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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01012
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

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Vol.90 No. 35


Friday Chamber banquet sells out


From staff reports
The Jackson County
Chamber of Commerce
banquet is a sellout this
year. The 300-plus tickets
fdr Friday night's big event
were going fast as news
made its way through the
community that a large
legislative presence .was
expected at the party.
Guest Speaker Allen
Bense, a former legisla-
tor, is guest speaker and
will pay tribute to Florida
District 5 Rep. Marti Coley,
who was recently appoint-
ed Speaker Pro Tempore.


So many legislators have
indicated they'll be there to
witness the moment that
the banquet is predicted
to constitute perhaps the
largest gathering of legis-
lators ever assembled in
Jackson County, accord-
ing to Chamber CEO Art
Kimbrough.
Look inside today's edi-
tion of the Jackson County
Floridan for a. stand-alone
booklet about the upcom-
ing event. In it, you will
find features about Bense
and Coley, letters from out-
going Chamber of Com-
merce Chairman Mickey


Gilmore and incoming
Chairman John Alter as he
sets a course for the com-
ing year under his leader-
ship. Kimbrough, who has
announced he will retire
in April, also contributed
a letter in which he sum-
marized the Chamber's
achievements during his
10-year tenure.
The booklet also contains
a feature story about this
year's winner of the Wayne
Mixson Economic Leader-
ship 'Award. That honor
went to the North Florida
Research and Education
Center, a cornerstone of


the University of Florida's 'i
Institute of Food and Ag- -
ricultural Sciences (IFAS)
program. 1:
An associated monetary .,,
award will go to an individ-
ual who works there, with
the recipient to be named
at the banquet. '
Inside the booklet, you'll "
also find pictures of the
current Chamber of Com- .
merce Board of Directors
and other key members
of the Chamber team, .as
well as stories on various MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN FILE
Chamber programs and People start on their suppers during the 2012 Chamber
the efforts made on behalf Banquet. This year's banquet will feature present and past
of its members. members of Jackson County's legislative delegation.


HONORING AFRICAN-AIMERICANS


William Dunaway C.apter,
Florida Society, Sons of the
ilmerican Revolution


Author seeks


archival


photos of


'Marianna Hill'
From staff reports
Author/historian/genealogist Beverly Mount-
*Douds of Port St. Joe is the scheduled guest speaker
for this week's meeting of The William Dunaway
Chapter, Florida Society, Sons of the American
Revolution.
Some may know Mount-Douds as the Cape San
Bias Lighthouse Lady. She will present "The Resto-
ration of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse" by the St.
Joseph Historical Society, during Thursday's SAR
meeting.
With the assistance of Roger Dunaway of Gulf
Breeze, formerly of Marianna, the author is current-
ly collecting old pictures of the Marianna Hill area
of Mexico Beach for possible use in an upcoming
book.
The gulf-view land, when changing hands in the
mid-1940s, was divvied up between several buyers
- most of whom were from Marianna, hence the
name. Families listed on deeds from that time in-
clude: Brownlee, Criglar, Packard, Farley, West, Fin-
layson, McCaskill, Singletary, Milton, Fite, Johnston
and MacKinnon.
Mount-Douds is looking for the oldest and most
historical photos of buildings (skating rink, drive-in
restaurant, etc.), cottages, family and visitors.
Each photo needs to be a good copy with a 40-70
word description of who, what, where and when,
including names, when possible, of anyone in the
picture. Attach captions to each picture individually
(paper or sticky note), but do not write on the back.
The initials of the photo's donor will be published
at the end of the caption; the front of the book will
list names matched to the initials.

See AUTHOR, Page 7A

Gulf Coast Be atoOgV
Gets* Wid ider iza.e


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Ruby Sylvester's students visits an art gallery filled with Black History Month pieces created by Hope School students.



Schools, churches plan


Black History Month events


From staff reports
Jackson County churches,
schools, clubs and individuals will
celebrate Black History Month
in a variety of ways throughout
February.
This Sunday, Feb. 10, Pope Cha-
pel AME Church will host a full
morning of events featuring the
Boys to Men Choir and guest
speaker Jimmie Doctrie, a noted
radio personality and executive in
the Dothan area.
At the celebration, six Jackson
County couples will be honored
for their contributions ti advanc-
ing the cause of equality and in
support of the Boys to Men Choir
and its umbrella organization,
Save Our Children. The honorees
are Sarah and Robert Pender, Inez
and James Smith, Ruth and Danny
Sylvester, Lawanda and Jimmy
Barnes, Helen and Marvin Couch
and the late Ernestine Collins and
her husband, Lynn Collins. The
church is located at 4898 Blue
Springs Road in Marianna.
The two-part program begins at
9:30 a.m. with the church school
segment of the program being
led by young men involved in the


, , '
S .. ,, .


Brittany Mejia, April Bell, Brennan Wooten and Ken Keys help Lottie Sims unpack
her groceries Tuesday at Hope School. Sims and her students will be preparing a
"soul food" lunch for the school's staff on Thursday.


program, which this year is themed
"Men in Leadership Roles."
The second part of the program
kicks off at 11 a.m. and will feature
a performance by the Boys to Men
Choir of Jackson County, the Youth


Community Choir, Praise Dancers
and other young people.
Skits related to local and national
Black History Month recognition
See HISTORY, Page 7A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Kevin Hardy uses a backhoe to pull up sections of concrete
while widening the entrance to the new Gulf Coast
Dermatology location on Highway 90 in Marianna.


) CLASSIFIEDS...6B


) ENTERTAINIr.IEIT...5B


) LOCAL...3A


) OBITUARIES...7A


)) OPINION...4A


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint W




7 65161 80050 9
V.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook
AM Fog. Partly Cloudy and Mild.
Today Justin liiefer 111B



-High- 73''
\ Low 55 -


S High- 730
Low 550

Thursday
Scattered Showers & Storms.


,' 1Sj


High 720
Low 520


Saturday
Mostly Sunny & Mild.


High- 720
..-I Low 50

Friday
Showers Early. Partly Cloudy
& Mild.


S High- 730
-' Low- 55'


Sunday
Partly Cloudy & Mild.
Possible Showers.


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.09"
0.09"
0.93"


Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Year to dite 2 In
Normal YTD o
Normal forar year 5.2"


4:06 AM
7:34 AM
4:11 AM
5:22 AM
5:56 AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
41.12 ft.
3.14 ft.
6.13 ft.
4.83 ft.


- 6:02 PM
- 11:24 PM
- 6:35 PM
- 7:08 PM
- 7:41 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
012 3 4 5


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:29 AM
Sunset 5:22 PM
Moonrise 3:04 AM
Moonset 1:46 PM


Feb. Feb. Feb. Mar.
10 17 25 4


FLORIDA'S iEAL

PANHANDLE JCOTR

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9 e

IS E UIEAS


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478 -
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520. Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon. Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna. FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month: $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond.
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
-here :ri-iil e .,,:. i .t lbiiYfor non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Subfnit your news or Community Calendar
events via email,fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
n AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Jackson County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620
during business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for
an appointment.
a Small business seminar "Business Plans"
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Chipola College in
R6om M-108 of the Business and Technology
,,.ii.lring. The seminar will help participants discover
which business type is best :,nt,:,1 lor their person-
ality, and how to create a working business model to
obtain financing and create a successful business.
Call 718-2441 or -..,l seversone@chipola.edu.
) Basic Computer Class Part 1- Noon to 3
p.m. at the Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
Highway 90, Marianna. Learn about and register for
free services. Call 526-0139.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting Noon
to 1p.m. in the AA ropm of First United '.J-elrtod,'
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
)) Ground breaking ceremony of First Federal
Bank of Florida, Marianna branch 2:30 p.m. at
the new location address of 4213 Lafayette Street.
Call 386-755-0600 ext. 3156 or email heringern@
ffsb.com.
) Chipola Champs Camp Fundraiser 5-9 a.m.
at Beef O'Brady's. Help local youth in rh Child Wel-
fare system attend camp. Tell your server you are
there for Chipola Champs Camp and 10% of your
bill .'.ll go to support the camp. Call 482-9568.

THURSDAY, FEB. 7
SAlabama-Florida Peanut Trade Show 8:30
a.m. at the National Peanut Festival Fairgrounds
Dothan, AL. This event will offer farmers the oppor-
tunity to view products and services of more than
70 exhibitors. Call 526-2590.
) International Chat n' Sip 8:30-10 a.m. at the
Jackson County Public Library Learning Center,
Marianna branch. The public is invited to join a
relaxed environment for the exchange of language,
culture and ideas among local and international
communities. Light refre .r.hrinen s will be served.
Call 482-9124.
D Job Club Noon to 3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center. 4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills: get job search assis-
tance. Call 526-0139.
) Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St., Marianna.
Call 482-2290.
) Employability Workshop, What Employers are
Looking For 2:30 p.m. at Marianna One Stop
Career Center. Call 718-0326.
) Bullying Inservice for Parents 3:30 p.m. at
Marianna High School Auditorium, for all interested


parents of lud-nl'; jnrinliri, Malone, Marianna
Middle, Marianna High and Jackson Alternative
schools. BP)i :itltng .,. 11 be provided. Call 482-
9605.
) AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Volunteers Free
Tax Return Preparation 4-7 p.m. at the Jackson
County Agriculture Center. Call 482-9620 during
business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. for an ap-
pointment.
) VFW & Ladies Auxiliary Meeting 6 p.m. at
2830 Wynn St. in Marianna. Covered-dish supper
*,:,-,:, 'd by a 7 p.m. business meeting. C jl 372-
2500.
) The William Dunaway Chapter, Florida Soci-
ety, Sons of the American Revolution 6:30
p.m. at Jim's Buffet and Grill. Dutch treat meal. Bev-
erly Mount-Douds, author, historian and genealogist
will present the program, "The Restoration of the
Cape San Bias Lighthouse by the St. Joseph Histori-
cal Society:' and possibly moving the lighthouse to
the St. Joe area. Call 594-6664.
) Davis and Dow Jazz Quartet 7 p.m. at the
Chipola C enrr lor trh Arts. Tickets are $14 for
adults and $10 for children under 18. Tickets for
Chipola students and employees are $5 the day
of the show. Tickets are available online at www.
chipola.edu, or c ll 718-2257.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
,mited t I., perz.o.r- : .iith 3 desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, FEB. 8
Black History Month Program 9:30 a.m. at
Hope School in Marianna. The theme this year is "At
the Crossroads of Freedom & Equality."
) Knitters Nook 10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
) Money Sense, Financial Literacy Noon to
4 p.m. at Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
Highway 90, Marianna. Money Sense is a class that
covers different topics in money management to
empower people to take charge of their finances
and create their own wealth. Call 526-0139.
) Better Breathers 2-3 p.m. at Jackson Hospital
in the Hudnall Building Community Room. The
program, presented by Michael Black is "Durable
Medical Equipment & How It Works for You" from
Gulf medical. Light refreshments will be served. Call
718-2849.
Jackson County Chamber of Commerce Annu-
al Banquet 5:30 p.m. (opening reception) at the
National Guard Armory, US 90, Marianna. Dinner at
6:45 p.m. Program (7:45 p.m.) features speaker Al-
lan Bense and a tribute to Rep. Marti Coley. Awards
will be presented and the gravel will be passed to


new chamber chairman. Individual tickets: $49.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and hang-
ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Call 209-7856,573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, FEB. 9
n The Artist Guild of Northwest Florida Field
Trip to the Wiregrass Art Museum in Dothan,
Ala. 8:30 a.m. Meet at the Lutheran Church in
Marianna. Dutch treat lunch. Call 569-2011.
) Partners For Pets Adoption Booth 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. at Tractor Supply in Marianna. There will be a
booth set up with puppies to adopt as well as a hot
dog booth. There will be other vendors including:
Dixieland Outfitters T-shirts, Warrior Gurl's Beads
and Things, Shirley's Quilting and Embroidery and
pony rides for the kids.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SUNDAY, FEB. 10
a Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in
the board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, FEB. 11
n The Artist Guild of Northwest Florida Debrief-
ing Session on the 2012 Sunday Afternoon
With the Arts 9 a.m. at the Lutheran Church in
Marianna. Bring your own lunch. Call 569-2011.
) JTrans Meeting 10 a.m. at the JTrans Office
in Marianna. In addition to its regular business, the
agenda will include approval of rates and grant ap-
plications. Call 674-4571.
) Marianna Lions Club Meeting Noon at Jim's
Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2005.
n Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees Monthly
Finance Committee and Board Meetings 5
p.m. in the C o:inurnt:, Room of the Hudnall Build-
ing. Call 718-2629,
) Employability Workshop, Using Social Media
in Your Job Search 2:30 p.m. at Marianna One
Stop Career Center. Call 718-0326.
City of Cottondale Regular Commission Meet-
ing 6 p.m. at Cottondale City Hall in the Commis-
sion Room. Call 352-4361.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com; fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following


,' IM
tcrr~ME


incidents for
Feb.4, the latest
available report:
One drunk
pedestrian, one
stolen tag, two


abandoned
vehicle reports, one suspicious
vehicle, two suspicious per-
sons, one escort, one highway
obstruction, one burglary, one
prowler, one panic alarm, 16
traffic stops, one follow-up
investigation, one animal com-
plaint, one fraud complaint and


one public service call.


Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following incidents
for Feb. 4, the latest available
report: One hospice death, one
stolen vehicle, three aban-
doned vehicles, one reckless
driver, one suspicious vehicle,
three suspicious incidents, one
suspicious person, two special
details, two escorts, one resi-
dential fire call, one hazardous
materials report, nine medi-
cal calls, one traffic crash, one
burglar alarm, four fire alarms,


one traffic stop, three larceny
complaints, one civil dispute,
one trespass complaint, one
juvenile complaint, one noise
complaint, one assist of a mo-
torist or pedestrian, four assists
of other agencies, two welfare
checks, one Baker Act trans-
port, one patrol request, three
threat/harassment complaints
and two 911 hang-ups.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persbns were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Matthew Olds, 43, 5348
Birdsview Road, Campbellton,


non-child support, hold for Bay
Co.
) Tramarviance Baker, 25, 8002
13th St., Tampa, violation of
county probation.
) Bruce Smith, 40, 7997
McKeown Mill Road, Sneads,
violation of state probation.
) Shannon Kent, 36, 639 High-
way 71, Marianna, grand theft
auto.


Jail Population: 207

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call 1-888-
404-FWCC (3922).


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-12A WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013


WAIE-UP CALL







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


LOCRL


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013 + 3AF


Miss Marianna Pageant will be held March 9


Special to the Floridan

The 2013 Little Miss, Ju-
nior Miss, and Miss Mari-
anna pageant will be held
Saturday, March 9.
If you are a first-grade
student at Golson Elemen-
tary, privately enrolled,
or home-schooled in the
Marianna school district,
this is your once-in-a-life-
time opportunity to rep-
resent your hometown of
Marianna, Fla. All Little
Miss contestants must
permanently and physi-
cally reside at a 32446 or
32448 Marianna zip code
and have done so for at
least six months prior to
the date of the pageant.
Little Miss Marianna is a
National Peanut Festival


preliminary pageant.
If' you are in the sixth,
seventh, or eighth grade
at Marianna Middle
School, privately enrolled,
or home-schooled in the
Marianna school district,
this is your opportunity to
be a role model to all young
girls while representing
the great city of Marianna
as Junior Miss Marianna.
A year of excitement and
rewarding responsibilities
comes with this prestigious
title. All Junior Miss con-
testants must permanent-
ly. and physically reside at
a 32446 or 32448 Marianna
zip,code and have done so
for at least six months prior
to the pageant.
The title of Miss Mari-
anna is a title of honor and


a title that holds many re-
sponsibilities, not only as,
an ambassador for the city
of Marianna, but as a role
model for all young ladies.
Miss Marianna undoubt-
edly must be a young
lady who possesses many
qualities beyond outer
beauty. High moral char-
acter, strong ethical val-
ues, compassion for all hu-
manity, and one that sets
and maintains high goals
and standards for herself
as well as those around her
are just some of the rec-
ommended qualities. Miss
Marianna contestants
must be between the ages
of 17 and 21 by Oct. 1, 2013,
and must permanently
and physically reside at a
32446 or 32448 Marianna


zip code and have done so
for at least six months prior
to the date of the pageant.
This could be your year to
join your Little Miss and
Junior Miss as you repre-
sent the great city of Mari-
anna, Fla. Miss Marianna
is a National Peanut Festi-
val preliminary pageant.
The deadline to enter
the pageant is Friday, Feb.
8. Information may be
obtained online at www.
jacksoncountypageants.
com or from The Jackson
County Chamber of Com-
merce, Lemon Squeeze
Salon and Boutique,
Heather Williams at Gol-
son Elementary or Debbie
Dryden at Marianna High
School, debbie.dryden@
jcsb.org.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Reigning queens are (from left) Junior Miss Marianna Alexis
Parish, Little Miss Marianna Rayleigh Carter and Miss Marianna
Courtney Massengill.


Local artist donates bird house to Marianna Woman's Club


Special to the Floridan

With a keen eye for the beauty
and use of all things recycled, lo-
cal artist Lanet James handcrafts
her unusual finds into handsome
bird houses.
She discovers her treasures in
all sorts of places and sees the
creative touch each piece can
bring to one of her many bird
house designs. She donated one
of her most recent creations to
the Marianna Woman's Club for
an Opportunity Drawing to be
held on April 6 at 12:15 p.m. at the
clubhouse located at the corner
of Caledonia and Clinton Streets
in downtown Marianna.
James' unique birdhouse is
sunny and bright and features a
touch of ladybug whimsy and an
ornate door and key front piece.
Proceeds from the Opportunity


Drawing will be used to fund the
various MariannaWoman's Club's
community projects. The com-
munity is invited to participate
in this drawing by purchasing
tickets from any Woman's Club
member. Tickets are $1 each or 6
for $5. Tickets are available at Mi-
chael's Toggery at 2878 Jefferson
Street in Marianna.
Founded on Nov. 4, 1919, the
Marianna Woman's Club is the
oldest service organization in
Jackson County. The club is a
member of the Florida Federation
of Women's Club and the General
Federation of Women's Club. The
historic club house, circa 1864, is
located on the corner of Caledo-
nia and Clinton Streets.
For more information, contact
president Chris Sharkey at Mari-
annaWoman's Club, P.O. Box 734,
Marianna, Fla., 32447.


7y \K


I 1 I



SUBMITTED PHOTOS
One of the many bird house designs created by
Lanet James.


SBA economic injury (


Special to the Floridan


The U.S. Small Busi-
ness Administration an-
nounced today that fed-
eral economic injury
disaster loans are available
to small businesses, small
agricultural cooperatives,
small businesses engaged
in aqifaculture and most
private nonprofit organi-
zations of all sizes located
in Gadsden, Jackson, Jef-
ferson and Leon counties
in Florida as a result of the'
drought beginning Dec.
15,2012.
"These counties are
eligible because they are
contiguous to one or more
primary counties in Geor-
gia. The Small Business
Administration recognizes
that disasters do not usu-
ally stop at county or state
lines. For that reason,
counties adjacent to pri-
mary counties named in
the declaration are includ-
ed," according to Frank
Skaggs, director of SBA's
Field Operations Center
East.
"When the Secretary of
Agriculture issues a di-
saster declaration to help
farmers recover from


damages and losses to
crops, the Small Business
Administration issues a
declaration to eligible en-
tities affected by the same
disaster," Skaggs says.
Under this declaration,
the SBA's Economic Injury
Disaster Loan program is
available to eligible farm-
related and nonfarm-re-
lated entities that suffered
financial losses as a direct
result of this disaster. With
the exception of aquacul-
ture enterprises, SBA can-
not provide disaster loans
to agricultural producers,
farmers or ranchers. Nurs-
eries are eligible to apply
for economic injury disas-
ter loans for losses caused
by drought conditions.
The loan amount can be
up to $2 million with inter-
est rates of 2.875 percent
for private non-profit or-
ganizations of all sizes and
4 percent for small busi-
nesses, with terms up to 30
years.
The SBA determines eli-
gibility based on the size
of the applicant, type of
activity and its financial
resources. Loan amounts
hnd terms are set by the
SBA and are based on


The following marriages
and divorces were re-
corded in Jackson County
during the week of Jan.
28-Feb. 1:
Marriages
) Albert Alonzo Gouge
Jr. and Christine Michelle
Cooper
) John Christopher Har-
rison and Melody Kriscen-
da Danner
) David Nixon Payne
and Susan Jane Toole
James Ryan Mul-
lins and Taylor Lyndsay
Coleman
) JerryWilson Cobb and
Myra S. Webster.


Divorces
) Matthew Edgar Baggett.
vs. Alexandra Lauren
Baggett
) Willard R. O'Bryan vs.
Julie Melton O'Bryan
).James William Roberts
vs. Lisa Ann Roberts
) Charles Lynwood Pu-
eschel vs. Angela Celeste
Pueschel
) Nancy Lynn Heiting vs.
Randy Lee Keith'Heiting
) Rudolph Lindberg
King vs. Tyler Lou King
) Zachary Eugene Austin
vs. Adrianne Syntell Austin
) Michael Douglas
Hughes vs. Kimberly
Dawn Hughes.


disaster loans available
SIGN UP FOR
each applicant's financial calling the SBA's Customer EZ PA Y
condition. Service Center at 800-659-
These working capital 2955, 800-877-8339 for the TODAY!!!


loans may be used to pay
fixed debts, payroll, ac-
counts payable, and other
bills that could have been
paid had the disaster not
occurred. The loans are
not intended to replace
lost sales or profits.
Applicants may apply
online using the Electronic
Loan Application (ELA)
via SBA's secure website at
https://disasterloan.sba.
gov/ela.
Disaster loan informa-
tion and application forms
may also be obtained by


death and hard-ot-hearlng,
or by sending an entail to
disastercustomerservice@
sba.gov.
Loan applications can
be downloaded from the
SBA's website at www.sba.
gov. Completed applica-
tions should be mailed to:
U.S. Small Business Ad-
ministration, Processing
and.Disbursement Center,
14925 Kingsport Road, Fort
Worth, TX 76155.
Completed loan applica-
tions must be returned to
SBA no later than Sept. 9.


With EZ pay, your bill is
automatically paid each
month from your checking
account or credit card
eliminating the need for
paper bills, statements
and stamps.

FLORIDAN
To sign up for
EZ Pay call us at
850-526-3614 or
visit us at
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Carat The FIVE C's
Color
Clarity
Cut
CONFIDENCE

Marianna's Most
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Est. 1971 -

v atson
GEMOLOGISTS
850.482.4037
watsonjewelers.com


-i' '


Florida Lottery

Mon. (E) 2/4 4-12 1 9 5 1 2-7 16-23 32
Mon I'M 3-1.8 9-3 6.5
Tue (E) 2-5 44-6 6 162 rNot available
Tueb (MI 3 7.5 5-3-6-7
Wed (E) 1/30 5.5.1 86F833 12.13-14.2736
weri (' 4.8 1 8 2-13


/31 91.7 0-9 5 1
2.4-6 0 3.7.7
2/' 35-9 7 8 73


3-15 16 29 33

1915 32?35


(Mi 40 61 0.0.5 0
(E) 2/2 7.4-5 8.9 38 10-13-2526 27
(Mi 3-4 1 4 6 08


Sun E.) 2/3 61-8 7-542


Sun OMA


1.3 18-21-34


9.57 8-O0-4


E = Evening drawing. M = Midrl drawing

Slui*y 2'2 11l16331401-41 PB '4
Wednesday I. L0 1416 32.47.52 PB 16

Saturday 2/2 1-2-3140.46u52 .tra4


Wednesday, 1/30


7 9 10 42 45 49


For lottery Intor maion. call 850 487 7777 or 900 73717777

Tild IDvi* aI o


David Malloy
Realtor@
Business: 850-258-4947
aJOIRLDl IMPACT
ae I E s t a CEe
Email: dlmalloy@yahoo.com ii,,,


'g~iltEn


State Farm
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710 """" URN


Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc
Linda J Pforte, Agent
2919 Penn Avenue, Suite B,
Marianna, FL 32448-2716
Bus 850-482-3425 Fax 850-482-6823
Toll Free 1-877-364-6007
linda.pforte.bxrs@statefarm.com
Good Neighbor Since 1986




[p f J '. A :3;i. ',-I :4z ', -i.'T
.. .. .
kGL mu(uL Y


4 Fiel .13895

S Metal $459
6: T-Post


& Ohel F'oencing Supplies
riannal | .I i 'neaId I .
482-5513 r 15o0593551i .
H ||lcatioani 1|1|1


BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


Bird
house
creator
Lanet
James is
pictured
with the
house
she
recently
donated
to the
Marianna
Woman's
Club.


JpPhilip


o* ^


Marriage, Divorce Report


FIRST BAIST

.Join Us ForWoisliip
Sunday: Wednesday:
Sunday School: 9:30 AM Fellowship Supper: 4:15PM
Morning Worship: 10:45 AM Children's Choir: 4:45 PM
Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Bible Study: 6:00 PM
wwjAv.fbcmiarian na.org














Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Citrus County Chronicle


Tough fiscal choices
force school children to walk up to two miles to
school or cut educational programs. Those are
just two of the predicaments facing Citrus County
School Board members as they plan for the 2013-14
budget.
The school board is facing a $3.7 million deficit, based
on a drop in student enrollment, impacts of the reduced
Progress Energy Florida tax payment and an expected
increase in property insurance.
Board members expect to make up $1.7 million of the
deficit from the district's reserve funds. They hope to
make up the rest by implementing cuts that have the least
impact on students.
Dipping into reserves is not a favorable, nor a sustain-
able solution. Cutting programs, while an easy way out,
is abhorrent and goes against the entire philosophy of
educating our young.
Many students in our school system do not have the
advantages students from wealthy or middle-class fami-
lies do. Students whose parents are professionals such
as doctors, lawyers, administrators; teachers or business
owners receive exposure to the myriad professional
possibilities available to them. Programs such as the
Marine Science Station, Business Academy, International
Baccalaureate, Art Academy and Health Academy provide
exposure to students who might not otherwise explore
these opportunities.
The school board has rejected cutting programs like the
Marine Science Station in the past and we would encour-
age them to do so in the future. We would much rather
have, students walking a mile or two to school than be
told you cannot be a marine biologist.
Programs such as these and other extracurricular activi-
ties like sports are oftentimes the only thing keeping stu-
dents engaged and attendingschools. They open avenues
to the underprivileged and allow others to opportunities
to realize their dreams.
We urge school board members to maintain their focus
on cuts with the least impact on students.


Contact representatives

Florida Legislature

Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus #205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436

Sen. Bill Montford. D-District 6
208 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
montford.bill.web@ flsenate.gov

U.S. Congress
Rep. Steve Southerland, R-2nd District
1229 Longworth HOB
Washingtbn, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-5235
Fax: (202) 225-5615

Sen. Bill Nelson (D)
Washington office
United States Senate
716 Senate Hart Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 224-5274

Sen. Marco Rubio (R)
Washington office
United States Senate
B40A Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510


Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor. P.O. Box 520,
Marianna FL. 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial@jcfloridan.com. The 'loridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number, These
will only be used to verify the letter and:will not be
pnnted..For more Information call 850-526-3614.


CLrNK
A.-:


rA FL R.
VN1ERSAL CLICK


Choose life, choose to have a family


n the morning of the 40th
anniversary of the Supreme
Court's Roe v. Wade ruling,
I felt a chill, and it wasn't the bitter
cold. After Mass at St. Patrick's
Cathedral, some 500 or so New
Yorkers walked through the streets
of Midtown Manhattan, in front
of God, man and Grand Central
Station, praying for life, love and
mercy. Our prayers were not in
judgment of others but that hu-
manity may do better: that women
and men may see better options
than abortion and that God may
forgive us for letting anyone think
that she is alone and has no other
choice than the death of her child.
The chill was the knowledge that
some of the people nearby know
the pain of abortion all too well. It
was the certainty that someone, on
her morning commute, was think-
ing that was her only option. It was
the sharing in a community's pain,
guilt and sorrow.
We tend to live our lives masked
in a veil of the self, pretending we
live alone. But as solitary as we
might sometimes feel, our actions
affect others.
Now is the time to take a few
steps back not to turn back the
clock, but to reflect.
Our problems won't be solved
through legislative actions. And
legislative solutions, to the extent
that they are effective, can't be
maximized without a fuller con-
text. We can't simply hold a vote
to defund Planned Parenthood in
order to send a political message
and assume that the culture will
change, that people will sud-
denly see the poisonous eugenics


Kathrnn Lopez


upon which the organization was
founded and see adoption as the
brilliant and generous option that
it is. A congressional vote is not
a magic trick. There are so many
more steps involved.
In a new book, "Fill These
Hearts," author Christopher West
asks us to "Consider the idea that
our bodies tell a story that reveals,
as we learn how to read it, the very
meaning of existence and the path
to the ultimate satisfaction of our
deepest desire."
West makes the point that our
bodies and souls are not separate
things, and that qur very physical
design speaks to our creation and
destination. "In the biblical under-
standing, there exists a profound
unity between that which is physi-
cal and that which is spiritual," he
writes. "This means that our bod-
ies are not mere shells in which
our true 'spiritual selves' live. We
are a profound unity of body and
soul, matter and spirit. In a very
real way, we are our bodies."
The general acceptance of the
notion that our bodies are more
than conglomeration of biologi-
cal functions is no longer some-
thing we can take for granted. Not
when our federal health-care poli-
cy treats women's fertility as a dis-


ease, as a roadblock to a confused
misunderstanding of freedom and
equality. Not when we are sending
women into combat.
The world-famous former mayor
of NewYork City, Ed Koch, just
died. He was good friends with
the late Cardinal John O'Connor.
They collaborated on a book, "His
Eminence and Hizzoner," in 1989
in which Koch wrote: "The future
of our nation depends on our abil-
ity to inculcate a strong sense of
morality in our young people. That
moral sense should be based on
philosophical, ethical and religious
teachings, which are the underpin-
nings of conscience. The way to
oppose abortion is by challenging
the conscience of those who advo-
cate it. If the battle cannot be won
at the level of conscience, it cannot
be won."
But what is conscience? What
constitutes right or wrong? If we
do not agree there are answers to
these questions, we'll never have
a constructive policy or cultural
debate about abortion. That is the
basic work we need to address. No
election is ever going to be better'
without it. No culture is ever going
to be renewed without it. No lives
are going to be truly saved and
redeemed without it. We won't
start making sense again without
it. The dark bitter cold of winter
will be warmed by the renewal that
comes with embracing life, living
life lovingly, supporting life, letting
someone know they are not alone.

Kathryn Lqpez is the editor-at-large of National
Review Online www.nationalreview.com. She
can be contacted at klopez@nationalreview.


Ploy to change Electoral College bound to backfire


S A e must stop being the
stupid party," Louisi-
V ana Gov. Bobby Jindal
warned fellow Republicans recent-
ly. "It's time for a new Republican
Party that talks like adults."
Many Republicans apparently
weren't listening, because they in-
sist on doing stupid things. Exhibit
A: lawmakers in a half-dozen states
who are trying to alter the Electoral
College system to give Republicans
more votes.
This is a desperate and ultimately
self-defeating reaction to the
changing demographics of Ameri-
ca. The GOP calculus seems to be:
We can never appeal to minorities,
and we cannot win the presi-
dency without them, so let's rig the
system to reduce their influence
- and, in the process, really tick
them off. The result will be to make
minorities feel even more unwel-
come in the Republican Party than
they already do, and more likely to
step up their organizing and voting
efforts.
In all but two cases, Maine and
Nebraska, all of a state's electoral
votes go to the winner of the popu-
lar vote. Republicans loved this
system when they were regularly
capturing the White House (five
of seven times between 1980 and
2004). But Barack Obama's two
victories have scared the heck out
of them, and with good reason.
In 1980, the electorate was 88
percent white, and Ronald Reagan
won 56 percent of that vote in
easily defeating Democrat Jimmy
Carter. Last year, Mitt Romney
actually bested Reagan among
whites, winning 59 percent. But
whites accounted for only 72 per-
cent of the total vote, and Obama
crushed Romney with minorities,
taking 93 percent of blacks, 73
percent of Asians and 71 percent of
Hispanics.
These minority voters, often
clustered in urban areas, provided
key margins for Obama in swing


Cokie & Steven
Roberts
states such as Ohio, Florida and
Virginia. So, figured those bril-
liant GOP strategists, perhaps the
law could be changed to allocate
electoral votes by congressional
district, thus boosting the lever-
age of rural areas and undercut-
ting that Democratic advantage. If
that alternative system had been
in effect last fall in Virginia, for
example, Romney would have won
nine of 13 electoral votes even
while losing the state by 150,000
popular votes.
From a crass political viewpoint,
it might be worth enraging minori-
ties if the GOP ploy had any chance
of working. But it doesn't.
Smart Republicans are ap-
palled. "It's not going to happen
in Virginia," insisted the state's
ambitious Republican governor,
Bob McDonnell. State Sen. Jill
HoltzmanVogel called the scheme
"pretty shortsighted." Then a state
Senate committee controlled by
Republicans killed the bill.
Even if these proposals somehow
became law, they would imme-
diately be challenged in court as
racially biased. And that's exactly
what they are. State Sen. Charles
Carrico, the lead sponsor in Vir-
ginia, candidly explained his mo-
tive in The Washington Post: "The
last election, constituents were
concerned that it didn't matter
what they did, that more densely
populated areas were going to
outvote them."
SMost federal judges will surely
understand that "densely popu-
lated areas" along with "urban"
and "metro" are code words for


race. And by the way, Sen. Carrico,
that's how democracy works. The
majority wins. Blacks in Ala-
bama and gays in Idaho also feel
outvoted.
Just because an idea is stupid
doesn't make it.surprising. At-
tempts to rig the Electoral College
flow from the same motives that
inspired Republican lawmakers
to pass laws limiting voter partici-
pation in a dozen states last fall.*
Many of the laws were tossed out
on legal grounds, but they gave
Democrats in "densely populated
areas" a pitch-perfect rallying cry.
The Nation quoted Matt Barreto,
a pollster specializing in the Latino
vote: "There were huge organizing
efforts in the black, Hispanic and
Asian communities, more than
there would have been, as a direct
result of the voter suppression ef-
forts." The Rev. Tony Minor, an Af-
rican-American minister in Ohio,
added: "When they went after big
mama's voting rights, they made all
of us mad."
Sanity has not completely
deserted Republican ranks. In
Florida, state House Speaker Will
Weatherford told reporters that
Republicans don't need "to change
the rules of the game" and offered
a different option: "I think we need
to get better." Fellow Floridian Sen.
Marco Rubio is doing exactly that,
bravely joining a bipartisan group
of U.S. senators in proposing a rea-
sonable compromise on immigra-
tion reform. Jeb and George Bush
have both proved that Republicans
can win a decent share of Hispanic
support if they respect and under-
stand those voters.
Subverting democracy by suf-
focating minorities is the opposite
of respect. It ignores Jindal's advice
and damages the Republican
brand. Talk about stupid.

Steve and Cokie Roberts can
be contacted by e-mail
at stevecokie@gmail.com.





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.comW


V


Gwaltney Mild or Hot 8 5
Roll Sausage.................... 2z.


Regular, Thick or Garlic
Bryan Bologna


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Gwaltney
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


S'TIMIST CLUB NAMES STUDENTS OF THE MlON T


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
The Optimist Club of Jackson County congratulates the November and January students of the month, Cassandra Pereda and Abbi Watson. Pereda and Watson were recognized at the Jan. 15
Optimist lunch meeting at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna. Pereda was selected as the November 2012 Student of the Month. She is a senior at Marianna High School and the daughter of Julio and
Martha Pereda. She was nominated by Mariannailigh School teacher Debbie Dryden. Watson was selected as the January 2013 Student of the Month. She is in the fifth grade at Dayspring
Christian Academy and is the daughter of Russell and Christy Watson. She was nominated by Dayspring teacher Elaine Myers. After remarks by both students they were presented with plaques
and a check by Optimist President Sylvia Stephens. For more information on the Optimist Club contact Stephens at 482-9652 and for more information on the Student of the Month program
contact chairman Mary Pettis at 526-9561. LEFT: Shown (from left) are Marianna High School teacher Debbie Dryden, November Student of the Month Cassandra Pereda and Optimist President
Sylvia Stephens. RIGHT: Shown (from left) are Dayspring teacher Elaine Myers, January Student of the Month Abbi Watson and Optimist President Sylvia Stephens.


r.-J.l..j Club Rp._esut
Special to the Floridan
The Marianna Duplicate Bridge
Club announces winners of the game
played Jan. 28:
) First Place: Roselyn Wheeler and
Martha Brennan
) Second Place: Ida Deal Knowles
and Allene Baker
) Third Place: Dorothy Baxter and
Jane Sangaree
) Fourth Place: Frances Subalesky
and Zillah Fossum
) Fifth Place: Janet Snyder and Bob
Snyder.
The Marianna Bridge Club is sanc-
tioned by the American Contract
Bridge League. The game is held ev-
ery Monday at 12:30 p.m. at St. Luke's
Episcopal Church, 4362 Lafayette St.
in Marianna. Anyone is welcome to
come and play or observe. For more
information and partners call Libby
Hutto at 526-3162.


Agrictutural Class Gives Back
to the ConmnunYity


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Marianna Agricultural class is giving back to the community. As part of
students' Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs they get to apply what
they learn in the classroom at the school land laboratory by producing fresh
produce. All classes have been growing winter gardens consisting of several
types of greens. The fresh vegetables are taken home by the students as well as
donated to Chipola Family Ministries and the Presbyterian Food Bank. Pictured
(from left): Ciera Ward, Megan Tillman, Hampton Jordan, Laurence Glover,
Cheyenne Welch and Edwin Velez.


&I


ED MCCOY
850-573-6198 cell
emccoy02@yahoo.com
S C-enury, 21
Sunrn south h
Propermei
1. W46 H, 90
SMARrER BOLDER FASTER Marianna FL
www.emccoyrealty.com


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Elani Jade Sanchez is the daughter of Rafael iamar Sanchez
of Marianna.



I~mt~1 I


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16A WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013


LOCAL







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
427&Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332

Frances Elaine
Beard

Frances Elaine Beard, 63,
of Marianna died Sunday,
February 3, 2013 at Jackson
Hospital.
A native of Belvidere, IL,
Mrs. Beard was a former
resident of Poplar Grove,
IL. and had resided in Ma-
rianna for the past 12 years.
She owned and operated
the Greyhound Bus Station
during that time. Frances
was a former Assistant
Manager of Ctrves Fitness
Center.
She was preceded in
death by her parents; Wil-
liam and Bessie Hess
Moore, a brother, David
Moore, two brothers-in-
law, Dwight Hackman and
Vern Payton.
Survivors includeherhus-
band, David L. Beard of
Marianna; two sons, Tho-
mas Beard of Rockford, IL,
Timothy Beard and wife,
Aletha of Rockford, IL.; one
brother, Howard Moore
and wife, Sandra of Rock-
ford; two sisters, Shirley
Payton of Tuscon, AZ and
Roberta Hackman of Bed-
ford, IN.; sister-in-law,
Laura Moore Patik of Cas-
per, WY. five grandchil-
dren, Cameron, Amanda,
Rebecca, Lila-Rose, and
Zachary Beard, and a host
of nieces, nephews and
friends.
Funeral services will be
at 11 a.m. Friday, February
8, 2013, at Belvidere Funer-
al Home Chapel in
Belvidere, IL. Interment
will follow in Highland Me-
morial Gardens Cemetery
in Belvidere, IL.
The family will receive
friends from 10 a.m. till fu-
neral time at Belvidere Fu-
neral Home, Friday, Febru-
ary 8, 2013.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel.
Expressions of Sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.coin
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332

Frances Ayers
Malloy

Frances Ayers Malloy, 88,
a former resident of Ma-
rianna died Sunday, Febru-
ary 3, 2013 in Jacksonville,
FL.
Prior to moving to Jack-
sonville three years ago,
Mrs. Malloy was a native
and life long resident of
Jackson County. She was a
former member of the Ma-
rianna Woman's Club and
the Marianna Garden Club,
Frances retired as a Jack-
son County Goverment
employee, where she held
several positions. She was
also a member of the First
Baptist Church of Marian-
na.
Frances was preceded in
death by her husband, Ver-
non C. Malloy; her parents,
James Ayers, Mamie Wat-
son Ayers; two sisters,
Louise Medlock and Edna
Cone.
Survivors include her
sons, Dale Malloy and wife,
Marie of Jacksonville, FL
David Malloy and wife,
Ginger of Marianna; a step-
son, Darrell Malloy of Lynn
Haven; one brother, James
W. Ayers of Denver, CO;
three sisters, Leola Mercer,
Jimmie Irwin and Mamie


Lawmakers criticize
Gov. Scott's budget
TALLAHASSEE Flori-
da Gov. Rick Scott's $74.2
billion proposed budget
isn't winning a lot of praise
from state legislators.
Scott's budget director
on Tuesday spent nearly
three hours going over
Scott's spending plan be-
fore a House budget panel.


Lou Green all of Marianna;
three grandchildren,
Heather Duey and hus-
band, David, Christopher
Malloy and wife Kelly;
Daphne Mahn and hus-
band Steve; seven great
grandchildren.
Funeral services will be
at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 6, 2013 at James &
Sikes Funeral Home Mad-
dox Chapel with Rev. Cap
Pooser officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in River-
side Cemetery with James
& Sikes Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel directing.
The family will receive
friends from 6. to 8 p.m.
Tuesday, February 5, 2013
at James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel.
Expressions of Sympathy
may be made online at
www.jainesandsikesfunleralhomes.com
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddog Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332

Delores B.
Peacock

Delores B. Peacock, 72,
of Marianna, died Monday,
February 4, 2013, at her
residence.
Mrs. Delores was a very
loving mother and grand-
mother. During her life,
she was a homemaker,
Manager of Cavalier Clean-
ers, a Floral Designer, and
care giver to both children
and adults.
She was preceded in
death by her husband, Cur-
tis L. Peacock; son, William
Anthony Peacock; parents,
William Coleman Bush and
Dakota Redmon Bush;
brotler-in-law, Ewell Pea-
cock.
She is survived by three
daughters, Judy Brown,
and husband, Randy of
Crawfordville, Karen Hill,
and husband, Charles of
Tallahassee, Lynn Arnold,
and husband, Drayton of
Sneads; brother, Robert
Bush, of Marianna; two sis-
ters, Lyvonne McAllister, of
Marianna, Alice
McPherson, of St. Cloud;
six grandchildren, Brooke
Brown, Jason Crosby,
Destini Crosby, Rachel Hill,
Erica Smith, Taylor Arnold;
three sisters-in-law, Janice
Hussey, Kathleen Griffin,
Frances Arnold; four
brothers-in-law, Donnie
Peacock, Billy Peacock,
Earl Peacock, Gene Pea-
cock.
Service will be at 10 a.m.
on Friday, February 8, 2013
at New Salem Baptist
Church with.Rev. Donnie
Peacock officiating with
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel di-
recting. A private burial will
be in Riverside cemetery.
The family will receive
friends Thursday, February
7, 2013, from 5 to 7 p.m. at
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel.
The Family would like to
give a special thanks to
Emerald Coast Hospice.
Expressions of Sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhonms.comn
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332
www.Jamesandsikcsfuncralhomes.com

Billy Saucier

Billy Saucier, 86, a former
resident of Marianna, died
Wednesday, January 30,
2013 at Ocala Regional
Medical Center in Ocala.
Funeral Arrangements
are pending and will be an-
nounced later by James. &
Sikes Funeral Home Mad-
dox Chapel.


Republican and Demo-
cratic legislators raised
questions on some of the
governor's key propos-
als, including his push to
offer a $2,500 pay raise
to school teachers and
bonuses for state employ-
ees and why Scott has
refused to take a stance on
whether to accept federal
aid for Medicaid.
From wire reports


ENJOYING A WARM SHOWER


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
A robin braves a light sprinkle to pick off a beak full of berries on Tuesday on Madison
Street in Marianna. The current forecast is for a chance of rain every day through
riday, but with high temperatures in the mid to low 70s and nighttime temperatures
in the 50s and low 60s.



No trial delay in Trayvon Martin case


The Associated Press

SANFORD The murder trial
for the Florida man charged in the
shooting death of teenager Trayvon
Martin remains set for a June start
after a judge Tuesday denied a de-
fense request for a postponement.
George Zimmerman's lead attor-
ney Mark O'Mara presented a mo-
tion to have the trial pushed back
to November. He argued that pros-
ectutors had been slow to turn over
needed evidence.
State attorney Bernie de la Rionda
denied the accusation the prosecu-
tion had been dragging its feet and
said it was rather a case of the de-
fense using inefficient means to se-'
cure the information it wanted.
With roughly four months left
before the scheduled June 10 trial,
Judge Debra Nelson said she felt the
defense still has time to work out
the outstanding issues.
"I don't see any of your issues to
be insurmountable," Nelson said in
denying the motion.
The 29-year-old Zimmerman is
claiming he acted in self-defense in
shooting the 17-year-old last year
after the two got into a fight and has
pleaded not guilty to a second-de-
gree murder charge. His hearing for
self-defense immunity under Flori-
da's "Stand Your Ground" law must
be held 45 days before trial. So his
lawyers would need to be ready by
late April to present that.
On what would have been Martin's
18th birthday, a local community
group gathered outside the Sanford


History
From Page 1A


will also be performed.
Several community leaders will
be recognized, including Jackson
County Commissioner Dr. Willie
Spires, Jackson County Teacher of
the Year Cornelius Clark, Marianna
Middle School Principal Eddie Ellis
and MMS assistant principal Ron-
ald Mitchell, Marianna Fire Chief
Nakeya "Nicky" Lovett, and Mari-
anna City Commissioners Rico Wil-
liams and Travis Ephriam.
After a presentation by guest
speaker Doctrie, a scholarship
award will be given to a member of
the Black Student Union at Chipola
College and the Boys to Men Choir.
Hope School has been celebrating
Black History Month in a variety of
ways all week, and on Friday at 9:30
a.m. will have a formal program,
themed "At the Crossroads of Free-
dom and Equality."
On Thursday, job preparation
teacher Lottie Sims and her stu-
dents will offer up a soul food
lunch to teachers and other staff


Author
From Page 1A
Mount-Douds will choose the
photos to be published and they
cannot be returned to donors. She
will edit information as needed.
Photos and captions can be


courthouse to remember the teen-
ager before the hearing.
Martin's parents, Tracy Martin and
Sybrina Fulton, did not attend the
remembrance nor the court pro-
ceeding because they were "over-
come with emotion," said their fam-
ily attorney Benjamin Crump.
"As (Trayvon's) brother said, it's
hard on mom, because there's no-
body to get a cake and ice cream
for," Crump said.
Crump said Martin's parents are
pleased that the case will progress
as scheduled.
"We're focusing on this killing
when it should be about remem-
bering this young man's life today,"
Crump said.
Later in the afternoon he told a
crowd at a "Banding Together for
Peace" rally in Goldsboro one of
Sanford's historic black communi:
ties that he felt "the spirit ofTray-
von Martin was in that courtroom
today."
Regarding the denial for a post-
ponement, Nelson specifically not-
ed thatboth the defense and pros-
ecution said during a status hearing
in late October that they could be
ready by June.
But O'Mara said he never made
that agreement about the June date
last year and that without the delay
and with a dwindling defense fund
for Zimmerman, it would be diffi-
cult to secure the expert witnesses it
wants to properly defend his client
"The only argument is that we
need more time," O'Mara told
the judge. "My defendant has the


members who buy a ticket for the
meal. The money raised in this
event will go into
fund that the students
will use for field trips
and other expenses
associated with their
educational pursuits.
Sims and nine of her
Doctrine students went on a
Doctrie
grocery shopping
trip Tuesday, getting their supplies
for the big meal that they'll start
prepping for today. On the menu
are ham, collard greens, fried corn-
bread, potato salad, fried cabbage,
candied yams, African fruit salad,
and banana pudding.
Some of those dishes are varia-
tions of Sims' family recipes that
go back generations. Sims and her
students started the meal tradition
five or six years ago. Sims volun-
teered to put it together, she said,
to showcase traditional southern
African-American fare for students
and the adults at Hope School and
in hopes that teaching others could
help preserve the traditions for fu-
ture generations.
The meal is also a big teaching op-
portunity for Sims. By participating,


submitted directly to: Beverly
Mount-Douds, 460 Redfish St., Port
St. Joe, FL, 32456. Submissions are
due by March 1.
Those looking for more infor-
mation about the Marianna Hill/
Beacon Hill book project can con-
tact Dunaway at 850-293-1144 or
lrd1248@yahoo.com.


right to a fair trial and a rigorous
defense."
O'Mara recently renewed his over-
tures to the public to donate more
money for Zimmerman, writing on
the defense's website that his fund
has raised more than $314,000 since
he was charged. But of that amount,
$95,000 was spent on bail, almost
$62,000 was spent on Zimmerman's
living expenses during the past eight
months and $56,100 was spent on
security.
The pricey living expenses were
the result of Zimmerman having to
stay at extended-stay hotels until
he. could find a place to rent after
his bail conditions were changed to
restrict him to the Seminole County,
Fla., jurisdiction of the shooting.
The defense did make some head-
way on a few of its other outstand-
ing pretrial requests on evidence.
The judge is allowing a limited
phone deposition with a woman
known only as "Witness 8." The
state says she is a teen with whom
Martin was talking at the moment
he encountered Zimmerman. Her
testimony will likely be pivotal in
the upcoming trial. The defense is
trying to obtain the names of her
Twitter and Facebook social media
accounts so that they can serve sub-
poenas to those companies.
The prosecution must also sup-
ply the defense a chain of custody,
a list of tests performance and
any reports generated when pros-
ecutors sent Martin's cellphone to
California to get help unlocking it
for analysis.


her students learn about cooking,
ingredient preparation, budgeting,
shopping, writing checks and bal-
ancing accounts, comparing costs
and profits, plate presentation, and
much more. About 40 are involved,
she said.
Grand Ridge School will host a
Black History Month event next
Tuesday, Feb. 12, featuring student
presentations and a keynote ad-
dress by guest speaker Marianna
City Commissioner Travis Ephriam.
The program begins at. 9:30 in the
school's new gymnasium.
Later this month, the Black Student
Union at Chipola College will spon-
sor a Black History Month celebra-
tion in the old Arts Center, which is
the first building on the right which
faces on College Street as visitors
enter the campus via that roadway.
The Rev. O. Jermaine Simmons will
be keynote speaker for the Feb. 22
event. It begins at 6 p.m. and runs
through 8 p.m. It includes a free ban-
quet meal and entertainment by the
Marianna Middle School Choir and
soloist Trish Brannon. The theme of
the gathering is "Celebrating Past
and Present Achievements Among
African-Americans."


At Thursday's SAR meeting, 6:30
p.m. at Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marian-
na, the author will have signed cop-
ies of her two books for sale, as well
as new copies (2000 edition) of "The
Great Tide" by Greenwood's own
Rubylea Hall. Guests are welcome.
For information about the local
SAR chapter, call 594-6664.


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
Quality Service at Affordable Prices
Come Visit us at our NEW LOCATION
3424 West Highway 90 (3/10 mile west from our previous location)
S850-482-5041 J


in cr


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964 L


Obituaries


State Brief


LOCAL & STATE


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013 7AF







18A + WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013


NATION


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Despite horror, Ala. child hostage seems OK


The Associated Press

MIDLAND CITY, Ala. -
By all accounts, a 5-year-
old in Alabama endured
an unforgettable horror:
Held for a week in a closet-
size bunker underground,
a captive of a volatile killer,
his only comforts a Hot
Wheels car and other treats
passed to him by officers.
Yet after being whisked to
safety by federal agents in a
raid that left his kidnapper
dead, the boy appeared to
be acting like a normal kid:
He was running around;
playing with a toy dinosaur
and other action figures,
eating a turkey sandwich
and watching "SpongeBob
SquarePants," relatives
and Dale County Sheriff
Wally Olson said.
"We know he's OK physi-
cally, but we don't know
how he is mentally," Betty
Jean Ransbottom, the boy's
grandmother, told The As-
sociated Press on Tuesday.
She added that she feared
the ordeal would stay with
the child, who turns 6 on
Wednesday, the.rest of his
life.
Meanwhile, authorities
grateful for a happy ending
embarked on a careful in-
vestigation. Agents swept
the 100-acre property for
explosives for a second
day as part of an investi-
gation so painstaking that
authorities had not yet re-
moved the body of the ab-
ductor, 65-year-old Jimmy
Lee Dykes, officials said.
FBI officials have of-
fered few details publicly
about the standoff and
the raid that ended it. For
days, officers passed food,
medicine and other items
into the bunker, which was
similar to a tornado shelter
and apparently had run-
ning water, heat and cable
television.
Ransbottom said the
family also had not been
told much about- what
happened because of the
ongoing investigation. An
FBI agent had been staying
with the family, and rela-
tives learned of the child's
rescue after another agent
at the scene called the
agent who was with them.
The family was relieved
and grateful for the sup-
port in a community where


ribbons, fliers and vigils all
symbolized the prayers for
the safe return of the boy,
whom law enforcement
officials have identified by
his first name, Ethan.
, The boy's mother, in a
statement released by the
FBI, expressed her thanks
for all the hard work of so
many officers to bring her
son home. The woman de-
clined to be identified, the
statement said.
"For the first time in al-
most a week, I woke up
this morning to the most
beautiful sight ... my sweet
boy," she said. "I can't de-
scribe how incredible it is
to hold him again."
On Monday, authorities
said Dykes had a gun and
appeared increasingly agi-
tated, though it's unclear
exactly how his behavior
changed. Negotiations
the details of which
have not been made pub-
lic were deteriorating.
Agents stormed the bun-
ker, whisking the boy to
safety and leaving Dykes
dead.
Neighbors said they
heard what sounded like
explosions and gunshots,
though the FBI and local
authorities would not con-
firm if shots were fired or
explosives detonated.
A law enforcement of-
ficial in Midland' City,
speaking on condition of
anonymity, said Dykes was
killed by law enforcement
agents. The official request-
ed anonymity because the
official was not authorized
to speak publicly ab6ut the
investigation.
However, Dale County
Coroner Woodrow Hil-
boldt said Tuesday that he
had not been able to con-
firm exactly how Dykes
died because the man's
body remained in the bun-
ker. An autopsy was to be
conducted in Montgom-
ery once the body is taken
away.
It also wasn't clear how
authorities knew Dykes
was armed, or what kind
of surveillance they used
to track his behavior and
movement.
At the request of law
enforcement authorities,
Secretary of Defense Leon
Panetta had approved
the provision of certain


HATTON HOUSE
SENIOR APARTMENTS


Utilities included In rent
Ample off-street parking Clubhouse
Indoor pool Fitness room
Laundry facilities New Management
Monthly Resident activities & events
Income guidelines apply.


equipment that could be
employed to assist in the
hostage situation, accord-
ing to a U.S. official who
requested anonymity to
discuss a pending law en-
forcement matter. It is not
clear whether the equip-
ment was actually used.
In Midland City, a town of
about 2,400 nestled among
peanut and cotton fields,
residents were relieved
that the boy was safely res-
cued from Dykes, a man
neighbors described as an
unstable menace who beat
a dog to death and threat-
ened to shoot trespassers.
Children and teachers
were trying to get back
to normal, though some


children who were on the [
bus where Dykes killed I
the driver have not yet re-
turned to school, said Don-
nyBynum, superintendent
of Midland City schools.
Counselors and clergy are
at the school to help any
distraught students.
Officials hope to eventu-
ally throw a party to cele-
brate the boy's 6th birthday
and to honor the memory
of Charles Albert Poland
Jr., the slain bus driver. No
date has been set, Bynum
said. For now, the boy's
family just wants things to F
go back to normal-- for all s
the reporters to go home, i
for him to be like any other
kid.


l 2884 Jefferson St.
Downtown Marianna


50o.48z2-.55


JAY HARE/DOTHAN EAGLE
BI Bureau Chief in Mobile, Steve Richardson (left) gives a
statement to the nedia following the end of the hostage crisis
n Midland City, Ala. on Monday afternoon.

OPEN FOR LUNCH


IDominos.com


We want to thank Spicy Shrimp $6.49
We"swant t6rthnCk ., .4
irruuu ru^iti_- r j jn


moved here recently and

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We hope you have

enjoyed our restaurant as

much as we have enjoyed

serving you.



NEA/&MAR/A


WALKER

Franchisees

*Fl -.i:d-^ a *, *i; c = ' .. -" ."

-I am 4pm Dally-
pll Lunch Baokets are srted clwh French Fries Hushpupples ana Apple Pie
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Crab Cake $7.99 Mahl Mahl Fingers $8.99
Catfish $7.99 Oysters $8.99


A Entees Ae Served Broiled" Blackened" or Fried
i-3e.S 403 !..c r F t,6.- eia c'r oi'ene


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Shrimp
Crab Cakes
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Grouper
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Combination of Any 2 of the Above Entrees* $10.99
i -, ,h '': ^.,' i k. ,r, Hj t ', *3''.j@ drC ._r, ,,',- (-i ,f ; ,'j-.
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Our ChicKen lenders Are Served Fried. Broiled or Blackened
Jumbo Chicken Tenders $
i. .,,j .,, .'. i, .r l :rr, ,: .:r. 'J
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Check oul our lacos and salads for more delicious chicken choices.


Wee Platter $11.99
SPanacea Platter $13.99
Grouper Platter $14.99
*-.--.i~", i '"x-- j .:* j -', :- ."- i3a- 'is-.3 ri I .ruS 52 .e'Trr3
ri -, : u'h l.f.CuC '-' - -,
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_______________*.l.i w cuc'1. f' f :i e 2 _____________


Frndu Pickles 54.49
Fried Green Tomato $4.49


CHECK OUT OUR
SSPECIALS AND
MENU ONLINE
850-482-3333
2915 Jefferson St.
Marianna


Bacon Wrapped Shrimp $6.99
Blue Crab Claws $6.49
Gumbo 65,. $5.49 Cup, $2.99
Soup of Day &,:. $5.49 Cue $2.99


ISalasea


Greek Salad $5.99
'?'xmcnare i'uI.'r- Sin t s-Cri
Adao 3SpW or Crces r S 5a
Side Greek Salad $2.75
Caesar Salad $5.99
AWi'Brt6M r..;- IsS.2
Adoa miwor Cnesr-S. tr 2 55


p pg SamSS a


Cranberry Pecan $5.99
Spinach Salad
B:-ri-icy Ble ji*-aaid. $8F 9
crr.-bio &flsar inr.nI
Aa9nnmporaveKenb fo$2250
Black & Bleu Salad $849


-only $8.49-


Choose between Greek. Cranberry Pecan Spinach or Caesar
Salads pa your choice of o bowl of soup.
rop with Shrimp or Chicken $9.99


Mediterranean Mahl Mahi Tacos
S-nkJr IArh 0j L'Qx cA m-l:r :ep--rOv ,
, Baja Shrimp Tacos
*?un 5us-.v- 9,edrf jC .Xoo~ fli
' Cm l,- C-. s riE-arp m mrc.ni. nf _.r r C-c:
' Wharf Shrimp Tacos
*~-* ,C) "- .p ,iCa-.6 ,-' ols-r Gr-ci0 ,.-,, r,,n Tr-
.' ,-Sui ., ar ,Sr B -,:-,


S m j0I critic rn :


All Po-Bojr are servea with :.redaed let
ana your cnoice of on
Grouper $9.99
Shrimp $7.99


All of our dressings ana sauces are homemade dalrry








kid S FREE


i Shrimp $4.99 Chicken
Fish $4.99 Mlni Comdogs
'4 *;..:i r-nd .f. ;' -. ,. ^ *> i 3 ,lr.r -,, .i l orn ..j Cf.j 1 ,r-nr, i.,,
Ij ,.,' ;.; -. r:. ii C a. Irr.j . =--- CI C '-
,. 01V:;- --- l .


Cheese Grits
French Fries
Garlic Green Beans


Loaded Grits
House Salad.


$1.75 Cole Slaw
$1.75 Rice Pilaf
$1.75 Hushpupples
Extra Sauce


Upgrade the side that con
wih nmeao fo only $.99
o order a premium side
by Itself for $275


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$4.99
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$1.75
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I










ay


110 Merchants Row
(Soulnwooal
402-0533
2910 Kerry Forest Parkwc
itonrnampljon Shop0Dng Cern
727-7767
Marlanna Location
4767 Hwy. 90. Suite A
850-526-1955


2045 3rd Avenue | Sneads, Florida 32460
hatton-house-apartments.com t&
J
l 'P-t;.i ,: \'% .. *' *: .i;i ; ,, ,|,I.;^ -',;,,,', -


Fish & Fries $6.49


Jackson County for

our warm welcome to

Marianna!



My wife, Maria, and I


$8.99



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fuce tomatos sp icy sauce
ne side Item
Oyster $8.99
Mahl Mahi $8.99


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Call or visit our webslte
www.thewharfexpress.com
to check for days and hours per location


3111 Mahan Drive
(PuDiLr Sraopping Cenrei|
668-1966 or 668-1968
745 Apalachee Parkway
ine\r ti-: Crill, *
656-1688
3813 North Monroe Street
iLake Jack'icn Winn olie PIOa:a
329-7491


I


A C) 1, J II L


- -


larr~nn~p~


I


-1-- -.- --.


I I; -I I ji.~:l I


I









&, .."! ,' Ja .
[',', .i
-Rw


Sports Briefs

High School
boys basketball
District Tournaments
connnue this week, with
Cottondale High School
hosting the District 3-IA
tournament.
The semifinals will be
Friday, with the winner
of Tuesday night's game
between Wewahitchka
and Altha facing the win-
ner of Sneads vs. Ponce
de Leon at 6 p.m., and
Graceville taking on the
winner of Cottondale vs.
Vernon at 7:30 p.m.
The championship
game will be Saturday at
7p.m.
In the three-team
District 1-4A tournament
hosted by Pensacola
Catholic, Marianna will
take on Walton in the
semifinal Friday at 7
p.m., with the winner to
take on Pensacola Catho-
lic on Saturday at 7 p.m.
The semifinals of the
District 1-1A tournament
hosted by Oentral will ,.
be Friday, with Paxton
to take on the winner of
Tuesday night's game
between Laurel Hill'and
Bethlehem at 6 p.m., and
Malone playing the win'-
ner of Central vs. Poplar
Springs at 7:30 p.m.
The championship
game will be Saturday at
7p,.m.

High School girls
basketball playoffs
The Marianna Lady
Bulldogs will open up
play in the first round
of the 4A state playoffs
Thursday night with
a road game against
Florida High at 7 p.m.
Eastern Standard Time.
In Class 1A, Malone will
travel to Chipley on Feb.
12 for the Regional Semi-
finals at 7 p.m., while
Cottondale will be on the
road against South Wal-
ton at the same time.

Chipola basketball
The Chipola men's
and women's basketball
teams will host Tallahas-
see on Saturday.
The women's game will
tip at 5:30 p.m., followed
by the men at 7:30 p.m.

Chipola Alumni
Baseball Weekend
Chipola baseball will
have its annual Alumni
Weekend Feb. 8-10, with
two-time Major League
Baseball home run
champion Jose Bautista
in attendance, as well as
dozens of other former
Chipola players.
A pro baseball auto-
graph session, home run
derby, alumni game, and
VIP dinner are set for
Feb. 9. Country singer
Billy Dean of Quincy is
scheduled to perform at
the events.
The "Night of Cham-
pions" Chipola baseball
celebrity dinner will be
Feb. 9 at Citizens Lodge
in Marianna, with social
hour at 6 p.m., and din-
ner at 7 p.m.
Cost is $100 per person.
For tickets or more
information, call Chipola
coach Jeff Johnson at
850-718-2237.

Malone youth
baseball
. The Malone Dixie
Youth Baseball Organiza-
tion will have registra-
tion for the 2013 season
on Feb. 9 from 8 a.m.
to noon at Malone City
Hall.


Registration is open to
boys and girls ages 5-12,
With a fee of $40 for all
ages due at sign-up. A
group rate will apply if
you have three or more
children in the same
family playing. New play-
ers should bring a copy
of their birth certificate.
to sign-up.

See BRIEFS, Page 2B


Sneads Football


Thomas hopes to put


imprint on Pirates


BYDUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridah.com

SNEADS Sneads High School stu-
dents were introduced to their new
football coach in a ceremony at the
school Tuesday morning, and former
Apalachicola head coach and Arnold
High School assistant coach Bill Thom-
as wasn't shy about trying to make a big
first impression.
Thomas, who spent the past 13 sea-
sons at Arnold as an assistant football
coach while also leading the Marlins
weightlifting team to two state cham-
pionships, made mention of his two
titles while addressing the students be-
fore saying, "The next ring 1 put on my
finger will say 'Sneads football.'"
It's a bold statement for a man tasked


to lead a Pirates program that hasn't
been to the postseason since 2003
and hasn't had a winning season since
2006.
However, Thomas said he has past
experience taking over a program
hungry to find success, and be-
lieves that experience will serve him
well.
"When I got to Apalachicola (in 1997),
we made the playoffs in my second
year there, and they hadn't been there
since 1973 before that," he said. "I'm a
much better football coach today than
I was then."
Apalachicola was just 1-19 the two
seasons previous to Thomas taking
over, and he managed two winning
See THOMAS, Page 2B


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
New Sneads Pirates football coach Bill Thomas poses for a
photo with Sneads High Principal Faye Parker following his
introduction to the school's students.


MALONE BASEBAIJ PREVIEW





Trying to move u'p


Hunter Eddins gets a hit during Malone baseball practice Monday.


Malone returns

key players from

2012 playoff team
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
After posting a 20-win season and mak-
ing the playoffs in 2012, the Malone Tigers
head into the new season with similar ex-
pectations with a large core of that team
returning for 2013.
Malone went 20-8 last year,


finishing runner-up in district before get-
ting knocked out of the playoffs by Hol-
mes County, but the Tigers lost just two
starters from that team in pitcher Nick
Breeden and infielder Garrett Harris.
The Tigers return four of their top five
hitters and two of their top three pitchers,
and go into the season with a good deal of
confidence thanks not only to their expe-
rience, but also their depth.
"This will be by far the biggest varsity I've
ever had in terms of guys who can play a
little bit," Malone coach Max Harkrider
said. "We'll have 17 on the roster, so there
will be some options there where there
hasn't been in the past. It makes practice


better because we've got competition. You
can kind of hold it over their head that
they've got somebody behind them now.
"In the past, you'could have a dropped
ball and we used to just have to live with
it. Now, I have some other guys who I feel
just as confident in to put out there, which
makes it nice for me as a coach."
While the number of losses from last
year's team is not significant, the impact
of not having Breeden will certainly be
felt, at least in the early going.
Breeden was the team's pitching ace as a
senior last year, leading the team in wins

See MALONE, Page 2B


Chipola Baseball



Indians hold on to defeat Wallace


BY NATHANIEL FRAZIER
nfrazier@dothaneagle.com

OZARK One inning made the difference for
the Chipola Indians in their victory over the Wal-
lace College Govs on Tuesday afternoon. That
was inning number two.
In that second inning, the Indians put together
four consecutive hits and a sacrifice fly. That led
to three runs and the Indians were able to hold
on for a 5-3 win.
After Chipola scored an unearned run in the
first inning, the Indians hit Wallace starting
pitcher Jordan Martin hard. Even the first out
was a hard hit ball. That was a line-drive fly ball
to left field. But after that, Martin's luck took a
turn. The next two batters, Christian Correa and
Bert Givens, hit line-drive singles. That's when
the runs started. Clayte Rooks knocked in the
first run with his RBI double to right field. Luis
Tunon followed with an RBI single to right field.
Daniel Mars made the second out with his line-
drive to center field, but the third run scored.
When the inning came to a close, Chipola had a
4-0 lead, which turned out to be enough.


See INDIANS, Page 3B


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'? ,. .
"-.Y. : i ", I. : : ... .


NAI HANIEL. IRAZi R/001 HAN EAGLE
Chipola's Josh Barber steals third base ahead of tag from Wallace's Tanner Emmons during the
game on Tuesday. L


~rilrr
i


~' J I I - '' ~ '~







-l2B WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013


SPOiTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Malone
From Page 1B
(7) and strikeouts (78)
while posting a phenom-
enal 1.14 ERA.
He also led the Tigers in
hitting at .436 while rack-
ing up a team-best 34 hits
and tying for the team lead
with 24 RBI.
"Losing Nick is big,"
Harkrider said. "Replacing
him is our top priority."
Fortunately for Malone,
there are two talented and
experienced options of
which to find a No. 1 start-
er in junior Jonathan Sikes
and senior Brett Henry.
The right-handers each
had terrific 2012 seasons,
with Sikes working as the
team's No. 2 starter and fin-
ishing 5-2 with a 1.20 ERA,
37 strikeouts, and 13 walks
in 35 innings, while Henry
did the bulk of his work out
of the bullpen, making 13
appearances and winning



Thomas
From Page 1B
seasons out of three before
moving on to Arnold in
2000.
The Pirates haven't dealt
with struggles quite that
pronounced in recent
seasons, but the program
hasn't been able to get over
the hiAnp and get back in
the playoffs.
Sneads went 4-6 last sea-
son and 5-5 in 2011, fin-
ishing 2-2 in district each
year.
Putting the Pirates over
the edge and returning
them to the playoffs is a
long and arduous process
that Thomas said that all of
his players must buy into.
"I believe more football
games are won between
November andAugust than
are won between August
and November," he said.


Briefs
From Page 1B
Marianna youth
baseball-softball
Marianna Recreation
Department will hold
registration for baseball
and softball for the 2013
season through Feb. 28
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. for
boys and girls ages 5-15 at
the Marianna Educational
and Recreational Expo in
Marianna.
Registration fee is $40,
except for Machine Pitch
Baseball and 8U girls
softball, which is $35
each.
For more information,


4Cn


three out of four decisions
and striking out 33 to just
seven walks with a 0.80
ERA in 35 innings of work.
"Sikes has thrown in
some big games for us. He
threw well in the district ti-
tle game last year and just
had some tough breaks be-
hind him," lHarkrider said.
"Brett Henry came in and
was our best relief pitcher
last year. How he develops
into the starter role will be
key."
Juniors Robert Orshall
and Eric Perdue will also
get work on the mound, as
will sophomore BT John-
son, but the strength of
the staff will still depend
largely on the right arms of
Sikes and Henry, who will
be counted on to continue
on the recent Malone tra-
dition of dominant start-
ing pitching at the top of
the rotation.
"Sikes and Brett will be
our anchor guys and 'be
1-2, however it falls out,"


"Anything worth doing re-
quires a great deal of effort
and hard work. Football
isn't a fall sport. It's a year-
round sport. To win during
the season you have to win
in the off-season. There are
a lot of great coaches who
know a lot of X's and O's,
but what separates great
teams from good ones is
what those coaches expect
from their players in the
off-season."
Of course, getting players
to buy into a plan or a phi-
losophy is the biggest chal-
lenge for any new coach,
and getting Sneads players
who have experienced the
disappointment of failing
to live up to expectations
the past two seasons to be-
lieve next year will be dif-
ferent could be the great-
est test for Thomas.
However, the coach said
that he doesn't think that
by the start of next season


call 850-482-6228.


call 850-482-6228.
Panhandle Seminole
Club golf tournament
The 2013 Panhandle
Seminole Club's annual
Scholarship golf tourna-
ment will be held April
5 at Indian Springs Golf
Club in Marianna. This
tournament, along with
another fundraiser, has
helped provide $40,000
over the past 10 years to
deserving local students
and helped further their
education.
Registration and warm-
up will begin at noon with
the shotgun start at 1 p.m.
for this four-man scramble
event. Cash prizes will
be awarded to the first,


VIMLB Brief


MLB asks Florida
paper for records
MIAMI Major League
Baseball officials have
asked the Miami News
Times for records the
alternative newspaper
obtained for a story on
alleged use of banned sub-
stances by several players.
Miami New Times
editor Chuck Strouse said
Tuesday the paper had.
not yet decided how to
respond.
Strouse described the
MLB move as a request
and noted that the league
does not have legal


subpoena power.
The newspaper reported
last week that NewYork
Yankees starAlex Rodri-
guez and other players
had obtained human
growth hormone and.
other banned substances
from a now-closed Coral
Gables clinic operated by
Anthony Bosch. The story
was based on clinic re-
cords the New Times said
it obtained.
Rodriguez and other
players denied the allega-
tions, as did an attorney
for Bosch.

From wire reports


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Harkrider said. "That's
what we try to do every
year, pitch well and play
good defense. We seem to
have guys step up when
it's their turn to carry it on.
That's,what we try to build
around. Both of those
guys can locate well, and
they've both gotten bet-
ter at throwing away and
coming back inside when
they need to.
"They can throw their
off-speed pitches, but
the biggest thing in high
school baseball is being
able to locate the fastball,
and that's something they
both do well. They both
fill the strike zone up, and
that's the key. You can't
defend walks, and that's
something they don't do a
lot of."
While the pitching is typi-
cally stellar, the offense has
been hit-and-miss for the
Tigers in recent seasons,
and there will again be
some question marks sur-


that confidence or belief
will be issues at all for his
team.
"I believe with the
amount of work we do this
spring and summer that
not only will they believe
they're going to make the
playoffs, they're going to
expect to make it," he said.
"No one expects some-
thing they haven't earned,
so you have to go through
the process of earning
it in the off-season. I'll
know what that changes
for them. I'll be able to see
when they go from believ-
ing to expecting."
The coach's background
in strength and condition-
ing and as a weightlifting
coach factored into his be-
ing favored as a prospect
for the Pirates job, Sneads
Athletic Director Zane
Walden said Tuesday.
"That's one of the things
that excites us is his back-


ground in strength and
conditioning. In small
school football, a lot of guys
have to go both directions,
so strength and condition-
ing is huge for us," he said.
"Coach Thomas has also
been at a small school be-
fore and understands the
management of athletes
at a small school and how
coaches have to share the
athletes. All of those were
positive factors for us."
After spending over a
decade as an assistant
coach at Arnold, Thomas
said he was actively look-
ing towards returning to
being a head coach, but
was looking for the right
opportunity.
He applied for the vacant
Arnold job after it came
open at the end of last sea-
son, but was passed over.
When he subsequently
interviewed with Sneads
for its newly-open po-


prize sponsorships are
also available for this
event. Call Roy Baker at
850-526-4005 or 209-
1326, or George Sweeney
at 850-482-5526.

Sports items
Send all sports items to editorial@
jcfloridan.com, or fax them to 850
482-4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson County
Floridan P.O. Box 520 Marianna,
FL 32447.


rounding the lineup, par-
ticularly with Breeden's bat
missing from the order.
Orshall is the top return-
ing hitter from 2012, bat-
ting .397 with 31 hits, 24
RBI, and a .564 slugging
percentage, while Sikes also
batted .397 with 29 hits, 18
RBI, and a team-best .569
on-base percentage.
Only one other Malone
player topped .300 at the
plate last year, and that
was sophomore Antwain
Johnson, who may not re-
turn until March given his
status as the starting point
guard on the Tigers' top-
ranked basketball team.
When he does return,
he'll figure to be a middle
of-the lineup hitter, with
Sikes and BT Johnson also
likely to bat near the top
of the order, and Orshall
locked in as the team's No.
3 hitter.
"Orshall will be our an-
chor. He's probably our
best hitter," Harkrider said.


sition, he said it didn't
take long to come to
the conclusion that it
was where he wanted to
be.
"Halfway through the
interview, I knew that
this was the perfect fit for
me," Thomas said. "The
administration really sold


"We've got five or six guys
that can hit near the top of
the order, but everybody
else after that will be the
toughest to figure out in
terms of where everybody
is going to hit. Right now,
with me throwing to them,
they all look pretty good. It
seems this year we've got
more guys who can hit, but
it's when you start seeing
live pitching where guys
usually separate.
"We've been trying to
throw live as much as we
can, but that will all come
out when another pitch-
er comes out and starts
throwing big curve balls
and locating and mixing it
up on them."
District 1-1A figures to
remain a challenge with
the likes of Central, Laurel
Hill, and returning cham-
pion Paxton all bringing
back strong teams, but
Harkrider said he doesn't
see any reason why his
team can't make the jump


second and third place
teams. Additional prizes
will be given for longest
drive, straightest drive,
closest to the pin, and so
on.
The green fees contribu-
tion of $65 will entitle each
golfer to an afternoon of
golf on a championship
course (to help a very
worthy cause), followed by
a great meal.
Scholarship (hole) and


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Marianna, FL 32446


Phone: 850-526-7144

Fax: 850-526-7166

chipolacominunitybank.com


from No. 2 to No. 1 in the
league this season.
"Getting that top seed
will be our No. 1 goal," the
coach said. "I think we've
got a chance to be pretty
good if we can just play
together, put some other
stuff aside, and just work
hard and be good team-
mates. We've done that
so far. One thing with this
team is they really seem to
get it, but then again we
haven't played a game.yet.
But they're having a lot of
fun and working hard. I
think we've got a chance to
be pretty good by the end
of the year. I really do."
Malone will compete in
a preseason classic at Cot-
tondale High School this
weekend, taking on Ponce
de Leon on Friday at 4
p.m., and Altha on Satur-
day at 11 a.m.
The Tigers will open the
regular season on Feb. 12
at home against Seminole
County (Ga.).


it for me. I felt like these
were the exact kind of
people that I want to work
with. They're willing to
do what it takes to win. I
didn't want to rush (back
into being a head coach),
but this seemed like the
right time and the right
opportunity."


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013 3BF


Wallace's Brian
Winn attempts
to dive back to
first base with
Chipola's Bert
Givens applying
the tag during
the game on
Tuesday.








Indians
From Page 1B
"We put together a few hits, and
we executed a hit-and-run in that
inning," Chipola coach Jeff Johnson
said. "Basically we executed in the
clutch."
Wallace coach Mackey Sasser
didn't disagree with Johnson, but he
had a different prospective.
"When you're ahead in the count
0-2 and you throw the ball down the
middle of the plate, you're going to
get hit," Sasser said. "We did that a
lot in that inning. Outside of that in-
ning, it was a well-pitched game."
"Both teams threw the ball well,"
Johnson added. "It was a well-
played game without a bunch of
errors. That's why we were. able


NATHANIEL FRAZIER/DOTHAN EAGLE


to get out of here in a nine inning
game in just about two hours and
15 minutes."
Wallace didn't get on the score-
board until the bottom of the fourth
inning. That's when Daniel Maddox
and Jon Floyd led off with back-to-
back singles.Three batters later and
with two outs, Tanner Emmons hit
a solid single to center field that
plated two runs, cutting the lead in
half at 4-2.
Chipola got one of those runs
back in the top of the fifth. Chase
Scott hit a single to left field and
later came home when Cameron
Gibson singled to left field.
Although Wallace had base run-
ners all over the place in the final
four innings, the Govs were only
able to scratch across one more run.
That came in the seventh inning


when Brian Winn hit a grounder
to short stop and beat the throw to
first base for an infield single. He
later scored on an infield single by
Maddox.
The winning pitcher was Akeen
Anthony. He threw five innings,
struck out two, gave up five hits,
walked one, and allowed two earned
runs.
Losing pitcher Jordan Martin
pitched six innings, struck out six,
hit two batters, and gave up three
earned runs.
Chipola improves to 5-4 on the
season and will host a tournament.
this weekend.
Wallace falls to 2-2. The Govs will
travel to Tifton to play ABAC Satur-
day and will host Darton Monday
on the campus of Rehobeth High
School.


LB prospect



commits



to Alabama


The Associated Press

ATLANTA Five-star
linebacker prospect Reu-
ben Foster says he'll play
for Alabama after a recruit-
ing process that left him
torn between the state's
two rivals and sporting
an Auburn tattoo.
The Auburn (Ala.) High
School star said Monday
night on Fox SportsSouth
that he plans to sign with
the two-time defending
national champion Crim-
son Tide over the Tigers
- where he had commit-
ted at one point and
Georgia.
Foster is rated the na-
tion's No. 2 prospect by
Scout.com and a five-star
player by each of the major
recruiting services. He said
he made his decision "on
my way up here.
"I was just confused,"
Foster said on "The New


College Football Show"
with daughter A'Ziya
perched on his lap. "I went
on the air and just came
out with the heart."
Foster, regarded as the
nation's top inside line-
backer prospect, says he
has been an Alabama fan
"since I was a pup." That
didn't make the recruiting
process simpler, though.
He had switched his
initial commitment from
Alabama to rival Auburn,
and then withdrew his
pledge to the Tigers after
the firing of coach Gene
Chizik. Before flipping,
though, he got an Auburn
'tattoo etched onto his right
forearm.
Foster left his visit to Au-
burn on the final recruit-
ing weekend and headed
to Tuscaloosa.
His indecision had led
some fans to express their
ire on social media.


g unveilredesignedlo


Jaguars unveil redesigned logo


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars have
a new logo to signify a new
era.
New video boards, which
will cost about $50 million
and will be the largest in
the NFL, are next.
Billionaire owner Shad
Khan, team president Mark
Lamping, general manager
Dave Caldwell and coach
Gus Bradley unveiled the
redesigned logo Tuesday,
a minor facelift for a fran-
chise that's making major
changes.
"If the Jacksonville Jag-
uars are truly to experi-
ence a rebirth, it was time
for a new logo," Khan said.
"Not a radical change. We
wanted to find the right
look that was faithful to
the past and respects the
players and the fans, and
also bring unmistakably a
new energy to the Jaguars
franchise.
"Our new symbol for a
new generation."
The new logo, which
comes on the heels of hir-
ing Caldwell and Bradley
following a 2-14 season,
maintains traditional col-
ors (black, teal and gold)
and offers a more realistic
and fierce jaguar head.
"Now that's a cool cat,"
Khan said.
The Jaguars also released
their theme for 2013
"Stand United" and
announced tickets prices
for next season as well as a
series of fan forums.
Arguably the biggest
news of the day came with


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Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shad Khan holds a football with the team's new logo Tuesday in
Jacksonville. The team unveiled a new logo and a "Stand United" theme for the 2013 season.
the release of concept chise in Jacksonville. ... League team by being at
drawings for the massive Whether it's the National the bottom, I think that's
video boards, which would Football League or any not true.".
top those in Houston and other business, you have In hopes of increasing
Dallas. They are slated to to compete economically. revenue, the Jaguars are
be ready by the 2014 sea- And to believe that local implementing a strategic
son, although the city of revenue is not important, price increase for season
Jacksonville still has to ap- then people are ignor- tickets. Although 80 per-
prove the plans and orga- ing what has happened cent of season tickets re-
nize funding. in the National Football main the same price for
"We want EverBank Field League over the last 10 2013, the team increased
to be a destination where years. prices for low-cost, high-
people are going to come "To believe that some- demand seats.
to see it," Khan said. how you can be satisfied The team also plans to
Whether stadium up- and be competing on create all-inclusive ticket
grades and re-brand-' equal footing with every packages as well as on-field
ing efforts help generate other National Football seating for next season.
more revenue remainS to
be seen. The Jaguars rank
29th in the league in local
revenue, a significant drop -
over a 16-year span.
Jacksonville ranked sec-
ond in that category dur- 4415C Constitution Ln
ing its inaugural season in
1995. Marianna, FL 32448
"We need to fix this,"
Lamping said. "If we do (Next door to Marianna Office Supply)
not, we threaten the finan- www.theupsstoreloca l.com/6003
cial stability of the fran- + nn ai ,, n .m


and a whole lot more!


SMARTER BOLOER. FASTER


(.11. 0 H ., 'l

(850) 526-2891


Century 21
Sunny South
Properties







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-14B WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013


World Cup Soccer Qualifying



Donovan missing as US faces Honduras


The Associated Press

MIAMI When the
United States takes the
field Wednesday in Hon-
duras for the start of the
final round of World Cup
qualifying, Landon Dono-
van will be missing.
The30-year-oldmidfield-
er, a veteran of three World
Cups and the American
career leader in goals and
assists, is taking a break
from soccer following the
Los Angeles Galaxy's sec-
ond straight Major League
Soccer title.
"Landon felt like he need-
ed some time to figure out
what was next for him, how
to go forward. We all sup-
port that, but at the same
time, life goes on here,"
fellow midfielder Michael
Bradley said. "We're ex-
cited about the guys here
and we're confident in the
group we have."
The Americans practiced
in Florida on Monday be-
fore traveling to San Pedro
Sula for the match. Coach
Jurgen Klinsmann main-
tained Donovan's absence
creates opportunity for
others.
"We have plenty of op-
tions," Klinsmann said.
"We have 24 players in the
camp, go plenty of options


.1i.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Maurice Edu (left) and Geoff Cameron battle as the U.S. Men's National Team trains at the
FIU Soccer Stadium on Monday in Miami. The team gathered to travel to face Honduras in the
opening match of Final Round qualifying for the 2014 FIFA World Cup today in San Pedro Sula.


obviously for the coaches.
And all of them are ready,
all of them are hungry, all of
them want to show a good
game. So, I'm very positive
about that challenge."
Donovan appeared in all
10 final-round matches in
2009 and all seven in 2005
through the clincher. He
missed the last four games
of last year's semifinal
round.


Galaxy coach Bruce Are-
na said last month he ex-
pects Donovan to return to
the team at some point this
year but wouldn't identify
a timetable.
With Donovan on sab-
batical, Graham Zusi might
get a chance to replace
Donovan on a flank. The
26-year-old Sporting Kan-
sas City midfielder trained
with England's West Ham


during the winter.
"Landon has been such
a mainstay in this team.
That position has been
locked up for quite some
time now," Zusi said. "Any
chance that he's not here is
a chance for someone else
to come in."
Much of the starting
lineup appears set for the
28th-ranked Americans.
Timmy Chandler is set to


make his competitive in-
ternational debut as right
back in place of injured
Steve Cherundolo. Chan-
dler, a German-American,
would be tied to the U.S.
team once he plays.
The Americans, seek-
ing their seventh straight
World Cup berth, playthree
of their first four qualifi-
ers on the road. They host
Costa Rica on March 22
at Commerce City, Colo.,
then play at Mexico four
days later and at Jamaica
on June 7.
"Every game in World
Cup qualifying is going to
be a challenge, but we see
a team that is growing, a
team that is kind of im-
proving," Klinsmann said.
"Obviously, these game are
all about points. You need
to get your points in to
qualify."
The U.S. clinched its
berth in 2009 with a 3-2
win at Estadio Olimpico
Metropolitario. That was
played at night, while
Wednesday's kickoff is at
3 p.m. local time in what


figures to be afternoon
heat. With the 59th-ranked
Catrachos seeking their
second straight World Cup
berth and just third ever
- the Honduran govern-
ment declared the after-
noon a national holiday.
"The whole country
stops just for this game,
and I think it's hard for us
as Americans to fathom
- but it does. It's their Su-
per Bowl," goalkeeper Tim
Howard said.
The top three teams in
the six-nation final round,
which also includes Pana-
ma, qualify for the 32-team
field at next year's tourna-
ment in Brazil. The fourth-
place finisher advances
to a playoff for another
berth, likely against New
Zealand.
The U.S. is 3-0-1 at Esta-
dio Olimpico. The general
goal in qualifying is to win
at home and pick up points
on the road.
"It makes you feel like if
you can get a few draws,
then you're staring home
in the face," Howard said.


e1~P R fit t iriu--/


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.`I








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
iOHH ..HERE\ MAZE"? E, M...A.
IT COMES...IT'& MY MA'AM that's5 M --S-
'TRNNEXT..HER P AN EASY ONE..
MY FIRST WORD IN
THE SPELLING BEE.. F


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
sIR FSOt \FE. LIFE- ISN' ENIkR,. R OW CA N OAIONE WRO .15
ALMOST COtAPLUE.TELY BAL>


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
MR. ROSA, I'VE MY HEART HAS BEEN
IENCED A MAJOR ON, AND LEFT
TRAGEDY IN I BLEEDING BY THE
MY PERSONAL ^- S SIPE OF THE ROAD.
S LIFE. .b ,


I WANT TO USE
TODAY'S CLASS
TO PEAL
WITH MY
PAIN ANO
ANGUjISH H
THOUGH
THE POWER
OF ART1!


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
0 20t13 RiA Strlmrirllll Dlit iy r liiT.l l, li
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PIPE \ ON THE
C IEANERS'A LEFT.


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0 CONFIDENT YOU WHAT T DO CFOLL TE LeD OF ri
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--



2sj-6- \f w


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"I see on your application that you used
to be a termite inspector."


ACROSS
1 Egypt's
capital
6 "- the
raven ...
11 Bottle of
champagne
12 Subordinate
13 Orchards
14 Walkways
15 Social
customs
.16 Eight bits
17Ski lift
(hyph.)
18 NBA coach
Unseld
19Kin of PDQ
23 Grow
weary
25 Popeye's
girl
26 Ceiling
fixture
29 Put off
31 Whopper
32 "Wheel of
Fortune"
buy
(2 wds.)
33 Follow
34Chiding
sound
35 Early
mornings
37Trampled
39Jazzy
James


40 Business
VIP
41 Castaway's
refuge
45 Ballooned
47 Pentium
producer
48 Not
impromptu
51 Conestogas
52Ebb
53 Slate
54 Parakeet
treats
55Call from
the Alps

DOWN
1 Ersatz
chocolate
2 Greek
marketplace
3 Flip
4 Regrets
5 Mantra
chants
6 Cut it out
7 Break open
8 Lubricate
9 Sock filler
10Coll.
credits
11 The brass,
for short
12 Noisy birds
160ne-pot
dinner
(2 wds.)


Answer to Previous Puzzle

FE B AMP VINE
SOER LAIC EVER
GREENTEY A REAL
GOALIE E T SSLEI

20 River actreSMA
21Car rental 43van ofTDS
RECIPE TASTE
Q k lk HIT J

LE FT RESTRA I N
IN-RE S ITE ICI
BOOR NED DST
18Small bird 42"Easy A"
20 River actress
deposit Emma
21 Car rental 43Ivan of
name tennis
22 Quicklook 44Joy
24"Ettu" Adamson's
time pet
25 Popular 46 Some
cookie wines
26 Lose 47 "Othello"
brightness heavy
27 Biology 48AARP
subj. members
28 Mr. 49Pigskin
Gingrich prop
30Continental 50 Expert
coin 51 Technique
36 Pestered
38 Nicked
40 Grant, as
land


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


2-6 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
"NPK MKE RX ARIPNRKH NPTE NPK

XBDHG, TEG ODEXRGKHTUCS KTXRKH

ND BHRNK BRNP." ATHNS WKCGATE


Previous Solution: "I would like to initiate an initiative: the Broadway Annoying
Audience Member Relocation Program." Daniel Radcliffe

TODAY CLUE: o spnbao
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-6


Horoscope

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Those with whom
you have involvements will
judge you to be fair and
equitable. The example
you set will be emulated by
them.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Any new venture that
you undertake will have
chances of success. It's pos-
sible there could be three
projects working out.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- You couldn't avoid the
spotlight if you tried, so
don't fight it. There is no
need to get stage fright.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) When you decide
to promote a new idea,
you can become an good
salesperson.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Knowing that you will
be better playing a sup-
portive role, you'll leave
management of a project
in the hands of someone in
whom you have faith.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Willingly making adjust-
ments that another wants
could turn out to be an
advantageous maneuver,
and you know it.
LEO (July 23-Aug.22)
Becoming a champion
of lost causes might be the
best thing you can do. It'll
give you an opportunity
to resurrect something
important.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Bonds can now be
established with someone
whom you've always liked
but have never been able to
get close to in the past.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.23)
Being in an artistic and
creative cycle makes this
an excellent day to try your
hand at beautifying your
living surroundings.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) There are indications
that you could derive some
benefits from an involve-
ment that involves ele-
ments of chance.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) It's important
to prime the pump to get
things flowing. If you're de-
sirous of making financial
gains, an investment might
be required.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Be grateful for what is
new and different in your
life, because it will be a har-
binger of things to come.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: I'm a mother in my mid-
20s and a very concerned-sister. My
brother, "Dennis," is four years younger
and the first to graduate high school.
He went to college and had everything
going for him. Now he is throwing it all
away.
Dennis turned to drugs and has missed
important moments in our lives, such as
weddings and holidays. He only shows
up at my mother's or grandmother's
house to take a shower, and then he goes
out again. My family and I are trying
so hard to point him back in the right
direction.
Two months ago, I had to have Den-
nis arrested for assaulting me. We are all
worried that something terrible is going
to happen. What do we do?
-WORRIED FAMILY IN ILLINOIS

Dear Worried: It is a nightmare when
a family member is on drugs, because
there is little you can do. Your brother


Bridge


Taken in isolation, how should South handle
today's heart suit for either five tricks or four?
And in the full deal, how should South play in
six hearts after West leads the diamond queen?
In the auction, North's three-heart rebid
was game-forcing. South's three spades was a
control-bid (cue-bid) indicating a maximum,
the spade ace and slam interest if North had a
sufficiently strong hand. Four clubs and four
diamonds were also control-bids, showing the
aces of those suits.
To play the heart suit without loss, declarer
should cash dummy's king before finessing his
jack. If South can afford one loser, he should
cash his ace, play low to dummy's king, and
lead back toward his jack. (This would be the
right play in six hearts if West had led a spade,
not a diamond.)
In this deal, though, if South loses an early
trump trick, the opponents will cash two dia-
mond winners. The best line of play is to take
the heart king and ace immediately. Here, the
queen drops and declarer can claim an over-
trick. But if the queen remains elusive, South
plays on clubs, hoping to discard both of his
diamond losers. If hearts are 3-2, declarer
needs the defender with the queen to have
at least three clubs. If hearts are 4-1 without
giving South two unavoidable losers, the key
defender must hold at least four clubs.


must want to stop and be willing to get
appropriate treatment. He's not there
yet. If he is in college, notify the counsel-
ors there, and contact Nar-Anon (nar-
anon.org) for support.
Dear Annie: My nephew is getting mar-
ried soon. The wedding will take place
in Canada. My husband and I do not
own passports, nor would we ever buy
them, because they are expensive and
we would never use them again. We have
traveled to other family weddings within
the United States, but we don't feel we
should be pressured to attend a wedding
out of the country. We can't afford it.
Do you think we are required to be
there?
SOON TO BE FAMILY OUTCAST

Dear Soon: No. You are not obligated to
attend any wedding, and certainly not
one that is beyond your financial means.
Send yoir regrets and a nice gift to make
up for your absence.


North 02-06-13
4 KQJ
V K76
+ 6 5 2
*652
A.K QJ
West East
4 10 8 5 4 4 9 7 2
Y Q 2 V 10 8 3
+ QJ 103 K94
4764 410853
South
4 A63
Y AJ954
A87
4 9,2

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 Pass 24 Pass
2NT Pass 3V Pass
34 Pass 44 Pass
4+ Pass 6 V All.pass

Opening lead: Q
_____________L


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013 5B F


ENTERTAINIVIENT








6B Wednesday, February 6, 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www..lCFLORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




MARKETPLACE


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 br (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not 9. jr,,, e .- pv:;,i: 1 *I. j tAll .,, r~ ,. ui -..i.li i, approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.
'Frdalns al01fe o ii w jfoiaIo


ANNOUNCEMENTS


Cemetery Plots: (2) Pinecrest Memory Gardens
2 outer burial containers, 24x12 bronze plaque,
and vase included. $3,500. Call 772-224-9098 or
850-322-0155


Professional Piano & Organ Teacher
I teach private piano and organ lessons in my
home in the Highlands. 30 years experience
teaching private lessons and in schools.
Great Gift For All Ages!
334-446-4226

(O) MERCHANDISE


Coin Collections Wanted!! Paying Top
Dollar $$$$ Call Mathew 985-516-0379



FIREWOOD (all split oak)
Delivery available! TRUCK LOAD $70. 4
CALL MARK 334-701-4967 or 334-791-6704
FIREWOOD for Sale! Good Prices!
You Cut or We Cut! Delivery Available in
Certain Areas. Call for More Info!
Tree clearing and clean-up available also.
Priced According to Load Size.
334-735-2957 or 334-372-5107

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Bowflex Extreme 2 great condition with ac-
cessories. Must sell. $300, 850-573-4700

(iA) PETS & ANIMALS


CKC Reg. Golden Retriever 2-M, 4-F, 8 wks
old, S/W, Parents on site $350.
Call 334-648-1287 or 334-791-9831.
Found Dog: M/lemon walker hound. Compass
Lake in the Hills. Call 850-209-8500.
Golden Retriever puppies: AKC registered. Born
1/10/13, First shots. Taking deposits. Serious
inquiries only! 334-343-5438.

( ') FARMER'S MARKET


CaselH 70 XT Loader: 79HP,
448 hours, reg. bucket and
grapple bucket. Must see to
appreciate the condition.
$19,500.00 Call 334-894-2315















Vine Ripe Tomatoes


Home Grown Greens
Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. H 52 Malvern




Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
rQ Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418

Sheltered Coastal Bermuda Hay
Baled with JD568 in Columbia, AL $55
Call 334-790-4439 or 334-618-1962


I Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract tosmall / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
I 334-389-2003


H I
1 & 2BR Houses & Apts ALSO
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
m 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
2BR 1BA House for rent, 3043 Noland St.
Safe neighborhood, $500/mo + dep.
850-482-8196/209-1301
2BR/1BA w/office in Grand Ridge, Rent to own,
very nice, $1000 down $650/mo. 850-997-
2464/850-274-9896
3/2 hardwood floors, CH&A
2940 Dogwood St. close to Riverside school.
$875. mo. 718-6541
3BR 28A House In Dogwood Hts, W/D, pets
welcome, fenced yard, storage shed, $800 +
dep 850-557-2198 ask for Marcus
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
x+ 850- 526-3355 4
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountryliving.com.
.# 850-209-8847 4-
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message
2BR 1.5BA at Millpond $495 + dep. very nice,
water/sewer/lawn maintenance included,
access to pond, No pets 850-209-3970
2BR 1BA MH In Dellwood, water/sewer
Included on own 16t, S350.+ $350. dep..
850-592-4625 4
Marianna 2/1 water, sewer, deck, dean
No Pets. $400. mo. + dep. 850-482-8333.
COMMERCIAL
(A REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

For Lease: 6,000 sq. ft. Daycare on 2.58 acres.
Licensed for 93 children. Room for expansion.
Call 850-718-6541.
RESIDENTIAL
(I REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

For Sale By Owner: 41
Briar Hills Drive, Dothan
3 bedroom, 2 bath on 1
S acre of land. 1300 square
feet. Built in 2008. All stain-
less steel appliances in kitchen stay. Hard-
wood, tile and carpet floors. Screened in patio.
2 car attached carport. Covered front porch.
Country setting 10 minutes from Southside
Walmart or SAMC. Asking $113,500. For more
information call 334-701-5889.


Graceville: Recently renovated 3 BR, 1.5 baths
1350 sq. ft. Great neighborhood and huge back-
yard, $89,999. Call 850-658-4081.
j I Very well maintained
5 bedroom, 2 bath, older
home. Includes 2 carports,
v ard. completely fenced
,(privacy) and a shed.
Close to schools. Room for
a family to grow! Call today for your personal
viewing. 850-263-2755.

S"--. "' ;- ",J One of a kind home
S' on the Apalachicola River
S"in Wewahitchka, Florida.
3BR, 2B modular home.
,-. '_" Outdoor kitchen, shop,
greenhouse and boat
house. Beautiful fenced yard on nice high
riverbank. Large lot is also zoned commercial.
Reduced to sell. $129,000. Call 850-819-0401


RECREATION


Wanted to Rent: Farm Land or Pasture in Ma-
rianna or West of Marianna; Call 850-718-1859

|(!) EMPLOYMENT


Assistant Utilities Operator
Must be high school
graduate with some
experience in operating
heavy equipment. Prefer
experience with
water/wastewater systems. Must have a
valid class B CDL issued by the state of
Florida. Salary $20,591.00/yr

Equipment Operator IV
Must be high school graduate with 1 to 3
yrs experience in the safe operation of
heavy motorized equipment
(Motorgrader). Must have valid FL class
A CDL prior to employment.
Salary: $20,591.00/yr
Submit Jackson County employment
application to: Human Resources Dept,
2864 Madison St, Marianna, FL 32448
PHONE (850) 482-9633.
Web site www.jacksoncountyfl.net
Closing date is 02-18-2013
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE/V.Pref/ADA/AA


Seeking Part-Time Companion/Homemaker
Services in Marianna, FL. Must have experience
with elderly, transportation and flexibility. Pay
Neg. Contact NEFLCompanion@gmail.com with
resume and contact number.
CPy ~RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways; lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL Call 850-482-4663
rts
EQUAL HOUS1NG OITrmjwNy


Clinton St. Furn room + kitchen, all utilities incl
$395; other furn. rooms for $375 727-433-RENT

7 ;t !i V 4 :f1 i I mn: L ; 1] :1 1,


Orchard Pointe Apartments
Now accepting applications for 1 BR Apts.
Call or come by to pick up
application
4445 Orchard Pointe Dr.
Marianna. Call 850-482-4259

ThAT'S ClAssifiEd


Spyder 1979 Fiat 2000 Classic Italian Sports
Car,Restored, Asking $13,479, Serious inquiries
only, 850-526-4394


Adets or"OLSUF o REb iiin vwclrdnIm e iefrdtis


Camcorder, Sony, digital $300. 850-482-7665
Camera: Olympus SP600 $149 850-482-7665
Crossbow w/7 Bolts $250 850-579-4082
Hammond Organ Console $500, 850-693-0521
Hide-A-Bed $30. 850-592-2881
LOST, female cat (Noel) black, white & brown
South Side Apartments. 850-573-4512. or text.
Lost: Walking Stick Winn-Dixie parking lot. 850-
579-2263


Organ -Console, Hammond, $500, 850-693-0521
Clean Your Closet ~ Collect Some Cash

Sewing Machine Singer, $75, 850-693-0521
Singer Sewing Machine $75, 850-693-0521
Stove Whirlpool, Gas, $140, 850-594-5643
Washer/Dryer good cond., $300, 850-594-5643
Winch, 2K Ib Cap. Master lock $65 850-579-4082


Sudoku


Level: H -2] [3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Tuesday's puzzle

1 2 6 7 5 3 4 8 9
7 3 4 89 6 5 2 1
589421673
5841279365
8 4 1 2 7 9 3 6 5

9 7 2 6 3 5 1 4 8
653184297

3 9 8 5 4 2 7 1 6
417368952

2 6591 7.834


@ 2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


2/6/13


74 15

2

16 8 9

8 2

35 2 9 84

8 6

7 1 38

7

1 5 49


_


I


PLE-AN s-D


Honda 2007 Foreman ATV ; 2-wheel & 4-wheel
Drive. Electric wench, 190 hours on it; $4800
Firm; 334-596-9966


14 ft. Alum. Boat, stick drive, 2 swivel seats,
1997 Suzuki 25 hp motor, all new parts in
motor $1200. 850-592-1934 or 850-693-5812


tr m e Packages From
Extreme $4,995
All Welded
Boats All Aluminum Boats
www.xtremeindustries.com



37 1999 Tiffin Alegro
Diesel Pusher. Only 64,000
.miles, located at Dothan
A Lemon Lot and Craigslist
for photos, highly polished
hardwood floors in living
area kitchen & bath. Lots of storage inside &
out, no smokers. $45,000. 334-296-2989 ask for
Brian.

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l Lincoln 1997 Towncar -
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W l Mercedes Benz 1981380 SL,
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Toyota 2000 Camry,
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Ford 2002 Explorer.
r Recently painted. Tinted
windows. CD player. New
tires. Needs motor and
transmission work.
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Ext Cab: green, 3 doors,
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great. $5,500. Firm. Call
334-718-9617
^ O i~ Dodge 1998 Dakota Ext
Cab: power steering, cold
AC, 160k miles, blue,
i $2.500. OBO
Call 334-798-1768 or 334-
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Ford 2003 Ranger P/U XLT 6 cyl. 26K actual
miles, extra clean $8000. 334-897-5648.


Volvo 1996-DIESEL TRUCK, Good Condition
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LF160025
There will be a special meeting of The Jackson
County Tourist Development Council February
12, 2013 at 10:00 am The meeting will be held at
The Historic Russ House.
LEGAI N OT;ICES"


LF160019
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 32-2012-CA-000302
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs
MARY ANN POLEWARCZYK A/K/A MARY ANN
BARNETT-POLEWARCZYK, et al,
Defendant(s).'
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated Janu-
ary 18, 2013 and entered in Case No. 32-2012-
CA-000302 of the Circuit Court of the FOUR-
TEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for JACKSON
County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA is the Plaintiff and MARY ANN
POLEWARCZYK A/K/A MARY ANN BARNETT-
POLEWARCZYK; are the Defendants, The Clerk
of the Court will sell to the highest and best


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, February 6, 2013- 7 B


bidder for cash at NORTH DOOR JACKSON
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, MARIANNA, FLORIDA
at 11:00AM, on the 21st day of Febuary, 2013,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
COMMENCING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE
SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD 10
(US. HIGHWAY 90) AND THE WEST LINE OF
SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 11
FEET WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 33 MINUTES
00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
785 FEET TO THE EAST SIDE OF A GRADED
ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 54 MI-
NUTES 40 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST
RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID GRADED ROAD 41.7.42
FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF JENN
CHING YOU, ET UX PROPERTY, AND CALL THIS
THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 40 SECONDS
EAST 210 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 33
MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST PARALLEL TO SAID
STATE ROAD 10 (US. HIGHWAY 90), 208.71
FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 54 MINUTES
40 SECONDS WEST 210 FEET TO THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF AND F JENN CHING YOU, ET
UX PROPERTY; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 33
MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF JENN CHING YOU, ET UX PROP-
ERTY 208.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
TOGETHER WITH A 2006 CAVALIER DOUBLE-
WIDE MOBILE HOME WITH SERIAL NUMBERS:
CV06AL0457447A AND CV06AL0457447B; AND
HUD LABEL NUMBERS: NA 1363648 AND NTA
1363649.
A/K/A 3000 MARIDALE ROAD, MARIANNA, FL
32448-3636
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale:
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on January 22, 2013.
Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.
ADA Coordinator
P.O. Box 1089
Panama City, Florida 32402
Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-571,7
Hearing Impaired: Dial 711
Email: ADARequest@judl4.flcourts.org


LF160020
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 32-2010-CA-000341
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs
JENNA LEIGH CHASON A/K/A JENNA LEIGH
HERNDON, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated Janu-
ary 18, 2013 and entered in Case No. 32-2010-
CA-000341 of the Circuit Court of the FOUR-
TEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for JACKSON
County, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE
BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC1, is
the Plaintiff and JENNA LEIGH CHASON A/K/A
JENNA LEIGH HERNDON; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JENNA LEIGH CHASON A/K/A
JENNA LEIGH HERNDON N/K/A THOMAS
HERNDON; CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES,
INC. F/K/A COMMERCIAL CREDIT CONSUMER
SERVICES,INC.; TENANT #1 N/K/A LUANNE AR-
NOLD are the Defendants, The Clerk of the


LEGAliEJS TE S
Court will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash at NORTH DOOR JACKSON COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, MARIANNA, FLORIDA at
11:00AM, on the 21st day of February, 2013,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE
NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 13
WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN
SOUTH 88 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 27 SECONDS
WEST 131.74 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DE-
GREES 24 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 200
FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 49 MI-
NUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 142.68 FEET TO THE
EAST LINE OF SECTION 10, THENCE RUN NORTH
00 DEGREE 16 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID LINE 199.42 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT RIGHT OF
WAY OF CLIFF ROAD AND HEISLFR ROAD ,
A/K/A 5095 CLIFF ROAD, GRACEVILLE, FL 32440
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on January 22, 2013.
Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tammy Baily
Deputy Clerk
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.
ADA Coordinator
P.O. Box 1089
Panama City, Florida 32402
Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717
Hearing Impaired: Dial 711
Email: ADARequest@judl4.ficourts.org


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Skiing



Vonn done for season with knee injury


The Associated Press

SCHIIAI)MING, Austria
All it look was a mo-
ment. Lindsey Vonn land-
ed hard and tumbled face
first with a piercing shriek.
Just like that, the star
American skier was on
the ground with two torn
ligaments in her right knee
and a broken bone in her
lower leg.
The cascading fall down
the slope during the super-
G at the world champion-
ships Tuesday knocked out
the fbur-time World Cup
champion for the rest of
the season, the latest and
most serious in a string of
injuries for Vonn at skiing's
biggest events.
The U.S. team said in a
statement it expects her
back for the next World
Cup season and the 2014
Sochi Olympics, which
start a year from this week.
The harrowing accident
came after Vonn was lifted
into the air off a jump in
the opening race at the
championships. As she hit
the ground, her right leg
gave way and she spun
down face first, throw-
ing an arm out to protect
herself. She ended up on
her back as she smashed
through a gate.
On the television feed,
Vonn was clearly heard
screaming an expletive as
she landed, then a despair-
ing "Yes, yes," when some-
one asked, "Are you hurt?"
Race leader and even-
tual champion Tina Maze
watched with her mouth


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lindsey Vonn speeds down the course during the women's super-G course, at the Alpine skiing
world championships in Schladming, Austria on Tuesday. Vonn crashed, injured her knee and is
done for the season.


agape. The concern also
was obvious on the face of
Vonn's sister, Laura Kildow,
who has been traveling
with her full time this
season.
For 12 minutes, Vonn lay
on the snow getting medi-
cal treatment before being
airlifted by helicopter to a
hospital in Schladming.
Vonn tore her anterior
cruciate ligament and
medial collateral ligament
in her right knee, U.S. ski
team medical director Kyle
Wilkens said in a state-
ment. The broken bone
was described as a "lateral
tibial plateau fracture."
Christian Kaulfersch,
the assistant medical di-
rector at the worlds, said
Vonn left the Schladming


Speeds go up for


drivers at tire test


The Associated Press

DARLINGTON, S.C.-
Carl Edwards and sev-
eral other Sprint Cup stars
gave the new, faster Gen-
6 race car a thumbs-up
after a Goodyear tire test
Tuesday at Darlington
Raceway.
Edwards said the .digi-
tal speedometer on his
Ford Fusion hit 193 mph
right before entering turn
three, a typically unheard
of speed at the ultra-tricky
track.
"Each time down, you
want to watch and see
what you're doing," he
said. "But the fastest point
is the point where the track
needs your attention and
your eyes are not supposed
to be on that monitor. I
saw 193 or something, but
I can't look at it any longer
before I have to look into
the corner."
Denny Hamlin, Mar-
tin Truex Jr., Paul Menard
and Juan Pablo Montoya
were also at Darlington
for the daylong session.
NASCAR teams have pre-
viously tested the car at
Daytona International
Speedway and Charlotte
Motorspeedway.
Edwards found the new
machine to be faster and
racers should expect better
handling and tighter racing


when the circuit returns to
NASCAR's oldest super-
speedway for the Southern
500 on May 11.
A few laps around the
track "Too Tough To Tame"
in the new car and Truex
was confident someone
would shatter Darlington's
record qualifying speed
of 181.254 mph set by
Kasey Kahne at the 2011
race.
Then again, Darlington
may not be the place for
higher speeds. The track
has a reputation as one of
the most fearsome layouts
in NASCAR. Its misshapen
corners think of an egg's
oval shape and nar-
row straightaways make
it treacherous with every
pass.
The past two races here
ended in melees with
Kevin Harvick and Kyle
Busch tangling after the
cooldown lap in 2011 and
crews for Kurt Busch and
Ryan Newman went at it at
the end of the 2012 event.
Edwards said the newly
designed car should only
add to the excitement here
and improve the product
for fans. The car has shown
more ability to grip the
surface, meaning drivers
can stick it into places not
generally accessible expect
to the most fearless pilots
at Darlington.


hospital on Tuesday after-
noon and will have surgery
in another hospital. "She
first wanted to go back to
the team hotel to mentally
deal with all what has hap-
pened," Kaulfersch said.
Vonn's father, Alan
Kildow, spoke' with her by
phone and said that she's,
"mad at the way things
turned out." His daughter
told him that she landed
in a clump of sugar snow,
or ice crystals, that caused
her to fall forward, he said.
"She's a tough character.
A very determined and
tough character," Kildow
told The Associated Press
in a phone interview. "She
will be back."
Kildow said that surgery
could take place as soon as



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this weekend, likely at the
Steadman Clinic, in Vail,
Colo. Recovery time var-
ies, according to Dr. Tom
Hackett, an orthopedic
surgeon at the clinic and
the team physician for the
U.S. snowboard squad.
But Vonn could be look-
ing at six-to-eight months
before she's back on skis.
"It's not like at six months
you say, 'OK, you can get
back on a super-G course,"
Hackett said. "There's a
progression to getting
back on skis, getting back
to taking some easy runs,
getting back to some gates,
and working your way
back to some steeper ter-
rain. There's a whole re-
turn to snow progression
that we've developed over



ne & Surgery


izens of
r support.
-482-3520


many years."
Time enough to get back
for Sochi?
"I think so," Hackett said.
"I would be very optimis-
tic she could come back
strong. She's a fierce com-
petitor. She's a fighter and
chances are that she will
- I would think essen-
tially take all of that ath-
letic energy and put it into
her rehabilitation. There's
a really good chance she
could come back as strong
as ever."
Comebacks are noth-
ing new for Vonn, who has
also been afflicted by in-
juries at her last six major


championships from
a thumb she sliced on a
champagne bottle at the
2009 worlds in Val d'Isere,
France, to a bruised shin
that she cured with Austri-
an cheese at the Vancouver
Olympics.
This one, however, could
prove the biggest test yet
for the 28-year-old who
won the downhill at the
2010 Vancouver Olympics.
Vonn took a month off
this season after being
hospitalized for an intes-
tinal illness in November,
and had just regained her
form with two wins last
month.


SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.
PAT FURR
Sunny South Properties
4630 Hwy. 90, Marianna, FL
Business: 850.526.2891
Cell: 850.209.8071 Wishing all a
furrl9@msn.com healthy, happy and
prosperous 2013!


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OUIDA MORRIS PAT FURR CLARICE BOYETTE
(850)209.4705 (850)209.8071 (80) 573-1572
Broker/Owner Furrl9@msn.com
C21sunnyso@aol.com





DEBBIE RONEY SMITH ED MCCOY BEVERLY THOMAS ELLEN MARSH
(850) 209.8039 (850) 573.6198 (850) 209-5211 (850) 209.1090
debbleroneysmlth www.emccoyrealty.com ellen@educaterealestate.net
@embarqmail.com emccoy01@yahoo.com


Complete the form below; then submit it, with your grandchild's photo & $18 per submission to:
Valentine Grandchildren, C/O Jackson County Floridan, P.O. Box 520, Marianna, Florida 32447
or drop them off at our office at 4403 Constitution Lane.
E', r.dp:rlo is C'. Or oCll n i B c r- .'. . V ,.:

Child's Name
Grandparent Name(s)
Daytime Phone Number
Submitted By


-18B WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013


SPORTS