEEL LIKE YO1RE
IN A PIT!

:- ^^


MRS.DONOVAN,I L(ANT TO
APOLOa6ZE FOR EWNG AT
YoU...IT WAS VERY RIUE OF
ME, AND I'M SORRY...


D


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
I \ THAT'S THE IMPORTANT
HLIPPED.) OKAY. THIN IS: WHEN A
PETER! HOCKEY PLAYED. FALLS
FALLING IS PART DOWN. WHAT DOES
OF LEARNING HE DO'


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


HE WAITS RIGHT HERE
UNTIL A TURBO-HOT
FIGURE SHKATER
COMESH OVER TO
OFFER HELP.




L


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
/ost oF THe LatNeTrs L /w arl's a
IroR SotLeR SysTeA were g MYTlICaL
NaMeD aFTR-re MqTHiCaL GOP?


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
THE TIME
AS COME T10
JOIN FORCES AND,
I C-HASE INO MOCO! I



'9


00o, YOU POOR.
LITTLE GUY'
HI. GOOD
GAME

0
0 o '


ONE MORE PUFF OF POWDER IN
THE AIRAND ONE MORE WAVE O
THE WAND, AND MOO WILL 5OON"t
SEE HOW IMPORTANT I TRULY AM.





IH"
jLI(L


EXCUSE ws FoR. GAwT x KEE
o, woET: FoRCETr-c, I
IvJ ou L- .o? ,To vAPNE T
I HA"J /s' ToK.j *r,,. T'Vr-i t< "Ig i
ooJENTo"-r. TIUr -
oor Jr-iT-To "-t 4e F- E. /



ERMAN BYIM UER



HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


ACROSS
1 Wheel part
4 Kimono
sashes
8 Heroic tale
12 Cry of
surprise
13Sub -
14Idaho
neighbor
15 Clearness
17 Exploding
star
18 Oxford's
river
19 Luxury fur
21 VP's boss
23 Tern
cousin
24 Entertain
27 do-well
29Simple
card game
30 Clock front
32Appoint
36 Extend
credit
38 Roof
problem
40 Fall behind
41 "So what
is new?"
43 Release
(2 wds.)
45E. -
bacteria
47 Smear


49 Iridescent
gems
51 Pinot et al.
55 Cloudy, in
London
56 Decking
out
58Rhine
feeder
59 Film spool
60 Part of a
footnote
abbr.
61 Happy
62 Fateful
date
63 QB
objectives

DOWN
1 Novelist
Victoria -
2 Nope
(hyph.)
3 Raton,
Fla.
4 Bought by
mail
5 Idaho
capital
6 Is, to Fritz
7 Declares
8 Beach
hazard
9 Lagoon
boundary
10Judge's
prop


Answer to Previous Puzzle


11Just as I 39Miceand
thought! octopi
16 Little 42 "Diamond
rascals -"
20 Birthday 44 Online
count auction site
22 Trapped 45 Type of reef
24 Leather 46 Musical
punch drama
25 Daisy 48 Jibe with
Yokum 50Rani's
26 Coffee garment
brewer 52 Early
28 Yale Briton
alumnus 53 Novelist
31 SSNs, e.g. Bagnold
33 Elev. 54-Some
34 Periodical, NCOs
for short 55 Choke or
35 Kind of trip joke
37 Not on time 57 Lipstick
color


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com


2-14 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebnty Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
"H B HC HRXEV XDWVW'B CE

HNXECEPG, NCZWBB GEN'VW

YVWYHVWI XE VJBT XDW YEBBJAJZJXG

EM B X H VSJCF." AWC TJCFBZWG


Previous Solution: "Love doesn't make the world go'round. Love is what
makes the ride worthwhile." Franklin P. Jones
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 slenbe U
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist, by Universal Uclick 2-15


Dear Annie: My wife and I are having
marital problems. Our issues started
when I caught her lying to me and talking
privately on the phone to my best friend
of 12 years the same guy who was the
best man at my wedding. After arguing
for a few days, I asked her to make a sin-
cere effort to go for counseling, and she
agreed. I also asked her to stop speaking
to my friend during the time we are try-
ing to repair our marriage. She agreed to
that, too.
However, this guy messages her' on
Facebook, and she still reads his com-
ments. We went to our first counsel-
ing session, and I felt it went well. But
when we got home, I realized that she
was having doubts. She finally said
she had not been in love with me for five
years.


Ann Landers offered the advice that if you want
to catch a trout, don't fish in a herring barrel.
The segue from that to this deal is thin. But
South is in four hearts. West leads the club queen.
How should declarer plan the play? What were
West's more effective opening leads?
North's rebid was a double negative, showing a
very weak hand, choosing either two no-trump or
three clubs, according to partnership preference.
Here, South would have done better to sign off in
three no-trump.
South starts with four potential losers: two
spades and two diamonds. He has only nine win-
ners: sixhearts, one diamond and two clubs.
Probably there is an instinct to play a heart to
dummy's nine, followed by a diamond to the
queen. However, when the finesse loses, if West
now returns his remaining trump (or shifts to
spades and East leads a trump in time), South's
contract is, as the British phrase it, kippered (from
the noun "kipper," a smoked herring).
The diamond queen is a red-card herring. After
South takes the first trick, he should cash his dia-
mond ace and play another diamond. The defend-
ers can win, cash two spades and shift to a trump,
but declarer takes that in his hand, ruffs the dia-
mond queen with dummy's heart nine (getting a
seventh trump trick), crosses back to hand with a
spade ruff or a club, draws trumps and claims.
The contract can be defeated if West leads a
trump, or if he starts with a spade and East switch-
es to a trump at trick two or three. Then, when
South concedes a diamond, the defense plays a
second trump to deny dummy a ruff.


Horoscope
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Heed your hunches
if you come up with some
bright idea regarding
a way to multiply your
resources.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Because you'll view
certain situations realis-
tically and not through
rose-colored glasses, you'll
accomplish much.
ARIES (March 21:April
19) -When going up
against another, be it in
business or sport, you'll
have a bit more to draw
upon than will your
opponent.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -Viewing things in
positive terms will give
you the advantage over
most opponents.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- If the stakes captivate
your interest, you will '
show an impressive moti-
vation to succeed.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-You're not likely to be
afraid of making snap de-
cisions, due to your strong
faith in your judgment..
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
-You have a great apti-
tude for sorting out the
problems of others and
helping them repair their
affairs;
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Get involved in
activities today that help
stimulate you mentally as
well as physically.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- If you believe condi-
tions involving your work
can be improved, take it
upon yourself to make the
necessary moves.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Temporarily set
aside your material wants
and needs, and instead
focus on your social life.
Surprisingly, this might be
where your greatest op-
portunities reside.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Don't allow
any situation to hang fire
if it has an effect on your
finances. Matters can be
concluded to your satis-
faction by putting forth
the necessary effort.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Since your greatest
attributes are likely to be
your leadership qualities,
it's highly likely that you'll
instinctively know how to
get what you want. Do so.


Annie, we have a beautiful 16-month-
old baby girl. I want to repair our mar-
riage for our child's sake, as well as for us.
What should I do? Can marriage counsel-
ing help if there's no love?
DYING IN NEWYORK

Dear NewYork: Marriage counseling can
help if there once was love that can be re-
captured, or if both parties are dedicated
to making the marriage work. A compat-
ible marriage doesn't necessarily require
passion for each other, only a commit-
ment to the stability of the relationship.
But you cannot do it alone. Please con-
tinue with counseling. If your wife wants
to work on the marriage, she will come
along and make the necessary effort. But
if she is unwilling, the counselor will help
you forge your own path.


North 02-15-13
4 J763
995
*52
487542
West East
4985 4AKQ10
S63 Y872
* K1076 J 9 8 4
4QJ109 463
South
4 42
VAKQJ104
*AQ3
4AK

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both

South West North East
24 Pass 24 Pass
2V Pass 2NT/34 Pass
4 Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: Q


2-15 LaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal UClick lor UFS, 2013


--- ----------~


COMICS







CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jacksoni County I'oridan *


ray, Februry 15, 2013-5
Friday, Feblruary 15, 2013- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure :c. pujbl ih n, aj ti fir ip:,.iralic erroi oi .-i:,r- ;n publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that ttr pu .i:-r, r -all 0.hrJOi E I -jis I.ji~ d -amage 3r.l-,ri out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error Is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or ot-irnii ard hcr, iha1i tr nio. 1.i-il.I ii'o r n -,.,i.iin ol arn advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under tI6 appropiiate .la .liatlor,.


ANNOUNCEMENTS


Garden of Memory Cemetery Chapel of
Memorls, companion Mausoleum, crypt
65-66 w/ two 0/C & two plaques I have the
quit deed Asking 52385. for property. Contact
Mark E. Holton major U.S. Army retired
pedi.care@hotmail.com for more information.

Enroll Now III Childcare Director
License Class, 144 clock hrs.
6 week Home Study course
Call Mrs. Alaina 334-714-4942 9am Spm
Professional Piano & Organ Teacher
I teach private piano and organ lessons in my
home in the Highlands. 30 years experience
teaching private lessons and in schools.
Great Gift For All Ages!
334-446-4226


CLASSIFIED WORK
I have sold the Disc Harrow that I had adver-
tised in the paper. My phone has been ring-
ing non stop(Ha Ha) so please cancel the ad
immediately.
To aid you in the tracking of the calls in re-
sponse to the ad-the calls have come from
Enterprise, Ashford, Gordon, Eufaula, Dothan
Metro Area and the Florida panhandle to the
tune of 15-20 calls. So the ad helped tremen-
dously.
Thanks for your help and I know who to call
on the next item for sale!!
Charlie Martin

4460 Broad St. 16th. 8-2 freezer, twin bed, desk,
ABEKA, ammo, books, movies, clothes, H/H,
holiday, up right piano & bit of everything
ESTATE SALE: 4280 Cedar St. Mariann a
Fri. 15th 10-? & Sat 16th. 8-? Furn, appl,
clothes, H/H medical supplies, dishes, older
TV, costume jewelry and sago palm-must cut.


Amish Fireplace -small heater,$75,850-482-3537
Bar Stools: (2) $10. Call 850-482-2360
Bed: full, mattress and rails. $150. 850-693-3260
Brake Fluid -4, gallon cont., $10 ea,850-209-3665
Buffet server: Mahogany $300. 850-693-0521
Chair -oversized,multicolors,$150,850-482-3537
Charger: 2/40/200 amp. $100. 850-482-2636
China cabinet: Mahogany. $300. 850-693-0521
Electric Stove: 40" Fridgeaire $250. 482-2006


($)


FINANCIAL


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
(14) Town Homes for Sale
1 block off circle,
great income & fully occupied.
Owner Finance
with good down payment
4 386-312-6363 4

(Ji) MERCHANDISE
,. '' ",. ,


Coin Collections Wanted!! Paying Top
Dollar $5$$ Call Mathew 985-516-0379


FIREWOOD (all split oak)
Delivery available! a TRUCK LOAD $70.
CALL MARK 334-701-4967 or 334-791-6704
FIREWOOD for Salel Good Pricesl
You Cut or We Cut! Delivery Available in
Certain Areas. Call for More Info!
Tree clearing and clean-up available also.
Priced According to Load Sze.
334-735-2957 or 334-372-5107

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

(E) PETS & ANIMALS


LOST, female cat (Noel) black, white & brown
South Side Apartments. 850-573-4512. or text.


Mirror w/shelves: $50. 850-693-3260.
Rocking Chair: Wood $20. Call 850-482-2360
Sewing Machine Singer 534. $50, 850-693-0521
Sign Stakes 75+, $25 for all, 850-209-3665
Table side table, carvings, $100, 850-482-3537
Window dbl pane,29Yx30 /4 $100. 850-482-2636
Windows.Transom 14x73, $45. 850-482-2636
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!


oI.
Bloodhound Pups
tered /registerable pups.
Litter includes black/tans
& reds (5 males/5 female).
Both parents are regis-
tered and on site. Born on
January 23, 2013. Will be ready for new homes
on March 6, 2013. $650. For more info. or to set
appointment for viewing call 334-726-2561.
Bullmastiff puppies: $500. Born Nov.15.2012,
have shots and their papers. They are ready for
GREAT home only. Already people friendly and
love to play. Please call 334-618-0987 Peggy.
CKC Reg, Golden Retriever 2-M $350.
4-F $300., 9 wks old, S/W, Parents on site
Call 334-648-1287 or 334-791-9831.
English Bulldog Puppies: AK C 1/M & 1/F
champion bloodlines, 9 weeks old, health
certificates, S&W. Colors: red & white, brindle
& white. Call 850-249-5626 or 843-267-6214
Found: Rat Terrier (maybe Chihuahua, too)
Female black/tan/white, near intersection of
Birchwood Rd & Co. Rd. 275 (aka Alliance Road
or Cypress Hwy), Marianna, FL, 850-762-3944
-ie : B Bor der i i s m.Teirri ei

Golden Retriever Puppies: AKC. Ready now.
$270. Pics available e-mail jkphi@live.com.
Call 850-526-4760 Marianna, FL
Reg. Toy/Mini Chocolate, Parti
colors & solids Schnauzers, Male
& Female, S/W, $500.-$600.
www.lovemyschnauzers.com
334-889-9024
Valentines Babies are Ready! LC Chihuah
Shh-Tzu mixes, taking dep. on Morldes
334-718-4886 plIyn nsw.r.com



CaselH 70 XT Loader: 79HP,
448 hours, reg. bucket and
grapple bucket. Must see to
appreciate the condition.
$19,500.00 Call 334-894-2315


Demo Salvage Concrete
for Sale & Delivery, great for erosion
control behind dams & gullies
334-347-7466 or 334-726-2561



Frozen Green


850-573-6594


Peanuts
We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
4 4128 Hwy 231


Sudoku


2013 The Mepharp Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Level: [- 2]
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Thursday's puzzle

9 3 5 2 7 8 4 6 1
935278461
617945 8 2 3
8 4 2 63'1 915176
842631957
526394718
491786235
783152694
1.59827346
1 5 9_ 8 27 3 4 6
3 7 4 5 6 9 1'8 2
2 6 84 1 35- 7 9
2 6 84 1 35 7 9


2/15/13


t /


Place an Ad


Fast, easy, no pressure
24 hours a day, 7 days a week!


\' \ 4 \ s0 Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
A\ & and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


4 9 8




-- ---- -9

263 1_ _

5 9

8 6 7

5 6 9

7 3 2

416 8
864


/ _~_~_~_I __ _~~_





m 5ara.


A ty" S F b gj


- 11-~1


at







Vine Ripe Tomatoes


Home Grown Greens
Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hw 52 Malvern
S *I


S Bahia seed for sale *4
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L....o...r ................. .... J
P Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418
Sheltered Coastal Bermuda Hay
Baled with JD568 in Columbia, AL $55
Call 334-790-4439 or 334-618-1962


Cow-Calf pairs for Sale $1600. each
4 334-886-9003 / 334-726-4661

Wanted to Rent: Farm Land or Pasture in Ma-
rianna or West of Marianna; Call 850-718-1859

The ClaSSifieds...=


|(*) EMPLOYMENT





McLANE.
Truck Driver
McLane Company, one of the largest
grocery wholesale companies in the nation,
is looking for Truck Drivers to join our
Dothan, Alabama Team.
Our Truck Drivers are responsible for
transporting customer orders to retail
locations in the Alabama, South Georgia and
Gulf Coast areas. Our drivers enjoy
excellent home time, team delivery routes,
top driver wages, excellent benefits and a
very lucrative 401k retirement plan.
The ideal driver applicant will hold a Class
"A" CDL, a minimum of two years driving
experience, good MVR record, knowledge of
DOT rules and able to pass a DOT physical
and drug screen. Route delivery experience
is preferred, but not required.
If you meet these qualifications and wish to
apply for a driving position with us, please
stop by our main lobby Monday through
Friday between the hours of 8am and 4pm
to complete an employment application.
McLane Southeast Dothan
100 McLane Parkway
Cottonwood, AL 36320
Phone: (334) 678-2707
Fax: (334) 678-2754
E-mail: ronald.paulk@mclaneco.com
(Take Highway 231 south to the Florida
state line. Turn left onto State Line Road.
McLane is 1 mile down on right.)
E.O.E.







6 B- Friday, February 15, 2013 Jackson County Floridan


0*. *





Opelika-Auburn News has an
immediate opening for a
Production Director.

The primary role of this position is to
overse6 the production operations at
the Opelika/Auburn, Alabama facility
of O&DS. A major requirement of this
position is to grow a profitable
commercial printing and distribution
operation at the Opelika-Auburn News.

This position is also responsible for'
promoting and championing safety
as a condition of employment while
ensuring that all safety policies are
followed and all OSHA guidelines are
met.

The successful candidate must be
able to bridge communication between
the production staff and other stake
holders.,

This position is responsible for
commercial printing goals, proper
scheduling of all product production
and high quality of each product.
Must have working knowledge of all
production equipment. 10 years
newspaper/commercial management
required. 4 year degree preferred.

Pre-employment drug and background
screening required. EOE/M/F/D/V;

Please apply at
www.worldmediaenterprise.com

World Medi? Enterprises Inc.
BH MEDIA GROUP/ A BERKSMIRE HATHAWAY COMPANY


IT'S AS EASY
AS 1 2 3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS






McLANE.
Distribution Center
Supervisor
McLane Company, one of the largest
grocery wholesale companies in the nation,
is looking for a Distribution Center
Supervisor to join our Dothan, AL Team.
This position reports directly to the
SDistribution Center Manager and is
responsible for the day to day operations
of a fast paced department staffed with
approximately 25+ employees.
Responsibilities include meeting daily
production standards, employee relations,
staffing, meeting order quality standards,
daily housekeeping and misc. reporting.
The ideal candidate will possess a
bachelor's degree and at least two to four
years hands on experience in the functional
areas listed above. Must also possess
excellent communication and computer
skills. Experience in the distribution
industry is preferred, but not required.
McLane Company offers an excellent salary,
annual bonus plan and benefits that include
medical, dental, vision, life, STD, LTD, and
401k. If you are interested in applying for
this position, you may stop by our main
lobby Monday through Friday between the
hours of 8am and 4pm or forward your
resume and salary history to:
McLane Southeast Dothan
Attn: Human Resources
100 McLane Parkway
Cottonwood, AL 36320
Phone: (334) 678-2707
Fax: (334) 678-2754
E-mail: ronald.paulk@mclaneco.com
(Take Highway 231 south to the Florida
state line. Turn left onto State Line Road.
McLane is 1 mile down on right.)
E.O.E.



S ,-" Family Support
Worker
Seeking caring individual to provide intensive
in-home parent support services. Candidates
should possess knowledge of child
growth/development and parent-child
relationships, and have the ability to relate to
families from a strength-based perspective.
This position will work out of Jackson County.
Qualifications require a high school diploma
and at least 1-year professional experience
in a human services field serving children
and their families.

4440 lai
Sponsored by Habilitative Services of North
Florida, Big Bend Community Based Care, and
Department of Children & Families. EEO


/ ( EDUCATION
) & INSTRUCTION
-SHOLS ISTUCIO


Classes Forming Now
for Medical Assisting,
FOR TIS Electrical Trades and
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

RESIDENTIAL
l) REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Orchard Pointe Apartments
Now accepting applications for 1 BR Apts.
Call or come by to pick up
application
4445 Orchard Pointe Dr.
Marlanna. Call 850-482-4259 J


2BR 1BA House for rent, 3043 Noland St.
Safe neighborhood, $500/mo + dep.
850-482-8196/209-1301
2BR/1BA Hou se Hwy 90
Grand Ridge $425. Mo. + $425. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
3/2 hardwood floors, CH&A
2940 Dogwood St. close to Riverside school.
$875. mo. 718-6541

3BR 2BA House in Dogwood Hts, W/D, pets
welcome, fenced yard, storage shed. $800 +
dep 850-557-2198 ask for Marcus

Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850-526-3355 4"
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Businress"


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
4 850-209-8847 4.
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

S 2& 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595

2BR 1.5BA at Millpond $495 + dep. very nice,
water/sewer/lawn maintenance included,
access tb pond, No pets 850-209-3970


I 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

f<^\\%- RESIDENTIAL -,
j. REAL.ESTATE FOR SALe.


Eufaula two acres with older model, two bed-
room, one bath single wide trailer With front
deck, a back porch, small garage, and lean to
for boat. Located in the White Oaks area; a
mile from White Oaks park and boat launch
ramp. Great for beginner home, just starting a
family, college student, or just a fishing get
away. $35,000 or best offer. 334-733-6625

|^ : FGCREATION <


4-Wheeler: 2011 Polaris Sportsman 800 EFI. 4x4,
91 miles, adult owned $5.500. Call 334-796-8136


Honda 2007 Foreman ATV : 2 wheel & 4-wheel
Drive. Electric wench. 190 hours on it: $4800
Firm; 334-596-9966


P- "%-Sf' .
-A



B&B Professional Auto Detailing
Now offering mobile wash inside
and outside, oil change & vacuum
Detailing now for the low price of $50.
(850) 573-5509
/n Ju..t ve l in eni l I' ,n i l H



For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Bonded References Available
850-526-2336
BULOING


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc.
ALTHA, FL
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055


WE OFFER COMLERI
LDSOMlIMO, PrB
AWOMagMeti
SBViESm asBOtE
s0rammasBwEM


TOlFF I


= FAC^TORY D'IET


Extreme

Boats


Packages From
$4,995
All Welded
All Aluminum Boats


Sii II
85-47900 onfy*F


Winnebago 1995 33 ft. Vectra CH&A, auto
leveling, Q-bed, new tires & batteries, new frig,
7.5 onan, Lg. awning and more !
$23,000 OBO 334-585-6689.

fi) TRANSPORTATION


Spyder 1979 Fiat 2000 Classic Italian Sports
Car,Restored, Asking $13,479, Serious inquiries
only, 850-526-4394
--- -----

$0 Down/ist Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade Anything!
BRING IN YOUR W2 OR LAST PAY STUB!!
SRIDE TODAY! Steve Pope 334-803-9550
L ................................ J
BMW 2012 X5: X drive 3.5d. 11000 miles. All
wheel drive sports package twin turbo diesel,
30 mpg on road, double sunroof, all options,
five passenger black with cinnamon interior.
Transferable warranty to 50k, & maintenance
included. $55,000. Call 229-220-1537
Chevrolet 2004 Impala,
$4999.00 Call 334-714-
2700.


Dodge 2000 Dakota SLT
Club Cab, V-6, 98,000
miles, clean. $5450, Call
S334-790-7959.
Ford 2000 Mustang, New
paint sharp car.
$5999.00. Call 334-714-
2700.

Honda 2000 Accord,.
$4999.00 Call
334-714-2700.


Honda 2008 Accord EXL:
4 doors, 1 owner, white, 75k
miles, sliding moon roof,
power driver seat, 5 Disc
CD changer, leather,
keyless entry, power windows.
$14,500. Call 334-493-7700
Honda 2008 Accord white, 4-door, tan interior,
tinted windows. Sharp-looking car. 85,000
miles. Asking $13,500. Call 334-616-0813 or
email smoney45799@gmail.com for pics.
Honda 2009 Fit Sport Silver, only 16900 miles,
garage kept, like new condition, alloy wheels,
great gas mileage. $13,600. Call 334-446-0681.
S HONDA 2012 ACCORD
COUPE V6 WITH AUTO-
MATIC TRANSMISSION.
SUNROOF, NAVIGATION,
HEATED LEATHER SEATS FULLY LOADED. NO
ACCIDENTS NOR HAS IT BEEN SMOKED IN.
HAVE CARFAX TO SHOW AS WELL. APPROX.
6,000 MILES AND IM ASKING $27,000. CAR LIST-
ED $32,800, NEW. CALL 334-268-3900.


Hyundai 2004 Sonata:
Silver, very low miles.
64k miles highwlayv 4 door
sedan, V6 engine, clean
title, good tires, immacu-
late interior, great gas mileage, one owner.
Retail $8,995. Selling $6,000. OBO. 646-456-2807


www.JCFI.ORTnD N.com


; -ia Mercury 1999 Grand Mar-
quis GS, loaded, leather,
new tires, 106,000 miles,
like new, $4500. Call 334-
790-7959.
Nissan 2004 Altima, Low
Miles, NADA Retail:
$8950.00, $7999.00. Call
334-714-2700.


Toyota 2000 Camry,
Clean vehicle, $4999.00.
Call 334-714-2700.


Toyota.2011 Camry SE, 4dr., auto, pwr pkg.,
white, 10,000 miles odm, show room condition
with extended warranty. $18,500. 850-569-2215,
850-718-5461 or 850-718-7105.

GMC 2001 Yukon SLT: Fully loaded, white and
silver, 201k miles, runs great $6,000. Call 334-
796-8136
Lexus 2002 RX300 white & silver with tanint.
sunroof, tirited windows, 6 disc cd changer,
new tires, exc. cond. 135K mi.
$9,900. 334-797-9290

Chevrolet 1998 Silverado
!- Ext Cab: green, 3 doors,
l350 V8, cold AC and runs
great. $5,500. Firm. Call
334-718-9617
Dodge 1996 2500 with Cummings Engine:
standard cab with long bed, good tires, clean
cab, 230k miles, $3,600. Call 850-482-8818
Dodge 1998 Dakota Ext
AC. 160k miles, blue,
52.500. OBO
Call 334-798-1768 or 334-
i691-7111
Ford 2003 Ranger P/U XLT 6 cyl. 26K actual
miles, extra clean $8000. 334-897-5648.
Ford 2004 Super Duty 4dr. 4 wheel drive, F-550
with hydraulic, 2 bale bed, exc. cond. 160K
miles $22,500. 334-347-7466 or 334-797-7289.
Massey Ferguson 1010 small tractor
3 cyl. diesel also comes with a 4 ft. bush hog
& box blade $3000. 334-798-1221.
WATD UO


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664

CASH Guaranteed
Highest prices paid for Junk,
old Farming Equipment,
Tractors, Semi Junk Cars
Nothing to big,
nothing to small
So call a Cash Cow Now!



L .. rill
I soo no s

4 334-435-5015 or 334- 596-9270
We pay finders fee of $25. & up
For your Convience FREE Pick up!
ROLL TIDE !!!!


r---

L ...


We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
334-794-9576 or 344-791-714


S ,Your guie to ..

IS. & businesses & seves.



VICE DIRECTORY


Call 526-3614 to place your di,


Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Now serving Jackson Co.
) 334-798-0687 4



50ag5260 ?U PS
7 t.' Grooming by (737)
.. Appointment Only
LIsa Shores & Tammy Martabano
^^r ~ \R *-^ Vs it Us onll-e st -v.dof.l]n.ud6.net
S- for pricing & to book your appoln e ncnt. odsyl



"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
Ill'fflin 1. ongr.I850 '69290


StumpsE
CALL
L'S TREE SERVICE.


I SELF SBTOAGEI


PHOTOGRAPHY
FOR ANY OCCASION!
U BEATABLE PRICES
Ir.Irn ph,,F', rprn, ri
lu ,hr'r. J >,inl...l:


S\i Gabnellh
ttct ^/yy-A


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAN

jcfloridan.com



monster"

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


CLASSIFIED


CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES


M--


I I


- ES-VC


1^ UI


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I


_jl w. .. - v w ww ww www-


II-OITOGRAPHY I


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www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIEDS Jackson County Floridan Friday, February 15, 2013-7 B


[wI)GA NOTIC1EALS


LF160035
SECTION 00010
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
PROJECT NAME: Nortek Boulevard Resurfacing
and Improvements
Sealed bids, submitted in triplicate, will be
received by the Board of County Commission-
ers of Jackson County, Florida, (Owner ), until
200 _p.m. (Central Time) March 7, 2013 at the
County Engineer's Office (County Engineer,
Larry Alvarez), 2828 Owens Street, Marianna,
FL 32446 for the construction of the following
described Project:
Reconstruction and Improvements
of Nortek Boulevard from west of
CR 167 to east of CR 167
The Work includes paving shoulders and
resurfacing of the road. Rough areas will
be removed and reconstructed. A crack relief
layer will be applied over the existing pave-
ment. A 1-1/2" asphalt layer will be applied di-
rectly over the crack relief. A 1" asphalt layer
will be applied over the surface. The crown and
slope will be restored. Grading and shoulder
work will be performed as needed to restore
positive drainage. Pipes will be replaced as in-
dicated, and mitered ends added. Maintenance
of traffic, sod, driveways, aprons, stormwater
pollution prevention, paving aprons at side
roads, grading ditches as needed to provide
positive drainage, and other as directed by the
Engineer are also included in the work.
A Non-Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held
on February 28, 2013 at 9:00 AM central time in
the Jackson County Road Department. Poten-
tial bidders are encouraged to attend.
The deadline for receipt of questions will be
March 4, 2013 at 2:00 PM Central Time.
Questions must be submitted in writing to the
County Engineer (email lalvarez@jacksoncount
yfl.com: fax (850) 482-9093) with a copy to the
Jeannie Bean (email jbean@jacksoncountyfl.co
m).
Bids will be opened and recorded at 2:10 PM
(or immediately thereafter) on March 7, 2013
at the Jackson County Board of County Com-
missioners Board Room at 2864 Madison
Street. Bids may be submitted to the County
Engineer at the Board Room from 1:50 PM until
2:10 PM Central Time.
Plans, specifications, and contract documents
will be open for public inspection after noon on
February 14, 2013 at the Road and Bridge office
at 2828 Owens Street. Bid documents must be
obtained from:
County Engineer
Attn: Larry Alvarez
2828 Owens Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 482-9677
upon payment of $ No Charge per set which
amount constitutes the cost of reproduction
and handling. This payment will not be refund-
ed.
The Owner reserves the right to waive any
informality or to reject any or all bids. Each
Bidder must deposit with his/her bid, security
in the amount, form and subject to the condi-
tions provided in the Information for Bidders.
Sureties used for obtaining bonds must appear
as acceptable according to the Department of
Treasury Circular 570. Bidders shall be FDOT
pre-approved and in good standing with FDOT.
No bid may be withdrawn for a period of
sixty days after the scheduled closing time for
receipt of bids.
To the extent applicable to this project,
attention of Bidders is particularly called to
the requirements of the Special Provisions
(Local Agency Program/Federal-Aid Contract
Requirements), conditions of employment to
be observed and minimum wage rates to be
paid under the Contract, Section 3, Segregated
Facilities, Section 109 Executive Order 11246,
and all applicable laws and regulations of the
Federal government and State of Florida,
and bondingland insurance requirements.
IN PARTICULAR, BIDDERS SHOULD NOTE THE
REQUIRED ATTACHMENTS AND CERTIFICA-
TIONS TO BE EXECUTED AND SUBMITTED WITH
THE FORM OF BID PROPOSAL.
DATE:
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE/FAIR HOUSING
JURISDICTION

(G:LT LIEGALS


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FL160016 A / (W6
STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINAL JUSTICE *
STANDARDS & TRAINING COMMISSION,
Petitioner
vs. I
MARISA M. KELLY, Case #33474
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MARISA M. KELLY, '
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative
Complaint has been filed against you seeking
to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in
accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any
rules promulgated thereunder.
You are required to serve a written copy of
your intent to request a hearing pursuant to
Section 120.57, F.S. upon Jennifer C. Pritt, Pro- Clean O ut Your Kitchen
gram Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism
Program, Florida Department of Law Enforce-
ment, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida
32302-1489, on or before March 22, 2013. Fail-
ure to do so will result in a default being en-
tered against you to Revoke said certification and Tu n Ea A
pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-
27, F.A.C.
Dated: January, 2013
Ernest W. George Lnto Cash,
CHAIRMAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE STANDARDS
AND TRAINING COMMISSION
By: -s- Jill Simpson, Division Representative


t. Those appliances might be wasting your valuable cabinet

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in the Classifidos, and easier for you to sell. So try it today!

Shoppers with a nose for bargains head straight for the
Classifieds. In the Classifieds, you can track down deals
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN (850) 5263614 or (800) 7792557
(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


r '


U U







18B FRIDAY, FEBRUARY15, 2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Olympics



Olympian Oscar Pistorius charged with murder


The Associated Press

PRETORIA, South Africa
- Paralympic superstar
Oscar Pistorius was charged
Thursday with the murder
of his girlfriend who was
shot inside his home in
South Africa, a stunning
development in the life of a
national hero known as the
Blade Runner for his high-
tech artificial legs.
Reeva Steenkamp, a
model who spoke out on
Twitter against rape and
abuse of women, was shot
four times in the predawn
hours in the house, in a
gated community in the
capital, Pretoria, police
said.
I-ours later after under-
going police questioning,
Pistorius left a police sta-
tilun accompanied by of-
ficers. He looked down as
photographers snapped
pictures, the hood on his
gl a w orkout jacket pulled
up,. co\eriing most of his
face. His court hearing was
originally scheduled for
Thursday afternoon but
has been postponed until
Friday to give forensic in-
vestigators time to carry
out their work, said Me-
dupe Simasiku, a spokes-
man for the prosecution.
South Africans were
shocked at the killing. But
while Pistorius captured
the nation's attention with
his Olympic quest, police
said there was a recent his-
tory of problems involving
him. Police spokeswoman
Brigadier Denise Beukes
said the incidents included
"allegations of a domestic
nature."
"I'm not going to elabo-
rate on it but there have
beenincidents (at Pistorius'
home)," Beukes said. Po-
licein South Africa do not
name suspects in crimes
until they have appeared in-
court but Beukes said that
the 26-year-old Pistorius
was at his home at the time
of the death of Steenkamp
and "there is no other sus-
pect involved."
Pistorius' father, Hen-
ke, declined to comment
when contacted by The As-


ABOVE:South Africa's Oscar Pistorius starts in the men's 40d-meter semifinal on Aug. 5 during the 2012 Summer Olympics in
London. BELOW: Pistorius leaves the Boschkop police station, east of Pretoria, South Africa en route to appear in court charged


with murder.
sociated Press, only saying
"we all pray'for guidance
and strength for Oscar and
the lady's parents."
Neither Pistorius' agent
Peet van Zyl nor coach
Ampie Louw could be
reached while Pistori-
us' own cellphone went
straight to voicemail.
Pistorius' former coach,
Andrea Giannini, said he
hopes it was "just a tragic
accident." Giannini said he
believed that Pistorius had
been dating Steenkamp for
"a few months."
"No matter how bad the
situation was, Oscar al-
ways stayed calm and posi-
tive," Giannini told the AP
in Italy. "Whenever he was
tired or nervous he was still
extremely nice to people. I
never saw him violent."
Yet Pistorius had troubles
in his personal life. In Feb-
ruary 2009, he crashed a
speed boat he was piloting
on South Africa's Vaal Riv-
er. Witnesses said he had
been drinking before the
crash and officers found
alcoholic beverages in the
wreckage, though they ac-
knowledged at the time


they hadn't conducted a
blood test on the athlete.
Pistorius broke his nose,
jaw and several ribs in the
crash, as well as damaged
his eye socket and required
some 180 stitches to his
face.
In November, Pistorius
also found himself in an
altercation with a local coal
mining millionaire over
a woman, South African
media reported. Eventu-
ally, the two men involved
the South African Police


Service's elite Hawks inves-
tigative unit before settling
the matter.
Pistorius owned firearms
and posted a photograph
of himself at a shooting
range in November 2011
to the social media website
Twitter, bragging about his
score.
"Had a 96% headshot
over 300m from 50shots!
Bam!" he tweeted.
Police said that earlier re-
ports that Steenkamp may
have been mistaken for


a burglar by Pistorius did
not come from the police.
Several local media outlets
initially reported that the
shooting may have been
accidental.
Capacity Relations, a tal-
ent management firm, ear-
lier named model Steen-
kamp as the victim of the
shooting. Police spokes-
woman Lt. Col. Katlego
Mogale told the AP that of-
ficers received a call around
3 a.m. after the shooting.
A 9 mm pistol was recov-


ered and -a murder case
opened against Pistorius.
Pistorius enjoyed target
shooting with his pistol
and an online advertise-
ment featuring him for
Nike read: "I am a bullet in
the chamber." An article in
January 2012 in The.New
York Times Magazine de-
scribed him talking about
how he pulled a pistol to
search his home when his
alarm went off the night
before an interview. At Pis-
torius' suggestion, he and
the journalist went to a
nearby target range where
they fired at targets with a
9 mm pistol. At one point,
Pistorius told the writer: "If
you practiced, I think you
could be pretty deadly."
Asked how often he went
target shooting, Pistorius
replied: "Just sometimes
when I can't sleep."
Police have still not re-
leased the name of the
woman, but the publicist
.for Steenkamp confirmed
in a statement that the
model was dead.
"We can confirm that Re-
eva Steenkamp has passed
away," Steenkamp's publi-
cist Sarit Tomlinson said.
"Our thoughts and prayers
go to the Steenkamp fam-
ily, who have asked to have
'their privacy respected
during this difficult time,
everyone is simply devas-
tated. She was the kindest,
sweetest human being; an
angel on earth and will be
sorely missed."
Tomlinson said Steen-
kamp, known simply as
Reeva, was one of FHM's
(formerly For Him Maga-
zine) 100 Sexiest Women
in the World for two years
running, appeared in
countless international
and national advertise-
ments and was one of the
celebrity contestants on
the reality show "Tropika
Island of Treasure," filmed
in Jamaica.
She and Pistorius were
first seen publicly together
in November at an awards
ceremonyinJohannesburg.
Later, she began mention-
ing the athlete in public
messages on Twitter.


Pistorius' girlfriend was



a model, law graduate


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This is an undated portfolio photo supplied by Ice Model Management in Johannesburg of
Reeva Steenkamp during a photo shoot.

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The Associated Press

JOHANNESBURG The
leggy blonde model tweet-
ed. that Valentine's Day
should be "a day of love for
everyone."
Instead Reeva Steenkamp
Was shot dead in the home
of her boyfriend, paralym-
pian superstar Oscar Pisto-
rius, who was charged with
her murder.
Steenkamp, South Afri-
can model with a law de-
gree, campaigned against
rape and violence against
women. Thursday morn-
ing, Reeva Steenkamp was
to give an inspirational talk
at a Johannesburg school.
The next day she was going
to wear black to protest the
brutal rape and mutilation
of a 17-year-old.


But the glamorous South
African celebrity was found
dead in the early hours
from four bullet wounds in
the Pretoria home of Pisto-
rius. The two had been dat-
ing for only a few months.
She was one of FHM
magazine's 100 Sexiest
Women in the World for the
past two years, appeared in
international and South Af-
rican advertisements and
was to make her debut next
week as a celebrity contes-
tant on the reality TV show
"Tropika Island of Treasure"
filmed in Jamaica. She was


also the South African face
of Avon cosmetics. Police
said the model was 30.
The freckled blonde who
appeared in scanty bikinis
on magazine covers and'
sashayed down fashion
ramps was "continuously
breaking the model ste-
reotype," said her publicist
Sarit Tomlinson.
Steenkamp was "the
sweetest, kindest, just an-
gelic soul" and at the same
time "a very inspiring in-
dividual, very passionate
aboutspeakingaboutwom-
en and empowerment."


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BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT
-_| "K '- -, -. -


LOCAL NEWS, YOUR WAY.

M: on-Fri 7am-5:3O0pm Sat 7a-1pm
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