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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01017
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text
('n 2 JobScq 72 "'.'1 003
II I k ** ORIGIN MIXEDl ADC 325
1, R ,I "1 LORIDA' A 1 .II STORY
PO BOX\ [ 1 7,00)
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Inforimling more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online







?LORIDAN


Vol.90 No.40


Jackson Coawz Conmtia >:.. io?


Studies continue into housing for departments


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Jackson County commission-
ers have ordered further study
into the possibility of building
one or two new structures to
house county departments, and


may soon put one of the county's
oldest buildings on the market.
Those options were discussed
in a workshop held Tuesday im-
mediately after the board's regu-
lar first-of-month commission
meeting.
The sale of Jackson County


Community Development
headquarters on Lafayette Street
in Marianna could help pay for
a new building to replace the
1950's structure, board mem-
bers say. The cost of replacing it
is estimated at $1.5 million to $2
million.


But commissioners are also
considering a much larger proj-
ect, one that could cost more
than $10 million. The board has
dusted off an old set of plans
for a new administration build-
ing that could include space for
community development, and


are also considering another
option.
The county might instead
build two structures, putting
community development in one
and housing administration and
See HOUSING, Page 9A


MARLONE




Heavy rains close





New Bridge Road


'. -

MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Water from recent heavy rains covers part of New Bridge Road on Tuesday near Malone. Jackson County Road and Bridge announced
the road's closure and advised caution when traveling nearby Ulyss and St. Phillips roads, both of which had water across them, but
were passable as of Tuesday afternoon.


County urges caution on two more


From staff reports
The Jackson County Road and Bridge
Department reported Tuesday that
New Bridge Road, which runs east-
west between Old US Road and Pleas-
ant Ridge Road in Malone, is closed
until further notice due to excess rain.
The department also advised travel-
ers to use caution on two additional
roads in the Malone area:


Chipola River flood stages
n Action Stage: 15 feet
n Flood Stage: 19 leet
M Moderate Stage: 26 feet
)) Major Stage: 39.10 feet
Source: NOAA.gov
Ulyss Road (between Sellers Road
and Pleasant Ridge Road).
) St. Phillips Road (between Highway


2 and Holyneck Road).'
Both Ulyss and St. Phillips were listed
as passable Tuesday, but with water
across them and more rain expected,
travelers are advised to use extreme
caution.
Rain today, then clearing
The National Weather Service in
See RAINS, Page 9A


BY ANGIE COOK
acook@jcfloridan.com


When she saw a ball of bees congregat-
ing in her camellia bush Saturday, Nola
Register wasn't sure what was attracting
them or how long they planned to stay.


But a conversation with her neighbor re-
vealed that what she was looking at was a
fleeting marvel of nature, and it might be
gone before the weekend was up.
Her neighbor was right.
See BEES, Page 9A


County

adopts, but

resents, flood

ordinance
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Jackson County Commissioners
didn't like it, but on Tuesday the board
voted to repeal the county's existing
floodplain management ordinance,
replacing it with a new chapter under
pressure from the Federal Emergency
Management Agency.
The new rules will apply to all flood
hazard areas in the county. Commis-
sioner Jeremy Branch, who made the
unanimously-approved motion to take
that action, put it on the record that he
did so reluctantly.
Commissioners say that not adopt-
ing the new version of Chapter 38 in
the county code of ordinances would
violate a national mandate and that
the county's penalty for non-compli-
ance would punish local residents. If
the county failed to bring the outdated
chapter up to date, owners of property
here could no longer participate in the
federal flood insurance program.
Local officials say they object to the
new version of flood regulations in part
because it more narrowly limits the
board's ability to grant variances re-
lated to construction activities allowed
by owners of properties in flood hazard
areas.
The new rules also place more respon-
sibility on the shoulders of the local gov-
ernment. It must appoint a floodplain
administrator to receive floodplain de-
velopment permits, inspect projects for
compliance and carry out many related
duties. The county must adopt flood
hazard maps, adopt certain new crite-
ria and procedures for development in
the floodplain.
More regulation for compliance would
fall to the building official and commu-
nity development department. And in-
stead of simply incorporating, by refer-
ence alone, any changes in the Florida
Building Code, the county would have
to set those out as they apply specifi-
cally to the local code.
In the old code, violations of the flood
regulations can be punished by a fine of
$500 per violation, upon proper adjudi-
cation of guilt in a non-criminal proce-
dure. The new code gives the floodplain
administrator the authority to issue
a stop-work order if he or she finds a
project in the works out of compliance.
The new ordinance is not retroac-
tively enforced upon existing structures
unless those structures are modified. If
changes occur, however, the new regu-
lations come into play.

While
searching for
a spot to set
up'a new hive,
a swarm of
bees settles
in for a short
stay in the
front yard
of a Green
Street home
on Saturday
MAR night in
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN Marianna.


> CLASSIFIEDS...7B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On .
Recycled Newsprint -..,-




7 1 I Y6 5 1 6 11! 8
7 65161 80050' 9


) ENTERTAINMENT...6B


Follow us




Facebook Twitter


) LOCAL...3A


. >OBITUARIES...9A


Marianna woman gets a visit

from a swarm of honeybees


) STATE...6A


))SPORTS...1B


) NATION...7A


*' "'* **"
St. *
,,"


al .n







-12A WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2013


WAIE-Up CIAL


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook

Moring rain & showers. Clearimn, later.
Today
Jiminkitc \,R% y
Z* -^, *


Hi.ih: 65
.' -, ,*, I*": 39


". ',' ... /
S Igh: 66
- Lo: -10 lih: 68
1.. --- \ j LoU : I4 1
_' :. High: 7 67
3. ) Lo 4: 40 ,"--


1 -111 .(1'


High 640
Low 38'


Thursday
Mostly sunny & mild.


+ y


High 58
Low -31'


Saturday
Sunny & cold.


'.1. -


7 l, I:.. .uo


1110l )o
Low 390


Friday
Mostly sunny & mild.



High 56
Low- 32'


Sunday
Sunny & cold.


-2 t T-
Iligh: h5
l* 'Low: 42
.' *t.H-


_ HI.oM: 37


NUhlLP


PRECIPITATION


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.28"
2.62"
2.23"


Year to date
Normal YTD
Normal for year


S'- High: 69
Slow: 145


Iilgh: 69
Lou: 43


7.43"
59.26"


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


7:37 PM
11:52AM
7:42 PM
8:53 PM
11:40 PM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
58.01 ft.
14.51 ft.
9.36 ft.
11.19 ft.


- 12:11 PM
- 5:31 AM
- 12:44 PM
- 1:17 PM
- 1:50 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme

0 1 2 3 -1 5


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:23 AM
5:27 PM
8:12 AM
9:09 PM


Feb.. Feb. Feb. Mar.
10 17 25 4


FLORIDA'S EAL

PANHANDLE COUNTRY

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9 FM

ISTN sHRWATH EDES


7's


I I -7
Sr-r- -l -


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfl6ridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.,

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months: $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
Subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to -I- r.i:gl .-.i,' .f the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will.not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind: Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


TODAY
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Jackson County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620
during business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for
an appointment.
a Chipola Retirees Breakfast and Fellowship
9:30 a.m. at the Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Deli.
All retirees, spouses and friends are invited to
attend.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Basic Computer Class Part 2 Noon to 3
p.m. at Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 US
90, Marianna. Learn about and register for free
services. Call 526-0139.'

THURSDAY, FEB. 14
n Job Club Noon to 3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 US 90, Marianna. Learn job
seeking/retention skills; get job search assistance.
Call 526-0139.
) Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St., Marianna.
Call 482-2290.
a Employability Workshop, Mock Interviewing
- 2:30 p.m. at Marianna One Stop Career Center.
Call 718-0326.
) Jackson County School Board Regular
Monthly Workshop Meeting 4 p.m. at the
School Board -ii: ting room, 2903 Jefferson St.,
Marianna. Meeting is open to the ;.il-it:i: and agenda
is posted at www.jcsb.org. Call 482-1200.
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation 4-7 p.m. at the Jackson
County,-'gr i,: I, itr,- Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for an
appointment.
))Quit Smoking Now Class/Support Grqup
- 5:30 p.m. at Jackson Hospital in the Cafeteria
Board Room. Free td attend. Curriculum developed
by ex-smokers for those who want to become ex-
smokers -ilim : :l, :. Call 718-2545.
) Grand Ridge Town Council Regular Meeting
- 6 p.m. at the Grand Ridge Town Hall. Call 592-
4621.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901.Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.


FRIDAY, FEB. 15
) Small business seminar "Business Plans"-
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Chipola College in Room
M-108 of the Business and Technology building. The
S-rnii-,, :.. ill help participants discover which busi-
ness type is best suited for their personality, and
how to create a working business,model to obtain
financing and create a successful business. Call
718-2441 or email seversone@chipola.edu.
) Knitters Nook 10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Lit.i.-r ,, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Money Sense, Financial Literacy Noon to 4
p.m. at Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 US
90, Marianna. Money Sense is a class that covers
different topics in money management to empower
people to take charge of their finances and create
their own wealth. Call 526-0139.
) Chipola Area Board of Realtors Awards Ban-
quet 5:30 p.m. at St. Luke's Church in Marianna.
Cocktail Hour is 5:30-6:30 p.m. followed by supper
at 7 p.m. ::.r n...:.l t i e- :ir ... ri., packet from www.
ChipolaAreaBoardofRealtors.com, or call 526-4030.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First Urit-l r.l1-rrt.:..:l
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Deadline for Jackson County students to en-
ter the Optimist Club of Jackson County Essay
Contest. The topic is "How Can I Help My Friends
Realize Their Value?" Call 526-9561.

SATURDAY, FEB. 16
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Tripp Family Reunion Meeting 5 p.m. at St.
Matthew Missibnary Baptist Church. This meeting is
to complete the committees and programs for the
family reunion of the late Robert "Jake" Trip and the
late Trussie Lee Tripp. Call 326-5683.

SUNDAY, FEB. 17
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story ..u.ijing Ihrind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.


) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in
the board room ct C :mmptl-iltron-lr..:e-. lie Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, FEB. 18
n Employability Workshop, Surviving a Layoff
2:30 p.m. at Marianna One Stop Career Center.
Call 718-0326.
) Genealogy Series II Class 2:30-4:30 p.m.
at the Jackson County Public Library, Marianna
Branch. Class is free. Discover proper research
techniques, learn tips and tricks to help in your
research journey and begin discovering your family
roots. Students must know computer basics, how
to use the Internet and have an interest in family
history. Students will need to bring a flash drive to
use in class. Call 482-9631.
Jackson County Quilter's Guild Meeting
5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Luter nr Church,
3975 US 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings are
fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects,
lessons, help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
) Beekeeping in the Panhandle 6-8 p.m. at
the Jackson County Agriculture Conference Center.
This interactive video short course will cover topics
of: Queen and package bee production, bee nutri-
tion and immunity, disease and pest management
and the history and theory of honey production.
Course to be held on Monday, Feb. 18 and 25, Mar. 4
and 11. Cost of the course is $25 or $40 per family.
Call 482-9620.
) Capt. Luke Lott's Calhoun Guards, Camp
2212 Sons of Confederate Veterans Monthly
Meeting 6 p.m. at the Altha Diner on Highway 71
in down town Altha. Call 592-3293.
n Alford Community Organization Meeting 6
p.m. in the Alford Community Center. New members
from Alford, surrounding communities invited to
join. Call 579-4482, 638-4900 or 579-5173.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, FEB. 19
Annual Fed Cattle Show and Sale 9:30 a.m.
at the Jackson County Ag Center, US 90 West. A
Livestock Judging Contest for FFA and 4-H mem-
bers will begin at 9:30 a.m. the Steer Show at 2 p.m.
with the Showmanship Contest to follow. Steers
will be sold to the public at auction. Registration for
steer buyers at 6:30 p.m. followed by the auction at
7 p.m. This event is hosted by the Jackson County
Cattlemen's Association. Call 482-9620.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Feb. 11, the latest
available report: One report of a
hit-and-run vehicle, one suspi-
cious person, one informa-,
tion call, four burglary alarms,
two panic alarms, eight traffic
stops, one larceny call, one civil
dispute, one follow-up investi-
gation, one assault, one call to
assist a motorist/pedestrian,
one report of property damage,
two public service calls and one
:call for VIN verification.

Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's


Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following incidents
for Feb. 11, the latest avail-
able report: One drunk driver,
one accident with injury, one
hospice death,
four abandoned
vehicles, one
CR IME suspicious
incident, four
suspicious
persons, one information call,
one funeral escort, one high-
way obstruction, two physical
disturbance calls, one verbal
disturbance call, one hitchhik-
er/pedestrian, one report of a
prowler, one fire (commercial),
10 medical calls, five traffic
crashes, one burglary alarm,
five traffic stops, two larceny
calls, three serving papers/ex
parte, one civil dispute, three


trespass calls, one juvenile-re-
lated complaint, one report of
assault, one noise disturbance
call, three animal complaints
(one dog-related, two horse-
related), one fraud, two calls
to assist another agency, two
public service calls, two crimi-
nal registrations, three welfare
checks, four, transports, one
Baker Act transport and one
report of threats/harassment.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Obadiah Pollard, 20; 6711
Kirkland Road, Bascom; driving
while license suspended or
revoked.


a Tommy Blizzard, 18, 6003
Fort Road, Greenwood; battery
domestic violence.
) Timothy Dozier, 43, 6003
Fort Road, Greenwood; battery
domestic violence.
) Jeffrey Benoit, 59, 3124
Hotchkiss Drive, Tallahassee;
'failure to appear, battery do-
mestic violence.
. Avery Holloman, 29, 12235
North 16th St., Apt. 203, Tampa;
violation of county probation,
petit theft.

Jail Population: 204


To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call 1-888-
404-FWCC (3922).


Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL

(850) 482-3051


---~


'k,







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Ted Walt VFW hosts its first ever district 17 meeting

Special to the Floridan .

The Ted Walt Veterans of P '" .
Foreign Wars and Ladies
Auxiliary of Post #12046 in .,
Marianna made chapter
history in January by host-
ing, for the first time in its
eight-year history, a quar-
terly meeting of the Dis-
trict 17VWE -
About 50 people came
to the session. Keynote
speaker was Chester Pyatt, .
Florida State Senior Vice-
Commander. He spoke
about upcoming projects
and goals of the national
VFW, sharing the informa-
tion on behalf of National
Commander- in-Chief
John Hamilton.
Past State Commander
Dave Harris also addressed
the group. Guest speaker
for the Ladies Auxiliary was
Lee Harris, Florida State
President of the Ladies
Auxiliary.
The meal, consisting of
pulled pork, macaroni and
cheese, green beans and
peach cobbler, was pre-
pared by VFW and Ladies
Auxiliary members.
District 17 stretches from
Port St. Joe to DeFuniak
Springs.
SUBMITTED PHOTOS
TOP LEFT: Chester Pyatt, Florida State Senior Vice-Commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, was keynote speaker at the recent quarterly meeting of the District 17 VFW, held at the Ted Walt
Post #12046 on Wynn Street in Marianna. TOP RIGHT: Guests chat outside the Ted Walt VFW Post prior to a District 17 meeting held in Marianna. Behind them, the four lots that the VFW recently
had cleared of overgrowth can be seen. BOTTOM LEFT: Members of the Ted Walt VFW Post and their guests socialize while awaiting the dinner hour at the first District 17 quarterly meeting ever
hosted by the 8-year-old post. BOTTOM RIGHT: Special guests at the recent VFW District meeting in Marianna were Dave Harris, left, Past Florida State Commander of the Veterans of Foreign
Wars, and Lee Harris, current Florida State President of the VFW Ladies Auxiliary.


USDA announces updates on MILC Program


Special to the Floridan

U.S. Department of Agriculture
Farm Service Agency Administra-
tor Juan Garcia recently announced
that beginning Feb. 5, USDA will
issue payments to dairy farmers
enrolled in the Milk Income Loss
Contract program for the Septem-
ber 2012 marketing. The American
Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 extended
the authorization of the Food, Con-
servation, and Energy Act of 2008,
the 2008,Farm Bill, through 2013
for many programs administered
by FSA, including MILC. The 2008
Farm Bill extension provides for a
continuation of the MILC program
through Sept. 30.
MILC payments are triggered when
the Boston Class I milk price falls be-
low $16.94 per hundredweight, af-
ter adjustment for the cost of dairy
feed rations. MILC payments are


calculated each month using the lat-
est milk price and feed cost.
As announced by FSA on Jan. 22,
all dairy producers' MILC contracts
are automatically extended to Sept.
30. Eligible producers therefore do
not need to re-enroll in MILC. MILC
operations with approved contracts
will continue to receive monthly
payments, if available.
The payment rate for September
2012 is approximately $0.59 per hun-
dredweight. The payment rate for
October 2012 marketing is approxi-
mately $0.02 per hundredweight.
The payment rate for November
2012 marketing is zero.
Before the October MILC payment
can be issued, dairy farmers must
complete a new Average Adjusted
Gross Income form for 2013. The
new form, CCC-933 Average Ad-
justed Gross Income Certification
and Consent to Disclosure of Tax


Information, must be completed by
producers before they can receive
payments for a variety of programs
administered by FSA and USDA's
Natural Resources Conservation Ser-
vice. Producers may obtain CCC-933
at their local USDA Service Center
or online at www.fsa.usda.gov/
ccc933. Specific detail about AGI
may be found here.
Dairy operations may select a
production start month other than
October 2012. Producers who want
to select a production start month
other than October 2012 must visit
their local FSA office Feb. 1-28, also
known as a relief period.
FSA will provide producers with
information on program require-
ments, updates and signups as the
information becomes available. For
more.information on MILC, contact
a local FSA county office or visit the
FSA website at www.fsa.usda.gov.



GAS WATCH
.. 1 S prices are going up. Here are
t least expensive places to buy
j; g in Jackson County, as of
Tuesday afternoon.
1. S3.49, BP Steel City, 2184
U.S. 231 S. Alford
2. $3.49, Dar-Bee's Quibk Stop,
6189 U.S. 90, Cypress
3. $3.49, Dixie Food & Gas, 1757
U.S. 231 S., Alford
4. $3.49, McCoy's Food Mart,
2823 Jefferson St., Marianna
5. $3.49, Mobil Food Mart, 2999
JeffersonSt., Marianna
6. $3.49, Murphy Oil, 2255 U.S.
71 S., Marianna
7. $3.49, Pilot, 2209 U.S. 71,
Marianna
8. $3.54 BP Station, River Road,
Sneads
Hi .,u see a lower price,
.. ,tact the Floridan newsroom
t ditorial@jcfloridan.con.


STAY N I IFOREkI*


Juan and Heather Renea
Whitehurst
S)TrevorAndrewKnowles,
Jr. and Abigail Hope Judge
) Timothy Hubert Hight-
ower, Sr. and Mary Lucindy
Lambert.
Divorces
None.


LOCAL NEWS, YOUR WAY.
WEEKNIGHTS AT 5:00, 6:00, & 10:00


The following marriages
and divorces weie re-
corded in Jackson County
during the week of Feb.
4-8:
Marriages
n James Foster Holmes
and Carol Ann Digiovanni
) Valente Abraham San


Florida Lotte:ry

Mon E ) 4.7 .. iE2 5 4.14
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Ellen Marsh o uly
CRS, REALTOR2
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.
Sa,.r,r, 3::..,1b PcmF e,-h
4 ,-1~:i. I H...-, .i0 a I.Mlar,.ra FL 22416

^ 850-209-1090


LI


UNITED STATE
POSTAL SERVI
Approved Postal P

* Stamps
* Mailboxes
* Express Mail Service
* Priority Mail Service
* First-Class Mail Service
* International Shipping Sen

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4415C Constitution
Marianna, FL 324
(Next door to Marianna Office S
www.theupsstorelocal.cor
store6003@yahoo.cc

850-526-4E


FS


rovider


vices


Lane
48
upply)
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377


Quilters Guild Show
January Blocks


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Members of Jackson County Quilters Guild show off their
Blocks of the Month for January. Participants make a different
block each-month and at the end of the year, have enough
blocks for a quilt top. The guild meets every Monday night
from 5:30-7:30 at Ascension Lutheran Church. New members
welcome. Call 209-7638 for more information. Seated (from
left): Jean Gause, Lanell Skalitzky and Dottie Rehberg.
Standing: Clemeteen Harvey, Diane Hiller, Linda Edwards,
Charlotte Hunter, Nancy McMullin and Chalullah Clay.

Marriage, Divorce Report


------------


___111_----1_1^__1111_----


IIL


LOCAL


WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 13, 2013 3AF














Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Florida Vocies


New rash of scams


have roots in old
Make no mistake it's the peak of the winter
season in Southwest Florida.
Our area is busy with traffic, shoppers,
diners and thieves.
With the influx of senior citizens comes an onslaught
of vultures. They pick on seniors for their assets and
perhaps loneliness and a certain measure of naivte.
Still, as much as scams seem to change, they actually
stay much the same. Officials in Collier and Lee coun-
ties report the classic rip-offs remain in play, including:
) The grandparents scam, in which a grandparent
receives a call from a scammer posing as a grandchild
or other relative who is traveling abroad and gets in a
bad situation. The caller requests money to be wired to
them right away.
) The mystery shopping scam, in which people be-
lieve they are working for a mystery shopping organiza-
tion but are actually out the money they put up.
) Scams about overdue loans. Seniors pay because
they feel threatened, even though they don't owe any
money.
) Utility bill scams that are merely schemes to steal
identities.
) Lottery scams, most recently portrayed as originat-
ing in Jamaica, in which victims-are told to put up some
money to get huge winnings. Most of us know the rest
of the story by now.
Please beware.
Please remember the adage: If it seems too good to be
true, it probably is.
'Tis the season.
Naples Daily News

Contact representatives

Florida Legislature

Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus #205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436

Sen. Bill Montford. D-District 6
208 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
montford.bill.web@ flsenate.gov

U.S. Congress
Rep. Steve Southerland, R-2nd District
1229 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-5235
Fax: (202) 225-5615

Sen. Bill Nelson (D)
Washington office
United States Senate
716 Senate Hart Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 224-5274

Sen. Marco Rubio (R)
Washington office
United States Senate
B40A Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
(202) 224-3041


Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor. PO.Bo 520.
Marianna FL, 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial''ijcflorndan.com. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call 850-526-3614


Probe of school for boys half-baked


or folks like me who spend
way too much time watch-
ing police procedurals,
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement (FDLE) was the last
place we'd expect to find bumbling
bureaucrats.
Decades of "Law and Order" and
"CSI" have conditioned the most
cynical Floridians to view our top
cops as an East Coast version of
"Hawaii Five-0," where elite squads
of avenging angels pursue truth and
justice with the aid of state-of-the-
art technology.
On television, no cold case is too
cold, and no victim is too "unim-
portant." But things are different at
FDLE.
The agency's indifference to the
generations of victims of the Dozier
School for Boys is a national embar-
rassment, and a black eye to the
Florida Cabinet, which appears un-
able to make the agency do its job.
In 2008, a series of gut-wrenching
reports by the Miami Herald's Carol
Marbin Miller and Ben Montgom-,
ery andWaveney Ann Moore of
the Tampa Bay Times exposed the
state's "reform school" in Marianna
-for the gulag that it has been since
it opened in 1900. Generations of
boys, some as young as 6, were
"reformed" to the point of death


One county in
BY PIERRETRISTAM
Last year the Florida Legisla-
ture passed a bill that allowed
returning outright prayer to
public schools. Not a moment of
silence, not the gathering around
the flagpole on the National Day
of Prayer, but the bona fide right
of students to lead other students
in prayer at any student assembly,
even mandatory ones. School of-
ficials are prohibited from interfer-
ing, or even judging whether the
prayer in question is appropriate.
Theoretically, a prayer could
invoke the Holy Trinity in every
line, making it explicitly Christian.
It could also invoke Wiccan pagan-
ism, though given Florida's more
Christian-theocratic mania these
days, we know very well what sort
of hosannas would tend to prevail.
One caveat: the law does require
local school boards to pass resolu-
tions enacting the allowance before
students can take advantage of
it. It's a constitutionally problem-
atic law in many regards. Beside
the outright violation of the First
Amendment public schools, as
government entities, would be en-
dorsing religion whether a prayer is
student-led or not, since students
are acting under authority of their
school prayer of any sort at stu-
dent assemblies would be a coer-
cive end-run around at least some
students' right to be left alone. It's
an even bigger problem if school
boards must enact a resolution to
enable student prayer, because it
certifies that prayer is made pos-
sible at the will of the board.
Not surprisingly, not a single
one of Florida's 67 school boards
enacted such a resolution. They've


by sadistic guards using sticks and
sodomy.
Aging survivors and history
Demanded the kind
of accounting that
can be rendered
only with subpoena
power, crime labs,
and other inves-
Floreence tigative tools not
Snyder generally available to
journalists.
As the bad press
piled up, then-Gov. Charlie Crist
dispatched the FDLE to the crime
scene with orders to find out what,
exactly, had happened at Dozier.
More than a year later, the state's
Sherlocks completed an investiga-
tion so half-baked that they missed
13 deaths and 19 gravesites.
We know that because a team
of anthropologists, biologists and
archaeologists from the University
of South Florida undertook to "pre-
.serve the records, inventory historic
buildings, find the graves, identify
the forgotten remains, protect the
historic cemetery arid open it to
families ... It's a humanitarian ef-
fort," Erin Kimmerle, a forensic an-
thropologist and assistant professor
at USF told reporter Montgomery
last May. "I hope for those families
that have questions and are looking


67


for information, that this will begin
to give them some of the informa-
tion and history they're looking for."
Barney Fife would be ashamed
to be out-policed by a bunch of
professors, but FDLE blew off USF's
findings, citing, but not explaining,
"the differing natures of criminal
investigations and anthropological
research. While both have value,
each has a different standard and
scope," the agency said in a press
release issued by three FDLE flacks,
whose combined salaries are north
of $164,000.
That's more than the $160,000
USF needs to excavate the un-.
marked graves of children who
died at Dozier, and to exhume their
remains and determine, at long last,
how they died, and at whose hands.
U.S. Senator Bill Nelson held a
press conference last week to-im-
plore state officials to get on with it.
If they don't, the U.S. Department
of Justice should step in.
The dead and walking wounded
children of Dozier are special vic-
tims from central casting. We owe
them a Benson and Stabler.

lorence Snyder is a Tallahassee-based corpo-
rate lawyer who has spent most of her career in
and around newspapers. She can be reached at
fsnyder@floridavoices.com


may enact risky prayer law


followed the state School Board
Association's advice: Leave well
enough alone. It's not worth the le-
gal muck that could be triggered by
one extremist invocation too many.
That enlightened streak may
be about to end. For the last two
straight meetings of the Flagler
County School Board, one of
its members, John Fischer, has
implored his colleagues to seize
on the state law and return prayer
to schools. Both times he laced his
impassioned proposal in a double-
bladed call to unity while attacking
"political correctness" and "special
interests" for keeping prayer out
of schools. "You know, there's just
hate," Fischer said, without provid-
ing a single example of the "hate"
he spoke of, even though he said
he had seen it in the school board's
own meeting chambers. "Why can't
we get along? Don't be afraid of the
political correctness. Don't be afraid
of all the activist groups. Don't be
afraid of all these people's hate, and
spread hate. Where's our rights?"
It was a strange question, coming
from an even stranger perspective.
Even as the school board member
was calling for all to get along, he
was doing so by creating an us-ver-
sus-them divide he did not define
beyond those who pray to a Chris-
tian god and those who don't. The
criticism of "special interests" and
"political correctness" is also ironic,
considering what that correctness
has enabled in public schools, in-
cluding racial integration, equality
for girls in school athletics, equality
for students with special needs, re-
spect for students of all creeds and
lifestyles whether atheist, Catholic,
gay, Wiccan or undefined.
One of the great and enduring


successes of the-American public
school, all academic hand-wring-
ing aside,;is its admirable reflection
of principles of equal opportunity,
fairriess and respect for all. Few
other institutions, including private
and charter schools, can make
that claim. Schools' balancing of
public and private religious rights
is among those successes. Why
jeopardize it?
Even before last year's resurrec-
tion of school prayer, Florida wasn't
quite the atheist-godless-com-
munist redoubt its mullahs would
make you believe it was. Public
schools could and still may provide
up to two minutes of silence at the
beginning of every day for prayer or
meditation. (Schools are loath to do
that only because their hours have
been slashed as it is, to save money,
so further reducing instructional
time wouldn't be wise.)
Students can pray at any time
of their choosing, anywhere they
please, even in groups, as long
as it doesn't interfere with school
activities. Florida law also requires
the Department of Education to
distribute explicit guidelines on
"Religious Expression in Public
Schools" to every school board
member, superintendent, princi-
pal and teacher in every school,
making students' rights to pray very
clear.
Then came last year's curveball
of a prayer law. School boards have
sensibly held their bats. Let us pray
they continue to do so, Flagler
County's veiled nostalgia for a more
unequal past notwithstanding.
Pierre Tristam is editor and publisher of Fla-
glerLive.com, a non-profit news service based
in Palm Coast, Fl, He can be reached at editor@
flaglerlive.com.


:.~ ,.







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


STORYTIME AT THE LIBRARY
- ,. I1 ,, j -
JJ J
,.,__ _.. .. ,IJ J'Ij.U .:


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN

B before working on a Valentine's Day masterpiece during the Jackson County Public
Library's Storytime program, 19-month-old Audrey Cloud decided to look for a good
book. During the program, kids could work on painting jumbo-sized hearts for their
valentines, and Children's Program Manager Lynn Lowenthal read them several fun books
about food and monster moms. The program, for children up to school age, is held on
Tuesday at 10 a.m.


ON THE LOOKOUT


A
1 .* '. i ,'- -. "



i" '
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
T im Chastain with Anderson Columbia looks topside for a tool as he cleans out a section
of sewer on Caledonia Street on Tuesday.


Optimist Club Makes Donation
.- A -, . . ..-


LienG- : C .d'es from -
Basic I~litry aiti'Wg







,.',, r. -, ~ '


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Air Force Airman James H. Lien III graduated from basic
military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week
program that included training in military discipline and
studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic
warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits toward an associate in applied
science degree through the Community College of the Air
Force. Lien is the son of James Lien and Tammy Bevis of
Marianna. He is a 2012 graduate of Marianna High School.
Williams Graduates from
Willia~ums GraduateS f~rom


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Private Ali Williams graduated from basic training at the U.S.
Army 2nd BN, 47th Infantry Alpha-Delta Company in Fort
Benning, GA. He continued his training at Fort Leonard Wood,
Mo., graduating on Jan. 25. Williams is currently residing in
California. He is the son of Mary F. Mack of Campbellton, and
a graduate of Graceville High School.




FIiTsrt PIST
Join Us For XWorship
Sunday: Wednesday:
Sunday School: 9:30 AM Fellowship Supper: 4:15PM
Morning Worship: 10:45 AM Children's Choir: 4:45 PM
Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Bible Study: 6:00 PM
www.fbcmarianna.org






-' i"A

. C hip ,l101rs1ng 1P1rilion
r.j ,,. .. .. .. . *....
R tirement Center
4294 Third.Ave. t ia'rianna, FL (850) 526-31.91


Dr. Daniel Powell, Chipola
'College's Dean of Fine and
Performing Arts, recently
accepted a donation for
The Chipola Regional Arts
Association from Optimist
Club president Lowell
Centers. The CRAA accepts
donations which are in turn
used to support Chipola's
annual Artist Series,
scholarships to deserving art
students as well as grants
to teachers to supplement
art and music programs.
Dr. Powell also spoke to the
group about the Chipola
Center for the Arts and
upcoming performances.
Club program chairman Ken
Stoutamire helped make the
presentation. From left: Ken
Stoutamire, Dr. Daniel Powell
and Lowell Centers.


\ FLORIDAN

it becofdcg


Jackson Count

HIstoly



SGet Started Today!
i [j Call (850) 526-3614
www.jcfloridan.com


LOCAL


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13. 2013 5AF


, :i: M^saW 3)---








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


55-year sentence in missing foster child case


The Associated Press

MIAMI A woman who once
cared for missing foster child
Rilya Wilson was sentenced
Tuesday to 55 years in prison
for kidnapping and child-abuse
convictions, closing a case that
spanned more than a decade
and triggered changes in Flori-
da's child-welfare system.
Circuit Judge Marisa Tinkler
Mendez imposed the sentence
on Geralyn Graham, 67, who was
convicted last month following
an eight-week trial. With a lone
holdout, jurors were unable to
agree on her guilt or innocence
on a first-degree murder charge,
and prosecutors are unlikely to
retry Graham on that count.
Tinkler Mendez said the evi-
dence showed that 4-year-old
Rilya was subjected to "sense-
less, cruel and inhumane acts"
at the hands of Graham.
"One can only be inherently
evil to inflict that type of pain
and torment on an innocent
child," the judge said.
Assistant State Attorney Sally
Weintraub said Rilya went from
an initial loving foster home to
an "abyss" with Graham that kept
the child in terror during the fi-
nal months of her short life.
"We trust that with this sen-
tencing there Will be some mea-
sure of satisfaction to those peo-
ple who loved Rilya and cared
about her," Weintraub said.
The judge sentenced Graham
to 30 years for kidnapping plus 25
years for aggravated child abuse.
Two other abuse sentences 25


years and five years, respectively
- will be served concurrently
for a total of 55
years behind bars.
Prosecutors had
sought the maxi-
mum of life plus
65 years.
Rilya vanished
Wilsoin December 2000
from the Miami-
area home shared by Graham
and her lover, Pamela Graham.
Her disappearance wasn't no-
ticed for 15 months, largely
because a Department of Chil-
dren and Families caseworker
neglected to check on the girl in
person as required.
The case led to the resignation
of then-DCF director Kathleen
Kearney and the passage of sev-
eral reform laws, including a new
missing-child-tracking system
and the contracting out of foster
child casework to private organi-
zations. Lawmakers also made it
illegal to falsify records of visits
between caseworkers and foster
children.
U.S. Rep. Frederica Wilson, a
Democrat who sponsored some
of those reforms in the state Leg-
islature, said Graham's sentence
was just. She is not related to Ri-
lya Wilson.
"She's not getting life, but she
will be in prison for the rest of
her life," Wilson said of Graham
after the sentencing.
Rilya, whose name is an acro-
nym for "remember I love you
always," was the daughter of a
crack-addicted woman. Rilya
and two sisters were all put up


for adoption, with the young-
er sibling also being cared for
by the Grahams when Rilya
disappeared.
By the time investigators got
the case, any physical evidence
that might have existed was long
gone. Rilya's body has never
been found, leading Graham's
defense lawyers to suggest dur-
ing the trial that the girl might
have been sold and could still
be alive. Prosecutors also had no
eyewitnesses to any crime.
Graham insisted she was in-
nocent and in brief remarks
Tuesday she said eventually "the
truth will come out."
"It hurt me to the depths of my
soul for anyone to think I would
do that to any child. I only tried
to help her," Graham said. "I
loved her too much to have ever
done anything to her. Things
have been greatly exaggerated."
Defense attorney Michael Mat-
ters said there will be appeals of
the convictions and sentence. He
praised the judge, nevertheless,
for restraint in the sentence.
"My client was not convicted of
murder, though the state would
like the court to sentence my
client and punish her as if she
were," Matters said.
During the trial there was evi-
dence of abuse, including a dog
cage witnesses said Graham ob-
tained to punish Rilya and tes-
timony about the girl's lengthy
confinement in a small laundry
room. Pamela Graham testified
that Geralyn Graham regularly
tied Rilya to her bed using plas-
tic restraints so she would not


,THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Geralyn Graham (center) talks to her attorneys Michael Matters (left) and
Scott Sakin prior to her sentencing in Miami Dade Criminal Court Tuesday.


get up during the night.
The murder case hinged on
testimony by three jailhouse
snitches. The state's star witness,
career criminal Robin Lunc-
eford, said Graham told her be-
hind bars that she smothered
Rilya with a pillow and buried
the body near water. Lunceford
said Graham believed Rilya was
evil and had to be put out of her
misery. A last straw was Rilya's
insistence on wearing a Cleopa-
tra mask instead of an angel cos-
tume for Halloween, according
to Lunceford.
Graham consistently denied
harming the girl, telling investi-
gators and even national televi-
sion shows that Rilya had been
taken away by a DCF worker for
mental tests and never returned.


No evidence ever surfaced to
back up that claim. Grahaq~ also
told other stories to friends about
Rilya's whereabouts, including
purported trips to DisneyWorld,
NewYork and New Jersey.
Lunceford made a deal with
prosecutors cutting her life sen-
tence to 10 years in exchange for
her testimony. She is currently
scheduled for release in March
2014.
Pamela Graham was charged
with child neglect but also will
likely get no jail time in ex-
change for her testimony. Pa-
mela Graham insisted she does
not know what happened to
Rilya, but she didn't admit to in-
vestigators until 2004 that there
were lies surrounding the girl's
disappearance.


Governor Scott'sjobs package coming under fire


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott, who has made
job creation his top pri-
ority since taking office,
is encountering growing-
resistance to his efforts to
use additional tax dollars
in his efforts to jumpstart
Florida's economy.
Scott's-jobs development
agency is coming under
scrutiny from lawmak-
ers increasingly skeptical
of its recent track record
in luring new companies
Sand new jobs to the state.
A House panel on Tuesday
peppered agency officials
with questions.
Top Republicans are
also calling Scott's push
to boost the amount of tax
dollars set aside to lure new
companies a tough sell.


Scott wants to increase the
amount from $111 million
to $278 million in the com-
ing year.
Rep. Ed Hooper, R-Clear-
water and chairman of the
House budget panel that
oversees state spending on
incentive programs, said
that unless there is a big
project already under con-
sideration it may be hard
persuading lawmakers to
set aside so much money.
"Those are dollars we
have to tie up all year,"
Hooper said.
Scott came into office
in 2011 pledging to create
700,000 jobs over seven
years by cutting taxes and
restructuring the state's
existing economic devel-
opment efforts. He had
made it clear he plans to
use the drop in the state's


unemployment rate as a
centerpiece of his re-elec-
tiorneffort in 2014.
SBut the growing unease
over the use of-economic
incentives comes amid
such high-profile failures
as Digital Domain. The
company last year filed for
bankruptcy and shuttered
its facility in Florida after
it accepted incentives, in-
cluding $20 million from
the state. Two other com-
panies that got help have
also declared bankruptcy;
the state is demanding the
return of money from oth-
er companies that did not
fulfill promised jobs.
Officials with Enterprise
Florida, the state's pub-
lic-private jobs develop-
ment agency, has pointed
out that Digital Domain
received assistance


outside of the state's nor-
mal process and should
not be used to judge the
state's efforts.
But legislators also are
raising questions about
whether money from the
state's main incentive pro-
grams is going to help com-
panies already located in
Florida that may not need
the help. Companies such
as Publix and Wal-Mart are
among the companies that
have gotten state assis-
tance in recent years.
'Rep. Mike Fasano, R-New
Port Richey, grilled Enter-
prise Florida officials, con-
tending that they are not
doing enough to help what
he called small "Mom and
Pop",businesses across the
state.
"I'm not hearing from
those small businesses,


Fisher Teaches Self Defense Course


6I hiL Lr


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Pilot Club of Marianna invited Lora Fisher to teach a self defense course recently. Lora is a certified instructor in self
defense and spoke with members and guests about the importance and basic steps in defending yourself. The class was held
Jan. 31 at Saint Luke's Episcopal Church in Marianna. The class was not only informative but was a lot of fun as well. For more
information on Pilot Club activities or if interested in joining contact Margie Mullins at 526-5701. From left: Amber Baggett,
Lora Fisher and Judy Lanier, Pilot Club President. For more information on taking a self defense class, contact Lora Fisher via
email at lorafisherl5@yahoo.com.

State Brief A


saying 'Wow! Enterprise
Florida just showed up
at my door and I'm doing
great now,'" Fasano said.
Griff Salmon, the chief
operating officer for Enter-
prise Florida, told Fasano
that "the assertion we only
pander to large companies
is frankly inaccurate."
Salmon, however, was
unable to assure House
members that the money
now coming from Florida
taxpayers was being used
to hire Floridians.
There is already a bill
moving through the Flor-
ida Senate that would in-
crease oversight of busi-
ness incentives. Sen. Andy
Gardiner, R-Orlando, also
said the legislation could
clamp down on some of
the state tax credits.
"We want the ability to

,-- -";;

.J I

understand the return on
investment and the eco-
nomic benefit," Gardiner
said.


OoPhilip


Carat The FIVE C's
Color
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CONFIDENCE

Marianna's Most
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Est.1971 0-

mfatson

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850.482.4037
watsonjewelers.com


2884 Jefferson St.
^M/k Downtown Marianna


8so.482.6855


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Severe weather
delays tornado drill
TALLAHASSEE Flor-
ida emergency manage-
ment officials are delaying
a statewide tornado drill
due to severe weather
that could include real
tornadoes.
The drill was scheduled
for Wednesday as part of
Severe Weather Awareness
Week in Florida. Officials
say they are rescheduling
it for Friday because of
hazardous weather fore-
cast for north Florida and
the Panhandle.
The National Weather


Service is predicting 90
percent chance of rain
with thunderstorms likely,
and it has issued a flood
Advisory for some areas.
The forecast says the pri-
mary threat is damaging
wind but that tornadoes
cannot be ruled out.
Those threats should
be over in time for the
rescheduled tornado drill.
Schools and daycare
centers are being urged to
participate. A simulated
tornado warning will be
broadcast on weather
radio.

From wire reports


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LOCAL & STATE






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Raindrops, gloomy skies can't stop Mardi Gras


The Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS De-
spite threatening skies,
the Mardi Gras party car-
ried on as thousands of
costumed revelers cheered
glitzy floats with make-
believe monarchs in an
all-out bash before Lent.
In the French Quarter, as
usual, Fat Tuesday played
out with all its flesh and
raunchiness.
Crowds were a little
smaller than recent years,
perhaps influenced by the
forecast bf rain. Still, pa-
rades went off as sched-
uled even as a fog settled
over the riverfront and
downtown areas.
Police, who had to deal
with massive waves of
visitors first for Super
Bowl and then for Mardi
Gras reported no ma-
jor problems other than
Saturday night when four
people were shot on Bour-
bon Street. A suspect has
been arrested.
There was a heavy po-
lice presence in the tour-
ist-filled Quarter, where
crowds began to swell in
the early afternoon and
would be bursting at the
seams by the time police
on horseback declared the
party over at midnight.
The family side of Mardi
Gras unfolded along stately
St. Charles Avenue, where
some groups camped
out overnight to stake
out prime spots for pa-
rade-viewing. A brief rain


I ,-.. .w u-v. -I -
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Revelers gather for the start of the Society of Saint Anne walking parade in the Bywater section of New Orleans during Mardi
Gras on Tuesday. Overcast skies and the threat of rain couldn't dampen the revelry of Mardi Gras as parades took to the streets,
showering costumed merrymakers with trinkets of all kinds.


shower as the final float in
the Krewe of Rex parade
passed by didn't dampen
the enthusiasm there.
Cliff Kenwood and his
wife, Jennie, of New Or-
leans, brought their two
children 8-year-old
Ivy and 6-year-old Jack
- to the festivities. Each
was dressed as a skeleton
and Cliff Kenwood wore
a banner around his hat
referencing the recent


publishing changes to the
city's newspaper The
Times-Picayune.
The costumes poked fun
at the paper's decision to
cut back from a daily pub-
lishing schedule to three
days a week. "We're black,
white and dead all over,"
Jennie Kenwood said
laughing.
She said their family kept
their subscription even
though they thought about


canceling. "We can't do it to
them. We don't want them
to die," she said.
Rain or shine, it was a last
chance to soakin some fun
during the Carnival season,
which ends with the start
of Lent on Wednesday.
The Krewe of Zulu led the
festivities from city neigh-
borhoods to the business
district, followed by the
parade of Rex, King of
Carnival, and hundreds of


truck floats decorated by
families and social groups.
In the French Quarter,
manyrevelers had drinks in
hand before sunrise. Some
donned tutus, beads and
boas. Some hadn't been to
bed since Monday's Lundi
Gras celebrations.
"We'll be in the French
Quarter all day," said Bob-
bie Meir, of Gretna, La.,
with feathers in her hair
and fingernails painted


purple. "The sights today
are jaw-dropping. It's a ton
of fun and the best party
in the world. Nobody does
Mardi Gras like we do."
On Bourbon Street,
women wore bustiers, fish-
net stockings, bikini bot-
toms and little else. Some
flashed flesh to attract the
attention of people throw-
ing beads from balconies.
"We're a flock of pea-
cocks," said Laura Kom-
arek, a recent New Orleans
transplant from Minne-
apolis who moved to the
Big Easy for a teaching job.
Komarek and a group of
friends walked Bourbon
Street wearing leotards
and large colorful feathers
on their bottoms,
Sipping, a hand-grenade,
one of Bourbon Street's
signature cocktails, Kom-
arek said this was her first
Mardi Gras.
"This is a totally differ-
ent experience than any
other event I've ever been
to in my life. I'm so happy,
having a blast with my
friends without a care in
the world."
The costumes were plen-
tiful. Many revelers were
clad in the traditional col-
ors of Mardi Gras purple,
green and gold. There were
cows, bees, pirates and
jesters. One reveler rode
through the French Quar-
ter on a bike dressed in a
U.S. Postal Service jersey
adorned with syringes, ref-
erencing the doping scan-
dal for the famed cyclist.


Source: Suspect didn't leave burning cabin


The Associated Press

BIG BEAR, Calif. The
man believed to be fugitive
ex-cop Christopher Dorner
never came out of a Califor-
nia mountain cabin, and a
single shot was heard inside
before the cabin was en-
gulfed in flames, a law en-
forcement official told The
Associated Press.
The law enforcement of-
ficial requested anonym-
ity because of the ongoing
investigation.
A fourth person a dep-
uty died earlier in the
latest confrontation with
America's most-wanted
man, which seemed to be
coming to an end.
Officials were waiting for
the fire to bum out before
approaching the ruins to
search for a body.
"We have reason to be-
lieve that it is him," San
Bemardino County sheriff's
spokeswoman Cynthia
Bachman said.
The cabin was on fire and
smoke was coming from
the structure in the late
afternoon after police sur-
rounded it in the snow-cov-
ered woods of Big Bear, a
resort town about 80 miles
east of Los Angeles.
Bachman didn't say how
the fire started but noted
there was gunfire.between
the person in the cabin and
law enforcement officers
around the home before
the blaze began.
TV helicopters showed
the fire burning freely with
no apparent effort to extin-
guish it.
Authorities have focused
their hunt for Christopher


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Commuters on Santa Monica Boulevard on the west side of Los Angeles see a digital billboard
displaying a large "wanted" poster for former Los Angeles police Officer Christopher Dorner.


Domer there since they said
he launched a campaign to
exact revenge against the
Los Angeles Police Depart-
ment for his firing.
Authorities say Dorner
threatened to bring "war-
fare" to LAPD officers and
their families, spreading
fear and setting off a search
for him across three states
and Mexico.
"Enough is enough. It's
time for you to turn yourself
in. It's timeto stop the blood-
shed," LAPD Cmdr. Andrew
Smith said earlier in the day
at a news conference held
outside police headquarters
in Los Angeles, a starkly dif-
ferent atmosphere than last
week when officials briefed
the news media under tight
security with Dorner on the
loose.
If the man inside the cab-


-in does prove to be Dorner,
it will lower tensions among
the more than 40 targets
police say he listed in an
online rant.
Until Tuesday, authori-
ties didn't know whether
Dorner was still near Big
Bear, where they found his
burned-out pickup last
week.
Around 12:20 p.m. Tues-
day, deputies got a report of
a stolen vehicle, authorities
said. The location was di-
rectly across the street from
where law enforcement set
up their command post on
Thursday and not far from
where Dorner's burned-out
pickup was abandoned.
The people whose vehicle
was stolen described the
suspect as looking similar
to Dorner. When authori-
ties found the vehicle, the


suspect ran into the forest
and barricaded himself in-
side the cabin.
The first exchange of gun-
fire occurred about 12:45
p.m.
California Department of
Fish and Wildlife said in a
statement that one of its of-
ficers traveling down High-
way 38 recognized a man
who fit Dorner's descrip-
tion traveling in the oppo-
site direction.
The wildlife officer pur-
sued the vehicle and there
was a shooting in which the
wildlife vehicle was hit nu-
merous times and the sus-
pect escaped on foot.
There was then a second
exchange with San Ber-
nardino County deputies,
two of whom were shot.
One died and the other was
expected to live.


O 21.
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.
PAT FURR
Sunny South Properties
4630 Hwy. 90, Marianna, FL
Business: 850.526.2891 YOUR
Cell: 850.209.8071 success is
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Sn VII


Gwaltney Mild or Hot
Roll Sausage ................ 20z.
McEver's $ 79
Beef Patties ................. 3b box


Whole Boston Butt
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Cook's Shank Portion
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Sex offender inmate stabs officer, flees in Texas


The Associated Press

MIAMI A manhunt is under way for a
prisoner convicted of violent sexual assaults
who stabbed one of two police escorts and
escaped in the Dallas area as he was being
transferred from Florida to Nevada, police
said Tuesday.
Alberto Morales, 42, stabbed the officer
once in the neck and three times in the back
Monday night outside a Walmart in Grape-
vine, police said. Grapevine Police Sgt. Robert
Eberling said Morales is believed to have used
his eyeglasses in the assault.
Miami-Dade Police Detective Jaime Par-
dinas, a 54-year-old who has been on the
force for 28 years, is in serious but stable
condition.
Pardinas and Detective David Carrero were
scheduled to fly with Morales to Nevada,
where he was to serve a sentence of 30 years
to life for a conviction of sexual assault with a
weapon. But the officers and Morales weren't
allowed to get back on the plane during a lay-
over in Texas because of the inmate's erratic
behavior, authorities said.
During the first leg of the flight, Morales was
"bumping his head against a passenger seat
in front of him, so he was doing a lot of crazy,
unusual things that just disrupted the entire
flight," said Miami-Dade Police Director J.D.
Patterson Jr.
Miami-Dade Police Deputy Director Juan
Perez said that it is out of the ordinary, but


that airlines occasionally ask officers and
their escorted inmates to leave because of li-
ability issues.
The detectives were then forced to rent a ve-
hicle at Dallas-Fort Worth International Air-
port with the intention of driving the nearly
1,200 miles to their destination. Miami po-
lice said there are clear policies about trans-
porting inmates across state lines, but didn't
discuss details other than to say two officers
must be present.
The officers stopped to use the restroom at
the store late Monday night and were waiting
for a third officer to meet them to help with
the rest of the trip. While Carrero was inside
the store, Morales go't hold of a sharp object,
stabbed Pardinas and fled, authorities said.
"He was handcuffed. We don't know how he
got the handcuffs free," Patterson said.
It's unclear if Morales' hands were cuffed in
front or behind him or if he was shackled. Mi-
ami police also declined to speculate on how
Morales obtained the object he used to stab
the officer. Morales, who was born in Cuba, is
believed to have run away.
Police in Grapevine, northwest of Dallas,
said they believe Morales is still on foot some-
where nearby and are pursuing several leads,
department spokesman Sgt. Robert Eberling
said. A $10,000 reward has been set for any
information leading to his arrest. The local
school district has locked all exterior doors,
but classes were running normally.
Longtime Las Vegas defense attorney Marc


Saggese, who represented Morales in a Ne-
vada criminal case, said his client claimed he
suffered a severe brain injury when he was hit
in the head with a baseball bat at 17 years old.
Morales said he heard voices and had trouble
controlling impulses.
"He said that ever since that attack and sub-
sequent surgeries he has been struggling with
demons in his head," Saggese said.
While in a jail medical ward, Morales muti-
lated his genitals and scrawled words in blood
on the wall. He underwent a psychological ex-
amination by doctors at a Nevada state men-
tal hospital in Sparks, but he was found com-
petent to stand trial, the attorney said.
Morales eventually pleaded guilty in 2008 to
sexually assaulting a woman at an apartment
blocks away from the Las Vegas Strip in 2003.
The woman told police a moan jumped from
her closet in the middle of the night, held a
gun to her face, blindfolded her, attacked
her several times and left after telling her he
would kill her if she called police, according to
Clark County District Court documents.
Following his conviction in Las Vegas, Mo-
rales was sent to Florida to face prior charges,
Las Vegas police Officer Laura Meltzer said.
Back in Miami, Morales was sentenced to
10 years in prison in December after pleading
guilty to sexual battery with a deadly weapon,
burglary with assault and. kidnapping stem-
ming from 2003. He broke into a Miami-area
home, pulled out a butcher knife and raped
two women, according to a police report.


State Briefs


Florida appellate court OKs
consecutive sentences
TALLAHASSEE An appellate court says
defendants can receive consecutive sen-
tences for displaying but not firing guns if
convicted of multiple counts resulting from
one event.
The 1st District Court of Appeal made that
decision Tuesday in a rare opinion by all 15
members.
It interprets Florida's 10-20-Life Law, which
sets minimum sentences of 10 years for using
a gun in a crime, 20 years for firing it and life
if a victim is harmed or killed.
The ruling means Leronnie Walton can get


Housing
From Page 1A

several other county de-
partments in a larger space
of about 50,000 square
feet in a two or three story
building. The board is eye-
ing the old county jail site
as a potential location for
the community develop-
ment building, and prop-
erty next to it as a site
for a new administration
building.
Both parcels belong to
the county already. Com-
missioners are also trying
to determine how much
money they'd ultimately
save by putting all under
one roof later as opposed
to building community
development now and
saving for the larger struc-
ture to be built later on.
Favorable interest rates
available now may not be
as low if the county de-
lays building, a factor the
board is weighing.
About a week ago, the
county received an unso-
licited offer for the com-
munity development
building and the property
it occupies, according to
Jackson County Adminis-
trator Ted Lakey. He said
a man called and made
an offer, but he did not
disclose who called or the
price heoffered.
As a result of that inter-
est, commissioners may
declare the' structure for
sale and give the general
public at large an oppor-
tunity to buy it. The board
took no official action to
put the building on the


Bees
From Page 1A

Register, of Marianna, says that
by Sunday afternoon, the swarm
had vanished, leaving- her yard
bee-free and her camellia in tact.
For additional insight, the Flori-
dan spoke with Jackson County
Extension Office agent Rob Tra-
wick, who took one look at a pho-
to of the swarm and was able to
shed some light on what the pol-
linators were up to.


market, but left it open for
further discussion later.
Board members talked
at length about these
space-making options to
give several county de-
partments some elbow
room. This isn't the first
time commissioners have
taken up the subject.
The county had, in 2003-
04, started putting some
money aside for a new
administration building
that could take some de-
partments out of the Jack-
son County Courthouse,
where space has been
tight for several years. The
Tax Collector's Office, the
Property Appraiser's Of-
fice, and the Supervisor
of Elections offices were
among those targeted for
relocation at that time. Ar-
chitects from Donofro and
Associates had drawn up
some preliminary plans
for a two-or-three story
building that would ini-
tially encompass 50,000
square feet.
Plans for a new building,
however, were shelved
when the economy took
a turn for the worse. The
money collected for the
project came from a por-
tion of the annual fee it
collects from Waste Man-
agement as host county
for the company's landfill.
The fund has grown to
more than $500,000 and is
still available for construc-
tion. The board talked
Tuesday about continuing
to put money aside from
that source, and using it to
help repay a construction
loan for a new adminis-
tration building or per-
haps a smaller one just for


two consecutive minimum 10-year terms for
attempting to rob two women in Jacksonville.
The court receded from a prior but op-
posite ruling and declared to the Florida
Supreme Court a conflict with another
appellate court.
Walton also faces consecutive 20-year min-
imums for shooting at two police officers.

Inmate dies awaiting execution
STARKE A man on Florida's death row
has died while awaiting his execution.
. The Department of Corrections reports that
49-year-old Tommy Wyatt died Friday. The
cause of death was not disclosed.
Authorities say Wyatt and another man,


Michael Lovette, ran away from a North Car-
olina prison roadwork crew in 1988, heading
to Florida and kicking off a cross-state crime
spree. They ended up in Vero Beach, where
they robbed a Domino's Pizza. Authorities
say Wyatt fatally shot three employees after
raping one of them.
Officials sayWyatt also killed a Tampa-area
woman that he met at a bar.
Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers reports
that Wyatt's attorneys were still appealing his
case to the federal courts.
Lovette remains in state prison, serving
10 life sentences for murder, robbery and
kidnapping.
From wire reports


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
At a workshop Tuesday, Jackson County commissioners talked about selling the building that
houses Community Development on Lafayette Street in Marianna.


community development. .order to help pay back the
Lakey gave commissioners money if the county were
an estimate of the expect- to move forward. Fellow
ed debt service on a $10 board member Ed Crutch-
million loan. Figured over field, however, said he
20 years at an interest rate didn't see how that would
of 2.5 percent, the annual be possible with depart-
loan repayment would be ments, in his estimation,
about $641,000. That's far already cut to the bone.
more than the Waste Man- On Tuesday, Paul Dono-
agement income, which fro Jr. brought in the old
was estimated at $300,000 administration building
a year. If commission- plans and presented them
ers do take out the loan, to refresh the board's
they must find a funding memory, as well as prelim-
source to pay for it, and inary plans for a 10,000-
board members expect square-foot building that
to address that further as could house Community
discussions continue. Development only. Dono-
Some commissioners fro told the board he could
say they are reluctant to also modify the larger
take out a large loan and building footprint to make
one board member, Jere- it smaller, since the county
my Branch, suggested that has made some progress
departments might have in the ensuing years to
to take additional budget alleviate space worries in
cuts in coming years in the courthouse.


The mass of bees, largely made
up of drones that likely number in
the thousands, was protecting a
new queen inside. And they were
house hunting.
You can't have two queens in
a colony, Trawick said. It's like
having too many cooks in the
kitchen.
When a new queen is hatched,
she falls from the hive, leaves the
colony and sets out to find a new
home followed by the scores of
drones that are attracted to her
unique pheromone (chemicals
that change behavior).


Searching for a suitable new
spot may take time, so the queen
and her drones will swarm a tem-
porary resting place such as
the branch of an unsuspecting
camellia bush while scout bees
check out the nearby area for
more permanent digs. And when
they find a cozy spot to call home,
the swarm is gone.
Trawick says people shouldn't
be alarmed if they find a swarm
of bees in their yard. Domesti-
cated honeybees are not known
to be aggressive, and if the bees
are clearly visible, as they were


In the years that passed
after the plans were first
developed and then
shelved, Jackson County
has bought a free-standing
office for the Supervisor
of Elections. The shelved
administration building
plans had space for that
office, and that could be
trimmed out now. Howev-
er, board member Chuck
Lockey also talked about
the possibility of selling
the elections headquar-
ters and moving that of-
fice into the new adminis-
tration building, should it
come to be.
The county expects to
hold a follow-up work-
shop next month to dis-
cuss the issues further, and
Donofro was tasked with
presenting more detailed
information about the
various building options.


on Register's camellia branch, it's
a good indication that they won't
be sticking around.
To learn more about bees and
beekeeping, check out the Ex-
tension's upcoming four-class
course a continuation of a
recent beginners course (not a
prerequisite).
Starting Feb. 18, classes meet
6-8 p.m. each Monday for four
weeks, at the Extension office on
Pennsylvania Avenue in Mari-
anna. The entire course costs $25
per person or $40 per couple. Call
482-9620 for details.


Obituary

Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850-526-5059

Coleman N.
Matthews

Coleman was born on
September 4, 1933 in Jack-
son County, and passed
away on February 11, 2013
at his home in Two Egg.
In 1951 Coleman mar-
ried his wife Martha and
they moved to Tampa. He
was baptized as one of Je-
hovah's Witnesses in 1966
and attended the local
Kingdom Hall in Marianna.
In 1987 Coleman retired
from his job after 35 years
with Continental Can and
then moved back to Two
Egg.
He is survived by his wife
of 60 years, Martha and his
three children, Cheryl
Bromley of Two Egg, Far-
rell Matthews and wife Alli-
son of Valrico, FL, Rhonda
Leske and husband Donald
of Samson, AL. Coleman is
also survived four grand-
children Matthew Leske,
Michelle Bullock, Amanda
Bussey ard Jeremy Byrd,
two great ,grandchildren
Justice Bussey and Nathan
Bullock, brother Archie
Matthews and wife Onita of
Valrico, FL, sister Sara
Manning and husband Al-
bert of Montgomery, Al,
and a host of nieces, neph-
ews and cousins.
A memorial service for
Coleman will be held at
1:00 P.M. on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 16, 2013 in The King-
dom Hall of Jehovah Wit-
nesses Church at 3440 Old
US Road, Marianna, FL.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements.
Expressions of sympathy
may be submitted online at
www.mariannachapelfh.com.



Rains
From Page 1A"

Tallahassee issued a flash
flood watch for the area on
Tuesday morning, to re-
main in effect through this
morning.
The watch area, which
includes southeast Ala-
bama, much of southwest
and south central Geor-
gia and the inland Florida
Panhandle, saw very heavy
rains Sunday night and
Monday. Tuesday brought
even more wet weather.
For Wednesday, NWS
forecasts showers and
thunderstorms, with to-
night's mostly cloudy skies
gradually clearing.
But even after the skies
clear, this week's excessive
rainfall in and especially-
to the north of Jackson
County may still be cause
for concern.
River watch
As reported in Tuesday's
Floridan, the Jackson
County Emergency Man-
agement office is urging
residents who live or have
property near the Chipola
River to keep an eye on ris-
ing water.
At US 90 Tuesday after-
noon, the river was at 9.3
feet. It is expected to con-
tinue rising over the next
several days, but remain
below flood stage. Action
stage is predicted for late,
Friday..
Those near the river are
reminded to take precau-
tions to protect life and
property, and to not drive
cars through flooded
areas.


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Twitter








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jcfloridannews


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
Quality Service at .f'.,'f !,L' Prices
Come Visit us at our NEW LOCATION
--ll 3424 West Highway 90 (3/10 mile west from our previous location)
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY13,2013 9AF


FROM THE FRONT & STATE






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Briefs

Syrian rebels advance
toward Aleppo airport
BEIRUT Rebels cap-
tured a small military base
near Aleppo on Tuesday
and stormed another in
the same area that protects
a major airport, a day after
seizing Syria's largest dam.
With the back-to-back
blows to President Bashar
Assad's regime, opposition
fighters appear to be re-
gaining some momentum,
expanding their northern
zone of control while at
the same timepushing
deeper into the heart of the
capital, Damascus.
Rebels have been at-
tacking Aleppo's civilian
airport, which remains in
regime hands, for weeks.
They now appear to have
removed the main de-
fenses around the facility.
Civilian flights stopped
weeks ago because of the
intensity of the fighting.

Agency raids abattoir
in horsemeat scandal
LONDON British au-
thorities on Tuesday raided
a slaughterhouse and a
meat processing com-
pany suspected of selling
horsemeat labeled as beef
for kebabs and burgers,
shutting them down and
seizing all the meat found.
It was the first time since
the growing scandal broke
across Europe that horse-
meat being marketed as
beef has been traced to an
abattoir in Britain, officials
said, raising questions
about how widespread the
practice is.
Millions of burgers have
been recalled around
Europe and accusations
have been made, but so far'
it's not clear how horse-
meat got introduced into
so many beef products.
French authorities have
already pointed to an
elaborate supply chain
that involved Romanian
butchers and Dutch and
Cypriot traders that result-
ed in horsemeat disguised
as beef being sold in frozen
meals like lasagna and
moussaka to consumers
around the continent.

Timbuktu residents
savor freedom
TIMBUKTU, Mali
-There were public pro-
tests and whispers of se-
cret love affairs. Heroes of
resistance everywhere: the
female fishmonger who
angrily knocked down one
of the occupiers, the imam
who sent them away from
his mosque, the elderly
sheep trader beaten for'
complaining about their ill
treatment of others.
Residents of this cara-
van crossing are free of
the violent militants who
tried for nine months to
impose their version of
Islam. French and African
forces are continuing to
chase them farther into the
Sahara.
And although many
doubt that they are gone
for good, now is a time for
sweeping up.

From wire reports


Vatican: Pope's retirement for real


The Associated Press,

VATICAN CITY-The pa-
pal ring will be destroyed,
along with other powerful
emblems of authority, just
as they are after a papal
death. The retiring pope
will live in a monastery
on the edge of the Vatican
gardens and will likely
even give up his beloved
theological writing.
The Vatican went out of
its way Tuesday to declare
that for Pope Benedict
XVI, retirement means just
that: Retirement.
With speculation swirl-
ing about his future role,
the Vatican's chief spokes-
man explicitly stated that
Benedict will not influ-
ence the election of his
successor.
And the Rev. Frederico
Lombardi deepened the
sense of finality by saying
that after his Feb. 28 ab-
dication, "objects strictly
connected" with the


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The lights are on in Pope BenedictXVI's apartment overlooking
St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican on Tuesday. With a few words
in Latin, Pope Benedict XVI did what no pope has done in more
than half a millennium, by announcing his resignation.
papal ministry will be "ter- is smashed upon a pope's
minated." Among these is death.
the papal ring, used as a And while the first pa-
seal for documents, which pal resignation in 600


years has left behind a
vast uncharted territory to
navigate how does one
address or even dress a re-
tired pope? the church
sought to send a clear
message that Benedict will
not be pulling strings from
behind the scenes.
"The pope will surely
say absolutely nothing
about the process of the
election," Lombardi told
reporters at a briefing. "He
will not interfere in any
way."
The Vatican has already
picked out the pope's fu-
ture home: A four-story
building attached to a
monastery on the north-
ern edge of the Vatican
gardens where cloistered
nuns used to live. It has
been under renovation for
several months, although
only a handful of Vatican
officials knew that it would
one day be Benedict's re-
tirement home.
On Tuesday, construc-


tion materials littered the
front lawn of the house
and plastic tubing snaked
down from the top floor to
a cargo container.
From a new name to this
new home to the awkward
reality' of having a reign-
ing pope and a retired one,
the 85-year-old Benedict
has plenty of decisions to
make as he becomes the
first pontiff in six centuries
to retire.
Benedict said Monday
he was stepping down be-
cause he simply no longer
had the strength in mind or
body to carry on. On Tues-
day, Lombardi revealed for
the first time that the pope
has had a pacemaker for
years and just had its bat-
tery replaced a few months
ago.
Although no date for a
conclave to choose the
next pope has been an-
nounced, it must begin
within 20 days of his Feb.
28 retirement.


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The Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea
The way North Korea
sees it, only bigger weap-
ons and more threatening
provocations will force
Washington to come to
the table to discuss what
Pyongyang says it really
wants: peace.
It's no coincidence that
North Korea's third un-
derground nuclear test
- and by all indications
so far its most powerful
yet took place Tuesday
on the eve of President
Barack Obama's State of
the Union address.
As perplexing as the
tactic may seem to the
outside world, it serves as
an attention-getting re-
minder to the world that
North Korea may be poor
but has the power to up-
set regional security and
stability.
And the response to its
latest provocation was
immediate.
"The danger posed by
North Korea's threatening
activities warrants further
swift and credible action
by the international com-
munity," Obama said in a
statement hours after the
test. "The United States
will also continue to take
steps necessary to defend
ourselves and our allies."
The United Nations, Ja-
pan and South Korea also
responded with predict-
able anger. Even China,
North Korea's staunchest
ally, summoned the North
Korean ambassador to the
Foreign Ministry for a rare
dressing down.
All this puts young
North Korean leader Kim
Jong Un and his circle of
advisers right where they
want to be: at the center
of controversy and the fo-
cus of foreign policy.
A year into his nascent


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
On a large television screen in front of Pyongyang's railway
station, a North Korean state television broadcaster
announces the news that North Korea conducted a nuclear
test on Tuesday.


leadership, he is referring
to his father's playbook
to try forcing a change
on North Korea policy in
capital cities across the
region mostly notably
in the U.S.
The intent in Pyong-
yang is to get Washington
to treat North Korea like
an equal, a fellow nuclear
power. The aim of the nu-.
clear and missile tests is
not to go to war with the
United States notwith-
standing itsoften bellig-
erent statements but
to force Washington to re-
spect its sovereignty and
military clout.
During his 17-year rule,
late North Korean leader
Kim Jong II poured scarce
resources into Pyong-
yang's nuclear and mis-
sile programs to use as
bargaining chips in ne-
gotiations with Washing-
ton, Seoul and Tokyo. At
the same time, he sought
to build unity at home
by pitching North Korea's
defiance as a matter of
national pride as well as
military defense.
North Korea has long
cited the U.S. military
presence on the Korean
Peninsula, and what
it considers a nuclear


umbrella in the region,
as the main reason be-
hind its need for nuclear
weapons.


N. Korea brandishing nukes


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Sports Briefs
High School boys
basketball
The 1A state playoffs will be-
gin Feb. 19, with Malone, Cot-
tondale and Sneads all playing
regional semifinal games.
Malone and Cottondale will
be at home, with the Tigers
hosting Chipley, and the
Hornets hosting the Bozeman
Bucks, both at 7 p.m.
Sneads will go on the road
to take on the West Gadsden
Panthers, with the winner of
that game to play the winner
of Cottondale vs. Bozeman.
The winner of Malone vs.
Chipley will take on the win-
ner of Holmes County vs.
Paxton.
The regional final round will
be Feb. 23.

Chipola basketball
The Chipola men's and
women's basketball teams will
go on the roadWednesday
to take on Northwest Florida
State. The women's game will
tip.at 5:30 p.m., with the men's
game to follow at 7:30 p.m.

Chipola baseball
The Indians will head to
Albany, Ga. on Wednesday to
face Darton College at 3 p.m.
Chipola retuiris to Marianna
for the weekend, hosting
Middle Georgia on Friday at 2
p.m. and again Saturday at 11
a.m. The Indians then play San
Jacinto on Saturday at 2 p.m.
and again Sunday at 1 p.m.

Chipola softball
The Lady Indians will host
a doubleheader Wednesday
against Darton College at 4
and 6 p.m.
Chipola will then head to
Aiken, S.C. on the weekend to
play Friday against Aiken Tech
at noon and USC-Lancaster at
4 p.m., and then again Satur-
day against Pitt Community
College at 10 a.m., Florence
Darlington at noon, and Geor-
gia Military at 4 p.m.
The Lady Indians will come
back Sunday to take on Santa
Fe Communi y College in
Gainesville at noon and 2 p.m.

High School baseball
Thursday- Couondale at
Malone, 4 and 6 p.m.; Liberty
County at Marianna, 5:30 and
7:30 p.m.
SFriday Malone at Gracev-
ille, 4 and 6 p.m.; Liberty
County at Sneads, 5:30 and
7:30 p.m.

High School Softball
Friday Port St. Joe at Mari-
anna, 4 and6 p.m.; Arnold
at Graceville, 4 and 6 p.m.;
Sneads at Blountstown, 4 and
6p.m.

Marianna youth
baseball-softball
Marianna Recreation
Department will hold registra-
tion for baseball and softball
for the 2013 season through
Feb. 28 from 8 a.m .to 4 p.m.
for boys and girls ages 5-15
at the Marianna Educational
and Recreational Expoin
Marianna.
Registration fee is $40,
except for Machine Pitch
Baseball and 8UL girls sohball,
which is $35 each. .
For more information, call
850-482-6228.
MHS Softball golf
tournament
The Marianna High School
softball team golf tourna-
ment will be held March 9-10
at Caverns Golf.Course, with
format being a three-man
scramble at $85 per player.
Lunch will be provided on
Sunday. For more informa-
tion, contact Scott Wiggins at
573-7506 or Brian McKeithan
at 482-4257.

See BRIEFS, Page 2B


~'


.4


Cottondale Baseball Preview



Hornets hope to make a move


Experienced team positioned
to have strong 2013 season
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Cottondale Hornets fell short of
their goals last season, finishing 2012
with a record of 11-16 and 3-9 in dis-
trict, but after losing only one senior
from that team, the Hornets enter
this season with aspirations of join-
ing the fray with the top teams in
District 3.
Right-handed pitcher and utility
player Caleb Toole was the only Cotton-
dale player from last year's team to de-
part, with key players like Trent Jack-
son, Austin Baxley, Ryan Morrissey,
Wesley Spooner, Jake Kernoschak,
Josh Simmons, and Tyler Stephens
all returning to form an experienced
core.
The Hornets will again be small in
number with just 10 varsity players, but
coach Greg Ohler said that the players


who are there are guys who have earned
his trust.
"It's kind of a small school problem
not having a lot of numbers, but the
good thing is that the numbers we've
got have gotten a ton of reps and experi-
ence at their spots, so that by the time
they're juniors and seniors, they know
what they can and can't do and I know
what situations I need to put them in,"
he said. "I'm excited about the experi-
ence we have back. Most of them have
been playing together a long time and
have a lot of games under their belts, so
they each know their roles and how im-
portant each play is.
"And there's not a bad guy or a bad at-
titude in this group. They always stay
upbeat and positive. If they make a mis-
take, they believe they'll get it back next
time."
Cottondale will have four seniors, with
Ohler referring to Jackson and Morrissey
as the team's "go-to guys."

See HORNETS, Page 2B


MCFARLAND MAKES COLLEGE CHOICE


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN


Chipola Basketball


Indians, Northwest


ready for rubber match

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Two of the top teams in the country ''\
will face off in Niceville tonight in the I.
rubber match of a three-game series
between thie No. 11 Chipola Indians t e
and the No. 7 Northwest Florida State
Raiders.
Northwest (22-2 overall, 8-1 in the
Panhandle Conference) won the first
meeting 80-65 in Niceville and Chipo-
la (24-2, 7-2) won the second 82-79
in Marianna, with tonight's matchup
to potentially decide the conference
champion and the league's top seed in
the state tournament. t
Chipola ,can clinch a state tourney
berth with a win and move into a tie
for first while earning the tiebreaker of
winning the season series.
The Raiders have already clinched a
spot in the state tournament and can
all but wrap up a second straight Pan- MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola's Demone Harrison shoots for three
See INDIANS, Page 2B Saturday.


M arianna
High
School
runner Isaiah
McFarland (left)
signed with the
South Georgia
State College's
cross-country
program Tuesday
during a ceremony
in the MHS library.
His mom, Angela
McFarland, is at
right.


Lady Indians


embracing


opportunity
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Less than a week after moving into sole
possession of first place in the Panhandle
Conference, the No. 8 Chipola Lady Indians
will try to solidify that position tonight when
.they travel to Niceville to take on the No. 4
Northwest Florida State Lady Raiders.
Chipola (22-3 overall, 7-2 in, conference)
has won four straight Panhandle games, the
last of which came 71-56 over Tallahassee on
Saturday night, which combined with a Gulf
Coast State victory over Northwest, put the
Lady Indians alone in first place for the first
time this season.
Northwest (22-3, 6-3) is now tied with the
Lady Commodores for second in the league
after losing to Gulf Coast 76-72 in overtime on
Saturday and must win tonight to maintain a
realistic shot at winning the conference.

See OPPORTUNITY, Page 3B


SPRING TRAINING
Miami Marlins have
lots of young arms to
choose from. See more
on page 10B.


Inside on thursday's

Inside on ThursdaY''SL


l







MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Josh Simmons gets an out at first during Cottondale
baseball practice.
1 *- -- ,


MARSKINERFLOIDA
Jos Simn esa u tfis uigCtodl
baseball practice







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


1r


CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Savannah Miller, granddaughter of Jackie and Royce Reagan of Marianna, signed a
soccer scholarship with Auburn University last Wednesday on National Signing Day.
Savannah has been a part of continuous championship teams with her middle school,
high school, and travel teams. She has played all over the United States and Europe winning
individual and teams awards while gaining soccer skills with some of the world's best.


Hornets
From Page 1B
"We'll definitely go
as they go," the coach
said.
A catcher and relief pitch-
er, Jackson was the team's
leading hitter last season,'.
batting .389 with a team-
high 28 hits to go with 18
RBI and a team-best .511
on-base percentage, while
shortstop'/pitcher Mor-
rissey hit .333 with 25 hits,
14 RBI, and team-bests in
runs (27) and stolen bases
(14).
Jackson also led the
team with a 2.95 ERA and
'two saves last season,
and Ohier said that he
would again be count-
ed on as the team's top
reliever this year. .
Morrissey will be third
in the starting pitching
rotation, with junior Jake
Kernoschak and sopho-
more Wesley Spooner
likely the team's 1-2
starters.
Kernoschak and Spooner
each started six games last
season, with Spooner fin-
ishing 3-1 with a 4.11 ERA
and Kernoschak 2-6 with a
6.84 ERA.
"We've got five or six
guys that can get up there
and throw and our best



Briefs
From Page 1B

Altrusa golf
tournament
The 20th annual Altrusa
golf tournament will be
held March 15 at Indian
Springs Golf Course, with
registration at noon and a
1 p.m. shotgun start.
Format will be four-per-
son scramble, modified
handicap, 18 holes.at $65
per person.
For more information,
contact Jay James at 526-
3197 or 209-3068, or Kathy
Milton at 482-7788 or
209-8013.

Panhandle Seminole
Club golf tournament
The 2013 Panhandle
Seminole Club's annual
scholarship golf tourna-
ment will be held April 5 at
Indian Springs Golf Club
in Marianna. This tourna-
ment, along with another
fundraiser, has helped
provide $40,000 over the
past 10 years to deserving
local students and helped
further their education.
SRegistration and warm-


arm is probably Trent, We have to find some believes the district is


but you have to take him
from behind the plate
because last year he was
definitely our MVP," Ohler
said.
"We won 11 with him and
without him back there
we probably win seven or
eight.. That's small-town
baseball. You move one
guy and then a bunch of
other guys have to move as
well."
Morrissey will fill in at
catcher when Jackson
pitches, while Kernoschak
will man center field when
he's not on the mound,
with Spooner playing
third when he doesn't
pitch.
Simmons at second base
and Baxley at first round
out the' infield, with junior
Thomas Lipford and se-
nior Willie Pippin joining
Kernoschak in the out-
field, and freshman Justin
Lipford filling in for Ker-
noschak when he's on the
mound.
"With only 10, a lot of
guys have to play dif-
ferent positions," Ohler
said. "The only positive is
guys are getting experi-
ence playing a lot of posi-
tions that they may have
to play during the season.
Hopefully defense will be
the best part of our game.

up will begin at noon with,
the shotgun start at 1 p.m.
for this four-man scram-
ble event. Cash prizes will
be awarded to the first-,
second- and third-place
teams. Additional prizes
will be given for longest
drive, straightest drive,
closest to the pin, and so
on.
The green fees contri-


guys to patch in some
outfield spots, but we're
pretty solid up the middle
with Trent, Morrissey and
Kernoschak."
Offensively, the Hornets
will look a lot like they did
last year, with Morrissey
again leading off followed
by Jackson, Baxley and
Spooner in.the heart of the
order.
Ohler said he feels good
about his team's ability
to score rmus, but less so
about its ability to prevent
them.
"I think we've got five
or six guys that are go-
ing to hit, and 'guys that
I think will put the ball in
play with a couple of guys
that have some power," he
said.
"The thing I'm worried
about early is just our
pitching. It's a lot of coach-
es' worry early on, but if I
had to pick one area out of
hitting, pitching and de-
fense, then pitching would
be my biggest concern
right now."
If the Hornets are to
make up any ground in
the seven-team District
3-1A, they'll have almost
nowhere to go but up af-
ter last year's sixth-place
finish.
But Ohler said he

bution of $65 will entitle
each golfer to a fantastic
afternoon of golf on a
championship course (to
help a very worthy cause),
followed by a great meal.
Scholarship (hole) arid
prize sponsorships are
also available for this
event. For more informa-
tion, call Roy Baker at
850-526-4005 or 209-1326,


pretty balanced on the
whole, and that his play-
ers the upperclass-
men in particular are
not intimidated by the
competition.
"I don't think anyone
is unbeatable. I think it's
a little more competitive
this year than in the past
and it's a little more even
playing field for everyone,"
he said.
"My guys aren't scared to
play anybody. Once you're
in a district with teams
like Bozeman and Bonifay
like my juniors and se-
niors were when they were
eighth- and ninth-graders,
you don't really get rattled
.by tough competition.
"Those guys don't have
a lot of playoff experience,
but they've played a lot of
baseball against very good
teams. I look at the sched-
ule and I don't know of
any games we can count
as sure wins, but I ,don't
think there are any games
we don't think we can win
either. By the end of the
season, I hope we'll be
right there in the mix with
everybody."
The Hornets open
their regular season on
Thursday in Malone
against the Tigers at
6 p.m.

or George Sweeney at
850-482-5526.

Sports items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan P.O. Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447.


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Indians
From Page ]B
handle championship
with a victory to take a
two-game lead with just
two conference games to
play.
It looked early on like
Northwest might have an
easy road to another con-
ference crown after its
decisive win over the In-
dians, who then dropped
to 1-2 in the league with
a home loss to Pensacola
State.
But the Indians have
since reeled off six con-
secutive Panhandle victo-
ries, including a dramatic
comeback win over the
Raiders in which Chipola
overcame an eight-point
deficit with six minutes
to play.
"After starting out 1-2,
we're very happy to be in
the position we are," In-
dians coach Patrick Blake
said. "We want to take
it one game at a time,
but this is a big one. It's
a great opportunity for
us. Mathematically, we
still could (win the con-
ference) if we lose, but I
imagine if we want to win
the conference then we
have to win this one. But
it's already a big rivalry, so
it doesn't need any added
motivation."
A glimpse of just how
heated the rivalry is came
out at the end of the last
matchup, ith the teams
having to be separated
after an altercation be-
tween Chipola freshman
forward Cinmeon Bow-
ers and Northwest soph-
omore guard Chris Jones
after the final buzzer
sounded.
The intensity of the ri-
valry will almost certainly
be on display again to-
night, but Blake said it's
important that his play-
ers keep their emotions
channeled in the right
direction.
"That's a constant dis-
cussion with our group,
just keeping control and
being poised and only fo-
cusing on the-things that
can help us win games,"
the first-year head coach
said. "It's going to be a
very exciting environ-
ment and a heated game,
but the team that keeps
its composure and poise
and is focused on just
making winning plays
will have the most suc-
cess. That's where the fo-
cus has to be."
While the second
matchup was a very com-
petitive, back and forth
affair the-whole way, the
first meeting in Niceville


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NOTICE OF ELECTION
FOR
THE TOWN OF SNEADS
Sneads City Election Voter Registration Deadline
There is an election scheduled for the Town of Sneads, Florida on
Tuesday, April 9, 2013.
The purpose of the election is to elect THREE members of the City Council.
The seats to be filled are Groups III, IV and V, and are for two-year terms each.
City residents wishing to vote in this election must be registered to vote by
Monday, March 11, 2013. Voter registration applications are available at Sneads
City Hall or at the Jackson County Supervisor of Elections Office.
Candidate Qualifying Dates
Qualifying for the Sneads City Election Groups III, IV and V will begin Monday,
February 18, 2013, at 7:00 am and end on Friday, February 22, 2013, at 12:00 noon.
Anyone wishing to run in the Election must be a qualified voter and live in the City
limits of Sneads. Those wishing to qualify must pay a qualifying fee equal to 5%
of the annual expense account of the office and must file the necessary qualifying
papers. You may do so at the Sneads City Hall located at 2028 Third Avenue.
For more information please call 593-6636.,


-12B o WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13 2013


SPORTS


was mostly one-sided in
Northwest's favor, as the
Raiders jumped out to
a 14-2 lead to start the
game and turned back
every Chipola attempt at
a rally.
But the Indians are
playing at a demonstra-
bly higher level now than
they were at the .start
of conference play, and
Blake said that his team
goes into this game feel-
ing much better about
its chances to win in one
of the nation's toughest
places to play.
"I think our confidence
is high right now," he said.
"The guys have really
bought in that if we play
as hard as we can and
*play together and play
for each other for 40 min-
utes, it will-take another
team playing at their best
to beat us. (The Raiders).
are going to be a different
team at home with a great
crowd behind them, but
our guys have to be able
to block out the distrac-
tions and play together
for 40 minutes and make
more plays than them."
While a loss would
likely just delay the Indi-
ans' clinching a spot in
the postseason, a victory
would put Chipola in the
driver's seat to at least
share the conference
title.
But Blake said that has
not been a topic of con-
versation at practice this
week.
"Obviously, that's a goal
of ours, but we kind of
stick to the things that
we control, and right now
we're just focusing on this
game," he said. "It's tough
enough to go on the road
and beat a great team;
I really don't want our
guys focusing on what it
may mean if we win or
lose. I just want us to be.
loose and ready to play.
We're excited to com-
pete in such a high level
game."
The game will tip at 7:30
p.m.

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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Opportunity

From Page 1B
For the Lady Indian's,
who have lost their two
league games by a total of
three points, it's an oppor-
tunity to virtually guaran-
tee at least a share of the
Panhandle title with a win.
"They all know the impli-
cations of all these games
that are left," Chipola
coach Greg Franklin said
of his players. "Once you
get in these situations, it's
about how you handle the
stress and the pressure in-
volved. We won't shy away
from it. We're looking for-
ward to playing this game.
It should be a postseason
type of game."
Each of the first two'
meetings between the
teams has been extreme-
ly competitive, with the
Lady Raiders winning the
first, 62-61 in Niceville
and the Lady Indians tak-
ing the second, 61-58 in
Marianna.
The latter was the fourth
of five conference games
for Chipola that has been
decided by three points
or less, but the Lady Indi-
ans have been dominant
in their last two outings,
rolling over Gulf Coast and
Tallahassee by scores of
66-45 and 71-56.
Franklin said his team
has been on an upward
trend over the course of
the conference season and
will be at its best in this
matchup.
"I believe we are a better
team now. I talked about
this with my team two
weeks ago that over the
next three or four weeks,
there will be teams that
will nose-dive, some that
will level off, and some that
will go up and take off,"
he said. "This team made
a decision that it wanted
to work hard and handle
business the right way, and
the result is that we're play-
ing better."
Chipola has certainly
moved on from its one-
point loss to Northwest
early in the year, but the
coach said that the Lady
Indians still haven't forgot-


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Jasmine Crawford handles a loose ball for Chipola during a
game against Tallahassee on Saturday.


ten about it and have used
it as motivation for this
game.
"This is a team that likes
to get payback," the coach
said. "The girls have a lot
of pride and a point to
prove. I just want to make
sure that we're focused on
playing basketball the way
we want to play. But they
didn't like the first result
and I don't like it either."
Franklin said his team's
toughness and resolve
have been its biggest
strengths during a season
in which the Lady Indians
have played with no more
than seven rotation play-
ers throughout the confer-
ence season and have no
players taller than 6-foot.
"I think it's the level of
grittiness that they have.
They just never give in.
They keep fighting," he
said. "And like anything
else, the more you buy
in, the more you invest,
and the more positive you
are, the better results you


will have."
While the Lady Indians
have already clinched a
spot in the state tourna-
ment, a conference cham-
pionship would be espe-
cially meaningful for a
Chipola program that has
had diminishing success
in recent seasons.
It's an opportunity that
Franklin said his team is
eager to take advantage of.
"That's a conversation
we're having. We'll make
sure we prepare ourselves
mentally and emotionally
for it, but you have to em-
brace the situation you're
in," he said. "We've been
in games of this magni-
tude before, so you don't
need to shy away from it.
You have to embrace it and
have your kids get com-
fortable in these types of
games because these are
the kinds of games and
teams we'll have to play in
the state tournament."
The gamd tips off at 5:30
p.m.


Body slam for wrestling:


Sport cut from Olympics


The Associated Press

LAUSANNE, Switzerland For wres-
tling, this may have been the ultimate
body slam: getting tossed out of the
Olympic rings.
The vote Tuesday by the IOC's execu-
tive board stunned the world's wrestlers,
Swho see their sport as popular in many
countries and steeped in history as old
as the Olympics themselves.
While wrestling will be included at the
2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, it was
cut from the games in 2020, which have
yet to be awarded to a host city.
2004 Olympic Greco-Roman cham-
pion Khasan Baroev of Russia called the
decision "mind-boggling."
"I just can't believe it. And what sport
will then be added to the Olympic pro-
gram? What sport is worthy of replacing
ours?" Baroev told the ITAR-Tass news
agency. "Wrestling is popular in many
countries just see how the medals
were distributed at the last Olympics."
American Rulan Gardner, who upset
three-time Russian Olympic champion
Alexander Karelin at the Sydney Games
in an epic gold-medal bout known, as
the "Miracle on the Mat," was saddened
by the decision to drop what he called "a
beloved sport."
' "It's the IOC trying to change the Olym-
pics to 'make it more mainstream and
more viewer-friendly instead of sticking
to what they founded the Olympics on,"
Gardner told The Associated Press in a
telephone interview from Logan, Utah:
The executive board of the Interna-
tional Olympic Committee reviewed
the 26 sports on its sultmer program in
order to remove one of them so it could
add one later this year. It decided to cut
wrestling and keep modern pentathlon
- a sport that combines fencing, horse
riding, swimming, running and shoot,
ing and was considered to be the
most likely to be dropped.
The board voted after reviewing a re-
port by the IOC program commission
report that analyzed 39 criteria, includ-
ing TV ratings, ticket sales, anti-dop-
ing policy and global participation and
popularity. With no official rankings or
recommendations contained in the re-
port, the final decision by the 15-mem-
ber board was also subject to political,
emotional and sentimental factors.
"This is a process of renewing and
renovating the program for the Olym-
pics," IOC spokesman MarkAdams said.
"In the view of the executive board, this


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In this Sept. 27,2000 photo, USA's Rulon
Gardner waves the American flag following
his gold medal win against three-time
Olympic gold medalist Alexandre Kareline,
of Russia, in the Greco-Roman 130 kg final
wrestling match at the Summer Games
in Sydney, Australia.
was the best program for the Olympic
Games in 2020. It's not a case of what's
wrong with wrestling; it is what's right
with the 25 core sports."
According to IOC documents obtained
by the AP, wrestling ranked "low" in sev-
eral of the technical criteria, including
popularity with the public at the Lon-
don Games just below 5 on a scale
of 10, Wrestling sold 113,851 tickets in
London out of 116,854 available.
Wrestling also ranked "low" in global
TV audience with a maximum of 58.5
million viewers and an average, of 23
million, the documents show. Inter-
net hits and press coverage were also
ranked as low.
The IOC also noted that FILA- the in-
ternational wrestling federation has
no athletes on its decision-making bod-
ies, no women's commission, no ethics
rules for technical officials and no med-
ical official on its executive board.
Modern pentathlon also ranked low in
general popularity in London, with 5.2
out of 10. The sport also ranked low in
all TV categories, with maximum view-
ership of 33.5 million and an average of
12.5 million.
FILA has 177 member nations, com-
pared to 108 for modern pentathlon.


Chipola finishes weekend with win


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Indians
baseball team finished off
a successful weekend in
style Sunday afternoon at
home with a 10-4 victory
over Shelton State.
The win improved
Chipola to 8-5 on the year
and gave the Indians three
wins in four games during
its annual Alumni Week-
end event.
Chipola beat Shelton
State 5-3 on Friday before
falling to Walters State 8-7
later in the day.
The Indians came back to


top Walter State 2-1 on Sat-
urday and wrapped things
up Sunday with their sec-
ond straight victory over
Shelton State.
Chipola got 12 hits as a
team and took advantage
of three Shelton State er-
rors. Cameron Gibson
led the way with a 3-for-5
with a double, two runs,
and two RBIs, while Dan-
iel Mars was 2-for-3 with a
double, two walks and two
runs.
Christian Correa was 2-
for-4 with a double and
an RBI, while Josh Barber
was 1-for-3 with a double,
a walk and two RBIs, and


Sports Brief


Cole Evans and Luis Tunon
each had a hit and drove in
a run.
Shane Crouse started on
the mound and got the win
for Chipola, going three
scoreless innings with two
walks and four strikeouts,
with GeronThompson also
pitching two scoreless in-
nings out of a bullpen that
saw seven Indians pitchers
take the mound.
Chipola will next go on


the road today to take on
Darton College at 3 p.m.
before returning home Fri-
day for another four-game
weekend.
The Indians will start
with Middle Georgia on
Friday at 2 p.m., with
games against Middle
Georgia on Saturday at 11
a.m. and San Jacinto at 2
p.m., followed by Sunday's
finale against San Jacinto
at 2 p.m.


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NBA
Royce White
practices in D-League
HIDALGO, Texas
- Houston Rockets' first-
round draft pick Royce
White says he's "fresh,
real ready to go" after two
workouts with the team's
developmental league
affiliate.
White, the 16th over-
all pick, had been away
from the Rockets since
early November as he
and the team worked out


an agreement address-
ing his anxiety disorder.
The two sides announced
an agreement on Jan. 26,
and White reported to Rio
Grande Valley in South
Texas on Monday.
White said Tuesday
that he's been "right on
the verge of coming back
the whole time." He says
he's "not really nervous,"
despite more than two
months away from the
team.
From wire reports


249S1


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SPORTS








14B + WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2013


SPORTS


Basketball



Miami becomes hoops haven


The Associated Press

MIAMI LeBron James,
Dwyane Wade and the
reigning NBA champions.
One of the hottest teams
in NCAA men's basketball.
The leading collegiate
women's scorer in the
country.
All in one city.
Welcome to Miami.
Long,considered a foot-
ball town, thanks to those
perfect-season Dolphins
and five-time-national-
champion Hurricanes, it
seems like Miami now has
an identity crisis of sorts.
Football town or a bas-
ketball town? It's been the
source of debate for some
time, perhaps now more
than ever, and South Flo-
ridians may all agree that
it's a nice problem to have.
"People here like bas-
ketball," said Jerica Coley,
the FIU guard whose 25.5-
point-per-game average
easily tops the women's
Division I charts and
whose nickname, Holy-
Coley, is part of a big-time
marketing push by her
school. "They want to see
good basketball. And as
a city, I guess we're pretty
good right now."
Pretty good? That's an
understatement.
The Heat will have the
best record in the Eastern
Conference at the All-Star
break this weekend and
boast a star-studded ros-
ter keyed, of course, by
the reigning MVP in James,
who seems to be in line to
win that award for a fourth
time this spring.
Down the road a bit in


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat's LeBron James (left) and Dwyane Wade attend a college basketball game between
Miami and North Carolina on Saturday in Coral Gables.


Coral Gables, the Miami
Hurricanes and coach Jim
Larranaga have gone from
unranked to No. 3 in the
nation and atop the At-
lantic Coast Conference in
about a month, easily be-
coming the biggest story in
the college game this sea-
son after enjoying blowout
wins over Duke and North
Carolina. A few more miles
away at FIU, Coley is star-
ring on a nightly basis
despite almost-constant
double- and triple-teams
against her.
Not to mention, the city
also lays claim to a former
women's national coach
of the year in Miami's Ka-
tie Meier and a surging
FIU men's program led by
Richard Pitino, the son of
legendary longtime Louis-
ville coach Rick Pitino.


"It's cool. We turned this
into 'a basketball town,"
Heat coach Erik Spoelstra
said. "And I'm a fan of the
other sports. I've gotten
to know coach Larranaga
the last two summers ...
and since then I've spent
a handful of times on cam-
pus meeting with him and
his staff, just talking hoops.
I'm a big fan of his. And
what they've been able
to do down here is very
cool."
SThat also means games
in Miami tend to be a tough
ticket. This past weekend,
the Heat played host to
the Los Angeles Clippers
on Friday, the Hurricane
men's team hosted North
Carolina on Saturday, and
the Heat closed the three-
day extravaganza at
home again Sunday with


a matchup against Kobe
Bryant and the Lakers.
Three days, three sellout
crowds, about 50,000 tick-
ets sold in all.
When the Heat won the
NBA title, team radio an-
nouncer Mike Inglis ex-
citedly shouted that Mi-
ami was "the center of
the basketball universe."
These days, it seems like
that statement has never
been more true. And in
a city where the football
teams aren't exactly fill-
ing stadiums, hoops is
hot.
"It's, well-deserved,"
said Heat guard James
Jones, a former Hurricane
player and a Miami na-
tive. "We have a very good
coach and very good team
down at the University of
Miami."


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN # www.jcfloridan.com


Snedeker withdraws

from Match Play

.event with sore ribs


The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -
Brandt Snedeker with-
drew from the Match Play
Championship on Ties-
day because of sore ribs
that have been causing
him discomfort despite
his torrid stretch of golf.
Snedeker said he began
feeling soreness in his left
rib cage a month ago at
the Humana Challenge.
He then finished runner-
up in consecutive weeks
to Tiger Woods and Phil
Mickelson, and won the
Pebble Beach National
Pro-Am for his second
win in his last seven
starts.
Already this year, Sne-
deker has earned nearly
$3 million and has risen
to a career-best No. 4 in
the world.
Snedeker also sustained
a rib injury last summer,
causing him to miss the
U.S. Open. He returned a
month later and had the
36-hole lead at the Brit-
ish Open before he tied
for third at Royal Lytham
& St. Annes.
According to a state-
ment from Crown Sports
Management; he will re-
turn to Nashville and see
hispersonal doctor, James
Elrod, who has suggested
rest to cope with the in-
jury. It is not believed to
be a long-term problem,
and Snedeker is sched-
uled to play March 7-10
in the Cadillac Champi-
onship at Doral.
Snedeker will be re-


placed next week at the
Match Play Champion-
ship by
.- Fredrik Ja-
I cobson of
Sweden,
who is No.
66 in the
ranking.
Snedeker The top
64 in the
world are eligible for the
Match Play. Phil Mickel-
son (No. 10) already has
said he won't be playing
because his kids are on a
school holiday that week.
Jacobson appeared to
have the 64th spot locked
up until Patrick Reed
made a 12-foot birdie
putt on his last hole at
Pebble Beach to tie for
seventh with Jacobson,
leaving the Swede 0.0002
points short of qualify-
ing. Jacobson wasn't up-
set, though he decided
to at least go to Marana,
Ariz., as the alternate.
"I'm really happy to be
part of it now and get a
chance to play a little
more golf that week," he
said. "You never know
how much golf you get to
play, but I know I'm go-
ing to get there and play
some golf."
The seeds for the tour-
nament will not be de-
termined until Sunday
night. Bernd Wiesberger
of Austria is the next al-
ternate. If anyone with-
draws after the brackets
are announced Sunday
night, he would take the
seed of whomever he
replaces.


Women's Soccer


Wambach to play her 200th with US team


The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tennessee
- Abby Wambach simply
laughs when asked about
playing her 200th game for
the U.S. women's national
team. The 2012 FIFA Player
of the Year is far too busy
playing to dwell on her
accomplishments.
"Hopefully I'll think
about those more when
I 'retire," Wambach said
Tuesday.
"I'm not really big on
personal accolades and
awards. It's just not my
style. So for me, it's another
game. It's exciting, I guess.
I don't know. It's hard to
explain because I don't re-
ally put that much value
on that kind of stuff. Iput
value on wins. I put value
on championships."
With 152 goals, the 33--
year-old forward enters
Wednesday's friendly
against Scotland six from
the world record set by Mia
Hamm from 1987-04. Only
seven Americans have ap-
peared in more interna-
tional matches.
Midfielder Shannon
Boxx called it a huge
accomplishment.
"We don't have that many
players that have been able
to get to that level," Boxx
said. "I think it's her day to-
morrow, and we can hope-
fully celebrate it with her.
Hopefully, she'll get a goal


to continue her strength
and her power."
Kristine Lilly tops the
U.S. list with 352 appear-
ances. Defender Christie
Rampone was set for her
278th onWednesday night,
while the others include
Hamm (275), Julie Foudy
(272), Joy Fawcett (239),
Tiffeny Milbrett (204) and
Kate Markgraf (201).
"She's an amazing, amaz-
ing player and an amaz-
ing person," defender Ali
Krieger said. "Great role
model for this team, and
she's our leader. She's one
of the best forwards in the
world, obviously the best
player this past year in
the world, and we're lucky
to have her. She's going
strong, and I hope that we
win for her and this team
and that she scores a few
goals just to make it 10
times better."
Wambach credits be-
ing the youngest of seven
for understanding the ap-
proach needed to play
within a team and great
coaches over the years be-
lieving in her for allowing
her to reach 200 caps.
"There's so many great
players in this country, and
a lot of it does kind of fall
down to a coach's opinion
for better or for worse,"
Wambach said. "I've had
really great coaches that re-
ally believed in me and put,
me on the field and gave


me the responsibility of
scoring goals for this team
for a lot of years. That's a
responsibility I take very
seriously. Two hundred,
100, whatever we're talk-
ing about, if we're winning
that game, that's the most
important thing for me."
The forward talked with
reporters before practice
at LP Field, home to the
NFL's Tennessee.Titans.
She then poised for photos
with a boy thanks to the
Make-A-Wish Foundation
before bringing him onto
the field to kick around a
football with herself and
then other teammates dur-
ing warm-ups.
Wambach doesn't sound
as if she's thinking of retire-
ment anytime soon either.


The Americans are busy
learning the philosophy of
new coach Tom Sermanni,
the Scot who spent the last
eight years as Australia's
national team coach. He
opened with a 4-1 win
Saturday over his native
country.
The national team will
be heading to Portugal
after Sermanni chooses
his squad for the Algarve
Cup. More than 12,000
tickets have been sold for
Wednesday, giving the U.S.
a chance to top the Ten-
nessee record of 13,081
who saw the U.S. women
beat Sweden 3-1 in Chat-
tanooga in 1997.
"It's an exciting time
to be on this team,"
Wambach said.


I -I


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RealtorO
Business: 850-258-4947
_u1JORLO IMPF:ICT
H F =,, R e a I E s c 8 tB
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


.4 Alabama players arrested

4 Alabama players arrested


The Associated Press

MONTGOMERY, Ala.
- Three University of Ala-
bama football players have
been charged with knock-
ing students unconscious
and stealing their wallets,
while a fourth player has
been charged with using a
stolen debit card, officials
said Tuesday.
Linebacker Tyler Hayes,
18, and safety Eddie Wil-
liams, 20, confessed to
robbing a student who
was punched in the head
and face and kicked in the
ribs and back early Mon-
day morning, according
to court documents. Wil-
liams said D.J. Pettway, 20,
a defensive lineman, and
Hayes waited in a nearby
vehicle about an hour later
while he knocked out and
robbed another student.
Williams and Hayes both
admitted to their involve-
ment, according to the
documents.
Williams and running
back Brent Calloway, 20,
both admitted to using a
stolen credit card to buy
snacks from vending ma-
chines inside a dormitory,
the documents said.
All four students were
indefinitely suspended by
coach Nick Saban.
Pettway and Hayes were
charged with second-de-
gree robbery. Williams was
charged with fraudulent
use of a credit card and


second-degree
Calloway was
with fraudulent


robbery.
charged
use of a


\_ 4,0Z.



THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In this Oct. 27, 2012 photo, Alabama's Eddie Williams (15)
catches a ball prior to a game against Mississippi State at
Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala.


credit card. Williams was
released on $65,000 bond,
while Hayes and Pettway
were released on $60,000
bond each. Calloway was
released on $5,000 bond.
"This behavior is unac-
ceptable for any student-
athlete at the University
of Alabama and not rep-
resentative of our football
program," Saban said in a
news release.
All four players were
backups last season for
Alabama, which has won


two straight national titles
and three of the past four.
Williams didn't play in
2012. But he was one of the
nation's top prospects the
previous year and moved
from receiver to safety.
The first student report-
ed having his Apple Mac-
book Pro stolen from his
backpack. Both sustained
mild concussions, cuts on
the face and heavy swell-
ing, and had their wal-
lets taken, according to
documents.


University police posted
an advisory Monday say-
ing two students reported
being approached by two
men who asked for a light
for a cigarette.
Police also said Williams
had been arrested on a
charge of carrying a pistol
without a permit a day be-
fore his arrest on the rob-
bery charges. Tuscaloosa
police Sgt. Brent Blankley
said in a news release that
a clerk at a gas station
called police early Sunday,
telling officers that Wil-
liams threatened that he
had something in his trunk
after a fight about paying
for gas.
Officers who pulled over
Williams found a pistol
in his pants pocket, the
release said. In that case,
he was released on $500
bond.
Jail records did not show
whether any of the players
had an attorney.
Pettway, who was a red-
shirt freshman, played in
13 games and had 2 1/2
sacks and eight tackles.
Hayes had 14 tackles as a
freshman.
Calloway played most-
ly on special teams but
gained 63 yards on 10 car-
ries. He has moved around
on the field, working as a
linebacker, tight end and
H-back since Alabama
signed the onetime Au-
burn commitment.
Calloway was arrested on
a charge of marijuana pos-
session in October 2011
during a redshirt season.


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2013 5B F


Felix Hernandez,


Seattle agree


on new contract


The Associated Press

PEORIA, Ariz. Felix
Hernandez and Seattle
reached agreement Tues-
day on a contract that
is expected to make the
Mariners ace the highest-
paid pitcher in baseball.
"I think it's a great thing
for the Seattle Mariners,"
Seattle general manager
Jack Zduriencik said. "It's
a great thing for Felix
Hernandez, and looking
forward to this guy being
here for a very long time,
obviously."
Hernandez's deal is
expected to be for $175'
million over seven years.
Terms of the contract
were not released by the
team. Hernandez and
Zduriencik will hold a
news conference in Se-
attle on Wednesday after-
noon where Hernandez
is expected to sign the
Contract.
Earlier Tuesday, Zduri-
encik said the sides were
having significant talks
to try to finalize a new
contract for the three-
time All-Star and 2010
AL Cy Young Award win-
ner. Zduriencik said then
that a deal of that mag-
nitude in years and dol-
lars, "takes time to work
things out."
It didn't take too long.
By the afternoon, Her-


SDebbie


A-Rod to rehab in New York, not spring training


nandez's deal was done
and Seattle had its ace
locked up through the
2019 season.
The new contract will
encompass the final two
years of his current deal
that is scheduled to pay
Hernandez $40.5 million
in 2013 and 2014. He'll re-
ceive $134.5 million over
the additional five years.
Hernandez's total dol-
lars would top CC Sa-
bathia's original $161
million, seven-year con-
tract with the New York
Yankees and his $25
million average would
surpass Zack Greinke's
$24.5 million under his
new contract with the
Los Angeles Dodgers and
tie him for the second-
highest in baseball with
Josh Hamilton and Ryan
Howard behind Alex Ro-
driguez ($27.5 million).
Hernandez's new money
would average $26.9 mil-
lion over five years.
With Hernandez off the
market, Detroit's Justin
Verlander and the Dodg-
ers' Clayton Kershaw
become the most attrac-
tive pitchers eligible for
free agency after the 2014
season.
Hernandez, who will
turn 27 on April 8, is 98-
76 with a 3.22 ERA in
eight seasons with the
Mariners.


Rponey Smith

850-209-8039 cell
CALL OR TEXT!
debtw -er,:,rnE.,.-:rFir.i-,, e,-rt, rqT, ]i.,:,b,,f


The Associated Press

TAMPA-AlexRodriguez
will not report to spring
training with the Yankees'
position players and will
Work on his rehabilitation
from hip surgery in New
York.
The' third baseman is
expected to be sidelined
until at least the All-Star
break following the Jan. 16
operation.
"I spoke to him last week.
He was still barely, I think,
on the crutches," Yankees
manager Joe Girardi said
Tuesday during his open-
ing spring training re-
marks. "There's not a lot
that he can do
\here."
The Miaini New Times
last month published
records, that allege Ro-
driguez purchased per-
formance-enhancing
substances in recent years
from Biogenesis of Amer-
ica LLC, a now-closed
clinic in Coral Gables,
near Rodriguez's offseason
home.
Rodriguez has denied
the allegations. Four years
ago, Rodriguez admitted
using PEDs from 2001-
03 while with the Texas
Rangers.
"Him being in New York
has nothing to do with try-
ing to get rid of a distrac-
tion. It's the best place him
for him to be."
Major League Baseball
is investigating the New
Times report and hopes to
acquire the documents.
"MLB has to go through


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
New York Yankees pitcher Michael Pineda throws as pitching
coach Larry Rothschild watches during spring training at
George M. Steinbrenner Field on Tuesday in Tampa.


its steps before any of us are
really going to be aware of
anything," Girardi said. "I
think you're always curious
about things that you read
about that are potentially
damaging to your players
and to baseball, of course.
My concern is getting him
healthy, and that's what I'll
focus on. I think that's our
team's focus, too."
New York signed former
Boston third baseman
Kevin Youkilis to fill in for
Rodriguez. Girardi said
that when Rodriguez is
able to do more, his rehab
situation will change.
"I think Alex had some-
what of a special surgery,"
the manager said. "It's not
a hamstring. It's not some-
thing we've done a lot of,
and we feel at this point
the best place for him to
be is New York, rehab-
bing under the doctor's
supervision."
Yankees captain Derek
Jeter is coming back from a


more common operation,
surgery on Oct. 20 to repair
a broken left ankle sus-
tained during the opener
of the AL championship
series against Detroit. The
38-year-old shortstop ex-
pects to be ready for the
April 1 opener against
Boston.
"When you look at our
club, Derek has been very,
important over the years,"
Girardi said. "And I think
we all anticipate that he's


going to be back ppen-
ing day. In my mind, he's
going to be an everyday
shortstop for us, I do."
Closer Mariano Rivera
also expects to be ready for
opening day. The 43-year-
old closer had surgery
June 12 to repair a torn
anterior cruciate ligament
in his right knee, an injury
that occurred while he was
shagging fly balls during
batting practice in Kansas
City on May 3.
"He's had ample time to
heal, and I believe he's a
great athlete," Girardi said.
"I don't think it should af-
fect his pitching."
Girardi.said no decision
has been made about po-
.tefitially switching Curtis
Granderson to center field
and Brett Gardner to left.
Overall, Girardi feels
good about the defending
AL East champions.
"This team could win
95 games and get to the
World Series, and win the
World Series," Girardi said.
"There's a lot of talent in
that room."


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BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
T'5o N \RTk F TOU MOCK g OU DON'TTRI NK t CONTROL" IF INCOFPE.TrCECOULDSbF
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711r -


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
02013 Rick SromokI Da. b UnirsalUc
wHeeN I FIRaT STaRTeD re ) BtbUGHT IN
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DIFFICULoT LeaRNING Ra Me2-Testev
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2 13 LughingSlock Inlornollonal nc, ODs byUnlvorsl UClick orU S,2013
"We don't have to worry about his future.
We were only in the park for ten minutes."


ACROSS
1 Kin's
partner
5 Leppard
81917
abdicator
12 Adams or
Brickell
13 Aged
14 Pull in, as
a horse
15 Kind of
pool
16 Arctic
sights
18"-
Butterfly"
20 Flights
21 - rush
22 Comic
strip prince
23 Pal
26 Deteriorate
29 Barrel
stopper
30 Underwrite
31 Tarzan's
son
33 Dry, as
champagne
34 Commanded
35 Igloo
shape
36 Family
cars
38 Fixes the
piano


39 Acorn
bearer
40Chitchat
41 An evening
out
43 Hair color
46 Fetes
48 pro quo
50 Bard's
river
51 Diner
sandwich
52 Annapolis
sch.
53Safecracker
54- Paulo
55Squeezed
(out)

DOWN
1 Beer barrel
2 Footnote
word
3 Turner of
"Typical
Male"
4 Taking
notice
5 Credo
6 She, in
Cherbourg
7 Rx monitor
8 Court
cases
9 Appear
10Broadcasts
11 TLC
providers


Answer to Previous Puzzle

CDS GWAGE MDSE
n O L OILS
TABLOIDS NEAP
ENSUE PETTY
IIBRA OTTN
WADE IDS PSI
OLES t ND U HS
KAN TIE SPAM
S IS BATS HAHS
RES TEE
TWEET ADEPT
E YRE GANGSTER
ANNS EPEE ARE
KNEE MOOR SKY
17 Explorers 37Indulgent
Lewis 38 Check
and 40 Zest
19Whichever 41Tookthe
22 Sotto plunge
23 Letterman's 42 Sleep
network like -
24 Has 43Jean Auel
regrets heroine
25 Single time 44Twice-
26Crumples baked
up bread
27 Poet's 45 Muse
black count
28 Iditarod 46 Feed for
terminus horses
30River edge 47Tummy
32 Lubber's muscles
"aye" 49Pop
34Bleated
35 Oldest city
in Iowa


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com


2-13 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
'WVR BNW WCX POVBD HNM K
HKVWC WCKW'R RN CKMP ... 'WVR
WCX YVTVBD EU WN VW WCKW'R
PVHHVGEYW."
SVYYVKI W. WCKGZXM K

Previous Solution: "Stand with anybody that stands right. Stand with him while
he is right and part with him when he goes wrong." Abraham Lincoln
TODAY CLUE: A slenbal
S2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-13


HorEoscOpe

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Even though you're
inclined to even the score
with someone who did
something that you deeply
resent, try to find out
the motives behind this
person's actions.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Every once in a
while, you're far too gener-
ous to an undeserving
person.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Be extremely selec-
tive about the goals you
pursue.
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20) Because of a
reluctance on your part
to express what is really
disturbing you, friends
and/or associates could
find you perplexing.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- It behooves you to be
more selective about those
with whom you choose
to associate. Steer clear of
companions who have a
faculty for making waves.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- For the sake of harmo-
ny, try to view things from
your mate or other house
member's perspective.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Having a bad attitude
about the day's duties
is likely to produce bad
results.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Although you may be
having difficulty getting
someone who is indebted
to you to settle his or her
account, applying pres-
sure won't help. Find
another way.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Be extremely diplo-
matic when dealing with
your mate or an important
person in your life.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Overstepping the
fine line between con-
structive criticism and
nitpicking could produce a
situation that will surprise
even you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -Should you
want to make a purchase
from a firm that you've
never dealt with, make
sure the merchandise can
be returned.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) If a person with
whom you're involved isn't
living up to his claims,
you'll handle it much bet-
ter if you're congenial.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: My brother, "Jay," and his
wife have an adopted daughter, "Anna,"
who is now 3 years old. We adore her.
Jay and I recently got into an argument.
He said they were angry that we didn't
call Anna on her birthday. I was surprised
by this, as we had already wished her a
happy birthday in person, with a gift and
a card at her party a few days prior to
her actual birthday. When Jay and I were
kids, we were always happy to receive
a card and a gift from our aunts and
uncles. We never expected them to call,
as well.
'In addition, Jay said that they were
angry that my husband and I didn't take
time off of work to be at the courthouse
to celebrate the "official" adoption six
months after Anna was born. We told
him at the time that we couldn't take
time off of work and would celebrate
with them at their home, which we did.
At that time, Jay said it was fine, but
now, it apparently wasn't good enough.
When my husband and I adopted our


Bridge


True bridge is not about making meaning-
less bids and playing uninformative cards; it
is about communicating with your partner -
and sometimes about breaking the opponents'
communication.
In this deal, South is in three no-trump after
East overcalled in hearts. West leads the heart
10. How should declarer plan the play?
Some Souths would have made a negative
double over one heart to show the four-card
spade suit. But with a limited hand worth only
one bid, two solid heart stoppers and four
weak spades, I like one no-trump. (If South had
doubled, North would have rebid two hearts, a
game-forcing cue-bid, South would have rebid
two or three no-trump, and the final contract
would have been the same.)
South started with seven top tricks: two
spades, two hearts and three diamonds. He
had to establish two club winners.
Thinking no further, the original declarer
took the first trick and played a club from his
hand. West rose with his king and led his re-
maining heart. Whether South won or lost this
trick, when he played a second club, East took
the trick and cashed his hearts for down one.
South should have cut the communications
between East,and West by ducking the first
trick. Then he would have made his contract.


oldest child, we never demanded that
anyone take the day off of work to be at
the courthouse, nor to be at the hospital
when our younger kids were born.
Annie, we celebrated Anna's adoption
multiple times right after her birth,
at her baptism, when we gave them a
baby shower and then at their home after
the courthouse. I reminded Jay of these
things and told him we love Anna and
don't like his implication that we don't
care. My brother used to be easygoing
until he married. Now they expect a pa-
rade every time Anna opens her eyes.
Are Jay's expectations reasonable? They
act as if the world revolves around them.
CAN'T KEEP UP

Dear Can't: Attending Anna's birthday
party and giving her a gift was sufficient.
It's also lovely to call on the actual birth-
day, but it is not an obligation. The rest of
Jay's complaints are irrational and self-
centered. We don't recommend.arguing
with him. Placate and ignore.


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


Jowo~ '


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


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CONVINCE MESE tE ( C. S IR
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Vulnerable: Both
South West North East

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6B + WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT






CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, February 13, 2013- 7B
,laickson Couuty Floridan Wednesday, February 13, 2013- / B


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For eadine cal tol-fee o viit ww~jfloida~co


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Coin Collections Wanted!! Paying Top
Dollar $$$$ Call Mathew 985-516-0379


FIREWOOD (all split oak)
Delivery available! TRUCK LOAD $70. 4
CALL MARK 334-701-4967 or 334-791-6704
FIREWOOD for Sale! Good Prices!
You Cut or We Cut! Delivery Available in
Certain Areas. Call for More Info!
Tree clearing and clean-up available also.
Priced According to Load Size.
334-735-2957 or 334-372-5107

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
* ) PETS & ANIMALS

LOST, female cat (Noel) black, white & brown
South Side Apartments. 850-573-4512. or text.

Bullmastiff puppies: $500. Born Nov.15.2012,
have shots and their papers. They are ready for
GREAT home only. Already people friendly and
love to play. Please call 334-618-0987 Peggy.
CKC Reg. Golden Retriever 2-M $350.
4-F $300., 9 wks old, S/W, Parents on site
Call 334-648-1287 or 334-791-9831.
English Bulldog Puppies: AK C 1/M & 1/F
champion bloodlines, 9 weeks old, health
certificates, S&W. Colors: red & white, brindle
& white. Call 850-249-5626 or 843-267-6214
Free puppies to a good home female and have
first shots, rabies tags. 334-791-7432

id B d ,,
Golden Retriever Puppies: AKC. Ready now.
$270. Pics available e-mail jkphi@live.com.
Call 850-526-4760 Marianna, FL


Valentines Babies are Ready! LC Chihuahua
Shih-Tzu mixes, taking dep. on Morkies
334-718-4886 plynn@sw.rr.com

SMi FARMER'S MARKET

CaselH 70 XT Loader: 79HP,
448 hours, reg. bucket and
grapple bucket. Must see to
appreciate the condition.
$19,500.00 Call 334-894-2315


Frozen Green
Peanuts
k We also have
shelled peanuts
850-209-3322 or
850-573-6594 4128 Hwy231


UST9 i 3 iI I


Vine Ripe Tomatoes


Home Grown Greens
Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. H 52 Malvern



3 Bahia seed for sale 4-
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102

S Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
After 5pm & weekends 585-5418
Med a i~w lome? Check out the Clasified


Sudoku


- --- -
7

5 6 7 Z



32




1


1561
-- - -
2 394
2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribui


Sheltered Coastal Bermuda Hay
Baled with JD568 in Columbia, AL. $55
Call 334-790-4439 or 334-618-1962


Cow-Calf pairs for Sale $1600. each
4 334-886-9003 / 334-726-4661


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
S* 334-389-2003
Wanted to Rent: Farm Land or Pasture in Ma-
rianna or West of Marianna; Call 850-718-1859

CLASSIFIED





(i) EMPLOYMENT


Techs needed for retail assembly
of bicycles, grills, etc. Must provide
tools & transportation. Piece work
pay averages $10-$16/hr. Apply to
fInorth rassemblersinc.net


MCLANE.
Truck Driver
McLane Company, one of the largest
grocery wholesale companies in the nation,
is looking for Truck Drivers to join our
Dothan, Alabama Team.
Our Truck Drivers are responsible for
transporting customer orders to retail
locations in the Alabama, South Georgia and
Gulf Coast areas. Our drivers enjoy
excellent home time, team delivery routes,
top driver wages, excellent benefits and a
very lucrative 401k retirement plan.
The ideal driver applicant will hold a Class
"A" CDL, a minimum of two years driving
experience, good MVR record, knowledge of
DOT rules and able to pass a DOT physical
and drug screen. Route delivery experience
is preferred, but not required.
If you meet these qualifications and wish to
apply for a driving position with us, please
stop by our main lobby Monday through
Friday between the hours of 8am and 4pm
to complete an employment application.
McLane Southeast Dothan
100 McLane Parkway
Cottonwood, AL 36320
Phone: (334) 678-2707
Fax: (334) 678-2754
E-mail: ronald.paulk @mclaneco.com
(Take Highway 231 south to the Florida
state line. Turn left onto State.Line Road.
McLane is 1 mile down on right.)
E.O.E. .


-1--Level: F2]
) 6 2 Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

4- Solution to Tuesday's puzzle
942 68 7 943 9 15
^~ b ----- 5A -iLL JJ
537216849

98 1 8 1 14 3 5 7 6 2
-- JA-J- .J- L.- -
4 3 3 6 2 7 8 1 9 54
-- 8 1 5 .9 4 2 6 3 7
749653281



- - -


ne Media Services. All rights reserved.


2/13/13


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


JACKSON C U

FLORIDAN
jcfloridan.com


monster
FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


(0


r-


L-


I






8 B \eddncsdla, February 13, 2013 Jackson County Floridan


- 0MANU CTI &OEi TIiONS I MArNm5UFTING.& O 'PIS


Opelika-Auburn News has an
immediate opening for a
Production Director.

The primary role of this position is to
oversee the production operations at
the Opelika/Auburn, Alabama facility
of O&DS. A major requirement of this
position is to grow a profitable
commercial printing and distribution
operation at the Opelika-Auburn News.

This position is also responsible for
promoting and championing safety
as a condition of employment while
ensuring that all safety policies are
followed and all OSHA guidelines are
met.

The successful candidate must be
able to bridge communication between
the production staff and other stake
holders.

This position is responsible for
commercial printing goals, proper
scheduling of all product production
and high quality of each product.
Must have working knowledge of all
production equipment. 10 years
newspaper/commercial management
required. 4 year degree preferred.

Pre-employment drug and background
screening required. EOE/M/F/D/V;

Please apply at
www.worldmediaenterprise.com

'" World Media Enterprises Inc.
Si M aDA GRcOUP A BSE RKSHIRE HATHA-WAY COMPANY






READ


the classified for


McLANE.

Distribution Center
Supervisor
McLane Company, one of the largest
grocery wholesale companies in the nation,
is looking for a Distribution Center
Supervisor to join our Dothan, AL Team.
This position reports directly to the
Distribution Center Manager and is
responsible for the day to day operations
of a fast paced department staffed with
approximately 25+ employees.
Responsibilities include meeting daily
production standards, employee relations,
staffing, meeting order quality standards,
daily housekeeping and misc. reporting.
The ideal candidate will possess a
bachelor's degreeand a at least two to four
years hands on experience in the functional
areas listed above. Must also possess
excellent communication and computer
skills. Experience in the distribution
industry is preferred, but not required.
McLane Company offers an excellent salary,
annual bonus plan and benefits that include
medical, dental, vision, life, STD, LTD, and
401k. If you are interested in applying for
this position, you may stop by our main
lobby Monday through Friday between the
hours of 8am and 4pm or forward your
resume and salary history to:
McLane Southeast Dothan
Attn: Human Resources
100 McLane Parkway
Cottonwood, AL 36320
Phone: (334) 678-2707
Fax: (334) 678-2754
E-mail: ronald.paulk mclaneco.com
(Take Highway 231 south to the Florida
state line. Turn left onto State Line Road.
McLane is 1 mile down on right.)
E.O.E.


rull-LIme p 1 U IsicUIIal poUUII LU Ito puviuc:
assessment and intensive in-home services
to families in crises. Program covers the
four county areas of Jackson, Calhoun,
Washington & Holmes Counties.
Qualifications include a minimum of
bachelor's degree in human services field;
preference given to candidates with at
least two years related experience.
Based in Marianna and Bonifay.
Position description/application
available at Habilitatve Services,
S4440 Putnam Street, Marianna.
Sponsored by Habilitative Services of North
Florida, Big Bend Community Based Care, and
Department of Children & Families. EEO


Qva o Family Support
Worker
Seeking caring individual to provide intensive
in-home parent support services. Candidates
should possess knowledge of child
growth/development and parent-child
relationships, and have the ability to relate to
families from a strength-based perspective.
This position will work out of Jackson County.
Qualifications require a high school diploma
and at least 1-year professional experience
in a human services field serving children
and their families.
Position description/application ..,iL
availableat Hablitative Servi6dls,l07a
4440 Putnam Street, Mariania. .E' '
Sponsored by Habilitative Services of North
Florida, Big Bend.Community Based Care, and
Department of Children & Families. EEO


JOBOPPORTUNTIES


CLASSIFIED


EDUCATION
INSTRUCTION


Classes Forming Now
'FORTIS Electrical Trades andore!
FOR TIS More!
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscolloge.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

(- RESIDENTIAL
y REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Orchard Pointe Apartments
Now accepting applications for I BR Apts.
Call or come by to pick up
application
4445 Orchard Pointe Dr.
Marianna. Call 850-482-4259


2BR 1BA House for rent, 3043 Noland St.
Safe neighborhood, $500/mo + dep.
850-482-8196/209-1301
2BR/1BA House Hwy 90
Grand Ridge $425. Mo. + $425. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
3/2 hardwood floors, CH&A
2940 Dogwood St. close to Riverside school.
$875. mo. 718-6541

3BR 2BA House in Dogwood Hts, W/D, pets
welcome, fenced yard, storage shed. $800 +
dep 850-557-2198 ask for Marcus

Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
4 850- 526-3355 4
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Very Nice 3/2 home, great Marianna location,
No Pets/Smokers, lawn, trash & water
included, more info 850-482-3233 Lv. message


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountryliving.com.
4 850-209-8847 4-
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $SO0/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message

2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes
in Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595
2BR 1.5BA at Millpond $495 + dep. very nice,
water/sewer/lawn maintenance included,
Success to pond, No pets 850-209-3970
2BR 1BA MH in Dellwood, water/sewer
included on own lot, $350.+ $350. dep.
0* 850-592-4625 4.
4 3/2 Dbl. Wd. Mobile Home (by itself)
on quiet lot in Sneads. 850-209-8595

RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Eufaula two acres with older model, two bed-
room, one bath single wide trailer With front
deck, a back porch, small garage, and lean to
for boat. Located in the White Oaks area; a
mile from White Oaks park and boat launch
ramp. Great for beginner home, just starting a
family, college student, or just a fishing get
away. $35,000 or best offer. 334-733-6625


I- For Sale By Owner: 41
Briar Hills Drive, Dothan
3 bedroom, 2 bath on 1
Sacred of land. 1300 square
feet. Built in 2008. All stain-
less steel appliances in kitchen stay. Hard-
wood, tile and carpet floors. Screened in patio.
2 car attached carport. Covered front porch.
Country setting 10 minutes from Southside
Walmart or SAMC. Asking $113,500. For more
information call 334-701-5889.


Graceville: Recently renovated 3 BR, 1.5 baths
1350 sq. ft. Great neighborhood and huge back-
yard, $89,999. Call 850-658-4081.
Very well maintained
S5 bedroom, 2 bath, older
q i? home. Includes 2 carports,
Sar, rd completely fenced
S (privacy) and a shed.
Sp. 0 Clos;e tt schools. Room for
a family to grow! Call today for your personal
viewing. 850-263-2755.


www..JC'IA)OtI)AN.com


M-. &


TRANSPORTATION


Spyder 1979 Fiat 2000 Classic Italian Sports
Car,Restored, Asking $13,479, Serious inquiries
only, 850-526-4394

r .................................
$0 Down/ist Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade Anything!
BRING IN YOUR W2 OR LAST PAY STUB!!
RIDE TODAY! Steve Pope 334-803-9550
BMW 2012 X5: X drive 3.5d. 11000 miles. All
wheel drive sports package twin turbo diesel,
30 mpg on road, double sunroof, all options,
five passenger black with cinnamon interior.
Transferable warranty to 50k, & maintenance
included. $55,000. Call 229-220-1537
... Cadillac 2000 Deville like new
S:ori nd. runs great red in color,
n.: .. tires, 48K original miles
,. .-'mpg, $6399. OBO
334-686-2199.

Chevrolet 2004 Impala,
S $4999.00 Call 334-714-
2700.


Dodge 2000 Dakota SLT
SClub Cab, V-6, 98,000
334-790-7959.

SFord 2000 Mustang, New
paint sharp car.
$5999.00. Call 334-714-
2700.

Honda 2000 Accord,
S$4999.00 Call
334-714-2700.


Honda 2008 Accord EXL:
4 doors, 1 owner, white, 75k
miles, sliding moon roof,
S g power driver seat, 5 Disc
CD changer, leather,
keyless entry, power windows.
$14,500. Call 334-493-7700
Honda 2008 Accord white, 4-door, tan interior,
tinted windows. Sharp-looking car. 85,000
miles. Asking $13,500. Call 334-618-0813 or
email smoney45799@gmail.com for pics.
Honda 2009 Fit Sport Silver, only 16900 miles,
garage kept, like new condition, alloy wheels,
great gas mileage. $13,600. Call 334-446-0681.
..... HONDA 2012 ACCORD
-^ COUPE V6 WITH AUTO-
B ~MATIC TRANSMISSION.
SUNROOF, NAVIGATION,
HEATED LEATHER SEATS FULLY LOADED. NO
ACCIDENTS NOR HAS IT BEEN SMOKED IN.
HAVE CARFAX TO SHOW AS WELL. APPROX.
6,000 MILES AND IM ASKING $27,000. CAR LIST-
ED $32,800, NEW. CALL 334-268-3900.


- I---' Hyundai 2004 Sonata:
SSiSlver. very low miles,
. tI' 4. mies highway, 4 door
~ iilaran. V6 engine, clean
title, good tires, immacu-
late interior, great gas mileage, one owner.
Retail $8,995. Selling $6,000. OBO. 646-456-2807


SBUSINESS & "fu/'''Your guide to great local

businesses & Cservices





SERVICE DIRECTORY


Call 526-3614 to place your ad.


Clay O'Neal's Ms.
Land Clearing, Inc. a ,D
ALTHA, FL i MSHMVO
850-62-9402 2
Cell 850-852-5055 4SEPB I



For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Bonded References Available
850-526-2336


B&B Professional Auto Detailing
Now offering mobile wash inside
and outside, oil change & vacuum
Detailing now for the low price of $50.
(850) 573-5509
/ Just give us a call and we'll come to you!
All services performed on site.


"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured




Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washing Bush Hogging
Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Now serving Jackson Co.
) 334-798-0687 4



26^6U6
7. W., Grooming by (
W |7- Appointment Only
Groomere/Styllete
LleIa Shore & Tammy Martabano
S v o vilt Us Olll. D .www.do.glnudB.nt
for pricIne & to book your appointment today


I-HTGAH


PHOTOGRAPH)
FOR ANY OCCASION!
UNBEATABLE PRICES
i ,, i, r, ',, ',,~ h I .
i lc Jea IIII'I( \ I


ur\t n, i' tellllPI


BESTWAY4E
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN N lKiI FlRiHi" I


61 Twy. B90U l MaUann, t'j F ;*B5 .868
3614 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 850-482-8682


This Month's Special
I $ OO
319500
35 Years in Business




Got Stumps?
CALL
HILL'S TREE SERVICE
3i .'s ..


__
~I ___ _~ __ ____ _


I


RECREATION


4-Wheeler: 2011 Polaris Sportsman 800 EFI, 4x4,
91 miles, adult owned $5,500. Call 334-796-8136
Honda 2007 Foreman ATV ; 2-wheel & 4-wheel
Drive. Electric wench, 190 hours on it; $4800
Firm; 334-596-9966


14 ft. Alum. Boat, stick drive, 2 swivel seats,
1997 Suzuki 25 hp motor, all new parts in
motor $1200. 850-592-1934 or 850-693-5812



|ILX^treme Packages From
Xtreme $4,995
All Welded
BOats All Aluminum Boats
www.xtremeindustries.com
I,5P54750 Bo.1ay11









www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, February 13, 2013- 9 B


- ,-_ '~ Lincoln 1997 Towncar -
125,000 mi., runs great, in-
terior & exterior clean,
rust free; good tires.
$ 2,450, 334-797-2422
S Mercedes Benz 1981 380 SL,
silver & blue convertible
with hard top, V8 engine,
75K low miles, garage kept,
runs in exc. cond. must see to believe it,
$15,000. OBO 786-417-1355 or 334-538-7475.
I L Mercury 1999 Grand Mar-
quis GS, loaded, leather,
new tires, 106,000 miles,
like new, $4500. Call 334-
790-7959.
Nissan 2004 Altima, Low
Miles, NADA Retail:
$8950.00, $7999.00. Call
334-714-2700.


Toyota 2000 Camry,
Clean vehicle, $4999.00.
Call 334-714-2700.


Toyota 2011 Camry SE 4dr., auto, pwr pkg.,
white, 10,000 miles odm, show room condition
with extended warranty. $18,500. 850-569-2215,
850-718-5461 or 850-718-7105.


GMC 2001 Yukon SLT: Fully loaded, white and
silver, 201k miles, runs great $6,000. Call 334-
796-8136


Chevrolet 1998 Silverado
Ext Cab: green, 3 doors,
350 V8, cold AC and runs
great. $5,500. Firm. Call
334-718-9617
Dodge 1998 Dakota Ext
Cab: power steering, cold
AC. 160k miles, blue,
$2.500. OBO
Call 334-798-1768 or 334-
691-7111
Ford 2003 Ranger P/U XLT 6 cyl. 26K actual
miles, extra clean $8000. 334-897-5648.
Massey Ferguson 1010 small tractor
3 cyl. diesel also comes with a 4 ft. bush hog
& box blade $3000. 334-798-1221.
Volvo 1996-DIESEL TRUCK, Good Condition
Asking price $10,000 OBO 334-695-1954



CALL FOR TOP PRICE

FOR JUNK VEHICLES
I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING -4 334-792-8664


CASH Guaranteed
Highest prices paid for Junk,
old Farming Equipment,
Tractors, Semi Junk Cars
Nothing to big,
nothing to small
So call a Cash Cow Now!






S334-435-5015 or 334- 596-9270
We pay finders fee of $25. & up
For your Convience FREE Pick up!
ROLL TIDE !!!


(rllsnllllonllnlonlnoonlalsolnolll
SGot a Clunker
. .-' We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325 & t Complete Cars
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285

a We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not
[ 334-794-9576 or 344-7914714


(m)


LEGALS


LF160027
STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF
INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT
The Department of Environmental Protection
gives notice of its intent to issue an environ-
mental resource permit for Apalachicola River
Snagging, file number 07-0129424-008-El, to the
US Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, at
P.O. Box 2288, Mobile, Alabama 36628-0001.
The purpose of the permit is to authorize main-
tenance snagging (relocation of tree snags out
of the navigation channel) in the Florida por-
tion of the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee, and
Flint Rivers (ACF) Federal Navigation Project.
The project will be located in the Apalachicola
River between River Mile 0.0 and River Mile
106.4 in Class III, Outstanding Florida Waters
(entire Florida portion of river), and Apalachi-
cola Bay Aquatic Preserve (River Miles 0.0 -
4.5) in Jackson, Gadsden, Calhoun, Liberty,
Gulf, and Franklin Counties.
Based-on all the above, and with the applica-
tion of general and limiting specific conditions
of the permit, the Department has reasonable
assurance the project, s proposed, fully meets
the environmental resources permitting re-
quirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Adminis-
trative Code, and will not harm the environ-
ment.


A person whose substantial interests are af-
fected by the Department's action may petition
for an administrative proceeding (hearing) un-
der Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida
Statute. The petition must contain the infor-
mation set forth below and must be filed (re-
ceived by the clerk) in the Office of General
Counsel of the Department at 3900 Common-
wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee
Florida 32399-3000.
Because the administrative hearing process is
designed to re-determine final agency action
on the application, the filing of a petition for an
administrative hearing may result in a modifi-
cation of the permit, or even a denial of the ap-
plication. Accordingly, the applicant will not
commence construction or other activities un-
der this permit until the deadlines below for fil
ing a petition for an administrative hearing, or
request for an extension of time, have expired.
Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida
Administrative Code, a person whose substan-
tial interests are affected by the Department's
action may also request art extension of time to
file a petition for an administrative hearing.
The Departmeht may, for good cause shown,
grant the request for an extension of time. Re-
quests for extension of time must be filed with
the Office of General Counsel of the Depart-
ment at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail
Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, be-
fore the applicable deadline. A timely request
for extension of time shall toll the running time
period for filing a petition until the request is
acted upon. If a request is filed late, the De-
partment may still grant it upon a motion by
the requesting party showing that the failure
to file a request for an extension of time before
the deadline was the result of excusable ne-
glect.
In the event that a timely and sufficient peti-
tion for an administrative hearing is filed, other
persons whose substantial interest will be af-
fected by the outcome of the administrative
process have the right to petition to intervene
in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at.
the discretion of the presiding officer upon the
filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-
106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code.
In accordance with subsection 28-106.111(2)
and subparagraph 62-110.106(3).4, Florida Ad-
ministrative Code, petitions for an administra-
tive hearing by the applicant must be filed
within 14 days of receipt of written notice. Pe-
titions filed by any persons other than the ap-
plicant, and other than those entitled to writ-
ten notice under Section 120.60(3) of the Flori-
da Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of
publication of the notice.
Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Stat-
utes, however, any person who has asked the
Department for notice of agency action may
file a petition within 14 days of such notice, re-
gardless of the date of publication.
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition
to the applicant at the address indicated above
at the time of filing. The failure of any person
to file a petition for an administrative hearing
within the appropriate time period shall consti-
tute a waiver of those rights.
A petition that disputes the material facts on
which the Department's action is based must
contain the following information
(a) The name and address of each agency af-
fected and each agency's file or identification
number, if known:
(b) The name, address, and telephone number
of the petitioner; the name, address, and tele-
phone of the petitioner's representative, if any,
which shall be the address for service purposes
during the course of the proceeding; and an ex-
planation of how the petitioner's substantial in-
terests are or will be affected by the agency
determination'
(c) A statement of when and how the petitioner
received notice of the agency decision;
(d) A statement of all disputed issues of mate-
rial fact. If there are none, the petition must so
indicate;
(e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts
alleged, including the specific facts that the
petitioner contends warrant reversal or modifi-
cation of the agency's proposed action;
(f) A statement of the specific rules or status
that the petitioner contends require reversal or
modification of the agency's proposed action;
and
(g) A statement of the relief sought by the peti-
tioner, stating precisely the action that the pe-
titioner wishes the agency to take with respect
to the agency's proposed action.
A petition that does not dispute the material
facts on which the.Department's action is
based shall state that no such facts are in dis-
pute and otherwise shall contain the same in-
formation as set forth above, as required by
Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code.
Under Sections 120.669(2)(c) and (d) of the
Florida Statute, a petition for administrative
hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the
petition does not substantially comply with the
above requirements or is untimely filed.
This action is final and effective on the date
filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a
petition is filed in accordance with thhe above.
Upon the timely filing 'of petition this order will
not be effective until further order of the De-
partment.
This permit, when issued, constitutes an order
of the Department. The applicant has the right
to seek judicial review of the order under Sec-
tion 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the filing
of the notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the
Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the
Clerk of the Department in the Office of Gener-
al Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard,
Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399-
3000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the
appeal accompanied by the applicable filing
fees with the appropriate district court of ap-
peal. The notice of appeal must e filed within
30 days from the date when the final order is
filed with the Clerk of the Department.
Requests for review before the Land and Water
Adjudicatory Commission must be filed with
the Secretary of the Commission and served on
the Department within 20 days from the date
when the final order is filed with the Clerk of
the Department.
The application for this permit is available for
public inspection during normal business
hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through
Friday, except for legal holidays, at the North-
west District office, 160 W. Government Street,


Pensacola, Florida.

If You Have It and Don't Need It...
Sell It in the CLASSIFIED


LF160033
NOTICE OF ACTION
n IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH (SEC. 39.801 (b) FS)
JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION The State of Florida to JIMMY DOYLE MORGAN,
CASE NO. 322012CA000268XXXXXX JR., father, whose residence and address are
unknown.
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff, You are hereby notified that a Petition under
vs. oath has been filed in the above styled Court
RAFAEL PEREZ; KELLY PEREZ; UNKNOWN TEN- for the Termination of Parental Rights in the
ANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL case of D.M.to the Department of Children and
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, Families, a licensed child placing agency, for
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DE- subsequent adoption.
S FENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR IN- You are hereby noticed that an Advisory Hear-
TEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, ing will be held before the Honorable William L.
Defendants. Wright, Circuit Judge, Fourteenth Judicial Cir-
cuit, at the Jackson County Courthouse, 4445
RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 Lafayette Street, Marianna, Jackson County,
Florida, on the 4th day of April, 2013
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order at the hour of 9:00 a.m. (Central Time)
or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dat-
ed December19, 2012, and entered in Case No. You have the right to appear with counsel at
322012CA000268XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in this hearing. If you can not afford legal repre-
and for Jackson County, Florida, wherein BANK sentation, the Court will appoint counsel for
o OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and RAFAEL PER- you at this hearing upon the determination of
EZ; KELLY PEREZ; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; insolvency. You must either appear on the
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN date and at the time specified or send a written
PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, response to the Court prior to that time.
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO
THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF YOUR PAREN-
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for TAL RIGHTS AS TO THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO
cash at the North Door of the Jackson County APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED,
Courthouse, 4445 Lafayette Street, Mariana, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PA-
Florida 32446. County, Florida, 11:00 a.m. on the RENT TO THIS CHILD.
14th day of March, 2012, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Order or Final Pursuant to sections 39.804(4)(d) and
Judgment, to-wit: 63.082(6)(g), Florida Statutes, you are hereby
LOT 4 informed of the availability of private place-
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF ment with an adoption entity, as defined in
SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 11 section 63.32(3)
WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE
S NORTH 88 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WITNESS my hand as Clerk of said Court, and
WEST, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SEC- the Seal thereof this 12th day of
TION, A DISTANCE OF 406.50 FEET; THENCE February, 2013.
LEAVING SAID NORTH LINE, SOUTH 21 DEGREES
33 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE DALE RABON-GUTHRIE
OF 317.15 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
WAY LINE OF MCPHERSON DRIVE; THENCE JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
NORTH 88 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 29 SECONDS
WEST., ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A BY:s/s/ Rebecca Adkins
DISTANCE OF 849.35 FEET; THENCE LEAVING DEPUTY CLERK
SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, SOUTH 06 DEGREES
55 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF LF160034
653.34 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 55
MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JACKSON COUNTY,
49.69 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 01 MI- FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
NUTES 06 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF FILE NUMBER: 13-022-PR
252.02 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 56
MINUTES 08 MINUTES WEST, A DISTANCE OF IN RE: ESTATE OF LUCIEN W. WATSON, JR.,
177.54 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; Deceased
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 56 MI- NOTICE TO CREDITORS
NUTES 08 WEST, A DISTANCE OF 145.20 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 55 The administration of the estate of Lucien W.
SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 346.42 FEET Watson, deceased, whose date of death was
TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF November 12, 2012, is pending in the Circuit
MCPHERSON DRIVE; THENCE NORTH 23 DE- Court for Jackson County, Florida, Probate Divi-
GREES 56 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST, ALONG sion, the address of which is Jackson County
SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 145.20 FEET; THENCE Courthouse, Post Office Drawer 510, Marianna,
NORTH 83 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 55 SECONDS FL 32447. The names and addresses of the per-
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 346.42 FEET TO THE sonal representative and the personal repre-
POINT OF BEGINNING; LOCATED IN THE sentative's attorney are set forth below.
NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 2
NORTH, RANGE 11 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, All creditors of the decedent and other persons
FLORIDA. having claims or demands against decedent's
TOGETHER WITH A PERPETUAL NON EXCLU- estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
SIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND quired to be served must file their claims with
UTILITIES OVER AND ACROSS THE ROADS this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
KNOWN AS MCDONALD DRIVE, CAMPBELL CIR- AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
CLE, MCDUFF DRIVE, MCGREGORS STREET, KU- OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
WAIT LANE AND MCPHERSON DRIVE. OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE THEM.
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE All other creditors of the decedent and other
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM persons having claims or demands against de-
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. cedent's estate must file their claims with this
If you are a person with a disability who needs court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
any accommodation in order to participate in THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
phone at (850) 747 5338 at least seven (7) days BARRED.
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
the time before the scheduled appearance is FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im- YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
paired, please call 711. OF DEATH IS BARRED.
DATED at Marianna, Florida, on February 5,
2013. The date of the first publication of this Notice
is February 13, 2012.
DALE RAVON GUTHRIE
As Clerk, Circuit Court Attorneys for Personal Representative:
By: Racheal Larmore Stuart E. Goldberg
As Deputy Clerk Fla. Bar No. 0365971
Amy Mason Collins
SHD Legal Group P.A. Fla. Bar No. 0044582
Attorneys for Plaintiff Law Offices of Stuart E. Goldberg, P.L. Post
PO BOX 11438 Office Box 12458 Tallahassee, Florida 32317
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339 1438 Telephone: (850)222-4000
Telephone: (954) 564 0071 Facsimile:(850)942-6400
Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com
Personal Representative:
LF160035 Lois A. Watson
Post Office Box 188,
IN CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION, Marianna, Florida 32447
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
JACKSON COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 12-014-DP BUY IT!
IN THE INTEREST OF: SELL IT! PIND IT!
D.M. MALE, A MINOR CHILD DOB: 03/23/1999












Amish Fireplace -small heater,$75,850-482-3537
Lost: Custom made exotic wood Walking
Bar Stools: (2) $10. Call 850-482-2360. Stick with leather thong through handle.
Battery charger fast charge, $100 850-482-2636 Has considerable sentimental value.
Bed: full, mattress and rails. $150. 850-693-3260 Last seen in Winn-Dixie parking lot around
Bed Set King/Queen bed, $275, 850-482-3537 10:15am Friday Feb 1st. Reward Offered No
Brake Fluid -4, gallon count $10 ea,850-209-3665 Question Asked. Call Eddy 850-579-2263
Please leave message or call back if no
Buffet/Server: Mahogany $500. 850-693-0521. answer.
Chair -oversized,multicolors,$150,850-482-3537
China Cabinet Mahogany $500. 850-693-0521. Rocking Chair: Wood $20. Call 850-482-2360


Exercise Stepper $30. 850-482-8347. Sewing Machine Singer 534. $50, 850-693-0521
SFree Dog to good home Young, large male Sign Stakes 75+, $25 for all, 850-209-3665
Lemon Walker Hound in Marianna 850-209-8500 Table side table, carvings, $100, 850,482-3537
Free Rescued Dogs to GOOD homes ONLY.
Many breeds, S/W, Call 334-791-7312! Wedding gown, new, sz 16, $300 850-693-3260.
Infant Car Seat $30 850-693-3260 'Window -Dbl pane,j channel,$100, 850-482-2636
Mirror w/shelves: $50. 850-693-3260. Windows (2) 14x73, $45 ea. 850-482-2636


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SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Miami Marlins



Young pitchers vying for jobs as camp opens


The Associated Press

JUPITER Miami Mar-
lins right-hander Nathan
Eovaldi stood at his locker
facing a phalanx of TV
cameras and tape record-
ers, responding to routine
questions with awkward
pauses and one-word an-
swers that betrayed his
youth.
"It's the first day," he
said finally with a nervous
smile. "I wasn't ready for
this."
Whatever attention the
Marlins receive this year
will be focused on young-
sters such as the 23-year-
old Eovaldi. That was clear
Tuesday, when pitchers
and catchers worked out
for the first time.
With Josh Johnson, Mark
Buehrle, Anibal Sanchez
and Heath Bell departing
in last year's payroll purge,
the Marlins will rebuild
their pitching staff by rely-
ing on young arms. Eoval-
di and 21-year-old Jacob
Turner are slotted for spots
in the rotation, and third-
year big-leaguer Steve Cis-
hek is the likely closer. ,; ,'
Top pitching prospect,
Jose Fernandez wore No.
78 Tuesday, which reflects
the Marlins' thinking that
he's at least a few months
away from being ready for
the big leagues. -But he'll
get a long look in his first
spring-training camp, and
several other youngsters
will battle for spots in the
bullpen.


Miami Marlins relief pitcher Mike Dunn throws a bullpen session
during the team's first spring training baseball workout for
pitchers and catchers Tuesday in Jupiter.


"We've got a lot of young
guys, so it should be great
competition," said the
rookie manager, 41-year-
old Mike Redmond. "These
guys realize the opportuni-
ty. I know as a player, when


you had an opportunity to
make a team and pitch in
the big leagues, that's all
you could ask."
As a former catcher, Red-
mond's well aware that un-
proven pitchers can make


a big splash at this time of
year. He remembers when
a cocky young prospect
by the name of Josh Beck-
ett first arrived at Marlins
camp in 2000.
"His very first spring
training, he had been draft-
ed No. 1, and I caught his
first bullpen," Redmond
said. "He was good. I re-
member being impressed
by his changeup, because
for a high school kid he
was so polished. I was like,
'Man, that's the'best chan-
geup I've ever seen from a
high school guy.'
"Then he threw a heater
and hit me in the wrist,
and I wasn't so impressed
anymore," Redmond said.
Even with an experi-
enced staff last year, the
Marlins finished last in the
NL East. They allowed op-
ponents to bat .263, third-
worst in the NL, and lost 93
games.
Redmond was manag-
ing in the Florida State
League last year, but he
reviewed Miami's pitching
performance.
"We've got to be better,"
he said. "We weren't good
enough last year. We didn't
throw enough strikes.
We've got to fill that strike
zone and give ourselves a
chance to let our defense
work. We've just got to be
better on the mound."
This year's staff may not
be better, but it will be
different. Ricky Nolasco,
whose $11.5 million con-
tract will represent about


MLB Brief


Royals acquire Elliott
Johnson from Rays
SURPRISE, Ariz. K4n-
sas City has acquired util-
ity player Elliott Johnson
from the Tampa Bay Rays
as the player to be named
in the Dec. 9 trade that


sent James Shields and
Wade Davis to Kansas
City for top prospects Wil
Myers and Jake Odorizzi
along with two other mi-
nor leaguers.
The switch-hitting
Johnson batted .242 with
10 doubles, six hom-


ers, 33 RBIs, and 18
steals last year with the
Rays.
The 29-year-old started
68 games at shortstop and
also played second, third -
and the outfield.
To make room for
Johnson on the 40-man


big league roster, the
Royals transferred right-
hander Felipe Paulino to
the 60-day disabled list.
Paulino is rehabbing from
elbow surgery and not
expected to pitch before
July.-
From wire reports


a quarter of the Marlins'
payroll, becomes an ace
for the first time in his
eight-year big league
career.
Right-hander Henderson
Alvarez, who went 9-14 last
year for Toronto, is expect-
ed to claim one startingjob.
Another is wide open, and
along with several young
pitchers, the contenders
include several veterans
trying to restart their ca-
reer, among them injury-
plagued John Maine.
"If you play well, you're
going to get an opportuni-
ty," said Maine, standing at
the locker formerly occu-
pied by ace Josh Johnson.
"It's a time to start build-
ing something and being
part of something pretty
fun."
Several bullpen jobs are
also vacant. Contend-
ers include 25-year-old


right-hander Arquimedes
Caminero, who is coming
back from reconstructive
elbow surgery.
"We loved his arm," pres-
ident of baseball opera-
tions Larry Beinfest said.
"We're going to take a good
look at him. We'll see if he's
ready to pitch in the major
leagues."
Miami's pitching could
be better than expected
if Eovaldi and Turner im-
prove. Eovaldi went 3-7
with a 4.43 ERA in 12 starts
last year, and Turner went
1-4 with a 3.38 ERA in sev-
en starts.
The Marlins say this
season could be similar
to 2006, when youngsters
Johnson, Nolasco and San-
chez all had breakthrough
seasons.
"They were at this point
once," Eovaldi said. "You've
got to start somewhere."


S "STRIVING FOR EXCELLENCE"
3 Extra Years of Post Doctorate
Specialty Training
Board Certified in Clinical Neurology
Additional Hours of Continuing
Education Every Year 4'
,a Vietnam Era Veteran ,

-'i. "M
"The area's only Chiropractic Specialist" ,

John W. Kurpa
D.C., D.A.B.C.N., F.A.C.F.N.
4261 Lafayette Street I Marianna. FL 32446
850.482.3696 M, W, F by appointment


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